Sample records for homeopathic

  1. Serious mistakes in meta-analysis of homeopathic research

    PubMed Central

    Vithoulkas, G

    2017-01-01

    The article discussed the immanent problems of meta-analyses selecting a number of independent trials in homeopathy, within which, the purpose was to examine the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment. Our focus lied in clarifying that the complex effects of homeopathic treatment known from history and day-to-day practice have not been respected so far. The examination of most of the homeopathic trials showed that studies rarely account for homeopathic principles, in order to assess the effectiveness of the treatment. The main flaw was that trials reflect the point of view that the treatment with a specific remedy could be administered in a particular disease. However, homeopathy aims to treat the whole person, rather than the diseases and each case has to be treated individually with an individualized remedy. Furthermore, the commonly known events during the course of homeopathic treatment, such as “initial aggravation” and “symptom-shift” were not considered in almost all the studies. Thus, only few trials were eligible for meta-analyses, if at all. These and other factors were discussed and certain homeopathic principles were suggested to be respected in further trials. It is expected, that a better understanding of homeopathic principles would provide guidelines for homeopathic research, which are more acceptable to both homeopathy and conventional medicine. PMID:28255376

  2. Can homeopaths detect homeopathic medicines by dowsing? A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    McCarney, R; Fisher, P; Spink, F; Flint, G; van Haselen, R

    2002-01-01

    Dowsing is a method of problem-solving that uses a motor automatism, amplified through a pendulum or similar device. In a homeopathic context, it is used as an aid to prescribing and as a tool to identify miasm or toxin load. A randomized double-blind trial was conducted to determine whether six dowsing homeopaths were able to distinguish between Bryonia in a 12c potency and placebo by use of dowsing alone. The homeopathic medicine Bryonia was correctly identified in 48.1% of bottle pairs (n=156; 95% confidence interval 40.2%, 56.0%; P=0.689). These results, wholly negative, add to doubts whether dowsing in this context can yield objective information. PMID:11934908

  3. Can homeopaths detect homeopathic medicines by dowsing? A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McCarney, R; Fisher, P; Spink, F; Flint, G; van Haselen, R

    2002-04-01

    Dowsing is a method of problem-solving that uses a motor automatism, amplified through a pendulum or similar device. In a homeopathic context, it is used as an aid to prescribing and as a tool to identify miasm or toxin load. A randomized double-blind trial was conducted to determine whether six dowsing homeopaths were able to distinguish between Bryonia in a 12c potency and placebo by use of dowsing alone. The homeopathic medicine Bryonia was correctly identified in 48.1% of bottle pairs (n=156; 95% confidence interval 40.2%, 56.0%; P=0.689). These results, wholly negative, add to doubts whether dowsing in this context can yield objective information.

  4. Unethical aspects of homeopathic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Shaw, D

    2010-11-27

    In the last year there has been a great deal of public debate about homeopathy, the system of alternative medicine whose main principles are that like cures like and that potency increases relative to dilution. The House of Commons Select Committee on Science and Technology concluded in November 2009 that there is no evidence base for homeopathy, and agreed with some academic commentators that homeopathy should not be funded by the NHS. While homeopathic doctors and hospitals are quite commonplace, some might be surprised to learn that there are also many homeopathic dentists practising in the UK. This paper examines the statements made by several organisations on behalf of homeopathic dentistry and suggests that they are not entirely ethical and may be in breach of various professional guidelines.

  5. Homeopathic treatment of premenstrual syndrome: a case series.

    PubMed

    Danno, Karine; Colas, Aurélie; Terzan, Laurence; Bordet, Marie-France

    2013-01-01

    Observational, prospective study to describe the homeopathic management of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) by a group of French physicians. Women with PMS for >3 months were prescribed individualized homeopathic treatment. The intensity of 10 clinical symptoms of PMS was scored individually at inclusion and at a 3-6 month follow-up visit: absent = 0, mild = 1, moderate = 2, severe = 3. Total symptom score (range: 0-30) was calculated and compared for each patient at inclusion and at follow-up. PMS impact on daily activities (quality of life, QoL) was compared at inclusion and follow-up as: none, mild, moderate, severe, very severe. Twenty-three women were prescribed homeopathic treatment only (mean age: 39.7 years). Folliculinum (87%) was the most frequently prescribed homeopathic medicine followed by Lachesis mutus (52.2%). The most common PMS symptoms (moderate or severe) at inclusion were: irritability, aggression and tension (87%), mastodynia (78.2%) and weight gain and abdominal bloating (73.9%); and the most common symptoms at follow-up were: irritability, aggression and tension (39.1%), weight gain and abdominal bloating (26.1%) and mastodynia (17.4%). Mean global score for symptom intensity was 13.7 at inclusion and 6.3 at follow-up. The mean decrease in score (7.4) was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Twenty-one women reported that their QoL also improved significantly (91.3%; p < 0.0001). Homeopathic treatment was well tolerated and seemed to have a positive impact on PMS symptoms. Folliculinum was the most frequent homeopathic medicine prescribed. There appears to be scope for a properly designed, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of individual homeopathic medicines in PMS. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The School Nurse's Role in Homeopathic Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Thomas, Elizabeth; McLean, Kay

    1998-01-01

    Describes the practices of homeopathy and how they affect the scope of practice of school nurses. Includes a definition of homeopathy, a discussion of remedies and the specific symptoms for which they are effective, and an examination of conditions treatable by homeopathic physicians. Nine guidelines for managing homeopathic products in the school…

  7. Embryonic Zebrafish Model - A Well-Established Method for Rapidly Assessing the Toxicity of Homeopathic Drugs: - Toxicity Evaluation of Homeopathic Drugs Using Zebrafish Embryo Model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himanshu R; Patil, Yogesh; Singh, Dipty; Thakur, Mansee

    2016-12-01

    Advancements in nanotechnology have led to nanoparticle (NP) use in various fields of medicine. Although the potential of NPs is promising, the lack of documented evidence on the toxicological effects of NPs is concerning. A few studies have documented that homeopathy uses NPs. Unfortunately, very few sound scientific studies have explored the toxic effects of homeopathic drugs. Citing this lack of high-quality scientific evidence, regulatory agencies have been reluctant to endorse homeopathic treatment as an alternative or adjunct treatment. This study aimed to enhance our insight into the impact of commercially-available homeopathic drugs, to study the presence of NPs in those drugs and any deleterious effects they might have, and to determine the distribution pattern of NPs in zebrafish embryos ( Danio rerio ). Homeopathic dilutions were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with selected area electron diffraction (SAED). For the toxicity assessment on Zebrafish, embryos were exposed to a test solution from 4 - 6 hours post-fertilization, and embryos/larvae were assessed up to 5 days post-fertilization (dpf) for viability and morphology. Toxicity was recorded in terms of mortality, hatching delay, phenotypic defects and metal accumulation. Around 5 dpf was found to be the optimum developmental stage for evaluation. The present study aimed to conclusively prove the presence of NPs in all high dilutions of homeopathic drugs. Embryonic zebrafish were exposed to three homeopathic drugs with two potencies (30CH, 200CH) during early embryogenesis. The resulting morphological and cellular responses were observed. Exposure to these potencies produced no visibly significant malformations, pericardial edema, and mortality and no necrotic and apoptotic cellular death. Our findings clearly demonstrate that no toxic effects were observed for these three homeopathic drugs at the potencies and exposure times used in this study. The embryonic zebrafish

  8. Scientific Research in Homeopathic Medicine: Validation, Methodology and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Verona's School of Homeopathic Medicine (www.omeopatia.org) organized a day of full immersion in the field of homeopathy, focusing on the validity of this much-debated discipline. There is widespread consensus in the medical community that evidence-based medicine is the best standard for assessing efficacy and safety of healthcare practices, and systematic reviews with strict protocols are essential to establish proof for various therapies. Students, homeopathic practitioners, academic and business representatives, who are interested in or curious about homeopathic practices attended the conference.

  9. Observations on the effects of odours on the homeopathic response.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Moira

    2014-07-01

    Samuel Hahnemann described incidences where the homeopathic response was disrupted by noxious smells in the environment. An earlier paper proposed that homeopathic medicines may be sensed by vomeronasal cells (VNCs) i.e. microvillus or brush cells in the vomeronasal organ (VNO), the taste buds and associated with the trigeminal nerve and nervus terminalis. This paper proposes an extension to the theory and suggests that a subset of solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) in the diffuse chemosensory system (DCS) that is morphologically similar to VNCs might also be receptive to homeopathic medicines. The types of odours that may interfere with this process are described. Two clinical cases of disruption of the homeopathic response are given as examples, showing that successful re-establishment of remedy action can be produced by timely repetition of the medicine. The ramifications on clinical homeopathic practice are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [The technicoregulatory situation in France for manufactured homeopathic medications].

    PubMed

    Santini, Cl

    2005-06-01

    Many homeopathic medications are marketed in France on the basis of old national regulations: homeopathic medications with a common denomination (unit or complex products) whose former approval was transformed into a marketing authorization in 1984; "normal formulations" with a special denomination, often dating from before 1941 (date when drug approval was instituted) including certain produces whose marketing approval was obtained under different mechanisms but still sold today. After the EEC excluded homeopathic drugs from the "medication" directives, in 1975 the 92/72/EEC directive stated that beyond the normal requirements for quality and safety, the same obligations could not be required for homeopathic and allopathic medications. A "registration" system was thus instituted for "traditional" medications en lieu of marketing approval. This included a dual obligation: 1) abstention from claiming therapeutic indications, 2) avoiding any formulation which could carry a risk for the patients (i.e. oral and topical formulations exclusive and degree of dilution guaranteeing safety). Beyond this restrictive framework, these medications have marketing approval, but, for the specific features of homeopathic medications, the directive leaves it up to the member States with a "homeopathic tradition" to apply special rules for evaluating the results of clinical trials designed to establish safety and efficacy. For the efficacy feature, traditional use can be used as an argument for marketing approval (article R5143 CSP). In order to create a more rational technicoregulatory environment, older products marketed before 1994 are being "validated" by group according to a calendar established in 2003 and which should run from 2004 to 2012. At the end of this validation procedure, all manufactured homeopathic products will either receive marketing approval or be recorder in compliance with general or specific European regulations. In conclusion, we make a few personal comments

  11. Low Potency Homeopathic Remedies and Allopathic Herbal Medicines: Is There an Overlap?

    PubMed Central

    Csupor, Dezső; Boros, Klára; Hohmann, Judit

    2013-01-01

    Classical homeopathy is based on the therapeutic application of highly diluted homeopathic stocks. The indications of such medicines are determined by proving, i.e. by applying the remedies in healthy subjects. However, there are several complex homeopathic medicinal products on the market with approved therapeutic indications. The efficacy of these medicines has been assessed in clinical trials on patients. There is no upper limit of dosing for such homeopathic remedies, and these products often contain undiluted mother tincture. The aim of our study was to compare an allopathic herbal medicine and a homeopathic product containing undiluted mother tincture based on the same plant. Two products (an allopathic herbal medicine and a homeopathic product) containing Vitex agnus-castus extract were analyzed by HPLC-DAD for their agnuside and casticin contents. The agnuside content of the allopathic product was approximately four times higher, while the amount of casticin was in the same order of magnitude. Our experiments revealed the presence of active ingredients in allopathic quantity in a homeopathic preparation, highlighting the controversy between the principles of classical and practice of contemporary homeopathy. According to the principles of classical homeopathy these remedies cannot be considered as homeopathic remedies but rather as (allopathic) herbal ones. This phenomenon necessitates a case-by-case approach towards the possible adverse effects and drug interactions of homeopathics in the daily medical practice. Homeopathic products containing active agents in allopathic doses should be treated the same way as allopathic medicines from the point of view of quality assurance and pharmacovigilance. PMID:24019954

  12. Whooping Cough Alleviated by Homeopathic Medicines: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chung, Youngran

    2017-10-02

    Context • Pertussis cough (whooping cough) is distressing due to the intensity and chronicity of its cough. No specific drugs are available that can alleviate the cough's intensity or significantly shorten its duration. Homeopathic medicines are used for a wide variety of medical conditions, including cough. Objective • The study investigated the benefits of homeopathic medicines for whooping cough, to alleviate the cough's intensity and to shorten its duration. Design • The current study was a case series of patients with whooping cough. Setting • The study took place at one of the suburban hospital clinics of the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago (Chicago, IL, USA). Participants • Participants were 20 patients aged 21 mo to 20 y, of whom 11 were female and 18 were male, who visited the hospital clinic for treatment of the chronic cough that is characteristic of whooping cough. The details of the cases of 3 representative participants are highlighted in the text. Intervention • The 3 representative patients all received 1 dose weekly of a 30c dilution of homeopathic pertussinum and a 6c dilution of homeopathic Drosera 3 times daily. The homeopathic medicines most often used for the other participants were the same doses of pertussinum and Drosera. Outcome Measures • Verbal feedback from patient or family were obtained at the follow-up visits. Results • The intensity and duration of participant's coughs were alleviated within days to 1 wk in most cases. Conclusions • Homeopathic medicines can alleviate the intensity or reduce the duration of whooping cough, with no adverse effects.

  13. Homeopathic pathogenetic trials produce specific symptoms different from placebo.

    PubMed

    Möllinger, Heribert; Schneider, Rainer; Walach, Harald

    2009-04-01

    Homeopathy uses information gathered from healthy volunteers taking homeopathic substances (pathogenetic trials) for clinical treatment. It is controversial whether such studies produce symptoms different from those produced by placebo. To test whether homeopathic preparations produce different symptoms than placebo in healthy volunteers. Three armed, double-blind, placebo controlled randomised experimental pathogenetic study in 25 healthy volunteers who took either one of two homeopathic remedies, Natrum muriaticum and Arsenicum album in 30CH or identical placebo. Main outcome parameter was the number of remedy-specific symptoms per group. On average, 6 symptoms typical for Arsenicum album were experienced by participants taking arsenicum album, 5 symptoms typical for Natrum muriaticum by those taking natrum muriaticum, and 11 non-specific symptoms by those in the placebo group. Differences were significant overall (Kruskall Wallis test, p = 0.0002,) and significantly different from placebo (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.001). Homeopathic remedies produce different symptoms than placebo. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Homeopathic Preparations of Quartz, Sulfur and Copper Sulfate Assessed by UV-Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ursula; Wolf, Martin; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Homeopathic preparations are used in homeopathy and anthroposophic medicine. Although there is evidence of effectiveness in several clinical studies, including double-blinded randomized controlled trials, their nature and mode of action could not be explained with current scientific approaches yet. Several physical methods have already been applied to investigate homeopathic preparations but it is yet unclear which methods are best suited to identify characteristic physicochemical properties of homeopathic preparations. The aim of this study was to investigate homeopathic preparations with UV-spectroscopy. In a blinded, randomized, controlled experiment homeopathic preparations of copper sulfate (CuSO4; 11c–30c), quartz (SiO2; 10c–30c, i.e., centesimal dilution steps) and sulfur (S; 11×–30×, i.e., decimal dilution steps) and controls (one-time succussed diluent) were investigated using UV-spectroscopy and tested for contamination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The UV transmission for homeopathic preparations of CuSO4 preparations was significantly lower than in controls. The transmission seemed to be also lower for both SiO2 and S, but not significant. The mean effect size (95% confidence interval) was similar for the homeopathic preparations: CuSO4 (pooled data) 0.0544% (0.0260–0.0827%), SiO2 0.0323% (–0.0064% to 0.0710%) and S 0.0281% (–0.0520% to 0.1082%). UV transmission values of homeopathic preparations had a significantly higher variability compared to controls. In none of the samples the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 100 ppb. Lower transmission of UV light may indicate that homeopathic preparations are less structured or more dynamic than their succussed pure solvent. PMID:19474239

  15. [Research to achieve a homeopathic lotion].

    PubMed

    Verbuţă, A; Cojocaru, I

    1996-01-01

    A formulation of homeopathic lotion was elaborated. It uses as mother-solutions: the Calendula tincture and the Fumaria tincture prepared according to the homeopathic rules, and a vegetal soft extract conventionally named by us Pt2a, and the 42 C alcohol was used as a vehicle. All dilutions were made at 3CH. The pH, the refraction index and the electrical conductivity of the three solutions prove a good stability of the preparation. The 2 CH a dilution was well tolerated at the administration with juvenile acne and the simple dry phthiriasis, an improving being noted after 3-4 days of treatment.

  16. A protocol for a trial of homeopathic treatment for irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome is a chronic condition with no known cure. Many sufferers seek complementary and alternative medicine including homeopathic treatment. However there is much controversy as to the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment. This three-armed study seeks to explore the effectiveness of individualised homeopathic treatment plus usual care compared to both an attention control plus usual care and usual care alone, for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Methods/design This is a three-armed pragmatic randomised controlled trial using the cohort multiple randomised trial methodology. Patients are recruited to an irritable bowel syndrome cohort from primary and secondary care using GP databases and consultants lists respectively. From this cohort patients are randomly selected to be offered, 5 sessions of homeopathic treatment plus usual care, 5 sessions of supportive listening plus usual care or usual care alone. The primary clinical outcome is the Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptom Severity at 26 weeks. From a power calculation, it is estimated that 33 people will be needed for the homeopathic treatment arm and 132 for the usual care arm, to detect a minimal clinical difference at 80 percent power and 5 percent significance allowing for loss to follow up. An unequal group size has been used for reasons of cost. Analysis will be by intention to treat and will compare homeopathic treatment with usual care at 26 weeks as the primary analysis, and homeopathic treatment with supportive listening as an additional analysis. Discussion This trial has received NHS approval and results are expected in 2013. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN90651143 PMID:23131064

  17. The effect of fluorine and homeopathic medicines in rats fed cariogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Almeida, N T; Dalmeida, V; Pustiglione, M

    2004-07-01

    Although some sectors of dentistry have benefited from technological advances, dental caries is still a major problem. Prevention and treatment of dental caries by fluorine is considered a major advance in public health. Nevertheless fluorosis, caused by ingestion of excessive amounts of fluorine during the period of teeth formation, is of great concern. In accordance with the homeopathic doctrine, minimum doses of fluorine and other substances could prevent and/or treat caries. In this experiment, we compared the preventive action of fluorine and evaluated the effect of homeopathic medicines on the teeth of rats fed a cariogenic diet. None of the groups included in this study developed caries. However, microscopy revealed the presence of precipitate and/or deposit in the groups treated with homeopathic medicines. This phenomenon might be due to deposit in the dental surface or precipitation of bacterial plaque or calcium salts. It was not possible to identify the composition of the deposit/precipitate due for technical reasons. In one of the groups treated with homeopathic medicines fur loss was observed in 40% of animals. These reactions might be caused due to the action of the homeopathic medicines.

  18. [On the effectiveness of the homeopathic remedy Arnica montana].

    PubMed

    Lüdtke, Rainer; Hacke, Daniela

    2005-11-01

    Arnica montana is a homeopathic remedy often prescribed after traumata and injuries. To assess whether Arnica is effective beyond placebo and to identify factors which support or contradict this effectiveness. All prospective, controlled trials on the effectiveness of homeopathic Arnica were included. Overall effectiveness was assessed by meta-analysis and meta-regression techniques. 68 comparisons from 49 clinical trials show a significant effectiveness of Arnica in traumatic injuries in random effects meta-analysis (odds ratio [OR], 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.55), but not in meta-regression models (OR, 0.37; CI, 0.11-1.24). We found no evidence for publication bias. Studies from Medline-listed journals and high-quality studies are less likely to report positive results (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0167). The hypothesis that homeopathic Arnica is effective could neither be proved nor rejected. All trials were highly heterogeneous, meta-regression does not help to explain this heterogeneity substantially.

  19. Usage and appraisal of educational media by homeopathic therapists – A cross sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During recent years the market for homeopathic education media has increasingly diversified with old (books, seminars) and new media (video-seminars, pc-programs, homeo-wiki and internet-courses). However, little is known about homeopaths’ preferences in using educational media and their requirements of this topic. Aim This survey was designed to gain a better understanding of the usage and appraisal of educational media by homeopaths. Methods 192 homeopathic practitioners (GPs and health practitioners) at a educational conference were asked to answer a standardized questionnaire covering the topics “formal education and context of work” (9 items), “homeopathic practise and usage (24 items), “utilization of educational media” (9 items) and “favoured attributes for educational media” (11 items). Results Out of 192 homeopaths who attended the conference, 118 completed the questionnaire (response rate 61.5%). For their continuing homeopathic education they predominantly indicated to use books (scale value from 0 = never to 2 = always: 1.72) and seminars (1.54) whereas journals (0.98) and the internet (0.65) were used less often. The most favoured attributes concerning medical education media were reliability (1.76), relevance for clinical practice (1.74) and user friendliness (1.6). Less favoured attributes were inexpensiveness (1.1), graphical material (0.92) and interactivity (0.88). Conclusions The survey illustrates the current situation of medical education media in homeopathy. Although there are parallels to earlier research conducted in conventional GPs, homeopaths are more likely to refer to classical media. New education tools should be designed according to these preferences. PMID:22794310

  20. Homeopathic practitioner views of changes in patients undergoing constitutional treatment for chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Koithan, Mary; Gorman, Margaret M; Baldwin, Carol M

    2003-02-01

    To identify areas that classical homeopathic practitioners would want to see evaluated in a patient self-report questionnaire sensitive to change during constitutional treatment. Open-ended, written practitioner questionnaire, analyzed using inductive content analysis. Two classical homeopathic meetings held in the western United States. Homeopathic practitioners attending the above professional meetings and volunteering to complete the questionnaire in response to announcements prior to sessions. Practitioners completed a demographic questionnaire and answered an open-ended question inquiring for changes about which to ask people undergoing classical homeopathic constitutional treatment. The categories that the 38 homeopaths identified included changes in: (1) emotions; (2) mentation; (3) specific physical functioning; (4) general physical changes; (5) perception of self; (6) relationships; (7) spirituality; (8) lifestyle; (9) energy; (10) dream content and tone; (11) well-being; (12) perceptions by others; (13) life relationships; (14) a sense of freedom or feeling less "stuck"; (15) sleep; (16) coping; (17) ability to adapt; (18) creativity; and (19) recall of past experiences. Sixteen percent (16%) of participants added more in-depth description of the nature of changes across categories (i.e., a rhythmical process of innovation and flux). The findings are consistent with the systemic orientation of classical homeopathic philosophy to evaluate and treat the patient as a whole. Taken together, the results support the need for development of new, multidimensional outcome measures for clinical research in homeopathy beyond the disease-specific and health-related quality-of-life scales available from conventional medical research.

  1. A systematic review of the quality of homeopathic clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Wayne B; Anderson, Rachel L; Crawford, Cindy C; Lyons, John S

    2001-01-01

    Background While a number of reviews of homeopathic clinical trials have been done, all have used methods dependent on allopathic diagnostic classifications foreign to homeopathic practice. In addition, no review has used established and validated quality criteria allowing direct comparison of the allopathic and homeopathic literature. Methods In a systematic review, we compared the quality of clinical-trial research in homeopathy to a sample of research on conventional therapies using a validated and system-neutral approach. All clinical trials on homeopathic treatments with parallel treatment groups published between 1945–1995 in English were selected. All were evaluated with an established set of 33 validity criteria previously validated on a broad range of health interventions across differing medical systems. Criteria covered statistical conclusion, internal, construct and external validity. Reliability of criteria application is greater than 0.95. Results 59 studies met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 79% were from peer-reviewed journals, 29% used a placebo control, 51% used random assignment, and 86% failed to consider potentially confounding variables. The main validity problems were in measurement where 96% did not report the proportion of subjects screened, and 64% did not report attrition rate. 17% of subjects dropped out in studies where this was reported. There was practically no replication of or overlap in the conditions studied and most studies were relatively small and done at a single-site. Compared to research on conventional therapies the overall quality of studies in homeopathy was worse and only slightly improved in more recent years. Conclusions Clinical homeopathic research is clearly in its infancy with most studies using poor sampling and measurement techniques, few subjects, single sites and no replication. Many of these problems are correctable even within a "holistic" paradigm given sufficient research expertise, support and methods

  2. Treatment of canine atopic dermatitis with a commercial homeopathic remedy: A single-blinded, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Danny W.; Miller, William H.; Senter, David A.; Cook, Christopher P.; Kirker, J. Edward; Cobb, Shaun M.

    2002-01-01

    A commercial homeopathic remedy and a placebo were administered orally as individual agents to 18 dogs with atopic dermatitis. The pruritus was reduced by less than 50% in only 2/18 dogs; 1 of these dogs was receiving the homeopathic remedy, the other was receiving the placebo. One dog vomited after administration of the homeopathic remedy. PMID:12170834

  3. The frequency of dietary references in homeopathic consultations.

    PubMed

    Filho, Rubens Dolce

    2011-07-01

    A retrospective quantitative study on dietary references found in medical records of 2753 patients attending consultations from 10/1/1994 to 5/31/2007 was conducted. The symptoms found in the rubrics relating to food and drink aggravation and amelioration, aversion and craving of homeopathic repertories reflect diets at different places and times and do not correspond fully, to contemporary gastronomy. Desires for sweet and spicy foods were statistically more frequent, revealing the prevailing taste for such food among the studied population. Food cravings should be carefully analyzed before considering them as indications for choosing homeopathic therapy, they are less significant than aversions, aggravations and ameliorations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Embryonic Zebrafish Model - A Well-Established Method for Rapidly Assessing the Toxicity of Homeopathic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Himanshu R; Patil, Yogesh; Singh, Dipty

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Advancements in nanotechnology have led to nanoparticle (NP) use in various fields of medicine. Although the potential of NPs is promising, the lack of documented evidence on the toxicological effects of NPs is concerning. A few studies have documented that homeopathy uses NPs. Unfortunately, very few sound scientific studies have explored the toxic effects of homeopathic drugs. Citing this lack of high-quality scientific evidence, regulatory agencies have been reluctant to endorse homeopathic treatment as an alternative or adjunct treatment. This study aimed to enhance our insight into the impact of commercially-available homeopathic drugs, to study the presence of NPs in those drugs and any deleterious effects they might have, and to determine the distribution pattern of NPs in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). Methods: Homeopathic dilutions were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with selected area electron diffraction (SAED). For the toxicity assessment on Zebrafish, embryos were exposed to a test solution from 4 - 6 hours post-fertilization, and embryos/larvae were assessed up to 5 days post-fertilization (dpf) for viability and morphology. Toxicity was recorded in terms of mortality, hatching delay, phenotypic defects and metal accumulation. Around 5 dpf was found to be the optimum developmental stage for evaluation. Results: The present study aimed to conclusively prove the presence of NPs in all high dilutions of homeopathic drugs. Embryonic zebrafish were exposed to three homeopathic drugs with two potencies (30CH, 200CH) during early embryogenesis. The resulting morphological and cellular responses were observed. Exposure to these potencies produced no visibly significant malformations, pericardial edema, and mortality and no necrotic and apoptotic cellular death. Conclusion: Our findings clearly demonstrate that no toxic effects were observed for these three homeopathic drugs at the potencies and exposure times used

  5. Effect of homeopathic treatment on gene expression in Copenhagen rat tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Rajeshkumar, N V; Sharma, Anuj; Warren, Jim; Singh, Anoop K; Ives, John A; Gaddipati, Jaya P; Maheshwari, Radha K; Jonas, Wayne B

    2006-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the inability to undergo apoptosis is an important factor in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Agents that induce apoptosis may inhibit tumor growth and provide therapeutic benefit. In a recent study, the authors found that certain homeopathic treatments produced anticancer effects in an animal model. In this study, the authors examined the immunomodulating and apoptotic effects of these remedies. The authors investigated the effect of a homeopathic treatment regimen containing Conium maculatum, Sabal serrulata, Thuja occidentalis, and a MAT-LyLu Carcinosin nosode on the expression of cytokines and genes that regulate apoptosis. This was assessed in prostate cancer tissues, extracted from animals responsive to these drugs, using ribonuclease protection assay or reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant changes in mRNA levels of the apoptotic genes bax, bcl-2, bcl-x, caspase-1, caspase-2, caspase-3, Fas, FasL, or the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-beta, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, IL-2, and interferon-gamma in prostate tumor and lung metastasis after treatment with homeopathic medicines. This study indicates that treatment with the highly diluted homeopathic remedies does not alter the gene expression in primary prostate tumors or in lung metastasis. The therapeutic effect of homeopathic treatments observed in the in vivo experiments cannot be explained by mechanisms based on distinct alterations in gene expression related to apoptosis or cytokines. Future research should explore subtle modulations in the expression of multiple genes in different biological pathways.

  6. Systematic Review of Plant-Based Homeopathic Basic Research: An Update.

    PubMed

    Ücker, Annekathrin; Baumgartner, Stephan; Sokol, Anezka; Huber, Roman; Doesburg, Paul; Jäger, Tim

    2018-05-01

     Plant-based test systems have been described as a useful tool for investigating possible effects of homeopathic preparations. The last reviews of this research field were published in 2009/2011. Due to recent developments in the field, an update is warranted. Publications on plant-based test systems were analysed with regard to publication quality, reproducibility and potential for further research.  A literature search was conducted in online databases and specific journals, including publications from 2008 to 2017 dealing with plant-based test systems in homeopathic basic research. To be included, they had to contain statistical analysis and fulfil quality criteria according to a pre-defined manuscript information score (MIS). Publications scoring at least 5 points (maximum 10 points) were assumed to be adequate. They were analysed for the use of adequate controls, outcome and reproducibility.  Seventy-four publications on plant-based test systems were found. Thirty-nine publications were either abstracts or proceedings of conferences and were excluded. From the remaining 35 publications, 26 reached a score of 5 or higher in the MIS. Adequate controls were used in 13 of these publications. All of them described specific effects of homeopathic preparations. The publication quality still varied: a substantial number of publications (23%) did not adequately document the methods used. Four reported on replication trials. One replication trial found effects of homeopathic preparations comparable to the original study. Three replication trials failed to confirm the original study but identified possible external influencing factors. Five publications described novel plant-based test systems. Eight trials used systematic negative control experiments to document test system stability.  Regarding research design, future trials should implement adequate controls to identify specific effects of homeopathic preparations and include systematic negative control

  7. [Acute otitis media in children. Comparison between conventional and homeopathic therapy].

    PubMed

    Friese, K H; Kruse, S; Moeller, H

    1996-08-01

    Within a prospective group study of five practicing otorhinolaryngologists, conventional therapy of acute otitis media in children was compared with homeopathic treatments. Group A (103 children) was primarily treated with homeopathic single remedies (Aconitum napellus, Apis mellifica, Belladonna, Capsicum, Chamomilla, Kalium bichromicum, Lachesis, Lycopodium, Mercurius solubilis, Okoubaka, Pulsatilla, Silicea). Group B (28 children) was treated by decongestant nose-drops, antibiotics, secretolytics and/or antipyretics. Comparisons were done by symptoms, physical findings, duration of therapy and number of relapses. The children of the study were between 1 and 11 years of age. The difference in numbers was explained by the children with otitis media being primarily treated by pediatricians using conventional methods. The median duration of pain in group A was 2 days and in group B 3 days. Median therapy in group A lasted 4 days and in group B 10 days. Antibiotics were given over a period of 8-10 days, while homeopathic treatments were stopped after healing. In group A 70.7% of the patients were free of relapses within 1 years and 29.3% had a maximum of three relapses. Group B had 56.5% without relapses and 43.5% a maximum of six relapses. Five children in group A were given antibiotics and 98 responded solely to homeopathic treatments. No side effects of treatment were found in either group.

  8. Homeopathic medicines do not alter growth and gene expression in prostate and breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Gaddipati, Jaya P; Rajeshkumar, N V; Sharma, Anuj; Singh, Anoop K; Ives, John A; Maheshwari, Radha K; Jonas, Wayne B

    2006-12-01

    Homeopathy is an alternative medical system practiced in all parts of the world. Although several theories are proposed to explain the mechanisms of action, none are scientifically verified. In this study, the authors investigate the effect of selected homeopathic remedies often used to treat prostate and breast cancer. The authors investigated the effect of the homeopathic medicines Conium maculatum, Sabal serrulata, Thuja occidentalis, Asterias, Phytolacca, and Carcinosin on prostate and breast cancer cell (DU-145, LNCaP, MAT-LyLu, MDA-MB-231) growth and on gene expression that regulates apoptosis, using MTT and multiprobe ribonuclease protection assay. None of the homeopathic remedies tested in different potencies produced significant inhibitory or growth-promoting activity in either prostate or breast cancer cells. Also, gene expression studies by ribonuclease protection assay produced no significant changes in mRNA levels of bax, bcl-2, bcl-x, caspase-1, caspase-2, caspase-3, Fas, or FasL after treatment with homeopathic medicines. The results demonstrate that the highly diluted homeopathic remedies used by homeopathic practitioners for cancer show no measurable effects on cell growth or gene expression in vitro using currently available methodologies.

  9. Homeopathic potentization based on nanoscale domains.

    PubMed

    Czerlinski, George; Ypma, Tjalling

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to present a simple descriptive and quantitative model of how high potencies in homeopathy arise. The model begins with the mechanochemical production of hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals from water and the electronic stabilization of the resulting nanodomains of water molecules. The life of these domains is initially limited to a few days, but may extend to years when the electromagnetic characteristic of a homeopathic agent is copied onto the domains. This information is transferred between the original agent and the nanodomains, and also between previously imprinted nanodomains and new ones. The differential equations previously used to describe these processes are replaced here by exponential expressions, corresponding to simplified model mechanisms. Magnetic stabilization is also involved, since these long-lived domains apparently require the presence of the geomagnetic field. Our model incorporates this factor in the formation of the long-lived compound. Numerical simulation and graphs show that the potentization mechanism can be described quantitatively by a very simplified mechanism. The omitted factors affect only the fine structure of the kinetics. Measurements of pH changes upon absorption of different electromagnetic frequencies indicate that about 400 nanodomains polymerize to form one cooperating unit. Singlet excited states of some compounds lead to dramatic changes in their hydrogen ion dissociation constant, explaining this pH effect and suggesting that homeopathic information is imprinted as higher singlet excited states. A simple description is provided of the process of potentization in homeopathic dilutions. With the exception of minor details, this simple model replicates the results previously obtained from a more complex model. While excited states are short lived in isolated molecules, they become long lived in nanodomains that form coherent cooperative aggregates controlled by the geomagnetic field. These

  10. Efficacy of a homeopathic complex on acute viral tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Malapane, Eunice; Solomon, Elizabeth M; Pellow, Janice

    2014-11-01

    Acute viral tonsillitis is an upper respiratory tract infection prevalent in school-aged children. Because this condition is self-limiting, conventional treatment options are usually palliative. Homeopathic remedies are a useful alternative to conventional medications in acute uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infections in children, offering earlier symptom resolution, cost-effectiveness, and fewer adverse effects. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of a homeopathic complex on the symptoms of acute viral tonsillitis in African children in South Africa. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 6-day pilot study. Thirty children, age 6 to 12 years, with acute viral tonsillitis were recruited from a primary school in Gauteng, South Africa. Participants took two tablets of the medication four times daily. The treatment group received lactose tablets medicated with the homeopathic complex (Atropa belladonna D4, Calcarea phosphoricum D4, Hepar sulphuris D4, Kalium bichromat D4, Kalium muriaticum D4, Mercurius protoiodid D10, and Mercurius biniodid D10). The placebo consisted of the unmedicated vehicle only. The Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale measured pain intensity, and a Symptom Grading Scale assessed changes in tonsillitis signs and symptoms. The treatment group had a statistically significant improvement in the following symptoms compared with the placebo group: pain associated with tonsillitis, pain on swallowing, erythema and inflammation of the pharynx, and tonsil size. The homeopathic complex used in this study exhibited significant anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving qualities in children with acute viral tonsillitis. No patients reported any adverse effects. These preliminary findings are promising; however, the sample size was small and therefore a definitive conclusion cannot be reached. A larger, more inclusive research study should be undertaken to verify the findings of this study.

  11. Homeopathic drug discovery: theory update and methodological aspect.

    PubMed

    Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman; Pathak, Surajit

    2008-08-01

    Homeopathy treats patient on the basis of totality of symptoms and is based on the principle of 'like cures like'. It uses ultra-low doses of highly diluted natural substances as remedies that originate from plants, minerals or animals. The objectives of this review are to discuss concepts, controversies and research related to understanding homeopathy in the light of modern science. Attempts have been made to focus on current views of homeopathy and to delineate its most plausible mechanism(s) of action. Although some areas of concern remain, research carried out so far both in vitro and in vivo validates the effects of highly diluted homeopathic medicines in a wide variety of organisms. The precise mechanism(s) and pathway(s) of action of highly diluted homeopathic drugs are still unknown.

  12. Homeopathic arnica therapy in patients receiving knee surgery: results of three randomised double-blind trials.

    PubMed

    Brinkhaus, B; Wilkens, J M; Lüdtke, R; Hunger, J; Witt, C M; Willich, S N

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of homeopathic Arnica montana on postoperative swelling and pain after arthroscopy (ART), artificial knee joint implantation (AKJ), and cruciate ligament reconstruction (CLR). Three randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, sequential clinical trials. Single primary care unit specialised in arthroscopic knee surgery. Patients suffering from a knee disease that necessitated arthroscopic surgery. Prior to surgery, patients were given 1 x 5 globules of the homeopathic dilution 30x (a homeopathic dilution of 1:10(30)) of arnica or placebo. Following surgery, 3 x 5 globules were administered daily. The primary outcome parameter was difference in knee circumference, defined as the ratio of circumference on day 1 (ART) or day 2 (CLR and AKJ) after surgery to baseline circumference. A total of 227 patients were enrolled in the ART (33% female, mean age 43.2 years;), 35 in the AKJ (71% female, 67.0 years), and 57 in the CLR trial (26% female; 33.4 years). The percentage of change in knee circumference was similar between the treatment groups for ART (group difference Delta=-0.25%, 95% CI: -0.85 to 0.41, p=0.204) and AKJ (Delta=-1.68%, -4.24 to 0.77, p=0.184) and showed homeopathic arnica to have a beneficial effect compared to placebo in CLR (Delta=-1.80%, -3.30 to -0.30, p=0.019). In all three trials, patients receiving homeopathic arnica showed a trend towards less postoperative swelling compared to patients receiving placebo. However, a significant difference in favour of homeopathic arnica was only found in the CLR trial.

  13. The Use of Intuition in Homeopathic Clinical Decision Making: An Interpretative Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Brien, Sarah; Dibb, Bridget; Burch, Alex

    2011-01-01

    While intuition plays a role in clinical decision making within conventional medicine, little is understood about its use in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate intuition from the perspective of homeopathic practitioners; its' manifestation, how it was recognized, its origins and when it was used within daily clinical practice. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with clinically experienced non-National Health Service (NHS) UK homeopathic practitioners. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the data. Homeopaths reported many similarities with conventional medical practitioner regarding the nature, perceived origin and manifestation of their intuitions in clinical practice. Intuition was used in two key aspects of the consultation: (i) to enhance the practitioner-patient relationship, these were generally trusted; and (ii) intuitions relating to the prescribing decision. Homeopaths were cautious about these latter intuitions, testing any intuitive thoughts through deductive reasoning before accepting them. Their reluctance is not surprising given the consequences for patient care, but we propose this also reflects homeopaths' sensitivity to the academic and medical mistrust of both homeopathy and intuition. This study is the first to explore the use of intuition in decision making in any form of complementary medicine. The similarities with conventional practitioners may provide confidence in validating intuition as a legitimate part of the decision making process for these specific practitioners. Further work is needed to elucidate if these findings reflect intuitive use in clinical practice of other CAM practitioners in both private and NHS (i.e., time limited) settings. PMID:19773389

  14. Informing the homeopathic practice for Turkish pharmacists: reviewing the example of Portuguese community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Afonso Miguel; Arslan, Miray; Şar, Sevgi

    2017-05-01

    Alternative and complementary therapy systems, such as homeopathy, have long been used around the world. Since 1995 homeopathy has been officially recognized in Europe as a system of medicine or a medical specialty. Portuguese community pharmacists have long-standing experience with homeopathic products. By contrast, healthcare professionals in Turkey are less experienced with homeopathic practice although there is a new regulatory setting in place. There are a limited number of studies addressing pharmacists' role within the homeopathic system. To investigate the attitudes (knowledge, feelings and behaviour) of experienced Portuguese pharmacy practitioners who deal with homeopathy, and thus to inform Turkish pharmacy practice and policy on homeopathy-related success factors. A qualitative cross-sectional design was followed, using semi-structured and face-to-face individual interviews with purposively selected Portuguese pharmacists experienced with homeopathic medicines. Audio-recordings were transcribed verbatim and the transcriptions imported into QSR NVivo v10 software for qualitative coding and analysis. Using a thematic content approach, the extracted codes were grouped and indexed by recurrent themes through a reflective procedure and constant comparison. Six general themes emerged, the most relevant being participants' feelings of gratitude for the ability to work in homeopathy; other themes were a helpful regulatory body, clear practice boundaries, scientific support and product quality assurance. Specialized homeopathic education was considered the most important factor for success. This was related to patients' positive perceptions and acceptance, suggesting an increase in public awareness through the pharmacy network. Portuguese pharmacists' attitudes towards their homeopathic practices highlighted the key elements for success in a field that is usually distant from traditional pharmaceutical education and practice. The present findings provide

  15. Homeopathic treatment in emergency medicine: a case series.

    PubMed

    Oberbaum, M; Schreiber, R; Rosenthal, C; Itzchaki, M

    2003-01-01

    Following a multiple-casualty construction disaster in Israel, members of The Center of Integrated Complementary Medicine joined in the emergency activity of the Shaare Zedek Medical Center. They administered homeopathic treatment to injured patients to supplement conventional orthopaedic treatment. This was to our knowledge the first time that complementary medicine had been used officially in conjunction with conventional medicine in an emergency situation. Our objective is to report and summarize the rationale, procedures and outcome of the complementary medicine intervention. Fifteen orthopaedic patients were included. They were treated by homeopathy in two phases starting 24 h post-trauma. All patients initially received Arnica montana 200CH in a single dose. Anxiety was treated with Aconite 200CH in nine patients, Opium 200CH in three, Ignatia 200CH in two and Arsenicum album 200CH in one according to type of anxiety. One day later, most patients reported a lessening of pain, 58% felt improvement, 89% had reduced anxiety, and overall, 61% felt that homeopathic treatment was helpful. In the second phase, 48 h post-trauma, specific complaints were addressed with classical homeopathy. At discharge patients rated the homeopathic treatment successful in 67% of the specific complaints. Several issues relating to the use of homeopathy in emergency medicine and its relation to conventional treatment are discussed. These include compliance, the conduct of rounds, shortage of time and staff, and the procurement of medicines.

  16. Anticholinergic Toxicity Secondary to Overuse of Topricin Cream, a Homeopathic Medication

    PubMed Central

    Regina, Angela; Jesin, Raphael C; Deeb, Liliane; Steinberg, Eric; Majlesi, Nima

    2018-01-01

    Adverse reactions from over-the-counter medications present a challenge to physicians. Homeopathic medicine is an alternative practice, originating in Germany and gaining popularity in the United States. It utilizes dilute preparations of substances in order to treat and cure disease. Patients may potentially suffer serious effects from the use of these products as the contents and concentrations are often unclear. Here, we describe a case of suspected atropine toxicity due to the overuse of a topical homeopathic cream, Topricin, which contains belladonna, a plant containing atropine. PMID:29736357

  17. Preliminary investigation of metal and metalloid contamination of homeopathic products marketed in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Tumir, Hrvoje; Bosnir, Jasna; Vedrina-Dragojević, Irena; Dragun, Zrinka; Tomić, Sinisa; Puntarić, Dinko

    2010-07-01

    Due to their popularity as a complementary therapy in many diseases, homeopathic products of animal, vegetable, mineral and chemical origin should be tested for the presence of contaminants to prevent eventual toxic effects. Thirty samples of homeopathic products were analyzed to estimate possible contamination with potentially toxic elements: Pb, Cd, As, Hg, Cr, Ni and Zn, and to assess human exposure to these metals/metalloid as a consequence of their consumption. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine metal and metalloid concentrations. Most tested products had very low metal/metalloid levels (below the limit of quantification of the method), but the metal/metalloid levels in the remaining products were in the following ranges (in microg g(-1)): Pb 0.33-1.29 (6 samples), Cd 2.78 (1 sample), As 0.22 (1 sample), Hg 0.02-0.12 (24 samples), Cr 0.40-10.27 (10 samples), Ni 0.43-55.00 (19 samples), and Zn 2.20-27.80 (11 samples). In the absence of regulatory standards for homeopathic products, the obtained results were compared to maximum allowable levels (MALs) as proposed by USP Ad Hoc Advisory Panel. Some analyzed preparations had metal levels above MALs (Pb: 2 samples; Cd: 1 sample; Ni: 2 samples). However, estimated cumulative daily intakes from tested homeopathic products were in all cases lower than permitted daily exposures for all dosage forms. The risk of bioaccumulation of metals/metalloid from the homeopathic medicines seems to be rather low, due to small quantities of those products prescribed to be applied per day, as well as insignificant metal contamination of the majority of tested products. However, the fact that particular formulations were contaminated by metals above MALs indicates potential risk and points to the necessity of regular monitoring of homeopathic products for metal contamination, due to their frequent and mostly unsupervised use. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Homeopathic treatment of minor aphthous ulcer: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Fahimeh; Mojaver, Yalda Nozad; Asadzadeh, Mehdi; Mirzazadeh, Mustafa

    2009-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to clinically determine the efficacy of individualised homeopathy in the treatment of minor recurrent aphthous ulceration (MiRAU). A randomized, single blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of individualised homeopathy. One hundred patients with minor aphthous ulcer were treated with individualised homeopathic medicines or placebo and followed up for 6 days. Patients received two doses of individualised homeopathic medicines in the 6C potency as oral liquid at baseline and 12 h later. Pain intensity and ulcer size were recorded at baseline during and at the end of the trial (mornings of days 4 and 6). All 100 patients completed treatment. Between group differences for pain intensity and ulcer size were statistically significant at day 4 and at day 6 (P<0.05). No adverse effects were reported. The results suggest that homeopathic treatment is an effective and safe method in the treatment of MiRAU.

  19. Homeopathic drug therapy. Homeopathy in Chikungunya Fever and Post-Chikungunya Chronic Arthritis: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Gyandas G

    2013-07-01

    To observe the effect of homeopathic therapy in Chikungunya Fever (CF) and in Post-Chikungunya Chronic Arthritis (PCCA) in a primary health care setting. A prospective observational study was conducted at Delhi Government Homeopathic Dispensary, Aali Village, New Delhi, India, for a period of 6 months, from 1st October 2010 to 31st March 2011. 126 patients (75 CF, 51 PCCA) were enrolled based on predefined inclusion criteria. A single homeopathic medicine was prescribed for each patient after case taking with the help of Materia Medica and/or Repertory. Results were evaluated on the basis of visual analogue scale and symptom scores. Complete recovery was seen in 84.5% CF cases in a mean time of 6.8 days. 90% cases of PCCA recovered completely in a mean time of 32.5 days. Homeopathic therapy may be effective in CF and PCCA. A randomized controlled trial should be considered. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Homeopathic drug selection using Intuitionistic fuzzy sets.

    PubMed

    Kharal, Athar

    2009-01-01

    Using intuitionistic fuzzy set theory, Sanchez's approach to medical diagnosis has been applied to the problem of selection of single remedy from homeopathic repertorization. Two types of Intuitionistic Fuzzy Relations (IFRs) and three types of selection indices are discussed. I also propose a new repertory exploiting the benefits of soft-intelligence.

  1. Testing the Nanoparticle-Allostatic Cross Adaptation-Sensitization Model for Homeopathic Remedy Effects

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Iris R.; Koithan, Mary; Brooks, Audrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Key concepts of the Nanoparticle-Allostatic Cross-Adaptation-Sensitization (NPCAS) Model for the action of homeopathic remedies in living systems include source nanoparticles as low level environmental stressors, heterotypic hormesis, cross-adaptation, allostasis (stress response network), time-dependent sensitization with endogenous amplification and bidirectional change, and self-organizing complex adaptive systems. The model accommodates the requirement for measurable physical agents in the remedy (source nanoparticles and/or source adsorbed to silica nanoparticles). Hormetic adaptive responses in the organism, triggered by nanoparticles; bipolar, metaplastic change, dependent on the history of the organism. Clinical matching of the patient’s symptom picture, including modalities, to the symptom pattern that the source material can cause (cross-adaptation and cross-sensitization). Evidence for nanoparticle-related quantum macro-entanglement in homeopathic pathogenetic trials. This paper examines research implications of the model, discussing the following hypotheses: Variability in nanoparticle size, morphology, and aggregation affects remedy properties and reproducibility of findings. Homeopathic remedies modulate adaptive allostatic responses, with multiple dynamic short- and long-term effects. Simillimum remedy nanoparticles, as novel mild stressors corresponding to the organism’s dysfunction initiate time-dependent cross-sensitization, reversing the direction of dysfunctional reactivity to environmental stressors. The NPCAS model suggests a way forward for systematic research on homeopathy. The central proposition is that homeopathic treatment is a form of nanomedicine acting by modulation of endogenous adaptation and metaplastic amplification processes in the organism to enhance long-term systemic resilience and health. PMID:23290882

  2. Anisocoria Secondary to Anticholinergic Mydriasis from Homeopathic Pink Eye Relief Drops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Yeung, Joseph C; Anderson, Dennis R

    2017-12-01

    A woman, aged 70 years, developed anisocoria after applying homeopathic eye drops (Similasan Pink Eye Relief) to her left eye. Her pupil was dilated for two weeks and did not respond to light or near stimuli for one week. Both 0.1% and 1% pilocarpine failed to constrict her left pupil, and magnetic resonance imaging of her brain did not reveal any abnormality. The eye drops she had used contain belladonna extracts which have a natural atropine component. This case demonstrates the importance, when evaluating a patient presenting with anisocoria, of knowing the chemical ingredients of the homeopathic eye drops, which often are not listed. © 2017 Marshfield Clinic.

  3. A Feasibility Pilot Trial of Individualized Homeopathic Treatment of Fatigue in Children Receiving Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brulé, David; Gillmeister, Biljana; Lee, Michelle; Alexander, Sarah; Gassas, Adam; Hendershot, Eleanor; Zupanec, Sue; Dupuis, Lee; Sung, Lillian

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue is a major problem in children with cancer. The objective was to examine the feasibility of performing a clinical trial of homeopathic treatment for fatigue in children receiving chemotherapy. This was a single-institution, open-label, pilot study. Children 2 to 18 years old, diagnosed with cancer, and receiving chemotherapy were eligible. Participants were given individualized homeopathic treatment for a maximum of 14 days. In-home or clinic assessments were conducted up to 3 times weekly. Feasibility was defined as the ability to recruit and administer homeopathy to 10 participants within 1 year. Fatigue was measured using the Symptom Distress Scale daily and the PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Module weekly. Between April 2012 and April 2014, 155 potential participants were identified. There were 45 eligible and contacted patients; 36 declined participation, 30 because they were not interested; 9 agreed to participate, but 1 participant withdrew prior to treatment initiation. Median length of homeopathic treatment was 10.5 (range = 6 to 14) days. All parents found homeopathic treatment to be easy or very easy to follow. Trials of individualized homeopathy for fatigue reduction in pediatric cancer are not feasible in this context; lack of interest was a primary reason. Alternative approaches to evaluating homeopathy efficacy are needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Method for appraising model validity of randomised controlled trials of homeopathic treatment: multi-rater concordance study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A method for assessing the model validity of randomised controlled trials of homeopathy is needed. To date, only conventional standards for assessing intrinsic bias (internal validity) of trials have been invoked, with little recognition of the special characteristics of homeopathy. We aimed to identify relevant judgmental domains to use in assessing the model validity of homeopathic treatment (MVHT). We define MVHT as the extent to which a homeopathic intervention and the main measure of its outcome, as implemented in a randomised controlled trial (RCT), reflect 'state-of-the-art' homeopathic practice. Methods Using an iterative process, an international group of experts developed a set of six judgmental domains, with associated descriptive criteria. The domains address: (I) the rationale for the choice of the particular homeopathic intervention; (II) the homeopathic principles reflected in the intervention; (III) the extent of homeopathic practitioner input; (IV) the nature of the main outcome measure; (V) the capability of the main outcome measure to detect change; (VI) the length of follow-up to the endpoint of the study. Six papers reporting RCTs of homeopathy of varying design were randomly selected from the literature. A standard form was used to record each assessor's independent response per domain, using the optional verdicts 'Yes', 'Unclear', 'No'. Concordance among the eight verdicts per domain, across all six papers, was evaluated using the kappa (κ) statistic. Results The six judgmental domains enabled MVHT to be assessed with 'fair' to 'almost perfect' concordance in each case. For the six RCTs examined, the method allowed MVHT to be classified overall as 'acceptable' in three, 'unclear' in two, and 'inadequate' in one. Conclusion Future systematic reviews of RCTs in homeopathy should adopt the MVHT method as part of a complete appraisal of trial validity. PMID:22510227

  5. [The administration of homeopathic drugs for the treatment of acute mastitis in cattle].

    PubMed

    Merck, C C; Sonnenwald, B; Rollwage, H

    1989-08-01

    The general principles of homeopathic therapy are described together with a number of homeopathic drugs used for the treatment of acute bovine mastitis. Fifty cows with acute mastitis were used in the study. The initial treatment comprised aconitum D 4, phytolacca D 1 and bryonia D 4. In subsequent treatments phytolacca D 1, bryonia D 4 and lachesis D 8 either singly or in combination were used; mercurius solubilis D 4 was also used. Encouraging results, especially in the treatment of cases of E.coli mastitis, were achieved.

  6. Effects of homeopathic mother tinctures on breath alcohol testing.

    PubMed

    Boatto, Gianpiero; Trignano, Claudia; Burrai, Lucia; Spanu, Andrea; Nieddu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In some countries, it is illegal to drive with any detectable amount of alcohol in blood; in others, the legal limit is 0.5 g/L or lower. Recently, some defendants charged with driving under the influence of alcohol and have claimed that positive breath alcohol test results were due to the ingestion of homeopathic mother tinctures. These preparations are obtained by maceration, digestion, infusion, or decoction of herbal material in hydroalcoholic solvent. A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the alcoholic content of three homeopathic mother tinctures and their ability to produce inaccurate breath alcohol results. Nine of 30 subjects gave positive results (0.11-0.82 g/L) when tests were taken within 1 min after drinking mother tincture. All tests taken at least 15 min after the mother tincture consumption and resulted in alcohol-free readings. An observation period of 15-20 min prior to breath alcohol testing eliminates the possibility of false-positive results. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Rat models of acute inflammation: a randomized controlled study on the effects of homeopathic remedies

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Anita; Bellavite, Paolo; Bertani, Simone; Chiarotti, Flavia; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Raschetti, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Background One of the cardinal principles of homeopathy is the "law of similarities", according to which patients can be treated by administering substances which, when tested in healthy subjects, cause symptoms that are similar to those presented by the patients themselves. Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the number of pre-clinical (in vitro and animal) studies aimed at evaluating the pharmacological activity or efficacy of some homeopathic remedies under potentially reproducible conditions. However, in addition to some contradictory results, these studies have also highlighted a series of methodological difficulties. The present study was designed to explore the possibility to test in a controlled way the effects of homeopathic remedies on two known experimental models of acute inflammation in the rat. To this aim, the study considered six different remedies indicated by homeopathic practice for this type of symptom in two experimental edema models (carrageenan- and autologous blood-induced edema), using two treatment administration routes (sub-plantar injection and oral administration). Methods In a first phase, the different remedies were tested in the four experimental conditions, following a single-blind (measurement) procedure. In a second phase, some of the remedies (in the same and in different dilutions) were tested by oral administration in the carrageenan-induced edema, under double-blind (treatment administration and measurement) and fully randomized conditions. Seven-hundred-twenty male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 170–180 g were used. Six homeopathic remedies (Arnica montana D4, Apis mellifica D4, D30, Atropa belladonna D4, Hamamelis virginiana D4, Lachesis D6, D30, Phosphorus D6, D30), saline and indomethacin were tested. Edema was measured using a water-based plethysmometer, before and at different times after edema induction. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Student t test. Results In the first phase of experiments, some

  8. Rat models of acute inflammation: a randomized controlled study on the effects of homeopathic remedies.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Anita; Bellavite, Paolo; Bertani, Simone; Chiarotti, Flavia; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Raschetti, Roberto

    2007-01-17

    One of the cardinal principles of homeopathy is the "law of similarities", according to which patients can be treated by administering substances which, when tested in healthy subjects, cause symptoms that are similar to those presented by the patients themselves. Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the number of pre-clinical (in vitro and animal) studies aimed at evaluating the pharmacological activity or efficacy of some homeopathic remedies under potentially reproducible conditions. However, in addition to some contradictory results, these studies have also highlighted a series of methodological difficulties.The present study was designed to explore the possibility to test in a controlled way the effects of homeopathic remedies on two known experimental models of acute inflammation in the rat. To this aim, the study considered six different remedies indicated by homeopathic practice for this type of symptom in two experimental edema models (carrageenan- and autologous blood-induced edema), using two treatment administration routes (sub-plantar injection and oral administration). In a first phase, the different remedies were tested in the four experimental conditions, following a single-blind (measurement) procedure. In a second phase, some of the remedies (in the same and in different dilutions) were tested by oral administration in the carrageenan-induced edema, under double-blind (treatment administration and measurement) and fully randomized conditions. Seven-hundred-twenty male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 170-180 g were used. Six homeopathic remedies (Arnica montana D4, Apis mellifica D4, D30, Atropa belladonna D4, Hamamelis virginiana D4, Lachesis D6, D30, Phosphorus D6, D30), saline and indomethacin were tested. Edema was measured using a water-based plethysmometer, before and at different times after edema induction. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Student t test. In the first phase of experiments, some statistically significant

  9. Homeopathic Prevention and Management of Epidemic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jennifer

    2018-05-12

     Homeopathy has been used to treat epidemic diseases since the time of Hahnemann, who used Belladonna to treat scarlet fever. Since then, several approaches using homeopathy for epidemic diseases have been proposed, including individualization, combination remedies, genus epidemicus, and isopathy.  The homeopathic research literature was searched to find examples of each of these approaches and to evaluate which were effective.  There is good experimental evidence for each of these approaches. While individualization is the gold standard, it is impractical to use on a widespread basis. Combination remedies can be effective but must be based on the symptoms of a given epidemic in a specific location. Treatment with genus epidemicus can also be successful if based on data from many practitioners. Finally, isopathy shows promise and might be more readily accepted by mainstream medicine due to its similarity to vaccination.  Several different homeopathic methods can be used to treat epidemic diseases. The challenge for the future is to refine these approaches and to build on the knowledge base with additional rigorous trials. If and when conventional medicine runs out of options for treating epidemic diseases, homeopathy could be seen as an attractive alternative, but only if there is viable experimental evidence of its success. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  10. Homeopathic medicinal products for preventing and treating acute respiratory tract infections in children.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Kate; van Driel, Mieke L; Buffington, Benjamin J; McGuire, Treasure M; King, David

    2018-04-09

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are common and may lead to complications. Most children experience between three and six ARTIs each year. Although these infections are self limiting, the symptoms can be distressing. Many treatments are used to control symptoms and shorten the duration of illness. They often have minimal benefit and may lead to adverse effects. Oral homeopathic medicinal products could play a role in the treatment of ARTIs for children if evidence for effectiveness is established. To assess the effectiveness and safety of oral homeopathic medicinal products compared with placebo or conventional therapy to prevent and treat acute respiratory tract infections in children. We searched CENTRAL (2017, Issue 11), which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Specialised Register, MEDLINE (1946 to 27 November 2017), Embase (2010 to 27 November 2017), CINAHL (1981 to 27 November 2017), AMED (1985 to December 2014), CAMbase (searched 29 March 2018), British Homeopathic Library (searched 26 June 2013 - no longer operating). We also searched the WHO ICTRP and ClinicalTrials.gov trials registers (29 March 2018), checked references, and contacted study authors to identify additional studies. Double-blind, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or double-blind cluster-RCTs comparing oral homeopathy medicinal products with identical placebo or self selected conventional treatments to prevent or treat ARTIs in children aged 0 to 16 years. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included eight RCTs of 1562 children receiving oral homeopathic medicinal products or a control treatment (placebo or conventional treatment) for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Four treatment studies examined the effect on recovery from URTIs, and four studies investigated the effect on preventing URTIs after one to three months of treatment and followed up for the remainder of the year. Two treatment and two prevention studies

  11. [Procedure for Latrodectus reproduction in the laboratory setting and the preparation of the first Russian matrix from its venom to manufacture homeopathic remedies with antiparasitic activity].

    PubMed

    Streliaeva, A V; Gasparian, E R; Polzikov, V V; Sagieva, A T; Lazareva, N B; Kurilov, D V; Chebyshev, N V; Sadykov, V M; Zuev, S S; Shcheglova, T A

    2012-01-01

    The investigation was undertaken to study the biology and ecology of Latrodectus, the possibilities of its importation to Russia from other countries, to breed Latrodectus in the laboratory setting, and to design the first homeopathic matrix of Latrodectus to manufacture homeopathic remedies. The authors were the first to devise a method for Latrodectus breeding in the laboratory setting of Moscow and its vicinities. The Latrodectus bred in the laboratory is suitable to manufacture drugs and in captivity they do not lose its biological activity. The authors were the first to prepare a homeopathic Latrodectus matrix for homeopathic medicines, by using the new Russian extragent petroleum. Chromatography mass spectrometry was used to identify more than a hundred chemical compounds in the Russian petroleum. The biological activity of the petroleum Latrodectus matrix for the manufacture of homeopathic remedies was highly competitive with that of the traditional Latrodectus venom matrix made using ethyl alcohol. The homeopathic Latrodectus matrix made using glycerol lost its biological activity because of glycerol. The biological activity of homeopathic matrixes made from Latrodectus inhabiting the USA, Uzbekistan, and the south of Russia and from that bred in the laboratory was studied. The homeopathic matrix made from the Latrodectus living in the Samarkand Region, Republic of Uzbekistan, has the highest biological activity.

  12. Rosacea Patient Perspectives on Homeopathic and Over-the-counter Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lucy; Kuo, Sandy; Huang, Karen E.; Taylor, Sarah L.; Feldman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rosacea patients commonly employ nonprescription therapies. The authors’ aim was to understand rosacea patients’ perceptions of over-the-counter products, complementary and alternative medicine, and homeopathic therapies. Method: A public, online discussion forum comprising 3,350 members and 27,051 posts provided a source of 346 posts on patient perceptions on alternative rosacea treatments. Results: Three major themes of nonprescription treatment were identified—motivation for use, patient-provider discussions, and experience with these treatments. Perceived medication failure, barriers to treatment, and distrust of physicians drive patients to seek nonprescription therapies. Still, patients prefer to consult a physician on incorporating nonprescription therapies into treatment. Complementary and alternative medicine natural products (19.4% of posts), complementary and alternative medicine practices (16.5%), and homeopathic medicine (3.8%) were commonly discussed. Conclusion: Physicians have an opportunity to be a trusted source of information on the strengths and weaknesses of skin care products and other complementary treatments for rosacea. PMID:26557217

  13. Arsenic content of homeopathic medicines

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kerr, H.D.; Saryan, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the widely held assumption that homeopathic medicines contain negligible quantities of their major ingredients, six such medicines labeled in Latin as containing arsenic were purchased over the counter and by mail order and their arsenic contents measured. Values determined were similar to those expected from label information in only two of six and were markedly at variance in the remaining four. Arsenic was present in notable quantities in two preparations. Most sales personnel interviewed could not identify arsenic as being an ingredient in these preparations and were therefore incapable of warning the general public of possiblemore » dangers from ingestion. No such warnings appeared on the labels.« less

  14. Additive homeopathy in cancer patients: Retrospective survival data from a homeopathic outpatient unit at the Medical University of Vienna.

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Katharina; Müllner, Michael; Friehs, Helmut; Schuster, Ernst; Marosi, Christine; Muchitsch, Ilse; Frass, Michael; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-04-01

    Current literature suggests a positive influence of additive classical homeopathy on global health and well-being in cancer patients. Besides encouraging case reports, there is little if any research on long-term survival of patients who obtain homeopathic care during cancer treatment. Data from cancer patients who had undergone homeopathic treatment complementary to conventional anti-cancer treatment at the Outpatient Unit for Homeopathy in Malignant Diseases, Medical University Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna, Austria, were collected, described and a retrospective subgroup-analysis with regard to survival time was performed. Patient inclusion criteria were at least three homeopathic consultations, fatal prognosis of disease, quantitative and qualitative description of patient characteristics, and survival time. In four years, a total of 538 patients were recorded to have visited the Outpatient Unit Homeopathy in Malignant Diseases, Medical University Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna, Austria. 62.8% of them were women, and nearly 20% had breast cancer. From the 53.7% (n=287) who had undergone at least three homeopathic consultations within four years, 18.7% (n=54) fulfilled inclusion criteria for survival analysis. The surveyed neoplasms were glioblastoma, lung, cholangiocellular and pancreatic carcinomas, metastasized sarcoma, and renal cell carcinoma. Median overall survival was compared to expert expectations of survival outcomes by specific cancer type and was prolonged across observed cancer entities (p<0.001). Extended survival time in this sample of cancer patients with fatal prognosis but additive homeopathic treatment is interesting. However, findings are based on a small sample, and with only limited data available about patient and treatment characteristics. The relationship between homeopathic treatment and survival time requires prospective investigation in larger samples possibly using matched-pair control analysis or randomized

  15. The anticancer homeopathic composite "Canova Method" is not genotoxic for human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Igor C; Lima, Patrícia D L; Cardoso, Plínio C S; Khayat, André S; Bahia, Marcelo O; Buchi, Dorli de Freitas; Cabral, Isabel R; Burbano, Rommel R

    2003-06-30

    The Canova Method (CM) is a homeopathic medicine indicated for the treatment of patients with cancer and for pathologies that involve a depressed immune system, such as AIDS. This product is composed of homeopathic dilutions of Aconitum napellus, Arsenicum album (arsenic trioxide), Bryonia alba, Lachesis muta venom and Thuya occidentalis. It stimulates the immune system by activating macrophages. Activated macrophages stimulate the lymphocytes so that they increase their cytotoxic action in response to tumoral growth or infection. Given that the CM stimulates and accelerates the activity of macrophages and lymphocytes, we evaluated genotoxic effects induced in human lymphocytes treated with this homeopathic medication in vitro. Structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations were scored for the assessment of induced genotoxic effects, while the variation in mitotic index was considered as a monitor for induced cellular toxicity. The lymphocytes were cultivated for 24, 48 or 72 h in the following final concentrations of the medicinal composite CM: 4, 8 and 12%. Treatments with the CM did not affect mitotic indexes, nor did they provoke chromosomal aberrations, when compared with untreated controls. There was no cytotoxicity or genotoxicity at the chromosomal level.

  16. A placebo controlled clinical trial investigating the efficacy of a homeopathic after-bite gel in reducing mosquito bite induced erythema.

    PubMed

    Hill, N; Stam, C; Tuinder, S; van Haselen, R A

    1995-01-01

    A randomised, placebo controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the efficacy of a homeopathic after-bite gel in the symptomatic relief of mosquito bites. Sixty eight healthy volunteers were bitten under laboratory conditions by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes at three spots, on the ventral aspect of the forearm. One bite was treated with the homeopathic after-bite gel, another bite with a placebo gel which was identical in appearance and smell to the homeopathic after-bite gel, and the third bite remained untreated. Immediately after the bites and 1, 3, 6, 26 and 31 hours post-bite, the length and width of the erythema were measured with a calliper, and photographs were taken of the bite sites from which the size of the erythema was subsequently determined. This was followed by assessment of the extent of itching with a verbal analogue scale, and finally treatment took place. For each spot the total erythema was calculated as the area under the plotted curve of the erythema at different time points (mm2*h) and the total sum of the itch scores was determined. For the bites treated with the homeopathic after-bite gel the median total erythema was 10.500 mm2*h. For the spots treated with the placebo gel and the untreated spots the median total erythema was 12.900 mm2*h and 13.300 mm2*h, respectively. The difference between the spots treated with the homeopathic after-bite gel and the untreated spots came close to significance (two-tailed P = 0.06), which was not the case for the difference between the spots treated with the homeopathic after-bite gel and the spots treated with placebo gel (P = 0.13). After pooling the data of a very similar previous pilot study and the present study (ntotal = 83), the homeopathic after-bite gel was significantly superior to no treatment (two-tailed P = 0.003) as well as to placebo gel (two-tailed P = 0.03). Comparing itching after the three treatments, no significant differences could be demonstrated. The extent of itching was

  17. The role of Abraham Lincoln in securing a charter for a homeopathic medical college.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Allen D; Kavaler, Florence

    2002-10-01

    In 1854, Abraham Lincoln was retained to prepare a state legislative proposal to charter a homeopathic medical college in Chicago. This was a complex task in view of the deep-seated animosity between allopathic or orthodox medical practitioners and irregular healers. Homeopathy was regarded as a cult by the nascent American Medical Association. In addition, the poor reputation of medical education in the United States in general, further complicated the project. Lincoln and influential individuals in Illinois lobbied legislators and succeeded in securing the charter. Subsequently, the Hahnemann Homeopathic Medical College accepted its first class in 1860 and with its successors remained in existence for almost sixty-five years.

  18. Homeopathic Treatment of Vitiligo: A Report of Fourteen Cases.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Seema; Mallappa, Mahesh; Tsintzas, Dionysios; Vithoulkas, George

    2017-12-02

    BACKGROUND Vitiligo, also known as leukoderma, is an autoimmune skin condition that results in the loss of melanin pigment. Vitiligo is not a rare condition but is difficult to treat and is associated with psychological distress. CASE REPORT A series of 14 cases of vitiligo are presented that were treated with individualized homeopathic remedies that were based on plant, animal, or mineral compounds. There were 13 women and one man in the case series, with a mean age 29.8 years, and a mean follow-up from treatment of 58 months. The mean time between the onset of the appearance of vitiligo and the first consultation at our clinic was 96 months. Homeopathic treatment for patients is holistic and was performed on an individualized basis as described in this case series. Photographic images of the skin are presented before and after treatment. CONCLUSIONS In 14 patients with vitiligo treated with individualized homeopathy, the best results were achieved in the patients who were treated in the early stages of the disease. We believe that homeopathy may be effective in the early stages of vitiligo, but large controlled clinical studies are needed in this area.

  19. Assays of homeopathic remedies in rodent behavioural and psychopathological models.

    PubMed

    Bellavite, Paolo; Magnani, Paolo; Marzotto, Marta; Conforti, Anita

    2009-10-01

    The first part of this paper reviews the effects of homeopathic remedies on several models of anxiety-like behaviours developed and described in rodents. The existing literature in this field comprises some fifteen exploratory studies, often published in non-indexed and non-peer-reviewed journals. Only a few results have been confirmed by multiple laboratories, and concern Ignatia, Gelsemium, Chamomilla (in homeopathic dilutions/potencies). Nevertheless, there are some interesting results pointing to the possible efficacy of other remedies, and confirming a statistically significant effect of high dilutions of neurotrophic molecules and antibodies. In the second part of this paper we report some recent results obtained in our laboratory, testing Aconitum, Nux vomica, Belladonna, Argentum nitricum, Tabacum (all 5CH potency) and Gelsemium (5, 7, 9 and 30CH potencies) on mice using ethological models of behaviour. The test was performed using coded drugs and controls in double blind (operations and calculations). After an initial screening that showed all the tested remedies (except for Belladonna) to have some effects on the behavioural parameters (light-dark test and open-field test), but with high experimental variability, we focused our study on Gelsemium, and carried out two complete series of experiments. The results showed that Gelsemium had several effects on the exploratory behaviour of mice, which in some models were highly statistically significant (p < 0.001), in all the dilutions/dynamizations used, but with complex differences according to the experimental conditions and test performed. Finally, some methodological issues of animal research in this field of homeopathy are discussed. The "Gelsemium model" - encompassing experimental studies in vitro and in vivo from different laboratories and with different methods, including significant effects of its major active principle gelsemine - may play a pivotal rule for investigations on other homeopathic

  20. Physicochemical Investigations of Homeopathic Preparations: A Systematic Review and Bibliometric Analysis-Part 1.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sabine D; Würtenberger, Sandra; Wolf, Ursula; Baumgartner, Stephan; Tournier, Alexander

    2018-05-01

    The last systematic review of physicochemical research performed on homeopathic preparations was published in 2003. The aim of the study is to update and expand the current state of knowledge in the area of physicochemical properties of homeopathic preparations. In part 1 of the study, we aim to present an overview of the literature with respect to publication quality and methods used. In part 2, we aim to identify the most interesting experimental techniques. With this, we aim to be in a position to generate meaningful hypotheses regarding a possible mode of action of homeopathic preparations. A two-step procedure was adopted: (1) an extensive literature search, followed by a bibliometric and quality analysis on the level of publications and (2) a thorough qualitative analysis of the individual physicochemical investigations found. In this publication, we report on step (1). We searched major scientific databases to find publications reporting physicochemical investigations of homeopathy from its origin to the end of 2015. Publications were assessed using a scoring scheme, the Manuscript Information Score (MIS). Information regarding country of origin of the research and experimental techniques used was extracted. We identified 183 publications (compared to 44 in the last review), 122 of which had an MIS ≥5. The rate of publication in the field was ∼2 per year from the 1970s until 2000. Afterward, it increased to over 5.5 publications per year. The quality of publications was seen to increase sharply from 2000 onward, whereas before 2000, only 12 (13%) publications were rated as "high quality" (MIS ≥7.5); 44 (48%) publications were rated as "high quality" from 2000 onward. Countries with most publications were Germany (n = 42, 23%), France (n = 29, 16%), India (n = 27, 15%), and Italy (n = 26, 14%). Techniques most frequently used were electrical impedance (26%), analytical methods (20%), spectroscopy (20%), and nuclear magnetic resonance (19

  1. Physicochemical Investigations of Homeopathic Preparations: A Systematic Review and Bibliometric Analysis—Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Sabine D.; Würtenberger, Sandra; Wolf, Ursula; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The last systematic review of physicochemical research performed on homeopathic preparations was published in 2003. The aim of the study is to update and expand the current state of knowledge in the area of physicochemical properties of homeopathic preparations. In part 1 of the study, we aim to present an overview of the literature with respect to publication quality and methods used. In part 2, we aim to identify the most interesting experimental techniques. With this, we aim to be in a position to generate meaningful hypotheses regarding a possible mode of action of homeopathic preparations. Methods: A two-step procedure was adopted: (1) an extensive literature search, followed by a bibliometric and quality analysis on the level of publications and (2) a thorough qualitative analysis of the individual physicochemical investigations found. In this publication, we report on step (1). We searched major scientific databases to find publications reporting physicochemical investigations of homeopathy from its origin to the end of 2015. Publications were assessed using a scoring scheme, the Manuscript Information Score (MIS). Information regarding country of origin of the research and experimental techniques used was extracted. Results: We identified 183 publications (compared to 44 in the last review), 122 of which had an MIS ≥5. The rate of publication in the field was ∼2 per year from the 1970s until 2000. Afterward, it increased to over 5.5 publications per year. The quality of publications was seen to increase sharply from 2000 onward, whereas before 2000, only 12 (13%) publications were rated as “high quality” (MIS ≥7.5); 44 (48%) publications were rated as “high quality” from 2000 onward. Countries with most publications were Germany (n = 42, 23%), France (n = 29, 16%), India (n = 27, 15%), and Italy (n = 26, 14%). Techniques most frequently used were electrical impedance (26%), analytical methods (20

  2. Homeopathic medications as clinical alternatives for symptomatic care of acute otitis media and upper respiratory infections in children.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to "first do no harm" in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children.

  3. Can the caged bird sing? Reflections on the application of qualitative research methods to case study design in homeopathic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Trevor DB

    2004-01-01

    Background Two main pathways exist for the development of knowledge in clinical homeopathy. These comprise clinical trials conducted primarily by university-based researchers and cases reports and homeopathic "provings" compiled by engaged homeopathic practitioners. In this paper the relative merits of these methods are examined and a middle way proposed. This consists of the "Formal Case Study" (FCS) in which qualitative methods are used to increase the rigour and sophistication with which homeopathic cases are studied. Before going into design issues this paper places the FCS in an historical and academic context and describes the relative merits of the method. Discussion Like any research, the FCS should have a clear focus. This focus can be both "internal", grounded in the discourse of homeopathy and also encompass issues of wider appeal. A selection of possible "internal" and "external" research questions is introduced. Data generation should be from multiple sources to ensure adequate triangulation. This could include the recording and transcription of actual consultations. Analysis is built around existing theory, involves cross-case comparison and the search for deviant cases. The trustworthiness of conclusions is ensured by the application of concepts from qualitative research including triangulation, groundedness, respondent validation and reflexivity. Though homeopathic case studies have been reported in mainstream literature, none has used formal qualitative methods – though some such studies are in progress. Summary This paper introduces the reader to a new strategy for homeopathic research. This strategy, termed the "formal case study", allows for a naturalistic enquiry into the players, processes and outcomes of homeopathic practice. Using ideas from qualitative research, it allows a rigorous approach to types of research question that cannot typically be addressed through clinical trials and numeric outcome studies. The FCS provides an opportunity

  4. Prospective Evaluation of Few Homeopathic Rubrics of Kent's Repertory From Bayesian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Koley, Munmun; Saha, Subhranil; Das, Kaushik Deb; Roy, Sushabhan; Goenka, Rachna; Chowdhury, Pulak Roy; Hait, Himangsu; Bhattacharyya, Chapal Kanti; Sadhukhan, Sanjoy Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Absolute grading system of homeopathic repertories poses substantial threat to reliability; however, it may be resolved by evaluating rubrics prospectively using likelihood ratio (LR). The authors evaluated few "physical general" rubrics from Kent's repertory-"chilly," "hot," "ambithermal," "preference for hot/cold food," "desire/aversion for fish/egg/meat/sour/pungent/salt/sweet/bitter"-prospectively in West Bengal, India, for 1.5 years using the Outcome Related to Impact on Daily Living scale. Per symptom/rubric, LRs < 1.5 were discarded. A total of 2039 encounters were analyzed for thermal relations and 4715 for desires/aversions for specific food items. Comparison with Kent's repertory revealed discrepancies. One new rubric with corresponding medicines was suggested to be introduced, new entries of medicines were recommended, and some seemed to maintain their ascribed importance. The authors refrained from converting LRs into typefaces prematurely; still they propose introducing LR to repertories for a structural update, changing its use, and enabling homeopaths to make more reliable predictions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Evaluation of homeopathic Arnica montana for ecchymosis after upper blepharoplasty: a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Kotlus, Brett S; Heringer, Dustin M; Dryden, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    Ecchymosis is commonly encountered after upper eyelid blepharoplasty. The use of homeopathic preparations of Arnica montana, a flowering herb, has been advocated by physicians, patients, and manufacturers for reduction of postsurgical ecchymosis. The authors evaluate its efficacy after upper eyelid blepharoplasty. A prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was performed in which patients were randomly assigned to the administration of homeopathic A. montana or placebo concurrent with unilateral upper eyelid blepharoplasty followed by contralateral treatment at least 1 month later. Ecchymosis was evaluated at days 3 and 7 by rank order of severity and measurement of surface area of observable ecchymosis. There was no statistically significant difference in area of ecchymosis or rank order of ecchymosis severity for days 3 and 7 after treatment with A. montana versus placebo. Additionally, there was no difference in ease of recovery per patient report, and there was no difference in the rate of ecchymosis resolution. The authors find no evidence that homeopathic A. montana, as used in this study, is beneficial in the reduction or the resolution of ecchymosis after upper eyelid blepharoplasty.

  6. Effects of Homeopathic Medicines on Polysomnographic Sleep of Young Adults with Histories of Coffee-Related Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Iris R.; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Aickin, Mikel; Baldwin, Carol M.; Bootzin, Richard R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Homeopathy, a common form of alternative medicine worldwide, relies on subjective patient reports for diagnosis and treatment. Polysomnography offers a modern methodology for evaluating the objective effects of taking homeopathic remedies that clinicians claim exert effects on sleep quality in susceptible individuals. Animal studies have previously shown changes in non rapid eye movement sleep with certain homeopathic remedies. Methods Young adults of both sexes (ages 18–31) with above-average scores on standardized personality scales for either cynical hostility or anxiety sensitivity (but not both), and a history of coffee-induced insomnia, participated in the month-long study. At-home polysomnographic recordings were obtained on successive pairs of nights once per week for a total of eight recordings (nights 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23). Subjects (N=54) received placebo pellets on night 8 (single-blind) and verum pellets on night 22 (double-blind) in 30c doses of one of two homeopathic remedies, Nux Vomica or Coffea Cruda. Subjects completed daily morning sleep diaries and weekly Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scales, as well as Profile of Mood States Scales at bedtime on polysomnography nights. Results Verum remedies significantly increased PSG total sleep time and NREM, as well as awakenings and stage changes. Changes in actigraphic and self-rated scale effects were not significant. Conclusions The study demonstrated the feasibility of using in-home all-night sleep recordings to study homeopathic remedy effects. Findings are similar though not identical to those reported in animals with the same remedies. Possible mechanisms include initial disruption of the nonlinear dynamics of sleep patterns by the verum remedies. PMID:20673648

  7. Remission of Schizoaffective Disorder Using Homeopathic Medicine: 2 Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Grise, Diane E; Peyman, Tara; Langland, Jeffrey

    2018-03-01

    Context • Research on the schizophrenia spectrum is primarily focused on pharmaceutical interventions, although alternative treatments have been gaining increasing popularity in recent years because patients are seeking treatments that are effective and have reduced side effects. A significant body of evidence already exists supporting the effectiveness of homeopathy to treat a wide array of illnesses. Objective • The research team intended to demonstrate the need for using both alternative and conventional treatments to improve clinical outcomes in the treatment of schizoaffective disorder. Design • The research team performed 2 case studies. Setting • The study took place at Arizona Natural Health Center (Tempe, AZ, USA), an outpatient clinic where Dr Tara Peyman worked as a naturopathic doctor from 2008 to 2014. Participants • The participants were a 23-y-old female (case 1) and a 34-y-old female (case 2), both of whom had been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder of the bipolar type. Intervention • Individualized homeopathic treatment was initiated for the 2 patients, who previously had received medication of atypical antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Outcome Measures • A Likert scale was used to evaluate the intensity of each patient's symptoms at each follow-up, based on self-reporting, using a scale from 1 to 10, with a score of 10 being the highest. Results • During the course of treatment, both patients' symptoms normalized, and they regained their ability to hold jobs, attend school, and maintain healthy relationships with their families and partners while requiring fewer pharmaceutical interventions. Conclusions • The 2 current case reports demonstrate a successful integrative approach to the treatment of schizoaffective disorder. They illustrate the value of individualized homeopathic prescriptions with proper case management in the successful treatment of that disorder. Future large-scale, double-blind, placebo

  8. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  9. Homeopathic Medications as Clinical Alternatives for Symptomatic Care of Acute Otitis Media and Upper Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to “first do no harm” in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children. PMID:24381823

  10. Effect of homeopathic Arnica montana on bruising in face-lifts: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Brook M; Denton, Andrew B; Ahn, Min S; Maas, Corey S

    2006-01-01

    To design a model for performing reproducible, objective analyses of skin color changes and to apply this model to evaluate the efficacy of homeopathic Arnica montana as an antiecchymotic agent when taken perioperatively. Twenty-nine patients undergoing rhytidectomy at a tertiary care center were treated perioperatively with either homeopathic A. montana or placebo in a double-blind fashion. Postoperative photographs were analyzed using a novel computer model for color changes, and subjective assessments of postoperative ecchymosis were obtained. No subjective differences were noted between the treatment group and the control group, either by the patients or by the professional staff. No objective difference in the degree of color change was found. Patients receiving homeopathic A. montana were found to have a smaller area of ecchymosis on postoperative days 1, 5, 7, and 10. These differences were statistically significant (P<.05) only on postoperative days 1 (P<.005) and 7 (P<.001). This computer model provides an efficient, objective, and reproducible means with which to assess perioperative color changes, both in terms of area and degree. Patients taking perioperative homeopathic A. montana exhibited less ecchymosis, and that difference was statistically significant (P<.05) on 2 of the 4 postoperative data points evaluated.

  11. Lack of efficacy of homeopathic therapy against post-calving clinical mastitis in dairy herds in the Waikato region of New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Williamson, J H; Lacy-Hulbert, S J

    2014-01-01

    To compare clinical and bacteriological cure rates of clinical mastitis following treatment with either antimicrobials or homeopathic preparations. Seven spring-calving herds from the Waikato region of New Zealand were used to source cases of clinical mastitis (n = 263 glands) during the first 90 days following calving. Duplicate milk samples were collected for bacteriology from each clinically infected gland at diagnosis and 25 (SD 5.3) days after initial treatment. Affected glands were treated with either an antimicrobial formulation or a homeopathic remedy. Generalised linear models with binomial error distribution and logit link were used to analyse the proportion of cows that were clinical treatment cures and the proportion of glands that were classified as bacteriological cures, based on initial and post-treatment milk samples. Mean cumulative incidence of clinical mastitis was 7% (range 2-13% across herds) of cows. Streptococcus uberis was the most common pathogen isolated from culture-positive samples from affected glands (140/209; 67%). The clinical cure rate was higher for cows treated with antimicrobials (107/113; 95%) than for cows treated with homeopathic remedies (72/114; 63%) (p < 0.001) based on the observance of clinical signs following initial treatment. Across all pathogen types bacteriological cure rate at gland level was higher for those cows treated with antimicrobials (75/102; 74%) than for those treated with a homeopathic preparation (39/107; 36%) (p < 0.001). Using herds located in the Waikato region of New Zealand, homeopathic remedies had significantly lower clinical and bacteriological cure rates compared with antimicrobials when used to treat post-calving clinical mastitis where S. uberis was the most common pathogen. The proportion of cows that needed retreatment was significantly higher for the homeopathic treated cows. This, combined with lower bacteriological cure rates, has implications for duration of infection

  12. Homeopathic Treatment of Vitiligo: A Report of Fourteen Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, Seema; Mallappa, Mahesh; Tsintzas, Dionysios; Vithoulkas, George

    2017-01-01

    Case series Patient: — Final Diagnosis: — Symptoms: Skin lesions Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Dermatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Vitiligo, also known as leukoderma, is an autoimmune skin condition that results in the loss of melanin pigment. Vitiligo is not a rare condition but is difficult to treat and is associated with psychological distress. Case Reports: A series of 14 cases of vitiligo are presented that were treated with individualized homeopathic remedies that were based on plant, animal, or mineral compounds. There were 13 women and one man in the case series, with a mean age 29.8 years, and a mean follow-up from treatment of 58 months. The mean time between the onset of the appearance of vitiligo and the first consultation at our clinic was 96 months. Homeopathic treatment for patients is holistic and was performed on an individualized basis as described in this case series. Photographic images of the skin are presented before and after treatment. Conclusions: In 14 patients with vitiligo treated with individualized homeopathy, the best results were achieved in the patients who were treated in the early stages of the disease. We believe that homeopathy may be effective in the early stages of vitiligo, but large controlled clinical studies are needed in this area. PMID:29196612

  13. Homeopathic arnica for prevention of pain and bruising: randomized placebo-controlled trial in hand surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stevinson, C; Devaraj, V S; Fountain-Barber, A; Hawkins, S; Ernst, E

    2003-01-01

    Homeopathic arnica is widely believed to control bruising, reduce swelling and promote recovery after local trauma; many patients therefore take it perioperatively. To determine whether this treatment has any effect, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial with three parallel arms. 64 adults undergoing elective surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome were randomized to take three tablets daily of homeopathic arnica 30C or 6C or placebo for seven days before surgery and fourteen days after surgery. Primary outcome measures were pain (short form McGill Pain Questionnaire) and bruising (colour separation analysis) at four days after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were swelling (wrist circumference) and use of analgesic medication (patient diary). 62 patients could be included in the intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences on the primary outcome measures of pain (P=0.79) and bruising (P=0.45) at day four. Swelling and use of analgesic medication also did not differ between arnica and placebo groups. Adverse events were reported by 2 patients in the arnica 6C group, 3 in the placebo group and 4 in the arnica 30C group. The results of this trial do not suggest that homeopathic arnica has an advantage over placebo in reducing postoperative pain, bruising and swelling in patients undergoing elective hand surgery. PMID:12562974

  14. Homeopathic arnica for prevention of pain and bruising: randomized placebo-controlled trial in hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Devaraj, V S; Fountain-Barber, A; Hawkins, S; Ernst, E

    2003-02-01

    Homeopathic arnica is widely believed to control bruising, reduce swelling and promote recovery after local trauma; many patients therefore take it perioperatively. To determine whether this treatment has any effect, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial with three parallel arms. 64 adults undergoing elective surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome were randomized to take three tablets daily of homeopathic arnica 30C or 6C or placebo for seven days before surgery and fourteen days after surgery. Primary outcome measures were pain (short form McGill Pain Questionnaire) and bruising (colour separation analysis) at four days after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were swelling (wrist circumference) and use of analgesic medication (patient diary). 62 patients could be included in the intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences on the primary outcome measures of pain (P=0.79) and bruising (P=0.45) at day four. Swelling and use of analgesic medication also did not differ between arnica and placebo groups. Adverse events were reported by 2 patients in the arnica 6C group, 3 in the placebo group and 4 in the arnica 30C group. The results of this trial do not suggest that homeopathic arnica has an advantage over placebo in reducing postoperative pain, bruising and swelling in patients undergoing elective hand surgery.

  15. Randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trial shows no benefit of homeopathic mastitis treatment in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Fanny; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Simons, Julia; Pieper, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Mastitis is one of the most common diseases in dairy production, and homeopathic remedies have been used increasingly in recent years to treat it. Clinical trials evaluating homeopathy have often been criticized for their inadequate scientific approach. The objective of this triple-blind, randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of homeopathic treatment in bovine clinical mastitis. The study was conducted on a conventionally managed dairy farm between June 2013 and May 2014. Dairy cows with acute mastitis were randomly allocated to homeopathy (n = 70) or placebo (n = 92), for a total of 162 animals. The homeopathic treatment was selected based on clinical symptoms but most commonly consisted of a combination of nosodes with Streptococcinum, Staphylococcinum, Pyrogenium, and Escherichia coli at a potency of 200c. Treatment was administered to cows in the homeopathy group at least once per day for an average of 5 d. The cows in the placebo group were treated similarly, using a placebo preparation instead (lactose globules without active ingredients). If necessary, we also used allopathic drugs (e.g., antibiotics, udder creams, and anti-inflammatory drugs) in both groups. We recorded data relating to the clinical signs of mastitis, treatment, time to recovery, milk yield, somatic cell count at first milk recording after mastitis, and culling. We observed cows for up to 200 d after clinical recovery. Base-level data did not differ between the homeopathy and placebo groups. Mastitis lasted for an average of 6 d in both groups. We observed no significant differences in time to recovery, somatic cell count, risk of clinical cure within 14 d after disease occurrence, mastitis recurrence risk, or culling risk. The results indicated no additional effect of homeopathic treatment compared with placebo. The advantages or disadvantages of homeopathy should be carefully assessed for individual farms. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by

  16. A model for homeopathic remedy effects: low dose nanoparticles, allostatic cross-adaptation, and time-dependent sensitization in a complex adaptive system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper proposes a novel model for homeopathic remedy action on living systems. Research indicates that homeopathic remedies (a) contain measurable source and silica nanoparticles heterogeneously dispersed in colloidal solution; (b) act by modulating biological function of the allostatic stress response network (c) evoke biphasic actions on living systems via organism-dependent adaptive and endogenously amplified effects; (d) improve systemic resilience. Discussion The proposed active components of homeopathic remedies are nanoparticles of source substance in water-based colloidal solution, not bulk-form drugs. Nanoparticles have unique biological and physico-chemical properties, including increased catalytic reactivity, protein and DNA adsorption, bioavailability, dose-sparing, electromagnetic, and quantum effects different from bulk-form materials. Trituration and/or liquid succussions during classical remedy preparation create “top-down” nanostructures. Plants can biosynthesize remedy-templated silica nanostructures. Nanoparticles stimulate hormesis, a beneficial low-dose adaptive response. Homeopathic remedies prescribed in low doses spaced intermittently over time act as biological signals that stimulate the organism’s allostatic biological stress response network, evoking nonlinear modulatory, self-organizing change. Potential mechanisms include time-dependent sensitization (TDS), a type of adaptive plasticity/metaplasticity involving progressive amplification of host responses, which reverse direction and oscillate at physiological limits. To mobilize hormesis and TDS, the remedy must be appraised as a salient, but low level, novel threat, stressor, or homeostatic disruption for the whole organism. Silica nanoparticles adsorb remedy source and amplify effects. Properly-timed remedy dosing elicits disease-primed compensatory reversal in direction of maladaptive dynamics of the allostatic network, thus promoting resilience and recovery from

  17. A model for homeopathic remedy effects: low dose nanoparticles, allostatic cross-adaptation, and time-dependent sensitization in a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Koithan, Mary

    2012-10-22

    This paper proposes a novel model for homeopathic remedy action on living systems. Research indicates that homeopathic remedies (a) contain measurable source and silica nanoparticles heterogeneously dispersed in colloidal solution; (b) act by modulating biological function of the allostatic stress response network (c) evoke biphasic actions on living systems via organism-dependent adaptive and endogenously amplified effects; (d) improve systemic resilience. The proposed active components of homeopathic remedies are nanoparticles of source substance in water-based colloidal solution, not bulk-form drugs. Nanoparticles have unique biological and physico-chemical properties, including increased catalytic reactivity, protein and DNA adsorption, bioavailability, dose-sparing, electromagnetic, and quantum effects different from bulk-form materials. Trituration and/or liquid succussions during classical remedy preparation create "top-down" nanostructures. Plants can biosynthesize remedy-templated silica nanostructures. Nanoparticles stimulate hormesis, a beneficial low-dose adaptive response. Homeopathic remedies prescribed in low doses spaced intermittently over time act as biological signals that stimulate the organism's allostatic biological stress response network, evoking nonlinear modulatory, self-organizing change. Potential mechanisms include time-dependent sensitization (TDS), a type of adaptive plasticity/metaplasticity involving progressive amplification of host responses, which reverse direction and oscillate at physiological limits. To mobilize hormesis and TDS, the remedy must be appraised as a salient, but low level, novel threat, stressor, or homeostatic disruption for the whole organism. Silica nanoparticles adsorb remedy source and amplify effects. Properly-timed remedy dosing elicits disease-primed compensatory reversal in direction of maladaptive dynamics of the allostatic network, thus promoting resilience and recovery from disease. Homeopathic

  18. Bleeding risks of herbal, homeopathic, and dietary supplements: a hidden nightmare for plastic surgeons?

    PubMed

    Wong, Wendy W; Gabriel, Allen; Maxwell, G Patrick; Gupta, Subhas C

    2012-03-01

    The utilization of complementary and alternative medicine has increased tremendously in the last two decades. Herbal products, homeopathic medicines, and dietary supplements are extremely popular and are available without a prescription (which likely contributes to their popularity). Despite their "natural" characteristics, these remedies have the potential to cause bleeding in patients who undergo surgery. The high use of these supplements among cosmetic surgery patients, coupled with increasing reports of hematomas associated with herbal and homeopathic medicines, prompted the authors to conduct a comprehensive review focused on bleeding risks of such products in an effort to raise awareness among plastic surgeons. This review focuses on 19 herbs, three herbal formulas, two herbal teas, and several other supplements that can cause bleeding perioperatively and postoperatively. In addition to being aware of such adverse effects, plastic surgeons must adequately screen all patients and educate them on the possible dangers associated with these treatments.

  19. Effects of homeopathic preparations on human prostate cancer growth in cellular and animal models.

    PubMed

    MacLaughlin, Brian W; Gutsmuths, Babett; Pretner, Ewald; Jonas, Wayne B; Ives, John; Kulawardane, Don Victor; Amri, Hakima

    2006-12-01

    The use of dietary supplements for various ailments enjoys unprecedented popularity. As part of this trend, Sabal serrulata (saw palmetto) constitutes the complementary treatment of choice with regard to prostate health. In homeopathy, Sabal serrulata is commonly prescribed for prostate problems ranging from benign prostatic hyperplasia to prostate cancer. The authors' work assessed the antiproliferative effects of homeopathic preparations of Sabal serrulata, Thuja occidentalis, and Conium maculatum, in vivo, on nude mouse xenografts, and in vitro, on PC-3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer as well as MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines. Treatment with Sabal serrulata in vitro resulted in a 33% decrease of PC-3 cell proliferation at 72 hours and a 23% reduction of DU-145 cell proliferation at 24 hours (P<.01). The difference in reduction is likely due to the specific doubling time of each cell line. No effect was observed on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Thuja occidentalis and Conium maculatum did not have any effect on human prostate cancer cell proliferation. In vivo, prostate tumor xenograft size was significantly reduced in Sabal serrulata-treated mice compared to untreated controls (P=.012). No effect was observed on breast tumor growth. Our study clearly demonstrates a biologic response to homeopathic treatment as manifested by cell proliferation and tumor growth. This biologic effect was (i)significantly stronger to Sabal serrulata than to controls and (ii)specific to human prostate cancer. Sabal serrulata should thus be further investigated as a specific homeopathic remedy for prostate pathology.

  20. Gas discharge visualization evaluation of ultramolecular doses of homeopathic medicines under blinded, controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Lewis, Daniel A; Brooks, Audrey J; Lewis, Sabrina E; Schwartz, Gary E

    2003-02-01

    To determine the feasibility of using a computerized biophysical method, gas discharge visualization (GDV), to differentiate ultramolecular doses of homeopathic remedies from solvent controls and from each other. Blinded, randomized assessment of four split samples each of 30c potencies of three homeopathic remedies from different kingdoms, for example, Natrum muriaticum (mineral), Pulsatilla (plant), and Lachesis (animal), dissolved in a 20% alcohol-water solvent versus two different control solutions (that is, solvent with untreated lactose/sucrose pellets and unsuccussed solvent alone). GDV measurements, involving application of a brief electrical impulse at four different voltage levels, were performed over 10 successive images on each of 10 drops from each bottle (total 400 images per test solution per voltage). The dependent variables were the quantified image characteristics of the liquid drops (form coefficient, area, and brightness) from the resultant burst of electron-ion emission and optical radiation in the visual and ultraviolet ranges. The procedure generated measurable images at the two highest voltage levels. At 17 kV, the remedies exhibited overall lower image parameter values compared with solvents (significant for Pulsatilla and Lachesis), as well as differences from solvents in fluctuations over repeated images (exposures to the same voltage). At 24 kV, other patterns emerged, with individual remedies showing higher or lower image parameters compared with other remedies and the solvent controls. GDV technology may provide an electromagnetic probe into the properties of homeopathic remedies as distinguished from solvent controls. However, the present findings also highlight the need for additional research to evaluate factors that may affect reproducibility of results.

  1. Physiotherapy and a Homeopathic Complex for Chronic Low-back Pain Due to Osteoarthritis: A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Mary; Pellow, Janice; Solomon, Elizabeth Margaret; Tsele-Tebakang, Tebogo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of chronic low-back pain (CLBP) and can be managed with drug therapy and physiotherapy. Homeopathic remedies may assist managing OA; however, research that supports their effectiveness is limited. The study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a homeopathic complex in combination with physiotherapy in treating CLBP due to OA. The study was a 6-wk, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot. The study took place in a private physiotherapy practice in Gauteng, South Africa. The participants were 30 males and females, aged 45-75 y, who were receiving physiotherapy treatment for OA of the lumbar spine from a therapist in private practice. The intervention and control groups both received standard physiotherapy treatment-massage, thermal therapy, and joint mobilization-every 2 wk. In addition, the treatment group received a homeopathic complex-6cH each of Arnica montana, Bryonia alba, Causticum, Kalmia latifolia, Rhus toxicodendron, and Calcarea fluorica. The control group a received a placebo. The primary measure was a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Secondary outcome measures included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), an evaluation of each patient's range of motion (ROM) of the lumbar spine, and a determination of each patient's need for pain medication. Intergroup analysis revealed that the treatment group significantly outperformed the control group with regard to pain, daily functioning, and ROM. No difference existed between the groups, however, in the need for conventional pain medication. The study was too small to be conclusive, but results suggest the homeopathic complex, together with physiotherapy, can significantly improve symptoms associated with CLBP due to OA.

  2. Education in Homeopathic Medicine during the Biennium 1918-1920. Bulletin, 1921, No. 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, W. A.

    1921-01-01

    Education in the homeopathic schools of medicine is under the direct guidance of the American Institute of Homeopathy, and the requirements of the American Federation of State Medical Examiners Boards are fulfilled in all details, so that graduates may comply with the requirements of all the States and Territorial possessions. There were 45 more…

  3. Effects of homeopathic medications Eupatorium perfoliatum and Arsenicum album on parasitemia of Plasmodium berghei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Lira-Salazar, G; Marines-Montiel, E; Torres-Monzón, J; Hernández-Hernández, F; Salas-Benito, J S

    2006-10-01

    Malaria is one of the most important parasitic diseases in the world and a major public health problem because of emerging drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium. A number of synthetic and natural compounds are now being analysed to develop more effective antimalarial drugs. We investigated the effect of homeopathic preparations of Eupatorium perfoliatum and Arsenicum album on parasitemia using a rodent malaria model. We found significant inhibitory effect on parasite multiplication with both medications with a level of 60% for Eupatorium perfoliatum at a 30 CH potency. Arsenicum album 0/6 gave 70% inhibition but this was less stable than Eupatorium perfoliatum. The number of schizonts was higher in animals treated with homeopathic medications. Although the mechanism of action is unknown, these agents would be good candidates as alternative or complementary medications in the treatment of malaria.

  4. Nonlinear dynamical systems effects of homeopathic remedies on multiscale entropy and correlation dimension of slow wave sleep EEG in young adults with histories of coffee-induced insomnia.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Aickin, Mikel; Bootzin, Richard R; Brooks, Audrey J

    2012-07-01

    Investigators of homeopathy have proposed that nonlinear dynamical systems (NDS) and complex systems science offer conceptual and analytic tools for evaluating homeopathic remedy effects. Previous animal studies demonstrate that homeopathic medicines alter delta electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave sleep. The present study extended findings of remedy-related sleep stage alterations in human subjects by testing the feasibility of using two different NDS analytic approaches to assess remedy effects on human slow wave sleep EEG. Subjects (N=54) were young adult male and female college students with a history of coffee-related insomnia who participated in a larger 4-week study of the polysomnographic effects of homeopathic medicines on home-based all-night sleep recordings. Subjects took one bedtime dose of a homeopathic remedy (Coffea cruda or Nux vomica 30c). We computed multiscale entropy (MSE) and the correlation dimension (Mekler-D2) for stages 3 and 4 slow wave sleep EEG sampled in artifact-free 2-min segments during the first two rapid-eye-movement (REM) cycles for remedy and post-remedy nights, controlling for placebo and post-placebo night effects. MSE results indicate significant, remedy-specific directional effects, especially later in the night (REM cycle 2) (CC: remedy night increases and post-remedy night decreases in MSE at multiple sites for both stages 3 and 4 in both REM cycles; NV: remedy night decreases and post-remedy night increases, mainly in stage 3 REM cycle 2 MSE). D2 analyses yielded more sporadic and inconsistent findings. Homeopathic medicines Coffea cruda and Nux vomica in 30c potencies alter short-term nonlinear dynamic parameters of slow wave sleep EEG in healthy young adults. MSE may provide a more sensitive NDS analytic method than D2 for evaluating homeopathic remedy effects on human sleep EEG patterns. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonlinear Dynamical Systems Effects of Homeopathic Remedies on Multiscale Entropy and Correlation Dimension of Slow Wave Sleep EEG in Young Adults with Histories of Coffee-Induced Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Iris R.; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Aickin, Mikel; Bootzin, Richard R.; Brooks, Audrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Investigators of homeopathy have proposed that nonlinear dynamical systems (NDS) and complex systems science offer conceptual and analytic tools for evaluating homeopathic remedy effects. Previous animal studies demonstrate that homeopathic medicines alter delta electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave sleep. The present study extended findings of remedy-related sleep stage alterations in human subjects by testing the feasibility of using two different NDS analytic approaches to assess remedy effects on human slow wave sleep EEG. Methods Subjects (N=54) were young adult male and female college students with a history of coffee-related insomnia who participated in a larger 4-week study of the polysomnographic effects of homeopathic medicines on home-based all-night sleep recordings. Subjects took one bedtime dose of a homeopathic remedy (Coffea cruda or Nux vomica 30c). We computed multiscale entropy (MSE) and the correlation dimension (Mekler-D2) for stage 3 and 4 slow wave sleep EEG sampled in artifact-free 2-minute segments during the first two rapid-eye-movement (REM) cycles for remedy and post-remedy nights, controlling for placebo and post-placebo night effects. Results MSE results indicate significant, remedy-specific directional effects, especially later in the night (REM cycle 2) (CC: remedy night increases and post-remedy night decreases in MSE at multiple sites for both stages 3 and 4 in both REM cycles; NV: remedy night decreases and post-remedy night increases, mainly in stage 3 REM cycle 2 MSE). D2 analyses yielded more sporadic and inconsistent findings. Conclusions Homeopathic medicines Coffea cruda and Nux vomica in 30c potencies alter short-term nonlinear dynamic parameters of slow wave sleep EEG in healthy young adults. MSE may provide a more sensitive NDS analytic method than D2 for evaluating homeopathic remedy effects on human sleep EEG patterns. PMID:22818237

  6. Effects of Homeopathic Arsenicum Album, Nosode, and Gibberellic Acid Preparations on the Growth Rate of Arsenic-Impaired Duckweed (Lemna gibba L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Tim; Scherr, Claudia; Simon, Meinhard; Heusser, Peter; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of homeopathically potentized Arsenicum album, nosode, and gibberellic acid in a bioassay with arsenic-stressed duckweed (Lemna gibba L.). The test substances were applied in nine potency levels (17x, 18x, 21x–24x, 28x, 30x, 33x) and compared with controls (unsuccussed and succussed water) regarding their influence on the plant’s growth rate. Duckweed was stressed with arsenic(V) for 48 h. Afterwards, plants grew in either potentized substances or water controls for 6 days. Growth rates of frond (leaf) area and frond number were determined with a computerized image analysis system for different time intervals (days 0–2, 2–6, 0–6). Five independent experiments were evaluated for each test substance. Additionally, five water control experiments were analyzed to investigate the stability of the experimental setup (systematic negative control experiments). All experiments were randomized and blinded. The test system exhibited a low coefficient of variation (≈1%). Unsuccussed and succussed water did not result in any significant differences in duckweed growth rate. Data from the control and treatment groups were pooled to increase statistical power. Growth rates for days 0–2 were not influenced by any homeopathic preparation. Growth rates for days 2–6 increased after application of potentized Arsenicum album regarding both frond area (p < 0.001) and frond number (p < 0.001), and by application of potentized nosode (frond area growth rate only, p < 0.01). Potencies of gibberellic acid did not influence duckweed growth rate. The systematic negative control experiments did not yield any significant effects. Thus, false-positive results can be excluded with high certainty. To conclude, the test system with L. gibba impaired by arsenic(V) was stable and reliable. It yielded evidence for specific effects of homeopathic Arsenicum album preparations and it will provide a valuable tool for future experiments that aim at revealing

  7. Dielectric dispersion studies of some potentised homeopathic medicines reveal structured vehicle.

    PubMed

    Mahata, C R

    2013-10-01

    Avogadro's Number gives 12c as the limit beyond which no original substance can be present in a highly diluted and succcussed (potentised) homeopathic medicine, implying that chemically such dilutions consist of nothing but the vehicle. But there is evidence that living systems react to homeopathic medicines diluted even above 12c. To explain how such medicines differ from another I hypothesise that altered structure may cause the difference, such as that between diamond and amorphous carbon. Some scientists have argued that dilution followed by succussion may lead to altered structural arrangement of water molecules. This concept may be termed 'Induced Molecular Structure'. Dielectric dispersion studies were conducted in a broad range with potencies below and above the Avogadro limit by taking 6c and 30c potencies of Graphites and Cuprum Metallicum in liquid form. Measurements were made with an Anomalous Dielectric Dispersion Detector (A3D), an instrument developed by the author. Experiments were carried out in a frequency range of 100 kHz to 50 MHz. Shifting of resonance frequencies as a function of medicine and potency, with potencies below and above the Avogadro limit, was observed. The range of resonance frequencies suggest that the phenomenon might originate from oscillation of dipoles caused by electric field in variously structured and polarised water. Also, there is reasonable evidence that frequencies change with materials and potency. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Homeopathic Arnica Patch for the Relief of Cellulitis-derived Pain and Numbness in the Hand.

    PubMed

    Barkey, Elisabeth; Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta

    2012-05-01

    Arnica montana, belonging to the Compositae family, is a plant with a longstanding tradition of relieving pain and/or inflammation in muscles and joints and may thus represent an alternative to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, which are often ineffective or lead to a number of adverse effects. A homeopathic arnica patch (3X dilution according to the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States) was developed to alleviate pain symptoms in the back and neck muscles and joints. The present case report describes the treatment outcome after administration of the arnica patch in a 55-year-old female patient with pain in the right hand and numbness in the fourth finger after cellulitis in the palmar area. The cellulitis was treated with antibiotics, but pain symptoms remained at 7 points on a 0-to-10-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain despite intake of oral ibuprofen and oral and topical application of an arnica-containing complex homeopathic ointment. Ten arnica patches were dispensed to the patient. She cut the patch into strips to cover all painful areas of the hand and applied them at night. After 3 days, she reported a substantial decrease in pain symptoms (VAS = 1) and a marked decrease in numbness and in the size of a tender nodule on the third metacarpal area. Moreover, the patient was able to sleep through the night without being awakened by the pain. The symptoms declined further during the next 2 days. This case demonstrates that after a relatively short period of time, the administration of the arnica patch on the hand provided a marked reduction of pain and recovery of functionality of the hand.

  9. A double-blind placebo-controlled study into the efficacy of a homeopathic remedy for fear of firework noises in the dog (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Cracknell, Nina R; Mills, Daniel S

    2008-07-01

    Seventy-five dogs that showed a fear response to fireworks participated in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the efficacy of a homeopathic remedy for the alleviation of their behavioural signs. Dogs were randomly assigned to one of two treatments; the homeopathic treatment or the placebo treatment. At the baseline assessments the owners identified the behavioural signs of fear that their dogs normally displayed in response to fireworks, rated their frequency and intensity, and assessed the global severity of their dog's responses. These measures were repeated at the final assessment and owners also completed weekly diaries for the length of the trial. There were significant improvements in the owners' rating of 14/15 behavioural signs of fear in the placebo treatment group and all 15 behavioural signs in the homeopathic treatment group. Both treatment groups also showed significant improvement in the owners' rating of the global severity of their dog's responses. However, there was no significant difference in the response seen between the two treatment groups.

  10. The Effectiveness and Safety of a Homeopathic Medicinal Product in Pediatric Upper Respiratory Tract Infections With Fever

    PubMed Central

    van Haselen, Robert; Thinesse-Mallwitz, Manuela; Maidannyk, Vitaliy; Buskin, Stephen L.; Weber, Stephan; Keller, Thomas; Burkart, Julia; Klement, Petra

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the clinical effectiveness of a homeopathic add-on therapy in a pediatric subpopulation with upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) in a randomized, controlled, multinational clinical trial. Patients received either on-demand symptomatic standard treatment (ST-group) or the same ST plus a homeopathic medication (Influcid; IFC-group) for 7 days. Outcome assessment was based on symptom and fever resolution and the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey–21 (WURSS-21). A total of 261 pediatric (<12 years) patients (130 IFC-group; 131 ST-group) were recruited in Germany and the Ukraine. The IFC-group used less symptomatic medication, symptoms resolved significantly earlier (P = .0001), had higher proportions of fever-free children from day 3 onwards, and the WURSS-assessed global disease severity was significantly less (P < .0001) during the entire URTI episode. One adverse event (vomiting) was possibly related to IFC. IFC as add-on treatment in pediatric URTI reduced global disease severity, shortened symptom resolution, and was safe in use. PMID:27493984

  11. A Homeopathic Arnica Patch for the Relief of Cellulitis-derived Pain and Numbness in the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Arnica montana, belonging to the Compositae family, is a plant with a longstanding tradition of relieving pain and/or inflammation in muscles and joints and may thus represent an alternative to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, which are often ineffective or lead to a number of adverse effects. A homeopathic arnica patch (3X dilution according to the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States) was developed to alleviate pain symptoms in the back and neck muscles and joints. Case Presentation: The present case report describes the treatment outcome after administration of the arnica patch in a 55-year-old female patient with pain in the right hand and numbness in the fourth finger after cellulitis in the palmar area. The cellulitis was treated with antibiotics, but pain symptoms remained at 7 points on a 0-to-10–point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain despite intake of oral ibuprofen and oral and topical application of an arnica-containing complex homeopathic ointment. Ten arnica patches were dispensed to the patient. She cut the patch into strips to cover all painful areas of the hand and applied them at night. After 3 days, she reported a substantial decrease in pain symptoms (VAS = 1) and a marked decrease in numbness and in the size of a tender nodule on the third metacarpal area. Moreover, the patient was able to sleep through the night without being awakened by the pain. The symptoms declined further during the next 2 days. Conclusion: This case demonstrates that after a relatively short period of time, the administration of the arnica patch on the hand provided a marked reduction of pain and recovery of functionality of the hand. PMID:24278813

  12. Homeopathic potencies of Arnica montana L. change gene expression in a Tamm-Horsfall protein-1 cell line in vitro model: the role of ethanol as a possible confounder and statistical bias.

    PubMed

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore; Bjørklund, Geir

    2017-07-01

    Marzotto et al. showed that homeopathic preparations of Arnica montana L. acted directly on gene expression of Tamm-Horsfall protein-1 (THP-1) monocyte/macrophage cell lines activated with phorbol12-myristate13-acetate and interleukin-4 (IL-4). A. montana homeopathic dilutions are used in complementary and alternative medicine to treat inflammation disorders and post-traumatic events as well as for wound repair. The French Pharmacopoeia of these remedies uses 0.3% ethanol in each centesimal dilution. In this paper, we discuss how ethanol-containing A. montana homeopathic centesimal dilutions can change gene expression in IL-4-treated monocyte/macrophage THP-1. We assessed the role of ethanol in the Arnica homeopathic dilutions containing this alcohol by investigating its action on gene expression of THP-1 cell. Evidence would strongly suggest that the presence of ethanol in these remedies might play a fundamental role in the dilutions ability to affect gene expression, particularly for doses from 5c to 15c. Where, rather than playing a major role in the mesoscopic structure of water, the ethanol might have a chemical-physical role in the induction of THP-1 gene expression, apoptosis, and deoxyribonucleic acid function. This evidence generates a debate about the suggestion that the use of a binary-mixed solvent in homeopathic chemistry, used by Hahnemann since 1810, may be fundamental to explain the activity of homeopathy on cell models.

  13. Homeopathic and conventional treatment for acute respiratory and ear complaints: A comparative study on outcome in the primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Haidvogl, Max; Riley, David S; Heger, Marianne; Brien, Sara; Jong, Miek; Fischer, Michael; Lewith, George T; Jansen, Gerard; Thurneysen, André E

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of homeopathy compared to conventional treatment in acute respiratory and ear complaints in a primary care setting. Methods The study was designed as an international, multi-centre, comparative cohort study of non-randomised design. Patients, presenting themselves with at least one chief complaint: acute (≤ 7 days) runny nose, sore throat, ear pain, sinus pain or cough, were recruited at 57 primary care practices in Austria (8), Germany (8), the Netherlands (7), Russia (6), Spain (6), Ukraine (4), United Kingdom (10) and the USA (8) and given either homeopathic or conventional treatment. Therapy outcome was measured by using the response rate, defined as the proportion of patients experiencing 'complete recovery' or 'major improvement' in each treatment group. The primary outcome criterion was the response rate after 14 days of therapy. Results Data of 1,577 patients were evaluated in the full analysis set of which 857 received homeopathic (H) and 720 conventional (C) treatment. The majority of patients in both groups reported their outcome after 14 days of treatment as complete recovery or major improvement (H: 86.9%; C: 86.0%; p = 0.0003 for non-inferiority testing). In the per-protocol set (H: 576 and C: 540 patients) similar results were obtained (H: 87.7%; C: 86.9%; p = 0.0019). Further subgroup analysis of the full analysis set showed no differences of response rates after 14 days in children (H: 88.5%; C: 84.5%) and adults (H: 85.6%; C: 86.6%). The unadjusted odds ratio (OR) of the primary outcome criterion was 1.40 (0.89–2.22) in children and 0.92 (0.63–1.34) in adults. Adjustments for demographic differences at baseline did not significantly alter the OR. The response rates after 7 and 28 days also showed no significant differences between both treatment groups. However, onset of improvement within the first 7 days after treatment was significantly faster upon homeopathic treatment both

  14. A systematic review of the quality of homeopathic pathogenetic trials published from 1945 to 1995.

    PubMed

    Dantas, F; Fisher, P; Walach, H; Wieland, F; Rastogi, D P; Teixeira, H; Koster, D; Jansen, J P; Eizayaga, J; Alvarez, M E P; Marim, M; Belon, P; Weckx, L L M

    2007-01-01

    The quality of information gathered from homeopathic pathogenetic trials (HPTs), also known as 'provings', is fundamental to homeopathy. We systematically reviewed HPTs published in six languages (English, German, Spanish, French, Portuguese and Dutch) from 1945 to 1995, to assess their quality in terms of the validity of the information they provide. The literature was comprehensively searched, only published reports of HPTs were included. Information was extracted by two reviewers per trial using a form with 87 items. Information on: medicines, volunteers, ethical aspects, blinding, randomization, use of placebo, adverse effects, assessments, presentation of data and number of claimed findings were recorded. Methodological quality was assessed by an index including indicators of internal and external validity, personal judgement and comments of reviewers for each study. 156 HPTs on 143 medicines, involving 2815 volunteers, produced 20,538 pathogenetic effects (median 6.5 per volunteer). There was wide variation in methods and results. Sample size (median 15, range 1-103) and trial duration (mean 34 days) were very variable. Most studies had design flaws, particularly absence of proper randomization, blinding, placebo control and criteria for analysis of outcomes. Mean methodological score was 5.6 (range 4-16). More symptoms were reported from HPTs of poor quality than from better ones. In 56% of trials volunteers took placebo. Pathogenetic effects were claimed in 98% of publications. On average about 84% of volunteers receiving active treatment developed symptoms. The quality of reports was in general poor, and much important information was not available. The HPTs were generally of low methodological quality. There is a high incidence of pathogenetic effects in publications and volunteers but this could be attributable to design flaws. Homeopathic medicines, tested in HPTs, appear safe. The central question of whether homeopathic medicines in high dilutions can

  15. Establishing the interfacial nano-structure and elemental composition of homeopathic medicines based on inorganic salts: a scientific approach.

    PubMed

    Temgire, Mayur Kiran; Suresh, Akkihebbal Krishnamurthy; Kane, Shantaram Govind; Bellare, Jayesh Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Extremely dilute systems arise in homeopathy, which uses dilution factors 10(60), 10(400) and also higher. These amounts to potencies of 30c, 200c or more, those are far beyond Avogadro's number. There is extreme skepticism among scientists about the possibility of presence of starting materials due to these high dilutions. This has led modern scientists to believe homeopathy may be at its best a placebo effect. However, our recent studies on 30c and 200c metal based homeopathic medicines clearly revealed the presence of nanoparticles of starting metals, which were found to be retained due to the manufacturing processes involved, as published earlier.(9,10) Here, we use HR-TEM and STEM techniques to study medicines arising from inorganic salts as starting materials. We show that the inorganic starting materials are present as nano-scale particles in the medicines even at 1 M potency (having a large dilution factor of 10(2000)). Thus this study has extended our physicochemical studies of metal based medicines to inorganic based medicines, and also to higher dilution. Further, we show that the particles develop a coat of silica: these particles were seen embedded in a meso-microporous silicate layer through interfacial encapsulation. Similar silicate coatings were also seen in metal based medicines. Thus, metal and inorganic salt based homeopathic medicines retain the starting material as nanoparticles encapsulated within a silicate coating. On the basis of these studies, we propose a universal microstructural hypothesis that all types of homeopathic medicines consist of silicate coated nano-structures dispersed in the solvent. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. How healthy are chronically ill patients after eight years of homeopathic treatment?--Results from a long term observational study.

    PubMed

    Witt, Claudia M; Lüdtke, Rainer; Mengler, Nils; Willich, Stefan N

    2008-12-17

    Homeopathy is a highly debated but often used medical treatment. With this cohort study we aimed to evaluate health status changes under homeopathic treatment in routine care. Here we extend former results, now presenting data of an 8-year follow-up. In a prospective, multicentre cohort study with 103 homeopathic primary care practices in Germany and Switzerland, data from all patients (age >1 year) consulting the physician for the first time were observed. The main outcome measures were: The patients' perceived change in complaint severity (numeric rating scales from 0 = no complaint to 10 = maximal severity) and quality of life as measured by the SF-36 at baseline, and after 2 and 8 years. A total of 3,709 patients were studied, 73% (2,722 adults, 72.8% female, age at baseline 41.0 +/- 12.3; 819 children, 48.4% female, age 6.5 +/- 4.0) contributed data to the 8-year follow-up. The most frequent diagnoses were allergic rhinitis and headache in adults, and atopic dermatitis and multiple recurrent infections in children. Disease severity decreased significantly (p < 0.001) between baseline, 2 and 8 years (adults from 6.2 +/- 1.7 to 2.9 +/- 2.2 and 2.7 +/- 2.1; children from 6.1 +/- 1.8 to 2.1 +/- 2.0 and 1.7 +/- 1.9). Physical and mental quality of life sores also increased considerably. Younger age, female gender and more severe disease at baseline were factors predictive of better therapeutic success. Patients who seek homeopathic treatment are likely to improve considerably. These effects persist for as long as 8 years.

  17. Homeopathic Individualized Q-Potencies versus Fluoxetine for Moderate to Severe Depression: Double-Blind, Randomized Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Adler, U. C.; Paiva, N. M. P.; Cesar, A. T.; Adler, M. S.; Molina, A.; Padula, A. E.; Calil, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Homeopathy is a complementary and integrative medicine used in depression, The aim of this study is to investigate the non-inferiority and tolerability of individualized homeopathic medicines [Quinquagintamillesmial (Q-potencies)] in acute depression, using fluoxetine as active control. Ninety-one outpatients with moderate to severe depression were assigned to receive an individualized homeopathic medicine or fluoxetine 20 mg day−1 (up to 40 mg day−1) in a prospective, randomized, double-blind double-dummy 8-week, single-center trial. Primary efficacy measure was the analysis of the mean change in the Montgomery & Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) depression scores, using a non-inferiority test with margin of 1.45. Secondary efficacy outcomes were response and remission rates. Tolerability was assessed with the side effect rating scale of the Scandinavian Society of Psychopharmacology. Mean MADRS scores differences were not significant at the 4th (P = .654) and 8th weeks (P = .965) of treatment. Non-inferiority of homeopathy was indicated because the upper limit of the confidence interval (CI) for mean difference in MADRS change was less than the non-inferiority margin: mean differences (homeopathy-fluoxetine) were −3.04 (95% CI −6.95, 0.86) and −2.4 (95% CI −6.05, 0.77) at 4th and 8th week, respectively. There were no significant differences between the percentages of response or remission rates in both groups. Tolerability: there were no significant differences between the side effects rates, although a higher percentage of patients treated with fluoxetine reported troublesome side effects and there was a trend toward greater treatment interruption for adverse effects in the fluoxetine group. This study illustrates the feasibility of randomized controlled double-blind trials of homeopathy in depression and indicates the non-inferiority of individualized homeopathic Q-potencies as compared to fluoxetine in acute treatment of outpatients

  18. How healthy are chronically ill patients after eight years of homeopathic treatment? – Results from a long term observational study

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Claudia M; Lüdtke, Rainer; Mengler, Nils; Willich, Stefan N

    2008-01-01

    Background Homeopathy is a highly debated but often used medical treatment. With this cohort study we aimed to evaluate health status changes under homeopathic treatment in routine care. Here we extend former results, now presenting data of an 8-year follow-up. Methods In a prospective, multicentre cohort study with 103 homeopathic primary care practices in Germany and Switzerland, data from all patients (age >1 year) consulting the physician for the first time were observed. The main outcome measures were: The patients' perceived change in complaint severity (numeric rating scales from 0 = no complaint to 10 = maximal severity) and quality of life as measured by the SF-36 at baseline, and after 2 and 8 years. Results A total of 3,709 patients were studied, 73% (2,722 adults, 72.8% female, age at baseline 41.0 ± 12.3; 819 children, 48.4% female, age 6.5 ± 4.0) contributed data to the 8-year follow-up. The most frequent diagnoses were allergic rhinitis and headache in adults, and atopic dermatitis and multiple recurrent infections in children. Disease severity decreased significantly (p < 0.001) between baseline, 2 and 8 years (adults from 6.2 ± 1.7 to 2.9 ± 2.2 and 2.7 ± 2.1; children from 6.1 ± 1.8 to 2.1 ± 2.0 and 1.7 ± 1.9). Physical and mental quality of life sores also increased considerably. Younger age, female gender and more severe disease at baseline were factors predictive of better therapeutic success. Conclusion Patients who seek homeopathic treatment are likely to improve considerably. These effects persist for as long as 8 years. PMID:19091085

  19. Permanent physico-chemical properties of extremely diluted aqueous solutions of homeopathic medicines.

    PubMed

    Elia, V; Baiano, S; Duro, I; Napoli, E; Niccoli, M; Nonatelli, L

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain information about the influence of successive dilutions and succussions on the water structure. 'Extremely diluted solutions' (EDS) are solutions obtained through the iteration of two processes: dilution in stages of 1:100 and succussion, typically used in homeopathic medicine. The iteration is repeated until extreme dilutions are reached, so that the chemical composition of the solution is identical to that of the solvent. Nine different preparations, were studied from the 3cH to 30cH (Hahnemannian Centesimal Dilution). Four of those were without the active principle (potentized water). Two different active principles were used: Arsenicum sulphuratum rubrum (ASR), As4S4, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4D). The solvents were: a solution of sodium bicarbonate and of silicic acid at 5 x 10(-5) M (mol/l) each, and solutions of sodium bicarbonate 5 x 10(-5), 7.5 x 10(-5) and 10 x 10(-5) M (mol/l) in double-distilled water. The containers were Pyrex glass to avoid the release of alkaline oxide and silica from the walls. Conductivity measurements of the solutions were carried out as a function of the age of the potencies. We found increases of electrical conductivity compared to untreated solvent. Successive dilution and succussion can permanently alter the physico-chemical properties of the aqueous solvent. But we also detected changes in physio-chemical parameters with time. This has not previously been reported. The modification of the solvent could provide an important support to the validity of homeopathic medicine, that employs 'medicines without molecules'. The nature of the phenomena here described remains still unexplained, nevertheless some significant experimental results were obtained.

  20. Efficacy of homeopathically potentized antimony on blood coagulation. A randomized placebo controlled crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Heusser, Peter; Berger, Sarah; Stutz, Monika; Hüsler, André; Haeberli, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-02-01

    Homeopathically potentized antimony 6x is traditionally used in anthroposophic medicine for an alleged pro-coagulatory effect in bleeding disorders. However, the scientific evidence base is yet insufficient. Results of a previous in vitro study suggested a slight increase of maximal clot firmness (MCF) and a tendency towards a shorter clotting time (CT). The objective of this study was to investigate the pro-coagulatory effects of antimony in vivo, and possible unexpected or adverse events. A randomized placebo controlled double blind crossover study was carried out in 30 healthy volunteers (15 males, 15 females). Each participant received intravenously 10 ml of antimony 6x and placebo in a randomized order at an interval of 1 month. Thrombelastography (TEG) was carried out immediately before and 30 and 60 min after the injection. Statistically significant pro-coagulatory effects were observed 30 min after injection for CT in men (p = 0.0306), and for MCF in men and women combined (p = 0.0476). The effect of antimony was significantly larger on test day 1 than on test day 2, whereas the effect of placebo was similar on both test days. No unexpected adverse or adverse events causally related to antimony were observed. This study adds evidence to the hypothesis that homeopathically potentized antimony may be efficacious in vivo. The consistency of the results with previous in vitro results indicates an effect on MCF and CT. The in vivo application of antimony 6x is safe. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Reproducibility of effects of homeopathically potentised gibberellic acid on the growth of Lemna gibba L. in a randomised and blinded bioassay.

    PubMed

    Majewsky, Vera; Scherr, Claudia; Arlt, Sebastian Patrick; Kiener, Jonas; Frrokaj, Kristina; Schindler, Tobias; Klocke, Peter; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    Reproducibility of basic research investigations in homeopathy is challenging. This study investigated if formerly observed effects of homeopathically potentised gibberellic acid (GA3) on growth of duckweed (Lemna gibba L.) were reproducible. Duckweed was grown in potencies (14x-30x) of GA3 and one time succussed and unsuccussed water controls. Outcome parameter area-related growth rate was determined by a computerised image analysis system. Three series including five independent blinded and randomised potency experiments (PE) each were carried out. System stability was controlled by three series of five systematic negative control (SNC) experiments. Gibbosity (a specific growth state of L. gibba) was investigated as possibly essential factor for reactivity of L. gibba towards potentised GA3 in one series of potency and SNC experiments, respectively. Only in the third series with gibbous L. gibba L. we observed a significant effect (p = 0.009, F-test) of the homeopathic treatment. However, growth rate increased in contrast to the former study, and most biologically active potency levels differed. Variability in PE was lower than in SNC experiments. The stability of the experimental system was verified by the SNC experiments. Gibbosity seems to be a necessary condition for reactivity of L. gibba to potentised GA3. Further still unknown conditions seem to govern effect direction and the pattern of active and inactive potency levels. When designing new reproducibility studies, the physiological state of the test organism must be considered. Variability might be an interesting parameter to investigate effects of homeopathic remedies in basic research. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of Postoperative Sore Throat With the Aid of the Homeopathic Remedy Arnica montana: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Tsintzas, Dionysis; Vithoulkas, George

    2017-10-01

    We present 2 cases of severe postoperative sore throat, hoarseness, aphonia, and dysphagia, after a laryngeal mask insertion, who were treated successfully with the homeopathic remedy Arnica montana. Three doses of Arnica montana 200CH were given to the patients over 36 hours. Although the symptoms were very intense, the remedy was very effective and cleared most of the symptoms in 48 hours.

  3. Treatment of Postoperative Sore Throat With the Aid of the Homeopathic Remedy Arnica montana: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Tsintzas, Dionysis; Vithoulkas, George

    2017-01-01

    We present 2 cases of severe postoperative sore throat, hoarseness, aphonia, and dysphagia, after a laryngeal mask insertion, who were treated successfully with the homeopathic remedy Arnica montana. Three doses of Arnica montana 200CH were given to the patients over 36 hours. Although the symptoms were very intense, the remedy was very effective and cleared most of the symptoms in 48 hours. PMID:29228804

  4. Toxic optic neuropathy following ingestion of homeopathic medication Arnica-30.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Devendra V; Goel, Shubhra; Ratra, Vineet; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of acute, bilateral and severe vision loss after inadvertent consumption of a large quantity of the homoeopathic medication Arnica-30. Severe vomiting which required hospitalization preceded visual symptoms. In the acute stage, pupillary responses to light were absent and fundus examination was normal. Vision loss followed a fluctuating course, with profound loss noted after 6 weeks along with bilateral optic disc pallor. Neuro-ophthalmic examination and detailed investigations were performed, including magnetic resonance imaging, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potentials (VEP). Ocular coherence tomography (OCT) showed gross thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer. While a differential diagnosis of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was kept in mind, these findings supported a diagnosis of bilateral toxic optic neuropathy. Arnica-30 is popularly used to accelerate wound healing, including after oculoplastic surgery. While homeopathic medicines are generally considered safe due to the very low concentrations involved, Arnica-30 may be neurotoxic if consumed internally in large quantities.

  5. High sensitivity 1H-NMR spectroscopy of homeopathic remedies made in water

    PubMed Central

    Anick, David J

    2004-01-01

    Background The efficacy of homeopathy is controversial. Homeopathic remedies are made via iterated shaking and dilution, in ethanol or in water, from a starting substance. Remedies of potency 12 C or higher are ultra-dilute (UD), i.e. contain zero molecules of the starting material. Various hypotheses have been advanced to explain how a UD remedy might be different from unprepared solvent. One such hypothesis posits that a remedy contains stable clusters, i.e. localized regions where one or more hydrogen bonds remain fixed on a long time scale. High sensitivity proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has not previously been used to look for evidence of differences between UD remedies and controls. Methods Homeopathic remedies made in water were studied via high sensitivity proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A total of 57 remedy samples representing six starting materials and spanning a variety of potencies from 6 C to 10 M were tested along with 46 controls. Results By presaturating on the water peak, signals could be reliably detected that represented H-containing species at concentrations as low as 5 μM. There were 35 positions where a discrete signal was seen in one or more of the 103 spectra, which should theoretically have been absent from the spectrum of pure water. Of these 35, fifteen were identified as machine-generated artifacts, eight were identified as trace levels of organic contaminants, and twelve were unexplained. Of the unexplained signals, six were seen in just one spectrum each. None of the artifacts or unexplained signals occurred more frequently in remedies than in controls, using a p < .05 cutoff. Some commercially prepared samples were found to contain traces of one or more of these small organic molecules: ethanol, acetate, formate, methanol, and acetone. Conclusion No discrete signals suggesting a difference between remedies and controls were seen, via high sensitivity 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The results failed to support

  6. Homeopathic Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Pregnant Women With Mental Disorders: A Double-blind, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, Edgard Costa de; Castilho, Euclides Ayres de

    2016-10-01

    Context • Worldwide, 35 million people suffer from obesity. Mental disorders have been associated with being overweight or obese. Considerable evidence has shown a correlation between stress and the use of homeopathy and stress and obesity. However, few studies have examined the relationship between weight loss and homeopathic treatment of obesity. Objective • The study intended to evaluate the efficacy of a homeopathic treatment in preventing excessive weight gain during pregnancy in overweight or obese women who were suspected of having a common mental disorder. Design • The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Setting • The study took place at the Center for the Social Support of Motherhood (São Paulo, Brazil). Participants • Participants were pregnant women who were enrolled at the center. Intervention • For the homeopathic group, 9 drugs were preselected, including (1) Pulsatilla nigricans, (2) Sepia succus, (3) Lycopodium clavatum, (4) sulphur, (5) Lachesis trigonocephalus, (6) Nux vomica, (7) Calcarea carbonica, (8) phosphorus; and (9) Conium maculatum. From those 9 drugs, 1 was prioritized for administration for each participant. After the first appointment, a reselection or selection of a new, more appropriate drug occurred, using the list of preselected drugs. The dosage was 6 drops orally 2 ×/d, in the morning and at night, on 4 consecutive days each wk, with an interval of 3 d between doses, up until the next appointment medical appointment. The control group received the equivalent placebo drug. Both groups also received a diet orientation. Outcome Measures • We evaluated pregnant women who were overweight or had class 1 or 2 obesity and were suspected of having a common mental disorder, with no concomitant diseases, in 2 groups: those receiving a placebo (control group, n = 72); and those receiving homeopathic treatment (homeopathy group, n = 62). Weight change during pregnancy was defined as the

  7. Effect of homeopathic preparations of Syzygium jambolanum and Cephalandra indica on gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and high fructose-induced type-2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Sathish; Narasimhan, Akilavalli; Chinta, Raveendar; Nair, K R Janardanan; Khurana, Anil; Nayak, Debadatta; Kumar, Alok; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2013-07-01

    Homeopathy is a holistic method of treatment that uses microdoses of natural substances originating from plants, minerals, or animal parts. Syzygium jambolanum and Cephalandra indica are used in homeopathy for treatment of type-2 diabetes. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for such effects are not known. Homeopathic preparations of S. jambolanum and C. indica in mother tincture, 6c and 30c were used to examine the molecular mechanism of antidiabetic effects in the skeletal muscle of rats with high fat and fructose-induced type-2 diabetes mellitus. After 30 days treatment, fasting blood glucose, serum insulin and insulin signaling molecules in the skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) were measured. Diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in serum insulin and lipid profile as well as low levels of insulin receptor (IR), v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt), p-Akt(ser473) and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) protein expression (p < 0.05) with a significant increase in fasting blood glucose level (p < 0.05) compared to the control group. Treatment with homeopathic remedies significantly increased the serum insulin and expression of these proteins (p < 0.05) with a significant decrease in fasting blood glucose (p < 0.05) compared to diabetic rats. In the present study homeopathic preparations of S. jambolanum and C. indica, including ultramolecular dilutions exhibit antidiabetic effects, improving insulin action through activation of insulin signaling molecules in skeletal muscle of type-2 diabetic rats. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of individualized homeopathic treatment and fluoxetine for moderate to severe depression in peri- and postmenopausal women (HOMDEP-MENOP): study protocol for a randomized, double-dummy, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Macías-Cortés, Emma del Carmen; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan

    2013-04-23

    The perimenopausal period refers to the interval when women's menstrual cycles become irregular and is characterized by an increased risk of depressive symptoms. Use of homeopathy to treat depression is widespread but there is a lack of clinical trials about its efficacy in depression in peri- and postmenopausal women. Previous trials suggest that individualized homeopathic treatments improve depression. In classical homeopathy, an individually selected homeopathic remedy is prescribed after a complete case history of the patient. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of the homeopathic individualized treatment versus placebo or fluoxetine in peri- and postmenopausal women with moderate to severe depression. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, three-arm trial with a six-week follow-up study was designed. The study will be conducted in a public research hospital in Mexico City (Juárez de México Hospital) in the outpatient service of homeopathy. One hundred eighty nine peri- and postmenopausal women diagnosed with major depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (moderate to severe intensity) will be included. The primary outcome is change in the mean total score among groups on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression after the fourth and sixth week of treatment. Secondary outcomes are: Beck Depression Inventory change in mean score, Greene's Scale change in mean score, response and remission rates and safety. Efficacy data will be analyzed in the intention-to-treat population. To determine differences in the primary and secondary outcomes among groups at baseline and weeks four and six, data will be analyzed by analysis of variance for independent measures with the Bonferroni post-hoc test. This study is the first trial of classical homeopathy that will evaluate the efficacy of homeopathic individualized treatment using C-potencies versus placebo or

  9. Efficacy of individualized homeopathic treatment and fluoxetine for moderate to severe depression in peri- and postmenopausal women (HOMDEP-MENOP): study protocol for a randomized, double-dummy, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The perimenopausal period refers to the interval when women’s menstrual cycles become irregular and is characterized by an increased risk of depressive symptoms. Use of homeopathy to treat depression is widespread but there is a lack of clinical trials about its efficacy in depression in peri- and postmenopausal women. Previous trials suggest that individualized homeopathic treatments improve depression. In classical homeopathy, an individually selected homeopathic remedy is prescribed after a complete case history of the patient. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of the homeopathic individualized treatment versus placebo or fluoxetine in peri- and postmenopausal women with moderate to severe depression. Methods/design A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, three-arm trial with a six-week follow-up study was designed. The study will be conducted in a public research hospital in Mexico City (Juárez de México Hospital) in the outpatient service of homeopathy. One hundred eighty nine peri- and postmenopausal women diagnosed with major depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (moderate to severe intensity) will be included. The primary outcome is change in the mean total score among groups on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression after the fourth and sixth week of treatment. Secondary outcomes are: Beck Depression Inventory change in mean score, Greene’s Scale change in mean score, response and remission rates and safety. Efficacy data will be analyzed in the intention-to-treat population. To determine differences in the primary and secondary outcomes among groups at baseline and weeks four and six, data will be analyzed by analysis of variance for independent measures with the Bonferroni post-hoc test. Discussion This study is the first trial of classical homeopathy that will evaluate the efficacy of homeopathic individualized treatment

  10. Effects of the homeopathic remedy arnica on attenuating symptoms of exercise-induced muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Plezbert, Julie A.; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency (200c), on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Methods Twenty subjects completed a maximal eccentric exercise protocol with the non-dominate elbow flexors to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Either Arnica or placebo tablets were administered in a random, double- blinded fashion immediately after exercise and at 24 hours and 72 hours after exercise. Before exercise, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post-exercise, assessments of delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle function included: 1) muscle soreness and functional impairment; 2) maximum voluntary contraction torque; 3) muscle swelling; and 4) range of motion tests to document spontaneous muscle shortening and muscle shortening ability. Blood samples drawn before exercise and at 24, 48, and 96 hours after exercise were used to measure muscle enzymes as indirect indices of muscle damage. Results Regardless of the intervention, the extent of delayed onset muscle soreness and elevations in muscle enzymes were similar on the days following the eccentric exercise protocol. The post-exercise time profiles of decreases in maximum voluntary contraction torque and muscle shortening ability and increases in muscle swelling and spontaneous muscle shortening were similar for each treatment intervention. Conclusions The results of this study did not substantiate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Despite the findings of this study, future investigations on the clinical efficacy of homeopathic interventions should consider incorporating research strategies that emphasize differential therapeutics for each patient rather than treating a specific disease or symptom complex, such as DOMS, with a single homeopathic remedy. PMID:19674657

  11. Prevention of poison ivy dermatitis with oral homeopathic Rhus toxicodendron.

    PubMed

    Signore, Robert Joseph

    2017-01-15

    Acute allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy is acommon and miserable dermatosis which affectsmillions of Americans each year. Preventativemeasures, such as avoidance, protective clothing,barrier creams, soaps, and solvents often fail despiteour patients' best attempts. Severe allergic reactionsto poison ivy are a significant source of decreasedemployee productivity owing to inability to work anda major health care expenditure. Patients may haveto leave their jobs and discontinue favorite outdoorrecreational activities as a result of severe urushiolsensitivity. Thus, a simple and effective method ofpreventing poison ivy dermatitis would be of greatbenefit to clinical dermatologists and their patients.Complementary and alternative medical practitionerscommonly prescribe homeopathic poison ivyproducts by mouth for the prevention of poisonivy dermatitis. Yet, conventional dermatologists aremostly unaware of this little known clinical pearl. Theauthor discusses two open studies and anecdotalexperience with administration of homeopathicpoison ivy in the prevention of acute allergic contactdermatitis related to poison ivy exposure. Potentialadvantages could include patient acceptability,ease of administration, affordability, and availability.Randomized clinical trials are needed to furtherevaluate the safety and efficacy of this interesting andpromising clinical tip.

  12. A homeopathic remedy from arnica, marigold, St. John's wort and comfrey accelerates in vitro wound scratch closure of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hostanska, Katarina; Rostock, Matthias; Melzer, Joerg; Baumgartner, Stephan; Saller, Reinhard

    2012-07-18

    Drugs of plant origin such as Arnica montana, Calendula officinalis or Hypericum perforatum have been frequently used to promote wound healing. While their effect on wound healing using preparations at pharmacological concentrations was supported by several in vitro and clinical studies, investigations of herbal homeopathic remedies on wound healing process are rare. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a commercial low potency homeopathic remedy Similasan® Arnica plus Spray on wound closure in a controlled, blind trial in vitro. We investigated the effect of an ethanolic preparation composed of equal parts of Arnica montana 4x, Calendula officinalis 4x, Hypericum perforatum 4x and Symphytum officinale 6x (0712-2), its succussed hydroalcoholic solvent (0712-1) and unsuccussed solvent (0712-3) on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Cell viability was determined by WST-1 assay, cell growth using BrdU uptake, cell migration by chemotaxis assay and wound closure by CytoSelect ™Wound Healing Assay Kit which generated a defined "wound field". All assays were performed in three independent controlled experiments. None of the three substances affected cell viability and none showed a stimulating effect on cell proliferation. Preparation (0712-2) exerted a stimulating effect on fibroblast migration (31.9%) vs 14.7% with succussed solvent (0712-1) at 1:100 dilutions (p < 0.001). Unsuccussed solvent (0712-3) had no influence on cell migration (6.3%; p > 0.05). Preparation (0712-2) at a dilution of 1:100 promoted in vitro wound closure by 59.5% and differed significantly (p < 0.001) from succussed solvent (0712-1), which caused 22.1% wound closure. Results of this study showed that the low potency homeopathic remedy (0712-2) exerted in vitro wound closure potential in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. This effect resulted from stimulation of fibroblasts motility rather than of their mitosis.

  13. Effectiveness of the homeopathic preparation Zeel compared with carprofen in dogs with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Stephan; Stolt, Pelle; Braun, Gabriele; Hellmann, Klaus; Reinhart, Erich

    2011-01-01

    The authors compared the symptomatic effectiveness of a complex homeopathic preparation Zeel (1-3 tablets orally per day depending on body weight) to carprofen (4 mg/kg body weight) in dogs (n=68) aged >1 yr diagnosed with osteoarthritis in a multicenter, prospective, observational open-label cohort study in 12 German veterinary clinics. The active treatment period was 56 days. Symptomatic effectiveness, lameness, stiffness of movements, and pain on palpation were evaluated by treating veterinarians and owners. Clinical signs of osteoarthritis improved significantly (P<0.05) at all time points (days 1, 28, and 56) with both therapies. At the end of the treatment period, effectiveness was comparable in both groups. Both treatment regimens were well tolerated with only three treatment-related adverse events, all in the carprofen group.

  14. Homeopathy as Boundary Object and Distributed Therapeutic Agency. A Discussion on the Homeopathic Placebo Response.

    PubMed

    Rughiniş, Cosima; Ciocănel, Alexandra; Vasile, Sorina

    2017-09-27

    We discuss homeopathy's placebo effect as the result of a distributed therapeutic agency involving humans, objects, and texts. Homeopathy has been involved in controversies for centuries, and the dispute whether it is therapy or quackery is as lively as ever. Still, homeopathy has retained significant popularity and acceptance within the medical establishment. We bracket the issue of biochemical effectiveness of homeopathic remedies as we only discuss homeopathy's potential to elicit a placebo response within its therapeutic alliance, in virtue of its social, symbolic, and material features. The review is based on literature discussing homeopathic effectiveness, including historical, biographical, sociological, and epistemological perspectives. We build upon research that clarifies the therapeutic relationship, examining its activities and meanings for practitioners and patients. Previous analyses discussing homeopathy's placebo effect stress the importance of the individualized consultation that functions as psychotherapy and generates empathy and hope. We enlarge the discussion, highlighting homeopathy's distributed therapeutic agency across humans, texts, and materials. The historical evolution of homeopathy in relation to biomedicine and science is important to understand its institutional integration into mainstream medicine and its appeal to scientifically minded doctors. Anecdotes of healing and the message of no-harm encourage patients to try homeopathy and hope for the best. The esthetics and ritual of remedies, coupled with computers' scientific legitimacy and time-saving power constitute a material infrastructure of therapeutic persuasion. Through its relation with biomedicine, its doctrine, consultation design, and treatment rituals, homeopathy offers a powerful medium to elicit a placebo response in a therapeutic alliance. By virtue of its proximity and radical difference from the scientific and biomedical enterprises, its material and textual

  15. New diagnostic and therapeutic approach to thyroid-associated orbitopathy based on applied kinesiology and homeopathic therapy.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Roy; Moncayo, Helga; Ulmer, Hanno; Kainz, Hartmann

    2004-08-01

    To investigate pathogenetic mechanisms related to the lacrimal and lymphatic glands in patients with thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO), and the potential of applied kinesiology diagnosis and homeopathic therapeutic measures. Prospective. Thyroid outpatient unit and a specialized center for complementary medicine (WOMED, Innsbruck; R.M. and H.M.). Thirty-two (32) patients with TAO, 23 with a long-standing disease, and 9 showing discrete initial changes. All patients were euthyroid at the time of the investigation. Clinical investigation was done, using applied kinesiology methods. Departing from normal reacting muscles, both target organs as well as therapeutic measures were tested. Affected organs will produce a therapy localization (TL) that turns a normal muscle tone weak. Using the same approach, specific counteracting therapies (i.e., tonsillitis nosode and lymph mobilizing agents) were tested. Change of lid swelling, of ocular movement discomfort, ocular lock, tonsil reactivity and Traditional Chinese Medicine criteria including tenderness of San Yin Jiao (SP6) and tongue diagnosis were recorded in a graded fashion. Positive TL reactions were found in the submandibular tonsillar structures, the pharyngeal tonsils, the San Yin Jiao point, the lacrimal gland, and with the functional ocular lock test. Both Lymphdiaral (Pascoe, Giessen, Germany) and the homeopathic preparation chronic tonsillitis nosode at a C3 potency (Spagyra, Grödig, Austria) counteracted these changes. Both agents were used therapeutically over 3-6 months, after which all relevant parameters showed improvement. Our study demonstrates the involvement of lymphatic structures and flow in the pathogenesis of TAO. The tenderness of the San Yin Jiao point correlates to the above mentioned changes and should be included in the clinical evaluation of these patients.

  16. Assessing patients' preferences for characteristics associated with homeopathic and conventional treatment of asthma: a conjoint analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, J; Van Haselen, R; Buxton, M; Hardy, K; Colehan, J; Partridge, M

    2002-01-01

    Background: A study was undertaken to investigate the preferences of patients with asthma for attributes or characteristics associated with treatment for their asthma and to investigate the extent to which such preferences may differ between patient subgroups. Methods: The economic technique of conjoint analysis (CA) was used to investigate patients' strength of preference for several key attributes associated with services for the treatment of asthma. A CA questionnaire was administered to two groups of asthma outpatients aged 18 years or older, 150 receiving conventional treatment at Whipps Cross Hospital (WC) and 150 receiving homeopathic treatment at the Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital (RL). Results: An overall response rate of 47% (n=142) was achieved. Statistically significant attributes in influencing preferences for both the WC and RL respondents were (1) the extent to which the doctor gave sufficient time to listen to what the patient has to say, (2) the extent to which the treatment seemed to relieve symptoms, and (3) the travel costs of attending for an asthma consultation. The extent to which the doctor treated the patient as a whole person was also a statistically significant attribute for the RL respondents. Conclusions: This study has shown that aspects associated with the process of delivery of asthma services are important to patients in addition to treatment outcomes. The homeopathic respondents expressed stronger preferences for the doctor to treat them as a whole person than the patients receiving conventional treatment. Overall, the preferences for the attributes included in the study were similar for both groups. PMID:12037224

  17. [Aconite in homeopathic relief of post-operative pain and agitation in children].

    PubMed

    Alibeu, J P; Jobert, J

    1990-01-01

    Despite the use of modern analgesic methods and an improved use of narcotics, the combination pain-agitation sometimes persists in the recovery-room. Aconit seems to be an appropriate homeopathic treatment in this case. To prescribe it, the following conditions must be combined: violence and suddeness of the stress bringing about intense and anguish. The study included 50 children with such symptoms; it was carried out double-blind, the children being given either placebo or Aconit. Aconit proved to be effective for children's postoperative agitation with 95% good results. It is usually stated in such studies that the placebo effect is high and may reach rates higher than 30%. Aconit is an amazing cure when well prescribed, as much for the speediness of its action as for its efficiency. This remedy has a place in the recovery-room and should be in every physician's emergency case. The fundamental research could specify how the remedy works and may be discover other molecules effective for stress.

  18. Morphometry of white muscle fibers and performance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fingerlings treated with methyltestosterone or a homeopathic complex.

    PubMed

    Júnior, R P; Vargas, L; Valentim-Zabott, M; Ribeiro, R P; da Silva, A V; Otutumi, L K

    2012-07-01

    Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), are widely used in fish farming, hormonal treatments are used to increase productivity. Studies of the characteristics of the fiber types are important in species that have well developed muscle mass, such as Nile tilapia. A total of 4800 post-larval fish were randomly assigned by tank to receive one of three treatments: Control (30°GL alcohol), Homeopathic complex (Homeopatila RS) or Hormone (17-α-methyltestosterone) supplemented in the feed for 28 days. Survival and morphological parameters were measured at day 45. At day 45, the survival rates were 54.1% (Control), 87.8% (Homeopathy), 50.3% (Hormone). The mean final weight for Homeopathy was statistically significantly lower (1.07 g) than the other two groups: Control (1.81 g) and Hormone (2.04 g). Mean total lengths were Control (4.75 cm), Hormone (4.49 cm), statistically significantly different from Homeopathy (3.83 cm). Average partial length, trunk length, height and body width were significantly lower for Homeopathy than Control or Hormone (p<0.05) Homeopathy treated fish had significantly greater muscle fiber diameter than the other two groups. Fish treated with the homeopathic complex had improved survival and muscle fiber hypertrophy, but were smaller (probably related to increased survival and overcrowding) compared to fingerlings treated with synthetic hormone or control. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A potentized homeopathic drug, Arsenicum Album 200, can ameliorate genotoxicity induced by repeated injections of arsenic trioxide in mice.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, P; Biswas, S J; Belon, P; Khuda-Bukhsh, A R

    2007-09-01

    Groundwater arsenic contamination has become a menacing global problem. No drug is available until now to combat chronic arsenic poisoning. To examine if a potentized homeopathic remedy, Arsenicum Album-200, can effectively combat chronic arsenic toxicity induced by repeated injections of Arsenic trioxide in mice, the following experimental design was adopted. Mice (Mus musculus) were injected subcutaneously with 0.016% arsenic trioxide at the rate of 1 ml/100 g body weight, at an interval of 7 days until they were killed at day 30, 60, 90 or 120 and were divided into three groups: (i) one receiving a daily dose of Arsenicum Album-200 through oral administration, (ii) one receiving the same dose of diluted succussed alcohol (Alcohol-200) and (iii) another receiving neither drug, nor succussed alcohol. The remedy or the placebo, as the case may be, was fed from the next day onwards after injection until the day before the next injection, and the cycle was repeated until the mice were killed. Two other control groups were also maintained: one receiving only normal diet, and the other receiving normal diet and succussed alcohol. Several toxicity assays, such as cytogenetical (chromosome aberrations, micronuclei, mitotic index, sperm head anomaly) and biochemical (acid and alkaline phosphatases, lipid peroxidation), were periodically made. Compared with controls, the drug fed mice showed reduced toxicity at statistically significant levels in respect of all the parameters studied, thereby indicating protective potentials of the homeopathic drug against chronic arsenic poisoning.

  20. Response to Individualized Homeopathic Treatment for Depression in Climacteric Women with History of Domestic Violence, Marital Dissatisfaction or Sexual Abuse: Results from the HOMDEP-MENOP Study.

    PubMed

    Macías-Cortés, Emma Del Carmen; Llanes-González, Lidia; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan

    2018-06-05

     Although individualized homeopathic treatment is effective for depression in climacteric women, there is a lack of well-designed studies of its efficacy for depression in battered women or in post-traumatic stress disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the association between individualized homeopathic treatment or fluoxetine and response to depression treatment in climacteric women with high levels of domestic violence, sexual abuse or marital dissatisfaction.  One hundred and thirty-three Mexican climacteric women with moderate-to-severe depression enrolled in the HOMDEP-MENOP Study (a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, three-arm trial, with a 6-week follow-up study) were evaluated. Domestic violence, marital dissatisfaction and sexual abuse were assessed at baseline. Response to depression treatment was defined by a decrease of 50% or more from baseline score of Hamilton scale. Association between domestic violence, sexual abuse, and marital dissatisfaction and response to depression treatment was analyzed with bivariate analysis in the three groups. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated.  Homeopathy versus placebo had a statistically significant association with response to depression treatment after adjusting for sexual abuse (OR [95% CI]: 11.07 [3.22 to 37.96]), domestic violence (OR [95% CI]: 10.30 [3.24 to 32.76]) and marital dissatisfaction (OR [95% CI]: 8.61 [2.85 to 25.99]).  Individualized homeopathic treatment is associated with response to depression treatment in climacteric women with high levels of domestic violence, sexual abuse or marital dissatisfaction. Further studies should be conducted to evaluate its efficacy specifically for post-traumatic stress disorder in battered women. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT01635218,:  URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01635218?term=depression+homeopathy&rank=1. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  1. The effect of the homeopathic remedies Arnica montana and Bellis perennis on mild postpartum bleeding--a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Oberbaum, Menachem; Galoyan, Narine; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Singer, Shepherd Roee; Grisaru, Sorina; Shashar, David; Samueloff, Arnon

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of Arnica Montana and Bellis perennis on postpartum blood loss. Double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, clinical trial. Department of Gynecology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem. Forty parturients were randomized to one of three groups: Arnica montana C6 and Bellis perennis C6 (n=14), Arnica montana C30 and Bellis perennis C30 (n=14), or double placebo (n=12). After 48 h the Arnica/placebo was halted, and patients continued the Bellis/placebo until cessation of lochia. Hemoglobin levels (Hb) at 48 and 72 h postpartum. At 72 h postpartum, mean Hb levels remained similar after treatment with homeopathic remedies (12.7 versus 12.4) as compared to a significant decrease in Hb levels in the placebo group (12.7 versus 11.6; p<0.05), in spite of less favorable initial characteristics of the treatment group. The mean difference in Hb levels at 72 h postpartum was -0.29 (95% CI -1.09; 0.52) in the treatment group and -1.18 (95% CI -1.82; -0.54) in the placebo group (p<0.05). Treatment with homeopathic Arnica montana and Bellis perennis may reduce postpartum blood loss, as compared with placebo.

  2. Can Additional Homeopathic Treatment Save Costs? A Retrospective Cost-Analysis Based on 44500 Insured Persons

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Julia K.; Reinhold, Thomas; Witt, Claudia M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the health care costs for patients using additional homeopathic treatment (homeopathy group) with the costs for those receiving usual care (control group). Methods Cost data provided by a large German statutory health insurance company were retrospectively analysed from the societal perspective (primary outcome) and from the statutory health insurance perspective. Patients in both groups were matched using a propensity score matching procedure based on socio-demographic variables as well as costs, number of hospital stays and sick leave days in the previous 12 months. Total cumulative costs over 18 months were compared between the groups with an analysis of covariance (adjusted for baseline costs) across diagnoses and for six specific diagnoses (depression, migraine, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and headache). Results Data from 44,550 patients (67.3% females) were available for analysis. From the societal perspective, total costs after 18 months were higher in the homeopathy group (adj. mean: EUR 7,207.72 [95% CI 7,001.14–7,414.29]) than in the control group (EUR 5,857.56 [5,650.98–6,064.13]; p<0.0001) with the largest differences between groups for productivity loss (homeopathy EUR 3,698.00 [3,586.48–3,809.53] vs. control EUR 3,092.84 [2,981.31–3,204.37]) and outpatient care costs (homeopathy EUR 1,088.25 [1,073.90–1,102.59] vs. control EUR 867.87 [853.52–882.21]). Group differences decreased over time. For all diagnoses, costs were higher in the homeopathy group than in the control group, although this difference was not always statistically significant. Conclusion Compared with usual care, additional homeopathic treatment was associated with significantly higher costs. These analyses did not confirm previously observed cost savings resulting from the use of homeopathy in the health care system. PMID:26230412

  3. A homeopathic remedy from arnica, marigold, St. John’s wort and comfrey accelerates in vitro wound scratch closure of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drugs of plant origin such as Arnica montana, Calendula officinalis or Hypericum perforatum have been frequently used to promote wound healing. While their effect on wound healing using preparations at pharmacological concentrations was supported by several in vitro and clinical studies, investigations of herbal homeopathic remedies on wound healing process are rare. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a commercial low potency homeopathic remedy Similasan® Arnica plus Spray on wound closure in a controlled, blind trial in vitro. Methods We investigated the effect of an ethanolic preparation composed of equal parts of Arnica montana 4x, Calendula officinalis 4x, Hypericum perforatum 4x and Symphytum officinale 6x (0712–2), its succussed hydroalcoholic solvent (0712–1) and unsuccussed solvent (0712–3) on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Cell viability was determined by WST-1 assay, cell growth using BrdU uptake, cell migration by chemotaxis assay and wound closure by CytoSelect ™Wound Healing Assay Kit which generated a defined “wound field”. All assays were performed in three independent controlled experiments. Results None of the three substances affected cell viability and none showed a stimulating effect on cell proliferation. Preparation (0712–2) exerted a stimulating effect on fibroblast migration (31.9%) vs 14.7% with succussed solvent (0712–1) at 1:100 dilutions (p < 0.001). Unsuccussed solvent (0712–3) had no influence on cell migration (6.3%; p > 0.05). Preparation (0712–2) at a dilution of 1:100 promoted in vitro wound closure by 59.5% and differed significantly (p < 0.001) from succussed solvent (0712–1), which caused 22.1% wound closure. Conclusion Results of this study showed that the low potency homeopathic remedy (0712–2) exerted in vitro wound closure potential in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. This effect resulted from stimulation of fibroblasts motility rather than of their mitosis. PMID:22809174

  4. Effect of the oral administration homeopathic Arnica montana on mitochondrial oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Ronaldo Antônio; da Costa, Ellen Dias; Catisti, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the effect of homeopathic Arnica on mitochondrial oxidative stress induced by Ca(2+) plus inorganic phosphate and/or Fe(2+)-citrate-mediated lipid peroxidation through changes in oxygen consumption rates. Mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from the livers of adult male Wistar rats which had been treated with Arnica montana 6cH, 12cH, 30cH or succussed 30% ethanol (control) for 21 days. In the presence of antimycin-A, electron transport chain inhibitor, as evidenced by antimycin-A insensitive O(2) consumption, Arnica inhibited lipid peroxidation of mitochondrial membranes. In oxidative stress conditions, in the presence of Ca(2+) and inorganic phosphate, animals receiving Arnica 30cH had a significant decrease in mitochondrial O(2) consumption compared to control animals. When administrated orally, Arnica 30cH protects against hepatic mitochondrial membrane permeabilization induced by Ca(2+) and/or Fe(2+)-citrate-mediated lipid peroxidation and fragmentation of proteins due to the attack by reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is metabolic dysregulation associated with antidepressant response in depressed women in climacteric treated with individualized homeopathic medicines or fluoxetine? The HOMDEP-MENOP Study.

    PubMed

    Macías-Cortés, Emma Del Carmen; Llanes-González, Lidia; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan

    2017-02-01

    Climacteric is associated with both depression and metabolic dysregulation. Scarce evidence suggests that metabolic dysregulation may predict poor response to conventional antidepressants. Response to depression treatment has not been studied in homeopathic medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of metabolic disorders in depressed climacteric women treated with homeopathic medicines, fluoxetine or placebo, and if these alterations have any association with response to depression treatment. One hundred and thirty-three Mexican women (40-65 years) with depression, enrolled in the HOMDEP-MENOP study, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, three-arm trial with a 6 week follow-up, underwent a complete medical history and clinical examination. Metabolic parameters were assessed at baseline. Association between baseline metabolic parameters and response to depression treatment was analyzed with bivariate analysis in the three groups. Odds ratios (OR) with their 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated. Metabolic parameters were considered for inclusion in the logistic regression model if they had a statistically significant relationship with response rate on bivariate analysis at p<0.05 or if they were clinically relevant. Overall combined prevalence (obesity and overweight) was 86.5%; 52.3% had hypertriglyceridemia; 44.7% hypercholesterolemia; 46.7% insulin resistance; and 16% subclinical hypothyroidism. There was no statistically significant association between dyslipidemia, overweight, or insulin resistance and non-response in the homeopathy group [OR (95% CI) 1.57 (0.46-5.32), p=0.467; 0.37 (0.003-1.11), p=0.059; 0.67 (0.16-2.7), p=0.579, respectively]. Metabolic dysregulation was not significantly associated with response to depression treatment in depressed climacteric women treated with individualized homeopathic treatment (IHT), fluoxetine or placebo. Due to the high prevalence of metabolic disorders and

  6. Homeopathic prescribing for chronic and acute periodontal conditions in 3 dental practices in the UK.

    PubMed

    Farrer, S; Baitson, E S; Gedah, L; Norman, C; Darby, P; Mathie, R T

    2013-10-01

    This investigation extends our previous dental data collection pilot study with the following main aims: to gain insight into the periodontal complaints that dentists in the UK treat using individualised homeopathic prescription; to record patient-assessed change in severity of treated complaint (acute or chronic); to determine periodontal pocket depth (PPD). Three dentists recorded data systematically at 249 homeopathic appointments in 51 patients over a period of 18 months. A spreadsheet enabled the data collection of the following records: date of appointment; anonymised patient identity; main periodontal problem treated; whether the condition was acute or chronic; patient-assessed clinical outcome on a 7-point Likert scale, ranging from -3 to +3, to compare the first and any subsequent appointments; whether any interventional dental surgery (IDS) had been carried out; clinician-assessed PPD measurements. At least one follow-up (FU) appointment was reported for each of 46 patients (22 chronic [6 with IDS, 16 without IDS]; 24 acute [10 with IDS, 14 without IDS]). In chronic cases, strongly positive outcomes (score of +2 or +3) were reported by 2 (33.3%) of 6 IDS patients and by 1 (6.3%) of 16 non-IDS patients. In acute cases, strongly positive outcomes were reported by 7 (70%) of 10 IDS patients and by 8 (57.2%) of 14 non-IDS patients (no statistically significant difference between sub-groups). The FU conditions most frequently treated with homeopathy were chronic periodontitis (19 patients) and acute periodontal abscess (11 patients). Analysis of PPD data was not feasible due to the small numbers of patients involved. Limited insight has been gained into the periodontal complaints treated by homeopathy in the UK. Due to small sample size and equivocal results, the interpretation of the patient-reported outcomes data is unclear. Positive findings obtained in the acute treatment setting suggest that this may be a promising area for research in periodontal

  7. Journeys in The Country of The Blind: Entanglement Theory and The Effects of Blinding on Trials of Homeopathy and Homeopathic Provings

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The idea of quantum entanglement is borrowed from physics and developed into an algebraic argument to explain how double-blinding randomized controlled trials could lead to failure to provide unequivocal evidence for the efficacy of homeopathy, and inability to distinguish proving and placebo groups in homeopathic pathogenic trials. By analogy with the famous double-slit experiment of quantum physics, and more modern notions of quantum information processing, these failings are understood as blinding causing information loss resulting from a kind of quantum superposition between the remedy and placebo. PMID:17342236

  8. Comparison of homeopathic globules prepared from high and ultra-high dilutions of various starting materials by ultraviolet light spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sabine D; Wolf, Ursula

    2016-02-01

    Homeopathic globules are commonly used in clinical practice, while research focuses on liquid potencies. Sequential dilution and succussion in their production process has been proposed to change the physico-chemical properties of the solvent(s). It has been reported that aqueous potencies of various starting materials showed significant differences in ultraviolet light transmission compared to controls and between different dilution levels. The aim of the present study was to repeat and expand these experiments to homeopathic globules. Globules were specially produced for this study by Spagyros AG (Gümligen, Switzerland) from 6 starting materials (Aconitum napellus, Atropa belladonna, phosphorus, sulfur, Apis mellifica, quartz) and for 6 dilution levels (6x, 12x, 30c, 200c, 200CF (centesimal discontinuous fluxion), 10,000CF). Native globules and globules impregnated with solvents were used as controls. Globules were dissolved in ultrapure water, and absorbance in the ultraviolet range was measured. The average absorbance from 200 to 340nm was calculated and corrected for differences between measurement days and instrumental drift. Statistically significant differences were found for A. napellus, sulfur, and A. mellifica when normalized average absorbance of the various dilution levels from the same starting material (including control and solvent control globules) was compared. Additionally, absorbance within dilution levels was compared among the various starting materials. Statistically significant differences were found among 30c, 200c and 200CF dilutions. This study has expanded previous findings from aqueous potencies to globules and may indicate that characteristics of aqueous high dilutions may be preserved and detectable in dissolved globules. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Individualized homeopathic treatment and fluoxetine for moderate to severe depression in peri- and postmenopausal women (HOMDEP-MENOP study): a randomized, double-dummy, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Macías-Cortés, Emma Del Carmen; Llanes-González, Lidia; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Perimenopausal period refers to the interval when women's menstrual cycles become irregular and is characterized by an increased risk of depression. Use of homeopathy to treat depression is widespread but there is a lack of clinical trials about its efficacy in depression in peri- and postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of individualized homeopathic treatment versus placebo and fluoxetine versus placebo in peri- and postmenopausal women with moderate to severe depression. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, superiority, three-arm trial with a 6 week follow-up study was conducted. The study was performed in a public research hospital in Mexico City in the outpatient service of homeopathy. One hundred thirty-three peri- and postmenopausal women diagnosed with major depression according to DSM-IV (moderate to severe intensity) were included. The outcomes were: change in the mean total score among groups on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Beck Depression Inventory and Greene Scale, after 6 weeks of treatment, response and remission rates, and safety. Efficacy data were analyzed in the intention-to-treat population (ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc test). After a 6-week treatment, homeopathic group was more effective than placebo by 5 points in Hamilton Scale. Response rate was 54.5% and remission rate, 15.9%. There was a significant difference among groups in response rate definition only, but not in remission rate. Fluoxetine-placebo difference was 3.2 points. No differences were observed among groups in the Beck Depression Inventory. Homeopathic group was superior to placebo in Greene Climacteric Scale (8.6 points). Fluoxetine was not different from placebo in Greene Climacteric Scale. Homeopathy and fluoxetine are effective and safe antidepressants for climacteric women. Homeopathy and fluoxetine were significantly different from placebo in response definition only. Homeopathy, but

  10. Individualized Homeopathic Treatment and Fluoxetine for Moderate to Severe Depression in Peri- and Postmenopausal Women (HOMDEP-MENOP Study): A Randomized, Double-Dummy, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Macías-Cortés, Emma del Carmen; Llanes-González, Lidia; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background Perimenopausal period refers to the interval when women's menstrual cycles become irregular and is characterized by an increased risk of depression. Use of homeopathy to treat depression is widespread but there is a lack of clinical trials about its efficacy in depression in peri- and postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of individualized homeopathic treatment versus placebo and fluoxetine versus placebo in peri- and postmenopausal women with moderate to severe depression. Methods/Design A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, superiority, three-arm trial with a 6 week follow-up study was conducted. The study was performed in a public research hospital in Mexico City in the outpatient service of homeopathy. One hundred thirty-three peri- and postmenopausal women diagnosed with major depression according to DSM-IV (moderate to severe intensity) were included. The outcomes were: change in the mean total score among groups on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Beck Depression Inventory and Greene Scale, after 6 weeks of treatment, response and remission rates, and safety. Efficacy data were analyzed in the intention-to-treat population (ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc test). Results After a 6-week treatment, homeopathic group was more effective than placebo by 5 points in Hamilton Scale. Response rate was 54.5% and remission rate, 15.9%. There was a significant difference among groups in response rate definition only, but not in remission rate. Fluoxetine-placebo difference was 3.2 points. No differences were observed among groups in the Beck Depression Inventory. Homeopathic group was superior to placebo in Greene Climacteric Scale (8.6 points). Fluoxetine was not different from placebo in Greene Climacteric Scale. Conclusion Homeopathy and fluoxetine are effective and safe antidepressants for climacteric women. Homeopathy and fluoxetine were significantly different from placebo

  11. Reporting Experiments in Homeopathic Basic Research (REHBaR).

    PubMed

    Stock-Schröer, Beate

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a criteria catalogue serving as a guideline for authors to improve quality of Reporting Experiments in Homeopathic Basic Research (REHBaR). Main focus was in the field of biochemical and biological experiments. So far, there was no guideline for scientists and authors available, unlike criteria catalogues common in clinical research. A Delphi Process was conducted among experts who published experimental work within the last five years in this field. The process included a total of five rounds, three rounds of adjusting and phrasing plus two consensus conferences. A checklist of 23 items was achieved, augmented with detailed examples how to handle each item while compiling a publication. Background, objectives and possible hypotheses are necessary to be given in the part 'introduction'. The section 'materials and methods' is the most important part, where a detailed description of chosen controls, object of investigation, experimental setup, replication, parameters, intervention, allocation, blinding, and statistical methods is mandatory. In the 'results' section sufficient details on analysed data, descriptive as well as inferential are needed. Moreover, authors should discuss their results and interpret them in the context of current evidence. REHBaR was compiled for authors when preparing their manuscripts, and to be used by scientific journals in the reviewing process. Reporting experiments in basic research in homeopathy is an important issue to state the quality and validity of gained results. A guideline for REHBaR seemed to be the first step to come to a commitment what information is necessary to be given in a paper. More than that, the catalogue can serve as a statement what the standards in good basic research should be. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Action of antibiotic oxacillin on in vitro growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) previously treated with homeopathic medicines.

    PubMed

    Passeti, Tânia Aguiar; Bissoli, Leandro Ribeiro; Macedo, Ana Paula; Libame, Registila Beltrame; Diniz, Susana; Waisse, Silvia

    2017-02-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a major public health concern worldwide. New treatment options are needed and homeopathy is one such option. We sought to assess the effect of the homeopathic medicine Belladonna (Bell) and a nosode (biotherapy) prepared from a multi-drug resistant bacterial species, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), on the same bacterium. Bell and MRSA nosode were prepared in 6cH and 30cH potencies in 30% alcohol and sterile water, according to the Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopeia and tested on MRSA National Collection of Type Cultures (NCTC) 10442. We assessed in vitro bacterial growth, deoxyribonuclease (DNAase) and hemolysin activity, and in vitro bacterial growth in combination with oxacillin (minimum inhibitory concentration - MIC). All values were compared to control: 30% alcohol and water. In vitro growth of MRSA was statistically significantly inhibited in the presence of Bell and nosode 6cH and 30cH compared to controls (p < 0.0001); and with combination of Bell or nosode 6cH and 30cH and oxacillin (p < 0.001). Bell 30cH and nosode 6cH and 30cH significantly decreased bacterial DNAse production (p < 0.001) and reduced red blood cell lysis. Cultures of MRSA treated with Belladonna or MRSA nosode exhibited reduced growth in vitro, reduced enzymatic activity and became more vulnerable to the action of the antibiotic oxacillin. Further studies are needed on the biomolecular basis of these effects. Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparative consecutive case series of 20 children with a diagnosis of ADHD receiving homeopathic treatment, compared with 10 children receiving usual care.

    PubMed

    Fibert, Philippa; Relton, Clare; Heirs, Morag; Bowden, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    20 consecutively enrolled children age 5-16 with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) received treatment by a homeopath (8 consultations and individualized remedies) for one year. Ten subsequently enrolled children received similar time and attention for 4 months. The study explored optimum treatment protocols; the effectiveness, deliverability and acceptability of treatment; and the feasibility of outcome measurement and recruitment. Parents completed Conners' Parent Rating Scale, Revised Long Version ( L) every 4 months, from which DSMIV total scores were extracted; and Measure Your Own Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP) every consultation. An interaction between time (baseline/4 months) and group (treatment/non-treatment) was found .756 F (1,28)=9.06, p=0.005. The intervention was associated with statistically significant improvements in treated children over the year: L (t (18)=4.529, p≤0.000); MYMOP (t (18)=6.938, p≤0.000). Mean DSMIV total t scores decreased at each time point: baseline: 85 (SD 5.1); 4 months 76.2 (SD 10.9); and 12 months 71.5 (SD 12.77). Recruitment of control participants was problematic. Recruitment to treatment was feasible via ADHD support groups, charities, police support agencies and social services, not schools or NHS services. Attending appointments was problematic for some participants, but home visits did not improve uptake. The best venue was a familiar clinic. Some participants took medicines inappropriately, but generally taking homeopathic remedies was acceptable and well implemented. L (80 items) was problematic for some parents. MYMOP was preferred by parents but not acceptable to stakeholders. In this small consecutive sample the intervention was associated with improvements in criminality, anger and children with a concomitant diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder ASD. Treatment by a homeopath was associated with sustained, increasing improvements and the intervention was acceptable to participants. More

  14. [The amazing career of a homeopath, philanthropist, Fourierist, Benoît-Jules Mure. (1809-1858)].

    PubMed

    Ségal, Alain; Trépardoux, Francis

    2005-01-01

    The authors evoke the difficulty of dealing with the life and work of Benoît-Jules Mure who was a homeopathic scientist and a keen specialist on propaganda. He was also an adept of Charles Fourier and he used almost his fortune to the spreading of homeopathy and at time, the improvement of social life. Thus he tried to settle humanitarian colonies in Brazil and later in Egypt, Nubian and Sudan in order to improve their fashion of life. He was hit by tuberculosis which led him discover homeopathy and by his strength of character lie led the idea of his mission in favour of his convictions. He was very angry with the official medical organisation and at last he never has been recognized as a médical doctor. The authors underline that his life and his work have probably left some definite marks in the South America let alone the birth of Socialism.

  15. Treatment with at Homeopathic Complex Medication Modulates Mononuclear Bone Marrow Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Beatriz; Abud, Ana Paula R.; de Oliveira, Carolina C.; Cardoso, Francolino; Bernardi, Raffaello Popa Di; Guimarães, Fernando S. F.; Gabardo, Juarez; de Freitas Buchi, Dorly

    2011-01-01

    A homeopathic complex medication (HCM), with immunomodulatory properties, is recommended for patients with depressed immune systems. Previous studies demonstrated that the medication induces an increase in leukocyte number. The bone marrow microenvironment is composed of growth factors, stromal cells, an extracellular matrix and progenitor cells that differentiate into mature blood cells. Mice were our biological model used in this research. We now report in vivo immunophenotyping of total bone marrow cells and ex vivo effects of the medication on mononuclear cell differentiation at different times. Cells were examined by light microscopy and cytokine levels were measured in vitro. After in vivo treatment with HCM, a pool of cells from the new marrow microenvironment was analyzed by flow cytometry to detect any trend in cell alteration. The results showed decreases, mainly, in CD11b and TER-119 markers compared with controls. Mononuclear cells were used to analyze the effects of ex vivo HCM treatment and the number of cells showing ring nuclei, niche cells and activated macrophages increased in culture, even in the absence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Cytokines favoring stromal cell survival and differentiation in culture were induced in vitro. Thus, we observe that HCM is immunomodulatory, either alone or in association with other products. PMID:19736221

  16. Short-term effects of repeated olfactory administration of homeopathic sulphur or pulsatilla on electroencephalographic alpha power in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Brooks, Audrey J; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Schwartz, Gary E

    2011-10-01

    Homeopathic pathogenetic trials usually rely on symptom self report measures. Adding objective biomarkers could enhance detection of subtle initial remedy effects. The present feasibility study examined electroencephalographic (EEG) effects of repeated olfactory administration of two polycrest remedies. College student volunteers (ages 18-30, both sexes) from an introductory psychology course were screened for good health and relatively elevated Sulphur or Pulsatilla symptom scores on the Homeopathic Constitutional Type Questionnaire (CTQ). Subjects underwent a series of 3 once-weekly double-blind sessions during which they repeatedly sniffed the remedy matched to their CTQ type and solvent controls. Each remedy was given in a 6c, 12c, and 30c potency, one potency per week, in randomly assigned order. Solvent controls included both plain distilled water and a water-ethanol (95%) solution. All sniff test solutions were further diluted just prior to laboratory sessions (0.5 ml test solution in 150 ml distilled water). Within a session, remedies and control solvents were administered via 2-s sniffs (8 sniffs of each of 4 different succussion levels for the potency in randomized order). Primary outcome variable was relative EEG power (alpha 1 8-10 Hz; alpha 2 10-12 Hz) averaged over 19 electrode sites, including all succussions for a given potency. Mixed-effect models revealed significant main effects for remedy type (Sulphur >Pulsatilla) in both alpha bands, controlling for gender, baseline resting EEG alpha, and solvent control responses. Additional analyses showed significant nonlinear interactions between dilution and time (weekly session) in alpha 2 for both remedies and alpha 1 for Sulphur. EEG alpha offers an objective biomarker of remedy effects for future studies and potential method for distinguishing time-dependent effects of specific remedies and remedy potencies from one another. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  17. Short-Term Effects of Repeated Olfactory Administration of Homeopathic Sulphur or Pulsatilla on Electroencephalographic Alpha Power in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Iris R.; Brooks, Audrey J.; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Schwartz, Gary E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Homeopathic pathogenetic trials usually rely on symptom self report measures. Adding objective biomarkers could enhance detection of subtle initial remedy effects. The present feasibility study examined electroencephalographic (EEG) effects of repeated olfactory administration of two polycrest remedies. Methods College student volunteers (ages 18–30, both sexes) from an introductory psychology course were screened for good health and relatively elevated Sulphur OR Pulsatilla symptom scores on the Homeopathic Constitutional Type Questionnaire. Subjects underwent a series of 3 once-weekly double-blind sessions during which they repeatedly sniffed the remedy matched to their CTQ type and solvent controls. Each remedy was given in a 6c, 12c, and 30c potency, one potency per week, in randomly assigned order. Solvent controls included both plain distilled water and a water-ethanol (95%) solution. All sniff test solutions were further diluted just prior to laboratory sessions (0.5 ml test solution in 150 ml distilled water). Within a session, remedies and control solvents were administered via 2-second sniffs (8 sniffs of each of 4 different succussion levels for the potency in randomized order). Primary outcome variable was relative EEG power (alpha 1 8–10 hertz; alpha 2 10–12 hertz) averaged over 19 electrode sites, including all succussions for a given potency. Results Mixed-effect models revealed significant main effects for remedy type (Sulphur>Pulsatilla) in both alpha bands, controlling for gender, baseline resting EEG alpha, and solvent control responses. Additional analyses showed significant non-linear interactions between dilution and time (weekly session) in alpha 2 for both remedies and alpha 1 for Sulphur. Conclusion EEG alpha offers an objective biomarker of remedy effects for future studies and potential method for distinguishing time-dependent effects of specific remedies and remedy potencies from one another. PMID:21962194

  18. A morphometric and molecular study of the apoptosis observed on tadpoles' tail explants under the exposition of triiodothyronine in different homeopathic dilutions.

    PubMed

    Guedes, José Roberto Pereira; Carrasco, Solange; Ferreira, Cláudia M; Bonamin, Leoni V; Goldenstein-Schainberg, Cláudia; Martins, Vanessa; Capelozzi, Vera L

    2016-08-01

    As a therapeutic system, homeopathy is supported by: i) similitude and experimentation in healthy individuals, ii) potentization. A challenge for researchers consists in looking for signals in water (or vehicle) to explain the storage of information in extremely high dilutions and the transfer of such information to the living systems. Anuran amphibian metamorphosis is controlled by thyroid hormones (TH), including the resorption of the tadpole tail. Apoptosis is a genetically regulated form of cell death that can be triggered by various extracellular and intracellular stimuli resulting in coordinated activation of a family of cysteine proteases called caspases. This study was blind and randomized. It performed in three stages: I) the identification of the most effective T3 homeopathic dilution to induce apoptotic reactions in Rana (Lithobates) catesbeianus tadpole tail explants stimulated by T3 in substantial, II) study of different controls and III) detection in explants under the action of the most effective dilution of T3, as established in Stage I. There was no statistically significant difference between tail macroscopic dimensions between the groups. T3 10cH decreased the expression of caspase 3/7 mRNA, in explants treated with T3 20 nM. The present experiment is in agreement with the hypothesis that T3, at a 10cH homeopathic dilution, changes the metamorphosis molecular network. Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Homeopathic Arnica montana for post-tonsillectomy analgesia: a randomised placebo control trial.

    PubMed

    Robertson, A; Suryanarayanan, R; Banerjee, A

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of Homeopathic Arnica in reducing the morbidity following tonsillectomy. Randomised double blind, placebo controlled trial at a tertiary referral centre. 190 patients over the age of 18 undergoing tonsillectomy were randomised into intervention and control groups receiving either Arnica 30c or identical placebo, 2 tablets 6 times in the first post-operative day and then 2 tablets twice a day for the next 7 days. The primary outcome measure was the change in pain scores (visual analogue scale) recorded by the patient on a questionnaire over 14 days post-operatively; Secondary outcome measures were: analgesia consumption, visits to the GP or hospital, antibiotic usage, the day on which their swallowing returned to normal and the day on which they returned to work. 111 (58.4%) completed questionnaires were available for analysis. The Arnica group had a significantly larger drop in pain score from day 1 to day 14 (28.3) compared to the placebo group (23.8) with p < 0.05. The two groups did not differ significantly on analgesic consumption or any of the other secondary outcome measures (number of post-operative visits to GP, use of antibiotics and secondary haemorrhage readmissions). The results of this trial suggest that Arnica montana given after tonsillectomy provides a small, but statistically significant, decrease in pain scores compared to placebo.

  20. Dielectric Dispersion Studies Indicate Change in Structure of Water by Potentised Homeopathic Medicines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahata, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Response of living bodies to different vastly `diluted' homeopathic medicines are different (rejecting the sceptic's view of `placebo' effect), though they are chemically same. Till now there is no satisfactory answer to how one such medicine differs from another in terms of scientifically measurable parameters. This paper tries to address this basic issue by taking two medicines of the same potency and two different potencies of the same medicine, namely, Arnica Mont 30c, 200c and Anacardium Orient 30c, 200c. These potencies are well above the Avogadro limit. The investigation reported here proceeds with the concept of `induced molecular structure' advanced by a number of scientists. Dielectric dispersion is used as the tool for experimental verification. It is based on the fact that when the exciting frequency of applied electric field equals the characteristic frequency, then macromolecules resonate leading to anomalous dielectric dispersion associated with sharp increase in dielectric loss, the resonance frequencies being different for macromolecules of different structures or dimensions. The results suggest that medicine- and potency-specific attributes are acquired by the vehicle (i.e. water) in the form of macromolecules generated by the potentization process of homeopathy making one medicine structurally different from another.

  1. Degree of Response to Homeopathic Potencies Correlates with Dipole Moment Size in Molecular Detectors: Implications for Understanding the Fundamental Nature of Serially Diluted and Succussed Solutions.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Steven J

    2018-02-01

     The use of solvatochromic dyes to investigate homeopathic potencies holds out the promise of understanding the nature of serially succussed and diluted solutions at a fundamental physicochemical level. Recent studies have shown that a range of different dyes interact with potencies and, moreover, the nature of the interaction is beginning to allow certain specific characteristics of potencies to be delineated.  The study reported in this article takes previous investigations further and aims to understand more about the nature of the interaction between potencies and solvatochromic dyes. To this end, the UV-visible spectra of a wide range of potential detectors of potencies have been examined using methodologies previously described.  Results presented demonstrate that solvatochromic dyes are a sub-group of a larger class of compounds capable of demonstrating interactions with potencies. In particular, amino acids containing an aromatic bridge also show marked optical changes in the presence of potencies. Several specific features of molecular detectors can now be shown to be necessary for significant interactions with homeopathic potencies. These include systems with a large dipole moment, electron delocalisation, polarizability and molecular rigidity.  Analysis of the optical changes occurring on interaction with potencies suggests that in all cases potencies increase the polarity of molecular detectors to a degree that correlates with the size of the compound's permanent or ground dipole moment. These results can be explained by inferring that potencies themselves have polarity. Possible candidates for the identity of potencies, based on these and previously reported results, are discussed. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  2. M1 homeopathic complex trigger effective responses against Leishmania (L) amazonensis in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Katia Fialho; de Santana, Fabiana Rodrigues; da Costa, Cleber Rafael Vieira; Kaplum, Vanessa; Volpato, Helito; Nakamura, Celso Vaturo; Bonamin, Leoni Villano; de Freitas Buchi, Dorly

    2017-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term referring to a range of clinical conditions caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania, Trypanosomatidae family, Kinetoplastida order that is transmitted by the bite of certain species of mosquitoes Phlebotominae subfamily. These parasites infect hosts wild and domestic mammals, considered as natural reservoirs and can also infect humans. Leishmania are obligate intramacrophage protozoa that have exclusively intracellular life style. This suggests that the amastigotes possess mechanisms to avoid killing by host cells. Cutaneous leishmaniasis, the most common form of the disease, causes ulcers on exposed parts of the body, leading to disfigurement, permanent scars, and stigma and in some cases disability. Many studies concluded that the cytokines profile and immune system of host have fundamental role in humans and animals natural self-healing. Conventional treatments are far from ideals and the search for new therapeutic alternatives is considered a strategic priority line of research by the World Health Organization. A promising approach in the field of basic research in homeopathy is the treatment of experimental infections with homeopathic drugs prepared from natural substances associations highly diluted, which comprise a combination of several different compounds considered as useful for a symptom or disease. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of M1, a complex homeopathic product, in macrophage-Leishmania interaction in vitro and in vivo. It was used RAW cells lineage and BALB/c mice as a host for the promastigotes of L. amazonensis (WHOM/BR/75/Josefa). Several biochemical and morphological parameters were determined. Together, the harmonic results obtained in this study indicate that, in general, the highly diluted products trigger rapid and effective responses by living organisms, cells and mice, against Leishmania, by altering cytokines profile, by NO increasing (p<0.05), by decreasing parasitic load (p<0

  3. Can Homeopathic Arsenic Remedy Combat Arsenic Poisoning in Humans Exposed to Groundwater Arsenic Contamination?: A Preliminary Report on First Human Trial

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Groundwater arsenic (As) has affected millions of people globally distributed over 20 countries. In parts of West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh alone, over 100 million people are at risk, but supply of As-free water is grossly inadequate. Attempts to remove As by using orthodox medicines have mostly been unsuccessful. A potentized homeopathic remedy, Arsenicum Album-30, was administered to a group of As affected people and thereafter the As contents in their urine and blood were periodically determined. The activities of various toxicity marker enzymes and compounds in the blood, namely aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione, were also periodically monitored up to 3 months. The results are highly encouraging and suggest that the drug can alleviate As poisoning in humans. PMID:16322812

  4. [Changes in physico-chemical parameters of homeopathic remedies ferrum metallicum CH6 and ferrum metallicum CH30 after exposure to high frequency electromagnetic radiation of low intensity].

    PubMed

    Mendez, N M

    2005-01-01

    It is considered the microwaves electromagnetic radiation do not affect the materials, alive or not, when used in low power. In high power, the interaction effects would be the material warming (thermal effect). However, in the last years, the studies about electromagnetic radiation with low power (non thermal effect) in the human being have been increasing. It was found out the electromagnetic radiation, even with low power, can affect the living organisms and biosubstratum. In the present work the influence of electromagnetic radiation (2.45 GHz 500 W/cm2), on physical and chemical parameters of the homeopathic pharmaceutics products in shown.

  5. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Related to Diabetes Mellitus Among Diabetics and Nondiabetics Visiting Homeopathic Hospitals in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Koley, Munmun; Saha, Subhranil; Arya, Jogendra Singh; Choubey, Gurudev; Ghosh, Shubhamoy; Chattopadhyay, Rajat; Das, Kaushik Deb; Ghosh, Aloke; Hait, Himangsu; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Banerjee, Tanapa

    2016-01-01

    High prevalence of undiagnosed cases of diabetes mellitus and poor knowledge, awareness, and practice has increased premature death, costly complications, and financial burden. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in November 2014 on 273 diabetics and 355 nondiabetics in 3 government homeopathic hospitals in West Bengal, India. A self-administered questionnaire assessing knowledge, awareness, and practice related to diabetes was used. A total of 17.5% to 29.3% of the participants were aware of the normal blood sugar level. Lack of insulin, frequent urination, hypertension, and poor wound healing were identified most frequently as the cause, symptom, association, and complications. A total of 35.5% to 46.5% said that diabetes was preventable; 14.1% to 31.9% knew that diabetes was controllable rather than curable. Consumption of planned diet, avoiding sugar, and testing blood sugar were the most frequently identified components of healthy lifestyle, diabetic diet, and diagnostic domain. Diabetics had higher knowledge and awareness than nondiabetics (P < .0001); still the latter need to be made aware and knowledgeable to curtail the ever-increasing burden of diabetes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Inhibition of peripheral blood neutrophil oxidative burst in periodontitis patients with a homeopathic medication Traumeel S

    PubMed Central

    žilinskas, Juozas; žekonis, Jonas; žekonis, Gediminas; Šadzevičienė, Renata; Sapragonienė, Marija; Navickaitė, Justina; Barzdžiukaitė, Ingrida

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The anti-inflammatory effects of a homeopathic remedy, Traumeel S, have been observed in experimental and clinical studies; however, its antioxidant properties have not been elucidated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant effects of Traumeel S on peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with periodontitis. Material/Methods The study was performed using venous blood of 22 individuals with chronic periodontitis and 21 healthy subjects. The antioxidant effects of Traumeel S on the production of reactive oxygen species by unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli neutrophils were investigated using luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). Results Polymorphonuclear leukocytes of periodontitis patients produced higher levels (p<0.01) of light output of lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence and significantly reduced (p<0.01) light output of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence than analogous cells of healthy subjects. Highly diluted (10−4 of the stem solution) Traumeel S significantly (by approximately 50%) reduced superoxide-induced oxidation of lucigenin by unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli polymorphonuclear leukocytes of periodontitis patients and had a tendency to intensify luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Preincubation of the unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli polymorphonuclear leukocytes of healthy subjects with Traumeel S exerts no inhibitory action on the luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence of the above-mentioned cells. Conclusions This study indicates that Traumeel S may significantly reduce production of superoxide anion by unstimulated and stimulated peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils of periodontitis patients. PMID:21525811

  7. Performing 'pragmatic holism': Professionalisation and the holistic discourse of non-medically qualified acupuncturists and homeopaths in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Givati, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine practitioners have often utilised 'holism' as a key identification mark of their practice, distancing themselves from 'the reductionist biomedicine'. However, the past couple of decades have witnessed increased engagement of several complementary and alternative medicines in professionalisation, which includes a degree of biomedical alignment while 'reducing' holistic claims in order to provide practice with a 'credible outlook' and move closer to the mainstream, a development which challenges the role of holism in complementary and alternative medicine practices. This article explores the strategies by which two groups of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners, namely, non-medically qualified acupuncturists and homeopaths in the United Kingdom, pragmatically accommodate holistic notions as a professional resource, a process of negotiation between maintaining their holistic premise, on the one hand, and the drive to professionalise and enhance their societal status, on the other. Based on in-depth interviews with non-medically qualified acupuncture and homeopathy practitioners and school principals, textual analysis of practitioners' web sites and observation of practice, the findings demonstrate the dynamic approach to 'holism' in complementary and alternative medicine practice. This discourse, through which practitioners use a range of strategies in order to 'narrow' or 'expand' their holistic expression, can be described as 'pragmatic holism', by which they try to make gains from the formalisation/standardisation processes, without losing the therapies' holistic outlook and appeal. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Homeopathy in France in 2011-2012 according to reimbursements in the French national health insurance database (SNIIRAM).

    PubMed

    Piolot, Michel; Fagot, Jean-Paul; Rivière, Sébastien; Fagot-Campagna, Anne; Debeugny, Gonzague; Couzigou, Patrice; Alla, François

    2015-08-01

    The use of homeopathic medicine is poorly described and the frequency of combined allopathic and homeopathic prescriptions is unknown. To analyse data on medicines, prescribers and patients for homeopathic prescriptions that are reimbursed by French national health insurance. The French national health insurance databases (SNIIRAM) were used to analyse prescriptions of reimbursed homeopathic drugs or preparations in the overall French population, during the period July 2011-June 2012. A total of 6,705,420 patients received at least one reimbursement for a homeopathic preparation during the 12-month period, i.e. 10.2% of the overall population, with a predominance in females (68%) and a peak frequency observed in children aged 0-4 years (18%). About one third of patients had only one reimbursement, and one half of patients had three or more reimbursements. A total of 120,110 healthcare professionals (HCPs) prescribed at least one homeopathic drug or preparation. They represented 43.5% of the overall population of HCPs, nearly 95% of general practitioners, dermatologists and pediatricians, and 75% of midwives. Homeopathy accounted for 5% of the total number of drug units prescribed by HCPs. Allopathic medicines were coprescribed with 55% of homeopathic prescriptions. Many HCPs occasionally prescribe reimbursed homeopathic preparations, representing however a small percentage of reimbursements compared to allopathic medicines. About 10% of the French population, particularly young children and women, received at least one homeopathic preparation during the year. In more than one half of cases, reimbursed homeopathic preparations are prescribed in combination with allopathic medicines. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A retrospective cost-analysis of additional homeopathic treatment in Germany: Long-term economic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Julia K.; Witt, Claudia M.; Reinhold, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to provide a long-term cost comparison of patients using additional homeopathic treatment (homeopathy group) with patients using usual care (control group) over an observation period of 33 months. Methods Health claims data from a large statutory health insurance company were analysed from both the societal perspective (primary outcome) and from the statutory health insurance perspective (secondary outcome). To compare costs between patient groups, homeopathy and control patients were matched in a 1:1 ratio using propensity scores. Predictor variables for the propensity scores included health care costs and both medical and demographic variables. Health care costs were analysed using an analysis of covariance, adjusted for baseline costs, between groups both across diagnoses and for specific diagnoses over a period of 33 months. Specific diagnoses included depression, migraine, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and headache. Results Data from 21,939 patients in the homeopathy group (67.4% females) and 21,861 patients in the control group (67.2% females) were analysed. Health care costs over the 33 months were 12,414 EUR [95% CI 12,022–12,805] in the homeopathy group and 10,428 EUR [95% CI 10,036–10,820] in the control group (p<0.0001). The largest cost differences were attributed to productivity losses (homeopathy: EUR 6,289 [6,118–6,460]; control: EUR 5,498 [5,326–5,670], p<0.0001) and outpatient costs (homeopathy: EUR 1,794 [1,770–1,818]; control: EUR 1,438 [1,414–1,462], p<0.0001). Although the costs of the two groups converged over time, cost differences remained over the full 33 months. For all diagnoses, homeopathy patients generated higher costs than control patients. Conclusion The analysis showed that even when following-up over 33 months, there were still cost differences between groups, with higher costs in the homeopathy group. PMID:28915242

  10. A short history of the development of homeopathy in India.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ajoy Kumar

    2010-04-01

    Homeopathy was introduced in India the early 19th century. It flourished in Bengal at first, and then spread all over India. In the beginning, the system was extensively practised by amateurs in the civil and military services and others. Mahendra Lal Sircar was the first Indian who became a homeopathic physician. A number of allopathic doctors started homeopathic practice following Sircar's lead. The 'Calcutta Homeopathic Medical College', the first homeopathic medical college was established in 1881. This institution took on a major role in popularising homeopathy in India. In 1973, the Government of India recognised homeopathy as one of the national systems of medicine and set up the Central Council of Homeopathy (CCH) to regulate its education and practice. Now, only qualified registered homeopaths can practice homeopathy in India. At present, in India, homeopathy is the third most popular method of medical treatment after allopathy and Ayurveda. There are over 200,000 registered homeopathic doctors currently, with approximately 12,000 more being added every year.

  11. Homeopathy for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jennifer; Williams, Anna-Leila; Girard, Christine; Njike, Valentine Yanchou; Katz, David

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a preliminary trial evaluating the effectiveness of homeopathy in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This work was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. This study was conducted in a private homeopathic clinic in the Seattle metropolitan area. Subjects included children 6-12 years of age meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria for ADHD. Forty-three subjects were randomized to receive a homeopathic consultation and either an individualized homeopathic remedy or placebo. Patients were seen by homeopathic physicians every 6 weeks for 18 weeks. Outcome measures included the Conner's Global Index-Parent, Conner's Global Index- Teacher, Conner's Parent Rating Scale-Brief, Continuous Performance Test, and the Clinical Global Impression Scale. There were no statistically significant differences between homeopathic remedy and placebo groups on the primary or secondary outcome variables. However, there were statistically and clinically significant improvements in both groups on many of the outcome measures. This pilot study provides no evidence to support a therapeutic effect of individually selected homeopathic remedies in children with ADHD. A therapeutic effect of the homeopathic encounter is suggested and warrants further evaluation. Future studies should be carried out over a longer period of time and should include a control group that does not receive the homeopathic consultation. Comparison to conventional stimulant medication for ADHD also should be considered.

  12. Pediatric homeopathy: a prospective observational survey based on parent proxy-reports of their children's health-related Quality of Life in six European countries and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenhoven, Michel; Goossens, Maria; Anelli, Marco; Sermeus, Guy; Kupers, Peter; Morgado, Carlos; Martin, Eduardo; Bezerra, Melissa

    2014-10-01

    Many European citizens regularly consult homeopathic doctors. Especially for children there is very little data available about the reasons they visit a homeopathic doctor. What are the expectations of the parents consulting a Homeopath MD with their child, who are they and last but not least are they satisfied with their initiative? This study including 773 children from six European countries and Brazil is aimed to look at parent-proxy satisfaction with homeopathic treatment prescribed for their children by a homeopathic doctor after a follow-up of two months. The questionnaire was developed from the methodology used in a survey of adults published in 2002. An initial questionnaire included demographic information and questions for assessing health-related Quality of Life (QoL). A follow-up questionnaire collected data on changes in QoL. The demographic characteristics of respondents showed more male children (53.1%) but more female parent-proxies (93.4%). 73.7% of respondents had previously tried conventional treatments; 26.3% non-conventional approaches. Satisfaction with the medical homeopathic consultation was high. Reported differences between baseline and final QoL ondexes are positive for all four studied conditions. It range from 3.206 to 10.188. Considering 7% as a reference value for "minimal clinical difference", this is reached for 2 on 4 conditions (8.473 and 10.188). Changes in complaint limitations visual scales are positive, even if uncertain for skin complaints and influenced parents satisfaction. Conclusions on clinical impact must be cautious. 4.2% of patients experienced side-effects which they attribute to homeopathic treatment. 10.1% of patients reported significant aggravation at the beginning of homeopathic treatment, 19% slight aggravation of symptoms. The satisfaction of parents using a medical homeopathic approach for their children is linked to the perceived competence of the doctor homeopath, the perceived improvement of the main

  13. The use of animal models in homeopathic research--a review of 2010-2014 PubMed indexed papers.

    PubMed

    Bonamin, Leoni Villano; Cardoso, Thayná Neves; de Carvalho, Aloísio Cunha; Amaral, Juliana Gimenez

    2015-10-01

    In the 1990s, a study was performed on the effects of highly diluted thyroxine on frog metamorphosis. This model represented one of the most discussed examples of the biological effects of high dilutions over the next two decades. In 2010, another critical conceptual review of the use of animal models in homeopathy and high-dilution research was published. The main contribution of these studies was the elucidation of the biological features and phenomenology of the effects of high dilutions on living systems, representing an important step forward in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of homeopathic medicines. We performed a further review of this line of investigation using the same methods. Fifty-three articles that were indexed in the PubMed database and used 12 different animal species were systematically evaluated. Only a fraction of the studies (29/53) reported herein were performed with "ultra high" dilutions. The other studies were performed with dilutions in ranges below 10(-23) (14/53 articles) or commercial complexes (10/53 articles). Only two articles reported negative results; both used in vivo protocols to test commercial complexes, one in fish and one in bees. The quality of the employed techniques improved in 2010-2014 compared with the studies that were reviewed previously in 2010, with the inclusion of more ethically refined protocols, including in vitro primary cell cultures and ex vivo studies (10/53 articles), often with three or more replicates and analyses of epigenetic mechanisms that were previously unknown in 2010. In our updated review of the past 5 years, we found further demonstrations of the biological effects of homeopathy using more refined animal models and in vitro techniques. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Where Does Homeopathy Fit in Pharmacy Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Teela

    2007-01-01

    Homeopathy has been the cause of much debate in the scientific literature with respect to the plausibility and efficacy of homeopathic preparations and practice. Nonetheless, many consumers, pharmacists, physicians, and other health care providers continue to use or practice homeopathic medicine and advocate its safety and efficacy. As drug experts, pharmacists are expected to be able to counsel their patients on how to safely and effectively use medications, which technically includes homeopathic products. Yet many pharmacists feel that the homeopathic system of medicine is based on unscientific theories that lack supporting evidence. Since consumers continue to use homeopathic products, it is necessary for pharmacists to have a basic knowledge of homeopathy and to be able to counsel patients about its general use, the current state of the evidence and its use in conjunction with other medications. PMID:17429507

  15. Homeopathy and health related Quality of Life: a patient satisfaction survey in six European countries and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenhoven, Michel; Goossens, Maria; Anelli, Marco; Sermeus, Guy; Kupers, Peter; Morgado, Carlos; Martin, Eduardo; Bezerra, Melissa

    2014-10-01

    Many patients throughout the world consult homeopathic medical doctors. Using a similar methodology as in a first survey published in 2002 a second survey was done including 919 adults receiving homeopathic treatment in six European countries and Brazil aimed to look at who are they, their reasons for consultations and expectations and satisfaction with homeopathy prescribed by a homeopathic doctor after a follow-up time of six months. An initial questionnaire included demographic information and questions for assessing health-related Quality of Life (QoL). A follow-up questionnaire collected data on changes in QoL. 77% patients had initially used conventional treatments and 23% other non-conventional treatments. Satisfaction of patients with the medical homeopathic consultation is high. The difference between the final QoL scores after six months and the baseline are positive. Reported differences between baseline and final index range from 3.87 to 10.41 depending on diagnosis. Taking 7% as a reference value for 'minimal clinically significant difference', this is reached for 3 of 8 conditions. Changes in complaint limitations visual scales are positive. Conclusions on clinical impact must be cautious. 6% of the patients experienced side-effects which they attributed to homeopathic treatment. 7.8% of the patients reported significant aggravation at the beginning of the homeopathic treatment and 26.2% slight aggravation of symptoms. The satisfaction of patients using a medical homeopathic approach is linked to the perceived competence of the doctor homeopath, the perceived improvement of the main complaints limitations and the time dedicated to them by the doctor. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of a dragonfly (Anax i.) homeopathic remedy on learning, memory and cell morphology in mice.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Oguz; Ulak, Guner; Kokturk, Sibel; Komsuoglu Celikyurt, Ipek; Tanyeri, Pelin; Akar, Furuzan; Erden, Faruk

    2016-02-01

    Homeopathy is a form of alternative medicine in which uses highly diluted preparations that are believed to cause healthy people to exhibit symptoms similar to those exhibited by patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dragonfly (Anax imperator, Anax i.) on learning and memory in naive mice using the Morris water maze (MWM) test; moreover, the effects of dragonfly on MK-801-induced cognitive dysfunction were evaluated. Male balb-c mice were treated with dragonfly (30C and 200C) or MK-801 (0.2 mg/kg) alone or concurrently (n = 10). Dragonfly (D) and MK-801 were administered subchronically for 6 days intraperitoneally 60 min and 30 min, respectively, before the daily performance of the MWM test. This study revealed that in the familiarization session and first session of the MWM test, Anax i. D30 significantly decreased escape latency compared to the control group, although MK-801, D30 and D200 significantly increased escape latency at the end of five acquisition sessions. Anax i. combined with dizocilpine maleate (MK-801) also significantly decreased escape latency in the familiarization session and first session of the MWM test, although this combination increased escape latency compared to the MK-801 alone group at the end of the test. Time spent in escape platform's quadrant in the probe trial significantly decreased while mean distance to platform significantly increased in MK-801, D30 and D200 groups. In the MWM test, Anax i. combined with MK-801 significantly decreased speed of the animals compared to the MK-801 alone group. General cell morphology was disturbed in the MK-801 group while D30 and D200 seemed to improve cell damage in the MK-801 group. These results suggest that the homeopathic Anax i. can impair learning acquisition and reference memory, and it has beneficial effects on disturbed cell morphology. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Homeopathy for Depression - DEP-HOM: study protocol for a randomized, partially double-blind, placebo controlled, four armed study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Homeopathy is often sought by patients with depression. In classical homeopathy, the treatment consists of two main elements: the case history and the prescription of an individually selected homeopathic remedy. Previous data suggest that individualized homeopathic Q-potencies were not inferior to the antidepressant fluoxetine in a sample of patients with moderate to severe depression. However, the question remains whether individualized homeopathic Q-potencies and/or the type of the homeopathic case history have a specific therapeutical effect in acute depression as this has not yet been investigated. The study aims to assess the two components of individualized homeopathic treatment for acute depression, i.e., to investigate the specific effect of individualized Q-potencies versus placebo and to investigate the effect of different approaches to the homeopathic case history. Methods/Design A randomized, partially double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-armed trial using a 2 × 2 factorial design with a six-week study duration per patient will be performed. 228 patients diagnosed with major depression (moderate episode) by a psychiatrist will be included. The primary endpoint is the total score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale after six weeks. Secondary end points are: Hamilton Depression Rating Scale total score after two and four weeks; response and remission rates, Beck Depression inventory total score, quality of life and safety at two, four and six weeks. Statistical analyses will be by intention-to-treat. The main endpoint will be analysed by a two-factorial analysis of covariance. Within this model generalized estimation equations will be used to estimate differences between verum and placebo, and between both types of case history. Discussion For the first time this study evaluates both the specific effect of homeopathic medicines and of a homeopathic case taking in patients with depression. It is an attempt to deal with the

  18. 'Homeopathy': untangling the debate.

    PubMed

    Relton, Clare; O'Cathain, Alicia; Thomas, Kate J

    2008-07-01

    There are active public campaigns both for and against homeopathy, and its continuing availability in the NHS is debated in the medical, scientific and popular press. However, there is a lack of clarity in key terms used in the debate, and in how the evidence base of homeopathy is described and interpreted. The term 'homeopathy' is used with several different meanings including: the therapeutic system, homeopathic medicine, treatment by a homeopath, and the principles of 'homeopathy'. Conclusions drawn from one of these aspects are often inappropriately applied to another aspect. In interpreting the homeopathy evidence it is important to understand that the existing clinical experimental (randomised controlled trial) evidence base provides evidence as to the efficacy of homeopathic medicines, but not the effectiveness of treatment by a homeopath. The observational evidence base provides evidence as to the effectiveness of treatment by a homeopath. We make four recommendations to promote clarity in the reporting, design and interpretation of homeopathy research.

  19. Adverse effects of homeopathy, what do we know? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Stub, Trine; Musial, Frauke; Kristoffersen, Agnete A; Alræk, Terje; Liu, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    Homeopathy is a popular treatment modality among patient, however there is sparse research about adverse effects of homeopathy. A concept unique for homeopathy, is homeopathic aggravation that is understood as a transient worsening of the patients' symptoms before an expected improvement occurs. From a risk perspective it is vital that a distinction between homeopathic aggravations and adverse effects is established. There is a lack of systematic information on how frequent adverse effects and homeopathic aggravations are reported in studies. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. Sixteen electronic databases were searched for Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs). The searches were limited from the year 1995 to January 2011. Forty-one RCTs, with a total of 6.055 participants were included. A subtotal of 39 studies was included in the additional meta-analysis. A total of 28 trials (68%) reported adverse effects and five trials (12%) reported homeopathic aggravations. The meta-analysis (including six subgroup comparisons) demonstrated that no significant difference was found between homeopathy and control with OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.86-1.14, I(2)=54%. More than two third of the adverse effects were classified as grade 1 (68%) and two third were classified as grade 2 (25%) and grade 3 (6%) according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects. Homeopathic aggravation was classified as grade 1 (98%) and grade 3 (2%), suggesting that homeopathic aggravations were reported to be less severe than adverse effects. The methodological quality according to a method recommended in the Cochrane handbook for RCTs, was high. Adverse effects including the concept of homeopathic aggravations are commonly reported in trials. The meta-analysis demonstrated that the proportion of patients experiencing adverse effects to be similar for patients randomized to homeopathic treatment compared to patients randomized to placebo and conventional medicine

  20. Immunology and Homeopathy. 3. Experimental Studies on Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Bellavite, Paolo; Ortolani, Riccardo; Conforti, Anita

    2006-01-01

    A search of the literature and the experiments carried out by the authors of this review show that there are a number of animal models where the effect of homeopathic dilutions or the principles of homeopathic medicine have been tested. The results relate to the immunostimulation by ultralow doses of antigens, the immunological models of the ‘simile’, the regulation of acute or chronic inflammatory processes and the use of homeopathic medicines in farming. The models utilized by different research groups are extremely etherogeneous and differ as the test medicines, the dilutions and the outcomes are concerned. Some experimental lines, particularly those utilizing mice models of immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory effects of homeopathic complex formulations, give support to a real effect of homeopathic high dilutions in animals, but often these data are of preliminary nature and have not been independently replicated. The evidence emerging from animal models is supporting the traditional ‘simile’ rule, according to which ultralow doses of compounds, that in high doses are pathogenic, may have paradoxically a protective or curative effect. Despite a few encouraging observational studies, the effectiveness of the homeopathic prevention or therapy of infections in veterinary medicine is not sufficiently supported by randomized and controlled trials. PMID:16786046

  1. Integrative Nanomedicine: Treating Cancer With Nanoscale Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Sarter, Barbara; Koithan, Mary; Banerji, Prasanta; Banerji, Pratip; Jain, Shamini; Ives, John

    2014-01-01

    Finding safer and more effective treatments for specific cancers remains a significant challenge for integrative clinicians and researchers worldwide. One emerging strategy is the use of nanostructured forms of drugs, vaccines, traditional animal venoms, herbs, and nutraceutical agents in cancer treatment. The recent discovery of nanoparticles in traditional homeopathic medicines adds another point of convergence between modern nanomedicine and alternative interventional strategies. A way in which homeopathic remedies could initiate anticancer effects includes cell-to-cell signaling actions of both exogenous and endogenous (exosome) nanoparticles. The result can be a cascade of modulatory biological events with antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects. The Banerji Protocols reflect a multigenerational clinical system developed by homeopathic physicians in India who have treated thousands of patients with cancer. A number of homeopathic remedy sources from the Banerji Protocols (eg, Calcarea phosphorica; Carcinosin—tumor-derived breast cancer tissue prepared homeopathically) overlap those already under study in nonhomeopathic nanoparticle and nanovesicle tumor exosome cancer vaccine research. Past research on antineoplastic effects of nano forms of botanical extracts such as Phytolacca, Gelsemium, Hydrastis, Thuja, and Ruta as well as on homeopathic remedy potencies made from the same types of source materials suggests other important overlaps. The replicated finding of silica, silicon, and nano-silica release from agitation of liquids in glassware adds a proven nonspecific activator and amplifier of immunological effects. Taken together, the nanoparticulate research data and the Banerji Protocols for homeopathic remedies in cancer suggest a way forward for generating advances in cancer treatment with natural product–derived nanomedicines. PMID:24753994

  2. Integrative nanomedicine: treating cancer with nanoscale natural products.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Sarter, Barbara; Koithan, Mary; Banerji, Prasanta; Banerji, Pratip; Jain, Shamini; Ives, John

    2014-01-01

    Finding safer and more effective treatments for specific cancers remains a significant challenge for integrative clinicians and researchers worldwide. One emerging strategy is the use of nanostructured forms of drugs, vaccines, traditional animal venoms, herbs, and nutraceutical agents in cancer treatment. The recent discovery of nanoparticles in traditional homeopathic medicines adds another point of convergence between modern nanomedicine and alternative interventional strategies. A way in which homeopathic remedies could initiate anticancer effects includes cell-to-cell signaling actions of both exogenous and endogenous (exosome) nanoparticles. The result can be a cascade of modulatory biological events with antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects. The Banerji Protocols reflect a multigenerational clinical system developed by homeopathic physicians in India who have treated thousands of patients with cancer. A number of homeopathic remedy sources from the Banerji Protocols (eg, Calcarea phosphorica; Carcinosin-tumor-derived breast cancer tissue prepared homeopathically) overlap those already under study in nonhomeopathic nanoparticle and nanovesicle tumor exosome cancer vaccine research. Past research on antineoplastic effects of nano forms of botanical extracts such as Phytolacca, Gelsemium, Hydrastis, Thuja, and Ruta as well as on homeopathic remedy potencies made from the same types of source materials suggests other important overlaps. The replicated finding of silica, silicon, and nano-silica release from agitation of liquids in glassware adds a proven nonspecific activator and amplifier of immunological effects. Taken together, the nanoparticulate research data and the Banerji Protocols for homeopathic remedies in cancer suggest a way forward for generating advances in cancer treatment with natural product-derived nanomedicines.

  3. Expectations and effectiveness of medical treatment and classical homeopathic treatment for patients with hypersensitivity illnesses--one year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Launsø, Laila; Henningsen, Inge; Rieper, Jonas; Brender, Henriette; Sandø, Finn; Hvenegaard, Anne

    2007-10-01

    To describe and compare characteristics of adult patients who received treatment for hypersensitivity illnesses by general practitioners (GPs) and classical homeopaths (CHs) over a period of 1 year and examine the statistical predictors of self-reported treatment outcomes. We conducted a survey on 151 Danish adult patients with hypersensitivity illnesses, who chose treatment from one of 13 GPs or one of 10 CHs who participated in the project. The treatments were given as individual packages in the naturalistic clinical setting. Patients completed questionnaires at start of treatment, after 6 months and a year after start of treatment. Response rates for the first, second and third questionnaire were respectively 68%, 98%, 95% for the GP patients and 82%, 98%, 94% for the CH patients. Patients seeking CH treatment in this study are significantly different in gender and education from patients seeking GP treatment. We did not find significant differences in terms of occupational training, occupation, sickness absence due to hypersensitivity illnesses, diseases other than hypersensitivity illnesses, symptoms severity due to hypersensitivity illnesses before treatment and expectation of the ability of the treatment to alleviate symptoms. Eighty-eight percent of GP and 21% of CH patients were continuing treatment after 1 year. Regression analysis showed that the only significant independent variables to explain the probability of obtaining very positive effect or cure for GPs and CHs were that the patients were in 'maintenance treatment', and had high expectation before treatment of the ability of the treatment to relieve their symptoms. In this study self-reported very positive effect of GP treatment and very positive effect and cure of CH treatment are associated with the patients' high expectation of the treatment and continuation of maintenance treatment.

  4. Homeopathy--between tradition and modern science: remedies as carriers of significance.

    PubMed

    Almirantis, Yannis

    2013-04-01

    The healing potential and description of homeopathic remedies, as determined in homeopathic pathogenic trials (HPTs) and verified by medical experience, are often found to be meaningfully connected with the symbolic content attributed to the original materials (tinctures, metals etc) through tradition or modern semantics. Such a connection is incompatible with a biomolecular mechanistic explanation of the healing action of remedies. The physiological effects of crude substances are often similar to the symptoms of illnesses cured by the corresponding homeopathic remedy. This is considered a manifestation of the similia principle. Evidence is brought here that in several cases the inverse situation occurs, with the healing properties of the crude substance and those of its homeopathic preparation partially coinciding, the remedy usually having broader healing properties. The existence of these two possibilities in the relationship of medicinal actions of remedy and the crude substance, offers evidence in favor of a direct involvement of the level of significances in the mechanism underlying the homeopathic phenomenon. Finally, an experimental methodology is proposed, which may bring the result of double-blind randomized studies for homeopathic remedies closer to the reported performance of homeopathy in real life medical practice. If successful, this method would be a further indication of a non-local, significance-related interpretation of homeopathy. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Homeopathy – what are the active ingredients? An exploratory study using the UK Medical Research Council's framework for the evaluation of complex interventions

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Trevor DB; Weiss, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    Background Research in homeopathy has traditionally addressed itself to defining the effectiveness of homeopathic potencies in comparison to placebo medication. There is now increasing awareness that the homeopathic consultation is in itself a therapeutic intervention working independently or synergistically with the prescribed remedy. Our objective was to identify and evalute potential "active ingredients" of the homeopathic approach as a whole, in a prospective formal case series, which draws on actual consultation data, and is based on the MRC framework for the evaluation of complex interventions. Methods Following on from a theoretical review of how homeopathic care might mediate its effects, 18 patients were prospectively recruited to a case series based at Bristol Homeopathic Hospital. Patients, who lived with one of three index conditions, were interviewed before and after a five visit "package of care". All consultations were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Additional data, including generic and condition-specific questionnaires, artwork and "significant other" reports were collected. Textual data was subject to thematic analysis and triangulated with other sources. Results We judged that around one third of patients had experienced a major improvement in their health over the study period, a third had some improvement and a third had no improvement. Putative active ingredients included the patients' "openness to the mind-body connection", consultational empathy, in-depth enquiry into bodily complaints, disclosure, the remedy matching process and, potentially, the homeopathic remedies themselves. Conclusion This study has has identified, using primary consultation and other data, a range of factors that might account for the effectiveness of homeopathic care. Some of these, such as empathy, are non-specific. Others, such as the remedy matching process, are specific to homeopathy. These findings counsel against the use of placebo-controlled RCT designs in

  6. Homeopathy for Depression: A Randomized, Partially Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Four-Armed Study (DEP-HOM)

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Ubiratan C.; Krüger, Stephanie; Teut, Michael; Lüdtke, Rainer; Schützler, Lena; Martins, Friederike; Willich, Stefan N.; Linde, Klaus; Witt, Claudia M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The specific clinical benefit of the homeopathic consultation and of homeopathic remedies in patients with depression has not yet been investigated. Aims To investigate the 1) specific effect of individualized homeopathic Q-potencies compared to placebo and 2) the effect of an extensive homeopathic case taking (case history I) compared to a shorter, rather conventional one (case history II) in the treatment of acute major depression (moderate episode) after six weeks. Methods A randomized, partially double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-armed trial using a 2×2 factorial design with a six-week study duration per patient was performed. Results A total of 44 from 228 planned patients were randomized (2∶1∶2∶1 randomization: 16 homeopathic Q-potencies/case history I, 7 placebo/case history I, 14 homeopathic Q-potencies/case history II, 7 placebo/case history II). Because of recruitment problems, the study was terminated prior to full recruitment, and was underpowered for the preplanned confirmatory hypothesis testing. Exploratory data analyses showed heterogeneous and inconclusive results with large variance in the sample. The mean difference for the Hamilton-D after 6 weeks was 2.0 (95%CI −1.2;5.2) for Q-potencies vs. placebo and −3.1 (−5.9;−0.2) for case history I vs. case history II. Overall, no consistent or clinically relevant results across all outcomes between homeopathic Q-potencies versus placebo and homeopathic versus conventional case taking were observed. The frequency of adverse events was comparable for all groups. Conclusions Although our results are inconclusive, given that recruitment into this trial was very difficult and we had to terminate early, we cannot recommend undertaking a further trial addressing this question in a similar setting. Prof. Dr. Claudia Witt had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Trial registration

  7. [The agent Latrodectus and canine paecilomycotic eclampsia as a laboratory model in the survey of treatment for mycoses and parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Gasparian, E R; Streliaeva, A V; Chebyshev, N V; Sagieva, A T; Polzikov, V V; Lazareva, N B; Kurilov, D V; Zuev, S S; Shcheglova, T A; Sadykov, V M

    2012-01-01

    The extragent used to prepare a Latrodectus mactans hydrocarbon extract is a multicomponent system composed of alkanes, alkenes, and arenes. More than 100 compounds were identified in the hydrocarbon extract (petroleum). The petroleum matrix of Latrodectus mactans was first obtained to manufacture homeopathic remedies. The authors could prepare the first Russian homeopathic medicine from Latrodectus mactans, which proved to be effective in treating canine eclampsia. Canine experiments provide a rationale for the authors' choice as the only homeopathic remedy among thousand known drugs to treat female eclampsia. It is Latrodectus mactans that is in the list of homeopathic medicines permitted for use in accordance with Order No. 335 (Supplement 2) of the Ministry of Health and Medical Industry of Russia, issued on November 29, 1995. It is manufactured from Latrodectus mactans living in the USA.

  8. Individualized homeopathy in a group of Egyptian asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Shafei, Heba Farid; AbdelDayem, Soha Mahmoud; Mohamed, Nagwa Hassan

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate homeopathy as an adjunctive treatment for bronchial asthma in children. In a prospective observational longitudinal study the effects of individualised homeopathic medicines were assessed in 30 children with asthma as an adjunct to conventional treatment. The main outcome measures were frequency of attacks, use of medication, night awakening and spirometry at baseline and at follow-up till 6 months. There were clinically relevant and statistically significant changes in those measuring severity, indicating relative improvements after 3 months and absolute improvements after 6 months of treatment by homeopathic medicines. This study provides evidence that homeopathic medicines, as prescribed by experienced homeopathic practitioners, improve severity of asthma in children. Controlled studies should be conducted. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of physician preferences for homeopathic or conventional medicines on patients with musculoskeletal disorders: results from the EPI3-MSD cohort.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Michel; Begaud, Bernard; Engel, Pierre; Avouac, Bernard; Lert, France; Rouillon, Frederic; Bénichou, Jacques; Massol, Jacques; Duru, Gerard; Magnier, Anne-Marie; Guillemot, Didier; Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae; Abenhaim, Lucien

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of physician practicing preferences (PPP) in primary care for homeopathy (Ho), CAM (Complementary and alternative medicines) with conventional medicine (Mx) or exclusively conventional medicine (CM) on patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), with reference to clinical progression, drug consumption, side effects and loss of therapeutic opportunity. The EPI3-MSD study was a nationwide observational cohort of a representative sample of general practitioners (GP) and their patients in France. Recruitment of GP was stratified by PPP, which was self-declared. Diagnoses and comorbidities were recorded by GP at inclusion. Patients completed a standardized telephone interview at inclusion, one, three and twelve months, including MSD-functional scales and medication consumption. 1153 MSD patients were included in the three PPP groups. Patients did not differ between groups except for chronicity of MSDs (>12 weeks), which was higher in the Ho group (62.1%) than in the CM (48.6%) and Mx groups (50.3%). The twelve-month development of specific functional scores was identical across the three groups after controlling for baseline score (p > 0.05). After adjusting for propensity scores, NSAID use over 12 months was almost half in the Ho group (OR, 0.54; 95%CI, 0.38-0.78) as compared to the CM group; no difference was found in the Mx group (OR, 0.81; 95% CI: 0.59-1.15). MSD patients seen by homeopathic physicians showed a similar clinical progression when less exposed to NSAID in comparison to patients seen in CM practice, with fewer NSAID-related adverse events and no loss of therapeutic opportunity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Nelson E. Baldwin, Photographer, Jan. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Nelson E. Baldwin, Photographer, Jan. 16, 1937, View - Second to Third Floor Stairs Old Homeopathic Hospital, 123 North Pearl St., Albany, N.Y. - Old Homeopathic Hospital (Interiors), 123 North Pearl Street, Albany, Albany County, NY

  11. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Nelson E. Baldwin, Photographer, Jan. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Nelson E. Baldwin, Photographer, Jan. 16, 1937, View - Stairway from First to Second Floor Old Homeopathic Hospital (Office of the HABS), Albany, N.Y. - Old Homeopathic Hospital (Interiors), 123 North Pearl Street, Albany, Albany County, NY

  12. Dietary Supplements in Children.

    PubMed

    Smolinske, Susan C

    2017-12-01

    High-quality systematic reviews of use of herbal or homeopathic remedies in children often suffer from design flaws, such as not following PRISMA guidelines, inconsistent outcome measurements, and paucity of high-quality studies. Herbal remedies have modest demonstrated benefits with insufficient evidence to recommend any particular supplement. Homeopathic remedies have no role in treatment of pediatric conditions, and have been associated with great harm in infants given homeopathic teething products. Two types of herbal supplements are associated with high risk in adolescents, energy drinks and adulterated weight-loss products. Parents should be counseled about risks of these products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Homeopathy for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Emily J; Nelson, E Andrea; Greenhalgh, Joanne; Cooper, Katy; Roberts, E Rachel; Agrawal, Anurag

    2013-11-13

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, chronic disorder that leads to decreased health-related quality of life and work productivity. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have not been able to give guidance on the effects of homeopathic treatment for IBS because no systematic reviews have been carried out to assess the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment for IBS. Two types of homeopathic treatment were evaluated in this systematic review. In clinical homeopathy a specific remedy is prescribed for a specific condition. This differs from individualised homeopathic treatment, where a homeopathic remedy based on a person's individual symptoms is prescribed after a detailed consultation. To assess the effectiveness and safety of homeopathic treatment for treating IBS. We searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Cochrane IBD/FBD Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Specialised Register and the database of the Homeopathic Library (Hom-inform) from inception to February 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort and case-control studies that compared homeopathic treatment with placebo, other control treatments, or usual care, in adults with IBS were considered for inclusion. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. The primary outcome was global improvement in IBS. The overall quality of the evidence supporting this outcome was assessed using the GRADE criteria. We calculated the mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for continuous outcomes and the risk ratio (RR) and 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes. Three RCTs (213 participants) were included. No cohort or case-control studies were identified. Two studies published in 1976 and 1979 compared clinical homeopathy (homeopathic remedy) to placebo for constipation-predominant IBS

  14. Homeopathy in the Age of Antimicrobial Resistance: Is It a Viable Treatment for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections?

    PubMed

    Fixsen, Alison

    2018-05-01

     Acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and their complications are the most frequent cause of antibiotic prescribing in primary care. With multi-resistant organisms proliferating, appropriate alternative treatments to these conditions are urgently required. Homeopathy presents one solution; however, there are many methods of homeopathic prescribing. This review of the literature considers firstly whether homeopathy offers a viable alternative therapeutic solution for acute URTIs and their complications, and secondly how such homeopathic intervention might take place.  Critical review of post 1994 clinical studies featuring homeopathic treatment of acute URTIs and their complications. Study design, treatment intervention, cohort group, measurement and outcome were considered. Discussion focused on the extent to which homeopathy is used to treat URTIs, rate of improvement and tolerability of the treatment, complications of URTIs, prophylactic and long-term effects, and the use of combination versus single homeopathic remedies.  Multiple peer-reviewed studies were found in which homeopathy had been used to treat URTIs and associated symptoms (cough, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, otitis media, acute sinusitis, etc.). Nine randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and 8 observational/cohort studies were analysed, 7 of which were paediatric studies. Seven RCTs used combination remedies with multiple constituents. Results for homeopathy treatment were positive overall, with faster resolution, reduced use of antibiotics and possible prophylactic and longer-term benefits.  Variations in size, location, cohort and outcome measures make comparisons and generalisations concerning homeopathic clinical trials for URTIs problematic. Nevertheless, study findings suggest at least equivalence between homeopathy and conventional treatment for uncomplicated URTI cases, with fewer adverse events and potentially broader therapeutic outcomes. The use of non

  15. Usefulness of classical homeopathy for the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections in individuals with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pannek, Jürgen; Pannek-Rademacher, Susanne; Jus, Mohinder S; Wöllner, Jens; Krebs, Jörg

    2018-02-27

    Context/Objective to investigate the usefulness of classical homeopathy for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design prospective study. Setting rehabilitation center in Switzerland. Participants patients with chronic SCI and ≥3 UTI/year. Interventions Participants were treated either with a standardized prophylaxis alone or in combination with homeopathy. Outcome measures The number of UTI, general and specific quality of life (QoL), and satisfaction with homeopathic treatment were assessed prospectively for one year. Results Ten patients were in the control group; 25 patients received adjunctive homeopathic treatment. The median number of self-reported UTI in the homeopathy group decreased significantly, whereas it remained unchanged in the control group. The domain incontinence impact of the KHQ improved significantly (P = 0.035), whereas the general QoL did not change. The satisfaction with homeopathic care was high. Conclusions Adjunctive homeopathic treatment lead to a significant decrease of UTI in SCI patients. Therefore, classical homeopathy could be considered in SCI patients with recurrent UTI. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov. (NCT01477502).

  16. A Review of Use of Enantiomers in Homeopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kuzeff, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews publications of laboratory experiments using pairs of enantiomers in homeopathy. Many molecules in nature have geometry which enables them to exist as nonsuperimposable mirror images or enantiomers. Modulation of toxicity of such molecules provides possibility for therapeutics, since they target multiple points in biochemical pathways. It was hypothesized that toxicity of a chemical agent could be counteracted by a homeopathic preparation of the enantiomer of the chemical agent (patents applied for: PCT/AU2003/000219-PCT/AU2008/001611). A diverse body of data, including controlled laboratory studies, supports the conclusion that toxicity of optical isomers may be inhibited by homeopathic enantiomer preparations. These data were obtained with minimal or no pretesting to determine optimal test solutions. Inhibition of the excitotoxic neurotransmitter L-glutamic acid with homeopathic preparations of D-glutamic acid indicates the latter may be of use for amelioration of symptoms of disturbances of mood. Similarly, homeopathic preparation of (+)-nicotine may be of use for inhibition of effects of nicotine in tobacco. PMID:23724294

  17. [Homeopathy for psychiatric patients-for and against].

    PubMed

    Hock, N; Juckel, G

    2018-06-01

    The application of homeopathic treatment quickly becomes a matter of ideological confrontation; however, homeopathy is steadily gaining in sympathy in the population. Although the possible effectiveness and the modes of action are currently not scientifically elucidated and the study situation regarding homeopathic treatment in psychiatry is still manageable, there is a whole series of positive evidence for the effects of homeopathic remedies for mental disorders, such as depression, anxiety disorders and addiction. The most important studies are presented and the most important arguments are weighed up with respect to the pros and cons. It is clear that homoeopathic remedies can only be used as an add-on and not alone. These remedies belong in the hands of physicians experienced in homeopathic and psychiatric psychopharmacology. It would be advisable to at least try out homeopathy for the well-being of the patient not only in the case of very mild disorders but also in severe chronic cases, since due to the generally good tolerability, no avoidable disadvantage should result.

  18. Like cures like: a neuroimmunological model based on electromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Shahabi, Shahram; Kasariyans, Aditya; Noorbakhsh, Farshid

    2013-12-01

    Recent investigations have pointed to the production of characteristic electromagnetic (EM) waves in highly diluted sterile filtrates of different microorganisms and their associated DNA molecules. Analysis of these diluted solutions that are prepared using methods almost identical to the way that homeopathic medicines are prepared has pointed to the existence of nanostructures capable of emitting EM waves. Combining these results with findings that point to the interaction of EM waves with sensory nerves with subsequent activation of homeostatic efferent pathways, we propose a model to describe mechanisms underlying the effects of homeopathic remedies. THE MODEL: Living cells and tissues are capable of generating EM waves in their physiological conditions. When a cell deviates from its physiological state, in addition to normal EM emissions, it starts to produce EM waves with altered characteristics. According to our model, the main cause of the therapeutic effects of homeopathic remedies is the occurrence of resonance between the non-physiological EM waves of the patient and extremely low-frequency EM waves produced by nanostructures present in the homeopathic remedy. Resonance occurs if the frequency and amplitude characteristics of the patient's non-physiological EM waves and those produced by nanostructures of the applied homeopathic remedy are similar. Once resonance occurs, stimulation of the patient's sensory neurons, which are sensitized due to inflammation of any origin, leads to triggering of different regulatory mechanisms, including the activation of descending antinociceptive and/or cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways, which leads to the restoration of homeostasis.

  19. [History of "special therapeutic directions": the example of homeopathy].

    PubMed

    Hopff, W H

    1996-04-01

    As for generally accepted therapeutic methods, the "special methods" may appear to be effective due to spontaneous recovery provided by nature. A great number of sceptical physicians are aware of this fact. The pharmacologist works continuously to differentiate effects directly caused by medical treatments - mainly drugs - from effects resulting from spontaneous recovery. This is one of the most difficult problems in medical treatment. As a representative example of all "special methods", we concentrate here on the history of homeopathy. As is generally known, there is no conformity in homeopathy, for example monotherapy versus therapy with complex homeopathic products; refusing the simile-rule; treatment with high potencies versus treatment with low potencies; classic versus scholastic homeopathy. The number of homeopathies really equals the number of homeopathic physicians. For this reason, instruction in homeopathy on the academic level is impossible. In addition, we have to forget all natural laws only to prove that "potentiation" may be true. Therapeutic success due purely to chance may be explained rationally and is occasionally seen in all other "special methods". The theories of homeopaths for the action with homeopathic products are neither in accordance with our natural laws nor comply with a rational philosophy.

  20. Homeopathy ‘for Mexicans’: Medical Popularisation, Commercial Endeavours, and Patients’ Choice in the Mexican Medical Marketplace, 1853–1872

    PubMed Central

    Hernández Berrones, Jethro

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on homeopaths’ strategies to popularise homeopathy from 1850 to 1870. I argue that homeopaths created a space for homeopathy in Mexico City in the mid-nineteenth century by facilitating patients’ access to medical knowledge, consultation and practice. In this period, when national and international armed conflicts limited the diffusion and regulation of academic medicine, homeopaths popularised homeopathy by framing it as a life-enhancing therapy with tools that responded to patients’ needs. Patients’ preference for homeopathy evolved into commercial endeavours that promoted the practice of homeopathy through the use of domestic manuals. Using rare publications and archival records, I analyse the popularisation of homeopathy in Ramón Comellas’s homeopathic manual, the commercialisation of Julián González’s family guides, and patients’ and doctors’ reception of homeopathy. I show that narratives of conversion to homeopathy relied on the different experiences of patients and trained doctors, and that patients’ positive experience with homeopathy weighed more than the doctors’ efforts to explain to the public how academic medicine worked. The fact that homeopaths and patients used a shared language to describe disease experiences framed the possibility of a horizontal transmission of medical knowledge, opening up the possibility for patients to become practitioners. By relying on the long tradition of domestic medicine in Mexico, the popularisation of homeopathy disrupted the professional boundaries that academic physicians had begun to build, making homeopaths the largest group that challenged the emergent medical academic culture and its diffusion in Mexico in the nineteenth century. PMID:28901873

  1. An exploratory study on scientific investigations in homeopathy using medical analyzer.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nirupama; Muraleedharan, K Charan; Paranjpe, Akalpita Sriniwas; Munta, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Hari; Nayak, Chaturbhuja

    2011-08-01

    The action of homeopathic medicines, in ultra-high dilution, is not directly observable. An attempt was made to explore autonomic response of selective homeopathic medicines, in healthy persons, using Medical Analyzer System (Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India). The objective of the study was to observe the action of homeopathic medicines on physiologic variability of heart rate and blood flow. Pre- and postinterventional variability spectra of heart rate and blood flow of 77 subjects were recorded with the Medical Analyzer System, administering homeopathic preparations of Aconitum napellus (6c, 10M), Arsenicum album (200c, 1M), Gelsemium sempervirens (200c, 1M), Phosphorus (200c, 1M), Pulsatilla nigricans (200c) and Sulphur (200c, 1M) versus placebo control. The amplitude of the peaks viz. low-frequency, medium-frequency, and high-frequency was measured for postintervention analysis. An increase in the amplitude of any valid peak by 100% or a decrease by 50% was considered as significant change. Aconitum napellus produced a response in heart rate variability (HRV) with 30c potency and in blood flow variability with 1M potency. Sulphur 200c and 1M, Gelsemium 200c and Pulsatilla 200c, produced a 62.5% response in HRV against the placebo response of 16.6%. Gelsemium, Phosphorus, and Sulphur produced a response in blood flow variability with a 1M potency, similar to the response of Aconitum napellus 1M. These data suggest that it is possible to record the response of homeopathic medicines on physiologic parameters of the autonomic nervous system.

  2. Elements of effective communication--rediscoveries from homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane S

    2009-11-01

    Patients are increasingly attracted to homeopathy despite the unproven effectiveness of homeopathic remedies. Clinical benefit of homeopathy may be due to communication. This review aims to identify and assess effective communication patterns in homeopathy. Narrative review and synthesis of published communication patterns, patient narratives and the author's professional experience as a homeopathic practitioner. In the biomedical model, where the focus is on disease, communication is physician-centered with early redirection of patients' concerns, and associated with reduced compliance, increasing risk of malpractice claims and low professional fulfillment. The biopsychosocial and the developing integrative medicine models are based on biomedicine but aim to include the whole person. Patient-centeredness is a behavior that elicits, respects and incorporates patients' wishes, allows active patient participation and is related to improved outcomes. The homeopathic model is based on holism and comprehension of the totality of the patient and uses patient-centered communication with a high degree of physician co-operation, empathy, hopefulness, enablement and narrative competence, all of which can improve outcomes. Both biopsychosocial and homeopathic models rely on patient-centered communication. Regardless of conceptual differences, they overlap in their common respect for the totality and individuality of the patient. The study of the homeopathic model shows that respect for the whole person is a basic requirement to entrench patient-centeredness more firmly in medicine. Medical education should include values such as individual coping strategies, the benefits of a sound and healthy life-style and the necessity of hope and enablement. Health care should be redesigned to honor physicians who practice these values.

  3. Physician practicing preferences for conventional or homeopathic medicines in elderly subjects with musculoskeletal disorders in the EPI3-MSD cohort.

    PubMed

    Danno, Karine; Joubert, Clementine; Duru, Gerard; Vetel, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    general practitioner. In contrast, analgesic use and MSD evolution were similar in the three groups. Consulting a homeopathic physician for MSD management does not appear to represent a loss of therapeutic opportunity, and decreases the use of NSAIDs.

  4. Hay fever & homeopathy: a case series evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vinita

    2016-05-01

    Seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever) is common and can considerably reduce the quality of life of sufferers. Despite the wide everyday application and promising results with homeopathy, scientific evidence of its effectiveness for most ailments is scarce. The assessment of the clinical effectiveness of homeopathic remedies in the alleviation of hay fever symptoms in a typical clinical setting. We performed a clinical observational study of eight patients in the treatment of hay fever symptoms over a two-year period (2012 and 2013) using Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP) self-evaluation questionnaires at baseline and again after two weeks and four weeks of homeopathic treatment. The individualized prescription - either a single remedy or multiple remedies - was based on the totality of each patient's symptoms. The average MYMOP scores for the eyes, nose, activity and wellbeing had improved significantly after two and four weeks of homeopathic treatment. The overall average MYMOP profile score at baseline was 3.83 (standard deviation, SD, 0.78). After 14 and 28 days of treatment the average score had fallen to 1.14 (SD, 0.36; P<0.001) and 1.06 (SD, 0.25; P<0.001) respectively. Individualized homeopathic treatment was associated with significant alleviation of hay fever symptoms, enabling the reduction in use of conventional treatment. The results presented in this study can be considered as a step towards a pilot pragmatic study that would use more robust outcome measures and include a larger number of patients prescribed a single or a multiple homeopathic prescription on an individualized basis. Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical verification in homeopathy and allergic conditions.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenhoven, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The literature on clinical research in allergic conditions treated with homeopathy includes a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCT) for hay fever with positive conclusions and two positive RCTs in asthma. Cohort surveys using validated Quality of Life questionnaires have shown improvement in asthma in children, general allergic conditions and skin diseases. Economic surveys have shown positive results in eczema, allergy, seasonal allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy and chronic allergic rhinitis. This paper reports clinical verification of homeopathic symptoms in all patients and especially in various allergic conditions in my own primary care practice. For preventive treatments in hay fever patients, Arsenicum album was the most effective homeopathic medicine followed by Nux vomica, Pulsatilla pratensis, Gelsemium, Sarsaparilla, Silicea and Natrum muriaticum. For asthma patients, Arsenicum iodatum appeared most effective, followed by Lachesis, Calcarea arsenicosa, Carbo vegetabilis and Silicea. For eczema and urticaria, Mezereum was most effective, followed by Lycopodium, Sepia, Arsenicum iodatum, Calcarea carbonica and Psorinum. The choice of homeopathic medicine depends on the presence of other associated symptoms and 'constitutional' features. Repertories should be updated by including results of such clinical verifications of homeopathic prescribing symptoms. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physician practicing preferences for conventional or homeopathic medicines in elderly subjects with musculoskeletal disorders in the EPI3-MSD cohort

    PubMed Central

    Danno, Karine; Joubert, Clementine; Duru, Gerard; Vetel, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    patients consulting a conventional practice general practitioner. In contrast, analgesic use and MSD evolution were similar in the three groups. Consulting a homeopathic physician for MSD management does not appear to represent a loss of therapeutic opportunity, and decreases the use of NSAIDs. PMID:25298739

  7. [Homeopathy in cancer patients: What does the "best" evidence tell us?

    PubMed

    de Nonneville, Alexandre; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2018-04-01

    Homeopathic medicines are used by many patients with cancer, usually alongside conventional treatment. A recent report by the European Academies' Science Advisory Council concluded that "that there are no robust and reproducible evidence that homeopathy is effective". This literature review aims to make the analysis of published controlled randomized trials involving homeopathic treatment in the field of oncology. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of homeopathy use by the general population worldwide: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Relton, Clare; Cooper, Katy; Viksveen, Petter; Fibert, Philippa; Thomas, Kate

    2017-05-01

    To systematically review surveys of 12-month prevalence of homeopathy use by the general population worldwide. Studies were identified via database searches to October 2015. Study quality was assessed using a six-item tool. All estimates were in the context of a survey which also reported prevalence of any complementary and alternative medicine use. A total of 36 surveys were included. Of these, 67% met four of six quality criteria. Twelve-month prevalence of treatment by a homeopath was reported in 24 surveys of adults (median 1.5%, range 0.2-8.2%). Estimates for children were similar to those for adults. Rates in the USA, UK, Australia and Canada all ranged from 0.2% to 2.9% and remained stable over the years surveyed (1986-2012). Twelve-month prevalence of all use of homeopathy (purchase of over-the-counter homeopathic medicines and treatment by a homeopath) was reported in 10 surveys of adults (median 3.9%, range 0.7-9.8%) while a further 11 surveys which did not define the type of homeopathy use reported similar data. Rates in the USA and Australia ranged from 1.7% to 4.4% and remained stable over the years surveyed. The highest use was reported by a survey in Switzerland where homeopathy is covered by mandatory health insurance. This review summarises 12-month prevalence of homeopathy use from surveys conducted in eleven countries (USA, UK, Australia, Israel, Canada, Switzerland, Norway, Germany, South Korea, Japan and Singapore). Each year a small but significant percentage of these general populations use homeopathy. This includes visits to homeopaths as well as purchase of over-the-counter homeopathic medicines. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Is There a Role for Homeopathy in Cancer Care? Questions and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe

    2015-09-01

    Patients with cancer commonly use complementary and integrative medicine, including homeopathy. Homeopathy has grown in popularity with the public but is viewed with skepticism by medical academia and is still excluded from conventionally prescribed treatments. In recent years, homeopathy has been used in cancer care in Europe and other countries worldwide. This use raised the question if there is any benefit in utilizing this type of care with cancer patients. The purpose of this manuscript is to explore the evidence related to the benefit of homeopathy in cancer care. Limited research has suggested that homeopathic remedies appear to cause cellular changes in some cancer cells. In animal models, several homeopathic remedies have had an inhibitory effect on certain tumor development. Some clinical studies of homeopathic remedies combined with conventional care have shown that homeopathic remedies improve quality of life, reduce symptom burden, and possibly improve survival in patients with cancer. The findings from several lab and clinical studies suggest that homeopathy might have some beneficial effect in cancer care; however, further large, comprehensive clinical studies are needed to determine these beneficial effects. Although additional studies are needed to confirm these findings, given the low cost, minimal risks, and the potential magnitude of homeopathy's effects, this use might be considered in certain situations as an additional tool to integrate into cancer care.

  10. Effectiveness of Homeopathic Medicines as Add-on to Institutional Management Protocol for Acute Encephalitis Syndrome in Children: An Open-Label Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Oberai, Praveen; Varanasi, Roja; Padmanabhan, Maya; Upadhyaya, Alok; Singh, Supriya; Singh, Samarendra Pratap; Vikram, Deepika; Khan, Tariq; Prasad, Ramesh; Gupta, A K; Singh, J R; Manchanda, Raj K

    2018-06-05

     Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) is endemic to certain parts of India, with limited treatment options. In our initial exploratory comparative observational study of 151 patients with AES, there was significantly reduced mortality with adjunctive homeopathy compared to institutional management protocol (IMP). The present randomized placebo-controlled trial brings more statistical rigor to this research program.  This study was conducted at a pediatric unit from 2013 to 2015. Children aged > 6 months and ≤ 18 years and receiving IMP were randomized to receive adjunctive homeopathy ( n  = 325) or placebo as control ( n  = 323). The primary effectiveness analysis was based on Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Morbidity was assessed using the Liverpool Outcome Score for Assessing Children at Follow-up. Analysis was by intention to treat.  A total of 612 children were analyzed (Homeopathy [H] = 304; Control [C] = 308). The primary outcome, GOS, differed significantly between H and C groups. There was 14.8% death/neuro-vegetative state in the H group compared to 29.8% in the C group. Relative risk was 0.49 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36 to 0.68), with absolute risk reduction of 15.0% (95% CI: 8.6 to 21.6%). Number needed to treat to prevent one additional death/neuro-vegetative state was 6.6 (95% CI: 4.6 to 11.6). Proportional-odds analysis also revealed a greater effect in the H group: odds ratio, 0.40 (95% CI: 0.27 to 0.60). The most frequently used medicines were Belladonna ( n  = 116), Stramonium ( n  = 33), Arsenicum album ( n  = 25), Sulfur ( n  = 18), Opium ( n  = 17), and Nux vomica ( n  = 10).  Adjunctive homeopathic medicines may improve clinical outcomes associated with AES. Further randomized and controlled studies, using double-blinded trial design, are recommended to discover if the current findings may be corroborated. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  11. Homeopathy in the treatment of tubercular lymphadenitis (TBLN)--an Indian experience.

    PubMed

    Chand, S Kusum; Manchanda, R K; Batra, Sudhir; Mittal, Renu

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been known since antiquity. In spite of effective antibiotic treatment, it is still a major worldwide public health problem. Endogenous factors are important in the development of active disease. Homeopathic medicines have the potential for immune-modulation and hence to influence endogenous factors in disease. In India, patients with tubercular lymphadenitis (TBLN) often consult homeopaths but such cases are seldom documented. The objective of the present study is to document such experience. A retrospective exploratory study of 25 positively diagnosed cases of TBLN has lead to the development of a homeopathic regime consisting of a patient specific constitutional medicine, one disease specific biotherapy (Tuberculinum) and Silicea 6x as supportive medicine. Homeopathy can be used as a complement to conventional anti tubercular treatment (ATT) with beneficial results. Further validation in controlled trials with immunological markers is required. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of the concentration of a Bryonia Dioica tincture by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milea, Irimie; Culea, E.; Iliescu, T.; Milea, Janetta

    1995-03-01

    It was established a method based on Raman spectroscopy in order to control the content and concentration of homeopathic dilutions. Dilutions of a tincture of Bryonia Dioica in ethanol were prepared and investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman line at 881 cm-1 was found to depend linearly versus the concentration of Bryonia Dioica. This permits to obtain a calibration curve that may be used to determine the concentration of Bryonia Dioica in ethanol. The method may be extended to determine the concentration of various homeopathic dilutions.

  13. The mathematics of dilution.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Barun Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The major objection to homeopathic medicine is that the doses of medicine prescribed in some cases are too dilute for any active ingredient to be present. The medicines would hence be rendered inactive, necessitating novel explanations for the action. A further examination of dilution in the light of the Langmuir equation shows that homeopathic medicines may not be as dilute as a simplistic application of Avogadro's Principle suggests, due to surface effects. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conceptions of health, illness and treatment of patients who use homeopathy in Santos, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Patriani Justo, C M; Dé Andrea Gomes, Mara H

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the conceptions of health and illness, the reasons for seeking homeopathy and continuing treatment, compliance and the meaning of the relationship between religiosity and health for patients who adhere to homeopathy. A qualitative study of 20 adult patients in Santos (Brazil) treated by homeopaths in the public and private sector for at least 2 years. Semi-structured interviews, organized by predefined thematic categories, the content of the interviews was analyzed. The conceptions of health and illness of the interviewed patients are related to the idea of vital balance/imbalance mediated by body-mind interaction. Dissatisfaction with conventional treatment, family influence and suggestions of others were the reasons for seeking homeopathic treatment. Patients continued homeopathic treatment due to positive therapeutic results, cure without being aggressive to the organism, the holistic integrated approach, the preventive nature of the treatment and low prices of medicine. For these patients, the availability of homeopathy in the public health sector extends the possibility of access. The need for a wider dissemination of homeopathy and the difficulties in following the prescription are the main problems involved in continuing treatment. Faith is an important component. We found a correlation between the conceptions of health and illness and the principles of homeopathy, assimilated through a strong bond between patients and the homeopathic practitioners. To investigate the beliefs, values and meanings that patients attribute to homeopathy helps to understand subjective aspects that may interfere with treatment compliance.

  15. Potential of the homeopathic remedy, Arnica Montana 30C, to reduce DNA damage in Escherichia coli exposed to ultraviolet irradiation through up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes.

    PubMed

    Das, Sreemanti; Saha, Santu Kumar; De, Arnab; Das, Durba; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2012-03-01

    To examine to what degree an ultra-highly diluted homeopathic remedy, Arnica Montana 30C (AM-30C), used in the treatment of shock and injury, can modulate the expression of nucleotide excision repair genes in Escherichia coli exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. E. coli were cultured to their log phase in a standard Luria-Bertani medium and then exposed to sublethal doses of UV irradiation at 25 and 50 J/m(2) for 22.5 and 45 s, respectively. The UV-exposed bacteria were then supplemented with either AM-30C (drug) or placebo (P-30C). The drug-treated and placebo-treated bacteria were subjected to assay for DNA damage and oxidative stress 90 min after UV exposure. Several protocols like comet assay, gel electrophoresis for DNA ladder and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and biomarker measurement like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were conducted. The mRNA expressions of the excision repair genes like ultraviolet repair uvrA, B and C genes (or also known as excision repair genes) were estimated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. The UV-exposed bacteria showed DNA damage and oxidative stress, as revealed by an increase in ROS generation, and a decrease in SOD, CAT and GSH activities. As compared to placebo, the AM-30C-treated bacteria showed less DNA damage and oxidative stress as manifested by a decrease in ROS generation, and an increase in SOD, CAT and GSH activities. AM-30C also up-regulated the expression of repair genes as compared to the control. AM-30C helped repair the DNA damage through up-regulation of repair genes and also ameliorated the oxidative stress through the reduction of ROS generation and suitable modulation of anti-oxidative stress enzymes.

  16. Homeopathy for Perennial Asthma in Adolescents: Pilot Feasibility Study Testing a Randomised Withdrawal Design.

    PubMed

    Mitchiguian Hotta, Livia; Cardinalli Adler, Ubiratan; de Toledo Cesar, Amarilys; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi; Demarzo, Marcelo Marcos Piva

    2018-05-01

     Previous findings from a pragmatic trial suggest that usual care compared with usual care plus individualised homeopathy is not a feasible design to address homeopathic interventions for asthma.  The main purpose of this article was to investigate the feasibility of the randomised withdrawal design as a strategy to assess the effectiveness of a standardised clinical-pharmaceutical homeopathic protocol ( Organon.modus ) on perennial asthma in adolescents.  Randomised withdrawal, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled, 12-week study. 12 to 17 years old adolescents, with the diagnosis of perennial asthma, using inhalatory beclomethasone (plus fenoterol for wheezing episodes), who achieved 3 months of well-controlled asthma, after a variable period of individualised homeopathic treatment according to Organon.modus protocol. a secondary care medical specialist centre. continuation with the individualised homeopathic medicine or with indistinguishable placebo during 12 weeks of beclomethasone step-down. number of days of well-controlled asthma. Secondary measures: number of days of fenoterol use, number of visits to an emergency service (without hospitalisation) and percentage of patients excluded due to an exacerbation characterising a partly controlled asthma. Tolerability was assessed by Adverse Events, registered at every visit.  Nineteen patients were randomised to continue treatment with homeopathy and 21 with placebo. Effectiveness measures for the homeopathy and placebo groups respectively were median number of days of good clinical control: 84 versus 30 ( p  = 0.18); median number of days of fenoterol use per patient: 3 versus 5 ( p  = 0.41); visits to an emergency room: 1 versus 6 ( p  = 0.35); percentage of exclusion due to partly controlled asthma: 36.8% versus 71.4% ( p  = 0.05). Few Adverse Events were reported.  This pilot study supports the feasibility of the double-blind randomised withdrawal design in studies investigating

  17. Utilization and perceived benefits of homeopathy and herbal therapies in U.S. adults: Implications of patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Taeho Greg; Ng, Jeremy Y; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated reasons for and perceived benefits of using homeopathic and herbal therapies in U.S. adults. Data were collected from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, which represents non-institutionalized U.S. adults (n = 33,167 unweighted). In the past 12 months, 18.6% (41.95 million) of U.S. adults reported using either homeopathy and/or herbal therapies. Among these users, 34.8% and 5.1% used them for wellness only and treatment only, respectively. 60.1% reported using homeopathic and herbal therapies for a combination of both treatment and wellness. In four out of seven self-reported perceived benefit measures, users for wellness only and for a combination of both treatment and wellness had higher likelihood of reporting benefits, compared to those who used CAM for treatment only (p < 0.001). Overall, homeopathic and herbal therapies maybe a promising lifestyle approach to enhance health-related quality of life in U.S. adults, but future research is needed to establish safety and efficacy issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunology and Homeopathy. 4. Clinical Studies—Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Bellavite, Paolo; Ortolani, Riccardo; Pontarollo, Francesco; Piasere, Valeria; Benato, Giovanni; Conforti, Anita

    2006-01-01

    The clinical studies on the effectiveness of homeopathy in respiratory allergy (18 randomized trials and 9 observational studies) are described. The literature of common immunologic disorders including also upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and otorhinolaryngology (reported in part 1), is evaluated and discussed. Most of initial evidence-based research was addressed to the question of whether homeopathic high dilutions are placebos or possess specific effects, but this question has been often equivocal and is still a matter of debate. The evidence demonstrates that in some conditions homeopathy shows significant promise, e.g. Galphimia glauca (low dilutions/potencies) in allergic oculorhinitis, classical individualized homeopathy in otitis and possibly in asthma and allergic complaints, and a few low-potency homeopathic complexes in sinusitis and rhinoconjunctivitis. A general weakness of evidence derives from lack of independent confirmation of reported trials and from presence of conflicting results, as in case of homeopathic immunotherapy and of classical homeopathy for URTI. The suitable methods to evaluate homeopathy effectiveness, without altering the setting of cure, are also analyzed. PMID:17173103

  19. Observational study on the dispensing of cough syrups to children with acute cough by community pharmacists in France.

    PubMed

    Allaert, François-André; Villet, Stéphanie; Vincent, Stéphane; Sauve, Laurent

    2018-04-01

    Over-the-counter medicines may be proposed by pharmacists for children with acute cough. Study objectives were to describe the sociodemographic profile of children who were proposed a cough syrup by a pharmacist, the nature of the cough and type(s) of cough syrup proposed and to assess the evolution of the cough, tolerance and satisfaction with treatment. Observational, prospective, longitudinal, multicentre study with 157 pharmacies in France. Children who were proposed a cough syrup by a pharmacist were recruited. Questionnaires were completed by the pharmacists and/or parents at inclusion and by the parents after 5 days of treatment. Four hundred fourteen children were included (mean age: 6.0±2.9 years); 45.9% had a dry and 43.3% a productive cough. 30.4% were proposed an allopathic antitussive syrup, 28.3% an allopathic expectorant syrup and 23.7% a homeopathic syrup. Children with a dry cough were more likely to be given an allopathic antitussive (55.2%) or homeopathic (28.2%) syrup. Children with a productive cough or cough of several days duration were more likely to be given an allopathic expectorant syrup (70.1%). Cough disappearance was more frequent with homeopathic syrups compared to allopathic expectorants (P=0.002), or allopathic antitussives (P=0.042). Adverse events were most common with allopathic antitussive syrups (18.7%) (P<0.001). Two-thirds of parents were satisfied with the treatment their child received. Pharmacists play an important role in the management of acute cough in children. Homeopathic cough syrups may have an interest in terms of public health.

  20. The feasibility of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to compare usual care with usual care plus individualised homeopathy, in children requiring secondary care for asthma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E A; Shaw, A; Nichol, J; Hollinghurst, S; Henderson, A J; Thompson, T; Sharp, D

    2011-07-01

    To test the feasibility of a pragmatic trial design with economic evaluation and nested qualitative study, comparing usual care (UC) with UC plus individualised homeopathy, in children requiring secondary care for asthma. This included recruitment and retention, acceptability of outcome measures patients' and health professionals' views and experiences and a power calculation for a definitive trial. In a pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial (RCT) design, children on step 2 or above of the British Thoracic Society Asthma Guidelines (BTG) were randomly allocated to UC or UC plus a five visit package of homeopathic care (HC). Outcome measures included the Juniper Asthma Control Questionnaire, Quality of Life Questionnaire and a resource use questionnaire. Qualitative interviews were used to gain families' and health professionals' views and experiences. 226 children were identified from hospital clinics and related patient databases. 67 showed an interest in participating, 39 children were randomised, 18 to HC and 21 to UC. Evidence in favour of adjunctive homeopathic treatment was lacking. Economic evaluation suggests that the cost of additional consultations was not offset by the reduced cost of homeopathic remedies and the lower use of primary care by children in the homeopathic group. Qualitative data gave insights into the differing perspectives of families and health care professionals within the research process. A future study using this design is not feasible, further investigation of a potential role for homeopathy in asthma management might be better conducted in primary care with children with less severe asthma. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Randomized controlled pilot study to compare Homeopathy and Conventional therapy in Acute Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Sinha, M N; Siddiqui, V A; Nayak, C; Singh, Vikram; Dixit, Rupali; Dewan, Deepti; Mishra, Alok

    2012-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of Homeopathy and Conventional therapy in Acute Otitis Media (AOM). A randomized placebo-controlled parallel group pilot study of homeopathic vs conventional treatment for AOM was conducted in Jaipur, India. Patients were randomized by a computer generated random number list to receive either individualized homeopathic medicines in fifty millesimal (LM) potencies, or conventional treatment including analgesics, antipyretics and anti-inflammatory drugs. Patients who did not improve were prescribed antibiotics at the 3rd day. Outcomes were assessed by the Acute Otitis Media-Severity of Symptoms (AOM-SOS) Scale and Tympanic Membrane Examination over 21 days. 81 patients were included, 80 completed follow-up: 41 for conventional and 40 for homeopathic treatment. In the Conventional group, all 40 (100%) patients were cured, in the Homeopathy group, 38 (95%) patients were cured while 02 (5%) patients were lost to the last two follow-up. By the 3rd day of treatment, 4 patients were cured in Homeopathy group but in Conventional group only one patient was cured. In the Conventional group antibiotics were prescribed in 39 (97.5%), no antibiotics were required in the Homeopathy group. 85% of patients were prescribed six homeopathic medicines. Individualized homeopathy is an effective conventional treatment in AOM, there were no significant differences between groups in the main outcome. Symptomatic improvement was quicker in the Homeopathy group, and there was a large difference in antibiotic requirements, favouring homeopathy. Further work on a larger scale should be conducted. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence and likelihood ratio of symptoms in patients with good therapeutic response to Lycopodium clavatum. A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Eizayaga, José Enrique; Pozzi, María Isabel; Canan, María Clara; Saravia, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Assessment of the likelihood ratio (LR) of symptoms has been proposed as a rational means for detecting indicators to homeopathic medicines. To investigate the prevalence and LR of symptoms commonly attributed to the homeopathic medicine Lycopodium clavatum (Lyc). Secondarily, to answer the question if experienced homeopaths could intuitively infer which the main symptoms of this medicine are. The presence of 35 selected symptoms, prescribed medicines and therapeutic response were assessed retrospectively. The symptoms' prevalence in the Lyc responding population and the LR of the symptoms compared to their prevalence in the remainder of the population were calculated. Two hundred and two Lyc and 550 non Lyc cases (total 752) were included for analysis. Twenty-two symptoms were confirmed as pertaining to Lyc's semiology (prevalence %; LR): contemptuous (3.3; 6.7), urinary stones history (2.7; 5.4), egotism (5.6; 3.6), dictatorial (33.3; 3.4), haughty (8.7; 3.3), sleeps on abdomen (3.3; 3.3), intolerance to clothing in abdomen (12.0; 3.1), reproaches (4.0; 3.0), helplessness (24.0; 2.7), fear of failure (10.7; 2.6), irritability on waking in the morning (16.7; 2.5), constipation alternating with diarrhea (8.7; 2.5), intolerant to contradiction (59.3; 2.3), want of self confidence (30.0; 2.4), abdominal distension after eating (23.3; 2.1); ailments from anticipation (32.0; 1.9), irritability before menses (23.3; 1.8), conscientious (26.0; 1.6), desire of sweets (52.0; 1.6), desire of chocolate (16.7; 1.6), lack of vital heat (41.3; 1.3), and flatterer (1.3; ∞). Surveyed homeopaths' intuitive inferences correlated well with symptoms' prevalence but not with their LR. Lycopodium's main symptoms are well known by homeopaths, but their knowledge correlates well with the symptoms' prevalence and not with their LR. Retrospective assessment of prevalence and LR of symptoms in good responders might be a means for better selection of symptoms for prospective studies

  3. Characteristics of patients consulting their regular primary care physician according to their prescribing preferences for homeopathy and complementary medicine.

    PubMed

    Lert, France; Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae; Rouillon, Frederic; Massol, Jacques; Guillemot, Didier; Avouac, Bernard; Duru, Gerard; Magnier, Anne-Marie; Rossignol, Michel; Abenhaim, Lucien; Begaud, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Homeopathic care has not been well documented in terms of its impact on patients' utilization of drugs or other complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). The objective of this study was to describe and compare patients who visit physicians in general practice (GPs) who prescribe only conventional medicines (GP-CM), regularly prescribe homeopathy within a mixed practice (GP-Mx), or are certified homeopathic GPs (GP-Ho). The EPI3-LASER study was a nationwide observational survey of a representative sample of GPs and their patients from across France. Physicians recorded their diagnoses and prescriptions on participating patients who completed a self-questionnaire on socio-demographics, lifestyle, quality of life Short Form 12 (SF-12) and the complementary and alternative medicine beliefs inventory (CAMBI). A total of 6379 patients (participation rate 73.1%) recruited from 804 GP practices participated in this survey. Patients attending a GP-Ho were slightly more often female with higher education than in the GP-CM group and had markedly healthier lifestyle. They did not differ greatly in their comorbidities or quality of life but exhibited large differences in their beliefs in holistic medicine and natural treatments, and in their attitude toward participating to their own care. Similar but less striking observations were made in patients of the GP-Mx group. Patients seeking care with a homeopathic GP did not differ greatly in their socio-demographic characteristics but more so by their healthier lifestyle and positive attitude toward CAM. Further research is needed to explore the directionality of those associations and to assess the potential economic benefits of homeopathic management in primary care. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The curious case of charles darwin and homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Dana

    2010-03-01

    In 1849, Charles Darwin was so ill that he was unable to work one out of every 3 days, and after having various troubling symptoms for 2-12 years, he wrote to a friend that he was 'going the way of all flesh'. He sought treatment from Dr James Manby Gully, a medical doctor who used water cure and homeopathic medicines. Despite being highly skeptical of these treatments, he experienced a dramatic improvement in his health, though some of his digestive and skin symptoms returned various times in his life. He grew to appreciate water cure, but remained skeptical of homeopathy, even though his own experiments on insectivore plants using what can be described as homeopathic doses of ammonia salts surprised and shocked him with their significant biological effect. Darwin even expressed concern that he should publish these results. Two of Darwin's sons were as incredulous as he was, but their observations confirmed the results of his experiments. Darwin was also known to have read a book on evolution written by a homeopathic physician that Darwin described as similar to his own but 'goes much deeper.'

  5. [New documental evidence on the history of homeopathy in Latin America: a case study of links between Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Tarcitano, Conrado Mariano; Waisse, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Homeopathy began to spread soon after it was formulated by Samuel Hahnemann in the early 1800s, reaching the Southern Cone in the 1830s. In processes of this kind, one figure is often cited as being responsible for introducing it, often attaining quasi-mythical status. Little is known, however, about how homeopathy reached Argentina at that time. Through archival research, we discovered that medical and lay homeopaths circulated between Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires. Given the well-known proselytizing of the circles gravitating around lay homeopaths B. Mure and J.V. Martins in Rio de Janeiro, the documents indicate that this movement actually went as far as Argentina, which had not been confirmed until now.

  6. Experimental neuropharmacology of Gelsemium sempervirens: Recent advances and debated issues.

    PubMed

    Bellavite, Paolo; Bonafini, Clara; Marzotto, Marta

    Gelsemium sempervirens L. (Gelsemium) is traditionally used for its anxiolytic-like properties and its action mechanism in laboratory models are under scrutiny. Evidence from rodent models was reported suggesting the existence of a high sensitivity of central nervous system to anxiolytic power of Gelsemium extracts and Homeopathic dilutions. In vitro investigation of extremely low doses of this plant extract showed a modulation of gene expression of human neurocytes. These studies were criticized in a few commentaries, generated a debate in literature and were followed by further experimental studies from various laboratories. Toxic doses of Gelsemium cause neurological signs characterized by marked weakness and convulsions, while ultra-low doses or high Homeopathic dilutions counteract seizures induced by lithium and pilocarpine, decrease anxiety after stress and increases the anti-stress allopregnanolone hormone, through glycine receptors. Low (non-Homeopathic) doses of this plant or its alkaloids decrease neuropathic pain and c-Fos expression in mice brain and oxidative stress. Due to the complexity of the matter, several aspects deserve interpretation and the main controversial topics, with a focus on the issues of high dilution pharmacology, are discussed and clarified. Copyright © 2017 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The defining role of structure (including epitaxy) in the plausibility of homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Manju Lata; Roy, Rustum; Bell, Iris R; Hoover, Richard

    2007-07-01

    The key stumbling block to serious consideration of homeopathy is the presumed "implausibility" of biological activity for homeopathic medicines in which the source material is diluted past Avogadro's number of molecules. Such an argument relies heavily on the assumptions of elementary chemistry (and biochemistry), in which the material composition of a solution, (dilution factors and ligand-receptor interactions), is the essential consideration. In contrast, materials science focuses on the three-dimensional complex network structure of the condensed phase of water itself, rather than the original solute molecules. The nanoheterogenous structure of water can be determined by interactive phenomena such as epitaxy (the transmission of structural information from the surface of one material to another without the transfer of any matter), temperature-pressure processes during succussion, and formation of colloidal nanobubbles containing gaseous inclusions of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and possibly the remedy source material. Preliminary data obtained using Raman and Ultra-Violet-Visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy illustrate the ability to distinguish two different homeopathic medicines (Nux vomica and Natrum muriaticum) from one another and to differentiate, within a given medicine, the 6c, 12c, and 30c potencies. Materials science concepts and experimental tools offer a new approach to contemporary science, for making significant advances in the basic science studies of homeopathic medicines.

  8. Case Reports of Five Cancer Patients with Unusual Course.

    PubMed

    Payrhuber, Dietmar; Thieves, Karin; Sangaletti, Piero; Muehlmann, Josef; Frass, Michael

    2018-06-16

     The analysis of the periodic table of elements by Jan Scholten opened the way for a new kind of classification and repertorisation of homeopathic remedies. Thereby, group analysis (resorting to series and stages) makes precise prescriptions possible. This approach appears to yield striking results, even in severe cases. Whereas Hahnemann stressed the emotional state ('Gemüthssymptome', Organon § 210) when choosing a remedy, Scholten 200 years later investigated the mental picture that represents a life conflict or even a life theme that may maintain the disease process. The person's environment, emotional traumas or a conflict drives him or her to suppress and dissect painful emotions. Such compensations can become subconscious and so strong that they can no longer be controlled; they then influence the patient with a highly destructive energy.  We present five case reports, each dealing with an unusual clinical course of severe cancer associated with homeopathic treatment using the Scholten method.  By presenting these cases, we consider how the constitution (lifelong signs and symptoms of the patient) and the mental state are interwoven and, as a complex mechanism, might provoke disease.  The appropriate homeopathic remedy, reflecting the Scholten approach, seemed to have beneficial impact on the disease process of the five individuals presented. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  9. Ultra-High Dilutions and Homeopathy: Can They Be Explained without Non-Local Theory?

    PubMed

    Almirantis, Yannis; Tsitinidis, Konstantinos

    2018-06-05

    We discuss questions related to the 'Benveniste Affair', its consequences and broader issues in an attempt to understand homeopathy. Specifically, we address the following points: 1.:  The relationship between the experiments conducted by Benveniste, Montagnier, their collaborators and groups that independently tested their results, to 'traditional' homeopathy. 2.:  Possible non-local components such as 'generalised entanglement' as the basis of the homeopathic phenomenon and experimental evidence for them. 3.:  The capability of highly diluted homeopathic remedies to provoke tangible biological changes in whole organisms and cellular experimental systems. 4.:  Aspects of the similia principle related to the above. 5.:  Suggestions that can lead to experimental verifications of the non-local hypothesis in homeopathy. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  10. Immunology and Homeopathy. 5. The Rationale of the ‘Simile’

    PubMed Central

    Ortolani, Riccardo; Pontarollo, Francesco; Pitari, Giuseppina; Conforti, Anita

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of homeopathic medicine is the ‘Similia Principle’, also known as the ‘Principle of Similarity’ or also as the ‘Simile’, which reflects the inversion of pharmacological effects in healthy subjects as compared with sick ones. This article describes the inversion of effects, a widespread medical phenomenon, through three possible mechanisms: non-linearity of dose–response relationship, different initial pathophysiological states of the organism, and pharmacodynamics of body response to the medicine. Based on the systemic networks which play an important role in response to stress, a unitary and general model is designed: homeopathic medicines could interact with sensitive (primed) regulation systems through complex information, which simulate the disorders of natural disease. Reorganization of regulation systems, through a coherent response to the medicine, could pave the way to the healing of the cellular, tissue and neuro-immuno-endocrine homeodynamics. Preliminary evidence is suggesting that even ultra-low doses and high-dilutions of drugs may incorporate structural or frequency information and interact with chaotic dynamics and physical-electromagnetic levels of regulation. From the clinical standpoint, the ‘simile’ can be regarded as a heuristic principle, according to which the detailed knowledge of pathogenic effects of drugs, associated with careful analysis of signs and symptoms of the ill subject, could assist in identifying homeopathic remedies with high grade of specificity for the individual case. PMID:17549232

  11. Homeopathy for Allergic Rhinitis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kushal; Mathie, Robert T; Costelloe, Céire; Howick, Jeremy

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of homeopathic intervention in the treatment of seasonal or perennial allergic rhinitis (AR). Randomized controlled trials evaluating all forms of homeopathic treatment for AR were included in a systematic review (SR) of studies published up to and including December 2015. Two authors independently screened potential studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes included symptom improvement and total quality-of-life score. Treatment effect size was quantified as mean difference (continuous data), or by risk ratio (RR) and odds ratio (dichotomous data), with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Meta-analysis was performed after assessing heterogeneity and risk of bias. Eleven studies were eligible for SR. All trials were placebo-controlled except one. Six trials used the treatment approach known as isopathy, but they were unsuitable for meta-analysis due to problems of heterogeneity and data extraction. The overall standard of methods and reporting was poor: 8/11 trials were assessed as "high risk of bias"; only one trial, on isopathy for seasonal AR, possessed reliable evidence. Three trials of variable quality (all using Galphimia glauca for seasonal AR) were included in the meta-analysis: nasal symptom relief at 2 and 4 weeks (RR = 1.48 [95% CI 1.24-1.77] and 1.27 [95% CI 1.10-1.46], respectively) favored homeopathy compared with placebo; ocular symptom relief at 2 and 4 weeks also favored homeopathy (RR = 1.55 [95% CI 1.33-1.80] and 1.37 [95% CI 1.21-1.56], respectively). The single trial with reliable evidence had a small positive treatment effect without statistical significance. A homeopathic and a conventional nasal spray produced equivalent improvements in nasal and ocular symptoms. The low or uncertain overall quality of the evidence warrants caution in drawing firm conclusions about intervention effects. Use of either Galphimia glauca or a homeopathic nasal spray

  12. Homeopathy: An Introduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... are inconsistent with fundamental concepts of chemistry and physics. There are significant challenges in carrying out rigorous clinical research on homeopathic remedies. Tell all your health care providers about any complementary health practices you ...

  13. Use of Arnica to relieve pain after carpal-tunnel release surgery.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, S L A; Belcher, H J C R

    2002-01-01

    Arnica is commonly used by the public as a treatment for bruising and swelling. To assess whether Arnica administration affects recovery from hand surgery. Double-blind, randomized comparison of Arnica administration versus placebo. Specialist hand surgery unit at the Queen Victoria NHS Trust. Thirty-seven patients undergoing bilateral endoscopic carpal-tunnel release between June 1998 and January 2000. Homeopathic Arnica tablets and herbal Arnica ointment compared to placebos. Grip strength, wrist circumference, and perceived pain measured 1 and 2 weeks after surgery. No difference in grip strength or wrist circumference was found between the 2 groups. However, there was a significant reduction in pain experienced after 2 weeks in the Arnica-treated group (P<.03). The role of homeopathic and herbal agents for recovery after surgery merits further investigation.

  14. Unequal brothers : are homeopathy and hormesis linked?

    PubMed

    Oberbaum, Menachem; Frass, Michael; Gropp, Cornelius

    2015-04-01

    The debate between those who believe homeopathy and hormesis derive from the same root and those who believe the two are different phenomena is as old as hormesis. It is an emotionally loaded discussion, with both sides fielding arguments which are far from scientific. Careful analysis of the basic paradigms of the two systems questions the claim of the homeopaths, who find similarities between them. The authors discuss these paradigms, indicating the differences between the claims of homeopathy and hormesis. It is time for thorough and serious research to lay this question to rest. One possible approach is to compare the activity of a hormetic agent, prepared in the usual way, with that of the same agent in the same concentration prepared homeopathically by serial dilution and succussion. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Re-analysis of survival data of cancer patients utilizing additive homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, Andreas; Frass, Michael; Gaertner, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    In this short communication we present a re-analysis of homeopathic patient data in comparison to control patient data from the same Outpatient´s Unit "Homeopathy in malignant diseases" of the Medical University of Vienna. In this analysis we took account of a probable immortal time bias. For patients suffering from advanced stages of cancer and surviving the first 6 or 12 months after diagnosis, respectively, the results show that utilizing homeopathy gives a statistically significant (p<0.001) advantage over control patients regarding survival time. In conclusion, bearing in mind all limitations, the results of this retrospective study suggest that patients with advanced stages of cancer might benefit from additional homeopathic treatment until a survival time of up to 12 months after diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Safe Use of Complementary Health Products and Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mind and Body Practices for Children and Teens Dietary Supplement Safety Information Using Dietary Supplements Wisely Dietary Supplement ... Homeopathic Drugs Dietary Supplements—Adverse Event Reporting ( FDA ) Dietary Supplement Alerts and Advisories Alerts and Advisories Clinical Practice ...

  17. Research on homeopathy: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Walach, Harald; Jonas, Wayne B; Ives, John; van Wijk, Roel; Weingärtner, Otto

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we review research on homeopathy from four perspectives, focusing on reviews and some landmark studies. These perspectives are laboratory studies, clinical trials, observational studies, and theoretical work. In laboratory models, numerous effects and anomalies have been reported. However, no single model has been sufficiently widely replicated. Instead, researchers have focused on ever-new models and experiments, leaving the picture of scattered anomalies without coherence. Basic research, trying to elucidate a purported difference between homeopathic remedies and control solutions has also produced some encouraging results, but again, series of independent replications are missing. While there are nearly 200 reports on clinical trials, few series have been conducted for single conditions. Some of these series document clinically useful effects and differences against placebo and some series do not. Observational research into uncontrolled homeopathic practice documents consistently strong therapeutic effects and sustained satisfaction in patients. We suggest that this scattered picture has to do with the fourth line of research: lack of a good theory. Some of the extant theoretical models are reviewed, including placebo, water structure, silica contamination, energy models, and entanglement models. It emerges that local models, suggesting some change in structure in the solvent, are far from convincing. The nonlocal models proposed would predict that it is impossible to nail down homeopathic effects with direct experimental testing and this places homeopathy in a scientific dilemma. We close with some suggestions for potentially fruitful research.

  18. THE MEDICO-SCIENTIFIC MARGINALISATION OF HOMEOPATHY: INTERNATIONAL LEGAL AND REGULATORY DEVELOPMENTS.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian

    2015-09-01

    The 2010 report of the United Kingdom Science and Technology Committee of the House of Commons and the 2015 report of the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council have overtaken in significance the uncritical Swiss report of 2012 and have gone a long way to changing the environment of tolerance toward proselytising claims of efficacy in respect of homeopathy. The inquiry being undertaken in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration during 2015 may accelerate this trend. An outcome of the reports and inquiries has been a series of decisions from advertising regulators and by courts rejecting medically unjustifiable claims in respect of the efficacy of homeopathy. Class actions have also been initiated in North America against manufacturers of homeopathic products. The changing legal and regulatory environment is generating an increasingly scientifically marginalised existence for homeopathy. That new environment is starting to provide effective inhibition of assertions on behalf of homeopathy and other health modalities whose claims to therapeutic efficacy cannot be justified by reference to the principles of evidence-based health care. This has the potential to reduce the financial support that is provided by insurers and governments toward homeopathy and to result in serious liability exposure for practitioners, manufacturers and those who purvey homeopathic products, potentially including pharmacists. In addition, it may give a fillip to a form of regulation of homeopaths if law reform to regulate unregistered health practitioners gathers momentum, as is taking place in Australia.

  19. Homeopathy in chronic sinusitis: a prospective multi-centric observational study.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Chaturbhuja; Singh, Vikram; Singh, V P; Oberai, Praveen; Roja, Varanasi; Shitanshu, Shashi Shekhar; Sinha, M N; Deewan, Deepti; Lakhera, B C; Ramteke, Sunil; Kaushik, Subhash; Sarkar, Sarabjit; Mandal, N R; Mohanan, P G; Singh, J R; Biswas, Sabyasachi; Mathew, Georgekutty

    2012-04-01

    The primary objective was to ascertain the therapeutic usefulness of homeopathic medicine in the management of chronic sinusitis (CS). Multicentre observational study at Institutes and Units of the Central Council for Research in Homoeopathy, India. Symptoms were assessed using the chronic sinusitis assessment score (CSAS). 17 pre-defined homeopathic medicines were shortlisted for prescription on the basis of repertorisation for the pathological symptoms of CS. Regimes and adjustment of regimes in the event of a change of symptoms were pre-defined. The follow-up period was for 6 months. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 16. 628 patients suffering from CS confirmed on X-ray were enrolled from eight Institutes and Units of the Central Council for Research in Homoeopathy. All 550 patients with at least one follow-up assessment were analyzed. There was a statistically significant reduction in CSAS (P = 0.0001, Friedman test) after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Radiological appearances also improved. A total of 13 out of 17 pre-defined medicines were prescribed in 550 patients, Sil. (55.2% of 210), Calc. (62.5% of 98), Lyc. (69% of 55), Phos. (66.7% of 45) and Kali iod. (65% of 40) were found to be most useful having marked improvement. 4/17 medicines were never prescribed. No complications were observed during treatment. Homeopathic treatment may be effective for CS patients. Controlled trials are required for further validation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Utility of Nutraceutical Products Marketed for Cognitive and Memory Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Graham J.; Austin-Wells, Vonnette; Zimmerman, Teena

    2008-01-01

    This article identifies a convenience sample of 14 memory-enhancing herbal products that were found to be available commercially, examines their active ingredients, states their claims, and evaluates the available evidence to determine their efficacy. The analyses identified four problematic areas. First, a majority of the products use cognitive terminology, which leads consumers to anticipate an intended cognitive benefit. Second, some ingredients are completely homeopathic and contain components not known outside of the homeopathic field. Third, the evidence of treatment efficacy is often contradictory, because products are recommended for purposes other than cognitive or memory loss. Finally, the manufacturers of the product have usually conducted the research on individual products. Until more research is available, it is suggested that holistic nursing professionals exercise caution in recommending nutraceuticals to their patients/clients for the use of cognitive improvement or memory enhancement. PMID:16251490

  1. A Not-So-Gentle Refutation of the Defence of Homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Zawiła-Niedźwiecki, Jakub; Olender, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    In a recent paper, Levy, Gadd, Kerridge, and Komesaroff attempt to defend the ethicality of homeopathy by attacking the utilitarian ethical framework as a basis for medical ethics and by introducing a distinction between evidence-based medicine and modern science. This paper demonstrates that their argumentation is not only insufficient to achieve that goal but also incorrect. Utilitarianism is not required to show that homeopathic practice is unethical; indeed, any normative basis of medical ethics will make it unethical, as a defence of homeopathic practice requires the rejection of modern natural sciences, which are an integral part of medical ethics systems. This paper also points out that evidence-based medicine lies at the very core of modern science. Particular arguments made by Levy et al. within the principlist medical ethics normative system are also shown to be wrong.

  2. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Nelson E. Baldwin, Photographer, Jan. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Nelson E. Baldwin, Photographer, Jan. 16, 1937, View - Interior Door Opening into Apartment on First Floor, 123 North Pearl St., Albany, N.Y. - Old Homeopathic Hospital (Interiors), 123 North Pearl Street, Albany, Albany County, NY

  3. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Nelson E. Baldwin, Photographer, Jan. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Nelson E. Baldwin, Photographer, Jan. 16, 1937, View - Double Doors and Columns in Apartment on First Floor, 123 North Pearl St., Albany, N.Y. - Old Homeopathic Hospital (Interiors), 123 North Pearl Street, Albany, Albany County, NY

  4. Homeopathy outperforms antibiotics treatment in juvenile scallop Argopecten ventricosus: effects on growth, survival, and immune response.

    PubMed

    Mazón-Suástegui, José Manuel; García-Bernal, Milagro; Saucedo, Pedro Enrique; Campa-Córdova, Ángel; Abasolo-Pacheco, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Mortality from vibriosis in mollusk production is attributed to pathogenic bacteria, particularly Vibrio alginolyticus. Use of increasingly potent antibiotics has led to bacterial resistance and increased pathogenicity. Alternatives in sanitation, safety, and environmental sustainability are currently under analysis. To-date, homeopathy has been investigated in aquaculture of freshwater fish, but not in marine mollusks. The effect of the homeopathic complexes in the growth, survival, and immune response of the Catarina scallop Argopecten ventricosus were assessed. A bioassay to assess the potential of homeopathy in improving cultivation of juvenile A. ventricosus was conducted for 21 days, with a final challenge of 120 h with V. alginolyticus. The experimental design included two homeopathic formulas The homeopathic complex Passival, consisting of Passiflora incarnata 30 CH, Valeriana officinalis 30 CH, Ignatia amara 30 CH and Zincum valerianicum 30 CH plus Phosphoricum acid 30 CH (treatment TH1) or Silicea terra 30 CH (TH2), two antibiotics (ampicillin = AMP, oxytetracycline = OXY), and two reference treatments (without homeopathic or antibiotic treatment = CTRL, ethanol 30° GL = ETH). Additionally, a negative control CTRL- (untreated/uninfected) is included in the challenge test. Juvenile scallops (4.14 ± 0.06 mm, 13.33 mg wet weight) were cultivated in 4 L tanks provided with aerated, filtered (1 μm), and UV-sterilized seawater that was changed every third day. They were fed a blend of the microalgae Isochrysis galbana and Chaetoceros calcitrans (150,000 cells mL -1 twice a day). All treatments were directly added to the tank water and then 500 mL challenge units were inoculated with 1 × 10 7  CFU/mL (LD 50 ) of V. alginolyticus. Juveniles grew significantly larger and faster in height and weight with TH2 compared to the ETH and CTRL (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Higher concentrations of proteins occurred in scallops exposed to TH2 (160.57 ± 7

  5. Treatment of hemorrhoids with individualized homeopathy: An open observational pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kaushik Deb; Ghosh, Shubhamoy; Das, Asim Kumar; Ghosh, Aloke; Mondal, Ramkumar; Banerjee, Tanapa; Ali, Seikh Sajid; Ali, Seikh Swaif; Koley, Munmun; Saha, Subhranil

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Controversies and disagreement exist on conventional treatment strategies of hemorrhoids due to relapse, inefficacy, and complications. We intend to evaluate the role of individualized homeopathic treatment in hemorrhoids. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, open, observational trial, hemorrhoids patients were treated using five standardized scales measuring complaints severity and anoscopic score. It was conducted at two homeopathic hospitals in India, during from mid-July 2014 to mid-July 2015. Patients were intervened as per individualized homeopathic principles and followed up every month up to 6 months. Results: Total 73 were screened, 52 enrolled, 38 completed, 14 dropped out. Intention to treat population (n: = 52) was analyzed in the end. Statistically significant reductions of mean bleeding (month 3: −21.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −30.3, −13.3, P: < 0.00001, d = 0.787; month 6: −25.5, 95% CI −35.4, −15.6, P: < 0.00001, d = 0.775), pain (month 3: −21.3, 95% CI −28.6, −14.0, P: < 0.00001, d = 0.851; month 6: −27.6, 95% CI −35.6, −19.6, P: < 0.00001, d = 1.003), heaviness visual analog scales (VASs) (month 3: −8.1, 95% CI −13.9, −2.3, P: = 0.008, d = 0.609; month 6: −12.1, 95% CI −19.1, −5.1, P: = 0.001, d = 0.693), and anoscopic score (month 3: −0.4, 95% CI −0.6, −0.2, P: < 0.0001, d = 0.760; month 6: −0.5, 95% CI −0.7, −0.3, P: < 0.0001, d = 0.703) were achieved. Itching VASs reduced significantly only after 6 months (−8.1, 95% CI −14.6, −1.6, P: = 0.017, d = 0.586). No significant lowering of discharge VASs was achieved after 3 and 6 months. Conclusion: Under classical homeopathic treatment, hemorrhoids patients improved considerably in symptoms severity and anoscopic scores. However, being observational trial, our study cannot provide efficacy data. Controlled studies are required. Trial Reg. CTRI/2015/07/005958. PMID:27757262

  6. Classical homeopathy in the treatment of cancer patients--a prospective observational study of two independent cohorts.

    PubMed

    Rostock, Matthias; Naumann, Johannes; Guethlin, Corina; Guenther, Lars; Bartsch, Hans H; Walach, Harald

    2011-01-17

    Many cancer patients seek homeopathy as a complementary therapy. It has rarely been studied systematically, whether homeopathic care is of benefit for cancer patients. We conducted a prospective observational study with cancer patients in two differently treated cohorts: one cohort with patients under complementary homeopathic treatment (HG; n = 259), and one cohort with conventionally treated cancer patients (CG; n = 380). For a direct comparison, matched pairs with patients of the same tumour entity and comparable prognosis were to be formed. Main outcome parameter: change of quality of life (FACT-G, FACIT-Sp) after 3 months. Secondary outcome parameters: change of quality of life (FACT-G, FACIT-Sp) after a year, as well as impairment by fatigue (MFI) and by anxiety and depression (HADS). HG: FACT-G, or FACIT-Sp, respectively improved statistically significantly in the first three months, from 75.6 (SD 14.6) to 81.1 (SD 16.9), or from 32.1 (SD 8.2) to 34.9 (SD 8.32), respectively. After 12 months, a further increase to 84.1 (SD 15.5) or 35.2 (SD 8.6) was found. Fatigue (MFI) decreased; anxiety and depression (HADS) did not change. CG: FACT-G remained constant in the first three months: 75.3 (SD 17.3) at t0, and 76.6 (SD 16.6) at t1. After 12 months, there was a slight increase to 78.9 (SD 18.1). FACIT-Sp scores improved significantly from t0 (31.0 - SD 8.9) to t1 (32.1 - SD 8.9) and declined again after a year (31.6 - SD 9.4). For fatigue, anxiety, and depression, no relevant changes were found. 120 patients of HG and 206 patients of CG met our criteria for matched-pairs selection. Due to large differences between the two patient populations, however, only 11 matched pairs could be formed. This is not sufficient for a comparative study. In our prospective study, we observed an improvement of quality of life as well as a tendency of fatigue symptoms to decrease in cancer patients under complementary homeopathic treatment. It would take considerably larger samples

  7. [The Aconit described by Nicander and today].

    PubMed

    Skaltsa, H; Philianos, S; Papaphilippou, G

    1997-01-01

    The herbal drug Aconite described by Nicander of Colophon (IInd century BC) is studied as to its symptoms and uses. The botanical identification presents some difficulties. There is a close correlation between the symptoms from Nicander's work and those cited by homeopaths authors.

  8. Veterinary Homeopathy: The Implications of Its History for Unorthodox Veterinary Concepts and Veterinary Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulter, Dwight B.

    1979-01-01

    The history of veterinary homeopathy, its future and implications are discussed. The need for investigation into the validity of both allopathic and homeopathic claims is stressed and it is suggested that maintenance of quality is the key factor in any approach. (BH)

  9. [Results of the use of pumpan preparation in the treatment of severe forms of angina pectoris].

    PubMed

    Parshina, S S; Golovacheva, T V; Afanas'eva, T N; Panchenko, O V; Baldina, A A; Starostina, N V; Lial'chenko, I F; Egorova, L P

    2000-01-01

    To assess validity of adjuvant use of pumpan, a homeopathic compound, in patients with unstable angina pectoris and angina of effort (functional class III-IV) receiving conventional treatment. A direct open controlled trial for 15 months performed initially in hospital, then outpatiently, covered 49 patients with severe angina. Examination of the patients included evaluation of clinical condition and the disease course, lipid metabolism, hemostasis, blood plasma electrolytes, aminotransferases, echo-CG, bicycle exercise, rheoencephalography, ultrasonic dopplerography of head and neck vessels. Pumpan produced a positive effect total nonspecific systemic resistance improved, number of hospitalizations reduced, intracardiac hemodynamics improved in some cases with severe angina. Homeopathic compound pumpan can be recommended in the treatment of severe angina to reinforce antianginal effect, improve the disease clinical course, to obtain a hypocoagulative and hypocholesterolemic effect, to normalize intracardiac hemodynamics, to raise myocardial performance and intracoronary reserve as well as nonspecific resistance of the body.

  10. Complementary treatment of psychotic and epileptic patients in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Razali, Salleh Mohd; Yassin, Azhar Mohd

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this article is to describe and compare the use of traditional/complementary medicine (T/CM) among psychotic (schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder) and epileptic Malay patients in peninsular Malaysia. There were 60 patients in each group. T/CM consultation was uniformly spread across all levels of education and social status. We could not find a single over-riding factor that influenced the decision to seek T/CM treatment because the decision to seek such treatment was complex and the majority of decisions were made by others. Fifty-three patients (44.2%), consisting of 37 (61.7%) psychotic and 16 (26.7%) epileptic patients had consulted Malay traditional healers (bomoh) and/or homeopathic practitioners in addition to modern treatment; of these, only three had consulted bomoh and homeopathic practitioners at the same time. The use of T/CM was significantly higher in psychotic than in epileptic Malay patients.

  11. Usage and Attitudes Towards Natural Remedies and Homeopathy in General Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Beer, André-Michael; Burlaka, Ievgeniia; Buskin, Stephen; Kamenov, Borislav; Pettenazzo, Andrea; Popova, Diana; Riveros Huckstadt, María Pilar; Sakalinskas, Virgilijus; Oberbaum, Menachem

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand the global approach and country differences in physicians’ usage, knowledge, and attitudes towards natural remedies and homeopathy in pediatric practice, an online survey involving 582 general pediatricians and general practitioners treating pediatric diseases was conducted in 6 countries. Overall, 17% of the pediatric prescriptions refer to phytotherapy and 15% refer to homeopathic preparations. Natural remedies and homeopathic preparations are more frequently used in upper respiratory tract infections, infant colic, sleep disturbances, and recurrent infections. In the majority of cases, they are used together with chemical drugs. Both treatment options are typically used if parents are concerned about side effects of conventional drugs or prefer natural remedies for themselves. Physicians express high interest in natural remedies and homeopathy; however, their knowledge is variable. Lack of proven efficacy, knowledge on mechanism of action, and information on indications are main factors that limit their usage. PMID:27493983

  12. Enzyme stabilization by glass-derived silicates in glass-exposed aqueous solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ives, J.A.; Moffett, J.R.; Arun, P.; Lam, D.; Todorov, T.I.; Brothers, A.B.; Anick, D.J.; Centeno, J.; Namboodiri, M.A.A.; Jonas, W.B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the solutes leaching from glass containers into aqueous solutions, and to show that these solutes have enzyme activity stabilizing effects in very dilute solutions. Methods: Enzyme assays with acetylcholine esterase were used to analyze serially succussed and diluted (SSD) solutions prepared in glass and plastic containers. Aqueous SSD preparations starting with various solutes, or water alone, were prepared under several conditions, and tested for their solute content and their ability to affect enzyme stability in dilute solution. Results: We confirm that water acts to dissolve constituents from glass vials, and show that the solutes derived from the glass have effects on enzymes in the resultant solutions. Enzyme assays demonstrated that enzyme stability in purified and deionized water was enhanced in SSD solutions that were prepared in glass containers, but not those prepared in plastic. The increased enzyme stability could be mimicked in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of silicates to the purified, deionized water that enzymes were dissolved in. Elemental analyses of SSD water preparations made in glass vials showed that boron, silicon, and sodium were present at micromolar concentrations. Conclusions: These results show that silicates and other solutes are present at micromolar levels in all glass-exposed solutions, whether pharmaceutical or homeopathic in nature. Even though silicates are known to have biological activity at higher concentrations, the silicate concentrations we measured in homeopathic preparations were too low to account for any purported in vivo efficacy, but could potentially influence in vitro biological assays reporting homeopathic effects. ?? 2009 The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  13. Selling falsehoods? A cross-sectional study of Canadian naturopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic and acupuncture clinic website claims relating to allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Blake; Carr, Stuart; Caulfield, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the frequency and qualitative characteristics of marketing claims made by Canadian chiropractors, naturopaths, homeopaths and acupuncturists relating to the diagnosis and treatment of allergy and asthma. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Canada. Data set 392 chiropractic, naturopathic, homeopathic and acupuncture clinic websites located in 10 of the largest metropolitan areas in Canada, as identified using 400 Google search results. Duplicates were not excluded from data analysis. Main outcome measures Mention of allergy, sensitivity or asthma, claim of ability to diagnose allergy, sensitivity or asthma, claim of ability to treat allergy, sensitivity or asthma, and claim of allergy, sensitivity or asthma treatment efficacy. Tests and treatments promoted were noted as qualitative examples. Results Naturopath clinic websites have the highest rates of advertising at least one of diagnosis, treatment or efficacy for allergy or sensitivity (85%) and asthma (64%), followed by acupuncturists (68% and 53%, respectively), homeopaths (60% and 54%) and chiropractors (33% and 38%). Search results from Vancouver, British Columbia were most likely to advertise at least one of diagnosis, treatment or efficacy for allergy or sensitivity (72.5%) and asthma (62.5%), and results from London, Ontario were least likely (50% and 40%, respectively). Of the interventions advertised, few are scientifically supported; the majority lack evidence of efficacy, and some are potentially harmful. Conclusions The majority of alternative healthcare clinics studied advertised interventions for allergy and asthma. Many offerings are unproven. A policy response may be warranted in order to safeguard the public interest. PMID:27986744

  14. A critical overview of homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Wayne B; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Linde, Klaus

    2003-03-04

    Homeopathy is a 200-year-old therapeutic system that uses small doses of various substances to stimulate autoregulatory and self-healing processes. Homeopathy selects substances by matching a patient's symptoms with symptoms produced by these substances in healthy individuals. Medicines are prepared by serial dilution and shaking, which proponents claim imprints information into water. Although many conventional physicians find such notions implausible, homeopathy had a prominent place in 19th-century health care and has recently undergone a worldwide revival. In the United States, patients who seek homeopathic care are more affluent and younger and more often seek treatment for subjective symptoms than those who seek conventional care. Homeopathic remedies were allowed by the 1939 Pure Food and Drug Act and are available over the counter. Some data--both from randomized, controlled trials and laboratory research--show effects from homeopathic remedies that contradict the contemporary rational basis of medicine. Three independent systematic reviews of placebo-controlled trials on homeopathy reported that its effects seem to be more than placebo, and one review found its effects consistent with placebo. There is also evidence from randomized, controlled trials that homeopathy may be effective for the treatment of influenza, allergies, postoperative ileus, and childhood diarrhea. Evidence suggests that homeopathy is ineffective for migraine, delayed-onset muscle soreness, and influenza prevention. There is a lack of conclusive evidence on the effectiveness of homeopathy for most conditions. Homeopathy deserves an open-minded opportunity to demonstrate its value by using evidence-based principles, but it should not be substituted for proven therapies.

  15. Influence of adjunctive classical homeopathy on global health status and subjective wellbeing in cancer patients - A pragmatic randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Frass, Michael; Friehs, Helmut; Thallinger, Christiane; Sohal, Narinderjit Kaur; Marosi, Christine; Muchitsch, Ilse; Gaertner, Katharina; Gleiss, Andreas; Schuster, Ernst; Oberbaum, Menachem

    2015-06-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine has increased over the past decade. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether homeopathy influenced global health status and subjective wellbeing when used as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapy. In this pragmatic randomized controlled trial, 410 patients, who were treated by standard anti-neoplastic therapy, were randomized to receive or not receive classical homeopathic adjunctive therapy in addition to standard therapy. The study took place at the Medical University Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Clinical Division of Oncology. The main outcome measures were global health status and subjective wellbeing as assessed by the patients. At each of three visits (one baseline, two follow-up visits), patients filled in two different questionnaires. 373 patients yielded at least one of three measurements. The improvement of global health status between visits 1 and 3 was significantly stronger in the homeopathy group by 7.7 (95% CI 2.3-13.0, p=0.005) when compared with the control group. A significant group difference was also observed with respect to subjective wellbeing by 14.7 (95% CI 8.5-21.0, p<0.001) in favor of the homeopathic as compared with the control group. Control patients showed a significant improvement only in subjective wellbeing between their first and third visits. Results suggest that the global health status and subjective wellbeing of cancer patients improve significantly when adjunct classical homeopathic treatment is administered in addition to conventional therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of very low doses of mediators on fungal laccase activity - nonlinearity beyond imagination

    PubMed Central

    Malarczyk, Elzbieta; Kochmanska-Rdest, Janina; Jarosz-Wilkolazka, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Laccase, an enzyme responsible for aerobic transformations of natural phenolics, in industrial applications requires the presence of low-molecular substances known as mediators, which accelerate oxidation processes. However, the use of mediators is limited by their toxicity and the high costs of exploitation. The activation of extracellular laccase in growing fungal culture with highly diluted mediators, ABTS and HBT is described. Two high laccase-producing fungal strains, Trametes versicolor and Cerrena unicolor, were used in this study as a source of enzyme. Selected dilutions of the mediators significantly increased the activity of extracellular laccase during 14 days of cultivation what was distinctly visible in PAGE technique and in colorimetric tests. The same mediator dilutions increased demethylation properties of laccase, which was demonstrated during incubation of enzyme with veratric acid. It was established that the activation effect was assigned to specific dilutions of mediators. Our dose-response dilution process smoothly passes into the range of action of homeopathic dilutions and is of interest for homeopaths. PMID:19732425

  17. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: part 1

    PubMed Central

    Lees, P.; Pelligand, L.; Whiting, M.; Chambers, D.; Toutain, P-L.; Whitehead, M. L.

    2017-01-01

    For many years after its invention around 1796, homeopathy was widely used in people and later in animals. Over the intervening period (1796-2016) pharmacology emerged as a science from Materia Medica (medicinal materials) to become the mainstay of veterinary therapeutics. There remains today a much smaller, but significant, use of homeopathy by veterinary surgeons. Homeopathic products are sometimes administered when conventional drug therapies have not succeeded, but are also used as alternatives to scientifically based therapies and licensed products. The principles underlying the veterinary use of drug-based and homeopathic products are polar opposites; this provides the basis for comparison between them. This two-part review compares and contrasts the two treatment forms in respect of history, constituents, methods of preparation, known or postulated mechanisms underlying responses, the legal basis for use and scientific credibility in the 21st century. Part 1 begins with a consideration of why therapeutic products actually work or appear to do so. PMID:28801498

  18. A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled feasibility study evaluating individualized homeopathy in managing pain of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Koley, Munmun; Saha, Subhranil; Ghosh, Shubhamoy

    2015-07-01

    Few homeopathic complexes seemed to produce significant effects in osteoarthritis; still, individualized homeopathy remained untested. We evaluated the feasibility of conducting an efficacy trial of individualized homeopathy in osteoarthritis. A prospective, parallel-arm, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study was conducted from January to October 2014 involving 60 patients (homeopathy, n = 30; placebo, n = 30) who were suffering from acute painful episodes of knee osteoarthritis and visiting the outpatient clinic of Mahesh Bhattacharyya Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, West Bengal, India. Statistically significant reduction was achieved in 3 visual analog scales (measuring pain, stiffness, and loss of function) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International scores in both groups over 2 weeks (P < .05); however, group differences were not significant (P > .05). Overall, homeopathy did not appear to be superior to placebo; still, further rigorous evaluation in this design involving a larger sample size seems feasible in future. Clinical Trials Registry, India (CTRI/2014/05/004589). © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. A systematic review of systematic reviews of homeopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, E

    2002-01-01

    Homeopathy remains one of the most controversial subjects in therapeutics. This article is an attempt to clarify its effectiveness based on recent systematic reviews. Electronic databases were searched for systematic reviews/meta-analysis on the subject. Seventeen articles fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Six of them related to re-analyses of one landmark meta-analysis. Collectively they implied that the overall positive result of this meta-analysis is not supported by a critical analysis of the data. Eleven independent systematic reviews were located. Collectively they failed to provide strong evidence in favour of homeopathy. In particular, there was no condition which responds convincingly better to homeopathic treatment than to placebo or other control interventions. Similarly, there was no homeopathic remedy that was demonstrated to yield clinical effects that are convincingly different from placebo. It is concluded that the best clinical evidence for homeopathy available to date does not warrant positive recommendations for its use in clinical practice. PMID:12492603

  20. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: part 1.

    PubMed

    Lees, P; Pelligand, L; Whiting, M; Chambers, D; Toutain, P-L; Whitehead, M L

    2017-08-12

    For many years after its invention around 1796, homeopathy was widely used in people and later in animals. Over the intervening period (1796-2016) pharmacology emerged as a science from Materia Medica (medicinal materials) to become the mainstay of veterinary therapeutics. There remains today a much smaller, but significant, use of homeopathy by veterinary surgeons. Homeopathic products are sometimes administered when conventional drug therapies have not succeeded, but are also used as alternatives to scientifically based therapies and licensed products. The principles underlying the veterinary use of drug-based and homeopathic products are polar opposites; this provides the basis for comparison between them. This two-part review compares and contrasts the two treatment forms in respect of history, constituents, methods of preparation, known or postulated mechanisms underlying responses, the legal basis for use and scientific credibility in the 21st century. Part 1 begins with a consideration of why therapeutic products actually work or appear to do so. British Veterinary Association.

  1. Selling falsehoods? A cross-sectional study of Canadian naturopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic and acupuncture clinic website claims relating to allergy and asthma.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Blake; Carr, Stuart; Caulfield, Timothy

    2016-12-16

    To identify the frequency and qualitative characteristics of marketing claims made by Canadian chiropractors, naturopaths, homeopaths and acupuncturists relating to the diagnosis and treatment of allergy and asthma. Cross-sectional study. Canada. 392 chiropractic, naturopathic, homeopathic and acupuncture clinic websites located in 10 of the largest metropolitan areas in Canada, as identified using 400 Google search results. Duplicates were not excluded from data analysis. Mention of allergy, sensitivity or asthma, claim of ability to diagnose allergy, sensitivity or asthma, claim of ability to treat allergy, sensitivity or asthma, and claim of allergy, sensitivity or asthma treatment efficacy. Tests and treatments promoted were noted as qualitative examples. Naturopath clinic websites have the highest rates of advertising at least one of diagnosis, treatment or efficacy for allergy or sensitivity (85%) and asthma (64%), followed by acupuncturists (68% and 53%, respectively), homeopaths (60% and 54%) and chiropractors (33% and 38%). Search results from Vancouver, British Columbia were most likely to advertise at least one of diagnosis, treatment or efficacy for allergy or sensitivity (72.5%) and asthma (62.5%), and results from London, Ontario were least likely (50% and 40%, respectively). Of the interventions advertised, few are scientifically supported; the majority lack evidence of efficacy, and some are potentially harmful. The majority of alternative healthcare clinics studied advertised interventions for allergy and asthma. Many offerings are unproven. A policy response may be warranted in order to safeguard the public interest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Homeopathy in paediatric atopic diseases: long-term results in children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elio; Bartoli, Paola; Bianchi, Alba; Da Frè, Monica

    2012-01-01

    To study the socio-demographic features, the prescribed remedies and the outcome of atopic diseases in children treated with homeopathy at the Homeopathic Clinic of Lucca (Italy), and the long-term outcome of children suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD) after an approximate 8-year period (range 5-10 years). Our data derive from an observational longitudinal study carried out on 213 children (38.6%) with atopic diseases out of 551 children consecutively examined from September 1998 to December 2008. We used the Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital Outcome Score to evaluate the results that were classified on the basis of a Likert scale. Eighty-three (39%) children were affected by asthma, 51 (24%) by allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, 76 (36%) by AD and 3 (1%) by food intolerance. Follow-up patients were 104 (48.8%), and 65 (62.5%) of them reported a major improvement or resolution. The parents of paediatric patients suffering from AD, who had started homeopathic treatment at <4.9 years of age were invited to follow-up assessment 8 years later and 40 children (mean age 12.9) were examined; 28/40 (70%) had a complete disappearance of AD, 12/40 children (30.0%) were still affected by AD; 8/40 (20%) had asthma and 8/40 patients had, or developed, allergic rhinitis. These preliminary results seem to confirm a positive therapeutic effect of homeopathy in atopic children. Furthermore, according to the data from the literature paediatric patients treated with homeopathy seem to show a reduced tendency to maintain AD and develop asthma (and allergic rhinitis) in adult age. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A prospective multi-centric open clinical trial of homeopathy in diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Chaturbhuja; Oberai, Praveen; Varanasi, Roja; Baig, Hafeezullah; Ch, Raveender; Reddy, G R C; Devi, Pratima; S, Bhubaneshwari; Singh, Vikram; Singh, V P; Singh, Hari; Shitanshu, Shashi Shekhar

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate homeopathic treatment in the management of diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy. A prospective multi-centric clinical observational study was carried out from October 2005 to September 2009 by Central Council for Research in Homeopathy (CCRH) (India) at its five institutes/units. Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM) and presenting with symptoms of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) were screened, investigated and were enrolled in the study after fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were evaluated by the diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy symptom score (DDSPSS) developed by the Council. A total of 15 homeopathic medicines were identified after repertorizing the nosological symptoms and signs of the disease. The appropriate constitutional medicine was selected and prescribed in 30, 200 and 1 M potency on an individualized basis. Patients were followed up regularly for 12 months. Out of 336 patients (167 males and 169 females) enrolled in the study, 247 patients (123 males and 124 females) were analyzed. All patients who attended at least three follow-up appointments and baseline curve conduction studies were included in the analysis.). A statistically significant improvement in DDSPSS total score (p = 0.0001) was found at 12 months from baseline. Most objective measures did not show significant improvement. Lycopodium clavatum (n = 132), Phosphorus (n = 27) and Sulphur (n = 26) were the medicines most frequently prescribed. Adverse event of hypoglycaemia was observed in one patient only. This study suggests homeopathic medicines may be effective in managing the symptoms of DPN patients. Further studies should be controlled and include the quality of life (QOL) assessment. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Controlled clinical studies of homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    Observations about controlled clinical trials expressed by Max Haidvogl in the book Ultra High Dilution (1994) have been appraised from a perspective two decades later. The present commentary briefly examines changes in homeopathy research evidence since 1994 as regards: the published number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), the use of individualised homeopathic intervention, the 'proven efficacy of homeopathy', and the quality of the evidence. The commentary reflects the details of RCTs that are available in a recently published literature review and by scrutiny of systematic reviews of RCTs in homeopathy. The homeopathy RCT literature grew by 309 records in the 18 years that immediately followed Haidvogl's article, with more than a doubling of the proportion that investigated individualised homeopathy. Discounting one prior publication, the entire systematic review literature on homeopathy RCTs post-dates 1994. A total of 36 condition-specific systematic reviews have been identified in the peer-reviewed literature: 16 of them reported positive, or tentatively positive, conclusions about homeopathy's clinical effectiveness; the other 20 were negative or non-conclusive. Reviews typically have been restricted in the strength of their conclusions by the low quality of the original RCT evidence. Three comprehensive systematic reviews concluded, cautiously, that homeopathy may differ from placebo; a fourth such review reached negative conclusions. A recent high-quality meta-analysis concluded that medicines prescribed in individualised homeopathic treatment may have small, specific, effects. Despite important growth in research activity since 1994, concerns about study quality limit the interpretation of available RCT data. The question whether homeopathic intervention differs from placebo awaits decisive answer. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Homeopathy in rural Australian primary health care: a survey of general practitioner referral and practice in rural and regional New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Wardle, J; Adams, J; Sibbritt, D

    2013-07-01

    Homeopathy has attracted considerable recent attention from the Australian conventional medical community. However, despite such increased attention there has been little exploration of the interface between homeopathy and Australian conventional medical practice. This article addresses this research gap by exploring homeopathic practice and referral by rural and regional Australian general practitioners (GPs). A 27-item questionnaire was sent to all 1486 GPs currently practising in rural and regional New South Wales, Australia (response rate 40.7%). Few GPs in this study utilised homeopathy in their personal practice, with only 0.5% of GPs prescribing homeopathy in the past 12 months, and 8.5% referring patients for homeopathic treatment at least a few times over the past 12 months. Nearly two-thirds of GPs (63.9%) reported that they would not refer for homeopathy under any circumstances. Being in a remote location, receiving patient requests for homeopathy, observing positive responses from homeopathy previously, using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners as information sources, higher levels of knowledge of homeopathy, and being interested in increasing CAM knowledge were all independently predictive of increased referral to homeopathy amongst GPs in this study. GPs in this study were less likely to refer to homeopathy if they used peer-reviewed literature as the major source of their information on CAM. Homeopathy is not integrated significantly in rural general practice either via GP utilisation or referral. There is significant opposition to homeopathy referral amongst rural and regional GPs, though some level of interaction with homeopathic providers exists. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Veterinary homeopathy: meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Robert T; Clausen, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of veterinary homeopathy has not previously been undertaken. For all medical conditions and species collectively, we tested the hypothesis that the outcome of homeopathic intervention (treatment and/or prophylaxis, individualised and/or non-individualised) is distinguishable from corresponding intervention using placebos. All facets of the review, including literature search strategy, study eligibility, data extraction and assessment of risk of bias, were described in an earlier paper. A trial was judged to comprise reliable evidence if its risk of bias was low or was unclear in specific domains of assessment. Effect size was reported as odds ratio (OR). A trial was judged free of vested interest if it was not funded by a homeopathic pharmacy. Meta-analysis was conducted using the random-effects model, with hypothesis-driven sensitivity analysis based on risk of bias. Nine of 15 trials with extractable data displayed high risk of bias; low or unclear risk of bias was attributed to each of the remaining six trials, only two of which comprised reliable evidence without overt vested interest. For all N = 15 trials, pooled OR = 1.69 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12 to 2.56]; P = 0.01. For the N = 2 trials with suitably reliable evidence, pooled OR = 2.62 [95% CI, 1.13 to 6.05]; P = 0.02). Meta-analysis provides some very limited evidence that clinical intervention in animals using homeopathic medicines is distinguishable from corresponding intervention using placebos. The low number and quality of the trials hinders a more decisive conclusion. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Semi-Individualized Homeopathy Add-On Versus Usual Care Only for Premenstrual Disorders: A Randomized, Controlled Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Klein-Laansma, Christien T; Jong, Mats; von Hagens, Cornelia; Jansen, Jean Pierre C H; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Jong, Miek C

    2018-03-22

    Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD) bother a substantial number of women. Homeopathy seems a promising treatment, but it needs investigation using reliable study designs. The feasibility of organizing an international randomized pragmatic trial on a homeopathic add-on treatment (usual care [UC] + HT) compared with UC alone was evaluated. A multicenter, randomized, controlled pragmatic trial with parallel groups. The study was organized in general and private homeopathic practices in the Netherlands and Sweden and in an outpatient university clinic in Germany. Women diagnosed as having PMS/PMDD, based on prospective daily rating by the daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) during a period of 2 months, were included and randomized. Women were to receive UC + HT or UC for 4 months. Homeopathic medicine selection was according to a previously tested prognostic questionnaire and electronic algorithm. Usual care was as provided by the women's general practitioner according to their preferences. Before and after treatment, the women completed diaries (DRSP), the measure yourself concerns and well-being, and other questionnaires. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses were performed. In Germany, the study could not proceed because of legal limitations. In Sweden, recruitment proved extremely difficult. In the Netherlands and Sweden, 60 women were randomized (UC + HT: 28; UC: 32), data of 47/46 women were analyzed (ITT/PP). After 4 months, relative mean change of DRSP scores in the UC + HT group was significantly better than in the UC group (p = 0.03). With respect to recruitment and different legal status, it does not seem feasible to perform a larger, international, pragmatic randomized trial on (semi-)individualized homeopathy for PMS/PMDD. Since the added value of HT compared with UC was demonstrated by significant differences in symptom score changes, further studies are warranted.

  8. Assessment of Likelihood Ratio for Four Contact Dermatitis Symptoms of Vinca Minor.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Suman; Nayak, Chaturbhuja; Rutten, Lex; Koley, Munmun; Saha, Subhranil; Roy, Mousumi; Abbas, Sk Jahir; Ghosh, Simantini; Halder, Suman; Wani, Ghulam Nabi; Mir, Anaitulah Ahmad; Bhat, Showket Ahmad

    2018-05-21

     Contact dermatitis (CD) is a frequently occurring medical condition, for which Vinca minor (VM) is one of the recommended homeopathic medicines. However, the symptoms indicating this medicine have not yet been assessed systematically. Likelihood ratio (LR), based on Bayesian statistics, may yield better estimation of a medicine's indication than the existing method of entry of symptoms into materia medica and repertories.  We investigated LRs of four CD symptoms of VM: (1) great sensitiveness of skin, with redness and soreness from slightest rubbing; (2) weeping eczema with foul, thick crusts; (3) itching amelioration in open air; and (4) CD of scalp. An observational, prospective, patient-outcome study was conducted in five different practice settings on 390 CD patients over 18 months using three outcomes-Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital Outcome Scale (GHHOS), Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD), and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), assessed at baseline, after 3 and 6 months. The LR of each of the four symptoms was estimated as per the patient-rated outcomes on GHHOS.  Seventy-four VM and 316 non-VM cases were analyzed. Estimated LRs were as follows: symptom 1, 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65 to 2.60); symptom 2, 1.48 (95% CI: 0.80 to 2.74); symptom 3, 1.70 (95% CI: 0.94 to 3.07); symptom 4, 1.36 (95% CI: 0.74 to 2.51). There were statistically significant reductions in SCORAD and DLQI scores over 3 and 6 months.  There was insufficient evidence to attribute any of the four assessed symptoms clearly to VM. Though non-significant, a high LR was observed for "itching amelioration in open air" (symptom 3). Symptoms in the homeopathic materia medica for VM are perhaps over-represented. More research of this nature is warranted. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  9. Randomised controlled trials of veterinary homeopathy: characterising the peer-reviewed research literature for systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Robert T; Hacke, Daniela; Clausen, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Systematic review of the research evidence in veterinary homeopathy has never previously been carried out. This paper presents the search methods, together with categorised lists of retrieved records, that enable us to identify the literature that is acceptable for future systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in veterinary homeopathy. All randomised and controlled trials of homeopathic intervention (prophylaxis and/or treatment of disease, in any species except man) were appraised according to pre-specified criteria. The following databases were systematically searched from their inception up to and including March 2011: AMED; Carstens-Stiftung Homeopathic Veterinary Clinical Research (HomVetCR) database; CINAHL; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; Embase; Hom-Inform; LILACS; PubMed; Science Citation Index; Scopus. One hundred and fifty records were retrieved; 38 satisfied the acceptance criteria (substantive report of a clinical treatment or prophylaxis trial in veterinary homeopathic medicine randomised and controlled and published in a peer-reviewed journal), and were thus eligible for future planned systematic review. Approximately half of the rejected records were theses. Seven species and 27 different species-specific medical conditions were represented in the 38 papers. Similar numbers of papers reported trials of treatment and prophylaxis (n=21 and n=17 respectively) and were controlled against placebo or other than placebo (n=18, n=20 respectively). Most research focused on non-individualised homeopathy (n=35 papers) compared with individualised homeopathy (n=3). The results provide a complete and clarified view of the RCT literature in veterinary homeopathy. We will systematically review the 38 substantive peer-reviewed journal articles under the main headings: treatment trials; prophylaxis trials. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [History of homeopathy in Franconia].

    PubMed

    Dross, Fritz; Ruisinger, Marion Maria

    2007-01-01

    The research for this paper was initiated by an Erlangen exhibition project on the history of homeopathy on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of Samuel Hahnemann's birth in 2005. The founder of homeopathic medicine received his doctor of medicine degree at the University of Erlangen in 1779. As Hahnemann spent only four months in Erlangen, homeopathic physicians, patients and apothecaries in the region from Hahnemann's time until today were investigated. The aim was to provide a concise survey of the general problems in the history of homeopathy derived from regional cases which could be illustrated by objects suitable for an exhibition. Thus, the article is not only about the history of homeopathy in Northern Bavaria (Franconia), but also about a shift in the use of media and about doing science the other way round, viz. by starting at the presentation and ending with the sources. The outcome of the project was that most of the crucial topics of the history of homeopathy could be covered on a micro-historic scale: trials, pharmacy, hospital, patients, university, National Socialism.

  11. Plausibility and evidence: the case of homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Lex; Mathie, Robert T; Fisher, Peter; Goossens, Maria; van Wassenhoven, Michel

    2013-08-01

    Homeopathy is controversial and hotly debated. The conclusions of systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials of homeopathy vary from 'comparable to conventional medicine' to 'no evidence of effects beyond placebo'. It is claimed that homeopathy conflicts with scientific laws and that homoeopaths reject the naturalistic outlook, but no evidence has been cited. We are homeopathic physicians and researchers who do not reject the scientific outlook; we believe that examination of the prior beliefs underlying this enduring stand-off can advance the debate. We show that interpretations of the same set of evidence--for homeopathy and for conventional medicine--can diverge. Prior disbelief in homeopathy is rooted in the perceived implausibility of any conceivable mechanism of action. Using the 'crossword analogy', we demonstrate that plausibility bias impedes assessment of the clinical evidence. Sweeping statements about the scientific impossibility of homeopathy are themselves unscientific: scientific statements must be precise and testable. There is growing evidence that homeopathic preparations can exert biological effects; due consideration of such research would reduce the influence of prior beliefs on the assessment of systematic review evidence.

  12. Health Care Utilization Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-11

    the Naval Health Research Center (protocol NHRC.2000.0007). Data Sources In addition to our longitudinal survey instrument , other data sources...megavitamin therapy, homeopathic remedies, hypnosis , massage therapy, relaxation, and spiritual healing. For the purposes of these analyses...acupuncture, biofeedback, chiropractic care, energy healing, folk medicine, hypnosis , and massage therapy were grouped together as practitioner-assisted

  13. Health Care Utilization Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Sources In addition to our longitudinal survey instrument , other data sources include the Standard Inpatient Data Record (SIDR), which is an...therapy, high-dose megavita- min therapy, homeopathic remedies, hypnosis , massage therapy, relaxation, and spiritual healing. For the pur- poses of these...analyses, acupuncture, biofeedback, chiro- practic care, energy healing, folk medicine, hypnosis , and massage therapy were grouped together as practi

  14. The Bradford Hill criteria and zinc-induced anosmia: a causality analysis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Terence M; Smith, Wendy M

    2010-07-01

    To apply the Bradford Hill criteria, which are widely used to establish causality between an environmental agent and disease, to evaluate the relationship between over-the-counter intranasal zinc gluconate therapy and anosmia. Patient and literature review applying the Bradford Hill criteria on causation. University of California, San Diego, Nasal Dysfunction Clinic. The study included 25 patients who presented to the University of California, San Diego, Nasal Dysfunction Clinic complaining of acute-onset anosmia after intranasal application of homeopathic zinc gluconate gel. Each of the 9 Bradford Hill criteria--strength of association, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient (dose-response), biological plausibility, biological coherence, experimental evidence, and analogy--was applied to intranasal zinc gluconate therapy and olfactory dysfunction using published, peer-reviewed medical literature and reported clinical experiences. Clinical, biological, and experimental data support the Bradford Hill criteria to demonstrate that intranasal zinc gluconate therapy causes hyposmia and anosmia. The Bradford Hill criteria represent an important tool for scientifically determining cause between environmental exposure and disease. Increased Food and Drug Administration oversight of homeopathic medications is needed to monitor the safety of these popular remedies.

  15. An exploration of the relationship between placebo and homeopathy and the implications for clinical trial design

    PubMed Central

    Haresnape, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Placebo appears to be a real neurobiological phenomenon that has evolved through the selection pressure to be able to heal ourselves. The complex language and social structures of humans means that we can attribute meaning to therapeutic encounters with culturally sanctioned authority figures and we can use our attachment to such figures to generate hope for recovery. Different mechanisms may be involved in the neurobiological aspect of placebo including anxiety, learning, conditioning as well as individual genetic variation. Examination of the published work shows that while some trials do seem to indicate a specific mode of action for homeopathic remedies other trials do not and this is an issue that needs to be addressed at the trial design stage. A clinical trial that includes both a placebo group and a non-participating control arm is the most powerful design for separating the non-specific and polymorphic placebo effect from the specific effects of trial medication. The control variables in a trial of homeopathic medication should also include the process of consultation as this may assume a meaning for the individual that can also be associated with a placebo effect. PMID:24040505

  16. In vitro assessment of anticytotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of CANOVA(®).

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Henrique Fonseca Sousa; Cardoso, Plínio Cerqueira Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Helem Ferreira; Mota, Tatiane Cristina; Gomes, Lorena Monteiro; Khayat, André Salim; Guimarães, Adriana Costa; Amorim, Marucia Irena Medeiros; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguéz; Bahia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2016-08-01

    CANOVA(®) (CA) is a homeopathic immunomodulator. It contains several homeopathic medicines prepares according to the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia. CA is indicated in clinical conditions in which the immune system is impaired and against tumors. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU) is an N-nitroso compound, with genotoxic/mutagenic properties. Although several studies have shown promising results in the use of CA, there are no studies reporting possible antigenotoxic effects. This study evaluated the in vitro antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic effects of CA in human lymphocytes exposed to NMU. Samples of human lymphocytes that were subjected to different concentrations of a mixture containing CA and NMU were used. The genotoxicity/antigenotoxicity of CA was evaluated by the comet assay, anticytotoxicity was assessed by quantification of apoptosis and necrosis using acridine orange/ethidium bromide. CA significantly reduced DNA damage induced by NMU and reduced significantly the frequency of NMU-induced apoptosis after 24 h of treatment. CA has an important cytoprotective effect significantly reducing the DNA damage and apoptosis induced by the carcinogen NMU. Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Using homeopathy for treating childhood asthma: understanding a family's choice.

    PubMed

    Doerr, L

    2001-08-01

    The incidence and severity of asthma are increasing despite concerted efforts in comprehensive management. Families may be expected to look to complementary or alternative therapies (CAM) for help in treating persistent childhood asthma. One such therapy is homeopathy, a system of medicine that uses specially prepared, highly dilute substances to induce the body's self-healing in a comprehensive manner. This article describes the contrasting experiences for a family who undergoes specialty consultations with an allergist and with a homeopath. The style of the interview and the diagnostic tools used vary, as well as the basic philosophies and goals. The advantages and limitations, as well as the regulatory framework of homeopathy are explained, as evidenced by the literature. For nurses and other clinicians caring for children and families who use nonconventional therapies, the clinical implications are that these professionals need to become knowledgeable about the various alternative therapies which can complement conventional care. Families who wish to try homeopathy along with conventional care need to have open lines of communication and cooperation between their providers, both conventional and homeopathic. The care of childhood asthma may prove to benefit from clinical trials in homeopathy. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  18. A gentle ethical defence of homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Levy, David; Gadd, Ben; Kerridge, Ian; Komesaroff, Paul A

    2015-06-01

    Recent discourses about the legitimacy of homeopathy have focused on its scientific plausibility, mechanism of action, and evidence base. These, frequently, conclude not only that homeopathy is scientifically baseless, but that it is "unethical." They have also diminished patients' perspectives, values, and preferences. We contend that these critics confuse epistemic questions with questions of ethics, misconstrue the moral status of homeopaths, and have an impoverished idea of ethics-one that fails to account either for the moral worth of care and of relationships or for the perspectives, values, and preferences of patients. Utilitarian critics, in particular, endeavour to present an objective evaluation-a type of moral calculus-quantifying the utilities and disutilities of homeopathy as a justification for the exclusion of homeopathy from research and health care. But these critiques are built upon a narrow formulation of evidence and care and a diminished episteme that excludes the values and preferences of researchers, homeopaths, and patients engaged in the practice of homeopathy. We suggest that homeopathy is ethical as it fulfils the needs and expectations of many patients; may be practiced safely and prudentially; values care and the virtues of the therapeutic relationship; and provides important benefits for patients.

  19. Observational study of Arctium lappa in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Miglani, Anjali; Manchanda, Raj K

    2014-07-01

    Arctium lappa (Lappa) is used in traditional Western and Chinese medicine for acne. It is mentioned in homeopathic literature for acne, but its effect has not previously been evaluated. To determine the effectiveness of homeopathic medicine Lappa in treatment of acne vulgaris. An uncontrolled observational interventional study was conducted on human subjects who fulfilled the inclusion criteria and gave written informed consent. Lappa was prescribed in potencies starting from 6c rising to 1M as required, over a period of 6 months. Objective assessment was change in acne lesion counts supplemented with Global Acne Grading System (GAGS) and subjective assessment by using Acne-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire (Acne-QoL). Out of 34 human subjects, 32 completed the follow-up. Statistical significant results were seen in lesion counts, GAGS and Acne-QoL score (p value <0.001). Lappa has shown positive effects in the treatment of acne especially of inflammatory type. Further controlled, randomized studies with larger sample size are desirable. Trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01040390. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in pregnancy: data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC).

    PubMed

    Bishop, J L; Northstone, K; Green, J R; Thompson, E A

    2011-12-01

    To report the frequency of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use by a population of pregnant women in the UK. Four postal self-completion questionnaires completed at 8, 12, 18 and 32 weeks' gestation provided the source of CAMs used. Questions asked for written descriptions about the use of any treatments, pills, medicines, ointments, homeopathic medicines, herbal medicines, supplements, drinks and herbal teas. An observational, population-based, cohort study of parents and children of 14,541 pregnant women residing within the former county of Avon in south-west England. Data was available for 14,115 women. Over a quarter (26.7%; n=3774) of women had used a CAM at least once in pregnancy, the use rising from 6% in the 1st trimester to 12.4% in the 2nd to 26.3% in the 3rd. Herbal teas were the most commonly reported CAM at any time in pregnancy (17.7%; n=2499) followed by homeopathic medicine (14.4%; n=2038) and then herbal medicine (5.8%; n=813). The most commonly used herbal product was chamomile used by 14.6% of women, the most commonly used homeopathic product was Arnica used by 3.1% of women. Other CAMs (osteopathy, aromatherapy, acupuncture/acupressure, Chinese herbal medicine, chiropractic, cranial sacral therapy, hypnosis, non-specific massage and reflexology) accounted for less than 1% of users. CAM use in pregnancy, where a wide range of CAMs has been assessed, has not been widely reported. Studies that have been conducted report varying results to this study (26.7%) by between 13.3% and 87% of pregnant women. Survey results will be affected by a number of factors namely the inclusion/exclusion of vitamins and minerals, the timing of data collection, the country of source, the number of women surveyed, and the different selection criteria of either recruiting women to the study or of categorising and identifying a CAM treatment or product. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Patient admission and induced abortion. A different mode: homeopathy and sophrology].

    PubMed

    Tregan, D; Cailleux-Kreitmann, J; Nègre-Garnier, C

    1994-03-01

    Unlike classic allopathic medicine in which specific drugs are given for specific symptoms, homeopathic prescriptions take into account the specificity of each patient. Different patients have different reactions to the same illness. Homeopathic practitioners sometimes prescribe different remedies for each patient suffering a particular illness. Two nurses and a midwife at the abortion service of the Center for Social Gynecology in Marseilles received training in homeopathic medicine which they applied to their work with abortion patients. A very complete and detailed questioning is necessary to identify the prescription that will be best adapted to the overall psychological, somatic, and etiological circumstances of the patient. Changes noted since the beginning of the pregnancy are especially noted. During the medical consultation, homeopathy may be proposed by the physician for patients who are particularly stressed. The anxiety and fear experienced by the referred patients can have physical consequences. The opportunity given to the patient to express herself and the individualized remedies prescribed enable the procedure to be completed under better conditions. Sophrology is the study of consciousness, its modifications, and the physical, psychological, and physiological means that can modify it for therapeutic or prophylactic purposes. A psychiatrist in Barcelona developed sophrology and began to teach it in 1960. The goal of sophrology is to achieve mental relaxation through muscular relaxation. Application of the principles of sophrology in an abortion service must be adapted to the structure and function of the service. Most patients have no knowledge of the method. Explanations must be rapid, clear, and simplified if patients are to obtain benefit. The practitioner instructs the patient in a calm voice to be aware of and maintain breathing, and uses positive words to suggest that the patient relax. Personnel with adequate training in sophrology can assist

  2. PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, L.; Drouin, J.; Desjardins, L.; Leroux, D.; Audet, D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study, which took the form of a two-period cross-over clinical trial, was to determine whether a homeopathic substance, Arnica Montana, significantly decreased bleeding time (Simplate II) and to describe its impact on various blood coagulation tests. It was not shown that this substance had a significant impact on various parameters of blood coagulation in healthy volunteers in the period immediately following administration [corrected]. PMID:7903572

  3. Experimental physical methods and theories--then and now.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Jurgen

    2015-10-01

    A first evaluation of fundamental research into the physics and physiology of Ultra high dilutions (UHDs) was conducted by the author in 1994(1). In this paper we revisit methods and theories from back then and follow their paths through their evolution and contribution to new knowledge in UHD research since then. Physical methods and theories discusses in our anthology on UHD in 1994(1) form the basis for tracing ideas and findings along their path of further development and impact on new knowledge in UHD. Experimental approaches to probe physical changes in homeopathic preparations have become more sophisticated over past two decades, so did the desire to report results to a scientific standard that is on par with those in specialist literature. The same cannot be said about underlying supporting theoretical models and simulations. Grant challenges in science often take a more targeted and more concerted approach to formulate a research question and then look for answers. A concerted effort to focus on one hypothesized physical aspect of a well-defined homeopathic preparation may help aligning experimental methods with theoretical models and, in doing so, help to gain a deeper understanding of the whole body of insights and data produced. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Appetoff: another diet fad.

    PubMed

    Beckerich, M J

    1989-12-01

    Appetoff diet patches were diet aids introduced to the public in 1987 and removed from the market in 1988 by the FDA for reasons of fraud. The ingredients were supposedly homeopathic concentrations of plant and mineral products. Although 91.6% of persons in this study who used the product for at least 1 week reported weight loss and mild side effects, no active ingredients could be detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  5. Effect of homeopathy on analgesic intake following knee ligament reconstruction: a phase III monocentre randomized placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Paris, A; Gonnet, N; Chaussard, C; Belon, P; Rocourt, F; Saragaglia, D; Cracowski, J L

    2008-01-01

    Aims The efficacy of homeopathy is still under debate. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of homeopathic treatment (Arnica montana 5 CH, Bryonia alba 5 CH, Hypericum perforatum 5 CH and Ruta graveolens 3 DH) on cumulated morphine intake delivered by PCA over 24 h after knee ligament reconstruction. Methods This was an add-on randomized controlled study with three parallel groups: a double-blind homeopathic or placebo arm and an open-label noninterventional control arm. Eligible patients were 18–60 years old candidates for surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament. Treatment was administered the evening before surgery and continued for 3 days. The primary end-point was cumulated morphine intake delivered by PCA during the first 24 h inferior or superior/equal to 10 mg day−1. Results One hundred and fifty-eight patients were randomized (66 in the placebo arm, 67 in the homeopathic arm and 25 in the noninterventional group). There was no difference between the treated and the placebo group for primary end-point (mean (95% CI) 48% (35.8, 56.3), and 56% (43.7, 68.3), required less than 10 mg day−1 of morphine in each group, respectively). The homeopathy treatment had no effect on morphine intake between 24 and 72 h or on the visual analogue pain scale, or on quality of life assessed by the SF-36 questionnaire. In addition, these parameters were not different in patients enrolled in the open-label noninterventional control arm. Conclusions The complex of homeopathy tested in this study was not superior to placebo in reducing 24 h morphine consumption after knee ligament reconstruction. What is already known about this subject The efficacy of homeopathy is still under debate and a recent meta-analysis recommended further randomized double-blind clinical trials to identify any clinical situation in which homeopathy might be effective. What this study adds The complex of homeopathy tested in this study (Arnica montana 5 CH, Bryonia alba 5 CH

  6. Homeopathy for allergic rhinitis: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is a global health problem that is often treated with homeopathy. The objective of this review will be to evaluate the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment of allergic rhinitis. Methods/Design The authors will conduct a systematic review. We will search Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED, CAM-Quest, Google Scholar and reference lists of identified studies up to December 2013. The review will include randomized controlled trials that evaluate homeopathic treatment of allergic rhinitis. Studies with participants of all ages, with acute or chronic comorbidities will be included. Patients with immunodeficiency will not be included. The diagnosis will be based on the published guidelines of diagnosis and classification. Studies of all homeopathy modalities (clinical, complex and classical homeopathy, and isopathy) will be included. We will include trials with both active controls (conventional therapy, standard care) and placebo controls. The primary outcomes are: an improvement of global symptoms recorded in validated daily or weekly diaries and any scores from validated visual analogue scales; the total Quality of Life Score (such as the Juniper RQLQ);individual symptoms scores which include any appropriate measures of nasal obstruction, runny nose, sneezing, itching, and eye symptoms; and number of days requiring medication. Secondary outcomes selected will include serum immunoglobin E (IgE) levels, individual ocular symptoms, adverse events, and the use of rescue medication. Treatment effects will be measured by calculating the mean difference and the standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval (CI) for continuous data. Risk ratio or, if feasible, odds ratio will be calculated with 95% CI for dichotomous data. After assessing clinical and statistical heterogeneity, meta-analysis will be performed, if appropriate. The individual participant will be the unit of analysis. Descriptive information on missing data will be

  7. Homeopathic treatment for prolonged postoperative coma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vithoulkas, G; Văcăraș, V; Kavouras, J; Buzoianu, A D; Mărginean, M; Văcăraș, D; Cozma, S

    2017-01-01

    Coma is the state of unrousable unconsciousness. There are variations in the degree of coma and the findings and signs found on the patient's clinical examination depend on the underlying cause of the disorder. The Glasgow Coma scale evaluates the best motor, verbal and eye answers of the patient. A patient is considered to be in a coma if his Glasgow Coma Scale is below 8 points. The progress that we have made throughout the years has also led to complications that can culminate in a major catastrophe like death, permanent brain damage, coma. A study performed reached the conclusion that prior comorbidity, older age, intraoperative hypotension, and cardiovascular surgery may predispose patients to postoperative coma. The article presents a case of postoperative coma treated successfully with homeopathy. Although a rare complication, postoperative coma is a severe, death-leading condition, causing immense suffering on both the patient and the patient's family. A multidisciplinary and thorough approach is necessary for these patients, but even after a well-conducted therapy, this condition leads to the death of the patient.

  8. Homeopathic treatment for prolonged postoperative coma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Vithoulkas, G; Văcăraș, V; Kavouras, J; Buzoianu, AD; Mărginean, M; Văcăraș, D; Cozma, S

    2017-01-01

    Coma is the state of unrousable unconsciousness. There are variations in the degree of coma and the findings and signs found on the patient’s clinical examination depend on the underlying cause of the disorder. The Glasgow Coma scale evaluates the best motor, verbal and eye answers of the patient. A patient is considered to be in a coma if his Glasgow Coma Scale is below 8 points. The progress that we have made throughout the years has also led to complications that can culminate in a major catastrophe like death, permanent brain damage, coma. A study performed reached the conclusion that prior comorbidity, older age, intraoperative hypotension, and cardiovascular surgery may predispose patients to postoperative coma. The article presents a case of postoperative coma treated successfully with homeopathy. Although a rare complication, postoperative coma is a severe, death-leading condition, causing immense suffering on both the patient and the patient’s family. A multidisciplinary and thorough approach is necessary for these patients, but even after a well-conducted therapy, this condition leads to the death of the patient. PMID:28616086

  9. Truth, proof and evidence: homeopathy and the medical paradigm.

    PubMed

    Swayne, Jeremy

    2008-04-01

    The study and practice of medicine, in its most personal and intimate functions, its most sophisticated scientific and technological manifestations, and its philosophical and ethical ramifications, are central to our understanding of the human condition. Homeopathic medicine: its insights, the questions that it begs, and the scientific and philosophical challenges it presents, has a significant contribution to make to this process. To be actively and seriously engaged with homeopathy is an adventurous undertaking. It is to be engaged in exploring both human nature and the nature of the world we inhabit. And in that process we are also engaged in the pursuit of truth and the exploration of reality. This paper deals first with the layout of the playing field on which homeopathy has to compete to be taken seriously. It then discusses three concepts: reality, truth and knowledge, which are objectives for which we strive and principles that guide us in that striving. In the third part it introduces the concept of 'personal knowledge' as an essential ingredient of scientific discovery and the pursuit of truth. And finally it proposes that the homeopathic community in general, and the Faculty of Homeopathy in particular, must expand its vision with a definition of a new paradigm, the new model of healthcare and medical science to which the vision aspires.

  10. Traumeel S® for pain relief following hallux valgus surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In spite of recent advances in post-operative pain relief, pain following orthopedic surgery remains an ongoing challenge for clinicians. We examined whether a well known and frequently prescribed homeopathic preparation could mitigate post-operative pain. Method We performed a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of the homeopathic preparation Traumeel S® in minimizing post-operative pain and analgesic consumption following surgical correction of hallux valgus. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized to receive either Traumeel tablets or an indistinguishable placebo, and took primary and rescue oral analgesics as needed. Maximum numerical pain scores at rest and consumption of oral analgesics were recorded on day of surgery and for 13 days following surgery. Results Traumeel was not found superior to placebo in minimizing pain or analgesic consumption over the 14 days of the trial, however a transient reduction in the daily maximum post-operative pain score favoring the Traumeel arm was observed on the day of surgery, a finding supported by a treatment-time interaction test (p = 0.04). Conclusions Traumeel was not superior to placebo in minimizing pain or analgesic consumption over the 14 days of the trial. A transient reduction in the daily maximum post-operative pain score on the day of surgery is of questionable clinical importance. Trial Registration This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. # NCT00279513 PMID:20380750

  11. Immunology and Homeopathy. 1. Historical Background

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Homeopathy was born as an experimental discipline, as can be seen from the enormous amount of homeopathic data collected over more than two centuries. However, the medical tradition of homeopathy has been separated from that of conventional science for a long time. Conventional scientific wisdom dictates that homeopathy should have no effect above placebo but experiments on ultra-high dilutions of solutes together with some clinical data suggest the intriguing possibility that it might do in some circumstances. Today, an osmotic process between disciplines, previously seen as in conflict, is facilitated because over the last few decades homeopathy has initiated the methods of current medical science and a substantial number of experimental studies—at molecular, cellular and clinical levels—are available. One area of dialogue and of common progress is that of inflammation and immunity, probably because these are closely related to the traditional ‘vital force’ of the body's self-healing power. In a series of papers we review the historical origins of homeopathy, the laboratory and animal models related to the field of immunopharmacology, the clinical evidence in favor and against the use of homeopathy in the inflammatory diseases and the hypotheses regarding its action mechanism(s). Finally, we will enlighten the specific characteristics of the homeopathic approach, which places great emphasis on identifying a cure for the whole organism. PMID:16322800

  12. Advice offered by practitioners of complementary/ alternative medicine: an important ethical issue.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2009-12-01

    The current popularity of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) generates many challenges to medical ethics. The one discussed here is the advice offered by CAM practitioners. Using selected examples, the author tries to demonstrate that some of the advice issued through the popular media or provided by acupuncturists, chiropractors, herbalists, homeopaths, pharmacists, and doctors is misleading or dangerous. This, the author argues, can impinge on the main principle of medical ethics: beneficence, nonmaleficence, and autonomy. We should work toward correcting this deplorable situation.

  13. Statistical Analysis of Physiological Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, María G.; Pérez, Leticia

    2003-07-01

    In spite of two hundred years of clinical practice, Homeopathy still lacks of scientific basis. Its fundamental laws, similia principle and the activity of the denominated ultra-high dilutions are controversial issues that do not fit into the mainstream medicine or current physical-chemistry field as well. Aside its clinical efficacy, the identification of physical - chemistry parameters, as markers of the homeopathic effect, would allow to construct mathematic models [1], which in turn, could provide clues regarding the involved mechanism.

  14. Comparison of veterinary drugs and veterinary homeopathy: part 2

    PubMed Central

    Lees, P.; Pelligand, L.; Whiting, M.; Chambers, D.; Toutain, P-L.; Whitehead, M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Part 2 of this narrative review outlines the theoretical and practical bases for assessing the efficacy and effectiveness of conventional medicines and homeopathic products. Known and postulated mechanisms of action are critically reviewed. The evidence for clinical efficacy of products in both categories, in the form of practitioner experience, meta-analysis and systematic reviews of clinical trial results, is discussed. The review also addresses problems and pitfalls in assessing data, and the ethical and negative aspects of pharmacology and homeopathy in veterinary medicine. PMID:28821700

  15. Seasonal Variation of the Effect of Extremely Diluted Agitated Gibberellic Acid (10e-30) on Wheat Stalk Growth: A Multiresearcher Study

    PubMed Central

    Endler, Peter Christian; Matzer, Wolfgang; Reich, Christian; Reischl, Thomas; Hartmann, Anna Maria; Thieves, Karin; Pfleger, Andrea; Hofäcker, Jürgen; Lothaller, Harald; Scherer-Pongratz, Waltraud

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a homeopathic high dilution of gibberellic acid on wheat growth was studied at different seasons of the year. Seedlings were allowed to develop under standardized conditions for 7 days; plants were harvested and stalk lengths were measured. The data obtained confirm previous findings, that ultrahigh diluted potentized gibberellic acid affects stalk growth. Furthermore, the outcome of the study suggests that experiments utilizing the bioassay presented should best be performed in autumn season. In winter and spring, respectively, no reliable effects were found. PMID:22125426

  16. Immunology and Homeopathy. 4. Clinical Studies—Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Bellavite, Paolo; Ortolani, Riccardo; Pontarollo, Francesco; Piasere, Valeria; Benato, Giovanni; Conforti, Anita

    2006-01-01

    The evidence-based research of the effectiveness of homeopathic medicines in common immunologic disorders is reviewed. In part 1, we introduce methodological issues of clinical research in homeopathy, and criteria utilized to evaluate the literature. Then 24 studies (12 randomized and 12 non-randomized) on common upper respiratory tract infections and otorhinolaryngologic complaints are described. In part 2, the focus will be on allergic diseases and the effectiveness of homeopathy will be globally evaluated and discussed using the criteria of evidence-based medicine. PMID:16951713

  17. Effects of potentised substances on growth rate of the water plant Lemna gibba L.

    PubMed

    Scherr, Claudia; Simon, Meinhard; Spranger, Jörg; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated, whether the growth rate of Lemna gibba L. (duckweed) can be influenced by the application of homeopathic potencies of gibberellic acid, kinetin, argentum nitricum, and lemna minor. Duckweed was grown in either potencies (14x-30x, decimal steps) or water controls (unsuccussed and succussed) over seven days. Frond (leaf-like structure) growth was measured using a non-destructive image analysis system. Growth rates were calculated for three time intervals (0-7, 0-3, 3-7 days). Five to six independent, randomized and blinded experiments were analysed for each of the four tested substances. Water control experiments were performed repeatedly to test the reliability of the experimental set-up (systematic negative controls). The systematic negative control experiments did not yield any significant effects. Hence, false positive results could be excluded. The test system had a low coefficient of variation (1.5%). Out of the four tested substances gibberellic acid had the most pronounced effect (p=0.0002, F-test) on the main outcome parameter frond growth rate (r(area) day 0-7). Potency levels 15x, 17x, 18x, 23x and 24x reduced growth rate of Lemna gibba (p<0.05 against the pooled water control, LSD test). Lemna gibba may be considered as a suitable test organism for further studies on the efficacy of homeopathic potencies. Evidence accumulates, that adjacent potency levels may strongly differ in their biological activity. Potential consequences for therapeutical application might be worth investigating.

  18. Homeopathic approach in the treatment of patients with mental disability.

    PubMed

    Dolce Filho, R

    2006-01-01

    The author describes his experience assisting mentally disabled patients with homeopathy. In these patients' anamneses, common traits shared by some syndromes, pathologies and behaviour, were taken into consideration, mainly to choose the most characteristic symptoms in each case. The study includes 58 cases of patients suffering from this pathology: 28 females and 30 males, ages ranging from 1 to 49 years (mean 20). Forty-seven had some improvement. Homeopathy is a useful alternative to relieve pathologies associated with mental disability. In those cases in which there were similarities between remedy and whole symptomatology, improvements in adaptation skills and in overall health were observed.

  19. Neem oil: an herbal therapy for alopecia causes dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Reutemann, Patricia; Ehrlich, Alison

    2008-01-01

    For more than 2,000 years, the neem tree has been considered one of the most useful and versatile plants in the world. Neem oil has been used for both homeopathic remedies and as a pesticide. Both systemic and contact reactions have occurred with the use of neem oil. We report a patient who presented with an acute case of contact dermatitis on the scalp and face after the use of neem oil for alopecia and present a review of the literature regarding its uses, toxicity, and regulation.

  20. Cough: impact, beliefs, and expectations from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Dal Negro, Roberto W; Mazzolini, Massimiliano; Turco, Paola; Zanasi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    standard for treating persistent cough (61.2 and 58.2 %, respectively), while anti-tussive drugs and aerosols in general are regarded as the most effective strategies (69.1 and 74.1 %, respectively). Moreover, 33.8 % of the sample is in favour of homeopathic drugs, while 23.2 % had already used an homeopathic anti-tussive syrup, and 27.6 % of subjects are really interested in using the homeopathic approach. The willingness to pay for an effective anti-tussive remedy was: 46.3 % up to 10 €; 27.8 % up to 20 €, and 13.3 % more than 20 €. Cough confirms its high impact in Italy, and a substantial proportion of individuals regards cough as "a disease". Only one out of three Italians refers to their doctor, but when cough is already persistent. Cough in children is much more feared than in adults. The majority of Italians have a proper and conservative position versus both antibiotic and the systemic steroid uses against cough. The Italian attitude to aerosol therapy confirms very high. Differently from the cough guidelines, anti-tussive drugs are highly valued among Italian people. The attitude and the interest to homeopathic anti-tussive remedies proves high. Finally, the willingness to pay for an effective anti-tussive remedy is quite high in Italy.

  1. Alternative medicine: an ethnographic study of how practitioners of Indian medical systems manage TB in Mumbai.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Andrew; Pai, Madhukar

    2016-03-01

    Mumbai is a hot spot for drug-resistant TB, and private practitioners trained in AYUSH systems (Ayurveda, yoga, Unani, Siddha and homeopathy) are major healthcare providers. It is important to understand how AYUSH practitioners manage patients with TB or presumptive TB. We conducted semi-structured interviews of 175 Mumbai slum-based practitioners holding degrees in Ayurveda, homeopathy and Unani. Most providers gave multiple interviews. We observed 10 providers in clinical interactions, documenting: clinical examinations, symptoms, history taking, prescriptions and diagnostic tests. No practitioners exclusively used his or her system of training. The practice of biomedicine is frequent, with practitioners often using biomedical disease categories and diagnostics. The use of homeopathy was rare (only 4% of consultations with homeopaths resulted in homeopathic remedies) and Ayurveda rarer (3% of consultations). For TB, all mentioned chest x-ray while 31 (17.7%) mentioned sputum smear as a TB test. One hundred and sixty-four practitioners (93.7%) reported referring TB patients to a public hospital or chest physician. Eleven practitioners (6.3%) reported treating patients with TB. Nine (5.1%) reported treating patients with drug-susceptible TB with at least one second-line drug. Important sources of health care in Mumbai's slums, AYUSH physicians frequently use biomedical therapies and most refer patients with TB to chest physicians or the public sector. They are integral to TB care and control. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Petroleum: a series of 25 cases.

    PubMed

    Gnaiger-Rathmanner, J; Schneider, A; Loader, B; Böhler, M; Frass, M; Singer, S R; Oberbaum, M

    2008-04-01

    This study is based on 25 well documented reports of cases which responded well to treatment with Petroleum. Materia medica data were compared with results in contemporary clinical practice. Many patients had characteristic skin problems; children often had recurrent or chronic upper respiratory tract problems. The most prominent mental feature is a quiet, withdrawn or stubborn disposition. The mental symptoms may be difficult to recognise. Detailed documentation in daily practice can be helpful for preserving data of the effect of a medicine; confirmation of statements given in materia medica; improving understanding of homeopathic medicines and differentiating the indications for medicines.

  3. Can homeopathy learn something from psychoanalysis?

    PubMed

    Van Hootegem, H

    2007-04-01

    This paper attempts to demonstrate how some insights from psychoanalysis can be useful in homeopathic treatment. I discuss three concepts: I illustrate these concepts with the case of a 23-year-old woman with chronic fatigue syndrome. (1) The working alliance: comparing medical alliance with a psychodynamic alliance. (2) The dream-function: serious somatic disorders can be the result of a blocked dream function, the restoration of the capacity to dream may lead to the disappearance of these disorders, homeopathy can help in this process. (3) The transgenerational influence: some traumatic, concealed events from the lives of ancestors can influence their descendants.

  4. Potentiated antibodies to mu-opiate receptors: effect on integrative activity of the brain.

    PubMed

    Geiko, V V; Vorob'eva, T M; Berchenko, O G; Epstein, O I

    2003-01-01

    The effect of homeopathically potentiated antibodies to mu-receptors (10(-100) wt %) on integrative activity of rat brain was studied using the models of self-stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus and convulsions produced by electric current. Electric current was delivered through electrodes implanted into the ventromedial hypothalamus. Single treatment with potentiated antibodies to mu-receptors increased the rate of self-stimulation and decreased the threshold of convulsive seizures. Administration of these antibodies for 7 days led to further activation of the positive reinforcement system and decrease in seizure thresholds. Distilled water did not change the rate of self-stimulation and seizure threshold.

  5. [History of oyster as drug from the origin to the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Since Antiquity, oyster is a subject of interest and medical use, as indicated by Oribiase and Galien. From the 17th century, this unique drug was proposed by physicians for various diseases, and more often for (la rage). One could think that that drug disappeared at the 20th and 21st centuries. But we can observe that it was still recommended by several authors as drug. Still today, companies offer oyster under various forms for allopathic and homeopathic treatments, as well as for food supplement. Research are ongoing to discover active substances within oyster and their potential medical interests.

  6. Is homeopathy possible?

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Lionel R

    2006-09-01

    As a therapeutic intervention, homeopathy is the target of increased scepticism because in the main, its remedies are diluted and succussed (potentized) out of material existence. This puts homeopathy seemingly at odds with the paradigm of conventional science, in particular, that atoms and molecules are the fundamental building blocks of all matter. Accordingly, homeopathy cannot work, so that any reported beneficial effects must, at best, be due to the placebo effect. The purpose of this article is to challenge that conclusion and to suggest that there may well be conventional science-based explanations of how homeopathy could be possible. Homeopathy's key principles are first described. Then the double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT), the chief means by which homeopathic remedies and prescribing are tested, is shown to be based on a linear reductionism that is too blunt an instrument with which to test the efficacy of complex interventions such as homeopathy The memory of water hypothesis, as a mechanism for how potentized remedies might work, is reviewed, along with some evidence for its existence. A possible rationale for the water memory effect is proposed in terms of a dynamic 'ordering' of water's constantly switching network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, induced by the manufacturing process of homeopathic remedies. This could lead to a long-range molecular 'coherence' between trillions of mobile water molecules. However, the water memory effect is an essentially pharmacological explanation of homeopathy's putative efficacy. It is pointed out that healing also entails an interaction between consenting beings. From this point of view, an explanation of any therapeutic procedure should include an attempt to describe the nature of the patient-practitioner interaction. From this perspective, a quantum theoretical treatment of the therapeutic process, involving a form of macro-entanglement between patient, practitioner and remedy (PPR), is advanced

  7. Drug use during early pregnancy: cross-sectional analysis from the Childbirth and Health Study in Primary Care in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Axelsdottir, Thury O; Sigurdsson, Emil L; Gudmundsdottir, Anna M; Kristjansdottir, Hildur; Sigurdsson, Johann A

    2014-09-01

    To analyse drug use in early pregnancy with special focus on socio-demographic factors associated with psychotropic and analgesic drug use. Cross-sectional study. A total of 1765 women were invited via their local health care centres, and 1111 participated at 11-16 weeks of pregnancy by filling out a postal questionnaire concerning socio-demographic and obstetric background, stressful life events, and drug use. Drug use prior to and early on in pregnancy, socio-demographic factors, smoking, and adverse life events were investigated. Drug categories screened for were psychotropics (collective term for antidepressants, relaxants, and sleep medication), analgesics, hormones, nicotine, vitamins/minerals, and homeopathic medicine. Drug use from the aforementioned drug categories, excluding vitamins/minerals and homeopathic medicine, was reduced by 18% during early pregnancy, compared with six months prior to conception (49% vs. 60%). Psychotropic drug use during early pregnancy was associated with elementary maternal education (p < 0.5), being unemployed (p < 0.001), being single/divorced/separated (p < 0.01), smoking prior to or during pregnancy (p < 0.01), forced to change job/move house (p < 0.001), and psychotropic drug use six months prior to pregnancy (p < 0.001). No items on the stressful life events scale were associated with increased analgesic use, which increased only with multiparity. Use of analgesics and psychotropic drugs seems common in pregnancy. Our results indicate that lack of a support network, stressful life events, and lower status in society may predispose women to more drug use. GPs and midwives responsible for maternity care could take this into account when evaluating risk and gain for women and foetuses in the primary care setting.

  8. Modulation of Signal Proteins: A Plausible Mechanism to Explain How a Potentized Drug Secale Cor 30C Diluted beyond Avogadro's Limit Combats Skin Papilloma in Mice.

    PubMed

    Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Paul, Saili; Dutta, Suman; Boujedaini, Naoual; Belon, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    In homeopathy, ability of ultra-high diluted drugs at or above potency 12C (diluted beyond Avogadro's limit) in ameliorating/curing various diseases is often questioned, particularly because the mechanism of action is not precisely known. We tested the hypothesis if suitable modulations of signal proteins could be one of the possible pathways of action of a highly diluted homeopathic drug, Secale cornutum 30C (diluted 10(60) times; Sec cor 30). It could successfully combat DMBA + croton oil-induced skin papilloma in mice as evidenced by histological, cytogenetical, immunofluorescence, ELISA and immunoblot findings. Critical analysis of several signal proteins like AhR, PCNA, Akt, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, NF-κB and IL-6 and of pro-apoptotic proteins like cytochrome c, Bax, Bad, Apaf, caspase-3 and -9 revealed that Sec cor 30 suitably modulated their expression levels along with amelioration of skin papilloma. FACS data also suggested an increase of cell population at S and G2 phases and decrease in sub-G1 and G1 phages in carcinogen-treated drug-unfed mice, but these were found to be near normal in the Sec cor 30-fed mice. There was reduction in genotoxic and DNA damages in bone marrow cells of Sec Cor 30-fed mice, as revealed from cytogenetic and Comet assays. Changes in histological features of skin papilloma were noted. Immunofluorescence studies of AhR and PCNA also suggested reduced expression of these proteins in Sec cor 30-fed mice, thereby showing its anti-cancer potentials against skin papilloma. Furthermore, this study also supports the hypothesis that potentized homeopathic drugs act at gene regulatory level.

  9. Consultation with health care professionals and influenza immunization among women in contact with young children.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Catharine T; Buxton, Jane A; Koehoorn, Mieke

    2010-01-01

    Primary health providers serve an important role in providing and promoting annual influenza immunization to high-risk groups and their close contacts. The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether consultation with a medical professional increases the likelihood of receiving a flu shot among women who have given birth in the past five years and to determine whether this association differs by type of medical professional. Data were obtained from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2005), Cycle 3.1. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between receiving a flu shot in the past 12 months and consulting with family doctors, specialists, nurses, chiropractors, or homeopaths/naturopaths. Among the 6,925 women included in our sample, 1,847 (28.4%) reported receiving a flu shot in the past 12 months. After adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics and province of residence, women who received flu shots in the past 12 months were significantly more likely to consult with a family doctor (AOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.34-1.83) and significantly less likely to consult with a chiropractor (AOR 0.76, 95% CI 0.64-0.90) or a homeopath/naturopath (AOR 0.72, 95% CI 0.54-0.97) over the same time period. Consultation with family doctors was found to have the strongest association with annual flu shots among women in contact with young children, whereas consultation with alternative care providers was found to have an independent inverse association. Given the influenza-associated health risks for young children, medical professionals should promote immunization at the time of consultation for household contacts of young children, including pregnant women.

  10. [Advertising and Zeitgeist. The advertising of Schwabe Pharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Cornelia; Riha, Ortrun

    2015-01-01

    This contribution explores the advertisements for homeopathic products in magazines in the first half of the twentieth century, focusing on the period between 1933 and 1945 and based on the example of the pharmaceutical company Dr Willmar Schwabe. In the first half of the twentieth century, Schwabe Pharmaceuticals was market leader for homeopathic and other complementary medical products (phytotherapy, biochemicals). The example chosen as well as the time frame complement the existing research. We searched three German publications (the homeopathy journal Leipziger Populäre Zeitschrift für Homöopathie, the medical weekly Münchner Medizinische Wochenschrift and the pharma magazine Pharmazeutische Zeitung) and collected target-group-specific results for laypersons, physicians and pharmacists. Analysis of the images and texts in the selected advertisements often reflected the historical background and the respective health policies (wartime requirements, times of need, "Neue Deutsche Heilkunde"). The history of this traditional company was seen as an important point in advertising, as were the recognisability of the brand through the company logo, the emphasis on the high quality of their products and the reference to the company's own research activities. We furthermore found the kind of argumentation that is typical of natural medicine (naturalness, the power of the sun, prominent representatives). Schwabe met the expectations of its clients, who were interested in complementary medicine, whilst pursuing an approach to homeopathy that was compatible with natural science, and it presented itself as a modern, scientifically oriented enterprise. The company did not lose credibility as a result, but increased its clientele by expanding to include the whole naturopathic market.

  11. Randomised controlled trials of homeopathy in humans: characterising the research journal literature for systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Robert T; Hacke, Daniela; Clausen, Jürgen; Nicolai, Ton; Riley, David S; Fisher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A new programme of systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in homeopathy will distinguish important attributes of RCT records, including: placebo controlled versus other-than-placebo (OTP) controlled; individualised versus non-individualised homeopathy; peer-reviewed (PR) versus non peer-reviewed (NPR) sources. (a) To outline the methods used to search and categorise the RCT literature; (b) to report details of the records retrieved; (c) to compare our retrieved records with those reported in two previous systematic reviews (Linde et al., 1997; Shang et al., 2005). Ten major electronic databases were searched for records published up to the end of 2011. A record was accepted for subsequent systematic review if it was a substantive report of a clinical trial of homeopathic treatment or prophylaxis in humans, randomised and controlled, and published in a PR or NPR journal. 489 records were potentially eligible: 226 were rejected as non-journal, minor or repeat publications, or lacking randomisation and/or controls and/or a 'homeopathic' intervention; 263 (164 PR, 99 NPR) were acceptable for systematic review. The 263 accepted records comprised 217 (137 PR, 80 NPR) placebo-controlled RCTs, of which 121 were included by, 66 were published after, and 30 were potentially eligible for, but not listed by, Linde or Shang. The 137 PR records of placebo-controlled RCTs comprise 41 on individualised homeopathy and 96 on non-individualised homeopathy. Our findings clarify the RCT literature in homeopathy. The 263 accepted journal papers will be the basis for our forthcoming programme of systematic reviews. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [René Allendy and the medicine of the imponderables].

    PubMed

    Hochmann, J

    1993-01-01

    René Allendy was one of the first French psychoanalysts. He was also a homeopath. A text by him on the "medicine of the imponderables" demonstrates his proximity to esoteric theories. The objective of this article is to illustrate a cultural misunderstanding at the time of the introduction of psychoanalysis in France, when it met up with a Gnostic and Illuminist heritage that was still very much alive. This initial confusion between the Freudian approach, which was in keeping with the thinking of the Lumières, and a certain obscurantism, explains perhaps some of the resistance as well as some of the subsequent deviations of psychoanalysis in France.

  13. Ernst Haeckel's biodynamics 1866 and the occult basis of organic farming

    PubMed Central

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT One hundred and 50 years ago (Sept. 1866), Ernst Haeckel published a monograph entitled General Morphology of Organisms, wherein key terms, such as Protista, Monera, ontogeny, phylogeny, ecology and the ‘biogenetic law’ where introduced. In addition, Haeckel coined the word “biodynamics” as a synonym for “general physiology.” In contrast, Rudolf Steiner's “biodynamic agriculture,” which originated in 1924, and was promoted via Ehrenfried Pfeiffer's book of 1938 with the same title, is an occult pseudoscience still popular today. The misuse of Haeckel's term to legitimize disproven homeopathic principles and esoteric rules within the context of applied plant research is unacceptable. PMID:27322020

  14. Immunomodulation of Homeopathic Thymulin 5CH in a BCG-Induced Granuloma Model

    PubMed Central

    Bonamin, Leoni Villano; Sato, Cesar; Zalla Neto, Ruggero; Morante, Graziela; Cardoso, Thayná Neves; de Santana, Fabiana Rodrigues; Coelho, Cideli de Paula; Osugui, Lika; Popi, Ana Flavia; Hurtado, Elizabeth Cristina Perez; Mariano, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyzed the immune modulation mechanisms of thymulin 5CH in a granuloma experimental model. Male adult Balb/c mice were inoculated with BCG into the footpad to induce granuloma, which was quantitatively evaluated. The phenotypic characterization of phagocyte, T- and B-lymphocyte populations in the peritoneum, and local lymph node was done by flow cytometry. During all experimental periods, thymulin 5CH and vehicle (control) were given ad libitum to mice, diluted into the drinking water (1.6 × 10−17 M). After 7 days from inoculation, thymulin-treated mice presented reduction in the number of epithelioid cytokeratine-positive cells (P = 0.0001) in the lesion, in relation to young phagocytes. After 21 days, the differentiation of B1 peritoneal stem cells into phagocytes reached the peak, being higher in thymulin-treated mice (P = 0.0001). Simultaneously, the score of infected phagocytes in the lesion decreased (P = 0.001), and the number of B1-derived phagocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the local lymph node increased in relation to control (P = 0.0001). No difference was seen on the CD25+ Treg cells. The results show that thymulin 5CH treatment is able to improve the granuloma inflammatory process and the infection remission, by modulating local and systemic phagocyte differentiation. PMID:23431344

  15. Development of Software for Automatic Analysis of Intervention in the Field of Homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajesh Kumar; Goyal, Shagun; Bhat, Sushma N; Rao, Srinath; Sakthidharan, Vivek; Kumar, Prasanna; Sajan, Kannanaikal Rappayi; Jindal, Sameer Kumar; Jindal, Ghanshyam D

    2018-05-01

    To study the effect of homeopathic medicines (in higher potencies) in normal subjects, Peripheral Pulse Analyzer (PPA) has been used to record physiologic variability parameters before and after administration of the medicine/placebo in 210 normal subjects. Data have been acquired in seven rounds; placebo was administered in rounds 1 and 2 and medicine in potencies 6, 30, 200, 1 M, and 10 M was administered in rounds 3 to 7, respectively. Five different medicines in the said potencies were given to a group of around 40 subjects each. Although processing of data required human intervention, a software application has been developed to analyze the processed data and detect the response to eliminate the undue delay as well as human bias in subjective analysis. This utility named Automatic Analysis of Intervention in the Field of Homeopathy is run on the processed PPA data and the outcome has been compared with the manual analysis. The application software uses adaptive threshold based on statistics for detecting responses in contrast to fixed threshold used in manual analysis. The automatic analysis has detected 12.96% higher responses than subjective analysis. Higher response rates have been manually verified to be true positive. This indicates robustness of the application software. The automatic analysis software was run on another set of pulse harmonic parameters derived from the same data set to study cardiovascular susceptibility and 385 responses were detected in contrast to 272 of variability parameters. It was observed that 65% of the subjects, eliciting response, were common. This not only validates the software utility for giving consistent yield but also reveals the certainty of the response. This development may lead to electronic proving of homeopathic medicines (e-proving).

  16. Extreme sensitivity of gene expression in human SH-SY5Y neurocytes to ultra-low doses of Gelsemium sempervirens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gelsemium sempervirens L. (Gelsemium s.) is a traditional medicinal plant, employed as an anxiolytic at ultra-low doses and animal models recently confirmed this activity. However the mechanisms by which it might operate on the nervous system are largely unknown. This work investigates the gene expression of a human neurocyte cell line treated with increasing dilutions of Gelsemium s. extract. Methods Starting from the crude extract, six 100 × (centesimal, c) dilutions of Gelsemium s. (2c, 3c, 4c, 5c, 9c and 30c) were prepared according to the French homeopathic pharmacopoeia. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed for 24 h to test dilutions, and their transcriptome compared by microarray to that of cells treated with control vehicle solutions. Results Exposure to the Gelsemium s. 2c dilution (the highest dose employed, corresponding to a gelsemine concentration of 6.5 × 10-9 M) significantly changed the expression of 56 genes, of which 49 were down-regulated and 7 were overexpressed. Several of the down-regulated genes belonged to G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, inflammatory response and neuropeptide receptors. Fisher exact test, applied to the group of 49 genes down-regulated by Gelsemium s. 2c, showed that the direction of effects was significantly maintained across the treatment with high homeopathic dilutions, even though the size of the differences was distributed in a small range. Conclusions The study shows that Gelsemium s., a medicinal plant used in traditional remedies and homeopathy, modulates a series of genes involved in neuronal function. A small, but statistically significant, response was detected even to very low doses/high dilutions (up to 30c), indicating that the human neurocyte genome is extremely sensitive to this regulation. PMID:24642002

  17. "Ultra High Dilution 1994" revisited 2015--the state of follow-up research.

    PubMed

    Endler, P Christian; Schulte, Jurgen; Stock-Schroeer, Beate; Stephen, Saundra

    2015-10-01

    The "Ultra High Dilution 1994" project was an endeavour to take stock of the findings and theories on homeopathic extreme dilutions that were under research at the time in areas of biology, biophysics, physics and medicine. The project finally materialized into an anthology assembling contributions of leading scientists in the field. Over the following two decades, it became widely quoted within the homeopathic community and also known in other research communities. The aim of the present project was to re-visit and review the 1994 studies from the perspective of 2015. The original authors from 1994 or close laboratory colleagues were asked to contribute papers covering their research efforts and learnings in the period from 1994 up to 2015. These contributions were edited and cross-referenced, and a selection of further contributions was added. About a dozen contributions reported on follow-up experiments and studies, including further developments in theory. Only few of the models that had seemed promising in 1994 had not been followed up later. Most models presented in the original publication had meanwhile been submitted to intra-laboratory, multicentre or independent scrutiny. The results of the follow-up research seemed to have rewarded the efforts. Furthermore, contributions were provided on new models that had been inspired by the original ones or that may be candidates for further in-depth ultra high dilution (UHD) research. The project "Ultra High Dilution 1994 revisited 2015" is the latest output of what might be considered the "buena vista social club" of homeopathy research. However, it presents new developments and results of the older, established experimental models as well as a general survey of the state of UHD research. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Top-10 list of herbal and supplemental medicines used by cosmetic patients: what the plastic surgeon needs to know.

    PubMed

    Heller, Justin; Gabbay, Joubin S; Ghadjar, Kiu; Jourabchi, Mickel; O'Hara, Catherine; Heller, Misha; Bradley, James P

    2006-02-01

    Widespread use of herbal medications/supplements among the presurgical population may have a negative effect on perioperative patient care. Thus, the authors' goal was to identify the prevalence of such use in a cosmetic surgery patient population compared with use among the general public; to assess physician awareness of proper management of these herbal medications/supplements; and to review the literature to provide rational strategies for managing perioperative patients taking these remedies. To assess patient (n = 100) and general public (n = 100) usage rates, open-ended lists of (1) the most common herbal medications/supplements and (2) homeopathic treatments were compiled. Board-certified plastic surgeons (n = 20) were then given the same list of herbs/supplements and surveyed on their awareness of these treatments and perioperative side effects. The usage rate for cosmetic versus public surveys for herbal medicines/supplements was 55 percent versus 24 percent (p < 0.001), with 35 percent versus 8 percent (p < 0.001) engaging in homeopathic practices, respectively. Cosmetic patients' top four herbal/supplements of usage were chondroitin (18 percent), ephedra (18 percent), echinacea (14 percent), and glucosamine (10 percent). The top four used by the general public were echinacea (8 percent), garlic (6 percent), ginseng (4 percent), and ginger (4 percent). The physician survey demonstrated awareness of 54 percent of the listed supplements/herbal medicines, 85 percent of which were not suggested to be discontinued preoperatively, with only ephedra achieving 100 percent physician discontinuation preoperatively. Herbal medicines and supplements displayed greater prevalence in the cosmetic surgery population than in the population at large. Furthermore, side effects and potential complications warrant addressing these remedies as pharmaceuticals rather than as safe and "natural." Thus, a descriptive "top-10" list with perioperative recommendations was compiled

  19. Effectiveness and Safety of Arnica montana in Post-Surgical Setting, Pain and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Morales-Medina, Julio César; Bellavite, Paolo; Rottigni, Valentina; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    Arnica montana has been widely used as a homeopathic remedy for the treatment of several inflammatory conditions in pain management and postoperative settings. This review gives an overview of the therapeutic use of Arnica montana in the above-mentioned fields also focusing on its mechanisms of action learned from animal models and in vitro studies. Arnica montana is more effective than placebo when used for the treatment of several conditions including post-traumatic and postoperative pain, edema, and ecchymosis. However, its dosages and preparations used have produced substantial differences in the clinical outcome. Cumulative evidence suggests that Arnica montana may represent a valid alternative to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, at least when treating some specific conditions.

  20. Contending medical ideologies and state formation: the nineteenth-century origins of medical pluralism in contemporary Colombia.

    PubMed

    Sowell, David

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses the encounter between contending medical ideologies in nineteenth-century Colombia. The first era of medical pluralism, in colonial Latin America, developed from the imposition of Hispanic medicine on existing indigenous medical systems through an imperial structure. This produced a "colonial medical spectrum" incorporating various medical ideologies that came under attack by practitioners of scientific medicine in the 1800s. As scientific physicians gained privileged access to state resources, they undertook partially successful campaigns to deny Hispanic, homeopathic, and other medical systems the right to be practiced. As the state authorized scientific medicine, other practices became "popularized," thereby laying the foundation for the medical pluralism of contemporary Colombia that juxtaposes "academic" and "traditional" medicines.

  1. Health insurance and use of alternative medicine in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    van Gameren, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives I analyze the effect of coverage by health insurance on the use of alternative medicine such as folk healers and homeopaths, in particular if it complements or substitutes conventional services. Methods Panel data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) is used to estimate bivariate probit models in order to explain the use of alternative medicine while allowing the determinant of interest, access to health insurance, to be an endogenous factor. Results The findings indicate that households with insurance coverage less often use alternative medicine, and that the effect is much stronger among poor than among rich households. Conclusions Poor households substitute away from traditional medicine towards conventional medicine. PMID:20546965

  2. On the physical basis of succussion.

    PubMed

    Torres, J L

    2002-10-01

    It is argued that succussion drives the homeopathic tincture undergoing potentisation to a turbulent regime, where vortices continually form and disappear, ranging in size from the linear extent of the container to a minimum scale determined by viscosity and the rate of energy dissipation. Input mechanical energy cascades down this population of eddies and becomes available at the microscopic level to perform work (chemical, electrical, etc). A structure generated in the tincture would be rupted by vortices smaller than it, and this sets definite limits on the strength of succussion, so the power input leads to larger vortices than the structures one is trying to create and preserve through potentisation. An experimental procedure to test this proposal is suggested, based on Rayleigh scattering.

  3. Homeopathy: clarifying its relationship to hormesis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Jonas, Wayne B

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the case that certain types of homeopathic medicine may represent a form of hormesis, that is, either pre- or post-conditioning hormesis. An example of a post-conditioning model by van Wijk and colleagues demonstrated successful enhancement of adaptive responses using below-toxic threshold doses (i.e. hormetic doses) of inducing agents when administered subsequent to a highly toxic chemical exposure, thus satisfying a basic experimental biomedical standard. Of note is that this model uses exposures within a measurable predicted hormetic range, unlike most forms of homeopathy. This experimental framework (along with a pre-conditioning model developed by Bellavite) provides a possible vehicle by which certain aspect(s) of homeopathy may be integrated into mainstream biomedical assessment and clinical practice.

  4. Mastitis prevention and control practices and mastitis treatment strategies associated with the consumption of (critically important) antimicrobials on dairy herds in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Stevens, M; Piepers, S; De Vliegher, S

    2016-04-01

    The main objectives of this study were to evaluate to what extent variations in herd-level antimicrobial consumption (AMC) can be explained by differences in management practices that are consistently effective in the prevention of (sub)clinical mastitis, on the one hand, and by differences in mastitis treatment strategies, on the other hand. Antimicrobial consumption data were obtained during 2012 and 2013 by "garbage can audits" and expressed as antimicrobial treatment incidences (ATI) for all compounds combined (total ATI) and for the critically important antimicrobials for human health separately. Data on mastitis prevention and control practices were obtained via face-to-face interviews performed during herd visits in March 2013. Some management practices and treatment strategies related to udder health were associated with the total AMC. However, the results demonstrated that implementing effective udder health management practices does not necessarily imply a low AMC and vice versa. Herds participating in a veterinary herd health management program and herds selectively drying off cows used fewer antimicrobials compared with herds not participating in such a program or applying blanket dry-cow therapy. Moreover, herds treating (some) (sub)clinical mastitis cases with intramammary homeopathic substances consumed fewer antimicrobials than herds not applying such homeopathic treatments. Besides these factors, no other direct association was found between effective udder health management practices on the one hand and AMC on the other hand. Also, the use of critically important antimicrobials was only associated with the way in which subclinical mastitis cases were treated. The latter indicates that the AMC of critically important antimicrobials is potentially driven by factors other than those included in this study such as those related to the "mindset" of the veterinarians and their farmers. Future research should therefore aim to unravel the reasoning of

  5. Drug utilization pattern during pregnancy in North India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rashmi; Kapoor, Bhuvneshvar; Verma, Ujala

    2006-07-01

    Pregnancy is a special physiological condition, where drug treatment presents a special concern. To evaluate the drug utilization pattern during pregnancy and to evaluate the effect of the educational and economic status on it.. The retrospective cross-sectional study. The postgraduate Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics of a medical college. and the antenatal clinic of the institution. Medical students filled 405 questionnaires after interviewing pregnant women (243 primigravida and 152 multigravida). All the collected questionnaires were analysed for various study parameters. Inter-group comparison was done using chi-square test. P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 700, 1086 and 686 drugs, with an average of 1.73, 2.89 and 2.49 drugs per pregnant women, were used during first, second and third trimester of pregnancy, respectively. A majority of the drugs used, were from category-A, followed by category-B and category-D. However, category C and X drugs constituted 2.90 (20) and 5.71% (40) of drugs used during the third trimester and first trimester, respectively. Herbal/homeopathic drugs constituted 6.42 (45), 3.68 (40) and 1.46% (10) of the drugs used in the first, second and third trimester of pregnancy, respectively (P=649). 33.33% (135) women believed that drug use during pregnancy is dangerous to both mother and child and 37.03% (150) believed that drugs are dangerous throughout pregnancy. 55.55% (225) females advocated the use of iron/folic acid during pregnancy. 24.69% (100) of women had knowledge about barrier contraceptives. Self-medication and homeopathic/ herbal drugs use was found more in graduates than in undergraduates; as well as, it was more in the higher socioeconomic group than the lower socioeconomic group. There is a need to educate and counsel women of child-bearing age, regarding the advantages and disadvantages of drug use during pregnancies, with special reference to alternative therapies and self-medication.

  6. Arnica montana experimental studies: confounders and biases?

    PubMed

    Bellavite, Paolo; Marzotto, Marta; Bonafini, Clara

    2018-03-01

    Arnica montana is a popular traditional remedy widely used in complementary and alternative medicine, in part for its wound-healing properties. The authors recently showed that this plant extract and several of its homeopathic dilutions are able to modify the expression of a series of genes involved in inflammation and connective tissue regeneration. Their studies opened a debate, including criticisms to the "errors" in the methods used and the "confounders and biases". Here the authors show that the criticisms raised on methodology and statistics are not consistent and cannot be considered pertinent. The present comment also updates and reviews information concerning the action of A. montana dilutions in human macrophage cells while summarizing the major experimental advances reported on this interesting medicinal plant. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Alopecia secondary to mesotherapy.

    PubMed

    Duque-Estrada, Bruna; Vincenzi, Colombina; Misciali, Cosimo; Tosti, Antonella

    2009-10-01

    Mesotherapy has recently become an advertised method for the treatment of different types of alopecia despite the lack of any data regarding its efficacy and possible side effects. The substances injected into the scalp include "cocktails" of natural plant extracts, homoeopathic agents, vitamins, vasodilators, and drugs that may stimulate hair growth, such as finasteride and minoxidil. We report two cases of patchy alopecia that developed after mesotherapy for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. In the first patient, alopecia developed after injections of the heparinoid vasodilator mesoglycan; the 3-month follow-up examination revealed a small residual area of cicatricial alopecia. The second patient developed reversible alopecia after multiple scalp injections of homeopathic agents. These cases underline the possible risks of mesotherapy as a therapeutic technique for hair loss.

  8. Homeopathy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Smolle, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Alternative methods are commonly used in patients with dermatologic diseases, with homeopathy being one of the most common. Homeopathy was developed by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) and is based on the law of similars and the law of infinitesimals. It is a regulatory therapy where high dilutions of particular compounds are thought to induce a counterreaction in the organism. In dermatology, homeopathy is often used in atopic dermatitis, other forms of eczema, psoriasis, and many other conditions. To date, however, there is no convincing evidence for a therapeutic effect. There are only a few controlled trials, most of them with negative results. The few studies with positive results have not been reproduced. Acceptance by the patient seems largely based on counseling and emotional care rather than on objective responses to the homeopathic drugs.

  9. Inflammatory Process Modulation by Homeopathic Arnica montana 6CH: The Role of Individual Variation

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ana Paula; Sato, Cesar; Cardoso, Thayna Neves; Bonamin, Leoni Villano

    2011-01-01

    The effects of Arnica montana 6cH on the individual modulation of acute inflammation kinetics in rats were evaluated. Adult male Wistar rats were inoculated with 1% carrageenan into the footpad and treated with Arnica montana 6cH, dexamethasone (4.0 mg/kg; positive control) or 5% hydroalcoholic solution (negative control), per os, each 15 minutes, between 30 and 180 minutes after the irritant inoculation. Histopathological and immunohistochemistry procedures were done in order to get a panel of inflammatory positive cells for CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD45RA (B lymphocytes), CD18 (beta 2 integrin), CD163 (ED2 protein), CD54 (ICAM-1), and MAC 387 (monocytes and macrophages). The statistical treatment of data included a posteriori classification of animals from each group (N = 20) in two subgroups presenting spontaneous precocious or late oedema. Animals that presented precocious oedema were less responsible to Arnica montana 6cH in relation to hemodynamic changes. Instead, rats that exhibited late oedema presented less intense oedema (P = .01), lower percentage of mast cell degranulation (P = .0001), and increase in lymphatic vessels diameter (P = .05). The data suggest an individually qualitative adjustment of inflammatory vascular events by Arnica montana 6cH. PMID:21318109

  10. Pretreatment with alcoholic extract of Crataegus oxycantha (AEC) activates mitochondrial protection during isoproterenol - induced myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, R; Thirupurasundari, C J; Devaraj, S Niranjali

    2006-11-01

    Crataegus oxycantha (hawthorn) is used in herbal and homeopathic medicine as a cardiotonic. The present study was done to investigate the effect of the alcoholic extract of Crataegus oxycantha (AEC) on mitochondrial function during experimentally induced myocardial infarction in rat. AEC was administered orally to male albino rats (150-200 g), at a dosage of 0.5 ml/100 g body weight/day, for 30 days. At the end of the experimental period, the animals were administered isoproterenol (85 mg/kg body weight, s.c) for 2 days at an interval of 24 h. After 48 h, the rats were anaesthetized and sacrificed. The hearts were homogenized for biochemical and electron microscopic analysis. AEC pretreatment maintained mitochondrial antioxidant status, prevented mitochondrial lipid peroxidative damage and decrease in Kreb's cycle enzymes induced by isoproterenol in rat heart.

  11. Should Anthroposophic Medicinal Products Be Regulated in Europe?

    PubMed

    Michaux, Geneviève

    2017-03-01

    European Commission’s reports suggest that the European Union should address the status of anthroposophic products, i.e. products that are developed, manufactured and prescribed in accordance with the holistic approach on which anthroposophic medicine is based. Anthroposophic products cannot be placed as such on the European market because they cannot meet the marketing authorisation or even registration requirements set out by European or national pharmaceutical law. Yet, the 95-year European tradition and good safety profile of anthroposophic products justify giving them an easier access to market. Such access can result from specific rules on anthroposophic products, but can be more efficiently achieved by encouraging the Member States to better apply the existing rules on marketing authorisation procedures or on registration of homeopathic and traditional herbal medicinal products, or by including anthroposophic substances, manufacturing methods or uses in monographs.

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine in inflammatory bowel diseases: what is the future in the field of herbal medicine?

    PubMed

    Gilardi, Daniela; Fiorino, Gionata; Genua, Marco; Allocca, Mariangela; Danese, Silvio

    2014-09-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine is wide-spread not only in Eastern countries, but also in the Western world. Despite the increasing evidence on the harmful effects induced by several naturopathic/homeopathic products, patients seem to appreciate these remedies, in particular because they consider them to be absolutely safe. This same phenomenon is common among inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. As a result there is a significant request for scientific data to evaluate both the efficacy and safety of these remedies, and to support the use of such medications as adjuvant treatments to biological and synthetic drugs. We aimed to review the current evidence on efficacy and safety of some natural products that are believed to be effective in inflammatory bowel disease. Further perspectives for the clinical use of herbal products and strategies for improving knowledge about herbal products in IBD are also discussed.

  13. From Hahnemann's hand to your computer screen: building a digital homeopathy collection

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Lisa A; Cameron, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Library holds the unique manuscript of the sixth edition of Samuel Hahnemann's Organon der Heilkunst, the primary text of homeopathy. The manuscript volume is Hahnemann's own copy of the fifth edition of the Organon with his notes for the sixth edition, handwritten throughout the volume. There is a high level of interest in the Organon manuscript, particularly among homeopaths. This led to the decision to present a digital surrogate on the web to make it accessible to a wider audience. Digitizing Hahnemann's manuscript and determining the best method of presentation on the web posed several challenges. Lessons learned in the course of this project will inform future digital projects. This article discusses the historical significance of the sixth edition of Hahnemann's Organon, its context in UCSF's homeopathy collections, and the specifics of developing the online homeopathy collection. PMID:21243055

  14. The medicinal use of chocolate in early North America.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Deanna L; Grivetti, Louis E

    2008-10-01

    The medicinal use of chocolate has a long history in North America dating back to the 16th century. From Mesoamerican Codices and European Treatises scholars have determined that for hundreds of years the beverage called chocolate was administered to the sick and prescribed homeopathically to prevent illness. Yet, little scholarship exists that focuses on medicinal chocolate usage in early North America (18th-19th century). This paper examines medical practices during this era and associated medicinal norms with special attention given to chocolate/cocoa usage. Given the current scientific attention on the relationship between dark chocolate consumption and heart disease attenuation it is timely to investigate and chronicle America's medical forebears' understanding of, and practices related to, the medicinal use of chocolate. Indeed, there is a significant amount of literature to suggest that chocolate was used for wellness and to treat illness.

  15. Cardioprotective effect of tincture of Crataegus on isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, R; Niranjali Devaraj, S

    2004-07-01

    Tincture of Crataegus (TCR), an alcoholic extract of the berries of hawthorn (Crataegus oxycantha), is used in herbal and homeopathic medicine. The present study was done to investigate the protective effect of TCR on experimentally induced myocardial infarction in rats. Pretreatment of TCR, at a dose of 0.5 mL/100 g bodyweight per day, orally for 30 days, prevented the increase in lipid peroxidation and activity of marker enzymes observed in isoproterenol-induced rats (85 mg kg(-1) s. c. for 2 days at an interval of 24 h). TCR prevented the isoproterenol-induced decrease in antioxidant enzymes in the heart and increased the rate of ADP-stimulated oxygen uptake and respiratory coupling ratio. TCR protected against pathological changes induced by isoproterenol in rat heart. The results show that pretreatment with TCR may be useful in preventing the damage induced by isoproterenol in rat heart.

  16. Toxic hepatitis induced by Gymnema sylvestre, a natural remedy for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shiyovich, Arthur; Sztarkier, Ignacio; Nesher, Lior

    2010-12-01

    Toxic hepatitis or drug-induced liver injury (DILI) encompasses a spectrum of conditions ranging from mild biochemical abnormalities to acute liver failure. Recent studies report that 35% to 48% of patients with diabetes use some form of complementary and alternative medical therapy. Moreover, >800 plants have been traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes. Despite this widespread use, only few were supported by rigorous clinical evidence. Gymnema sylvestre, also known as gurmar (sugar destroyer in Hindi), is a plant considered to be with potent antidiabetic effects and, hence, widely used in folk, ayurvedic and homeopathic systems in medicine. The authors were unable to find previous reports associating G sylvestre to liver injury. Herein, the authors report a case of DILI in a patient who was treated with G sylvestre for diabetes mellitus and review the literature to suggest possible mechanisms that led to this acute condition.

  17. Running an NHS community homeopathy clinic - 10-year anniversary 2001-2011.

    PubMed

    Bawden, Stella

    2012-01-01

    An outcome series was conducted over a five-year period of patients attending a community NHS homeopathy clinic in Dorchester, Dorset. 273 new patients were seen. 183 (67%) questionnaires were completed at six months after initial consultation. 44% of patients had been unwell for more than five years; 19% of all patients for more than 15 years. A wide variety of conditions were seen, the largest group with depression, anxiety or grief. For follow-up patients 75-81% indicated an improvement in their symptoms and activity while 58% recorded an improvement in their overall wellbeing. Six months after the initiation of treatment 155 (84.7%) felt an improvement in their condition with 148 (81%) attributing this to homeopathy. Nobody reported deterioration due to homeopathic treatment; conventional drug use was reduced in 46 patients (25%). Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Arnica D30 in marathon runners. Pooled results from two double-blind placebo controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Tveiten, D; Bruset, S

    2003-10-01

    To examine whether the homeopathic medicine Arnica D30 has an effect on muscle soreness and cell damage after marathon running. The subjects were 82 marathon runners from two separate randomised double-blind placebo controlled trials participating in the Oslo Marathon in 1990 and 1995. Five pills of Arnica D30 or placebo were given morning and evening. Treatment started on the evening before the marathon and continued on day of the race and the three following days. The runners assessed muscular soreness on a visual analogue scale. Muscle enzymes, electrolytes and creatinine were measured before and after the marathon. Muscle soreness immediately after the marathon run was lower in the Arnica group than in the placebo group (P = 0.04). Cell damage measured by enzymes was similar in the Arnica and the placebo group. These pooled results suggest that Arnica D30 has a positive effect on muscle soreness after marathon running, but not on cell damage measured by enzymes.

  19. Systems Approaches: A Global and Historical Perspective on Integrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The globalization of healing systems is a dance of cultural awareness and cultural dominance that has arisen throughout history. With the development of greater communication and interest in whole-systems approaches to healing, the opportunity for the development of a global perspective on healing has emerged with new life force. The birth of integrative holistic healing systems in the West, such as naturopathic, homeopathic, anthroposophic, integral and functional medicine, and others, echoes the ocean of wisdom present in traditional healing systems, such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Ayurveda. In working to integrate the lessons from these systems, we see the inextricable link between man and the natural world, we work to understand the root cause of disease, we focus on the whole person to return balance, and we use empiric observation in large populations over time to grasp the interrelationships inherent in the whole-systems view of illness and wellness. PMID:24278794

  20. [General aspects of homeopathy].

    PubMed

    Avello L, Marcia; Avendaño O, Cristian; Mennickent C, Sigrid

    2009-01-01

    Homeopathic medicine is a type of therapy that appeared in Europe at the end of the eighteenth century. At the present time, it is widely accepted in developed countries as a form of alternative medicine. In Chile, health regulation includes homeopathy as pharmaceutical products and homeopathy is also considered a form of complementary medicine, that is well accepted by the public. The scientific rationale of homeopathy is based on an empiric type of thought that goes from the general to the particular. The symptoms that are valued are those that are particular to each sick individual. It uses diluted solutions of plants, minerals, animals and even venoms. There are basically two hypotheses to explain its mechanisms of action: The "immunological memory" and the "memory of water" or the transmission of electromagnetic information of the water. There still is needed to perform new studies to scientifically assess homeopathy and its usefulness, as an accepted alternative therapy.

  1. Cutting Edge Research in Homeopathy: HRI's second international research conference in Rome.

    PubMed

    Tournier, Alexander L; Roberts, E Rachel

    2016-02-01

    Rome, 3rd-5th June 2015, was the setting for the Homeopathy Research Institute's (HRI) second conference with the theme 'Cutting Edge Research in Homeopathy'. Attended by over 250 delegates from 39 countries, this event provided an intense two and a half day programme of presentations and a forum for the sharing of ideas and the creation of international scientific collaborations. With 35 oral presentations from leaders in the field, the scientific calibre of the programme was high and the content diverse. This report summarises the key themes underpinning the cutting edge data presented by the speakers, including six key-note presentations, covering advancements in both basic and clinical research. Given the clear commitment of the global homeopathic community to high quality research, the resounding success of both Barcelona 2013 and Rome 2015 HRI conferences, and the dedicated support of colleagues, the HRI moves confidently forward towards the next biennial conference. Copyright © 2015.

  2. Moral Legitimacy: The Struggle Of Homeopathy in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Louise

    2016-02-01

    This article deploys a well-established theoretical model from the accountability literature to the domain of bioethics. Specifically, homeopathy is identified as a controversial industry and the strategic action of advocates to secure moral legitimacy and attract public funding is explored. The Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital (GHH) is used as the location to examine legitimizing strategies, from gaining legitimacy as a National Health Service (NHS) hospital in 1948, followed by maintaining and repairing legitimacy in response to government enquires in 2000 and 2010. An analysis of legitimizing strategies leads to the conclusion that advocates have been unsuccessful in maintaining and repairing moral legitimacy for homeopathy, thus threatening continued public funding for this unscientific medical modality. This is an encouraging development towards open and transparent NHS accountability for targeting limited public resources in pursuit of maximizing society's health and well-being. Policy implications and areas for future research are suggested. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effect of human milk as a treatment for dry eye syndrome in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Jose L.; Bidikov, Luke; Pedler, Michelle G.; Kennedy, Jeffrey B.; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Gregory, Darren G.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dry eye syndrome (DES) affects millions of people worldwide. Homeopathic remedies to treat a wide variety of ocular diseases have previously been documented in the literature, but little systematic work has been performed to validate the remedies’ efficacy using accepted laboratory models of disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of human milk and nopal cactus (prickly pear), two widely used homeopathic remedies, as agents to reduce pathological markers of DES. Methods The previously described benzalkonium chloride (BAK) dry eye mouse model was used to study the efficacy of human milk and nopal cactus (prickly pear). BAK (0.2%) was applied to the mouse ocular surface twice daily to induce dry eye pathology. Fluorescein staining was used to verify that the animals had characteristic signs of DES. After induction of DES, the animals were treated with human milk (whole and fat-reduced), nopal, nopal extract derivatives, or cyclosporine four times daily for 7 days. Punctate staining and preservation of corneal epithelial thickness, measured histologically at the end of treatment, were used as indices of therapeutic efficacy. Results Treatment with BAK reduced the mean corneal epithelial thickness from 36.77±0.64 μm in the control mice to 21.29±3.2 μm. Reduction in corneal epithelial thickness was largely prevented by administration of whole milk (33.2±2.5 μm) or fat-reduced milk (36.1±1.58 μm), outcomes that were similar to treatment with cyclosporine (38.52±2.47 μm), a standard in current dry eye therapy. In contrast, crude or filtered nopal extracts were ineffective at preventing BAK-induced loss of corneal epithelial thickness (24.76±1.78 μm and 27.99±2.75 μm, respectively), as were solvents used in the extraction of nopal materials (26.53±1.46 μm for ethyl acetate, 21.59±5.87 μm for methanol). Epithelial damage, as reflected in the punctate scores, decreased over 4 days of treatment with whole and fat

  4. Effect of human milk as a treatment for dry eye syndrome in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Diego, Jose L; Bidikov, Luke; Pedler, Michelle G; Kennedy, Jeffrey B; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Gregory, Darren G; Petrash, J Mark; McCourt, Emily A

    Dry eye syndrome (DES) affects millions of people worldwide. Homeopathic remedies to treat a wide variety of ocular diseases have previously been documented in the literature, but little systematic work has been performed to validate the remedies' efficacy using accepted laboratory models of disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of human milk and nopal cactus (prickly pear), two widely used homeopathic remedies, as agents to reduce pathological markers of DES. The previously described benzalkonium chloride (BAK) dry eye mouse model was used to study the efficacy of human milk and nopal cactus (prickly pear). BAK (0.2%) was applied to the mouse ocular surface twice daily to induce dry eye pathology. Fluorescein staining was used to verify that the animals had characteristic signs of DES. After induction of DES, the animals were treated with human milk (whole and fat-reduced), nopal, nopal extract derivatives, or cyclosporine four times daily for 7 days. Punctate staining and preservation of corneal epithelial thickness, measured histologically at the end of treatment, were used as indices of therapeutic efficacy. Treatment with BAK reduced the mean corneal epithelial thickness from 36.77±0.64 μm in the control mice to 21.29±3.2 μm. Reduction in corneal epithelial thickness was largely prevented by administration of whole milk (33.2±2.5 μm) or fat-reduced milk (36.1±1.58 μm), outcomes that were similar to treatment with cyclosporine (38.52±2.47 μm), a standard in current dry eye therapy. In contrast, crude or filtered nopal extracts were ineffective at preventing BAK-induced loss of corneal epithelial thickness (24.76±1.78 μm and 27.99±2.75 μm, respectively), as were solvents used in the extraction of nopal materials (26.53±1.46 μm for ethyl acetate, 21.59±5.87 μm for methanol). Epithelial damage, as reflected in the punctate scores, decreased over 4 days of treatment with whole and fat-reduced milk but continued to

  5. Histopathological changes of renal tissue following sodium fluoride administration in two consecutive generations of mice. Correlation with the urinary elimination of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Dimcevici Poesina, Nicoleta; Bălălău, Cristian; Nimigean, Vanda Roxana; Nimigean, Victor; Ion, Ion; Baconi, Daniela; Bârcă, Maria; Băran Poesina, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the toxic effects (evaluated as histopathological changes) of sodium fluoride on the kidney in two consecutive generations of NMRI mice. An attempt to correlate the toxicity with the urinary elimination of fluoride has been made, as urinary fluoride excretion has been widely used as an indicator of fluoride intake and exposure. Six mixed (males and females) animal groups have been constituted by dividing the populations of mice derived from pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.5 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.5 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage and pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.25 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.25 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage; three types of sodium fluoride treatments were administrated: homeopathic, allopathic-homeopathic and allopathic. When the animals reached the adulthood, by randomization, they were selected in pairs for giving birth to the second generation of mice. No treatments were administrated to the second generation of mice; thus, the urinary elimination of fluoride in the second generation is attributed to exposure at sodium fluoride before birth. The administration of sodium fluoride to the first generation (F1) is realized until the mice reached the adulthood. For the first generation, the urine was collected at three times, every three weeks: at the age of four weeks, seven weeks and 11 weeks; single sampling urine, at the age of four weeks, has been conducted for the second generation. The urine samples have been analyzed using the ion selective electrode method for fluoride. For the histopathological examination, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation; the kidneys were collected in a 10% formalin solution. The preparation of samples for optical microscopy was realized with Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. The results indicate that the elimination of fluoride was similar (at the second evaluation, at 7-week-old of the first generation) for the both generations

  6. The 2005 meta-analysis of homeopathy: the importance of post-publication data.

    PubMed

    Rutten, A L B; Stolper, C F

    2008-10-01

    There is a discrepancy between the outcome of a meta-analysis published in 1997 of 89 trials of homeopathy by Linde et al and an analysis of 110 trials by Shang et al published in 2005, these reached opposite conclusions. Important data were not mentioned in Shang et al's paper, but only provided subsequently. What was the outcome of Shang et al's predefined hypotheses? Were the homeopathic and conventional trials comparable? Was subgroup selection justified? The possible role of ineffective treatments. Was the conclusion about effect justified? Were essential data missing in the original article? Analysis of post-publication data. Re-extraction and analysis of 21 higher quality trials selected by Shang et al with sensitivity analysis for the influence of single indications. Analysis of comparability. Sensitivity analysis of influence of subjective choices, like quality of single indications and of cut-off values for 'larger samples'. The quality of trials of homeopathy was better than of conventional trials. Regarding smaller trials, homeopathy accounted for 14 out of 83 and conventional medicine 2 out of 78 good quality trials with n<100. There was selective inclusion of unpublished trials only for homeopathy. Quality was assessed differently from previous analyses. Selecting subgroups on sample size and quality caused incomplete matching of homeopathy and conventional trials. Cut-off values for larger trials differed between homeopathy and conventional medicine without plausible reason. Sensitivity analyses for the influence of heterogeneity and the cut-off value for 'larger higher quality studies' were missing. Homeopathy is not effective for muscle soreness after long distance running, OR=1.30 (95% CI 0.96-1.76). The subset of homeopathy trials on which the conclusion was based was heterogeneous, comprising 8 trials on 8 different indications, and was not matched on indication with those of conventional medicine. Essential data were missing in the original

  7. Ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Struijs, Peter Aa; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2010-05-13

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle ligament ruptures? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 38 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cold treatment, diathermy, functional treatment, homeopathic ointment, immobilisation, physiotherapy, surgery, and ultrasound.

  8. Ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle ligament ruptures? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 38 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cold treatment, diathermy, functional treatment, homeopathic ointment, immobilisation, physiotherapy, surgery, and ultrasound. PMID:21718566

  9. [Alchemy, freemasonry and homeopathy].

    PubMed

    Pinet, Patrice

    2011-07-01

    In this article we are showing that homeopathic doctrine has really esoteric and occult origins as it was suspected by a few authors, nevertheless we saw Hahnemann also using scientific writers. As early as twenty-two years old Hahnemann was initiate in the freemasonry, very in vogue at that time. He will be life long attached to it and will keep close to distinguished freemasons. Freemasonry has conveid enlightement philosophical ideas as well as occult, alchemical and theosophical ones by successive incursion of very different orders. Among these we can find a few rosicrucians orders. At the beginning of 17th century in Germany, the first rosicrucians authors appealed to Paracelse, and the first members of their legendary fraternity manifested their contempt for the practice of transmutation into gold and must devote themselves to gratuitous medical practice (famous utopia). Freemasonry took again these philanthropic views so that Hahnemann was certainly involved to the ideas of Paracelse and his followers through the Rosicrucians which played a substantial part within freemasonry before homeopathy rose.

  10. New therapies for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Braido, Fulvio; Sclifò, Francesca; Ferrando, Matteo; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2014-04-01

    Because of its burden on patient's lives and its impact on asthma, allergic rhinitis must be treated properly with more effective and safer treatments. According to guidelines by Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), the classification, pathogenesis, and treatment of allergic rhinitis are well defined. Currently, second-generation antihistamines and inhaled steroids are considered the cornerstone of first-line therapy. However, new formulations of available drugs (e.g., loratadine and rupatadine oral solution, ebastine fast-dissolving tablets, and the combination of intranasal fluticasone propionate and azelastine hydrochloride), recently discovered molecules (e.g., ciclesonide, bilastine, and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors), immunologic targets (e.g., omalizumab), and unconventional treatments (e.g., homeopathic treatments) are currently under investigation and represent a new frontier in modern medicine and in allergic rhinitis management. The aim of this review is to provide an update on allergic rhinitis treatment, paying particular attention to clinical trials published within the past 20 months that assessed the efficacy and safety of new formulations of available drugs or new molecules.

  11. Sulphur alters NFκB-p300 cross-talk in favour of p53-p300 to induce apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shilpi; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Guha, Deblina; Kajal, Kirti; Khan, Poulami; Chakraborty, Sreeparna; Mukherjee, Shravanti; Paul, Shrutarshi; Manchanda, Rajkumar; Khurana, Anil; Nayak, Debadatta; Chakrabarty, Rathin; Sa, Gaurisankar; Das, Tanya

    2015-08-01

    Adverse side effects of chemotherapy during cancer treatment have shifted considerable focus towards therapies that are not only targeted but are also devoid of toxic side effects. We evaluated the antitumorigenic activity of sulphur, and delineated the molecular mechanisms underlying sulphur-induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. A search for the underlying mechanism revealed that the choice between the two cellular processes, NFκBp65-mediated survival and p53-mediated apoptosis, was decided by the competition for a limited pool of transcriptional coactivator protein p300 in NSCLC cells. In contrast, sulphur inhibited otherwise upregulated survival signaling in NSCLC cells by perturbing the nuclear translocation of p65NFκB, its association with p300 histone acetylase, and subsequent transcription of Bcl-2. Under such anti-survival condition, induction of p53-p300 cross-talk enhanced the transcriptional activity of p53 and intrinsic mitochondrial death cascade. Overall, the findings of this preclinical study clearly delineated the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptogenic effect of the non-toxic homeopathic remedy, sulphur, in NSCLC cells.

  12. Homeopathy and systematics: a systematic analysis of the therapeutic effects of the plant species used in homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Bharatan, V

    2008-07-01

    The therapeutic effects of the plant species used in homeopathy have never been subjected to systematic analysis. A survey of the various Materiae Medicae shows that over 800 plant species are the source of medicines in homeopathy. As these medicines are considered related to one another with respect to their therapeutic effects for treating similar symptoms, the aim is to classify and map them using the concept of homology. This involves placing the discipline of homeopathy into a comparative framework using these plant medicines as taxa, therapeutic effects as characters, and contemporary cladistic techniques to analyse these relationships. The results are compared using cladograms based on different data sets used in biology (e.g. morphological characters and DNA sequences) to test whether similar cladistic patterns exist among these medicines. By classifying the therapeutic actions, genuine homologies can be distinguished from homoplasies. As this is a comparative study it has been necessary first to update the existing nomenclature of the plant species in the homeopathic literature in line with the current International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.

  13. Could Homeopathy Become An Alternative Therapy In Dengue Fever? An example Of 10 Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Seema; Mahesh, Mallappa; Vithoulkas, George

    2018-01-01

    Background: Dengue fever is one of the most rampant epidemics in India of late and any therapy that may help limit the sickness and hospital admissions is worth considering. In India complementary and alternative medicine physicians are medically trained and hence have a role to play in delivery of public health. Case Series: We present a retrospective case series of 10 Indian patients who were diagnosed with dengue fever and treated exclusively with homeopathic remedies at Bangalore, India. This case series demonstrates with evidence of laboratory reports that even when the platelets dropped considerably there was good result without resorting to any other means. Conclusions: A need for further, larger studies is indicated by this evidence, to precisely define the role of homeopathy in treating dengue fever. This study also emphasises the importance of individualised treatment during an epidemic for favourable results with homeopathy. Abbreviations: DF: dengue fever, NS1: non-structural protein 1 antigen, IgG: immunoglobulin G, IgM: immunoglobulin M, +ve: positive, -ve: negative, WBC: white blood cells, RBC: red blood cells, ESR: erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

  14. Treatment with Ruta graveolens 5CH and Rhus toxicodendron 9CH may reduce joint pain and stiffness linked to aromatase inhibitors in women with early breast cancer: results of a pilot observational study.

    PubMed

    Karp, Jean-Claude; Sanchez, Carole; Guilbert, Philippe; Mina, William; Demonceaux, Antoine; Curé, Hervé

    2016-11-01

    To determine the possible effect of two homeopathic medicines, Ruta graveolens 5CH and Rhus toxicodendron 9CH, in the prevention of aromatase inhibitor (AI) associated joint pain and/or stiffness in women with early, hormone-receptor positive, breast cancer. This prospective, unrandomized observational study was carried out between April and October 2014. Women were recruited in two groups, according to which of the two study centres they attended: one receiving homeopathy in addition to standard treatment (group H) and a control group, receiving standard treatment (group C). All women were treated with an AI. In addition, women in group H also took Ruta graveolens 5CH and Rhus toxicodendron 9CH (5 granules, twice a day) up to 7 days before starting AI treatment. The homeopathic medicines were continued for 3 months. Demographic and clinical data were recorded using a self-assessment questionnaire at inclusion (T0) and 3 months (T3). Primary evaluation criteria were the evolution of scores for joint pain and stiffness, the impact of pain on sleep and analgesic consumption in the two groups after 3 months of treatment. Forty patients (mean age 64.9±8.1 years) were recruited, 20 in each group. Two-thirds of the patients had joint pain before starting AI treatment. There was a significant difference in the evolution of mean composite pain score between T0 and T3 in the two groups (-1.3 in group H vs. +3.4 in group C; p=0.0001). The individual components of the pain score (frequency, intensity and number of sites of pain) also decreased significantly in group H. Nine patients in group C (45%) vs. 1 (5%) in group H increased their analgesic consumption between T0 and T3 (p=0.0076). After 3 months of treatment, joint pain had a worse impact on sleep in patients in group C (35% vs. 0% of patients; p=0.0083). The differences observed in the evolution of morning and daytime stiffness between the two groups were smaller (p=0.053 and p=0.33, respectively), with the exception

  15. Efficacy of a non-hormonal treatment, BRN-01, on menopausal hot flashes: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Colau, Jean-Claude; Vincent, Stéphane; Marijnen, Philippe; Allaert, François-André

    2012-09-01

    Homeopathic medicines have a place among the non-hormonal therapies for the treatment of hot flashes during the menopause. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the non-hormonal treatment BRN-01 in reducing hot flashes in menopausal women. This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study carried out between June 2010 and July 2011. The study was conducted in 35 active centers in France (gynecologists in private practice). One hundred and eight menopausal women, ≥ 50 years of age, were enrolled in the study. The eligibility criteria included menopause for <24 months and ≥ 5 hot flashes per day with a significant negative effect on the women's professional and/or personal life. Treatment was either BRN-01 tablets, a registered homeopathic medicine containing Actaea racemosa (4 centesimal dilutions [4CH]), Arnica montana (4CH), Glonoinum (4CH), Lachesis mutus (5CH), and Sanguinaria canadensis (4CH), or identical placebo tablets, prepared by Laboratoires Boiron according to European Pharmacopoeia standards. Oral treatment (2 to 4 tablets per day) was started on day 3 after study enrollment and was continued for 12 weeks. The main outcome measure was the hot flash score (HFS) compared before, during, and after treatment. Secondary outcome criteria were the quality of life (QoL) [measured using the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDIS)], severity of symptoms (measured using the Menopause Rating Scale), evolution of the mean dosage, and compliance. All adverse events (AEs) were recorded. One hundred and one women were included in the final analysis (intent-to-treat population: BRN-01, n = 50; placebo, n = 51). The global HFS over the 12 weeks, assessed as the area under the curve (AUC) adjusted for baseline values, was significantly lower in the BRN-01 group than in the placebo group (mean ± SD 88.2 ± 6.5 versus 107.2 ± 6.4; p = 0.0411). BRN-01 was well tolerated; the frequency of

  16. The N-of-1 Clinical Trial: A Timely Research Opportunity in Homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich-Zürni, Susanne; Teut, Michael; Roll, Stephanie; Mathie, Robert T

    2018-02-01

     The randomised controlled trial (RCT) is considered the 'gold standard' for establishing treatment efficacy or effectiveness of an intervention, but its data do not infer response in an individual patient. Individualised clinical care, a fundamental principle in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including homeopathy, seems well disposed in principle to being researched by single-patient (N-of-1) study design. Guidelines for reporting N-of-1 trials have recently been developed.  To overview the current status in the literature of the N-of-1 method and its application in medicine, including CAM. To consider whether the N-of-1 trial design offers an opportunity for novel research in homeopathy. N-OF-1 TRIAL DESIGN:  The N-of-1 trial applies the principles of the conventional crossover, blinded, RCT design. The treatment under study and the comparator are repeated in a randomised order, and with suitable washout time, over a defined period. N-of-1 design is constrained for use in chronic stable conditions, and for interventions that have quick onset and cessation of effect, with modest or negligible carryover. Outcome data can be aggregated and interpreted for the individual subject; they can also be pooled with data from several similar N-of-1 trials, enabling more generalisable conclusions. THE N-OF-1 TRIAL IN CAM: The typical individualisation of patient care can be accommodated in N-of-1 study design if the patient and the specific therapeutic intervention are selected within the constraints of the method. Application of the N-of-1 method in CAM has been advocated but has been mainly limited, in practice, to a small number of studies in herbal and traditional Chinese medicine. THE N-OF-1 TRIAL IN HOMEOPATHY:  Individualised homeopathy can be accommodated for investigation within the same methodological constraints; less in-depth homeopathic approaches to prescribing are also amendable to investigation using the N-of-1 method. No such studies

  17. Identification and characterization of two new derivatives of chlorogenic acids in Arnica (Arnica montana L.) flowers by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2011-04-27

    Arnica montana is a medicinally important plant due to its broad health effects, and it is used in Ayurvedic, Homeopathic, Unani, and folk medicines. We have used LC-MS(n) (n = 2-5) to detect and characterize in Arnica flowers 11 quantitatively minor fumaric and methoxyoxalic acid-containing chlorogenic acids, nine of them not previously reported in nature. These comprise 1,5-dicaffeoyl-3-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid, 1,3-dicaffeoyl-4-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoyl-4-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid, and 1-methoxyoxaloyl-4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (M(r) 602); 3-caffeoyl-4-feruloyl-5-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid and 3-feruloyl-4-methoxyoxaloyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid (M(r) 616); 1,5-dicaffeoyl-4-fumaroyl and 1,5-dicaffeoyl-3-fumaroylquinic acid (M(r) 614); 3,5-dicaffeoyl-1,4-dimethoxyoxaloylquinic acid (M(r) 688); and 1-methoxyoxaloyl-3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid and 1,3,4-tricaffeoyl-5-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid (M(r) 764). All of the structures have been assigned on the basis of LC-MS(n) patterns of fragmentation, relative hydrophobicity, and analogy of fragmentation patterns if compared to caffeoylquinic acids. This is the first time when fumaric acid-containing chlorogenic acids are reported in nature.

  18. [The homeopathy or the myth of pure experience].

    PubMed

    Pinet, P

    1998-01-01

    Hahnemann and homeopaths have always hold that the origine of homeopathy was essentially experimental. The Hippocrate's method of observation, the experience with quinquina carried out by Hahnemann in 1790, and furthermore a similar experimental thought than the C. Bernard's one, are constantly put forward. The alchemist origins of homeopathy, in particular Paracelse, that old authors had found, have been scathingly denied. It stands yet to reason that the rôle of the paracelsian philosophy, through the german philosophy at the Hahnemann's time and the medical vitalism at its acme at that time, was crucial. Nevertheless, the direct part of contemporary physicians, specially english ones, as Nugent, J. Hunter and Cullen has been disregarded. Hahnemann, proudly, said nothing about his most important springs. The history of his ideas, the theorical and conceptual problems involved by the principle of similitude and not only the infinitesimality, show that homeopathy arises, not so much from experience as from theoretical ideas, and mind of system so current before C. Bernard. It can be easily showed that C. Bernard's epistemology, which is prevailing in biology today, is a logical obstacle to homeopathy.

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicines Use during Pregnancy: A Systematic Review of Pregnant Women and Healthcare Professional Views and Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pallivalappila, Abdul Rouf; Stewart, Derek; Shetty, Ashalatha; Pande, Binita; McLay, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To undertake a systematic review of the recent (2008–2013) primary literature, describing views and experiences of CAM use during pregnancy by women and healthcare professionals. Method. Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Database of Systematic Review Library and Allied, and Complementary Medicine Database were searched. Studies reporting systemic CAM products (homeopathic preparations, herbal medicines, Vitamins and minerals, homeopathy, and special diets) alone or in combination with other nonsystemic CAM modalities (e.g., acupuncture) were included. Results. Database searches retrieved 2,549 citations. Removal of duplicates followed by review of titles and abstracts yielded 32 relevant studies. Twenty-two reported the perspectives of women and their CAM use during pregnancy, while 10 focused on healthcare professionals. The majority of studies had significant flaws in study design and reporting, including a lack of appropriate definitions of CAM and associated modalities, absence of detailed checklists provided to participants, the use of convenience sampling, and a general lack of scientific robustness in terms of data validity and reliability. Conclusion. To permit generalisability of study findings, there is an urgent need to expand the evidence base assessing CAMs use during pregnancy using appropriately designed studies. PMID:24194778

  20. The puzzle of homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Reilly, D

    2001-01-01

    Homeopathy is a branch of Western medicine that has mostly been rejected by Western orthodoxy for the last 200 years because of conceptual and scientific clashes. Homeopathy uses microdoses of potential toxins to provoke defense and self-regulatory responses, rather than the more orthodox approach of blocking body reactions. This approach hints at its clinical scope: it can help, at times resolve, conditions that are intrinsically reversible rather than mechanical problems, deficiencies, or irreversible breakdowns in body functions where it is only palliative. In recent years, there has been a renaissance of interest. Public demand has soared, and with it professional interest. Approximately 20% of Scotland's general practitioners have completed basic training. This is partly occasioned by public interest in complementary medicine and a sympathy with the more mind-body approach of homeopathy, and partly by recent scientific evidence. Some homeopathic dilutions are so extreme they are dismissed by critics as only placebo. Yet trials and meta-analyses of controlled trials are pointing toward real effects, mechanism of action unknown. Clinical outcome studies suggest useful clinical impact and excellent safety. There seems to be a potential to enhance patient care by integrating the two systems.

  1. Healing traditions and men's sexual health in Mumbai, India: the realities of practiced medicine in urban poor communities.

    PubMed

    Schensul, Stephen L; Mekki-Berrada, Abdelwahed; Nastasi, Bonnie; Saggurti, Niranjan; Verma, Ravi K

    2006-06-01

    Men's pre- and extra-marital sexual behavior has been identified as the primary factor in the growing HIV/STI epidemic among both males and females in India. One major barrier to reaching men has been their underutilization of public health services, which has severely limited programs geared to prevention and early case identification. A significant number of men in India have strong culturally-based sexual health concerns, much of which are derived from "semen-loss" and deficiencies in sexual performance. This paper reports on an ongoing Indo-US project that has focused on men's concerns about sexual health problems and assesses the services provided by non-allopaths in three low-income communities in Mumbai. Findings indicate that the primary health resources for these men are private, community-based non-allopaths, who identify themselves as ayurvedic, unani and homeopathic providers. The paper suggests that the combination of strong culturally-based sexual health concerns and the presence of private non-allopaths who manage these problems present a window of opportunity for intervention programs to address the challenge of HIV/STI prevention and early case identification in India.

  2. Explanatory models for homeopathy: from the vital force to the current paradigm.

    PubMed

    Waisse, Silvia; Bonamin, Leoni Villano

    2016-08-01

    Facing claims for and against the scientific status of homeopathy, one is entitled to ask: is there a scientific model for homeopathy? In this study we reconstructed the model put forward by Hahnemann. The results showed that it was essentially based on the assumption of a 'vital force' exclusive to living beings. While the vital force was a basic element of 18th-century science, the existence of such a sui generis force of nature was refuted with the formulation of the law of the conservation of energy by mid-19th century. As a function of that fact for homeopathic theory, we discuss the history of the rise and demise of the theory of the vital force from the last quarter of the 18th century to 1830. Finally, we call the attention to the paradigm shift biology underwent starting at the end of the 19th century as the framework for contemporary views on the functioning of living beings and consequently, of the effects of pharmacological agents on them. Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the immunological cellular response of Cebus apella exposed to the carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and treated with CANOVA®.

    PubMed

    Feio, Danielle Cristinne Azevedo; Muniz, José Augusto Pereira Carneiro; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; De Brito Junior, Lacy Cardoso; De Lima, Patrícia Danielle Lima

    2014-01-01

    The immune response modifier Canova® is a homeopathic remedy indicated for patients with depressed immune system, since this drug appears to increase adaptive immunity and induce an immune response against multiple and severe pathological conditions, including cancer. We evaluated the pattern of immune cellular response in non-human primates of the species Cebus apella exposed to N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) with and without Canova®. Twelve animals were divided into four groups, with three animals each: negative control and three experimental groups, MNU-alone (35 days); MNU (35 days)-plus-Canova® (3 days) and Canova®-alone (3 days). The animals received MNU orally and Canova® by three intravenous injections. Evaluation of the cellular immune response was performed by immunophenotyping of T-lymphocytes (CD4(+), CD8(+)), B-lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Analysis was also performed of the cell cycle. Our results suggest an increase of T-lymphocytes (CD4(+)CD3(+)) only in the Canova® group, while in the MNU-plus-Canova® group only B-lymphocytes increased. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Zinc Gluconate and 2 Other Divalent Cationic Compounds on Olfactory Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duncan-Lewis, Christopher A; Lukman, Roy L; Banks, Robert K

    2011-01-01

    Intranasal application of zinc gluconate has commonly been used to treat the common cold. The safety of this treatment, however, has come into question recently. In addition to a United States recall of a homeopathic product that contains zinc gluconate, abundant literature reports cytotoxic effects of zinc on the olfactory epithelium. Additional research suggests that divalent cations (such as zinc) can block ion channels that facilitate the transduction of odors into electrical signals on the olfactory epithelium. The purpose of the current study was 2-fold: to confirm whether zinc gluconate causes anosmia and to reveal whether any other divalent cationic compounds produce a similar effect. Groups of mice underwent a buried food-pellet test to gauge olfactory function and then were nasally irrigated with 1 of 3 divalent cationic compounds. When tested after treatment, mice irrigated with zinc gluconate and copper gluconate experienced a marked increase in food-finding time, indicating that they had lost their ability to smell a hidden food source. Control mice irrigated with saline had a significantly lower increase in times. These results confirm that zinc gluconate can cause anosmia and reveal that multiple divalent cations can negatively affect olfaction. PMID:22330252

  5. Utilization and Safety of Common Over-the-Counter Dietary/Nutritional Supplements, Herbal Agents, and Homeopathic Compounds for Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Ruchir; Salvo, Marissa C

    2016-09-01

    Dietary supplements are commonly used by patients as part of their medical care plan. Often clinicians may not be aware of their use, because patients do not always consider these to be medications. All clinicians need to continually ask patients about their use of dietary supplements when collecting a medication history. Dietary supplements and prescription medications often share similar enzymatic pathways for their metabolism. These interactions may lead to severe adverse reactions. This article reviews available evidence for a variety of dietary supplements in select disease categories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Abuse concerning the nature and the commercialization of weight-loss products].

    PubMed

    Adrian, J

    1990-10-01

    Produces and products for slimming cures are extremely diversified, most of them being used per os. Among them, bulk materials (hydrocolloids, gums) that can reduce the food consumption must be distinguished from a profusion of substances with varied origin and nature whose efficiency and inocuousness often remain undertermined. Some commercial proposals are real untrue advertising. For example, the papain that is a proteolytic enzyme or the vitamin B6 that enables the aminoacid metabolism and the elongation of essential fatty acids. The bean husks are a particular case, they contain starch-blockers able to reduce the in vitro hydrolysis of carbohydrates. Meanwhile, they have no action on the calorie potential provided by the lipids, the alcohol, etc. More these anti-amylases are revealed ineffective under the conditions of digestion; their use in slimming cures is an abuse, opposite our actual knowledges. The homeopathic pharmaceuticals can be ranged in the same category. Their efficiency is not scientifically proved. The most of these substances transit through commercial networks that are hardly identified; more their run lasts only a few months and they are quickly renewed. They constitute an economical sector probably important and, in practice, escaping the elementary medical and regular checkings. An increased watching should be set up in order to reorganize the actual situation.

  7. Efficacy of homeopathy in livestock according to peer-reviewed publications from 1981 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Doehring, C.; Sundrum, A.

    2016-01-01

    Homeopathy is widely used in livestock, especially in order to reduce the use of antibiotics, although it is often seen as controversial. A comprehensive literature review has been conducted to assess the efficacy of homeopathy in cattle, pigs and poultry. Only peer-reviewed publications dealing with homeopathic remedies, which could possibly replace or prevent the use of antibiotics in the case of infective diseases or growth promotion in livestock were included. Search results revealed a total number of 52 trials performed within 48 publications fulfilling the predefined criteria. Twenty-eight trials were in favour of homeopathy, with 26 trials showing a significantly higher efficacy in comparison to a control group, whereas 22 showed no medicinal effect. Cure rates for the treatments with antibiotics, homeopathy or placebo varied to a high degree, while the remedy used did not seem to make a big difference. Looking at all the studies, no study was repeated under comparable conditions. Consequently, the use of homeopathy currently cannot claim to have sufficient prognostic validity where efficacy is concerned. When striving for high therapeutic success in treatment, the potential of homeopathy in replacing or reducing antibiotics can only be validated if evidence of efficacy is confirmed by randomised controlled trials under modified conditions. PMID:27956476

  8. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Sunila, Ellanzhiyil Surendran; Preethi, Korengath Chandran; Kuttan, Girija

    2009-01-01

    Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929) and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties. PMID:18955237

  9. Psorinum Therapy in Treating Stomach, Gall Bladder, Pancreatic, and Liver Cancers: A Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aradeep; Biswas, Jaydip; Chatterjee, Ashim; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Mukhopadhyay, Bishnu; Mandal, Syamsundar

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively studied the clinical efficacy of an alternative cancer treatment “Psorinum Therapy” in treating stomach, gall bladder, pancreatic and liver cancers. Our study was observational, open level and single arm. The participants' eligibility criteria included histopathology/cytopathology confirmation of malignancy, inoperable tumor, and no prior chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The primary outcome measures of the study were (i) to assess the radiological tumor response (ii) to find out how many participants survived at least 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years and finally 5 years after the beginning of the study considering each type of cancer. Psorinum-6x was administered orally to all the participants up to 0.02 ml/Kg body weight as a single dose in empty stomach per day for 2 years along with allopathic and homeopathic supportive cares. 158 participants (42 of stomach, 40 of gall bladder, 44 of pancreatic, 32 of liver) were included in the final analysis of the study. Complete tumor response occurred in 28 (17.72%) cases and partial tumor response occurred in 56 (35.44%) cases. Double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial should be conducted for further scientific exploration of this alternative cancer treatment. PMID:21197093

  10. [The First School of Vienna and Samuel Hahnemann's pharmaceutical techniques].

    PubMed

    Gantenbein, U L

    2000-01-01

    The First or Elder Vienna School of Medicine was initiated by Gerard van Swieten, the famous pupil of Herman Boerhaave. The aim of this school was to put medicine on new scientific foundations-promoting unprejudiced clinical observation, botanical and chemical research, and the introduction of simple but powerful remedies. One of the products of this school was Anton Störck (1731-1803), appointed Director of Austrian public health and medical education by Empress Maria Theresia. Following the tradition of the Vienna School, Störck was the first scientist to systematically test the effects of so-called poisonous plants (e.g., hemlock, henbane, meadow saffron). Discovering new therapeutic properties in previously dreaded plants, Störck used himself as a subject in experiments to determine tolerable dose levels. As a result of his investigations, Störck was able to successfully treat his patients using the drugs he discovered. Samuel Hahnemann's later writings, including his "Organon", show that he was considerably influenced by Störck's ideas. In fact, Hahnemann's clinical teacher at Vienna was a follower of Störck, Joseph Quarin. Hahnemann's elaborate system of validating homeopath material can be seen as a development and refinement of the techniques he learned in Vienna.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study in Pediatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Dhankar, Mukesh

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to study the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in acutely sick hospitalized children and factors associated with it. This is a cross-sectional, hospital-based study in a tertiary care center of Delhi, India. Children admitted to a pediatric unit during the study period were assessed using a specially designed questionnaire. Out of the total 887 admitted children, 161 (18.1%) were using complementary and alternate medicine in one form or another. Of these, 113 (70.2%) were using complementary and alternate medicine for the current illness directly leading to admission and the remaining 48 (29.8%) had used complementary and alternate medicine in past. The common complementary and alternate medicine use observed in our study was combined ayurveda and spiritual approach (25.5%), ayurveda (24.8%), spiritual (21.7%), homeopathic (13%), and 47.2% of children were using spiritual approach in form of Jhada (tying piece of cloth on arm or leg or keeping a knife by the side of child). The significant factors associated with complementary and alternate medicine use were younger age, female gender, and father being employed. Complementary and alternate medicine is commonly used even in acutely sick children. PMID:29616560

  12. Immunology and Homeopathy. 2. Cells of the Immune System and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bellavite, Paolo; Conforti, Anita; Pontarollo, Francesco; Ortolani, Riccardo

    2006-01-01

    Here we describe the results of some experimental laboratory studies aimed at verifying the efficacy of high dilutions of substances and of homeopathic medicines in models of inflammation and immunity. Studies carried out on basophils, lymphocytes, granulocytes and fibroblasts are reviewed. This approach may help to test under controlled conditions the main principles of homeopathy such as ‘similarity’ of drug action at the cellular level and the effects of dilution/dynamization on the drug activity. The current situation is that few and rather small groups are working on laboratory models for homeopathy. Regarding the interpretation of data in view of the simile principle, we observe that there are different levels of similarity and that the laboratory data give support to this principle, but have not yet yielded the ultimate answer to the action mechanism of homeopathy. Evidence of the biological activity in vitro of highly diluted-dynamized solutions is slowly accumulating, with some conflicting reports. It is our hope that this review of literature unknown to most people will give an original and useful insight into the ‘state-of-the-art’ of homeopathy, without final conclusions ‘for’ or ‘against’ this modality. This kind of uncertainty may be difficult to accept, but is conceivably the most open-minded position now. PMID:16550219

  13. Traumeel S in preventing and treating mucositis in young patients undergoing SCT: a report of the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Sencer, SF; Zhou, T; Freedman, LS; Ives, JA; Chen, Z; Wall, D; Nieder, ML; Grupp, SA; Yu, LC; Sahdev, I; Jonas, WB; Wallace, JD; Oberbaum, M

    2012-01-01

    Mucositis can be a serious complication of hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). A previous phase II trial in 32 children undergoing HSCT reported a beneficial effect of the homeopathic remedy Traumeel S. The Children’s Oncology Group sought to replicate the results in a multi-institutional trial. The study was an international multi-center, double-blind, randomized trial comparing Traumeel with placebo in patients aged 3–25 years undergoing myeloablative HSCT. Traumeel/placebo was started on Day −1 as a five-time daily mouth rinse. Efficacy of the treatment was assessed using the modified Walsh scale for mucositis, scored daily from Day −1 to 20 days after HCST. The main outcome was the sum of Walsh scale scores (area-under-the-curve (AUC)) over this period. Other outcomes included narcotic use, days of total parenteral feeding, days of nasogastric feeding and adverse events. In 181 evaluable patients, there was no statistical difference in mucositis (AUC) in the Traumeel group (76.7) compared with placebo (67.3) (P = 0.13). There was a trend towards less narcotic usage in the Traumeel patients. No statistically beneficial effect from Traumeel was demonstrated for mucositis. We could not confirm that Traumeel is an effective treatment for mucositis in children undergoing HSCT. PMID:22504933

  14. Efficacy of homeopathy in livestock according to peer-reviewed publications from 1981 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Doehring, C; Sundrum, A

    2016-12-17

    Homeopathy is widely used in livestock, especially in order to reduce the use of antibiotics, although it is often seen as controversial. A comprehensive literature review has been conducted to assess the efficacy of homeopathy in cattle, pigs and poultry. Only peer-reviewed publications dealing with homeopathic remedies, which could possibly replace or prevent the use of antibiotics in the case of infective diseases or growth promotion in livestock were included. Search results revealed a total number of 52 trials performed within 48 publications fulfilling the predefined criteria. Twenty-eight trials were in favour of homeopathy, with 26 trials showing a significantly higher efficacy in comparison to a control group, whereas 22 showed no medicinal effect. Cure rates for the treatments with antibiotics, homeopathy or placebo varied to a high degree, while the remedy used did not seem to make a big difference. Looking at all the studies, no study was repeated under comparable conditions. Consequently, the use of homeopathy currently cannot claim to have sufficient prognostic validity where efficacy is concerned. When striving for high therapeutic success in treatment, the potential of homeopathy in replacing or reducing antibiotics can only be validated if evidence of efficacy is confirmed by randomised controlled trials under modified conditions. British Veterinary Association.

  15. Patient Safety in Complementary Medicine through the Application of Clinical Risk Management in the Public Health System

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Elio G.; Picchi, Marco; Baccetti, Sonia; Monechi, Maria Valeria; Vuono, Catia; Sabatini, Federica; Traversi, Antonella; Di Stefano, Mariella; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Albolino, Sara; Tartaglia, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To develop a systematic approach to detect and prevent clinical risks in complementary medicine (CM) and increase patient safety through the analysis of activities in homeopathy and acupuncture centres in the Tuscan region using a significant event audit (SEA) and failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA). Methods: SEA is the selected tool for studying adverse events (AE) and detecting the best solutions to prevent future incidents in our Regional Healthcare Service (RHS). This requires the active participation of all the actors and external experts to validate the analysis. FMEA is a proactive risk assessment tool involving the selection of the clinical process, the input of a multidisciplinary group of experts, description of the process, identification of the failure modes (FMs) for each step, estimates of the frequency, severity, and detectability of FMs, calculation of the risk priority number (RPN), and prioritized improvement actions to prevent FMs. Results: In homeopathy, the greatest risk depends on the decision to switch from allopathic to homeopathic therapy. In acupuncture, major problems can arise, mainly from delayed treatment and from the modalities of needle insertion. Conclusions: The combination of SEA and FMEA can reveal potential risks for patients and suggest actions for safer and more reliable services in CM. PMID:29258191

  16. Patient Safety in Complementary Medicine through the Application of Clinical Risk Management in the Public Health System.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elio G; Bellandi, Tommaso; Picchi, Marco; Baccetti, Sonia; Monechi, Maria Valeria; Vuono, Catia; Sabatini, Federica; Traversi, Antonella; Di Stefano, Mariella; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Albolino, Sara; Tartaglia, Riccardo

    2017-12-16

    Aim: To develop a systematic approach to detect and prevent clinical risks in complementary medicine (CM) and increase patient safety through the analysis of activities in homeopathy and acupuncture centres in the Tuscan region using a significant event audit (SEA) and failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA). Methods: SEA is the selected tool for studying adverse events (AE) and detecting the best solutions to prevent future incidents in our Regional Healthcare Service (RHS). This requires the active participation of all the actors and external experts to validate the analysis. FMEA is a proactive risk assessment tool involving the selection of the clinical process, the input of a multidisciplinary group of experts, description of the process, identification of the failure modes (FMs) for each step, estimates of the frequency, severity, and detectability of FMs, calculation of the risk priority number (RPN), and prioritized improvement actions to prevent FMs. Results: In homeopathy, the greatest risk depends on the decision to switch from allopathic to homeopathic therapy. In acupuncture, major problems can arise, mainly from delayed treatment and from the modalities of needle insertion. Conclusions: The combination of SEA and FMEA can reveal potential risks for patients and suggest actions for safer and more reliable services in CM.

  17. Hahnemann and placebo.

    PubMed

    Jütte, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) known today as the founder of homoeopathy, was - as far as we know - the first physician who administrated placebos to his patient on a systematic and regular basis. This study is based upon unpublished documents (e.g. patients' letters) in the Archives of the Institute for the History of Medicine of the Robert Bosch Foundation in Stuttgart. It also profited from the critical edition of Hahnemann's case journals and the editorial comments which have also been published in this series. Hahnemann differentiated clearly between homeopathic drugs and pharmaceutical substances which he considered as sham medicine (e.g. milk sugar). A close look at Hahnemann's case journals reveals that the percentage of placebo prescriptions was very high (between 54 and 85 percent). In most instances Hahnemann marked placebos with the paragraph symbol (§). The rationale behind this practice was that Hahnemann had encountered the well-known problem that patients were used to taking medicine on a daily basis as it was typical for the age of heroic medicine. The main reason for giving placebo was therefore to please the impatient patient who was used to frequent medications in allopathic medicine, not only every day but sometimes also hourly. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of stratification factors and score-scales in clinical trials of treatment of clinical mastitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hektoen, L; Ødegaard, S A; Løken, T; Larsen, S

    2004-05-01

    There is often a need to reduce sample size in clinical trials due to practical limitations and ethical considerations. Better comparability between treatment groups by use of stratification in the design, and use of continuous outcome variables in the evaluation of treatment results, are two methods that can be used in order to achieve this. In this paper the choice of stratification factors in trials of clinical mastitis in dairy cows is investigated, and two score-scales for evaluation of clinical mastitis are introduced. The outcome in 57 dairy cows suffering from clinical mastitis and included in a clinical trial comparing homeopathic treatment, placebo and a standard antibiotic treatment is investigated. The strata of various stratification factors are compared across treatments to determine which other factors influence outcome. The two score scales, measuring acute and chronic mastitis symptoms, respectively, are evaluated on their ability to differentiate between patients classified from clinical criteria as responders or non-responders to treatment. Differences were found between the strata of the factors severity of mastitis, lactation number, previous mastitis this lactation and bacteriological findings. These factors influence outcome of treatment and appear relevant as stratification factors in mastitis trials. Both score scales differentiated between responders and non-responders to treatment and were found useful for evaluation of mastitis and mastitis treatment.

  19. Atropa belladonna neurotoxicity: Implications to neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Kwakye, Gunnar F; Jiménez, Jennifer; Jiménez, Jessica A; Aschner, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Atropa belladonna, commonly known as belladonna or deadly nightshade, ranks among one of the most poisonous plants in Europe and other parts of the world. The plant contains tropane alkaloids including atropine, scopolamine, and hyoscyamine, which are used as anticholinergics in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs and homeopathic remedies. These alkaloids can be very toxic at high dose. The FDA has recently reported that Hyland's baby teething tablets contain inconsistent amounts of Atropa belladonna that may have adverse effects on the nervous system and cause death in children, thus recalled the product in 2017. A greater understanding of the neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna and its modification of genetic polymorphisms in the nervous system is critical in order to develop better treatment strategies, therapies, regulations, education of at-risk populations, and a more cohesive paradigm for future research. This review offers an integrated view of the homeopathy and neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna in children, adults, and animal models as well as its implications to neurological disorders. Particular attention is dedicated to the pharmaco/toxicodynamics, pharmaco/toxicokinetics, pathophysiology, epidemiological cases, and animal studies associated with the effects of Atropa belladonna on the nervous system. Additionally, we discuss the influence of active tropane alkaloids in Atropa belladonna and other similar plants on FDA-approved therapeutic drugs for treatment of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Attitudes towards depression, psychiatric medication and help-seeking intentions amid financial crisis: Findings from Athens area.

    PubMed

    Economou, Marina; Bergiannaki, Joanna Despina; Peppou, Lily Evangelia; Karayanni, Ismini; Skalkotos, George; Patelakis, Athanasios; Souliotis, Kyriakos; Stefanis, Costas

    2016-05-01

    The financial crisis has yielded adverse effects on the population worldwide, as evidenced by elevated rates of major depression. International recommendations for offsetting the mental health impact of the recession highlight the need for effective treatment, including reduction in the stigma attached to the disorder. This study endeavoured to explore lay attitudes to depression and psychiatric medication during a period of financial crisis and to identify their correlates. Furthermore, it investigated their link to help-seeking intentions. A random and representative sample of 621 respondents from Athens area participated in the study (Response Rate = 81.7%). The telephone interview schedule consisted of the Personal Stigma Scale, a self-constructed scale tapping attitudes to psychiatric medication and one question addressing help-seeking intentions. The preponderant stigmatising belief about depression pertains to perceiving the disorder as a sign of personal weakness. In addition, stereotypes of unpredictability and dangerousness were popular among the sample. Nonetheless, stigmatising beliefs are much stronger with regard to psychiatric medication; perceived as addictive, capable of altering one's personality, less effective than homeopathic remedies and doing more harm than good. Help-seeking intentions were predicted by education, unemployment and attitudes to psychiatric medication solely. Research on the mental health effects of the global recession should encompass studies investigating the stigma attached to mental disorders and its implications. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Palm tree syrup: nutritional composition of a natural edulcorant.

    PubMed

    Luis, G; Rubio, C; Gutiérrez, A J; Hernández, C; González-Weller, D; Revert, C; Castilla, A; Abreu, P; Hardisson, A

    2012-01-01

    Palm syrup is a typical product from the Canary Islands, traditionally produced from the sap of the tropical palm tree Phoenix canariensis. Its high caloric content has led to its increasing use as a health food supplement for athletes, children and elderly. Furthermore, demand for this natural syrup is continuously increasing due also to its medicinal uses in homeopathic medicine. Palm Tree syrup samples prepared with palm sap from primary producers in La Gomera island (Canary Islands, Spain) were analyzed for their nutritional composition (moisture, ash, sugars, fat, vitamins and minerals). 35 syrup samples from five different producing regions in La Gomera island were analyzed. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine sugars and vitamins and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (FAAS) was used to analyze the minerals. Major carbohydrates were sucrose (37.8%), glucose (9.50%) and fructose (4.80%), respectively. The presence of arabinose could not be confirmed. Niacin was the water-soluble vitamin with the highest concentration with an average content of 0.003%. Fat content was found to be under 0.20%. Potassium was the mineral with highest contents (0.45%). Results suggest that palm tree syrup can play an important role as a sugar and mineral source in human nutrition, suggesting that future applications for this product could be developed.

  2. Solanaceae III: henbane, hags and Hawley Harvey Crippen.

    PubMed

    Lee, M R

    2006-12-01

    Hyoscyamus, the henbane, is one of the drugs of the ancients. Initially used both as a poison and narcotic, it was widely adopted by witches, wizards and soothsayers as a component of their hallucinatory and flying ointments. It was also used by notorious poisoners such as Madame Voisin in France. Eventually, in the nineteenth century its active principle was isolated by Ladenburg and called l-hyoscine. It proved to be a tropane alkaloid very similar to atropine. These two alkaloids proved to be very important in the study of the parasympathetic component of the autonomic nervous system, and together with physostigmine, allowed the major neurotransmitter acetylcholine to be isolated and its mechanisms of action to be characterised. The Crippen murder case in 1910 gave hyoscine further fame, indeed, notoriety. The unassuming homeopathic doctor murdered his wife with the alkaloid and then decamped for Canada with his mistress Ethel Le Neve. The case became a worldwide sensation for several reasons: the arrest of the fugitive couple by wireless telegraphy (Marconigram) and the extensive chemical and histological evidence presented by Willcox and Spilsbury. Some authorities claim that this was the beginning of the science of forensic medicine in Britain. Hyoscine is now hardly ever used in modern therapeutics but its history from antiquity to the witches and on to Dr Crippen is both bizarre and fascinating.

  3. [The efficacy of the complex medication Phyto-Hypophyson L in female, hormone-related sterility. A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical double-blind study].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, J; Luft, B; Boehmann, S; Runnebaum, B; Gerhard, I

    2000-08-01

    In a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, the effects of Phyto Hypophyson L (Steierl-Pharma GmbH, Herrsching, Germany), an Agnus castus-containing homeopathic preparation, were investigated in 67 women with fertility disorders. 37 women with oligomenorrhea and 30 women with amenorrhea received 50 drops of Phyto Hypophyson L or placebo 3 times a day over 3 months or 3 cycles. OUTCOME MEASURE AND RESULTS: The outcome measure being spontaneous menstruation, improved concentration of progesterone in the luteal phase, shortening of the cycle, earlier ovulation, and pregnancy was achieved in 38 out of 67 women. It was achieved more often from women with oligomenorrhea in the Phyto Hypophyson L group compared to the placebo group (82 versus 45%, p = 0.021). However, there was no significant effect when viewing the whole group. The baby take-home rate during the therapy and 6 months after the end of the therapy showed a ratio of 6 : 2 (18.7 : 6.4%). This result was not significant. Furthermore, in the oligomenorrhea verum group we observed a significant increase of progesterone during the luteal phase compared to the oligomenorrhea placebo group. Only very few undesirable drug effects were observed. In women with sterility and oligomenorrhea, a treatment with Phyto Hypophyson L can be recommended over a period of 3-6 months. Copyright 2000 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine use by pediatric specialty outpatients.

    PubMed

    Adams, Denise; Dagenais, Simon; Clifford, Tammy; Baydala, Lola; King, W James; Hervas-Malo, Marilou; Moher, David; Vohra, Sunita

    2013-02-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is high among children and youth with chronic illnesses. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and patterns of CAM use in 10 subspecialty clinics in Canada and to compare CAM use between 2 geographically diverse locations. This survey was carried out at 1 Children's Hospital in western Canada (Edmonton) and 1 Children's Hospital in central Canada (Ottawa). Questionnaires were completed by parents in either French or English. Although demographic characteristics of the 2 populations were similar, CAM use at the western hospital was 71% (n = 704) compared with 42% (n = 222) at the central hospital (P < .0001). Most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they feel comfortable discussing CAM in their clinic. The most common CAM products currently used were multivitamins/minerals, herbal products, and homeopathic remedies. The most common CAM practices currently used were massage, chiropractic, relaxation, and aromatherapy. Eighty adverse effects were reported, and 55 (68.8%) of these were self-assessed as minor. Results of this study indicate that CAM use is high among pediatric specialty clinic outpatients and is much greater in the western than in the central hospital. Most respondents felt that their CAM use was helpful with few or no harms associated. Many patients, using CAM alongside their conventional medicines, are still not discussing their CAM use with their physicians and are increasing the likelihood for potential interactions and preventable harms.

  5. Conservative treatment of torn medial meniscus via mechanical force, manually assisted short lever chiropractic adjusting procedures.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorn, B S

    1994-09-01

    To present the first reported case of successful chiropractic intervention in treatment of a torn medial meniscus of the knee, the meniscal tear being documented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 54-yr-old woman complaining of right knee pain of several months' duration with accompanying marked functional impairment was diagnosed as having a tear in the posterior horn of the ipsilateral medial meniscus, verified by MRI studies of the same. Independent consultation with three medical specialists resulted in the unanimous decision that surgical intervention for the purpose of meniscectomy provided the only therapeutic approach indicated for the problem. However, the patient was reticent to undergo said surgical procedure and chose, instead, to utilize chiropractic care and conservative management in an effort to resolve her condition without having to resort to surgery. The patient received chiropractic treatment to the knee via mechanical force, manually assisted short lever chiropractic adjusting procedures (MFMA) utilizing an Activator Adjusting Instrument. Auxiliary treatment included the use of homeopathic therapy as an adjunct to chiropractic care. Said treatment resulted in a complete resolution of the patient's disability, the patient recovering full function of the knee joint and achieving an asymptomatic status without having to submit to surgical intervention and its possible adverse sequelae. Conservative management of meniscal tears via chiropractic treatment may provide a therapeutically effective and financially cost containing alternative to routine meniscectomy in certain cases involving torn medial menisci of the knee.

  6. Use of diagnostic self-tests on body materials among Internet users in the Netherlands: prevalence and correlates of use

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Gaby; Portegijs, Piet; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Buntinx, Frank; Norg, Roelf; van der Weijden, Trudy

    2009-01-01

    Background A range of self-tests on body materials has become available to the general public, but the extent of their use has hardly been studied. This study examined how many people use diagnostic self-tests on body materials such as blood or urine, as well as the type of tests that are used, and factors associated with their use. Methods Cross-sectional survey. Participants were recruited from an existing Dutch Internet panel of 12,529 persons, and information was collected by means of a structured Internet-based questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess correlates of self-test use. Results Response to the survey was 63%. Sixteen percent of the respondents said they had ever used at least one self-test, with a mean of 2.1 tests per self-tester. The most frequently reported self-tests were those for diabetes and cholesterol. Self-testers generally reported lower health status and had a higher BMI than non-testers. On the other hand, they were more likely to engage in health-related behaviour such as the use of dietary supplements and homeopathic medicine. Conclusion Self-testing proved to be relatively prevalent among Dutch Internet users. We therefore think that it is essential to develop appropriate information for consumers, health care providers and policymakers, about the pros and cons of self-testing and specific self-tests. More test-specific research is needed. PMID:19358708

  7. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Israel: 2000 vs. 1993.

    PubMed

    Shmueli, Amir; Shuval, Judith

    2004-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medical care has gained increasing popularity in western societies in recent years. To provide a cross-sectional and temporal (2000 vs. 1993) analysis of the use of complementary and alternative medicine in Israel. The subjects studied represented the Israeli Jewish urban population aged 45-75 years. Full sit-down interviews were conducted with 2,003 respondents in 1993 and 2,505 respondents in 2000. For 1993, 6% of the population reported on consultations with CAM providers during the previous year. For 2000, that proportion increased to 10%. Being a woman, having higher education, enjoying better economic status, being younger, living in a big city, and being dissatisfied with specialists' care were all positively related to the use of non-conventional medicine, particularly in 2000. In both years, more than 50% of the consultations were with acupuncturists and homeopaths. However, chiropractors have doubled their market shares, and lower back pain became the leading problem for which care was sought. The main reason for consulting CAM was a reluctance to use too many drugs or to undergo an invasive procedure. However, a significant proportion of the users continue to use conventional medicine concurrently. Seventy-five percent in 2000 and 60% in 1993 reported that the treatment helped. Between 1993 and 2000, CAM in Israel changed from an infant industry into a mainstream medical commodity, reflected in both prevalence and different patterns of consumption.

  8. Using Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells to Teach Core Biology Concepts: A Simple Lab Module.

    PubMed

    McIlrath, Victoria; Trye, Alice; Aguanno, Ann

    2015-06-18

    Undergraduate biology students are required to learn, understand and apply a variety of cellular and molecular biology concepts and techniques in preparation for biomedical, graduate and professional programs or careers in science. To address this, a simple laboratory module was devised to teach the concepts of cell division, cellular communication and cancer through the application of animal cell culture techniques. Here the mouse mammary tumor (MMT) cell line is used to model for breast cancer. Students learn to grow and characterize these animal cells in culture and test the effects of traditional and non-traditional chemotherapy agents on cell proliferation. Specifically, students determine the optimal cell concentration for plating and growing cells, learn how to prepare and dilute drug solutions, identify the best dosage and treatment time course of the antiproliferative agents, and ascertain the rate of cell death in response to various treatments. The module employs both a standard cell counting technique using a hemocytometer and a novel cell counting method using microscopy software. The experimental procedure lends to open-ended inquiry as students can modify critical steps of the protocol, including testing homeopathic agents and over-the-counter drugs. In short, this lab module requires students to use the scientific process to apply their knowledge of the cell cycle, cellular signaling pathways, cancer and modes of treatment, all while developing an array of laboratory skills including cell culture and analysis of experimental data not routinely taught in the undergraduate classroom.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicines and childhood eczema: a US population-based study.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Lee-Wong, Mary; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in US children with eczema is unknown. Furthermore, it is unknown whether CAM use in the United States is associated with higher eczema prevalence. We sought to determine the eczema prevalence in association with CAM usage. We analyzed data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey that included a nationally representative sample of 9417 children ages 0 to 17 years. Overall, 46.9% (95% confidence interval, 45.6%-48.2%) of children in the United States used 1 or more CAM, of which 0.99% (0.28%-1.71%) used CAM specifically to treat their eczema, including herbal therapy (0.46%), vitamins (0.33%), Ayurveda (0.28%), naturopathy (0.24%), homeopathy (0.20%), and traditional healing (0.12%). Several CAMs used for other purposes were associated with increased eczema prevalence, including herbal therapy (survey logistic regression; adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 2.07 [1.40-3.06]), vitamins (1.45 [1.21-1.74]), homeopathic therapy (2.94 [1.43-6.00]), movement techniques (3.66 [1.62-8.30]), and diet (2.24 [1.10-4.58]), particularly vegan diet (2.53 [1.17-5.51]). In conclusion, multiple CAMs are commonly used for the treatment of eczema in US children. However, some CAMs may actually be harmful to the skin and be associated with higher eczema prevalence in the United States.

  10. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor expression in KATO-III cells after Helicobacter pylori stimulation under the influence of strychnos Nux vomica and Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Roland; Pasching, Eva; Moser, Doris; Frass, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have shown the stimulating effect of Helicobacter pylori on the gene expression of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) using the gastric epithelial cell line KATO-III. Strychnos Nux vomica (Nux vomica) and Calendula officinalis are used in highly diluted form in homeopathic medicine to treat patients suffering from gastritis and gastric ulcers. To investigate the influence of Nux vomica and Calendula officinalis on HB-EGF-like growth factor gene expression in KATO-III cells under the stimulation of H. pylori strain N6 using real-time PCR with and without addition of Nux vomica and Calendula officinalis as a 10c or 12c potency. Baseline expression and stimulation were similar to previous experiments, addition of Nux vomica 10c and Calendula officinalis 10c in a 43% ethanolic solution led to a significant reduction of H. pylori induced increase in gene expression of HB-EGF (reduced to 53.12+/-0.95% and 75.32+/-1.16% vs. control; p<0.05), respectively. Nux vomica 12c reduced HB-EGF gene expression even in dilutions beyond Avogadro's number (55.77+/-1.09%; p<0.05). Nux vomica 12c in a 21.5% ethanol showed a smaller effect (71.80+/-3.91%, p<0.05). This effect was only be observed when the drugs were primarily prepared in ethanol, not in aqueous solutions. The data suggest that both drugs prepared in ethanolic solution are potent inhibitors of H. pylori induced gene expression. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative effectiveness of individualised homeopathy and antibiotics in the treatment of bovine clinical mastitis: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Diana; Sundrum, Albert

    2018-01-01

    Based on the widespread use of homeopathy in dairy farm practice when treating mastitis, a blind randomised controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to assess the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment of clinical mastitis on four dairy farms. The study considered specific guidelines for RCTs as well as the basic principles of individualised homeopathy and involved 180 lactating dairy cows. Evaluation of cure rates was based on clinical investigation of the udder and on laboratory analysis of milk samples. In culture-positive cases, the antibiotic treatment provided suboptimal bacteriological cures (60–81 per cent) but was more effective than individualised homeopathy (33–43 per cent) whose effects appeared little different to those of placebos (45–47 per cent) (P≤0.05). On the cytological cure level, all three treatment methods were similarly ineffective: antibiotic being 2–21 per cent, individualised homeopathy 0–8 per cent and placebo 3–13 per cent (P≤0.05; P=0.13). Antibiotics, individualised homeopathy and placebo had similar effects on bacteriological and cytological cure in cases of culture-negative milk samples (P>0.4) and Escherichia coli infections (P=1.0). The study results implied that the effectiveness of individualised homeopathy does not go beyond a placebo effect and successful treatment is highly dependent on the specific mastitis pathogen. Thus, antimicrobial or alternative remedies used should be based on the bacterial culture of the milk sample. Trial registration number NTP-ID: 00008011-1-9, Pre-results. PMID:29374099

  12. Increased of the hepatocytes and splenocytes apoptosis accompanies clinical improvement and higher survival in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated with highly diluted Lycopodium clavatum.

    PubMed

    Falkowski-Temporini, Gislaine Janaina; Lopes, Carina Ribeiro; Massini, Paula Fernanda; Brustolin, Camila Fernanda; Ferraz, Fabiana Nabarro; Sandri, Patricia Flora; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Aleixo, Denise Lessa; Barion, Terezinha Fátima; Esper, Luiz Gilson; de Araújo, Silvana Marques

    2017-09-01

    Recent evidence includes apoptosis as a defense against Trypanosoma cruzi infection, which promotes an immune response in the host induced by T cells, type 1, 2 and 17. Currently, there is no medicine completely preventing the progression of this disease. We investigated the immunological and apoptotic effects, morbidity and survival of mice infected with T. cruzi and treated with dynamized homeopathic compounds 13c: Kalium causticum (GCaus), Conium maculatum, (GCon), Lycopodium clavatum (GLy) and 7% alcohol solution (control, vehicle compounds, GCI). There was significant difference in the increase of apoptosis in the treated groups, compared with GCI, which might indicate action of the compounds in these cells. Infected animals treated with Lycopodium clavatum presented better performance compared with other groups. GLy showed a higher amount of hepatocytes and splenocytes undergoing apoptosis, higher number of apoptotic bodies in the liver, predominance of Th1 response, increased TNF-α and decreased IL-6, higher survival, lower morbidity, higher water consumption, body temperature, tendency to higher feed intake and weight gain compared with GCI. Conium maculatum had worse results with increased Th2 response with increased IL-4, worsening of the infection with early mortality of the animals. Together, these data suggest that highly diluted medicines modulate the immune response and apoptosis, affecting the morbidity of animals infected with a highly virulent strain of T. cruzi, being able to minimize the course of infection, providing more alternative approaches in the treatment of Chagas disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Electromagnetic and magnetic vector potential bio-information and water.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cyril William

    2015-10-01

    This work developed over the past 40 years starting from dielectric measurements on enzymes and the subsequent finding that the measurements were affected by electric, magnetic, electromagnetic fields and quantum fields. A request for help in the diagnosis and therapy of chemically sensitive patients who had become sensitive to their electromagnetic environment came in 1982. The same symptoms could be provoked by a chemical or a frequency challenge and this led to an appreciation of the synergy between chemical and frequency environmental sensitivities. Experimental cooperation with theoretical physicist Herbert Fröhlich FRS and others led to an understanding of the physics of coherent water in living systems and a mechanism for the memory of water for coherent frequencies. In a coherent system there are interacting frequencies proportionate to any velocity the system will support, in particular the velocity of light and the velocity of coherence diffusion. Thus, there can be biological interaction between the optical, microwave and ELF spectral regions. Frequency modulation of light scattered by bio-fields and its retention in recorded images is discussed. A 'nil-potent' frequency can erase a frequency signature and thence affect a biological system. Homeopathy is interpreted through the biological effects of coherent frequencies derived from the frequency signature of the 'Mother Tincture' and developed through dilution and succussion. A homeopathic potency has a frequency signature therefore it must be able to have a biological effect. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Alternative approaches for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep farming: a review.

    PubMed

    Šimpraga, Miljenko; Ljubičić, Iva; Hlede, Jadranka Pejaković; Vugrovečki, Ana Shek; Marinculić, Albert; Tkalčić, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) are a serious health problem and represent the most significant constraint in sheep grazing operations. Problems tend to be worse in organic sheep farming systems, as a consequence of a less restricted access of animals to outdoor environment with a higher exposure to infective larvae. In domestic animals, GIN are effectively controlled by an aggressive prophylactic administration of commercially available anthelmintics. As a consequence to a common overdose and misuse of readily available antiparasitic treatments, there is an inevitable development of populations of GIN resistant to all major classes of anthelmintics. Also, the control of GIN that is based entirely on the anthelmintic use, threatens sustainability of the sheep farming worldwide. The combination of the optimized use of anthelmintic drugs and alternative approaches seem to be a reasonable choice in sustainable parasitic control programs that offer a substantial reduction of anthelmintic treatments and conservation of anthelmintic efficacy. In that aspect, a "targeted selective treatment (TST)" directed towards animals clinically diagnosed with GIN, seems to be an effective approach to leave some parasite populations unexposed to anthelmintics (refugia) and to reduce development of anthelmintic resistance. Also, many current research efforts aim to find and validate sustainable non-chemotherapeutic approaches to GIN control, including changes in grazing management, optimized nutrition, dietary supplementation, consumption of plants with anthelmintic properties, biological control by nematophagous fungi, copper oxide wire particles (COWP), and homeopathic treatments. This manuscript outlines (outlines) and discusses relevant alternative approaches for GIN control in modern sheep farming systems.

  15. Advances in Integrative Nanomedicine for Improving Infectious Disease Treatment in Public Health.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Schwartz, Gary E; Boyer, Nancy N; Koithan, Mary; Brooks, Audrey J

    2013-04-01

    Infectious diseases present public health challenges worldwide. An emerging integrative approach to treating infectious diseases is using nanoparticle (NP) forms of traditional and alternative medicines. Advantages of nanomedicine delivery methods include better disease targeting, especially for intracellular pathogens, ability to cross membranes and enter cells, longer duration drug action, reduced side effects, and cost savings from lower doses. We searched Pubmed articles in English with keywords related to nanoparticles and nanomedicine. Nanotechnology terms were also combined with keywords for drug delivery, infectious diseases, herbs, antioxidants, homeopathy, and adaptation. NPs are very small forms of material substances, measuring 1-100 nanometers along at least one dimension. Compared with bulk forms, NPs' large ratio of surface-area-to-volume confers increased reactivity and adsorptive capacity, with unique electromagnetic, chemical, biological, and quantum properties. Nanotechnology uses natural botanical agents for green manufacturing of less toxic NPs. Nanoparticle herbs and nutriceuticals can treat infections via improved bioavailability and antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies demonstrate that homeopathic medicines may contain source and/or silica nanoparticles because of their traditional manufacturing processes. Homeopathy, as a form of nanomedicine, has a promising history of treating epidemic infectious diseases, including malaria, leptospirosis and HIV/AIDS, in addition to acute upper respiratory infections. Adaptive changes in the host's complex networks underlie effects. Nanomedicine is integrative, blending modern technology with natural products to reduce toxicity and support immune function. Nanomedicine using traditional agents from alternative systems of medicine can facilitate progress in integrative public health approaches to infectious diseases.

  16. CAM use in pediatric neurology: an exploration of concurrent use with conventional medicine.

    PubMed

    Galicia-Connolly, Elaine; Adams, Denise; Bateman, Justin; Dagenais, Simon; Clifford, Tammy; Baydala, Lola; King, W James; Vohra, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have found that up to 60% of children with neurologic conditions have tried complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). To assess the use of CAM among patients presenting to neurology clinics at two academic centers in Canada. A survey instrument was developed to inquire about use of CAM products and therapies, including reasons for use, perceived helpfulness, and concurrent use with conventional medicine, and administered to patients or their parents/guardians at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa. Overall CAM use at the Stollery was 78%, compared to 48% at CHEO. The most common CAM products used were multi-vitamins (84%), vitamin C (37%), homeopathic remedies (24%), and fish oil/omega 3 s (22%). The most common CAM practices used were massage (47%), chiropractic (37%), faith healing (18%), aromatherapy (16%), homeopathy (16%), and relaxation (16%). Many patients used CAM products at the same time as conventional medicine but just over half (57%) discussed this concurrent use with their physician. CAM use is common in pediatric neurology patients and most respondents felt that it was helpful, with few or no harms associated. However, this use is often undisclosed, increasing possibility of interactions with conventional drugs. We urge clinicians to inquire about CAM use during routine history taking at every patient visit. Parents would clearly like more information about CAM from their specialty clinics; such information would be easier to share if more primary data were available about the safety and effectiveness of commonly used therapies.

  17. CAM Use in Pediatric Neurology: An Exploration of Concurrent Use with Conventional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Galicia-Connolly, Elaine; Adams, Denise; Bateman, Justin; Dagenais, Simon; Clifford, Tammy; Baydala, Lola; King, W. James; Vohra, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found that up to 60% of children with neurologic conditions have tried complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Objective To assess the use of CAM among patients presenting to neurology clinics at two academic centers in Canada. Methods A survey instrument was developed to inquire about use of CAM products and therapies, including reasons for use, perceived helpfulness, and concurrent use with conventional medicine, and administered to patients or their parents/guardians at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa. Results Overall CAM use at the Stollery was 78%, compared to 48% at CHEO. The most common CAM products used were multi-vitamins (84%), vitamin C (37%), homeopathic remedies (24%), and fish oil/omega 3 s (22%). The most common CAM practices used were massage (47%), chiropractic (37%), faith healing (18%), aromatherapy (16%), homeopathy (16%), and relaxation (16%). Many patients used CAM products at the same time as conventional medicine but just over half (57%) discussed this concurrent use with their physician. Conclusion CAM use is common in pediatric neurology patients and most respondents felt that it was helpful, with few or no harms associated. However, this use is often undisclosed, increasing possibility of interactions with conventional drugs. We urge clinicians to inquire about CAM use during routine history taking at every patient visit. Parents would clearly like more information about CAM from their specialty clinics; such information would be easier to share if more primary data were available about the safety and effectiveness of commonly used therapies. PMID:24736474

  18. Comparative effectiveness of individualised homeopathy and antibiotics in the treatment of bovine clinical mastitis: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Keller, Diana; Sundrum, Albert

    2018-04-07

    Based on the widespread use of homeopathy in dairy farm practice when treating mastitis, a blind randomised controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to assess the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment of clinical mastitis on four dairy farms. The study considered specific guidelines for RCTs as well as the basic principles of individualised homeopathy and involved 180 lactating dairy cows. Evaluation of cure rates was based on clinical investigation of the udder and on laboratory analysis of milk samples. In culture-positive cases, the antibiotic treatment provided suboptimal bacteriological cures (60-81 per cent) but was more effective than individualised homeopathy (33-43 per cent) whose effects appeared little different to those of placebos (45-47 per cent) (P≤0.05). On the cytological cure level, all three treatment methods were similarly ineffective: antibiotic being 2-21 per cent, individualised homeopathy 0-8 per cent and placebo 3-13 per cent (P≤0.05; P=0.13). Antibiotics, individualised homeopathy and placebo had similar effects on bacteriological and cytological cure in cases of culture-negative milk samples (P>0.4) and Escherichia coli infections (P=1.0). The study results implied that the effectiveness of individualised homeopathy does not go beyond a placebo effect and successful treatment is highly dependent on the specific mastitis pathogen. Thus, antimicrobial or alternative remedies used should be based on the bacterial culture of the milk sample. NTP-ID: 00008011-1-9, Pre-results. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Effects of herbal medicinal formulas on suppressing viral replication and modulating immune responses.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui-Fen; Lu, Min-Chi; Chang, Hon-Chou; Wei, Cheng-Chung; Kao, Chih-Hsiung; Chen, Zong-Huei; Huang, Chin-Chin; Li, Ching

    2010-01-01

    The Chinese medicinal herbs Radix Isatidis and Viola yedoensis Makino have been suggested to possess antiviral activity. This study tests whether these and other Chinese and Western herbal medicinal formulas can modulate the immune functions involving virus-suppression in BALB/c mouse. We first confirmed the extract from Viola yedoensis Makino, but not from Radix Isatidis, the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula Chui-Uren-Chien (CUC), or a Western homeopathic medicinal drink Método Canova, could inhibit the replications of herpes simplex virus-1 and enterovirus 71 in the human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell line. Subsequently, the same herbal extracts and drink underwent toxicity and immunomodulatory tests on mice of 5-7 weeks old. After 8 weeks of feeding different herbal medicinal formulas, no hepatic or renal toxicity was noted in any tested animal; whereas among the immune function evaluations, only the mice treated with CUC extract were found to be associated with significant increases (p < 0.05) in both the level of plasma IgG and the percentage of monocyte in blood mononuclear cells as well as the activation of macrophage Raw264.7 cells for nitric oxide production, suggesting its role in modulating the non-specific immune response. Analyses using protein arrays showed CUC was the most potent herbal medicinal formula eliciting fluctuations in plasma cytokine and chemokine concentrations. Taking all experimental data together, we conclude Chui-Uren-Chien possesses immunomodulatory capability in mouse, but none of the herbal medicinal formulas tested here are involved in strengthening antiviral immunity.

  20. Advances in Integrative Nanomedicine for Improving Infectious Disease Treatment in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Iris R.; Schwartz, Gary E.; Boyer, Nancy N.; Koithan, Mary; Brooks, Audrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Infectious diseases present public health challenges worldwide. An emerging integrative approach to treating infectious diseases is using nanoparticle (NP) forms of traditional and alternative medicines. Advantages of nanomedicine delivery methods include better disease targeting, especially for intracellular pathogens, ability to cross membranes and enter cells, longer duration drug action, reduced side effects, and cost savings from lower doses. Methods We searched Pubmed articles in English with keywords related to nanoparticles and nanomedicine. Nanotechnology terms were also combined with keywords for drug delivery, infectious diseases, herbs, antioxidants, homeopathy, and adaptation. Results NPs are very small forms of material substances, measuring 1–100 nanometers along at least one dimension. Compared with bulk forms, NPs’ large ratio of surface-area-to-volume confers increased reactivity and adsorptive capacity, with unique electromagnetic, chemical, biological, and quantum properties. Nanotechnology uses natural botanical agents for green manufacturing of less toxic NPs. Discussion Nanoparticle herbs and nutriceuticals can treat infections via improved bioavailability and antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies demonstrate that homeopathic medicines may contain source and/or silica nanoparticles because of their traditional manufacturing processes. Homeopathy, as a form of nanomedicine, has a promising history of treating epidemic infectious diseases, including malaria, leptospirosis and HIV/AIDS, in addition to acute upper respiratory infections. Adaptive changes in the host’s complex networks underlie effects. Conclusions Nanomedicine is integrative, blending modern technology with natural products to reduce toxicity and support immune function. Nanomedicine using traditional agents from alternative systems of medicine can facilitate progress in integrative public health approaches to infectious

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine for rheumatic diseases: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Phang, Jie Kie; Kwan, Yu Heng; Goh, Hendra; Tan, Victoria Ie Ching; Thumboo, Julian; Østbye, Truls; Fong, Warren

    2018-04-01

    To summarize all good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions in patients with rheumatic diseases. A systematic literature review guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) was performed. We excluded non-English language articles and abstract-only publications. Due to the large number of RCTs identified, we only include "good quality" RCTs with Jadad score of five. We identified 60 good quality RCTs using CAM as intervention for patients with rheumatic diseases: acupuncture (9), Ayurvedic treatment (3), homeopathic treatment (3), electricity (2), natural products (31), megavitamin therapies (8), chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation (3), and energy healing therapy (1). The studies do not seem to suggest a particular type of CAM is effective for all types for rheumatic diseases. However, some CAM interventions appear to be more effective for certain types of rheumatic diseases. Acupuncture appears to be beneficial for osteoarthritis but not rheumatoid arthritis. For the other therapeutic modalities, the evidence base either contains too few trials or contains trials with contradictory findings which preclude any definitive summary. There were only minor adverse reactions observed for CAM interventions presented. We identified 60 good quality RCTs which were heterogenous in terms of interventions, disease, measures used to assess outcomes, and efficacy of CAM interventions. Evidence indicates that some CAM therapies may be useful for rheumatic diseases, such as acupuncture for osteoarthritis. Further research with larger sample size is required for more conclusive evidence regarding efficacy of CAM interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of homeopathy in organic dairy farming in Spain.

    PubMed

    Orjales, Inmaculada; López-Alonso, Marta; Rodríguez-Bermúdez, Ruth; Rey-Crespo, Francisco; Villar, Ana; Miranda, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Organic farming principles promote the use of unconventional therapies as an alternative to chemical substances (which are limited by organic regulations), with homeopathy being the most extensive. Traditionally, Spain has had little faith in homeopathy but its use in organic farming is growing. Fifty-six Spanish organic dairy farmers were interviewed to obtain what we believe to be the first data on the use of homeopathy in organic dairy cattle in Spain. Only 32% of farms use some sort of alternative therapy (16.1% homeopathy, 10.7% phytotherapy and 5.3% using both therapies) and interestingly, a clear geographical pattern showing a higher use towards the East (similar to that in the human population) was observed. The main motivation to use homeopathy was the need to reduce chemical substances promoted by organic regulations, and the treatment of clinical mastitis being the principle reason. The number of total treatments was lower in farms using homeopathy compared with those applying allopathic therapies (0.13 and 0.54 treatments/cow/year respectively) and although the bulk SCC was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in these farms (161,826 and 111,218 cel/ml, respectively) it did not have any negative economical penalty for the farmer and milk quality was not affected complying with the required standards; on the contrary homeopathic therapies seems to be an alternative for reducing antibiotic treatments, allowing farmers to meet the organic farming principles. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hospital clinical trial: Homeopathy (Agraphis nutans 5CH, Thuya occidentalis 5CH, Kalium muriaticum 9CH and Arsenicum iodatum 9CH) as adjuvant, in children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Pedrero-Escalas, M F; Jimenez-Antolin, J; Lassaletta, L; Diaz-Saez, G; Gavilán, J

    2016-09-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of paediatric hearing loss. No single treatment has proved its effectiveness. There is a lack of evidence-based medicine studies in the area of homeopathy. A prospective randomized, double blinded interventional placebo control study was conducted. Patients, from 2 months to 12 years, with OME diagnosed by pneumatic otoscopy (PNO) and tympanometry, were randomized into two groups. Both groups received aerosol therapy (mucolytics and corticosteroids). In addition, the experimental group (EG) received homeopathy (Agraphis nutans 5CH, Thuya Occidentalis 5CH, Kalium muriaticum 9CH and Arsenicum iodatum), and the placebo group (PG) placebo, both of them for 3 months. Patients were evaluated by PNO examination and tympanometry at baseline, at 45 and 90 days. 97 patients were enrolled. In the EG, 61.9% of individuals were cured (PNO went from negative in the 1st visit to positive in the 3rd visit) compared with 56.8% of patients treated with placebo. 4.8% of patients in the EG suffered a recurrence (positive PNO in the 2nd visit changed to negative in the 3rd visit) while 11.4% did in the PG. No significant difference was found. Adverse events were distributed similarly, except in the case of upper respiratory tract infections, which were less frequent in EG (3 vs. 13, p: 0.009). The homeopathic scheme used as adjuvant treatment cannot be claimed to be an effective treatment in children with OME. EUDRACT number: 2011-006086-17, PROTOCOL code: 55005646. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Economic evaluations of homeopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Viksveen, Petter; Dymitr, Zofia; Simoens, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Economic evaluations of commonly used complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies such as homeopathy are needed to contribute to the evidence base on which policy makers, clinicians, health-care payers, as well as patients base their health-care decisions in an era of constrained resources. To review and assess existing economic evaluations of homeopathy. Literature search was made to retrieve relevant publications using AMED, the Cochrane Library, CRD (DARE, NHS EED, HTA), EMBASE, MEDLINE, and the journal Homeopathy (former British Homoeopathic Journal). A hand search of relevant publications was carried out. Homeopathy researchers were contacted. Identified publications were independently assessed by two authors. Fifteen relevant articles reported on 14 economic evaluations of homeopathy. Thirteen studies reported numbers of patients: a total of 3,500 patients received homeopathic treatment (median 97, interquartile range 48-268), and 10 studies reported on control group participants (median 57, IQR 40-362). Eight out of 14 studies found improvements in patients' health together with cost savings. Four studies found that improvements in homeopathy patients were at least as good as in control group patients, at comparable costs. Two studies found improvements similar to conventional treatment, but at higher costs. Studies were highly heterogeneous and had several methodological weaknesses. Although the identified evidence of the costs and potential benefits of homeopathy seemed promising, studies were highly heterogeneous and had several methodological weaknesses. It is therefore not possible to draw firm conclusions based on existing economic evaluations of homeopathy. Recommendations for future research are presented.

  5. High-dilution effects revisited. 1. Physicochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Bellavite, Paolo; Marzotto, Marta; Olioso, Debora; Moratti, Elisabetta; Conforti, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that homeopathic high dilutions (HDs) can effectively have a pharmacological action, and so cannot be considered merely placebos. However, until now there has been no unified explanation for these observations within the dominant paradigm of the dose-response effect. Here the possible scenarios for the physicochemical nature of HDs are reviewed. A number of theoretical and experimental approaches, including quantum physics, conductometric and spectroscopic measurements, thermoluminescence, and model simulations investigated the peculiar features of diluted/succussed solutions. The heterogeneous composition of water could be affected by interactive phenomena such as coherence, epitaxy and formation of colloidal nanobubbles containing gaseous inclusions of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, silica and, possibly, the original material of the remedy. It is likely that the molecules of active substance act as nucleation centres, amplifying the formation of supramolecular structures and imparting order to the solvent. Three major models for how this happens are currently being investigated: the water clusters or clathrates, the coherent domains postulated by quantum electrodynamics, and the formation of nanoparticles from the original solute plus solvent components. Other theoretical approaches based on quantum entanglement and on fractal-type self-organization of water clusters are more speculative and hypothetical. The problem of the physicochemical nature of HDs is still far from to be clarified but current evidence strongly supports the notion that the structuring of water and its solutes at the nanoscale can play a key role. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of complementary therapies on post-operative pain control in ambulatory knee surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Timothy; Downham, Christopher; Barlow, David

    2013-10-01

    Ambulatory knee surgery is a common procedure with over 100,000 knee arthroscopies performed in the U.K. in 2010-2011. Pain after surgery can decrease patient satisfaction, delay discharge, and decrease cost effectiveness. Multi-modal therapies, including complementary therapies, to improve pain control after surgery have been recommended. However, a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of complementary therapies to enhance pain control after ambulatory knee surgery is lacking, and this article aims to address this deficit. CINHAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED and CENTRAL databases were searched. Only Randomised Controlled Trials were included. All eligible papers were quality assessed using the Jadad system, and data was extracted using piloted forms. Two independent reviewers performed each stage of the review. Full details of the study methodology can be found on Prospero, a systematic review register. Five studies satisfied our eligibility criteria: three reporting on acupuncture, one on homeopathy, and one on acupoints. Acupoint pressure was the only study that demonstrated reduced pain compared with placebo. This study was the least methodologically robust. Arnica, although demonstrating a significant reduction in swelling, did not affect post-operative pain. Acupuncture did not affect post-operative pain; however, a reduction in ibuprofen use was demonstrated in two studies. Before recommending complementary therapy for routine use in ambulatory knee surgery, further work is required. Two areas of future research likely to bear fruit are demonstrating robust evidence for the effect of acupoint pressure on post-operative pain, and quantifying the positive effect of homeopathic arnica on post-operative swelling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Calendula officinalis on human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Saini, Pragtipal; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Sun, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Song, Fengyu; Gregson, Karen S; Windsor, L Jack

    2012-04-01

    Calendula officinalis is commonly called the marigold. It is a staple topical remedy in homeopathic medicine. It is rich in quercetin, carotenoids, lutein, lycopene, rutin, ubiquinone, xanthophylls, and other anti-oxidants. It has anti-inflammatory properties. Quercetin, one of the active components in Calendula, has been shown to inhibit recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and decrease the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL), IL-6 and IL-8 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore-stimulated human mast cells. To examine the effects of Calendula on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) mediated collagen degradation and MMP activity. Lactate dehydrogenate assays were performed to determine the non-toxic concentrations of Calendula, doxycycline and quercetin. Cell-mediated collagen degradation assays were performed to examine the inhibitory effect on cell-mediated collagen degradation. Gelatin zymography was performed to examine their effects on MMP-2 activity. The experiments were repeated three times and ANOVA used for statistical analyses. Calendula at 2-3% completely inhibited the MMP-2 activity in the zymograms. Doxycycline inhibited HGF-mediated collagen degradation at 0.005, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.05%, and MMP-2 activity completely at 0.05%. Quercetin inhibited HGF-mediated collagen degradation at 0.005, 0.01 and 0.02%, and MMP-2 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Calendula inhibited HGF-mediated collagen degradation and MMP-2 activity more than the same correlated concentration of pure quercetin. Calendula inhibits HGF-mediated collagen degradation and MMP-2 activity more than the corresponding concentration of quercetin. This may be attributed to additional components in Calendula other than quercetin. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Gas nanobubbles and aqueous nanostructures: the crucial role of dynamization.

    PubMed

    Demangeat, Jean-Louis

    2015-04-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs) have been a subject of intensive research over the past decade. Their peculiar characteristics, including extremely low buoyancy, longevity, enhanced solubility of oxygen in water, zeta potentials and burst during collapse, have led to many applications in the industrial, biological and medical fields. NBs may form spontaneously from dissolved gas but the process is greatly enhanced by gas supersaturation and mechanical actions such as dynamization. Therefore, the formation of NBs during the preparation of homeopathic dilutions under atmospheric pressure cannot be ignored. I suggested in 2009 the involvement of NBs in nanometric superstructures revealed in high dilutions using NMR relaxation. These superstructures seemed to increase in size with dilution, well into the ultramolecular range (>12c). I report here new experiments that confirm the involvement of NBs and prove the crucial role of dynamization to create superstructures specific to the solute. A second dynamization was shown to enhance or regenerate these superstructures. I postulate that superstructures result from a nucleation process of NBs around the solute, with shells of highly organized water (with ions and silicates if any) which protect the solute against out-diffusion and behave as nucleation centres for further dilution steps. The sampling tip may play an active role by catching the superstructures and thus carry the encaged solute across the dilution range, possibly up to the ultramolecular range. The superstructures were not observed at low dilution, probably because of a destructuring of the solvent by the solute and/or of an inadequate gas/solute ratio. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of melanin from Sepiella Maindroni ink (MSMI) on the intestinal Microbiome of mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Song, Weiwei; Wang, Chunlin; Mu, Changkao; Li, Ronghua

    2017-07-03

    By the search for new natural compounds with beneficial health effects, cephalopod ink has been considered as an attempt to develop new drugs and functional foods, which is an especially active field in Asia, where cephalopods are a major fishery catch, for which ink sacs are a bi-product and where homeopathic medicine has deep roots. There is a demand to evaluate the safety and influence to the organism. The specific composition and relative abundance of the gut microbiota, which is potentially a major modulator of host metabolism, drives the interaction between functional foods and host health. We explore the effects of melanin from Sepiella Maindroni, most common cuttlefish in China, on the intestinal microbiome of mice. ICR mice were randomly divided four groups, which were normal group (S), low melanin dose group (D; 120 mg/kg), medium melanin dose group (Z; 240 mg/kg), and high melanin dose group (G; 480 mg/kg). Melanin was delivered for 28 consecutive days. Fecal samples were used to generate 7715 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) via high-throughput sequencing. There were significant shifts in relative abundance of the dominant taxa at the phylum, class, order, family, and genus levels following melanin treatment. MSMI had no significant effect on the structure of intestinal flora in mice. The main effect was in the proportion of dominant bacterial communities. The effect positively correlated with the dose. From a health point of view, the use of melanin does not cause intestinal flora disorder. Our results may have important implications for MSMI as functional food component and potential therapeutic for manipulating gut microbiota.

  10. A short guide to peer-reviewed, MEDLINE-indexed complementary and alternative medicine journals.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sherry; Littman, Lynn; Palmer, Christina; Singh, Gurneet; LaRiccia, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) comprises a multitude of disciplines, for example, acupuncture, ayurvedic medicine, biofeedback, herbal medicine, and homeopathic medicine. While research on CAM interventions has increased and the CAM literature has proliferated since the mid-1990s, a number of our colleagues have expressed difficulties in deciding where to publish CAM articles. In response, we created a short guide to peer-reviewed MEDLINE-indexed journals that publish CAM articles. We examined numerous English-language sources to identify titles that met our criteria, whether specific to or overlapping CAM. A few of the resources in which we found the journal titles that we included are Alternative Medicine Foundation, American Holistic Nurses Association, CINAHL/Nursing Database, Journal Citation Reports database, MEDLINE, PubMed, and Research Council for Complementary Medicine. We organized the 69 selected titles for easy use by creating 2 user-friendly tables, one listing titles in alphabetical order and one listing them in topical categories. A few examples of the topical categories are Acupuncture, CAM (general), Chinese Medicine, Herbal/Plant/Phytotherapy, Neuroscience/Psychology, Nursing/Clinical Care. Our study is the first to list general CAM journals, specialty CAM journals, and overlapping mainstream journals that are peer reviewed, in English, and indexed in MEDLINE. Our goal was to assist both authors seeking publication and mainstream journal editors who receive an overabundance of publishable articles but must recommend that authors seek publication elsewhere due to space and priority issues. Publishing in journals indexed by and included in MEDLINE (or PubMed) ensures that citations to articles will be found easily. Copyright © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  11. Phase-Transition-Induced Pattern Formation Applied to Basic Research on Homeopathy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kokornaczyk, Maria Olga; Scherr, Claudia; Bodrova, Natalia Borisovna; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2018-05-16

     Methods based on phase-transition-induced pattern formation (PTPF) are increasingly used in medical research. Frequent application fields are medical diagnosis and basic research in homeopathy. Here, we present a systematic review of experimental studies concerning PTPF-based methods applied to homeopathy research. We also aimed at categorizing the PTPF methods included in this review.  Experimental studies were collected from scientific databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Russian eLibrary) and from experts in the research field in question, following the PRISMA guidelines. The studies were rated according to pre-defined scientific criteria.  The review included 15 experimental studies. We identified seven different PTPF methods applied in 12 experimental models. Among these methods, phase-transition was triggered through evaporation, freezing, or solution, and in most cases led to the formation of crystals. First experimental studies concerning the application of PTPF methods in homeopathic research were performed in the first half of the 20th century; however, they were not continued in the following years. Only in the last decade, different research groups re-launched the idea, introducing new experimental approaches and computerized pattern evaluation techniques. The here-identified PTPF methods are for the first time proposed to be classified as one group of methods based on the same basic physical phenomenon.  Although the number of experimental studies in the area is still rather limited, the long tradition in the application of PTPF methods and the dynamics of the present developments point out the high potential of these methods and indicate that they might meet the demand for scientific methods to study potentized preparations. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  12. Blueberry Improves the Therapeutic Effect of Etanercept on Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Phase III Study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yingjie; Wang, Ye; Guo, Jun; Chu, Haifeng; Gao, Yong; Pang, Limin

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthritis in the adolescents under the age of 16. Etanercept, an inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor, is often used to treat JIA despite its significant side effects. Homeopathic remedies, such as blueberries, have anti-inflammatory properties with fewer unwanted effects and should be considered as a primary treatment. We aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept for JIA. Two hundred and one JIA patients were selected, and randomly and evenly assigned to three groups: ETA (50 mg of etanercept twice weekly), ETABJ (matched etanercept and 50 ml blueberry juice daily) and ETAPJ (matched etanercept and placebo juice). The severity of JIA was measured using American College of Rheumatology scales (ACR) 20, 50 and 70. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL1) alpha and IL1 beta, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RA) were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA. After a 6-month follow-up, the ACR20, ACR50 and ACR70 in an ETABJ group were higher than those in other two groups (P < 0.05), suggesting clinically meaningful improvement in JIA. Meanwhile, the symptoms and side effects were reduced significantly or absent in an ETABJ group, including mental diseases, retrobulbar optic neuritis, gaining weight, infection, cutaneous vasculitis, diarrhea, uveitis and pancytopenia. Blueberries reduced the levels of IL1 alpha and beta, and increased the level of IL1RA. Thus, a combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept can reduce the severity of JIA and should be developed as a new method for JIA therapy.

  13. Consumer and health literacy: The need to better design tobacco-cessation product packaging, labels, and inserts.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Stephanie M; Smith-Simone, Stephanie Y

    2010-03-01

    Tobacco-cessation product packaging and instruction materials may not be appropriate for some smokers and may contribute to the underuse and misuse of evidence-based treatments. The dual goals of this project are to analyze literacy levels of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved and non-approved tobacco-cessation product packaging, directions, and claims, and to identify and categorize claims found on product packaging. The Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids (CTFK) maintains the Quitting and Reducing Tobacco Use Inventory of Products (QuiTIP) database, which catalogs products marketed and sold to consumers to reduce or quit use of tobacco products. It also includes all medications approved by the FDA for tobacco cessation as well as a sample of non-approved products such as homeopathic, herbal, nutritional, or dietary supplements commonly marketed as either cessation aids or alternative tobacco/nicotine products. This paper assesses the reading levels required to understand product packaging, labeling, and instructions using the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) and identifies claims on the product package labels using standard qualitative methods. Key findings show that the average reading levels needed to understand instructions for both FDA-approved and non-approved cessation products are above the reading levels recommended to ensure maximum comprehension. Improving the packaging and directions of evidence-based tobacco-cessation products so that they are preferably at or below a fifth-grade reading level, along with using consumer-based design principles to develop packaging, may help smokers take advantage of and correctly use products that will greatly increase their chances of successful quitting. 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Public awareness of warning symptoms, risk factors, and treatment of stroke in northwest India.

    PubMed

    Pandian, Jeyaraj D; Jaison, Ashish; Deepak, Sukhbinder S; Kalra, Guneet; Shamsher, Shivali; Lincoln, Douglas J; Abraham, George

    2005-03-01

    This study assessed public awareness of warning symptoms, risk factors, and treatment of stroke in Ludhiana, Punjab, North West India. A hospital-based survey was conducted between February 2002 and September 2002 by the Stroke section of Christian Medical College. The study subjects were relatives of patients without history of stroke, attending the outpatient department of the hospital. Trained medical students, interns, and a nurse interviewed subjects using a structured, pretested, open-ended questionnaire. Nine hundred forty-two individuals were interviewed during the study period (56.4% men, mean age 40.1 years, age range 15 to 80 years). Forty-five percent of the subjects did not recognize the brain as the affected organ in stroke. In the multivariate analysis, higher education (P<0.001; odds ratio 2.6; 95%, CI 1.8 to 3.8) and upper socioeconomic status (P<0.005; odds ratio 1.6; CI, 1.1 to 2.2) correlated with a better knowledge of which organ was affected in stroke. Twenty-three percent of the participants did not know a single warning symptom of stroke. Twenty-one percent of the subjects could not identify even a single risk factor for stroke. Seven percent of the study population believed that oil massage would improve stroke victims. A small proportion of subjects believed in witchcraft, faith healing, homeopathic, and ayurvedic treatment (3%). This hospital-based survey reveals a better awareness of stroke warning signs and risk factors. However, knowledge regarding the organ involved, etiology, and treatment of stroke is lacking. Considerable education is needed to increase public awareness in modern concepts of stroke treatment.

  15. Homeopathy in the treatment of fibromyalgia--a comprehensive literature-review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Katja; Raak, Christa; Cramer, Holger; Lauche, Romy; Ostermann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Coping with the complex nature of fibromyalgia symptoms (FMS) still remains a challenge for patients. Taking into account the possible adverse events of pharmacological treatments patients often seek additional treatments for the management of fibromyalgia and turn towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). In this review, we aimed to investigate the current state of literature of homeopathy in the treatment of FMS. We searched Medline, the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, AMED, PsycInfo and CAMbase for the terms "fibromyalgia AND homeopath$" through February 2013. In addition we searched Google Scholar, the library of the Carstens Foundation and that of the Deutsche Homöopathische Union (DHU). Standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated and meta-analyzed using the generic inverse variance method. We found 10 case-reports, 3 observational studies, 1 non-randomized and 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on homeopathy for fibromyalgia. Both case reports and observational studies are naturally predominated by the use of qualitative and not validated outcome measures. Meta-analyses of CCTs revealed effects of homeopathy on tender point count (SMD=-0.42; 95%CI -0.78, -0.05; P=0.03), pain intensity (SMD=-0.54; 95%CI -0.97, -0.10; P=0.02), and fatigue (SMD=-0.47; 95%CI -0.90, -0.05; P=0.03) compared to placebo. The results of the studies as well as the case reports define a sufficient basis for discussing the possible benefits of homeopathy for patients suffering from fibromyalgia syndrome although any conclusions based on the results of this review have to be regarded as preliminary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Veterinary homeopathy: systematic review of medical conditions studied by randomised trials controlled by other than placebo.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Robert T; Clausen, Jürgen

    2015-09-15

    No systematic review has previously been carried out on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of veterinary homeopathy in which the control group was an intervention other than placebo (OTP). For eligible peer-reviewed RCTs, the objectives of this study were to assess the risk of bias (RoB) and to quantify the effect size of homeopathic intervention compared with an active comparator or with no treatment. Our systematic review approach complied fully with the PRISMA 2009 Checklist. Cochrane methods were applied to assess RoB and to derive effect size using standard meta-analysis methods. Based on a thorough and systematic literature search, the following key attributes of the published research were distinguished: individualised homeopathy (n = 1 RCT)/non-individualised homeopathy (n = 19); treatment (n = 14)/prophylaxis (n = 6); active controls (n = 18)/untreated controls (n = 2). The trials were highly diverse, representing 12 different medical conditions in 6 different species. No trial had sufficiently low RoB to be judged as reliable evidence: 16 of the 20 RCTs had high RoB; the remaining four had uncertain RoB in several domains of assessment. For three trials with uncertain RoB and without overt vested interest, it was inconclusive whether homeopathy combined with conventional intervention was more or was less effective than conventional intervention alone for modulation of immune response in calves, or in the prophylaxis of cattle tick or of diarrhoea in piglets. Due to the poor reliability of their data, OTP-controlled trials do not currently provide useful insight into the effectiveness of homeopathy in animals.

  17. [The company Willmar Schwabe in the Nazi era].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Christoph; Meyer, Ulrich; Seyfang, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    This essay follows the history of the Schwabe Company between 1933 and 1945 when it, like all other companies at the time, had to subject to the state-enforced conformity ('Gleichschaltung'). While Willmar Schwabe II (1878-1935), the company's second director, kept clear of Nazi politics, both of his sons, who succeeded him at an early age, became members of the Nazi party: Willmar III (1907-1983) probably from initial conviction and Wolfgang (1912-2000), who joined in 1937, more likely for opportunistic reasons. The two lay journals published by Schwabe--the Leipziger Populäre Zeitschrift für Homöopathie and the Biochemische Monatsblätter--embraced the Nazi ideology more thoroughly than the general homeopathic journal Allgemeine Homöopathische Zeitung, including above all contributions on racial hygiene. Our research has revealed that Schwabe only employed foreign workers from 1942 on, that their number was much lower, at 0.9 per cent in 1942 and 3.6 per cent in 1944, than that of other pharmaceutical companies and that their pay hardly differed from that of German workers. The sales and profit figures investigated have shown that the company did not profit exceptionally from the new Nazi health policies ('Neue Deutsche Heilkunde'): while its sales and profits rose in the Nazi era due to the increased use of medication among the civil population during wartime, the drugs produced by Schwabe remained marginal also during the war, as is apparent also from its modest deliveries to the army. All in all one can conclude that the company offered neither resistance nor particular support to the Nazi ideology.

  18. Perioperative Arnica montana for Reduction of Ecchymosis in Rhinoplasty Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chaiet, Scott R; Marcus, Benjamin C

    2016-05-01

    Studies of homeopathic therapies to decrease postrhinoplasty ecchymosis have previously used subjective measurements, limiting their clinical significance. Recently, Arnica montana was shown to decrease postoperative ecchymosis after rhytidectomy, using an objective measuring tool. We believe that oral A. montana, given perioperatively, can be objectively shown to reduce extent and intensity of postoperative ecchymosis in rhinoplasty surgery. Subjects scheduled for rhinoplasty surgery with nasal bone osteotomies by a single surgeon were prospectively randomized to receive either oral perioperative A. montana (Alpine Pharmaceuticals, San Rafael, Calif) or placebo in a double-blinded fashion. Ecchymosis was measured in digital "three-quarter"-view photographs at 3 postoperative time points. Each bruise was outlined with Adobe Photoshop (Adobe Systems Incorporated, San Jose, Calif), and the extent was scaled to a standardized reference card. Cyan, magenta, yellow, black, and luminosity were analyzed in the bruised and control areas to calculate change in intensity. P value of <0.1 was set as a meaningful difference with statistical significance. Compared with 13 subjects receiving placebo, 9 taking A. montana had 16.2%, 32.9%, and 20.4% less extent on postoperative days 2/3, 7, and 9/10, a statistically significant difference on day 7 (P = 0.097). Color change initially showed 13.1% increase in intensity with A. montana but 10.9% and 36.3% decreases on days 7 and 9/10, a statistically significant difference on day 9/10 (P = 0.074). One subject experienced mild itching and rash with the study drug that resolved during the study period. Arnica montana seems to accelerate postoperative healing, with quicker resolution of the extent and the intensity of ecchymosis after osteotomies in rhinoplasty surgery, which may dramatically affect patient satisfaction.

  19. Internet treatment of sexually transmitted infections - a public health hazard?

    PubMed

    Vivancos, Roberto; Schelenz, Silke; Loke, Yoon K

    2007-11-15

    Owing to the stigma associated with sexually transmitted infections, patients may prefer to keep their illness private, and choose instead to try self-treatment remedies from the internet. However, such remedies may prove hazardous if the sellers do not provide detailed advice on adverse effects, or on avoiding transmission and re-infection. We conducted an internet search to determine the availability of treatments for STIs and the nature of information provided by vendors of these treatments. We conducted a systematic internet search using five different search engines in February 2007. The search term included the words "self treatment" and the name of six different common STIs. We visited the vendors' websites and recorded any information on the formulation, adverse effects, cautions, and prevention of infection. We identified a total of 77 treatments from 52 different companies, most of which were sold from the UK and US. The available remedies were predominantly for topical use and consisted mainly of homeopathic remedies. Only a small proportion of the web-listed products gave details on adverse effects, contraindications and interactions (22%, 25% and 9% respectively). Similarly, web vendors seldom provided advice on treatment of sexual contacts (20% of chlamydia and 25% of gonorrhea treatments) or on preventive measures (13%). Conversely, evidence of effectiveness was claimed for approximately 50% of the products. While treatments for certain STIs are widely available on the internet, purchasers of such products may potentially suffer harm because of the lack of information on adverse effects, interactions and contra-indications. Moreover, we consider the paucity of preventive health advice to be a serious omission, thereby leading to patients being needlessly exposed to, and potentially re-infected with the causative pathogens.

  20. Vitex agnus castus: a systematic review of adverse events.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Claudia; Thompson Coon, Joanna; Pittler, Max H; Ernst, Edzard

    2005-01-01

    Vitex agnus castus L. (VAC) [Verbenaceae] is a deciduous shrub that is native to Mediterranean Europe and Central Asia. Traditionally, VAC fruit extract has been used in the treatment of many female conditions, including menstrual disorders (amenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea), premenstrual syndrome (PMS), corpus luteum insufficiency, hyperprolactinaemia, infertility, acne, menopause and disrupted lactation. The German Commission E has approved the use of VAC for irregularities of the menstrual cycle, premenstrual disturbances and mastodynia. Clinical reviews are available for the efficacy of VAC in PMS, cycle disorders, hyperprolactinaemia and mastalgia, but so far no systematic review has been published on adverse events or drug interactions associated with VAC. Therefore, this review was conducted to evaluate all the available human safety data of VAC monopreparations. Literature searches were conducted in six electronic databases, in references lists of all identified papers and in departmental files. Data from spontaneous reporting schemes of the WHO and national drug safety bodies were also included. Twelve manufacturers of VAC-containing preparations and five herbalist organisations were contacted for additional information. No language restrictions were imposed. Combination preparations including VAC or homeopathic preparations of VAC were excluded. Data extraction of key data from all articles reporting adverse events or interactions was performed independently by at least two reviewers, regardless of study design. Data from clinical trials, postmarketing surveillance studies, surveys, spontaneous reporting schemes, manufacturers and herbalist organisations indicate that the adverse events following VAC treatment are mild and reversible. The most frequent adverse events are nausea, headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, menstrual disorders, acne, pruritus and erythematous rash. No drug interactions were reported. Use of VAC should be avoided during pregnancy or

  1. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu; Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut; Ma Shuangge

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reportedmore » activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for

  2. Prescription Patterns and the Cost of Migraine Treatments in German General and Neurological Practices.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Louis; Kostev, Karel

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze prescription patterns and the cost of migraine treatments in general practices (GPs) and neurological practices (NPs) in Germany. This study included 43,149 patients treated in GPs and 13,674 patients treated in NPs who were diagnosed with migraine in 2015. Ten different families of migraine therapy were included in the analysis: triptans, analgesics, anti-emetics, beta-blockers, antivertigo products, gastroprokinetics, anti-epileptics, calcium channel blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, and other medications (all other classes used in the treatment of migraine including homeopathic medications). The share of migraine therapies and their costs were estimated for GPs and NPs. The mean age was 44.4 years in GPs and 44.1 years in NPs. Triptans and analgesics were the 2 most commonly prescribed families of drugs in all patients and in the 9 specific subgroups. Interestingly, triptans were more commonly prescribed in NPs than in GPs (30.9% to 55.0% vs. 30.0% to 44.7%), whereas analgesics were less frequently given in NPs than in GPs (11.5% to 17.2% vs. 35.3% to 42.4%). Finally, the share of patients who received no therapy was higher in NPs than in GPs (33.9% to 58.4% vs. 27.5% to 37.9%). The annual cost per patient was €66.04 in GPs and €94.71 in NPs. Finally, the annual cost per patient increased with age and was higher in women and in individuals with private health insurance coverage than in men and individuals with public health insurance coverage. Triptans and analgesics were the 2 most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of migraine. Furthermore, approximately 30% to 40% of patients did not receive any therapy. Finally, the annual cost per patient was higher in NPs than in GPs. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  3. Reconstituted mother tinctures of Gelsemium sempervirens L. improve memory and cognitive impairment in mice scopolamine-induced dementia model.

    PubMed

    Palit, Partha; Mukherjee, Dhrubojyoti; Mandal, Subhash C

    2015-01-15

    Gelsemium sempervirens (L.) J.St.-Hil is a herb used for the treatment of various neuroses in both homeopathic and Ayurvedic systems. The present study examines whether Gelsemium reconstituted tincture can protect against scopolamine induced cognitive discrepancies in amnesic mouse model. In order to investigate the protective mechanism of Gelsemium against dementia, in vitro acetyl cholinesterase and β-secretase enzyme inhibition and estimation of glutathione level in mouse brain were carried out. The inhibition study on acetyl cholinesterase and β-secretase enzyme was conducted on brain homogenate supernatant spectrophotometrically using specific substrate. Cognitive enhancement activity was assessed by elevated plus maze and passive avoidance study in scopolamine induced dementia mouse model. Glutathione, an anti-oxidant, was measured spectrophotometrically from scopolamine induced amnesic mice brain supernatant using 5,5'-dithiobis 2-nitrobenzoic acid in the presence and absence of Gelsemium tincture. Significant inhibition was found with Gelsemium on AChE and β-secretase enzyme with an IC50 of 9.25 and 16.25 µg/ml, respectively, followed by increasing glutathione levels in comparison to the untreated dementia group. The effect of Gelsemium of scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits was determined by measuring the behavioral parameters and the antioxidant status of the brain after scopolamine (1mg/kg i.p.) injected amnesic mice. Gelsemium significantly demonstrated in vivo anti-dementia activity (60% protection) and increased exploratory behavior. Our investigations indicated that alkaloid, iridoids and coumarin enriched reconstituted Gelsemium tincture extract displays promising cognitive enhancement in adult mice after short-term oral treatment. Hence, Gelsemium can be a promising anti-dementia agent, mediating the protection against amnesia, attention disorders and learning dysfunctions through dual inhibition of both acetyl cholinesterases (no false

  4. Functional Medicine Approach to Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Richer, Alice C

    2017-08-01

    Background: The U.S. military has seen dramatic increases in traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among military personnel due to the nature of modern-day conflicts. Conventional TBI treatment for secondary brain injuries has suboptimal success rates, and patients, families, and healthcare professionals are increasingly turning to alternative medicine treatments. Objective: Effective treatments for the secondary injury cascades that occur after an initial brain trauma are unclear at this time. The goal of successful treatment options for secondary TBI injuries is to reduce oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and inflammation while supporting mitochondrial functions and repair of membranes, synapses, and axons. Intervention: A new paradigm of medical care, known as functional medicine, is increasing in popularity and acceptance. Functional medicine combines conventional treatment methods with complementary, genetic, holistic, and nutritional therapies. The approach is to assess the patient as a whole person, taking into account the interconnectedness of the body and its unique reaction to disease, injury, and illness while working to restore balance and optimal health. Functional medicine treatment recommendations often include the use of acupuncture, Ayurveda, chiropractic manipulation, detoxification programs, herbal and homeopathic supplements, specialized diets, massage, meditation and mindfulness practices, neurobiofeedback, nutritional supplements, t'ai chi , and yoga. At present, some of these alternative treatments appear to be beneficial, but more research is needed to validate reported outcomes. Conclusions: Few clinical studies validate the effectiveness of alternative therapies for TBIs. However, further clinical trials and empirical studies warrant further investigation based on some reported positive results from research studies, case histories, anecdotal evidence, and widespread popularity of some approaches. To date, only nutritional therapies and

  5. [AIDS in Tanzania].

    PubMed

    Barstad, S

    1993-04-20

    The World Health Organization has announced that within 3 years 10% of Tanzania's population of 26 million will be infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). But there is some faint hope in the research of Tanzanian traditional medicine. An almost 90-year-man, Waziri Mrisho, is credited with having treated AIDS patients successfully with herbs that strengthen the immune system. Margaret Nakamya was stricken by the symptoms of AIDs in March 1990. She was referred to Waziri and started using his herbs. 3 years later she weighs 49 kg compared to 40 kg before. The old man's son set up a little factory where he pulverizes herbs and sells them at the price he can command The 3 types of trees that the herbal medicine is taken from grow in the wild, but some have also been planted around the factory. Even if these herbs are effective, it will take years before the AIDS epidemic is over, when people have changed their lifestyles. The means of communication (TV, cinema, radio, telephone) are missing or inadequate. In the Kagera region, with 1.2 million inhabitants, 25% of pregnant women are HIV-infected and 65,000 children lost their parents to AIDS. There are 2000 children in Dar Es Salaam living in the streets. The Anglican St. Albans Church runs a center for street kids where they get meals 3 times a week. The nurse Ruth Nesje enlisted a Norwegian physician and homeopath in a research project involving 30 AIDS patients in Norway. The University in Bergen will do in vitro testing. One group of patients will receive both AZT and the herbs, another group will get only AZT, and the 3rd group will obtain only the herbs. The Norwegian Nursing Association, NORAD, and DANIDA also plan various projects in the Tanga region.

  6. Dementia: treating patients and caregivers with complementary and alternative medicine--results of a clinical expert conference using the World Café method.

    PubMed

    Teut, Michael; Bloedt, Susanne; Baur, Roland; Betsch, Frederik; Elies, Michael; Fruehwald, Maria; Fuesgen, Ingo; Kerckhoff, Annette; Krüger, Eckard; Schimpf, Dorothee; Schnabel, Katharina; Walach, Harald; Warme, Britta; Warning, Albercht; Wilkens, Johannes; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    In Germany the number of inhabitants with dementia is expected to increase from 1.2 million at present to 2.3 million in 2050. Our aim was to investigate which treatments complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) experts consider to be of therapeutic use in developing treatment strategies and hypotheses for further clinical studies. In a participatory group workshop the 'World Café' method was used. As questions we asked: 1) 'Based on your clinical experience, which CAM therapies are effective in the treatment of patients with dementia? 2) Based on your clinical experience, which CAM therapies are effective in the treatment of lay and professional caregivers of patients with dementia?, and 3) How should a CAM treatment program look like?' Further Delphi rounds were used to reach consensus and summarize the results. The 2-day workshop took place in January 2012 in Berlin. A total of 17 experts participated. The most important subject in the treatment was the need to understand patients' biographies in order to individualize the therapy. Therapy itself consists of the therapeutic relationship, nonmedical therapies such as sports, massage, music and arts therapy as well as medical treatment such as herbal or homeopathic medicines. With regard to caregivers the most important aim is to prevent or reduce psychological distress, e.g., by mind-body programs. Instead of single treatments, more general elements such as understanding the patients' biographies, therapeutic relationships, individualizing, networking, and self-care emerged as main results. An integrative treatment program should connect outpatient and inpatient care as well as all experts. CAM training courses should be offered to doctors, nurses, and caregivers. Future clinical studies should focus on complex intervention programs integrating these key elements. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  7. Functional Medicine Approach to Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The U.S. military has seen dramatic increases in traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among military personnel due to the nature of modern-day conflicts. Conventional TBI treatment for secondary brain injuries has suboptimal success rates, and patients, families, and healthcare professionals are increasingly turning to alternative medicine treatments. Objective: Effective treatments for the secondary injury cascades that occur after an initial brain trauma are unclear at this time. The goal of successful treatment options for secondary TBI injuries is to reduce oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and inflammation while supporting mitochondrial functions and repair of membranes, synapses, and axons. Intervention: A new paradigm of medical care, known as functional medicine, is increasing in popularity and acceptance. Functional medicine combines conventional treatment methods with complementary, genetic, holistic, and nutritional therapies. The approach is to assess the patient as a whole person, taking into account the interconnectedness of the body and its unique reaction to disease, injury, and illness while working to restore balance and optimal health. Functional medicine treatment recommendations often include the use of acupuncture, Ayurveda, chiropractic manipulation, detoxification programs, herbal and homeopathic supplements, specialized diets, massage, meditation and mindfulness practices, neurobiofeedback, nutritional supplements, t'ai chi, and yoga. At present, some of these alternative treatments appear to be beneficial, but more research is needed to validate reported outcomes. Conclusions: Few clinical studies validate the effectiveness of alternative therapies for TBIs. However, further clinical trials and empirical studies warrant further investigation based on some reported positive results from research studies, case histories, anecdotal evidence, and widespread popularity of some approaches. To date, only nutritional therapies and

  8. Attitude and practice of patients and doctors towards complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Junaid, Rabyyan; Abaas, Mustafa; Fatima, Batool; Anis, Irma; Hussain, Mehwish

    2012-08-01

    To determine the attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine among the doctors and patients. The study was carried out at Civil Hospital Karachi and Liaquat National University Hospital, Karachi during April to September 2010. Two sets of questionnaires were developed separately for doctors and patients. Each set consisted of queries regarding demographic data of patients and doctors. The questionnaire for the patients contained questions reflecting the general attitude, mode of complimentary and alternative medicine usage, disease referred and the underlined reasons behind pricking the options. The questionnaires for doctors in general laid focus on the personal opinion about the practice not only for their own use, but also related to their concern towards those patients who used complimentary and alternative medicine. Predictive analysis software statistics 18 was used for statistical analysis. Of the patients, 237 (59.3%) used complimentary and alternative medicine. Herbal medicine followed by homeopathic medicine were the most commonly used therapies. Fever and cough were the most common diseases for which patients used the options. The preference was mainly based on inter-personal communications, reliance on complimentary and alternative medicine, and financial restriction. Concealing from the doctors was common in patients. Only 62 (34.4%) out of 180 doctors used complimentary and alternative medicine themselves. Refusal by other doctors was because they considered the option ineffective, obsolete and unsatisfactory. About half of the doctors forbade the patients to use such therapies, but 31% (n=73) patients ignored the doctor's advice. The use of complimentary and alternative medicine is highly prevalent in our society by patients irrespective of their social class. Preference for such therapies, on the other hand, is quite low among medical doctors as they consider allopathic medicine to be effective.

  9. A biopsy of Breast Cancer mobile applications: state of the practice review.

    PubMed

    Giunti, G; Giunta, D H; Guisado-Fernandez, E; Bender, J L; Fernandez-Luque, L

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. The use of mobile software applications for health and wellbeing promotion has grown exponentially in recent years. We systematically reviewed the breast cancer apps available in today's leading smartphone application stores and characterized them based on their features, evidence base and target audiences. A cross-sectional study was performed to characterize breast cancer apps from the two major smartphone app stores (iOS and Android). Apps that matched the keywords "breast cancer" were identified and data was extracted using a structured form. Reviewers independently evaluated the eligibility and independently classified the apps. A total of 1473 apps were a match. After removing duplicates and applying the selection criteria only 599 apps remained. Inter-rater reliability was determined using Fleiss-Cohen's Kappa. The majority of apps were free 471 (78.63%). The most common type of application was Disease and Treatment information apps (29.22%), Disease Management (19.03%) and Awareness Raising apps (15.03%). Close to 1 out of 10 apps dealt with alternative or homeopathic medicine. The majority of the apps were intended for patients (75.79%). Only one quarter of all apps (24.54%) had a disclaimer about usage and less than one fifth (19.70%) mentioned references or source material. Gamification specialists determined that 19.36% contained gamification elements. This study analyzed a large number of breast cancer-focused apps available to consumers. There has been a steady increase of breast cancer apps over the years. The breast cancer app ecosystem largely consists of start-ups and entrepreneurs. Evidence base seems to be lacking in these apps and it would seem essential that expert medical personnel be involved in the creation of medical apps. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The history of the Memory of Water.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Yolène

    2007-07-01

    'Homeopathic dilutions' and 'Memory of Water' are two expressions capable of turning a peaceful and intelligent person into a violently irrational one,' as Michel Schiff points out in the introduction of his book 'The Memory of Water'. The idea of the memory of water arose in the laboratory of Jacques Benveniste in the late 1980s and 20 years later the debate is still ongoing even though an increasing number of scientists report they have confirmed the basic results. This paper, first provides a brief historical overview of the context of the high dilution experiments then moves on to digital biology. One working hypothesis was that molecules can communicate with each other, exchanging information without being in physical contact and that at least some biological functions can be mimicked by certain energetic modes characteristics of a given molecule. These considerations informed exploratory research which led to the speculation that biological signaling might be transmissible by electromagnetic means. Around 1991, the transfer of specific molecular signals to sensitive biological systems was achieved using an amplifier and electromagnetic coils. In 1995, a more sophisticated procedure was established to record, digitize and replay these signals using a multimedia computer. From a physical and chemical perspective, these experiments pose a riddle, since it is not clear what mechanism can sustain such 'water memory' of the exposure to molecular signals. From a biological perspective, the puzzle is what nature of imprinted effect (water structure) can impact biological function. Also, the far-reaching implications of these observations require numerous and repeated experimental tests to rule out overlooked artifacts. Perhaps more important is to have the experiments repeated by other groups and with other models to explore the generality of the effect. In conclusion, we will present some of this emerging independent experimental work.

  11. Maternal use of probiotics during pregnancy and effects on their offspring's health in an unselected population.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Nicole; Van der Gugten, Anne; Uiterwaal, Cuno; Vlieger, Arine; Rijkers, Ger; Van der Ent, Kors

    2016-02-01

    Probiotics are used by women in the perinatal period and may improve balance of microbiota, with possible health benefits for both mother and baby. Characteristics and (health) behaviour patterns of mothers using probiotics during pregnancy, and health effects on their offspring, were investigated. Differences between mothers using probiotics during pregnancy and those who did not, were assessed. In total, 341 out of 2491 (13.7%) mothers reported use of probiotics during pregnancy. There were no significant differences in maternal features (gestation, age, ethnicity, education) between users and non-users. Logistic regression analyses showed that consumption of probiotics was significantly associated with use of homeopathic products [odds ratio (OR) 1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-2.33, p = 0.005], maternal history of smoking (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.25-2.37, p = 0.001) and paternal history of smoking (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.01-1.89, p = 0.05). Common disease symptoms during the first year of life in the offspring did not differ between both groups. The use of probiotics or other health-related products without doctor's prescription during pregnancy might point to compensation for types of less favourable behaviour. Probiotic use during pregnancy does not seem to induce positive health effects in the offspring in an unselected population. Aberrant microbiota compositions have been detected during critical periods when early programming occurs including pregnancy and early neonatal life. Probiotics modulate intestinal microbiota composition and are associated with positive health effects. The use of probiotics or other health-related products without doctor's prescription during pregnancy is associated with and might point to compensation for types of less favourable behaviour. Probiotic use during pregnancy does not induce positive health effects in the offspring in this unselected population.

  12. Comparative Effectiveness of Homoeopathic vs. Conventional Therapy in Usual Care of Atopic Eczema in Children: Long-Term Medical and Economic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Stephanie; Reinhold, Thomas; Pach, Daniel; Brinkhaus, Benno; Icke, Katja; Staab, Doris; Jäckel, Tanja; Wegscheider, Karl; Willich, Stefan N.; Witt, Claudia M.

    2013-01-01

    Background One in five children visiting a homeopathic physician suffers from atopic eczema. Objectives We aimed to examine the long-term effectiveness, safety and costs of homoeopathic vs. conventional treatment in usual medical care of children with atopic eczema. Methods In this prospective multi-centre comparative observational non-randomized rater-blinded study, 135 children (48 homoeopathy, 87 conventional) with mild to moderate atopic eczema were included by their respective physicians. Depending on the specialisation of the physician, the primary treatment was either standard conventional treatment or individualized homeopathy as delivered in routine medical care. The main outcome was the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis) at 36 months by a blinded rater. Further outcomes included quality of life, conventional medicine consumption, safety and disease related costs at six, 12 and 36 months after baseline. A multilevel ANCOVA was used, with physician as random effect and the following fixed effects: age, gender, baseline value, severity score, social class and parents’ expectation. Results The adjusted mean SCORAD showed no significant differences between the groups at 36 months (13.7 95% CI [7.9–19.5] vs. 14.9 [10.4–19.4], p = 0.741). The SCORAD response rates at 36 months were similar in both groups (33% response: homoeopathic 63.9% vs. conventional 64.5%, p = 0.94; 50% response: 52.0% vs. 52.3%, p = 0.974). Total costs were higher in the homoeopathic versus the conventional group (months 31–36 200.54 Euro [132.33–268.76] vs. 68.86 Euro [9.13–128.58], p = 0.005). Conclusions Taking patient preferences into account, while being unable to rule out residual confounding, in this long-term observational study, the effects of homoeopathic treatment were not superior to conventional treatment for children with mild to moderate atopic eczema, but involved higher costs. PMID:23383019

  13. The role of the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the Medicine and Medical Devices Safety Authority in evaluating complementary and alternative medicines in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dilip; Skinner, Margot; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2006-04-03

    Currently, the regulation of complementary and alternative medicines and related health claims in Australia and New Zealand is managed in a number of ways. Complementary medicines, including herbal, minerals, nutritional/dietary supplements, aromatherapy oils and homeopathic medicines are regulated under therapeutic goods/products legislation. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), a division of the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing is responsible for administering the provisions of the legislation in Australia. The New Zealand Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Authority (Medsafe) administers the provision of legislation in New Zealand. In December 2003 the Australian and New Zealand governments signed a Treaty to establish a single, bi-national agency to regulate therapeutic products, including medical devices prescription, over-the-counter and complementary medicines. A single agency will replace the Australian TGA and the New Zealand Medsafe. The role of the new agency will be to safeguard public health through regulation of the quality, safety and efficacy or performance of therapeutic products in both Australia and New Zealand. The major activities of the new joint Australia New Zealand therapeutic products agency are in product licensing, specifying labelling standards and setting the advertising scheme, together with determining the risk classes of medicines and creating an expanded list of ingredients permitted in Class I medicines. A new, expanded definition of complementary medicines is proposed and this definition is currently under consultation. Related Australian and New Zealand legislation is being developed to implement the joint scheme. Once this legislation is passed, the Treaty will come into force and the new joint regulatory scheme will begin. The agency is expected to commence operation no later than 1 July 2006 and will result in a single agency to regulate complementary and alternative medicines.

  14. Natural supplements for H1N1 influenza: retrospective observational infodemiology study of information and search activity on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Hill, Shawndra; Mao, Jun; Ungar, Lyle; Hennessy, Sean; Leonard, Charles E; Holmes, John

    2011-05-10

    As the incidence of H1N1 increases, the lay public may turn to the Internet for information about natural supplements for prevention and treatment. Our objective was to identify and characterize websites that provide information about herbal and natural supplements with information about H1N1 and to examine trends in the public's behavior in searching for information about supplement use in preventing or treating H1N1. This was a retrospective observational infodemiology study of indexed websites and Internet search activity over the period January 1, 2009, through November 15, 2009. The setting is the Internet as indexed by Google with aggregated Internet user data. The main outcome measures were the frequency of "hits" or webpages containing terms relating to natural supplements co-occurring with H1N1/swine flu, terms relating to natural supplements co-occurring with H1N1/swine flu proportional to all terms relating to natural supplements, webpage rank, webpage entropy, and temporal trend in search activity. A large number of websites support information about supplements and H1N1. The supplement with the highest proportion of H1N1/swine flu information was a homeopathic remedy known as Oscillococcinum that has no known side effects; supplements with the next highest proportions have known side effects and interactions. Webpages with both supplement and H1N1/swine flu information were less likely to be medically curated or authoritative. Search activity for supplements was temporally related to H1N1/swine flu-related news reports and events. The prevalence of nonauthoritative webpages with information about supplements in the context of H1N1/swine flu and the increasing number of searches for these pages suggest that the public is interested in alternatives to traditional prevention and treatment of H1N1. The quality of this information is often questionable and clinicians should be cognizant that patients may be at risk of adverse events associated with the use

  15. Milk and plasma disposition of thymol following intramammary administration of a phytoceutical mastitis treatment.

    PubMed

    McPhee, C S; Anderson, K L; Yeatts, J L; Mason, S E; Barlow, B M; Baynes, R E

    2011-04-01

    Despite the recent growth of the organic dairy industry, organic producers and veterinarians have limited information when choosing mastitis treatments for animals in organic dairy production. Organic producers commonly administer homeopathic or other plant-based products without having research evaluating the efficacy of these products and using estimated or no withholding times to treat mastitis and other health problems in their herds. In this pilot study, we attempted to identify several active ingredients of Phyto-Mast (Penn Dutch Cow Care, Narvon, PA), a plant-based mastitis treatment used on organic dairy farms, and to quantify the product residue in milk and plasma after intramammary administration. We developed an assay to quantify thymol (one of the active ingredients in Phyto-Mast) in milk and plasma using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thymol is a volatile aromatic compound with antiinflammatory properties. As a model for dairy cows, 5 healthy, lactating alpine dairy goats were given 5 mL of Phyto-Mast per udder half. For 10 d following treatment, we analyzed blood and milk samples for thymol residues using GC-MS. The GC-MS assay was very sensitive for thymol detection, to a concentration of 0.01 μg/mL in plasma. Using thymol as a marker, Phyto-Mast was detectable and quantifiable in plasma beginning with the 15-min posttreatment sample, but was no longer detectable in the 4-h posttreatment sample. Thymol residues were only detected in the 12-h posttreatment milk sample. An inflammatory response was not evident in the udder following phytoceutical administration. Although this study provides information about the elimination of thymol, the product contains several other active chemicals, which may have different pharmacokinetic behaviors. Further analysis and additional study animals will help to determine a milk withholding time for Phyto-Mast. Given the recent growth of the organic dairy industry, understanding the pharmacokinetics

  16. HISTORICAL AND CURRENT PERSPECTIVE IN THE USE OF THYROID EXTRACTS FOR THE TREATMENT OF HYPOTHYROIDISM.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, James V

    2015-10-01

    To describe the history, refinements, implementation, physiology, and clinical outcomes achieved over the past several centuries of thyroid hormone replacement strategies. A Medline search was initiated using the following search terms: bioidentical thyroid hormone, thyroid hormone extract, combination thyroxine (T4) and tri-iodothyronine (T3) therapy, homeopathic thyroid hormone therapy, and thyroid hormone replacement. Pertinent articles of interest were identified by title (and where available abstract) for further review. Additional references were identified during a review of the identified literature. A rich history of physician intervention in thyroid dysfunction was identified dating back more than 2 millennia. Although not precisely documented, thyroid ingestion from animal sources had been used for centuries but was finally scientifically described and documented in Europe over 130 years ago. Since the reports by Bettencourt and Murray, there has been a continuous documentation of outcomes, refinement of hormone preparation production, and updating of recommendations for the most effective and safe use of these hormones for relieving the symptoms of hypothyroidism. As the thyroid extract preparations contain both levothyroxine (LT4) and liothyronine (LT3), current guidelines do not endorse their use as controlled studies do not clearly document enhanced objective outcomes compared with LT4 monotherapy. Among current issues cited, the optimum ratio of LT4 to LT3 has yet to be determined, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not appear to be monitoring the thyroid hormone ratios or content in extract preparations on the market. Taken together, these limitations are important detriments to the use of thyroid extract products. The evolution of thyroid hormone therapies has been significant over the extended period of time they have been in use to treat hypothyroidism. Although numerous websites continue to advocate the use of thyroid hormone

  17. Self-medication and related health complaints among expatriate high school students in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Shehnaz, Syed Ilyas; Khan, Nelofer; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Issa, Khaled Jamal; Arifulla, Mohamed

    Background Self-medication, often without adult guidance, has been reported to be a common practice during adolescence. Similar to other preventable health-risk behaviors initiated in early adolescence, it has become a cause for concern universally. Objective This study examines the prevalence of self-medication with both prescribed and non-prescribed (OTC) medications, related health complaints, sources of drugs, and sources of drug recommendation, and gender differences related to self-medication among expatriate high school students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 324 expatriate students through a validated, self-administered questionnaire and data was analyzed using SPSS 19 version. Means and proportions were calculated and Pearson Chi-square test of significance was used to analyze association among variables. Results Majority of the participating students, almost equally distributed by gender, was aged 16 to 17 years. The period prevalence rate of self-medication with prescribed and OTC medications were 89.2%, which did not vary with age, gender, ethnicity or parents’ educational level. The most common sources of drug and drug recommendation were community pharmacies and parents respectively. Headache and fever were the common self-medicated conditions and consequently, analgesics and antipyretics were most commonly used both in the previous two weeks and the previous year prior to the survey. A high prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics (53%) and sedative/hypnotics (27%) was also observed. A female excess emerged for certain health complaints and use of medicines except for the use of anti-allergic and herbal/homeopathic drugs. Conclusions This is the first study to explore self-medication practices among high school students in UAE and provides baseline data critical in creating awareness about the risks and benefits of self-medication. Health care providers, educators and parents should be

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma: a Leksell Gamma Knife Society 2000 debate.

    PubMed

    Linskey, M E

    2000-12-01

    expense of potential late recurrence. The answer to minimizing complications while maintaining maximum tumor control is improved conformality of radiosurgery dose planning and not resorting to homeopathic radiosurgery doses or hypofractionation radiotherapy schemes.

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma: a Leksell Gamma Knife Society 2000 debate.

    PubMed

    Linskey, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    expense of potential late recurrence. The answer to minimizing complications while maintaining maximum tumor control is improved conformality of radiosurgery dose planning and not resorting to homeopathic radiosurgery doses or hypofractionation radiotherapy schemes.

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine for pediatric otitis media.

    PubMed

    Levi, Jessica R; Brody, Robert M; McKee-Cole, Katie; Pribitkin, Edmund; O'Reilly, Robert

    2013-06-01

    To review the literature involving complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for pediatric otitis media. Multiple modalities are discussed, including prevention involving breastfeeding, nutrition, and vaccination; symptomatic treatment involving homeopathy, natural health products, and probiotics; manual manipulations involving osteopathy and chiropractics; and traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine. The information presented will assist physicians in advising patients on their decision-making during the early stages of otitis media when antibiotics and surgery are not yet indicated. A systematic literature search was conducted through January 2012 in PubMed using MESH term "otitis media" in conjunction with "complementary therapies," "homeopathy," "manipulation, osteopathic," "manipulation, chiropractic," "acupuncture therapy," "probiotics," "naturopathy," and "xylitol." Theses searches yielded 163 unique results. Abstracts and titles were evaluated for relevance. Case reports, case series, randomized controlled trials, and basic science research were included. Publications not relevant to the discussion of alternative medicine in otitis media were excluded. Bibliographies were checked for further publications. Thirty-six unique publications were reviewed. Of all therapies in complementary and alternative medicine, only xylitol has been studied in well-designed, randomized, blinded trials; it is likely effective, but compliance limits its applicability. Management of acute otitis media begins with watchful waiting. Herbal eardrops may help relieve symptoms. Homeopathic treatments may help decrease pain and lead to faster resolution. Prevention should be emphasized with elimination of risk factors, such as second hand smoke and bottle-feeding, as well as maintaining nutrition and vaccinations. Vitamin supplementation may be helpful. Probiotics and xylitol may be beneficial as well. Traditional Chinese/Japanese therapies show promising results but remain

  1. Is use of homeopathy associated with poor prescribing in English primary care? A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alex J; Croker, Richard; Bacon, Seb; Ernst, Edzard; Curtis, Helen J; Goldacre, Ben

    2018-05-01

    Objectives Prescribing of homeopathy still occurs in a small minority of English general practices. We hypothesised that practices that prescribe any homeopathic preparations might differ in their prescribing of other drugs. Design Cross-sectional analysis. Setting English primary care. Participants English general practices. Main outcome measures We identified practices that made any homeopathy prescriptions over six months of data. We measured associations with four prescribing and two practice quality indicators using multivariable logistic regression. Results Only 8.5% of practices (644) prescribed homeopathy between December 2016 and May 2017. Practices in the worst-scoring quartile for a composite measure of prescribing quality (>51.4 mean percentile) were 2.1 times more likely to prescribe homeopathy than those in the best category (<40.3) (95% confidence interval: 1.6-2.8). Aggregate savings from the subset of these measures where a cost saving could be calculated were also strongly associated (highest vs. lowest quartile multivariable odds ratio: 2.9, confidence interval: 2.1-4.1). Of practices spending the most on medicines identified as 'low value' by NHS England, 12.8% prescribed homeopathy, compared to 3.9% for lowest spenders (multivariable odds ratio: 2.6, confidence interval: 1.9-3.6). Of practices in the worst category for aggregated price-per-unit cost savings, 12.7% prescribed homeopathy, compared to 3.5% in the best category (multivariable odds ratio: 2.7, confidence interval: 1.9-3.9). Practice quality outcomes framework scores and patient recommendation rates were not associated with prescribing homeopathy (odds ratio range: 0.9-1.2). Conclusions Even infrequent homeopathy prescribing is strongly associated with poor performance on a range of prescribing quality measures, but not with overall patient recommendation or quality outcomes framework score. The association is unlikely to be a direct causal relationship, but may reflect underlying

  2. "Placebo effect is probably what we refer to as patient healing power": A qualitative pilot study examining how Norwegian complementary therapists reflect on their practice.

    PubMed

    Stub, Trine; Foss, Nina; Liodden, Ingrid

    2017-05-12

    Complementary therapists spend considerable time with their patients, especially in the first consultation. The communication between patients and their therapists is important for raising consciousness and activation of the patient's self-healing power. Thus, the aims in this study were to delineate what complementary therapists regard as essential in patient consultations, their view of the healing process, and how the therapists understand the placebo effect and its position in the healing process. Semi-structured individual interviews (n = 4), focus group interview (n = 1) and participant observation were conducted among four different complementary therapists in a Norwegian community. The text data was transcribed verbatim and the analysis of the material was conducted according to conventional and direct content analysis. Some codes were predefined and others were defined during the analysis. The pilot study showed that the implemented methods seems feasible and fit well with the aims of this study. Complementary therapists (chiropractor, naprapath (musculoskeletal therapist), acupuncturist and acupuncturist/homeopath) representing four different complementary modalities participated. A combination of the conversation and examination during the first consultation formed the basis for the therapist's choice of treatment. A successful consultation was characterized by a fruitful relationship between the therapist and the patient. Moreover, the therapist needs to be humble and show the patient respect. Patients' positive beliefs and expectations about the treatment play a significant role in the healing process. The more hope the therapist can bring about, the more easily the patient can start believing that it is possible to get well. This was a pilot study. Therefore the findings should be appreciated as limited and preliminary. Therapists' and patients' mutual understanding and treatment goals were essential for a successful consultation. The therapists

  3. Strategies used by dairy family farmers in the south of Brazil to comply with organic regulations.

    PubMed

    Honorato, L A; Machado Filho, L C P; Barbosa Silveira, I D; Hötzel, M J

    2014-03-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the environmental, feeding, and health management of organic (ORG) family dairy farms in the south of Brazil in comparison with conventional (CONV) farms, and to assess their degree of compliance with Brazilian organic legislation and the strategies they adopt to accomplish this (n=17 per group). During 2 visits to each farm in March and September, 2010, observations were made on the environment, feed, and health management, followed by bulk milk testing, clinical evaluation, and breed assessment of each individual cow, and an evaluation of diseases and treatments reported within the period. Additional data were collected directly from the farmers through direct interviews. The number of lactating cows was, on average, 11 (range 5 to 19) in the ORG and 16 (range 7 to 42) in the CONV herds. The ORG herds presented a lower percentage of the Holstein breed; whereas CONV herds were predominantly Holstein, in the ORG herds, only 2 herds were 100% Holstein and the remaining herds were crosses of Holstein, Jersey, and Gir (Bos indicus) cattle. Milk production per cow was lower (10.2 vs. 15.1 ± 1.22 L/cow, respectively) in ORG than in the CONV farms. The ORG farms offered less concentrate feed than CONV farms and had better pasture management. Organic farmers reported using phytotherapic and homeopathic products, and pasture management as a strategy to keep infection levels of endo- and ectoparasites low, whereas CONV farmers regularly used anthelmintics and acaricides. Milk production was lower in ORG than in CONV farms, but cow health and condition scores were broadly similar, indicating that the with these strategies ORG farms were able to secure levels of animal welfare comparable with CONV farms while complying with organic regulation, although at the cost of lower cow productivity. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient-Provider Interactions Affect Symptoms in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Pilot Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Dossett, Michelle L; Mu, Lin; Davis, Roger B; Bell, Iris R; Lembo, Anthony J; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Yeh, Gloria Y

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether the benefits that some patients derive from complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) are related to the therapies recommended or to the consultation process as some CIM provider visits are more involved than conventional medical visits. Many patients with gastrointestinal conditions seek out CIM therapies, and prior work has demonstrated that the quality of the patient-provider interaction can improve health outcomes in irritable bowel syndrome, however, the impact of this interaction on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is unknown. We aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of conducting a 2 x 2 factorial design study preliminarily exploring the impact of the patient-provider interaction, and the effect of an over-the-counter homeopathic product, Acidil, on symptoms and health-related quality of life in subjects with GERD. 24 subjects with GERD-related symptoms were randomized in a 2 x 2 factorial design to receive 1) either a standard visit based on an empathic conventional primary care evaluation or an expanded visit with questions modeled after a CIM consultation and 2) either Acidil or placebo for two weeks. Subjects completed a daily GERD symptom diary and additional measures of symptom severity and health-related quality of life. There was no significant difference in GERD symptom severity between the Acidil and placebo groups from baseline to follow-up (p = 0.41), however, subjects who received the expanded visit were significantly more likely to report a 50% or greater improvement in symptom severity compared to subjects who received the standard visit (p = 0.01). Total consultation length, perceived empathy, and baseline beliefs in CIM were not associated with treatment outcomes. An expanded patient-provider visit resulted in greater GERD symptom improvement than a standard empathic medical visit. CIM consultations may have enhanced placebo effects, and further studies to assess the active components of this visit

  5. Alternative treatments for adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Arnold, L E

    2001-06-01

    A previous review of alternative treatments (Tx) of ADHD--those other than psychoactive medication and behavioral/psychosocial Tx--was supplemented with an additional literature search focused on adults with ADHD. Twenty-four alternative Tx were identified, ranging in scientific documentation from discrediting controlled studies through mere hypotheses to positive controlled double-blind clinical trials. Many of them are applicable only to a specific subgroup. Although oligoantigenic (few-foods) diets have convincing double-blind evidence of efficacy for a properly selected subgroup of children, they do not appear promising for adults. Enzyme-potentiated desensitization, relaxation/EMG biofeedback, and deleading also have controlled evidence of efficacy. Iron supplementation, magnesium supplementation, Chinese herbals, EEG biofeedback, massage, meditation, mirror feedback, channel-specific perceptual training, and vestibular stimulation all have promising prospective pilot data, many of these tests reasonably controlled. Single-vitamin megadosage has some intriguing pilot trial data. Zinc supplementation is hypothetically supported by systematic case-control data, but no systematic clinical trial. Laser acupuncture has promising unpublished pilot data and may be more applicable to adults than children. Essential fatty acid supplementation has promising systematic case-control data, but clinical trials are equivocal. RDA vitamin supplementation, non-Chinese herbals, homeopathic remedies, and antifungal therapy have no systematic data in ADHD. Megadose multivitamin combinations are probably ineffective for most patients and are possibly dangerous. Simple sugar restriction seems ineffective. Amino acid supplementation is mildly effective in the short term, but not beyond 2-3 months. Thyroid treatment is effective in the presence of documented thyroid abnormality. Some alternative Tx of ADHD are effective or probably effective, but mainly for certain patients. In some

  6. Medicinal plants of the genus Gelsemium (Gelsemiaceae, Gentianales)--a review of their phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology and traditional use.

    PubMed

    Jin, Gui-Lin; Su, Yan-Ping; Liu, Ming; Xu, Ying; Yang, Jian; Liao, Kai-Jun; Yu, Chang-Xi

    2014-02-27

    In the genus Gelsemium, Gelsemium elegans (Gardn. & Champ.) Benth. has been recognized as a toxic plant that is widely distributed in Southeast Asia and has been used as traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid pain, neuropathic pain, spasticity, skin ulcers and cancers for many years. Gelsemium sempervirens (L.) J.St.-Hil. has been used since the nineteenth century in homeopathy for treating anxiety, neuralgia, migraine and spasmodic disorders, such as asthma and whooping cough in North America. This review aims to provide comprehensive information on the botany, traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological research and toxicology of medicinal plants in the genus Gelsemium. The overall objective is to explore the evidence supporting its ethnopharmacological effectiveness. A literature survey was performed by searching the scientific databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, SciFinder, Scopus, Web of Science and the Chinese CNKI, in addition to traditional Chinese medicine and homeopathic texts for information on Gelsemium. Plants of the genus Gelsemium have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of migraines, neuralgia, sciatica, cancer and various types of sores. Studies into the phytochemical composition of this genus have shown that all of the species are rich sources of monoterpene indole alkaloids and that they have attracted the attention of many researchers due to their markedly diverse and complex architecture. To date, a total of 121 alkaloids have been isolated and identified from the genus. The crude extracts, as well as the monomeric compounds, from the genus possess anti-tumor, analgesic, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating pharmacological activities. It is evident from the available literature that Gelsemium species possess potential for use as a beneficial therapeutic remedy. However, the analysis of previous pharmacological research suggests that a clear assignment of active molecules and mechanisms of

  7. Is use of homeopathy associated with poor prescribing in English primary care? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Croker, Richard; Bacon, Seb; Ernst, Edzard; Curtis, Helen J; Goldacre, Ben

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Prescribing of homeopathy still occurs in a small minority of English general practices. We hypothesised that practices that prescribe any homeopathic preparations might differ in their prescribing of other drugs. Design Cross-sectional analysis. Setting English primary care. Participants English general practices. Main outcome measures We identified practices that made any homeopathy prescriptions over six months of data. We measured associations with four prescribing and two practice quality indicators using multivariable logistic regression. Results Only 8.5% of practices (644) prescribed homeopathy between December 2016 and May 2017. Practices in the worst-scoring quartile for a composite measure of prescribing quality (>51.4 mean percentile) were 2.1 times more likely to prescribe homeopathy than those in the best category (<40.3) (95% confidence interval: 1.6–2.8). Aggregate savings from the subset of these measures where a cost saving could be calculated were also strongly associated (highest vs. lowest quartile multivariable odds ratio: 2.9, confidence interval: 2.1–4.1). Of practices spending the most on medicines identified as ‘low value’ by NHS England, 12.8% prescribed homeopathy, compared to 3.9% for lowest spenders (multivariable odds ratio: 2.6, confidence interval: 1.9–3.6). Of practices in the worst category for aggregated price-per-unit cost savings, 12.7% prescribed homeopathy, compared to 3.5% in the best category (multivariable odds ratio: 2.7, confidence interval: 1.9–3.9). Practice quality outcomes framework scores and patient recommendation rates were not associated with prescribing homeopathy (odds ratio range: 0.9–1.2). Conclusions Even infrequent homeopathy prescribing is strongly associated with poor performance on a range of prescribing quality measures, but not with overall patient recommendation or quality outcomes framework score. The association is unlikely to be a direct causal relationship, but may reflect

  8. Alternative health care consultations in Ontario, Canada: A geographic and socio-demographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An important but understudied component of Canada's health system is alternative care. The objective of this paper is to examine the geographic and socio-demographic characteristics of alternative care consultation in Ontario, Canada's largest province. Methods Data is drawn from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS Cycle 3.1, 2005) for people aged 18 or over (n = 32,598) who had a consultation with an alternative health care provider. Four groups of consultations are examined: (1) all consultations (2) massage therapy (3) acupuncture, and (4) homeopath/naturopath. Descriptive statistics, mapping and logistic regression modeling are employed to analyze the data and to compare modalities of alternative health care use. Results In 2005, more than 1.2 million adults aged 18 or over consulted an alternative health care provider, representing about 13% of the total population of Ontario. The analysis revealed a varied geographic pattern of consultations across the province. Consultations were fairly even across the urban to rural continuum and rural residents were just as likely to consult a provider as their urban counterparts. From a health perspective, people with a chronic condition, lower health status and self-perceived unmet health care needs were more likely to see an alternative health provider. Women with chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, high blood pressure, chronic fatigue syndrome and chemical sensitivities were more likely to see an alternative provider if they felt their health care needs were not being met. Conclusions The analysis revealed that geography is not a factor in determining alternative health care consultations in Ontario. By contrast, there is a strong association between these consultations and socio-demographic characteristics particularly age, sex, education, health and self-perceived unmet health care needs. The results underscore the importance of women's health needs as related to alternative care use. The paper

  9. Mastitis and related management factors in certified organic dairy herds in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Cecilia; Emanuelson, Ulf; Forslund, Kristina; Hansson, Ingrid; Ekman, Torkel

    2006-01-01

    Background Mastitis is one of the major threats to animal health, in organic farming as well as conventional. Preliminary studies of organic dairy herds have indicated better udder health in such herds, as compared to conventional herds. The aim of this paper was to further study mastitis and management related factors in certified organic dairy herds. Methods An observational study of 26 certified organic dairy herds in mid-eastern Sweden was conducted during one year. A large-animal practitioner visited the herds three times and clinically examined and sampled cows, and collected information about general health and management routines. Data on milk production and disorders treated by a veterinarian in the 26 herds, as well as in 1102 conventional herds, were retrieved from official records. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess associations between herd type (organic vs. conventional) and incidence of disorders. Results The organic herds that took part in the study ranged in size from 12 to 64 cows, in milk production from 3772 to 10334 kg per cow and year, and in bulk milk somatic cell counts from 83000 to 280000 cells/ml. The organic herds were found to have a lower incidence of clinical mastitis, teat injuries, and a lower proportion of cows with a high somatic cell count (as indicated by the UDS, Udder Disease Score) compared to conventional herds. The spectrum of udder pathogenic bacteria was similar to that found in other Swedish studies. Treatment of mastitis was found to be similar to what is practised in conventional herds. Homeopathic remedies were not widely used in the treatment of clinical mastitis. The calves in most of these organic herds suckled their dams for only a few days, which were not considered to substantially affect the udder health. The main management factor that was different from conventional herds was the feeding strategy, where organic herds used a larger share of forage. Conclusion Udder health in Swedish organic

  10. Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Naseem Akhtar; Al-Bedah, Abdullah Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Mood disorders are a major public health problem and are associated with considerable burden of disease, suicides, physical comorbidities, high economic costs, and poor quality of life. Approximately 30%-40% of patients with major depression have only a partial response to available pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been used either alone or in combination with conventional therapies in patients with mood disorders. This review of the literature examines evidence-based data on the use of CAM in mood disorders. A search of the PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Quertile databases using keywords was conducted, and relevant articles published in the English language in the peer-reviewed journals over the past two decades were retrieved. Evidence-based data suggest that light therapy, St John's wort, Rhodiola rosea, omega-3 fatty acids, yoga, acupuncture, mindfulness therapies, exercise, sleep deprivation, and S-adenosylmethionine are effective in the treatment of mood disorders. Clinical trials of vitamin B complex, vitamin D, and methylfolate found that, while these were useful in physical illness, results were equivocal in patients with mood disorders. Studies support the adjunctive role of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid in unipolar and bipolar depression, although manic symptoms are not affected and higher doses are required in patients with resistant bipolar depression and rapid cycling. Omega-3 fatty acids are useful in pregnant women with major depression, and have no adverse effects on the fetus. Choline, inositol, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, and N-acetylcysteine are effective adjuncts in bipolar patients. Dehydroepiandrosterone is effective both in bipolar depression and depression in the setting of comorbid physical disease, although doses should be titrated to avoid adverse effects. Ayurvedic and homeopathic therapies have the potential to improve symptoms

  11. Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Naseem Akhtar; Al-Bedah, Abdullah Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Mood disorders are a major public health problem and are associated with considerable burden of disease, suicides, physical comorbidities, high economic costs, and poor quality of life. Approximately 30%–40% of patients with major depression have only a partial response to available pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been used either alone or in combination with conventional therapies in patients with mood disorders. This review of the literature examines evidence-based data on the use of CAM in mood disorders. A search of the PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Quertile databases using keywords was conducted, and relevant articles published in the English language in the peer-reviewed journals over the past two decades were retrieved. Evidence-based data suggest that light therapy, St John’s wort, Rhodiola rosea, omega-3 fatty acids, yoga, acupuncture, mindfulness therapies, exercise, sleep deprivation, and S-adenosylmethionine are effective in the treatment of mood disorders. Clinical trials of vitamin B complex, vitamin D, and methylfolate found that, while these were useful in physical illness, results were equivocal in patients with mood disorders. Studies support the adjunctive role of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid in unipolar and bipolar depression, although manic symptoms are not affected and higher doses are required in patients with resistant bipolar depression and rapid cycling. Omega-3 fatty acids are useful in pregnant women with major depression, and have no adverse effects on the fetus. Choline, inositol, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, and N-acetylcysteine are effective adjuncts in bipolar patients. Dehydroepiandrosterone is effective both in bipolar depression and depression in the setting of comorbid physical disease, although doses should be titrated to avoid adverse effects. Ayurvedic and homeopathic therapies have the potential to improve

  12. Circadian aspects of hyperthermia in mice induced by Aconitum napellus.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Salvador Sánchez; Sothern, Robert B; López, Fernando Santillán; Lujambio, Irene Mendoza; Waizel-Bucay, José; Sánchez, Carolina Olarte; Monroy, Claudia Pérez; Betancourt, Eduardo Tena

    2011-07-01

    Aconitum napellus (Acn) is used topically to relieve pain, itching and inflammation, and internally to reduce febrile states, among others. Any circadian time-related consequences of Acn administration are unknown. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of two doses of Acn on body temperature (BT) of mice treated at six different times over 24 hours. BALB/c female mice were housed in six chambers (six mice each) with air temperature 24 ± 3°C, humidity 60 ± 4%, and a 12-hours light (L)/12-hours dark cycle, but with L-onset staggered by 4 hours between chambers so that study at one external test time resulted in six test times (02, 06, 10, 14, 18 and 22 hours [h] after light onset). Rectal temperature (RT; in °C) was measured at baseline (B) and 1 hour after oral treatment with placebo (P) or two doses of Acn (6C and 30C, two studies each) in six studies over an 8 day span. The difference in RT for each mouse from the respective B + P timepoint mean RT was computed following each Acn treatment, and data from each of the six studies (original RT and difference from B + P) were analyzed for time-effect by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and for circadian rhythm by 24-hour cosine fitting. A CIRCADIAN RHYTHM IN RT WAS FOUND AT B AND AFTER P (MEAN: 35.58°C vs. 35.69°C; peak: 15:31 h vs. 15:40 h) and after each Acn dose (30C or 6C). Acn induced hyperthermia and the overall change in BT was rhythmically significant for each dose (mean = +1.95°C vs. +1.70°C), with greatest hyperthermia observed during the L-span for each dose (peak = 08:56 h vs. 05:17 h). Acn administered around the clock induced hyperthermia overall and in a time-dependent manner, with greatest effects during the resting (L) span. Thus, time of day may significantly impact the outcome of Acn and other homeopathic treatments and should be considered in determining optimal dosing and treatment time(s) in order to increase the desired outcome and decrease undesired effects.

  13. A short history of nitroglycerine and nitric oxide in pharmacology and physiology.

    PubMed

    Marsh, N; Marsh, A

    2000-04-01

    1. Nitroglycerine (NG) was discovered in 1847 by Ascanio Sobrero in Turin, following work with Theophile-Jules Pelouze. Sobrero first noted the 'violent headache' produced by minute quantities of NG on the tongue. 2. Constantin Hering, in 1849, tested NG in healthy volunteers, observing that headache was caused with 'such precision'. Hering pursued NG ('glonoine') as a homeopathic remedy for headache, believing that its use fell within the doctrine of 'like cures like'. 3. Alfred Nobel joined Pelouze in 1851 and recognized the potential of NG. He began manufacturing NG in Sweden, overcoming handling problems with his patent detonator. Nobel suffered acutely from angina and was later to refuse NG as a treatment. 4. During the mid-19th century, scientists in Britain took an interest in the newly discovered amyl nitrite, recognized as a powerful vasodilator. Lauder Brunton, the father of modern pharmacology, used the compound to relieve angina in 1867, noting the pharmacological resistance to repeated doses. 5. William Murrell first used NG for angina in 1876, although NG entered the British Pharmacopoeia as a remedy for hypertension. William Martindale, the pharmaceutical chemist, prepared '...a more stable and portable preparation': 1/100th of a grain in chocolate. 6. In the early 20th century, scientists worked on in vitro actions of nitrate-containing compounds although little progress was made towards understanding the cellular mode of action. 7. The NG industry flourished from 1900, exposing workers to high levels of organic nitrites; the phenomena of nitrate tolerance was recognized by the onset of 'Monday disease' and of nitrate-withdrawal/overcompensation by 'Sunday Heart Attacks'. 8. Ferid Murad discovered the release of nitric oxide (NO) from NG and its action on vascular smooth muscle (in 1977). Robert Furchgott and John Zawadski recognized the importance of the endothelium in acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation (in 1980) and Louis Ignarro and Salvador

  14. Beliefs and practices regarding childhood fever among parents: a cross-sectional study from Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fever is an extremely common occurrence in paediatric patients and the most common cause for a child to be taken to the doctor. The literature indicates that parents have too many misconceptions and conflicting information about fever management. The aim of this study was to identify parents’ beliefs and practices regarding childhood fever management. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey among parents whose children were enrolled and presented for health care at primary health care clinics in the Nablus region of Palestine. Data were collected using structured questionnaire interviews with parents. The questionnaire consisted of ‘yes/no’ responses and multiple-response questions. Descriptive statistics were used. Results Overall, 402 parents were interviewed. All parents believed that fever could cause at least one harmful effect if left untreated. The harmful effects most frequently reported by parents were brain damage (38.1%), dehydration (15.7%), and other organs damage such as liver and kidney damage (14.2%). The study showed that 65.4% of parents would recognise fever by only touching the child, 31.6% would measure the temperature and 3.0% would assess temperature by touching and measuring the child. Antipyretic was preferred to be used by 34.8% of parents, while 49.8% stated that they preferred cold sponges, and 3.2% stated that they preferred homeopathic methods to treat fever. The most common factors influencing frequency of medication administration included physician’s instruction (61.7%), the degree of elevated temperature (14.9%) and instructions on the medication leaflet (13.7%). Of the participant parents, 53.2% believed antipyretics used to reduce fever were harmful. Parents reported the most harmful outcomes from these antipyretics to be allergic reactions (20.9%), effects on the stomach (16.9%), kidney damage (16.2%) and overdose (11.4%). Conclusions Parents were anxious when dealing with a feverish child, which

  15. Traditional Indian medicine and homeopathy for HIV/AIDS: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Fritts, M; Crawford, CC; Quibell, D; Gupta, A; Jonas, WB; Coulter, I; Andrade, SA

    2008-01-01

    Background Allopathic practitioners in India are outnumbered by practitioners of traditional Indian medicine and homeopathy (TIMH), which is used by up to two-thirds of its population to help meet primary health care needs, particularly in rural areas. India has an estimated 2.5 million HIV infected persons. However, little is known about TIMH use, safety or efficacy in HIV/AIDS management in India, which has one of the largest indigenous medical systems in the world. The purpose of this review was to assess the quality of peer-reviewed, published literature on TIMH for HIV/AIDS care and treatment. Results Of 206 original articles reviewed, 21 laboratory studies, 17 clinical studies, and 6 previous reviews of the literature were identified that covered at least one system of TIMH, which includes Ayurveda, Unani medicine, Siddha medicine, homeopathy, yoga and naturopathy. Most studies examined either Ayurvedic or homeopathic treatments. Only 4 of these studies were randomized controlled trials, and only 10 were published in MEDLINE-indexed journals. Overall, the studies reported positive effects and even "cure" and reversal of HIV infection, but frequent methodological flaws call into question their internal and external validity. Common reasons for poor quality included small sample sizes, high drop-out rates, design flaws such as selection of inappropriate or weak outcome measures, flaws in statistical analysis, and reporting flaws such as lack of details on products and their standardization, poor or no description of randomization, and incomplete reporting of study results. Conclusion This review exposes a broad gap between the widespread use of TIMH therapies for HIV/AIDS, and the dearth of high-quality data supporting their effectiveness and safety. In light of the suboptimal effectiveness of vaccines, barrier methods and behavior change strategies for prevention of HIV infection and the cost and side effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for its treatment

  16. Homeopathy for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder or hyperkinetic disorder.

    PubMed

    Coulter, M K; Dean, M E

    2007-10-17

    Homeopathy is one form of complementary/alternative medicine which is promoted as being a safe and effective form of treatment for children and adults. Within the UK homeopathy use is estimated at 1.9% of the adult population (Thomas 2004), and around 11% for children under 16 years (Simpson 2001). There has been increased interest in homeopathy's potential as a non-pharmacological intervention for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder as an alternative to the use of stimulant medications such as Ritalin. Homeopathy is a system of medicine based on the principle of treating "like with like" using various dilutions of natural or man-made substances. Homeopathy focuses on the unique characteristics of each patient's experience and symptomatology and uses this information to determine the appropriate prescription for each patient. To assess the safety and effectiveness of homeopathy as a treatment for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. We searched a wide set of databases from their inception to March 2006 including: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, AMED, BIOSIS, CISCOM, CINAHL, Dissertation Abstracts, ECH (European Committee for Homeopathy thesis database), EMBASE, ERIC, HomInform (Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital Library), LILACS, PsycINFO, Science Citation Index, SIGLE, GIRI - International congress on ultra-low doses, Liga Medicorum Homeopathica Internationalis. We contacted experts in the field about ongoing or current research. All studies where individualised, clinical or formula homeopathy had been used to treat participants with ADHD or HKD who were randomly or quasi-randomly allocated to either true treatment or a control were selected. Control groups could include wait-list, no treatment, medication, placebo homeopathy, educational or behavioural interventions. Data from four eligible studies (total n = 168) were extracted and entered into RevMan. Results were synthesised and estimates of the effect sizes were calculated and presented as appropriate (using

  17. Incidence and 30-day case fatality rate of first-ever stroke in urban Nigeria: the prospective community based Epidemiology of Stroke in Lagos (EPISIL) phase II results.

    PubMed

    Danesi, Mustapha A; Okubadejo, Njideka U; Ojini, Frank I; Ojo, Oluwadamilola O

    2013-08-15

    Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide and a major contributor to global disease burden. Although epidemiologic information from a community perspective is important in determining the magnitude of the burden in specific regions, and directing equitable distribution of health resources, data on the incidence of stroke in developing countries in Africa are scarce. To determine the current incidence rate and short-term (30-day) case fatality rate (CFR) of stroke in urban Nigeria, and provide age-adjusted and gender-specific incidence rates to enable comparison with global populations. The study was a prospective community-based stroke registry enrolling hospitalized and non-hospitalized first-ever in a lifetime stroke cases presenting at all health facilities (hospitals, homeopathic caregivers, physiotherapy clinics) located in the designated community. Pre-hospitalization deaths due to stroke were not included in our study. The study was conducted between January 1st and December 31st 2007 in Surulere Local Government Area of Lagos State, south western Nigeria, a mixed-income urban locality with a population of approximately 750,000 based on data from the National Population Commission. Stroke was defined using the World Health Organization (WHO) clinical criteria. Case fatality at 30-days post stroke was determined at follow-up on 160 hospitalized stroke cases. 189 first-ever strokes, comprised of 112 men and 77 women (mean±SD age 58.5±13.5 years) were documented, giving a crude incidence rate of 25.2 per 100,000 per year (95% confidence interval 21.6- 28.8). The gender-specific rates were 28.3/100,000 and 21.3/100,000 for males and females respectively. The age-adjusted incidence rate was 54.08 per 100,000 per year (adjusted to the WHO New World Population). Hospitalization rate was 84.6%, while the CFR (hospitalized) was 16.2%. The stroke incidence in this urban sub-Saharan African community remains lower than that in emerging and developed economies

  18. The health workforce crisis in Bangladesh: shortage, inappropriate skill-mix and inequitable distribution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    revealed the number of faith/traditional healers, homeopaths (qualified and non-qualified) and basic care providers. Conclusions Bangladesh is suffering from a severe HRH crisis--in terms of a shortage of qualified providers, an inappropriate skills-mix and inequity in distribution--which requires immediate attention from policy makers. PMID:21255446

  19. Hypertension: adherence to treatment in rural Bangladesh – findings from a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Khanam, Masuma Akter; Lindeboom, Wietze; Koehlmoos, Tracey Lynn Perez; Alam, Dewan Shamsul; Niessen, Louis; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor adherence has been identified as the main cause of failure to control hypertension. Poor adherence to antihypertensive treatment is a significant cardiovascular risk factor, which often remains unrecognized. There are no previous studies that examined adherence with antihypertensive medication or the characteristics of the non-adherent patients in Bangladesh. Objective This paper aims to describe hypertension and factors affecting adherence to treatment among hypertensive persons in rural Bangladesh. Design The study population included 29,960 men and women aged 25 years and older from three rural demographic surveillance sites of the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b): Matlab, Abhoynagar, and Mirsarai. Data was collected by a cross-sectional design on diagnostic provider, initial, and current treatment. Discontinuation of medication at the time of interview was defined as non-adherence to treatment. Results The prevalence of hypertension was 13.67%. Qualified providers diagnosed only 53.5% of the hypertension (MBBS doctors 46.1 and specialized doctors 7.4%). Among the unqualified providers, village doctors diagnosed 40.7%, and others (nurse, health worker, paramedic, homeopath, spiritual healer, and pharmacy man) each diagnosed less than 5%. Of those who started treatment upon being diagnosed with hypertension, 26% discontinued the use of medication. Age, sex, education, wealth, and type of provider were independently associated with non-adherence to medication. More men discontinued the treatment than women (odds ratio [OR] 1.74, confidence interval [CI] 1.48–2.04). Non-adherence was greater when hypertension was diagnosed by unqualified providers (OR 1.52, CI 1.31–1.77). Hypertensive patients of older age, least poor quintile, and higher education were less likely to be non-adherent. Patients with cardiovascular comorbidity were also less likely to be non-adherent to antihypertensive medication (OR 0

  20. 'Complementary ENT': a systematic review of commonly used supplements.

    PubMed

    Karkos, P D; Leong, S C; Arya, A K; Papouliakos, S M; Apostolidou, M T; Issing, W J

    2007-08-01

    To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. in vivo human studies. animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports. We also excluded other forms of 'alternative medicine' such as reflexology, acupuncture and other homeopathic remedies. Lack of common outcome measures prevented a formal meta-analysis. Three studies on the effects of spirulina in allergy, rhinitis and immunomodulation were found. One was a double-blind, placebo, randomised, controlled trial (RCT) of patients with allergic rhinitis, demonstrating positive effects in patients fed spirulina for 12 weeks. The other two studies, although non-randomised, also reported a positive role for spirulina in mucosal immunity. Regarding the use of Ginkgo biloba in tinnitus, a Cochrane review published in 2004 showed no evidence for this. The one double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that followed confirmed this finding. Regarding the use of Vertigoheel in vertigo, two double-blind RCTs and a meta-analysis were identified. The first RCT suggested that Vertigoheel was equally effective in reducing the severity, duration and frequency of vertigo compared with betahistine. The second RCT suggested that Vertigoheel was a suitable alternative to G. biloba in the treatment of atherosclerosis-related vertigo. A meta-analysis of only four clinical trials confirms that Vertigoheel was equally effective compared with betahistine, G. biloba and dimenhydrinate. Regarding multivitamins and sinusitis, two small paediatric pilot studies reported a positive response for chronic sinusitis and otitis media following a course of multivitamins and cod liver oil. Regarding bromelain (pineapple enzyme) and sinusitis, one randomised

  1. Highly diluted medication reduces tissue parasitism and inflammation in mice infected by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carina Ribeiro; Falkowski, Gislaine Janaina Sanchez; Brustolin, Camila Fernanda; Massini, Paula Fernanda; Ferreira, Érika Cristina; Moreira, Neide Martins; Aleixo, Denise Lessa; Kaneshima, Edilson Nobuyoshi; de Araújo, Silvana Marques

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of Kalium causticum, Conium maculatum, and Lycopodium clavatum 13cH in mice infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In a blind, controlled, randomized study, 102 male Swiss mice, 8 weeks old, were inoculated with 1400 trypomastigotes of the Y strain of T. cruzi and distributed into the following groups: CI (treated with 7% hydroalcoholic solution), Ca (treated with Kalium causticum 13cH), Co (treated with Conium maculatum 13cH), and Ly (treated with Lycopodium clavatum 13cH). The treatments were performed 48 h before and 48, 96, and 144 h after infection. The medication was repertorized and prepared in 13cH, according to Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia. The following parameters were evaluated: infectivity, prepatent period, parasitemia peak, total parasitemia, tissue tropism, inflammatory infiltrate, and survival. Statistical analysis was conduced considering 5% of significance. The prepatent period was greater in the Ly group than in the CI group (p = 0.02). The number of trypomastigotes on the 8th day after infection was lower in the Ca group than in the CI group (p < 0.05). Total parasitemia was significantly lower in the Ca, Co, and Ly groups than in the CI group. On the 12th day after infection, the Ca, Co, and Ly groups had fewer nests and amastigotes/nest in the heart than the CI group (p < 0.05). Decreases in the number of nests and amastigotes in the intestine were observed in the Ly group compared with the CI group (p < 0.05). In the liver (day 12), Ly significantly prevented the formation of inflammatory foci compared with the other groups. In skeletal muscle, Co and Ly decreased the formation of inflammatory foci compared with CI (p < 0.05). Ly afforded greater animal survival compared with CI, Ca, and Co (p < 0.05). The animals in the Co group died prematurely compared with the CI group (p = 0.03). Ly with 13cH potency had significantly more benefits in the treatment of mice infected with T. cruzi, reducing the number

  2. Medicinal plants used for traditional veterinary in the Sierras de Córdoba (Argentina): An ethnobotanical comparison with human medicinal uses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    with a vast repertoire of plant pharmacopoeia, the therapies also involve religious or ritualistic practices and other popular remedies that evidence the influence of traditional Hispanic-European knowledge. Although the traditional veterinary knowledge seems to be similar or else is inlcuded in the local human ethnomedicine, sharing a common group of plants, it has distinct traits originated by a constant assessment of new applications specifically destined to the treatment of animals. Conclusions Veterinary medicine is a fountain of relevant vernacular knowledge, a permanent source for testing new applications with valuable ethnobotanical interest. Knowledge on medicinal applications of native plants will allow future validations and tests for new homeopathic or phytotherapeutic preparations. PMID:21816043

  3. Circadian aspects of hyperthermia in mice induced by Aconitum napellus

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Salvador Sánchez; Sothern, Robert B.; López, Fernando Santillán; Lujambio, Irene Mendoza; Waizel-Bucay, José; Sánchez, Carolina Olarte; Monroy, Claudia Pérez; Betancourt, Eduardo Tena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aconitum napellus (Acn) is used topically to relieve pain, itching and inflammation, and internally to reduce febrile states, among others. Any circadian time-related consequences of Acn administration are unknown. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of two doses of Acn on body temperature (BT) of mice treated at six different times over 24 hours. Materials and Methods: BALB/c female mice were housed in six chambers (six mice each) with air temperature 24 ± 3°C, humidity 60 ± 4%, and a 12-hours light (L)/12-hours dark cycle, but with L-onset staggered by 4 hours between chambers so that study at one external test time resulted in six test times (02, 06, 10, 14, 18 and 22 hours [h] after light onset). Rectal temperature (RT; in °C) was measured at baseline (B) and 1 hour after oral treatment with placebo (P) or two doses of Acn (6C and 30C, two studies each) in six studies over an 8 day span. The difference in RT for each mouse from the respective B + P timepoint mean RT was computed following each Acn treatment, and data from each of the six studies (original RT and difference from B + P) were analyzed for time-effect by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and for circadian rhythm by 24-hour cosine fitting. Results: A circadian rhythm in RT was found at B and after P (mean: 35.58°C vs. 35.69°C; peak: 15:31 h vs. 15:40 h) and after each Acn dose (30C or 6C). Acn induced hyperthermia and the overall change in BT was rhythmically significant for each dose (mean = +1.95°C vs. +1.70°C), with greatest hyperthermia observed during the L-span for each dose (peak = 08:56 h vs. 05:17 h). Conclusion: Acn administered around the clock induced hyperthermia overall and in a time-dependent manner, with greatest effects during the resting (L) span. Thus, time of day may significantly impact the outcome of Acn and other homeopathic treatments and should be considered in determining optimal dosing and treatment time(s) in order to increase the desired

  4. Herbal medicine for low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gagnier, J J; van Tulder, M; Berman, B; Bombardier, C

    2006-04-19

    placebo for short-term improvements in pain and rescue medication. An additional trial demonstrated relative equivalence to 12.5 mg per day of rofecoxib. Three low quality trials on Capsicum Frutescens (Cayenne), examining various topical preparations, found moderate evidence that Capsicum Frutescens produced more favourable results than placebo and one trial found equivalence to a homeopathic ointment. Harpagophytum Procumbens, Salix Alba and Capsicum Frutescens seem to reduce pain more than placebo. Additional trials testing these herbal medicines against standard treatments are needed. The quality of reporting in these trials was generally poor. Trialists should refer to the CONSORT statement extension for reporting trials of herbal medicine interventions.

  5. Inferring relationships between clinical mastitis, productivity and fertility: a recursive model application including genetics, farm associated herd management, and cow-specific antibiotic treatments.

    PubMed

    Rehbein, Pia; Brügemann, Kerstin; Yin, Tong; V Borstel, U König; Wu, Xiao-Lin; König, Sven

    2013-10-01

    respect to the previous LCM was close to zero. Estimated recursive effects between SCS and CM were positive, implying strong phenotypic impacts between both traits. Structural equation coefficients explained a detrimental impact of CM on female fertility traits CTFS and SFI. The cow-specific CM treatment had no significant impact on performance traits in the ongoing lactation. For most treatments, beta-lactam-antibiotics were used, but test-day SCS and production traits after the beta-lactam-treatment were comparable to those after other antibiotic as well as homeopathic treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Invited review: A systematic review and qualitative analysis of treatments other than conventional antimicrobials for clinical mastitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Francoz, D; Wellemans, V; Dupré, J P; Roy, J P; Labelle, F; Lacasse, P; Dufour, S

    2017-10-01

    or positive controls. Few studies evaluated the effect of treatment on milk yield. In general, the power of the different studies was very low, thus precluding conclusions on noninferiority or nonsuperiority of the treatments investigated. No evidence-based recommendations could be given for the use of an alternative or non-antimicrobial conventional treatment for clinical mastitis. However, probiotics and oxytocin with or without frequent milk out should not be recommended. We concluded that homeopathic treatments are not efficient for management of clinical mastitis. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  7. Metallocenyl dendrimers and their applications in molecular electronics, sensing, and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Astruc, Didier; Ornelas, Cátia; Ruiz, Jaime

    2008-07-01

    NPs proceed with TOFs and TONs that do not depend on the size of the PdNPs. Moreover these catalysts are more efficient when employed in lower (down to "homeopathic") amounts, presumably because of a leaching mechanism whereby Pd atoms escape from the PdNP surface subsequent to oxidative addition of the aryl halide. Under these conditions, the "mother" PdNPs have greater difficulty quenching the extremely active leached Pd atoms because of their low concentration. Although dendrimers presenting catalysts at their branch termini can be recovered and reused readily, their inner-sphere components can lead to steric inhibition of substrate approach. In contrast, star-shaped catalysts do not suffer from such steric problems, as has been demonstrated for water-soluble dendrimers bearing cationic iron-sandwich termini, which are redox catalysts of cathodic nitrate and nitrite reduction in water.

  8. How Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practitioners Use PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Quint-Rapoport, Mia

    2007-01-01

    Background PubMed is the largest bibliographic index in the life sciences. It is freely available online and is used by professionals and the public to learn more about medical research. While primarily intended to serve researchers, PubMed provides an array of tools and services that can help a wider readership in the location, comprehension, evaluation, and utilization of medical research. Objective This study sought to establish the potential contributions made by a range of PubMed tools and services to the use of the database by complementary and alternative medicine practitioners. Methods In this study, 10 chiropractors, 7 registered massage therapists, and a homeopath (N = 18), 11 with prior research training and 7 without, were taken through a 2-hour introductory session with PubMed. The 10 PubMed tools and services considered in this study can be divided into three functions: (1) information retrieval (Boolean Search, Limits, Related Articles, Author Links, MeSH), (2) information access (Publisher Link, LinkOut, Bookshelf ), and (3) information management (History, Send To, Email Alert). Participants were introduced to between six and 10 of these tools and services. The participants were asked to provide feedback on the value of each tool or service in terms of their information needs, which was ranked as positive, positive with emphasis, negative, or indifferent. Results The participants in this study expressed an interest in the three types of PubMed tools and services (information retrieval, access, and management), with less well-regarded tools including MeSH Database and Bookshelf. In terms of their comprehension of the research, the tools and services led the participants to reflect on their understanding as well as their critical reading and use of the research. There was universal support among the participants for greater access to complete articles, beyond the approximately 15% that are currently open access. The abstracts provided by PubMed were

  9. Adverse-event profile of Crataegus spp.: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Claudia; Mazzanti, Gabriela; Pittler, Max H; Ernst, Edzard

    2006-01-01

    Crataegus spp. (hawthorn) monopreparations are predominantly used for treating congestive heart failure. The effectiveness of hawthorn preparations (flowers with leaves; berries) is documented in a number of clinical studies, reviews and meta-analyses. The aim of this article is to assess the safety data of all available human studies on hawthorn monopreparations. Systematic searches were conducted on MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, The Cochrane Library, the UK National Research Register and the US ClinicalTrials.gov (up to January 2005). Data were requested from the spontaneous reporting scheme of the WHO. Hand searches were also conducted in a sample of relevant medical journals, conference proceedings, reference lists of identified articles and our own files. Eight manufacturers of hawthorn-containing preparations were contacted and asked to supply any information on adverse events or drug interactions. Data from all clinical studies and reports were assessed. Only human studies on monopreparations were included. Data from hawthorn-containing combination preparations and homeopathic preparations were excluded. All studies were read and evaluated by one reviewer and independently verified by at least one additional reviewer.Twenty-nine clinical studies were identified, of which 24 met our inclusion criteria. A total of 7311 patients were enrolled, and data from 5,577 patients were available for analysis. The daily dose and duration of treatment with hawthorn monopreparations ranged from 160 to 1,800 mg and from 3 to 24 weeks, respectively. The extracts most used in the clinical trials were WS 1,442 (extract of hawthorn standardised to 18.75% oligomeric procyanidins) and LI 132 (extract of hawthorn standardised to 2.25% flavonoids). Overall, 166 adverse events were reported. Most of these adverse events were, in general, mild to moderate; eight severe adverse events have been reported with the LI 132 extract. The most frequent adverse events were dizziness/vertigo (n = 15

  10. Herbal medicine for low back pain: a Cochrane review.

    PubMed

    Gagnier, Joel J; van Tulder, Maurits W; Berman, Brian; Bombardier, Claire

    2007-01-01

    Salix alba (White willow bark) found moderate evidence for short-term improvements in pain and rescue medication for daily doses standardized to 120 mg or 240 mg salicin with an additional trial demonstrating relative equivalence to 12.5 mg per day of rofecoxib. Three low-quality trials using Capsicum frutescens (Cayenne) using various topical preparations found moderate evidence for favorable results against placebo and one trial found equivalence to a homeopathic ointment. Harpagophytum procumbens, Salix alba, and Capsicum frutescens seem to reduce pain more than placebo. Additional trials testing these herbal medicines against standard treatments will clarify their equivalence in terms of efficacy. The quality of reporting in these trials was generally poor; thus, trialists should refer to the CONSORT statement in reporting clinical trials of herbal medicines.

  11. Alternative Medicine on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Muret, Marc

    2000-01-01

    the right to be different, show respect and tolerance, act correctly regarding copyright. More good authors should put their articles on the Net to increase the amount of basic data available online (theory, case reports, FAQ etc.). The need to create a specific (virtual) team in order to establish quality criteria, screen, control and grade the online information about alternative medicine seems obvious. This team must include professional experts with specific knowledge and experience. A homeopath should evaluate homeopathy, an acupuncturist should evaluate acupuncture. Serious thought has to be given to creating a central data bank on alternative medicine, to provide quality information to different portals and websites, as well as to patients, doctors, educators and journalists.

  12. [Placebo and the relationship between doctors and patients. Overview].

    PubMed

    Scriba, P C

    2012-09-01

    In medicine, placebos are used both in scientific studies and for practical therapeutic purposes. In evidence-based medicine, the efficacy of treatment may be determined as the difference between the effects of the verum (the active study drug) and the placebo, the latter being a substance lacking specific action on the disease under consideration. However, the improvements in patients' conditions under placebo treatment may be substantial and comparable to those with verum. Genuine placebos predominate in clinical studies, while pseudoplacebos prevail in practical therapy. The term pseudoplacebo can also be applied to many procedures in complementary medicine, including homeopathic medicine (Büchel et al., Placebo in der Medizin, 2011). The comprehensive definition of placebo, as used in a report by the German Medical Association (Büchel et al., Placebo in der Medizin, 2011), states that a placebo effect may occur even when treating with verum. The placebo effect is modulated by the context of the treatment, by the expectations of the patients and the doctors, and by the success of the relationship between doctors and patients. A number of unspecific effects, e.g., spontaneous alleviation, statistical effects, variance with time, methodological errors, in addition to the placebo effect make up the total response that is called"placebo reaction." A complete list of the effectiveness of placebo for all important diseases is still lacking. Further, it is not possible to predict which patients will respond to placebo. Which characteristics of doctors are important (competence, empathy, communicative ability and partnership, trust) in order to achieve a placebo effect, particularly in addition to the verum effect measures of evidence-based medicine? Are there doctors who are better in this than others? Could the nocebo effect weaken the efficacy of treatment in evidence-based medicine? Since a placebo effect may occur in almost any standard therapy, information about

  13. Sociocultural aspects of arsenicosis in Bangladesh: community perspective.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh A; Sayed, Muhammad H S; Khan, Manzurul H; Karim, Muhammad N; Haque, Muhammad A; Bhuiyan, Mohammad S A; Rahman, Muhammad S; Faruquee, Mahmud H

    2007-10-01

    nature of treatment provided. Furthermore length of time needed for reversal of symptoms led to loosing faith on efficacy of treatment, which cascades to negligence of patient's part in seeking health care. Women are less likely to get treatment for arsenicosis than men (P< .01). As there appear to be specific difficulties for women particularly for poor women in accessing health care, social and cultural values make it difficult for them to attend to their own health needs and to travel to service providers. Study findings suggest that a significant proportion (79.9%) of arsenicosis patient was found to access alternative health care. This includes; Homeopath, village doctors, Kabiraj and local pharmacists. Respondents in high intervention Upazillas were significantly more likely to get treatment (P< .05), to face fewer problems and to be satisfied with the facility (P< .001). Provision of safe water options, periodic screening of water source for arsenic, availability of trained doctor, regular availability of medicine, doorstep treatment, follow up on severe patients were the suggestions came from community for improvement.

  14. [Patients as customers? The term "customer" in the perception of medical students at the end of their university training].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, L; Körner, M; Geppert, E; Siegel, A; Stöbel, U; Bengel, J

    2012-01-01

    acceptance of the customer approach was found in classical service settings such as pharmacies, the lowest level in emergency medical aid. According to medical students, a consumer orientation has been realised in different health service areas in correspondingly different degrees: On top of the list are plastic surgery clinics, followed by private health insurances and homeopathic clinics. A minority of medical students predict the implementation of consumer orientation in the emergency medical aid. Future physicians consider their relationship to patients largely as a relationship between a healing person and a person seeking help rather than a relationship between a service provider and a customer.Considering recent developments in the organisation of medical services and health services in general, it becomes increasingly important to know what kind of 'service behaviour' patients expect from their doctors and other health providers. Obviously, it is not self-evident for medical students to perceive their future patients as customers and to act as customer-oriented 'service providers'. In view of this, the faculties of medicine at universities - which provide professional training to students of medicine - should be aware of the challenge to 'socialise' their students so that they can keep up with patients' expectations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Doctors and Their Patients in the Seventeenth to Nineteenth Centuries.

    PubMed

    Baschin, Marion; Dietrich-Daum, Elisabeth; Ritzmann, Iris

    2016-01-01

    How can these finings be interpreted in conclusion? Analysis has revealed firstly that, depending on the chosen period, the socio-geographical situation and the profile of the individual doctor's practice, the clientele varied widely in terms of gender, age and social rank. The consultation behaviour of men and women changed noticeably. Findings overall suggest that up until t8o the gender distribution varied in the individual practices. There was a trend for women to be overrepresented in urban practices during the earlier period. But in general, from the mid-nineteenth century they predominated - in towns as well as in the country in allopathic as well as homeopathic practices. The absence of children, which was bemoaned by many physicians, did not apply to the practices under investigation. On the contrary: the percentage is consistently high while older patients remained underrepresented right up until the end of the period under investigation, even though their proportion increased in the individual practices during the course of the nineteenth century In each of the nineteenth century practices investigated - and increasingly among the lower and middle classes - the physicians' services were used by several members of the same family. We have found no evidence to support the thesis that up until the nineteenth century academic physicians were mainly consulted by aristocratic or wealthy bourgeois patients. The theory probably applies only to early modern urban doctors. In the practices examined here, from the middle of the eighteenth century, patients from all social strata went to consult physicians. The participation of members of the lower classes or from an artisanal, (proto) industrial or agricultural background clearly increased over time 'despite ubiquitous economic and cultural barriers. That the annual numbers of consultations per physician increased - despite the growing number of physicians available - suggests that for economically disadvantaged

  16. Anecdotal therapies.

    PubMed

    Millikan, L E

    1999-01-01

    biggest shot in the arm for enhancing FDA protocols was the thalidomide situation, an outgrowth of an ethically studied and used medication that perhaps had been released too soon, prior to sufficient trials to determine the total patient risk. As in many situations, the pendulum swings in both directions, and after thalidomide, the acceptance of new treatments required more and more rigorous studies, and studies from other countries often were not acceptable unless a small part of a larger, whole proposal. The AIDS crisis has prompted a swing back, away from such expensive and rigorous pre-marketing review, to more expedited processes for the relief of patients with this fatal disease. This has streamlined the FDA, and hopefully the swing of the pendulum will not go too far, to result in problems in the future. Anecdotal therapies and medications are the first step in many parts of the world to therapeutic trials. The most widely used aspects of anecdotal therapies, again, remains in the situation with diseases without good therapies at the present time. The so-called orphan drugs and orphan diseases, while a serious medical problem, do not present a significant volume for effective drug screening in many instances, and the FDA has developed some new approaches to circumvent this very expensive development process for patients suffering from these rare and unusual disorders. The most recent example of anecdotal therapy catching the public fancy in dermatology was the Skin-Cap Spray. This product, over the period of twelve months, got rave reviews in the lay press in the non-peer reviewed dermatologic periodicals, and amassed impressive sales figures in this period of time. It was extremely effective, and most dermatologists who used it have patients who consider it the most effective therapy in the last year. The formulation of a low concentration of zinc pyrithione seemed unusual, and this truly was an anecdotal approach, using a homeopathic dosage of a commonly used p

  17. Herbal medicine for low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Oltean, Hanna; Robbins, Chris; van Tulder, Maurits W; Berman, Brian M; Bombardier, Claire; Gagnier, Joel J

    2014-12-23

    to placebo gel. Capsicum frutescens cream or plaster probably produces more favourable results than placebo in people with chronic LBP (three trials, 755 participants, moderate quality evidence). Based on current evidence, it is not clear whether topical capsicum cream is more beneficial for treating people with acute LBP compared to placebo (one trial, 40 participants, low quality evidence). Another trial found equivalence of C. frutescens cream to a homeopathic oint