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Sample records for homogeneous crystal nucleation

  1. Crystallization in supercooled liquid Cu: Homogeneous nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, J. C.; Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; Wu, H. A.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-02-01

    Homogeneous nucleation and growth during crystallization of supercooled liquid Cu are investigated with molecular dynamics simulations, and the microstructure is characterized with one- and two-dimensional x-ray diffraction. The resulting solids are single-crystal or nanocrystalline, containing various defects such as stacking faults, twins, fivefold twins, and grain boundaries; the microstructure is subject to thermal fluctuations and extent of supercooling. Fivefold twins form via sequential twinning from the solid-liquid interfaces. Critical nucleus size and nucleation rate at 31% supercooling are obtained from statistical runs with the mean first-passage time and survival probability methods, and are about 14 atoms and 1032 m-3s-1, respectively. The bulk growth dynamics are analyzed with the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami law and manifest three stages; the Avrami exponent varies in the range of 1-19, which also depends on thermal fluctuations and supercooling.

  2. Crystallization in supercooled liquid Cu: Homogeneous nucleation and growth

    SciTech Connect

    E, J. C.; Wang, L.; Luo, S. N.; Cai, Y.; Wu, H. A.

    2015-02-14

    Homogeneous nucleation and growth during crystallization of supercooled liquid Cu are investigated with molecular dynamics simulations, and the microstructure is characterized with one- and two-dimensional x-ray diffraction. The resulting solids are single-crystal or nanocrystalline, containing various defects such as stacking faults, twins, fivefold twins, and grain boundaries; the microstructure is subject to thermal fluctuations and extent of supercooling. Fivefold twins form via sequential twinning from the solid-liquid interfaces. Critical nucleus size and nucleation rate at 31% supercooling are obtained from statistical runs with the mean first-passage time and survival probability methods, and are about 14 atoms and 10{sup 32} m{sup −3}s{sup −1}, respectively. The bulk growth dynamics are analyzed with the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami law and manifest three stages; the Avrami exponent varies in the range of 1–19, which also depends on thermal fluctuations and supercooling.

  3. Temperature-dependent mechanisms of homogeneous crystal nucleation in quenced Lennard-Jones liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, L.; Morris, James R; Lo, Y. C.

    2008-01-01

    We have observed homogeneous crystal nucleation in Lennard-Jones liquid by molecular dynamics simulations. A clear nucleation time delay has been observed at T=0.677T{sub m} and T=0.629T{sub m} indicating the presence of a barrier, in contrast to recent reports [Trudu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 105701 (2006)]. The structure of nuclei observed in the previous results and in the present work is evidence of transient-time dominated nucleation, not of a spinodal. Very rapid nucleation is observed at T=0.484T{sub m}, indicating either a low (but finite) barrier or possibly a spinodal transformation. No spinodal effect has been observed in similar simulations of crystal nucleation in aluminum at any temperature [Aga et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 245701 (2006)], suggesting that different qualitative behaviors may be possible in what would seem to be similar potentials.

  4. Interfacial free energy adjustable phase field crystal model for homogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Huang, Yunhao

    2016-05-18

    To describe the homogeneous nucleation process, an interfacial free energy adjustable phase-field crystal model (IPFC) was proposed by reconstructing the energy functional of the original phase field crystal (PFC) methodology. Compared with the original PFC model, the additional interface term in the IPFC model effectively can adjust the magnitude of the interfacial free energy, but does not affect the equilibrium phase diagram and the interfacial energy anisotropy. The IPFC model overcame the limitation that the interfacial free energy of the original PFC model is much less than the theoretical results. Using the IPFC model, we investigated some basic issues in homogeneous nucleation. From the viewpoint of simulation, we proceeded with an in situ observation of the process of cluster fluctuation and obtained quite similar snapshots to colloidal crystallization experiments. We also counted the size distribution of crystal-like clusters and the nucleation rate. Our simulations show that the size distribution is independent of the evolution time, and the nucleation rate remains constant after a period of relaxation, which are consistent with experimental observations. The linear relation between logarithmic nucleation rate and reciprocal driving force also conforms to the steady state nucleation theory.

  5. Molecular simulation of homogeneous nucleation of crystals of an ionic liquid from the melt.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxia; Shen, Yan; Hung, Francisco R; Santiso, Erik E

    2015-09-28

    The homogeneous nucleation of crystals of the ionic liquid [dmim(+)][Cl(-)] from its supercooled liquid phase in the bulk (P = 1 bar, T = 340 K, representing a supercooling of 58 K) was studied using molecular simulations. The string method in collective variables [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 024106 (2006)] was used in combination with Markovian milestoning with Voronoi tessellations [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 2589-2594 (2009)] and order parameters for molecular crystals [E. E. Santiso and B. L. Trout, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064109 (2011)] to sketch a minimum free energy path connecting the supercooled liquid and the monoclinic crystal phases, and to determine the free energy and the rates involved in the homogeneous nucleation process. The physical significance of the configurations found along this minimum free energy path is discussed with the help of calculations based on classical nucleation theory and with additional simulation results obtained for a larger system. Our results indicate that, at a supercooling of 58 K, the liquid has to overcome a free energy barrier of the order of 60 kcal/mol and to form a critical nucleus with an average size of about 3.6 nm, before it reaches the thermodynamically stable crystal phase. A simulated homogeneous nucleation rate of 5.0 × 10(10) cm(-3) s(-1) was obtained for our system, which is in reasonable agreement with experimental and simulation rates for homogeneous nucleation of ice at similar degrees of supercooling. This study represents our first step in a series of studies aimed at understanding the nucleation and growth of crystals of organic salts near surfaces and inside nanopores.

  6. Molecular simulation of homogeneous nucleation of crystals of an ionic liquid from the melt

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiaoxia; Shen, Yan; Hung, Francisco R.; Santiso, Erik E.

    2015-09-28

    The homogeneous nucleation of crystals of the ionic liquid [dmim{sup +}][Cl{sup −}] from its supercooled liquid phase in the bulk (P = 1 bar, T = 340 K, representing a supercooling of 58 K) was studied using molecular simulations. The string method in collective variables [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 024106 (2006)] was used in combination with Markovian milestoning with Voronoi tessellations [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 2589–2594 (2009)] and order parameters for molecular crystals [E. E. Santiso and B. L. Trout, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064109 (2011)] to sketch a minimum free energy path connecting the supercooled liquid and the monoclinic crystal phases, and to determine the free energy and the rates involved in the homogeneous nucleation process. The physical significance of the configurations found along this minimum free energy path is discussed with the help of calculations based on classical nucleation theory and with additional simulation results obtained for a larger system. Our results indicate that, at a supercooling of 58 K, the liquid has to overcome a free energy barrier of the order of 60 kcal/mol and to form a critical nucleus with an average size of about 3.6 nm, before it reaches the thermodynamically stable crystal phase. A simulated homogeneous nucleation rate of 5.0 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} s{sup −1} was obtained for our system, which is in reasonable agreement with experimental and simulation rates for homogeneous nucleation of ice at similar degrees of supercooling. This study represents our first step in a series of studies aimed at understanding the nucleation and growth of crystals of organic salts near surfaces and inside nanopores.

  7. Free energy barriers for homogeneous crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of binary hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Ganagalla, Srinivasa Rao; Punnathanam, Sudeep N

    2013-05-07

    In this study, the free energy barriers for homogeneous crystal nucleation in a system that exhibits a eutectic point are computed using Monte Carlo simulations. The system studied is a binary hard sphere mixture with a diameter ratio of 0.85 between the smaller and larger hard spheres. The simulations of crystal nucleation are performed for the entire range of fluid compositions. The free energy barrier is found to be the highest near the eutectic point and is nearly five times that for the pure fluid, which slows down the nucleation rate by a factor of 10(-31). These free energy barriers are some of highest ever computed using simulations. For most of the conditions studied, the composition of the critical nucleus corresponds to either one of the two thermodynamically stable solid phases. However, near the eutectic point, the nucleation barrier is lowest for the formation of the metastable random hexagonal closed packed (rhcp) solid phase with composition lying in the two-phase region of the phase diagram. The fluid to solid phase transition is hypothesized to proceed via formation of a metastable rhcp phase followed by a phase separation into respective stable fcc solid phases.

  8. Homogeneous nucleation kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, D. H.; Appleby, M. R.; Leedom, G. L.; Babu, S. V.; Naumann, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation kinetics are rederived in a manner fundamentally similar to the approach of classical nucleation theory with the following modifications and improvements. First, the cluster is a parent phase cluster and does not require energization to the parent state. Second, the thermodynamic potential used to describe phase stability is a continuous function along the pathway of phase decomposition. Third, the kinetics of clustering corresponds directly to the diffusional flux of monomers through the cluster distribution and are formally similar to classical theory with the resulting kinetic equation modified by two terms in the preexponential factor. These terms correct for the influence of a supersaturation dependent clustering within the parent phase and for the influence of an asymmetrical cluster concentration as a function of cluster size at the critical cluster size. Fourth, the supersaturation dependence of the nucleation rate is of the same form as that given by classical nucleation theory. This supersaturation dependence must however be interpreted in terms of a size dependent surface tension. Finally, there are two scaling laws which describe supersaturation to either constant nucleation rate or to the thermodynamically determined physical spinodal.

  9. Homogenous Nucleation and Crystal Growth in a Model Liquid from Direct Energy Landscape Sampling Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Nathan; Zhang, Yang

    Nucleation and crystal growth are understood to be activated processes involving the crossing of free-energy barriers. Attempts to capture the entire crystallization process over long timescales with molecular dynamic simulations have met major obstacles because of molecular dynamics' temporal constraints. Herein, we circumvent this temporal limitation by using a brutal-force, metadynamics-like, adaptive basin-climbing algorithm and directly sample the free-energy landscape of a model liquid Argon. The algorithm biases the system to evolve from an amorphous liquid like structure towards an FCC crystal through inherent structure, and then traces back the energy barriers. Consequently, the sampled timescale is macroscopically long. We observe that the formation of a crystal involves two processes, each with a unique temperature-dependent energy barrier. One barrier corresponds to the crystal nucleus formation; the other barrier corresponds to the crystal growth. We find the two processes dominate in different temperature regimes. Compared to other computation techniques, our method requires no assumptions about the shape or chemical potential of the critical crystal nucleus. The success of this method is encouraging for studying the crystallization of more complex

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of steady-state crystal growth and homogeneous nucleation in polyethylene-like polymer.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takashi

    2008-11-14

    Molecular mechanisms of crystal growth and homogeneous nucleation from the melt of polyethylene-like linear polymer are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The present paper is aimed at extending our previous work with respect to the system size and the boundary condition, thereby enabling detailed studies on the structures of sufficiently large lamellae and fully equilibrated melt. Lamellae of uniform thickness but with marked tapered edges are found to grow at constant velocity from the substrate. Three-dimensional shape of the growing lamellae exhibits peculiar undulation at the growth front, the origin of which is suggested to be the inhomogeneous thickness distribution within the lamellae. Trajectories of chains crystallizing onto the growth front reveal an unexpected pathway for chain folding, where a partially attached chain stem forms a new fold by plunging its head back into a neighboring stem position through slithering snake motions of the chain. Detailed statistics of folds and cilia show that the folds are rather neat and mostly make re-entries into the nearest or the second or third nearest neighboring stem positions, whereas the cilia are generally short but with a small number of longer cilia forming thick amorphous layers. Structure of supercooled melt investigated versus temperature reveals that, at moderate degree of supercooling, the overall chain conformation remains Gaussian random coil but the persistent length of chains increases monotonically with increasing supercooling. Exceptions are at the largest supercooling where homogeneous nucleation takes place; usual melt structure becomes rapidly unstable and emerges many crystallites of random orientations. During early 10-20 ns after the quench, density of melt, radius of gyration of chains, and fraction of kinked bonds show marked alterations. These structural changes are highly cooperative and are considered simply due to the emergence of many embryonic crystals in the melt

  11. Interplay between the Relaxation of the Glass of Random l/d-Lactide Copolymers and Homogeneous Crystal Nucleation: Evidence for Segregation of Chain Defects.

    PubMed

    Androsch, René; Schick, Christoph

    2016-05-19

    Random l-isomer rich copolymers of poly(lactic acid) containing up to 4% d-isomer co-units have been cooled from the molten state to obtain glasses free of crystals and homogeneous crystal nuclei. The kinetics of enthalpy relaxation and the formation of homogeneous crystal nuclei have then been analyzed using fast scanning chip calorimetry. It has been found that the relaxation of the glass toward the structure/enthalpy of the supercooled liquid state is independent of the presence of d-isomer co-units in the chain. Formation of homogeneous crystal nuclei in the glassy state requires the completion of the relaxation of the glass. However, nucleation is increasingly delayed in the random copolymers with increasing d-isomer chain defect concentration. The data show that the slower formation of homogeneous crystal nuclei in random l/d-lactide copolymers, compared to the homopolymer, is not caused by different chain-segment mobility in the glassy state but by the segregation of chain defects in this early stage of the crystallization process.

  12. Crystal nucleation in lithium borate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gary L.; Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    Crystal nucleation measurements were made on three lithium borate compositions in the vicinity of Li2O-2Br2O3. All nucleation measurements were performed at 500 C. Certain aspects of the nucleation behavior indicated (tentatively) that it proceeded by a homogeneous mechanism. The steady state nucleation rate was observed to have the largest value when the Li2O concentration was slightly in excess of the diborate composition. The change in nucleation rate with composition is controlled by the variation of viscosity as well as the change in free energy with composition. The variation of nucleation rate is explained qualitatively in these terms.

  13. Crystal nucleation of colloidal hard dumbbells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ran; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2011-01-21

    Using computer simulations, we investigate the homogeneous crystal nucleation in suspensions of colloidal hard dumbbells. The free energy barriers are determined by Monte Carlo simulations using the umbrella sampling technique. We calculate the nucleation rates for the plastic crystal and the aperiodic crystal phase using the kinetic prefactor as determined from event driven molecular dynamics simulations. We find good agreement with the nucleation rates determined from spontaneous nucleation events observed in event driven molecular dynamics simulations within error bars of one order of magnitude. We study the effect of aspect ratio of the dumbbells on the nucleation of plastic and aperiodic crystal phases, and we also determine the structure of the critical nuclei. Moreover, we find that the nucleation of the aligned close-packed crystal structure is strongly suppressed by a high free energy barrier at low supersaturations and slow dynamics at high supersaturations.

  14. Nucleation precursors in protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Vorontsova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal nucleation is a central problem in biological crystallography and other areas of science, technology and medicine. Recent studies have demonstrated that protein crystal nuclei form within crucial precursors. Here, methods of detection and characterization of the precursors are reviewed: dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and Brownian microscopy. Data for several proteins provided by these methods have demonstrated that the nucleation precursors are clusters consisting of protein-dense liquid, which are metastable with respect to the host protein solution. The clusters are several hundred nanometres in size, the cluster population occupies from 10−7 to 10−3 of the solution volume, and their properties in solutions supersaturated with respect to crystals are similar to those in homogeneous, i.e. undersaturated, solutions. The clusters exist owing to the conformation flexibility of the protein molecules, leading to exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and enhanced intermolecular binding. These results indicate that protein conformational flexibility might be the mechanism behind the metastable mesoscopic clusters and crystal nucleation. Investigations of the cluster properties are still in their infancy. Results on direct imaging of cluster behaviors and characterization of cluster mechanisms with a variety of proteins will soon lead to major breakthroughs in protein biophysics. PMID:24598910

  15. Nucleation and Crystallization in nucleated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Christoph; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Wurm, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Crystallization is commonly considered as nucleation followed by a growth process. Here we apply the recently developed technique, differential fast scanning calorimetry (DFSC), for a unique, new look at the crystal growth of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and PCL carbon nanotube composites from 185 K, below the glass transition temperature, to 330 K, close to the equilibrium melting temperature. The DFSC allows temperature control of the sample and determination of its heat capacity during temperature treatments by employing cooling and heating rates from 50 to 50,000 K/s. First, the crystal nucleation and overall crystallization half times were determined simultaneously in the range of temperatures where crystallization of PCL occurs. After attempting to analyze the experiments with the classical nucleation and growth model a new methodology is described, which addresses the specific problems of crystallization of flexible linear macromolecules. The structures seem to range from having practically unmeasurable latent heats of ordering (nuclei) to being clearly-recognizable, ordered species with rather sharp disordering endotherms at temperatures from the glass transition to equilibrium melting (increasingly perfect and larger crystals). The mechanisms and kinetics of growth (if any) involve a detailed understanding of the interaction with the surrounding rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) in dependence of crystal size and perfection. E. Zhuravlev, J.W.P. Schmelzer, B. Wunderlich and C. Schick, Kinetics of nucleation and crystallization in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), Polymer 52 (2011) 1983-1997.

  16. Effect of gravity wave temperature variations on homogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Tra; Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Legras, Bernard; Plougonven, Riwal

    2015-04-01

    Observations of cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) have shown various ice number concentrations (INC) (e.g., Jensen et al. 2013), which has lead to a puzzle regarding their formation. In particular, the frequently observed low numbers of ice crystals seemed hard to reconcile with homogeneous nucleation knowing the ubuquity of gravity waves with vertical velocity of the order of 0.1 m/s. Using artificial time series, Spichtinger and Krämer (2013) have illustrated that the variation of vertical velocity during a nucleation event could terminate it and limit the INC. However, their study was limited to constructed temperature time series. Here, we carry out numerical simulations of homogeneous ice nucleation forced by temperature time series data collected by isopycnic balloon flights near the tropical tropopause. The balloons collected data at high frequency (30 s), so gravity wave signals are well resolved in the temperature time series. With the observed temperature time series, the numerical simulations with homogeneous freezing show a full range of ice number concentrations (INC) as previously observed in the tropical upper troposphere. The simulations confirm that the dynamical time scale of temperature variations (as seen from observations) can be shorter than the nucleation time scale. They show the existence of two regimes for homogeneous ice nucleation : one limited by the depletion of water vapor by the nucleated ice crystals (those we name vapor events) and one limited by the reincrease of temperature after its initial decrease (temperature events). Low INC may thus be obtained for temperature events when the gravity wave perturbations produce a non-persistent cooling rate (even with large magnitude) such that the absolute change in temperature remains small during nucleation. This result for temperature events is explained analytically by a dependence of the INC on the absolute drop in temperature (and not on the cooling rate). This

  17. Nucleation of Crystals in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.

    2010-07-01

    Solution crystallization is an essential part of processes in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and a major step in physiological and pathological phenomena. Crystallization starts with nucleation and control of nucleation is crucial for the control of the number, size, perfection, polymorphism and other characteristics of the crystalline materials. Recently, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the mechanism of nucleation of crystals in solution. The most significant of these is the two-step mechanism of nucleation, according to which the crystalline nucleus appears inside pre-existing metastable clusters of size several hundred nanometers, which consist of dense liquid and are suspended in the solution. While initially proposed for protein crystals, the applicability of this mechanism has been demonstrated for small molecule organic materials, colloids, and biominerals. This mechanism helps to explain several long-standing puzzles of crystal nucleation in solution: nucleation rates which are many orders of magnitude lower than theoretical predictions, nucleation kinetic dependencies with steady or receding parts at increasing supersaturation, the role of heterogeneous substrates for polymorph selection, the significance of the dense protein liquid, and others. More importantly, this mechanism provides powerful tools for control of the nucleation process by varying the solution thermodynamic parameters so that the volume occupied by the dense liquid shrinks or expands.

  18. Protein crystal nucleation in pores

    PubMed Central

    Nanev, Christo N.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2017-01-01

    The most powerful method for protein structure determination is X-ray crystallography which relies on the availability of high quality crystals. Obtaining protein crystals is a major bottleneck, and inducing their nucleation is of crucial importance in this field. An effective method to form crystals is to introduce nucleation-inducing heterologous materials into the crystallization solution. Porous materials are exceptionally effective at inducing nucleation. It is shown here that a combined diffusion-adsorption effect can increase protein concentration inside pores, which enables crystal nucleation even under conditions where heterogeneous nucleation on flat surfaces is absent. Provided the pore is sufficiently narrow, protein molecules approach its walls and adsorb more frequently than they can escape. The decrease in the nucleation energy barrier is calculated, exhibiting its quantitative dependence on the confinement space and the energy of interaction with the pore walls. These results provide a detailed explanation of the effectiveness of porous materials for nucleation of protein crystals, and will be useful for optimal design of such materials. PMID:28091515

  19. Overview: Experimental studies of crystal nucleation: Metals and colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlach, Dieter M.; Palberg, Thomas; Klassen, Ina; Klein, Stefan; Kobold, Raphael

    2016-12-01

    Crystallization is one of the most important phase transformations of first order. In the case of metals and alloys, the liquid phase is the parent phase of materials production. The conditions of the crystallization process control the as-solidified material in its chemical and physical properties. Nucleation initiates the crystallization of a liquid. It selects the crystallographic phase, stable or meta-stable. Its detailed knowledge is therefore mandatory for the design of materials. We present techniques of containerless processing for nucleation studies of metals and alloys. Experimental results demonstrate the power of these methods not only for crystal nucleation of stable solids but in particular also for investigations of crystal nucleation of metastable solids at extreme undercooling. This concerns the physical nature of heterogeneous versus homogeneous nucleation and nucleation of phases nucleated under non-equilibrium conditions. The results are analyzed within classical nucleation theory that defines the activation energy of homogeneous nucleation in terms of the interfacial energy and the difference of Gibbs free energies of solid and liquid. The interfacial energy acts as barrier for the nucleation process. Its experimental determination is difficult in the case of metals. In the second part of this work we therefore explore the potential of colloidal suspensions as model systems for the crystallization process. The nucleation process of colloids is observed in situ by optical observation and ultra-small angle X-ray diffraction using high intensity synchrotron radiation. It allows an unambiguous discrimination of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation as well as the determination of the interfacial free energy of the solid-liquid interface. Our results are used to construct Turnbull plots of colloids, which are discussed in relation to Turnbull plots of metals and support the hypothesis that colloids are useful model systems to investigate crystal

  20. Effect of cloud-scale vertical velocity on the contribution of homogeneous nucleation to cirrus formation and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Liu, X.

    2016-06-01

    Ice nucleation is a critical process for the ice crystal formation in cirrus clouds. The relative contribution of homogeneous nucleation versus heterogeneous nucleation to cirrus formation differs between measurements and predictions from general circulation models. Here we perform large-ensemble simulations of the ice nucleation process using a cloud parcel model driven by observed vertical motions and find that homogeneous nucleation occurs rather infrequently, in agreement with recent measurement findings. When the effect of observed vertical velocity fluctuations on ice nucleation is considered in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, the relative contribution of homogeneous nucleation to cirrus cloud occurrences decreases to only a few percent. However, homogeneous nucleation still has strong impacts on the cloud radiative forcing. Hence, the importance of homogeneous nucleation for cirrus cloud formation should not be dismissed on the global scale.

  1. Crystallization of Nucleator Nanofibrils in Polypropylene Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipp, J.; Cohen, Y.; Khalfin, R. L.; Shuster, M.; Terry, A. E.

    2007-03-01

    Self-associating molecules act as nucleating agents in polypropylene (PP) in order to increase the crystallization rate and decrease the crystallite size, by forming a fine network of nanofibrils within the polymer melt. The thermodynamic and kinetic basis for formation of this structure is not clear. Current models usually invoke a spinodal decomposition mechanism, as temperature is lowered into an immiscibility gap. This presentation deals with 1,3:2,4-Di(3,4-dimethylbenzylidene)sorbitol [dMdBS] in PP. The kinetics of structure formation was evaluated using small angle x-ray scattering, including synchrotron measurements. The results indicate a crystallization process by means of a nucleation and growth mechanism, which is controlled by the rate of homogeneous nucleation. The thermodynamic temperature of this process, determined for two different dMdBS concentrations from the temperature dependence of the crystallization half-time, agrees with that obtained by group-contribution calculation of the solubility parameters. dMdBS nanofibril formation has a remarkable effect on PP crystallization in melt-spun fibers. Just 0.4% additive at a moderate spin-draw ratio yields a crystalline morphology comprised of parallel chain-folded lamellae, with the lamellar normal highly aligned along the fiber axis.

  2. Homogeneous vs. heterogeneous nucleation in water-dicarboxylic acid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Vehkamäki, H.; Riipinen, I.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-03-01

    Binary heterogeneous nucleation of water-succinic/glutaric/malonic/adipic acid on nanometer-sized particles is investigated within the frame of classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. Homogeneous nucleation is also included for comparison. It is found that the nucleation probabilities depend on the contact angle and on the size of the seed particles. New thermodynamical properties, such as saturation vapor pressure, density and surface tension for all the dicarboxylic acid aqueous solutions are included in the calculations. While the new surface tension and density formulations do not bring any significant difference in the computed nucleation rate for homogeneous nucleation for succinic and glutaric acids, the use of the newly derived equations for the vapor pressure decrease the acid concentrations in gas phase by 3 orders of magnitude. According to our calculations, the binary heterogeneous nucleation of succinic acid-water and glutaric acid-water - although it requires a 3-4 orders of magnitude lower vapor concentrations than the homogeneous nucleation - cannot take place under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand binary homogeneous nucleation of adipic acid-water systems might be possible under conditions occuring in upper boundary layer. However, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between the surface and the molecules of the nucleating vapor should be considered in the future.

  3. Rate of Homogenous Nucleation of Ice in Supercooled Water.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, James D; Murray, Benjamin J; O'Sullivan, Daniel

    2016-08-25

    The homogeneous freezing of water is of fundamental importance to a number of fields, including that of cloud formation. However, there is considerable scatter in homogeneous nucleation rate coefficients reported in the literature. Using a cold stage droplet system designed to minimize uncertainties in temperature measurements, we examined the freezing of over 1500 pure water droplets with diameters between 4 and 24 μm. Under the assumption that nucleation occurs within the bulk of the droplet, nucleation rate coefficients fall within the spread of literature data and are in good agreement with a subset of more recent measurements. To quantify the relative importance of surface and volume nucleation in our experiments, where droplets are supported by a hydrophobic surface and surrounded by oil, comparison of droplets with different surface area to volume ratios was performed. From our experiments it is shown that in droplets larger than 6 μm diameter (between 234.6 and 236.5 K), nucleation in the interior is more important than nucleation at the surface. At smaller sizes we cannot rule out a significant contribution of surface nucleation, and in order to further constrain surface nucleation, experiments with smaller droplets are necessary. Nevertheless, in our experiments, it is dominantly volume nucleation controlling the observed nucleation rate.

  4. Sigmoid kinetics of protein crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanev, Christo N.; Tonchev, Vesselin D.

    2015-10-01

    A non-linear differential equation expressing the new phase nucleation rate in the different steps of the process (non-stationary and stationary nucleation and in the plateau region) is derived from basic principles of the nucleation theory. It is shown that one and the same sigmoid (logistic) function describes both nucleation scenarios: the one according to the classical theory, and the other according to the modern two-stage mechanism of protein crystal formation. Comparison to experimental data on both insulin crystal nucleation kinetics and on bovine β-lactoglobulin crystallization indicates a good agreement with the sigmoidal prediction. Experimental data for electrochemical nucleation and glass crystallization obey the same sigmoid time dependence, and suggest universality of this nucleation kinetics law.

  5. Homogeneous nucleation of methane hydrates: unrealistic under realistic conditions.

    PubMed

    Knott, Brandon C; Molinero, Valeria; Doherty, Michael F; Peters, Baron

    2012-12-05

    Methane hydrates are ice-like inclusion compounds with importance to the oil and natural gas industry, global climate change, and gas transportation and storage. The molecular mechanism by which these compounds form under conditions relevant to industry and nature remains mysterious. To understand the mechanism of methane hydrate nucleation from supersaturated aqueous solutions, we performed simulations at controlled and realistic supersaturation. We found that critical nuclei are extremely large and that homogeneous nucleation rates are extremely low. Our findings suggest that nucleation of methane hydrates under these realistic conditions cannot occur by a homogeneous mechanism.

  6. Interpretation of DTA experiments used for crystal nucleation rate determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is presented of two schemes which have been proposed for the determination of the temperature dependence of homogeneous crystal nucleation rates in glasses via DTA measurements. The first method is based upon the postulate that the inverse of the temperature at which the DTA crystallization rate is maximum, will increase monotonically as the number density of nucleated particles increases. The secone method is based on the observation that the intensity at T(p) (peak height) increases as T(p) grows. The validity of both of these methods is assessed for inorganic glasses for two specific crystal growth models.

  7. Kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in many component systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Reiss's classical treatment of the kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in a system containing two chemical components is extended to many-component systems. The formulation is analogous to the pseudo-stationary state theory of chemical reaction rates with the free energy as a function of the composition of the embryo taking the place of the potential energy as a function of interatomic distances.

  8. Kinetics of homogeneous nucleation on many-component systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Reiss's (1950) classical treatment of the kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in a system containing two chemical components is extended to many-component systems. The formulation is analogous to the pseudostationary-state theory of chemical reaction rates, with the free energy as a function of the composition of the embryo taking the place of the potential energy as a function of interatomic distances.

  9. Comparison of parameterizations for homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, T.; Zobrist, B.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of ice particles from liquid aqueous aerosols is of central importance for the physics and chemistry of high altitude clouds. In this paper, we present new laboratory data on ice nucleation and compare them with two different parameterizations for homogeneous as well as heterogeneous ice nucleation. In particular, we discuss and evaluate the effect of solutes and ice nuclei. One parameterization is the λ-approach which correlates the depression of the freezing temperature of aqueous droplets in comparison to pure water droplets, Tf, with the corresponding depression, Tm, of the equilibrium ice melting point: Tf = λ × Tm. Here, λ is independent of concentration and a constant that is specific for a particular solute or solute/ice nucleus combination. The other approach is water-activity-based ice nucleation theory which describes the effects of solutes on the freezing temperature Tf via their effect on water activity: aw(Tf) = awi(Tf) + aw. Here, awi is the water activity of ice and aw is a constant that depends on the ice nucleus but is independent of the type of solute. We present new data on both homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation with varying types of solutes and ice nuclei. We evaluate and discuss the advantages and limitations of the two approaches for the prediction of ice nucleation in laboratory experiments and atmospheric cloud models.

  10. Homogenous Surface Nucleation of Solid Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Hamill, P.; Salcedo, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A general surface nucleation rate theory is presented for the homogeneous freezing of crystalline germs on the surfaces of aqueous particles. While nucleation rates in a standard classical homogeneous freezing rate theory scale with volume, the rates in a surface-based theory scale with surface area. The theory is used to convert volume-based information on laboratory freezing rates (in units of cu cm, seconds) of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) aerosols into surface-based values (in units of sq cm, seconds). We show that a surface-based model is capable of reproducing measured nucleation rates of NAT and NAD aerosols from concentrated aqueous HNO3 solutions in the temperature range of 165 to 205 K. Laboratory measured nucleation rates are used to derive free energies for NAT and NAD germ formation in the stratosphere. NAD germ free energies range from about 23 to 26 kcal mole, allowing for fast and efficient homogeneous NAD particle production in the stratosphere. However, NAT germ formation energies are large (greater than 26 kcal mole) enough to prevent efficient NAT particle production in the stratosphere. We show that the atmospheric NAD particle production rates based on the surface rate theory are roughly 2 orders of magnitude larger than those obtained from a standard volume-based rate theory. Atmospheric volume and surface production of NAD particles will nearly cease in the stratosphere when denitrification in the air exceeds 40 and 78%, respectively. We show that a surface-based (volume-based) homogeneous freezing rate theory gives particle production rates, which are (not) consistent with both laboratory and atmospheric data on the nucleation of solid polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  11. Critical humidities of homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation: Inferences from extended classical nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Vitaly I.; Curry, Judith A.

    2009-02-01

    A generalization of classical ice nucleation theory is used to derive analytical expressions for the critical (threshold) humidities of homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing. The critical radius and energy of an ice embryo and nucleation rates were derived previously by the authors as functions of temperature, pressure, water saturation ratio, and radii of freezing particles. Here we invert the analytical expressions for the nucleation rates and solve them relative to the critical water and ice saturation ratios (or critical relative humidities). The critical humidities are expressed as analytical functions of temperature, pressure, nucleation or cooling rates, radius of freezing particles and their physico-chemical properties, misfit strain, and activation energy. Calculations of critical ice relative humidities are made using these equations over an extended temperature range down to -75°C and are compared with previous empirical parameterizations and experimental data, and differences are interpreted in the context of variation of the other parameters. It is shown that the critical humidities for heterogeneous ice nucleation are lower than those for homogeneous nucleation; however, this difference is not constant but depends substantially on the temperature and properties of freezing aerosol. Some simple parameterizations for cloud and climate models are suggested.

  12. Crystallization and nucleation kinetics in volcanic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, C.; Fortunati, A.; Carroll, M. R.; Scaillet, B.; Landi, P.

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of this experimental study is to constrain and quantitatively model the complex solidification process that transforms a magma in a solid material. Of major interest are crystal nucleation and growth driven by isothermal decompression of hydrous magmas, and comparison with results from more abundant crystal growth/nucleation data obtained in isobaric cooling experiments. This research concerns two different volcanic systems, Pantelleria (peralkaline rhyolite) and Stromboli (basalt), to better understand how crystallization kinetics can affect different magma compositions. For Stromboli volcanic system TZM apparatus has been used to perform decompression runs at Bayerisches Geoinstitut in Bayreuth (DE). As for Pantelleria composition, cooling experiments has been done using IHPV devices at ISTO of Orléans (FR), on the basis of previous phase equilibrium work (Di Carlo et al., 2010). First obtained results for Stromboli case show high rates of nucleation and crystal growth during the initial stages of crystallization which were followed by crystal growth at approximately constant number densities as equilibrium was approached. Shapes of crystals growing in melts are controlled by the kinetics of crystallization and may provide information about the degree of undercooling experienced by batches of magma en route to the surface (Lofgren, 1980). The study of crystallization kinetics through phases growth rates (Couch et al., 2003), together with the calculation of nucleation density and nucleation rates (Hammer et al., 1999) represent a step toward the estimation of the time scales of magmatic processes in volcanic systems and the interpretation of shallow magmatic processes. The results for Stromboli suggest average crystal growth timescales on the order of weeks, but this is complicated by clear evidence that some crystals have experienced repeated periods of both dissolution and growth (Landi et al., 2004).

  13. Heterodimer formation and crystal nucleation of gramicidin D.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, B M; Gassman, R M; Langs, D A; Pangborn, W A; Duax, W L

    1998-01-01

    The linear pentadecapeptide antibiotic gramicidin D is a heterogeneous mixture of six components. Precise refinements of three-dimensional structures of naturally occurring gramicidin D in crystals obtained from methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol demonstrate the unexpected presence of stable left-handed antiparallel double-helical heterodimers that vary with the crystallization solvent. The side chains of Trp residues in the three structures exhibit sequence-specific patterns of conformational preference. Tyr substitution for Trp at position 11 appears to favor beta ribbon formation and stabilization of the antiparallel double helix that acts as a template for gramicidin folding and nucleation of different crystal forms. The fact that a minor component in a heterogeneous mixture influences aggregation and crystal nucleation has potential applications to other systems in which anomalous behavior is exhibited by aggregation of apparently homogeneous materials, such as the enigmatic behavior of prion proteins. PMID:9788907

  14. Nucleation of protein crystals: critical nuclei, phase behavior, and control pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Oleg; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2001-11-01

    We have studied the nucleation of crystals of the model protein lysozyme using a novel technique that allows direct determinations of homogeneous nucleation rates. At constant temperature of 12.6°C we varied the thermodynamic supersaturation by changing the concentrations of protein and precipitant. We found a broken dependence of the homogeneous nucleation rate on supersaturation that is beyond the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. The nucleation theorem allows us to relate this to discrete changes of the size of the crystal nuclei with increasing supersaturation as (10 or 11)→(4 or 5)→(1 or 2). Furthermore, we observe that the existence of a second liquid phase at high protein concentrations strongly affects crystal nucleation kinetics. We show that the rate of homogeneous nucleation of lysozyme crystals passes through a maximum in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid phase boundary hidden below the liquidus (solubility) line in the phase diagram of the protein solution. We found that glycerol and polyethylene glycol (PEG), which do not specifically bind to proteins, shift this phase boundary and significantly suppress or enhance the crystal nucleation rates, although no simple correlation exists between the action of PEG on the phase diagram and the nucleation kinetics. This provides for a control mechanism which does not require changes in the protein concentration, or the acidity and ionicity of the solution. The effects of the two additives on the phase diagram strongly depend on their concentration and this provides opportunities for further tuning of nucleation rates.

  15. The Nucleation and Growth of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining crystals of suitable size and high quality continues to be a major bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Currently, structural genomics efforts are achieving on average about a 10% success rate in going from purified protein to a deposited crystal structure. Growth of crystals in microgravity was proposed as a means of overcoming size and quality problems, which subsequently led to a major NASA effort in microgravity crystal growth, with the agency also funding research into understanding the process. Studies of the macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth process were carried out in a number of labs in an effort to understand what affected the resultant crystal quality on Earth, and how microgravity improved the process. Based upon experimental evidence, as well as simple starting assumptions, we have proposed that crystal nucleation occurs by a series of discrete self assembly steps, which 'set' the underlying crystal symmetry. This talk will review the model developed, and its origins, in our laboratory for how crystals nucleate and grow, and will then present, along with preliminary data, how we propose to use this model to improve the success rate for obtaining crystals from a given protein.

  16. A compact setup to study homogeneous nucleation and condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Mattias; Alxneit, Ivo; Rütten, Frederik; Wuillemin, Daniel; Tschudi, Hans Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    An experiment is presented to study homogeneous nucleation and the subsequent droplet growth at high temperatures and high pressures in a compact setup that does not use moving parts. Nucleation and condensation are induced in an adiabatic, stationary expansion of the vapor and an inert carrier gas through a Laval nozzle. The adiabatic expansion is driven against atmospheric pressure by pressurized inert gas its mass flow carefully controlled. This allows us to avoid large pumps or vacuum storage tanks. Because we eventually want to study the homogeneous nucleation and condensation of zinc, the use of carefully chosen materials is required that can withstand pressures of up to 106 Pa resulting from mass flow rates of up to 600 lN min-1 and temperatures up to 1200 K in the presence of highly corrosive zinc vapor. To observe the formation of droplets a laser beam propagates along the axis of the nozzle and the light scattered by the droplets is detected perpendicularly to the nozzle axis. An ICCD camera allows to record the scattered light through fused silica windows in the diverging part of the nozzle spatially resolved and to detect nucleation and condensation coherently in a single exposure. For the data analysis, a model is needed to describe the isentropic core part of the flow along the nozzle axis. The model must incorporate the laws of fluid dynamics, the nucleation and condensation process, and has to predict the size distribution of the particles created (PSD) at every position along the nozzle axis. Assuming Rayleigh scattering, the intensity of the scattered light can then be calculated from the second moment of the PSD.

  17. A compact setup to study homogeneous nucleation and condensation.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mattias; Alxneit, Ivo; Rütten, Frederik; Wuillemin, Daniel; Tschudi, Hans Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    An experiment is presented to study homogeneous nucleation and the subsequent droplet growth at high temperatures and high pressures in a compact setup that does not use moving parts. Nucleation and condensation are induced in an adiabatic, stationary expansion of the vapor and an inert carrier gas through a Laval nozzle. The adiabatic expansion is driven against atmospheric pressure by pressurized inert gas its mass flow carefully controlled. This allows us to avoid large pumps or vacuum storage tanks. Because we eventually want to study the homogeneous nucleation and condensation of zinc, the use of carefully chosen materials is required that can withstand pressures of up to 10(6) Pa resulting from mass flow rates of up to 600 l(N) min(-1) and temperatures up to 1200 K in the presence of highly corrosive zinc vapor. To observe the formation of droplets a laser beam propagates along the axis of the nozzle and the light scattered by the droplets is detected perpendicularly to the nozzle axis. An ICCD camera allows to record the scattered light through fused silica windows in the diverging part of the nozzle spatially resolved and to detect nucleation and condensation coherently in a single exposure. For the data analysis, a model is needed to describe the isentropic core part of the flow along the nozzle axis. The model must incorporate the laws of fluid dynamics, the nucleation and condensation process, and has to predict the size distribution of the particles created (PSD) at every position along the nozzle axis. Assuming Rayleigh scattering, the intensity of the scattered light can then be calculated from the second moment of the PSD.

  18. Homogeneous ice nucleation at moderate supercooling from molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Sanz, E; Vega, C; Espinosa, J R; Caballero-Bernal, R; Abascal, J L F; Valeriani, C

    2013-10-09

    Among all of the freezing transitions, that of water into ice is probably the most relevant to biology, physics, geology, or atmospheric science. In this work, we investigate homogeneous ice nucleation by means of computer simulations. We evaluate the size of the critical cluster and the nucleation rate for temperatures ranging between 15 and 35 K below melting. We use the TIP4P/2005 and the TIP4P/ice water models. Both give similar results when compared at the same temperature difference with the model's melting temperature. The size of the critical cluster varies from ∼8000 molecules (radius = 4 nm) at 15 K below melting to ∼600 molecules (radius = 1.7 nm) at 35 K below melting. We use Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) to estimate the ice-water interfacial free energy and the nucleation free-energy barrier. We obtain an interfacial free energy of 29(3) mN/m from an extrapolation of our results to the melting temperature. This value is in good agreement both with experimental measurements and with previous estimates from computer simulations of TIP4P-like models. Moreover, we obtain estimates of the nucleation rate from simulations of the critical cluster at the barrier top. The values we get for both models agree within statistical error with experimental measurements. At temperatures higher than 20 K below melting, we get nucleation rates slower than the appearance of a critical cluster in all water of the hydrosphere during the age of the universe. Therefore, our simulations predict that water freezing above this temperature must necessarily be heterogeneous.

  19. Interfacial supersaturation, secondary nucleation, and crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Clifford Y.; Wu, Jenn-Fang; Rousseau, Ronald W.

    1992-02-01

    A theory describing the source of nuclei in secondary nucleation is presented and used to rationalize experimental data from the literature, some of which had appeared to be conflicting. The theory rests on a model in which an adsorption layer consisting of clusters of growth units of varying size is formed on the surface of growing crystals. The existence of the layer is related to the two-resistance model of crystal growth; by varying system conditions, the relative importance of the two resistances is altered and thereby changes the interfacial supersaturation even though overall supersaturation remains constant. Interracial supersaturation and contact energy determine kinetics in a system dominated by contact nucleation.

  20. Polymorphic crystals selected in the nucleation stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui-Jun; Peng, Shu-Ming; Zhou, Xiao-Song; Ju, Xin

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore the atomic mechanism of formation of polymorphic crystals. Cooling the Lennard-Jones systems, we observe that the system almost always evolves into a polymorphic crystal with either fivefold-symmetric stacking faults or single-direction stacking faults. The detailed analysis reveals that such an evolution depends on the configuration of fcc/hcp concomitance in the nucleation stage. A defect-induced model is then introduced to illustrate these two evolution routes. Through calculating the formation energies of the defective critical nuclei, we find that the polymorphic crystals seem to be determined by their critical nuclei, in which the relatively lower formation energy ensures the preponderance of the fivefold-symmetric cluster. Before the nucleation, we observe that thermal fluctuations prefer hcp-like particles over fcc-like ones while in the nucleation and growth stage this preference reverses. Notably, an extended step rule of Ostwald is seemingly suitable to characterise the growth process because of the temporary hcp layers appearing among fcc layers in the growth stage. Although the crystalline cluster with single-direction stacking faults has higher growth rate and structural order than its competitor, the component (fcc and hcp) proportion of the final crystals is almost always constant regardless of the polymorphic type. Our finding renews the understanding of the polymorphism of crystals, and possibly draws more attention of people intending to control the polymorphic structures through nucleation.

  1. Nucleation and structural growth of cluster crystals.

    PubMed

    Leitold, Christian; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-08-21

    We study the nucleation of crystalline cluster phases in the generalized exponential model with exponent n = 4. Due to the finite value of this pair potential for zero separation, at high densities the system forms cluster crystals with multiply occupied lattice sites. Here, we investigate the microscopic mechanisms that lead to the formation of cluster crystals from a supercooled liquid in the low-temperature region of the phase diagram. Using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling, we calculate the free energy as a function of the size of the largest crystalline nucleus in the system, and compare our results with predictions from classical nucleation theory. Employing bond-order parameters based on a Voronoi tessellation to distinguish different crystal structures, we analyze the average composition of crystalline nuclei. We find that even for conditions where a multiply occupied fcc crystal is the thermodynamically stable phase, the nucleation into bcc cluster crystals is strongly preferred. Furthermore, we study the particle mobility in the supercooled liquid and in the cluster crystal. In the cluster crystal, the motion of individual particles is captured by a simple reaction-diffusion model introduced previously to model the kinetics of hydrogen bonds.

  2. Cluster Mechanism of Homogeneous Crystallization (Computer Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belashchenko, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) study of homogeneous crystallization of liquid rubidium is conducted with an inter-particle pair potential. The equilibrium crystallization temperature of the models was 313 K. Models consisted of 500, 998, and 1968 particles in a basic cube. The main investigation method was as follows: to detect (along the MD run) the atoms with Voronoi polyhedrons (VP) of 0608 type (“0608-atoms,” as in a bcc crystal) and to detect the bound groups of 0608-atoms (“0608-clusters”) that could play the role of the seeds in crystallization. Full crystallization was observed only at temperatures lower than 185 K with the creation of a predominant bcc crystal. The crystallization mechanism of Rb models differs drastically from the mechanism adopted in classical nucleation theory. It consists of the growth of the total number of 0608-atoms on cooling and the formation of 0608-clusters, analogous to the case of coagulation of solute for a supersaturated two-component solution. At the first stage of the process the clusters have a very loose structure (something like medusa or octopus with many tentacles) and include inside atoms with other Voronoi polyhedron types. The dimensions of clusters quickly increase and approach those of the basic cube. 0608-atoms play the leading role in the crystallization process and activate the transition of the atoms involved in the 0608-coordination. The fast growth of the maximum cluster begins after it attains a critical size (about 150 0608-atoms). The fluctuations of cluster sizes are very important in the creation of a 0608-cluster of critical (threshold) size. These fluctuations are especially large in the interval from 180 K to 185 K.

  3. Anomalous Behavior of the Homogeneous Ice Nucleation Rate in “No-Man’s Land”

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ice nucleation kinetics from near-ambient pressure water as temperature decreases below the homogeneous limit TH by cooling micrometer-sized droplets (microdroplets) evaporatively at 103–104 K/s and probing the structure ultrafast using femtosecond pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron X-ray laser. Below 232 K, we observed a slower nucleation rate increase with decreasing temperature than anticipated from previous measurements, which we suggest is due to the rapid decrease in water’s diffusivity. This is consistent with earlier findings that microdroplets do not crystallize at <227 K, but vitrify at cooling rates of 106–107 K/s. We also hypothesize that the slower increase in the nucleation rate is connected with the proposed “fragile-to-strong” transition anomaly in water. PMID:26207172

  4. Homogeneous nucleation in liquid nitrogen at negative pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidakov, V. G.; Vinogradov, V. E.; Pavlov, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    The kinetics of spontaneous cavitation in liquid nitrogen at positive and negative pressures has been studied in a tension wave formed by a compression pulse reflected from the liquid-vapor interface on a thin platinum wire heated by a current pulse. The limiting tensile stresses (Δ p = p s - p, where p s is the saturation pressure), the corresponding bubble nucleation frequencies J (1020-1022 s-1 m-3), and temperature induced nucleation frequency growth rate G T = dln J/dT have been experimentally determined. At T = 90 K, the limiting tensile stress was Δ p = 8.3 MPa, which was 4.9 MPa lower than the value corresponding to the boundary of thermodynamic stability of the liquid phase (spinodal). The measurement results were compared to classical (homogeneous) nucleation theory (CNT) with and without neglect of the dependence of the surface tension of critical bubbles on their dimensions. In the latter case, the properties of new phase nuclei were described in terms of the Van der Waals theory of capillarity. The experimental data agree well with the CNT theory when it takes into account the "size effect."

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Homogeneous Crystallization in Polymer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth from the melt of polyethylene-like polymer were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The crystallinity was determined by using the site order parameter method (SOP), which described local order degree around an atom. Snapshots of the simulations showed evolution of the nucleation and the crystal growth through SOP images clearly. The isothermal crystallization kinetics was determined at different temperatures. The rate of crystallization, Kc, and the Avrami exponents, n, were determined as a function of temperature. The forming of nucleis was traced to reveal that the nucleis were formed with more ordered cores and less ordered shells. A detailed statistical analysis of the MD snapshots and trajectories suggested conformations of the polymer chains changed smoothly from random coil to chain folded lamella in the crystallization processes.

  6. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous inorganic/organic particles representative of biomass burning: water activity, freezing temperatures, nucleation rates.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Rigg, Yannick J

    2011-02-10

    Homogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role in the formation of cirrus clouds with subsequent effects on the global radiative budget. Here we report on homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients of aqueous droplets serving as surrogates of biomass burning aerosol. Micrometer-sized (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/levoglucosan droplets with mass ratios of 10:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 and aqueous multicomponent organic droplets with and without (NH(4))(2)SO(4) under typical tropospheric temperatures and relative humidities are investigated experimentally using a droplet conditioning and ice nucleation apparatus coupled to an optical microscope with image analysis. Homogeneous freezing was determined as a function of temperature and water activity, a(w), which was set at droplet preparation conditions. The ice nucleation data indicate that minor addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the aqueous organic droplets renders the temperature dependency of water activity negligible in contrast to the case of aqueous organic solution droplets. The mean homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient derived from 8 different aqueous droplet compositions with average diameters of ∼60 μm for temperatures as low as 195 K and a(w) of 0.82-1 is 2.18 × 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with predictions of the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory when taking predictive uncertainties into account. However, the presented ice nucleation data indicate that the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory overpredicts the freezing temperatures by up to 3 K and corresponding ice nucleation rate coefficients by up to ∼2 orders of magnitude. A shift of 0.01 in a(w), which is well within the uncertainty of typical field and laboratory relative humidity measurements, brings experimental and predicted freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice

  7. Estimation of homogeneous nucleation flux via a kinetic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, C. F.; Bauer, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed kinetic model for condensation under homogeneous conditions, and the onset of unidirectional cluster growth in supersaturated gases, does not suffer from the conceptual flaws that characterize classical nucleation theory. When a full set of simultaneous rate equation is solved, a characteristic time emerges, for each cluster size, at which the production rate, and its rate of conversion to the next size (n + 1) are equal. Procedures for estimating the essential parameters are proposed; condensation fluxes J(kin) exp ss are evaluated. Since there are practical limits to the cluster size that can be incorporated in the set of simultaneous first-order differential equations, a code was developed for computing an approximate J(th) exp ss based on estimates of a 'constrained equilibrium' distribution, and identification of its minimum.

  8. Nozzle-Free Liquid Microjetting via Homogeneous Bubble Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehwa; Baac, Hyoung Won; Ok, Jong G.; Youn, Hong Seok; Guo, L. Jay

    2015-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a physical mechanism for producing liquid microjets by taking an optoacoustic approach that can convert light to sound through a carbon-nanotube-coated lens, where light from a pulsed laser is converted to high momentum sound wave. The carbon-nanotube lens can focus high-amplitude sound waves to a microspot of <1 00 μ m near the air-water interface from the water side, leading to microbubbles in water and subsequent microjets into the air. Laser-flash shadowgraphy visualizes two consecutive jets closely correlated with bubble dynamics. Because of the acoustic scattering from the interface, negative pressure amplitudes are significantly increased up to 80 MPa, even allowing homogeneous bubble nucleation. As a demonstration, this nozzle-free approach is applied to inject colored liquid into a tissue-mimicking gel as well as print a material on a glass substrate.

  9. In situ FT-IR study on the homogeneous nucleation of nanoparticles of titanium oxides from highly supersaturated vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Kimura, Yuki; Yamazaki, Tomoya

    2016-09-01

    The formation of nanoparticles of titanium oxides by homogeneous nucleation from highly supersaturated vapors was investigated by in situ Fourier transform IR spectroscopy and by observation of the resulting nanoparticles by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Titanium metal was thermally evaporated in a specially designed chamber under a gaseous atmosphere of oxygen and argon. Nanoparticles nucleated and subsequently grew as they flew freely through the oxidizing gas atmosphere. Nascent nanoparticles of titanium oxides showed a broad IR absorption band at 10-20 μm. Subsequently, the cooled nanoparticles showed a sharp crystalline anatase feature at 12.8 μm. TEM observations showed the formation of spherical anatase nanoparticles. The IR spectral evolution showed that the titanium oxides nucleated as metastable liquid droplets, and that crystallization proceeded through secondary nucleation from the supercooled liquid droplets. This suggests that history of the titanium oxide nanoparticles, such as the temperature and oxidation that they experience after nucleation, determines their polymorphic form.

  10. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important mechanism for the glaciation of mixed phase clouds and may also be relevant for cloud formation and dehydration at the cirrus cloud level. It is thought to proceed through different mechanisms, namely contact, condensation, immersion and deposition nucleation. Supposedly, deposition nucleation is the only pathway which does not involve liquid water but occurs by direct water vapor deposition on a surface. This study challenges this classical view by putting forward the hypothesis that what is called deposition nucleation is in fact homogeneous or immersion nucleation occurring in pores and cavities that may form between aggregated primary particles and fill with water at relative humidity RHw < 100% because of the inverse Kelvin effect. Evidence for this hypothesis of pore condensation and freezing (PCF) originates from a number of only loosely connected scientific areas. The prime example for PCF is ice nucleation in clay minerals and mineral dusts, for which the data base is best. Studies on freezing in confinement carried out on mesoporous silica materials such as SBA-15, SBA-16, MCM-41, zeolites and KIT have shown that homogeneous ice nucleation occurs abruptly at T=230-235 K in pores with diameters (D) of 3.5-4 nm or larger but only gradually at T=210-230 K in pores with D=2.5-3.5 nm. Melting temperatures in pores are depressed by an amount that can be described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. Water adsorption isotherms of MCM-41 show that pores with D=3.5-4 nm fill with water at RHw = 56-60% in accordance with an inverse Kelvin effect. Water in such pores should freeze homogeneously for T < 235 K even before relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) reaches ice saturation. Ice crystal growth by water vapor deposition from the gas phase is therefore expected to set in as soon as RHw > 100%. Pores with D > 7.5 nm fill with water at RHi > 100% for T < 235 K and are likely to freeze homogeneously as soon as they are

  11. Communication: Bubbles, crystals, and laser-induced nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Brandon C.; LaRue, Jerry L.; Wodtke, Alec M.; Doherty, Michael F.; Peters, Baron

    2011-05-01

    Short intense laser pulses of visible and infrared light can dramatically accelerate crystal nucleation from transparent solutions; previous studies invoke mechanisms that are only applicable for nucleation of ordered phases or high dielectric phases. However, we show that similar laser pulses induce CO2 bubble nucleation in carbonated water. Additionally, in water that is cosupersaturated with argon and glycine, argon bubbles escaping from the water can induce crystal nucleation without a laser. Our findings suggest a possible link between laser-induced nucleation of bubbles and crystals.

  12. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements and the properties of critical clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wyslouzil, Barbara E.; Strey, Reinhard; Wölk, Judith; Wilemski, Gerald; Kim, Yoojeong

    2009-10-06

    By combining a range of experimental techniques, quantitative nucleation rate measurements can now be made over {approx} 20 orders of magnitude. These rates can be used to directly test the predictions of nucleation theories or scaling laws. They can also provide direct information regarding the properties of the critical clusters - the first fragments of the new phase that are in unstable equilibrium with the supersaturated mother phase. This paper reviews recent progress in the field of vapor phase nucleation with a special focus on integrating the results from supersonic nozzle and nucleation pulse chamber studies.

  13. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-06-27

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10{sup −3} of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  14. Ice nucleation in solutions and freeze-avoiding insects-homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, Karl Erik; Kristiansen, Erlend; Pedersen, Sindre Andre; Hammel, Harold T

    2004-06-01

    This article challenges the common view that solutions and cold-hardy freeze-avoiding insects always freeze by heterogeneous nucleation. Data are presented to show that the nucleation temperatures of a variety of solutions and freeze-avoiding insects are a function of the water volume as described by the data previously published by Bigg in 1953. The article also points out that the relationships between melting point depression and depression of nucleation temperature are different for samples undergoing homogeneous nucleation and those undergoing heterogeneous nucleation. Aqueous solutions and freeze-avoiding insects display a relationship like that of homogeneously nucleated samples. It is also argued that the identity of the "impurities" assumed to cause heterogeneous nucleation in aqueous solutions and insects is obscure and that the "impurities" have features which make their existence rather unlikely.

  15. Flow-Induced Crystallization and Nucleation in Isotactic Polypropylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Flow-induced crystallization (FIC) occurs when a brief interval of strong flow precedes a temperature quench; many more nuclei form, resulting in a much more fine-grained solid morphology and better material properties. Common industrial polymer processing (injection molding) depends on FIC, which has been the subject of many experimental studies, most commonly on isotactic polypropylene (iPP). The prevailing hypothesis is that FIC results from flow aligning chains in the melt, increasing the melt free energy with respect to the crystal, hence acting like undercooling. Here, I combine experimental results for FIC and homogeneous nucleation with theoretical estimates for critical nuclei, to assess the prevailing hypothesis. Current best information supports the view that chain stretching (not just alignment) is necessary and sufficient to explain the observed increase in nucleation rate. Important puzzles remain: 1) shear applied at temperatures well above the equilibrium melting temperature Tm = 187 C is effective for FIC, and 2) a sheared sample may be held for hours above Tm, and still crystallize faster when quenched.

  16. Nacre biomineralisation: A review on the mechanisms of crystal nucleation.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    The wide diversity of biogenic minerals that is found in nature, each with its own morphology, mechanical properties and composition, is remarkable. In order to produce minerals that are optimally adapted for their function, biomineralisation usually occurs under strict cellular control. This control is exerted by specialised proteins and polysaccharides that assemble into a 3-dimensional organic matrix framework, forming a microenvironment where mineral deposition takes place. Molluscs are unique in that they use a striking variety of structural motifs to build their shells, each made of crystals with different morphologies and different calcium carbonate polymorphs. Much of want is known about mollusc shell formation comes from studies on the nacreous layer, or mother-of-pearl. In this review, we discuss two existing models on the nucleation of aragonite crystals during nacre formation: heteroepitaxial nucleation and mineral bridges. The heteroepitaxial nucleation model is based on the identification of chemical functional groups and aragonite-nucleating proteins at the centre of crystal imprints. It proposes that during nacre formation, each aragonite tablet nucleates independently on a nucleation site that is formed by acidic proteins and/or glycoproteins adsorbed on the chitin scaffold. The mineral bridges model is based on the identification of physical connections between the crystals in a stack, which results in a large number of crystals across several layers sharing the same crystallographic orientation. These observations suggest that there is one nucleation event per stack of tablets. Once the first crystal nucleates and reaches the top interlamellar matrix, it continues growing through pores, giving rise to the next layer of nacre, subsequently propagating into a stack. We compare both models and propose that they work in concert to control crystal nucleation in nacre. De novo crystal nucleation has to occur at least once per stack of aligned crystals

  17. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    PubMed

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A; Potenza, Marco A C; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-07-01

    Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10(-3) of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in lysozyme and glucose isomerase solutions are locations for crystal nucleation.

  18. Structure of supersaturated solution and crystal nucleation induced by diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooshima, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Koichi; Iwasa, Hideo; Yamamoto, Ren

    2013-06-01

    The effect of a seed crystal on nucleation of L-alanine from a quiescent supersaturated solution was investigated. When a seed crystal was not used, nucleation did not occur at least for 5 h. When a seed crystal was introduced into the supersaturated solution with careful attention to avoid convection of the solution, fine crystals appeared at the place far from the seed crystal. At that time, there was no convection at the place that fine crystals appeared. Namely, there was no possibility that those fine crystals came from the surface of seed crystal. We supposed that nucleation was induced by directional diffusion of solute molecules caused by growth of the seed crystal. In order to prove this hypothesis, we designed an experiment using an apparatus composed of two compartments divided by a dialysis membrane that L-alanine molecules could freely permeate. Two supersaturated solutions having a supersaturation ratio of 1.2 and a smaller ratio were placed in the two compartments in the absence of seed crystals. This apparatus allowed the directional diffusion of solute molecules between two solutions. Nucleation occurred within 30 min. The frequency of nucleation among 7-times repeated experiments was in proportion to the difference of supersaturation ratio between the two solutions. This result poses a new mechanism of the secondary nucleation that the directional diffusion caused by growth of existing crystals induces nucleation.

  19. High-frequency gravity waves and homogeneous ice nucleation in tropical tropopause layer cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Ueyama, Rei; Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Theopaul V.; Alexander, M. Joan; Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Woods, Sarah; Lawson, R. Paul; Kim, Ji-Eun; Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of high-frequency gravity waves on homogeneous-freezing ice nucleation in cold cirrus clouds is examined using parcel model simulations driven by superpressure balloon measurements of temperature variability experienced by air parcels in the tropical tropopause region. We find that the primary influence of high-frequency waves is to generate rapid cooling events that drive production of numerous ice crystals. Quenching of ice nucleation events by temperature tendency reversal in the highest-frequency waves does occasionally produce low ice concentrations, but the overall impact of high-frequency waves is to increase the occurrence of high ice concentrations. The simulated ice concentrations are considerably higher than indicated by in situ measurements of cirrus in the tropical tropopause region. One-dimensional simulations suggest that although sedimentation reduces mean ice concentrations, a discrepancy of about a factor of 3 with observed ice concentrations remains. Reconciliation of numerical simulations with the observed ice concentrations will require inclusion of physical processes such as heterogeneous nucleation and entrainment.

  20. Droplet crystallisation in large scale direct molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous vapor-to-liquid nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemand, J.; Tanaka, K. K.; Tanaka, H.; Angelil, R.

    2014-12-01

    We use large scale direct (NVE and NVT) molecular dynamics simulations to study phase transitions. Typical runs contain one billion atoms and run for up to 100 million time-steps. This corresponds to scales of micrometers and microseconds and allows us to resolve similar nucleation rates as probed in some laboratory experiments. In homogeneous vapor-to-liquid nucleation simulations using Lennard-Jones atoms (Diemand et al. JCP 2013) and various water models (ongoing work) we observe a second phase transition form liquid-to-solid in some of the lower temperature runs (see Tanaka et al. JCP 2011 for one such case). Here we will describe the crystallisation of these supercooled liquid-like nano-clusters in detail. We will present crystal structure, nucleation and growth rates for a range of temperatures, droplet sizes and interaction potentials and compare with model predictions. Since our liquid nano-droplets are condensing naturally out of the vapour phase, as in clouds and some experiments and industrial processes, we can address some specific questions relevant in these contexts: How does the droplet size, structure and especially its surface affect the freezing process? To what extend does the latent heat from the ongoing condensation onto the droplets surface delay and alter crystallisation? Can frozen nano-clusters grow by direct de-sublimation from the vapour, or is there always a liquid-like surface? And can they form directly without going through a liquid-like proto-cluster stage?

  1. Efficient nucleation of stardust silicates via heteromolecular homogeneous condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goumans, T. P. M.; Bromley, Stefan T.

    2012-03-01

    Dust particles, ubiquitous throughout the Universe, continuously evolve in processes closely entangled with the stellar life cycle. Dust nucleates in outflows of dying stars and is heavily processed in the journey through the interstellar medium, until it is finally subsumed in a next-generation star or its surrounding planetary system. Although the formation of silicates has been studied experimentally and theoretically for decades, the stardust nucleation process in the condensation zone of oxygen-rich stellar outflows still remains mysterious. These silicates are mostly ternary oxides consisting of O, Mg and Si, which cannot nucleate directly from gaseous monomers. Previous work has suggested that silicates form on nucleation seeds consisting of low-abundant elements or from addition of metals to SiO-nuclei. However, our extensive computational study of the thermodynamic properties of a large number of clusters shows that pure SiO nucleation is unfeasible, while heteromolecular nucleation of Mg, SiO and H2O is a plausible mechanism to form magnesium silicates under stellar outflow conditions.

  2. New metastable form of ice and its role in the homogeneous crystallization of water.

    PubMed

    Russo, John; Romano, Flavio; Tanaka, Hajime

    2014-07-01

    The homogeneous crystallization of water at low temperature is believed to occur through the direct nucleation of cubic (Ic) and hexagonal (Ih) ices. Here, we provide evidence from molecular simulations that the nucleation of ice proceeds through the formation of a new metastable phase, which we name Ice 0. We find that Ice 0 is structurally similar to the supercooled liquid, and that on growth it gradually converts into a stacking of Ice Ic and Ih. We suggest that this mechanism provides a thermodynamic explanation for the location and pressure dependence of the homogeneous nucleation temperature, and that Ice 0 controls the homogeneous nucleation of low-pressure ices, acting as a precursor to crystallization in accordance with Ostwald's step rule of phases. Our findings show that metastable crystalline phases of water may play roles that have been largely overlooked.

  3. Note: Homogeneous TIP4P/2005 ice nucleation at low supercooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2013-09-01

    We present a partial free energy profile for the homogeneous nucleation of ice using an all-atom model of water at low supercooling, at which ice growth dynamics are reasonably accessible to simulation. We demonstrate that the free energy profile is well described by classical nucleation theory, and that the nucleation barrier is entropic in origin. We also estimate to first order the temperature dependence of the interfacial free energy.

  4. Note: Homogeneous TIP4P/2005 ice nucleation at low supercooling.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2013-09-07

    We present a partial free energy profile for the homogeneous nucleation of ice using an all-atom model of water at low supercooling, at which ice growth dynamics are reasonably accessible to simulation. We demonstrate that the free energy profile is well described by classical nucleation theory, and that the nucleation barrier is entropic in origin. We also estimate to first order the temperature dependence of the interfacial free energy.

  5. Homogeneous bubble nucleation in rhyolitic magmas: An experimental study of the effect of H2O and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourtada-Bonnefoi, C. C.; Laporte, D.

    2002-04-01

    Rapid decompression experiments were performed to study homogeneous bubble nucleation in a crystal-free rhyolitic liquid at 800°C. Bubble nucleation was produced by lowering the pressure at 1-10 MPa s-1 from an initial value between 200 and 295 MPa to a final value below the volatile saturation pressure PSat. Six volatile compositions with 4.1-7.7 wt % H2O and 10-1200 ppm CO2 were investigated. For each composition we determined the critical pressure PHoN below which homogeneous nucleation can proceed. The samples quenched below PHoN showed a nucleated core with a large number of uniformly spaced bubbles. With decreasing pressure, bubble number densities increased from <1011 m-3 (for samples quenched just below PHoN) to >1015 m-3. The degree of supersaturation required for homogeneous nucleation, ΔPHoN (= PSat - PHoN), increased with decreasing H2O content or increasing CO2 content. Huge values of ΔPHoN, >=135 to 310 MPa, were measured in the H2O-poor compositions (4.1-4.6 wt % H2O; 50-1100 ppm CO2); much lower values from ~60 to 160 MPa were obtained in the H2O-rich compositions (7.0-7.7 wt % H2O; 10-630 ppm CO2). The high ΔPHoN in liquids with 4-5 wt % H2O should result in the buildup of large degrees of supersaturation during magma ascent, a very late nucleation event, and a rapid (explosive) vesiculation. By contrast, rhyolitic liquids with much larger water contents have higher saturation pressures and much lower ΔPHoN: bubble nucleation may therefore occur at depth in the volcanic conduit favoring a subsequent near-equilibrium degassing.

  6. Control of Protein Crystal Nucleation and Growth Using Stirring Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Ai; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Warizaya, Masaichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2004-11-01

    We have previously developed a protein crystallization technique using a stirring protein solution and revealed that (i) continuous stirring prevents excess spontaneous nucleation and accelerates the growth of protein crystals and (ii) prestirring (solution stirring in advance) promotes the crystal nucleation of hen egg-white lysozyme. In bovine adenosine deaminase (ADA) crystallization, continuous stirring improves the crystal quality but elongates the nucleation time. In this paper, in order to control both the crystal nucleation and growth of ADA using a Micro-Stirring technique, we carried out five different stirring patterns such as (i) no stirring, (ii) continuous stirring, (iii) prestirring, (iv) poststirring (stirring late in the growth period) and (v) restirring (combined pre- and poststirring). The results showed that high-quality well-shaped crystals were obtained under the continuous stirring and restirring conditions and the nucleation time under the prestirring and restirring conditions was shorter than that under the continuous stirring and poststirring conditions. Consequently, high-quality crystals were promptly obtained under the restirring condition. These results suggest that we are able to control both the nucleation and growth of protein crystals with the stirring techniques.

  7. Nucleation of crystals that are mixed composites of all three polymorphs in the Gaussian core model.

    PubMed

    Mithen, J P; Callison, A J; Sear, R P

    2015-06-14

    We present results of computer simulations of homogeneous crystal nucleation in the Gaussian core model. In our simulations, we study the competition between the body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered-cubic (fcc), and hexagonal-close-packed crystal phases. We find that the crystal nuclei that form from the metastable fluid phase are typically "mixed"; they do not consist of a single crystal polymorph. Furthermore, when the fcc phase is stable or fcc and bcc phases are equally stable, this mixed nature is found to persist far beyond the size at the top of the nucleation barrier, that is, far into what would be considered the growth (rather than nucleation) regime. In this region, the polymorph that forms is therefore selected long after nucleation. This has implications. When nucleation is slow, it will be the rate-limiting step for crystallization. Then, the step that determines the time scale for crystallisation is different from the step that controls which polymorph forms. This means that they can be independently controlled. Also between nucleation and polymorph selection, there is a growing phase that is clearly crystalline not fluid, but this phase cannot be assigned to any one polymorph.

  8. Nucleation of crystals that are mixed composites of all three polymorphs in the Gaussian core model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithen, J. P.; Callison, A. J.; Sear, R. P.

    2015-06-01

    We present results of computer simulations of homogeneous crystal nucleation in the Gaussian core model. In our simulations, we study the competition between the body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered-cubic (fcc), and hexagonal-close-packed crystal phases. We find that the crystal nuclei that form from the metastable fluid phase are typically "mixed"; they do not consist of a single crystal polymorph. Furthermore, when the fcc phase is stable or fcc and bcc phases are equally stable, this mixed nature is found to persist far beyond the size at the top of the nucleation barrier, that is, far into what would be considered the growth (rather than nucleation) regime. In this region, the polymorph that forms is therefore selected long after nucleation. This has implications. When nucleation is slow, it will be the rate-limiting step for crystallization. Then, the step that determines the time scale for crystallisation is different from the step that controls which polymorph forms. This means that they can be independently controlled. Also between nucleation and polymorph selection, there is a growing phase that is clearly crystalline not fluid, but this phase cannot be assigned to any one polymorph.

  9. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    SciTech Connect

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J; Evans, J W; Thiel, P A

    2014-11-01

    We observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  10. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    DOE PAGES

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; ...

    2014-11-05

    In this study, we observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  11. Superheating and Homogeneous Single Bubble Nucleation in a Solid-State Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Gaku; Levine, Edlyn V.; Hoogerheide, David P.; Burns, Michael M.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate extreme superheating and single bubble nucleation in an electrolyte solution within a nanopore in a thin silicon nitride membrane. The high temperatures are achieved by Joule heating from a highly focused ionic current induced to flow through the pore by modest voltage biases. Conductance, nucleation, and bubble evolution are monitored electronically and optically. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are achieved just before bubble nucleation with the system at atmospheric pressure. Bubble nucleation is homogeneous and highly reproducible. This nanopore approach more generally suggests broad application to the excitation, detection, and characterization of highly metastable states of matter. PMID:25062192

  12. Homogeneous condensation - Freezing nucleation rate measurements for small water droplets in an expansion cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, D. E.; Anderson, R. J.; Kassner, J. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data on ice nucleation, presented in an earlier paper, are analyzed to yield information about the homogeneous nucleation rate of ice from supercooled liquid and the heights of energy barriers to that nucleation. The experiment consisted of using an expansion cloud chamber to nucleate from the vapor a cloud of supercooled pure water drops and the observation of the fraction of drops which subsequently froze. The analysis employed standard classical homogeneous nucleation theory. The data are used to extract the first experimental measurement (albeit indirect) of the activation energy for the transfer of a water molecule across the liquid-ice interface at temperatures near -40 C. The results provide further evidence that the local liquid structure becomes more icelike as the temperature is lowered.

  13. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence can be used to study protein crystal nucleation through methods such as anisotropy, quenching, and resonance energy transfer (FRET), to follow pH and ionic strength changes, and follow events occurring at the growth interface. We have postulated, based upon a range of experimental evidence that the growth unit of tetragonal hen egg white lysozyme is an octamer. Several fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme have been prepared. The fluorescent probes lucifer yellow (LY), cascade blue, and 5-((2-aminoethyl)aminonapthalene-1-sulfonic acid (EDANS), have been covalently attached to ASP 101. All crystallize in the characteristic tetragonal form, indicating that the bound probes are likely laying within the active site cleft. Crystals of the LY and EDANS derivatives have been found to diffract to at least 1.7 A. A second group of derivatives is to the N-terminal amine group, and these do not crystallize as this site is part of the contact region between the adjacent 43 helix chains. However derivatives at these sites would not interfere with formation of the 43 helices in solution. Preliminary FRET studies have been carried out using N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and LY (Ex -425 nm, Em 525 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1 M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10(exp -5) M respectively). The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence intensity of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations reflected in the lower solubility. The calculated average distance between any two protein molecules at 5 x 10(exp -6) M is approximately 70nm, well beyond the

  14. Atomistic simulation of the homogeneous nucleation and of the growth of N2 crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyssale, Jean-Marc; Delhommelle, Jerome; Millot, Claude

    2005-03-01

    We report on a computer simulation study of the early stages of the crystallization of molecular nitrogen. First, we study how homogeneous nucleation takes place in supercooled liquid N2 for a moderate degree of supercooling. Using the umbrella sampling technique, we determine the free energy barrier of formation for a critical nucleus of N2. We show that, in accord with Ostwald's rule of stages, the structure of the critical nucleus is predominantly that of a metastable polymorph (α-N2 for the state point investigated). We then monitor the evolution of several critical nuclei through a series of unbiased molecular dynamics trajectories. The growth of N2 crystallites is accompanied by a structural evolution toward the stable polymorph β-N2. The microscopic mechanism underlying this evolution qualitatively differs from that reported previously. We do not observe any dissolution or reorganization of the α-like core of the nucleus. On the contrary, we show that α-like and β-like blocks coexist in postcritical nuclei. We relate the structural evolution to a greater adsorption rate of β-like molecules on the surface and show that this transition actually starts well within the precritical regime. We also carefully investigate the effect of the system size on the height of the free energy barrier of nucleation and on the structure and size of the critical nucleus.

  15. Effect of an electric field on nucleation and growth of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, V. M.; Guchenko, S. A.; Gyngazova, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the electric field strength on nucleation and growth of the crystals of ammonium halides and alkali metal sulfates has been studied. The optimal electric field strength for NH4Cl and NH4Br crystals was found to be 15 kV/cm, and for NH4I, it equaled 10 kV/cm. No effect of the electric field strength on the crystal growth was found for alkali metal sulfates. This difference is analyzed in terms of the crystal growth thermodynamics. In case, when the electric field is small and the Gibbs energy is of a significant value, the influence of the electric field at the crystal growth is negligible. A method to estimate the critical radius of homogeneous nucleation of the crystal is suggested.

  16. Toward the theory of homogeneous nucleation and its parameterization for cloud models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Vitaly; Sassen, Kenneth

    Following the classical approach in homogeneous nucleation theory, a general but simple expression for the homogeneous freezing rate is derived with account for solution and curvature effects, and applied to the examples of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid solutions. After showing that this method compares well with other approaches, a parameterization suitable for use in various cloud models is discussed.

  17. The microscopic features of heterogeneous ice nucleation may affect the macroscopic morphology of atmospheric ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Cox, Stephen J; Raza, Zamaan; Kathmann, Shawn M; Slater, Ben; Michaelides, Angelos

    2013-01-01

    It is surprisingly difficult to freeze water. Almost all ice that forms under "mild" conditions (temperatures > -40 degrees C) requires the presence of a nucleating agent--a solid particle that facilitates the freezing process--such as clay mineral dust, soot or bacteria. In a computer simulation, the presence of such ice nucleating agents does not necessarily alleviate the difficulties associated with forming ice on accessible timescales. Nevertheless, in this work we present results from molecular dynamics simulations in which we systematically compare homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, using the atmospherically important clay mineral kaolinite as our model ice nucleating agent. From our simulations, we do indeed find that kaolinite is an excellent ice nucleating agent but that contrary to conventional thought, non-basal faces of ice can nucleate at the basal face of kaolinite. We see that in the liquid phase, the kaolinite surface has a drastic effect on the density profile of water, with water forming a dense, tightly bound first contact layer. Monitoring the time evolution of the water density reveals that changes away from the interface may play an important role in the nucleation mechanism. The findings from this work suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleating agents may not only enhance the ice nucleation rate, but also alter the macroscopic structure of the ice crystals that form.

  18. Improved quasi-unary nucleation model for binary H2SO4-H2O homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fangqun

    2007-08-01

    Aerosol nucleation events have been observed at a variety of locations worldwide, and may have significant climatic and health implications. Binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) of H2SO4 and H2O is the foundation of recently proposed nucleation mechanisms involving additional species such as ammonia, ions, and organic compounds, and it may dominate atmospheric nucleation under certain conditions. We have shown in previous work that H2SO4-H2O BHN can be treated as a quasi-unary nucleation (QUN) process involving H2SO4 in equilibrium with H2O vapor, and we have developed a self-consistent kinetic model for H2SO4-H2O nucleation. Here, the QUN approach is improved, and an analytical expression yielding H2SO4-H2O QUN rates is derived. Two independent measurements related to monomer hydration are used to constrain the equilibrium constants for this process, which reduces a major source of uncertainty. It is also shown that the capillarity approximation may lead to a large error in the calculated Gibbs free energy change for the evaporation of H2SO4 molecules from small H2SO4-H2O clusters, which affects the accuracy of predicted BHN nucleation rates. The improved QUN model—taking into account the recently measured energetics of small clusters—is thermodynamically more robust. Moreover, predicted QUN nucleation rates are in better agreement with available experimental data than rates calculated using classical H2SO4-H2O BHN theory.

  19. A physically constrained classical description of the homogeneous nucleation of ice in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, Thomas; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2016-12-01

    Liquid water can persist in a supercooled state to below 238 K in the Earth's atmosphere, a temperature range where homogeneous nucleation becomes increasingly probable. However, the rate of homogeneous ice nucleation in supercooled water is poorly constrained, in part, because supercooled water eludes experimental scrutiny in the region of the homogeneous nucleation regime where it can exist only fleetingly. Here we present a new parameterization of the rate of homogeneous ice nucleation based on classical nucleation theory. In our approach, we constrain the key terms in classical theory, i.e., the diffusion activation energy and the ice-liquid interfacial energy, with physically consistent parameterizations of the pertinent quantities. The diffusion activation energy is related to the translational self-diffusion coefficient of water for which we assess a range of descriptions and conclude that the most physically consistent fit is provided by a power law. The other key term is the interfacial energy between the ice embryo and supercooled water whose temperature dependence we constrain using the Turnbull correlation, which relates the interfacial energy to the difference in enthalpy between the solid and liquid phases. The only adjustable parameter in our model is the absolute value of the interfacial energy at one reference temperature. That value is determined by fitting this classical model to a selection of laboratory homogeneous ice nucleation data sets between 233.6 K and 238.5 K. On extrapolation to temperatures below 233 K, into a range not accessible to standard techniques, we predict that the homogeneous nucleation rate peaks between about 227 and 231 K at a maximum nucleation rate many orders of magnitude lower than previous parameterizations suggest. This extrapolation to temperatures below 233 K is consistent with the most recent measurement of the ice nucleation rate in micrometer-sized droplets at temperatures of 227-232 K on very short time scales

  20. Kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth in Pd(40)Ni(40)P(20) glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drehman, A. J.; Greer, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of Pd(40)Ni(40)P(20) glass, produced by cooling the melt at 1 or 800 K/s, are heated in a differential scanning calorimeter to determine the crystallization kinetics. Optical microscopy shows that eutectic crystallization proceeds both by growth from the surface of the samples and by the growth of spherical regions around preexisting nuclei in the interior. A modified Kissinger (1957) analysis is used to obtain the activation energy for crystal growth (3.49 eV). The steady state homogeneous nucleation frequency at 590 K is about 10 million/cu m per sec. This is estimated to be the maximum nucleation frequency: it is too low to account for the observed population of quenched-in nuclei, which are therefore presumed to be heterogeneous. The major practical obstacle to glass formation in this system is heterogeneous nucleation.

  1. Theory of homogeneous nucleation - A chemical kinetic view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. H.; Qiu, H.

    1986-01-01

    A simple function with two undetermined parameters has been used in place of the Thomson-Gibbs relation to relate the activation energy of the vaporization reaction to cluster size. The parameters are iterated to assume optimum values in numerical computation so experimental data may be correlated. Calculations show this approach closely predicts and correlates available data for water, benzene, and ethanol. The nucleation formulism is redeveloped with an emphasis on the chemical kinetic view. Surface tension of the liquid and free energy of droplet formation are not used in its derivation.

  2. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    -association process is a function of the protein concentration relative to the saturation concentration, and observing it in dilute solution (conc. less than or equal to 10(exp -5)M) requires that the experiments be performed under low solubility conditions, i.e., low temperatures and high salt concentrations. Data from preliminary steady state FRET studies with N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA-lys, donor, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and asp101 LY-lys as an acceptor showed a consistent trend of decreasing donor fluorescence intensity with increasing total protein concentration. The FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C. The corresponding C(sub sat) values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approx. 3.3 and approx. 2.5 x 10(exp -5)M respectively). The donor fluorescence decrease is more pronounced at7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations as reflected in the lower solubility. Results from these and other ongoing studies will be discussed in conjunction with an emerging model for how tetragonal lysozyme crystals nucleate and the relevance of that model to other proteins.

  3. Secondary nucleation kinetcs of ammonium sulfate in a CMSMPR crystallizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudey, P. J.; van Rosmalen, G. M.; de Jong, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    Secondary nucleation in suspension is most frequently modelled by an empirical "power-law" relating the nucleation rate to supersaturation and to the slurry density of the crystals already present in the solution. In this paper kinetic rate equations are developed based on a general modelling of secondary nucleation employing two mechanisms, surface breeding and mechanical breeding, each consisting of sequential steps. The specific equations gained in this way are used to determine the breeding mechanisms prevailing in suspension crystallization. Ammonium sulfate was used as a test case. For this system it is concluded that surface breeding is the predominant mechanism in both evaporation and cooling experiments.

  4. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Protein Crystals on Fluorinated Layered Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Ino, Keita; Udagawa, Itsumi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kubota, Munehiro; Kurosaka, Keiichi; Arai, Kazuhito; Seki, Yasutaka; Nogawa, Masaya; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Taguchi, Hayao; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface. PMID:21818343

  5. The decisive role of free water in determining homogenous ice nucleation behavior of aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Lishan; Li, Chenxi; Cao, Zexian

    2016-05-26

    It is a challenging issue to quantitatively characterize how the solute and pressure affect the homogeneous ice nucleation in a supercooled solution. By measuring the glass transition behavior of solutions, a universal feature of water-content dependence of glass transition temperature is recognized, which can be used to quantify hydration water in solutions. The amount of free water can then be determined for water-rich solutions, whose mass fraction, Xf, is found to serve as a universal relevant parameter for characterizing the homogeneous ice nucleation temperature, the meting temperature of primary ice, and even the water activity of solutions of electrolytes and smaller organic molecules. Moreover, the effects of hydrated solute and pressure on ice nucleation is comparable, and the pressure, when properly scaled, can be incorporated into the universal parameter Xf. These results help establish the decisive role of free water in determining ice nucleation and other relevant properties of aqueous solutions.

  6. The decisive role of free water in determining homogenous ice nucleation behavior of aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Lishan; Li, Chenxi; Cao, Zexian

    2016-01-01

    It is a challenging issue to quantitatively characterize how the solute and pressure affect the homogeneous ice nucleation in a supercooled solution. By measuring the glass transition behavior of solutions, a universal feature of water-content dependence of glass transition temperature is recognized, which can be used to quantify hydration water in solutions. The amount of free water can then be determined for water-rich solutions, whose mass fraction, Xf, is found to serve as a universal relevant parameter for characterizing the homogeneous ice nucleation temperature, the meting temperature of primary ice, and even the water activity of solutions of electrolytes and smaller organic molecules. Moreover, the effects of hydrated solute and pressure on ice nucleation is comparable, and the pressure, when properly scaled, can be incorporated into the universal parameter Xf. These results help establish the decisive role of free water in determining ice nucleation and other relevant properties of aqueous solutions. PMID:27225427

  7. Bubble evolution and properties in homogeneous nucleation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg; Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the properties of naturally formed nanobubbles in Lennard-Jones molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-to-vapor nucleation in the boiling and the cavitation regimes. The large computational volumes provide a realistic environment at unchanging average temperature and liquid pressure, which allows us to accurately measure properties of bubbles from their inception as stable, critically sized bubbles, to their continued growth into the constant speed regime. Bubble gas densities are up to 50 % lower than the equilibrium vapor densities at the liquid temperature, yet quite close to the gas equilibrium density at the lower gas temperatures measured in the simulations: The latent heat of transformation results in bubble gas temperatures up to 25 % below those of the surrounding bulk liquid. In the case of rapid bubble growth—typical for the cavitation regime—compression of the liquid outside the bubble leads to local temperature increases of up to 5 %, likely significant enough to alter the surface tension as well as the local viscosity. The liquid-vapor bubble interface is thinner than expected from planar coexistence simulations by up to 50 % . Bubbles near the critical size are extremely nonspherical, yet they quickly become spherical as they grow. The Rayleigh-Plesset description of bubble-growth gives good agreement in the cavitation regime.

  8. Nucleation and Convection Effects in Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilow, Peter G.

    1998-01-01

    Our work under this grant has significantly contributed to the goals of the NASA supported protein crystallization program. We have achieved the main objectives of the proposed work, as outlined in the original proposal: (1) We have provided important insight into protein nucleation and crystal growth mechanisms to facilitate a rational approach to protein crystallization; (2) We have delineated the factors that currently limit the x-ray diffraction resolution of protein crystals, and their correlation to crystallization conditions; (3) We have developed novel technologies to study and monitor protein crystal nucleation and growth processes, in order to increase the reproducibility and yield of protein crystallization. We have published 17 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and books and made more than 15 invited and 9 contributed presentations of our results at international and national scientific meetings.

  9. Nucleation and crystal growth in laser patterned lines in glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Honma, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Laser-induced crystallization is a new method for the design and control of the crystallization of glasses and opens a new door in the study of nucleation and crystal growth in glasses. Nonlinear optical Sm-doped -BaB2O4 (-BBO) crystal lines were patterned by continuous wave Yb:YVO4 fiber laser (wavelength 1080 nm) in 8Sm2O3-42BaO-50B2O3 glass as an example, and nucleation and crystal growth behaviors in the laser-patterned bending and crossing lines were examined. It was confirmed that the growth of c-axis oriented -BBO crystals follows along the laser scanning direction even if laser scanning direction changes. The model of self-organized homo-epitaxial crystal growth was demonstrated for the orientation of -BBO crystals at the crossing point of two lines, in which the first crystal line at the crossing point acts as nucleation site for the second crystal line. This study proposes a new crystal growth technology.

  10. Twin nucleation and migration in FeCr single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Patriarca, L.; Abuzaid, Wael; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Maier, Hans J.; Chumlyakov, Y.

    2013-01-15

    Tension and compression experiments were conducted on body-centered cubic Fe -47.8 at pct. Cr single crystals. The critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) magnitudes for slip nucleation, twin nucleation and twin migration were established. We show that the nucleation of slip occurs at a CRSS of about 88 MPa, while twinning nucleates at a CRSS of about 191 MPa with an associated load drop. Following twin nucleation, twin migration proceeds at a CRSS that is lower than the initiation stress ( Almost-Equal-To 114-153 MPa). The experimental results of the nucleation stresses indicate that the Schmid law holds to a first approximation for the slip and twin nucleation cases, but to a lesser extent for twin migration particularly when considerable slip strains preceded twinning. The CRSSs were determined experimentally using digital image correlation (DIC) in conjunction with electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD). The DIC measurements enabled pinpointing the precise stress on the stress-strain curves where twins or slip were activated. The crystal orientations were obtained using EBSD and used to determine the activated twin and slip systems through trace analysis. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Digital image correlation allows to capture slip/twin initiation for bcc FeCr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal orientations from EBSD allow slip/twin system indexing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleation of slip always precedes twinning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twin growth is sustained with a lower stress than required for nucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twin-slip interactions provide high hardening at the onset of plasticity.

  11. Self Nucleation and Crystallization of Poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David; Cebe, Peggy

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a hydrophilic, biodegradable, semi-crystalline polymer with uses ranging from textiles to medicine. Film samples of PVA were investigated to assess crystallization and melting behavior during self-nucleation experiments, and thermal degradation, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, respectively. TG results show that degradation occurred at temperatures close to the observed peak melting temperature of 223 C. Using conventional DSC, PVA was heated at a rate of 10 C/min to various self-nucleation temperatures, Ts, within its melting range, briefly annealed, cooled and reheated. Three distinct crystallization regimes were observed upon cooling, depending upon self nucleation temperature. At low values of Ts, below 227 C, PVA only partially melts; residual crystal anneals while new, less perfect crystals form during cooling. Between 228 C and 234 C, PVA was found to crystallize exclusively by self-nucleation. For Ts above 235 C the PVA melts completely. Fast scanning chip-based calorimetry was used to heat and cool at 2000 K/s, to prevent degradation. Results of self nucleation experiments using fast scanning and conventional DSC will be compared. NSF DMR-1206010.

  12. Extended study of molecular dynamics simulation of homogeneous vapor-liquid nucleation of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Koishi, Takahiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2007-12-01

    Using the simple point charge/extended water model, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous vapor-liquid nucleation at various values of temperature T and supersaturation S, from which the nucleation rate J, critical nucleus size n*, and the cluster formation free energy ΔG were derived. As well as providing lots of simulation data, the results were compared with theories on homogeneous nucleation, including the classical, semiphenomenological, and scaled models, but none of these gave a satisfactory explanation for our results. It was found that two main factors made the theories fail: (1) The average cluster structure including the nonspherical shape and the core structure that is not like the bulk liquid and (2) the forward rate which is larger than assumed by the theories by about one order of magnitude. The quantitative evaluation of these factors is left for future investigations.

  13. Free energy landscapes for homogeneous nucleation of ice for a monatomic water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2012-02-01

    We simulate the homogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled liquid water at 220 K in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble using the MW monatomic water potential. Monte Carlo simulations using umbrella sampling are performed in order to determine the nucleation free energy barrier. We find the Gibbs energy profile to be relatively consistent with that predicted by classical nucleation theory; the free energy barrier to nucleation was determined to be ˜18 kBT and the critical nucleus comprised ˜85 ice particles. Growth from the supercooled liquid gives clusters that are predominantly cubic, whilst starting with a pre-formed subcritical nucleus of cubic or hexagonal ice results in the growth of predominantly that phase of ice only.

  14. Homogenous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water at close to atmospherically relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, D.; Neitola, K.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Petäjä, T.; Vanhanen, J.; Sipilä, M.; Paasonen, P.; Kulmala, M.; Lihavainen, H.

    2011-06-01

    In this study the homogeneous nucleation rates in the system of sulfuric acid and water were measured by using a flow tube technique. The goal was to directly compare particle formation rates obtained from atmospheric measurements with nucleation rates of freshly nucleated particles measured with particle size magnifier (PSM) which has detection efficiency of unity for particles having mobility diameter of 1.5 nm. The gas phase sulfuric acid concentration in this study was measured with the chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), commonly used in field measurements. The wall losses of sulfuric acid were estimated from measured concentration profiles along the flow tube. The initial concentrations of sulfuric acid estimated from loss measurements ranged from 108 to 3 × 109 molecules cm-3. The nucleation rates obtained in this study cover about three orders of magnitude from 10-1 to 102 cm-3 s-1 for commercial ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) TSI model 3025A and from 101 to 104 cm-3 s-1 for PSM. The nucleation rates and the slopes (dlnJ/dln [H2SO4]) show satisfactory agreement when compared to empirical kinetic and activation models and the latest atmospheric nucleation data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental work providing temperature dependent nucleation rate measurements using a high efficiency particle counter with a cut-off-size of 1.5 nm together with direct measurements of gas phase sulfuric acid concentration.

  15. Surface or internal nucleation and crystallization of glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höland, W.; Rheinberger, V. M.; Ritzberger, C.; Apel, E.

    2013-07-01

    Fluoroapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) was precipitated in glass-ceramics via internal crystallization of base glasses. The crystals grew with a needle-like morphology in the direction of the crystallographic c-axis. Two different reaction mechanisms were analyzed: precipitation via a disordered primary apatite crystals and a solid state parallel reaction to rhenanite (NaCaPO4) precipitation. In contrast to the internal nucleation used in the formation of fluoroapatite, surface crystallization was induced to precipitate a phosphate-free oxyapatite of NaY9(SiO4)6O2-type. Internal nucleation and crystallization have been shown to be a very useful tool for developing high-strength lithium disilicate (Li2Si2O5) glass-ceramics. A very controlled process was conducted to transform the lithium metasilicate glass-ceramic precursor material into the final product of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic without the major phase of the precursor material. The combination of all these methods allowed the driving forces of the internal nucleation and crystallization mechanisms to be explained. An amorphous phosphate primary phase was discovered in the process. Nucleation started at the interface between the amorphous phosphate phase and the glass matrix. The final products of all these glass-ceramics are biomaterials for dental restoration showing special optical properties, e.g. translucence and color close to dental teeth.

  16. Homogeneous ice freezing temperatures and ice nucleation rates of aqueous ammonium sulfate and aqueous levoglucosan particles for relevant atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel Alexander; Lopez, Miguel David

    2009-09-28

    Homogeneous ice nucleation from micrometre-sized aqueous (NH4)2SO4 and aqueous levoglucosan particles is studied employing the optical microscope technique. A new experimental method is introduced that allows us to control the initial water activity of the aqueous droplets. Homogeneous ice freezing temperatures and ice melting temperatures of these aqueous solution droplets, 10 to 80 microm in diameter, are determined. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous (NH4)2SO4 particles 5-39 wt% in concentration and aqueous levoglucosan particles with initial water activities of 0.85-0.99 yield upper limits of the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients of up to 1x10(10) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived homogeneous ice freezing temperatures and upper limits of the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are compared with corresponding predictions of the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory [T. Koop, B. P. Luo, A. Tsias and T. Peter, Nature, 2000, 406, 611]. It is found that the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory can capture the experimentally derived ice freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients of the aqueous (NH4)2SO4 and aqueous levoglucosan particles. However, the level of agreement between experimentally derived and predicted values, in particular for homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, crucially depends on the extrapolation method to obtain water activities at corresponding freezing temperatures. It is suggested that the combination of experimentally derived ice freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients can serve as a better validation of the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory than when compared to the observation of homogeneous ice freezing temperatures alone. The atmospheric implications with regard to the application of the water-activity-based ice nucleation theory and derivation of maximum ice particle production rates are briefly discussed.

  17. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    1999-01-01

    The following list summarizes the most important results that have been consistently reported for glass forming melts in microgravity: (1) Glass formation is enhanced for melts prepared in space; (2) Glasses prepared in microgravity are more chemically homogeneous and contain fewer and smaller chemically heterogeneous regions than identical glasses prepared on earth; (3) Heterogeneities that are deliberately introduced such as Pt particles are more uniformly distributed in a glass melted in space than in a glass melted on earth; (4) Glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization and have a higher mechanical strength and threshold energy for radiation damage; and (5) Glasses crystallized in space have a different microstructure, finer grains more uniformly distributed, than equivalent samples crystallized on earth. The preceding results are not only scientifically interesting, but they have considerable practical implications. These results suggest that the microgravity environment is advantageous for developing new and improved glasses and glass-ceramics that are difficult to prepare on earth. However, there is no suitable explanation at this time for why a glass melted in microgravity will be more chemically homogeneous and more resistant to crystallization than a glass melted on earth. A fundamental investigation of melt homogenization, nucleation, and crystal growth processes in glass forming melts in microgravity is important to understanding these consistently observed, but yet unexplained results. This is the objective of the present research. A lithium disilicate (Li2O.2SiO2) glass will be used for this investigation, since it is a well studied system, and the relevant thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for nucleation and crystal growth at 1-g are available. The results from this research are expected to improve our present understanding of the fundamental mechanism of nucleation and crystal growth in melts and liquids, and to lead

  18. Direct Calculation of the Rate of Homogeneous Ice Nucleation for a Molecular Model of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Debenedetti, Pablo

    Ice formation is ubiquitous in nature, with important consequences in many systems and environments. However, its intrinsic kinetics and mechanism are difficult to discern with experiments. Molecular simulations of ice nucleation are also challenging due to sluggish structural relaxation and the large nucleation barriers, and direct calculations of homogeneous nucleation rates have only been achieved for mW, a monoatomic coarse-grained model of water. For the more realistic molecular models, only indirect estimates have been obtained by assuming the validity of classical nucleation theory. Here, we use a coarse-grained variant of a path sampling approach known as forward-flux sampling to perform the first direct calculation of the homogeneous nucleation rate for TIP4P/Ice, which is the most accurate water model for studying ice polymorphs. By using a novel topological order parameter, we are able to identify a freezing mechanism that involves a competition between cubic and hexagonal ice polymorphs. In this competition, cubic ice wins as its growth leads to more compact crystallites

  19. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    This flight definition project has the specific objective of investigating the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in high temperature inorganic oxide, glass forming melts in microgravity. It is related to one1 of our previous NASA projects that was concerned with glass formation for high temperature containerless melts in microgravity. The previous work culminated in two experiments which were conducted aboard the space shuttle in 1983 and 1985 and which consisted of melting (at 1500 C) and cooling levitated 6 to 8 mm diameter spherical samples in a Single Axis Acoustic Levitator (SAAL) furnace. Compared to other types of materials, there have been relatively few experiments, 6 to 8, conducted on inorganic glasses in space. These experiments have been concerned with mass transport (alkali diffusion), containerless melting, critical cooling rate for glass formation, chemical homogeneity, fiber pulling, and crystallization of glass forming melts. One of the most important and consistent findings in all of these experiments has been that the glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization (better glass former) and more chemically homogeneous than equivalent glasses made on earth (1g). The chemical composition of the melt appears relatively unimportant since the same general results have been reported for oxide, fluoride and chalcogenide melts. These results for space-processed glasses have important implications, since glasses with a higher resistance to crystallization or higher chemical homogeneity than those attainable on earth can significantly advance applications in areas such as fiber optics communications, high power laser glasses, and other photonic devices where glasses are the key functional materials. The classical theories for nucleation and crystal growth for a glass or melt do not contain any parameter that is directly dependent upon the g-value, so it is not readily apparent why glasses prepared in microgravity should be

  20. Prediction of the homogeneous droplet nucleation by the density gradient theory and PC-SAFT equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planková, Barbora; Hrubý, Jan; Vinš, Václav

    2013-05-01

    We combined the density gradient theory (DGT) with the PC-SAFT and Peng-Robinson equations of state to model the homogeneous droplet nucleation and compared it to the classical nucleation theory (CNT) and experimental data. We also consider the effect of capillary waves on the surface tension. DGT predicts nucleation rates smaller than the CNT and slightly improves the temperature-dependent deviation of the predicted and experimental nucleation rates.

  1. Examination of surface nucleation during the growth of long alkane crystals by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Alexander; Rutledge, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    Crystal growth from the melt of n-pentacontane (C50) was studied by molecular dynamics simulation using a validated united atom model. By quenching below the melting temperature of C50 (370 K), propagation of the crystal growth front into the C50 melt from a crystalline polyethylene surface was observed. By tracking the location of the midpoint in the orientational order parameter profile between the crystal and melt, crystal growth rates between 0.015-0.040 m/s were observed, for quench depths of 10 to 70 K below the melting point. In this work, surface nucleation is identified with the formation of 2D clusters of crystalline sites within layers parallel to the propagating growth front, by analogy to the formation of 3D clusters in primary, homogeneous nucleation. These surface nucleation events were tracked over several layers and numerous simulations, and a mean first passage time analysis was employed to estimate critical nucleus sizes, induction times and rates for surface nucleation. Based on new insights provided by the detailed molecular trajectories obtained from simulation, the classical theory proposed by Lauritzen and Hoffman is re-examined.

  2. Sizes and spatial relationships of crystals in granitic plutons: Exploring the crystallization gaps, heterogeneous nucleation, and mechanical clustering of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špillar, V.; Dolejš, D.

    2012-04-01

    Quantitative measurements on magmatic textures provide an important insight into nucleation and growth rates as well as mechanical effects such as crystal settling and melt extraction in magma reservoirs. Crystal size distribution (CSD) measurements and spatial analysis are routinely applied to dilute volcanic suspensions but comparable data on holocrystalline multiphase plutonic rocks are uncommon. We present quantitative description of CSDs and spatial relationships for all rock-forming minerals from an intrusive suite of the Fichtelgebirge/Smrčiny granite batholith in central Europe. This composite body represents two spatially unrelated chambers, consisting of peraluminous biotite, two-mica, and tourmaline-muscovite granites, crystallized as texturally diverse batches covering equigranular, serial porphyritic, and hiatal porphyritic fine- to coarse-grained types. All granite samples exhibit straight to concave-up CSDs in the natural log of population density vs. crystal size projection. Straight CSDs were only found in fine-grained biotite-rich granites representing early crystallizing roof facies of the batholith. For all other samples, the slope decreases from -65 to nearly 0 mm-1 as grain size increases. The curvature can result from superposition of two quasilinear segments. It cannot be produced by two separate crystallization events because the population of larger grains is about 10 times more abundant by volume than the fine one. Instead, we propose that the concave-up CSDs developed in situ, with enhanced nucleation and/or reduced growth rates during the final stage of solidification. Spatial analysis and measurements of contact relationships reveal significant clustering of crystals except near the roof of the batholith. The clustering index decreases to 0.6 for the smallest crystals (random = 1), Ripley's Ľ-function reaches 0.8 mm, and the clusters are mineral sensitive: pairs of like phases appear to be more clustered than the unlike pairs. The

  3. Homogeneous nucleation and growth in supersaturated zinc vapor investigated by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, F.; Kraska, T.

    2007-12-01

    Homogeneous nucleation and growth of zinc from supersaturated vapor are investigated by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in the temperature range from 400to800K and for a supersaturation ranging from logS =2 to 11. Argon is added to the vapor phase as carrier gas to remove the latent heat from the forming zinc clusters. A new parametrization of the embedded atom method for zinc is employed for the interaction potential model. The simulation data are analyzed with respect to the nucleation rates and the critical cluster sizes by two different methods, namely, the threshold method of Yasuoka and Matsumoto [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 8451 (1998)] and the mean first passage time method for nucleation by Wedekind et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 134103 (2007)]. The nucleation rates obtained by these methods differ approximately by one order of magnitude. Classical nucleation theory fails to describe the simulation data as well as the experimental data. The size of the critical cluster obtained by the mean first passage time method is significantly larger than that obtained from the nucleation theorem.

  4. Homogeneous two-dimensional nucleation of guest-free silicon clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yong jun

    2015-01-01

    The difficulty in synthesizing guest-free semiconductor clathrates complicates the process of determining how these cage-like structures form. This work studies the microscopic mechanism of the nucleation of guest-free Si136 clathrate using molecular dynamics simulations with the Stillinger-Weber potential. The homogeneous nucleation of Si136, which is realized in a narrow negative pressure range before liquid cavitation, exhibits the characteristic feature of the two-dimensional (2D) mode. The critical nucleus is composed of one to two five-membered rings, and the nucleation barrier is close to 1 kBT. According to a thermodynamic model based on atomistic nucleation theory, the effective binding energy associated with the formation of 2D critical nuclei is significantly low, which is responsible for the low nucleation barrier of Si136 clathrate. In the post-nucleation period, the critical nucleus preferentially grows into a dodecahedron, and the latter continuously grows with sharing face along <1 1 0>.

  5. Two-Step Mechanism of Homogeneous Nucleation of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, Oleg; Pan, Weichun; Filobelo, Luis; Hirsch, Rhoda Elison; Nagel, Ronald L.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a debilitating genetic disease that affects hundreds of thousands of babies born each year worldwide. Its primary pathogenic event is the polymerization of a mutant, sickle cell, hemoglobin (HbS); and this is one of a line of diseases (Alzheimer's, Huntington's, prion, etc.) in which nucleation initiates pathophysiology. We show that the homogeneous nucleation of HbS polymers follows a two-step mechanism with metastable dense liquid clusters serving as precursor to the ordered nuclei of the HbS polymer. The evidence comes from data on the rates of fiber nucleation and growth and nucleation delay times, the interaction of fibers with polarized light, and mesoscopic metastable HbS clusters in solution. The presence of a precursor in the HbS nucleation mechanism potentially allows low-concentration solution components to strongly affect the nucleation kinetics. The variations of these concentrations in patients might account for the high variability of the disease in genetically identical patients. In addition, these components can potentially be utilized for control of HbS polymerization and treatment of the disease. PMID:17449671

  6. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol in helium: the effect of carrier gas pressure.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Stratmann, Frank

    2006-04-28

    Kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapor of 1-propanol was studied using an upward thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Helium was used as a noncondensable carrier gas and the influence of its pressure on observed nucleation rates was investigated. The isothermal nucleation rates were determined by a photographic method that is independent on any nucleation theory. In this method, the trajectories of growing droplets are recorded using a charge coupled device camera and the distribution of local nucleation rates is determined by image analysis. The nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol were carried out at four isotherms 260, 270, 280, and 290 K. In addition, the pressure dependence was investigated on the isotherms 290 K (50, 120, and 180 kPa) and 280 K (50 and 120 kPa). The isotherm 270 K was measured at 25 kPa and the isotherm 260 K at 20 kPa. The experiments confirm the earlier observations from several thermal diffusion chamber investigations that the homogeneous nucleation rate of 1-propanol tends to increase with decreasing total pressure in the chamber. In order to reduce the possibility that the observed phenomenon is an experimental artifact, connected with the generally used one-dimensional description of transfer processes in the chamber, a recently developed two-dimensional model of coupled heat, mass, and momentum transfer inside the chamber was used and results of both models were compared. It can be concluded that the implementation of the two-dimensional model does not explain the observed effect. Furthermore the obtained results were compared both to the predictions of the classical theory and to the results of other investigators using different experimental devices. Plotting the experimental data on the so-called Hale plot shows that our data seem to be consistent both internally and also with the data of others. Using the nucleation theorem the critical cluster sizes were obtained from the slopes of the individual isotherms

  7. Shear effects on crystal nucleation in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Juan J.; Sintes, Tomás; Holm, C.; Sorensen, C. M.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2008-09-01

    Extensive two-dimensional Langevin dynamics simulations are used to determine the effect of steady shear flows on the crystal nucleation kinetics of charge stabilized colloids and colloids whose pair potential possess an attractive shallow well of a few kBT ’s (attractive colloids). Results show that in both types of systems small amounts of shear speeds up the crystallization process and enhances the quality of the growing crystal significantly. Moderate shear rates, on the other hand, destroy the ordering in the system. The very high shear rate regime where a reentering transition to the ordered state could exist is not considered in this work. In addition to the crystal nucleation phenomena, the analysis of the transport properties and the characterization of the steady state regime under shear are performed.

  8. Homogeneous nucleation of water: From vapor to supercooled droplets to ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölk, J.; Wyslouzil, B. E.; Strey, R.

    2013-05-01

    We provide a brief overview of the extensive scientific research that has been conducted to determine the degree to which pure water can be supercooled and the rates at which the relevant phase transitions occur. Beginning with condensation, we present the homogeneous vapor - liquid nucleation rates measured over 20 orders of magnitude with a variety of experimental devices. Some of the experimental methods used to examine nucleation from the vapor phase can also be used to study freezing. In particular, using a supersonic nozzle (SSN) apparatus we have followed the condensation and subsequent freezing of pure water droplets by combining our normal pressure trace measurements (PTM) with both small angle Xray scattering (SAXS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The time dependence of the fraction of frozen droplets yields the volume based nucleation rates for the freezing transition, 7.66ṡ1023 < Jice/cm-3s-1 < 4.23ṡ1024, confirming and extending those reported in the literature.

  9. Modelling binary homogeneous nucleation of water-sulfuric acid vapours: parameterisation for high temperature emissions.

    PubMed

    Vehkamäki, H; Kulmala, M; Lehtinen, K E J; Noppel, M

    2003-08-01

    Particles formed in the automobile exhaust might form a significant fraction of fine particles in urban air. We have developed a model and produced parametrizations for predicting the particle formation rate at exhaust conditions. We studied the formation in the mixture of water and sulfuric acid vapors and at temperatures between 300 and 400 K. A thermodynamically consistent version of the classical binary homogeneous nucleation model was used. The needed thermodynamical input data (vapor pressures, chemical activities, surface tensions, densities) are carefully investigated and utilized in thermodynamically consistent way. The obtained nucleation rates are parametrized in order to be able to use this nucleation model in aerosol dynamic models, exhaust models, or other process models. The parametrization reduces computational time at least by a factor of 500.

  10. Homogeneous nucleation and droplet growth in nitrogen. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, E. H.

    1983-01-01

    A one dimensional computer model of the homogeneous nucleation process and growth of condensate for nitrogen flows over airfoils is developed to predict the onset of condensation and thus to be able to take advantage of as much of Reynolds capability of cryogenic tunnels as possible. Homogeneous nucleation data were taken using a DFVLR CAST-10 airfoil in the 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and are used to evaluate the classical liquid droplet theory and several proposed corrections to it. For predicting liquid nitrogen condensation effects, use of the arbitrary Tolman constant of 0.25 x 250 billionth m or the Reiss or Kikuchi correction agrees with the CAST-10 data. Because no solid nitrogen condensation were found experimentally during the CAST-10 experiments, earlier nozzle data are used to evaluate corrections to the classical liquid droplet theory in the lower temperature regime. A theoretical expression for the surface tension of solid nitrogen is developed.

  11. Using Microfluidics to Decouple Nucleation and Growth of Protein Crystals.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jung-Uk; Cristobal, Galder; Link, Darren R; Thorsen, Todd; Fraden, Seth

    2007-01-01

    A high throughput, low volume microfluidic device has been designed to decouple the physical processes of protein crystal nucleation and growth. This device, called the Phase Chip, is constructed out of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer. One of the Phase Chip's innovations is to exploit surface tension forces to guide each drop to a storage chamber. We demonstrate that nanoliter water-in-oil drops of protein solutions can be rapidly stored in individual wells thereby allowing the screening of 1000 conditions while consuming a total of only 10 mug protein on a 20 cm(2) chip. Another significant advance over current microfluidic devices is that each well is in contact with a reservoir via a dialysis membrane through which only water and other low molecular weight organic solvents can pass, but not salt, polymer, or protein. This enables the concentration of all solutes in a solution to be reversibly, rapidly, and precisely varied in contrast to current methods, such as the free interface diffusion or sitting drop methods, which are irreversible. The Phase Chip operates by first optimizing conditions for nucleation by using dialysis to supersaturate the protein solution, which leads to nucleation of many small crystals. Next, conditions are optimized for crystal growth by using dialysis to reduce the protein and precipitant concentrations, which leads small crystals to dissolve while simultaneously causing only the largest ones to grow, ultimately resulting in the transformation of many small, unusable crystals into a few large ones.

  12. A Model for Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Nucleation and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallization is a complex process, involving a system that typically has 5 or more components (macromolecule, water, buffer + counter ion, and precipitant). Whereas small molecules have only a few contacts in the crystal lattice, macromolecules generally have 10's or even 100's of contacts between molecules. These can range from hydrogen bonds (direct or water-mediated), through van der Waals, hydrophobic, salt bridges, and ion-mediated contacts. The latter interactions are stronger and require some specificity in the molecular alignment, while the others are weaker, more prevalent, and more promiscuous, i.e., can be readily broken and reformed between other sites. Formation of a consistent, ordered, 3D structure may be difficult or impossible in the absence of any or presence of too many strong interactions. Further complicating the process is the inherent structural asymmetry of monomeric (single chain) macromolecules. The process of crystal nucleation and growth involves the ordered assembly of growth units into a defined 3D lattice. We suggest that for many macromolecules, particularly those that are monomeric, this involves a preliminary solution-phase assembly process into a growth unit having some symmetry prior to addition to the lattice, recapitulating the initial stages of the nucleation process. If this model is correct then fluids and crystal growth models assuming a strictly monodisperse nutrient solution need to be revised. This model has been developed from experimental evidence based upon face growth rate, AFM, and fluorescence energy transfer data for the nucleation and growth of tetragonal lysozyme crystals.

  13. Cavitation in a metallic liquid: Homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wu, H. A.; Luo, S. N.

    2014-06-07

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids during cavitation in liquid Cu. We characterize in detail the atomistic cavitation processes by following the temporal evolution of cavities or voids, analyze the nucleation behavior with the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods, and discuss the results against classical nucleation theory (CNT), the Tolman equation for surface energy, independent calculation of surface tension via integrating the stress profiles, the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) growth law, and the power law for nucleus size distributions. Cavitation in this representative metallic liquid is a high energy barrier Poisson processes, and the steady-state nucleation rates obtained from statistical runs with the MFPT and SP methods are in agreement. The MFPT method also yields the critical nucleus size and the Zeldovich factor. Fitting with the Tolman's equation to the MD simulations yields the surface energy of a planar interface (∼0.9 J m{sup −2}) and the Tolman length (0.4–0.5 Å), and those values are in accord with those from integrating the stress profiles of a planar interface. Independent CNT predictions of the nucleation rate (10{sup 33−34} s{sup −1} m{sup −3}) and critical size (3–4 Å in radius) are in agreement with the MFPT and SP results. The JMA law can reasonably describe the nucleation and growth process. The size distribution of subcritical nuclei appears to follow a power law with an exponent decreasing with increasing tension owing to coupled nucleation and growth, and that of the supercritical nuclei becomes flattened during further stress relaxation due to void coalescence.

  14. Soot Aerosol Particles as Cloud Condensation Nuclei: from Ice Nucleation Activity to Ice Crystal Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, Claire; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Ortega, Isamel Kenneth; Carpentier, Yvain; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of solid-state particles (soot) from engine exhausts due to incomplete fuel combustion is considered to influence ice and liquid water cloud droplet activation [1]. The activity of these aerosols would originate from their ability to be important centers of ice-particle nucleation, as they would promote ice formation above water homogeneous freezing point. Soot particles are reported to be generally worse ice nuclei than mineral dust because they activate nucleation at higher ice-supersaturations for deposition nucleation and at lower temperatures for immersion freezing than ratios usually expected for homogeneous nucleation [2]. In fact, there are still numerous opened questions as to whether and how soot's physico-chemical properties (structure, morphology and chemical composition) can influence their nucleation ability. Therefore, systematic investigations of soot aerosol nucleation activity via one specific nucleation mode, here deposition nucleation, combined with thorough structural and compositional analyzes are needed in order to establish any association between the particles' activity and their physico-chemical properties. In addition, since the morphology of the ice crystals can influence their radiative properties [3], we investigated their morphology as they grow over both soot and pristine substrates at different temperatures and humidity ratios. In the present work, Combustion Aerosol STandart soot samples were produced from propane using various experimental conditions. Their nucleation activity was studied in deposition mode (from water vapor), and monitored using a temperature-controlled reactor in which the sample's relative humidity is precisely measured with a cryo-hygrometer. Formation of water/ice onto the particles is followed both optically and spectroscopically, using a microscope coupled to a Raman spectrometer. Vibrational signatures of hydroxyls (O-H) emerge when the particle becomes hydrated and are used to characterize ice

  15. Nucleation and growth control in protein crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Nyce, Thomas A.; Meehan, Edward J.; Sowers, Jennifer W.; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    The five topics summarized in this final report are as follows: (1) a technique for the expedient, semi-automated determination of protein solubilities as a function of temperature and application of this technique to proteins other than lysozyme; (2) a small solution cell with adjustable temperature gradients for the growth of proteins at a predetermined location through temperature programming; (3) a microscopy system with image storage and processing capability for high resolution optical studies of temperature controlled protein growth and etching kinetics; (4) growth experiments with lysozyme in thermosyphon flow ; and (5) a mathematical model for the evolution of evaporation/diffusion induced concentration gradients in the hanging drop protein crystallization technique.

  16. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions. PMID:26843366

  17. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-02-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions.

  18. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-01

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model.

  19. Direct calculation of ice homogeneous nucleation rate for a molecular model of water

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2015-01-01

    Ice formation is ubiquitous in nature, with important consequences in a variety of environments, including biological cells, soil, aircraft, transportation infrastructure, and atmospheric clouds. However, its intrinsic kinetics and microscopic mechanism are difficult to discern with current experiments. Molecular simulations of ice nucleation are also challenging, and direct rate calculations have only been performed for coarse-grained models of water. For molecular models, only indirect estimates have been obtained, e.g., by assuming the validity of classical nucleation theory. We use a path sampling approach to perform, to our knowledge, the first direct rate calculation of homogeneous nucleation of ice in a molecular model of water. We use TIP4P/Ice, the most accurate among existing molecular models for studying ice polymorphs. By using a novel topological approach to distinguish different polymorphs, we are able to identify a freezing mechanism that involves a competition between cubic and hexagonal ice in the early stages of nucleation. In this competition, the cubic polymorph takes over because the addition of new topological structural motifs consistent with cubic ice leads to the formation of more compact crystallites. This is not true for topological hexagonal motifs, which give rise to elongated crystallites that are not able to grow. This leads to transition states that are rich in cubic ice, and not the thermodynamically stable hexagonal polymorph. This mechanism provides a molecular explanation for the earlier experimental and computational observations of the preference for cubic ice in the literature. PMID:26240318

  20. Direct calculation of ice homogeneous nucleation rate for a molecular model of water.

    PubMed

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2015-08-25

    Ice formation is ubiquitous in nature, with important consequences in a variety of environments, including biological cells, soil, aircraft, transportation infrastructure, and atmospheric clouds. However, its intrinsic kinetics and microscopic mechanism are difficult to discern with current experiments. Molecular simulations of ice nucleation are also challenging, and direct rate calculations have only been performed for coarse-grained models of water. For molecular models, only indirect estimates have been obtained, e.g., by assuming the validity of classical nucleation theory. We use a path sampling approach to perform, to our knowledge, the first direct rate calculation of homogeneous nucleation of ice in a molecular model of water. We use TIP4P/Ice, the most accurate among existing molecular models for studying ice polymorphs. By using a novel topological approach to distinguish different polymorphs, we are able to identify a freezing mechanism that involves a competition between cubic and hexagonal ice in the early stages of nucleation. In this competition, the cubic polymorph takes over because the addition of new topological structural motifs consistent with cubic ice leads to the formation of more compact crystallites. This is not true for topological hexagonal motifs, which give rise to elongated crystallites that are not able to grow. This leads to transition states that are rich in cubic ice, and not the thermodynamically stable hexagonal polymorph. This mechanism provides a molecular explanation for the earlier experimental and computational observations of the preference for cubic ice in the literature.

  1. Method and apparatus for nucleating the crystallization of undercooled materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Barret, Peter F.

    1989-01-01

    A method of storing and controlling a release of latent heat of transition of a phase-change material is disclosed. The method comprises trapping a crystallite of the material between two solid objects and retaining it there under high pressure by applying a force to press the two solid objects tightly together. A crystallite of the material is exposed to a quantity of the material that is in a supercooled condition to nucleate the crystallization of the supercooled material.

  2. Overview: Homogeneous nucleation from the vapor phase—The experimental science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyslouzil, Barbara E.; Wölk, Judith

    2016-12-01

    Homogeneous nucleation from the vapor phase has been a well-defined area of research for ˜120 yr. In this paper, we present an overview of the key experimental and theoretical developments that have made it possible to address some of the fundamental questions first delineated and investigated in C. T. R. Wilson's pioneering paper of 1897 [C. T. R. Wilson, Philos. Trans. R. Soc., A 189, 265-307 (1897)]. We review the principles behind the standard experimental techniques currently used to measure isothermal nucleation rates, and discuss the molecular level information that can be extracted from these measurements. We then highlight recent approaches that interrogate the vapor and intermediate clusters leading to particle formation, more directly.

  3. Crystal nucleation as the ordering of multiple order parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation is an activated process in which the system has to overcome a free energy barrier in order for a first-order phase transition between the metastable and the stable phases to take place. In the liquid-to-solid transition, the process occurs between phases of different symmetry, and it is thus inherently a multi-dimensional process, in which all symmetries are broken at the transition. In this Focus Article, we consider some recent studies which highlight the multi-dimensional nature of the nucleation process. Even for a single-component system, the formation of solid crystals from the metastable melt involves fluctuations of two (or more) order parameters, often associated with the decoupling of positional and orientational symmetry breaking. In other words, we need at least two order parameters to describe the free-energy of a system including its liquid and crystalline states. This decoupling occurs naturally for asymmetric particles or directional interactions, focusing here on the case of water, but we will show that it also affects spherically symmetric interacting particles, such as the hard-sphere system. We will show how the treatment of nucleation as a multi-dimensional process has shed new light on the process of polymorph selection, on the effect of external fields on the nucleation process and on glass-forming ability.

  4. Nucleation Chemical Physics: From Vapor Phase Clusters to Crystals in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn M.

    2007-08-03

    Both vapor-phase clusters and condensed-phase crystals are important in a wide variety of fundamental and applied problems in chemical physics. Favorable fluctuations in a supersaturated phase generate clusters of the new phase – exactly how one defines these new clusters as distinct from the mother phase represents a continuing challenge in molecular theories of nucleation. These incipient clusters can form homogeneously within the mother phase or heterogeneously on seeds, dust, impurities, ions, or others stability-inducing atomic/molecular structures (e.g., steps, edges, vacancies, etc.). Upon reaching a critical size the clusters may grow to macroscopic dimensions if enough nucleating material is present in surrounding environment or until relaxation processes dominate bringing the phase transformation to completion. This work was supported by the Chemical and Material Sciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  5. Nucleation and Convection Effects in Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Work during the second year under this grant (NAG8-1161) resulted in several major achievements. We have characterized protein impurities as well as microheterogeneities in the proteins hen egg white lysozyme and horse spleen apoferritin, and demonstrated the effects of these impurities on nucleation and crystallization. In particular, the purification of apoferritin resulted in crystals with an X-ray diffraction resolution of better than 1.8 A, i.e. a 1 A improvement over earlier work on the cubic form. Furthermore, we have shown, in association with studies of liquid-liquid phase separation, that depending on the growth conditions, lysozyme can produce all growth morphologies that have been observed with other proteins. Finally, in connection with our experimental and simulation work on growth step bunching, we have developed a system-dependent criterion for advantages and disadvantages of crystallization from solution under reduced gravity. In the following, these efforts are described in some detail.

  6. Crystallization of isoelectrically homogeneous cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, B.D.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1989-02-07

    Past difficulty in growing good crystals of cholera toxin has prevented the study of the crystal structure of this important protein. The authors have determined that failure of cholera toxin to crystallize well has been due to its heterogeneity. They have now succeeded in overcoming the problem by isolating a single isoelectric variant of this oligomeric protein (one A subunit and five B subunits). Cholera toxin purified by their procedure readily forms large single crystals. The crystal form has been described previously. They have recorded data from native crystals of cholera toxin to 3.0-{angstrom} resolution with our electronic area detectors. With these data, they have found the orientation of a 5-fold symmetry axis within these crystals, perpendicular to the screw dyad of the crystal. They are now determining the crystal structure of cholera toxin by a combination of multiple heavy-atom isomorphous replacement and density modification techniques, making use of rotational 5-fold averaging of the B subunits.

  7. Updated H2SO4-H2O binary homogeneous nucleation look-up tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fangqun

    2008-12-01

    The calculated rates of H2SO4-H2O binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN), which is the only nucleation mechanism currently widely used in global aerosol models, are well known to have large uncertainties. Recently, we have reduced the uncertainties in the BHN rates on the basis of a kinetic quasi-unary nucleation (KQUN) model, by taking into account the measured bonding energetics of H2SO4 monomers with hydrated sulfuric acid dimers and trimers. The uncertainties were further reduced by using two independent measurements to constrain the equilibrium constants for monomer hydration. In this paper, we present updated BHN rate look-up tables derived from the improved KQUN model which can be used by anyone to obtain the BHN rates under given conditions. The look-up tables cover a wide range of key parameters that can be found in the atmosphere and laboratory studies, and their usage significantly reduces the computational costs of the BHN rate calculations, which is critical for multidimensional modeling. The look-up tables can also be used by those involved in experiments and field measurements to quickly assess the likeliness of BHN. For quick application, one can obtain the BHN rates and properties of critical clusters by browsing through the tables. A comparison of results based on the look-up tables with those from widely used classical BHN model indicates that, in addition to several orders of magnitude difference in nucleation rates, there also exists substantial difference in the predicted numbers of sulfuric acid molecules in the critical clusters and their dependence on key parameters.

  8. Direct observation of liquid nucleus growth in homogeneous melting of colloidal crystals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziren; Wang, Feng; Peng, Yi; Han, Yilong

    2015-01-01

    The growth behaviour of liquid nucleus is crucial for crystal melting, but its kinetics is difficult to predict and remains challenging in experiment. Here we directly observed the growth of individual liquid nuclei in homogeneous melting of three-dimensional superheated colloidal crystals with single-particle dynamics by video microscopy. The growth rate of nucleus at weak superheating is well fitted by generalizing the Wilson–Frenkel law of crystallization to melting and including the surface tension effects and non-spherical-shape effects. As the degree of superheating increases, the growth rate is enhanced by nucleus shape fluctuation, nuclei coalescence and multimer attachment. The results provide new guidance for the refinement of nucleation theory, especially for the poorly understood strong-superheating regime. The universal Lindemann parameter observed at the superheat limit and solid–liquid interfaces indicates a connection between homogeneous and heterogeneous melting. PMID:25897801

  9. The crystal nucleation theory revisited: The case of 2D colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A. E.; Ixtlilco-Cortés, L.

    2011-03-01

    Most of the theories and studies of crystallization and crystal nucleation consider the boundaries between the crystallites and the fluid as smooth. The crystallites are the small clusters of atoms, molecules and/or particles with the symmetry of the crystal lattice that, with a slight chance of success, would grow to form the crystal grains. In fact, in the classical nucleation theory, the crystallites are assumed to have a spherical shape (circular in 2D). As far are we are aware, there is only one experimental work [1] on colloidal crystals that founds rough surfaces for the crystallites and for the crystal grains. Motivated by this work, we performed large Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations in 2D, that would follow the eventual growing of a few crystallites to form the crystal grains. The used potential has, besides the impenetrable hard core, a soft core followed by a potential well. We found that indeed the crystallites have a fractal boundary, whose value we were able to obtain. See the figure below of a typical isolated crystallite. We were also able to obtain the critical crystallite size, measured by its number of particles, Nc, and not by any critical radius. The boundaries of the crystals above Nc also have a fractal structure but of a lower value, closer to one. Finally, we also obtained the line tension between the crystallites and the surrounding fluid, as function of temperature and particle diameter, as well as the chemical potential difference between these two phases. In the URL: www.fis.unam.mx˜˜agus˜ there are posted two movies that can be downloaded: (1) 2D_crystal_nucleation.mp4, and (2) 2D_crystal_growth.mp4, that illustrate the crystal nucleation and its further growth.

  10. Crystal growth nucleation and Fermi energy equalization of intrinsic spherical nuclei in glass-forming melts.

    PubMed

    Tournier, Robert F

    2009-02-01

    The energy saving resulting from the equalization of Fermi energies of a crystal and its melt is added to the Gibbs free-energy change ΔG2ls associated with a crystal formation in glass-forming melts. This negative contribution being a fraction ε ls(T) of the fusion heat is created by the electrostatic potential energy -U0 resulting from the electron transfer from the crystal to the melt and is maximum at the melting temperature Tm in agreement with a thermodynamics constraint. The homogeneous nucleation critical temperature T2, the nucleation critical barrier ΔG2ls∗/kBT and the critical radius R∗2ls are determined as functions of εls(T). In bulk metallic glass forming melts, εls(T) and T2 only depend on the free-volume disappearance temperature T0l, and εls(Tm) is larger than 1 (T0l>Tm/3); in conventional undercooled melts εls(Tm) is smaller than 1 (T0l>Tm/3). Unmelted intrinsic crystals act as growth nuclei reducing ΔG2ls∗/kBT and the nucleation time. The temperature-time transformation diagrams of Mg65Y10Cu25, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, Pd43Cu27 Ni10P20, Fe83B17 and Ni melts are predicted using classic nucleation models including time lags in transient nucleation, by varying the intrinsic nucleus contribution to the reduction of ΔG2ls∗/kBT. The energy-saving coefficient ε nm(T) of an unmelted crystal of radius Rnm is reduced when Rnm ≪R∗2ls; εnm is quantified and corresponds to the first energy level of one s-electron moving in vacuum in the same spherical attractive potential -U0 despite the fact that the charge screening is built by many-body effects.

  11. Empirical relationships of homogeneous bubble nucleation, growth and coalescence in rhyolitic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachetti, T.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Gardner, J. E.; Truong, N.; Toledo, P.; Hajimirza, S.

    2015-12-01

    Decompression experiments of homogeneous nucleation, growth and coalescence of bubbles in rhyolitic melt provide new data for an empirical formulation to predict bubble number density and size from controlled experimental conditions. Samples were hydrated at 200-250 MPa and 850 °C to water contents of 5.4-6.0 wt%, followed by decompression at rates of 60-150 MPa.s-1. Samples were held at final pressures for 6-90 s, allowing for bubble growth and coalescence after decompression and nucleation. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images and computed tomography (CT) scans of the decompressed glasses were analyzed for size distributions of both isolated and coalesced bubbles separately. Sample porosities vary from 4% to 63%, and connected porosity is positively correlated with total porosity for samples where it is greater than approximately 35%. A steep increase in the proportion of connected bubbles is observed once the average bubble wall thickness becomes lower than approximately 2 μm. In combination with SEM, CT and bubble size distributions these results indicate that bubble coalescence is independent of bubble size. Bubble number density varies from 8.9×1011 m-3 to 4.4×1016 m-3 (melt-referenced), and is positively correlated with the degree of supersaturation (130-210 MPa), as well as initial water content. For most experiments, we do not observe any increase in bubble number density after 10-20 s, suggesting that bubble nucleation has stopped. The bubble number density does not show a systematic correlation with decompression rate.

  12. Homogeneous nucleation of ethanol and n-propanol in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, F.

    1982-01-01

    The condensation by homogeneous nucleation of ethanol (200 proof) and of n-propanol (99.98%) carried at small mole fraction in dry air (99.995%) was studied in the unsteady, isentropic expansion of a shock tube. Samples of the vapor at different partial pressures in dry air at room temperature were expanded into the liquid coexistence regime of the condensing species. A Kristler pressure transducer and Rayleigh light scattering were used to measure the pressure in the expansion and the onset of condensation. Condensation was observed at different locations between 0.15 and 1 m upstream of the diaphragm location, which correspond to different cooling rates of of the vapor samples about 50 to 10 C/ms.

  13. Crystal nucleation and near-epitaxial growth in nacre.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ian C; Blonsky, Adam Z; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Pokroy, Boaz; Romao, Carl P; White, Mary Anne; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2013-12-01

    Nacre is the iridescent inner lining of many mollusk shells, with a unique lamellar structure at the sub-micron scale, and remarkable resistance to fracture. Despite extensive studies, nacre formation mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we present 20-nm, 2°-resolution polarization-dependent imaging contrast (PIC) images of shells from 15 mollusk species, mapping nacre tablets and their orientation patterns. These data show where new crystal orientations appear and how similar orientations propagate as nacre grows. In all shells we found stacks of co-oriented aragonite (CaCO₃) tablets arranged into vertical columns or staggered diagonally. Near the nacre-prismatic (NP) boundary highly disordered spherulitic aragonite is nucleated. Overgrowing nacre tablet crystals are most frequently co-oriented with the underlying aragonite spherulites, or with another tablet. Away from the NP-boundary all tablets are nearly co-oriented in all species, with crystal lattice tilting, abrupt or gradual, always observed and always small (plus or minus 10°). Therefore aragonite crystal growth in nacre is near-epitaxial. Based on these data, we propose that there is one mineral bridge per tablet, and that "bridge tilting" may occur without fracturing the bridge, hence providing the seed from which the next tablet grows near-epitaxially.

  14. A Proposed Model for Protein Crystal Nucleation and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    How does one take a molecule, strongly asymmetric in both shape and charge distribution, and assemble it into a crystal? We propose a model for the nucleation and crystal growth process for tetragonal lysozyme, based upon fluorescence, light, neutron, and X-ray scattering data, size exclusion chromatography experiments, dialysis kinetics, AFM, and modeling of growth rate data, from this and other laboratories. The first species formed is postulated to be a 'head to side' dimer. Through repeating associations involving the same intermolecular interactions this grows to a 4(sub 3) helix structure, that in turn serves as the basic unit for nucleation and subsequent crystal growth. High salt attenuates surface charges while promoting hydrophobic interactions. Symmetry facilitates subsequent helix-helix self-association. Assembly stability is enhanced when a four helix structure is obtained, with each bound to two neighbors. Only two unique interactions are required. The first are those for helix formation, where the dominant interaction is the intermolecular bridging anion. The second is the anti-parallel side-by-side helix-helix interaction, guided by alternating pairs of symmetry related salt bridges along each side. At this stage all eight unique positions of the P4(sub3)2(sub 1),2(sub 1) unit cell are filled. The process is one of a) attenuating the most strongly interacting groups, such that b) the molecules begin to self-associate in defined patterns, so that c) symmetry is obtained, which d) propagates as a growing crystal. Simple and conceptually obvious in hindsight, this tells much about what we are empirically doing when we crystallize macromolecules. By adjusting the growth parameters we are empirically balancing the intermolecular interactions, preferentially attenuating the dominant strong (for lysozyme the charged groups) while strengthening the lesser strong (hydrophobic) interactions. In the general case for proteins the lack of a singularly defined

  15. Influence of protein solution in nucleation and optimized formulation for the growth of ARM lipase crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Masomian, Malihe; Leow, Adam Thean Chor; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad

    2015-09-01

    ARM lipase is a thermostable and organic solvent tolerant enzyme which was highly purified prior to crystallization. The His-tagged ARM lipase was purified with immobilized metal affinity chromatography followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The effect of different salt concentrations on stability, solubility and crystal nucleation of the protein was studied. The highly purified and homogeneous ARM lipase with protein concentration of 2 mg/mL was successfully crystallized by a sitting drop, vapor diffusion method with the use of 0.1 M MES monohydrate pH 6.5 and 12% (v/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 20000 as precipitant. The crystallization conditions were optimized by changing the pH and concentration of the precipitant. The optimum crystallization condition was 2 mg/mL ARM lipase in 0.1 M Tris-HCl, 0.15 M NaCl, pH 8.0 protein solution, crystallized using 0.1 M Tris-HCl, pH 8.0 and 12% (v/v) PEG 20000 as precipitant.

  16. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnbull, D.

    1979-01-01

    Crystal nucleation behavior in metallic alloys known to form glasses in melt quenching was characterized and from this characterization the possibility that massive amounts of certain alloys could be slow cooled to the glass state was assessed. Crystal nucleation behavior of pure liquid metals was examined experimentally, under containerless conditions, and theoretically.

  17. Report on the Implementation of Homogeneous Nucleation Scheme in MARMOT-based Phase Field Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin

    2013-09-30

    In this report, we summarized our effort in developing mesoscale phase field models for predicting precipitation kinetics in alloys during thermal aging and/or under irradiation in nuclear reactors. The first part focused on developing a method to predict the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei such as the sizes and concentration profiles of critical nuclei, and nucleation barrier. These properties are crucial for quantitative simulations of precipitate evolution kinetics with phase field models. Fe-Cr alloy was chosen as a model alloy because it has valid thermodynamic and kinetic data as well as it is an important structural material in nuclear reactors. A constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method was developed to search for the energy minimum path during nucleation. With the method we are able to predict the concentration profiles of the critical nuclei of Cr-rich precipitates and nucleation energy barriers. Simulations showed that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nucleus strongly depends on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The Cr concentration inside the critical nucleus is much smaller than the equilibrium concentration calculated by the equilibrium phase diagram. This implies that a non-classical nucleation theory should be used to deal with the nucleation of Cr precipitates in Fe-Cr alloys. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. A number of interesting phenomena were observed from the simulations: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrated that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei into phase

  18. Linear relation between TH (homogeneous ice nucleation temperature) and Tm (melting temperature) for aqueous solutions of sucrose, trehalose, and maltose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Soga, Makoto; Kajiwara, Kazuhito

    2007-08-01

    Homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures ( THs) of aqueous sucrose, trehalose, and maltose solutions were measured together with melting temperatures ( Tms). It is shown that there is a linear relation between TH and Tm for these solutions. Almost identical supercooling behavior is observed for these aqueous disaccharide solutions.

  19. Insights into the nucleation role of cellulose crystals during crystallization of poly(β-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianxiang; Xu, Chunjiang; Wu, Defeng; Pan, Keren; Qian, Aiwen; Sha, Yulu; Wang, Li; Tong, Wei

    2015-12-10

    Cellulose crystals, including microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), were used as the fillers to prepare green composites with poly(β-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) by melt mixing for crystallization study. The results reveal that the spherulite morphology of PHB and its composites depends highly on the crystallization temperature, evolving from bundle shaped to ring-banded and finally to irregular or zigzag textures with increase of temperature. However, the ring-banded structure is strongly affected by the presence of cellulose crystals, and the average band space decreases evidently with the addition of MCC or NCC. Compared with PHB/MCC composite, PHB/NCC composite shows degraded spherulite structure with smaller band space and higher flocculation level of peak-to-valley height because of stronger unbalanced stresses in this system. Besides, cellulose crystals can act as good heterogeneous nucleating agent to accelerate the crystallization of PHB, which is further confirmed by the polarized optical microscopy observations and the kinetic analyses.

  20. Kinetics of Nucleation and Crystal Growth in Glass Forming Melts in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2001-01-01

    This flight definition project has the specific objective of investigating the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in high temperature inorganic oxide, glass forming melts in microgravity. It is related to one of our previous NASA projects that was concerned with glass formation for high temperature containerless melts in microgravity. The previous work culminated in two experiments which were conducted aboard the space shuttle in 1983 and 1985 and which consisted of melting (at 1500 C) and cooling levitated 6 to 8 mm diameter spherical samples in a Single Axis Acoustic Levitator (SAAL) furnace. Compared to other types of materials, there have been relatively few experiments, 6 to 8, conducted on inorganic glasses in space. These experiments have been concerned with mass transport (alkali diffusion), containerless melting, critical cooling rate for glass formation, chemical homogeneity, fiber pulling, and crystallization of glass forming melts. One of the most important and consistent findings in all of these experiments has been that the glasses prepared in microgravity are more resistant to crystallization (better glass former) and more chemically homogeneous than equivalent glasses made on Earth (1 g). The chemical composition of the melt appears relatively unimportant since the same general results have been reported for oxide, fluoride and chalcogenide melts. These results for space-processed glasses have important implications, since glasses with a higher resistance to crystallization or higher chemical homogeneity than those attainable on Earth can significantly advance applications in areas such as fiber optics communications, high power laser glasses, and other photonic devices where glasses are the key functional materials.

  1. The carrier gas pressure effect in a laminar flow diffusion chamber, homogeneous nucleation of n-butanol in helium.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jiri; Kulmala, Markku; Viisanen, Yrjö; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2006-06-14

    Homogeneous nucleation rate isotherms of n-butanol+helium were measured in a laminar flow diffusion chamber at total pressures ranging from 50 to 210 kPa to investigate the effect of carrier gas pressure on nucleation. Nucleation temperatures ranged from 265 to 280 K and the measured nucleation rates were between 10(2) and 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The measured nucleation rates decreased as a function of increasing pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at pressures below 100 kPa. This negative carrier gas effect was also temperature dependent. At nucleation temperature of 280 K and at the same saturation ratio, the maximum deviation between nucleation rates measured at 50 and 210 kPa was about three orders of magnitude. At nucleation temperature of 265 K, the effect was negligible. Qualitatively the results resemble those measured in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Also the slopes of the isothermal nucleation rates as a function of saturation ratio were different as a function of total pressure, 50 kPa isotherms yielded the steepest slopes, and 210 kPa isotherms the shallowest slopes. Several sources of inaccuracies were considered in the interpretation of the results: uncertainties in the transport properties, nonideal behavior of the vapor-carrier gas mixture, and shortcomings of the used mathematical model. Operation characteristics of the laminar flow diffusion chamber at both under-and over-pressure were determined to verify a correct and stable operation of the device. We conclude that a negative carrier gas pressure effect is seen in the laminar flow diffusion chamber and it cannot be totally explained with the aforementioned reasons.

  2. Phase-field crystal modeling of heteroepitaxy and exotic modes of crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podmaniczky, Frigyes; Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Gránásy, László

    2017-01-01

    We review recent advances made in modeling heteroepitaxy, two-step nucleation, and nucleation at the growth front within the framework of a simple dynamical density functional theory, the Phase-Field Crystal (PFC) model. The crystalline substrate is represented by spatially confined periodic potentials. We investigate the misfit dependence of the critical thickness in the StranskiKrastanov growth mode in isothermal studies. Apparently, the simulation results for stress release via the misfit dislocations fit better to the PeopleBean model than to the one by Matthews and Blakeslee. Next, we investigate structural aspects of two-step crystal nucleation at high undercoolings, where an amorphous precursor forms in the first stage. Finally, we present results for the formation of new grains at the solid-liquid interface at high supersaturations/supercoolings, a phenomenon termed Growth Front Nucleation (GFN). Results obtained with diffusive dynamics (applicable to colloids) and with a hydrodynamic extension of the PFC theory (HPFC, developed for simple liquids) will be compared. The HPFC simulations indicate two possible mechanisms for GFN.

  3. An enthalpy landscape view of homogeneous melting in crystals.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Alex M; Sinno, Talid

    2011-08-21

    A detailed analysis of homogeneous melting in crystalline materials modeled by empirical interatomic potentials is presented using the theory of inherent structures. We show that the homogeneous melting of a perfect, infinite crystalline material can be inferred directly from the growth exponent of the inherent structure density-of-states distribution expressed as a function of formation enthalpy. Interestingly, this growth is already established by the presence of very few homogeneously nucleated point defects in the form of Frenkel pairs. This finding supports the notion that homogeneous melting is appropriately defined in terms of a one-phase theory and does not require detailed consideration of the liquid phase. We then apply this framework to the study of applied hydrostatic compression on homogeneous melting and show that the inherent structure analysis used here is able to capture the correct pressure-dependence for two crystalline materials, namely silicon and aluminum. The coupling between the melting temperature and applied pressure arises through the distribution of formation volumes for the various inherent structures.

  4. Beneficial effect of solubility enhancers on protein crystal nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Gosavi, Rajendrakumar A; Bhamidi, Venkateswarlu; Varanasi, Sasidhar; Schall, Constance A

    2009-04-21

    Crystallizing solutions of proteins often contain various nonelectrolyte additives that arise from the purification process of proteins or from the reagents employed in the screening kits. Currently, limited knowledge exists about the influence of these additives on the mechanisms underlying the crystallization process, in particular on the nucleation stage of crystals. To address this need, we studied crystallization of two proteins, D-xylose isomerase and chicken egg-white lysozyme, in small batches and in the presence of two solubility-enhancing additives, acetonitrile and glycerol. We have also measured the nucleation rates of crystals of these proteins in the presence and in the absence of acetonitrile using the method of initial rates. With the addition of the solubility enhancers, both proteins exhibited an increase in crystal nucleation at any given supersaturation. Solubility enhancing additives appear to lower the energy barrier to nucleation by influencing the strength of attraction between the protein molecules. We have characterized the quality of D-xylose isomerase crystals by determining the crystal mosaicity, which showed considerable improvement for crystals grown in the presence of additives. When compared to the crystals of chicken egg-white lysozyme, D-xylose isomerase crystals required higher supersaturations to nucleate. We attribute this result to the large size of the D-xylose isomerase molecule, which influences the energy barrier to nucleation by increasing the surface area of the critical nucleus. Contrary to the common expectation that reagents that solubilize the protein may hinder the crystallization process, our results suggest that solubility enhancers, in fact, can have a beneficial effect on the nucleation and growth of crystals. These findings are of importance in formulating successful strategies toward crystallizing new proteins.

  5. Experiment and theory for heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Chayen, Naomi E; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Sear, Richard P

    2006-01-17

    The determination of high-resolution structures of proteins requires crystals of suitable quality. Because of the new impetus given to structural biology by structural genomics/proteomics, the problem of crystallizing proteins is becoming increasingly acute. There is therefore an urgent requirement for the development of new efficient methods to aid crystal growth. Nucleation is the crucial step that determines the entire crystallization process. Hence, the holy grail is to design a "universal nucleant," a substrate that induces the nucleation of crystals of any protein. We report a theory for nucleation on disordered porous media and its experimental testing and validation using a mesoporous bioactive gel-glass. This material induced the crystallization of the largest number of proteins ever crystallized using a single nucleant. The combination of the model and the experimental results opens up the scope for the rational design of nucleants, leading to alternative means of controlling crystallization.

  6. CRYSTALLIZATION OF SYNTHETIC HAEMOZOIN (β-HAEMATIN) NUCLEATED AT THE SURFACE OF LIPID PARTICLES

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Anh N.; Ncokazi, Kanyile K.; de Villiers, Katherine A.; Wright, David W.; Egan, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The mechanism of formation of haemozoin, a detoxification by-product of several blood-feeding organisms including malaria parasites, has been a subject of debate; however, recent studies suggest that neutral lipids may serve as a catalyst. In this study, a model system consisting of an emulsion of neutral lipid particles was employed to investigate the formation of β-haematin, the synthetic counterpart of haemozoin, at the lipid-water interface. A solution of monoglyceride, either monostearoylglycerol (MSG) or monopalmitoylglycerol (MPG), dissolved in acetone and methanol was introduced to an aqueous surface. Fluorescence, confocal and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) imaging and dynamic light scattering analysis of samples obtained from beneath the surface confirmed the presence of homogeneous lipid particles existing in two major populations: one in the low micrometer size range and the other in the hundred nanometre range. The introduction of haem (Fe(III)PPIX) to this lipid particle system under biomimetic conditions (37 °C, pH 4.8) produced β-haematin with apparent first order kinetics and an average half life of 0.5 min. TEM of monoglycerides (MSG or MPG) extruded through a 200 nm filter with haem produced β-haematin crystals aligned and parallel to the lipid/water interface. These TEM data, together with a model system replacing the lipid with an aqueous organic solvent interface using either methyl laurate or docosane demonstrated that the OH and C=O groups are apparently necessary for efficient nucleation. This suggests that β-haematin crystallizes via epitaxial nucleation at the lipid-water interface through interaction of Fe(III)PPIX with the polar head group. Once nucleated, the crystal grows parallel to the interface until growth is terminated by the curvature of the lipid particle. The hydrophobic nature of the mature crystal favours an interior transport resulting in crystals aligned parallel to the lipid-water interface and each

  7. Enhanced High-Temperature Ice Nucleation Ability of Crystallized Aerosol Particles after Pre-Activation at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Moehler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.

    2014-12-01

    The term pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation describes the observation that the ice nucleation ability of solid ice nuclei may improve after they have already been involved in ice crystal formation or have been exposed to a temperature lower than 235 K. This can be explained by the retention of small ice embryos in cavities or crevices at the particle surface or by the capillary condensation and freezing of supercooled water, respectively. In recent cloud chamber experiments with crystallized aqueous ammonium sulfate, oxalic acid, and succinic acid solution droplets, we have unraveled a further pre-activation mechanism under ice subsaturated conditions which does not require the preceding growth of ice on the seed aerosol particles (Wagner, R. et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, doi: 10.1002/2014JD021741). First cloud expansion experiments were performed at a high temperature (267 - 244 K) where the crystallized particles did not promote any heterogeneous ice nucleation. Ice nucleation at this temperature, however, could be triggered by temporarily cooling the crystallized particles to a lower temperature. This is because upon crystallization, residuals of the aqueous solution are trapped within the crystals. These captured liquids can freeze when cooled below their respective homogeneous or heterogeneous freezing temperature, leading to the formation of ice pockets in the crystalline particles. When warmed again to the higher temperature, ice formation by the pre-activated particles occurred via depositional and deliquescence-induced ice growth, with ice active fractions ranging from 1 to 4% and 4 to 20%, respectively. Pre-activation disappeared above the eutectic temperature, which for the organic acids are close to the melting point of ice. This mechanism could therefore contribute to the very small fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles that are still ice active well above 263 K.

  8. Study of gypsum crystal nucleation and growth rates in simulated flue gas desulfurization liquors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, A.D.; Etherton, D.

    1981-06-01

    The kinetics of gypsum crystal nucleation and growth rates were measured in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber liquors. Variables studied were parent seed crystal size and mass; the organic additives citric acid, adipic acid, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, and Calgon CL246 polyacrylic acid formulation; and pH. Citric acid produced gypsum crystals with a more favorable columnar structure. Lower pH resulted in increased nucleation rates. Stable secondary nucleation was observed in the presence of retained parent gypsum seed crystals of size >150 ..mu..m. Growth and nucleation rates were correlated using reaction kinetic models. These kinetics were then used in rigorous computer simulations to predict crystal-size distribution (CSD) with different scrubber configurations. Scrubber process configurations employing classified product removal were calculated to produce a gypsum sludge having a mean particle size up to twice as large as the particle size with unclassified operation.

  9. A quantitative parameter-free prediction of simulated crystal nucleation times

    SciTech Connect

    Aga, Rachel S; Morris, James R; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Mendelev, Mikhail I.

    2006-01-01

    We present direct comparisons between simulated crystal-nucleation times and theoretical predictions using a model of aluminum, and demonstrate that a quantitative prediction can be made. All relevant thermodynamic properties of the system are known, making the agreement of our simulation data with nucleation theories free of any adjustable parameters. The role of transient nucleation is included in the classical nucleation theory approach, and shown to be necessary to understand the observed nucleation times. The calculations provide an explanation on why nucleation is difficult to observe in simulations at moderate undercoolings. Even when the simulations are significantly larger than the critical nucleus, and when simulation times are sufficiently long, at moderate undercoolings the small concentration of critical nuclei makes the probability of the nucleation low in molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. Mechanism for diamond nucleation and growth on single crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, T. P.; Xiong, Fulin; Chang, R. P. H.; White, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond crystals on single-crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon ions is studied. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used for diamond growth. The single-crystal copper substrates were implanted either at room or elevated temperature with carbon ions prior to diamond nucleation. This procedure leads to the formation of a graphite film on the copper surface which greatly enhances diamond crystallite nucleation. A simple lattice model is constructed for diamond growth on graphite as 111 line (diamond) parallel to 0001 line (graphite) and 110 line (diamond) parallel to 1 1 -2 0 (graphite).

  11. Optimization of crystal nucleation close to a metastable fluid-fluid phase transition.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Jan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Stanley, H Eugene; Reguera, David; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-06-22

    The presence of a metastable fluid-fluid critical point is thought to dramatically influence the crystallization pathway, increasing the nucleation rate by many orders of magnitude over the predictions of classical nucleation theory. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the kinetics of crystallization in the vicinity of this metastable critical point and throughout the metastable fluid-fluid phase diagram. To quantitatively understand how the fluid-fluid phase separation affects the crystal nucleation, we evaluate accurately the kinetics and reconstruct the thermodynamic free-energy landscape of crystal formation. Contrary to expectations, we find no special advantage of the proximity of the metastable critical point on the crystallization rates. However, we find that the ultrafast formation of a dense liquid phase causes the crystallization to accelerate both near the metastable critical point and almost everywhere below the fluid-fluid spinodal line. These results unveil three different scenarios for crystallization that could guide the optimization of the process in experiments.

  12. The Effect of Solution Parameters on Lysozyme Nucleation Rates and Crystal Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, R. A.; Snell, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    In the pursuit of strongly diffracting high quality macromolecule crystals of suitable volume, this study investigates how the formation of macromolecules in solution and their growth characteristics effect crystal volume and diffracting quality. We systematically investigated the effect of solution conditions on lysozyme nucleation rates and the volume of crystals produced. Batch crystallization plates were used in combination with a video microscope system to measure nucleation rates and crystal volume. As expected from classical nucleation theory, crystal numbers were found to increase with increases in temperature and supersaturation. Small changes in solution pH, at constant supersaturation values were found, however, to dramatically effect the number of crystals nucleated in the wells varying from 1000s to 10s in the pH range 4.0 to 5.2. Having optimized the conditions required to produce an appropriate number of crystals of a suitable volume for X-ray analysis, a large number of uniform crystals were produced under exactly the same conditions. In the X-ray analysis of more than 50 such crystals there was found a wide variation in crystal lattice parameters and data quality. The variation in X-ray quality crystal samples is thought to be related to the growth rate variation caused by growth rate dispersion seen in lysozyme crystal growth experiments.

  13. Impurity effects on orientation of lysozyme crystals nucleated on fatty acid thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Hondoh, H.; Nakada, T.

    2008-04-01

    Commercially available lysozyme samples that have different lot numbers (E02Z04 and E05802) were crystallized on fatty acid thin films. The orientation of lysozyme crystals nucleated on the films was investigated by atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy. The numbers of lysozyme crystals with specific planes parallel to the films are different. In other words, the impurities contained in commercial lysozyme significantly affect the orientation of lysozyme crystals. Detailed analysis of the orientation distribution of the lysozyme crystals nucleated from the purified sample showed that acetic acid is one of the substances promote the epitaxy.

  14. Nucleation in a Potts lattice gas model of crystallization from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Nathan; Peters, Baron

    2009-11-01

    Nucleation from solution is important in many pharmaceutical crystallization, biomineralization, material synthesis, and self-assembly processes. Simulation methodology has progressed rapidly for studies of nucleation in pure component and implicit solvent systems; however little progress has been made in the simulation of explicit solvent systems. The impasse stems from the inability of rare events simulation methodology to be combined with simulation techniques which maintain a constant chemical potential driving force (supersaturation) for nucleation. We present a Potts lattice gas (PLG) to aid in the development of new simulation strategies for nucleation from solution. The PLG captures common crystallization phase diagram features such as a eutectic point and solute/solvent melting points. Simulations of the PLG below the bulk solute melting temperature reveal a competition between amorphous and crystalline nuclei. As the temperature is increased toward the bulk melting temperature, the nucleation pathway changes from a one step crystalline nucleation pathway to a two step pathway, where an amorphous nucleus forms and then crystallizes. We explain these results in terms of classical nucleation theory with different size-dependant chemical potentials for the amorphous and crystalline nucleation pathways. The two step pathway may be particularly important when crystallization is favored only at postcritical sizes.

  15. Volume nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing in supercooled water microdroplets: results from a combined experimental and modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, M. E.; Kuhn, T.; Khalizov, A. F.; Sloan, J. J.

    2010-08-01

    Temperature-dependent volume nucleation rate coefficients for supercooled water droplets, JV(T), are derived from infrared extinction measurements in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using a microphysical model. The model inverts water and ice aerosol size distributions retrieved from experimental extinction spectra by considering the evolution of a measured initial droplet distribution via homogeneous nucleation and the exchange of vapour-phase water along a well-defined temperature profile. Experiment and model results are reported for supercooled water droplets with mean radii of 1.0, 1.7, and 2.9 μm. Values of mass accommodation coefficients for evaporation of water droplets and vapour deposition on ice particles are also determined from the model simulations. The coefficient for ice deposition was found to be 0.031 ± 0.001, while that for water evaporation was 0.054 ± 0.012. Results are considered in terms of the applicability of classical nucleation theory to the freezing of micrometre-sized droplets in cirrus clouds, with implications for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models.

  16. Volume nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing in supercooled water microdroplets: results from a combined experimental and modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, M. E.; Kuhn, T.; Khalizov, A. F.; Sloan, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    Temperature-dependent volume nucleation rate coefficients for supercooled water droplets, JV(T), are derived from infrared extinction measurements in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using a microphysical model. The model inverts water and ice aerosol size distributions retrieved from experimental extinction spectra by considering the evolution of a measured initial droplet distribution via homogeneous nucleation and the exchange of vapour-phase water along a well-defined temperature profile. Experiment and model results are reported for supercooled water droplets with mode radii of 1.0, 1.7, and 2.9 μm. Values of mass accommodation coefficients for evaporation of water droplets and vapour deposition on ice particles are also determined from the model simulations. The coefficient for ice deposition was found to be approximately 0.031, while that for water evaporation was 0.054. Results are considered in terms of the applicability of classical nucleation theory to the freezing of micrometre-sized droplets in cirrus clouds, with implications for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models.

  17. In-situ observation of nucleated polymer crystallization in polyoxymethylene sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slouf, Miroslav; Krejcikova, Sabina; Vackova, Tatana; Kratochvil, Jaroslav; Novak, Libor

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a dynamic sandwich method, which can be used for in-situ observation and quantification of polymer crystallization nucleated by micro/nanoparticles. The method was applied on polyoxymethylene (POM) composites with three nucleating agents: talc micropowder (POM/mTalc), chalk nanopowder (POM/nChalk) and titanate nanotubes (POM/TiNT). The nucleating agents were deposited between polymer films, the resulting sandwich samples were consolidated by thermal treatment, and their microtomed cross-sections were observed during isothermal crystallization by polarized light microscopy. As the intensity of polarized light was shown to be proportional to the relative crystallinity, the PLM results could be fitted to Avrami equation and the nucleating activity of all investigated particles could be quantified by means of Avrami parameters (n, k). The crystallization half-times increased reproducibly in the following order: POM/nChalk < POM/mTalc < POM/TiNT ~ POM. For strong nucleating agents (mTalc, nChalk), the crystallization kinetics corresponded to spontaneous crystallization starting from central nucleating layer, which was verified by computer simulations. The results were also confirmed by DSC. We concluded that the sandwich method is an efficient microscopic technique for detailed evaluation of nucleating activity of arbitrary micro/nanoparticles in polymer systems.

  18. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of electrodeposition: Crossover from continuous to instantaneous homogeneous nucleation within Avrami’s law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stefan; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2006-06-01

    The influence of lateral adsorbate diffusion on the dynamics of the first-order phase transition in a two-dimensional Ising lattice gas with attractive nearest-neighbor interactions is investigated by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. For example, electrochemical underpotential deposition proceeds by this mechanism. One major difference from adsorption in vacuum surface science is that under control of the electrode potential and in the absence of mass-transport limitations, local adsorption equilibrium is approximately established. We analyze our results using the theory of Kolmogorov, Johnson and Mehl, and Avrami (KJMA), which we extend to an exponentially decaying nucleation rate. Such a decay may occur due to a suppression of nucleation around existing clusters in the presence of lateral adsorbate diffusion. Correlation functions prove the existence of such exclusion zones. By comparison with microscopic results for the nucleation rate I and the interface velocity of the growing clusters v, we can show that the KJMA theory yields the correct order of magnitude for Iv2. This is true even though the spatial correlations mediated by diffusion are neglected. The decaying nucleation rate causes a gradual crossover from continuous to instantaneous nucleation, which is complete when the decay of the nucleation rate is very fast on the time scale of the phase transformation. Hence, instantaneous nucleation can be homogeneous, producing negative minima in the two-point correlation functions. We also present in this paper an n-fold way Monte Carlo algorithm for a square lattice gas with adsorption/desorption and lateral diffusion.

  19. Nucleation kinetics and crystal growth with fluctuating rates at the intermediate stage of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Malygin, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Crystal growth kinetics accompanied by particle growth with fluctuating rates at the intermediate stage of phase transitions is analyzed theoretically. The integro-differential model of governing equations is solved analytically for size-independent growth rates and arbitrary dependences of the nucleation frequency on supercooling/supersaturation. Two important cases of Weber-Volmer-Frenkel-Zel'dovich and Mier nucleation kinetics are detailed. A Fokker-Plank type equation for the crystal-size density distribution function is solved explicitly.

  20. Toward a molecular theory of homogeneous bubble nucleation: II. Calculation of the number density of critical nuclei and the rate of nucleation.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Korosh; Corti, David S

    2013-10-17

    In the present paper, we develop a method to calculate the rate of homogeneous bubble nucleation within a superheated L-J liquid based on the (n,v) equilibrium embryo free energy surface introduced in the first paper (DOI: 10.1021/jp404149n). We express the nucleation rate as the product of the concentration of critical nuclei within the metastable liquid phase and the relevant forward rate coefficient. We calculate the forward rate coefficient of the critical nuclei from their average lifetime as determined from MD simulations of a large number of embryo trajectories initiated from the transitional region of the metastable liquid configuration space. Therefore, the proposed rate coefficient does not rely on any predefined reaction coordinate. In our model, the critical nuclei belong to the region of the configuration space where the committor probability is about one-half, guaranteeing the dynamical relevance of the proposed embryos. One novel characteristic of our approach is that we define a limit for the configuration space of the equilibrium metastable phase and do not include the configurations that have zero committor probability in the nucleation free energy surface. Furthermore, in order to take into account the transitional degrees of freedom of the critical nuclei, we develop a simulation-based approach for rigorously mapping the free energy of the (n,v) equilibrium embryos to the concentration of the critical nuclei within the bulk metastable liquid phase.

  1. The Effects of Thermal History on Nucleation of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals, or Hot Protein and Cold Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Michael; Judge, Russell; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Chicken egg white lysozyme has a well characterized thermally driven phase transition. Between pH 4.2 and 5.2, the transition temperature, as defined by the point where the tetragonal and orthorhombic solubilities are equal, is a function of the pH, salt (precipitant) type and concentration, and most likely of the buffer concentration as well. This phase transition can be carried out with protein solution alone, prior to addition of precipitant solution. Warming a lysozyme solution above the phase transition point, then cooling it back below this point, has been shown to affect the subsequent nucleation rate, as determined by the numbers and size of crystals formed, but not the growth rate for the tetragonal crystal form . We have now measured the kinetics of this process and investigated its reversibility. The transition effects are progressive with temperature, having a half time of about 1 hour at 37C at pH 4.8. After holding a lysozyme solution at 37C (prior to addition of precipitant) for 16 hours, then cooling it back to 4C no return to the pre-warmed nucleation kinetics are observed after at least 4 weeks. Orthorhombic lysozyme crystals apparently do not undergo the flow-induced growth cessation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Putting the protein in the orthorhombic form does not affect the averaged face growth kinetics, only nucleation, for tetragonal crystals. This differential behaviour may be exploited to elucidate how and where flow affects the lysozyme crystal growth process. The presentation will focus on the results of these and ongoing studies in this area.

  2. Theoretical study of vapor-liquid homogeneous nucleation using stability analysis of a macroscopic phase.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Calderón, Bernardo

    2012-10-14

    Stability analysis is generally used to verify that the solution to phase equilibrium calculations corresponds to a stable state (minimum of the free energy). In this work, tangent plane distance analysis for stability of macroscopic mixtures is also used for analyzing the nucleation process, reconciling thus this analysis with classical nucleation theories. In the context of the revised nucleation theory, the driving force and the nucleation work are expressed as a function of the Lagrange multiplier corresponding to the mole fraction constraint from the minimization problem of stability analysis. Using a van der Waals fluid applied to a ternary mixture, Lagrange multiplier properties are illustrated. In particular, it is shown how the Lagrange multiplier value is equal to one on the binodal and spinodal curves at the same time as the driving force of nucleation vanishes on these curves. Finally, it is shown that, on the spinodal curve, the nucleation work from the revised and generalized nucleation theories are characterized by two different local minima from stability analysis, irrespective of any interfacial tension models.

  3. Using natural seeding material to generate nucleation in protein crystallization experiments.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Allan; Mac Sweeney, Aengus; Haber, Alexander

    2003-07-01

    The nucleation event in protein crystallization is a part of the process that is poorly controlled. It is generally accepted that the protein should be in the metastable phase for crystal growth, but for nucleation higher levels of saturation are needed. Formation of nuclei in bulk solvent requires interaction of protein molecules until a critical size of aggregate is created. In many crystallization experiments sufficiently high levels of saturation are not reached to allow this critical nucleation event to occur. If an environment can be created that favours a higher local concentration of macromolecules, the energy barrier for nucleation may be lowered. When seeds are introduced at lower levels of saturation in a crystallization experiment, nucleation may be facilitated and crystal growth initiated. In this study, the use of natural materials as stable seeds for nucleation has been investigated. The method makes it possible to introduce seeds into crystallization trials at any stage of the experiment using both microbatch and vapour-diffusion methods.

  4. Crystal Nucleation in Liquids: Open Questions and Future Challenges in Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The nucleation of crystals in liquids is one of nature’s most ubiquitous phenomena, playing an important role in areas such as climate change and the production of drugs. As the early stages of nucleation involve exceedingly small time and length scales, atomistic computer simulations can provide unique insights into the microscopic aspects of crystallization. In this review, we take stock of the numerous molecular dynamics simulations that, in the past few decades, have unraveled crucial aspects of crystal nucleation in liquids. We put into context the theoretical framework of classical nucleation theory and the state-of-the-art computational methods by reviewing simulations of such processes as ice nucleation and the crystallization of molecules in solutions. We shall see that molecular dynamics simulations have provided key insights into diverse nucleation scenarios, ranging from colloidal particles to natural gas hydrates, and that, as a result, the general applicability of classical nucleation theory has been repeatedly called into question. We have attempted to identify the most pressing open questions in the field. We believe that, by improving (i) existing interatomic potentials and (ii) currently available enhanced sampling methods, the community can move toward accurate investigations of realistic systems of practical interest, thus bringing simulations a step closer to experiments. PMID:27228560

  5. Enhancement of crystal homogeneity of protein crystals under application of an external alternating current electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, H.; Uda, S.; Fujiwara, K.; Nozawa, J.; Tachibana, M.; Kojima, K.

    2014-10-06

    X-ray diffraction rocking-curve measurements were performed on tetragonal hen egg white (HEW) lysozyme crystals grown with and without the application of an external alternating current (AC) electric field. The crystal quality was assessed by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for each rocking curve. For two-dimensional maps of the FWHMs measured on the 440 and the 12 12 0 reflection, the crystal homogeneity was improved under application of an external electric field at 1 MHz, compared with that without. In particular, the significant improvement of the crystal homogeneity was observed for the 12 12 0 reflection.

  6. Investigation of primary nucleation phenomena of acetylsalicylic acid crystals induced by ultrasonic irradiation—ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Etsuko; Ebihara, Satomi; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of our study is to clarify ultrasonic primary nucleation phenomena for controlling final product size by adjusting the number of primary nuclei. In our previous study, the effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the number of nuclei was investigated under the same supersaturated condition, as a result two novel phenomena were observed. First, there is a region where ultrasonic irradiation inhibits primary nucleation. Second, a specific amount of energy is needed to activate primary nucleation. From this result, it was expected that the ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation has a certain relationship to the energy necessary to form a stable nucleus. Therefore, we investigated the following: whether ultrasonic irradiation inhibits and activates primary nucleation at various degrees of supersaturation, whether final crystal size relates to the number of nuclei, and whether the ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation relates to the energy necessary to form a stable nucleus. First, we found that ultrasonic irradiation inhibits and activates primary nucleation at various supersaturated degrees. Second, we found that final crystal size increases or decreases depending on the number of nuclei. Therefore, it was indicated that ultrasonic energy could yield the desired crystal size by inducing suitable nucleation. Third, we found that the ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation decreases with a decrease in the energy necessary to form a stable nucleus. From this, we can propose criteria for determining the effect of ultrasonic irradiation on primary nucleation by showing diagrams correlating Δ Gcrit with Ecrit.

  7. Crystal nucleation and cluster-growth kinetics in a model glass under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V.; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2010-08-01

    Crystal nucleation and growth processes induced by an externally applied shear strain in a model metallic glass are studied by means of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, in a range of temperatures. We observe that the nucleation-growth process takes place after a transient, induction regime. The critical cluster size and the lag-time associated with this induction period are determined from a mean first-passage time analysis. The laws that describe the cluster-growth process are studied as a function of temperature and strain rate. A theoretical model for crystallization kinetics that includes the time dependence for nucleation and cluster growth is developed within the framework of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami scenario and is compared with the molecular dynamics data. Scalings for the cluster-growth laws and for the crystallization kinetics are also proposed and tested. The observed nucleation rates are found to display a nonmonotonic strain rate dependency.

  8. Nucleation kinetics, growth and studies of β-alanine single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, D.; Selvarajan, P.; HemaDurga, K. K.; Lincy Mary Ponmani, S.

    2013-06-01

    Solubility and metastable zone width for the re-crystallized salt of β-alanine was determined. Induction period measurement for the selected supersaturation ratios at room temperature (31 °C) was carried out for supersaturated aqueous solutions of β-alanine and it is noticed that induction period decreases with increase of supersaturation ratio. The nucleation parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, radius and number of molecules of the critical nucleus, interfacial tension and the nucleation rate have been evaluated by classical nucleation theory. Single crystals of β-alanine were grown using the optimized nucleation parameters by solution method and grown crystals have been subjected to various studies like XRD studies, FTIR, optical, thermal and SHG studies.

  9. Local order parameters for use in driving homogeneous ice nucleation with all-atom models of water.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Doye, Jonathan P K; Noya, Eva G; Vega, Carlos

    2012-11-21

    We present a local order parameter based on the standard Steinhardt-Ten Wolde approach that is capable both of tracking and of driving homogeneous ice nucleation in simulations of all-atom models of water. We demonstrate that it is capable of forcing the growth of ice nuclei in supercooled liquid water simulated using the TIP4P/2005 model using over-biassed umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations. However, even with such an order parameter, the dynamics of ice growth in deeply supercooled liquid water in all-atom models of water are shown to be very slow, and so the computation of free energy landscapes and nucleation rates remains extremely challenging.

  10. A novel approach to the theory of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Berim, Gersh O; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to the theory of nucleation, formulated relatively recently by Ruckenstein, Narsimhan, and Nowakowski (see Refs. [7-16]) and developed further by Ruckenstein and other colleagues, is presented. In contrast to the classical nucleation theory, which is based on calculating the free energy of formation of a cluster of the new phase as a function of its size on the basis of macroscopic thermodynamics, the proposed theory uses the kinetic theory of fluids to calculate the condensation (W(+)) and dissociation (W(-)) rates on and from the surface of the cluster, respectively. The dissociation rate of a monomer from a cluster is evaluated from the average time spent by a surface monomer in the potential well as obtained from the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in the phase space of position and momentum for liquid-to-solid transition and the phase space of energy for vapor-to-liquid transition. The condensation rates are calculated using traditional expressions. The knowledge of those two rates allows one to calculate the size of the critical cluster from the equality W(+)=W(-) as well as the rate of nucleation. The developed microscopic approach allows one to avoid the controversial application of classical thermodynamics to the description of nuclei which contain a few molecules. The new theory was applied to a number of cases, such as the liquid-to-solid and vapor-to-liquid phase transitions, binary nucleation, heterogeneous nucleation, nucleation on soluble particles and protein folding. The theory predicts higher nucleation rates at high saturation ratios (small critical clusters) than the classical nucleation theory for both solid-to-liquid as well as vapor-to-liquid transitions. As expected, at low saturation ratios for which the size of the critical cluster is large, the results of the new theory are consistent with those of the classical one. The present approach was combined with the density functional theory to account for the density

  11. The early crystal nucleation process in hard spheres shows synchronised ordering and densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, Joshua T.; Anwar, Muhammad; Dorosz, Sven; Schilling, Tanja

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the early part of the crystal nucleation process in the hard sphere fluid using data produced by computer simulation. We find that hexagonal order manifests continuously in the overcompressed liquid, beginning approximately one diffusion time before the appearance of the first "solid-like" particle of the nucleating cluster, and that a collective influx of particles towards the nucleation site occurs simultaneously to the ordering process: the density increases leading to nucleation are generated by the same individual particle displacements as the increases in order. We rule out the presence of qualitative differences in the early nucleation process between medium and low overcompressions and also provide evidence against any separation of translational and orientational order on the relevant lengthscales.

  12. Homogeneous bubble nucleation in water at negative pressure: A Voronoi polyhedra analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abascal, Jose L. F.; Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Aragones, Juan L.; Valeriani, C.

    2013-02-01

    We investigate vapor bubble nucleation in metastable TIP4P/2005 water at negative pressure via the Mean First Passage Time (MFPT) technique using the volume of the largest bubble as a local order parameter. We identify the bubbles in the system by means of a Voronoi-based analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories. By comparing the features of the tessellation of liquid water at ambient conditions to those of the same system with an empty cavity we are able to discriminate vapor (or interfacial) molecules from the bulk ones. This information is used to follow the time evolution of the largest bubble until the system cavitates at 280 K above and below the spinodal line. At the pressure above the spinodal line, the MFPT curve shows the expected shape for a moderately metastable liquid from which we estimate the bubble nucleation rate and the size of the critical cluster. The nucleation rate estimated using Classical Nucleation Theory turns out to be about 8 order of magnitude lower than the one we compute by means of MFPT. The behavior at the pressure below the spinodal line, where the liquid is thermodynamically unstable, is remarkably different, the MFPT curve being a monotonous function without any inflection point.

  13. Multiple pathways of crystal nucleation in an extremely supersaturated aqueous potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) solution droplet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooheyong; Wi, Haeng Sub; Jo, Wonhyuk; Cho, Yong Chan; Lee, Hyun Hwi; Jeong, Se-Young; Kim, Yong-Il; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-01-01

    Solution studies have proposed that crystal nucleation can take more complex pathways than previously expected in classical nucleation theory, such as formation of prenucleation clusters or densified amorphous/liquid phases. These findings show that it is possible to separate fluctuations in the different order parameters governing crystal nucleation, that is, density and structure. However, a direct observation of the multipathways from aqueous solutions remains a great challenge because heterogeneous nucleation sites, such as container walls, can prevent these paths. Here, we demonstrate the existence of multiple pathways of nucleation in highly supersaturated aqueous KH2PO4 (KDP) solution using the combination of a containerless device (electrostatic levitation), and in situ micro-Raman and synchrotron X-ray scattering. Specifically, we find that, at an unprecedentedly deep level of supersaturation, a high-concentration KDP solution first transforms into a metastable crystal before reaching stability at room temperature. However, a low-concentration solution, with different local structures, directly transforms into the stable crystal phase. These apparent multiple pathways of crystallization depend on the degree of supersaturation. PMID:27791068

  14. Nucleation of Crystals From Solution in Microgravity (USML-1 Glovebox (GBX) Investigation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.; Reiss, Donald A.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1994-01-01

    A new method for initiating nucleation from solutions in microgravity which avoids nucleation on container walls and other surfaces is described. This method consists of injecting a small quantity of highly concentrated, heated solution into the interior of a lightly supersaturated, cooler host gowth solution. It was tested successfully on USML-I, producing a large number of LAP crystals whose longest dimension averaged 1 mm.

  15. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: II. Nucleation in the metastable liquid immiscibility region.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    In the second part of our paper, we address crystal nucleation in the metastable liquid miscibility region of eutectic systems that is always present, though experimentally often inaccessible. While this situation resembles the one seen in single component crystal nucleation in the presence of a metastable vapor-liquid critical point addressed in previous works, it is more complex because of the fact that here two crystal phases of significantly different compositions may nucleate. Accordingly, at a fixed temperature below the critical point, six different types of nuclei may form: two liquid-liquid nuclei: two solid-liquid nuclei; and two types of composite nuclei, in which the crystalline core has a liquid "skirt," whose composition falls in between the compositions of the solid and the initial liquid phases, in addition to nuclei with concentric alternating composition shells of prohibitively high free energy. We discuss crystalline phase selection via exploring/identifying the possible pathways for crystal nucleation.

  16. The effect of temperature and solution pH on the nucleation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals.

    PubMed

    Judge, R A; Jacobs, R S; Frazier, T; Snell, E H; Pusey, M L

    1999-09-01

    Part of the challenge of macromolecular crystal growth for structure determination is obtaining crystals with a volume suitable for x-ray analysis. In this respect an understanding of the effect of solution conditions on macromolecule nucleation rates is advantageous. This study investigated the effects of supersaturation, temperature, and pH on the nucleation rate of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Batch crystallization plates were prepared at given solution concentrations and incubated at set temperatures over 1 week. The number of crystals per well with their size and axial ratios were recorded and correlated with solution conditions. Crystal numbers were found to increase with increasing supersaturation and temperature. The most significant variable, however, was pH; crystal numbers changed by two orders of magnitude over the pH range 4.0-5.2. Crystal size also varied with solution conditions, with the largest crystals obtained at pH 5.2. Having optimized the crystallization conditions, we prepared a batch of crystals under the same initial conditions, and 50 of these crystals were analyzed by x-ray diffraction techniques. The results indicate that even under the same crystallization conditions, a marked variation in crystal properties exists.

  17. The Effect of Temperature and Solution pH on the Nucleation of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Russell A.; Jacobs, Randolph S.; Frazier, Tyralynn; Snell, Edward H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    Part of the challenge of macromolecular crystal growth for structure determination is obtaining crystals with a volume suitable for x-ray analysis. In this respect an understanding of the effect of solution conditions on macromolecule nucleation rates is advantageous. This study investigated the effects of supersaturation, temperature, and pH on the nucleation rate of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Batch crystallization plates were prepared at given solution concentrations and incubated at set temperatures over 1 week. The number of crystals per well with their size and axial ratios were recorded and correlated with solution conditions. Crystal numbers were found to increase with increasing supersaturation and temperature. The most significant variable, however, was pH; crystal numbers changed by two orders of magnitude over the pH range 4.0-5.2. Crystal size also varied with solution conditions, with the largest crystals obtained at pH 5.2. Having optimized the crystallization conditions, we prepared a batch of crystals under the same initial conditions, and 50 of these crystals were analyzed by x-ray diffraction techniques. The results indicate that even under the same crystallization conditions, a marked variation in crystal properties exists.

  18. Effect of Mannitol on Nucleation and Crystal Growth of Amorphous Flavonoids: Implications on the Formation of Nanocrystalline Solid Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Shete, Ganesh; Modi, Sameer R; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we studied crystallization kinetics of amorphous hesperetin (HRN) and naringenin (NRN) alone, and in 1:1 proportion with mannitol at Tg + 15 K. Crystallization rate of NRN was found to be significantly higher than HRN. Mannitol accelerated crystallization of HRN as well as NRN. NRN exhibited higher crystallization rate than HRN, in presence of mannitol, as well. Finke-Watzky model was used to deconvolute the crystallization kinetics data into nucleation and crystal growth rate constant. HRN alone had 9.56 × 10(9) times faster nucleation rate and 1.88 times slower crystal growth than NRN alone. Mannitol increased nucleation and crystal growth rate of HRN as well as NRN. In presence of mannitol, HRN possessed 1.34 × 10(10) times faster nucleation rate and 1.70 times slower crystal growth rate than NRN. Differences in crystallization behavior of HRN and NRN were explained by their thermodynamic properties.

  19. Effects of chitosan on the alignment, morphology and shape of calcite crystals nucleating under Langmuir monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyungil; Uysal, Ahmet; Kewalramani, Sumit; Stripe, Benjamin; Dutta, Pulak

    2009-04-22

    The growth of calcium carbonate crystals under Langmuir monolayers was investigated in the presence of chitosan, a soluble derivative of chitin added to the subphase to better simulate the polyelectrolyte-containing in vivo environment. Chitosan causes distinct concentration-dependent changes in the orientation, shape and morphology of the calcite crystals nucleating under acid and sulfate monolayers. Our results suggest that polyelectrolytes may play essential roles in controlling the growth of biogenic calcite crystals.

  20. Effects of Chitosan on the Morphology and Alignment of Calcite Crystals Nucleating Under Langmuir Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Uysal, A; Kewalramani, S; Stripe, B; Dutta, P

    2009-01-01

    The growth of calcium carbonate crystals under Langmuir monolayers was investigated in the presence of chitosan, a soluble derivative of chitin added to the subphase to better simulate the polyelectrolyte-containing in vivo environment. Chitosan causes distinct concentration-dependent changes in the orientation, shape and morphology of the calcite crystals nucleating under acid and sulfate monolayers. Our results suggest that polyelectrolytes may play essential roles in controlling the growth of biogenic calcite crystals.

  1. The Measurement of Sulfur Oxidation Products and Their Role in Homogeneous Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, F. L.

    1999-01-01

    An improved version of a transverse ion source was developed which uses selected ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry techniques inside of a particle nucleation flow tube. These new techniques are very unique, in that the chemical ionization is done inside of the flow tube rather than by having to remove the compounds and clusters of interest which are lost on first contact,with any surfaces. The transverse source is also unique because it allows the ion reaction time to be varied over more than an order of magnitude, which in turn makes possible the separation of ion induced cluster growth from the charging of preexisting molecular clusters. As a result of combining these unique capabilities, the first ever measurements of prenucleation molecular clusters were performed. These clusters are the intermediate stage of growth in the gas-to-particle conversion process. This new technique provides a means of observing clusters containing 2, 3, 4, ... and up to about 8 sulfuric acid molecules, where the critical cluster size under these measurement conditions was about 4 or 5. Thus, the nucleation process can now be directly observed and even growth beyond the critical cluster size can be investigated. The details of this investigation are discussed in a recently submitted paper, which is included as Appendix A. Measurements of the diffusion coefficient of sulfuric acid and sulfuric acid clustered with a water molecule have also been performed. The measurements are also discussed in more detail in another recently submitted paper which is included as Appendix B. The empirical results discussed in both of these papers provide a critical test of present nucleation theories. They also provide new hope for resolving many of the huge discrepancies between field observation and model prediction of particle nucleation. The second part of the research conducted under this project was directed towards the development of new chemical ionization techniques for measuring sulfur

  2. Nucleation of crystals from solution: classical and two-step models.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Deniz; Lee, Alfred Y; Myerson, Allan S

    2009-05-19

    Crystallization is vital to many processes occurring in nature and in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries. Notably, crystallization is an attractive isolation step for manufacturing because this single process combines both particle formation and purification. Almost all of the products based on fine chemicals, such as dyes, explosives, and photographic materials, require crystallization in their manufacture, and more than 90% of all pharmaceutical products contain bioactive drug substances and excipients in the crystalline solid state. Hence control over the crystallization process allows manufacturers to obtain products with desired and reproducible properties. We judge the quality of a crystalline product based on four main properties: size, purity, morphology, and crystal structure. The pharmaceutical industry in particular requires production of the desired crystal form (polymorph) to assure the bioavailability and stability of the drug substance. In solution crystallization, nucleation plays a decisive role in determining the crystal structure and size distribution. Therefore, understanding the fundamentals of nucleation is crucial to achieve control over these properties. Because of its analytical simplicity, researchers have widely applied classical nucleation theory to solution crystallization. However, a number of differences between theoretical predictions and experimental results suggest that nucleation of solids from solution does not proceed via the classical pathway but follows more complex routes. In this Account, we discuss the shortcomings of classical nucleation theory and review studies contributing to the development of the modern two-step model. In the two-step model that was initially proposed for protein crystallization, a sufficient-sized cluster of solute molecules forms first, followed by reorganization of that cluster into an ordered structure. In recent experimental and theoretical studies, we and other researchers have

  3. Homogeneous nucleation: classical formulas as asymptotic limits of the Cahn-Hilliard approach.

    PubMed

    Parra, I E; Cordero-Gracia, M; Gómez, M

    2007-02-07

    Classical expressions for the critical cluster work of formation approximate the nonclassical expressions based in the density functional theory of capillarity for the limit of low supersaturation degrees. However, the ratio between classical and nonclassical expressions for nucleation rates grows as the supersaturation degree decreases. Here, with the aim to obtain simple and more accurate expressions that approximate the modern nucleation rate formulas, an asymptotic expansion of the Cahn-Hilliard expression of the critical work of formation is developed within the limit of low supersaturation. In such asymptotic expansion, terms up to third order are retained. The ratios between the corrected classical expressions and the nonclassical ones are now decreasing for supersaturation degrees tending to zero. However, the corrected approximate formulas are as difficult to handle as the exact Cahn-Hilliard expressions. When only the two first low-order terms of the asymptotic expansion are retained, a simpler corrected classical expression is obtained but it can only approximate nonclassical expressions up to order unity. Finally, using a Becker-Doring model of nucleation, the kinetic prefactor of the critical nuclei rate of formation is modeled consistently with the Cahn-Hilliard approach to the critical work of formation.

  4. The Bjerknes instability during crystal nucleation by acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Amar, Martine

    2004-05-01

    The instability of position of a growing spherical crystal in an acoustic field is studied. Due to the Bjerknes force, a spherical crystal, whose position is shifted from an antinode of pressure, moves in the acoustic field. This displacement, stable in the case of bubbles in a cavitation experiment, turns out to be unstable in the case of crystallization. This effect is studied for an arbitrary Atwood number. To cite this article: M. Ben Amar, C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  5. Introducing uncertainty analysis of nucleation and crystal growth models in Process Analytical Technology (PAT) system design of crystallization processes.

    PubMed

    Samad, Noor Asma Fazli Abdul; Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist V; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the application of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis as part of a systematic model-based process monitoring and control (PAT) system design framework for crystallization processes. For the uncertainty analysis, the Monte Carlo procedure is used to propagate input uncertainty, while for sensitivity analysis, global methods including the standardized regression coefficients (SRC) and Morris screening are used to identify the most significant parameters. The potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystallization process is used as a case study, both in open-loop and closed-loop operation. In the uncertainty analysis, the impact on the predicted output of uncertain parameters related to the nucleation and the crystal growth model has been investigated for both a one- and two-dimensional crystal size distribution (CSD). The open-loop results show that the input uncertainties lead to significant uncertainties on the CSD, with appearance of a secondary peak due to secondary nucleation for both cases. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the most important parameters affecting the CSDs are nucleation order and growth order constants. In the proposed PAT system design (closed-loop), the target CSD variability was successfully reduced compared to the open-loop case, also when considering uncertainty in nucleation and crystal growth model parameters. The latter forms a strong indication of the robustness of the proposed PAT system design in achieving the target CSD and encourages its transfer to full-scale implementation.

  6. Fragmentation, nucleation and migration of crystals and bubbles in the Bishop Tuff rhyolitic magma

    SciTech Connect

    Gualda, G.; Cook, D.L.; Chopra, R.; Qin, L.; Anderson, A.T.; Rivers, M.

    2010-12-07

    The Bishop Tuff (USA) is a large-volume, high-silica pyroclastic rhyolite. Five pumice clasts from three early stratigraphic units were studied. Size distributions were obtained using three approaches: (1) crushing, sieving and winnowing (reliable for crystals >100 {micro}m); (2) microscopy of 1 mm{sup 3} fragments (preferable for crystals <100 {micro}m); and (3) computerised X-ray microtomography of {approx}1 cm{sup 3} pumice pieces. Phenocryst fragments coated with glass are common, and the size distributions for all crystals are concave-upward, indicating that crystal fragmentation is an important magmatic process. Three groups are recognised, characterised by: (1) high-density (0.759-0.902 g cm{sup -3}), high-crystal content (14.4-15.3 wt.%) and abundant large crystals (>800 {micro}m); concave-downward size distributions for whole crystals indicate late-stage growth with limited nucleation, compatible with the slow cooling of a large, gas-saturated, stably stratified magma body; (2) low-density (0.499 g cm{sup -3}), low-crystal content (6.63 wt.%) and few large crystals; the approximately linear size distribution reveals that nucleation was locally important, perhaps close to the walls; and (3) intermediate characteristics in all respects. The volumetric fraction of bubbles inversely correlates with the number of large crystals. This is incompatible with isobaric closed-system crystallisation, but can be explained by sinking of large crystals and rise of bubbles in the magma.

  7. Heterogeneous dislocation nucleation in single crystal copper-antimony solid-solution alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajgarhia, Rahul K.; Spearot, Douglas E.; Saxena, Ashok

    2009-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to study the partial dislocation nucleation process in single crystal copper with varying concentrations of antimony (0.0-2.0 at%Sb) under uniaxial tension. A well-established embedded-atom method potential is used to represent the Cu-Cu interactions and a recently developed Lennard-Jones potential is used for the Cu-Sb and Sb-Sb interactions. Antimony atoms are randomly distributed as substitutional defects in the Cu single crystal. MD simulations indicate that the tensile stress required for partial dislocation nucleation in the crystal decreases with increasing concentration of Sb. The strain field around Sb dopant atoms in the Cu lattice reduces the unstable stacking fault energy, which promotes heterogeneous nucleation of partial dislocations and reduces the tensile stresses required for plastic deformation. In addition, the role of Sb on the reduction in the stress required for dislocation nucleation is found to be orientation-dependent. Finally, both temperature and Sb distribution play a role in the statistical variation of the stress required for heterogeneous partial dislocation nucleation; this variation is maximum at moderate levels of Sb concentration (0.20-0.50 at%Sb).

  8. First passage times in homogeneous nucleation: Dependence on the total number of particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yvinec, Romain; Bernard, Samuel; Pujo-Menjouet, Laurent; Hingant, Erwan

    2016-01-21

    Motivated by nucleation and molecular aggregation in physical, chemical, and biological settings, we present an extension to a thorough analysis of the stochastic self-assembly of a fixed number of identical particles in a finite volume. We study the statistics of times required for maximal clusters to be completed, starting from a pure-monomeric particle configuration. For finite volumes, we extend previous analytical approaches to the case of arbitrary size-dependent aggregation and fragmentation kinetic rates. For larger volumes, we develop a scaling framework to study the first assembly time behavior as a function of the total quantity of particles. We find that the mean time to first completion of a maximum-sized cluster may have a surprisingly weak dependence on the total number of particles. We highlight how higher statistics (variance, distribution) of the first passage time may nevertheless help to infer key parameters, such as the size of the maximum cluster. Finally, we present a framework to quantify formation of macroscopic sized clusters, which are (asymptotically) very unlikely and occur as a large deviation phenomenon from the mean-field limit. We argue that this framework is suitable to describe phase transition phenomena, as inherent infrequent stochastic processes, in contrast to classical nucleation theory.

  9. Optimization of crystal nucleation close to a metastable fluid-fluid phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Wedekind, Jan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Reguera, David; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a metastable fluid-fluid critical point is thought to dramatically influence the crystallization pathway, increasing the nucleation rate by many orders of magnitude over the predictions of classical nucleation theory. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the kinetics of crystallization in the vicinity of this metastable critical point and throughout the metastable fluid-fluid phase diagram. To quantitatively understand how the fluid-fluid phase separation affects the crystal nucleation, we evaluate accurately the kinetics and reconstruct the thermodynamic free-energy landscape of crystal formation. Contrary to expectations, we find no special advantage of the proximity of the metastable critical point on the crystallization rates. However, we find that the ultrafast formation of a dense liquid phase causes the crystallization to accelerate both near the metastable critical point and almost everywhere below the fluid-fluid spinodal line. These results unveil three different scenarios for crystallization that could guide the optimization of the process in experiments PMID:26095898

  10. Kinetics of nucleation and crystallization in poly(e-caprolactone) (PCL)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Schmelzer, Jurn; Wunderlich, Bernhard {nmn}; Schick, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The recently developed differential fast scanning calorimetry (DFSC) is used for a new look at the crystal growth of poly(3-caprolactone) (PCL) from 185 K, below the glass transition temperature, to 330 K, close to the equilibrium melting temperature. The DFSC allows temperature control of the sample and determination of its heat capacity using heating rates from 50 to 50,000 K/s. The crystal nucleation and crystallization halftimes were determined simultaneously. The obtained halftimes cover a range from 3 102 s (nucleation at 215 K) to 3 109 s (crystallization at 185 K). After attempting to analyze the experiments with the classical nucleation and growth model, developed for systems consisting of small molecules, a new methodology is described which addresses the specific problems of crystallization of flexible linear macromolecules. The key problems which are attempted to be resolved concern the differences between the structures of the various entities identified and their specific role in the mechanism of growth. The structures range from configurations having practically unmeasurable latent heats of ordering (nuclei) to being clearly-recognizable, ordered species with rather sharp disordering endotherms in the temperature range from the glass transition to equilibrium melting for increasingly perfect and larger crystals. The mechanisms and kinetics of growth involve also a detailed understanding of the interaction with the surrounding rigid-amorphous fraction (RAF) in dependence of crystal size and perfection.

  11. A parameter free prediction of simulated crystal nucleation times in the Lennard-Jones system: from steady state nucleation to the transient-time regime

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, L.; Morris, James R; Aga, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Large scale simulations of crystal nucleation from the liquid are performed using the Lennard-Jones potential, to determine the time required for nucleation. By considering both transient and finite-size effects, we successfully predict the nucleation time within order of magnitude without any parameter fitting. All necessary parameters are derived from separate, equilibrium simulations. At smaller undercoolings, large system sizes are required, not only to accommodate large critical nuclei, but also to control statistical effects that are controlled by the density of critical nuclei. Two distinct nucleation regions are observed in the simulations, which are dominated by transient time and steady state nucleation time, respectively. At deep undercoolings, we still show consistency between predicted transient times and simulated nucleation times, which suggests that the short nucleation times in simulations are due to a small barrier to nucleation, rather than spinodal transformation that have been previously predicted. We compare with similar, previous results on a model of Al, which does not show such rapid nucleation at low temperatures, and suggest that the differences are due to the behavior of the reduced barrier G*/kBT.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of two-dimensional crystal growth in nucleated isotactic polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieruccini, M.; Marco, G. Di; Lanza, M.

    1996-08-01

    A thermodynamic model is used to describe the two-dimensional crystallization kinetics (as observed by means of a calorimeter) of polypropylene nucleated with small amounts of indigo. The customary expression of the free enthalpy associated to secondary nucleation is initially used to analyze the experimental data. A significant dependence of the apparent surface tension (either basal or lateral) of the nuclei on the concentration of indigo is pointed out. To account for this effect, a phenomenological correction to the free enthalpy of nucleation is considered afterwards, which is connected with an entropy contribution arising from the formation of the crystal-melt interface. A more detailed data analysis is then carried out in light of this model.

  13. Time-evolution of grain size distributions in random nucleation and growth crystallization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teran, Anthony V.; Bill, Andreas; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2010-02-01

    We study the time dependence of the grain size distribution N(r,t) during crystallization of a d -dimensional solid. A partial differential equation, including a source term for nuclei and a growth law for grains, is solved analytically for any dimension d . We discuss solutions obtained for processes described by the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Mehl-Johnson model for random nucleation and growth (RNG). Nucleation and growth are set on the same footing, which leads to a time-dependent decay of both effective rates. We analyze in detail how model parameters, the dimensionality of the crystallization process, and time influence the shape of the distribution. The calculations show that the dynamics of the effective nucleation and effective growth rates play an essential role in determining the final form of the distribution obtained at full crystallization. We demonstrate that for one class of nucleation and growth rates, the distribution evolves in time into the logarithmic-normal (lognormal) form discussed earlier by Bergmann and Bill [J. Cryst. Growth 310, 3135 (2008)]. We also obtain an analytical expression for the finite maximal grain size at all times. The theory allows for the description of a variety of RNG crystallization processes in thin films and bulk materials. Expressions useful for experimental data analysis are presented for the grain size distribution and the moments in terms of fundamental and measurable parameters of the model.

  14. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-04

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  15. Effects of Pre-Existing Ice Crystals on Cirrus Clouds and Comparison between Different Ice Nucleation Parameterizations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiangjun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the treatment of ice nucleation in a more realistic manner in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5.3 (CAM5.3), the effects of preexisting ice crystals on ice nucleation in cirrus clouds are considered. In addition, by considering the in-cloud variability in ice saturation ratio, homogeneous nucleation takes place spatially only in a portion of cirrus cloud rather than in the whole area of cirrus cloud. With these improvements, the two unphysical limiters used in the representation of ice nucleation are removed. Compared to observations, the ice number concentrations and the probability distributions of ice number concentration are both improved with the updated treatment. The preexisting ice crystals significantly reduce ice number concentrations in cirrus clouds, especially at mid- to high latitudes in the upper troposphere (by a factor of ~10). Furthermore, the contribution of heterogeneous ice nucleation to cirrus ice crystal number increases considerably.Besides the default ice nucleation parameterization of Liu and Penner (2005, hereafter LP) in CAM5.3, two other ice nucleation parameterizations of Barahona and Nenes (2009, hereafter BN) and Kärcher et al. (2006, hereafter KL) are implemented in CAM5.3 for the comparison. In-cloud ice crystal number concentration, percentage contribution from heterogeneous ice nucleation to total ice crystal number, and preexisting ice effects simulated by the three ice nucleation parameterizations have similar patterns in the simulations with present-day aerosol emissions. However, the change (present-day minus pre-industrial times) in global annual mean column ice number concentration from the KL parameterization (3.24×106 m-2) is obviously less than that from the LP (8.46×106 m-2) and BN (5.62×106 m-2) parameterizations. As a result, experiment using the KL parameterization predicts a much smaller anthropogenic aerosol longwave indirect forcing (0.24 W m-2) than that using the LP (0.46 W m-2

  16. A parameter-free prediction of simulated crystal nucleation times in the Lennard-Jones system: from the steady-state nucleation to the transient time regime.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lu Jian; Morris, James R; Aga, Rachel S

    2010-08-28

    Large scale simulations of crystal nucleation from the liquid are performed using the Lennard-Jones potential to determine the time required for nucleation. By considering both transient and finite-size effects, we for the first time successfully predict the nucleation time without any parameter fitting in the Lennard-Jones system. All necessary parameters are derived from separate, equilibrium simulations. At small undercoolings, large system size effects are observed. The required system size is not only determined by the size of the critical nuclei, but also the characteristic spacing between them. Two distinct nucleation regions are predicted by theory and observed by the simulations, which are dominated by the transient time and the steady-state nucleation time, respectively.

  17. Externally applied electric fields up to 1.6 × 10(5) V/m do not affect the homogeneous nucleation of ice in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Tang, Sindy K Y; Bishop, Kyle J M; Whitesides, George M

    2011-02-10

    The freezing of water can initiate at electrically conducting electrodes kept at a high electric potential or at charged electrically insulating surfaces. The microscopic mechanisms of these phenomena are unknown, but they must involve interactions between water molecules and electric fields. This paper investigates the effect of uniform electric fields on the homogeneous nucleation of ice in supercooled water. Electric fields were applied across drops of water immersed in a perfluorinated liquid using a parallel-plate capacitor; the drops traveled in a microchannel and were supercooled until they froze due to the homogeneous nucleation of ice. The distribution of freezing temperatures of drops depended on the rate of nucleation of ice, and the sensitivity of measurements allowed detection of changes by a factor of 1.5 in the rate of nucleation. Sinusoidal alternation of the electric field at frequencies from 3 to 100 kHz prevented free ions present in water from screening the electric field in the bulk of drops. Uniform electric fields in water with amplitudes up to (1.6 ± 0.4) × 10(5) V/m neither enhanced nor suppressed the homogeneous nucleation of ice. Estimations based on thermodynamic models suggest that fields in the range of 10(7)-10(8) V/m might cause an observable increase in the rate of nucleation.

  18. The Effect of Solution Conditions on the Nucleation Kinetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Russell A.; Baird, James K.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    An understanding of protein crystal nucleation rates and the effect of solution conditions upon them, is fundamental to the preparation of protein crystals of the desired size and shape for X-ray diffraction analysis. The ability to predict the effect of supersaturation, temperature, pH and precipitant concentration on the number and size of crystals formed is of great benefit in the pursuit of protein structure analysis. In this study we experimentally examine the effect of supersaturation, temperature, pH and sodium chloride concentration on the nucleation rate of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals. In order to do this batch crystallization plates were prepared at given solution concentrations and incubated at three different temperatures over the period of one week. The number of crystals per well with their size and dimensions were recorded and correlated against solution conditions. Duplicate experiments indicate the reproducibility of the technique. Although it is well known that crystal numbers increase with increasing supersaturation, large changes in crystal number were also correlated against solution conditions of temperature, pH and salt concentration over the same supersaturation ranges. Analysis of these results enhance our understanding of the effect of solution conditions such as the dramatic effect that small changes in charge and ionic strength can have on the number of tetragonal lysozyme crystals that form and grow in solution.

  19. Study of experiments on condensation of nitrogen by homogeneous nucleation at states modelling those on the national transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    A cryogenic wind tunnel is based on the twofold idea of lowering drive power and increasing Reynolds number by operating with nitrogen near its boiling point. There are two possible types of condensation problems involved in this mode of wind tunnel operation. They concern the expansion from the nozzle supply to the test section at relatively low cooling rates, and secondly the expansion around models in the test section. This secondary expansion involves higher cooling rates and shorter time scales. In addition to these two condensation problems it is not certain what purity of nitrogen can be achieved in a large facility. Therefore, one cannot rule out condensation processes other than those of homogeneous nucleation.

  20. The interfacial amorphous double layer and the homogeneous nucleation in reflow of a Sn-Zn solder on Cu substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Chien-Cheng; Lin, Kwang-Lung

    2011-05-15

    To illustrate the interfacial reaction mechanism, the Sn-Zn[Sn-8.5Zn-0.5Ag-0.01Al-0.1Ga (wt%)] solder was reflowed on Cu substrate at 250 deg. C for 15 s followed by immediate quench in liquid nitrogen. The frozen interfacial microstructure was investigated with high resolution transmission electron microscope. An amorphous double layer was formed at the interface which consists of a 5 nm pure Cu region and a Cu-Zn diffusion region. Nanocrystalline intermetallic compound (IMC) Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} were observed in the Cu-Zn diffusion region. These nanocrystalline IMCs are suggested to form via a homogeneous nucleation process.

  1. Test of classical nucleation theory and mean first-passage time formalism on crystallization in the Lennard-Jones liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Lundrigan, Sarah E. M.; Saika-Voivod, Ivan

    2009-09-14

    We perform molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo computer simulations to test the ability of the recently developed formalism of mean first-passage time (MFPT) [J. Wedekind, R. Strey, and D. Reguera, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 134103 (2007); J. Wedekind and D. Reguera, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 11060 (2008)] to characterize crystal nucleation in the Lennard-Jones liquid. We find that the nucleation rate, critical embryo size, Zeldovich factor, attachment rate, and the nucleation barrier profile obtained from MFPT all compare very well to the same quantities calculated using other methods. Furthermore, we find that the nucleation rate obtained directly through MD closely matches the prediction of classical nucleation theory.

  2. Test of classical nucleation theory and mean first-passage time formalism on crystallization in the Lennard-Jones liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundrigan, Sarah E. M.; Saika-Voivod, Ivan

    2009-09-01

    We perform molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo computer simulations to test the ability of the recently developed formalism of mean first-passage time (MFPT) [J. Wedekind, R. Strey, and D. Reguera, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 134103 (2007); J. Wedekind and D. Reguera, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 11060 (2008)] to characterize crystal nucleation in the Lennard-Jones liquid. We find that the nucleation rate, critical embryo size, Zeldovich factor, attachment rate, and the nucleation barrier profile obtained from MFPT all compare very well to the same quantities calculated using other methods. Furthermore, we find that the nucleation rate obtained directly through MD closely matches the prediction of classical nucleation theory.

  3. Ice nucleation: elemental identification of particles in snow crystals.

    PubMed

    Parungo, F P; Pueschel, R F

    1973-06-08

    A scanning field-emission electron microscope combined with an x-ray analyzer is used to locate the ice nucleus within a three-dimensional image of a snow crystal and determine the chemical composition of the nucleus. This makes it possible to better understand the effect of nuclei in cloud seeding.

  4. Crystal nucleation of zincophosphate open frameworks in reverse micelle nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnola, Mario J.

    The synthesis of microporous zincophosphates was studied through a novel synthetic route based on reactants encapsulated in reverse micelles. The zincophosphate analog of sodalite had been previously synthesized in a reverse micelle system using Aerosol OT (AOT) as surfactant. The synthesis of open framework zincophosphates using this detergent proved unsuccessful. By studying the conventional synthesis of zincophosphates and the AOT reverse micelle aqueous environment through Raman microscopy, FTIR, NMR and XRD, it was found that the relatively high concentrations of sodium ions and the disordered structure of water present in the AOT reverse micelles prevented the synthesis of open framework structures. Based on these results, a system containing reverse micelles of the cationic surfactant dioctyldimethylammonium chloride (DODMAC) was developed. Zn 2+- and PO43--containing DODMAC reverse micelles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and conductivity measurements, indicating a rod-like shape for the former and a spherical shape for the latter reverse micelles. Combination of the two reverse micelle solutions led to the first successful reverse micelle based synthesis of the zincophosphate analog of Zeolite-X, ZnPO-X. The size of the crystals was controlled by modifying the volume ratio between the individual reagent micellar solutions. Nanocrystals of the order of 20 nm were obtained by interrupting the reaction at early stages. Studies of both the conventional aqueous and the reverse micelle based syntheses of ZnPO-X revealed that the morphology of the ZnPO-X crystals was controlled by the concentration of tetramethylammonium ions (TMA+). The ZnPO-X crystals synthesized via the reverse micelles were obtained as a single phase. Using Raman spectroscopy, it was determined that, during conventional synthesis, H+ ions promote the hydrolysis of the ZnPO-X crystals that leads to hopeite formation. Ion-exchange by monovalent cations indicated that the crystal

  5. Equilibrium studies of protein aggregates and homogeneous nucleation in protein formulation.

    PubMed

    Kiese, Sylvia; Pappenberger, Astrid; Friess, Wolfgang; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2010-02-01

    Shaking or heat stress may induce protein aggregates. Aggregation behavior of an IgG1 stressed by shaking or heat following static storage at 5 and 25 degrees C was investigated to determine whether protein aggregates exist in equilibrium. Aggregates were detected using different analytical methods including visual inspection, turbidity, light obscuration, size exclusion chromatography, and dynamic light scattering. Significant differences were evident between shaken and heated samples upon storage. Visible and subvisible particles (insoluble aggregates), turbidity and z-average diameter decreased whilst soluble aggregate content increased in shaken samples over time. Insoluble aggregates were considered to be reversible and dissociate into soluble aggregates and both aggregate types existed in equilibrium. Heat-induced aggregates had a denatured protein structure and upon static storage, no significant change in insoluble aggregates content was shown, whilst changes in soluble aggregates content occurred. This suggested that heat-induced insoluble aggregates were irreversible and not in equilibrium with soluble aggregates. Additionally, the aggregation behavior of unstressed IgG1 after spiking with heavily aggregated material (shaken or heat stressed) was studied. The aggregation behavior was not significantly altered, independent of the spiking concentration over time. Thus, neither mechanically stressed native nor temperature-induced denatured aggregates were involved in nucleating or propagating aggregation.

  6. Role of molecule flexibility on the nucleation of dislocations in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, Lynn B.; Mitchell, Robert L.; Knap, Jaroslaw; Chung, Peter W.

    2013-10-01

    We show that a molecule's flexibility described by changes to its conformation and orientation during deformation is vital for the proper representation of dislocation nucleation in molecular crystals. This is shown for the molecular crystal hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) by comparing direct atomistic simulations to two alternate forms of a continuum dislocation nucleation model for a crack tip loaded in pure shear. The atomistic simulations show the emission of partial dislocations. These are compared to continuum dislocation nucleation models based on generalized stacking fault (GSF) energy surfaces where the molecules are allowed to be either rigid or flexible. The rigid molecules are unable to represent the partial dislocations whereas the flexible molecules agree with the direct atomistic model to within 17% of the stress intensity factor for emission of the first partial dislocation and to within 1% for the second partial. This agreement first indicates that the molecule flexibility serves a critical role in the ductile behavior of the molecular crystal and, second, the continuum dislocation nucleation model represents the correct atomistic behavior, showing two partial dislocations connected by a stacking fault, when parameterized with GSF energy surfaces that account for the molecule flexibility.

  7. Supercooling, ice nucleation and crystal growth: a systematic study in plant samples.

    PubMed

    Zaragotas, Dimitris; Liolios, Nikolaos T; Anastassopoulos, Elias

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an innovative technological platform which is based on infrared video recording and is used for monitoring multiple ice nucleation events and their interactions, as they happen in 96 well microplates. Thousands of freezing curves were obtained during this study and the following freezing parameters were measured: cooling rate, nucleation point, freezing point, solidus point, degree of supercooling, duration of dendritic phase and duration of crystal growth. We demonstrate the use of this platform in the detection of ice nuclei in plant samples. Future applications of this platform may include breeding for frost tolerance, cryopreservation, frozen food technology and atmospheric sciences.

  8. Antheraea pernyi silk sericin mediating biomimetic nucleation and growth of hydroxylapatite crystals promoting bone matrix formation.

    PubMed

    Jiayao, Zhuang; Guanshan, Zhou; Jinchi, Zhang; Yuyin, Chen; Yongqiang, Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Bone biomineralization is well-regulated processes mediated by extracellular matrix proteins. The materials that can direct nucleation of hydroxylapatite (HAp) crystals and assembly of well-structured material-minerals complex are the key to mimicking the natural mineralization. This study used sericin from Antheraea pernyi (A.pernyi), non-mulberry silkworm cocoon as template to mediate nucleation of HAp crystals. Here we find out that AS (Antheraea pernyi sericin) can nucleate the formation HAp crystals in simulated body fluid verified by XRD and FTIR observations. The HAp crystals are organized into nano-rods oriented with c-axis preferentially parallel to the long axis of AS due to hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interaction and finally aggregated into HAp globule. The cell culture of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) showed that the HAp crystals mediated by AS not only stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation but also promote 0f osteogenic differentiation, suggesting that the resultant mineralized AS biomaterial has potential in promoting bone formation. Thus our work will provide significant implication on biomineralization of A. pernyi silk sericin as a potential scaffold for tissue engineering.

  9. Biomineralization Mechanisms: A new paradigm for crystal nucleation in organic matricies

    PubMed Central

    Veis, Arthur; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial practical interest in the mechanism by which the carbonated apatite of bone mineral can be initiated specifically in a matrix. The current literature is replete with studies aimed at mimicking the properties of vertebrate bone, teeth and other hard tissues by creating organic matrices that can be mineralized in vitro, and either functionally substitute for bone on a permanent basis, or serve as a temporary structure that can be replaced by normal remodeling processes. A key element in this is mineralization of an implant with the matrix and mineral disposed in the proper orientations and relationships. This review examines the pathway to crystallization from a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution in vitro, focusing on the basic mechanistic questions concerning mineral nucleation and growth. Since bone and dentin mineral forms within collagenous matricies we consider how the in vitro crystallization mechanisms might or might not be applicable to understanding the in vivo processes of biomineralization in bone and dentin. We propose that the pathway to crystallization from the calcium phosphate supersaturated tissue fluids involves the formation of a dense liquid phase of first-layer bound-water hydrated calcium and phosphate ions in which the crystallization is nucleated. SIBLING proteins and their in vitro analogs such as polyaspartic acids, have similar dense liquid first-layer bound water surfaces which interact with the dense liquid calcium phosphate nucleation clusters and modulate the rate of crystallization within the bone and dentin collagen fibril matrix. PMID:23241924

  10. Biomineralization mechanisms: a new paradigm for crystal nucleation in organic matrices.

    PubMed

    Veis, Arthur; Dorvee, Jason R

    2013-10-01

    There is substantial practical interest in the mechanism by which the carbonated apatite of bone mineral can be initiated specifically in a matrix. The current literature is replete with studies aimed at mimicking the properties of vertebrate bone, teeth, and other hard tissues by creating organic matrices that can be mineralized in vitro and either functionally substitute for bone on a permanent basis or serve as a temporary structure that can be replaced by normal remodeling processes. A key element in this is mineralization of an implant with the matrix and mineral arranged in the proper orientations and relationships. This review examines the pathway to crystallization from a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution in vitro, focusing on the basic mechanistic questions concerning mineral nucleation and growth. Since bone and dentin mineral forms within collagenous matrices, we consider how the in vitro crystallization mechanisms might or might not be applicable to understanding the in vivo processes of biomineralization in bone and dentin. We propose that the pathway to crystallization from the calcium phosphate-supersaturated tissue fluids involves the formation of a dense liquid phase of first-layer bound-water hydrated calcium and phosphate ions in which the crystallization is nucleated. SIBLING proteins and their in vitro analogs, such as polyaspartic acids, have similar dense liquid first-layer bound-water surfaces which interact with the dense liquid calcium phosphate nucleation clusters and modulate the rate of crystallization within the bone and dentin collagen fibril matrix.

  11. Engineering nanoparticle-protein associations for protein crystal nucleation and nanoparticle arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Denise N.

    Engineering the nanoparticle - protein association offers a new way to form protein crystals as well as new approaches for arrangement of nanoparticles. Central to this control is the nanoparticle surface. By conjugating polymers on the surface with controlled molecular weights many properties of the nanoparticle can be changed including its size, stability in buffers and the association of proteins with its surface. Large molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings allow for weak associations between proteins and nanoparticles. These interactions can lead to changes in how proteins crystallize. In particular, they decrease the time to nucleation and expand the range of conditions over which protein crystals form. Interestingly, when PEG chain lengths are too short then protein association is minimized and these effects are not observed. One important feature of protein crystals nucleated with nanoparticles is that the nanoparticles are incorporated into the crystals. What results are nanoparticles placed at well-defined distances in composite protein-nanoparticle crystals. Crystals on the size scale of 10 - 100 micrometers exhibit optical absorbance, fluorescence and super paramagnetic behavior derivative from the incorporated nanomaterials. The arrangement of nanoparticles into three dimensional arrays also gives rise to new and interesting physical and chemical properties, such as fluorescence enhancement and varied magnetic response. In addition, anisotropic nanomaterials aligned throughout the composite crystal have polarization dependent optical properties.

  12. On the Ice Nucleation Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be

  13. Quantum effect on the nucleation of plastic deformation carriers and destruction in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Khon, Yury A. Kaminskii, Petr P.

    2015-10-27

    New concepts on the irreversible crystal deformation as a structure transformation caused by a change in interatomic interactions at fluctuations of the electron density under loading are described. The change in interatomic interactions lead to the excitation of dynamical displacements of atoms. A model and a theory of a deformable pristine crystal taking into account the excitation of thermally activated and dynamical displacements of atoms are suggested. New mechanisms of the nucleation of plastic deformation carriers and destruction in pristine crystals at the real value of the deforming stress are studied.

  14. Nucleation and convection effects in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The following activities are reported on: repartitioning of NaCl and protein impurities in lysozyme crystallization; dependence of lysozyme growth kinetics on step sources and impurities; facet morphology response to nonuniformities in nutrient and impurity supply; interactions in undersaturated and supersaturated lysozyme solutions; heterogeneity determination and purification of commercial hen egg white lysozyme; nonlinear response of layer growth dynamics in the mixed kinetics-bulk transport regime; development of a simultaneous multiangle light scattering technique; and x-ray topography of tetragonal lysozyme grown by the temperature-control technique.

  15. A Local Order Parameter-Based Method for Simulation of Free Energy Barriers in Crystal Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Hossein; Khanjari, Neda; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-03-14

    While global order parameters have been widely used as reaction coordinates in nucleation and crystallization studies, their use in nucleation studies is claimed to have a serious drawback. In this work, a local order parameter is introduced as a local reaction coordinate to drive the simulation from the liquid phase to the solid phase and vice versa. This local order parameter holds information regarding the order in the first- and second-shell neighbors of a particle and has different well-defined values for local crystallites and disordered neighborhoods but is insensitive to the type of the crystal structure. The order parameter is employed in metadynamics simulations to calculate the solid-liquid phase equilibria and free energy barrier to nucleation. Our results for repulsive soft spheres and the Lennard-Jones potential, LJ(12-6), reveal better-resolved solid and liquid basins compared with the case in which a global order parameter is used. It is also shown that the configuration space is sampled more efficiently in the present method, allowing a more accurate calculation of the free energy barrier and the solid-liquid interfacial free energy. Another feature of the present local order parameter-based method is that it is possible to apply the bias potential to regions of interest in the order parameter space, for example, on the largest nucleus in the case of nucleation studies. In the present scheme for metadynamics simulation of the nucleation in supercooled LJ(12-6) particles, unlike the cases in which global order parameters are employed, there is no need to have an estimate of the size of the critical nucleus and to refine the results with the results of umbrella sampling simulations. The barrier heights and the nucleation pathway obtained from this method agree very well with the results of former umbrella sampling simulations.

  16. Satellite Remote Sensing of the Dependence of Homogeneous Ice Nucleation on Latitude and Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. L.; Garnier, A.; Avery, M. A.; Erfani, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds can be thought of as belonging to one of two categories: those formed through (1) homo- and (2) heterogeneous ice nucleation (henceforth hom and het) due to the very different microphysical and radiative properties associated with these two mechanisms. Hom cirrus will form only when atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) are sufficiently low in concentration, and studies suggest that mineral dust may account for most IN globally. Hence the occurrence of hom and het cirrus is likely to depend on latitude and season as mineral dust does, making satellite remote sensing the preferred method for characterizing this occurrence. A new understanding of thermal absorption in two split-window channels renders a reinterpretation of a standard CALIPSO satellite retrieval; the effective absorption optical depth ratio or βeff. Using earlier studies and aircraft measurements in cirrus clouds, βeff is found to be tightly related to the ice particle number concentration/ice water content ratio, or N/IWC, and thresholds for hom cirrus are estimated in terms of N/IWC and βeff. When applied to cold semi-transparent cirrus clouds, we find that (1) polar cirrus (T < -38 C) occur much more often during winter than summer and (2) hom cirrus prevail at high latitudes during winter, and during spring and fall over Antarctica. The figure shows estimates of the fraction of cirrus produced by hom (where βeff > 1.15) during January and August, where green is ~ 50% and red ~ 90-100%. These high N/IWC values associated with hom cirrus occur in regions where mineral dust concentrations are predicted to be minimal. This high N/IWC condition during winter is likely to have a strong greenhouse effect that may increase high latitude temperatures by 2-5°K relative to conditions where het cirrus dominates (Storelvmo et al. 2014, Philos. Trans. A, Royal Soc.). Thus, the lack of mineral dust in the high latitudes during winter may result in a strong warming influence over these regions. Moreover

  17. Peptides of Matrix Gla protein inhibit nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals.

    PubMed

    Goiko, Maria; Dierolf, Joshua; Gleberzon, Jared S; Liao, Yinyin; Grohe, Bernd; Goldberg, Harvey A; de Bruyn, John R; Hunter, Graeme K

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated protein that has been shown to prevent the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in the walls of blood vessels. MGP is also expressed in kidney and may inhibit the formation of kidney stones, which mainly consist of another crystalline phase, calcium oxalate monohydrate. To determine the mechanism by which MGP prevents soft-tissue calcification, we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated sequences of human MGP in both post-translationally modified and non-modified forms. The effects of these peptides on hydroxyapatite formation and calcium oxalate crystallization were quantified using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Peptides YGlapS (MGP1-14: YγEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YEpS (YEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YGlaS (YγESHESMESYELNP) and SK-Gla (MGP43-56: SKPVHγELNRγEACDD) inhibited formation of hydroxyapatite in order of potency YGlapS > YEpS > YGlaS > SK-Gla. The effects of YGlapS, YEpS and YGlaS on hydroxyapatite formation were on both crystal nucleation and growth; the effect of SK-Gla was on nucleation. YGlapS and YEpS significantly inhibited the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, while simultaneously promoting the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate. The effects of these phosphopeptides on calcium oxalate monohydrate formation were on growth of crystals rather than nucleation. We have shown that the use of dynamic light scattering allows inhibitors of hydroxyapatite nucleation and growth to be distinguished. We have also demonstrated for the first time that MGP peptides inhibit the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate. Based on the latter finding, we propose that MGP function not only to prevent blood-vessel calcification but also to inhibit stone formation in kidney.

  18. Nucleation in Synoptically Forced Cirrostratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R.-F.; Starr, D. OC.; Reichardt, J.; DeMott, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Formation and evolution of cirrostratus in response to weak, uniform and constant synoptic forcing is simulated using a one-dimensional numerical model with explicit microphysics, in which the particle size distribution in each grid box is fully resolved. A series of tests of the model response to nucleation modes (homogeneous-freezing-only/heterogeneous nucleation) and heterogeneous nucleation parameters are performed. In the case studied here, nucleation is first activated in the prescribed moist layer. A continuous cloud-top nucleation zone with a depth depending on the vertical humidity gradient and one of the nucleation parameters is developed afterward. For the heterogeneous nucleation cases, intermittent nucleation zones in the mid-upper portion of the cloud form where the relative humidity is on the rise, because existent ice crystals do not uptake excess water vapor efficiently, and ice nuclei (IN) are available. Vertical resolution as fine as 1 m is required for realistic simulation of the homogeneous-freezing-only scenario, while the model resolution requirement is more relaxed in the cases where heterogeneous nucleation dominates. Bulk microphysical and optical properties are evaluated and compared. Ice particle number flux divergence, which is due to the vertical gradient of the gravity-induced particle sedimentation, is constantly and rapidly changing the local ice number concentration, even in the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is shallow, particle number concentration decreases rapidly as ice particles grow and sediment away from the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is large, a region of high ice number concentration can be sustained. The depth of nucleation zone is an important parameter to be considered in parametric treatments of ice cloud generation.

  19. Evidence of Multi-step Nucleation Leading to Various Crystallization Pathways from an Fe-O-Al Melt

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G. C.; Wang, Q.; Li, S. L.; Ai, X. G.; Fan, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    The crystallization process from a solution begins with nucleation, which determines the structure and size of the resulting crystals. Further understanding of multi-pathway crystallizations from solution through two-step nucleation mechanisms is needed. This study uses density functional theory to probe the thermodynamic properties of alumina clusters at high temperature and reveals the thermodynamic relationship between these clusters and the saturation levels of dissolved oxygen and aluminum in an Fe–O–Al melt. Based on the thermodynamics of cluster formation and the experimental evidence for both excess oxygen in the Fe-O-Al melt and for alumina with a polycrystalline structure in solidified iron, we demonstrate that the appearance of various types of clusters that depends on the saturation ratio determines the nucleation steps that lead to the various crystallization pathways. Such mechanisms may also be important in nucleation and crystallization from solution. PMID:24866413

  20. Nucleation control and separation of paracetamol polymorphs through swift cooling crystallization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudha, C.; Srinivasan, K.

    2014-09-01

    Polymorphic nucleation behavior of pharmaceutical solid paracetamol has been investigated by performing swift cooling crystallization process. Saturated aqueous solution prepared at 318 K was swiftly cooled to 274 K in steps of every 1 K in the temperature range from 274 K to 313 K with uniform stirring of 100 rpm. The resultant supersaturation generated in the mother solution favours the nucleation of three different polymorphs of paracetamol. Lower supersaturation region σ=0.10-0.83 favours stable mono form I; the intermediate supersaturation region σ=0.92-1.28 favours metastable ortho form II and the higher supersaturation region σ=1.33-1.58 favours unstable form III polymorphic nucleation. Depending upon the level of supersaturation generated during swift cooling process and the corresponding solubility limit and metastable zone width (MSZW) of each polymorph, the nucleation of a particular polymorph occurs in the system. The type of polymorphs was identified by in-situ optical microscopy and the internal structure was confirmed by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) study. By this novel approach, the preferred nucleation regions of all the three polymorphs of paracetamol are optimized in terms of different cooling ranges employed during the swift cooling process. Also solution mediated polymorphic transformations from unstable to mono and ortho to mono polymorphs have been studied by in-situ.

  1. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; ...

    2016-03-03

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are donemore » with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.« less

  2. Role of clusters in nonclassical nucleation and growth of protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Sleutel, Mike; Van Driessche, Alexander E. S.

    2014-01-01

    The development of multistep nucleation theory has spurred on experimentalists to find intermediate metastable states that are relevant to the solidification pathway of the molecule under interest. A great deal of studies focused on characterizing the so-called “precritical clusters” that may arise in the precipitation process. However, in macromolecular systems, the role that these clusters might play in the nucleation process and in the second stage of the precipitation process, i.e., growth, remains to a great extent unknown. Therefore, using biological macromolecules as a model system, we have studied the mesoscopic intermediate, the solid end state, and the relationship that exists between them. We present experimental evidence that these clusters are liquid-like and stable with respect to the parent liquid and metastable compared with the emerging crystalline phase. The presence of these clusters in the bulk liquid is associated with a nonclassical mechanism of crystal growth and can trigger a self-purifying cascade of impurity-poisoned crystal surfaces. These observations demonstrate that there exists a nontrivial connection between the growth of the macroscopic crystalline phase and the mesoscopic intermediate which should not be ignored. On the other hand, our experimental data also show that clusters existing in protein solutions can significantly increase the nucleation rate and therefore play a relevant role in the nucleation process. PMID:24449867

  3. Single ice crystal measurements during nucleation experiments with the depolarization detector IODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, M.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.; Möhler, O.

    2008-12-01

    In order to determine the efficiency of aerosol particles of several types to nucleate ice, an Ice Optical DEpolarization detector (IODE) was developed to distinguish between water droplets and ice crystals in ice nucleation chambers. A laser beam polarized linearly (power: 50 mW, wavelength: 407 nm) is directed through the chamber. The scattered light intensity from particles is measured at a scattering angle of Θ=175° in both polarization components (parallel and perpendicular). The ratio between the perpendicular intensity over the total one gives the depolarization ratio δ. Single particle detection is possible, using a peak detection algorithm. For high particle concentrations, a real-time signal averaging method can also be run simultaneously. The IODE detector was used in connection with the Zurich ice nucleation chamber during the ICIS 2007 workshop where ice nucleation experiments were performed with several aerosol types. In presence of ice crystals, peaks were detected in both channels, generating depolarization signals. Mean values of δ ranged from 0.24 to 0.37.

  4. Single ice crystal measurements during nucleation experiments with the depolarization detector IODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, M.; Stetzer, O.; Lüönd, F.; Möhler, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine the efficiency of different aerosol particles to nucleate ice, an Ice Optical DEpolarization detector (IODE) was developed to distinguish between water droplets and ice crystals in ice nucleation chambers. A laser beam polarized linearly (power: 50 mW, wavelength: 407 nm) is directed through the chamber. The scattered light intensity from particles is measured at a scattering angle of Θ=175° in both polarization components (parallel and perpendicular). The ratio between the perpendicular intensity over the total one yields the depolarization ratio δ. Single particle detection is possible, using a peak detection algorithm. For high particle concentrations, a real-time signal averaging method can also be run simultaneously. The IODE detector was used in connection with the Zurich ice nucleation chamber during the ICIS 2007 workshop where ice nucleation experiments were performed with several aerosol types. In presence of ice crystals, a depolarization ratio could be measured on a particle-by-particle basis. Mean values of δ ranged from 0.24 to 0.37 and agree well with theoretical calculations.

  5. Effects of crystallization and bubble nucleation on the seismic properties of magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, Barbara Andrea; Cordonnier, Benoit; Zappone, Alba; Ulmer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Seismic tomography of potentially hazardous volcanoes is a prime tool to assess the location and dimensions of magmatic reservoirs. Seismic velocities are strongly affected by processes occurring within the conduit or in the magma chamber, such as crystallization and bubble exsolution. However, the limited number of constrained measurements does not allow yet to link seismic tomography and the textural state of a particular volcanic system. In this study, we investigated a chemically simplified melt in the system CaO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-CO2, which undergoes plagioclase crystallization and bubble exsolution. A Paterson-type internally heated gas pressure apparatus was employed to measure ultrasonic velocities at a constant pressure of 250 MPa and at temperature from 850 to 700°C. Magmatic processes such as crystallization, bubble nucleation, and coalescence have been recognized throughout the measurements of seismic velocities in the laboratory. Compression and shear wave velocities increase nonlinearly during crystallization. At a crystal fraction exceeding 0.45, the formation of a crystal network favors the propagation of seismic waves through magmatic liquids. However, bubble nucleation induced by crystallization leads to an increase of magma compressibility resulting in a lowering of the wave propagation velocities. These two processes occur simultaneously and have a competing influence on the seismic properties of magmas. In addition, as already observed by previous authors, when the bubble fraction is less than 0.10, the decrease in seismic velocities is more pronounced than for higher bubble fractions. The effect of bubble coalescence on elastic properties is thus lower than the effect of bubble nucleation.

  6. Homogeneous nucleation of water in argon. Nucleation rate computation from molecular simulations of TIP4P and TIP4P/2005 water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Lucia R.; Smeulders, David M. J.; Dam, Jacques A. M.; Gaastra-Nedea, Silvia V.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to study nucleation of water at 350 K in argon using TIP4P and TIP4P/2005 water models. We found that the stability of any cluster, even if large, strongly depends on the energetic interactions with its vicinity, while the stable clusters change their composition almost entirely during nucleation. Using the threshold method, direct nucleation rates are obtained. Our nucleation rates are found to be 1.08 ×1027 cm-3 s-1 for TIP4P and 2.30 ×1027 cm-3 s-1 for TIP4P/2005. The latter model prescribes a faster dynamics than the former, with a nucleation rate two times larger due to its higher electrostatic charges. The non-equilibrium water densities derived from simulations and state-of-art equilibrium parameters from Vega and de Miguel [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 154707 (2007)] are used for the classical nucleation theory (CNT) prediction. The CNT overestimates our results for both water models, where TIP4P/2005 shows largest discrepancy. Our results complement earlier data at high nucleation rates and supersaturations in the Hale plot [Phys. Rev. A 33, 4156 (1986)], and are consistent with MD data on the SPC/E and the TIP4P/2005 model.

  7. Mathematical modelling of nucleation and growth of crystals with buoyancy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    A complete analytical solution of the integro-differential model describing the nucleation of crystals and their subsequent growth in a binary system with allowance for buoyancy forces is constructed. An exact analytical solution of the Fokker-Planck-type equation for the three-parameter density distribution function is found for arbitrary nucleation kinetics. Two important cases of the Weber-Volmer-Frenkel-Zel'dovich and Meirs kinetics are considered in some detail. It is shown that the solute concentration decreases and the distribution function increases with increasing the melt supercooling (with increasing the depth of a metastable system). It is demonstrated that the distribution function attains its minimum at a certain size of crystals owing to buoyancy forces.

  8. Nucleation and Crystallization as Induced by Bending Stress in Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol W.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    Glass Fibers of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2) and Li2O.1.6SiO2 (LS1.6) compositions were heated near, but below, the glass transition temperature for different times while subjected to a constant bending stress of about 1.2 GPa. The nucleation density and the crystallization tendency estimated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) of a glass sample in the vicinity of the maximum of the bending stress increased relative to that of stress-free glass fibers. LS2 glass fibers were found more resistant to nucleation and crystallization than the Ls1.6 glass fibers. These results are discussed in regards to shear thinning effects on glass stability.

  9. Temperature dependence of homogeneous nucleation rates for water: Near equivalence of the empirical fit of Wölk and Strey, and the scaled nucleation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Barbara N.

    2005-05-01

    It is pointed out that the temperature fitting function of Wölk and Strey [J. Phys. Chem. 105, 11683 (2001)], recently shown to convert the Becker-Döring [Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 24, 719 (1935)] nucleation rate into an expression in agreement with much of the experimental water nucleation rate data, also converts the Becker-Döring rate into a form nearly equivalent with the scaled nucleation rate model, Jscaled=Jocexp[-16πΩ3(Tc/T-1)3/3(lnS)2]. In the latter expression Joc is the inverse thermal wavelength cubed/sec, evaluated at Tc.

  10. A new experimental setup to investigate nucleation, dynamic growth and surface properties of single ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Jens; Bieligk, Henner; Niedermeier, Dennis; Clauss, Tina; Chou, Cédric; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Stratmann, Frank

    2013-04-01

    The nucleation and growth of atmospheric ice particles is of importance for both, weather and climate. However, knowledge is still sparse, e.g. when considering the influences of ice particle surface properties on the radiative properties of clouds. Therefore, based on the experiences with our laminar flow tube chamber LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Stratmann et al., 2004), we developed a new device to characterize nucleation, dynamic growth and light scattering properties of a fixed single ice crystal in dependence on the prevailing thermodynamic conditions. Main part of the new setup is a thermodynamically controlled laminar flow tube with a diameter of 15 mm and a length of 1.0 m. Connected to the flow tube is a SID3-type (Small Ice Detector, Kaye et al., 2008) instrument called LISA (Leipzig Ice Scattering Apparatus), equipped with an additional optical microscope. For the investigations, a single ice nucleus (IN) with a dry size of 2-5 micrometer is attached to a thin glass fiber and positioned within the optical measuring volume of LISA. The fixed particle is exposed to the thermodynamically controlled air flow, exiting the flow tube. Two mass flow controllers adjusting a dry and a humidified gas flow are applied to control both, the temperature and the saturation ratio over a wide range. The thermodynamic conditions in the experiments were characterized using a) temperature and dew-point measurements, and b) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Dependent on temperature and saturation ratio in the measuring volume, ice nucleation and ice crystal growth/shrinkage can occur. The optical microscope allows a time dependent visualization of the particle/ice crystal, and the LISA instrument is used to obtain 2-D light scattering patterns. Both devices together can be applied to investigate the influence of thermodynamic conditions on ice crystal growth, in particular its shape and surface properties. We successfully performed

  11. Novel Electric Nucleation Technique for Growing Large Single Crystal in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.

    1999-01-01

    We present, herein, an electrical model for growing crystals without a seed which might not be free of defects and thereby still hinder the growth of a perfect crystal in space. The system is designed to confine nucleation to a single site automatically in an under saturated solution to avoid multiple nucleation. The technique is based on the effect of electrostriction, which is the tendency of a material to become more compressed in the presence of an electric field. The system is designed to create an electrical potential well between two hyperboloid electrodes with applied voltage at low frequency. The induced potential well between the electrodes oscillates at low frequency and attracts the solute and condenses it into the region of maximum field intensity. The alternating voltage prevents molecules with intrinsic charge from being attracted to the electrodes. The continuous presence of the electric field during the duration of the experiment, provides a continuous migration of the molecules toward the trapping site. This will eliminate the creation of a depletion region around the nucleation center and will enhance the crystal growth rate. Aside from the above mentioned advantages, the system is compact, safe to operate, and inexpensive to build.

  12. Dynamic Light Scattering Study of Inhibition of Nucleation and Growth of Hydroxyapatite Crystals by Osteopontin

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, John R.; Goiko, Maria; Mozaffari, Maryam; Bator, Daniel; Dauphinee, Ron L.; Liao, Yinyin; Flemming, Roberta L.; Bramble, Michael S.; Hunter, Graeme K.; Goldberg, Harvey A.

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of isoforms of osteopontin (OPN) on the nucleation and growth of crystals from a supersaturated solution of calcium and phosphate ions. Dynamic light scattering is used to monitor the size of the precipitating particles and to provide information about their concentration. At the ion concentrations studied, immediate precipitation was observed in control experiments with no osteopontin in the solution, and the size of the precipitating particles increased steadily with time. The precipitate was identified as hydroxyapatite by X-ray diffraction. Addition of native osteopontin (nOPN) extracted from rat bone caused a delay in the onset of precipitation and reduced the number of particles that formed, but the few particles that did form grew to a larger size than in the absence of the protein. Recombinant osteopontin (rOPN), which lacks phosphorylation, caused no delay in initial calcium phosphate precipitation but severely slowed crystal growth, suggesting that rOPN inhibits growth but not nucleation. rOPN treated with protein kinase CK2 to phosphorylate the molecule (p-rOPN) produced an effect similar to that of nOPN, but at higher protein concentrations and to a lesser extent. These results suggest that phosphorylations are critical to OPN’s ability to inhibit nucleation, whereas the growth of the hydroxyapatite crystals is effectively controlled by the highly acidic OPN polypeptide. This work also demonstrates that dynamic light scattering can be a powerful tool for delineating the mechanism of protein modulation of mineral formation. PMID:23457612

  13. Dynamic light scattering study of inhibition of nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals by osteopontin.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, John R; Goiko, Maria; Mozaffari, Maryam; Bator, Daniel; Dauphinee, Ron L; Liao, Yinyin; Flemming, Roberta L; Bramble, Michael S; Hunter, Graeme K; Goldberg, Harvey A

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of isoforms of osteopontin (OPN) on the nucleation and growth of crystals from a supersaturated solution of calcium and phosphate ions. Dynamic light scattering is used to monitor the size of the precipitating particles and to provide information about their concentration. At the ion concentrations studied, immediate precipitation was observed in control experiments with no osteopontin in the solution, and the size of the precipitating particles increased steadily with time. The precipitate was identified as hydroxyapatite by X-ray diffraction. Addition of native osteopontin (nOPN) extracted from rat bone caused a delay in the onset of precipitation and reduced the number of particles that formed, but the few particles that did form grew to a larger size than in the absence of the protein. Recombinant osteopontin (rOPN), which lacks phosphorylation, caused no delay in initial calcium phosphate precipitation but severely slowed crystal growth, suggesting that rOPN inhibits growth but not nucleation. rOPN treated with protein kinase CK2 to phosphorylate the molecule (p-rOPN) produced an effect similar to that of nOPN, but at higher protein concentrations and to a lesser extent. These results suggest that phosphorylations are critical to OPN's ability to inhibit nucleation, whereas the growth of the hydroxyapatite crystals is effectively controlled by the highly acidic OPN polypeptide. This work also demonstrates that dynamic light scattering can be a powerful tool for delineating the mechanism of protein modulation of mineral formation.

  14. The laminar flow tube reactor as a quantitative tool for nucleation studies: Experimental results and theoretical analysis of homogeneous nucleation of dibutylphthalate

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Knott, Michael; Ford, Ian J.

    2000-09-01

    A laminar flow tube reactor was designed and constructed to provide an accurate, quantitative measurement of a nucleation rate as a function of supersaturation and temperature. Measurements of nucleation of a supersaturated vapor of dibutylphthalate have been made for the temperature range from -30.3 to +19.1 degree sign C. A thorough analysis of the possible sources of experimental uncertainties (such as defining the correct value of the initial vapor concentration, temperature boundary conditions on the reactor walls, accuracy of the calculations of the thermodynamic parameters of the nucleation zone, and particle concentration measurement) is given. Both isothermal and the isobaric nucleation rates were measured. The experimental data obtained were compared with the measurements of other experimental groups and with theoretical predictions made on the basis of the self-consistency correction nucleation theory. Theoretical analysis, based on the first and the second nucleation theorems, is also presented. The critical cluster size and the excess of internal energy of the critical cluster are obtained. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. The Laminar Flow Tube Reactor as a Quantitative Tool for Nucleation Studies: Experimental Results and Theoretical Analysis of Homogeneous Nucleation of Dibutylphthalate

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Laulainen, Nels S. ); Barlow, Stephan E. ); Knott, Michael; Ford, Ian J.

    1999-12-01

    A Laminar Flow Tube Reactor has been designed and constructed in order to provide an accurate, quantitative measurement of a nucleation rate as a function of supersaturation and temperature. Measurements of nucleation of a supersaturated vapor of dibutylphthalate have been made for the temperature range from -30.3 C to+19.1 C. A thorough analysis of the possible sources of experimental uncertainties (such as defining the correct value of the initial vapor concentration, temperature boundary conditions on the reactor walls, accuracy of the calculations of the thermodynamic parameters of the nucleation zone, and particle concentration measurement) has been provided. Both isothermal and the isobaric nucleation rates have been measured. The experimental data obtained have been compared with measurements of other experimental groups and with theoretical predictions made on the basis of the self-consistency correction nucleation theory. Theoretical analysis based on the first and the second nucleation theorems has been made. The critical cluster size and the excess of internal energy of the critical cluster have been obtained.

  16. Complete thermodynamically consistent kinetic model of particle nucleation and growth: Numerical study of the applicability of the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnokov, Evgeni N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.

    2007-04-01

    A complete thermodynamically consistent elementary reaction kinetic model of particle nucleation and growth from supersaturated vapor was developed and numerically evaluated to determine the conditions for the steady-state regime. The model treats all processes recognized in the aerosol science (such as nucleation, condensation, evaporation, agglomeration/coagulation, etc.) as reversible elementary reactions. It includes all possible forward reactions (i.e., of monomers, dimers, trimers, etc.) together with the thermodynamically consistent reverse processes. The model is built based on the Kelvin approximation, and has two dimensionless parameters: S0—the initial supersaturation and Θ—the dimensionless surface tension. The time evolution of the size distribution function was obtained over the ranges of parameters S0 and Θ. At low initial supersaturations, S0, the steady state is established after a delay, and the steady-state distribution function corresponds to the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. At high initial supersaturations, the depletion of monomers due to condensation on large clusters starts before the establishing of the steady state. The steady state is never reached, and the classical nucleation theory is not applicable. The boundary that separates these two regimes in the two dimensionless parameter space, S0 and Θ, was determined. The model was applied to several experiments on water nucleation in an expansion chamber [J. Wolk and R. Strey, J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11683 (2001)] and in Laval nozzle [Y. J. Kim et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 4365 (2004)]. The conditions of the experiments performed using Laval nozzle (S0=40-120) were found to be close to the boundary of the non-steady-state regime. Additional calculations have shown that in the non-steady-state regime the nucleation rate is sensitive to the rate constants of the initial steps of the nucleation process, such as the monomer-monomer, monomer-dimer, etc., reactions. This

  17. Crystalline domain structure and cholesterol crystal nucleation in single hydrated DPPC:cholesterol:POPC bilayers.

    PubMed

    Ziblat, Roy; Leiserowitz, Leslie; Addadi, Lia

    2010-07-21

    Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on single hydrated bilayers and monolayers of DPPC:Cholesterol:POPC at varying concentrations. There are substantial differences in the phase and structure behavior of the crystalline domains formed within the bilayers relative to the corresponding monolayers, due to interactions between the opposing leaflets. Depending on the lipid composition, these interactions led to phase separation, changes in molecular tilt angle, or formation of cholesterol crystals. In monolayers, DPPC and cholesterol form a single crystalline phase at all compositions studied. In bilayers, a second crystalline phase appears when cholesterol levels are increased: domains of cholesterol and DPPC form monolayer thick crystals where each of the lipid leaflets diffracts independently, whereas excess cholesterol forms cholesterol bilayer thick crystals at a DPPC:Chol ratio < 46:54 +/- 2 mol %. The nucleation of the cholesterol crystals occurs at concentrations relevant to the actual cell plasma membrane composition.

  18. Crystallization of aqueous inorganic-malonic acid particles: nucleation rates, dependence on size, and dependence on the ammonium-to-sulfate ratio.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew T; Riffell, Jenna L; Bertram, Allan K

    2006-07-06

    Using an electrodynamic balance, we determined the relative humidity (RH) at which aqueous inorganic-malonic acid particles crystallized, with ammonium sulfate ((NH(4))(2)SO(4)), letovicite ((NH(4))(3)H(SO(4))(2)), or ammonium bisulfate (NH(4)HSO(4)) as the inorganic component. The results for (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-malonic acid particles and (NH(4))(3)H(SO(4))(2)-malonic acid particles show that malonic acid decreases the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles by less than 7% RH when the dry malonic acid mole fraction is less than 0.25. At a dry malonic acid mole fraction of about 0.5, the presence of malonic acid can decrease the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles by up to 35% RH. For the NH(4)HSO(4)-malonic acid particles, the presence of malonic acid does not significantly modify the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles for the entire range of dry malonic acid mole fractions studied; in all cases, either the particles did not crystallize or the crystallization RH was close to 0% RH. Size dependent measurements show that the crystallization RH of aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4) particles is not a strong function of particle volume. However, for aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-malonic acid particles (with dry malonic acid mole fraction = 0.36), the crystallization RH is a stronger function of particle volume, with the crystallization RH decreasing by 6 +/- 3% RH when the particle volume decreases by an order of magnitude. To our knowledge, these are the first size dependent measurements of the crystallization RH of atmospherically relevant inorganic-organic particles. These results suggest that for certain organic mole fractions the particle size and observation time need to be considered when extrapolating laboratory crystallization results to atmospheric scenarios. For aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4) particles, the homogeneous nucleation rate data are a strong function of RH, but for aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-malonic acid particles (with dry organic mole fraction = 0

  19. Nucleation and growth of crystals under cirrus and polar stratospheric cloud conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Queen, Brian; Teets, Edward; Fahey, James

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory studies examine phase changes of hygroscopic substances which occur as aerosol in stratosphere and troposphere (sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, nitric acid, sulfuric acid), under controlled conditions, in samples volume 1 to 10(exp -4) ml. Crystallization of salts from supersaturated solutions is examined by slowly evaporating a solution drop on a substrate, under controlled relative humidity, until self nucleation occurs; controlled nucleation of ice in a mm capillary U-tube gives a measured ice crystallization velocity at known supercooling. Two states of crystallization occur for regions where hydrates exist. It is inferred that all of the materials readily exist as supersaturated/supercooled solutions; the degree of metastability appears to be slightly enhanced by inclusion of aircraft produced soot. The crystallization velocity is taken as a measure of viscosity. Results suggest an approach to a glass transition at high molality, supersaturation and/or supercooling within the range of atmospheric interest. It is hypothesized that surface reactions occur more readily on solidified particles - either crystalline or glass, whereas volume reactions are more important on droplets with sufficiently low viscosity and volume diffusivity. Implications are examined for optical properties of such particles in the atmosphere. In a separate experiment, crystal growth was examined in a modified thermal vapor diffusion chamber over the range of cirrus temperature (-30 to -70 C) and under controlled supersaturation and air pressure. The crystals grew at a velocity of 1-2 microns/s, thickness 60-70 micron, in the form of thin column crystals. Design criteria are given for a system to investigate particle growth down to -100 C, (PSC temperatures) where nitric acid particles can be grown under similar control and in the form of hydrate crystals.

  20. Nucleation and Crystallization of Globular Proteins: What we Know and What is Missing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F.; Vekilov, P. G.; Muschol, M.; Thomas, B. R.

    1996-01-01

    Recently. much progress has been made in understanding the nucleation and crystallization of globular proteins, including the formation of compositional and structural crystal defects, Insight into the interactions of (screened) protein macro-ions in solution, obtained from light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and osmotic pressure studies. can guide the search for crystallization conditions. These studies show that the nucleation of globular proteins is governed by the same principles as that of small molecules. However, failure to account for direct and indirect (hydrodynamic) protein interactions in the solutions results in unrealistic aggregation scenarios. Microscopic studies of numerous proteins reveal that crystals grow by the attachment of growth units through the same layer-spreading mechanisms as inorganic crystals. Investigations of the growth kinetics of hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) reveal non-steady behavior under steady external conditions. Long-term variations in growth rates are due to changes in step-originating dislocation groups. Fluctuations on a shorter timescale reflect the non-linear dynamics of layer growth that results from the interplay between interfacial kinetics and bulk transport. Systematic gel electrophoretic analyses suggest that most HEWL crystallization studies have been performed with material containing other proteins at percent levels. Yet, sub-percent levels of protein impurities impede growth step propagation and play a role in the formation of structural/compositional inhomogeneities. In crystal growth from highly purified HEWL solutions, however, such inhomogeneities are much weaker and form only in response to unusually large changes in growth conditions. Equally important for connecting growth conditions to crystal perfection and diffraction resolution are recent advances in structural characterization through high-resolution Bragg reflection profiling and X-ray topography.

  1. Liquid-to-crystal nucleation: A New Generation lag-time apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heneghan, Af; Haymet, Adj

    2002-03-01

    The statistics of liquid-to-crystal nucleation are examined using a new generation lag-time apparatus. A single 200 micro L sample of distilled water, both unseeded and seeded with an insoluble AgI crystal, is cooled at a constant rate, α, until the sample freezes. This cycle is repeated as many times as possible to generate the unambiguous statistics of nucleation. Our data are the times and the temperatures to nucleation for approximately 300 runs at each of five different cooling rates. The cooling rates in this experiment range from 0.01 K sec_-1 = 0.6 K min_-1 to more than an order of magnitude faster. Of interest is the functional form describing the average lag-time, <τ>, as a function of supercooling, Δ T. These data and analysis yield, from a single experiment, this average lag time, <τ>, as a function of the supercooling, Δ T. The one approximation in this analysis is easily verified by this apparatus and experiments performed thus far[1]. Comparison is made with related experiments of supercooled alloys. [1] Heneghan AF, Wilson PW, Wang GW, Haymet ADJ, Journal of Chemical Physics, 115, 7599-7608 (2001)

  2. Controlled parallel crystallization of lithium disilicate and diopside using a combination of internal and surface nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampf, Markus; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian; Höland, Wolfram

    2016-10-01

    In the mid-19th century, Dr. Donald Stookey identified the importance and usability of nucleating agents and mechanisms for the development of glass-ceramic materials. Today, a number of various internal and surface mechanisms as well as combinations thereof have been established in the production of glass-ceramic materials. In order to create new innovative material properties the present study focuses on the precipitation of CaMgSiO6 as a minor phase in Li2Si2O5 based glass-ceramics. In the base glass of the SiO2-Li2O-P2O5-Al2O3-K2O-MgO-CaO system P2O5 serves as nucleating agent for the internal precipitation of Li2Si2O5 crystals while a mechanical activation of the glass surface by means of ball milling is necessary to nucleate the minor CaMgSi2O6 crystal phase. For a successful precipitation of CaMgSi2O6 a minimum ratio of MgO and CaO in the range between 1.4 mol% and 2.9 mol% in the base glasses was determined. The nucleation and crystallization of both crystal phases takes place during sintering a powder compact. Dependent on the quality of the sintering process the dense Li2Si2O5-CaMgSi2O6 glass-ceramics show a mean biaxial strength of up to 392 ± 98 MPa. The microstructure of the glass-ceramics is formed by large (5-10 µm) bar like CaMgSi2O6 crystals randomly embedded in a matrix of small (≤ 0.5 µm) plate like Li2Si2O5 crystals arranged in an interlocking manner. While there is no significant influence of the minor CaMgSi2O6 phase on the strength of the material, the translucency of the material decreases upon precipitation of the minor phase.

  3. Polymorph selection and nucleation pathway in the crystallization of Hertzian spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wenze; Fu, Cuiliu; Sun, Zhiwei; Xu, Shenghua

    2016-10-01

    The crystallization process of Hertzian spheres is studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations in an NPT ensemble where the total number of particles N, the pressure P, and the temperature T are kept constant. It has been observed that the bond orientational ordering rather than the translational ordering (density) plays a primary role. The crystal polymorphs are determined by the state points. Under the conditions of small supercooling, the system is likely to be nucleated into crystals that have a preference for the metastable bcc structure, which can be regarded as a manifestation of the Alexander-McTague mechanism. In contrast, small nuclei are found to have a preference for fcc symmetry under conditions of a high degree of supercooling. Prestructured precursors that act as seeds and wet on the nuclei during nucleation always have a high degree of bcc-like ordering, despite different state points. The results above may provide a clue to the understanding of the crystallization process in core-softened particles.

  4. Amelogenin as a promoter of nucleation and crystal growth of apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uskoković, Vuk; Li, Wu; Habelitz, Stefan

    2011-02-01

    Human dental enamel forms over a period of 2-4 years by substituting the enamel matrix, a protein gel mostly composed of a single protein, amelogenin with fibrous apatite nanocrystals. Self-assembly of amelogenin and the products of its selective proteolytic digestion are presumed to direct the growth of apatite fibers and their organization into bundles that eventually comprise the mature enamel, the hardest tissue in the mammalian body. This work aimed to establish the physicochemical and biochemical conditions for the growth of apatite crystals under the control of a recombinant amelogenin matrix (rH174) in combination with a programmable titration system. The growth of apatite substrates was initiated in the presence of self-assembling amelogenin particles. A series of constant titration rate experiments was performed that allowed for a gradual increase of the calcium and/or phosphate concentrations in the protein suspensions. We observed a significant amount of apatite crystals formed on the substrates following the titration of rH174 sols that comprised the initial supersaturation ratio equal to zero. The protein layers adsorbed onto the substrate apatite crystals were shown to act as promoters of nucleation and growth of calcium phosphates subsequently formed on the substrate surface. Nucleation lag time experiments have showed that rH174 tends to accelerate precipitation from metastable calcium phosphate solutions in proportion to its concentration. Despite their mainly hydrophobic nature, amelogenin nanospheres, the size and surface charge properties of which were analyzed using dynamic light scattering, acted as a nucleating agent for the crystallization of apatite. The biomimetic experimental setting applied in this study proves as convenient for gaining insight into the fundamental nature of the process of amelogenesis.

  5. Theoretical study of production of unique glasses in space. [kinetic relationships describing nucleation and crystallization phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, D. C.; Sievert, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The potential of producing the glassy form of selected materials in the weightless, containerless nature of space processing is examined through the development of kinetic relationships describing nucleation and crystallization phenomena. Transformation kinetics are applied to a well-characterized system (SiO2), an excellent glass former (B2O3), and a poor glass former (Al2O3) by conventional earth processing methods. Viscosity and entropy of fusion are shown to be the primary materials parameters controlling the glass forming tendency. For multicomponent systems diffusion-controlled kinetics and heterogeneous nucleation effects are considered. An analytical empirical approach is used to analyze the mullite system. Results are consistent with experimentally observed data and indicate the promise of mullite as a future space processing candidate.

  6. Numerical simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition - Part 2: Impact of initial ice crystal number, radiation, stratification, secondary nucleation and layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterstrasser, S.; Gierens, K.

    2010-02-01

    Simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition were performed with an LES model. In Part 1 the impact of relative humidity, temperature and vertical wind shear was explored in a detailed parametric study. Here, we study atmospheric parameters like stratification and depth of the supersaturated layer and processes which may affect the contrail evolution. We consider contrails in various radiation scenarios herein defined by the season, time of day and the presence of lower-level cloudiness which controls the radiance incident on the contrail layer. Under suitable conditions, controlled by the radiation scenario and stratification, radiative heating lifts the contrail-cirrus and prolongs its lifetime. The potential of contrail-driven secondary nucleation is investigated. We consider homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores released from sublimated contrail ice crystals. In our model the contrail dynamics triggered by radiative heating does not suffice to force homogeneous freezing of ambient liquid aerosol particles. Furthermore, our model results suggest that heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores is unimportant. Contrail evolution is not controlled by the depth of the supersaturated layer as long as it exceeds roughly 500 m. Deep fallstreaks however need thicker layers. A variation of the initial ice crystal number is effective during the whole evolution of a contrail. A cut of the soot particle emission by two orders of magnitude can reduce the contrail timescale by one hour and the optical thickness by a factor of 5. Hence future engines with lower soot particle emissions could potentially lead to a reduction of the climate impact of aviation.

  7. Dependence of nucleation kinetics and crystal morphology of a model protein system on ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidi, V.; Skrzypczak-Jankun, E.; Schall, C. A.

    2001-11-01

    Nucleation rate data for hen egg-white lysozyme crystallization were obtained using a particle counter. Tetragonal lysozyme crystals were expected to form at the temperature and solution conditions of these experiments: 4°C, pH 4.5 with 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer and 2-6% NaCl (w/v). The rates varied as expected, as smooth monotonic functions of supersaturation at 2%, 3% and 6% NaCl. However, at 5% NaCl, a great deal of scatter in the data was observed. At 2% and 3% NaCl, all the batches contained crystals with tetragonal morphology. At 6% NaCl, almost all of the vials contained the white powder with few or no tetragonal crystals. At 5% NaCl concentration, a mixture of tetragonal crystals and powder formed in varying proportions in all the vials as observed by visual inspection. The powdery material was examined using optical microscopy and was seen to consist of needles with regular structure and sharp, faceted edges. Powder diffraction data from these needles was inconsistent with experimental powder diffraction data from tetragonal lysozyme crystals. It is possible that at high salt and protein concentrations liquid-liquid separation occurred and yielded a crystal polymorph.

  8. Nucleation and crystallization of Na2O-2CaO-3SiO2 glass by differential thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Xiaojie J.; Ray, Chandra S.; Day, Delbert E.

    1991-01-01

    DTA is presently used to characterize the nucleation and crystallization processes of the Na2O-2CaO-3SiO2 glass. A nucleation rate-temperaturelike curve is obtained by plotting either the reciprocal of the temperature corresponding to the crystallization peak maximum, or the height of the crystallization peak, as a function of nucleation temperature. The nucleation-temperature range for this glass composition, 550-650 C, and the maximum nucleation temperature of 600 + or - 5 C, are found to be in excellent agreement with those associated with the classical nucleation technique, followed by isothermal crystallization. It is noted that when most of the nucleation occurs during the DTA measurements, a modified Kissinger equation must be used to calculate the crystallization energy.

  9. Tetragonal Lysozyme Nucleation and Crystal Growth: The Role of the Solution Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Sumida, John; Maxwell, Daniel; Gorti, Sridhar

    2002-01-01

    Lysozyme, and most particularly the tetragonal form of the protein, has become the default standard protein for use in macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth studies. There is a substantial body of experimental evidence, from this and other laboratories, that strongly suggests this proteins crystal nucleation and growth is by addition of associated species that are preformed by standard reversible concentration-driven self association processes in the bulk solution. The evidence includes high resolution AFM studies of the surface packing and of growth unit size at incorporation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements of intermolecular distances in dilute solution, dialysis kinetics, and modeling of the growth rate data. We have developed a selfassociation model for the proteins crystal nucleation and growth. The model accounts for the obtained crystal symmetry, explains the observed surface structures, and shows the importance of the symmetry obtained by self-association in solution to the process as a whole. Further, it indicates that nucleation and crystal growth are not distinct mechanistically, but identical, with the primary difference being the probability that the particle will continue to grow or dissolve. This model also offers a possible mechanism for fluid flow effects on the growth process and how microgravity may affect it. While a single lysozyme molecule is relatively small (M.W. = 14,400), a structured octamer in the 4(sub 3) helix configuration (the proposed average sized growth unit) would have a M.W. = 115,000 and dimensions of 5.6 x 5.6 x 7.6 nm. Direct AFM measurements of growth unit incorporation indicate that units as wide as 11.2 nm and as long as 11.4 nm commonly attach to the crystal. These measurements were made at approximately saturation conditions, and they reflect the sizes of species that both added or desorbed from the crystal surface. The larger and less isotropic the associated species the more likely that it

  10. Surface effects in nucleation and growth of smectic-B crystals in thin samples.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, T; Akamatsu, S

    2002-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the surface effects (interactions with the container walls) during the nucleation and growth of smectic-B (SmB) crystals from the nematic in free growth and directional solidification of a mesogenic molecule [C4H9-(C6H10)2CN] called CCH4 in thin (of thickness in the 10-microm range) samples. We follow the dynamics of the system in real time with a polarizing microscope. The inner surfaces of the glass-plate samples are coated with polymeric films, either rubbed polyimid (PI) films or mono-oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films deposited by friction at high temperature. The orientation of the nematic and the smectic-B is planar. In PI-coated samples, the orientation effect of SmB crystals is mediated by the nematic, whereas, in PTFE-coated samples, it results from a homoepitaxy phenomenon occurring for two degenerate orientations. A recrystallization phenomenon partly destroys the initial distribution of crystal orientations. In directional solidification of polycrystals in PTFE-coated samples, a particular dynamics of faceted grain boundary grooves is at the origin of a dynamical mechanism of grain selection. Surface effects also are responsible for the nucleation of misoriented terraces on facets and the generation of lattice defects in the solid.

  11. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-19

    [1] Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (-0.06 Wm-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm-2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 ± 0.10 Wm-2 (1σ uncertainty). Finally, this represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of -1.6 Wm-2.

  12. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettelman, Andrew; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, Ulrike; Chen, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (0.06 Wm(exp-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 +/- 0.10 Wm(exp-2) (1 sigma uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of 1.6 Wm(sup-2).

  13. The Effects of Impurities on Protein Crystal Growth and Nucleation: A Preliminary Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schall, Constance A.

    1998-01-01

    Kubota and Mullin (1995) devised a simple model to account for the effects of impurities on crystal growth of small inorganic and organic molecules in aqueous solutions. Experimentally, the relative step velocity and crystal growth of these molecules asymptotically approach zero or non-zero values with increasing concentrations of impurities. Alternatively, the step velocity and crystal growth can linearly approach zero as the impurity concentration increases. The Kubota-Mullin model assumes that the impurity exhibits Langmuirian adsorption onto the crystal surface. Decreases in step velocities and subsequent growth rates are related to the fractional coverage (theta) of the crystal surface by adsorbed impurities; theta = Kx / (I +Kx), x = mole fraction of impurity in solution. In the presence of impurities, the relative step velocity, V/Vo, and the relative growth rate of a crystal face, G/Go, are proposed to conform to the following equations: V/Vo approx. = G/Go = 1 - (alpha)(theta). The adsorption of impurity is assumed to be rapid and in quasi-equilibrium with the crystal surface sites available. When the value of alpha, an effectiveness factor, is one the growth will asymptotically approach zero with increasing concentrations of impurity. At values less than one, growth approaches a non-zero value asymptotically. When alpha is much greater than one, there will be a linear relationship between impurity concentration and growth rates. Kubota and Mullin expect alpha to decrease with increasing supersaturation and shrinking size of a two dimensional nucleus. It is expected that impurity effects on protein crystal growth will exhibit behavior similar to that of impurities in small molecule growth. A number of proteins were added to purified chicken egg white lysozyme, the effect on crystal nucleation and growth assessed.

  14. The effect of protein–precipitant interfaces and applied shear on the nucleation and growth of lysozyme crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Nuno M.; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Blundell, Tom L.; Mackley, Malcolm R.

    2009-11-01

    The nucleation of lysozyme in microbatch experiments was linked to the formation of protein–precipitant interfaces. The use of oscillatory shear allowed decreasing the nucleation rate and extending the growth period for lysozyme crystals, presumably through the control of the number of interfaces and removal of impurities or defects. This paper is concerned with the effect of protein–precipitant interfaces and externally applied shear on the nucleation and growth kinetics of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals. The early stages of microbatch crystallization of lysozyme were explored using both optical and confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging. Initially, an antisolvent (precipitant) was added to a protein drop and the optical development of the protein–precipitant interface was followed with time. In the presence of the water-soluble polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) a sharp interface was observed to form immediately within the drop, giving an initial clear separation between the lighter protein solution and the heavier precipitant. This interface subsequently became unstable and quickly developed within a few seconds into several unstable ‘fingers’ that represented regions of high concentration-gradient interfaces. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the subsequent nucleation of protein crystals occurred preferentially in the region of these interfaces. Additional experiments using an optical shearing system demonstrated that oscillatory shear significantly decreased nucleation rates whilst extending the growth period of the lysozyme crystals. The experimental observations relating to both nucleation and growth have relevance in developing efficient and reliable protocols for general crystallization procedures and the controlled crystallization of single large high-quality protein crystals for use in X-ray crystallography.

  15. Homogeneous bubble nucleation in H2O- and H2O-CO2-bearing basaltic melts: Results of high temperature decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, Nolwenn; Pichavant, Michel

    2016-11-01

    High pressure and temperature decompression experiments were conducted to provide experimental information on the conditions of homogeneous bubble nucleation in basaltic melts. Experiments were performed on H2O- and H2O-CO2-bearing natural melts from Stromboli. Three starting volatile compositions were investigated: series #1 (4.91 wt% H2O, no CO2), series #2 (2.37-2.45 wt% H2O, 901-1011 ppm CO2) and series #3 (0.80-1.09 wt% H2O, 840-923 ppm CO2). The volatile-bearing glasses were first synthesized at 1200 °C and 200 MPa, and second continuously decompressed in the pressure range 150-25 MPa and rapidly quenched. A fast decompression rate of 78 kPa/s (or 3 m/s) was applied to limit the water loss from the glass cylinder and the formation of a H2O-depleted rim. Post-decompression glasses were characterized texturally by X-ray microtomography. The results demonstrate that homogenous bubble nucleation requires supersaturation pressures (difference between saturation pressure and pressure at which homogeneous bubble nucleation is observed, ∆ PHoN) ≤ 50-100 MPa. ∆ PHoN varies with the dissolved CO2 concentration, from ≪ 50 MPa (no CO2, series #1) to ≤ 50 MPa (872 ± 45 ppm CO2, series #3) to < 100 MPa (973 ± 63 ppm CO2, series #2). In series #1 melts, homogeneous bubble nucleation occurs as two distinct events, the first at high pressure (200 < P < 150 MPa) and the second at low pressure (50 < P < 25 MPa), just below the fragmentation level. In contrast, homogenous nucleation in series #2 and #3 melts is a continuous process. As well, chemical near-equilibrium degassing occurs in the series #1 melts, unlike in the series #2 and #3 melts which retain high CO2 concentrations even for higher vesicularities (up to 23% at 25 MPa). Thus, our experimental observations underline a significant effect of CO2 on the physical mechanisms of bubble vesiculation in basaltic melts. Our experimental decompression textures either reproduce or approach the characteristics of

  16. The effect of protein-precipitant interfaces and applied shear on the nucleation and growth of lysozyme crystals.

    PubMed

    Reis, Nuno M; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Blundell, Tom L; Mackley, Malcolm R

    2009-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of protein-precipitant interfaces and externally applied shear on the nucleation and growth kinetics of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals. The early stages of microbatch crystallization of lysozyme were explored using both optical and confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging. Initially, an antisolvent (precipitant) was added to a protein drop and the optical development of the protein-precipitant interface was followed with time. In the presence of the water-soluble polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) a sharp interface was observed to form immediately within the drop, giving an initial clear separation between the lighter protein solution and the heavier precipitant. This interface subsequently became unstable and quickly developed within a few seconds into several unstable 'fingers' that represented regions of high concentration-gradient interfaces. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the subsequent nucleation of protein crystals occurred preferentially in the region of these interfaces. Additional experiments using an optical shearing system demonstrated that oscillatory shear significantly decreased nucleation rates whilst extending the growth period of the lysozyme crystals. The experimental observations relating to both nucleation and growth have relevance in developing efficient and reliable protocols for general crystallization procedures and the controlled crystallization of single large high-quality protein crystals for use in X-ray crystallography.

  17. Nucleation, growth and characterization of semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal sodium acetate doped L-tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Arthi, D; Anbuselvi, D; Jayaraman, D; Arul Martin Mani, J; Joseph, V

    2015-02-05

    Sodium acetate doped L-tyrosine single crystal with dimensions 47×15×8 mm(3) was grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Nucleation kinetics of the growth of the material was studied to optimize the growth conditions. The grown doped crystal was then characterized using single crystal XRD, UV-vis-NIR, FTIR, NMR, SEM-EDAX and NLO studies. XRD study reveals that the grown crystal belongs to monoclinic system with space group P21. Lattice parameters of the grown crystals are found to be a=5.096 Å, b=8.966 Å, c=11.088 Å, α=β=90° and γ=92.035°. The transparent range of the grown crystal was measured as 260-1100 nm with 260 nm as lower cut off wavelength using UV-vis-NIR absorption spectrum and the optical band gap was evaluated as 3.24 eV from the Tauc's plot. The various functional groups were identified using FTIR spectral analysis. The thermal behavior of the title compound has been analyzed using TGA/DTA and DSC thermal curves. From the thermal study, the material is found to possess thermal stability up to 158°C. The microstructure of the grown crystal and the presence of various elements in the crystal were analyzed using SEM and EDAX techniques. NMR spectral analysis confirms the molecular structure of the grown compound. The nonlinear optical property was tested using Kurtz Perry powder technique and SHG efficiency was measured nearly same as that of KDP.

  18. Nucleation, growth and characterization of semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal sodium acetate doped L-tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthi, D.; Anbuselvi, D.; Jayaraman, D.; Arul Martin Mani, J.; Joseph, V.

    2015-02-01

    Sodium acetate doped L-tyrosine single crystal with dimensions 47 × 15 × 8 mm3 was grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Nucleation kinetics of the growth of the material was studied to optimize the growth conditions. The grown doped crystal was then characterized using single crystal XRD, UV-vis-NIR, FTIR, NMR, SEM-EDAX and NLO studies. XRD study reveals that the grown crystal belongs to monoclinic system with space group P21. Lattice parameters of the grown crystals are found to be a = 5.096 Å, b = 8.966 Å, c = 11.088 Å, α = β = 90° and γ = 92.035°. The transparent range of the grown crystal was measured as 260-1100 nm with 260 nm as lower cut off wavelength using UV-vis-NIR absorption spectrum and the optical band gap was evaluated as 3.24 eV from the Tauc's plot. The various functional groups were identified using FTIR spectral analysis. The thermal behavior of the title compound has been analyzed using TGA/DTA and DSC thermal curves. From the thermal study, the material is found to possess thermal stability up to 158 °C. The microstructure of the grown crystal and the presence of various elements in the crystal were analyzed using SEM and EDAX techniques. NMR spectral analysis confirms the molecular structure of the grown compound. The nonlinear optical property was tested using Kurtz Perry powder technique and SHG efficiency was measured nearly same as that of KDP.

  19. Nucleation of liquid droplets and voids in a stretched Lennard-Jones fcc crystal.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Tipeev, Azat O

    2015-09-28

    The method of molecular dynamics simulation has been used to investigate the phase decay of a metastable Lennard-Jones face-centered cubic crystal at positive and negative pressures. It is shown that at high degrees of metastability, crystal decay proceeds through the spontaneous formation and growth of new-phase nuclei. It has been found that there exists a certain boundary temperature. Below this temperature, the crystal phase disintegrates as the result of formation of voids, and above, as a result of formation of liquid droplets. The boundary temperature corresponds to the temperature of cessation of a crystal-liquid phase equilibrium when the melting line comes in contact with the spinodal of the stretched liquid. The results of the simulations are interpreted in the framework of classical nucleation theory. The thermodynamics of phase transitions in solids has been examined with allowance for the elastic energy of stresses arising owing to the difference in the densities of the initial and the forming phases. As a result of the action of elastic forces, at negative pressures, the boundary of the limiting superheating (stretching) of a crystal approaches the spinodal, on which the isothermal bulk modulus of dilatation becomes equal to zero. At the boundary of the limiting superheating (stretching), the shape of liquid droplets and voids is close to the spherical one.

  20. Structure of finite sphere packings via exact enumeration: Implications for colloidal crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, Robert S.; Harwayne-Gidansky, Jared; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2012-05-01

    We analyze the geometric structure and mechanical stability of a complete set of isostatic and hyperstatic sphere packings obtained via exact enumeration. The number of nonisomorphic isostatic packings grows exponentially with the number of spheres N, and their diversity of structure and symmetry increases with increasing N and decreases with increasing hyperstaticity H≡Nc-NISO, where Nc is the number of pair contacts and NISO=3N-6. Maximally contacting packings are in general neither the densest nor the most symmetric. Analyses of local structure show that the fraction f of nuclei with order compatible with the bulk (rhcp) crystal decreases sharply with increasing N due to a high propensity for stacking faults, five- and near-fivefold symmetric structures, and other motifs that preclude rhcp order. While f increases with increasing H, a significant fraction of hyperstatic nuclei for N as small as 11 retain non-rhcp structure. Classical theories of nucleation that consider only spherical nuclei, or only nuclei with the same ordering as the bulk crystal, cannot capture such effects. Our results provide an explanation for the failure of classical nucleation theory for hard-sphere systems of N≲10 particles; we argue that in this size regime, it is essential to consider nuclei of unconstrained geometry. Our results are also applicable to understanding kinetic arrest and jamming in systems that interact via hard-core-like repulsive and short-ranged attractive interactions.

  1. Effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the number of acetylsalicylic acid crystals produced under the supersaturated condition and the ability of controlling the final crystal size via primary nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Etsuko; Kato, Yumi; Hagisawa, Minoru; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2006-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of ultrasound irradiation on the number of crystals formed in an acetylsalicyclic acid crystallization process and to assess the controllability of the final product size via the number of primary nuclei. The number of crystals present after primary nucleation was counted and the relationship between the final product size and the number of crystals was examined. Additionally, the growing ASA crystals were observed, since ultrasound energy not only may control primary nucleation but may also the perfection of the crystal shape. At a high level of ultrasonic energy, ultrasound irradiation increased the average number of crystals, an effect that has been reported often; however, at a low level of ultrasonic energy it decreased the average number of crystals, and moreover, these opposing ultrasonic effects on the number of crystals interchanged at a specific energy threshold. These results reveal two novel phenomena—that there is an energy region where ultrasonic irradiation inhibits primary nucleation, and that a specific amount of ultrasonic energy is needed to activate primary nucleation. On the other hand, the final product size almost depended upon the number of primary nuclei, indicating that the final product size could be controlled via the number of crystals influenced by ultrasound irradiation. According to the photographs of crystals, they were not destroyed by the process. Therefore, it was proposed that ultrasound energy does not destroy the perfection of the crystal shape but only controls primary nucleation under the condition: both short irradiation time and low supersaturated condition.

  2. Kinetics of gypsum nucleation and crystal growth from Dead Sea brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Itay J.; Gavrieli, Ittai; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2009-10-01

    The Dead Sea brine is supersaturated with respect to gypsum ( Ω = 1.42). Laboratory experiments and evaluation of historical data show that gypsum nucleation and crystal growth kinetics from Dead Sea brine are both slower in comparison with solutions at a similar degree of supersaturation. The slow kinetics of gypsum precipitation in the Dead Sea brine is mainly attributed to the low solubility of gypsum which is due to the high Ca 2+/SO 42- molar ratio (115), high salinity (˜280 g/kg) and to Na + inhibition. Experiments with various clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite) indicate that these minerals do not serve as crystallization seeds. In contrast, calcite and aragonite which contain traces of gypsum impurities do prompt precipitation of gypsum but at a considerable slower rate than with pure gypsum. This implies that transportation inflow of clay minerals, calcite and local crystallization of minerals in the Dead Sea does not prompt significant heterogeneous precipitation of gypsum. Based on historical analyses of the Dead Sea, it is shown that over the last decades, as inflows to the lake decreased and its salinity increased, gypsum continuously precipitated from the brine. The increasing salinity and Ca 2+/SO 42- ratio, which results from the precipitation of gypsum, lead to even slower kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth, which resulted in an increasing degree of supersaturation with respect to gypsum. Therefore, we predict that as the salinity of the Dead Sea brine continues to increase (accompanied by Dead Sea water level decline), although gypsum will continuously precipitate, the degree of supersaturation will increase furthermore due to progressively slower kinetics.

  3. Method for preparing homogeneous single crystal ternary III-V alloys

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1991-01-01

    A method for producing homogeneous, single-crystal III-V ternary alloys of high crystal perfection using a floating crucible system in which the outer crucible holds a ternary alloy of the composition desired to be produced in the crystal and an inner floating crucible having a narrow, melt-passing channel in its bottom wall holds a small quantity of melt of a pseudo-binary liquidus composition that would freeze into the desired crystal composition. The alloy of the floating crucilbe is maintained at a predetermined lower temperature than the alloy of the outer crucible, and a single crystal of the desired homogeneous alloy is pulled out of the floating crucible melt, as melt from the outer crucible flows into a bottom channel of the floating crucible at a rate that corresponds to the rate of growth of the crystal.

  4. Amphiphilic triblock copolymer-assisted synthesis of hierarchical NiCo nanoflowers by homogeneous nucleation in liquid polyols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arief, Injamamul; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Rose-like NiCo nanoflowers were synthesized by homogeneous, one-pot polyol reduction of Ni and Co-acetates in presence of an amphiphilic triblock copolymer and KOH. 1,2-propanediol was used as solvent-cum-reducing agent as no external reducing agent was found to be necessary in this process. Detailed x-ray diffraction and morphological characterizations confirmed formation of fcc hierarchical NiCo nanoflowers containing 2D nanosheet-like subunits (thickness of about 30 nm) with an average diameter of ~700 nm. Amphiphilic polymer played a pivotal role in the growth of nanorose as it favored a preferential growth of nanocrystals along a particular crystal plane as was observed in transmission electron microscopy. Effects of other parameters like use of hydrophilic polymer, surfactants, ratio of initial metal concentrations, choice of polyol media and concentration of KOH on the morphology of nanoflowers were also investigated. Room temperature magnetic studies revealed higher saturation magnetization and low coercivity (108.6 emu/g and 78.4 Oe) of nanorose. Based on LaMer model, a kinetically-controlled growth mechanism for the formation of NiCo nanorose is also proposed.

  5. A Fiber Optic Probe for Monitoring Protein Aggregation, Nucleation, and Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Arabshahi, Alireza; Wilson, William W.; Bray, Terry L.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    1996-01-01

    Protein crystals are experimentally grown in hanging drops in microgravity experiments on-board the Space Shuttle orbiter. The technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) can be used to monitor crystal growth process in hanging droplets (approx. 30 (L)) in microgravity experiments, but elaborate instrumentation and optical alignment problems have made in-situ applications difficult. In this paper we demonstrate that such experiments are now feasible. We apply a newly developed fiber optic probe to various earth and space (micro- gravity) bound protein crystallization system configurations to test its capability. These include conventional batch (cuvette or capillary) systems, hanging drop method in a six-pack hanging drop vapor diffusion apparatus (HDVDA), a modified HDVDA for temperature- induced nucleation and aggregation studies, and a newly envisioned dynamically controlled vapor diffusion system (DCVDS) configuration. Our compact system exploits the principles of DLS and offers a fast (within a few seconds) means of quantitatively and non-invasively monitoring the various growth stages of protein crystallization. In addition to DLS capability, the probe can also be used for performing single-angle static light scattering measurements. It utilizes extremely low levels of laser power (approx. few (W)) without a need of having any optical alignment and vibration isolation. The compact probe is also equipped with a miniaturized microscope for visualization of macroscopic protein crystals. This new optical diagnostic system opens up enormous opportunity for exploring new ways to grow good quality crystals suitable for x-ray crystallographic analysis and may help develop a concrete scientific basis for understanding the process of crystallization.

  6. A first test of the hypothesis of biogenic magnetite-based heterogeneous ice-crystal nucleation in cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Golash, Harry N; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    An outstanding biophysical puzzle is focused on the apparent ability of weak, extremely low-frequency oscillating magnetic fields to enhance cryopreservation of many biological tissues. A recent theory holds that these weak magnetic fields could be inhibiting ice-crystal nucleation on the nanocrystals of biological magnetite (Fe3O4, an inverse cubic spinel) that are present in many plant and animal tissues by causing them to oscillate. In this theory, magnetically-induced mechanical oscillations disrupt the ability of water molecules to nucleate on the surface of the magnetite nanocrystals. However, the ability of the magnetite crystal lattice to serve as a template for heterogeneous ice crystal nucleation is as yet unknown, particularly for particles in the 10-100 nm size range. Here we report that the addition of trace-amounts of finely-dispersed magnetite into ultrapure water samples reduces strongly the incidence of supercooling, as measured in experiments conducted using a controlled freezing apparatus with multiple thermocouples. SQUID magnetometry was used to quantify nanogram levels of magnetite in the water samples. We also report a relationship between the volume change of ice, and the degree of supercooling, that may indicate lower degassing during the crystallization of supercooled water. In addition to supporting the role of ice-crystal nucleation by biogenic magnetite in many tissues, magnetite nanocrystals could provide inexpensive, non-toxic, and non-pathogenic ice nucleating agents needed in a variety of industrial processes, as well as influencing the dynamics of ice crystal nucleation in many natural environments.

  7. Synthesis of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Mono layer: Control of Nucleation and Crystal Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Stehle, Yijing Y.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Kidder, Michelle; Polyzos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.

    2015-11-10

    Mono layer hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) attracts significant attention due to the potential to be used as a complementary two-dimensional dielectric in fabrication of functional 2D heterostructures. Here we investigate the growth stages of the hBN single crystals and show that hBN crystals change their shape from triangular to truncated triangular and further to hexagonal depending on copper substrate distance from the precursor. We suggest that the observed hBN crystal shape variation is affected by the ratio of boron to nitrogen active species concentrations on the copper surface inside the CVD reactor. Strong temperature dependence reveals the activation energies for the hBN nucleation process of similar to 5 eV and crystal growth of similar to 3.5 eV. We also show that the resulting h-BN film morphology is strongly affected by the heating method of borazane precursor and the buffer gas. Elucidation of these details facilitated synthesis of high quality large area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition on copper using borazane as a precursor.

  8. Nucleation of liquid droplets and voids in a stretched Lennard-Jones fcc crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Baidakov, Vladimir G. Tipeev, Azat O.

    2015-09-28

    The method of molecular dynamics simulation has been used to investigate the phase decay of a metastable Lennard-Jones face-centered cubic crystal at positive and negative pressures. It is shown that at high degrees of metastability, crystal decay proceeds through the spontaneous formation and growth of new-phase nuclei. It has been found that there exists a certain boundary temperature. Below this temperature, the crystal phase disintegrates as the result of formation of voids, and above, as a result of formation of liquid droplets. The boundary temperature corresponds to the temperature of cessation of a crystal–liquid phase equilibrium when the melting line comes in contact with the spinodal of the stretched liquid. The results of the simulations are interpreted in the framework of classical nucleation theory. The thermodynamics of phase transitions in solids has been examined with allowance for the elastic energy of stresses arising owing to the difference in the densities of the initial and the forming phases. As a result of the action of elastic forces, at negative pressures, the boundary of the limiting superheating (stretching) of a crystal approaches the spinodal, on which the isothermal bulk modulus of dilatation becomes equal to zero. At the boundary of the limiting superheating (stretching), the shape of liquid droplets and voids is close to the spherical one.

  9. Synthesis of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Mono layer: Control of Nucleation and Crystal Morphology

    DOE PAGES

    Stehle, Yijing Y.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Unocic, Raymond R.; ...

    2015-11-10

    Mono layer hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) attracts significant attention due to the potential to be used as a complementary two-dimensional dielectric in fabrication of functional 2D heterostructures. Here we investigate the growth stages of the hBN single crystals and show that hBN crystals change their shape from triangular to truncated triangular and further to hexagonal depending on copper substrate distance from the precursor. We suggest that the observed hBN crystal shape variation is affected by the ratio of boron to nitrogen active species concentrations on the copper surface inside the CVD reactor. Strong temperature dependence reveals the activation energies formore » the hBN nucleation process of similar to 5 eV and crystal growth of similar to 3.5 eV. We also show that the resulting h-BN film morphology is strongly affected by the heating method of borazane precursor and the buffer gas. Elucidation of these details facilitated synthesis of high quality large area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition on copper using borazane as a precursor.« less

  10. Solubility and crystal nucleation in organic solvents of two polymorphs of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Svärd, Michael; Hippen, Perschia; Rasmuson, Åke C

    2015-07-01

    Two crystal polymorphs of 1,7-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione (curcumin) have been obtained by crystallization from ethanol (EtOH) solution. The polymorphs have been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction and shown to be the previously described forms I and III. The solubility of both polymorphs in EtOH and of one polymorph in ethyl acetate (EA) has been measured between 10°C and 50°C with a gravimetric method. Primary nucleation of curcumin from EtOH solution has been investigated in 520 constant temperature crystallization experiments in sealed, magnetically stirred vials under different conditions of supersaturation, temperature, and agitation rate. By a thermodynamic analysis of the melting data and solubility of form I, the solid-state activity is estimated from 10°C up to the melting point. The solubility is lower in EtOH than in EA, and in both solvents, a positive deviation from Raoult's law is observed. Form I has lower solubility than form III and is accordingly thermodynamically more stable over the investigated temperature interval. Extrapolation of solubility regression models indicates that there should be a low-temperature enantiotropic transition point, below which form I will be metastable. By slurry conversion experiments, it is established that this temperature is below -30°C. All nucleation experiments resulted in the stable form I. The induction time is observed to decrease with increasing agitation rate up to a certain point, and then increase with further increasing agitation rate; a trend previously observed for other compounds. By correlating the induction time data obtained at different supersaturation and temperature, the interfacial energy of form I in EtOH is estimated to be 3.0 mJ/m(2) .

  11. Significant improvement of GaN crystal quality with ex-situ sputtered AlN nucleation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo-Wei; Yang, Young; Wen, Wei-Chih; Li, Heng; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2016-03-01

    Ex-situ sputtered AlN nucleation layer has been demonstrated effective to significantly improve crystal quality and electrical properties of GaN epitaxy layers for GaN based Light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In this report, we have successfully reduced X-ray (102) FWHM from 240 to 110 arcsec, and (002) FWHM from 230 to 101 arcsec. In addition, reverse-bias voltage (Vr) increased around 20% with the sputtered AlN nucleation layer. Furthermore, output power of LEDs grown on sputtered AlN nucleation layer can be improved around 4.0% compared with LEDs which is with conventional GaN nucleation layer on pattern sapphire substrate (PSS).

  12. Epitaxy versus oriented heterogeneous nucleation of organic crystals on ionic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, K. R.; Shlichta, P. J.; Wilcox, W. R.; Lefever, R. A.

    1997-04-01

    It is plausible to assume that epitaxy is a special case of heterogeneous nucleation in which a restrictive crystallographic relationship exists between substrate and deposit orientations. This would mean that epitaxial substrates should always induce a perceptible reduction in the critical supercooling for nucleation of the deposit. To test this hypothesis, the critical supercoolings of six organic compounds were measured on glass and 11 single-crystal cleaved substrates including (0001) graphite, (001) mica, (111) BaF 2, SrF 2, and CaF 2, and (100) KCl, KBr, KI, NaCl, NaF, and LiF. Reductions in supercooling (with reference to glass substrates) were checked many times for repeatability and reproducibility and shown in almost all cases to have a standard deviation of 1 C or less. Acetanilide, benzoic acid, and p-bromochlorobenzene showed a wide range of supercooling reductions and were oriented on all crystalline substrates. Naphthalene and p-dibromobenzene showed only slight supercooling reductions but were oriented on all substrates, including glass. Benzil showed strong supercooling reductions only for mica and KI but was oriented not only in these cases but also with KI, BaF 2, CaF 2, and graphite. There was little correlation between degree of lattice match and either supercooling reduction or degree of preferred orientation. These results suggest that, for the systems and geometry studied, forces such as molecular dipole binding and growth anisotropy had a stronger effect than lattice match.

  13. Mesoscopic Impurities Expose a Nucleation-Limited Regime of Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleutel, Mike; Lutsko, James F.; Maes, Dominique; Van Driessche, Alexander E. S.

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale self-assembly is naturally subject to impediments at the nanoscale. The recently developed ability to follow processes at the molecular level forces us to resolve older, coarse-grained concepts in terms of their molecular mechanisms. In this Letter, we highlight one such example. We present evidence based on experimental and simulation data that one of the cornerstones of crystal growth theory, the Cabrera-Vermilyea model of step advancement in the presence of impurities, is based on incomplete physics. We demonstrate that the piercing of an impurity fence by elementary steps is not solely determined by the Gibbs-Thomson effect, as assumed by Cabrera-Vermilyea. Our data show that for conditions leading up to growth cessation, step retardation is dominated by the formation of critically sized fluctuations. The growth recovery of steps is counter to what is typically assumed, not instantaneous. Our observations on mesoscopic impurities for lysozyme expose a nucleation-dominated regime of growth that has not been hitherto considered, where the system alternates between zero and near-pure velocity. The time spent by the system in arrest is the nucleation induction time required for the step to amass a supercritical fluctuation that pierces the impurity fence.

  14. Homogenous nucleation rates of n-propanol measured in the Laminar Flow Diffusion Chamber at different total pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görke, Hanna; Neitola, Kimmo; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Lihavainen, Heikki; Wölk, Judith; Strey, Reinhard; Brus, David

    2014-05-01

    Nucleation rates of n-propanol were investigated in the Laminar Flow Diffusion Chamber. Nucleation temperatures between 270 and 300 K and rates between 100 and 106 cm-3 s-1 were achieved. Since earlier measurements of n-butanol and n-pentanol suggest a dependence of nucleation rates on carrier gas pressure, similar conditions were adjusted for these measurements. The obtained data fit well to results available from literature. A small positive pressure effect was found which strengthen the assumption that this effect is attributed to the carbon chain length of the n-alcohol [D. Brus, A. P. Hyvärinen, J. Wedekind, Y. Viisanen, M. Kulmala, V. Ždímal, J. Smolík, and H. Lihavainen, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 134312 (2008)] and might be less intensive for substances in the homologous series with higher equilibrium vapor pressure. A comparison with the theoretical approach by Wedekind et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 12 (2008)] shows that the effect goes in the same direction but that the intensity is much stronger in experiments than in theory.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Study on Nucleation Behavior and Lamellar Mergence of Polyethylene Globule Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhen; Wang, Simiao

    2012-02-01

    The site order parameter (SOP) has been adopted to analyze various order structure formation and distribution during the crystallization of a multi-chain polyethylene globule simulated by molecular dynamics. We found that the nucleation relies on crystallinity fluctuation with increase of amplitude, and the baby nucleus in the fluctuation suddenly appears with different shape and increasing size. In the growth stage, a number of lamellar mergence was observed and their selective behaviors were suggested to be related to the orientation difference between the merging lamellae. We obtained that SOP distribution of all atoms in the system during crystallization appears with two peaks: one for the amorphous phase and the other for the crystalline phase. Mesomorphic structures with medium orders locate between the two peaks as an order promotion pathway. Obtained data show that the medium order structure fluctuates at the growth front and does not always be available; the medium order structure existing at the front is not always good for developing. It is possibly caused by chain entanglement.

  16. Pre-ordering of interfacial water in the pathway of heterogeneous ice nucleation does not lead to a two-step crystallization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Laura; Peters, Baron; Molinero, Valeria

    2016-12-01

    According to Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT), the transition from liquid to crystal occurs in a single activated step with a transition state controlled by the size of the crystal embryo. This picture has been challenged in the last two decades by several reports of two-step crystallization processes in which the liquid first produces pre-ordered or dense domains, within which the crystal nucleates in a second step. Pre-ordering preceding crystal nucleation has been recently reported in simulations of ice crystallization, raising the question of whether the mechanism of ice nucleation involves two steps. In this paper, we investigate the heterogeneous nucleation of ice on carbon surfaces. We use molecular simulations with efficient coarse-grained models combined with rare event sampling methods and free energy calculations to elucidate the role of pre-ordering of liquid water at the carbon surface in the reaction coordinate for heterogeneous nucleation. We find that ice nucleation proceeds through a classical mechanism, with a single barrier between liquid and crystal. The reaction coordinate that determines the crossing of the nucleation barrier is the size of the crystal nucleus, as predicted by CNT. Wetting of the critical ice nuclei within pre-ordered domains decreases the nucleation barrier, increasing the nucleation rates. The preferential pathway for crystallization involves the early creation of pre-ordered domains that are the birthplace of the ice crystallites but do not represent a minimum in the free energy pathway from liquid to ice. We conclude that a preferential pathway through an intermediate-order precursor does not necessarily result in a two-step mechanism.

  17. Thermodynamic equilibrium, metastable zone widths, and nucleation behavior in the cooling crystallization of gestodene-ethanol systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-yu; Zhu, Liang; Yang, Li-bin; Wang, Yan-fei; Sha, Zuo-liang; Zhao, Xiao-yu

    2016-03-01

    A systematic investigation of nucleation behavior for the batch cooling crystallization of unseeded gestodene-ethanol solutions was carried out. The solubilities of the two polymorphs (forms I and II) of gestodene in ethanol were gravimetrically measured between 268.15 and 333.15 K under atmospheric pressure of 0.10 MPa. In addition, the metastable zone widths (MSZWs) of the gestodene-ethanol solutions were determined by the polythermal method combined with the focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM®) technique. Moreover, polymorphic forms of the grown crystals were identified by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and optical microscope. Experimental results indicated that the measured MSZWs were dependent on numerous technological parameters, including cooling rate, saturation temperature, and agitation intensity. With variation of the nucleation temperature and cooling rate, forms I, II, and a mixture of the two forms were crystallized from ethanol solution. The nucleation kinetic parameters were estimated from MSZW data using the self-consistent Nývlt-like approach. Due to the high solubility of form I in ethanol at the corresponding temperature range, the stronger solute-solvent interactions confirmed that the nucleation of form I had a greater activation energy than that of form II.

  18. The nucleation of inosine: the impact of solution chemistry on the appearance of polymorphic and hydrated crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Chiarella, Renato A; Gillon, Amy L; Burton, Rebecca C; Davey, Roger J; Sadiq, Ghazala; Auffret, Anthony; Cioffi, Marina; Hunter, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    This contribution concerns the issue of crystal nucleation in the polymorphic and hydrate forming system inosine-water. A combination of computational and experimental tools have been used to explore the relationship between solution phase inosine species and the structural synthons as found in its crystal structures. It is evident that the initial nucleation of a metastable polymorph at temperatures above 10 degrees C is directed by dimeric self-association as revealed through proton NMR. At lower temperatures a dihydrate structure becomes the most stable solid phase and in this region of the phase diagram this is the only form that appears even though the solution species remain unchanged. This can only be rationalised in terms of a combination of water binding to the solution dimers and the thermodynamic stability of the hydrate crystal structure.

  19. Homogeneity characterization of lattice spacing of silicon single crystals by a self-referenced lattice comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Waseda, A.; Zhang, X. W.

    2011-04-01

    The homogeneity of the lattice spacings of silicon single crystals from different origins was characterized. Strain measurements were performed on single crystals from NRLM3, NRLM4 and 28Si-10Pr11 ingots, which are all used to determine the Avogadro constant. NRLM3 and NRLM4 both exhibited clear striations, whereas almost no pattern was obtained for 28Si-10Pr11. The standard deviation of the lattice spacing of the single crystal obtained from 28Si-10Pr11 was 4.7 × 10-9, which enabled the lattice spacing to be determined with a standard uncertainty of 3 × 10-9.

  20. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Kim, Rosalind [Moraga, CA; Jancarik, Jamila [Walnut Creek, CA

    2012-01-31

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  1. Comment on vapor phase homogeneous nucleation of CH 3CN and the scaling law for onset supersaturation ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Barbara N.; Kelly, Brendan

    1992-01-01

    We point out that the scaling law for onset vapor phase nucleation, ln Sonset ≈ 0.53 [Ω( Tc/ T-1)] 3/2, with Ω = 1.77 (from CH 3CN surface tension data) predicts the temperature dependence and approximate magnitude of CH 3CN supersaturation ratio data, S. This is contrary to the conclusions of Wright, Caldwell and El-Shall who estimate too large a value (2.14) for Ω. We note that Ω, the excess molecular surface entropy/ k, is more reliably extracted from the temperature derivative of the surface tension data.

  2. Free energy calculations along entropic pathways. I. Homogeneous vapor-liquid nucleation for atomic and molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-11-01

    Using the entropy S as a reaction coordinate, we determine the free energy barrier associated with the formation of a liquid droplet from a supersaturated vapor for atomic and molecular fluids. For this purpose, we develop the μ V T -S simulation method that combines the advantages of the grand-canonical ensemble, that allows for a direct evaluation of the entropy, and of the umbrella sampling method, that is well suited to the study of an activated process like nucleation. Applying this approach to an atomic system such as Ar allows us to test the method. The results show that the μ V T -S method gives the correct dependence on supersaturation of the height of the free energy barrier and of the size of the critical droplet, when compared to predictions from the classical nucleation theory and to previous simulation results. In addition, it provides insight into the relation between the entropy and droplet formation throughout this process. An additional advantage of the μ V T -S approach is its direct transferability to molecular systems, since it uses the entropy of the system as the reaction coordinate. Applications of the μ V T -S simulation method to N2 and CO2 are presented and discussed in this work, showing the versatility of the μ V T -S approach.

  3. Elimination of off-axis light leakage in a homogeneously aligned liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seung-Won; Park, Byung Wok; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    Among various liquid crystal display modes, the in-plane switching mode exhibits the widest viewing angle because the liquid crystals are homogeneously-aligned initially and rotate within a plane parallel to the substrates when an in-plane field is applied. However, further improvement is still needed for viewing high-quality dark images from the bisector direction of the crossed polarizers. Several compensation schemes have been proposed to eliminate the off-axis light leakage in a homogeneously-aligned liquid crystal cell. Although a 100:1 iso-contrast contour at an wavelength of 550 nm can cover the entire viewing cone, light leakage at other wavelengths still remains very severe. In this paper we introduce achromatic optical compensation methods using uniaxial films to eliminate the off-axis light leakage at the dark state in homogeneously-aligned liquid crystal cell.Uniaxial films with different dispersion characteristics are used so that they can compensate one another to achieve achromatic optical compensation. The retardation values are optimized through numerical research with the aid of the Poincaré sphere.

  4. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  5. Polymer-templated nucleation and crystal growth of perovskite films for solar cells with efficiency greater than 21%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dongqin; Yi, Chenyi; Luo, Jingshan; Décoppet, Jean-David; Zhang, Fei; Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammed; Li, Xiong; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The past several years have witnessed the rapid emergence of a class of solar cells based on mixed organic-inorganic halide perovskites. Today’s state-of-the-art perovskite solar cells (PSCs) employ various methods to enhance nucleation and improve the smoothness of the perovskite films formed via solution processing. However, the lack of precise control over the crystallization process creates a risk of forming unwanted defects, for example, pinholes and grain boundaries. Here, we introduce an approach to prepare perovskite films of high electronic quality by using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a template to control nucleation and crystal growth. We obtain shiny smooth perovskite films of excellent electronic quality, as manifested by a remarkably long photoluminescence lifetime. We realize stable PSCs with excellent reproducibility showing a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of up to 21.6% and a certified PCE of 21.02% under standard AM 1.5G reporting conditions.

  6. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-butanol in helium: a comparative study of a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and a laminar flow diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Zdímal, Vladimír; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2005-06-01

    Isothermal homogeneous nucleation rates of 1-butanol were measured both in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and in a laminar flow diffusion chamber built recently at the Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. The chosen system 1-butanol-helium can be studied reasonably well in both devices, in the overlapping range of temperatures. The results were compared with those found in the literature and those measured by Lihavainen in a laminar flow diffusion chamber of a similar design. The same isotherms measured with the thermal diffusion cloud chamber occur at highest saturation ratios of the three devices. Isotherms measured with the two laminar flow diffusion chambers are reasonably close together; the measurements by Lihavainen occur at lowest saturation ratios. The temperature dependences observed were similar in all three devices. The molecular content of critical clusters was calculated using the nucleation theorem and compared with the Kelvin equation. Both laminar flow diffusion chambers provided very similar sizes slightly above the Kelvin equation, whereas the thermal diffusion cloud chamber suggests critical cluster sizes significantly smaller. The results found elsewhere in the literature were in reasonable agreement with our results.

  7. The crystal-fluid interfacial free energy and nucleation rate of NaCl from different simulation methods.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Jorge R; Vega, Carlos; Valeriani, Chantal; Sanz, Eduardo

    2015-05-21

    In this work, we calculate the crystal-fluid interfacial free energy, γ(cf), for the Tosi-Fumi model of NaCl using three different simulation techniques: seeding, umbrella sampling, and mold integration. The three techniques give an orientationaly averaged γ(cf) of about 100 mJ/m(2). Moreover, we observe that the shape of crystalline clusters embedded in the supercooled fluid is spherical. Using the mold integration technique, we compute γ(cf) for four different crystal orientations. The obtained interfacial free energies range from 100 to 114 mJ/m(2), being (100) and (111) the crystal planes with the lowest and highest γ(cf), respectively. Within the accuracy of our calculations, the interfacial free energy either does not depend on temperature or changes very smoothly with it. Combining the seeding technique with classical nucleation theory, we also estimate nucleation free energy barriers and nucleation rates for a wide temperature range (800-1040 K). The obtained results compare quite well with brute force calculations and with previous results obtained with umbrella sampling [Valeriani et al., J. Chem. Phys, 122, 194501 (2005)].

  8. Role of dynamic heterogeneities in crystal nucleation kinetics in an oxide supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Prabhat K.; Cassar, Daniel R.; Zanotto, Edgar D.

    2016-12-01

    The temperature at which the classical critical nucleus size is equal to the average size of the cooperatively rearranging regions (CRR) in a supercooled liquid has been referred to as a "cross-over" temperature. We show, for the first time, using published nucleation rate, viscosity, and thermo-physical data, that the cross-over temperature for the lithium disilicate melt is significantly larger than the temperature of the kinetic spinodal and is equal or close to the temperature corresponding to the maximum in the experimentally observed nucleation rates. We suggest that the abnormal decrease in nucleation rates below the cross-over temperature is most likely because, in this regime, the CRR size controls the critical nucleus size and the nucleation rate. This finding links, for the first time, measured nucleation kinetics to the dynamic heterogeneities in a supercooled liquid.

  9. Microwave effect in the fast synthesis of microporous materials: which stage between nucleation and crystal growth is accelerated by microwave irradiation?

    PubMed

    Jhung, Sung Hwa; Jin, Taihuan; Hwang, Young Kyu; Chang, Jong-San

    2007-01-01

    Microporous materials, such as silicalite-1 and VSB-5 molecular sieves, have been synthesized by both microwave irradiation (MW) and conventional electric heating (CE). The accelerated syntheses by microwave irradiation can be quantitatively investigated by various heating modes conducted in two steps such as MW-MW, MW-CE, CE-MW, and CE-CE (in the order of nucleation-crystal growth). In the case of synthesis by MW-CE or CE-MW, the heating modes were changed for the second step just after the appearance of X-ray diffraction peaks in the first step. We have quantitatively demonstrated that the microwave irradiation accelerates not only the nucleation but also crystal growth. However, the contribution to decrease the synthesis time by microwave irradiation is larger in the nucleation stage than in the step of crystal growth. The crystal size increases in the order of MW-MWcrystal growth and small crystal size observed in the synthesis from microwave-nucleated precursor can be explained in terms of the fact that the microwave-nucleated samples have higher population of nuclei with smaller size than the samples nucleated by conventional heating.

  10. Nucleation and crystallization of Ca doped basaltic glass for the production of a glass-ceramic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrago, Mariona; Royo, Irene; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martínez, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants is a waste with a composition roughly similar to that of a basalt. It may contain potentially toxic elements that can be inertized by vitrification. Using a glass-ceramic process, these elements will be emplaced in newly formed mineral phases. Glass-ceramic production requires an accurate knowledge of the temperatures of nucleation (TN) and crystal growth of the corresponding minerals. This work arises from the study of the addition of ions to a basaltic matrix in order to establish a model of vitrification of sewage sludge. In this case a glass-ceramic is obtained from a glass made with a basalt that has been doped with 16% CaO. Two glasses which underwent different cooling processes have been produced and compared. The first was annealed at 650oC (AG) and the second was quenched (QG). The chemical composition of the glasses is SiO2 36.11 wt%, Al2O312.19 wt%, CaO 24.44 wt%, FeO 10.06 wt%, MgO 9.19 wt%, Na2O 2.28 wt%, TiO2 2.02 wt%, K2O 1.12 wt%, P2O5 0.46 wt%. Glass transition temperature obtained by dilatometry varies from 640 oC (AG) to 700 oC (QG). The temperatures of nucleation and crystal growth of the glass have been determined by Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The phases formed after these treatments were identified by X-Ray Diffraction. The temperatures of exothermic and endothermic peaks measured in the quenched glass are, in average, 10 oC higher than those found for the annealed glass. The exothermic peaks provide crystallization temperatures for different phases: a first event at 857 oC corresponds to the growth of magnetite, pyroxene and nepheline, whereas a second event at 1030 oC is due to the crystallization of melilite from the reaction between previous minerals and a remaining amorphous phase. The complete melting of this system occurs at 1201 oC. This glass has been nucleated inside the DTA furnace (500-850° C/3 hours) and then heated up to 1300 oC using the fraction between 400-500μm. TN

  11. Investigating the role of solvent-solute interaction in crystal nucleation of salicylic acid from organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Khamar, Dikshitkumar; Zeglinski, Jacek; Mealey, Donal; Rasmuson, Åke C

    2014-08-20

    In previous work, it has been shown that the crystal nucleation of salicylic acid (SA) in different solvents becomes increasingly more difficult in the order: chloroform, ethyl acetate acetonitrile, acetone, methanol, and acetic acid. In the present work, vibration spectroscopy, calorimetric measurements, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms. Raman and infrared spectra suggest that SA exists predominately as dimers in chloroform, but in the other five solvents there is no clear evidence of dimerization. In all solvents, the shift in the SA carbonyl peak reflecting the strength in the solvent-solute interaction is quite well correlated to the nucleation ranking. This shift is corroborated by DFT calculated energies of binding one solvent molecule to the carboxyl group of SA. An even better correlation of the influence of the solvent on the nucleation is provided by DFT calculated energy of binding the complete first solvation shell to the SA molecule. These solvation shell binding energies are corroborated by the enthalpy of solvent-solute interaction as estimated from experimentally determined enthalpy of solution and calculated enthalpy of cavity formation using the scaled particle theory. The different methods reveal a consistent picture and suggest that the stronger the solvent binds to the SA molecule in solution, the slower the nucleation becomes.

  12. Effect of Pt Doping on Nucleation and Crystallization in Li2O.2SiO2 Glass: Experimental Measurements and Computer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, K. Lakshmi; Kelton, K. F.; Ray, C. S.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation and its effects on the crystallization of lithium disilicate glass containing small amounts of Pt are investigated. Measurements of the nucleation frequencies and induction times with and without Pt are shown to be consistent with predictions based on the classical nucleation theory. A realistic computer model for the transformation is presented. Computed differential thermal analysis data (such as crystallization rates as a function of time and temperature) are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results. This modeling provides a new, more quantitative method for analyzing calorimetric data.

  13. Probing the homogeneity of the isotopic composition and molar mass of the ‘Avogadro’-crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramann, Axel; Lee, Kyoung-Seok; Noordmann, Janine; Rienitz, Olaf

    2015-12-01

    Improved measurements on silicon crystal samples highly enriched in the 28Si isotope (known as ‘Si28’ or AVO28 crystal material) have been carried out at PTB to investigate local isotopic variations in the original crystal. This material was used for the determination of the Avogadro constant NA and therefore plays an important role in the upcoming redefinition of the SI units kilogram and mole, using fundamental constants. Subsamples of the original crystal have been extensively studied over the past few years at the National Research Council (NRC, Canada), the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ, Japan), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA), the National Institute of Metrology (NIM, People’s Republic of China), and multiple times at PTB. In this study, four to five discrete, but adjacent samples were taken from three distinct axial positions of the crystal to obtain a more systematic and comprehensive understanding of the distribution of the isotopic composition and molar mass throughout the crystal. Moreover, improved state-of-the-art techniques in the experimental measurements as well as the evaluation approach and the determination of the calibration factors were utilized. The average molar mass of the measured samples is M  =  27.976 970 12(12) g mol-1 with a relative combined uncertainty uc,rel(M)  =  4.4 ×10-9. This value is in astounding agreement with the values of single samples measured and published by NIST, NMIJ, and PTB. With respect to the associated uncertainties, no significant variations in the molar mass and the isotopic composition as a function of the sample position in the boule were observed and thus could not be traced back to an inherent property of the crystal. This means that the crystal is not only ‘homogeneous’ with respect to molar mass but also has predominantly homogeneous distribution of the three stable Si isotopes.

  14. Spontaneous nucleation and growth of GaN nanowires: the fundamental role of crystal polarity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Kong, Xiang; Gotschke, Tobias; Calarco, Raffaella; Geelhaar, Lutz; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver

    2012-12-12

    We experimentally investigate whether crystal polarity affects the growth of GaN nanowires in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and whether their formation has to be induced by defects. For this purpose, we prepare smooth and coherently strained AlN layers on 6H-SiC(0001) and SiC(0001̅) substrates to ensure a well-defined polarity and an absence of structural and morphological defects. On N-polar AlN, a homogeneous and dense N-polar GaN nanowire array forms, evidencing that GaN nanowires form spontaneously in the absence of defects. On Al-polar AlN, we do not observe the formation of Ga-polar GaN NWs. Instead, sparse N-polar GaN nanowires grow embedded in a Ga-polar GaN layer. These N-polar GaN nanowires are shown to be accidental in that the necessary polarity inversion is induced by the formation of Si(x)N. The present findings thus demonstrate that spontaneously formed GaN nanowires are irrevocably N-polar. Due to the strong impact of the polarity on the properties of GaN-based devices, these results are not only essential to understand the spontaneous formation of GaN nanowires but also of high technological relevance.

  15. Communication: Fourier-transform infrared probing of remarkable quantities of gas trapped in cold homogeneously nucleated nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uras-Aytemiz, Nevin; Devlin, J. Paul

    2013-07-01

    Studies of catalyzed all-vapor gas-hydrate formation on a sub-second timescale have been extended with a special focus on liquid-droplet compositions at the instant of hydrate crystallization. This focus has been enabled by inclusion of methanol in the all-vapor mixture. This slows droplet to gas-hydrate conversion near 200 K to a time scale suited for standard FTIR sampling. Such droplet data are sought as a guide to ongoing efforts to reduce the amount of guest catalyst required for instant formation of the gas hydrates. For the same reason, all-vapor sampling has also been extended to the generation of long-lived liquid droplets with reduced or no water content. Observations of single-solvent droplets show that surprising quantities of gas molecules are trapped during rapid droplet growth. For example, CO2 is trapped at levels near 50 mol. % in droplets of acetone, tetrahydrofuran, or trimethylene oxide formed under CO2 pressures of several Torr in a cold-chamber at 170 K. Less but significant amounts of gas are trapped at higher temperatures, or in methanol or water-methanol droplets. The droplet metastability appears to commonly lead to formation of bubbles larger than the original nanodroplets. Besides serving as a guide for the all-vapor gas-hydrate studies, the semiquantitative evidence of extensive trapping of gases is expected to have a role in future studies of atmospheric aerosols.

  16. The effect of nucleation layer thickness on the structural evolution and crystal quality of bulk GaN grown by a two-step process on cone-patterned sapphire substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Lin; Zhai, Guangmei; Mei, Fuhong; Jia, Wei; Yu, Chunyan; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2016-05-01

    The role of nucleation layer thickness on the GaN crystal quality grown on cone-patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) was explored. The morphologies of epitaxial GaN at different growth stages were investigated by a series of growth interruption in detail. After 10- and 15-min three-dimensional growth, the nucleation sites are very important for the bulk GaN crystal quality. They have a close relationship with the nucleation layer thickness, as confirmed through the scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Nucleation sites formed mainly on patterns are bad for bulk GaN crystal quality and nucleation sites formed mainly in the trenches of PSS mounds are good for bulk GaN crystal quality, as proved by X-ray diffraction analysis. Nucleation layer thickness can effectively control the nucleation sites and thus determine the crystal quality of bulk GaN.

  17. Bubble Nucleation, Coalescence and Outgassing Induced by Crystallization: Insights into Their Contribution to Seismic Properties of Magmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tomography of potentially hazardous volcanoes is a prime tool to assess the location and dimensions of magmatic reservoirs. Magma rheology and volcanic eruptive style are to a first order controlled by processes occurring within the conduit or in the magma chamber, such as crystallization and bubble exsolution. Seismic velocities are strongly affected by these processes, but the limited number of constrained measurements does not allow yet establishing a firm link between seismic tomography and the textural and hence rheologic state of volcanic systems. Elastic parameters of vapor-saturated, partially molten systems are thus providing fundamental information for the identification of such reservoirs under volcanoes. We investigated a chemically simplified melt analogous to trachyte, which undergoes plagioclase crystallization and bubble exsolution. A Paterson-type apparatus was employed to measure the seismic velocities at a constant pressure of 250 MPa and at a frequency of 0.1 MHz. The temperature was decreased at a rate of 0.5 or 0.1 °C/min from 850 to 700 °C and velocities were recorded every 45 minutes. In order to characterize the microstructure evolution, we conducted series of cold-seal experiments at identical pressure conditions but with rapid-quenching at each of the recorded temperatures. Magmatic processes such as crystallization, bubble nucleation and coalescence have been recognized throughout the measurements of seismic velocities in the laboratory. Compression and shear wave velocities increase non-linearly during crystallization. At crystal fraction exceeding 45 vol%, the formation of a crystal network favors the propagation of seismic waves through magmatic liquids. However, bubble nucleation induced by crystallization leads to an increase of magma compressibility resulting in a lowering of the wave propagation velocities. These two processes occurring simultaneously have thus competing effects on the seismic properties of magmas. In

  18. Anatomy of a metabentonite: nucleation and growth of illite crystals and their colescence into mixed-layer illite/smectite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Blum, A.E.; Serravezza, M.

    2011-01-01

    The illite layer content of mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) in a 2.5 m thick, zoned, metabentonite bed from Montana decreases regularly from the edges to the center of the bed. Traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern modeling using Markovian statistics indicated that this zonation results from a mixing in different proportions of smectite-rich R0 I/S and illite-rich R1 I/S, with each phase having a relatively constant illite layer content. However, a new method for modeling XRD patterns of I/S indicates that R0 and R1 I/S in these samples are not separate phases (in the mineralogical sense of the word), but that the samples are composed of illite crystals that have continuous distributions of crystal thicknesses, and of 1 nm thick smectite crystals. The shapes of these distributions indicate that the crystals were formed by simultaneous nucleation and growth. XRD patterns for R0 and R1 I/S arise by interparticle diffraction from a random stacking of the crystals, with swelling interlayers formed at interfaces between crystals from water or glycol that is sorbed on crystal surfaces. It is the thickness distributions of smectite and illite crystals (also termed fundamental particles, or Nadeau particles), rather than XRD patterns for mixed-layer I/S, that are the more reliable indicators of geologic history, because such distributions are composed of well-defined crystals that are not affected by differences in surface sorption and particle arrangements, and because their thickness distribution shapes conform to the predictions of crystal growth theory, which describes their genesis.

  19. Crystal plasticity model for BCC iron atomistically informed by kinetics of correlated kinkpair nucleation on screw dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Sankar; McDowell, David L.; Zhu, Ting

    2014-04-01

    The mobility of dislocation in body-centered cubic (BCC) metals is controlled by the thermally activated nucleation of kinks along the dislocation core. By employing a recent interatomic potential and the Nudged Elastic Band method, we predict the atomistic saddle-point state of 1/2<111> screw dislocation motion in BCC iron that involves the nucleation of correlated kinkpairs and the resulting double superkinks. This unique process leads to a single-humped minimum energy path that governs the one-step activation of a screw dislocation to move into the adjacent {110} Peierls valley, which contrasts with the double-humped energy path and the two-step transition predicted by other interatomic potentials. Based on transition state theory, we use the atomistically computed, stress-dependent kinkpair activation parameters to inform a coarse-grained crystal plasticity flow rule. Our atomistically-informed crystal plasticity model quantitatively predicts the orientation dependent stress-strain behavior of BCC iron single crystals in a manner that is consistent with experimental results. The predicted temperature and strain-rate dependencies of the yield stress agree with experimental results in the 200-350 K temperature regime, and are rationalized by the small activation volumes associated with the kinkpair-mediated motion of screw dislocations.

  20. Theory and practice of “shape spectroscopy” of local FCC structures in computer simulations of nucleation and crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitus, A. C.; Smolej, F.; Hahn, H.; Patashinski, A. Z.

    1996-02-01

    Starting from the previously developed probabilistic method for recognition of structures of small clusters of atoms undergoing thermal fluctuations, we derive simple algorithms for the very detailed study of local face-centered-cubic (FCC) arrangements of the atoms, directly in a configuration of atoms when it is being simulated. This includes (i) an algorithm for a local identification of FCC-like clusters, with the discussion of its reliability, and (ii) an algorithm for the calculation of the relative orientational correlations between the clusters. As an illustration, the method is used for studying nucleation and growth of an FCC phase in a rapidly quenched melt of 4000 Lennard-Jones atoms. On the basis of this analysis, we propose two trial hypotheses about (i) the existence of “slow” and “quick” regimes during the nucleation and growth and (ii) that in the intermediate stages of nucleation and crystallization the FCC-like local order appears rather in two-, than in three-dimensional aggregates.

  1. Site-specific colloidal crystal nucleation by template-enhanced particle transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Chandan K.; Sood, A. K.; Ganapathy, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    The monomer surface mobility is the single most important parameter that decides the nucleation density and morphology of islands during thin-film growth. During template-assisted surface growth in particular, low surface mobilities can prevent monomers from reaching target sites and this results in a partial to complete loss of nucleation control. Whereas in atomic systems a broad range of surface mobilities can be readily accessed, for colloids, owing to their large size, this window is substantially narrow and therefore imposes severe restrictions in extending template-assisted growth techniques to steer their self-assembly. Here, we circumvented this fundamental limitation by designing templates with spatially varying feature sizes, in this case moiré patterns, which in the presence of short-range depletion attraction presented surface energy gradients for the diffusing colloids. The templates serve a dual purpose: first, directing the particles to target sites by enhancing their surface mean-free paths and second, dictating the size and symmetry of the growing crystallites. Using optical microscopy, we directly followed the nucleation and growth kinetics of colloidal islands on these surfaces at the single-particle level. We demonstrate nucleation control, with high fidelity, in a regime that has remained unaccessed in theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies on atoms and molecules as well. Our findings pave the way for fabricating nontrivial surface architectures composed of complex colloids and nanoparticles as well.

  2. A Proposed Pathway for the Nucleation and Crystal Growth of the Tetragonal Form of Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A number of factors, the shape and charge distribution anisotropy, multiple components in the solution (buffer + counter ion, precipitant, protein, and water), conformational flexibility, and large numbers of intermolecular contacts, all serve as complicating variables in understanding the nucleation and growth mechanism for macromolecules. Intermolecular contacts include hydrogen bonds, van der Waals, hydrophobic, salt bridges, and ion-mediated contacts. The latter interactions are stronger and give specificity while the others are weaker, more prevalent, and more promiscuous, i.e., can lead to a range of possible molecular interactions. We propose that for tetragonal lysozyme, and by extension many other monomeric proteins, there is a solution-phase assembly process to form 4(sub 3) helix structures that are the basic unit for nucleation. The formation of these structures is continuous and concentration dependent. They subsequently also servc as growth units, with that process then being a recapitulation of the nucleation process. The advantages of solution phase assembly are the immediate burying of the strongest interactions, removing them from subsequent participation in the nucleation and growth process, and the introduction of symmetry into the system, which also assists in the assembly process.

  3. The Theory of Ice Nucleation by Heterogeneous Freezing of Deliquescent Mixed CCN. Part II: Parcel Model Simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Vitaly I.; Curry, Judith A.

    2005-02-01

    The new theory of ice nucleation by heterogeneous freezing of deliquescent mixed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) presented in Part I is incorporated into a parcel model with explicit water and ice bin microphysics to simulate the process of ice nucleation under transient thermodynamic conditions. Simulations are conducted over the temperature range -4° to -60°C, with vertical velocities varying from 1 to 100 cm s-1, for varying initial relative humidities and aerosol characteristics. These simulations show that the same CCN that are responsible for the drop nucleation may initiate crystal nucleation and can be identified as ice nuclei (IN) when crystals form. The simulated nucleation rates and concentrations of nucleated crystals depend on temperature and supersaturation simultaneously, showing good agreement with observations but with noticeable differences when compared with classical temperature-only and supersaturation-only parameterizations. The kinetics of heterogeneous ice nucleation exhibits a negative feedback via water supersaturation, whereby ice nucleation depends on the water supersaturation that is diminished by ice crystal diffusional growth. This feedback is stronger than the corresponding feedback for drop nucleation, and may explain discrepancies between observed ice nuclei concentrations and ice crystal concentrations, the very small fraction of CCN that may serve as IN, and the much smaller crystal concentrations as compared to drop concentrations. The relative importance of heterogeneous versus homogeneous nucleation is examined for a variety of cloud conditions. Based on these calculations, a simple parameterization for ice crystal concentration is suggested for use in cloud models and large-scale models.

  4. Refinement of collagen-mineral interaction: a possible role for osteocalcin in apatite crystal nucleation, growth and development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Jacquet, Robin; Lowder, Elizabeth; Landis, William J

    2015-02-01

    Mineralization of vertebrate tissues such as bone, dentin, cementum, and calcifying tendon involves type I collagen, which has been proposed as a template for calcium and phosphate ion binding and subsequent nucleation of apatite crystals. Type I collagen thereby has been suggested to be responsible for the deposition of apatite mineral without the need for non-collagenous proteins or other extracellular matrix molecules. Based on studies in vitro, non-collagenous proteins, including osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein, are thought to mediate vertebrate mineralization associated with type I collagen. These proteins, as possibly related to mineral deposition, have not been definitively localized in vivo. The present study has reexamined their localization in the leg tendons of avian turkeys, a representative model of vertebrate mineralization. Immunocytochemistry of osteocalcin demonstrates its presence at the surface of, outside and within type I collagen while that of bone sialoprotein appears to be localized at the surface of or outside type I collagen. The association between osteocalcin and type I collagen structure is revealed optimally when calcium ions are added to the antibody solution in the methodology. In this manner, osteocalcin is found specifically located along the a4-1, b1, c2 and d bands defining in part the hole and overlap zones within type I collagen. From these data, while type I collagen itself may be considered a stereochemical guide for intrafibrillar mineral nucleation and subsequent deposition, osteocalcin bound to type I collagen may also possibly mediate nucleation, growth and development of platelet-shaped apatite crystals. Bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin as well, each immunolocalized at the surface of or outside type I collagen, may affect mineral deposition in these portions of the avian tendon.

  5. Homogeneity and variation of donor doping in Verneuil-grown SrTiO3:Nb single crystals.

    PubMed

    Rodenbücher, C; Luysberg, M; Schwedt, A; Havel, V; Gunkel, F; Mayer, J; Waser, R

    2016-08-31

    The homogeneity of Verneuil-grown SrTiO3:Nb crystals was investigated. Due to the fast crystal growth process, inhomogeneities in the donor dopant distribution and variation in the dislocation density are expected to occur. In fact, for some crystals optical studies show variations in the density of Ti(3+) states on the microscale and a cluster-like surface conductivity was reported in tip-induced resistive switching studies. However, our investigations by TEM, EDX mapping, and 3D atom probe reveal that the Nb donors are distributed in a statistically random manner, indicating that there is clearly no inhomogeneity on the macro-, micro-, and nanoscale in high quality Verneuil-grown crystals. In consequence, the electronic transport in the bulk of donor-doped crystals is homogeneous and it is not significantly channelled by extended defects such as dislocations which justifies using this material, for example, as electronically conducting substrate for epitaxial oxide film growth.

  6. Homogeneity and variation of donor doping in Verneuil-grown SrTiO3:Nb single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenbücher, C.; Luysberg, M.; Schwedt, A.; Havel, V.; Gunkel, F.; Mayer, J.; Waser, R.

    2016-08-01

    The homogeneity of Verneuil-grown SrTiO3:Nb crystals was investigated. Due to the fast crystal growth process, inhomogeneities in the donor dopant distribution and variation in the dislocation density are expected to occur. In fact, for some crystals optical studies show variations in the density of Ti3+ states on the microscale and a cluster-like surface conductivity was reported in tip-induced resistive switching studies. However, our investigations by TEM, EDX mapping, and 3D atom probe reveal that the Nb donors are distributed in a statistically random manner, indicating that there is clearly no inhomogeneity on the macro-, micro-, and nanoscale in high quality Verneuil-grown crystals. In consequence, the electronic transport in the bulk of donor-doped crystals is homogeneous and it is not significantly channelled by extended defects such as dislocations which justifies using this material, for example, as electronically conducting substrate for epitaxial oxide film growth.

  7. Homogeneity and variation of donor doping in Verneuil-grown SrTiO3:Nb single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Rodenbücher, C.; Luysberg, M.; Schwedt, A.; Havel, V.; Gunkel, F.; Mayer, J.; Waser, R.

    2016-01-01

    The homogeneity of Verneuil-grown SrTiO3:Nb crystals was investigated. Due to the fast crystal growth process, inhomogeneities in the donor dopant distribution and variation in the dislocation density are expected to occur. In fact, for some crystals optical studies show variations in the density of Ti3+ states on the microscale and a cluster-like surface conductivity was reported in tip-induced resistive switching studies. However, our investigations by TEM, EDX mapping, and 3D atom probe reveal that the Nb donors are distributed in a statistically random manner, indicating that there is clearly no inhomogeneity on the macro-, micro-, and nanoscale in high quality Verneuil-grown crystals. In consequence, the electronic transport in the bulk of donor-doped crystals is homogeneous and it is not significantly channelled by extended defects such as dislocations which justifies using this material, for example, as electronically conducting substrate for epitaxial oxide film growth. PMID:27577508

  8. Midlatitude Cirrus Clouds Derived from Hurricane Nora: A Case Study with Implications for Ice Crystal Nucleation and Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Arnott, W. Patrick; OCStarr, David; Mace, Gerald G.; Wang, Zhien; Poellot, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Hurricane Nora traveled up the Bala Peninsula coast in the unusually warm El Nino waters of September 1997, until rapidly decaying as it approached Southern California on 24 September. The anvil cirrus blowoff from the final surge of tropical convection became embedded in subtropical flow that advected the cirrus across the western US, where it was studied from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) in Salt Lake City, Utah. A day later, the cirrus shield remnants were redirected southward by midlatitude circulations into the Southern Great Plains, providing a case study opportunity for the research aircraft and ground-based remote sensors assembled at the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. Using these comprehensive resources and new remote sensing cloud retrieval algorithms, the microphysical and radiative cloud properties of this unusual cirrus event are uniquely characterized. Importantly, at both the FARS and CART sites the cirrus generated spectacular optical displays, which acted as a tracer for the hurricane cirrus, despite the limited lifetimes of individual ice crystals. Lidar polarization data indicate widespread regions of uniform ice plate orientations, and in situ particle masticator data show a preponderance of pristine, solid hexagonal plates and columns. It is suggested that these unusual aspects are the result of the mode of cirrus particle nucleation, presumably involving the lofting of sea-salt nuclei in thunderstorm updrafts into the upper troposphere. This created a reservoir of haze particles that continued to produce halide-saltcontaminated ice crystals during the extended period of cirrus cloud maintenance. The reference that marine microliters are embedded in the replicas of ice crystals collected over the CART site points to the longevity of marine effects. Various nucleation scenarios proposed for cirrus clouds based on this and other studies, and the implications for understanding cirrus radiative

  9. Mercury iodide nucleation and crystal growth in vapor phase (4-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadoret, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this experiment are to grow simultaneously three single crystals of mercuric iodide (HgI2) in an imposed temperature profile and to assess the advantages of growth in microgravity on the HgI2 crystal quality. Growth in microgravity should reduce fluctuations in HgI2 concentrations and thus decrease the resultant crystal defects. In order to test this hypothesis, a seeded growth of HgI2 crystals will be performed on International Microgravity Lab. (IML-1).

  10. Inferring the effects of compositional boundary layers on crystal nucleation, growth textures, and mineral chemistry in natural volcanic tephras through submicron-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmer, Georg; Sakamoto, Naoya; Hwang, Shyh-Lung; Matsuda, Nozomi; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki; Moebis, Anja; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2016-09-01

    Crystal nucleation and growth are first order processes captured in volcanic rocks and record important information about the rates of magmatic processes and chemical evolution of magmas during their ascent and eruption. We have studied glass-rich andesitic tephras from the Central Plateau of the Southern Taupo Volcanic Zone by electron- and ion-microbeam imaging techniques to investigate down to sub-micrometre scale the potential effects of compositional boundary layers (CBLs) of melt around crystals on the nucleation and growth of mineral phases and the chemistry of crystal growth zones. We find that CBLs may influence the types of mineral phases nucleating and growing, and growth textures such as the development of swallowtails. The chemistry of the CBLs also has the capacity to trigger intermittent overgrowths of nanometre-scale bands of different phases in rapidly growing crystals, resulting in what we refer to as cryptic phase zoning. The existence of cryptic phase zoning has implications for the interpretation of microprobe compositional data, and the resulting inferences made on the conditions of magmatic evolution. Identification of cryptic phase zoning may in future lead to more accurate thermobarometric estimates and thus geospeedometric constraints. In future, a more quantitative characterization of CBL formation and its effects on crystal nucleation and growth may contribute to a better understanding of melt rheology and magma ascent processes at the onset of explosive volcanic eruptions, and will likely be of benefit to hazard mitigation efforts.

  11. Shear-Induced Precursor Relaxation-Dependent Growth Dynamics and Lamellar Orientation of β-Crystals in β-Nucleated Isotactic Polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Hui; Fang, Du-Fei; Lei, Jun; Li, Liang-Bin; Hsiao, Benjamin S; Li, Zhong-Ming

    2015-04-30

    Although a shear flow field and β-nucleating agents (β-NAs) can separately induce the formation of β-crystals in isotactic polypropylene (iPP) in an efficient manner, we previously encountered difficulty in obtaining abundant β-crystals when these two factors were applied due to the competitive growth of α- and β-crystals. In the current study, to induce the formation of a high fraction of β-crystals, a strategy that introduces a relaxation process after applying a shear flow field but before cooling to crystallize β-nucleated iPP was proposed. Depending on the relaxation state of the shear-induced oriented precursors, abundant β-crystals with a refined orientation morphology were indeed formed. The key to producing these crystals lay in the partially dissolved shear-induced oriented precursors as a result of the relaxation process's ability to generate β-crystals by inducing the formation of needlelike β-NAs. Therefore, the content of β-crystals gradually increased with relaxation time, whereas the overall crystallization kinetics progressively decreased. Moreover, more time was required for the content of the β-phase to increase to the (maximum) value observed in quiescent crystallization than for the effect of flow on crystallization kinetics to be completely eliminated. The c-axis of the oriented β-lamellae was observed to be perpendicular, rather than parallel, to the fiber axis of the needlelike β-NAs, as first evidenced by the unique small-angle X-ray scattering patterns obtained. The significance of the relaxation process was manifested in regulating the content and morphology of oriented β-crystals in sheared, β-nucleated iPP and thus in the structure and property manipulation of iPP.

  12. Formation of a crystal nucleus from liquid

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Crystallization is one of the most fundamental nonequilibrium phenomena universal to a variety of materials. It has so far been assumed that a supercooled liquid is in a “homogeneous disordered state” before crystallization. Contrary to this common belief, we reveal that a supercooled colloidal liquid is actually not homogeneous, but has transient medium-range structural order. We find that nucleation preferentially takes place in regions of high structural order via wetting effects, which reduce the crystal–liquid interfacial energy significantly and thus promotes crystal nucleation. This novel scenario provides a clue to solving a long-standing mystery concerning a large discrepancy between the rigorous numerical estimation of the nucleation rate on the basis of the classical nucleation theory and the experimentally observed ones. Our finding may shed light not only on the mechanism of crystal nucleation, but also on the fundamental nature of a supercooled liquid state. PMID:20663951

  13. A Study on Nucleation, Crystallization Kinetics, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ru-Bi Partial Substituted BSCCO Glass Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, Ahmet Tolga; Ozturk, Ozgur; Gokcen, Tugba; Cavdar, Sukru; Koralay, Haluk; Senol, Abdulkadir

    2015-03-01

    This study deals with, the effects of Ru-Bi partial substitutions on the thermal, structural and mechanical properties of Bi1 . 8 - xRuxPb0.2Sr2CaCu2O10+δ (x =0.0, 0.025, 0.050, 0.075), produced with glass-ceramics method have been investigated. The effects of Ru-Bi Partial substitutions on glass transition, nucleation and crystallization temperature are analyzed by differential thermal analyzer (DTA). Furthermore, micro-structure and micro-mechanical properties of Ru-Bi partial substituted BSCCO glass ceramics have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Vickers microhardness measurements. From the DTA results, nucleation kinetics have been obtained by using Ozawa, Augis-Bennett, Takher and Kissinger equations. Also activation energies and Avrami parameters have been found. Oxidation amount is seen to be increased with increasing Ru concentration in consequence of thermogravimetric analyses results. Moreover, Lattice parameters, volume fractions and surface morphologies of the samples are obtained from XRD and SEM measurements, respectively.

  14. Unraveling the microscopic pathway of homogeneous water crystallization at supercooled conditions from direct simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Fausto; Palmer, Jeremy; Singh, Rakesh; Debenedetti, Pablo; Car, Roberto

    By means of unbiased classical molecular dynamics simulations, we identify the microscopic pathways of spontaneous homogeneous crystallization in supercooled ST2 water. By introducing a new order parameter, we are able to monitor formation/disruption of locally ordered regions characterized by small ice clusters with intermediate range order. When two of these regions are close each other, they percolate and form a larger ordered region. The process is slow enough to allow for polymorphic selection in favor of cubic ice (Ic). The formation of an ice nucleus requires percolation of many small clusters so that the transformations at the interface of the nucleus do not involve its core, thus guaranteeing the stability of the nucleus. The growth of the crystalline nucleus is fast and involves direct transformation of interfacial liquid molecules as well as percolation of small Ic/Ih clusters. The growth is too fast to allow conversion of Ih into Ic sites, originating the formation of a stacking fault in the final crystal. We recognize Euclidean structures in the oxygen configuration of the second shell in Ic and Ih clusters. This new point of view allows us to explain the source of the ordered stacking fault geometry.

  15. Nucleation Mechanism of 6H-SiC Polytype Inclusions Inside 15R-SiC Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Chen, H.; Choi, G.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Edgar, J.H.; Grasza, K.; Tymicki, E.; Su, D.; Zhu, Y.

    2010-06-01

    A model is presented for the nucleation mechanism of 6H-SiC polytype inclusions inside 15R-SiC boules. Inhomogeneous densities of screw dislocations lead to uneven growth rates, resulting in complex step overgrowth processes which can partially suppress the Burgers vector of a 15R 1c screw dislocation through the creation of Frank faults and Frank partial dislocations. Combined with stacking shifts induced by the passage of basal plane partial dislocations, it is shown that the partial Burgers vector suppression can leave behind a residual 6H 1c dislocation, which then acts as a nucleus for reproduction of 6H-SiC structure in the 15R-SiC crystal.

  16. Quantification of gypsum crystal nucleation, growth, and breakage rates in a wet flue gas desulfurization pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, B.B.; Kiil, S.; Johnsson, J.E.

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of nucleation, growth and breakage on the particle size distribution (PSD) of gypsum crystals produced by the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. The steady state PSD, obtained in a falling film wet FGD pilot plant during desulfurization of a 1000 ppm(V) SO{sub 2} gas stream, displayed a strong nonlinear behaviour (in a ln(n(l)) vs. I plot) at the lower end of the particle size range, compared to the well-known linear mixed suspension mixed product removal model. A transient population balance breakage model, fitted to experimental data, was able to model an increase in the fraction of small particles, but not to the extent observed experimentally. A three-parameter, size-dependent growth model, previously used for sodium sulphate decahydrate and potash alum, was able to describe the experimental data, indicating either size-dependent integration kinetics or growth rate dispersion.

  17. Nucleation and growth of epitaxial cadmium selenide electrodeposited on InP and GaAs single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Beaunier, L.; Cachet, H.; Froment, M.; Maurin, G.

    2000-05-01

    Epitaxial CdSe layers were electrodeposited from aqueous solutions onto InP and GaAs single crystals. The analysis of current transients shows that the growth kinetics corresponds to the Scharifker model assuming a progressive nucleation followed by three-dimensional diffusion-limited growth. Diffusion control is effective after less than 0.1 s after the beginning of the potential pulse. The phenomena associated with the formation of a coherent film cannot be detected by this technique. Transmission electron microscopy observations of CdSe films with increasing thicknesses show when the diffusion control is effective, a large density of growth steps followed by the formation of epitaxial nuclei which finally coalesce.

  18. Dynamic crystallization kinetics and nucleation parameters of a new generation of nanocomposites based on isotactic polypropylene and MoS2 inorganic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Naffakh, Mohammed; Remskar, Maja; Marco, Carlos; Gómez-Fatou, Marián A

    2011-03-31

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate the dynamic crystallization behavior and crystalline structure of novel nanocomposites based on isotactic polypropylene (iPP) and molybdenum disulfide inorganic nanotubes (INT-MoS(2)). The influence of the INT-MoS(2) content and different cooling rates on the crystallization behavior has been studied. The crystallization exothermic peak shifted to higher temperature, and the overall crystallization time was reduced by increasing the INT-MoS(2). The dynamic crystallization kinetics was analyzed using the Ozawa-Avrami method, which was successful in describing the dynamic crystallization behavior of these new nanocomposites. On the other hand, study of the nucleation activity using the Dobreva method revealed that the INT-MoS(2) had an efficient nucleation effect on the monoclinic crystal form of iPP. Moreover, this effect was corroborated by the results of the crystallization activation energy, calculated using Kissinger and Takhor methods, which also confirmed the fact that the addition of INT-MoS(2) made the molecular chains easier to crystallize and increased the crystallization rate of iPP.

  19. Quantitative Description of Crystal Nucleation and Growth from in Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ievlev, Anton V; Jesse, Stephen; Cochell, Thomas J; Unocic, Raymond R; Protopopescu, Vladimir A; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-12-22

    Recent advances in liquid cell (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (S)TEM has enabled in situ nanoscale investigations of controlled nanocrystal growth mechanisms. Here, we experimentally and quantitatively investigated the nucleation and growth mechanisms of Pt nanostructures from an aqueous solution of K2PtCl6. Averaged statistical, network, and local approaches have been used for the data analysis and the description of both collective particles dynamics and local growth features. In particular, interaction between neighboring particles has been revealed and attributed to reduction of the platinum concentration in the vicinity of the particle boundary. The local approach for solving the inverse problem showed that particles dynamics can be simulated by a stationary diffusional model. The obtained results are important for understanding nanocrystal formation and growth processes and for optimization of synthesis conditions.

  20. Asymmetric cold/warm rolling simulation by crystal plasticity multi-scale finite element analysis based on crystallographic homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Koshiro; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Hideo; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study is forming a high formability aluminum alloy sheet metal by controlling the microcrystal structure and the texture. So asymmetric rolling is applied to the material process. Analysis method is crystal plasticity multi-scale finite element analysis based on crystallographic homogenization.

  1. In situ X-ray studies of adlayer-induced crystal nucleation at the liquid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Elsen, Annika; Festersen, Sven; Runge, Benjamin; Koops, Christian T.; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Deutsch, Moshe; Seeck, Oliver H.; Murphy, Bridget M.; Magnussen, Olaf M.

    2013-05-29

    Crystal nucleation and growth at a liquid–liquid interface is studied on the atomic scale by in situ Å-resolution X-ray scattering methods for the case of liquid Hg and an electrochemical dilute electrolyte containing Pb2+, F-, and Br- ions. In the regime negative of the Pb amalgamation potential Φrp = -0.70 V, no change is observed from the surface-layered structure of pure Hg. Upon potential-induced release of Pb2+ from the Hg bulk at Graphic, the formation of an intriguing interface structure is observed, comprising a well-defined 7.6-Å–thick adlayer, decorated with structurally related 3D crystallites. Both are identified by their diffraction peaks as PbFBr, preferentially aligned with their Graphic axis along the interface normal. X-ray reflectivity shows the adlayer to consist of a stack of five ionic layers, forming a single-unit-cell–thick crystalline PbFBr precursor film, which acts as a template for the subsequent quasiepitaxial 3D crystal growth. This growth behavior is assigned to the combined action of electrostatic and short-range chemical interactions.

  2. Examining the role of fluctuations in the early stages of homogenous polymer crystallization with simulation and statistical learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a relationship between the dynamics in the amorphous and crystalline domains during polymer crystallization: the fluctuations of ordering-rate about a material-specific value in the amorphous phase drive those fluctuations associated with the increase in percent crystallinity. This suggests a differential equation that satisfies the three experimentally observed time regimes for the rate of crystal growth. To test this postulated expression, we applied a suite of statistical learning tools to molecular dynamics simulations to extract the relevant phenomenology. This study shows that the proposed relationship holds in the early time regime. It illustrates the effectiveness of soft computing tools in the analysis of coarse-grained simulations in which patterns exist, but may not easily yield to strict quantitative evaluation. This ability assists us in characterizing the critical early time molecular arrangement during the primary nucleation phase of polymer melt crystallization. In addition to supporting the validity of the proposed kinetics expression, the simulations show that (i) the classical nucleation and growth mechanism is active in the early stages of ordering; (ii) the number of nuclei and their masses grow linearly during this early time regime; and (iii) a fixed inter-nuclei distance is established.

  3. Disclination lines at homogeneous and heterogeneous colloids immersed in a chiral liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Melle, Michael; Schlotthauer, Sergej; Hall, Carol K; Diaz-Herrera, Enrique; Schoen, Martin

    2014-08-14

    In the present work we perform Monte Carlo simulations in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble to study defect topologies formed in a cholesteric liquid crystal due to the presence of a spherical colloidal particle. Topological defects arise because of the competition between anchoring at the colloidal surface and the local director. We consider homogeneous colloids with either local homeotropic or planar anchoring to validate our model by comparison with earlier lattice Boltzmann studies. Furthermore, we perform simulations of a colloid in a twisted nematic cell and discuss the difference between induced and intrinsic chirality on the formation of topological defects. We present a simple geometrical argument capable of describing the complex three-dimensional topology of disclination lines evolving near the surface of the colloid. The presence of a Janus colloid in a cholesteric host fluid reveals a rich variety of defect structures. Using the Frank free energy we analyze these defects quantitatively indicating a preferred orientation of the Janus colloid relative to the cholesteric helix.

  4. High Compositional Homogeneity of CdTexSe1-x Crystals Grown by the Bridgman Method

    DOE PAGES

    Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; ...

    2015-02-03

    We obtained high-quality CdTexSe1-x (CdTeSe) crystals from ingots grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. The compositional uniformity of the ingots was evaluated by X-ray fluorescence at BNL’s National Synchrotron Light Source X27A beam line. The resulting compositional homogeneity was highly uniform throughout the ingot, and the effective segregation coefficient of Se was ~1.0. This uniformity offers potential opportunity to enhance the yield of the materials for both infrared substrate and radiation-detector applications, so greatly lowering the cost of production and also offering us the prospect to grow large-diameter ingots for use as large-area substrates and for producing higher efficiency gamma-raymore » detectors. The concentration of secondary phases was found to be much lower, by eight- to ten fold compared to that of conventional CdxZn1-xTe (CdZnTe or CZT).« less

  5. Supersaturation, nucleation, and crystal growth during single- and biphasic dissolution of amorphous solid dispersions: polymer effects and implications for oral bioavailability enhancement of poorly water soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ashish L; Wang, Peng; Obara, Sakae; Worthen, David R

    2014-04-01

    The influence of polymers on the dissolution, supersaturation, crystallization, and partitioning of poorly water soluble compounds in biphasic media was evaluated. Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) containing felodipine (FLD) and itraconazole (ITZ) were prepared by hot melt mixing (HMM) using various polymers. The ASDs were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and HPLC. Amorphous drug conversion was confirmed using DSC and PXRD, and drug stability by HPLC. Single- and biphasic dissolution studies of the ASDs with concurrent dynamic light scattering (DLS) and polarized light microscopic (PLM) analysis of precipitated drugs were performed. HPLC revealed no HMM-induced drug degradation. Maximum partitioning into the organic phase was dependent upon the degree of supersaturation. Although the highest supersaturation of FLD was attained using Eudragit® EPO and AQOAT® AS-LF with better nucleation and crystal growth inhibition using the latter, higher partitioning of the drug into the organic phase was achieved using Pharmacoat® 603 and Kollidon® VA-64 by maintaining supersaturation below critical nucleation. Critical supersaturation for ITZ was surpassed using all of the polymers, and partitioning was dependent upon nucleation and crystal growth inhibition in the order of Pharmacoat® 603>Eudragit® L-100-55>AQOAT® AS-LF. HMM drug-polymer systems that prevent drug nucleation by staying below critical supersaturation are more effective for partitioning than those that achieve the highest supersaturation.

  6. Patterns of Expression in the Matrix Proteins Responsible for Nucleation and Growth of Aragonite Crystals in Flat Pearls of Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liang; Su, Jingtan; Zheng, Guilan; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2013-01-01

    The initial growth of the nacreous layer is crucial for comprehending the formation of nacreous aragonite. A flat pearl method in the presence of the inner-shell film was conducted to evaluate the role of matrix proteins in the initial stages of nacre biomineralization in vivo. We examined the crystals deposited on a substrate and the expression patterns of the matrix proteins in the mantle facing the substrate. In this study, the aragonite crystals nucleated on the surface at 5 days in the inner-shell film system. In the film-free system, the calcite crystals nucleated at 5 days, a new organic film covered the calcite, and the aragonite nucleated at 10 days. This meant that the nacre lamellae appeared in the inner-shell film system 5 days earlier than that in the film-free system, timing that was consistent with the maximum level of matrix proteins during the first 20 days. In addition, matrix proteins (Nacrein, MSI60, N19, N16 and Pif80) had similar expression patterns in controlling the sequential morphologies of the nacre growth in the inner-film system, while these proteins in the film-free system also had similar patterns of expression. These results suggest that matrix proteins regulate aragonite nucleation and growth with the inner-shell film in vivo. PMID:23776687

  7. Elements in Nucleating Crystals (Mineraloids?) on Fibers: Are Fumaroles Unknown Resources for a Future Hydrogen Economy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenholzner, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Crabtree et al. (2004) summarized some key aspects of H2 production and H storage. Elements in compounds necessary for natural H2 production are Mn in MnO (photosynthesis) and Fe in Fe clusters (bacteria). Relevant elements for H2 production and H storage in compounds known from fumarole emissions and/or volcanic ash leachates are: Mn, Fe, Ti, Mg, B, N, Al, Ni, La, K, Na. H2 and H_ {2}S are common species of many fumaroles. If H2S is pumped through steel tubes Fe sulfides are forming and H2 is released. In the past several estimations of global volcanic metal fluxes to the atmosphere had been published. No attempt had been made to mine volcanic gases for certain elements. Filter experiments performed at a fumarole at La Fossa volcano, Vulcano Island, Italy and subsequent FESEM/EDS analysis document some phenomena difficult to explain. 1. On an Al-P-O ceramic filter applied for 5 mins. at a filter-2-bubblers system (0.8 - 1 l/min) once Hg-S-rich particles got collected, at another time Ce-La-carbonate particles. Other filters (borosilicate glass fiber and/or Nuclepore or Millipore (0.2 micrometers) applied for 1 h before or after the ceramic filters did not collect these particles. It remains unanswered if problems related to adhesion caused these results, or the ceramic filter had been in place at times of particle ``bursts", or classical physics cannot explain such phenomena. 2. Particles are nucleating on glass and organic fibers. One set of experiments followed a traditional aerosol particle collection approach utilizing a filter-2-bubblers system (AC). Another experiment had been the clogging of a fumarole vent by various glass fiber materials (CE). FESEM/EDS data from AC and CE show both nucleating particles on fibers. One data set of the AC and CE documents that one type of particle (CE: mostly metal chlorides, to a minor amount metal sulfides and AC: barberiite) nucleates on one fiber, whereas other fibers are empty. This single fiber anomaly had been

  8. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  9. Nucleation kinetics, growth and characterization of dLAP, dLAP:KF and dLAP:NaN 3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, A. S. Haja; Ravi, G.; Jayavel, R.; Ramasamy, P.

    2003-03-01

    The nucleation parameters, such as interfacial tension, radius of the critical nucleus and critical free energy change have been estimated for deuterated L-arginine phosphate (dLAP), potassium fluoride mixed dLAP and sodium azide mixed dLAP single crystals. Pure and additive mixed dLAP single crystals are grown by slow cooling technique. The effect of microbial contamination and colouration on the growth solutions has been studied. The crystalline powder of the grown crystals has been examined by X-ray diffraction and thermal analyses in order to estimate the lattice parameters and study thermal properties respectively.

  10. Seismic properties of magmatic processes at laboratory scale: Effects of crystallization and bubble nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, Barbara; Cordonnier, Benoit; Ulmer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Seismic tomography of potentially hazardous volcanoes is a prime tool to assess the dimensions of magmatic reservoirs and possible magmatic ascent. Magma rheology and volcanic eruptive style are to a first order controlled by processes occurring in the conduit or in the chamber, such as crystallization and bubble exsolution. Seismic velocities are strongly affected by these processes (Carrichi et al, 2009) but the only few constrained measurements don't allow yet to establish a link between seismic tomography and the textural state of the volcanic system. Elastic parameters of vapor-saturated, partially molten systems are thus providing fundamental information for the identification of such reservoirs under active and seemingly dormant volcanoes. We investigated a chemically simplified melt analogous to andesite and trachyte, in the system CaO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-CO2 (Picard et al, 2011), which undergoes plagioclase crystallization and bubble exsolution. Using a Paterson-type internally-heated gas pressure apparatus, we measured the ultrasonic velocities at a constant pressure of 250 MPa and at a frequency of 0.1 MHz. Samples have been first heated at 850 °C for 30 minutes. Subsequently, the temperature has been decreased to 650 °C at a rate of 0.5 or 0.1 °C/min and velocities were recorded every 45 minutes. In order to characterize the microstructure evolution, series of cold-seal experiments at identical pressure conditions but with rapid-quenching at each of the recorded temperatures have been undertaken. We will present new experimental results that clarify the dependence of the seismic velocities on the evolution of microstructures (bubble and crystal-size distribution) as well as the evolution of composition (melt and crystals). REFERENCES Caricchi, L., Burlini, L., and Ulmer, P. (2009) Propagation of P and S-waves in magmas with different crystal contents: insights into the crystallinity of magmatic reservoirs. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal

  11. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to an ordered-solid/disordered-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the ordered-crystal/disordered-crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, arrests giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favors crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures. [4pt] In collaboration with Chantal Valeriani, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands and SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, JCMB King's Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK; Teun Vissers, Andrea Fortini, Mirjam E. Leunissen, and Alfons van Blaaderen, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University; Daan Frenke, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW, Cambridge, UK; and Marjolein Dijkstra, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University.

  12. Crystallization of Solids in the Presence of Anisotropic Growth Rates and Gaussian Nucleation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokovic, Kimberly; Bill, Andreas; Bergmann, Ralf

    2010-10-01

    The grain size distribution allows characterizing quantitatively the microstructure of an amorphous solid at different stages of crystallization. We review the theory developed recently for the grain size distribution (GSD) [1] and present two extensions of the model. In the first generalization, we replace the isotropic growth rate by an anisotropic rate that leads to the formation of ellipsoidal grains. Different anisotropic growth mechanisms are considered. We obtain an analytical expression for the GSD when the growth rate leads to a change of volume leaving the shape of grains invariant [2]. In the second generalization, we study how the GSD is affected by replacing the Dirac-type source term of nuclei by a more physical Gaussian-type source. We use that model to analyze the GSD at early stages of crystallization.[4pt] [1] A.V.Teran, R.B.Bergmann and A.Bill, Phys. Rev. B 81, 075319 (2010).[0pt] [2] K.S.Lokovic, R.B.Bergmann and A.Bill, Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 1245, A16-07 (2010).

  13. Bax crystal structures reveal how BH3 domains activate Bax and nucleate its oligomerization to induce apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Czabotar, Peter E; Westphal, Dana; Dewson, Grant; Ma, Stephen; Hockings, Colin; Fairlie, W Douglas; Lee, Erinna F; Yao, Shenggen; Robin, Adeline Y; Smith, Brian J; Huang, David C S; Kluck, Ruth M; Adams, Jerry M; Colman, Peter M

    2013-01-31

    In stressed cells, apoptosis ensues when Bcl-2 family members Bax or Bak oligomerize and permeabilize the mitochondrial outer membrane. Certain BH3-only relatives can directly activate them to mediate this pivotal, poorly understood step. To clarify the conformational changes that induce Bax oligomerization, we determined crystal structures of BaxΔC21 treated with detergents and BH3 peptides. The peptides bound the Bax canonical surface groove but, unlike their complexes with prosurvival relatives, dissociated Bax into two domains. The structures define the sequence signature of activator BH3 domains and reveal how they can activate Bax via its groove by favoring release of its BH3 domain. Furthermore, Bax helices α2-α5 alone adopted a symmetric homodimer structure, supporting the proposal that two Bax molecules insert their BH3 domain into each other's surface groove to nucleate oligomerization. A planar lipophilic surface on this homodimer may engage the membrane. Our results thus define critical Bax transitions toward apoptosis.

  14. Photophysical Analysis of the Formation of Organic–Inorganic Trihalide Perovskite Films: Identification and Characterization of Crystal Nucleation and Growth

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the different processes occurring during hybrid organic–inorganic lead iodide perovskite film formation can be identified and analyzed by a combined in situ analysis of their photophysical and structural properties. Our observations indicate that this approach permits unambiguously identifying the crystal nucleation and growth regimes that lead to the final material having a cubic crystallographic phase, which stabilizes to the well-known tetragonal phase upon cooling to room temperature. Strong correlation between the dynamic and static photoemission results and the temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction data allows us to provide a description and to establish an approximate time scale for each one of the stages and their evolution. The combined characterization approach herein explored yields key information about the kinetics of the process, such as the link between the evolution of the defect density during film formation, revealed by a fluctuating photoluminescence quantum yield, and the gradual changes observed in the PbI2-related precursor structure. PMID:26949439

  15. Photophysical Analysis of the Formation of Organic-Inorganic Trihalide Perovskite Films: Identification and Characterization of Crystal Nucleation and Growth.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Miguel; Galisteo-López, Juan F; Calvo, Mauricio E; López, Cefe; Míguez, Hernán

    2016-02-11

    In this work we demonstrate that the different processes occurring during hybrid organic-inorganic lead iodide perovskite film formation can be identified and analyzed by a combined in situ analysis of their photophysical and structural properties. Our observations indicate that this approach permits unambiguously identifying the crystal nucleation and growth regimes that lead to the final material having a cubic crystallographic phase, which stabilizes to the well-known tetragonal phase upon cooling to room temperature. Strong correlation between the dynamic and static photoemission results and the temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction data allows us to provide a description and to establish an approximate time scale for each one of the stages and their evolution. The combined characterization approach herein explored yields key information about the kinetics of the process, such as the link between the evolution of the defect density during film formation, revealed by a fluctuating photoluminescence quantum yield, and the gradual changes observed in the PbI2-related precursor structure.

  16. Polymorphic phase transition among the titania crystal structures using a solution-based approach: from precursor chemistry to nucleation process.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Girish; Rao, K S R Koteswara

    2014-10-21

    Nanocrystalline titania are a robust candidate for various functional applications owing to its non-toxicity, cheap availability, ease of preparation and exceptional photochemical as well as thermal stability. The uniqueness in each lattice structure of titania leads to multifaceted physico-chemical and opto-electronic properties, which yield different functionalities and thus influence their performances in various green energy applications. The high temperature treatment for crystallizing titania triggers inevitable particle growth and the destruction of delicate nanostructural features. Thus, the preparation of crystalline titania with tunable phase/particle size/morphology at low to moderate temperatures using a solution-based approach has paved the way for further exciting areas of research. In this focused review, titania synthesis from hydrothermal/solvothermal method, conventional sol-gel method and sol-gel-assisted method via ultrasonication, photoillumination and ILs, thermolysis and microemulsion routes are discussed. These wet chemical methods have broader visibility, since multiple reaction parameters, such as precursor chemistry, surfactants, chelating agents, solvents, mineralizer, pH of the solution, aging time, reaction temperature/time, inorganic electrolytes, can be easily manipulated to tune the final physical structure. This review sheds light on the stabilization/phase transformation pathways of titania polymorphs like anatase, rutile, brookite and TiO2(B) under a variety of reaction conditions. The driving force for crystallization arising from complex species in solution coupled with pH of the solution and ion species facilitating the orientation of octahedral resulting in a crystalline phase are reviewed in detail. In addition to titanium halide/alkoxide, the nucleation of titania from other precursors like peroxo and layered titanates are also discussed. The non-aqueous route and ball milling-induced titania transformation is briefly

  17. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  18. Main features of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.; Punin, Yu. O.

    2015-05-01

    The regularities of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity have been investigated, and the induction order and constants have been determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is shown that an increase in the initial supersaturation leads to a transition from the heterogeneous nucleation of crystallites to a homogeneous one. Some additives are found to enhance nucleation: HCO{3/-} > C6H12O6 > F-, while others hinder this process: protein (casein) > Mg2+. It is established that crystallization in DPF occurs more rapidly and the DPF composition is favorable for the growth of small (52.6-26.1 μm) crystallites. On the contrary, the conditions implemented in the model saliva solution facilitate the formation of larger (198.4-41.8 μm) crystals.

  19. Overview: Understanding nucleation phenomena from simulations of lattice gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in Ising/lattice gas models are reviewed with an emphasis on the general insight gained on the mechanisms by which metastable states decay. Attention is paid to the proper distinction of particles that belong to a cluster (droplet), that may trigger a nucleation event, from particles in its environment, a problem crucial near the critical point. Well below the critical point, the lattice structure causes an anisotropy of the interface tension, and hence nonspherical droplet shapes result, making the treatment nontrivial even within the conventional classical theory of homogeneous nucleation. For temperatures below the roughening transition temperature facetted crystals rather than spherical droplets result. The possibility to find nucleation barriers from a thermodynamic analysis avoiding a cluster identification on the particle level is discussed, as well as the question of curvature corrections to the interfacial tension. For the interpretation of heterogeneous nucleation at planar walls, knowledge of contact angles and line tensions is desirable, and methods to extract these quantities from simulations will be mentioned. Finally, also the problem of nucleation near the stability limit of metastable states and the significance of the spinodal curve will be discussed, in the light of simulations of Ising models with medium range interactions.

  20. Influence of Nucleation Mechanisms on the Radiative Properties of Deep Convective Clouds and Subvisible Cirrus in CRYSTAL/FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    2005-01-01

    their data can be fit using standard Langmuir isotherms as suggested in some, but not all, laboratory studies. We have found in the SOLVE data set that this is not the case. Moreover some laboratory studies show there are important kinetic effects that may be occurring in the atmosphere limiting the transfer of nitric acid to the ice. The SOLVE data seem consistent with these studies. We are currently re-analyzing the CRYSTAL data to look for these kinetic effects. There are a number of implications of these studies. One of the more interesting is that the nitric acid coating on ice can be used as a cloud clock to determine how long the cloud parcel has been in existence. We have also been involved with several laboratory studies. We have worked to improve the database on ice optical constants, which are critical for remote sensing. We have also studied the ways in which ice nucleates on clays. We suspect now that the standard theories used for depositional ice nucleation are completely incorrect. Further work will be needed to develop a new theory.

  1. An Atomistic-to-Continuum Framework for Nonlinear Crystal Mechanics Based on Asymptotic Homogenization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    circumstances, however, some of these may reduce to the identity map. Possible scenarios are summarized below: Elastoplasticity with defects : F ¼ FLFP ¼ F...F, Homogeneous elastoplasticity : F ¼ FLFP ¼ F, Elasticity with defects : F ¼ FL ¼ F ~F, Homogeneous elasticity : F ¼ FL ¼ F. ð33Þ In Eq. (33... elastoplasticity with defects’’ is the most general case, for example a crystalline volume element that has sustained dislocation flux during its

  2. Nucleation and growth kinetics of biochemicals measured at high supersaturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Amarjit J.; Kirwan, Donald J.

    1994-12-01

    A grid mixer device (characteristic micromixing time < 3 ms) was successfully used to measure both nucleation and growth kinetics of lovastatin in 60 vol% methanol and asparagine monohydrate in 50 vol% 2-propanol at 23°C at high supersaturations but in the absence of mixing limitations. The supersaturation ratios investigated were in the range 1.25-8.8 for the lovastatin system and 1.17-4.1 for the asparagine system. When plotted according to primary nucleation theory, the induction time and nucleation rate measurements for both systems exhibited a homogeneous nucleation region at high supersaturations and a heterogeneous nucleation region at low supersaturations. The values of interfacial free energy extracted from these measurements for lovastatin (1.4-1.6 mJ/m 2) and asparagine (4.5-6.1 mJ/m 2) were an order-of-magnitude lower than those for inorganic salts reflecting the weaker intermolecular bonding in such biochemical solutes. The measured crystal growth rates for both solutes over the entire range of supersaturation could be represented with a power law dependence on chemical potential driving force. The kinetic orders of crystal growth were found to be 6.7 and 2.9 for lovastatin and asparagine, respectively. These unusually high kinetic orders could be represented by a polynuclear surface nucleation growth mechanism. The activation energy for the growth of lovastatin was measured as 280 kJ/mol.

  3. Modulation of crystal formation by bone phosphoproteins: role of glutamic acid-rich sequences in the nucleation of hydroxyapatite by bone sialoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, G K; Goldberg, H A

    1994-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a bone-specific glycoprotein containing phosphoserine and sulphotyrosine residues and regions of contiguous glutamic acid residues. Recent studies in this laboratory have shown that BSP is capable of nucleating the bone mineral hydroxyapatite in a steady-state agarose gel system. We show here that chemical modification of carboxylate groups abolishes the nucleation activity of BSP, but enzymic dephosphorylation has no effect. Formation of hydroxyapatite is also induced by poly(L-glutamic acid) and poly(D-glutamic acid), but not by poly(L-aspartic acid) or poly(L-lysine). Calreticulin, a muscle protein with short sequences of contiguous glutamic acid residues, also lacks nucleation activity. These findings suggest that the nucleation of hydroxyapatite by BSP involves one or both of the glutamic acid-rich sequences. Based on these findings and others, we propose that polycarboxylate sequences represent a general site for growth-modulating interactions between proteins and biological crystals. Images Figure 3 PMID:7915111

  4. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: I. Transitions in the one-phase liquid region.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    The phase field theory (PFT) has been applied to predict equilibrium interfacial properties and nucleation barrier in the binary eutectic system Ag-Cu using double well and interpolation functions deduced from a Ginzburg-Landau expansion that considers fcc (face centered cubic) crystal symmetries. The temperature and composition dependent free energies of the liquid and solid phases are taken from CALculation of PHAse Diagrams-type calculations. The model parameters of PFT are fixed so as to recover an interface thickness of approximately 1 nm from molecular dynamics simulations and the interfacial free energies from the experimental dihedral angles available for the pure components. A nontrivial temperature and composition dependence for the equilibrium interfacial free energy is observed. Mapping the possible nucleation pathways, we find that the Ag and Cu rich critical fluctuations compete against each other in the neighborhood of the eutectic composition. The Tolman length is positive and shows a maximum as a function of undercooling. The PFT predictions for the critical undercooling are found to be consistent with experimental results. These results support the view that heterogeneous nucleation took place in the undercooling experiments available at present. We also present calculations using the classical droplet model [classical nucleation theory (CNT)] and a phenomenological diffuse interface theory (DIT). While the predictions of the CNT with a purely entropic interfacial free energy underestimate the critical undercooling, the DIT results appear to be in a reasonable agreement with the PFT predictions.

  5. Impact of heterogeneous ice nuclei on homogeneous freezing events in cirrus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Spichtinger, Peter; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2010-07-29

    The influence of initial heterogeneous nucleation on subsequent homogeneous nucleation events in cirrus clouds is investigated using a box model which includes the explicit impact of aerosols on the nucleation of ice crystals and sedimentation. Different effects are discussed, namely the impact of external mixtures of heterogeneous ice nuclei and the influence of size-dependent freezing thresholds. Several idealized experiments are carried out, which show that the treatment of external mixtures of ice nuclei can strongly change later homogeneous nucleation events (i.e., the ice crystal number densities) in different matters. The use of size-dependent freezing thresholds can also change the cloud prop erties when compared to more simple parameterizations. This size effect is most important for large IN concentrations. Based upon these findings, recommendations for future modeling and measurement efforts are presented.

  6. Unique nucleation activity of inorganic fullerene-like WS2 nanoparticles in polyphenylene sulfide nanocomposites: isokinetic and isoconversional study of dynamic crystallization kinetics.

    PubMed

    Naffakh, Mohammed; Marco, Carlos; Gómez, Marián A; Jiménez, Ignacio

    2009-05-21

    The dynamic crystallization kinetics of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) nanocomposites with inorganic fullerene WS2 nanopartices (IF-WS2) content varying from 0.05 to 8 wt % has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The analysis of the crystallization at different cooling rates demonstrates that the completely isokinetic description of the crystallization process is not possible. However, the isoconversional methods in combination with the JMAEK equation provide a better understanding of the kinetics of the dynamic crystallization process. The addition of IF-WS2 influences the crystallization kinetics of PPS but in ways unexpected for polymer nanocomposites. A drastic change from retardation to promotion of crystallization is observed with increasing nanoparticle content. In the same way, the results of the nucleation activity and the effective energy barrier confirmed the unique dependence of the crystallization behavior of PPS on composition. In addition, the morphological data obtained from the polarized optical microscopy (POM) and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction is consistent with results of the crystallization kinetics of PPS/IF-WS2 nanocomposites.

  7. A detailed study of ice nucleation by feldspar minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, T. F.; Murray, B. J.; Wilson, T. W.; Carpenter, M. A.; Harrison, A.; Holden, M. A.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Morris, J.; O'Sullivan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Immersion mode heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a crucial role in controlling the composition of mixed phase clouds, which contain both supercooled liquid water and ice particles. The amount of ice in mixed phase clouds can affect cloud particle size, lifetime and extent and so affects radiative properties and precipitation. Feldspar minerals are probably the most important minerals for ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds because they nucleate ice more efficiently than other components of atmospheric mineral dust (Atkinson et al. 2013). The feldspar class of minerals is complex, containing numerous chemical compositions, several crystal polymorphs and wide variations in microscopic structure. Here we present the results of a study into ice nucleation by a wide range of different feldspars. We found that, in general, alkali feldspars nucleate ice more efficiently than plagioclase feldspars. However, we also found that particular alkali feldspars nucleate ice relatively inefficiently, suggesting that chemical composition is not the only important factor that dictates the ice nucleation efficiency of feldspar minerals. Ice nucleation by feldspar is described well by the singular model and is probably site specific in nature. The alkali feldspars that do not nucleate ice efficiently possess relatively homogenous structure on the micrometre scale suggesting that the important sites for nucleation are related to surface topography. Ice nucleation active site densities for the majority of tested alkali feldspars are similar to those found by Atkinson et al (2013), meaning that the validity of global aerosol modelling conducted in that study is not affected. Additionally, we have found that ice nucleation by feldspars is strongly influenced, both positively and negatively, by the solute content of droplets. Most other nucleants we have tested are unaffected by solutes. This provides insight into the mechanism of ice nucleation by feldspars and could be of importance

  8. Two-dimensional thermoluminescence method for checking LiF crystals homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Gieszczyk, W.; Kłosowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL), being one of the common luminescence methods, is very sensitive to the presence of any impurities in the material structure and can be used for the detection of impurity distribution in the bulk of the crystal. If in a TL reader a CCD camera is used, a measurement of TL signal would give us an unique two-dimensional (2-D) imaging of TL signal distribution, and thereby the distribution of dopants. The possibility of the application of 2-D TL method for the control of uniformity of the crystal related to dopant distribution in the volume of the bulk crystal was tested on the large area samples of LiF doped and un-doped crystals grown by Czochralski method at the IFJ PAN in Kraków. The special TL reader with a CCD camera was used for analyzing of luminescence emitting during the heating of the irradiated in uniform radiation field slices of crystals cut longitudinal and perpendicular to the growth axis and for analyzing of the shape of TL glow curves for selected crystal areas. Non-uniform distribution of the dopants was demonstrated for doped crystal grown with relatively slow growth rate.

  9. Fabrication of tensile-strained single-crystalline GeSn on transparent substrate by nucleation-controlled liquid-phase crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hiroshi; Amamoto, Takashi; Koyama, Masahiro; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeru; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2017-01-01

    We developed a method of forming single-crystalline germanium-tin (GeSn) alloy on transparent substrates that is based on liquid-phase crystallization. By controlling and designing nucleation during the melting growth process, a highly tensile-strained single-crystalline GeSn layer was grown on a quartz substrate without using any crystal-seeds or catalysts. The peak field-effect hole mobility of 423 cm2/V s was obtained for a top-gate single-crystalline GeSn MOSFET on a quartz substrate with a Sn content of 2.6%, indicating excellent crystal quality and mobility enhancement due to Sn incorporation and tensile strain.

  10. Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate from a homogeneous precursor solution in the presence of partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Takashi; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-04-01

    Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was demonstrated by the photodecarboxylation of ketoprofen (KP, 2-(3-benzoylphenyl)propionic acid) under alkaline conditions (pH 10). In this method, a homogeneous solution comprising KP, calcium chloride, ammonia, and partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAPS, degree of saponification: 86.5-89.0 mol %) was used as the precursor solution and was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for different time periods. Thermogravimetric analysis of the obtained xerogels showed that increasing the UV irradiation time increased the amount of CaCO3 formed and the complete conversion of calcium ions to calcite was achieved after 50 min of UV irradiation. Furthermore, solid phase analyses suggested that nanometer-to-micron-sized calcite crystals were formed and dispersed in the obtained PVAPS matrix.

  11. Evidence for a liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water within the E3B3 model and a possible interpretation of the kink in the homogeneous nucleation line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yicun; Skinner, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Supercooled water exhibits many thermodynamic anomalies, and several scenarios have been proposed to interpret them, among which the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) hypothesis is the most commonly discussed. We investigated Widom lines and the LLCP of deeply supercooled water, by using molecular dynamics simulation with a newly reparameterized water model that explicitly includes three-body interactions. Seven isobars are studied from ambient pressure to 2.5 kbar, and Widom lines are identified by calculating maxima in the coefficient of thermal expansion and the isothermal compressibility (both with respect to temperature). From these data we estimate that the LLCP of the new water model is at 180 K and 2.1 kbar. The oxygen radial distribution function is calculated along the 2 kbar isobar. It shows a steep change in the height of its second peak between 180 and 185 K, which indicates a transition between the high-density liquid and low-density liquid phases and which is consistent with the ascribed location of the critical point. The good agreement of the height of the second peak of the radial distribution function between simulation and experiment at 1 bar, as a function of temperature, supports the validity of the model. The location of the LLCP within the model is close to the kink in the experimental homogeneous nucleation line. We use existing experimental data to argue that the experimental LLCP is at 168 K and 1.95 kbar and speculate how this LLCP and its Widom line might be responsible for the kink in the homogeneous nucleation line.

  12. Evidence for a liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water within the E3B3 model and a possible interpretation of the kink in the homogeneous nucleation line.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yicun; Skinner, J L

    2016-06-07

    Supercooled water exhibits many thermodynamic anomalies, and several scenarios have been proposed to interpret them, among which the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) hypothesis is the most commonly discussed. We investigated Widom lines and the LLCP of deeply supercooled water, by using molecular dynamics simulation with a newly reparameterized water model that explicitly includes three-body interactions. Seven isobars are studied from ambient pressure to 2.5 kbar, and Widom lines are identified by calculating maxima in the coefficient of thermal expansion and the isothermal compressibility (both with respect to temperature). From these data we estimate that the LLCP of the new water model is at 180 K and 2.1 kbar. The oxygen radial distribution function is calculated along the 2 kbar isobar. It shows a steep change in the height of its second peak between 180 and 185 K, which indicates a transition between the high-density liquid and low-density liquid phases and which is consistent with the ascribed location of the critical point. The good agreement of the height of the second peak of the radial distribution function between simulation and experiment at 1 bar, as a function of temperature, supports the validity of the model. The location of the LLCP within the model is close to the kink in the experimental homogeneous nucleation line. We use existing experimental data to argue that the experimental LLCP is at 168 K and 1.95 kbar and speculate how this LLCP and its Widom line might be responsible for the kink in the homogeneous nucleation line.

  13. Composition and (in)homogeneity of carotenoid crystals in carrot cells revealed by high resolution Raman imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Maciej; Marzec, Katarzyna M.; Grzebelus, Ewa; Simon, Philipp W.; Baranska, Malgorzata; Baranski, Rafal

    2015-02-01

    Three categories of roots differing in both β/α-carotene ratio and in total carotenoid content were selected based on HPLC measurements: high α- and β-carotene (HαHβ), low α- and high β-carotene (LαHβ), and low α- and low β-carotene (LαLβ). Single carotenoid crystals present in the root cells were directly measured using high resolution Raman imaging technique with 532 nm and 488 nm lasers without compound extraction. Crystals of the HαHβ root had complex composition and consisted of β-carotene accompanied by α-carotene. In the LαHβ and LαLβ roots, measurements using 532 nm laser indicated the presence of β-carotene only, but measurements using 488 nm laser confirmed co-occurrence of xanthophylls, presumably lutein. Thus the results show that independently on carotenoid composition in the root, carotenoid crystals are composed of more than one compound. Individual spectra extracted from Raman maps every 0.2-1.0 μm had similar shapes in the 1500-1550 cm-1 region indicating that different carotenoid molecules were homogeneously distributed in the whole crystal volume. Additionally, amorphous carotenoids were identified and determined as composed of β-carotene molecules but they had a shifted the ν1 band probably due to the effect of bonding of other plant constituents like proteins or lipids.

  14. Nucleation in food colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povey, Malcolm J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation in food colloids has been studied in detail using ultrasound spectroscopy. Our data show that classical nucleation theory (CNT) remains a sound basis from which to understand nucleation in food colloids and analogous model systems using n-alkanes. Various interpretations and modifications of CNT are discussed with regard to their relevance to food colloids. Much of the evidence presented is based on the ultrasound velocity spectrometry measurements which has many advantages for the study of nucleating systems compared to light scattering and NMR due to its sensitivity at low solid contents and its ability to measure true solid contents in the nucleation and early crystal growth stages. Ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy also responds to critical fluctuations in the induction region. We show, however, that a periodic pressure fluctuation such as a quasi-continuous (as opposed to a pulse comprising only a few pressure cycles) ultrasound field can alter the nucleation process, even at very low acoustic intensity. Thus care must be taken when using ultrasound techniques that the measurements do not alter the studied processes. Quasi-continuous ultrasound fields may enhance or suppress nucleation and the criteria to determine such effects are derived. The conclusions of this paper are relevant to colloidal systems in foods, pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals, cosmetics, and personal products.

  15. The effective second-order elastic constants of a strained crystal using the elastic wave propagation in a homogeneously deformed material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. Ramji; Padmaja, A.

    1988-06-01

    The equation for elastic wave propagation in a homogeneously deformed crystal has been used to obtain the expressions for the effective second-order elastic constants of the seven crystal systems in terms of their natural second- and third-order elastic constants. These expressions are employed to obtain the pressure derivatives of the effective second-order elastic constants of some cubic crystals for which experimental data are available.

  16. Analysis of plasmons and homogenization in a flat-layered photonic crystals and hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovich, Mikhael V.

    2016-04-01

    The dispersion equation and the analysis and homogenization in periodic and quasiperiodic plane layered structures with alternating dielectric layers of metal and dielectric layers, as well as a graphene sheet and SiO2 layers have been investigated. The cases are considered when these patterns become the properties of hyperbolic metamaterials, i.e., having different signs of the real parts of the tensor components of the effective dielectric constant. It is shown that usage only dielectric layers is perspective in reducing losses.

  17. Plasmon analysis and homogenization in plane layered photonic crystals and hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovich, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    Dispersion equations are obtained and analysis and homogenization are carried out in periodic and quasiperiodic plane layered structures consisting of alternating dielectric layers, metal and dielectric layers, as well as graphene sheets and dielectric (SiO2) layers. Situations are considered when these structures acquire the properties of hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs), i.e., materials the real parts of whose effective permittivity tensor have opposite signs. It is shown that the application of solely dielectric layers is more promising in the context of reducing losses.

  18. Unique airborne measurements at the tropopause of Fukushima Xe-133, aerosol, and aerosol precursors indicate aerosol formation via homogeneous and cosmic ray induced nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Hans; Arnold, Frank; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Minikin, Andreas; Baumann, Robert; Simgen, Hardy; Lindemann, Stefan; Rauch, Ludwig; Kaether, Frank; Pirjola, Liisa; Schumann, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    We report unique airborne measurements, at the tropopause, of the Fukushima radio nuclide Xe-133, aerosol particles (size, shape, number concentration, volatility), aerosol precursor gases (particularly SO2, HNO3, H2O). Our measurements and accompanying model simulations indicate homogeneous and cosmic ray induced aerosol formation at the tropopause. Using an extremely sensitive detection method, we managed to detect Fukushima Xe-133, an ideal transport tracer, at and even above the tropopause. To our knowledge, these airborne Xe-133 measurements are the only of their kind. Our investigations represent a striking example how a pioneering measurement of a Fukshima radio nuclide, employing an extremely sensitive method, can lead to new insights into an important atmospheric process. After the Fukushima accidential Xe-133 release (mostly during 11-15 March 2011), we have conducted two aircraft missions, which took place over Central Europe, on 23 March and 11 April 2011. In the air masses, encountered by the research aircraft on 23 March, we have detected Fukushima Xe-133 by an extremely sensitive method, at and even above the tropopause. Besides increased concentrations of Xe-133, we have detected also increased concentrations of the gases SO2, HNO3, and H2O. The Xe-133 data and accompanying transport model simulations indicate that a West-Pacific Warm Conveyor Belt (WCB) lifted East-Asian planetary boundary layer air to and even above the tropopause, followed by relatively fast quasi-horizontal advection to Europe. Along with Xe-133, anthropogenic SO2, NOx (mostly released from East-Asian ground-level combustion sources), and warer vapour were also lifted by the WCB. After the lift, SO2 and NOx experienced efficient solar UV-radiation driven conversion to the important aerosol precursors gases H2SO4 and HNO3. Our investigations indicate that, increased concentrations of the gases SO2, HNO3, and H2O promoted homogeneous and cosmic ray induced aerosol formation at and

  19. New Findings on Ice Nucleation in Mid-latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lawson, P.; Baker, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent GCM simulations (CESM1) show a global aerosol indirect effect of -1.39 W m-2 with -2.02 W m-2 from shortwave and +0.63 W m-2 from longwave cloud forcing, the longwave being due to homogeneous nucleation of ice crystals. However, the extent of homogeneous nucleation in ice clouds is poorly understood. This study uses results from a recent field campaign, SPARTICUS (Small PARTicles In CirrUS), to evaluate the impact of homogeneous nucleation on the ice particle size distribution (PSD) shape, as well as ice particle concentration, shape, PSD effective size and fall speed. While earlier measurements were difficult to evaluate for ice nucleation effects due to the problem of ice particle shattering, recent in-situ measurements using the 2 dimensional-stereo (2D-S) probe have greatly reduced this problem resulting in provocative findings for both synoptic and anvil cirrus sampled during SPARTICUS. For mid-latitude synoptic and anvil cirrus around -40°C, these new measurements show that clear changes in the ice PSD and its properties occur regarding (1) PSD shape, (2) total number concentration-to-ice water content ratio (N/IWC), (3) PSD mean size, (4) PSD mean area ratio and (5) the mass-weighted fall velocity (Vm). These changes are consistent with a change in ice nucleation mechanism, with heterogeneous nucleation processes active at temperatures warmer than -40°C and homogeneous freezing nucleation at temperatures colder than -40°C. The change in Vm implies that cirrus colder than -40°C will have longer lifetimes and greater cloud coverage than warmer cirrus clouds, all other relevant factors remaining equal. The increase in N/IWC with colder temperatures (T < -40°C) appears consistent with homogeneous nucleation theory. Figure 1 shows normalized frequency distribution of PSD area ratios for temperatures above and below -40°C. Area ratios (ice particle projected area/area of circle defined by particle maximum dimension) are a measure of ice particle shape

  20. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  1. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  2. Using Inorganic Crystals To Grow Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Mcpherson, Alexander A.

    1989-01-01

    Solid materials serve as nucleating agents. Protein crystals induced by heterogeneous nucleation and in some cases by epitaxy to grow at lower supersaturations than needed for spontaneous nucleation. Heterogeneous nucleation makes possible to grow large, defect-free single crystals of protein more readily. Such protein crystals benefits research in biochemistry and pharmacology.

  3. The Thermodynamics Of Calcite Nucleation On Organic Surfaces: Classical Vs. Non-Classical Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M.; Hu, Q.; Hamm, L. M.; Lee, J. R.; Becker, U.; Dove, P. M.; De Yoreo, J.

    2012-12-01

    Nucleation in the natural world often occurs at organic surfaces. During biomineralization, living organisms use macromolecular matrices to direct nucleation of a variety of inorganic materials by controlling the timing, polymorphism, morphology, and crystallographic orientation of mineral nuclei. In geochemical settings, mineral surfaces, which are often covered with organic layers or biofilms, surround the volume within which nucleation occurs. Despite the importance of nucleation phenomena in these natural settings, our understanding of the reaction dynamics and energetics of the process is limited. Issues such as the role of pre-nucleation clusters, formation of amorphous precursors, and polymorph selection during the initial stages of nucleation, as well as the structural relationships between the organic matrix and the emerging nucleus are poorly understood. Using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols as simple models for macromolecular matrices and organic films, we address the gaps in our understanding by employing a suite of in situ methods to investigate CaCO3 nucleation. From optical measurements of calcite nucleation rates on alkanethiol SAMs, we find that for two carboxyl-terminated alkanethiol SAMs with odd (mercaptoundecanoic acid) and even (mercaptohexadecanoic acid) carbon chains, the rate exhibits the supersaturation dependence expected from classical theory and the effective interfacial energy is reduced from about 109 mJ/m2 in bulk solution to 81 mJ/m2 and 72 mJ/m2, respectively. Theoretical analysis shows that the corresponding free energy barrier is reduced from 105kT for homogeneous nucleation in bulk solution to 27KT and 19kT, respectively. The results demonstrate that calcite nucleation on these carboxyl SAMs is described well in purely classical terms through a reduction in the thermodynamic barrier due to decreased interfacial free energy. In addition, although amorphous particles form prior to crystal nucleation on hydroxyl

  4. Closure between ice-nucleating particle and ice crystal number concentrations in ice clouds embedded in Saharan dust: Lidar observation during the BACCHUS Cyprus 2015 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert; Bühl, Johannes; Engelmann, Ronny; Baars, Holger; Nisantzi, Argyro; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos; Atkinson, James; Kanji, Zamin; Vrekoussis, Michalis; Sciare, Jean; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, we compare ice-nucleating particle number concentration (INPC) derived from polarization lidar (Mamouri and Ansmann, 2015) with ice crystal number concentrations (ICNC) in ice cloud layers embedded in the observed Saharan dust layers (at heights above 6 km and corresponding temperatures from -20 to -40°C). ICNC is estimated from the respective cirrus extinction profiles obtained with the same polarization lidar in combination with Doppler lidar measurements of the ice crystal sedimentation speed from which the mean size of the crystals can be estimated. Good agreement between INPC and ICNC was obtained for two case studies of the BACCHUS Cyprus 2015 field campaign with focus on INPC profiling. The campaign was organized by the Cyprus Institute, Nicosia, where a lidar was deployed. Additionaly, observations of AERONET and EALINET Lidar stations during the BACCHUS Cyprus 2015 field campaign, performed by Cyprus University of Technology in Limassol. Both, INPC and ICNC were found in the range from 10-50 1/L. Lidar-derived INPC values were also compared with in-situ INPC measurements (Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber, HINC, ETH Zurich, deployed at Agia Marina, at 500 m a.s.l., 30 km west of the lidar site). Reasonable and partly good agreement (during dust events) was found between the two retrievals. The findings of these closure studies corroborate the applicability of available INPC parameterization schemes (DeMott et al., 2010, 2015) implemented in the lidar retrieval scheme, and more generally INPC profiling by using active remote sensing (at ground and in space with CALIPSO and EarthCARE lidars).

  5. Photonic Crystal Enhancement of a Homogeneous Fluorescent Assay using Submicron Fluid Channels Fabricated by E-jet Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yafang; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the enhancement of a liquid-based homogenous fluorescence assay using the resonant electric fields from a photonic crystal (PC) surface. Because evanescent fields are confined to the liquid volume nearest to the photonic crystal, we developed a simple approach for integrating a PC fabricated on a silicon substrate within a fluid channel with submicron height, using electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing of a light-curable epoxy adhesive to define the fluid channel pattern. The PC is excited by a custom-designed compact instrument that illuminates the PC with collimated light that precisely matches the resonant coupling condition when the PC is covered with aqueous media. Using a molecular beacon nucleic acid fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) probe for a specific miRNA sequence, we demonstrate an 8x enhancement of the fluorescence emission signal, compared to performing the same assay without exciting resonance in the PC detecting a miRNA sequence at a concentration of 62nM from a liquid volume of only ~20 nl. The approach may be utilized for any liquid-based fluorescence assay for applications in point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, or pathogen detection. PMID:24376013

  6. Photonic crystal enhancement of a homogeneous fluorescent assay using submicron fluid channels fabricated by E-jet patterning.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafang; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate the enhancement of a liquid-based homogenous fluorescence assay using the resonant electric fields from a photonic crystal (PC) surface. Because evanescent fields are confined to the liquid volume nearest to the photonic crystal, we developed a simple approach for integrating a PC fabricated on a silicon substrate within a fluid channel with submicron height, using electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing of a light-curable epoxy adhesive to define the fluid channel pattern. The PC is excited by a custom-designed compact instrument that illuminates the PC with collimated light that precisely matches the resonant coupling condition when the PC is covered with aqueous media. Using a molecular beacon nucleic acid fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) probe for a specific miRNA sequence, we demonstrate an 8× enhancement of the fluorescence emission signal, compared to performing the same assay without exciting resonance in the PC detecting a miRNA sequence at a concentration of 62 nM from a liquid volume of only ∼20 nL. The approach may be utilized for any liquid-based fluorescence assay for applications in point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, or pathogen detection.

  7. Heterogeneous nucleation from a supercooled ionic liquid on a carbon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoxia; Shen, Yan; Hung, Francisco R.; Santiso, Erik E.

    2016-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the nucleation of the crystal phase of the ionic liquid [dmim+][Cl-] from its supercooled liquid phase, both in the bulk and in contact with a graphitic surface of D = 3 nm. By combining the string method in collective variables [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 024106 (2006)], with Markovian milestoning with Voronoi tessellations [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 2589-2594 (2009)] and order parameters for molecular crystals [Santiso and Trout, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064109 (2011)], we computed minimum free energy paths, the approximate size of the critical nucleus, the free energy barrier, and the rates involved in these nucleation processes. For homogeneous nucleation, the subcooled liquid phase has to overcome a free energy barrier of ˜85 kcal/mol to form a critical nucleus of size ˜3.6 nm, which then grows into the monoclinic crystal phase. This free energy barrier becomes about 42% smaller (˜49 kcal/mol) when the subcooled liquid phase is in contact with a graphitic disk, and the critical nucleus formed is about 17% smaller (˜3.0 nm) than the one observed for homogeneous nucleation. The crystal formed in the heterogeneous nucleation scenario has a structure that is similar to that of the bulk crystal, with the exception of the layers of ions next to the graphene surface, which have larger local density and the cations lie with their imidazolium rings parallel to the graphitic surface. The critical nucleus forms near the graphene surface separated only by these layers of ions. The heterogeneous nucleation rate (˜4.8 × 1011 cm-3 s-1) is about one order of magnitude faster than the homogeneous rate (˜6.6 × 1010 cm-3 s-1). The computed free energy barriers and nucleation rates are in reasonable agreement with experimental and simulation values obtained for the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of other systems (ice, urea, Lennard-Jones spheres, and oxide glasses).

  8. Effect of mixing, concentration and temperature on the formation of mesostructured solutions and their role in the nucleation of DL-valine crystals.

    PubMed

    Jawor-Baczynska, Anna; Moore, Barry D; Sefcik, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We report investigations on the formation of mesostructured solutions in DL-valine-water-2-propanol mixtures, and the crystallization of DL-valine from these solutions. Mesostructured liquid phases, similar to those previously observed in aqueous solutions of glycine and DL-alanine, were observed using Dynamic Light Scattering and Brownian microscopy, in both undersaturated and supersaturated solutions below a certain transition temperature. Careful experimentation was used to demonstrate that the optically clear mesostructured liquid phase, comprising colloidal mesoscale clusters dispersed within bulk solution, is thermodynamically stable and present in equilibrium with the solid phase at saturation conditions. Solutions prepared by slow cooling contained mesoscale clusters with a narrow size distribution and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of around 200 nm. Solutions of identical composition prepared by rapid isothermal mixing of valine aqueous solutions with 2-propanol contained mesoscale clusters which were significantly larger than those observed in slowly cooled solutions. The presence of larger mesoscale clusters was found to correspond to faster nucleation. Observed induction times were strongly dependent on the rapid initial mixing step, although solutions were left undisturbed afterwards and the induction times observed were up to two orders of magnitude longer than the initial mixing period. We propose that mesoscale clusters above a certain critical size are likely to be the location of productive nucleation events.

  9. Growth of Nd{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} single crystal using optical floating zone technique

    SciTech Connect

    Murugesan, G.; Kalainathan, S.; Nithya, R.; Ravindran, T. R.

    2015-06-24

    Single crystals of Nd{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} were grown using Optical Floating zone technique in oxygen atmosphere by spontaneous nucleation. Powder X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the grown single crystal is of homogeneous composition. Laue diffraction was recorded in both transmission and backscattering geometries to check the crystal quality. Vibrational properties were analyzed using Raman measurements.

  10. Investigations on nucleation, HRXRD, optical, piezoelectric, polarizability and Z-scan analysis of L-arginine maleate dihydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthy Priya, S.; Alexandar, A.; Surendran, P.; Lakshmanan, A.; Rameshkumar, P.; Sagayaraj, P.

    2017-04-01

    An efficient organic nonlinear optical single crystal of L-arginine maleate dihydrate (LAMD) has been grown by slow evaporation solution technique (SEST) and slow cooling technique (SCT). The crystalline perfection of the crystal was examined using high-resolution X-ray diffractometry (HRXRD) analysis. Photoluminescence study confirmed the optical properties and defects level in the crystal lattice. Electromechanical behaviour was observed using piezoelectric co-efficient (d33) analysis. The photoconductivity analysis confirmed the negative photoconducting nature of the material. The dielectric constant and loss were measured as a function of frequency with varying temperature and vice-versa. The laser damage threshold (LDT) measurement was carried out using Nd:YAG Laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm (Focal length is 35 cm) and the obtained results showed that LDT value of the crystal is high compared to KDP crystal. The high laser damage threshold of the grown crystal makes it a potential candidate for second and higher order nonlinear optical device application. The third order nonlinear optical parameters of LAMD crystal is determined by open-aperture and closed-aperture studies using Z-scan technique. The third order linear and nonlinear optical parameters such as the nonlinear refractive index (n2), two photon absorption coefficient (β), Real part (Reχ3) and imaginary part (Imχ3) of third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility are calculated.

  11. Homogeneous versus composite Cd1 -x -yMnxZnySnAs2 crystals: Magnetic interactions and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilanski, L.; Skupiński, P.; Lewińska, S.; Dynowska, E.; Reszka, A.; Grasza, K.; Szymczak, R.; Ślawska-Waniewska, A.; Górska, M.; Kowalski, B. J.; Dobrowolski, W.

    2017-01-01

    We present the studies of structural, magnetic, and magnetotransport properties of Cd1 -x -yMnxZnySnAs2 crystals with the average Mn contents x changing from 0.013 to 0.170 and Zn contents y varying from 0.002 to 0.051. Homogenous distribution of Mn ions is observed for the samples with x ≤0.025 . The presence of MnAs clusters in the studied alloy for x >0.025 induces room-temperature ferromagnetism with the Curie temperature TC, with values around 325 K . High crystal quality leads to high carrier mobility values observed for all of our samples, as high as 7100 cm2 /(V s ) for x =0.025 and y =0.028 . The Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are observed at T ≤50 K for all of our samples. The oscillations allowed the calculation of the effective mass m*, giving values of about 0.11 -0.12 me . The presence of magnetic impurities has a strong influence on the magnetoresistance of the alloy. For the samples with x ≥0.076 , the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are observed on the background of a strong linear positive magnetoresistance, present up to room temperature. The maximum values of the linear positive magnetoresistance are close to 200% for the sample with x =0.170 and y =0.002 , at T =1.5 K . This positive magnetoresistance is related to the presence of MnAs clusters in the semiconductor lattice.

  12. Crystallization on prestructured seeds.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Swetlana; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The crystallization transition of an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid in the presence of small prestructured seeds is studied with transition path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the homogeneous crystallization, clusters of a few particles arranged into a face- and body-centered cubic structure enhance the crystallization, while icosahedrally ordered seeds do not change the reaction rate. We identify two distinct nucleation regimes-close to the seed and in the bulk. Crystallites form close to the face- and body-centered structures and tend to stay away from the icosahedrally ordered seeds.

  13. Dynamic density functional theory for nucleation: Non-classical predictions of mesoscopic nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Yatsyshin, Peter; Lutsko, James F.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) for fluids and its dynamic extension (DDFT) provide an appealing mean-field framework for describing equilibrium and dynamics of complex soft matter systems. For a long time, homogeneous nucleation was considered to be outside the limits of applicability of DDFT. However, our recently developed mesoscopic nucleation theory (MeNT) based on fluctuating hydrodynamics, reconciles the inherent randomness of the nucleation process with the deterministic nature of DDFT. It turns out that in the weak-noise limit, the most likely path (MLP) for nucleation to occur is determined by the DDFT equations. We present computations of MLPs for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in colloidal suspensions. For homogeneous nucleation, the MLP obtained is in excellent agreement with the reduced order-parameter description of MeNT, which predicts a multistage nucleation pathway. For heterogeneous nucleation, the presence of impurities in the fluid affects the MLP, but remarkably, the overall qualitative picture of homogeneous nucleation persists. Finally, we highlight the use of DDFT as a simulation tool, which is especially appealing as there are no known applications of MeNT to heterogeneous nucleation. We acknowledge financial support from the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 and from EPSRC via Grants No. EP/L020564 and EP/L025159.

  14. Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

    2008-08-26

    Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or ‘interstitial’ aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation.

  15. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiantian; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-01-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270–1480 MPa. PMID:27279765

  16. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Jiang, Jun; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-05-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270-1480 MPa.

  17. Biomimetic nucleation of hydroxyapatite crystals mediated by Antheraea pernyi silk sericin promotes osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingying; Shuai, Yajun; Zhang, Can; Chen, Yuyin; Zhu, Liangjun; Mao, Chuanbin; OuYang, Hongwei

    2014-04-14

    Biomacromolecules have been used as templates to grow hydroxyapatite crystals (HAps) by biomineralization to fabricate mineralized materials for potential application in bone tissue engineering. Silk sericin is a protein with features desirable as a biomaterial, such as increased hydrophilicity and biodegradation. Mineralization of the silk sericin from Antheraea pernyi (A. pernyi) silkworm has rarely been reported. Here, for the first time, nucleation of HAps on A. pernyi silk sericin (AS) was attempted through a wet precipitation method and consequently the cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs on mineralized AS were investigated. It was found that AS mediated the nucleation of HAps in the form of nanoneedles while self-assembling into β-sheet conformation, leading to the formation of a biomineralized protein based biomaterial. The cell viability assay of BMSCs showed that the mineralization of AS stimulated cell adhesion and proliferation, showing that the resultant AS biomaterial is biocompatible. The differentiation assay confirmed that the mineralized AS significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs when compared to nonmineralized AS as well as other types of sericin (B. mori sericin), suggesting that the resultant mineralized AS biomaterial has potential in promoting bone formation. This result represented the first work proving the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs directed by silk sericin. Therefore, the biomineralization of A. pernyi silk sericin coupled with seeding BMSCs on the resultant mineralized biomaterials is a useful strategy to develop the potential application of this unexplored silk sericin in the field of bone tissue engineering. This study lays the foundation for the use of A. pernyi silk sericin as a potential scaffold for tissue engineering.

  18. Deciphering the energetic barriers to calcium carbonate nucleation as a continuum of competing interfacial forces between polysaccharide chemistry and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, A. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Researchers have long-postulated that living organisms utilize organic matrices to actively guide the formation and growth of crystalline structures. The timing and placement of these features are most easily controlled during the nucleation stage. Our recent kinetic study of heterogeneous calcite nucleation found the energy barrier to formation is regulated by a systematic relationship to the competing interfacial energies between the substrate, crystal, and liquid (Giuffre et al., 2013). Chitosan presents a low energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate-crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate-crystal interfaces. These results showed calcite nucleation is regulated by substrate-crystal interactions but could not quantify the larger continuum of competing forces that must regulate calcite nucleation. To determine these relationships, we estimate the energy barriers to nucleation and crystal-liquid interfacial energies by measuring the kinetics of homogeneous calcite nucleation in NaCl solutions at ionic strengths that extend to seawater salinity (0.6 M). The data show that solutions of greater ionic strength produce faster nucleation rates, smaller crystal-liquid interfacial energies, and lower barriers to nucleation, which concurs with recent theoretical and experimental findings that background electrolytes promote ion desolvation during nucleation. By applying this relationship to heterogeneous nucleation on chitosan and heparin in future work, we will quantify the relative contributions of substrate-crystal-liquid interfacial energies. The findings reiterate a directing role for PS

  19. Orientation dependence of heterogeneous nucleation at the Cu-Pb solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palafox-Hernandez, J. Pablo; Laird, Brian B.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we examine the effect of surface structure on the heterogeneous nucleation of Pb crystals from the melt at a Cu substrate using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. In a previous work [Palafox-Hernandez et al., Acta Mater. 59, 3137 (2011)] studying the Cu/Pb solid-liquid interface with MD simulation, we observed that the structure of the Cu(111) and Cu(100) interfaces was significantly different at 625 K, just above the Pb melting temperature (618 K for the model). The Cu(100) interface exhibited significant surface alloying in the crystal plane in contact with the melt. In contrast, no surface alloying was seen at the Cu(111) interface; however, a prefreezing layer of crystalline Pb, 2-3 atomic planes thick and slightly compressed relative to bulk Pb crystal, was observed to form at the interface. We observe that at the Cu(111) interface the prefreezing layer is no longer present at 750 K, but surface alloying in the Cu(100) interface persists. In a series of undercooling MD simulations, heterogeneous nucleation of fcc Pb is observed at the Cu(111) interface within the simulation time (5 ns) at 592 K—a 26 K undercooling. Nucleation and growth at Cu(111) proceeded layerwise with a nearly planar critical nucleus. Quantitative analysis yielded heterogeneous nucleation barriers that are more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the predicted homogeneous nucleation barriers from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation was considerably more difficult on the Cu(100) surface-alloyed substrate. An undercooling of approximately 170 K was necessary to observe nucleation at this interface within the simulation time. From qualitative observation, the critical nucleus showed a contact angle with the Cu(100) surface of over 90°, indicating poor wetting of the Cu(100) surface by the nucleating phase, which according to classical heterogeneous nucleation theory provides an explanation of the large undercooling necessary to nucleate on the Cu(100) surface

  20. Cu-Zn slags from Røros (Norway): a case study of rapid cooling and crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchulski, Rafał; Szopa, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    The mining town of Røros located in central Norway was established in 1644 and it is known of historical mining industry related to copper. Røros was designated as an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980 on the base of mining culture represented by, e.g., unique wooden architecture. Slag pieces are composed of three parts differing in glass to crystallites ratio. Røros slags are composed of olivine- and pyroxene- group minerals accompanied by sulphides, with glass in the interstices. Temperature gradient and volatiles content were determined as the main factor influencing crystallization process in this material

  1. Cu-Zn Slags from R⊘ros (Norway): A Case Study of Rapid Cooling and Crystal Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchulski, Rafał; Szopa, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    The mining town of R⊘ros located in central Norway was established in 1644 and it is known of historical mining industry related to copper. R⊘ros was designated as an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980 on the base of mining culture represented by, e.g., unique wooden architecture. Slag pieces are composed of three parts differing in glass to crystallites ratio. R⊘ros slags are composed of olivine- and pyroxene- group minerals accompanied by sulphides, with glass in the interstices. Temperature gradient and volatiles content were determined as the main factor influencing crystallization process in this material.

  2. Stochastic kinetics reveal imperative role of anisotropic interfacial tension to determine morphology and evolution of nucleated droplets in nematogenic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    For isotropic fluids, classical nucleation theory predicts the nucleation rate, barrier height and critical droplet size by ac- counting for the competition between bulk energy and interfacial tension. The nucleation process in liquid crystals is less understood. We numerically investigate nucleation in monolayered nematogenic films using a mesoscopic framework, in par- ticular, we study the morphology and kinetic pathway in spontaneous formation and growth of droplets of the stable phase in the metastable background. The parameter κ that quantifies the anisotropic elastic energy plays a central role in determining the geometric structure of the droplets. Noncircular nematic droplets with homogeneous director orientation are nucleated in a background of supercooled isotropic phase for small κ. For large κ, noncircular droplets with integer topological charge, accompanied by a biaxial ring at the outer surface, are nucleated. The isotropic droplet shape in a superheated nematic background is found to depend on κ in a similar way. Identical growth laws are found in the two cases, although an unusual two-stage mechanism is observed in the nucleation of isotropic droplets. Temporal distributions of successive events indi- cate the relevance of long-ranged elasticity-mediated interactions within the isotropic domains. Implications for a theoretical description of nucleation in anisotropic fluids are discussed.

  3. Stochastic kinetics reveal imperative role of anisotropic interfacial tension to determine morphology and evolution of nucleated droplets in nematogenic films

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    For isotropic fluids, classical nucleation theory predicts the nucleation rate, barrier height and critical droplet size by ac- counting for the competition between bulk energy and interfacial tension. The nucleation process in liquid crystals is less understood. We numerically investigate nucleation in monolayered nematogenic films using a mesoscopic framework, in par- ticular, we study the morphology and kinetic pathway in spontaneous formation and growth of droplets of the stable phase in the metastable background. The parameter κ that quantifies the anisotropic elastic energy plays a central role in determining the geometric structure of the droplets. Noncircular nematic droplets with homogeneous director orientation are nucleated in a background of supercooled isotropic phase for small κ. For large κ, noncircular droplets with integer topological charge, accompanied by a biaxial ring at the outer surface, are nucleated. The isotropic droplet shape in a superheated nematic background is found to depend on κ in a similar way. Identical growth laws are found in the two cases, although an unusual two-stage mechanism is observed in the nucleation of isotropic droplets. Temporal distributions of successive events indi- cate the relevance of long-ranged elasticity-mediated interactions within the isotropic domains. Implications for a theoretical description of nucleation in anisotropic fluids are discussed. PMID:28054600

  4. Containerless Undercooled Melts: Ordering, Nucleation, and Dendrite Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlach, Dieter M.; Binder, Sven; Galenko, Peter; Gegner, Jan; Holland-Moritz, Dirk; Klein, Stefan; Kolbe, Matthias; Volkmann, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Electromagnetic and electrostatic levitation are applied to containerless undercool and solidify metallic melts. A large undercooling range becomes accessible with the extra benefit that the freely suspended drop is accessible directly for in situ observation. The short-range order in undercooled melts is investigated by combining levitation with elastic neutron scattering and X-ray scattering using synchrotron radiation. Muon Spin Rotation ( µSR) experiments show magnetic ordering in deeply undercooled Co80Pd20 alloys. The onset of magnetic ordering stimulates nucleation. Results on nucleation undercooling of zirconium are presented showing the limit of maximum undercoolability set by the onset of homogeneous nucleation. Metastable phase diagrams are determined by applying energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction of Ni-V alloys with varying concentration. Nucleation is followed by crystal growth. Rapid dendrite growth velocity is measured on levitation-processed samples as a function of undercooling ∆ T by using high-speed video camera technique. Solute trapping in dilute solid solutions and disorder trapping in intermetallic compounds are experimentally verified. Measurements of glass-forming Cu-Zr alloy show a maximum in the V(∆ T) relation that is indicative for diffusion-controlled growth. The influence of convection on dendrite growth of Al50Ni50 is shown by comparative measurements of dendrite growth velocity on Earth and in reduced gravity. Eventually, faceting of a rough interface by convection is presented as observed on Ni2B alloys.

  5. Sensitivity of liquid clouds to homogenous freezing parameterizations.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Ross J; Murray, Benjamin J; Dobbie, Steven J; Koop, Thomas

    2015-03-16

    Water droplets in some clouds can supercool to temperatures where homogeneous ice nucleation becomes the dominant freezing mechanism. In many cloud resolving and mesoscale models, it is assumed that homogeneous ice nucleation in water droplets only occurs below some threshold temperature typically set at -40°C. However, laboratory measurements show that there is a finite rate of nucleation at warmer temperatures. In this study we use a parcel model with detailed microphysics to show that cloud properties can be sensitive to homogeneous ice nucleation as warm as -30°C. Thus, homogeneous ice nucleation may be more important for cloud development, precipitation rates, and key cloud radiative parameters than is often assumed. Furthermore, we show that cloud development is particularly sensitive to the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate. In order to better constrain the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation laboratory measurements are needed at both high (>-35°C) and low (<-38°C) temperatures.

  6. Nucleation and crystal growth in a suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres with bi-modal size distribution studied by time-resolved ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Menke, Dirk; Forthaus, Martin; Subatzus, Sebastian; Franke, Markus; Schöpe, Hans-Joachim; Palberg, Thomas; Perlich, Jan; Herlach, Dieter

    2014-12-07

    A suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres exhibiting a bi-modal size distribution of particles, thereby mimicking a binary mixture, was studied using time-resolved ultra-small-angle synchrotron X-ray scattering (USAXS). The sample, consisting of particles of diameters d(A) = (104.7 ± 9.0) nm and d(B) = (88.1 ± 7.8) nm (d(A)/d(B) ≈ 1.2), and with an estimated composition A(0.6(1))B(0.4(1)), was studied with respect to its phase behaviour in dependance of particle number density and interaction, of which the latter was modulated by varying amounts of added base (NaOH). Moreover, its short-range order in the fluid state and its eventual solidification into a long-range ordered colloidal crystal were observed in situ, allowing the measurement of the associated kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth. Key parameters of the nucleation kinetics such as crystallinity, crystallite number density, and nucleation rate density were extracted from the time-resolved scattering curves. By this means an estimate on the interfacial energy for the interface between the icosahedral short-range ordered fluid and a body-centered cubic colloidal crystal was obtained, comparable to previously determined values for single-component colloidal systems.

  7. Nucleation reduction strategy of BaNH{4}MgHPO{4} (barium ammonium magnesium hydrogen phosphate, in vitro approach-1) crystals grown in silica gel medium and its characterization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, P.; Kanchana, G.; Sundaramoorthi, P.

    2009-02-01

    Kidney stones consist of various organic, inorganic and semi-organic compounds. Mineral oxalate monohydrate and di-hydrate is the main inorganic constituent of kidney stones. However, the mechanisms for the formation of crystal mineral oxalate are not clearly understood. In this field of study there are many hypothesis including nucleation, crystal growth and or aggregation of formation of AOMH (ammonium oxalate monohydrate) and AODH (ammonium oxalate di-hydrate) crystals. The effect of some urinary species such as ammonium oxalates, calcium, citrate, proteins and trace mineral elements have been previously reported by the author. The kidney stone constituents are grown in the kidney environments, the sodium meta silica gel medium (SMS) provides the necessary growth simulation (in vitro). In the artificial urinary stone growth process, growth parameters within the different chemical environments are identified. The author has reported the growth of urinary crystals such as CHP, SHP, BHP and AHP. In the present study, BaNH{4}MgHPO{4} (barium ammonium magnesium hydrogen phosphate) crystals have been grown in three different growth faces to attain the total nucleation reductions. As an extension of this research, many characterization studies have been carried out and the results are reported.

  8. Investigating ice nucleation in cirrus clouds with an aerosol-enabled Multiscale Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chengzhu; Wang, Minghuai; Morrison, H.; Somerville, Richard C.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Li, J-L F.

    2014-11-06

    In this study, an aerosol-dependent ice nucleation scheme [Liu and Penner, 2005] has been implemented in an aerosol-enabled multi-scale modeling framework (PNNL MMF) to study ice formation in upper troposphere cirrus clouds through both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. The MMF model represents cloud scale processes by embedding a cloud-resolving model (CRM) within each vertical column of a GCM grid. By explicitly linking ice nucleation to aerosol number concentration, CRM-scale temperature, relative humidity and vertical velocity, the new MMF model simulates the persistent high ice supersaturation and low ice number concentration (10 to 100/L) at cirrus temperatures. The low ice number is attributed to the dominance of heterogeneous nucleation in ice formation. The new model simulates the observed shift of the ice supersaturation PDF towards higher values at low temperatures following homogeneous nucleation threshold. The MMF models predict a higher frequency of midlatitude supersaturation in the Southern hemisphere and winter hemisphere, which is consistent with previous satellite and in-situ observations. It is shown that compared to a conventional GCM, the MMF is a more powerful model to emulate parameters that evolve over short time scales such as supersaturation. Sensitivity tests suggest that the simulated global distribution of ice clouds is sensitive to the ice nucleation schemes and the distribution of sulfate and dust aerosols. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that with a value of 250 μm for the critical diameter, Dcs, that distinguishes ice crystals from snow, the model can produce good agreement to the satellite retrieved products in terms of cloud ice water path and ice water content, while the total ice water is not sensitive to the specification of Dcs value.

  9. Investigating ice nucleation in cirrus clouds with an aerosol-enabled Multiscale Modeling Framework

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Chengzhu; Wang, Minghuai; Morrison, H.; ...

    2014-11-06

    In this study, an aerosol-dependent ice nucleation scheme [Liu and Penner, 2005] has been implemented in an aerosol-enabled multi-scale modeling framework (PNNL MMF) to study ice formation in upper troposphere cirrus clouds through both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. The MMF model represents cloud scale processes by embedding a cloud-resolving model (CRM) within each vertical column of a GCM grid. By explicitly linking ice nucleation to aerosol number concentration, CRM-scale temperature, relative humidity and vertical velocity, the new MMF model simulates the persistent high ice supersaturation and low ice number concentration (10 to 100/L) at cirrus temperatures. The low ice numbermore » is attributed to the dominance of heterogeneous nucleation in ice formation. The new model simulates the observed shift of the ice supersaturation PDF towards higher values at low temperatures following homogeneous nucleation threshold. The MMF models predict a higher frequency of midlatitude supersaturation in the Southern hemisphere and winter hemisphere, which is consistent with previous satellite and in-situ observations. It is shown that compared to a conventional GCM, the MMF is a more powerful model to emulate parameters that evolve over short time scales such as supersaturation. Sensitivity tests suggest that the simulated global distribution of ice clouds is sensitive to the ice nucleation schemes and the distribution of sulfate and dust aerosols. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that with a value of 250 μm for the critical diameter, Dcs, that distinguishes ice crystals from snow, the model can produce good agreement to the satellite retrieved products in terms of cloud ice water path and ice water content, while the total ice water is not sensitive to the specification of Dcs value.« less

  10. Formation of Protein Condensed Phases: Nucleation Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vekilov, Peter G

    2012-04-04

    Proteins in solution form a number of condensed phases. Even omitting the amyloid structures formed after partial protein unfolding, these phases include crystals, polymers, and other solid aggregates, as well as dense liquids and gels. Some of these condensed phases underlie pathological conditions, others play a crucial role in the biological function of the respective protein or are an essential part of its laboratory or industrial processing. In this review, we summarize the fundamentals and recent findings on the kinetics of nucleation of dense liquid droplets and crystals. We define the transition from nucleation to spinodal decomposition for these two phase transitions. We review the two-step mechanism of protein crystal nucleation, in which mesoscopic metastable protein clusters serve as precursors to the ordered crystal nuclei. The concepts and mechanisms reviewed here provide powerful tools for control of the nucleation process by varying the solution thermodynamic parameters.

  11. Slow processes in viscous liquids: Stress and structural relaxation, chemical reaction freezing, crystal nucleation and microemulsion arrest, in relation to liquid fragility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. A.; Alba, C.; Arzimanoglou, A.; Fan, J.; Böhmer, R.; Lu, Q.; Sanchez, E.; Senapati, H.; Tatsumisago, M.

    1992-05-01

    We review a variety of measurements on model systems in the medium viscosity range which seem consistent with both thermodynamical (entropy vanishing) and dynamical (mode coupling) origins of glassy behavior and then examine behavior near and below Tg to seek relations between liquid fragility and the non-exponential and non-linear aspects of liquid relaxation processes. We include the model ionic system Ca(NO3)2-KNO3 and analogs, van der Waals systems, and the covalently-bonded system Ge-As-Se in which the relation of liquid properties to the vector percolation concepts of Phillips and Thorpe can be conveniently studied. With some basic phenomenology in the liquid state itself thereby established, we turn attention to longer length-scale processes occurring in viscous liquid media. Among these will be the kinetics of nucleation of crystals, the freezing of microemulsion droplet sizes during continuous cooling of temperature sensitive microemulsions, and the freezing of chemical reactions during continuous cooling or continuous evaporation of solvent. The latter freezings can occur at temperatures which are far above the solvent glass transition temperature depending on solvent fragility, which may be a consideration in the strategies adopted by nature in preservation of plant and insect integrity in cold and arid climates. Finally we consider the slowing down which occurs in liquids with density maxima like water and SiO2 which appear to have, as their low temperature metastable limits, spinodal instabilities (with associated divergences in physical properties) in place of the usual ideal glass transitions. So far little studied for lack of tractable slow systems, these offer a new and challenging arena for relaxation studies.

  12. Preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and thereforemore » nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. As a result, these insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.« less

  13. Preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. As a result, these insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  14. Colloidal Crystal Growth Monitored By Bragg Diffraction Interference Fringes

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Justin J.; Tikhonov, Alexander; Asher, Sanford A.

    2010-01-01

    We monitor the crystal growth kinetics of crystallization of a shear melted crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The fcc CCA heterogeneously nucleates at the flow cell wall surface. We examined the evolution of the (111) Bragg diffraction peak, and, for the first time, quantitatively monitored growth by measuring the temporal evolution of the Bragg diffraction interference fringes. Modeling of the evolution of the fringe patterns exposes the time dependence of the increasing crystal thickness. The initial diffusion driven linear growth is followed by ripening-driven growth. Between 80 to 90 μM NaCl concentrations the fcc crystals first linearly grow at rates between 1.9 and 4.2 μm/sec until they contact homogeneously nucleated crystals in the bulk. At lower salt concentrations interference fringes are not visible because the strong electrostatic interactions between particles result in high activation barriers, preventing defect annealing and leading to a lower crystal quality. The fcc crystals melt to a liquid phase at >90 μM NaCl concentrations. Increasing NaCl concentrations slows the fcc CCA growth rate consistent with the expectation of the classical Wilson-Frenkel growth theory. The final thickness of wall nucleated CCA is determined by the competition between growth of heterogeneously and homogenously nucleated CCA and increases with higher NaCl concentrations. PMID:20542277

  15. Crystallization sequence of the Upper Border Series of the Skaergaard Intrusion: revised subdivision and implications for chamber-scale magma homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonsen, Lars Peter; Tegner, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Although it is one of the best-studied layered mafic intrusions in the world, the crystallization sequence of the Skaergaard Intrusion, east Greenland, remains in debate. In particular, it has been argued that the crystallization sequence in the Upper Border Series, which crystallized downwards from the roof of the magma chamber, differs from that in the Layered Series formed at the floor. The proposed deviation would require chemical stratification of the magma, and a reexamination of the crystallization sequence therefore has important implications for understanding the dynamics of the system. Here, we examine a new sample set from the Upper Border Series, combining field observations, petrography and anorthite contents of plagioclase with bulk rock Ti, V, P, Cu and Mn concentrations. We demonstrate that the first phases on the liquidus were plagioclase and olivine followed by augite, then ilmenite and magnetite (simultaneously), sulfides, apatite and finally ferrobustamite (now inverted to hedenbergite). This crystallization sequence represents extreme differentiation along the tholeiitic trend, and it mirrors those at the floor (Layered Series) and walls (Marginal Border Series). We therefore propose a revised subdivision of the Upper Border Series into equivalents of the subzones in the Layered Series denoted by apostrophes (LZa', LZb', etc.). Moreover, the first appearance of each of the cumulus phases occurs at similar plagioclase core anorthite contents. The mirror images of the crystallization sequences and the anorthite contents of plagioclase cores in the three series imply that the Skaergaard magma chamber solidified by in situ crystallization along the floor, walls and roof from one, largely homogenous, convecting magma body.

  16. Utilizing Controlled Vibrations in a Microgravity Environment to Understand and Promote Microstructural Homogeneity During Floating-Zone Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in floating-zone configurations utilizing silicone oil and nitrate salts that mechanically induced vibration effectively minimizes detrimental, gravity independent, thermocapillary flow. The processing parameters leading to crystal improvement and aspects of the on-going modeling effort are discussed. Plans for applying the crystal growth technique to commercially relevant materials, e.g., silicon, as well as the value of processing in a microgravity environment are presented.

  17. On the role of cubic structure in ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tōru

    1982-10-01

    To clarify the formation mechanism of snow polycrystals the possibility of formation of a cubic ice embryo is discussed on the basis of the homogeneous nucleation theory for supercooled water formed from ambient water molecules in the phase of supersaturated vapour. In this connection, attention is paid to a finding from a model of broken hydrogen bonds that the plane {111} of a cubic ice crystal has a smaller specific interfacial energy than each of the {0001} or {10ovbar|10} planes of a hexagonal ice crystal. Hence, it follows that a critical cubic embryo has a smaller activation energy than a critical hexagonal embryo below a critical temperature; namely, Ostwald's step rule (Stufenregel) holds for a change from cubic ice to hexagonal ice below a critical temperature. This discussion is reinforced by examining, from the viewpoint of this step rule, the observed misorientation of the c-axis of natural snow polycrystals and the results of experiments using frozen water droplets.

  18. A preliminary study of the mechanical effects of polymer crystallization in the vicinity of a rigid cylindrical inclusion: Homogeneous crystallization under plane strain

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Negahban, M.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of crystallization on the mechanical response of a polymer containing a rigid cylindrical inclusion under different loading conditions and under the plane strain restriction. As will be shown, external loading and crystallization can both induce an inhomogeneous distribution of stress and deformation in the vicinity of a cylindrical inclusion and can also interact with each other. Crystallization is a process of transition of the polymer`s microstructure from disordered state to an ordered one. This transition occurs in many polymers, such as polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon, and natural rubber. The process of crystallization gives rise to a macroscopic deformation, reducing the macroscopic volume, and it can increase the toughness and rigidity of a polymer. For example, for natural rubber crystallization causes a two order of magnitude increase in the elastic moduli. Moreover, crystallization can result in stress relaxation under constant uniaxial extension and creep under constant load. These effects have been captured in a constitutive model developed by Negahban, Wineman and Ma, which has been shown to be in good agreement with experimental results. This presentation provides (1) a theoretical evaluation of the effect of crystallization on the distribution of stress and mechanical moduli under axisymmetric loading and an estimation of the idual stress resulting from crystallization in the vicinity of a cylindrical inclusion; and (2) a numerical simulation of the stress distribution in the vicinity of an inclusion due to crystallization under both constant displacement loading and constant traction loading. All results are for plane strain conditions. Results show that an inhomogeneous distribution of stress and deformation is developed in the vicinity of the inclusion due to the external loading and/or due to crystallization.

  19. Ice nucleation on carbon surface supports the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabriolu, Raffaela; Li, Tianshu

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of heterogeneous nucleation in nature was explained qualitatively by the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation established over more than 60 years ago, but the quantitative validity and the key conclusions of the theory have remained unconfirmed. Employing the forward flux sampling method and the coarse-grained water model (mW), we explicitly computed the heterogeneous ice nucleation rates in the supercooled water on a graphitic surface at various temperatures. The independently calculated ice nucleation rates were found to fit well according to the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation. The fitting procedure further yields the estimate of the potency factor, which measures the ratio of the heterogeneous nucleation barrier to the homogeneous nucleation barrier. Remarkably, the estimated potency factor agrees quantitatively with the volumetric ratio of the critical nuclei between the heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Our numerical study thus provides a strong support to the quantitative power of the theory and allows understanding ice nucleation behaviors under the most relevant freezing conditions.

  20. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Lane Howard

    The relaxation of a metastable phase via the formation of a critical domain of the corresponding stable phase is a phenomenon that has been studied extensively in condensed matter physics. This dissertation describes laboratory studies of this phenomenon in the context of ice nucleation from undercooled liquid water. Such a study presents unique experimental challenges because the formation of a critical embryo is a statistical event, and once it occurs the entire sample relaxes to the stable phase. In order to study this statistical process it is necessary to create a large ensemble of separate, yet identical, domains of the metastable phase. The design of an apparatus is described which creates such an ensemble, in time, by repeatedly freezing and thawing a single water drop. This apparatus allows for the collection of a large data set and therefore can identify subtle changes in nucleation statistics that are produced by external controls. This dissertation describes a series of experiments intended to probe several aspects of ice nucleation. Results are presented for homogeneous ice nucleation as well as heterogeneous ice nucleation by; silanized and unsilanized glass, aliphatic alcohol Langmuir films, ionizing radiation, electric fields and motion at the three phase contact line. These experiments are analyzed largely in the context of classical nucleation theory. The unique experimental technique described here allows for sensitive tests of the temperature dependent nucleation rates, R( T), in these systems. Analysis of the R( T) within the context of classical nucleation theory constrains thermodynamic parameters and provides insight into these nucleation processes.

  1. Nucleation pressure threshold in acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Christopher; Doering, Charles; Kripfgans, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    We combine classical nucleation theory with superharmonic focusing to predict necessary pressures to induce nucleation in acoustic droplet vaporization. We show that linear acoustics is a valid approximation to leading order when particle displacements in the sound field are small relative the radius of the droplet. This is done by perturbation analysis of an axisymmetric compressible inviscid flow about a droplet with small surface perturbations relative to the mean radius subjected to an incoming ultrasonic wave. The necessary nucleation pressure threshold inside the droplet is calculated to be - 9 . 33 +/- 0 . 30 MPa for typical experimental parameters by employing results from classical homogeneous nucleation theory. As a result we are able to predict if a given incident pressure waveform will induce nucleation. This research was supported by the Rackham Merit Fellowship, the University of Michigan Physics department, the University of Michigan's MCubed program, and NSF awards PHY-1205219 and DMS-1515161.

  2. On the induction of homogeneous bulk crystallization in Eu-doped calcium aluminosilicate glass by applying simultaneous high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz, R. F.; de Ligny, D.; Le Floch, S.; Martinet, C.; Rohling, J. H.; Medina, A. N.; Sandrini, M.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Lima, S. M.; Baesso, M. L.; Guyot, Y.

    2016-06-01

    From initial calcium aluminosilicate glass, transparent glass-ceramics have been successfully synthesized under simultaneous high pressure and temperature (SHPT). Possible homogeneous volumetric crystallization of this glassy system, which was not achieved previously by means of conventional heat treatment, has been put in evidence with a SHPT procedure. Structural, mechanical, and optical properties of glass and glass-ceramic obtained were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction allowed to identify two main crystalline phases: merwinite [Ca3Mg(SiO4)2] and diopside [CaMgSi2O6]. A Raman scanning profile showed that the formation of merwinite is quite homogeneous over the bulk sample. However, the sample surface also contains significant diopside crystals. Instrumented Berkovich nanoindentation was applied to determine the effect of SHPT on hardness from glass to glass-ceramic. For Eu-doped samples, the broadband emission due to 4f65d1 → 4f7 transition of Eu2+ was studied in both host systems. Additionally, the 5D0 → 7FJ transition of Eu3+ was used as an environment probe in the pristine glass and the glass-ceramic.

  3. Viewing Angle Characteristics of Transflective Display in a Homogeneously Aligned Liquid Crystal Cell Driven by Fringe-Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Tae Bong; Song, Je Hoon; Seo, Dae-Shik; Lee, Seung Hee

    2004-09-01

    We have studied the optimal cell configuration for a fringe-field driven transflective liquid crystal display that exhibits high image quality. The cell is composed of two half-plate compensation films, liquid crystal, and two parallel polarizers in the transmissive region. Viewing angle characteristics of the device mainly depends on the orientation of the polarizer axis. The measured contrast ratio in an optimized configuration is greater than 5 in polar angles of over 50° in all directions and in those over 80° in certain azimuthal cross-sectional planes.

  4. Metadynamics simulations of ice nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Quigley, D; Rodger, P M

    2008-04-21

    The metadynamics method for accelerating rate events in molecular simulations is applied to the problem of ice freezing. We demonstrate homogeneous nucleation and growth of ice at 180 K in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble without the presence of external fields or surfaces. This result represents the first report of continuous and dynamic ice nucleation in a system of freely evolving density. Simulations are conducted using a variety of periodic simulation domains. In all cases the cubic polymorph ice I(c) is grown. The influence of boundary effects on estimates of the nucleation free energy barrier are discussed in relation to differences between this and earlier work.

  5. Mutations in C4orf26, encoding a peptide with in vitro hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation and growth activity, cause amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Parry, David A; Brookes, Steven J; Logan, Clare V; Poulter, James A; El-Sayed, Walid; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Al Harasi, Sharifa; Sayed, Jihad; Raïf, El Mostafa; Shore, Roger C; Dashash, Mayssoon; Barron, Martin; Morgan, Joanne E; Carr, Ian M; Taylor, Graham R; Johnson, Colin A; Aldred, Michael J; Dixon, Michael J; Wright, J Tim; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2012-09-07

    Autozygosity mapping and clonal sequencing of an Omani family identified mutations in the uncharacterized gene, C4orf26, as a cause of recessive hypomineralized amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), a disease in which the formation of tooth enamel fails. Screening of a panel of 57 autosomal-recessive AI-affected families identified eight further families with loss-of-function mutations in C4orf26. C4orf26 encodes a putative extracellular matrix acidic phosphoprotein expressed in the enamel organ. A mineral nucleation assay showed that the protein's phosphorylated C terminus has the capacity to promote nucleation of hydroxyapatite, suggesting a possible function in enamel mineralization during amelogenesis.

  6. Nucleation and Growth of Crystalline Grains in RF-Sputtered TiO 2 Films

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, J. C.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Dutta, P.; ...

    2009-01-01

    Amore » morphous TiO 2 thin films were radio frequency sputtered onto siliconmonoxide and carbon support films on molybdenum transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids and observed during in situ annealing in a TEM heating stage at 250 ∘ C. The evolution of crystallization is consistent with a classical model of homogeneous nucleation and isotropic grain growth. The two-dimensional grain morphology of the TEM foil allowed straightforward recognition of amorphous and crystallized regions of the films, for measurement of crystalline volume fraction and grain number density. By assuming that the kinetic parameters remain constant beyond the onset of crystallization, the final average grain size was computed, using an analytical extrapolation to the fully crystallized state. Electron diffraction reveals a predominance of the anatase crystallographic phase.« less

  7. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3 σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  8. Accurate control of a liquid-crystal display to produce a homogenized Fourier transform for holographic memories.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Andrés; Gallego, Sergi; Méndez, David; Alvarez, Mariela L; Fernández, Elena; Ortuño, Manuel; Neipp, Cristian; Beléndez, Augusto; Pascual, Inmaculada

    2007-09-01

    We show an accurate procedure to obtain a Fourier transform (FT) with no dc term using a commercial twisted-nematic liquid-crystal display. We focus on the application to holographic storage of binary data pages, where a drastic decrease of the dc term in the FT is highly desirable. Two different codification schemes are considered: binary pi radians phase modulation and hybrid ternary modulation. Any deviation in the values of the amplitude and phase shift generates the appearance of a strong dc term. Experimental results confirm that the calculated configurations provide a FT with no dc term, thus showing the effectiveness of the proposal.

  9. Cell Gap-Dependent Transmittance Characteristic in a Fringe Field-Driven Homogeneously Aligned Liquid Crystal Cell with Positive Dielectric Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Jai; Kim, Hyang Yul; Lee, Seung Hee; Lee, Yong Kyun; Park, Kyu Chang; Jang, Jin

    2005-09-01

    Transmittance characteristic in a homogeneously aligned liquid crystal (LC) cell driven by a fringe-electric field is investigated as a function of cell gap using the LC with positive dielectric anisotropy. In this device, the fringe-electric field drives the LCs to rotate so that the dielectric torque is electrode-positional dependent, which results in electrode-position dependency in the LC’s rotating angle. As the cell gap decreases to 2 μm, more LCs are affected by surface anchoring, and the LCs above the center of electrodes, in which the LCs are twisted by elastic force between neighboring molecules, are less twisted compared to the 4 μm cell. Consequently, when the cell gap decreases from 4 to 2 μm, the transmittance also decreases even though the cell retardation value remains the same.

  10. Structure and optical homogeneity of LiNbO{sub 3}:Zn (0.03–4.5 mol.%) crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorov, Nikolay E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru Tepljakova, Natalja E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru Gabain, Aleksei E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru Yanichev, Aleksander E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru Palatnikov, Mikhail E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru

    2014-11-14

    Structure and optical homogeneity of LiNbO{sub 3}:Zn (0.03–4.5 mol.%) crystals were searched by photoinduced light scattering and by Raman spectroscopy. The photorefractive effect depends on Zn{sup 2+} concentration nonmonotonically. Decrease of photorefractive effect is explained by decrease of structure defects with localized electrons. The Zn{sup 2+} cations replace structure defects Nb{sub Li} and Li{sub Nb}, trapping levels appear near the bottom of the conduction band and photo electrons recombine with emission under laser radiation. By the Raman spectra the area of the high structure order is found. In this area the own alternation, the alternation of impurity cations and the vacancies along the polar axis is almost perfect.

  11. Laser control of zeolite nucleation.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marta; Mayoral, Alvaro; Mateo, Ester; Lahoz, Ruth; de la Fuente, Germán F; Coronas, Joaquín

    2012-02-01

    Precursor solutions for the synthesis of zeolites are irradiated by means of a Nd-YAG laser. These solutions are subsequently submitted to a hydrothermal treatment and the results analyzed by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Laser irradiation promotes the formation of silica nanoparticles that nucleate into zeolite (silicalite-1), following a hydrothermal treatment. The average crystal size (in the 0.6-3.6 μm range) of the zeolite exponentially decreases as a function of laser irradiation time. In addition, a longer irradiation time results in a narrower crystal size distribution.

  12. Kinetics of bubble nucleation in a rhyolitic melt: an experimental study of the effect of ascent rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourtada-Bonnefoi, Catherine C.; Laporte, Didier

    2004-02-01

    In order to characterize the effect of ascent rate on the kinetics of bubble nucleation in a rhyolitic magma, we performed three series of experiments decompressed at rates of either 1000, 167, or 27.8 kPa/s. The experiments were carried out in an externally heated pressure vessel at 800°C and in the pressure range 260-59 MPa; the starting material was a crystal-free and bubble-free rhyolitic glass containing 7.0 wt% dissolved H 2O. In all the decompression experiments, homogeneous bubble nucleation began at 90±2 MPa, that is, ≈150 MPa below the water saturation pressure of the silicate liquid, 240 MPa. The degree of supersaturation Δ PHoN required to trigger homogeneous bubble nucleation was almost independent of decompression rate (Δ PHoN is the difference between the saturation pressure and the nucleation pressure): nucleation pressure decreased by ≤3 MPa for a 36-fold increase in decompression rate. These results are in good agreement with the classical theory of nucleation assuming a rhyolite-H 2O surface tension of 0.106 N m -1. Our major experimental finding is that, after a short nucleation event, the nucleation rate dropped and the bubble number density N reached a stationary value that was strongly sensitive to decompression rate: 6.8 mm -3 at 27.8 kPa/s, 470 mm -3 at 167 kPa/s, and 5800 mm -3 at 1000 kPa/s. The smaller value of N at low decompression rate was compensated by a larger mean bubble size, so that, at a given pressure, vesicularity was almost independent of decompression rate. The experimental values of N can be reproduced within a factor 0.3-1.4 using a relationship derived from published numerical simulations of vesiculation in ascending magmas. The nucleation behavior in our experiments is dictated by a competition between bubble nucleation and diffusive bubble growth, which depletes in water the surrounding liquid and therefore reduces the degree of volatile supersaturation. Once a critical value of N is attained, diffusive bubble

  13. Orientation and Morphology of Calcite Nucleated under Floating Monolayers: A Magnesium-ion-enhanced Nucleation Study

    SciTech Connect

    B Stripe; A Uysal; P Dutta

    2011-12-31

    We have studied the biomimetic growth of calcium carbonate crystals under floating monolayer templates, in the presence of Mg ions, using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and SEM imaging. Crystals grown under sulfate monolayers nucleate from the (0 0 1) plane with and without Mg ions, while undergoing substantial changes in morphology. Crystals grown under alcohol monolayers nucleate from the (1 0 4) plane in the presence of Mg. X-ray data do not detect orientation in crystals grown under acid monolayers, but at higher Mg concentrations the resulting morphologies are indicative of template-nucleated growth. These results suggest that Mg provides living organisms a way to enhance the orientation and control the morphology of acid-templated crystals.

  14. Vapour–to–liquid nucleation: Nucleation theorems for nonisothermal–nonideal case

    SciTech Connect

    Malila, J.; McGraw, R.; Napari, I.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-29

    Homogeneous vapour-to-liquid nucleation, a basic process of aerosol formation, is often considered as a type example of nucleation phenomena, while most treatment of the subject introduce several simplifying assumptions (ideal gas phase, incompressible nucleus, isothermal kinetics, size-independent surface free energy...). During last decades, nucleation theorems have provided new insights into properties of critical nuclei facilitating direct comparison between laboratory experiments and molecular simulations. These theorems are, despite of their generality, often applied in forms where the aforementioned assumptions are made. Here we present forms of nucleation theorems that explicitly take into account these effects and allow direct estimation of their importance. Only assumptions are Arrhenius-type kinetics of nucleation process and exclusion carrier gas molecules from the critical nucleus.

  15. Beyond classical nucleation theory of bubble nucleation during explosive volcanic eruptions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Gardner, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    (greater) than approximately 90 MPa. We explore the implications of these results for homogeneous bubble nucleation during explosive volcanic eruptions, with a focus on the relationship between BND and decompression rate, as well as eruption intensity.

  16. Mean-field kinetic nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalikmanov, V. I.

    2006-03-01

    A new semiphenomenological model of homogeneous vapor-liquid nucleation is proposed in which the cluster kinetics follows the "kinetic approach to nucleation" and the thermodynamic part is based on the revised Fisher droplet model with the mean-field argument for the cluster configuration integral. The theory is nonperturbative in a cluster size and as such is valid for all clusters down to monomers. It contains two surface tensions: macroscopic (planar) and microscopic. The latter is a temperature dependent quantity related to the vapor compressibility factor at saturation. For Lennard-Jones fluids the microscopic surface tension possesses a universal behavior with the parameters found from the mean-field density functional calculations. The theory is verified against nucleation experiments for argon, nitrogen, water, and mercury, demonstrating very good agreement with experimental data. Classical nucleation theory fails to predict experimental results when a critical cluster becomes small.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Crystal Nucleation and Growth Behavior of Methane Hydrate in the Presence of the Surface and Nanopores of Porous Sediment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ke-Feng; Li, Xiao-Sen; Chen, Zhao-Yang; Xia, Zhi-Ming; Xu, Chun-Gang; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-08-09

    The behavior of hydrate formation in porous sediment has been widely studied because of its importance in the investigation of reservoirs and in the drilling of natural gas hydrate. However, it is difficult to understand the hydrate nucleation and growth mechanism on the surface and in the nanopores of porous media by experimental and numerical simulation methods. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations of the nucleation and growth of CH4 hydrate in the presence of the surface and nanopores of clay are carried out. The molecular configurations and microstructure properties are analyzed for systems containing one H2O hydrate layer (System A), three H2O hydrate layers (System B), and six H2O hydrate layers (System C) in both clay and the bulk solution. It is found that hydrate formation is more complex in porous media than in the pure bulk solution and that there is cooperativity between hydrate growth and molecular diffusion in clay nanopores. The hydroxylated edge sites of the clay surface could serve as a source of CH4 molecules to facilitate hydrate nucleation. The diffusion velocity of molecules is influenced by the growth of the hydrate that forms a block in the throats of the clay nanopore. Comparing hydrate growth in different clay pore sizes reveals that the pore size plays an important role in hydrate growth and molecular diffusion in clay. This simulation study provides the microscopic mechanism of hydrate nucleation and growth in porous media, which can be favorable for the investigation of the formation of natural gas hydrate in sediments.

  18. Ice nucleation in the upper troposphere: Sensitivity to aerosol number density, temperature, and cooling rate

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.; Toon, O.B.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated the processes that control ice crystal nucleation in the upper troposphere using a numerical model. Nucleation of ice resulting from cooling was simulated for a range of aerosol number densities, initial temperatures, and cooling rates. In contrast to observations of stratus clouds, we find that the number of ice crystals that nucleate in cirrus is relatively insensitive to the number of aerosols present. The ice crystal size distribution at the end of the nucleation process is unaffected by the assumed initial aerosol number density. Essentially, nucleation continues until enough ice crystals are present such that their deposition growth rapidly depletes the vapor and shuts off any further nucleation. However, the number of ice crystals nucleated increases rapidly with decreasing initial temperature and increasing cooling rate. This temperature dependence alone could explain the large ice crystal number density observed in very cold tropical cirrus.

  19. Refreeze experiments with water droplets containing different types of ice nuclei interpreted by classical nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Lukas; Marcolli, Claudia; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    CNT using the contact angle α as the only fit parameter. Conversely, birch pollen washing water and small nonadecanol-coated water droplets show temperature dependencies of freezing rates steeper than predicted by all three CNT parameterizations. Good agreement of observations and calculations can be obtained when a pre-factor β is introduced to the rate coefficient as a second fit parameter. Thus, the following microphysical picture emerges: heterogeneous freezing occurs at ice-nucleating sites that need a minimum (critical) surface area to host embryos of critical size to grow into a crystal. Fits based on CNT suggest that the critical active site area is in the range of 10-50 nm2, with the exact value depending on sample, temperature, and CNT-based parameterization. Two fitting parameters are needed to characterize individual active sites. The contact angle α lowers the energy barrier that has to be overcome to form the critical embryo at the site compared to the homogeneous case where the critical embryo develops in the volume of water. The pre-factor β is needed to adjust the calculated slope of freezing rate increase with temperature decrease. When this slope is steep, this can be interpreted as a high frequency of nucleation attempts, so that nucleation occurs immediately when the temperature is low enough for the active site to accommodate a critical embryo. This is the case for active sites of birch pollen washing water and for small droplets coated with nonadecanol. If the pre-factor is low, the frequency of nucleation attempts is low and the increase in freezing rate with decreasing temperature is shallow. This is the case for Hoggar Mountain dust, the large droplets coated with nonadecanol, and ATD. Various hypotheses why the value of the pre-factor depends on the nature of the active sites are discussed.

  20. Homogeneity Pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Tracy; Fan, Jianqing; Wu, Yichao

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the homogeneity of coefficients in high-dimensional regression, which extends the sparsity concept and is more general and suitable for many applications. Homogeneity arises when regression coefficients corresponding to neighboring geographical regions or a similar cluster of covariates are expected to be approximately the same. Sparsity corresponds to a special case of homogeneity with a large cluster of known atom zero. In this article, we propose a new method called clustering algorithm in regression via data-driven segmentation (CARDS) to explore homogeneity. New mathematics are provided on the gain that can be achieved by exploring homogeneity. Statistical properties of two versions of CARDS are analyzed. In particular, the asymptotic normality of our proposed CARDS estimator is established, which reveals better estimation accuracy for homogeneous parameters than that without homogeneity exploration. When our methods are combined with sparsity exploration, further efficiency can be achieved beyond the exploration of sparsity alone. This provides additional insights into the power of exploring low-dimensional structures in high-dimensional regression: homogeneity and sparsity. Our results also shed lights on the properties of the fussed Lasso. The newly developed method is further illustrated by simulation studies and applications to real data. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. PMID:26085701

  1. Inhibition of bacterial ice nucleators by fish antifreeze glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Parody-Morreale, A; Murphy, K P; Di Cera, E; Fall, R; DeVries, A L; Gill, S J

    1988-06-23

    Certain bacteria promote the formation of ice in super-cooled water by means of ice nucleators which contain a unique protein associated with the cell membrane. Ice nucleators in general are believed to act by mimicking the structure of an ice crystal surface, thus imposing an ice-like arrangement on the water molecules in contact with the nucleating surface and lowering the energy necessary for the initiation of ice formation. Quantitative investigation of the bacterial ice-nucleating process has recently been made possible by the discovery of certain bacteria that shed stable membrane vesicles with ice nucleating activity. The opposite effect, inhibition of ice formation, has been described for a group of glycoproteins found in different fish and insect species. This group of substances, termed antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), promotes the supercooling of water with no appreciable effect on the equilibrium freezing point or melting temperature. Substantial evidence now indicates that AFGPs act by binding to a growing ice crystal and slowing crystal growth. As the ice-nucleating protein surface is believed to have a structure similar to an embryonic ice crystal, AFGPs might be predicted to interact directly with a bacterial ice-nucleating site. We report here that AFGPs from the antarctic fish Dissostichus mawsoni inhibit the ice-nucleating activity of membrane vesicles from the bacterium Erwinia herbicola. The inhibition effect shows saturation at high concentration of AFGP and conforms to a simple binding reaction between the AFGP and the nucleation centre.

  2. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Skrotzki, J.; Leisner, T.; Wilson, T. W.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2012-09-01

    with the ice crystals during the preceding homogeneous freezing cycle exhibit pre-activation: they may retain small ice embryos in pores, have footprints on their surface which match the ice lattice, or simply have a much greater surface area or different surface microstructure compared to the unprocessed glassy aerosol particles. Pre-activation must be considered for the correct interpretation of experimental results on the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of glassy aerosol particles and may provide a mechanism of producing a population of extremely efficient ice nuclei in the upper troposphere.

  3. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Skrotzki, J.; Leisner, T.; Wilson, T. W.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2012-04-01

    ice crystals during the preceding homogeneous freezing cycle exhibit pre-activation: they may retain small ice embryos in pores, have footprints on their surface which match the ice lattice, or simply have a much greater surface area or different surface microstructure compared to the unprocessed glassy aerosol particles. Pre-activation must be considered for the correct interpretation of experimental results on the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of glassy aerosol particles and may provide a mechanism of producing a population of extremely efficient ice nuclei in the upper troposphere.

  4. Temporal and spectral cloud screening of polar winter aerosol optical depth (AOD): impact of homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds and crystal layers on climatological-scale AODs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Norman T.; Baibakov, Konstantin; Hesaraki, Sareh; Ivanescu, Liviu; Martin, Randall V.; Perro, Chris; Chaubey, Jai P.; Herber, Andreas; Duck, Thomas J.

    2016-10-01

    We compared star-photometry-derived, polar winter aerosol optical depths (AODs), acquired at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, and Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, with GEOS-Chem (GC) simulations as well as ground-based lidar and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) retrievals over a sampling period of two polar winters. The results indicate significant cloud and/or low-altitude ice crystal (LIC) contamination which is only partially corrected using temporal cloud screening. Spatially homogeneous clouds and LICs that remain after temporal cloud screening represent an inevitable systematic error in the estimation of AOD: this error was estimated to vary from 78 to 210 % at Eureka and from 2 to 157 % at Ny-Ålesund. Lidar analysis indicated that LICs appeared to have a disproportionately large influence on the homogeneous coarse-mode optical depths that escape temporal cloud screening. In principle, spectral cloud screening (to yield fine-mode or submicron AODs) reduces pre-cloud-screened AODs to the aerosol contribution if one assumes that coarse-mode (super-micron) aerosols are a minor part of the AOD. Large, low-frequency differences between these retrieved values and their GC analogue appeared to be often linked to strong, spatially extensive planetary boundary layer events whose presence at either site was inferred from CALIOP profiles. These events were either not captured or significantly underestimated by the GC simulations. High-frequency AOD variations of GC fine-mode aerosols at Ny-Ålesund were attributed to sea salt, while low-frequency GC variations at Eureka and Ny-Ålesund were attributable to sulfates. CALIOP profiles and AODs were invaluable as spatial and temporal redundancy support (or, alternatively, as insightful points of contention) for star photometry retrievals and GC estimates of AOD.

  5. Binary nucleation at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahoransky, R. A.; Peters, F.

    1985-01-01

    The onset of homogeneous condensation of binary vapors in the supersaturated state is studied in ethanol/n-propanol and water/ethanol via their unsteady expansion in a shock tube at temperatures below 273 K. Ethanol/n-propanol forms a nearly ideal solution, whereas water/ethanol is an example of a strongly nonideal mixture. Vapor mixtures of various compositions are diluted in dry air at small mole fractions and expanded in the driver section from room temperature. The onset of homogeneous condensation is detected optically and the corresponding thermodynamic state is evaluated. The experimental results are compared with the binary nucleation theory, and the particular problems of theoretical evaluation at low temperatures are discussed.

  6. Nucleation-fibrillation dynamics of Aβ1-40 peptides on liquid-solid surface studied by total-internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy coupled with quartz-crystal microbalance biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Hiroki; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Noi, Kentaro; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji; Hirao, Masahiko

    2015-07-01

    We have successfully developed the total-internal-reflection-fluorescence microscopy combined with a quartz-crystal microbalance (TIRFM-QCM) biosensor, and monitored the nucleation-fibrillation phenomenon of amyloid β1-40 peptide on the naked quartz surface. The cross-β-sheet structures were visualized with the TIRFM using the thioflavin-T (Th-T) label, and other unlabeled aggregates were detected through the frequency change of the 58-MHz wireless-electrodeless QCM throughout the aggregation reaction. The QCM response indicates significant adsorption of the peptides on the quartz surface at the early stage, which is followed by fibrillation. The non-cross-β-sheet oligomers are first formed, and nuclei appear in the oligomer region, from which fibrils originate and elongate. The two-color TIRFM observation was performed after the aggregation reaction with the Nile-red label as well as the ThT label for identifying nucleation from non-β-sheet regions. An aggregation model is proposed.

  7. Validity of commonly used formula of nucleation work for bubble nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Atsushi

    2013-08-01

    Nishioka and Kusaka [Journal of Chemical Physics 96 (1992) 5370] showed that the commonly used formula, W=n(μα-μβ)+γA, for work of formation of critical nucleus is derived by integrating the isothermal Gibbs-Duhem relation for the incompressible nucleating phase, such as an incompressible liquid phase nucleation in a vapor phase. In their paper as well as in a subsequent paper [Li, Nishioka, Holcomb, Journal of Crystal Growth 171 (1997) 259] it was stated that the commonly used formula was valid for an incompressible nucleating phase and no longer held for such as a bubble nucleation. In this paper, we will amend this statement; that is, the commonly used formula is shown to hold for incompressible parent phase, such as a bubble nucleation in an incompressible parent phase.

  8. Self-assembling process of Oxalamide compounds and their nucleation efficiency in bio-degradable Poly(hydroxyalkanoate)s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Piming; Deshmukh, Yogesh S.; Wilsens, Carolus H. R. M.; Ryan Hansen, Michael; Graf, Robert; Rastogi, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    One of the key requirements in semi-crystalline polyesters, synthetic or bio-based, is the control on crystallization rate and crystallinity. One of the limiting factors in the commercialization of the bio-based polyesters, for example polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesized by bacteria for energy storage purposes, is the slow crystallization rate. In this study, we show that by tailoring the molecular structure of oxalamide compounds, it is possible to dissolve these compounds in molten poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), having a hydroxyvalerate co-monomer content of less than 2 mol%. Upon cooling the polymer melt, the homogeneously dispersed oxalamide compound crystallizes just below the melting temperature of the polymer. The phase-separated compound reduces the nucleation barrier of the polymer, thus enhancing the crystallization rate, nucleation density and crystallinity. The findings reported in this study provide a generic route for the molecular design of oxalamide-based compounds that can be used for enhancing nucleation efficiency of semi-crystalline bio-based polyesters.

  9. Self-assembling process of Oxalamide compounds and their nucleation efficiency in bio-degradable Poly(hydroxyalkanoate)s

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Piming; Deshmukh, Yogesh S.; Wilsens, Carolus H.R.M.; Ryan Hansen, Michael; Graf, Robert; Rastogi, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    One of the key requirements in semi-crystalline polyesters, synthetic or bio-based, is the control on crystallization rate and crystallinity. One of the limiting factors in the commercialization of the bio-based polyesters, for example polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesized by bacteria for energy storage purposes, is the slow crystallization rate. In this study, we show that by tailoring the molecular structure of oxalamide compounds, it is possible to dissolve these compounds in molten poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), having a hydroxyvalerate co-monomer content of less than 2 mol%. Upon cooling the polymer melt, the homogeneously dispersed oxalamide compound crystallizes just below the melting temperature of the polymer. The phase-separated compound reduces the nucleation barrier of the polymer, thus enhancing the crystallization rate, nucleation density and crystallinity. The findings reported in this study provide a generic route for the molecular design of oxalamide-based compounds that can be used for enhancing nucleation efficiency of semi-crystalline bio-based polyesters. PMID:26290334

  10. Kinetics of nucleation of thermodynamically ordered ferroelectric phases in PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3- xPbTiO3 crystals with different compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamzina, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    The kinetics of electric field-induced nucleation of ordered ferroelectric phases from a mixed glassy relaxor state has been studied in a number of single-crystal (1- x)PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3- xPbTiO3 (PMN- xPT) solid solutions ( x = 29, 33, 35%) lying in a morphotropic phase region. It is shown that the formation of these phases and fast establishment of a macroscopic polarization are preceded by some delay time, depending on the electric field strength and temperature. It is found that the monoclinic phase is thermodynamically stable at room temperature in all the compounds in the time ( 3000 s) and electric field ( 1 kV/cm) ranges under study, whereas the monoclinic phase of the compound with x = 35% transforms, at temperatures near the temperature of the morphotropic phase transition after insignificant time interval of 100 s, to another stable ferroelectric tetragonal phase.

  11. Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Kuang; Liu, Yung-Tsung; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Shen, Tien-Lin; Hsieh, Ming-Yang; Tzou, An-Jye; Chen, Shih-Chen; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Chan, Sheng-Wen; Shen, Yen-Ping; Cheng, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Chen, Hao-Ming; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Charlton, Martin D B; Hsieh, Tung-Po; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-04-06

    Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new "paradigm shift" non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) as used by the Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase.

  12. High Compositional Homogeneity of CdTexSe1-x Crystals Grown by the Bridgman Method

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Lee, K.; Lee, W.; Tappero, R.; Yang, G.; Gul, R.; James, R. B.

    2015-02-03

    We obtained high-quality CdTexSe1-x (CdTeSe) crystals from ingots grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. The compositional uniformity of the ingots was evaluated by X-ray fluorescence at BNL’s National Synchrotron Light Source X27A beam line. The resulting compositional homogeneity was highly uniform throughout the ingot, and the effective segregation coefficient of Se was ~1.0. This uniformity offers potential opportunity to enhance the yield of the materials for both infrared substrate and radiation-detector applications, so greatly lowering the cost of production and also offering us the prospect to grow large-diameter ingots for use as large-area substrates and for producing higher efficiency gamma-ray detectors. The concentration of secondary phases was found to be much lower, by eight- to ten fold compared to that of conventional CdxZn1-xTe (CdZnTe or CZT).

  13. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  14. A~comprehensive parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation of dust surrogate: laboratory study with hematite particles and its application to atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Paukert, M.; Steinke, I.; Zhang, K.; Kulkarni, G.; Hoose, C.; Schnaiter, M.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.

    2014-06-01

    A new heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization that covers a~wide temperature range (-36 to -78 °C) is presented. Developing and testing such an ice nucleation parameterization, which is constrained through identical experimental conditions, is critical in order to accurately simulate the ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. The surface-scaled ice nucleation efficiencies of hematite particles, inferred by ns, were derived from AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber measurements under water subsaturated conditions that were realized by continuously changing temperature (T) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) in the chamber. Our measurements showed several different pathways to nucleate ice depending on T and RHice conditions. For instance, almost T-independent freezing was observed at -60 °C < T < -50 °C, where RHice explicitly controlled ice nucleation efficiency, while both T and RHice played roles in other two T regimes: -78 °C < T < -60 °C and -50 °C < T < -36 °C. More specifically, observations at T colder than -60 °C revealed that higher RHice was necessary to maintain constant ns, whereas T may have played a significant role in ice nucleation at T warmer than -50 °C. We implemented new ns parameterizations into two cloud models to investigate its sensitivity and compare with the existing ice nucleation schemes towards simulating cirrus cloud properties. Our results show that the new AIDA-based parameterizations lead to an order of magnitude higher ice crystal concentrations and inhibition of homogeneous nucleation in colder temperature regions. Our cloud simulation results suggest that atmospheric dust particles that form ice nuclei at lower temperatures, below -36 °C, can potentially have stronger influence on cloud properties such as cloud longevity and initiation when compared to previous parameterizations.

  15. Crystal quality and differential crystal-growth behaviour of three proteins crystallized in gel at high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Kadri, A; Lorber, B; Charron, C; Robert, M-C; Capelle, B; Damak, M; Jenner, G; Giegé, R

    2005-06-01

    Pressure is a non-invasive physical parameter that can be used to control and influence protein crystallization. It is also found that protein crystals of superior quality can be produced in gel. Here, a novel crystallization strategy combining hydrostatic pressure and agarose gel is described. Comparative experiments were conducted on hen and turkey egg-white lysozymes and the plant protein thaumatin. Crystals could be produced under up to 75-100 MPa (lysozymes) and 250 MPa (thaumatin). Several pressure-dependent parameters were determined, which included solubility and supersaturation of the proteins, number, size and morphology of the crystals, and the crystallization volume. Exploration of three-dimensional phase diagrams in which pH and pressure varied identified growth conditions where crystals had largest size and best morphology. As a general trend, nucleation and crystal-growth kinetics are altered and nucleation is always enhanced under pressure. Further, solubility of the lysozymes increases with pressure while that of thaumatin decreases. Likewise, changes in crystallization volumes at high and atmospheric pressure are opposite, being positive for the lysozymes and negative for thaumatin. Crystal quality was estimated by analysis of Bragg reflection profiles and X-ray topographs. While the quality of lysozyme crystals deteriorates as pressure increases, that of thaumatin crystals improves, with more homogeneous crystal morphology suggesting that pressure selectively dissociates ill-formed nuclei. Analysis of the thaumatin structure reveals a less hydrated solvent shell around the protein when pressure increases, with approximately 20% less ordered water molecules in crystals grown at 150 MPa when compared with those grown at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa). Noticeably, the altered water distribution is seen in depressurized crystals, indicating that pressure triggers a stable structural alteration on the protein surface while its polypeptide backbone

  16. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: bridging stochastic and singular freezing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, D.; Shaw, R. A.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized model that bridges these stochastic and singular descriptions of heterogeneous ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats statistically similar particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. We suggest that ice nucleation is fundamentally a stochastic process but that for realistic atmospheric particle populations this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties. Full evaluation of the model will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  17. Real-time molecular scale observation of crystal formation.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Roy E; Houben, Lothar; Wolf, Sharon G; Leitus, Gregory; Lang, Zhong-Ling; Carbó, Jorge J; Poblet, Josep M; Neumann, Ronny

    2017-04-01

    How molecules in solution form crystal nuclei, which then grow into large crystals, is a poorly understood phenomenon. The classical mechanism of homogeneous crystal nucleation proceeds via the spontaneous random aggregation of species from liquid or solution. However, a non-classical mechanism suggests the formation of an amorphous dense phase that reorders to form stable crystal nuclei. So far it has remained an experimental challenge to observe the formation of crystal nuclei from five to thirty molecules. Here, using polyoxometallates, we show that the formation of small crystal nuclei is observable by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. We observe both classical and non-classical nucleation processes, depending on the identity of the cation present. The experiments verify theoretical studies that suggest non-classical nucleation is the lower of the two energy pathways. The arrangement in just a seven-molecule proto-crystal matches the order found by X-ray diffraction of a single bulk crystal, which demonstrates that the same structure was formed in each case.

  18. Comparison of crystal growth and thermoelectric properties of n-type Bi-Se-Te and p-type Bi-Sb-Te nanocrystalline thin films: Effects of homogeneous irradiation with an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Takashiri, Masayuki Imai, Kazuo; Uyama, Masato; Nishi, Yoshitake; Hagino, Harutoshi; Miyazaki, Koji; Tanaka, Saburo

    2014-06-07

    The effects of homogenous electron beam (EB) irradiation on the crystal growth and thermoelectric properties of n-type Bi-Se-Te and p-type Bi-Sb-Te thin films were investigated. Both types of thin films were prepared by flash evaporation, after which homogeneous EB irradiation was performed at an acceleration voltage of 0.17 MeV. For the n-type thin films, nanodots with a diameter of less than 10 nm were observed on the surface of rice-like nanostructures, and crystallization and crystal orientation were improved by EB irradiation. The resulting enhancement of mobility led to increased electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power factor for the n-type thin films. In contrast, the crystallization and crystal orientation of the p-type thin films were not influenced by EB irradiation. The carrier concentration increased and mobility decreased with increased EB irradiation dose, possibly because of the generation of defects. As a result, the thermoelectric power factor of p-type thin films was not improved by EB irradiation. The different crystallization behavior of the n-type and p-type thin films is attributed to atomic rearrangement during EB irradiation. Selenium in the n-type thin films is more likely to undergo atomic rearrangement than the other atoms present, so only the crystallinity of the n-type Bi-Se-Te thin films was enhanced.

  19. Programmable and coherent crystallization of semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liyang; Niazi, Muhammad R.; Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy O.; Li, Ruipeng; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Munir, Rahim; Balawi, Ahmed H.; Laquai, Frédéric; Amassian, Aram

    2017-01-01

    The functional properties and technological utility of polycrystalline materials are largely determined by the structure, geometry, and spatial distribution of their multitude of crystals. However, crystallization is seeded through stochastic and incoherent nucleation events, limiting the ability to control or pattern the microstructure, texture, and functional properties of polycrystalline materials. We present a universal approach that can program the microstructure of materials through the coherent seeding of otherwise stochastic homogeneous nucleation events. The method relies on creating topographic variations to seed nucleation and growth at designated locations while delaying nucleation elsewhere. Each seed can thus produce a coherent growth front of crystallization with a geometry designated by the shape and arrangement of seeds. Periodic and aperiodic crystalline arrays of functional materials, such as semiconductors, can thus be created on demand and with unprecedented sophistication and ease by patterning the location and shape of the seeds. This approach is used to demonstrate printed arrays of organic thin-film transistors with remarkable performance and reproducibility owing to their demonstrated spatial control over the microstructure of organic and inorganic polycrystalline semiconductors. PMID:28275737

  20. Computer Modeling of Non-Isothermal Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Narayan, K. Lakshmi; Levine, L. E.; Cull, T. C.; Ray, C. S.

    1996-01-01

    A realistic computer model for simulating isothermal and non-isothermal phase transformations proceeding by homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and interface-limited growth is presented. A new treatment for particle size effects on the crystallization kinetics is developed and is incorporated into the numerical model. Time-dependent nucleation rates, size-dependent growth rates, and surface crystallization are also included. Model predictions are compared with experimental measurements of DSC/DTA peak parameters for the crystallization of lithium disilicate glass as a function of particle size, Pt doping levels, and water content. The quantitative agreement that is demonstrated indicates that the numerical model can be used to extract key kinetic data from easily obtained calorimetric data. The model can also be used to probe nucleation and growth behavior in regimes that are otherwise inaccessible. Based on a fit to data, an earlier prediction that the time-dependent nucleation rate in a DSC/DTA scan can rise above the steady-state value at a temperature higher than the peak in the steady-state rate is demonstrated.

  1. SUCCESS Evidence for Cirrus Cloud Ice Nucleation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    During the SUCCESS mission, several measurements were made which should improve our understanding of ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. Temperature and water vapor concentration were made with a variety of instruments on the NASA DC-8. These observations should provide accurate upper tropospheric humidities. In particular, we will evaluate what humidities are required for ice nucleation. Preliminary results suggest that substantial supersaturations frequently exist in the upper troposphere. The leading-edge region of wave-clouds (where ice nucleation occurs) was sampled extensively at temperatures near -40 and -60C. These observations should give precise information about conditions required for ice nucleation. In addition, we will relate the observed aerosol composition and size distributions to the ice formation observed to evaluate the role of soot or mineral particles on ice nucleation. As an alternative technique for determining what particles act as ice nuclei, numerous samples of aerosols inside ice crystals were taken. In some cases, large numbers of aerosols were detected in each crystal, indicating that efficient scavenging occurred. Analysis of aerosols in ice crystals when only one particle per crystal was detected should help with the ice nucleation issue. Direct measurements of the ice nucleating activity of ambient aerosols drawn into airborne cloud chambers were also made. Finally, measurements of aerosols and ice crystals in contrails should indicate whether aircraft exhaust soot particles are effective ice nuclei.

  2. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  3. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  4. A tale of two mechanisms. Strain-softening versus strain-hardening in single crystals under small stressed volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Bei, Hongbin; Xia, Yuzhi; Barabash, Rozaliya; Gao, Y. F.

    2015-08-10

    Pre-straining defect-free single crystals will introduce heterogeneous dislocation nucleation sources that reduce the measured strength from the theoretical value, while pre-straining bulk samples will lead to strain hardening. Their competition is investigated by nanoindentation pop-in tests on variously pre-strained Mo single crystals with several indenter radii (~micrometer). Pre-straining primarily shifts deformation mechanism from homogeneous dislocation nucleation to a stochastic behavior, while strain hardening plays a secondary role, as summarized in a master plot of pop-in strength versus normalized indenter radius.

  5. Size Dependant Nucleation of Confined 2-Decanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanuel, Samuel; Bauer, Hillary; Safiq, Alexandrea; Dulmaa, Jargalsaikhan; Khraisat, Amer

    2012-02-01

    We have studied freezing and melting of physically confined 2-decanol in nano porous silica using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). Both melting and freezing temperatures are suppressed for physically confined 2-decanol. In the presence of bulk, freezing of the confined system is triggered by freezing of the bulk where nucleation is heterogeneous. There is, however, a cutoff size between 100 nm and 300 nm where phase transition is no longer initiated through heterogeneous nucleation. Below the cutoff size, nucleation is homogeneous where the confined system has to be supercooled further before any phase transition can occur. Melting of the confined system, on the other hand, is not influenced by the presence or absence of the bulk.

  6. Crystallization of Ice in Aqueous Solutions of Glycerol and Dimethyl Sulfoxide. 1. A Comparison of Mechanisms

    PubMed

    Hey; Macfarlane

    1996-04-01

    The crystallization of ice from aqueous solutions of glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry. In particular, the ice crystallization behavior of glycerol and Me2SO solutions containing approximately the same mole percent solute concentration (i.e., approximately 16 mol%) has been compared. These solutions (45 w/w% Me2SO (15.9 mol%) and 50 w/w% glycerol (16.4 mol%)) were shown to exhibit markedly different ice crystallization properties. For example, the peak homogeneous nucleation temperature of the Me2SO solution was observed to be 3°C above Tg, whereas the peak homogeneous nucleation temperature of the glycerol solution was shown to be 20°C above Tg. Further, the 50 w/w% glycerol solution was shown to devitrify at temperatures close to those of the peak nucleation rate, whereas the Me2SO solution was found to devitrify at temperatures much higher than the peak nucleation temperature. This, along with evidence from emulsion-based calorimetry experiments, indicates that the nucleation leading to devitrification in 45 w/w% Me2SO solutions is largely heterogeneous in nature.

  7. Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1993-11-01

    Several bacterial species are able to catalyze ice formation at temperatures as warm as -2 degrees C. These microorganisms efficiently catalyze ice formation at temperatures much higher than most organic or inorganic substances. Because of their ubiquity on the surfaces of frost-sensitive plants, they are responsible for initiating ice formation, which results in frost injury. The high temperature of ice catalysis conferred by bacterial ice nuclei makes them useful in ice nucleation-limited processes such as artificial snow production, the freezing of some food products, and possibly in future whether modification schemes. The rarity of other ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperature, and the ease and sensitivity with which ice nuclei can be quantified, have made the use of a promoterless bacterial ice nucleation gene valuable as a reporter of transcription. Target genes to which this promoter is fused can be used in cells in natural habitats. Warm-temperature ice nucleation sites have also been extensively studied at a molecular level. Nucleation sites active at high temperatures (above -5 degrees C) are probably composed of bacterial ice nucleation protein molecules that form functionally aligned aggregates. Models of ice nucleation proteins predict that they form a planar array of hydrogen binding groups that closely complement that of an ice crystal face. Moreover, interdigitation of these molecules may produce a large contiguous template for ice formation.

  8. Effect of inter-species selective interactions on the thermodynamics and nucleation free-energy barriers of a tessellating polyhedral compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2016-12-01

    The phase behavior and the homogeneous nucleation of an equimolar mixture of octahedra and cuboctahedra are studied using thermodynamic integration, Gibbs-Duhem integration, and umbrella sampling simulations. The components of this mixture are modeled as polybead objects of equal edge lengths so that they can assemble into a space-filling compound with the CsCl crystal structure. Taking as reference the hard-core system where the compound crystal does not spontaneously nucleate, we quantified the effect of inter-species selective interactions on facilitating the disorder-to-order transition. Facet selective and facet non-selective inter-species attractions were considered, and while the former was expectedly more favorable toward the target tessellating structure, the latter was found to be similarly effective in nucleating the crystal compound. Ranges for the strength of attractions and degree of supersaturation were identified where the nucleation free-energy barrier was small enough to foretell a fast process but large enough to prevent spinodal fluctuations that can trap the system in dense metastable states lacking long-range order. At those favorable conditions, the tendency toward the local orientational order favored by packing entropy is amplified and found to play a key role seeding nuclei with the CsCl structure.

  9. Chiral symmetry breaking dictated by electric-field-driven shape transitions of nucleating conglomerate domains in a bent-core liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, G. B.; Pratibha, R.

    2014-04-01

    Generating and controlling chiral symmetry breaking and enantiomeric excess is not only interesting from a fundamental perspective but can also lead to novel functional materials. In this work, we show how the dark conglomerate (DC) liquid crystalline phase characterized by macroscopic chiral domains offers such a possibility if formed under an electric field. In addition the chiral domains are electro-optically switchable. The chiral segregation in the DC phase can be tuned by using dc or ac fields at different frequencies. Consequently, the enantioselectivity, dielectric parameters and switching polarization in the DC phase become tunable. Another interesting aspect is that the nucleating conglomerate domains formed under ac fields exhibit frequency dependent shape transitions which have a striking resemblance to domain shape changes observed in two-dimensional monolayers. This can therefore be used as a model experimental system to get a physical insight into the effects of chiral and electrostatic interactions, under external fields, on domain growth and interface structures. The domain shape transitions can also be used to investigate the role of growth morphology in coarsening and scaling hypotheses. From a technological point of view this opens up the possibility of obtaining chiral thin films with preferential sense of chirality which can be useful in chiroptical and nonlinear optical applications.

  10. Melt structure and self-nucleation of ethylene copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamo, Rufina G.

    A strong memory effect of crystallization has been observed in melts of random ethylene copolymers well above the equilibrium melting temperature. These studies have been carried out by DSC, x-ray, TEM and optical microscopy on a large number of model, narrow, and broad copolymers with different comonomer types and contents. Melt memory is correlated with self-seeds that increase the crystallization rate of ethylene copolymers. The seeds are associated with molten ethylene sequences from the initial crystals that remain in close proximity and lower the nucleation barrier. Diffusion of all sequences to a randomized melt state is a slow process, restricted by topological chain constraints (loops, knots, and other entanglements) that build in the intercrystalline region during crystallization. Self-seeds dissolve above a critical melt temperature that demarcates homogeneity of the copolymer melt. There is a critical threshold level of crystallinity to observe the effect of melt memory on crystallization rate, thus supporting the correlation between melt memory and the change in melt structure during copolymer crystallization. Unlike binary blends, commercial ethylene-1-alkene copolymers with a range in inter-chain comonomer composition between 1 and about 15 mol % display an inversion of the crystallization rate in a range of melt temperatures where narrow copolymers show a continuous acceleration of the rate. With decreasing the initial melt temperature, broadly distributed copolymers show enhanced crystallization followed by a decrease of crystallization rate. The inversion demarcates the onset of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) and a reduction of self-nuclei due to the strong thermodynamic drive for molecular segregation inside the binodal. The strong effect of melt memory on crystallization rate can be used to identify liquid-liquid phase separation in broadly distributed copolymers, and offers strategies to control the state of copolymer melts in ways of

  11. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  12. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, M; Sagis, L M C

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  13. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2014-12-01

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  14. Ice Nucleation properties of Air-Plane Soot Surrogates Using Vibrational Micro-spectroscopy: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, Claire; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Ortega, Ismael; Carpentier, Yvain; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    Aircraft emissions have been studied extensively since the late 1960s and the interest was mainly driven by their direct and indirect effects on climate and the generation of contrails [1-4]. Emissions of solid-state particles (soots) from engine exhausts due to incomplete fuel combustion are considered to influence ice and liquid water cloud droplet activation [4]. The activity of these aerosols would originate from their ability to be important centers of ice-particle nucleation by promoting ice formation above water homogeneous freezing point. While some experiments focused on ice nucleation on soot particles did not yet reach definitive conclusions, soot are reported to be generally worse ice nuclei than mineral dust, nucleating at higher ice-supersaturations for deposition nucleation and at lower temperatures for immersion freezing. However, there are still numerous opened questions on the ice nucleation properties of soot particles [5], most likely due to the lack of information on the abundance, on the physico-chemical properties (structure and chemical compositions) of these aerosols, competition between different ice nucleation modes and dynamical factors that affect ice nucleation. Furthermore, the soot emitted from aircraft may be associated with soluble components like sulphate that can act as heterogeneous ice nuclei and initiate freezing at supersaturation of only 120-130% [6]. Therefore, more detailed studies of aerosol nucleation activity combined with throughout structural and compositional analyzes are needed in order to establish any association between the particles' hygroscopicity and their physico-chemical properties. In the present preliminary work, nucleation activity of air-plane soot particle surrogates is monitored using a temperature-controlled reactor in which the sample's relative humidity is precisely measured with a cryo-hygrometer. Formation of water/ice onto the particles is followed both optically and spectroscopically, using a

  15. Pre-activation of ice-nucleating particles by the pore condensation and freezing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Kiselev, Alexei; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Steinke, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    In spite of the resurgence in ice nucleation research a comparatively small number of studies deal with the phenomenon of pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation. Fifty years ago, it was shown that various mineral dust and volcanic ash particles can be pre-activated to become nuclei for ice crystal formation even at temperatures as high as 270-271 K. Pre-activation was achieved under ice-subsaturated conditions without any preceding macroscopic ice growth by just temporarily cooling the particles to temperatures below 228 K. A two-step mechanism involving capillary condensation of supercooled water and subsequent homogeneous freezing was proposed to account for the particles' enhanced ice nucleation ability at high temperatures. This work reinvestigates the efficiency of the proposed pre-activation mechanism in temperature-cycling experiments performed in a large cloud chamber with suspended particles. We find the efficiency to be highest for the clay mineral illite as well as for highly porous materials like zeolite and diatomaceous earth, whereas most aerosols generated from desert dust surface samples did not reveal a measurable pre-activation ability. The pre-activation efficiency is linked to particle pores in a certain size range. As estimated by model calculations, only pores with diameters between about 5 and 8 nm contribute to pre-activation under ice-subsaturated conditions. This range is set by a combination of requirements from the negative Kelvin effect for condensation and a critical size of ice embryos for ice nucleation and melting. In contrast to the early study, pre-activation is only observed for temperatures below 260 K. Above that threshold, the particles' improved ice nucleation ability disappears due to the melting of ice in the pores.

  16. Ostwald-Meyers Metastable Region in LiBr Crystallization-Comparison of Measurements with Predictions.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Kristin N.; Dirksen, James A.; Ring, Terry A.

    2001-07-15

    Experiments have been performed to measure the Ostwald-Meyers metastable region during crystallization from concentrated LiBr solutions. Solution thermodynamics shows that several hydrated LiBr salts and ice can crystallize depending upon the concentration of LiBr in aqueous solution. The available solubility data were interpreted to give solubility products of several hydrated LiBr salts using the formulation of Helgeson, which accounts for the activity of water. The crystallization temperature was measured by monitoring to +/-0.01 degrees C the temperature of solutions inside test tubes placed in a cooling bath programmed at a cooling rate of 20 degrees C/h. A release of the heat of crystallization identifies the temperature of crystallization. The equilibrium solubility was verified by crystallization with seed crystals present. The crystallization temperature without seeds present was 10 to 20 degrees C less than the equilibrium solubility temperature corresponding to the Ostwald-Meyers metastable region. This crystallization temperature measured at 20 degrees C/h was shown to correspond to nucleation on the surface of the test tube with an interface energy of 40+/-1.2 erg/cm(2). Homogeneous nucleation from solution data shows the crystallization temperature to be from 40 to 50 degrees C below the equilibrium solubility curve and to be accurately predicted by homogeneous nucleation with an interface energy of 26 erg/cm(2), the literature value of the ice/water interface. Since the hydrated LiBr salts have surfaces that expose structured water molecules to the solution, this value is believed to be an appropriate value of the interface energy of the hydrated LiBr crystals. Crystallization temperature measurements were performed at different cooling rates, showing that slower cooling rates gave a narrower Ostwald-Myers metastable zone as is expected. Induction time measurements showed that the time to spontaneous crystallization increases as the supersaturation

  17. Anvil Glaciation in a Deep Cumulus Updraught over Florida Simulated with the Explicit Microphysics Model. I: Impact of Various Nucleation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Vaughan T. J.; Andronache, Constantin; Sherwood, Steven C.; Bansemer, Aaron; Conant, William C.; Demott, Paul J.; Flagan, Richard C.; Heymsfield, Andy; Jonsson, Haflidi; Poellot, Micheal; Rissman, Tracey A.; Seinfeld, John H.; Vanreken, Tim; Varutbangkul, Varuntida; Wilson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Simulations of a cumulonimbus cloud observed in the Cirrus regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) with an advanced version of the Explicit Microphysics Model (EMM) are presented. The EMM has size-resolved aerosols and predicts the time evolution of sizes, bulk densities and axial ratios of ice particles. Observations by multiple aircraft in the troposphere provide inputs to the model, including observations of the ice nuclei and of the entire size distribution of condensation nuclei. Homogeneous droplet freezing is found to be the source of almost all of the ice crystals in the anvil updraught of this particular model cloud. Most of the simulated droplets that freeze to form anvil crystals appear to be nucleated by activation of aerosols far above cloud base in the interior of the cloud ("secondary" or "in cloud" droplet nucleation). This is partly because primary droplets formed at cloud base are invariably depleted by accretion before they can reach the anvil base in the updraught, which promotes an increase with height of the average supersaturation in the updraught aloft. More than half of these aerosols, activated far above cloud base, are entrained into the updraught of this model cloud from the lateral environment above about 5 km above mean sea level. This confirms the importance of remote sources of atmospheric aerosol for anvil glaciation. Other nucleation processes impinge indirectly upon the anvil glaciation by modifying the concentration of supercooled droplets in the upper levels of the mixed-phase region. For instance, the warm-rain process produces a massive indirect impact on the anvil crystal concentration, because it determines the mass of precipitation forming in the updraught. It competes with homogeneous freezing as a sink for cloud droplets. The effects from turbulent enhancement of the warm-rain process and from the nucleation processes on the anvil ice properties are assessed.

  18. Nucleation theorems, the statistical mechanics of molecular clusters, and a revision of classical nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, I. J.

    1997-11-01

    The nucleation theorems relate the temperature and supersaturation dependence of the rate of nucleation of droplets from a metastable vapor phase to properties of the critical molecular cluster, the size that is approximately equally likely to grow or decay. They are derived here using a combination of statistical mechanics and cluster population dynamics, using an arbitrary model cluster definition. The theorems are employed to test the validity of the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation and its ``internally consistent'' form. It is found that the properties of the critical cluster for these models are incorrect, and it emerges that this occurs because the classical theory employs the free energy of a fixed droplet, rather than one free to take any position in space. Thus a term representing positional, or mixing, entropy is missing from the cluster free energy. A revised model is proposed, based on the capillarity approximation but with such a term included, and it is shown that it is fully consistent with the nucleation theorems. The model increases classical rates by factors of approximately 104-106. Other nucleation models should be tested for internal consistency using the same methods. Finally, the nucleation theorems are used to extract the excess internal energies of molecular clusters from experimental data for several substances.

  19. Nucleation of carbon nanostructures: Molecular dynamics with reactive potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiullina, G. M.; Orekhov, N. D.; Stegailov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present our first results in the study of the details of nucleation in the homogeneous carbon gas phase using computer calculations with molecular dynamics methods. Direct and controlled molecular-dynamics approaches are used and two reactive potentials (ReaxFF and AIREBO) are compared. The calculations have shown that the nucleation process in the AIREBO model is going more actively than in the ReaxFF one.

  20. Observations on the nucleation of ice VII in compressed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Chapman, David J.; Bland, Simon N.; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Water can freeze upon multiple shock compression, but the window material determines the pressure of the phase transition. Several plate impact experiments were conducted with liquid targets on a single-stage gas gun, diagnosed simultaneously using photonic doppler velocimetry (PDV) and high speed imaging through the water. The experiments investigated why silica windows instigate freezing above 2.5 GPa whilst sapphire windows do not until 7 GPa. We find that the nucleation of ice occurs on the surfaces of windows and can be affected by the surface coating suggesting the surface energy of fused silica, likely due to hydroxyl groups, encourages nucleation of ice VII crystallites. Aluminium coatings prevent nucleation and sapphire surfaces do not nucleate until approximately 6.5 GPa. This is believed to be the threshold pressure for the homogeneous nucleation of water.

  1. Regional Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lili; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has been made to understand the organizational principles of human brain function using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods, among which resting-state fMRI (rfMRI) is an increasingly recognized technique for measuring the intrinsic dynamics of the human brain. Functional connectivity (FC) with rfMRI is the most widely used method to describe remote or long-distance relationships in studies of cerebral cortex parcellation, interindividual variability, and brain disorders. In contrast, local or short-distance functional interactions, especially at a scale of millimeters, have rarely been investigated or systematically reviewed like remote FC, although some local FC algorithms have been developed and applied to the discovery of brain-based changes under neuropsychiatric conditions. To fill this gap between remote and local FC studies, this review will (1) briefly survey the history of studies on organizational principles of human brain function; (2) propose local functional homogeneity as a network centrality to characterize multimodal local features of the brain connectome; (3) render a neurobiological perspective on local functional homogeneity by linking its temporal, spatial, and individual variability to information processing, anatomical morphology, and brain development; and (4) discuss its role in performing connectome-wide association studies and identify relevant challenges, and recommend its use in future brain connectomics studies. PMID:26170004

  2. Bubble nucleation in a Lennard-Jones binary liquid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidakov, Vladimir G.; Protsenko, Sergey P.; Bryukhanov, Vasiliy M.

    2016-10-01

    We report a molecular dynamics (MD) study of homogeneous bubble nucleation in a stretched Lennard-Jones binary mixture at a temperature close to the solvent triple point. The pressure of the limiting stretching pn corresponding to a fixed value of the nucleation rate has been determined. The values of pn achieved in MD simulation are lower than those calculated from classical nucleation theory (CNT). The discrepancy between the data of MD simulation and CNT may be connected with the neglect in the latter of the size dependence of the surface tension of critical bubbles.

  3. Understanding ice nucleation characteristics of selective mineral dusts suspended in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anand; Marcolli, Claudia; Kaufmann, Lukas; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Introduction & Objectives Freezing of liquid droplets and subsequent ice crystal growth affects optical properties of clouds and precipitation. Field measurements show that ice formation in cumulus and stratiform clouds begins at temperatures much warmer than those associated with homogeneous ice nucleation in pure water, which is ascribed to heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring on the foreign surfaces of ice nuclei (IN). Various insoluble particles such as mineral dust, soot, metallic particles, volcanic ash, or primary biological particles have been suggested as IN. Among these the suitability of mineral dusts is best established. The ice nucleation ability of mineral dust particles may be modified when secondary organic or inorganic substances are accumulating on the dust during atmospheric transport. If the coating is completely wetting the mineral dust particles, heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs in immersion mode also below 100 % RH. A previous study by Kaufmann (PhD Thesis 2015, ETHZ) with Hoggar Mountain dust suspensions in various solutes (ammonium sulfate, PEG, malonic acid and glucose) showed reduced ice nucleation efficiency (in immersion mode) of the particles. Though it is still quite unclear of how surface modifications and coatings influence the ice nucleation activity of the components present in natural dust samples. In view of these results we run freezing experiments using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with the following mineral dust particles suspended in pure water and ammonium sulfate solutions: Arizona Test Dust (ATD), microcline, and kaolinite (KGa-2, Clay Mineral Society). Methodology Suspensions of mineral dust samples (ATD: 2 weight%, microcline: 5% weight, KGa-2: 5% weight) are prepared in pure water with varying solute concentrations (ammonium sulfate: 0 - 10% weight). 20 vol% of this suspension plus 80 vol% of a mixture of 95 wt% mineral oil (Aldrich Chemical) and 5 wt% lanolin (Fluka Chemical) is emulsified with a

  4. Nucleation in plasmas at high and low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.S.; Garscadden, A.

    1994-12-31

    The nucleation processes occurring under both high-pressure and low-pressure plasma conditions have been studied and the significance of different processes for particle formation will be presented in detail. Particle nucleation and growth phenomena in plasmas are extremely important to a wide range of processes occurring under laboratory, atmospheric and astrophysical conditions. These include plasma-enhanced processing, cluster-growth mechanisms, synthesis of powders in plasma reactors, aerosol and cloud formation in planetary atmospheres, and formation of interstellar dust grains. Under most circumstances, particle formation occurs as a homogeneous nucleation process. However, at lower pressures in plasma or charged particle environments, the ions can act as condensation nuclei, and ion-induced nucleation becomes highly favored. The nucleatio