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Sample records for homolog lectin structure

  1. Extensive amino acid sequence homologies between animal lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Paroutaud, P.; Levi, G.; Teichberg, V.I.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have established the amino acid sequence of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from the electric eel and the sequences of several peptides from a similar lectin isolated from human placenta. These sequences were compared with the published sequences of peptides derived from the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from human lung and with sequences deduced from cDNAs assigned to the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins from chicken embryo skin and human hepatomas. Significant homologies were observed. One of the highly conserved regions that contains a tryptophan residue and two glutamic acid resides is probably part of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding site, which, on the basis of spectroscopic studies of the electric eel lectin, is expected to contain such residues. The similarity of the hydropathy profiles and the predicted secondary structure of the lectins from chicken skin and electric eel, in spite of differences in their amino acid sequences, strongly suggests that these proteins have maintained structural homologies during evolution and together with the other ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins were derived form a common ancestor gene.

  2. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  3. The three-dimensional structure of codakine and related marine C-type lectins.

    PubMed

    Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Markiv, Anatoly; Smith-Ravin, Juliette

    2007-10-01

    Codakine is a new Ca(2+)-dependent mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) isolated from the gill tissue of the tropical clam, Codakia orbicularis. Bioinformatic analyses with the BLAST program have revealed similarities with marine lectins involved in immunity whose three-dimensional (3D) structures were unknown up until recently. In this article, we present bioinformatic analyses of marine lectins that are homologous to codakine, in particular lectins from the sea worm Laxus oneistus, named mermaid. These lectins are involved in the symbiotic association with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria which are closely related to the C. orbicularis gill symbiont. Using homology modelling, folding that is characteristic of C-type lectins was observed in all the marine Ca(2+)-dependent lectins studied, with conservation of random coiled structures of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) and Ca(2+)-binding sites. Like codakine, the marine lectins analysed contain a signal peptide commonly found in secreted and transmembrane proteins. The majority of the predictive 3D models established from the lectins exhibit a common feature, namely the involvement in invertebrate and vertebrate immunity (dendritic cell receptor, macrophage receptor, etc.). These bioinformatic analyses and the literature data support the hypothesis that codakine, like the L. oneistus mermaids, is probably involved in the cellular mediation of symbiosis and defence against pathogenic microorganisms.

  4. A rainbow trout lectin with multimeric structure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L E; Thiel, S; Petersen, T E; Jensenius, J C

    1997-04-01

    A novel lectin has been identified in rainbow trout serum and plasma. The lectin binds to Sepharose (an agarose polymer) in a calcium-dependent manner. Glucose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, mannose, N-acetyl-mannosamine, L-fucose, maltose and alpha-methyl-mannoside are good inhibitors of this binding, whereas glucosamine and D-fucose inhibits to a lesser degree and mannosamine and galactose do not inhibit the binding to Sepharose. When analysed by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions, the lectin appears as a characteristic ladder of bands with approximately 16 kDa between consecutive bands. Upon reduction, the lectin appears as a 16-kDa band. On size-exclusion chromatography of trout serum and plasma, the protein emerges over a broad range corresponding to sizes from about 2000 kDa to less than 200 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequence (AAENRNQXPPG) shows no significant homology with known proteins. Because of the characteristic appearance in non-reducing SDS-PAGE and the lectin activity, we propose to name the protein "ladderlectin."

  5. Structure of a lectin from the sea mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (CGL)

    PubMed Central

    Jakób, Michał; Lubkowski, Jacek; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    CGL is a 150 amino-acid residue lectin that was originally isolated from the sea mussel Crenomytilus grayanus. It is specific for binding GalNAc/Gal-containing carbohydrate moieties and in general does not share sequence homology with other known galectins or lectins. Since CGL displays antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities, and interacts with high affinity with mucin-type receptors, which are abundant on some cancer cells, knowledge of its structure is of significant interest. Conditions have been established for the expression, purification and crystallization of a recombinant variant of CGL. The crystal structure of recombinant CGL was determined and refined at a resolution of 2.12 Å. The amino-acid sequence of CGL contains three homologous regions (73% similarity) and the folded protein has a β-trefoil topology. Structural comparison of CGL with the closely related lectin MytiLec allowed description of the glycan-binding pockets. PMID:26527272

  6. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  7. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-04-08

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  8. High-resolution crystal structures of Colocasia esculenta tarin lectin.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patricia R; Meagher, Jennifer L; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J; Paschoalin, Vânia M F; Silva, Joab T; Stuckey, Jeanne A

    2017-01-01

    Tarin, the Colocasia esculenta lectin from the superfamily of α-d-mannose-specific plant bulb lectins, is a tetramer of 47 kDa composed of two heterodimers. Each heterodimer possesses homologous monomers of ~11.9 (A chain) and ~12.7 (B chain) kDa. The structures of apo and carbohydrate-bound tarin were solved to 1.7 Å and 1.91 Å, respectively. Each tarin monomer forms a canonical β-prism II fold, common to all members of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) family, which is partially stabilized by a disulfide bond and a conserved hydrophobic core. The heterodimer is formed through domain swapping involving the C-terminal β-strand and the β-sheet on face I of the prism. The tetramer is assembled through the dimerization of the B chains from heterodimers involving face II of each prism. The 1.91 Å crystal structure of tarin bound to Manα(1,3)Manα(1,6)Man reveals an expanded carbohydrate-binding sequence (QxDxNxVxYx4/6WX) on face III of the β-prism. Both monomers possess a similar fold, except for the length of the loop, which begins after the conserved tyrosine and creates the binding pocket for the α(1,6)-terminal mannose. This loop differs in size and amino-acid composition from 10 other β-prism II domain proteins, and may confer carbohydrate-binding specificity among members of the GNA-related lectin family.

  9. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  10. A profile of protein-protein interaction: Crystal structure of a lectin-lectin complex.

    PubMed

    Surya, Sukumaran; Abhilash, Joseph; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-06-01

    Proteins may utilize complex networks of interactions to create/proceed signaling pathways of highly adaptive responses such as programmed cell death. Direct binary interactions study of proteins may help propose models for protein-protein interaction. Towards this goal we applied a combination of thermodynamic kinetics and crystal structure analyses to elucidate the complexity and diversity in such interactions. By determining the heat change on the association of two galactose-specific legume lectins from Butea monosperma (BML) and Spatholobus parviflorus (SPL) belonging to Fabaceae family helped to compute the binding equilibrium. It was extended further by X-ray structural analysis of BML-SPL binary complex. In order to chart the proteins interacting mainly through their interfaces, identification of the nature of forces which stabilized the association of the lectin-lectin complex was examined. Comprehensive analysis of the BMLSPL complex by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystal structure threw new light on the lectin-lectin interactions suggesting of their use in diverse areas of glycobiology.

  11. Structural characterization of novel chitin-binding lectins from the genus Artocarpus and their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Melissa B; Lopes, José L S; Soares-Costa, Andréa; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina; Moreira, Renato A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Beltramini, Leila M

    2006-01-01

    Two novel chitin-binding lectins from seeds of Artocarpus genus were described in this paper, one from A. integrifolia (jackfruit) and one from A. incisa (breadfruit). They were purified from saline crude extract of seeds using affinity chromatography on chitin column, size-exclusion chromatography and reverse-phase chromatography on the C-18 column. Both are 14 kDa proteins, made up of 3 chains linked by disulfide bonds. The partial amino acid sequences of the two lectins showed they are homologous to each other but not to other plant chitin-binding proteins. Thus, they cannot be classified in any known plant chitin-binding protein family, particularly because of their inter-chain covalent bonds. Their circular dichroism spectra and deconvolution showed a secondary structure content of beta-sheet and unordered elements. The lectins were thermally stable until 80 degrees C and structural changes were observed below pH 6. Both lectins inhibited the growth of Fusarium moniliforme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and presented hemagglutination activity against human and rabbit erythrocytes. These lectins were denoted jackin (from jackfruit) and frutackin (from breadfruit).

  12. Use of labeled tomato lectin for imaging vasculature structures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Levine, Samantha T; Haynes, Sherry M; Gutierrez, Paula; Baratta, Janie L; Tan, Zhiqun; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2015-02-01

    Intravascular injections of fluorescent or biotinylated tomato lectin were tested to study labeling of vascular elements in laboratory mice. Injections of Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin) (50-100 µg/100 µl) were made intravascularly, through the tail vein, through a cannula implanted in the jugular vein, or directly into the left ventricle of the heart. Tissues cut for thin 10- to 12-µm cryostat sections, or thick 50- to 100-µm vibratome sections, were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Tissue labeled by biotinylated lectin was examined by bright field microscopy or electron microscopy after tissue processing for biotin. Intravascular injections of tomato lectin led to labeling of vascular structures in a variety of tissues, including brain, kidney, liver, intestine, spleen, skin, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and experimental tumors. Analyses of fluorescence in serum indicated the lectin was cleared from circulating blood within 2 min. Capillary labeling was apparent in tissues collected from animals within 1 min of intravascular injections, remained robust for about 1 h, and then declined markedly until difficult to detect 12 h after injection. Light microscopic images suggest the lectin bound to the endothelial cells that form capillaries and endothelial cells that line some larger vessels. Electron microscopic studies confirmed the labeling of luminal surfaces of endothelial cells. Vascular labeling by tomato lectin is compatible with a variety of other morphological labeling techniques, including histochemistry and immunocytochemistry, and thus appears to be a sensitive and useful method to reveal vascular patterns in relationship to other aspects of parenchymal development, structure, and function.

  13. Crystal structure of native and Cd/Cd-substituted Dioclea guianensis seed lectin. A novel manganese-binding site and structural basis of dimer-tetramer association.

    PubMed

    Wah, D A; Romero, A; Gallego del Sol, F; Cavada, B S; Ramos, M V; Grangeiro, T B; Sampaio, A H; Calvete, J J

    2001-07-20

    Diocleinae legume lectins are a group of oligomeric proteins whose subunits display a high degree of primary structure and tertiary fold conservation but exhibit considerable diversity in their oligomerisation modes. To elucidate the structural determinants underlaying Diocleinae lectin oligomerisation, we have determined the crystal structures of native and cadmium-substituted Dioclea guianensis (Dguia) seed lectin. These structures have been solved by molecular replacement using concanavalin (ConA) coordinates as the starting model, and refined against data to 2.0 A resolution. In the native (Mn/Ca-Dguia) crystal form (P4(3)2(1)2), the asymmetric unit contains two monomers arranged into a canonical legume lectin dimer, and the tetramer is formed with a symmetry-related dimer. In the Cd/Cd-substituted form (I4(1)22), the asymmetric unit is occupied by a monomer. In both crystal forms, the tetrameric association is achieved by the corresponding symmetry operators. Like other legume lectins, native D. guianensis lectin contains manganese and calcium ions bound in the vicinity of the saccharide-combining site. The architecture of these metal-binding sites (S1 and S2) changed only slightly in the cadmium/cadmium-substituted form. A highly ordered calcium (native lectin) or cadmium (Cd/Cd-substituted lectin) ion is coordinated at the interface between dimers that are not tetrameric partners in a similar manner as the previously identified Cd(2+) in site S3 of a Cd/Ca-ConA. An additional Mn(2+) coordination site (called S5), whose presence has not been reported in crystal structures of any other homologous lectin, is present in both, the Mn/Ca and the Cd/Cd-substituted D. guianensis lectin forms. On the other hand, comparison of the primary and quaternary crystal structures of seed lectins from D. guianensis and Dioclea grandiflora (1DGL) indicates that the loop comprising residues 117-123 is ordered to make interdimer contacts in the D. grandiflora lectin structure

  14. Structural homologies among the hemopoietins.

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, J W; Ziltener, H J; Leslie, K B

    1986-01-01

    A group of cytokines characterized by a common set of target cells--namely, the pluripotential hemopoietic stem cells or their cellular derivatives--share similarities in the amino acid sequence at their N terminus or in the putative signal peptide immediately prior to the published N terminus. Murine P-cell-stimulating factor (PSF), murine and human interleukin 2 (IL-2), murine and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), human erythropoietin, and human interleukin 1 beta all share alanine as the N-terminal amino acid and have some similarities in the succeeding three or four amino acids. In the case of murine PSF and GM-CSF, the six N-terminal amino acids are readily cleaved from mature molecules and are lacking from the N-terminal amino acid sequences reported initially. A sixth cytokine, colony-stimulating factor 1, has an alanine followed by a similar pattern of five amino acids at the end of the putative signal peptide. GM-CSF and IL-2 have more extensive homology, about 25% of residues being identical in three regions that comprise about 70% of the molecules. Only minor similarities of uncertain significance were found among the complete amino acid sequences of the other cytokines. Although its evolutionary origin is uncertain, the homology around the N terminus may provide a structural marker for a group of cytokines active on the pluripotential hemopoietic stem cell and its derivatives. PMID:3085095

  15. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  16. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide.

  17. Structure predictions of two Bauhinia variegata lectins reveal patterns of C-terminal properties in single chain legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo M S G; Conceição, Fabricio R; McBride, Alan J A; Pinto, Luciano da S

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and -II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins.

  18. Structure Predictions of Two Bauhinia variegata Lectins Reveal Patterns of C-Terminal Properties in Single Chain Legume Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gustavo M. S. G.; Conceição, Fabricio R.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Pinto, Luciano da S.

    2013-01-01

    Bauhinia variegata lectins (BVL-I and BVL-II) are single chain lectins isolated from the plant Bauhinia variegata. Single chain lectins undergo post-translational processing on its N-terminal and C-terminal regions, which determines their physiological targeting, carbohydrate binding activity and pattern of quaternary association. These two lectins are isoforms, BVL-I being highly glycosylated, and thus far, it has not been possible to determine their structures. The present study used prediction and validation algorithms to elucidate the likely structures of BVL-I and -II. The program Bhageerath-H was chosen from among three different structure prediction programs due to its better overall reliability. In order to predict the C-terminal region cleavage sites, other lectins known to have this modification were analysed and three rules were created: (1) the first amino acid of the excised peptide is small or hydrophobic; (2) the cleavage occurs after an acid, polar, or hydrophobic residue, but not after a basic one; and (3) the cleavage spot is located 5-8 residues after a conserved Leu amino acid. These rules predicted that BVL-I and –II would have fifteen C-terminal residues cleaved, and this was confirmed experimentally by Edman degradation sequencing of BVL-I. Furthermore, the C-terminal analyses predicted that only BVL-II underwent α-helical folding in this region, similar to that seen in SBA and DBL. Conversely, BVL-I and -II contained four conserved regions of a GS-I association, providing evidence of a previously undescribed X4+unusual oligomerisation between the truncated BVL-I and the intact BVL-II. This is the first report on the structural analysis of lectins from Bauhinia spp. and therefore is important for the characterisation C-terminal cleavage and patterns of quaternary association of single chain lectins. PMID:24260572

  19. Structures of Xenopus Embryonic Epidermal Lectin Reveal a Conserved Mechanism of Microbial Glycan Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wangkanont, Kittikhun; Wesener, Darryl A; Vidani, Jack A; Kiessling, Laura L; Forest, Katrina T

    2016-03-11

    Intelectins (X-type lectins), broadly distributed throughout chordates, have been implicated in innate immunity. Xenopus laevis embryonic epidermal lectin (XEEL), an intelectin secreted into environmental water by the X. laevis embryo, is postulated to function as a defense against microbes. XEEL is homologous (64% identical) to human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1), which is also implicated in innate immune defense. We showed previously that hIntL-1 binds microbial glycans bearing exocyclic vicinal diol groups. It is unknown whether XEEL has the same ligand specificity. Also unclear is whether XEEL and hIntL-1 have similar quaternary structures, as XEEL lacks the corresponding cysteine residues in hIntL-1 that stabilize the disulfide-linked trimer. These observations prompted us to further characterize XEEL. We found that hIntL-1 and XEEL have similar structural features. Even without the corresponding intermolecular disulfide bonds present in hIntL-1, the carbohydrate recognition domain of XEEL (XEELCRD) forms a stable trimer in solution. The structure of XEELCRD in complex with d-glycerol-1-phosphate, a residue present in microbe-specific glycans, indicated that the exocyclic vicinal diol coordinates to a protein-bound calcium ion. This ligand-binding mode is conserved between XEEL and hIntL-1. The domain architecture of full-length XEEL is reminiscent of a barbell, with two sets of three glycan-binding sites oriented in opposite directions. This orientation is consistent with our observation that XEEL can promote the agglutination of specific serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae. These data support a role for XEEL in innate immunity, and they highlight structural and functional conservation of X-type lectins among chordates.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray structure analysis of the banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca.

    PubMed

    Singh, D D; Saikrishnan, K; Kumar, Prashant; Dauter, Z; Sekar, K; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2004-11-01

    The banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca, MW 29.4 kDa, has been isolated, purified and crystallized. The trigonal crystals contain one dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement to a resolution of 3 A. The structure of the subunit is similar to that of jacalin-like lectins.

  1. Atomic- Resolution Crystal Structure of the Antiviral Lectin Scytovirin

    SciTech Connect

    Moulaei,T.; Botos, I.; Ziolkowska, N.; Bokesch, H.; Krumpe, L.; McKee, T.; O'Keefe, B.; Dauter, Z.; Wlodawer, A.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of the natural and recombinant antiviral lectin scytovirin (SVN) were solved by single-wavelength anomalous scattering and refined with data extending to 1.3 Angstroms and 1.0 Angstroms resolution, respectively. A molecule of SVN consists of a single chain 95 amino acids long, with an almost perfect sequence repeat that creates two very similar domains (RMS deviation 0.25 Angstroms for 40 pairs of Ca atoms). The crystal structure differs significantly from a previously published NMR structure of the same protein, with the RMS deviations calculated separately for the N- and C-terminal domains of 5.3 Angstroms and 3.7 Angstroms, respectively, and a very different relationship between the two domains. In addition, the disulfide bonding pattern of the crystal structures differs from that described in the previously published mass spectrometry and NMR studies.

  2. Near-planar Solution Structures of Mannose-binding Lectin Oligomers Provide Insight on Activation of Lectin Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ami; Phillips, Anna; Gor, Jayesh; Wallis, Russell; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is a fundamental component of innate immunity that orchestrates complex immunological and inflammatory processes. Complement comprises over 30 proteins that eliminate invading microorganisms while maintaining host cell integrity. Protein-carbohydrate interactions play critical roles in both the activation and regulation of complement. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) activates the lectin pathway of complement via the recognition of sugar arrays on pathogenic surfaces. To determine the solution structure of MBL, synchrotron x-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the carbohydrate-recognition domains in the MBL dimer, trimer, and tetramer are positioned close to each other in near-planar fan-like structures. These data were subjected to constrained modeling fits. A bent structure for the MBL monomer was identified starting from two crystal structures for its carbohydrate-recognition domain and its triple helical region. The MBL monomer structure was used to identify 10–12 near-planar solution structures for each of the MBL dimers, trimers, and tetramers starting from 900 to 6,859 randomized structures for each. These near-planar fan-like solution structures joined at an N-terminal hub clarified how the carbohydrate-recognition domain of MBL binds to pathogenic surfaces. They also provided insight on how MBL presents a structural template for the binding and auto-activation of the MBL-associated serine proteases to initiate the lectin pathway of complement activation. PMID:22167201

  3. Strict specificity for high-mannose type N-glycans and primary structure of a red alga Eucheuma serra lectin.

    PubMed

    Hori, Kanji; Sato, Yuichiro; Ito, Kaori; Fujiwara, Yoshifumi; Iwamoto, Yasumasa; Makino, Hiroyuki; Kawakubo, Akihiro

    2007-05-01

    We have elucidated the carbohydrate-binding profile of a non-monosaccharide-binding lectin named Eucheuma serra lectin (ESA)-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra using a lectin-immobilized column and a centrifugal ultrafiltration-high performance liquid chromatography method with a variety of fluorescence-labeled oligosaccharides. In both methods, ESA-2 exclusively bound with high-mannose type (HM) N-glycans, but not with any of other N-glycans including complex type, hybrid type and core pentasaccharides, and oligosaccharides from glycolipids. These findings indicate that ESA-2 recognizes the branched oligomannosides of the N-glycans. However, ESA-2 did not bind with any of the free oligomannoses examined that are constituents of the branched oligomannosides implying that the portion of the core N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residue(s) of the N-glycans is also essential for binding. Thus, the algal lectin was strictly specific for HM N-glycans and recognized the extended carbohydrate structure with a minimum size of the pentasaccharide, Man(alpha1-3)Man(alpha1-6)Man(beta1-4)GlcNAc(beta1-4) GlcNAc. Kinetic analysis of binding with a HM heptasaccharide (M5) showed that ESA-2 has four carbohydrate-binding sites per polypeptide with a high association constant of 1.6x10(8) M-1. Sequence analysis, by a combination of Edman degradation and mass analyses of the intact protein and of peptides produced by its enzymic digestions, showed that ESA-2 is composed of 268 amino acids (molecular weight 27950) with four tandemly repeated domains of 67 amino acids. The number of repeats coincided with the number of carbohydrate-binding sites in the monomeric molecule. Surprisingly, the marine algal lectin was homologous to hemagglutinin from the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

  4. Novel Matrix Proteins of Pteria penguin Pearl Oyster Shell Nacre Homologous to the Jacalin-Related β-Prism Fold Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Naganuma, Takako; Hoshino, Wataru; Shikanai, Yukihiro; Sato, Rie; Liu, Kaiyue; Sato, Saho; Muramoto, Koji; Osada, Makoto; Yoshimi, Kyosuke; Ogawa, Tomohisa

    2014-01-01

    Nacreous layers of pearl oyster are one of the major functional biominerals. By participating in organic compound-crystal interactions, they assemble into consecutive mineral lamellae-like photonic crystals. Their biomineralization mechanisms are controlled by macromolecules; however, they are largely unknown. Here, we report two novel lectins termed PPL2A and PPL2B, which were isolated from the mantle and the secreted fluid of Pteria penguin oyster. PPL2A is a hetero-dimer composed of α and γ subunits, and PPL2B is a homo-dimer of β subunit, all of which surprisingly shared sequence homology with the jacalin-related plant lectin. On the basis of knockdown experiments at the larval stage, the identification of PPLs in the shell matrix, and in vitro CaCO3 crystallization analysis, we conclude that two novel jacalin-related lectins participate in the biomineralization of P. penguin nacre as matrix proteins. Furthermore, it was found that trehalose, which is specific recognizing carbohydrates for PPL2A and is abundant in the secreted fluid of P. penguin mantle, functions as a regulatory factor for biomineralization via PPL2A. These observations highlight the unique functions, diversity and molecular evolution of this lectin family involved in the mollusk shell formation. PMID:25375177

  5. A Lichen Lectin Specifically Binds to the alpha-1,4-Polygalactoside Moiety of Urease Located in the Cell Wall of Homologous Algae.

    PubMed

    Sacristán, Mara; Millanes, Ana-María; Legaz, María-Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    A lectin from the lichen Evernia prunastri developing arginase activity (EC. 3.5.3.1) binds to the homologous algae that contain polygalactosilated urease (EC. 3.5.1.5) in their cell walls acting as a lectin ligand. The enzyme bound to its ligand shows to be inactive to hydrolyze of arginine. Hydrolysis of the galactoside moiety of urease in intact algae with alpha-1,4-galactosidase (EC. 3.2.1.22) releases high amount of D-galactose and impedes the binding of the lectin to the algal cell wall. However, the use of beta-,4-galactosidase (EC.3.2.1.23) releases low amounts of D-galactose from the algal cell wall and does not change the pattern of binding of the lectin to its ligand. The production of glycosilated urease is restricted to the season in which algal cells divide and this assures the recognition of new phycobiont produced after cell division by its fungal partner.

  6. A Lichen Lectin Specifically Binds to the α-1,4-Polygalactoside Moiety of Urease Located in the Cell Wall of Homologous Algae

    PubMed Central

    Sacristán, Mara; Millanes, Ana-María; Legaz, María-Estrella

    2006-01-01

    A lectin from the lichen Evernia prunastri developing arginase activity (EC. 3.5.3.1) binds to the homologous algae that contain polygalactosilated urease (EC. 3.5.1.5) in their cell walls acting as a lectin ligand. The enzyme bound to its ligand shows to be inactive to hydrolyze of arginine. Hydrolysis of the galactoside moiety of urease in intact algae with α-1,4-galactosidase (EC. 3.2.1.22) releases high amount of D-galactose and impedes the binding of the lectin to the algal cell wall. However, the use of β-,4-galactosidase (EC.3.2.1.23) releases low amounts of D-galactose from the algal cell wall and does not change the pattern of binding of the lectin to its ligand. The production of glycosilated urease is restricted to the season in which algal cells divide and this assures the recognition of new phycobiont produced after cell division by its fungal partner. PMID:19521472

  7. Identification of mycobacterial lectins from genomic data.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-four sequences containing lectin domains with homologs of known three-dimensional structure were identified through a search of mycobacterial genomes. They appear to belong to the β-prism II, the C-type, the Microcystis virdis (MV), and the β-trefoil lectin folds. The first three always occur in conjunction with the LysM, the PI-PLC, and the β-grasp domains, respectively while mycobacterial β-trefoil lectins are unaccompanied by any other domain. Thirty heparin binding hemagglutinins (HBHA), already annotated, have also been included in the study although they have no homologs of known three-dimensional structure. The biological role of HBHA has been well characterized. A comparison between the sequences of the lectin from pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria provides insights into the carbohydrate binding region of the molecule, but the structure of the molecule is yet to be determined. A reasonable picture of the structural features of other mycobacterial proteins containing one or the other of the four lectin domains can be gleaned through the examination of homologs proteins, although the structure of none of them is available. Their biological role is also yet to be elucidated. The work presented here is among the first steps towards exploring the almost unexplored area of the structural biology of mycobacterial lectins.

  8. A soluble fucose-specific lectin from Aspergillus fumigatus conidia--structure, specificity and possible role in fungal pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Houser, Josef; Komarek, Jan; Kostlanova, Nikola; Cioci, Gianluca; Varrot, Annabelle; Kerr, Sheena C; Lahmann, Martina; Balloy, Viviane; Fahy, John V; Chignard, Michel; Imberty, Anne; Wimmerova, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an important allergen and opportunistic pathogen. Similarly to many other pathogens, it is able to produce lectins that may be involved in the host-pathogen interaction. We focused on the lectin AFL, which was prepared in recombinant form and characterized. Its binding properties were studied using hemagglutination and glycan array analysis. We determined the specificity of the lectin towards l-fucose and fucosylated oligosaccharides, including α1-6 linked core-fucose, which is an important marker for cancerogenesis. Other biologically relevant saccharides such as sialic acid, d-mannose or d-galactose were not bound. Blood group epitopes of the ABH and Lewis systems were recognized, Le(Y) being the preferred ligand among others. To provide a correlation between the observed functional characteristics and structural basis, AFL was crystallized in a complex with methyl-α,L-selenofucoside and its structure was solved using the SAD method. Six binding sites, each with different compositions, were identified per monomer and significant differences from the homologous AAL lectin were found. Structure-derived peptides were utilized to prepare anti-AFL polyclonal antibodies, which suggested the presence of AFL on the Aspergillus' conidia, confirming its expression in vivo. Stimulation of human bronchial cells by AFL led to IL-8 production in a dose-dependent manner. AFL thus probably contributes to the inflammatory response observed upon the exposure of a patient to A. fumigatus. The combination of affinity to human epithelial epitopes, production by conidia and pro-inflammatory activity is remarkable and shows that AFL might be an important virulence factor involved in an early stage of A. fumigatus infection.

  9. Metal ions in sugar binding, sugar specificity and structural stability of Spatholobus parviflorus seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Joseph; Dileep, Kalarickal Vijayan; Palanimuthu, Muthusamy; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkotu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakath

    2013-08-01

    Spatholobus parviflorus seed lectin (SPL) is a heterotetrameric lectin, with two α and two β monomers. In the crystal structure of SPL α monomer, two residues at positions 240 and 241 are missing. This region was modeled based on the positional and sequence similarities. The role of metal ions in SPL structure was analyzed by 10 ns molecular dynamics simulation. MD simulations were performed in the presence and absence of metal ions to explain the loss of haemagglutinating property of the lectin due to demetallization. Demetallized structure was found to deviate drastically at the metal binding loop region. Affinity of different sugars like N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc), D-galactose and lactose towards the native and demetallized protein was calculated by molecular docking studies. It was found that the sugar binding site got severely distorted in demetallized lectin. Consequently, sugar binding ability of lectin might be decreasing in the demetallized condition. Isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) analysis of the sugars in the presence of native and demetallized protein confirmed the in silico results. It was observed after molecular dynamics simulations, that significant structural deviations were not caused in the quaternary structure of demetallized lectin. It was confirmed that the structural changes modified the sugar binding ability, as well as sugar specificity of the present lectin. The role of metal ions in sugar binding is described based on the in silico studies and ITC analysis. A comprehensive analysis of the ITC data suggests that the sugar specificity of the metal bound lectin and the loss of sugar specificity due to metal chelation are not linear.

  10. Structure prediction and functional analysis of a non-permutated lectin from Dioclea grandiflora.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Bruno Lopes; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Simões, Rafael da Conceição; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape da Silva; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-12-01

    Legume lectins have been widely studied and applied for many purposes in the last few decades, but many of their physiological aspects remain elusive. The Diocleinae legume subtribe, which includes intensively explored lectins, such as ConA, presents an unusual and extensive post-translational process which results in minor alterations in protein structure, in turn making its function elusive. Despite previous reports about Diocleinae precursor activity, no structural or functional analyses have ever been carried out to understand the impacts of post-translational processing relative to lectin structure and binding specificity. Here we analyzed the functionality of a non glycosylated, recombinantly expressed lectin precursor from Dioclea grandiflora through inhibition assays, corroborating the experimental data with structural information generated by molecular modeling, docking calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate that Diocleinae precursors are active and share the same carbohydrate specificity as mature lectins. At the same time, however, subtle structural alterations were detected and mostly result in an "incomplete" functionality of the precursor, as consequence of an immature binding site and an unstructured tetramer interface, affecting carbohydrate binding and oligomer formation, respectively.

  11. A Lectin from the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Has a Highly Novel Primary Structure and Induces Glycan-mediated Cytotoxicity of Globotriaosylceramide-expressing Lymphoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Takio, Koji; Kawsar, Sarkar M. A.; Matsumoto, Ryo; Hasan, Imtiaj; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A.; Yasumitsu, Hidetaro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A novel lectin structure was found for a 17-kDa α-d-galactose-binding lectin (termed “MytiLec”) isolated from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis. The complete primary structure of the lectin was determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometric analysis. MytiLec was found to consist of 149 amino acids with a total molecular mass of 16,812.59 Da by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in good agreement with the calculated value of 16,823.22 Da. MytiLec had an N terminus of acetylthreonine and a primary structure that was highly novel in comparison with those of all known lectins in the structure database. The polypeptide structure consisted of three tandem-repeat domains of ∼50 amino acids each having 45–52% homology with each other. Frontal affinity chromatography technology indicated that MytiLec bound specifically to globotriose (Gb3; Galα1–4Galβ1–4Glc), the epitope of globotriaosylceramide. MytiLec showed a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect on human Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells (which have high surface expression of Gb3) but had no such effect on erythroleukemia K562 cells (which do not express Gb3). The cytotoxic effect of MytiLec was specifically blocked by the co-presence of an α-galactoside. MytiLec treatment of Raji cells caused increased binding of anti-annexin V antibody and incorporation of propidium iodide, which are indicators of cell membrane inversion and perforation. MytiLec is the first reported lectin having a primary structure with the highly novel triple tandem-repeat domain and showing transduction of apoptotic signaling against Burkitt lymphoma cells by interaction with a glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomain containing Gb3. PMID:23093409

  12. Structural characterization of a lectin from Canavalia virosa seeds with inflammatory and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Osterne, Vinicius Jose Silva; Silva-Filho, Jose Caetano; Santiago, Mayara Queiroz; Pinto-Junior, Vanir Reis; Almeida, Alysson Chaves; Barreto, Adolph Annderson Gonçalves Costa; Wolin, Ingrid Alessandra Victoria; Nascimento, Ana Paula Machado; Amorim, Renata Morais Ferreira; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Delatorre, Plinio; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2017-01-01

    A lectin from Canavalia virosa, Diocleinae subtribe, was purified by affinity chromatography with Sephadex G-50 matrix and named ConV. The primary structure of ConV was obtained by mass spectrometry and crystals were obtained by the vapor diffusion method at 293K and belonged to orthorhombic space group P21221 with two molecules in its asymmetric unit. The structure obtained presented Rfactor and Rfree of 18.91% and 24.92% respectively, with no residues in nonallowed regions of Ramachandran plot. The crystal structure was solved at 2.53Å and was demonstrated to be very similar to other lectins from the same subtribe. In inflammatory tests, ConV elicited paw edema, but incubation of lectin with glucose beforehand was able to reduce the edematogenic effect, indicating the involvement of the carbohydrate recognition domain in this process. The lectin also showed toxicity to rat C6 glioma cells, disrupting the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔYm) and decreasing cell viability, indicating an anticancer potential for ConV. In silico studies confirmed that ConV interacts strongly with carbohydrates that comprise the N-glycans of glycoproteins. This finding corroborates the hypothesis which holds that the lectin domain interacts with glycans in molecular targets and that this contributes to the effects observed in biological activities.

  13. Biochemical and structural analysis of Helix pomatia agglutinin. A hexameric lectin with a novel fold.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jean-Frederic; Lescar, Julien; Chazalet, Valérie; Audfray, Aymeric; Gagnon, Jean; Alvarez, Richard; Breton, Christelle; Imberty, Anne; Mitchell, Edward P

    2006-07-21

    Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) is a N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) binding lectin found in the albumen gland of the roman snail. As a constituent of perivitelline fluid, HPA protects fertilized eggs from bacteria and is part of the innate immunity system of the snail. The peptide sequence deduced from gene cloning demonstrates that HPA belongs to a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins recently identified in several invertebrates. This domain is also present in discoidin from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Investigation of the lectin specificity was performed with the use of glycan arrays, demonstrating that several GalNAc-containing oligosaccharides are bound and rationalizing the use of this lectin as a cancer marker. Titration microcalorimetry performed on the interaction between HPA and GalNAc indicates an affinity in the 10(-4) M range with an enthalpy-driven binding mechanism. The crystal structure of HPA demonstrates the occurrence of a new beta-sandwich lectin fold. The hexameric quaternary state was never observed previously for a lectin. The high resolution structure complex of HPA with GalNAc characterizes a new carbohydrate binding site and rationalizes the observed preference for alphaGalNAc-containing oligosaccharides.

  14. Using crystallographic water properties for the analysis and prediction of lectin-carbohydrate complex structures.

    PubMed

    Modenutti, C; Gauto, D; Radusky, L; Blanco, J; Turjanski, A; Hajos, S; Marti, Ma

    2015-02-01

    Understanding protein-ligand interactions is a fundamental question in basic biochemistry, and the role played by the solvent along this process is not yet fully understood. This fact is particularly relevant in lectins, proteins that mediate a large variety of biological processes through the recognition of specific carbohydrates. In the present work, we have thoroughly analyzed a nonredundant and well-curated set of lectin structures looking for a potential relationship between the structural water properties in the apo-structures and the corresponding protein-ligand complex structures. Our results show that solvent structure adjacent to the binding sites mimics the ligand oxygen structural framework in the resulting protein-ligand complex, allowing us to develop a predictive method using a Naive Bayes classifier. We also show how these properties can be used to improve docking predictions of lectin-carbohydrate complex structures in terms of both accuracy and precision, thus developing a solid strategy for the rational design of glycomimetic drugs. Overall our results not only contribute to the understanding of protein-ligand complexes, but also underscore the role of the water solvent in the ligand recognition process. Finally, we discuss our findings in the context of lectin specificity and ligand recognition properties.

  15. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer. PMID:28123516

  16. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer.

  17. NMR Solution Structure of a Cyanovirin Homolog from Wheat Head Blight Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Matei, Elena; Louis, John M.; Jee, JunGoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the cyanovirin-N homolog (CVNH) lectin family are found in bacteria, fungi and plants. As part of our ongoing work on CVNH structure-function studies, we determined the high-resolution NMR solution structure of the homolog from the wheat head blight disease causing ascomycetous fungus Gibberella zeae (or Fusarium graminearum), hereafter called GzCVNH. Like cyanovirin-N (CV-N), GzCVNH comprises two tandem sequence repeats and the protein sequence exhibits 30% identity with CV-N. The overall structure is similar to those of other members of the CVNH family, with the conserved pseudo-symmetric halves of the structure, domains A and B, closely resembling recently determined structures of Tuber borchii, Neurospora crassa and Ceratopteris richardii CVNH proteins. Although GzCVNH exhibits a similar glycan recognition profile to CV-N and specifically binds to Manα(1–2)Manα, its weak carbohydrate binding affinity to only one binding site is insufficient for conferring anti-HIV activity. PMID:21365681

  18. Structural studies of a vasorelaxant lectin from Dioclea reflexa Hook seeds: Crystal structure, molecular docking and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Junior, Vanir Reis; Osterne, Vinicius José Silva; Santiago, Mayara Queiroz; Correia, Jorge Luis Almeida; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Pereira, Maria Gonçalves; Chicas, Larissa Silva; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Ferreira, Wandemberg Paiva; Rocha, Cíntia Renata Costa; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2017-05-01

    The three-dimensional structure of Dioclea reflexa seed lectin (DrfL) was studied in detail by a combination of X-ray crystallography, molecular docking and molecular dynamics. DrfL was purified by affinity chromatography using Sephadex G-50 matrix. Its primary structure was obtained by mass spectrometry, and crystals belonging to orthorhombic space group P212121 were grown by the vapor diffusion method at 293K. The crystal structure was solved at 1.765Å and was very similar to that of other lectins from the same subtribe. The structure presented Rfactor and Rfree of 21.69% and 24.89%, respectively, with no residues in nonallowed regions of Ramachandran plot. Similar to other Diocleinae lectins, DrfL was capable of relaxing aortic rings via NO induction, with CRD participation, albeit with low intensity (32%). In silico analysis results demonstrated that DrfL could strongly interact with complex N-glycans, components of blood vessel glycoconjugates. Despite the high similarity among Diocleinae lectins, it was also reported that each lectin has unique CRD properties that influence carbohydrate binding, resulting in different biological effects presented by these molecules.

  19. Structural and functional characterization of the GalNAc/Gal-specific lectin from the phytopathogenic ascomycete Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary.

    PubMed

    Candy, Laure; Van Damme, Els J M; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Erard, Monique; Rougé, Pierre

    2003-08-22

    The lectin found in mycelium and sclerotes of the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a homodimer consisting of two identical non-covalently bound subunits of 16,000 Da. CD spectra analysis revealed that the S. sclerotiorum agglutinin (SSA) contains predominantly beta-sheet structures. SSA exhibits specificity towards GalNAc whereby the hydroxyls at positions 4 and 6 of the pyranose ring play a key role in the interaction with simple sugars. The carbohydrate-binding site of SSA can also accommodate disaccharides. The N-terminal sequence of SSA shares no significant similarity with any other protein except a lectin from the Sclerotiniaceae species Ciborinia camelliae. A comparison of SSA and the lectins from C. camelliae and some previously characterized lectins indicates that the Sclerotiniaceae lectins form a homogeneous family of fungal lectins. This newly identified lectin family, which is structurally unrelated to any other family of fungal lectins, is most probably confined to the Ascomycota.

  20. PDBalert: automatic, recurrent remote homology tracking and protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Vatsal; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Söding, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Background During the last years, methods for remote homology detection have grown more and more sensitive and reliable. Automatic structure prediction servers relying on these methods can generate useful 3D models even below 20% sequence identity between the protein of interest and the known structure (template). When no homologs can be found in the protein structure database (PDB), the user would need to rerun the same search at regular intervals in order to make timely use of a template once it becomes available. Results PDBalert is a web-based automatic system that sends an email alert as soon as a structure with homology to a protein in the user's watch list is released to the PDB database or appears among the sequences on hold. The mail contains links to the search results and to an automatically generated 3D homology model. The sequence search is performed with the same software as used by the very sensitive and reliable remote homology detection server HHpred, which is based on pairwise comparison of Hidden Markov models. Conclusion PDBalert will accelerate the information flow from the PDB database to all those who can profit from the newly released protein structures for predicting the 3D structure or function of their proteins of interest. PMID:19025670

  1. Homology-Based Modeling of Protein Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Zhexin

    The human genome project has already discovered millions of proteins (http://www.swissprot.com). The potential of the genome project can only be fully realized once we can assign, understand, manipulate, and predict the function of these new proteins (Sanchez and Sali, 1997; Frishman et al., 2000; Domingues et al., 2000). Predicting protein function generally requires knowledge of protein three-dimensional structure (Blundell et al., 1978;Weber, 1990), which is ultimately determined by protein sequence (Anfinsen, 1973). Protein structure determination using experimental methods such as X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy is very time consuming (Johnson et al. 1994). To date, fewer than 2% of the known proteins have had their structures solved experimentally. In 2004, more than half a million new proteins were sequenced that almost doubled the efforts in the previous year, but only 5300 structures were solved. Although the rate of experimental structure determination will continue to increase, the number of newly discovered sequences grows much faster than the number of structures solved (see Fig. 10.1).

  2. Purification and primary structure of a novel mannose-specific lectin from Centrolobium microchaete Mart seeds.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves de; Alves, Ana Cecília; Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; Dias, Artur Hermano Sampaio; Martins, Francisco William Viana; Cajazeiras, João Batista; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago do; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to purify and characterize a novel mannose-binding lectin from the seeds of Centrolobium microchaete. Centrolobium microchaete lectin (CML) was purified by affinity chromatography in mannose-Sepharose-4B column. CML agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes and was inhibited by D-mannose, α-methyl-D-mannoside, D-glucose, N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine and sucrose. The lectin was stable at pH 7.0 and 8.0 and temperatures up to 60°C. The monomeric form of CML showed approximately 28kDa, and its native form is probably a homodimer, as determined by gel filtration chromatography. The primary structure of CML was determined by tandem mass spectrometry that showed CML as a protein with two distinct forms (isolectins CML-1 and CML-2) with 246 and 247 residues, respectively. CML-2 possesses one residue of Asn more than CML-1 in C-terminal. The primary structure of CML agrees with the molecular weights found by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: 27,224 and 27,338Da for CML-1 and CML-2, respectively. CML is a metal-dependent glycoprotein. Moreover, the glycan composition of CML and its structure were predicted.

  3. Isolation and determination of the primary structure of a lectin protein from the serum of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Merchant, Mark E; Maccha, Venkata; Siddavarapu, Vivekananda Reddy; Hasan, Azeem; Murray, Kermit K

    2012-02-01

    Mass spectrometry in conjunction with de novo sequencing was used to determine the amino acid sequence of a 35kDa lectin protein isolated from the serum of the American alligator that exhibits binding to mannose. The protein N-terminal sequence was determined using Edman degradation and enzymatic digestion with different proteases was used to generate peptide fragments for analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS). Separate analysis of the protein digests with multiple enzymes enhanced the protein sequence coverage. De novo sequencing was accomplished using MASCOT Distiller and PEAKS software and the sequences were searched against the NCBI database using MASCOT and BLAST to identify homologous peptides. MS analysis of the intact protein indicated that it is present primarily as monomer and dimer in vitro. The isolated 35kDa protein was ~98% sequenced and found to have 313 amino acids and nine cysteine residues and was identified as an alligator lectin. The alligator lectin sequence was aligned with other lectin sequences using DIALIGN and ClustalW software and was found to exhibit 58% and 59% similarity to both human and mouse intelectin-1. The alligator lectin exhibited strong binding affinities toward mannan and mannose as compared to other tested carbohydrates.

  4. Differential affinities of Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL) toward monosaccharides and polyvalent mammalian structural units.

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert M; Wu, June H; Tsai, Ming-Sung; Yang, Zhangung; Sharon, Nathan; Herp, Anthony

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies on the carbohydrate specificities of Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL) were mainly limited to analyzing the binding of oligo-antennary Galbeta1-->4GlcNAc (II). In this report, a wider range of recognition factors of ECL toward known mammalian ligands and glycans were examined by enzyme-linked lectinosorbent and inhibition assays, using natural polyvalent glycotopes, and a glycan array assay. From the results, it is shown that GalNAc was an active ligand, but its polyvalent structural units, in contrast to those of Gal, were poor inhibitors. Among soluble natural glycans tested for 50% molecular mass inhibition, Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 capsular polysaccharide of polyvalent II was the most potent inhibitor; it was 2.1 x 10(4), 3.9 x 10(3) and 2.4 x 10(3) more active than Gal, tri-antennary II and monomeric II, respectively. Most type II-containing glycoproteins were also potent inhibitors, indicating that special polyvalent II and Galbeta1-related structures play critically important roles in lectin binding. Mapping all information available, it can be concluded that: [a] Galbeta1-->4GlcNAc (II) and some Galbeta1-related oligosaccharides, rather than GalNAc-related oligosaccharides, are the core structures for lectin binding; [b] their polyvalent II forms within macromolecules are a potent recognition force for ECL, while II monomer and oligo-antennary II forms play only a limited role in binding; [c] the shape of the lectin binding domains may correspond to a cavity type with Galbeta1-->4GlcNAc as the core binding site with additional one to four sugars subsites, and is most complementary to a linear trisaccharide, Galbeta1-->4GlcNAcbeta1-->6Gal. These analyses should facilitate the understanding of the binding function of ECL.

  5. The primary structure of the Cytisus scoparius seed lectin and a carbohydrate-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1992-09-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose-binding Cytisus scoparius seed lectin II (CSII) was determined using a protein sequencer. After digestion of CSII with endoproteinase Lys-C or Asp-N, the resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then subjected to sequence analysis. Comparison of the complete amino acid sequence of CSII with the sequences of other leguminous seed lectins revealed regions of extensive homology. The amino acid residues of concanavalin A (Con A) involved in the metal binding site are highly conserved among those of CSII. A carbohydrate-binding peptide of CSII was obtained from the endoproteinase Asp-N digest of CSII by affinity chromatography on a column of GalNAc-Gel. This peptide was retained on the GalNAc-Gel column and was presumed to have affinity for the column. The amino acid sequence of the retarded peptide was determined using a protein sequencer. The retarded peptide was found to correspond to the putative metal-binding region of Con A. These results strongly suggest that this peptide represents the carbohydrate-binding and metal ion-binding sites of CSII.

  6. Diversity in recognition of glycans by F-type lectins and galectins: molecular, structural, and biophysical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vasta, Gerardo R.; Ahmed, Hafiz; Bianchet, Mario A.; Fernández-Robledo, José A.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2013-01-01

    Although lectins are “hard-wired” in the germline, the presence of tandemly arrayed carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs), of chimeric structures displaying distinct CRDs, of polymorphic genes resulting in multiple isoforms, and in some cases, of a considerable recognition plasticity of their carbohydrate binding sites, significantly expand the lectin ligand-recognition spectrum and lectin functional diversification. Analysis of structural/functional aspects of galectins and F-lectins—the most recently identified lectin family characterized by a unique CRD sequence motif (a distinctive structural fold) and nominal specificity for l-Fuc—has led to a greater understanding of self/nonself recognition by proteins with tandemly arrayed CRDs. For lectins with a single CRD, however, recognition of self and nonself glycans can only be rationalized in terms of protein oligomerization and ligand clustering and presentation. Spatial and temporal changes in lectin expression, secretion, and local concentrations in extracellular microenvironments, as well as structural diversity and spatial display of their carbohydrate ligands on the host or microbial cell surface, are suggestive of a dynamic interplay of their recognition and effector functions in development and immunity. PMID:22973821

  7. Glycodendritic structures based on Boltorn hyperbranched polymers and their interactions with Lens culinaris lectin.

    PubMed

    Arce, Eva; Nieto, Pedro M; Díaz, Vicente; Castro, Rossana García; Bernad, Antonio; Rojo, Javier

    2003-01-01

    Multivalent scaffolds bearing carbohydrates have been prepared to mediate biological processes where carbohydrates are involved. These systems consist of dendritic structures based on Boltorn H20 and H30 hyperbranched polymers to which carbohydrates are linked through a convenient spacer. Mannose has been chosen as a sugar unit to test the viability of this strategy. These glycodendritic compounds have been prepared in a few steps with good yields, showing a high solubility in physiological media and low toxicity. The binding of these dendritic polymers to the mannose-binding lectin Lens culinaris (LCA) was studied using STD-NMR experiments and quantitative precipitation assays. The results demonstrate the existence of a clear interaction between the mannose derivative systems and the Lens lectin where the dendritic scaffold does not have an important role in mannose binding but supplies the necessary multivalence for lectin cluster formation. These glycodendritic structures are able to interact with a receptor, and therefore they can be considered as promising tools for biological studies.

  8. Prediction of common folding structures of homologous RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Han, K; Kim, H J

    1993-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm and a computer program for simultaneously folding homologous RNA sequences. Given an alignment of M homologous sequences of length N, the program performs phylogenetic comparative analysis and predicts a common secondary structure conserved in the sequences. When the structure is not uniquely determined, it infers multiple structures which appear most plausible. This method is superior to energy minimization methods in the sense that it is not sensitive to point mutation of a sequence. It is also superior to usual phylogenetic comparative methods in that it does not require manual scrutiny for covariation or secondary structures. The most plausible 1-5 structures are produced in O(MN2 + N3) time and O(N2) space, which are the same requirements as those of widely used dynamic programs based on energy minimization for folding a single sequence. This is the first algorithm probably practical both in terms of time and space for finding secondary structures of homologous RNA sequences. The algorithm has been implemented in C on a Sun SparcStation, and has been verified by testing on tRNAs, 5S rRNAs, 16S rRNAs, TAR RNAs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and RRE RNAs of HIV-1. We have also applied the program to cis-acting packaging sequences of HIV-1, for which no generally accepted structures yet exist, and propose potentially stable structures. Simulation of the program with random sequences with the same base composition and the same degree of similarity as the above sequences shows that structures common to homologous sequences are very unlikely to occur by chance in random sequences. PMID:7681944

  9. Structural Studies of an Anti-Inflammatory Lectin from Canavalia boliviana Seeds in Complex with Dimannosides

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Tales Rocha; Delatorre, Plínio; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Bezerra, Ingrid Gonçalves; Teixeira, Cicero Silvano; Simões, Rafael Conceição; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; de Alencar, Nylane Maria Nunes; Gruber, Karl; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Plant lectins, especially those purified from species of the Leguminosae family, represent the best-studied group of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Lectins purified from seeds of the Diocleinae subtribe exhibit a high degree of sequence identity notwithstanding that they show very distinct biological activities. Two main factors have been related to this feature: variance in key residues influencing the carbohydrate-binding site geometry and differences in the pH-dependent oligomeric state profile. In this work, we have isolated a lectin from Canavalia boliviana (Cbol) and solved its x-ray crystal structure in the unbound form and in complex with the carbohydrates Man(α1-3)Man(α1-O)Me, Man(α1-4)Man(α1-O)Me and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-α-D-mannose. We evaluated its oligomerization profile at different pH values using Small Angle X-ray Scattering and compared it to that of Concanavalin A. Based on predicted pKa-shifts of amino acids in the subunit interfaces we devised a model for the dimer-tetramer equilibrium phenomena of these proteins. Additionally, we demonstrated Cbol anti-inflammatory properties and further characterized them using in vivo and in vitro models. PMID:24865454

  10. Structural and Functional Relationships between the Lectin and Arm Domains of Calreticulin*

    PubMed Central

    Pocanschi, Cosmin L.; Kozlov, Guennadi; Brockmeier, Ulf; Brockmeier, Achim; Williams, David B.; Gehring, Kalle

    2011-01-01

    Calreticulin and calnexin are key components in maintaining the quality control of glycoprotein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum. Although their lectin function of binding monoglucosylated sugar moieties of glycoproteins is well documented, their chaperone activity in suppressing protein aggregation is less well understood. Here, we use a series of deletion mutants of calreticulin to demonstrate that its aggregation suppression function resides primarily within its lectin domain. Using hydrophobic peptides as substrate mimetics, we show that aggregation suppression is mediated through a single polypeptide binding site that exhibits a Kd for peptides of 0.5–1 μm. This site is distinct from the oligosaccharide binding site and differs from previously identified sites of binding to thrombospondin and GABARAP (4-aminobutyrate type A receptor-associated protein). Although the arm domain of calreticulin was incapable of suppressing aggregation or binding hydrophobic peptides on its own, it did contribute to aggregation suppression in the context of the whole molecule. The high resolution x-ray crystal structure of calreticulin with a partially truncated arm domain reveals a marked difference in the relative orientations of the arm and lectin domains when compared with calnexin. Furthermore, a hydrophobic patch was detected on the arm domain that mediates crystal packing and may contribute to calreticulin chaperone function. PMID:21652723

  11. Structural analysis and unique molecular recognition properties of a Bauhinia forficata lectin that inhibits cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lubkowski, Jacek; Durbin, Sarah V; Silva, Mariana C C; Farnsworth, David; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Lectins have been used at length for basic research and clinical applications. New insights into the molecular recognition properties enhance our basic understanding of carbohydrate-protein interactions and aid in the design/development of new lectins. In this study, we used a combination of cell-based assays, glycan microarrays, and X-ray crystallography to evaluate the structure and function of the recombinant Bauhinia forficata lectin (BfL). The lectin was shown to be cytostatic for several cancer cell lines included in the NCI-60 panel; in particular, it inhibited growth of melanoma cancer cells (LOX IMVI) by over 95%. BfL is dimeric in solution and highly specific for binding of oligosaccharides and glycopeptides with terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc). BfL was found to have especially strong binding (apparent Kd  = 0.5-1.0 nm) to the tumor-associated Tn antigen. High-resolution crystal structures were determined for the ligand-free lectin, as well as for its complexes with three Tn glycopeptides, globotetraose, and the blood group A antigen. Extensive analysis of the eight crystal structures and comparison to structures of related lectins revealed several unique features of GalNAc recognition. Of special note, the carboxylate group of Glu126, lining the glycan-binding pocket, forms H-bonds with both the N-acetyl of GalNAc and the peptide amido group of Tn antigens. Stabilization provided by Glu126 is described here for the first time for any GalNAc-specific lectin. Taken together, the results provide new insights into the molecular recognition of carbohydrates and provide a structural understanding that will enable rational engineering of BfL for a variety of applications.

  12. Structural analysis of β-prism lectin from Colocasia esculenta (L.) S chott.

    PubMed

    Vajravijayan, S; Pletnev, S; Pletnev, V Z; Nandhagopal, N; Gunasekaran, K

    2016-10-01

    The Mannose-binding β-Prism Colocasia esculenta lectin (β-PCL) was purified from tubers using ion exchange chromatography. The purified β-PCL appeared as a single band of ∼12kDa on SDS-PAGE. β-PCL crystallizes in trigonal space group P3121 and diffracted to a resolution of 2.1Å. The structure was solved using Molecular replacement using Crocus vernus lectin (PDB: 3MEZ) as a model. From the final refined model to an R-factor of 16.5% and an Rfree of 20.4%, it has been observed that the biological unit consists of two β-Prism domains augmented through C-terminals swap over to form one of faces for each domain. Cα superposition of individual domains of β-PCL with individual domains of other related structures and superposition of whole protein structures were carried out. The higher RMS deviation for the superposition of whole structures suggest that β-prism domains assume different orientation in each structure.

  13. KM+, a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia: amino acid sequence, predicted tertiary structure, carbohydrate recognition, and analysis of the beta-prism fold.

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, J. C.; De Oliveira, P. S.; Garratt, R.; Beltramini, L.; Resing, K.; Roque-Barreira, M. C.; Greene, L. J.

    1999-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit), which contains 149 residues/mol, is reported and compared to those of other members of the Moraceae family, particularly that of jacalin, also from jackfruit, with which it shares 52% sequence identity. KM+ presents an acetyl-blocked N-terminus and is not posttranslationally modified by proteolytic cleavage as is the case for jacalin. Rather, it possesses a short, glycine-rich linker that unites the regions homologous to the alpha- and beta-chains of jacalin. The results of homology modeling implicate the linker sequence in sterically impeding rotation of the side chain of Asp141 within the binding site pocket. As a consequence, the aspartic acid is locked into a conformation adequate only for the recognition of equatorial hydroxyl groups on the C4 epimeric center (alpha-D-mannose, alpha-D-glucose, and their derivatives). In contrast, the internal cleavage of the jacalin chain permits free rotation of the homologous aspartic acid, rendering it capable of accepting hydrogen bonds from both possible hydroxyl configurations on C4. We suggest that, together with direct recognition of epimeric hydroxyls and the steric exclusion of disfavored ligands, conformational restriction of the lectin should be considered to be a new mechanism by which selectivity may be built into carbohydrate binding sites. Jacalin and KM+ adopt the beta-prism fold already observed in two unrelated protein families. Despite presenting little or no sequence similarity, an analysis of the beta-prism reveals a canonical feature repeatedly present in all such structures, which is based on six largely hydrophobic residues within a beta-hairpin containing two classic-type beta-bulges. We suggest the term beta-prism motif to describe this feature. PMID:10210179

  14. Homology model building of the HMG-1 box structural domain.

    PubMed Central

    Baxevanis, A D; Bryant, S H; Landsman, D

    1995-01-01

    Nucleoproteins belonging to the HMG-1/2 family possess homologous domains approximately 75 amino acids in length. These domains, termed HMG-1 boxes, are highly structured, compact, and mediate the interaction between HMG-1 box-containing proteins and DNA in a variety of biological contexts. Homology model building experiments on HMG-1 box sequences 'threaded' through the 1H-NMR structure of an HMG-1 box from rat indicate that the domain does not have rigid sequence requirements for its formation. Energy calculations indicate that the structure of all HMG-1 box domains is stabilized primarily through hydrophobic interactions. We have found structural relationships in the absence of statistically significant sequence similarity, identifying several candidate proteins which could possibly assume the same three-dimensional conformation as the rat HMG-1 box motif. The threading technique provides a method by which significant structural similarities in a diverse protein family can be efficiently detected, and the 'structural alignment' derived by this method provides a rational basis through which phylogenetic relationships and the precise sites of interaction between HMG-1 box proteins and DNA can be deduced. Images PMID:7731789

  15. Structure and Specificity of a Binary Tandem Domain F-Lectin from Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchet, M.; Odom, E; Vasta, J; Amzel, M

    2010-01-01

    The plasma of the striped bass Morone saxatilis contains a fucose-specific lectin (MsaFBP32) that consists of two F-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in tandem. The crystal structure of the complex of MsaFBP32 with l-fucose reported here shows a cylindrical 81-A-long and 60-A-wide trimer divided into two globular halves: one containing N-terminal CRDs (N-CRDs) and the other containing C-terminal CRDs (C-CRDs). The resulting binding surfaces at the opposite ends of the cylindrical trimer have the potential to cross-link cell surface or humoral carbohydrate ligands. The N-CRDs and C-CRDs of MsaFBP32 exhibit significant structural differences, suggesting that they recognize different glycans. Analysis of the carbohydrate binding sites provides the structural basis for the observed specificity of MsaFBP32 for simple carbohydrates and suggests that the N-CRD recognizes more complex fucosylated oligosaccharides and with a relatively higher avidity than the C-CRD. Modeling of MsaFBP32 complexed with fucosylated glycans that are widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes rationalizes the observation that binary tandem CRD F-type lectins function as opsonins by cross-linking 'non-self' carbohydrate ligands and 'self' carbohydrate ligands, such as sugar structures displayed by microbial pathogens and glycans on the surface of phagocytic cells from the host.

  16. Structure of the native (unligated) mannose-specific bulb lectin from Scilla campanulata (bluebell) at 1.7 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, S D; Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Rizkallah, P J; Allen, A K; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J

    1999-07-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of native Scilla campanulata agglutinin, a mannose-specific lectin from bluebell bulbs and a member of the Liliaceae family, has been determined by molecular replacement and refined to an R value of 0.186 at 1.7 A resolution. The lectin crystallizes in space group P21212 with unit-cell parameters a = 70. 42, b = 92.95, c = 46.64 A. The unit cell contains eight protein molecules of Mr = 13143 Da (119 amino-acid residues). The asymmetric unit comprises two chemically identical molecules, A and B, related by a non-crystallographic twofold axis perpendicular to c. This dimer further associates by crystallographic twofold symmetry to form a tetramer. The fold of the polypeptide backbone closely resembles that found in the lectins from Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) and Hippeastrum (amaryllis) and contains a threefold symmetric beta-prism made up of three antiparallel four-stranded beta-sheets. Each of the four-stranded beta-sheets (I, II and III) possesses a potential saccharide-binding site containing conserved residues; however, site II has two mutations relative to sites I and III which may prevent ligation at this site. Our study provides the first accurate and detailed description of a native (unligated) structure from this superfamily of mannose-specific bulb lectins and will allow comparisons with a number of lectin-saccharide complexes which have already been determined or are currently under investigation.

  17. Crystal Structure of a Fructokinase Homolog from Halothermothrix orenii

    SciTech Connect

    Khiang, C.; Seetharaman, J; Kasprzak, J; Cherlyn, N; Patel, B; Love, C; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Fructokinase (FRK; EC 2.7.1.4) catalyzes the phosphorylation of D-fructose to D-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P). This irreversible and near rate-limiting step is a central and regulatory process in plants and bacteria, which channels fructose into a metabolically active state for glycolysis. Towards understanding the mechanism of FRK, here we report the crystal structure of a FRK homolog from a thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii (Hore{_}18220 in sequence databases). The structure of the Hore{_}18220 protein reveals a catalytic domain with a Rossmann-like fold and a b-sheet 'lid' for dimerization. Based on comparison of Hore{_}18220 to structures of related proteins, we propose its mechanism of action, in which the lid serves to regulate access to the substrate binding sites. Close relationship of Hore{_}18220 and plant FRK enzymes allows us to propose a model for the structure and function of FRKs.

  18. X-ray structure solution of amaryllis lectin by molecular replacement with only 4% of the total diffracting matter.

    PubMed

    Chantalat, L; Wood, S D; Rizkallah, P; Reynolds, C D

    1996-11-01

    It is often the case that analogous proteins from different species crystallize in a different form. These structures can usually be easily solved by the molecular-replacement (MR) technique, as the protein folding is very often conserved. However, the results from MR become more uncertain as the proportion of diffracting matter decreases as a result of multimericity and/or absence of some of the atoms in the model. In this paper results are presented on the structure solution of amaryllis lectin (109 residues per monomer) containing two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure was solved by MR using the Calpha coordinates of one monomer from snowdrop lectin which has 85% amino-acid sequence identity to amaryllis lectin. This represents only 6% of the non-H atoms of the protein molecule to be used for structure determination and it is a major improvement on previous reports. Further calculations were carried out in order to establish the minimum number of atoms which could be included in the model before a clear solution to the MR problem was revealed. This study showed that the structure of amaryllis lectin could still have been solved easily with 3.85% of the model, which even in the most favourable cases, will probably constitute a minimum for molecular-replacement structure solution.

  19. Persistent homology analysis of protein structure, flexibility and folding

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are the most important biomolecules for living organisms. The understanding of protein structure, function, dynamics and transport is one of most challenging tasks in biological science. In the present work, persistent homology is, for the first time, introduced for extracting molecular topological fingerprints (MTFs) based on the persistence of molecular topological invariants. MTFs are utilized for protein characterization, identification and classification. The method of slicing is proposed to track the geometric origin of protein topological invariants. Both all-atom and coarse-grained representations of MTFs are constructed. A new cutoff-like filtration is proposed to shed light on the optimal cutoff distance in elastic network models. Based on the correlation between protein compactness, rigidity and connectivity, we propose an accumulated bar length generated from persistent topological invariants for the quantitative modeling of protein flexibility. To this end, a correlation matrix based filtration is developed. This approach gives rise to an accurate prediction of the optimal characteristic distance used in protein B-factor analysis. Finally, MTFs are employed to characterize protein topological evolution during protein folding and quantitatively predict the protein folding stability. An excellent consistence between our persistent homology prediction and molecular dynamics simulation is found. This work reveals the topology-function relationship of proteins. PMID:24902720

  20. Structural analysis and binding properties of isoforms of tarin, the GNA-related lectin from Colocasia esculenta.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia R; Winter, Harry C; Verícimo, Mauricio A; Meagher, Jennifer L; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Goldstein, Irwin J; Paschoalin, Vânia M F; Silva, Joab T

    2015-01-01

    The lectins, a class of proteins that occur widely in animals, plants, fungi, lichens and microorganisms, are known for their ability to specifically bind to carbohydrates. Plant lectins can be classified into 12 families including the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin superfamily, which is widespread among monocotyledonous plants and binds specifically to mannose, a behavior that confers remarkable anti-tumor, anti-viral and insecticidal properties on these proteins. The present study characterized a mitogenic lectin from this family, called tarin, which was purified from the crude extract from taro (Colocasia esculenta). The results showed that tarin is a glycoprotein with 2-3% carbohydrate content, composed of least 10 isoforms with pIs ranging from 5.5 to 9.5. The intact protein is a heterotetramer of 47kDa composed of two non-identical and non-covalently associated polypeptides, with small subunits of 11.9kDa and large subunits of 12.6kDa. The tarin structure is stable and recovers or maintains its functional structure following treatments at different temperatures and pH. Tarin showed a complex carbohydrate specificity, binding with high affinity to high-mannose and complex N-glycans. Many of these ligands can be found in viruses, tumor cells and insects, as well as in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Chemical modifications confirmed that both conserved and non-conserved amino acids participate in this interaction. This study determined the structural and ligand binding characteristics of a GNA-related lectin that can be exploited for several different purposes, particularly as a proliferative therapeutic molecule that is able to enhance the immunological response.

  1. NMR solution structures of actin depolymerizing factor homology domains

    PubMed Central

    Goroncy, Alexander K; Koshiba, Seizo; Tochio, Naoya; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Sato, Manami; Inoue, Makato; Watanabe, Satoru; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Tanaka, Akiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    Actin is one of the most conserved proteins in nature. Its assembly and disassembly are regulated by many proteins, including the family of actin-depolymerizing factor homology (ADF-H) domains. ADF-H domains can be divided into five classes: ADF/cofilin, glia maturation factor (GMF), coactosin, twinfilin, and Abp1/drebrin. The best-characterized class is ADF/cofilin. The other four classes have drawn much less attention and very few structures have been reported. This study presents the solution NMR structure of the ADF-H domain of human HIP-55-drebrin-like protein, the first published structure of a drebrin-like domain (mammalian), and the first published structure of GMF β (mouse). We also determined the structures of mouse GMF γ, the mouse coactosin-like domain and the C-terminal ADF-H domain of mouse twinfilin 1. Although the overall fold of the five domains is similar, some significant differences provide valuable insights into filamentous actin (F-actin) and globular actin (G-actin) binding, including the identification of binding residues on the long central helix. This long helix is stabilized by three or four residues. Notably, the F-actin binding sites of mouse GMF β and GMF γ contain two additional β-strands not seen in other ADF-H structures. The G-actin binding site of the ADF-H domain of human HIP-55-drebrin-like protein is absent and distorted in mouse GMF β and GMF γ. PMID:19768801

  2. Structural differences between two lectins from Cytisus scoparius, both specific for D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine.

    PubMed

    Young, N M; Watson, D C; Williams, R E

    1984-08-15

    Three lectin fractions were obtained from seeds of the leguminous plant Cytisus scoparius (Scotch broom) by means of affinity chromatography on a N-acetyl-D-galactosamine medium. The first fraction, termed CSIa, was equally well inhibited in haemagglutination experiments by D-galactose and by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and consisted of a group of isolectins formed from closely related polypeptide chains of approx. Mr 30000. The second fraction, CSIb, was closely related to CSIa in specificity, c.d. and other properties. The third fraction contained a homogeneous lectin, CSII, formed from subunits again of approx. Mr 30000. CSII was 100 times more readily inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine than by D-galactose. Despite the similarity in specificity, comparative studies of their amino acid composition, c.d. and N-terminal amino acid sequence showed that the CSIa and CSII lectins diverged considerably in structure. The lectin from Cytisus sessilifolius, specific for chitobiose, was also examined and resembled CSIa in composition and c.d. properties.

  3. Localization of binding sites of Ulex europaeus I, Helix pomatia and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 lectins and analysis of their backbone structures by several glycosidases and poly-N-acetyllactosamine-specific lectins in human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ito, N; Imai, S; Haga, S; Nagaike, C; Morimura, Y; Hatake, K

    1996-09-01

    Several studies have shown the deletion of blood group A or B antigens and the accumulation of H antigens in human breast carcinomas. Other studies have independently demonstrated that the binding sites of lectins such as Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I-B4 (GSAI-B4) are highly expressed in these cells. In order to clarify the molecular mechanisms of malignant transformation and metastasis of carcinoma cells, it is important to understand the relationship between such phenotypically distinct events. For this purpose, we examined whether the binding sites of these lectins and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) are expressed concomitantly in the same carcinoma cells and analyzed their backbone structures. The expression of the binding sites of these lectins was observed independently of the blood group (ABO) of the patients and was not affected by the histological type of the carcinomas. Observation of serial sections stained with these lectins revealed that the distribution of HPA binding sites was almost identical to that of GSAI-B4 in most cases. Furthermore, in some cases, UEA-I binding patterns were similar to those of HPA and GSAI-B4 but in other cases, mosaic staining patterns with these lectins were also observed, i.e., some cell clusters were stained with both HPA and GSAI-B4 but not with UEA-I and adjacent cell clusters were stained only with UEA-I. Digestion with endo-beta-galactosidase or N-glycosidase F markedly reduced the staining intensity of these lectins. Together with the reduction of staining by these lectins, reactivity with Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin II appeared in carcinoma cells following endo-beta-galactosidase digestion. Among the lectins specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine, Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (LEA) most vividly and consistently stained the cancer cells. Next to LEA, pokeweed mitogen agglutinin was also effective in staining these cells. Carcinoma cells reactive with these

  4. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  5. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James M; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone and (13)Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2-1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9-1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments.

  6. Binding of different monosaccharides by lectin PA-IIL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: thermodynamics data correlated with X-ray structures.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Charles; Mitchell, Edward P; Pokorná, Martina; Gautier, Catherine; Utille, Jean-Pierre; Wimmerová, Michaela; Imberty, Anne

    2006-02-06

    The lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IIL) is involved in host recognition and biofilm formation. Lectin not only displays an unusually high affinity for fucose but also binds to L-fucose, L-galactose and D-arabinose that differ only by the group at position 5 of the sugar ring. Isothermal calorimetry experiments provided precise determination of affinity for the three methyl-glycosides and revealed a large enthalpy contribution. The crystal structures of the complexes of PA-IIL with L-galactose and Met-beta-D-arabinoside have been determined and compared with the PA-IIL/fucose complex described previously. A combination of the structures and thermodynamics provided clues for the role of the hydrophobic group in affinity.

  7. Characterization of the oligomer structure of recombinant human mannan-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pia H; Weilguny, Dietmar; Matthiesen, Finn; McGuire, Kirsten A; Shi, Lei; Højrup, Peter

    2005-03-25

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) belongs to a family of proteins called the collectins, which show large differences in their ultrastructures. These differences are believed to be determined by different N-terminal disulfide-bonding patterns. So far only the bonding pattern of two of the simple forms (recombinant rat MBL-C and bovine CL-43) have been determined. Recombinant MBL expressed in human cells was purified, and the structure of the N-terminal region was determined. Preliminary results on human plasma-derived MBL revealed high similarity to the recombinant protein. Here we report the structure of the N-terminal part of recombinant human MBL and present a model to explain the oligomerization pattern. Using a strategy of consecutive enzymatic digestions and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, we succeeded in identifying a number of disulfide-linked peptides from the N-terminal cysteine-rich region. Based on these building blocks, we propose a model that can explain the various oligomeric forms found in purified MBL preparations. Furthermore, the model was challenged by the production of cysteine to serine mutants of the three N-terminally situated cysteines. The oligomerization patterns of these mutants support the proposed model. The model indicates that the polypeptide dimer is the basic unit in the oligomerization.

  8. Structural bases of lectin-carbohydrate affinities: comparison with protein-folding energetics.

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, E.; Hernández-Arana, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have made a comparative structure based analysis of the thermodynamics of lectin-carbohydrate (L-C) binding and protein folding. Examination of the total change in accessible surface area in those processes revealed a much larger decrease in free energy per unit of area buried in the case of L-C associations. According to our analysis, this larger stabilization of L-C interactions arises from a more favorable enthalpy of burying a unit of polar surface area, and from higher proportions of polar areas. Hydrogen bonds present at 14 L-C interfaces were identified, and their overall characteristics were compared to those reported before for hydrogen bonds in protein structures. Three major factors might explain why polar-polar interactions are stronger in L-C binding than in protein folding: (1) higher surface density of hydrogen bonds; (2) better hydrogen-bonding geometry; (3) larger proportion of hydrogen bonds involving charged groups. Theoretically, the binding entropy can be partitioned into three main contributions: entropy changes due to surface desolvation, entropy losses arising from freezing rotatable bonds, and entropic effects that result from restricting translation and overall rotation motions. These contributions were estimated from structural information and added up to give calculated binding entropies. Good correlation between experimental and calculated values was observed when solvation effects were treated according to a parametrization developed by other authors from protein folding studies. Finally, our structural parametrization gave calculated free energies that deviate from experimental values by 1.1 kcal/mol on the average; this amounts to an uncertainty of one order of magnitude in the binding constant. PMID:10338018

  9. Functional coverage of the human genome by existing structures, structural genomics targets, and homology models.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Bourne, Philip E

    2005-08-01

    The bias in protein structure and function space resulting from experimental limitations and targeting of particular functional classes of proteins by structural biologists has long been recognized, but never continuously quantified. Using the Enzyme Commission and the Gene Ontology classifications as a reference frame, and integrating structure data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), target sequences from the structural genomics projects, structure homology derived from the SUPERFAMILY database, and genome annotations from Ensembl and NCBI, we provide a quantified view, both at the domain and whole-protein levels, of the current and projected coverage of protein structure and function space relative to the human genome. Protein structures currently provide at least one domain that covers 37% of the functional classes identified in the genome; whole structure coverage exists for 25% of the genome. If all the structural genomics targets were solved (twice the current number of structures in the PDB), it is estimated that structures of one domain would cover 69% of the functional classes identified and complete structure coverage would be 44%. Homology models from existing experimental structures extend the 37% coverage to 56% of the genome as single domains and 25% to 31% for complete structures. Coverage from homology models is not evenly distributed by protein family, reflecting differing degrees of sequence and structure divergence within families. While these data provide coverage, conversely, they also systematically highlight functional classes of proteins for which structures should be determined. Current key functional families without structure representation are highlighted here; updated information on the "most wanted list" that should be solved is available on a weekly basis from http://function.rcsb.org:8080/pdb/function_distribution/index.html.

  10. Structural studies of the carbohydrate moieties of lectins from potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and thorn-apple (Datura stramonium) seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ashford, David; Desai, Nila N.; Allen, Anthony K.; Neuberger, Albert; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Selvendran, Robert R.

    1982-01-01

    1. Methylation analysis of potato (Solanum tuberosum) lectin and thorn-apple (Datura stramonium) lectin confirmed previous conclusions that both glycoproteins contained high proportions of l-arabinofuranosides and lesser amounts of d-galactopyranosides. The arabinofuranosides are present in both lectins as short unbranched chains containing 1→2- and 1→3-linkages, which are known to be linked to hydroxyproline. Galactopyranosides are present as monosaccharides, which are known to be attached to serine, in potato lectin and as both the monosaccharide and the 1→3-linked disaccharide in Datura lectin. 2. Alkaline digestion of potato lectin and subsequent separation of the components by gel filtration led to the isolation of four fractions corresponding to the mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-arabinosides of hydroxyproline. The latter two fractions accounted for over 70% of the total hydroxyproline. 3. Methylation analysis was used to show that the triarabinoside contained only 1→2-linkages between sugars, but that the tetra-arabinoside contained both 1→2- and 1→3-linkages. Direct-insertion mass spectrometry of these compounds using electron impact and chemical ionization, in a comparison with other known structural patterns, was used to determine the sequences of the sugars, which were Araƒ1→2Araƒ1→2Araƒ1→Hyp and Araƒ1→3Araƒ1→2Araƒ1→2Araƒ 1→Hyp. 4. On the basis of optical rotation it had previously been suggested [Allen, Desai, Neuberger & Creeth (1978) Biochem. J. 171, 665–674] that all the arabinose of potato lectin was present as the β-l-furanoside. However, measurement of the optical rotations of the hydroxyprolyl arabinosides showed that whereas the diarabinoside had a molar rotation ([m]) value close to that predicted, the triarabinoside was more dextrorotatory and the tetra-arabinoside was less dextrorotatory than expected. Possible explanations for these findings are that, although the di- and tri-arabinosides contain exclusively

  11. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    DOE PAGES

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog ofmore » uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.« less

  12. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  13. Structure of the Lectin Regulatory Domain of the Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysin Lectinolysin Reveals the Basis for Its Lewis Antigen Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Feil, Susanne C.; Lawrence, Sara; Mulhern, Terrence D.; Holien, Jessica K.; Hotze, Eileen M.; Farrand, Stephen; Tweten, Rodney K.; Parker, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) punch holes in target cell membranes through a highly regulated process. Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin (LLY) exhibits another layer of regulation with a lectin domain that enhances the pore-forming activity of the toxin. We have determined the crystal structures of the lectin domain by itself and in complex with various glycans that reveal the molecular basis for the Lewis antigen specificity of LLY. A small-angle X-ray scattering study of intact LLY reveals the molecule is flat and elongated with the lectin domain oriented so that the Lewis antigen-binding site is exposed. We suggest that the lectin domain enhances the pore-forming activity of LLY by concentrating toxin molecules at fucose-rich sites on membranes, thus promoting the formation of pre-pore oligomers on the surface of susceptible cells. PMID:22325774

  14. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  15. HorA web server to infer homology between proteins using sequence and structural similarity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong-Hyun; Cheng, Hua; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    The biological properties of proteins are often gleaned through comparative analysis of evolutionary relatives. Although protein structure similarity search methods detect more distant homologs than purely sequence-based methods, structural resemblance can result from either homology (common ancestry) or analogy (similarity without common ancestry). While many existing web servers detect structural neighbors, they do not explicitly address the question of homology versus analogy. Here, we present a web server named HorA (Homology or Analogy) that identifies likely homologs for a query protein structure. Unlike other servers, HorA combines sequence information from state-of-the-art profile methods with structure information from spatial similarity measures using an advanced computational technique. HorA aims to identify biologically meaningful connections rather than purely 3D-geometric similarities. The HorA method finds ∼90% of remote homologs defined in the manually curated database SCOP. HorA will be especially useful for finding remote homologs that might be overlooked by other sequence or structural similarity search servers. The HorA server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/horaserver. PMID:19417074

  16. Identification of structural and secretory lectin-binding glycoproteins of normal and cancerous human prostate.

    PubMed

    Lad, P M; Cooper, J F; Learn, D B; Olson, C V

    1984-12-07

    We have utilized the technique of lectin-loading of SDS gels with iodinated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin to identify glycoproteins in prostatic and seminal fluids as well as in prostate tissue fractions. The following subunits which bound both lectins were detected: (a) 50, 43 and 38 kDa subunits common to prostatic and seminal fluids, and an additional 55 kDa subunit which predominates only in prostatic fluid; (b) 78, 55, 50 and 43 kDa subunits in prostatic tissue cytosol and (c) 195, 170, 135, 116 and 95 kDa subunits present in the particulate fractions of prostatic tissue. Immunoblotting using specific rabbit antibodies revealed the 50 kDa band to be prostatic acid phosphatase and the 38 kDa band to be prostate-specific antigen. Interestingly, antibodies directed toward prostatic acid phosphatase were found to cross-react with the 43 kDa band. Fractionation on sucrose gradients showed that several of these particulate glycoproteins were associated with a vesicle fraction enriched in adenylate cyclase activity, implying that they are plasma membrane glycoproteins. Comparison of soluble and particulate fractions of normal and cancerous tissue homogenates was made by densitometric scanning of autoradiograms of lectin-loaded gels. Similar relative intensities of lectin-binding were obtained for corresponding proteins in normal and cancerous tissue fractions. Also, immunoblotting showed no differences in prostatic acid phosphatase or prostate-specific antigen between normal and cancerous soluble homogenate fractions. Our results suggest that major lectin-binding proteins are conserved in the transition from normal to cancerous tissue. These results may be useful in developing a multiple-marker profile of metastatic prostate cancer and for the design of imaging agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, to prominent soluble and particulate prostate glycoproteins.

  17. Structural features of the combining site region of Erythrina corallodendron lectin: role of tryptophan 135.

    PubMed Central

    Adar, R.; Moreno, E.; Streicher, H.; Karlsson, K. A.; Angström, J.; Sharon, N.

    1998-01-01

    The role of Trp 135 and Tyr 108 in the combining site of Erythrina corallodendron lectin (ECorL) was investigated by physicochemical characterization of mutants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis, hemagglutination-inhibition studies, and molecular modeling, including dynamics simulations. The findings demonstrate that Trp 135 in ECorL: (1) is required for the tight binding of Ca2+ and Mn2+ to the lectin because mutation of this residue into alanine results in loss of these ions upon dialysis and concomitant reversible inactivation of the mutant; (2) contributes to the high affinity of methyl alpha-N-dansylgalactosaminide (MealphaGalNDns) to the lectin; and (3) is solely responsible for the fluorescence energy transfer between the aromatic residues of the lectin and the dansyl group in the ECorL-MealphaGalNDns complex. Docking of MealphaGalNDns into the combining site of the lectin reveals that the dansyl moiety is parallel with the indole of Trp 135, as required for efficient fluorescence energy transfer, in one of the two possible conformations that this ligand assumes in the bound state. In the W135A mutant, which still binds MealphaGalNDns strongly, the dansyl group may partially insert itself into the place formerly occupied by Trp 135, a process that from dynamics simulations does not appear to be energetically favored unless the loop containing this residue assumes an open conformation. However, a small fraction of the W135A molecules must be able to bind MealphaGalNDns in order to explain the relatively high affinity, as compared to galactose, still remaining for this ligand. A model for the molecular events leading to inactivation of the W135A mutant upon demetallization is also presented in which the cis-trans isomerization of the Ala 88-Asp 89 peptide bond, observed in high-temperature dynamics simulations, appears not to be a required step. PMID:9514259

  18. Discrimination between Distant Homologs and Structural Analogs: Lessons from Manually Constructed, Reliable Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hua; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    A natural way to study protein sequence, structure, and function is to put them in the context of evolution. Homologs inherit similarities from their common ancestor, while analogs converge to similar structures due to a limited number of energetically favorable ways to pack secondary structural elements. Using novel strategies, we previously assembled two reliable databases of homologs and analogs. In this study, we compare these two data sets and develop a support vector machine (SVM)-based classifier to discriminate between homologs and analogs. The classifier uses a number of well-known similarity scores. We observe that although both structure scores and sequence scores contribute to SVM performance, profile sequence scores computed based on structural alignments are the best discriminators between remote homologs and structural analogs. We apply our classifier to a representative set from the expert-constructed database, Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP). The SVM classifier recovers 76% of the remote homologs defined as domains in the same SCOP superfamily but from different families. More importantly, we also detect and discuss interesting homologous relationships between SCOP domains from different superfamilies, folds, and even classes. PMID:18313074

  19. Tryptophan environment, secondary structure and thermal unfolding of the galactose-specific seed lectin from Dolichos lablab: fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Nabil Ali Mohammed; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar; Swamy, Musti J

    2006-07-01

    Fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic studies were carried out on the galactose-specific lectin from Dolichos lablab seeds (DLL-II). The microenvironment of the tryptophan residues in the lectin under native and denaturing conditions were investigated by quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein by a neutral quencher (acrylamide), an anionic quencher (iodide ion) and a cationic quencher (cesium ion). The results obtained indicate that the tryptophan residues of DLL-II are largely buried in the hydrophobic core of the protein matrix, with positively charged side chains residing close to at least some of the tryptophan residues under the experimental conditions. Analysis of the far UV CD spectrum of DLL-II revealed that the secondary structure of the lectin consists of 57% alpha-helix, 21% beta-sheet, 7% beta-turns and 15% unordered structures. Carbohydrate binding did not significantly alter the secondary and tertiary structures of the lectin. Thermal unfolding of DLL-II, investigated by monitoring CD signals, showed a sharp transition around 75 degrees C both in the far UV region (205 nm) and the near UV region (289 nm), which shifted to ca. 77-78 degrees C in the presence of 0.1 M methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, indicating that ligand binding leads to a moderate stabilization of the lectin structure.

  20. Effects of temperature, pH and sugar binding on the structures of lectins ebulin f and SELfd.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Celia; Cordoba-Diaz, Damián; Cordoba-Diaz, Manuel; Girbés, Tomás; Jiménez, Pilar

    2017-04-01

    Ebulin f and SELfd are two lectins of Sambucus ebulus L. that show different stability and digestibility properties in gastric fluid due to their structural differences which may explain their different toxicological profiles. The main aim was to determine the effects of pH, temperature and sugar binding on the intrinsic structures of both proteins by fluorescence analyses. Quenching experiments were conducted, under different pH and temperature conditions, with acrylamide (uncharged) and iodide (charged), to study the possible changes of their intrinsic fluorescence. Results revealed that the native structure of SELfd is more folded than that of ebulin f. At pH 2.0, ebulin f displayed a more open structure than at neutral pH. It can be concluded that this is the main reason why ebulin f is accessible to pepsin action and more sensitive to degradation, in contrast to SELfd as we reported previously.

  1. Structural Basis of Specific Recognition of Non-Reducing Terminal N-Acetylglucosamine by an Agrocybe aegerita Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiao-Ming; Li, De-Feng; Jiang, Shuai; Lan, Xian-Qing; Hu, Yonglin; Sun, Hui; Wang, Da-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) is a reversible post-translational modification that plays essential roles in many cellular pathways. Research in this field, however, is hampered by the lack of suitable probes to identify, accumulate, and purify the O-GlcNAcylated proteins. We have previously reported the identification of a lectin from the mushroom Agrocybe aegerita, i.e., Agrocybe aegerita lectin 2, or AAL2, that could bind terminal N-acetylglucosamine with higher affinities and specificity than other currently used probes. In this paper, we report the crystal structures of AAL2 and its complexes with GlcNAc and GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc and reveal the structural basis of GlcNAc recognition by AAL2 and residues essential for the binding of terminal N-acetylglucosamine. Study on AAL2 may enable us to design a protein probe that can be used to identify and purify O-GlcNAcylated proteins more efficiently. PMID:26114302

  2. Structure/function relationships in RecA protein-mediated homology recognition and strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Prentiss, Mara; Prévost, Chantal; Danilowicz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    RecA family proteins include RecA, Rad51, and Dmc1. These recombinases are responsible for homology search and strand exchange. Homology search and strand exchange occur during double-strand break repair and in eukaryotes during meiotic recombination. In bacteria, homology search begins when RecA binds an initiating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the primary DNA-binding site to form the presynaptic filament. The filament is a right-handed helix, where the initiating strand is bound deep within the filament. Once the presynaptic filament is formed, it interrogates nearby double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to find a homologous sequence; therefore, we provide a detailed discussion of structural features of the presynaptic filament that play important functional roles. The discussion includes many diagrams showing multiple filament turns. These diagrams illustrate interactions that are not evident in single turn structures. The first dsDNA interactions with the presynaptic filament are insensitive to mismatches. The mismatch insensitive interactions lead to dsDNA deformation that triggers a homology testing process governed by kinetics. The first homology test involves ∼8 bases. Almost all interactions are rejected by this initial rapid test, leading to a new cycle of homology testing. Interactions that pass the initial rapid test proceed to a slower testing stage. That slower stage induces nonhomologous dsDNA to reverse strand exchange and begin a new cycle of homology testing. In contrast, homologous dsDNA continues to extend the heteroduplex strand-exchange product until ATP hydrolysis makes strand exchange irreversible.

  3. Primary structure of hemolytic lectin CEL-III from marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata and its cDNA: structural similarity to the B-chain from plant lectin, ricin.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Tabata, S; Sugihara, K; Kouzuma, Y; Kimura, M; Yamasaki, N

    1999-11-16

    CEL-III, a galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) specific lectin purified from a marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata has a strong hemolytic activity especially toward human and rabbit erythrocytes. We determined the primary structure of the CEL-III by examining the amino acid sequences of the protein and the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA. The cDNA encoding CEL-III has 1823 nucleotides and an open reading frame of 1296 nucleotides. CEL-III is composed of 432 amino acid residues with a M(r) of 47¿ omitted¿457 and has six internal tandem repeats, each with of 40-50 amino acids, comprising the N-terminal two-thirds of the molecule. Similar repeats are found in the B-chains of cytotoxic plant lectins, such as ricin and abrin, where six repetitive sequences extend throughout the molecules. A hydropathy plot predicts hydrophobic segments in the C-terminal region of CEL-III. These findings suggest that the N-terminal region of CEL-III plays an important role in binding to carbohydrate receptors on the target cell membranes, an event which triggers an intermolecular hydrophobic interaction of the C-terminal region, the result being oligomerization of CEL-III to lead to pore-formation in erythrocyte membrane.

  4. Crystal structure of PvuII endonuclease reveals extensive structural homologies to EcoRV.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, A; Vlassi, M; Kotsifaki, D; Tucker, P A; Wilson, K S; Kokkinidis, M

    1994-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dimeric PvuII restriction endonuclease (R.PvuII) has been determined at a resolution of 2.4A. The protein has a mixed alpha/beta architecture and consists of two subdomains. Despite a lack of sequence homology, extensive structural similarities exist between one R.PvuII subdomain and the DNA-binding subdomain of EcoRV endonuclease (R.EcoRV); the dimerization subdomains are unrelated. Within the similar domains, flexible segments of R.PvuII are topologically equivalent to the DNA-binding turns of R.EcoRV; potential catalytic residues can be deduced from the structural similarities to R.EcoRV. Conformational flexibility is important for the interaction with DNA. A possible classification of endonuclease structures on the basis of the positions of the scissile phosphates is discussed.

  5. The bark of Robinia pseudoacacia contains a complex mixture of lectins.Characterization of the proteins and the cDNA clones.

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, E J; Barre, A; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Rougé, P; Peumans, W J

    1995-01-01

    Two lectins were isolated from the inner bark of Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust). The first (and major) lectin (called RPbAI) is composed of five isolectins that originate from the association of 31.5- and 29-kD polypeptides into tetramers. In contrast, the second (minor) lectin (called RPbAII) is a hometetramer composed of 26-kD subunits. The cDNA clones encoding the polypeptides of RPbAI and RPbAII were isolated and their sequences determined. Apparently all three polypeptides are translated from mRNAs of approximately 1.2 kb. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of the different clones indicates that the 31.5- and 29-kD RPbAI polypeptides show approximately 80% sequence identity and are homologous to the previously reported legume seed lectins, whereas the 26-kD RPbAII polypeptide shows only 33% sequence identity to the previously described legume lectins. Modeling the 31.5-kD subunit of RPbAI predicts that its three-dimensional structure is strongly related to the three-dimensional models that have been determined thus far for a few legume lectins. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA isolated from Robinia has revealed that the Robinia bark lectins are the result of the expression of a small family of lectin genes. PMID:7716244

  6. Lectin engineering, a molecular evolutionary approach to expanding the lectin utilities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2015-04-27

    In the post genomic era, glycomics--the systematic study of all glycan structures of a given cell or organism--has emerged as an indispensable technology in various fields of biology and medicine. Lectins are regarded as "decipherers of glycans", being useful reagents for their structural analysis, and have been widely used in glycomic studies. However, the inconsistent activity and availability associated with the plant-derived lectins that comprise most of the commercially available lectins, and the limit in the range of glycan structures covered, have necessitated the development of innovative tools via engineering of lectins on existing scaffolds. This review will summarize the current state of the art of lectin engineering and highlight recent technological advances in this field. The key issues associated with the strategy of lectin engineering including selection of template lectin, construction of a mutagenesis library, and high-throughput screening methods are discussed.

  7. Weak conservation of structural features in the interfaces of homologous transient protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Singh, Prashant; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-11-01

    Residue types at the interface of protein-protein complexes (PPCs) are known to be reasonably well conserved. However, we show, using a dataset of known 3-D structures of homologous transient PPCs, that the 3-D location of interfacial residues and their interaction patterns are only moderately and poorly conserved, respectively. Another surprising observation is that a residue at the interface that is conserved is not necessarily in the interface in the homolog. Such differences in homologous complexes are manifested by substitution of the residues that are spatially proximal to the conserved residue and structural differences at the interfaces as well as differences in spatial orientations of the interacting proteins. Conservation of interface location and the interaction pattern at the core of the interfaces is higher than at the periphery of the interface patch. Extents of variability of various structural features reported here for homologous transient PPCs are higher than the variation in homologous permanent homomers. Our findings suggest that straightforward extrapolation of interfacial nature and inter-residue interaction patterns from template to target could lead to serious errors in the modeled complex structure. Understanding the evolution of interfaces provides insights to improve comparative modeling of PPC structures.

  8. Weak conservation of structural features in the interfaces of homologous transient protein–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Singh, Prashant; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Residue types at the interface of protein–protein complexes (PPCs) are known to be reasonably well conserved. However, we show, using a dataset of known 3-D structures of homologous transient PPCs, that the 3-D location of interfacial residues and their interaction patterns are only moderately and poorly conserved, respectively. Another surprising observation is that a residue at the interface that is conserved is not necessarily in the interface in the homolog. Such differences in homologous complexes are manifested by substitution of the residues that are spatially proximal to the conserved residue and structural differences at the interfaces as well as differences in spatial orientations of the interacting proteins. Conservation of interface location and the interaction pattern at the core of the interfaces is higher than at the periphery of the interface patch. Extents of variability of various structural features reported here for homologous transient PPCs are higher than the variation in homologous permanent homomers. Our findings suggest that straightforward extrapolation of interfacial nature and inter-residue interaction patterns from template to target could lead to serious errors in the modeled complex structure. Understanding the evolution of interfaces provides insights to improve comparative modeling of PPC structures. PMID:26311309

  9. HOMSTRAD: recent developments of the Homologous Protein Structure Alignment Database.

    PubMed

    Stebbings, Lucy A; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    HOMSTRAD (http://www-cryst.bioc.cam.ac.uk/ homstrad/) is a collection of protein families, clustered on the basis of sequence and structural similarity. The database is unique in that the protein family sequence alignments have been specially annotated using the program, JOY, to highlight a wide range of structural features. Such data are useful for identifying key structurally conserved residues within the families. Superpositions of the structures within each family are also available and a sensitive structure-aided search engine, FUGUE, can be used to search the database for matches to a query protein sequence. Historically, HOMSTRAD families were generated using several key pieces of software, including COMPARER and MNYFIT, and held in a number of flat files and indexes. A new relational database version of HOMSTRAD, HOMSTRAD BETA (http://www-cryst.bioc.cam. ac.uk/homstradbeta/) is being developed using MySQL. This relational data structure provides more flexibility for future developments, reduces update times and makes data more easily accessible. Consequently it has been possible to add a number of new web features including a custom alignment facility. Altogether, this makes HOMSTRAD and its new BETA version, an excellent resource both for comparative modelling and for identifying distant sequence/structure similarities between proteins.

  10. The sequence and structure of snake gourd (Trichosanthes anguina) seed lectin, a three-chain nontoxic homologue of type II RIPs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Jeyaprakash, A Arockia; Chandran, Thyageshwar; Mormann, Michael; Swamy, Musti J; Vijayan, M

    2013-08-01

    The sequence and structure of snake gourd seed lectin (SGSL), a nontoxic homologue of type II ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), have been determined by mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography, respectively. As in type II RIPs, the molecule consists of a lectin chain made up of two β-trefoil domains. The catalytic chain, which is connected through a disulfide bridge to the lectin chain in type II RIPs, is cleaved into two in SGSL. However, the integrity of the three-dimensional structure of the catalytic component of the molecule is preserved. This is the first time that a three-chain RIP or RIP homologue has been observed. A thorough examination of the sequence and structure of the protein and of its interactions with the bound methyl-α-galactose indicate that the nontoxicity of SGSL results from a combination of changes in the catalytic and the carbohydrate-binding sites. Detailed analyses of the sequences of type II RIPs of known structure and their homologues with unknown structure provide valuable insights into the evolution of this class of proteins. They also indicate some variability in carbohydrate-binding sites, which appears to contribute to the different levels of toxicity exhibited by lectins from various sources.

  11. Structural and binding studies of a C-type galactose-binding lectin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Pinheiro, Matheus P; de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Sampaio, Suely V; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    BJcuL is a snake venom galactoside-binding lectin (SVgalL) isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and is involved in a wide variety of biological activities including triggering of pro-inflammatory response, disruption of microbial biofilm structure and induction of apoptosis. In the present work, we determined the crystallographic structure of BJcuL, the first holo structure of a SVgalL, and introduced the fluorescence-based thermal stability assay (Thermofluor) as a tool for screening and characterization of the binding mechanism of SVgalL ligands. BJcuL structure revealed the existence of a porous and flexible decameric arrangement composed of disulfide-linked dimers related by a five-fold symmetry. Each monomer contains the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a calcium ion required for BJcuL lectinic activity and a sodium ion required for protein stabilization. BJcuL thermostability was found to be induced by calcium ion and galactoside sugars which exhibit hyperbolic saturation profiles dependent on ligand concentration. Serendipitously, the gentamicin group of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gAGAs) was also identified as BJcuL ligands. On contrast, gAGAs exhibited a sigmoidal saturation profile compatible with a cooperative mechanism of binding. Thermofluor, hemagglutination inhibition assay and molecular docking strategies were used to identify a distinct binding site in BJcuL localized at the dimeric interface near the fully conserved intermolecular Cys86-Cys86 disulfide bond. The hybrid approach used in the present work provided novel insights into structural behavior and functional diversification of SVgaLs.

  12. Hierarchical structures of amorphous solids characterized by persistent homology

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Takenobu; Hirata, Akihiko; Escolar, Emerson G.; Matsue, Kaname; Nishiura, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a topological method that extracts hierarchical structures of various amorphous solids. The method is based on the persistence diagram (PD), a mathematical tool for capturing shapes of multiscale data. The input to the PDs is given by an atomic configuration and the output is expressed as 2D histograms. Then, specific distributions such as curves and islands in the PDs identify meaningful shape characteristics of the atomic configuration. Although the method can be applied to a wide variety of disordered systems, it is applied here to silica glass, the Lennard-Jones system, and Cu-Zr metallic glass as standard examples of continuous random network and random packing structures. In silica glass, the method classified the atomic rings as short-range and medium-range orders and unveiled hierarchical ring structures among them. These detailed geometric characterizations clarified a real space origin of the first sharp diffraction peak and also indicated that PDs contain information on elastic response. Even in the Lennard-Jones system and Cu-Zr metallic glass, the hierarchical structures in the atomic configurations were derived in a similar way using PDs, although the glass structures and properties substantially differ from silica glass. These results suggest that the PDs provide a unified method that extracts greater depth of geometric information in amorphous solids than conventional methods. PMID:27298351

  13. Structural Investigation of a Novel N-Acetyl Glucosamine Binding Chi-Lectin Which Reveals Evolutionary Relationship with Class III Chitinases

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Dipak N.; Datta, Manali; Dev, Aditya; Dhindwal, Sonali; Singh, Nirpendra; Dasauni, Pushpanjali; Kundu, Suman; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2013-01-01

    The glycosyl hydrolase 18 (GH18) family consists of active chitinases as well as chitinase like lectins/proteins (CLPs). The CLPs share significant sequence and structural similarities with active chitinases, however, do not display chitinase activity. Some of these proteins are reported to have specific functions and carbohydrate binding property. In the present study, we report a novel chitinase like lectin (TCLL) from Tamarindus indica. The crystal structures of native TCLL and its complex with N-acetyl glucosamine were determined. Similar to the other CLPs of the GH18 members, TCLL lacks chitinase activity due to mutations of key active site residues. Comparison of TCLL with chitinases and other chitin binding CLPs shows that TCLL has substitution of some chitin binding site residues and more open binding cleft due to major differences in the loop region. Interestingly, the biochemical studies suggest that TCLL is an N-acetyl glucosamine specific chi-lectin, which is further confirmed by the complex structure of TCLL with N-acetyl glucosamine complex. TCLL has two distinct N-acetyl glucosamine binding sites S1 and S2 that contain similar polar residues, although interaction pattern with N-acetyl glucosamine varies extensively among them. Moreover, TCLL structure depicts that how plants utilize existing structural scaffolds ingenuously to attain new functions. To date, this is the first structural investigation of a chi-lectin from plants that explore novel carbohydrate binding sites other than chitin binding groove observed in GH18 family members. Consequently, TCLL structure confers evidence for evolutionary link of lectins with chitinases. PMID:23717482

  14. Refinement of protein structure homology models via long, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Raval, Alpan; Piana, Stefano; Eastwood, Michael P; Dror, Ron O; Shaw, David E

    2012-08-01

    Accurate computational prediction of protein structure represents a longstanding challenge in molecular biology and structure-based drug design. Although homology modeling techniques are widely used to produce low-resolution models, refining these models to high resolution has proven difficult. With long enough simulations and sufficiently accurate force fields, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations should in principle allow such refinement, but efforts to refine homology models using MD have for the most part yielded disappointing results. It has thus far been unclear whether MD-based refinement is limited primarily by accessible simulation timescales, force field accuracy, or both. Here, we examine MD as a technique for homology model refinement using all-atom simulations, each at least 100 μs long-more than 100 times longer than previous refinement simulations-and a physics-based force field that was recently shown to successfully fold a structurally diverse set of fast-folding proteins. In MD simulations of 24 proteins chosen from the refinement category of recent Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) experiments, we find that in most cases, simulations initiated from homology models drift away from the native structure. Comparison with simulations initiated from the native structure suggests that force field accuracy is the primary factor limiting MD-based refinement. This problem can be mitigated to some extent by restricting sampling to the neighborhood of the initial model, leading to structural improvement that, while limited, is roughly comparable to the leading alternative methods.

  15. Structure guided homology model based design and engineering of mouse antibodies for humanization.

    PubMed

    Kurella, Vinodh B; Gali, Reddy

    2014-01-01

    No universal strategy exists for humanizing mouse antibodies, and most approaches are based on primary sequence alignment and grafting. Although this strategy theoretically decreases the immunogenicity of mouse antibodies, it neither addresses conformational changes nor steric clashes that arise due to grafting of human germline frameworks to accommodate mouse CDR regions. To address these issues, we created and tested a structure-based biologic design approach using a de novo homology model to aid in the humanization of 17 unique mouse antibodies. Our approach included building a structure-based de novo homology model from the primary mouse antibody sequence, mutation of the mouse framework residues to the closest human germline sequence and energy minimization by simulated annealing on the humanized homology model. Certain residues displayed force field errors and revealed steric clashes upon closer examination. Therefore, further mutations were introduced to rationally correct these errors. In conclusion, use of de novo antibody homology modeling together with simulated annealing improved the ability to predict conformational and steric clashes that may arise due to conversion of a mouse antibody into the humanized form and would prevent its neutralization when administered in vivo. This design provides a robust path towards the development of a universal strategy for humanization of mouse antibodies using computationally derived antibody homologous structures.

  16. Distant homology detection using a LEngth and STructure-based sequence Alignment Tool (LESTAT).

    PubMed

    Lee, Marianne M; Bundschuh, Ralf; Chan, Michael K

    2008-05-15

    A new machine learning algorithm, LESTAT (LEngth and STructure-based sequence Alignment Tool) has been developed for detecting protein homologs having low-sequence identity. LESTAT is an iterative profile-based method that runs without reliance on a predefined library and incorporates several novel features that enhance its ability to identify remote sequences. To overcome the inherent bias associated with a single starting model, LESTAT utilizes three structural homologs to create a profile consisting of structurally conserved positions and block separation distances. Subsequent profiles are refined iteratively using sequence information obtained from previous cycles. Additionally, the refinement process incorporates a "lock-in" feature to retain the high-scoring sequences involved in previous alignments for subsequent model building and an enhancement factor to complement the weighting scheme used to build the position specific scoring matrix. A comparison of the performance of LESTAT against PSI-BLAST for seven systems reveals that LESTAT exhibits increased sensitivity and specificity over PSI-BLAST in six of these systems, based on the number of true homologs detected and the number of families these homologs covered. Notably, many of the hits identified are unique to each method, presumably resulting from the distinct differences in the two approaches. Taken together, these findings suggest that LESTAT is a useful complementary method to PSI-BLAST in the detection of distant homologs.

  17. On Recurrent/Homologous Coronal Jets Emission: Coronal Geyser Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razvan Paraschiv, Alin; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    Active region 11302 has shown a vast display of solar jets during its lifetime. We examine the emission mechanism responsible for multiple coronal jet events occurring at the center-east side of the active region. Identified jet events were detected in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV), hard X-ray (HXR) and radio emissions, observed by dedicated instruments such as SDO's AIA and HMI, STEREO's EUVI and WAVES, and RHESSI, respectively. We report the detection of a base-arch structure in the lower atmosphere. The site was labelled "Coronal Geyser". The structure had emitted jets quasi-periodically for the entire time the AR was visible in SDO'S field of view. The jets expand into the corona with an apparent line of sight velocity of ~200-300$ km/s. To our knowledge the long time-scale behaviour of jet recurrence and base geyser structure was not previously discussed and data analysis of this phenomena will provide new information for theoretical modelling and data interpretation of jets.

  18. A comparison of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin with its deglycosylated derivative.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, D C; Graham, C; Urbaniak, S J; Jeffree, C E; Allen, A K

    1984-06-15

    A deglycosylated derivative of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin was prepared with the use of trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. Its properties were generally similar to those of the native lectin, but differences were evident in terms of relative agglutinating activity towards sheep, (untreated) human and trypsin-treated human erythrocytes. The two forms of tomato lectin were used in conjunction with a battery of specific antisera to investigate structural relatedness among solanaceous lectins. Immunological cross-reactivity between tomato, potato and Datura lectins depends on the integrity of the glycosylated region of those lectins; that between Datura lectin and other seed lectins, however, has a separate structural basis.

  19. Plant as a plenteous reserve of lectin

    PubMed Central

    Hivrale, AU; Ingale, AG

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are clusters of glycoproteins of nonimmune foundation that combine specifically and reversibly to carbohydrates, mainly the sugar moiety of glycoconjugates, resulting in cell agglutination and precipitation of glycoconjugates. They are universally distributed in nature, being established in plants, fungi, viruses, bacteria, crustacea, insects, and animals, but leguminacae plants are rich source of lectins. The present review reveals the structure, biological properties, and application of plant lectins. PMID:24084524

  20. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  1. NMR Structure of Francisella tularensis Virulence Determinant Reveals Structural Homology to Bet v1 Allergen Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zook, James; Mo, Gina; Sisco, Nicholas J; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Hansen, Debra T; Baravati, Bobby; Cherry, Brian R; Sykes, Kathryn; Wachter, Rebekka; Van Horn, Wade D; Fromme, Petra

    2015-06-02

    Tularemia is a potentially fatal bacterial infection caused by Francisella tularensis, and is endemic to North America and many parts of northern Europe and Asia. The outer membrane lipoprotein, Flpp3, has been identified as a virulence determinant as well as a potential subunit template for vaccine development. Here we present the first structure for the soluble domain of Flpp3 from the highly infectious Type A SCHU S4 strain, derived through high-resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; the first structure of a lipoprotein from the genus Francisella. The Flpp3 structure demonstrates a globular protein with an electrostatically polarized surface containing an internal cavity-a putative binding site based on the structurally homologous Bet v1 protein family of allergens. NMR-based relaxation studies suggest loop regions that potentially modulate access to the internal cavity. The Flpp3 structure may add to the understanding of F. tularensis virulence and contribute to the development of effective vaccines.

  2. Sequence–structure relationships in RNA loops: establishing the basis for loop homology modeling

    PubMed Central

    Schudoma, Christian; May, Patrick; Nikiforova, Viktoria; Walther, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The specific function of RNA molecules frequently resides in their seemingly unstructured loop regions. We performed a systematic analysis of RNA loops extracted from experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of RNA molecules. A comprehensive loop-structure data set was created and organized into distinct clusters based on structural and sequence similarity. We detected clear evidence of the hallmark of homology present in the sequence–structure relationships in loops. Loops differing by <25% in sequence identity fold into very similar structures. Thus, our results support the application of homology modeling for RNA loop model building. We established a threshold that may guide the sequence divergence-based selection of template structures for RNA loop homology modeling. Of all possible sequences that are, under the assumption of isosteric relationships, theoretically compatible with actual sequences observed in RNA structures, only a small fraction is contained in the Rfam database of RNA sequences and classes implying that the actual RNA loop space may consist of a limited number of unique loop structures and conserved sequences. The loop-structure data sets are made available via an online database, RLooM. RLooM also offers functionalities for the modeling of RNA loop structures in support of RNA engineering and design efforts. PMID:19923230

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of a galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia).

    PubMed

    Chandran, Thyageshwar; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2010-09-01

    A galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a four-chain type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) resulting from covalent association through a disulfide bridge between two identical copies of a two-chain unit. The available structural information on such four-chain RIPs is meagre. The bitter gourd lectin was therefore crystallized for structural investigation and the crystals have been characterized. It is anticipated that the structure of the orthorhombic crystals will be analysed using molecular replacement by taking advantage of its sequence, and presumably structural, homology to normal two-chain type II RIPs.

  4. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  5. Crystal structure of an enzymatically inactive trans-sialidase-like lectin from Trypanosoma cruzi: the carbohydrate binding mechanism involves residual sialidase activity.

    PubMed

    Oppezzo, Pablo; Obal, Gonzalo; Baraibar, Martín A; Pritsch, Otto; Alzari, Pedro M; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    Trans-sialidases are surface-located proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi that participate in key parasite-host interactions and parasite virulence. These proteins are encoded by a large multigenic family, with tandem-repeated and individual genes dispersed throughout the genome. While a large number of genes encode for catalytically active enzyme isoforms, many others display mutations that involve catalytic residues. The latter ultimately code for catalytically inactive proteins with very high similarity to their active paralogs. These inactive members have been shown to be lectins, able to bind sialic acid and galactose in vitro, although their cellular functions are yet to be fully established. We now report structural and biochemical evidence extending the current molecular understanding of these lectins. We have solved the crystal structure of one such catalytically inactive trans-sialidase-like protein, after soaking with a specific carbohydrate ligand, sialyl-α2,3-lactose. Instead of the expected trisaccharide, the binding pocket was observed occupied by α-lactose, strongly suggesting that the protein retains residual hydrolytic activity. This hypothesis was validated by enzyme kinetics assays, in comparison to fully active wild-type trans-sialidase. Surface plasmon resonance also confirmed that these trans-sialidase-like lectins are not only able to bind small oligosaccharides, but also sialylated glycoproteins, which is relevant in the physiologic scenario of parasite infection. Inactive trans-sialidase proteins appear thus to be β-methyl-galactosyl-specific lectins, evolved within an exo-sialidase scaffold, thus explaining why their lectin activity is triggered by the presence of terminal sialic acid.

  6. Functional and structural balances of homologous sensorimotor regions in multiple sclerosis fatigue.

    PubMed

    Cogliati Dezza, I; Zito, G; Tomasevic, L; Filippi, M M; Ghazaryan, A; Porcaro, C; Squitti, R; Ventriglia, M; Lupoi, D; Tecchio, F

    2015-03-01

    Fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) is a highly disabling symptom. Among the central mechanisms behind it, an involvement of sensorimotor networks is clearly evident from structural and functional studies. We aimed at assessing whether functional/structural balances of homologous sensorimotor regions-known to be crucial for sensorimotor networks effectiveness-decrease with MS fatigue increase. Functional connectivity measures at rest and during a simple motor task (weak handgrip of either the right or left hand) were derived from primary sensorimotor areas electroencephalographic recordings in 27 mildly disabled MS patients. Structural MRI-derived inter-hemispheric asymmetries included the cortical thickness of Rolandic regions and the volume of thalami. Fatigue symptoms increased together with the functional inter-hemispheric imbalance of sensorimotor homologous areas activities at rest and during movement, in absence of any appreciable parenchymal asymmetries. This finding supports the development of compensative interventions that may revert these neuronal activity imbalances to relieve fatigue in MS.

  7. Antibody structure determination using a combination of homology modeling, energy-based refinement, and loop prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Day, Tyler; Warshaviak, Dora; Murrett, Colleen; Friesner, Richard; Pearlman, David

    2014-08-01

    We present the blinded prediction results in the Second Antibody Modeling Assessment (AMA-II) using a fully automatic antibody structure prediction method implemented in the programs BioLuminate and Prime. We have developed a novel knowledge based approach to model the CDR loops, using a combination of sequence similarity, geometry matching, and the clustering of database structures. The homology models are further optimized with a physics-based energy function (VSGB2.0), which improves the model quality significantly. H3 loop modeling remains the most challenging task. Our ab initio loop prediction performs well for the H3 loop in the crystal structure context, and allows improved results when refining the H3 loops in the context of homology models. For the 10 human and mouse derived antibodies in this assessment, the average RMSDs for the homology model Fv and framework regions are 1.19 Å and 0.74 Å, respectively. The average RMSDs for five non-H3 CDR loops range from 0.61 Å to 1.05 Å, and the H3 loop average RMSD is 2.91 Å using our knowledge-based loop prediction approach. The ab initio H3 loop predictions yield an average RMSD of 1.28 Å when performed in the context of the crystal structure and 2.67 Å in the context of the homology modeled structure. Notably, our method for predicting the H3 loop in the crystal structure environment ranked first among the seven participating groups in AMA-II, and our method made the best prediction among all participants for seven of the ten targets.

  8. Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhucheng; Yang, Haijuan; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2008-07-08

    The RecA family of ATPases mediates homologous recombination, a reaction essential for maintaining genomic integrity and for generating genetic diversity. RecA, ATP and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) form a helical filament that binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), searches for homology, and then catalyses the exchange of the complementary strand, producing a new heteroduplex. Here we have solved the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli RecA-ssDNA and RecA-heteroduplex filaments. They show that ssDNA and ATP bind to RecA-RecA interfaces cooperatively, explaining the ATP dependency of DNA binding. The ATP {gamma}-phosphate is sensed across the RecA-RecA interface by two lysine residues that also stimulate ATP hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for DNA release. The DNA is underwound and stretched globally, but locally it adopts a B-DNA-like conformation that restricts the homology search to Watson-Crick-type base pairing. The complementary strand interacts primarily through base pairing, making heteroduplex formation strictly dependent on complementarity. The underwound, stretched filament conformation probably evolved to destabilize the donor duplex, freeing the complementary strand for homology sampling.

  9. Sister cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between sister chromatids (sister bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes sister bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their sister. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for sister cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459

  10. Identification of novel DNA repair proteins via primary sequence, secondary structure, and homology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, JB; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA repair is the general term for the collection of critical mechanisms which repair many forms of DNA damage such as methylation or ionizing radiation. DNA repair has mainly been studied in experimental and clinical situations, and relatively few information-based approaches to new extracting DNA repair knowledge exist. As a first step, automatic detection of DNA repair proteins in genomes via informatics techniques is desirable; however, there are many forms of DNA repair and it is not a straightforward process to identify and classify repair proteins with a single optimal method. We perform a study of the ability of homology and machine learning-based methods to identify and classify DNA repair proteins, as well as scan vertebrate genomes for the presence of novel repair proteins. Combinations of primary sequence polypeptide frequency, secondary structure, and homology information are used as feature information for input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM). Results We identify that SVM techniques are capable of identifying portions of DNA repair protein datasets without admitting false positives; at low levels of false positive tolerance, homology can also identify and classify proteins with good performance. Secondary structure information provides improved performance compared to using primary structure alone. Furthermore, we observe that machine learning methods incorporating homology information perform best when data is filtered by some clustering technique. Analysis by applying these methodologies to the scanning of multiple vertebrate genomes confirms a positive correlation between the size of a genome and the number of DNA repair protein transcripts it is likely to contain, and simultaneously suggests that all organisms have a non-zero minimum number of repair genes. In addition, the scan result clusters several organisms' repair abilities in an evolutionarily consistent fashion. Analysis also identifies several functionally unconfirmed

  11. Calcium ions stabilize a protein structure of hemolytic lectin CEL-III from marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata.

    PubMed

    Sallay, I; Tojo, S; Nomiyama, K; Kouzuma, Y; Kimura, M; Yamasaki, N

    2001-06-01

    CEL-III, a galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc)-specific lectin purified from a marine invertebrate, Cucumaria echinata, has a strong hemolytic activity, especially toward human and rabbit erythrocytes in the presence of Ca2+. We evaluated the role of Ca2+ in hemagglutinating and hemolytic activities of CEL-III. We found that Ca2+ is closely associated with both activities of CEL-III. The fluorescence spectra of CEL-III upon binding to Ca2+ were measured. The result showed a structural change of CEL-III in the presence of Ca2+. The structural change of CEL-III upon Ca2+ binding was further demonstrated by stabilization against urea denaturation and by insusceptibility to protease digestions. CEL-III was completely unfolded at a low concentration of 2 M urea, while CEL-III complexed with Ca2+ was stable in 6 M urea. As for protease digestions, CEL-III monomer and oligomer were readily digested by trypsin, chymotrypsin, and papain in the absence of Ca2+, while they were insusceptible to the three proteases in the presence of Ca2+. The papain digestion of the decalcified oligomer produced a large C-terminal peptide, suggestting that the C-terminal region of CEL-III may participate in oligomerization of CEL-III as a core domain.

  12. Glycopeptide Site Heterogeneity and Structural Diversity Determined by Combined Lectin Affinity Chromatography/IMS/CID/MS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feifei; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Clemmer, David E.

    2015-07-01

    Glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of chicken ovomucoid were enriched using a simplified lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) platform, and characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as well as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS. The LAC platform effectively enriched the glycoproteome, from which a total of 117 glycopeptides containing 27 glycan forms were identified for this protein. IMS-MS analysis revealed a high degree of glycopeptide site heterogeneity. Comparison of the IMS distributions of the glycopeptides from different charge states reveals that higher charge states allow more structures to be resolved. Presumably the repulsive interactions between charged sites lead to more open configurations, which are more readily separated compared with the more compact, lower charge state forms of the same groups of species. Combining IMS with collision induced dissociation (CID) made it possible to determine the presence of isomeric glycans and to reconstruct their IMS profiles. This study illustrates a workflow involving hybrid techniques for determining glycopeptide site heterogeneity and evaluating structural diversity of glycans and glycopeptides.

  13. Electron-microscopic analysis of ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria L.) lectin: evidence for a new type of supra-molecular protein structure.

    PubMed

    Leurentop, L; Verbelen, J P; Peumans, W J

    1987-09-01

    The lectin of ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria L.) was investigated electron-microscopically after negative staining with uranyl salts. Affinity-purified preparations of this glycoprotein were highly heteromorphous as they contained small particles approximately 4.6 nm in diameter and very large particles of different shapes. Among the latter, circular and helicoidal structures were the most regular in appearance. The circles were 9.3 nm in diameter, whereas the helices were 9 nm or 20 nm in diameter and up to 60 nm in length. After photographic enhancement, pictures of the molecules indicated that both the larger structures and the small particles could be obtained in pure forms by gel filtration of the lectin on Sepharose 4B. Since the former were the only constituents of the excluded fraction (Mr>5000000), whereas they were totally absent in the fraction eluting with an apparent molecular weight of about 500000, these supra-molecular structures revealed by the electron microscope cannot be artefacts generated during preparation of the lectin for electron-microscopic observation.

  14. Structure- and Sequence-Based Function Prediction for Non-Homologous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sael, Lee; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    The structural genomics projects have been accumulating an increasing number of protein structures, many of which remain functionally unknown. In parallel effort to experimental methods, computational methods are expected to make a significant contribution for functional elucidation of such proteins. However, conventional computational methods that transfer functions from homologous proteins do not help much for these uncharacterized protein structures because they do not have apparent structural or sequence similarity with the known proteins. Here, we briefly review two avenues of computational function prediction methods, i.e. structure-based methods and sequence-based methods. The focus is on our recently developments of local structure-based methods and sequence-based methods, which can effectively extract function information from distantly related proteins. Two structure-based methods, Pocket-Surfer and Patch-Surfer, identify similar known ligand binding sites for pocket regions in a query protein without using global protein fold similarity information. Two sequence-based methods, PFP and ESG, make use of weakly similar sequences that are conventionally discarded in homology based function annotation. Combined together with experimental methods we hope that computational methods will make leading contribution in functional elucidation of the protein structures. PMID:22270458

  15. Ligand Discovery from a Dopamine D3 Receptor Homology Model and Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Jens; Coleman, Ryan G.; Setola, Vincent; Irwin, John J.; Fan, Hao; Schlessinger, Avner; Sali, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    G-Protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are intensely studied as drug targets and for their role in signaling. With the determination of the first crystal structures, interest in structure-based ligand discovery has increased. Unfortunately, most GPCRs lack experimental structures. The determination of the D3 receptor structure, and a community challenge to predict it, enabled a fully prospective comparison of ligand discovery from a modeled structure versus that of the subsequently released crystal structure. Over 3.3 million molecules were docked against a homology model, and 26 of the highest ranking were tested for binding. Six had affinities from 0.2 to 3.1μM. Subsequently, the crystal structure was released and the docking screen repeated. Of the 25 compounds selected, five had affinities from 0.3 to 3.0μM. One of the novel ligands from the homology model screen was optimized for affinity to 81nM. The feasibility of docking screens against modeled GPCRs more generally is considered. PMID:21926995

  16. Automatic Prediction of Protein 3D Structures by Probabilistic Multi-template Homology Modeling.

    PubMed

    Meier, Armin; Söding, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Homology modeling predicts the 3D structure of a query protein based on the sequence alignment with one or more template proteins of known structure. Its great importance for biological research is owed to its speed, simplicity, reliability and wide applicability, covering more than half of the residues in protein sequence space. Although multiple templates have been shown to generally increase model quality over single templates, the information from multiple templates has so far been combined using empirically motivated, heuristic approaches. We present here a rigorous statistical framework for multi-template homology modeling. First, we find that the query proteins' atomic distance restraints can be accurately described by two-component Gaussian mixtures. This insight allowed us to apply the standard laws of probability theory to combine restraints from multiple templates. Second, we derive theoretically optimal weights to correct for the redundancy among related templates. Third, a heuristic template selection strategy is proposed. We improve the average GDT-ha model quality score by 11% over single template modeling and by 6.5% over a conventional multi-template approach on a set of 1000 query proteins. Robustness with respect to wrong constraints is likewise improved. We have integrated our multi-template modeling approach with the popular MODELLER homology modeling software in our free HHpred server http://toolkit.tuebingen.mpg.de/hhpred and also offer open source software for running MODELLER with the new restraints at https://bitbucket.org/soedinglab/hh-suite.

  17. Ion transport and structural dynamics in homologous ammonium and phosphonium-based room temperature ionic liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Griffin, Phillip J.; Holt, Adam P.; Tsunashima, Katsuhiko; ...

    2015-02-01

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in a homologous pair of ammonium and phosphonium based room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have been characterized over a wide temperature range using broadband dielectric spectroscopy and quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy. We have found that the ionic conductivity of the phosphonium based IL is significantly enhanced relative to the ammonium homolog, and this increase is primarily a result of a lower glass transition temperature and higher ion mobility. Additionally, these ILs exhibit pronounced secondary relaxations which are strongly influenced by the atomic identity of the cation charge center. While the secondary relaxation in the phosphoniummore » IL has the expected Arrhenius temperature dependence characteristic of local beta relaxations, the corresponding relaxation process in the ammonium IL was found to exhibit a mildly non-Arrhenius temperature dependence in the measured temperature range-indicative of molecular cooperativity. These differences in both local and long-range molecular dynamics are a direct reflection of the subtly different inter-ionic interactions and mesoscale structures found in these homologous ILs.« less

  18. Ion transport and structural dynamics in homologous ammonium and phosphonium-based room temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Phillip J.; Holt, Adam P.; Tsunashima, Katsuhiko; Sangoro, Joshua R.; Kremer, Friedrich; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-02-01

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in a homologous pair of ammonium and phosphonium based room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have been characterized over a wide temperature range using broadband dielectric spectroscopy and quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy. We have found that the ionic conductivity of the phosphonium based IL is significantly enhanced relative to the ammonium homolog, and this increase is primarily a result of a lower glass transition temperature and higher ion mobility. Additionally, these ILs exhibit pronounced secondary relaxations which are strongly influenced by the atomic identity of the cation charge center. While the secondary relaxation in the phosphonium IL has the expected Arrhenius temperature dependence characteristic of local beta relaxations, the corresponding relaxation process in the ammonium IL was found to exhibit a mildly non-Arrhenius temperature dependence in the measured temperature range-indicative of molecular cooperativity. These differences in both local and long-range molecular dynamics are a direct reflection of the subtly different inter-ionic interactions and mesoscale structures found in these homologous ILs.

  19. Ion transport and structural dynamics in homologous ammonium and phosphonium-based room temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Philip J.; Holt, Adam P.; Tsunashima, Katsuhiko; Sangoro, Joshua R.; Kremer, Friedrich; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-02-28

    Charge transport and structural dynamics in a homologous pair of ammonium and phosphonium based room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have been characterized over a wide temperature range using broadband dielectric spectroscopy and quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy. We have found that the ionic conductivity of the phosphonium based IL is significantly enhanced relative to the ammonium homolog, and this increase is primarily a result of a lower glass transition temperature and higher ion mobility. Additionally, these ILs exhibit pronounced secondary relaxations which are strongly influenced by the atomic identity of the cation charge center. While the secondary relaxation in the phosphonium IL has the expected Arrhenius temperature dependence characteristic of local beta relaxations, the corresponding relaxation process in the ammonium IL was found to exhibit a mildly non-Arrhenius temperature dependence in the measured temperature range—indicative of molecular cooperativity. These differences in both local and long-range molecular dynamics are a direct reflection of the subtly different inter-ionic interactions and mesoscale structures found in these homologous ILs.

  20. Mistletoe lectin has a shiga toxin-like structure and should be combined with other Toll-like receptor ligands in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Maletzki, Claudia; Linnebacher, Michael; Savai, Rajkumar; Hobohm, Uwe

    2013-08-01

    Mistletoe extract (ME) is applied as an adjuvant treatment in cancer therapy in thousands of patients each year in Europe. The main immunostimulating component of mistletoe extract, mistletoe lectin, recently has been shown to be a pattern recognition receptor ligand and hence is binding to an important class of pathogen-sensing receptors. Pattern recognition receptor ligands are potent activators of dendritic cells. This activation is a prerequisite for a full-blown T-cell response against cancer cells. Pattern recognition receptor ligands are increasingly recognized as important players in cancer immunotherapy. We collect evidence from case studies on spontaneous regression, from epidemiology, from experiments in a mouse cancer model, and from protein structure comparisons to argue that a combination of mistletoe therapy with other pattern recognition receptor ligand substances leads to an increased immune stimulatory effect. We show that mistletoe lectin is a plant protein of bacterial origin with a 3D structure very similar to shiga toxin from Shigella dysenteriae, which explains the remarkable immunogenicity of mistletoe lectin. Secondly, we show that a combination of pattern recognition receptor ligands applied metronomically in a cancer mouse model leads to complete remission, while single pattern recognition receptor ligands slowed tumor growth. Taken together, we propose to combine mistletoe drugs with other pattern recognition receptor ligand drugs to increase its efficacy in adjuvant or even primary cancer therapy.

  1. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  2. Specialized structures in the leaf epidermis of basal angiosperms: morphology, distribution, and homology.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Kevin J

    2006-05-01

    The morphology of specialized structures in the leaf epidermis of 32 species of basal (ANITA: Amborella, Nymphaeales, Illiciales, Trimeniaceae, and Austrobaileyaceae) angiosperms, representing all seven families and 11 of 14 genera, was investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy. Distribution, density, and size of structures were also measured, and character evolution was analyzed. Hydropotes are a synapomorphy of Nymphaeales and ethereal oil cells are a synapomorphy of Austrobaileyales, but uniseriate nonglandular trichomes appear to have arisen independently several times. Specialized structures are frequently characterized by adjacent epidermal cells that have striking similarities in their form and arrangement (i.e., architecture) to subsidiary cells of certain types of stomatal complexes. Additionally, forms intermediate to oil cells and stomata, to trichomes and stomata, and to hydropotes and oil cells are present in some taxa. Thus, all of these specialized structures and their adjacent epidermal cells form complexes that may be homologous with, and evolutionarily derived from stomatal complexes, and the specialized structure, or portion thereof, may be homologous to the stoma or guard mother cell. Improved knowledge of the morphology and evolution of these structures in the earliest branching extant angiosperm lineages has a bearing on many diverse areas of botany.

  3. Current assessment of docking into GPCR crystal structures and homology models: successes, challenges, and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Beuming, Thijs; Sherman, Woody

    2012-12-21

    The growing availability of novel structures for several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has provided new opportunities for structure-based drug design of ligands against this important class of targets. Here, we report a systematic analysis of the accuracy of docking small molecules into GPCR structures and homology models using both rigid receptor (Glide SP and Glide XP) and flexible receptor (Induced Fit Docking; IFD) methods. The ability to dock ligands into different structures of the same target (cross-docking) is evaluated for both agonist and inverse agonist structures of the A2A receptor and the β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors. In addition, we have produced homology models for the β1-adrenergic, β2-adrenergic, D3 dopamine, H1 histamine, M2 muscarine, M3 muscarine, A2A adenosine, S1P1, κ-opioid, and C-X-C chemokine 4 receptors using multiple templates and investigated the ability of docking to predict the binding mode of ligands in these models. Clear correlations are observed between the docking accuracy and the similarity of the sequence of interest to the template, suggesting regimes in which docking can correctly identify ligand binding modes.

  4. Crystal structures of trypanosomal histidyl-tRNA synthetase illuminate differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic homologs.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Ethan A; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, J Robert; Larson, Eric T; Kelley, Angela; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J; Kim, Jessica; Zhang, Li; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Buckner, Frederick S; van Voorhis, Wesley C; Hol, Wim G J

    2010-03-26

    Crystal structures of histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS) from the eukaryotic parasites Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi provide a first structural view of a eukaryotic form of this enzyme and reveal differences from bacterial homologs. HisRSs in general contain an extra domain inserted between conserved motifs 2 and 3 of the Class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic core. The current structures show that the three-dimensional topology of this domain is very different in bacterial and archaeal/eukaryotic forms of the enzyme. Comparison of apo and histidine-bound trypanosomal structures indicates substantial active-site rearrangement upon histidine binding but relatively little subsequent rearrangement after reaction of histidine with ATP to form the enzyme's first reaction product, histidyladenylate. The specific residues involved in forming the binding pocket for the adenine moiety differ substantially both from the previously characterized binding site in bacterial structures and from the homologous residues in human HisRSs. The essentiality of the single HisRS gene in T. brucei is shown by a severe depression of parasite growth rate that results from even partial suppression of expression by RNA interference.

  5. Crystal structure of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata: implications of domain structure for its membrane pore-formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Eto, Seiichiro; Sugawara, Hajime; Kurisu, Genji; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Kusunoki, Masami; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2004-08-27

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent and galactose-specific lectin purified from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, which exhibits hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities. Six molecules of CEL-III are assumed to oligomerize to form an ion-permeable pore in the cell membrane. We have determined the crystal structure of CELIII by using single isomorphous replacement aided by anomalous scattering in lead at 1.7 A resolution. CEL-III consists of three distinct domains as follows: the N-terminal two carbohydrate-binding domains (1 and 2), which adopt beta-trefoil folds such as the B-chain of ricin and are members of the (QXW)(3) motif family; and domain 3, which is a novel fold composed of two alpha-helices and one beta-sandwich. CEL-III is the first Ca(2+)-dependent lectin structure with two beta-trefoil folds. Despite sharing the structure of the B-chain of ricin, CEL-III binds five Ca(2+) ions at five of the six subdomains in both domains 1 and 2. Considering the relatively high similarity among the five subdomains, they are putative binding sites for galactose-related carbohydrates, although it remains to be elucidated whether bound Ca(2+) is directly involved in interaction with carbohydrates. The paucity of hydrophobic interactions in the interfaces between the domains and biochemical data suggest that these domains rearrange upon carbohydrate binding in the erythrocyte membrane. This conformational change may be responsible for oligomerization of CEL-III molecules and hemolysis in the erythrocyte membranes.

  6. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs.

    PubMed

    Driggers, Camden M; Hartman, Steven J; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ∼15-30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue ("Arg-type" enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg ("Gln-type" enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis "Arg-type" enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha "Gln-type" CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among "Gln-type" CDO enzymes, we conclude that the "Gln-type" CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  7. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs

    PubMed Central

    Driggers, Camden M; Hartman, Steven J; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ∼15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases. PMID:25307852

  8. Lectin staining shows no evidence of involvement of glycocalyx/mucous layer carbohydrate structures in development of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Nielsen, Christian; Biagini, Matteo; Husby, Steffen; Lillevang, Søren T

    2013-11-18

    The presence of unique carbohydrate structures in the glycocalyx/mucous layer of the intestine may be involved in a susceptibility to celiac disease (CD) by serving as attachment sites for bacteria. This host-microbiota interaction may influence the development of CD and possibly other diseases with autoimmune components. We examined duodenal biopsies from a total of 30 children, of which 10 had both celiac disease (CD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D); 10 had CD alone; and 10 were suspected of having gastrointestinal disease, but had normal duodenal histology (non-CD controls). Patients with both CD and T1D were examined before and after remission following a gluten-free diet. We performed lectin histochemistry using peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA) staining for Gal-β(1,3)-GalNAc and Fucα1-2Gal-R, respectively, of the glycocalyx/mucous layer. The staining was scored based on dissemination of stained structures on a scale from 0 to 3. Evaluation of the scores revealed no difference between biopsies obtained before and after remission in the group of children with both CD and T1D. A comparison of this pre-remission group with the children who had CD alone or the non-CD controls also showed no significant differences. Based on our material, we found no indication that the presence of Gal-β(1,3)-GalNAc or Fucα1-2Gal-R is involved in the susceptibility to CD, or that the disease process affects the expression of these carbohydrates.

  9. Articular soft tissue anatomy of the archosaur hip joint: Structural homology and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Henry P; Holliday, Casey M

    2015-06-01

    Archosaurs evolved a wide diversity of locomotor postures, body sizes, and hip joint morphologies. The two extant archosaurs clades (birds and crocodylians) possess highly divergent hip joint morphologies, and the homologies and functions of their articular soft tissues, such as ligaments, cartilage, and tendons, are poorly understood. Reconstructing joint anatomy and function of extinct vertebrates is critical to understanding their posture, locomotor behavior, ecology, and evolution. However, the lack of soft tissues in fossil taxa makes accurate inferences of joint function difficult. Here, we describe the soft tissue anatomies and their osteological correlates in the hip joint of archosaurs and their sauropsid outgroups, and infer structural homology across the extant taxa. A comparative sample of 35 species of birds, crocodylians, lepidosaurs, and turtles ranging from hatchling to skeletally mature adult were studied using dissection, imaging, and histology. Birds and crocodylians possess topologically and histologically consistent articular soft tissues in their hip joints. Epiphyseal cartilages, fibrocartilages, and ligaments leave consistent osteological correlates. The archosaur acetabulum possesses distinct labrum and antitrochanter structures on the supraacetabulum. The ligamentum capitis femoris consists of distinct pubic- and ischial attachments, and is homologous with the ventral capsular ligament of lepidosaurs. The proximal femur has a hyaline cartilage core attached to the metaphysis via a fibrocartilaginous sleeve. This study provides new insight into soft tissue structures and their osteological correlates (e.g., the antitrochanter, the fovea capitis, and the metaphyseal collar) in the archosaur hip joint. The topological arrangement of fibro- and hyaline cartilage may provide mechanical support for the chondroepiphysis. The osteological correlates identified here will inform systematic and functional analyses of archosaur hindlimb evolution and

  10. Structural Studies of DNA End Detection and Resection in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Christian Bernd; Seifert, Florian Ulrich; Linke-Winnebeck, Christian; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by two major pathways, homologous recombination or nonhomologous end joining. The commitment to one or the other pathway proceeds via different steps of resection of the DNA ends, which is controlled and executed by a set of DNA double-strand break sensors, endo- and exonucleases, helicases, and DNA damage response factors. The molecular choreography of the underlying protein machinery is beginning to emerge. In this review, we discuss the early steps of genetic recombination and double-strand break sensing with an emphasis on structural and molecular studies. PMID:25081516

  11. Fruit-specific lectins from banana and plantain.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Zhang, W; Barre, A; Houlès Astoul, C; Balint-Kurti, P J; Rovira, P; Rougé, P; May, G D; Van Leuven, F; Truffa-Bachi, P; Van Damme, E J

    2000-09-01

    One of the predominant proteins in the pulp of ripe bananas (Musa acuminata L.) and plantains (Musa spp.) has been identified as a lectin. The banana and plantain agglutinins (called BanLec and PlanLec, respectively) were purified in reasonable quantities using a novel isolation procedure, which prevented adsorption of the lectins onto insoluble endogenous polysaccharides. Both BanLec and PlanLec are dimeric proteins composed of two identical subunits of 15 kDa. They readily agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes and exhibit specificity towards mannose. Molecular cloning revealed that BanLec has sequence similarity to previously described lectins of the family of jacalin-related lectins, and according to molecular modelling studies has the same overall fold and three-dimensional structure. The identification of BanLec and PlanLec demonstrates the occurrence of jacalin-related lectins in monocot species, suggesting that these lectins are more widespread among higher plants than is actually believed. The banana and plantain lectins are also the first documented examples of jacalin-related lectins, which are abundantly present in the pulp of mature fruits but are apparently absent from other tissues. However, after treatment of intact plants with methyl jasmonate, BanLec is also clearly induced in leaves. The banana lectin is a powerful murine T-cell mitogen. The relevance of the mitogenicity of the banana lectin is discussed in terms of both the physiological role of the lectin and the impact on food safety.

  12. Antagonistic jacalin-related lectins regulate the size of ER body-type beta-glucosidase complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Atsushi J; Fukao, Yoichiro; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Nishimura, Mikio; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2008-06-01

    PYK10/BGLU23 is a beta-glucosidase that is a major protein of ER bodies, which are endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived organelles that may be involved in defense systems. PYK10 has active and inactive forms. Active PYK10 molecules form large complexes with diameters ranging from 0.65 microm to > 70 microm. We identified three beta-glucosidases (PYK10, BGLU21 and BGLU22), five jacalin-related lectins (JALs) and a GDSL lipase-like protein (GLL) in the purified PYK10 complex. Expression levels of JALs and GLLs were lower in the nai1-1 mutant, which has no ER bodies, than in Col-0. The subcellular localization of PYK10 is predicted to be different from the localizations of JALs and GLLs. This suggests that PYK10 interacts with its partners (JALs and GLLs) when the subcellular structure is destroyed by pathogens. The PYK10 complex was found to be larger in the pbp1-1 and jal22-1 mutants than in Col-0, while it was smaller in the jal23-1, jal31-1 and jal31-2 mutants than in Col-0. These results show that two types of JALs having opposite roles regulate the size of the PYK10 complex antagonistically. We define the two types of lectins as a 'polymerizer-type lectin' and an 'inhibitor-type lectin'. Interestingly, the closest homologs of polymerizer-type lectins (JAL31 and JAL23) were inhibitor-type lectins (PBP1/JAL30 and JAL22). The pairs of polymerizer-type and inhibitor-type lectins reported here are good examples of genes that have evolved new functions after gene duplication (neofunctionalization).

  13. The HHpred interactive server for protein homology detection and structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Söding, Johannes; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N.

    2005-01-01

    HHpred is a fast server for remote protein homology detection and structure prediction and is the first to implement pairwise comparison of profile hidden Markov models (HMMs). It allows to search a wide choice of databases, such as the PDB, SCOP, Pfam, SMART, COGs and CDD. It accepts a single query sequence or a multiple alignment as input. Within only a few minutes it returns the search results in a user-friendly format similar to that of PSI-BLAST. Search options include local or global alignment and scoring secondary structure similarity. HHpred can produce pairwise query-template alignments, multiple alignments of the query with a set of templates selected from the search results, as well as 3D structural models that are calculated by the MODELLER software from these alignments. A detailed help facility is available. As a demonstration, we analyze the sequence of SpoVT, a transcriptional regulator from Bacillus subtilis. HHpred can be accessed at . PMID:15980461

  14. Coverage of whole proteome by structural genomics observed through protein homology modeling database

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Go, Mitiko

    2006-01-01

    We have been developing FAMSBASE, a protein homology-modeling database of whole ORFs predicted from genome sequences. The latest update of FAMSBASE (http://daisy.nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp/Famsbase/), which is based on the protein three-dimensional (3D) structures released by November 2003, contains modeled 3D structures for 368,724 open reading frames (ORFs) derived from genomes of 276 species, namely 17 archaebacterial, 130 eubacterial, 18 eukaryotic and 111 phage genomes. Those 276 genomes are predicted to have 734,193 ORFs in total and the current FAMSBASE contains protein 3D structure of approximately 50% of the ORF products. However, cases that a modeled 3D structure covers the whole part of an ORF product are rare. When portion of an ORF with 3D structure is compared in three kingdoms of life, in archaebacteria and eubacteria, approximately 60% of the ORFs have modeled 3D structures covering almost the entire amino acid sequences, however, the percentage falls to about 30% in eukaryotes. When annual differences in the number of ORFs with modeled 3D structure are calculated, the fraction of modeled 3D structures of soluble protein for archaebacteria is increased by 5%, and that for eubacteria by 7% in the last 3 years. Assuming that this rate would be maintained and that determination of 3D structures for predicted disordered regions is unattainable, whole soluble protein model structures of prokaryotes without the putative disordered regions will be in hand within 15 years. For eukaryotic proteins, they will be in hand within 25 years. The 3D structures we will have at those times are not the 3D structure of the entire proteins encoded in single ORFs, but the 3D structures of separate structural domains. Measuring or predicting spatial arrangements of structural domains in an ORF will then be a coming issue of structural genomics. PMID:17146617

  15. Structural Insights into Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh4–Msh5 Complex Function Using Homology Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rakshambikai, Ramaswamy; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Nishant, Koodali Thazath

    2013-01-01

    The Msh4–Msh5 protein complex in eukaryotes is involved in stabilizing Holliday junctions and its progenitors to facilitate crossing over during Meiosis I. These functions of the Msh4–Msh5 complex are essential for proper chromosomal segregation during the first meiotic division. The Msh4/5 proteins are homologous to the bacterial mismatch repair protein MutS and other MutS homologs (Msh2, Msh3, Msh6). Saccharomyces cerevisiae msh4/5 point mutants were identified recently that show two fold reduction in crossing over, compared to wild-type without affecting chromosome segregation. Three distinct classes of msh4/5 point mutations could be sorted based on their meiotic phenotypes. These include msh4/5 mutations that have a) crossover and viability defects similar to msh4/5 null mutants; b) intermediate defects in crossing over and viability and c) defects only in crossing over. The absence of a crystal structure for the Msh4–Msh5 complex has hindered an understanding of the structural aspects of Msh4–Msh5 function as well as molecular explanation for the meiotic defects observed in msh4/5 mutations. To address this problem, we generated a structural model of the S. cerevisiae Msh4–Msh5 complex using homology modeling. Further, structural analysis tailored with evolutionary information is used to predict sites with potentially critical roles in Msh4–Msh5 complex formation, DNA binding and to explain asymmetry within the Msh4–Msh5 complex. We also provide a structural rationale for the meiotic defects observed in the msh4/5 point mutations. The mutations are likely to affect stability of the Msh4/5 proteins and/or interactions with DNA. The Msh4–Msh5 model will facilitate the design and interpretation of new mutational data as well as structural studies of this important complex involved in meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:24244354

  16. Homology modeling, docking and structure-based pharmacophore of inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jakyung; Medina-Franco, José L.

    2011-06-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is an emerging epigenetic target for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. To date, several inhibitors from different structural classes have been published. In this work, we report a comprehensive molecular modeling study of 14 established DNTM1 inhibitors with a herein developed homology model of the catalytic domain of human DNTM1. The geometry of the homology model was in agreement with the proposed mechanism of DNA methylation. Docking results revealed that all inhibitors studied in this work have hydrogen bond interactions with a glutamic acid and arginine residues that play a central role in the mechanism of cytosine DNA methylation. The binding models of compounds such as curcumin and parthenolide suggest that these natural products are covalent blockers of the catalytic site. A pharmacophore model was also developed for all DNMT1 inhibitors considered in this work using the most favorable binding conformations and energetic terms of the docked poses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first pharmacophore model proposed for compounds with inhibitory activity of DNMT1. The results presented in this work represent a conceptual advance for understanding the protein-ligand interactions and mechanism of action of DNMT1 inhibitors. The insights obtained in this work can be used for the structure-based design and virtual screening for novel inhibitors targeting DNMT1.

  17. Structure-Function Network Mapping and Its Assessment via Persistent Homology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between brain structure and function is a fundamental problem in network neuroscience. This work deals with the general method of structure-function mapping at the whole-brain level. We formulate the problem as a topological mapping of structure-function connectivity via matrix function, and find a stable solution by exploiting a regularization procedure to cope with large matrices. We introduce a novel measure of network similarity based on persistent homology for assessing the quality of the network mapping, which enables a detailed comparison of network topological changes across all possible thresholds, rather than just at a single, arbitrary threshold that may not be optimal. We demonstrate that our approach can uncover the direct and indirect structural paths for predicting functional connectivity, and our network similarity measure outperforms other currently available methods. We systematically validate our approach with (1) a comparison of regularized vs. non-regularized procedures, (2) a null model of the degree-preserving random rewired structural matrix, (3) different network types (binary vs. weighted matrices), and (4) different brain parcellation schemes (low vs. high resolutions). Finally, we evaluate the scalability of our method with relatively large matrices (2514x2514) of structural and functional connectivity obtained from 12 healthy human subjects measured non-invasively while at rest. Our results reveal a nonlinear structure-function relationship, suggesting that the resting-state functional connectivity depends on direct structural connections, as well as relatively parsimonious indirect connections via polysynaptic pathways. PMID:28046127

  18. Hemolytic lectin CEL-III heptamerizes via a large structural transition from α-helices to a β-barrel during the transmembrane pore formation process.

    PubMed

    Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2014-05-02

    CEL-III is a hemolytic lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) and one oligomerization domain (domain 3). After binding to the cell surface carbohydrate chains through domains 1 and 2, domain 3 self-associates to form transmembrane pores, leading to cell lysis or death, which resembles other pore-forming toxins of diverse organisms. To elucidate the pore formation mechanism of CEL-III, the crystal structure of the CEL-III oligomer was determined. The CEL-III oligomer has a heptameric structure with a long β-barrel as a transmembrane pore. This β-barrel is composed of 14 β-strands resulting from a large structural transition of α-helices accommodated in the interface between domains 1 and 2 and domain 3 in the monomeric structure, suggesting that the dissociation of these α-helices triggered their structural transition into a β-barrel. After heptamerization, domains 1 and 2 form a flat ring, in which all carbohydrate-binding sites remain bound to cell surface carbohydrate chains, stabilizing the transmembrane β-barrel in a position perpendicular to the plane of the lipid bilayer.

  19. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Lakhlili, Wiame; Chevé, Gwénaël; Yasri, Abdelaziz; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site.

  20. Crystal structure of archaeal homolog of proteasome-assembly chaperone PbaA.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Arunima; Satoh, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Masato; Kato, Koichi

    2014-10-24

    Formation of the eukaryotic proteasome is not a spontaneous process but a highly ordered process assisted by several assembly chaperones. In contrast, archaeal proteasome subunits can spontaneously assemble into an active form. Recent bioinformatic analysis identified the proteasome-assembly chaperone-like proteins, PbaA and PbaB, in archaea. Our previous study showed that the PbaB homotetramer functions as a proteasome activator through its tentacle-like C-terminal segments. However, a functional role of the other homolog PbaA has remained elusive. Here we determined the 2.25-Å resolution structure of PbaA, illustrating its disparate tertiary and quaternary structures compared with PbaB. PbaA forms a homopentamer in which the C-terminal segments, with a putative proteasome-activating motif, are packed against the core. These findings offer deeper insights into the molecular evolution relationships between the proteasome-assembly chaperones and the proteasome activators.

  1. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    SciTech Connect

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  2. Annotating Protein Functional Residues by Coupling High-Throughput Fitness Profile and Homologous-Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yushen; Wu, Nicholas C.; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Tianhao; Gong, Danyang; Shu, Sara; Wu, Ting-Ting

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identification and annotation of functional residues are fundamental questions in protein sequence analysis. Sequence and structure conservation provides valuable information to tackle these questions. It is, however, limited by the incomplete sampling of sequence space in natural evolution. Moreover, proteins often have multiple functions, with overlapping sequences that present challenges to accurate annotation of the exact functions of individual residues by conservation-based methods. Using the influenza A virus PB1 protein as an example, we developed a method to systematically identify and annotate functional residues. We used saturation mutagenesis and high-throughput sequencing to measure the replication capacity of single nucleotide mutations across the entire PB1 protein. After predicting protein stability upon mutations, we identified functional PB1 residues that are essential for viral replication. To further annotate the functional residues important to the canonical or noncanonical functions of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (vRdRp), we performed a homologous-structure analysis with 16 different vRdRp structures. We achieved high sensitivity in annotating the known canonical polymerase functional residues. Moreover, we identified a cluster of noncanonical functional residues located in the loop region of the PB1 β-ribbon. We further demonstrated that these residues were important for PB1 protein nuclear import through the interaction with Ran-binding protein 5. In summary, we developed a systematic and sensitive method to identify and annotate functional residues that are not restrained by sequence conservation. Importantly, this method is generally applicable to other proteins about which homologous-structure information is available. PMID:27803181

  3. Effect of monovalent cations and G-quadruplex structures on the outcome of intramolecular homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Barros, Paula; Boán, Francisco; Blanco, Miguel G; Gómez-Márquez, Jaime

    2009-06-01

    Homologous recombination is a very important cellular process, as it provides a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. This complex process is affected by many factors within cells. Here, we have studied the effect of monovalent cations (K+, Na+, and NH4+) on the outcome of recombination events, as their presence affects the biochemical activities of the proteins involved in recombination as well as the structure of DNA. For this purpose, we used an in vitro recombination system that includes a protein nuclear extract, as a source of recombination machinery, and two plasmids as substrates for intramolecular homologous recombination, each with two copies of different alleles of the human minisatellite MsH43. We found that the presence of monovalent cations induced a decrease in the recombination frequency, accompanied by an increase in the fidelity of the recombination. Moreover, there is an emerging consensus that secondary structures of DNA have the potential to induce genomic instability. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of the sequences capable of forming G-quadruplex on the production of recombinant molecules, taking advantage of the capacity of some MsH43 alleles to generate these kinds of structure in the presence of K+. We observed that the MsH43 recombinants containing duplications, generated in the presence of K+, did not include the repeats located towards the 5'-side of the G-quadruplex motif, suggesting that this structure may be involved in the recombination events leading to duplications. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the recombination of repetitive sequences.

  4. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    PubMed Central

    Khin, Mar Mar; Hua, Jie Song; Ng, Han Cong; Wadström, Torkel; Ho, Bow

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms. METHODS: Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS: Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A), fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas (Lotus A) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori lectin agglutination. Interes tingly, heating of H. pylori cells at 60 °C for 1 h was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION: The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during the events of morphological transformation, resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection. This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:11819557

  5. The Lipopolysaccharide Structures of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Determine the Attachment of Human Mannose-Binding Lectin to Intact Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Devyatyarova-Johnson, Marina; Rees, Ian H.; Robertson, Brian D.; Turner, Malcolm W.; Klein, Nigel J.; Jack, Dominic L.

    2000-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of the innate immune system. It binds to the arrays of sugars commonly presented by microorganisms and activates the complement system independently of antibody. Despite detailed knowledge of the stereochemical basis of MBL binding, relatively little is known about how bacterial surface structures influence binding of the lectin. Using flow cytometry, we have measured the binding of MBL to a range of mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Neisseria gonorrhoeae which differ in the structure of expressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For both organisms, the possession of core LPS structures led to avid binding of MBL, which was abrogated by the addition of O antigen (Salmonella serovar Typhimurium) or sialic acid (N. gonorrhoeae). Truncation of the LPS within the core led to lower levels of MBL binding. It was not possible to predict the magnitude of MBL binding from the identity of the LPS terminal sugar alone, indicating that the three-dimensional disposition of LPS molecules is probably also of importance in determining MBL attachment. These results further support the hypothesis that LPS structure is a major determinant of MBL binding. PMID:10858200

  6. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, William J.; Kirby, Jonathan M.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Chambers, Christopher J.; Davies, Abigail H.; Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-07-01

    The crystal structure of Cwp84, an S-layer protein from Clostridium difficile is presented for the first time. The cathepsin L-like fold of cysteine protease domain, a newly observed ‘lectin-like’ domain and several other features are described. Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism.

  7. Structure and function of regulator of G protein signaling homology domains.

    PubMed

    Tesmer, John J G

    2009-01-01

    All regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins contain a conserved domain of approximately 130 amino acids that binds to activated heterotrimeric G protein α subunits (Gα) and accelerates their rate of GTP hydrolysis. Homologous domains are found in at least six other protein families, including a family of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) and the G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Although some of the RhoGEF and GRK RGS-like domains can also bind to activated Gα subunits, they do so in distinct ways and with much lower levels of GTPase activation. In other protein families, the domains have as of yet no obvious relationship to heterotrimeric G protein signaling. These RGS homology (RH) domains are now recognized as mediators of extraordinarily diverse protein-protein interactions. Through these interactions, they play roles that range from enzyme to molecular scaffold to signal transducing module. In this review, the atomic structures of RH domains from RGS proteins, Axins, RhoGEFs, and GRKs are compared in light of what is currently known about their functional roles.

  8. Efficient system of homologous RNA recombination in brome mosaic virus: sequence and structure requirements and accuracy of crossovers.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, P D; Bujarski, J J

    1995-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a tripartite positive-stranded RNA virus of plants engineered to support intersegment RNA recombination, was used for the determination of sequence and structural requirements of homologous crossovers. A 60-nucleotide (nt) sequence, common between wild-type RNA2 and mutant RNA3, supported efficient repair (90%) of a modified 3' noncoding region in the RNA3 segment by homologous recombination with wild-type RNA2 3' noncoding sequences. Deletions within this sequence in RNA3 demonstrated that a nucleotide identity as short as 15 nt can support efficient homologous recombination events, while shorter (5-nt) sequence identity resulted in reduced recombination frequency (5%) within this region. Three or more mismatches within a downstream portion of the common 60-nt RNA3 sequence affected both the incidence of recombination and the distribution of crossover sites, suggesting that besides the length, the extent of sequence identity between two recombining BMV RNAs is an important factor in homologous recombination. Site-directed mutagenesis of the common sequence in RNA3 did not reveal a clear correlation between the stability of predicted secondary structures and recombination activity. This indicates that homologous recombination does not require similar secondary structures between two recombining RNAs at the sites of crossovers. Nearly 20% of homologous recombinants were imprecise (aberrant), containing either nucleotide mismatches, small deletions, or small insertions within the region of crossovers. This implies that homologous RNA recombination is not as accurate as proposed previously. Our results provide experimental evidence that the requirements and thus the mechanism of homologous recombination in BMV differ from those of previously described heteroduplex-mediated nonhomologous recombination (P. D. Nagy and J. J. Bujarski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:6390-6394, 1993). PMID:7983703

  9. Assembly scaffold NifEN: A structural and functional homolog of the nitrogenase catalytic component

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Aaron W.; Blank, Michael A.; Rebelein, Johannes G.; Lee, Chi Chung; Ribbe, Markus W.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hu, Yilin

    2016-01-01

    NifEN is a biosynthetic scaffold for the cofactor of Mo-nitrogenase (designated the M-cluster). Previous studies have revealed the sequence and structural homology between NifEN and NifDK, the catalytic component of nitrogenase. However, direct proof for the functional homology between the two proteins has remained elusive. Here we show that, upon maturation of a cofactor precursor (designated the L-cluster) on NifEN, the cluster species extracted from NifEN is spectroscopically equivalent and functionally interchangeable with the native M-cluster extracted from NifDK. Both extracted clusters display nearly indistinguishable EPR features, X-ray absorption spectroscopy/extended X-ray absorption fine structure (XAS/EXAFS) spectra and reconstitution activities, firmly establishing the M-cluster–bound NifEN (designated NifENM) as the only protein other than NifDK to house the unique nitrogenase cofactor. Iron chelation experiments demonstrate a relocation of the cluster from the surface to its binding site within NifENM upon maturation, which parallels the insertion of M-cluster into an analogous binding site in NifDK, whereas metal analyses suggest an asymmetric conformation of NifENM with an M-cluster in one αβ-half and an empty cluster-binding site in the other αβ-half, which led to the proposal of a stepwise assembly mechanism of the M-cluster in the two αβ-dimers of NifEN. Perhaps most importantly, NifENM displays comparable ATP-independent substrate-reducing profiles to those of NifDK, which establishes the M-cluster–bound αβ-dimer of NifENM as a structural and functional mimic of one catalytic αβ-half of NifDK while suggesting the potential of this protein as a useful tool for further investigations of the mechanistic details of nitrogenase. PMID:27506795

  10. Structural investigation of porcine stomach mucin by X-ray fiber diffraction and homology modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Veluraja, K.; Vennila, K.N.; Umamakeshvari, K.; Jasmine, A.; Velmurugan, D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Techniques to get oriented mucin fibre. {yields} X-ray fibre diffraction pattern for mucin. {yields} Molecular modeling of mucin based on X-ray fibre diffraction pattern. -- Abstract: The basic understanding of the three dimensional structure of mucin is essential to understand its physiological function. Technology has been developed to achieve orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules. X-ray fiber diffraction of partially orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules show d-spacing signals at 2.99, 4.06, 4.22, 4.7, 5.37 and 6.5 A. The high intense d-spacing signal at 4.22 A is attributed to the antiparallel {beta}-sheet structure identified in the fraction of the homology modeled mucin molecule (amino acid residues 800-980) using Nidogen-Laminin complex structure as a template. The X-ray fiber diffraction signal at 6.5 A reveals partial organization of oligosaccharides in porcine stomach mucin. This partial structure of mucin will be helpful in establishing a three dimensional structure for the whole mucin molecule.

  11. Crystal structures of three protozoan homologs of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Ethan A; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, Robert; Napuli, Alberto J; Kim, Jessica E; Buckner, Frederick S; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G J

    2011-05-01

    Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) is an essential enzyme that is recognizably conserved across all forms of life. It is responsible for activating and attaching tryptophan to a cognate tRNA(Trp) molecule for use in protein synthesis. In some eukaryotes this original core function has been supplemented or modified through the addition of extra domains or the expression of variant TrpRS isoforms. The three TrpRS structures from pathogenic protozoa described here represent three illustrations of this malleability in eukaryotes. The Cryptosporidium parvum genome contains a single TrpRS gene, which codes for an N-terminal domain of uncertain function in addition to the conserved core TrpRS domains. Sequence analysis indicates that this extra domain, conserved among several apicomplexans, is related to the editing domain of some AlaRS and ThrRS. The C. parvum enzyme remains fully active in charging tRNA(Trp) after truncation of this extra domain. The crystal structure of the active, truncated enzyme is presented here at 2.4Å resolution. The Trypanosoma brucei genome contains separate cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of TrpRS that have diverged in their respective tRNA recognition domains. The crystal structure of the T. brucei cytosolic isoform is presented here at 2.8Å resolution. The Entamoeba histolytica genome contains three sequences that appear to be TrpRS homologs. However one of these, whose structure is presented here at 3.0Å resolution, has lost the active site motifs characteristic of the Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic domain while retaining the conserved features of a fully formed tRNA(Trp) recognition domain. The biological function of this variant E. histolytica TrpRS remains unknown, but, on the basis of a completely conserved tRNA recognition region and evidence for ATP but not tryptophan binding, it is tempting to speculate that it may perform an editing function. Together with a previously reported structure of an unusual Trp

  12. LECTINPred: web Server that Uses Complex Networks of Protein Structure for Prediction of Lectins with Potential Use as Cancer Biomarkers or in Parasite Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Pedreira, Nieves; Dorado, Julián; Pazos, Alejandro; Pérez-Montoto, Lázaro G; Ubeira, Florencio M; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2014-04-01

    Lectins (Ls) play an important role in many diseases such as different types of cancer, parasitic infections and other diseases. Interestingly, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains +3000 protein 3D structures with unknown function. Thus, we can in principle, discover new Ls mining non-annotated structures from PDB or other sources. However, there are no general models to predict new biologically relevant Ls based on 3D chemical structures. We used the MARCH-INSIDE software to calculate the Markov-Shannon 3D electrostatic entropy parameters for the complex networks of protein structure of 2200 different protein 3D structures, including 1200 Ls. We have performed a Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) using these parameters as inputs in order to seek a new Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) model, which is able to discriminate 3D structure of Ls from other proteins. We implemented this predictor in the web server named LECTINPred, freely available at http://bio-aims.udc.es/LECTINPred.php. This web server showed the following goodness-of-fit statistics: Sensitivity=96.7 % (for Ls), Specificity=87.6 % (non-active proteins), and Accuracy=92.5 % (for all proteins), considering altogether both the training and external prediction series. In mode 2, users can carry out an automatic retrieval of protein structures from PDB. We illustrated the use of this server, in operation mode 1, performing a data mining of PDB. We predicted Ls scores for +2000 proteins with unknown function and selected the top-scored ones as possible lectins. In operation mode 2, LECTINPred can also upload 3D structural models generated with structure-prediction tools like LOMETS or PHYRE2. The new Ls are expected to be of relevance as cancer biomarkers or useful in parasite vaccine design.

  13. Crystal structure of a bacterial homolog of the kidney urea transporter

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Elena J.; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Urea is highly concentrated in mammalian kidney to produce the osmotic gradient necessary for water re-absorption. Free diffusion of urea across cell membranes is slow due to its high polarity, and specialized urea transporters have evolved to achieve rapid and selective urea permeation. Here we present the 2.3 Å structure of a functional urea transporter from the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The transporter is a homotrimer, and each subunit contains a continuous membrane-spanning pore formed by the two homologous halves of the protein. The pore contains a constricted selectivity filter that can accommodate multiple dehydrated urea molecules in single file. Backbone and side chain oxygen atoms provide continuous coordination of urea as it progresses through the filter, and well-placed α-helix dipoles provide additional compensation for dehydration energy. These results establish that the urea transporter operates by a channel-like mechanism and reveal the physical and chemical basis of urea selectivity. PMID:19865084

  14. Sexual dimorphism of motorneurons: timbal muscle innervation in male periodical cicadas and homologous structures in females.

    PubMed

    Wohlers, D; Bacon, J

    1980-01-01

    In 17-year cicadas, only the male has a sound-producing apparatus. It consists of paired abdominal timbals, each driven by a specialized timbal muscle. Each muscle is innervated by a large timbal motorneuron. Having the largest axon in the auditory nerve, its central structure is readily elucidated with cobalt. The largest cell in the female auditory nerve is found to be a motorneuron that bears striking resemblance to the timbal motorneuron of the male. On the basis of their anatomy within the CNS, we consider these cells to be homologous, despite the fact that the female has no apparent timbal muscle. Cobalt-filling to the periphery reveals the target muscle of the female motorneuron to be one of the three tensor tympani muscles supporting the tympanum; these muscles are not found in the male. The evolutionary significance of these findings is discussed in terms of a possible loss of the sound-producing apparatus in females.

  15. Galactose-specific seed lectins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Marapakala, Kavitha; Sultan, Nabil Ali M; Kenoth, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Lectins, the carbohydrate binding proteins have been studied extensively in view of their ubiquitous nature and wide-ranging applications. As they were originally found in plant seed extracts, much of the work on them was focused on plant seed lectins, especially those from legume seeds whereas much less attention was paid to the lectins from other plant families. During the last two decades many studies have been reported on lectins from the seeds of Cucurbitaceae species. The main focus of the present review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on these proteins, especially with regard to their physico-chemical characterization, interaction with carbohydrates and hydrophobic ligands, 3-dimensional structure and similarity to type-II ribosome inactivating proteins. The future outlook of research on these galactose-specific proteins is also briefly considered.

  16. Protegrin structure-activity relationships: using homology models of synthetic sequences to determine structural characteristics important for activity.

    PubMed

    Ostberg, Nathan; Kaznessis, Yiannis

    2005-02-01

    The protegrin family of antimicrobial peptides is among the shortest in sequence length while remaining very active against a variety of microorganisms. The major goal of this study is to characterize easily calculated molecular properties, which quantitatively show high correlation with antibacterial activity. The peptides studied have high sequence similarity but vary in activity over more than an order of magnitude. Hence, sequence analysis alone cannot be used to predict activity for these peptides. We calculate structural properties of 62 protegrin and protegrin-analogue peptides and correlate them to experimental activities against six microbe species, as well as hemolytic and cytotoxic activities. Natural protegrins structures were compared with synthetic derivatives using homology modeling, and property descriptors were calculated to determine the characteristics that confer their antimicrobial activity. A structure-activity relationship study of all these peptides provides information about the structural properties that affect activity against different microbial species.

  17. Fungal Rtt109 Histone Acetyltransferase is an Unexpected Structural Homolog of Metazoan p300/CBP

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,Y.; Holbert, M.; Wurtele, H.; Meeth, K.; Rocha, W.; Gharib, M.; Jiang, E.; Thibault, P.; Verreault, A.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Rtt109, also known as KAT11, is a recently characterized fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that modifies histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56) to promote genome stability. Rtt109 does not show sequence conservation with other known HATs and depends on association with either of two histone chaperones, Asf1 or Vps75, for HAT activity. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of an Rtt109-acetyl coenzyme A complex and carry out structure-based mutagenesis, combined with in vitro biochemical studies of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex and studies of Rtt109 function in vivo. The Rtt109 structure reveals noteworthy homology to the metazoan p300/CBP HAT domain but exhibits functional divergence, including atypical catalytic properties and mode of cofactor regulation. The structure reveals a buried autoacetylated lysine residue that we show is also acetylated in the Rtt109 protein purified from yeast cells. Implications for understanding histone substrate and chaperone binding by Rtt109 are discussed.

  18. Crystal structure of the murine cytomegalovirus MHC-I homolog m144.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Kannan; Hicks, Ashleigh; Mans, Janet; Robinson, Howard; Guan, Rongjin; Mariuzza, Roy A; Margulies, David H

    2006-04-21

    Large DNA viruses of the herpesvirus family produce proteins that mimic host MHC-I molecules as part of their immunoevasive strategy. The m144 glycoprotein, expressed by murine cytomegalovirus, is thought to be an MHC-I homolog whose expression prolongs viral survival in vivo by preventing natural killer cell activation. To explore the structural basis of this m144 function, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of an m144/beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) complex at 1.9A resolution. This structure reveals the canonical features of MHC-I molecules including readily identifiable alpha1, alpha2, and alpha3 domains. A unique disulfide bond links the alpha1 helix to the beta-sheet floor, explaining the known thermal stability of m144. Close juxtaposition of the alpha1 and alpha2 helices and the lack of critical residues that normally contribute to anchoring the peptide N and C termini eliminates peptide binding. A region of 13 amino acid residues, corresponding to the amino-terminal portion of the alpha2 helix, is missing in the electron density map, suggesting an area of structural flexibility that may be involved in ligand binding.

  19. Effect of mutation on aggregation propensity in homology model structures of syntaxin-3 from Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Amutha Selvaraj; Rajesh, Durairaj; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2014-10-01

    Perception of molecular mechanism would provide potent additional knowledge on mammalian membrane proteins involved in causing diseases. In human, syntaxin-3 (STX3) is a significant apical targeting protein in the epithelial membrane and in exocytosis process; it also acts as a vesicle transporter by cellular receptor in neutrophils, which is crucial for protein trafficking event. Structurally, syntaxin-3 has hydrophobic domain at carboxyl terminus that directs itself to intra-cellular compartments. In addition, the experimental structure of STX3 is not available and no mutational study has been carried out with natural variants of proteins. Moreover, there is no evidence so far for the natural variant Val286 of STX3 causing any diseases. Hence, in the present study, analyses of residue-based properties of the homology model STX3 were carried out along with mutations at carboxyl terminus of STX3 by implementing protein engineering and in silico approaches. The model structure of STX3 was constructed adopting Modeller v9.11 and the aggregation propensity was analyzed with BioLuminate tool. The results showed that there was reduction in aggregation propensity with point mutation at Val286, instead of Ile, resulting into increasing the structural stability of STX3. In conclusion, the Ccap exposed residue would be a suitable position for further mutational studies, particularly with Val286 of STX3 in human. This approach could gainfully be applied to STX3 for efficient drug designing which would be a valuable target in the cancer treatment.

  20. Structural basis for gating mechanisms of a eukaryotic P-glycoprotein homolog

    PubMed Central

    Kodan, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Nakatsu, Toru; Sakiyama, Keita; Hipolito, Christopher J.; Fujioka, Akane; Hirokane, Ryo; Ikeguchi, Keiji; Watanabe, Bunta; Hiratake, Jun; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Suga, Hiroaki; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Kato, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter that actively transports chemically diverse substrates across the lipid bilayer. The precise molecular mechanism underlying transport is not fully understood. Here, we present crystal structures of a eukaryotic P-glycoprotein homolog, CmABCB1 from Cyanidioschyzon merolae, in two forms: unbound at 2.6-Å resolution and bound to a unique allosteric inhibitor at 2.4-Å resolution. The inhibitor clamps the transmembrane helices from the outside, fixing the CmABCB1 structure in an inward-open conformation similar to the unbound structure, confirming that an outward-opening motion is required for ATP hydrolysis cycle. These structures, along with site-directed mutagenesis and transporter activity measurements, reveal the detailed architecture of the transporter, including a gate that opens to extracellular side and two gates that open to intramembranous region and the cytosolic side. We propose that the motion of the nucleotide-binding domain drives those gating apparatuses via two short intracellular helices, IH1 and IH2, and two transmembrane helices, TM2 and TM5. PMID:24591620

  1. An Approach for Zika Virus Inhibition Using Homology Structure of the Envelope Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Sandun; Fernando, Teshan; Stefanik, Michal; Eyer, Ludek; Ruzek, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    To find an effective drug for Zika virus, it is important to understand how numerous proteins which are critical for the virus' structure and function interact with their counterparts. One approach to inhibiting the flavivirus is to deter its ability to bind onto glycoproteins; however, the crystal structures of envelope proteins of the ever-evolving viral strains that decipher glycosidic or drug-molecular interactions are not always available. To fill this gap, we are reporting a holistic, simulation-based approach to predict compounds that will inhibit ligand binding onto a structurally unresolved protein, in this case the Zika virus envelope protein (ZVEP), by developing a three-dimensional general structure and analyzing sites at which ligands and small drug-like molecules interact. By examining how glycan molecules and small-molecule probes interact with a freshly resolved ZVEP homology model, we report the susceptibility of ZVEP to inhibition via two small molecules, ZINC33683341 and ZINC49605556-by preferentially binding onto the primary receptor responsible for the virus' virulence. Antiviral activity was confirmed when ZINC33683341 was tested in cell culture. We anticipate the results to be a starting point for drug discovery targeting Zika virus and other emerging pathogens.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Murine Cytomegalovirus MHC-I Homolog m144

    SciTech Connect

    Natarajan,K.; Hicks, A.; Mans, J.; Robinson, H.; Guan, R.; Mariuzza, R.; Margulies, D.

    2006-01-01

    Large DNA viruses of the herpesvirus family produce proteins that mimic host MHC-I molecules as part of their immunoevasive strategy. The m144 glycoprotein, expressed by murine cytomegalovirus, is thought to be an MHC-I homolog whose expression prolongs viral survival in vivo by preventing natural killer cell activation. To explore the structural basis of this m144 function, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of an m144/{beta}2-microglobulin ({beta}2m) complex at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. This structure reveals the canonical features of MHC-I molecules including readily identifiable {alpha}1, {alpha}2, and {alpha}3 domains. A unique disulfide bond links the {alpha}1 helix to the {beta}-sheet floor, explaining the known thermal stability of m144. Close juxtaposition of the {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 helices and the lack of critical residues that normally contribute to anchoring the peptide N and C termini eliminates peptide binding. A region of 13 amino acid residues, corresponding to the amino-terminal portion of the {alpha}2 helix, is missing in the electron density map, suggesting an area of structural flexibility that may be involved in ligand binding.

  3. Cyborg lectins: novel leguminous lectins with unique specificities.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Maruyama, I N; Osawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPA) is one of the beta-galactose-binding leguminous lectins. Leguminous lectins contain a long metal-binding loop, part of which determines their carbohydrate-binding specificities. Random mutations were introduced into a portion of the cDNA coding BPA that corresponds to the carbohydrate-binding loop of the lectin. An library of the mutant lectin expressed on the surface of lambda foo phages was screened by the panning method. Several phage clones with an affinity for mannose or N-acetylglucosamine were isolated. These results indicate the possibility of making artificial lectins (so-called "cyborg lectins") with distinct and desired carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  4. Beyond the Twilight Zone: automated prediction of structural properties of proteins by recursive neural networks and remote homology information.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Catherine; Pollastri, Gianluca

    2009-10-01

    The prediction of 1D structural properties of proteins is an important step toward the prediction of protein structure and function, not only in the ab initio case but also when homology information to known structures is available. Despite this the vast majority of 1D predictors do not incorporate homology information into the prediction process. We develop a novel structural alignment method, SAMD, which we use to build alignments of putative remote homologues that we compress into templates of structural frequency profiles. We use these templates as additional input to ensembles of recursive neural networks, which we specialise for the prediction of query sequences that show only remote homology to any Protein Data Bank structure. We predict four 1D structural properties - secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, backbone structural motifs, and contact density. Secondary structure prediction accuracy, tested by five-fold cross-validation on a large set of proteins allowing less than 25% sequence identity between training and test set and query sequences and templates, exceeds 82%, outperforming its ab initio counterpart, other state-of-the-art secondary structure predictors (Jpred 3 and PSIPRED) and two other systems based on PSI-BLAST and COMPASS templates. We show that structural information from homologues improves prediction accuracy well beyond the Twilight Zone of sequence similarity, even below 5% sequence identity, for all four structural properties. Significant improvement over the extraction of structural information directly from PDB templates suggests that the combination of sequence and template information is more informative than templates alone.

  5. cDNA and Gene Structure of MytiLec-1, A Bacteriostatic R-Type Lectin from the Mediterranean Mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis)

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Gerdol, Marco; Fujii, Yuki; Rajia, Sultana; Koide, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Daiki; Kawsar, Sarkar M. A.; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    MytiLec is an α-d-galactose-binding lectin with a unique primary structure isolated from the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis). The lectin adopts a β-trefoil fold that is also found in the B-sub-unit of ricin and other ricin-type (R-type) lectins. We are introducing MytiLec(-1) and its two variants (MytiLec-2 and -3), which both possess an additional pore-forming aerolysin-like domain, as members of a novel multi-genic “mytilectin family” in bivalve mollusks. Based on the full length mRNA sequence (911 bps), it was possible to elucidate the coding sequence of MytiLec-1, which displays an extended open reading frame (ORF) at the 5′ end of the sequence, confirmed both at the mRNA and at the genomic DNA sequence level. While this extension could potentially produce a polypeptide significantly longer than previously reported, this has not been confirmed yet at the protein level. MytiLec-1 was revealed to be encoded by a gene consisting of two exons and a single intron. The first exon comprised the 5′UTR and the initial ATG codon and it was possible to detect a putative promoter region immediately ahead of the transcription start site in the MytiLec-1 genomic locus. The remaining part of the MytiLec-1 coding sequence (including the three sub-domains, the 3′UTR and the poly-A signal) was included in the second exon. The bacteriostatic activity of MytiLec-1 was determined by the agglutination of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which was reversed by the co-presence of α-galactoside. Altogether, these data support the classification of MytiLec-1 as a member of the novel mytilectin family and suggest that this lectin may play an important role as a pattern recognition receptor in the innate immunity of mussels. PMID:27187419

  6. Differential structuring of human populations for homologous X and Y microsatellite loci.

    PubMed Central

    Scozzari, R; Cruciani, F; Malaspina, P; Santolamazza, P; Ciminelli, B M; Torroni, A; Modiano, D; Wallace, D C; Kidd, K K; Olckers, A; Moral, P; Terrenato, L; Akar, N; Qamar, R; Mansoor, A; Mehdi, S Q; Meloni, G; Vona, G; Cole, D E; Cai, W; Novelletto, A

    1997-01-01

    The global pattern of variation at the homologous microsatellite loci DYS413 (Yq11) and DXS8174 and DXS8175 (Xp22) was analyzed by examination of 30 world populations from four continents, accounting for more than 1,100 chromosomes per locus. The data showed discordant patterns of among- and within-population gene diversity for the Y-linked and the X-linked microsatellites. For the Y-linked polymorphism, all groups of populations displayed high FST values (the correlation between random haplotypes within subpopulations, relative to haplotypes of the total population) and showed a general trend for the haplotypes to cluster in a population-specific way. This was especially true for sub-Saharan African populations. The data also indicated that a large fraction of the variation among populations was due to the accumulation of new variants associated with the radiation process. Europeans exhibited the highest level of within-population haplotype diversity, whereas sub-Saharan Africans showed the lowest. In contrast, data for the two X-linked polymorphisms were concordant in showing lower FST values, as compared with those for DYS413, but higher within-population variances, for African versus non-African populations. Whereas the results for the X-linked loci agreed with a model of greater antiquity for the African populations, those for DYS413 showed a confounding pattern that is apparently at odds with such a model. Possible factors involved in this differential structuring for homologous X and Y microsatellite polymorphisms are discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:9326337

  7. Structural Characterization of Inhibitors with Selectivity against Members of a Homologous Enzyme Family

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E.

    2013-01-31

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  8. Structure of recombinant rat UBF by electron image analysis and homology modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Neil, K J; Ridsdale, R A; Rutherford, B; Taylor, L; Larson, D E; Glibetic, M; Rothblum, L I; Harauz, G

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the structure of recombinant rat UBF (rrUBF), an RNA polymerase I transcription factor, by electron microscopy and image analysis of single particles contrasted with methylamine tungstate. Recombinant rat UBF appeared to be a flat, U-shaped protein with a central region of low density. In the dominant projections, 2-fold mirror symmetry was seen, consistent with the dimerization properties of this molecule, and of dimensions in agreement with the length of DNA that rat UBF protects in footprinting studies. Electron microscopy of various rrUBF-DNA complexes confirmed that our recombinant protein was fully able to bind the 45S rDNA promoter, and that it caused substantial bends in the DNA. Upon extended incubation in a droplet covered by a lipid monolayer at the liquid-air interface, rrUBF formed long filamentous arrays with a railway track appearance. This structure was interpreted to consist of overlapping rrUBF dimers 3.5 nm apart, which value would represent the thickness of the protein. Our results show rrUBF to interact with and bend the promoter DNA into a roughly 10 nm diameter superhelix. Based on all these electron microscopical results, an atomic structure was predicted by homology modelling of the HMG fingers, and connected by energy minimized intervening segments. PMID:8628680

  9. Synthesis, structure and magnetism of homologous series of polycrystalline cobalt alkane mono- and dicarboxylate soaps.

    PubMed

    Rueff, Jean-Micel; Masciocchi, Norberto; Rabu, Pierre; Sironi, Angelo; Skoulios, Antoine

    2002-04-15

    Carboxylate-bridged chain complexes of Co(II) (the diaquacobalt(II) mono- and ,-dialkanoates) form two homologous series of layered compounds which have been fully characterised both structurally and magnetically. The crystal structures of two selected members, [Co[CH3(CH2)10COO]2(H2O)2] and [Co[CH3(CH2)18COO]2(H2O)2], have been solved by X-ray powder diffraction and selected-area electron diffraction methods, and refined by the Rietveld technique. Crystal data: monoclinic, P 2(1)/a; a=9.688(1), b=7.5495(9), c=37.281(5) A, =96.70(3) primary, Z=4; and monoclinic, P 2(1)/a; a=9.7260(7), b=7.5477(7), c=57.53(1) A, =94.66(4) primary, Z=4, respectively. Their isomorphous structures contain layers of octahedral diaquacobalt(II) ions bonded to two chemically inequivalent alkanoates, one chelating and one bridging two Co atoms about 6.3 A apart, thus confirming the rare anti-anti conformation mode of the -RCOO groups recently proposed for diaquacobalt(II) ,-dodecanedioate. Extensive magnetic characterisation allowed estimation of the feeble antiferromagnetic coupling, which is weaker in the mono- than in the dialkanoate series.

  10. Pan-eukaryote ITS2 homologies revealed by RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Annette W.

    2007-01-01

    For evolutionary comparisons, phylogenetics and evaluation of potential interbreeding taxa of a species, various loci have served for animals and plants and protistans. One [second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA] is highly suitable for all. Its sequence is species specific. It has already been used extensively and very successfully for plants and some protistans, and a few animals (where historically, the mitochondrial genes have dominated species studies). Despite initial impressions that ITS2 is too variable, it has proven to provide useful biological information at higher taxonomic levels, even across all eukaryotes, thanks to the conserved aspects of its transcript secondary structure. The review of all eukaryote groups reveals that ITS2 is expandable, but always retains in its RNA transcript a common core structure of two helices with hallmark characteristics important for ribosomal RNA processing. This aspect of its RNA transcript secondary structure can rescue difficult alignment problems, making the ITS2 a more powerful tool for phylogenetics. Equally important, the recognition of eukaryote-wide homology regions provides extensive and detailed information to test experimental studies of ribosomal rRNA processing. PMID:17459886

  11. Crystal structure and mechanistic basis of a functional homolog of the antigen transporter TAP

    PubMed Central

    Nöll, Anne; Thomas, Christoph; Herbring, Valentina; Zollmann, Tina; Barth, Katja; Mehdipour, Ahmad Reza; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Brüchert, Stefan; Joseph, Benesh; Abele, Rupert; Oliéric, Vincent; Wang, Meitian; Diederichs, Kay; Stroud, Robert M.; Pos, Klaas M.; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    ABC transporters form one of the largest protein superfamilies in all domains of life, catalyzing the movement of diverse substrates across membranes. In this key position, ABC transporters can mediate multidrug resistance in cancer therapy and their dysfunction is linked to various diseases. Here, we describe the 2.7-Å X-ray structure of heterodimeric Thermus thermophilus multidrug resistance proteins A and B (TmrAB), which not only shares structural homology with the antigen translocation complex TAP, but is also able to restore antigen processing in human TAP-deficient cells. TmrAB exhibits a broad peptide specificity and can concentrate substrates several thousandfold, using only one single active ATP-binding site. In our structure, TmrAB adopts an asymmetric inward-facing state, and we show that the C-terminal helices, arranged in a zipper-like fashion, play a crucial role in guiding the conformational changes associated with substrate transport. In conclusion, TmrAB can be regarded as a model system for asymmetric ABC exporters in general, and for TAP in particular. PMID:28069938

  12. Structural characterization of inhibitors with selectivity against members of a homologous enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E

    2012-01-01

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  13. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  14. The Importance of Isomorphism for Conclusions about Homology: A Bayesian Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Approach with Ordinal Indicators.

    PubMed

    Guenole, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    We describe a Monte Carlo study examining the impact of assuming item isomorphism (i.e., equivalent construct meaning across levels of analysis) on conclusions about homology (i.e., equivalent structural relations across levels of analysis) under varying degrees of non-isomorphism in the context of ordinal indicator multilevel structural equation models (MSEMs). We focus on the condition where one or more loadings are higher on the between level than on the within level to show that while much past research on homology has ignored the issue of psychometric isomorphism, psychometric isomorphism is in fact critical to valid conclusions about homology. More specifically, when a measurement model with non-isomorphic items occupies an exogenous position in a multilevel structural model and the non-isomorphism of these items is not modeled, the within level exogenous latent variance is under-estimated leading to over-estimation of the within level structural coefficient, while the between level exogenous latent variance is overestimated leading to underestimation of the between structural coefficient. When a measurement model with non-isomorphic items occupies an endogenous position in a multilevel structural model and the non-isomorphism of these items is not modeled, the endogenous within level latent variance is under-estimated leading to under-estimation of the within level structural coefficient while the endogenous between level latent variance is over-estimated leading to over-estimation of the between level structural coefficient. The innovative aspect of this article is demonstrating that even minor violations of psychometric isomorphism render claims of homology untenable. We also show that posterior predictive p-values for ordinal indicator Bayesian MSEMs are insensitive to violations of isomorphism even when they lead to severely biased within and between level structural parameters. We highlight conditions where poor estimation of even correctly specified

  15. The Importance of Isomorphism for Conclusions about Homology: A Bayesian Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Approach with Ordinal Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Guenole, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    We describe a Monte Carlo study examining the impact of assuming item isomorphism (i.e., equivalent construct meaning across levels of analysis) on conclusions about homology (i.e., equivalent structural relations across levels of analysis) under varying degrees of non-isomorphism in the context of ordinal indicator multilevel structural equation models (MSEMs). We focus on the condition where one or more loadings are higher on the between level than on the within level to show that while much past research on homology has ignored the issue of psychometric isomorphism, psychometric isomorphism is in fact critical to valid conclusions about homology. More specifically, when a measurement model with non-isomorphic items occupies an exogenous position in a multilevel structural model and the non-isomorphism of these items is not modeled, the within level exogenous latent variance is under-estimated leading to over-estimation of the within level structural coefficient, while the between level exogenous latent variance is overestimated leading to underestimation of the between structural coefficient. When a measurement model with non-isomorphic items occupies an endogenous position in a multilevel structural model and the non-isomorphism of these items is not modeled, the endogenous within level latent variance is under-estimated leading to under-estimation of the within level structural coefficient while the endogenous between level latent variance is over-estimated leading to over-estimation of the between level structural coefficient. The innovative aspect of this article is demonstrating that even minor violations of psychometric isomorphism render claims of homology untenable. We also show that posterior predictive p-values for ordinal indicator Bayesian MSEMs are insensitive to violations of isomorphism even when they lead to severely biased within and between level structural parameters. We highlight conditions where poor estimation of even correctly specified

  16. Comparison of homology models and X-ray structures of the nuclear receptor CAR: assessing the structural basis of constitutive activity.

    PubMed

    Windshügel, Björn; Jyrkkärinne, Johanna; Vanamo, Jenni; Poso, Antti; Honkakoski, Paavo; Sippl, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) possesses an intrinsic basal activity whose structural basis has been analysed during the last decade. Recently, we published a homology model of the CAR ligand binding domain (LBD) based on the X-ray structures of the closely related pregnane X (PXR) and vitamin D (VDR) receptor. A detailed analysis of the homology model and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations afforded us to propose a potential mechanism underlying the constitutive activity of CAR. Almost simultaneously, X-ray structures of human and mouse CAR LBD were released. In the present study, a detailed analysis and comparison of homology model and X-ray structures is carried out in order to evaluate the quality and reliability of our homology modelling procedure. The hypothesis of the constitutive activity which we proposed on the basis of our modelling results was tested for consistency with the crystal structures. In addition, the features stated to be essential for the basal activity based on the X-ray data were investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the homology modelling procedure was able to predict the CAR LBD structure with high accuracy. Structural features that have been revealed as critical for constitutive activity in the model are also observed in the X-ray structures. Furthermore, the MD simulations of the CAR X-ray structures and a detailed analysis of other NRs clarify the role of distinct structural features that have been assigned an important role for the constitutive activity.

  17. Structural basis of coactivation of liver receptor homolog-1 by β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Yumoto, Fumiaki; Nguyen, Phuong; Sablin, Elena P.; Baxter, John D.; Webb, Paul; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the three-dimensional structure of a β-catenin armadillo repeat in complex with the liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) ligand binding domain at 2.8 Å resolution as the first structure of β-catenin in complex with any nuclear receptor. The surface of β-catenin that binds LRH-1 partly overlaps defined contact sites for peptide segments of β-catenin partners, including T-cell factor-4. The surface of LRH-1 that engages β-catenin is comprised of helices 1, 9, and 10 and is distinct from known interaction surfaces of LRH-1, including corepressor and coactivator binding sites. Targeted mutagenesis of amino acids forming both sides of the LRH-1/β-catenin interface reveals that they are essential for stable interactions between these proteins in solution. The LRH-1 binding site in β-catenin is also required for association with androgen receptor, providing evidence that the observed LRH-1/β-catenin interaction may be prototypic. PMID:22187462

  18. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Sottrup-Jensen, L; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, T; Tack, B F

    1984-01-01

    Human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is a major pregnancy-associated protein. Its quaternary structure (two covalently bound 180-kDa subunits, which are further non-covalently assembled into a tetramer of 720 kDa) is similar to that of human alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). Here we show, from the results of complete or partial sequence determination of a random selection of 38 tryptic peptides covering 685 residues of the subunit of PZP, that PZP and alpha 2M indeed are extensively homologous. In the stretches of PZP sequenced so far, the degree of identically placed residues in the two proteins is 68%, indicating a close evolutionary relationship between PZP and alpha 2M. Although the function of PZP in pregnancy is largely unknown, its close structural relationship to alpha 2M suggests analogous proteinase binding properties and a potential for being taken up in cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In this regard our studies indicate a bait region in PZP significantly different from that present in alpha 2M. PZP could be the human equivalent of the acute-phase alpha-macroglobulins (e.g., rat alpha 2M and rabbit alpha 1M) described earlier. PMID:6209714

  19. Structural and functional homology between periplasmic bacterial molecular chaperones and small heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zav'yalova, G A; Denesyuk, A I; Gaestel, M; Korpela, T

    1995-07-01

    The periplasmic Yersinia pestis molecular chaperone Caf1M belongs to a superfamily of bacterial proteins for one of which (PapD protein of Escherichia coli) the immunoglobulin-like fold was solved by X-ray analysis. The N-terminal domain of Caf1M was found to share a 20% amino acid sequence identity with an inclusion body-associated protein IbpB of Escherichia coli. One of the regions that was compared, was 32 amino acids long, and displayed more than 40% identity, probability of random coincidence was 1.2 x 10(-4). IbpB is involved in a superfamily of small heat shock proteins which fulfil the function of molecular chaperone. On the basis of the revealed homology, an immunoglobulin-like one-domain model of IbpB three-dimensional structure was designed which could be a prototype conformation of sHsp's. The structure suggested is in good agreement with the known experimental data obtained for different members of sHsp's superfamily.

  20. Structural and Mechanistic Studies of Pesticin, a Bacterial Homolog of Phage Lysozymes*

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, Silke I.; Albrecht, Reinhard; Braun, Volkmar; Zeth, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis produces and secretes a toxin named pesticin that kills related bacteria of the same niche. Uptake of the bacteriocin is required for activity in the periplasm leading to hydrolysis of peptidoglycan. To understand the uptake mechanism and to investigate the function of pesticin, we combined crystal structures of the wild type enzyme, active site mutants, and a chimera protein with in vivo and in vitro activity assays. Wild type pesticin comprises an elongated N-terminal translocation domain, the intermediate receptor binding domain, and a C-terminal activity domain with structural analogy to lysozyme homologs. The full-length protein is toxic to bacteria when taken up to the target site via the outer or the inner membrane. Uptake studies of deletion mutants in the translocation domain demonstrate their critical size for import. To further test the plasticity of pesticin during uptake into bacterial cells, the activity domain was replaced by T4 lysozyme. Surprisingly, this replacement resulted in an active chimera protein that is not inhibited by the immunity protein Pim. Activity of pesticin and the chimera protein was blocked through introduction of disulfide bonds, which suggests unfolding as the prerequisite to gain access to the periplasm. Pesticin, a muramidase, was characterized by active site mutations demonstrating a similar but not identical residue pattern in comparison with T4 lysozyme. PMID:22593569

  1. Review of crystalline structures of some selected homologous series of rod-like molecules capable of forming liquid crystalline phases.

    PubMed

    Zugenmaier, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structures of four homologous series of rod-like molecules are reviewed, two of which form hydrogen bonds and two with a symmetric chemical constitution. Many of the compounds investigated turn into liquid crystalline phases upon temperature increase. It is of valuable interest to know possible conformations and possible packing arrangements as prerequisites to model liquid crystalline structures. The hydrogen bonds of homologous series of pure 4-(ω-hydroxyalkyloxy)-4'-hydroxybiphenyl (HnHBP, n the alkyloxy tail length) are realized through head to tail arrangements of the hydroxyl groups and crystallize except one compound in chiral space groups without the molecules containing any asymmetric carbon. The hydrogen bonds of the homologous series of 4-substituted benzoic acids with various lengths of the tail provide dimers through strong polar bonding of adjacent carboxyl groups and thus provide the stiff part of a mesogenic unit prerequisite for liquid crystalline phases. The homologous series of dialkanoyloxybiphenyls (BP-n, n = 1, 19), of which nine compounds could be crystallized, show liquid crystalline behavior for longer alkane chain lengths, despite the high mobility of the alkane chain ends already detectable in the crystal phase. A single molecule, half a molecule or two half molecules form the asymmetric unit in a centrosymmetric space group. The homologous series of 1,4-terephthalidene-bis-N-(4'-n-alkylaniline) (TBAA-n) exhibit a large variety of packing arrangements in the crystalline state, with or without relying on the symmetry center within the molecules.

  2. In Silico Study to Develop a Lectin-Like Protein from Mushroom Agaricus bisporus for Pharmaceutical Application

    PubMed Central

    Ismaya, Wangsa Tirta; Yunita; Damayanti, Sophi; Wijaya, Caroline; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R.; Retnoningrum, Debbie Sofie; Rachmawati, Heni

    2016-01-01

    A lectin-like protein of unknown function designated as LSMT was recently discovered in the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The protein shares high structural similarity to HA-33 from Clostridium botulinum (HA33) and Ricin-B-like lectin from the mushroom Clitocybe nebularis (CNL), which have been developed as drug carrier and anti-cancer, respectively. These homologous proteins display the ability to penetrate the intestinal epithelial cell monolayer, and are beneficial for oral administration. As the characteristics of LSMT are unknown, a structural study in silico was performed to assess its potential pharmaceutical application. The study suggested potential binding to target ligands such as HA-33 and CNL although the nature, specificity, capacity, mode, and strength may differ. Further molecular docking experiments suggest that interactions between the LSMT and tested ligands may take place. This finding indicates the possible use of the LSMT protein, initiating new research on its use for pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27110510

  3. Complete structure of the cell surface polysaccharide of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557: A receptor for lectin-mediated interbacterial adherence

    SciTech Connect

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A. ); Cisar, J.O. )

    1991-07-02

    Lectin-carbohydrate binding is known to play an important role in a number of different cell-cell interactions including those between certain species of oral streptococci and actinomyces that colonize teeth. The cell wall polysaccharides of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557, S. oralis 34, and Streptococcus mitis J22, although not identical antigenically, each function as a receptor molecule for the galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine reactive fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii. Carbohydrate analysis of the receptor polysaccharide isolated from S. oralis ATCC 10557 shows galactose (3 mol), glucose (1 mol), GalNAc (1 mol), and rhamnose (1 mol). {sup 1}H NMR spectra of the polysaccharide show that is partially O-acetylated. Analysis of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the de-O-acetylated polysaccharide shows that it is composed of repeating subunits containing six monosaccharides and that the subunits are joined by a phosphodiester linkage. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra were completely assigned by two-dimensional homonuclear correlation methods and by {sup 1}H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum correlation ({sup 1}H({sup 13}C)HMQC). The complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C assignment of the native polysaccharide was carried out by the same techniques augmented by a {sup 13}C-coupled hybrid HMQC-COSY method, which is shown to be especially useful for carbohydrates in which strong coupling and overlapping peaks in the {sup 1}H spectrum pose difficulties.

  4. Correlation between carbohydrate-binding specificity and amino acid sequence of carbohydrate-binding regions of Cytisus-type anti-H(O) lectins.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1992-06-15

    A carbohydrate-binding peptide of the di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin I (CSA-I) was isolated from the endoproteinase Asp-N digest of CSA-I by affinity chromatography on a column of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine oligomer-Sepharose (GlcNAc oligomer-Sepharose). The amino acid sequence of the carbohydrate-binding peptide of CSA-I was determined to be DTYFGKTYNPW using a gas-phase protein sequencer. This sequence corresponds to the sequence from Asp-129 to Trp-139 based on the primary structure of CSA-I, and shows a high degree of homology to those of the putative carbohydrate-binding peptide of the Laburnum alpinum lectin I (LAA-I) (DTYFGKAYNPW) and of the Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II) (DSYFGKTYNPW). The binding of these three anti-H(O) lectins is known to be inhibited by di-N-acetylchitobiose but not by L-fucose. These results strongly suggest that there is a good correlation between the carbohydrate-binding specificity and the amino acid sequence of the carbohydrate-binding regions of di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding lectins.

  5. Modulation of MICAL Monooxygenase Activity by its Calponin Homology Domain: Structural and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Alqassim, Saif S.; Urquiza, Mauricio; Borgnia, Eitan; Nagib, Marc; Amzel, L. Mario; Bianchet, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    MICALs (Molecule Interacting with CasL) are conserved multidomain enzymes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization in nerve development, endocytosis, and apoptosis. In these enzymes, a type-2 calponin homology (CH) domain always follows an N-terminal monooxygenase (MO) domain. Although the CH domain is required for MICAL-1 cellular localization and actin-associated function, its contribution to the modulation of MICAL activity towards actin remains unclear. Here, we present the structure of a fragment of MICAL-1 containing the MO and the CH domains—determined by X-ray crystallography and small angle scattering—as well as kinetics experiments designed to probe the contribution of the CH domain to the actin-modification activity. Our results suggest that the CH domain, which is loosely connected to the MO domain by a flexible linker and is far away from the catalytic site, couples F-actin to the enhancement of redox activity of MICALMO-CH by a cooperative mechanism involving a trans interaction between adjacently bound molecules. Binding cooperativity is also observed in other proteins regulating actin assembly/disassembly dynamics, such as ADF/Cofilins. PMID:26935886

  6. Analysis of EST and lectin expressions in hemocytes of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) (Bivalvia: Mollusca) infected with Perkinsus olseni.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Young-Mee; Park, Kyung-Il; Kim Cho, Somi; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Cho, Moonjae

    2006-01-01

    The hemocytes of invertebrates play key roles in both cellular and humoral immune reactions by phagocytosis or delivering immune factors such as lectin and anti-microbial peptides. Bacterial infection causes changes in components such as lectins, anti-bacterial peptides, and lysosomal enzymes of plasma or hemolymph in molluscs. Previously, we found that infection with the protozoan parasite, Perkinsus, increases lectin synthesis in hemocytes. In order to investigate the patterns of genes expressed in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) infected with the protozoan parasite Perkinsus olseni, we constructed a cDNA library and sequenced 1850 clones (expressed sequence tags). A total of 79 ESTs, were related to 29 functional immune genes such as C-type lectin, lysozyme, and cystatin B, in Manila clams. Lectins were the largest group of immune-function ESTs found in our Manila clams library. Among 7 lectin clones, two full length cDNAs of lectins were cloned. MCL-3, which is a simple C-type lectin composed of 151 amino acids, has a relatively short signal sequence of 17aa and single carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of approximately 130 residues. It is highly homologous to eel C-type lectin. The sequence of mc-sialic acid-binding lectin consists of 168 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 19.2 and shows high homology to sialic acid-binding lectin from the snail, Cepaea hortensis. The expression of 7 different lectins in hemocytes was analyzed by RT-PCR using gene-specific primers. Hemocytes from Perkinsus-infected clam expressed different sets of lectins than with Vibrio infection. These results demonstrate that several lectins are involved in Manila clam innate immunity and different challenges induce expression of different lectins.

  7. Nitrogenase and Homologs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzes biological nitrogen fixation, a key step in the global nitrogen cycle. Three homologous nitrogenases have been identified to date, along with several structural and/or functional homologs of this enzyme that are involved in nitrogenase assembly, bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis and methanogenic process, respectively. In this article, we provide an overview of the structures and functions of nitrogenase and its homologs, which highlights the similarity and disparity of this uniquely versatile group of enzymes. PMID:25491285

  8. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  9. Structural and Functional Characterization of the Kindlin-1 Pleckstrin Homology Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Luke A.; Lumb, Craig N.; Brahme, Nina N.; Zalyte, Ruta; Bird, Louise E.; De Colibus, Luigi; Owens, Raymond J.; Calderwood, David A.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Gilbert, Robert J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Inside-out activation of integrins is mediated via the binding of talin and kindlin to integrin β-subunit cytoplasmic tails. The kindlin FERM domain is interrupted by a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain within its F2 subdomain. Here, we present data confirming the importance of the kindlin-1 PH domain for integrin activation and its x-ray crystal structure at a resolution of 2.1 Å revealing a C-terminal second α-helix integral to the domain but found only in the kindlin protein family. An isoform-specific salt bridge occludes the canonical phosphoinositide binding site, but molecular dynamics simulations display transient switching to an alternative open conformer. Molecular docking reveals that the opening of the pocket would enable potential ligands to bind within it. Although lipid overlay assays suggested the PH domain binds inositol monophosphates, surface plasmon resonance demonstrated weak affinities for inositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (Ins(3,4,5)P3; KD ∼100 μm) and no monophosphate binding. Removing the salt bridge by site-directed mutagenesis increases the PH domain affinity for Ins(3,4,5)P3 as measured by surface plasmon resonance and enables it to bind PtdIns(3,5)P2 on a dot-blot. Structural comparison with other PH domains suggests that the phosphate binding pocket in the kindlin-1 PH domain is more occluded than in kindlins-2 and -3 due to its salt bridge. In addition, the apparent affinity for Ins(3,4,5)P3 is affected by the presence of PO4 ions in the buffer. We suggest the physiological ligand of the kindlin-1 PH domain is most likely not an inositol phosphate but another phosphorylated species. PMID:23132860

  10. Crystal Structures of the Nuclear Receptor, Liver Receptor Homolog 1, Bound to Synthetic Agonists.

    PubMed

    Mays, Suzanne G; Okafor, C Denise; Whitby, Richard J; Goswami, Devrishi; Stec, Józef; Flynn, Autumn R; Dugan, Michael C; Jui, Nathan T; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-12-02

    Liver receptor homolog 1 (NR5A2, LRH-1) is an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that regulates diverse biological processes, including metabolism, proliferation, and the resolution of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Although preclinical and cellular studies demonstrate that LRH-1 has great potential as a therapeutic target for metabolic diseases and cancer, development of LRH-1 modulators has been difficult. Recently, systematic modifications to one of the few known chemical scaffolds capable of activating LRH-1 failed to improve efficacy substantially. Moreover, mechanisms through which LRH-1 is activated by synthetic ligands are entirely unknown. Here, we use x-ray crystallography and other structural methods to explore conformational changes and receptor-ligand interactions associated with LRH-1 activation by a set of related agonists. Unlike phospholipid LRH-1 ligands, these agonists bind deep in the pocket and do not interact with residues near the mouth nor do they expand the pocket like phospholipids. Unexpectedly, two closely related agonists with similar efficacies (GSK8470 and RJW100) exhibit completely different binding modes. The dramatic repositioning is influenced by a differential ability to establish stable face-to-face π-π-stacking with the LRH-1 residue His-390, as well as by a novel polar interaction mediated by the RJW100 hydroxyl group. The differing binding modes result in distinct mechanisms of action for the two agonists. Finally, we identify a network of conserved water molecules near the ligand-binding site that are important for activation by both agonists. This work reveals a previously unappreciated complexity associated with LRH-1 agonist development and offers insights into rational design strategies.

  11. High-resolution structural insights on the sugar-recognition and fusion tag properties of a versatile β-trefoil lectin domain from the mushroom Laetiporus sulphureus.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Iván; Acebrón, Iván; de las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario; Rodríguez-Crespo, I; Menéndez, Margarita; García, Pedro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Goldstein, Irwin J; Pérez-Agote, Begoña; Mancheño, José M

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we analyzed at high resolution the sugar-binding mode of the recombinant N-terminal ricin-B domain of the hemolytic protein LSLa (LSL(150)) from the mushroom Laetiporus sulphureus and also provide functional in vitro evidence suggesting that, together with its putative receptor-binding role, this module may also increase the solubility of its membrane pore-forming partner. We first demonstrate that recombinant LSL(150) behaves as an autonomous folding unit and an active lectin. We have determined its crystal structure at 1.47 Å resolution and also that of the [LSL(150):(lactose)β, γ)] binary complex at 1.67 Å resolution. This complex reveals two lactose molecules bound to the β and γ sites of LSL(150), respectively. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicates that LSL(150) binds two lactoses in solution with highly different affinities. Also, we test the working hypothesis that LSL(150) exhibits in vivo properties typical of solubility tags. With this aim, we have fused an engineered version of LSL(150) (LSL(t)) to the N-terminal end of various recombinant proteins. All the designed LSL(150)-tagged fusion proteins were successfully produced at high yield, and furthermore, the target proteins were purified by a straightforward affinity procedure on agarose-based matrices due to the excellent properties of LSL(150) as an affinity tag. An optimized protocol for target protein purification was devised, which involved removal of the LSL(150) tag through in-column cleavage of the fusion proteins with His(6)-tagged TEV endoprotease. These results permitted to set up a novel, lectin-based system for production and purification of recombinant proteins in E. coli cells with attractive biotechnological applications.

  12. Structure and Function Analysis of Nucleocapsid Protein of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Interacting with RNA Using Homology Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. PMID:25540203

  13. Multiple templates-based homology modeling enhances structure quality of AT1 receptor: validation by molecular dynamics and antagonist docking.

    PubMed

    Sokkar, Pandian; Mohandass, Shylajanaciyar; Ramachandran, Murugesan

    2011-07-01

    We present a comparative account on 3D-structures of human type-1 receptor (AT1) for angiotensin II (AngII), modeled using three different methodologies. AngII activates a wide spectrum of signaling responses via the AT1 receptor that mediates physiological control of blood pressure and diverse pathological actions in cardiovascular, renal, and other cell types. Availability of 3D-model of AT1 receptor would significantly enhance the development of new drugs for cardiovascular diseases. However, templates of AT1 receptor with low sequence similarity increase the complexity in straightforward homology modeling, and hence there is a need to evaluate different modeling methodologies in order to use the models for sensitive applications such as rational drug design. Three models were generated for AT1 receptor by, (1) homology modeling with bovine rhodopsin as template, (2) homology modeling with multiple templates and (3) threading using I-TASSER web server. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation (15 ns) of models in explicit membrane-water system, Ramachandran plot analysis and molecular docking with antagonists led to the conclusion that multiple template-based homology modeling outweighs other methodologies for AT1 modeling.

  14. Identification, Characterization, and X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of a Novel Type of Mannose-Specific Lectin CGL1 from the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Unno, Hideaki; Matsuyama, Kazuki; Tsuji, Yoshiteru; Goda, Shuichiro; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2016-01-01

    A novel mannose-specific lectin, named CGL1 (15.5 kDa), was isolated from the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Characterization of CGL1 involved isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), glycoconjugate microarray, and frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). This analysis revealed that CGL1 has strict specificity for the mannose monomer and for high mannose-type N-glycans (HMTGs). Primary structure of CGL1 did not show any homology with known lectins but did show homology with proteins of the natterin family. Crystal structure of the CGL1 revealed a unique homodimer in which each protomer was composed of 2 domains related by a pseudo two-fold axis. Complex structures of CGL1 with mannose molecules showed that residues have 8 hydrogen bond interactions with O1, O2, O3, O4, and O5 hydroxyl groups of mannose. The complex interactions that are not observed with other mannose-binding lectins revealed the structural basis for the strict specificity for mannose. These characteristics of CGL1 may be helpful as a research tool and for clinical applications. PMID:27377186

  15. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-06

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Recombinant lectins: an array of tailor-made glycan-interaction biosynthetic tools.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2013-03-01

    Lectins are a heterogeneous group of proteins found in plants, animals and microorganisms, which possess at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific mono- or oligosaccharides. The range of lectins and respective biological activities is unsurprising given the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and the multiple modes of interaction with proteins. Recombinant DNA technology has been traditionally used for cloning and characterizing newly discovered lectins. It has also been employed as a means of producing pure and sequence-defined lectins for different biotechnological applications. This review focuses on the production of recombinant lectins in heterologous organisms, and highlighting the Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris expression systems, which are the most employed. The choice of expression host depends on the lectin. Non-glycosylated recombinant lectins are produced in E. coli and post-translational modified recombinant lectins are produced in eukaryotic organisms, namely P. pastoris and non-microbial hosts such as mammalian cells. Emphasis is given to the applications of the recombinant lectins especially (a) in cancer diagnosis and/or therapeutics, (b) as anti-microbial, anti-viral, and anti-insect molecules or (c) in microarrays for glycome profiling. Most reported applications are from recombinant plant lectins. These applications benefit from the tailor-made design associated with recombinant production and will aid in unraveling the complex biological mechanisms of glycan-interactions, bringing recombinant lectins to the forefront of glycobiology. In conclusion, recombinant lectins are developing into valuable biosynthetic tools for biomedical research.

  17. Satellite RNA of cucumber mosaic virus forms a secondary structure with partial 3'-terminal homology to genomal RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, K H; Symons, R H

    1983-01-01

    Sat-RNA is one of several replicating satellite RNAs which have been isolated from RNA encapsidated in cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and which are totally dependent on CMV for replication. The 336 residue sequence of Sat-RNA obtained using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination and partial enzymic digestion procedures shows only a few short stretches (up to 11 residues) of sequence homology with one of the three CMV genomal RNAs so far sequenced. Sat-RNA has 88% sequence homology with another, previously sequenced, satellite RNA of CMV, CARNA 5. Analysis of partial digests of 5'- or 3' -32P-Sat-RNA with nuclease S1 or RNase T1 under non-denaturing conditions showed that only about 10% of the residues in Sat-RNA were cleaved. Further data on base-paired segments of Sat-RNA were obtained using digestion with RNase T1 followed by electrophoretic fractionation of the resulting fragments under both non-denaturing and denaturing conditions. On the basis of this data, a complete secondary structure model is proposed for Sat-RNA with 52% of its residues involved in base pairs. A prominent hairpin at the 3'-terminus of Sat-RNA shows considerable sequence and structural homology with parts of the 3'-terminal tRNA-like structure of the CMV genomal RNAs. Images PMID:6186989

  18. Solution Structure and Sugar-Binding Mechanism of Mouse Latrophilin-1 RBL: a 7TM Receptor-Attached Lectin-Like Domain

    PubMed Central

    Vakonakis, Ioannis; Langenhan, Tobias; Prömel, Simone; Russ, Andreas; Campbell, Iain D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Latrophilin-1 (Lat-1), a target receptor for α-Latrotoxin, is a putative G protein-coupled receptor implicated in synaptic function. The extracellular portion of Lat-1 contains a rhamnose binding lectin (RBL)-like domain of unknown structure. RBL domains, first isolated from the eggs of marine species, are also found in the ectodomains of other metazoan transmembrane proteins, including a recently discovered coreceptor of the neuronal axon guidance molecule SLT-1/Slit. Here, we describe a structure of this domain from the mouse Lat-1. RBL adopts a unique α/β fold with long structured loops important for monosaccharide recognition, as shown in the structure of a complex with L-rhamnose. Sequence alignments and mutagenesis show that residues important for carbohydrate binding are often absent in other receptor-attached examples of RBL, including the SLT-1/Slit coreceptor. We postulate that this domain class facilitates direct protein-protein interactions in many transmembrane receptors. PMID:18547526

  19. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  20. Donut-shaped fingerprint in homologous polypeptide relationships--a topological feature related to pathogenic structural changes in conformational disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2009-05-21

    Features of homologous relationship of proteins can provide us a general picture of protein universe, assist protein design and analysis, and further our comprehension of the evolution of organisms. Here we carried out a study of the evolution of protein molecules by investigating homologous relationships among residue segments. The motive was to identify detailed topological features of homologous relationships for short residue segments in the whole protein universe. Based on the data of a large number of non-redundant proteins, the universe of non-membrane polypeptide was analyzed by considering both residue mutations and structural conservation. By connecting homologous segments with edges, we obtained a homologous relationship network of the whole universe of short residue segments, which we named the graph of polypeptide relationships (GPR). Since the network is extremely complicated for topological transitions, to obtain an in-depth understanding, only subgraphs composed of vital nodes of the GPR were analyzed. Such analysis of vital subgraphs of the GPR revealed a donut-shaped fingerprint. Utilization of this topological feature revealed the switch sites (where the beginning of exposure of previously hidden "hot spots" of fibril-forming happens, in consequence a further opportunity for protein aggregation is provided; 188-202) of the conformational conversion of the normal alpha-helix-rich prion protein PrP(C) to the beta-sheet-rich PrP(Sc) that is thought to be responsible for a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Efforts in analyzing other proteins related to various conformational diseases are also introduced.

  1. Structure and lipid-binding properties of the kindlin-3 pleckstrin homology domain.

    PubMed

    Ni, Tao; Kalli, Antreas C; Naughton, Fiona B; Yates, Luke A; Naneh, Omar; Kozorog, Mirijam; Anderluh, Gregor; Sansom, Mark S P; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2017-02-15

    Kindlins co-activate integrins alongside talin. They possess, like talin, a FERM domain (4.1-erythrin-radixin-moiesin domain) comprising F0-F3 subdomains, but with a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain inserted in the F2 subdomain that enables membrane association. We present the crystal structure of murine kindlin-3 PH domain determined at a resolution of 2.23 Å and characterise its lipid binding using biophysical and computational approaches. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest flexibility in the PH domain loops connecting β-strands forming the putative phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PtdInsP)-binding site. Simulations with PtdInsP-containing bilayers reveal that the PH domain associates with PtdInsP molecules mainly via the positively charged surface presented by the β1-β2 loop and that it binds with somewhat higher affinity to PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 compared with PtdIns(4,5)P2 Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with lipid headgroups immobilised and the PH domain as an analyte indicate affinities of 300 µM for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and 1 mM for PtdIns(4,5)P2 In contrast, SPR studies with an immobilised PH domain and lipid nanodiscs as the analyte show affinities of 0.40 µM for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and no affinity for PtdIns(4,5)P2 when the inositol phosphate constitutes 5% of the total lipids (∼5 molecules per nanodisc). Reducing the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 composition to 1% abolishes nanodisc binding to the PH domain, as does site-directed mutagenesis of two lysines within the β1-β2 loop. Binding of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 by a canonical PH domain, Grp1, is not similarly influenced by SPR experimental design. These data suggest a role for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 clustering in the binding of some PH domains and not others, highlighting the importance of lipid mobility and clustering for the biophysical assessment of protein-membrane interactions.

  2. Structure and lipid-binding properties of the kindlin-3 pleckstrin homology domain

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Tao; Kalli, Antreas C.; Naughton, Fiona B.; Yates, Luke A.; Naneh, Omar; Kozorog, Mirijam; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Kindlins co-activate integrins alongside talin. They possess, like talin, a FERM domain (4.1-erythrin–radixin–moiesin domain) comprising F0–F3 subdomains, but with a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain inserted in the F2 subdomain that enables membrane association. We present the crystal structure of murine kindlin-3 PH domain determined at a resolution of 2.23 Å and characterise its lipid binding using biophysical and computational approaches. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest flexibility in the PH domain loops connecting β-strands forming the putative phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PtdInsP)-binding site. Simulations with PtdInsP-containing bilayers reveal that the PH domain associates with PtdInsP molecules mainly via the positively charged surface presented by the β1–β2 loop and that it binds with somewhat higher affinity to PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 compared with PtdIns(4,5)P2. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with lipid headgroups immobilised and the PH domain as an analyte indicate affinities of 300 µM for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and 1 mM for PtdIns(4,5)P2. In contrast, SPR studies with an immobilised PH domain and lipid nanodiscs as the analyte show affinities of 0.40 µM for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and no affinity for PtdIns(4,5)P2 when the inositol phosphate constitutes 5% of the total lipids (∼5 molecules per nanodisc). Reducing the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 composition to 1% abolishes nanodisc binding to the PH domain, as does site-directed mutagenesis of two lysines within the β1–β2 loop. Binding of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 by a canonical PH domain, Grp1, is not similarly influenced by SPR experimental design. These data suggest a role for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 clustering in the binding of some PH domains and not others, highlighting the importance of lipid mobility and clustering for the biophysical assessment of protein–membrane interactions. PMID:27974389

  3. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses. PMID:25165467

  4. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J M

    2014-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses.

  5. Isolation and characterization of lectins and lectin-alliinase complexes from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (Allium ursinum).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-04-01

    A procedure developed to separate the homodimeric and heterodimeric mannose-binding lectins from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum L.) and ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) also enabled the isolation of stable lectin-alliinase complexes. Characterization of the individual lectins indicated that, in spite of their different molecular structure, the homomeric and heteromeric lectins resemble each other reasonably well with respect to their agglutination properties and carbohydrate-binding specificity. However, a detailed analysis of the lectin-alliinase complexes from garlic and ramsons bulbs demonstrated that only the heterodimeric lectins are capable of binding to the glycan chains of the alliinase molecules (EC 4.4.1.4). Moreover, it appears that only a subpopulation of the alliinase molecules is involved in the formation of lectin-alliinase complexes and that the complexed alliinase contains more glycan chains than the free enzyme. Finally, some arguments are given that the lectin-alliinase complexes do not occur in vivo but are formed in vitro after homogenization of the tissue.

  6. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  7. Serial lectin affinity chromatography with concavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin demonstrates altered asparagine-linked sugar-chain structures of prostatic acid phosphatase in human prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K I; Honda, M; Arai, K; Hosoya, Y; Moriguchi, H; Sumi, S; Ueda, Y; Kitahara, S

    1997-08-01

    Differences between human prostate carcinoma (PCA, five cases) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, five cases) in asparagine-linked (Asn) sugar-chain structure of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) were investigated using lectin affinity chromatography with concanavalin A (Con A) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). PAP activities were significantly decreased in PCA-derived PAP, while no significant differences between the two PAP preparations were observed in the enzymatic properties (Michaelis-Menten value, optimal pH, thermal stability, and inhibition study). In these PAP preparations, all activities were found only in the fractions which bound strongly to the Con A column and were undetectable in the Con A unbound fractions and in the fractions which bound weakly to the Con A column. The relative amounts of PAP which bound strongly to the Con A column but passed through the WGA column, were significantly greater in BPH-derived PAP than in PCA-derived PAP. In contrast, the relative amounts of PAP which bound strongly to the Con A column and bound to the WGA column, were significantly greater in PCA-derived PAP than in BPH-derived PAP. The findings suggest that Asn-linked sugar-chain structures are altered during oncogenesis in human prostate and also suggest that studies of qualitative differences of sugar-chain structures of PAP might lead to a useful diagnostic tool for PCA.

  8. Heterogeneous dynamics in DNA site discrimination by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of ETS-family transcription factors.

    PubMed

    He, Gaofei; Tolic, Ana; Bashkin, James K; Poon, Gregory M K

    2015-04-30

    The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences only for DNA complexes of PU.1. Free solution measurements by dynamic light scattering showed PU.1 to be more dynamic than Ets-1; moreover, dynamic changes are strongly coupled to site discrimination by PU.1, but not Ets-1. Interrogation of the protein/DNA interface by DNA footprinting showed similar accessibility to dimethyl sulfate for PU.1/DNA and Ets-1/DNA complexes, indicating that the dynamics of PU.1/DNA complexes reside primarily outside that interface. An information-based analysis of the two homologs' binding motifs suggests a role for dynamic coupling in PU.1's ability to enforce a more stringent sequence preference than Ets-1 and its proximal sequence homologs.

  9. Structural homologies and functional similarities between mammalian origins of replication and amplification promoting sequences.

    PubMed

    Stolzenburg, F; Gerwig, R; Dinkl, E; Grummt, F

    1994-06-01

    MuNTS2, a 423 bp sequence isolated from the non-transcribed spacer of murine rDNA stimulates the amplification of cis-linked plasmid DNA in mouse cells under selective conditions. Here we demonstrate that a 180 bp subdomain of muNTS2 is highly homologous (approximately 70%) to three domains of the first well-characterized origin of replication of mammalian chromosomes, i.e. the origin of bidirectional replication (OBR) of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. When subcloned, the 180 bp homology region of muNTS2 was revealed to be essential for the amplification promoting activity of muNTS2. Fragments of the initiation zone of DNA replication from the DHFR locus of hamster cells containing the domains of homology to the mouse muNTS2 element proved also to promote DNA amplification. Thus, the screening system for amplification promoting elements turned out to detect an origin of bidirectional replication.

  10. When decisions on homologous structures cause ambiguous taxa relationships: the Neomorphinae (Aves, Cuculidae) example.

    PubMed

    Posso, S R; Donatelli, R J

    2010-02-01

    The anatomy of Neomorphinae is poorly understood and the systematics of this sub-family is also the most controversial of the cuckoo taxa, mainly with regard to the systematic position of Tapera and Dromococcyx. In this study, morphological similarities of the Neomorphinae are discussed after a comprehensive description of the cranial osteology was conducted in seven species, embracing all the Neomorphinae genera. This description is followed by comparisons with other cuckoos in order to contribute to the anatomy and systematics of this sub-family. In this way, we provide illustrations that enable the osteological descriptions and the proposed primary homologies to be visualised and compared. Even though Neomorphinae species share many cranial osteological characteristics, there are some anatomical divergences that allowed us to divide them into two distinct groups: (Dromococcyx/Tapera) and (Morococcyx(Neomorphus/Geococcyx)). After comparisons among all cuckoos this study suggests that Neomorphinae are more similar to Crotophaginae and Couinae than to other sub-families of cuckoos. Our results contrast with a recent phylogenetic study based on morphological features, mainly because alternative interpretations to the primary osteological homologies in this study grouped Tapera and Dromococcyx with Cuculinae. Although morphological studies can be used in phylogenetic analysis, we demonstrated here that decisions in the interpretation of the homologies can provide ambiguous results.

  11. Lectin typing of Campylobacter isolates.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, N; Benjamin, J; Skirrow, M B

    1990-01-01

    Isolates of Campylobacter jejuni, C coli, C fetus and C laridis were tested for agglutination reactions with a panel of five lectins: Arachis hypogaea, Bauhinia purpurea, Solanum tuberosum, Triticum vulgaris and Wisteria floribunda. Twenty three patterns of agglutination (lectin types) were recorded among 376 isolates. Patterns were consistent and reproducible. Only 4.5% of isolates were untypable because of autoagglutination. Some lectin types were found exclusively or predominantly in a species, but others were shared between species. Forty two per cent of C jejuni and 35% of C coli isolates belonged to lectin type 4. There was no apparent correlation between lectin type and serotype; different lectin types were found among strains of single Penner and Lior serotypes. Lectin typing is a simple and economical procedure suitable for use in non-specialist laboratories, either as an adjunct to serogrouping or, after further development, as a sole typing scheme. PMID:2262570

  12. PyMod: sequence similarity searches, multiple sequence-structure alignments, and homology modeling within PyMOL

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years, an exponential growing number of tools for protein sequence analysis, editing and modeling tasks have been put at the disposal of the scientific community. Despite the vast majority of these tools have been released as open source software, their deep learning curves often discourages even the most experienced users. Results A simple and intuitive interface, PyMod, between the popular molecular graphics system PyMOL and several other tools (i.e., [PSI-]BLAST, ClustalW, MUSCLE, CEalign and MODELLER) has been developed, to show how the integration of the individual steps required for homology modeling and sequence/structure analysis within the PyMOL framework can hugely simplify these tasks. Sequence similarity searches, multiple sequence and structural alignments generation and editing, and even the possibility to merge sequence and structure alignments have been implemented in PyMod, with the aim of creating a simple, yet powerful tool for sequence and structure analysis and building of homology models. Conclusions PyMod represents a new tool for the analysis and the manipulation of protein sequences and structures. The ease of use, integration with many sequence retrieving and alignment tools and PyMOL, one of the most used molecular visualization system, are the key features of this tool. Source code, installation instructions, video tutorials and a user's guide are freely available at the URL http://schubert.bio.uniroma1.it/pymod/index.html PMID:22536966

  13. Structural and Functional Studies of the Ras-Associating and Pleckstrin Homology Domains of Grb10 and Grb14

    SciTech Connect

    Depetris, R.; Wu, J; Hubbard, S

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor receptor-binding proteins Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 are adaptor proteins containing a Ras-associating (RA) domain, a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a family-specific BPS (between PH and SH2) region and a C-terminal Src-homology-2 domain. Previous structural studies showed that the Grb14 BPS region binds as a pseudosubstrate inhibitor in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor to suppress insulin signaling. Here we report the crystal structure of the RA and PH domains of Grb10 at 2.6-A resolution. The structure reveals that these two domains, along with the intervening linker, form an integrated, dimeric structural unit. Biochemical studies demonstrated that Grb14 binds to activated Ras, which may serve as a timing mechanism for downregulation of insulin signaling. Our results illuminate the membrane-recruitment mechanisms not only of Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 but also of MIG-10, Rap1-interacting adaptor molecule, lamellipodin and Pico, proteins involved in actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement that share a structurally related RA-PH tandem unit.

  14. Transitive Homology-Guided Structural Studies Lead to Discovery of Cro Proteins With 40% Sequence Identify But Different Folds

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, C.G.; Hall, B.M.; Anderson, W.J.; Ingram, W.M.; Roberts, S.A.; Montfort, W.R.; Cordes, M.H.J.

    2009-05-27

    Proteins that share common ancestry may differ in structure and function because of divergent evolution of their amino acid sequences. For a typical diverse protein superfamily, the properties of a few scattered members are known from experiment. A satisfying picture of functional and structural evolution in relation to sequence changes, however, may require characterization of a larger, well chosen subset. Here, we employ a 'stepping-stone' method, based on transitive homology, to target sequences intermediate between two related proteins with known divergent properties. We apply the approach to the question of how new protein folds can evolve from preexisting folds and, in particular, to an evolutionary change in secondary structure and oligomeric state in the Cro family of bacteriophage transcription factors, initially identified by sequence-structure comparison of distant homologs from phages P22 and {lambda}. We report crystal structures of two Cro proteins, Xfaso 1 and Pfl 6, with sequences intermediate between those of P22 and {lambda}. The domains show 40% sequence identity but differ by switching of {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet in a C-terminal region spanning {approx}25 residues. Sedimentation analysis also suggests a correlation between helix-to-sheet conversion and strengthened dimerization.

  15. Homology models of human gamma-crystallins: structural study of the extensive charge network in gamma-crystallins.

    PubMed

    Salim, Asmat; Zaidi, Zafar H

    2003-01-17

    The lens is composed of highly stable and long-lived proteins, the crystallins which are divided into alpha-, beta-, and gamma-crystallins. Human gamma-crystallins belong to the betagamma superfamily. A large number of gamma-crystallins have been sequenced and have been found to share remarkable sequence homology with each other. Some of the gamma-crystallins from various sources have also been elucidated structurally by X-ray crystallographic or NMR spectroscopic experiments. Their three-dimensional structures are also similar having consisted of two domains each possessing two Greek key motifs. In this study we have constructed the comparative or homology models of the four major human gamma-crystallins, gammaA-,gammaB-, gammaC-, and gammaD-crystallins and studied the charge network in these crystallins. Despite an overall structural similarity between these crystallins, differences in the ion pair formation do exist which is partly due to the differences in their primary sequence and partly due to the structural orientation of the neighboring amino acids. In this study, we present an elaborate analysis of these charged interactions and their formation or loss with respect to the structural changes.

  16. Structure and binding analysis of Polyporus squamosus lectin in complex with the Neu5Ac[alpha]2-6Gal[beta]1-4GlcNAc human-type influenza receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Grant, Oliver C.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Winter, Harry C.; Tateno, Hiroaki; Fadda, Elisa; Woods, Robert J.

    2013-03-07

    Glycan chains that terminate in sialic acid (Neu5Ac) are frequently the receptors targeted by pathogens for initial adhesion. Carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) with specificity for Neu5Ac are particularly useful in the detection and isolation of sialylated glycoconjugates, such as those associated with pathogen adhesion as well as those characteristic of several diseases including cancer. Structural studies of lectins are essential in order to understand the origin of their specificity, which is particularly important when employing such reagents as diagnostic tools. Here, we report a crystallographic and molecular dynamics (MD) analysis of a lectin from Polyporus squamosus (PSL) that is specific for glycans terminating with the sequence Neu5Ac{alpha}2-6Gal{beta}. Because of its importance as a histological reagent, the PSL structure was solved (to 1.7 {angstrom}) in complex with a trisaccharide, whose sequence (Neu5Ac{alpha}2-6Gal{beta}1-4GlcNAc) is exploited by influenza A hemagglutinin for viral adhesion to human tissue. The structural data illuminate the origin of the high specificity of PSL for the Neu5Ac{alpha}2-6Gal sequence. Theoretical binding free energies derived from the MD data confirm the key interactions identified crystallographically and provide additional insight into the relative contributions from each amino acid, as well as estimates of the importance of entropic and enthalpic contributions to binding.

  17. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana 5-methylthioribose kinase reveals a more occluded active site than its bacterial homolog

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Shao-Yang; Cornell, Kenneth A; Howell, P Lynne

    2007-01-01

    Background Metabolic variations exist between the methionine salvage pathway of humans and a number of plants and microbial pathogens. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme required for methionine salvage in plants and many bacteria. The absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that MTR kinase is a good target for the design of specific herbicides or antibiotics. Results The structure of Arabidopsis thaliana MTR kinase co-crystallized with ATPγS and MTR has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structure is similar to B. subtilis MTR kinase and has the same protein kinase fold observed in other evolutionarily related protein kinase-like phosphotransferases. The active site is comparable between the two enzymes with the DXE-motif coordinating the nucleotide-Mg, the D238 of the HGD catalytic loop polarizing the MTR O1 oxygen, and the RR-motif interacting with the substrate MTR. Unlike its bacterial homolog, however, the Gly-rich loop (G-loop) of A. thaliana MTR kinase has an extended conformation, which shields most of the active site from solvent, a feature that resembles eukaryotic protein kinases more than the bacterial enzyme. The G- and W-loops of A. thaliana and B. subtilis MTR kinase adopt different conformations despite high sequence similarity. The ATPγS analog was hydrolyzed during the co-crystallization procedure, resulting in ADP in the active site. This suggests that the A. thaliana enzyme, like its bacterial homolog, may have significant ATPase activity in the absence of MTR. Conclusion The structure of A. thaliana MTR kinase provides a template for structure-based design of agrochemicals, particularly herbicides whose effectiveness could be regulated by nutrient levels. Features of the MTR binding site offer an opportunity for a simple organic salt of an MTR analog to specifically inhibit MTR kinase. PMID:17961230

  18. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana 5-methylthioribose Kinase Reveals a More Occluded Active Site Than its Bacterial Homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Cornell, K.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic variations exist between the methionine salvage pathway of humans and a number of plants and microbial pathogens. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme required for methionine salvage in plants and many bacteria. The absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that MTR kinase is a good target for the design of specific herbicides or antibiotics. The structure of Arabidopsis thaliana MTR kinase co-crystallized with ATP?S and MTR has been determined at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The structure is similar to B. subtilis MTR kinase and has the same protein kinase fold observed in other evolutionarily related protein kinase-like phosphotransferases. The active site is comparable between the two enzymes with the DXE-motif coordinating the nucleotide-Mg, the D238 of the HGD catalytic loop polarizing the MTR O1 oxygen, and the RR-motif interacting with the substrate MTR. Unlike its bacterial homolog, however, the Gly-rich loop (G-loop) of A. thaliana MTR kinase has an extended conformation, which shields most of the active site from solvent, a feature that resembles eukaryotic protein kinases more than the bacterial enzyme. The G- and W-loops of A. thaliana and B. subtilis MTR kinase adopt different conformations despite high sequence similarity. The ATP?S analog was hydrolyzed during the co-crystallization procedure, resulting in ADP in the active site. This suggests that the A. thaliana enzyme, like its bacterial homolog, may have significant ATPase activity in the absence of MTR. The structure of A. thaliana MTR kinase provides a template for structure-based design of agrochemicals, particularly herbicides whose effectiveness could be regulated by nutrient levels. Features of the MTR binding site offer an opportunity for a simple organic salt of an MTR analog to specifically inhibit MTR kinase.

  19. The x-ray crystal structure of mannose-binding lectin-associated serine proteinase-3 reveals the structural basis for enzyme inactivity associated with the Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yongqing, Tang; Wilmann, Pascal G; Reeve, Shane B; Coetzer, Theresa H; Smith, A Ian; Whisstock, James C; Pike, Robert N; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C

    2013-08-02

    The mannose-binding lectin associated-protease-3 (MASP-3) is a member of the lectin pathway of the complement system, a key component of human innate and active immunity. Mutations in MASP-3 have recently been found to be associated with Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome, a severe developmental disorder manifested by cleft palate, intellectual disability, and skeletal abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for MASP-3 function remains to be understood. Here we characterize the substrate specificity of MASP-3 by screening against a combinatorial peptide substrate library. Through this approach, we successfully identified a peptide substrate that was 20-fold more efficiently cleaved than any other identified to date. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutant forms of the enzyme associated with 3MC syndrome were completely inactive against this substrate. To address the structural basis for this defect, we determined the 2.6-Å structure of the zymogen form of the G666E mutant of MASP-3. These data reveal that the mutation disrupts the active site and perturbs the position of the catalytic serine residue. Together, these insights into the function of MASP-3 reveal how a mutation in this enzyme causes it to be inactive and thus contribute to the 3MC syndrome.

  20. The X-ray Crystal Structure of Mannose-binding Lectin-associated Serine Proteinase-3 Reveals the Structural Basis for Enzyme Inactivity Associated with the Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Yongqing, Tang; Wilmann, Pascal G.; Reeve, Shane B.; Coetzer, Theresa H.; Smith, A. Ian; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.

    2013-01-01

    The mannose-binding lectin associated-protease-3 (MASP-3) is a member of the lectin pathway of the complement system, a key component of human innate and active immunity. Mutations in MASP-3 have recently been found to be associated with Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome, a severe developmental disorder manifested by cleft palate, intellectual disability, and skeletal abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for MASP-3 function remains to be understood. Here we characterize the substrate specificity of MASP-3 by screening against a combinatorial peptide substrate library. Through this approach, we successfully identified a peptide substrate that was 20-fold more efficiently cleaved than any other identified to date. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutant forms of the enzyme associated with 3MC syndrome were completely inactive against this substrate. To address the structural basis for this defect, we determined the 2.6-Å structure of the zymogen form of the G666E mutant of MASP-3. These data reveal that the mutation disrupts the active site and perturbs the position of the catalytic serine residue. Together, these insights into the function of MASP-3 reveal how a mutation in this enzyme causes it to be inactive and thus contribute to the 3MC syndrome. PMID:23792966

  1. Processing of joint molecule intermediates by structure-selective endonucleases during homologous recombination in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Erin K; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2011-04-01

    Homologous recombination is required for maintaining genomic integrity by functioning in high-fidelity repair of DNA double-strand breaks and other complex lesions, replication fork support, and meiotic chromosome segregation. Joint DNA molecules are key intermediates in recombination and their differential processing determines whether the genetic outcome is a crossover or non-crossover event. The Holliday model of recombination highlights the resolution of four-way DNA joint molecules, termed Holliday junctions, and the bacterial Holliday junction resolvase RuvC set the paradigm for the mechanism of crossover formation. In eukaryotes, much effort has been invested in identifying the eukaryotic equivalent of bacterial RuvC, leading to the discovery of a number of DNA endonucleases, including Mus81-Mms4/EME1, Slx1-Slx4/BTBD12/MUS312, XPF-ERCC1, and Yen1/GEN1. These nucleases exert different selectivity for various DNA joint molecules, including Holliday junctions. Their mutant phenotypes and distinct species-specific characteristics expose a surprisingly complex system of joint molecule processing. In an attempt to reconcile the biochemical and genetic data, we propose that nicked junctions constitute important in vivo recombination intermediates whose processing determines the efficiency and outcome (crossover/non-crossover) of homologous recombination.

  2. Bacteriophage Nf DNA region controlling late transcription: structural and functional homology with bacteriophage phi 29.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Salas, M

    1993-06-25

    The putative region for the control of late transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage Nf has been identified by DNA sequence homology with the equivalent region of the evolutionary related phage phi 29. A similar arrangement of early and late promoters has been detected in the two phages, suggesting that viral transcription could be regulated in a similar way at late times of the infection. Transcription of late genes requires the presence of a viral early protein, gpF in phage Nf and p4 in phage phi 29, being the latter known to bind to a DNA region located upstream from the phage phi 29 late promoter. We have identified a DNA region located upstream from the putative late promoter of phage Nf that is probably involved in binding protein gpF. Furthermore, we show that the phage phi 29 protein p4 is able to bind to this region and activate transcription from the phage Nf putative late promoter. Sequence alignment has also revealed the existence of significant internal homology between the two early promoters contained in this region of each phage.

  3. Lectin-like molecules in transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorbushin, Alexander M; Borisova, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    The common periwinkle Littorina littorea was introduced in the list of models for comparative immunobiology as a representative of phylogenetically important taxon Caenogastropoda. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of Littorina littorea hemocytes from 182 million mRNA-Seq pair-end 100 bp reads into a total of 15,526 contigs clustered in 4472 unigenes. The transcriptome profile was analyzed for presence of carbohydrate-binding molecules in a variety of architectural contexts. Hemocytes' repertoire of lectin-like proteins bearing conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) is highly diversified, including 11 of 15 lectin families earlier described in animals, as well as the novel members of lectin family found for the first time in mollusc species. The new molluscan lineage-specific domain combinations were confirmed by cloning and sequencing, including the fuco-lectin related molecules (FLReMs) composed of N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle Fucolectin Tachylectin-4 Pentaxrin (FTP) domain, and a C-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region. The repertoire of lectin-like molecules is discussed in terms of their potential participation in the receptor phase of immune response. In total, immune-associated functions may be attributed to 70 transcripts belonging to 6 lectin families. These lectin-like genes show low overlap between species of invertebrates, suggesting relatively rapid evolution of immune-associated genes in the group. The repertoire provides valuable candidates for further characterization of the gene functions in mollusc immunity.

  4. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, R.W.; Moloy, K.G.

    1988-02-23

    A process is described for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  5. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, Richard W.; Moloy, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    A process for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  6. Structure of Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (NR5A2) with PIP3 hormone bound in the ligand binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Sablin, Elena P; Blind, Raymond D; Uthayaruban, Rubatharshini; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Deacon, Ashley M; Das, Debanu; Ingraham, Holly A; Fletterick, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear receptor LRH-1 (Liver Receptor Homolog-1, NR5A2) is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression programs critical for many aspects of metabolism and reproduction. Although LRH-1 is able to bind phospholipids, it is still considered an orphan nuclear receptor (NR) with an unknown regulatory hormone. Our prior cellular and structural studies demonstrated that the signaling phosphatidylinositols PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind and regulate SF-1 (Steroidogenic Factor-1, NR5A1), a close homolog of LRH-1. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human LRH-1 ligand binding domain (LBD) bound by PIP3 - the first phospholipid with a head group endogenous to mammals. We show that the phospholipid hormone binds LRH-1 with high affinity, stabilizing the receptor LBD. While the hydrophobic PIP3 tails (C16/C16) are buried inside the LRH-1 ligand binding pocket, the negatively charged PIP3 head group is presented on the receptor surface, similar to the phosphatidylinositol binding mode observed in the PIP3-SF-1 structure. Thus, data presented in this work reinforce our earlier findings demonstrating that signaling phosphatidylinositols regulate the NR5A receptors LRH-1 and SF-1.

  7. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  8. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  9. Self-assembled carbohydrate-based vesicles for lectin targeting.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Marinalva Cardoso; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; da Silveira, Nadya Pesce; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Giacomelli, Fernando Carlos; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues; Frizon, Tiago Elias Allievi; Dal-Bó, Alexandre Gonçalves

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the physicochemical interactions between vesicles formed by phosphatidylcholine (PC) and glycosylated polymeric amphiphile N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminyl-PEG900-docosanate (C22PEG900GlcNAc) conjugated with Bauhinia variegata lectin (BVL). Lectins are proteins or glycoproteins capable of binding glycosylated membrane components. Accordingly, the surface functionalization by such entities is considered a potential strategy for targeted drug delivery. We observed increased hydrodynamic radii (RH) of PC+C22PEG900GlcNAc vesicles in the presence of lectins, suggesting that this aggregation was due to the interaction between lectins and the vesicular glycosylated surfaces. Furthermore, changes in the zeta potential of the vesicles with increasing lectin concentrations implied that the vesicular glycosylated surfaces were recognized by the investigated lectin. The presence of carbohydrate residues on vesicle surfaces and the ability of the vesicles to establish specific interactions with BVL were further explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. The results indicated that the thickness of the hydrophilic layer was to some extent influenced by the presence of lectins. The presence of lectins required a higher degree of polydispersity as indicated by the width parameter of the log-normal distribution of size, which also suggested more irregular structures. Reflectance Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis.) analyses revealed that the studied lectin preferentially interacted with the choline and carbonyl groups of the lipid, thereby changing the choline orientation and intermolecular interactions. The protein also discretely reduced the intermolecular communication of the hydrophobic acyl chains, resulting in a disordered state.

  10. Homology modeling using simulated annealing of restrained molecular dynamics and conformational search calculations with CONGEN: application in predicting the three-dimensional structure of murine homeodomain Msx-1.

    PubMed Central

    Li, H.; Tejero, R.; Monleon, D.; Bassolino-Klimas, D.; Abate-Shen, C.; Bruccoleri, R. E.; Montelione, G. T.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed an automatic approach for homology modeling using restrained molecular dynamics and simulated annealing procedures, together with conformational search algorithms available in the molecular mechanics program CONGEN (Bruccoleri RE, Karplus M, 1987, Biopolymers 26:137-168). The accuracy of the method is validated by "predicting" structures of two homeodomain proteins with known three-dimensional structures, and then applied to predict the three-dimensional structure of the homeodomain of the murine Msx-1 transcription factor. Regions of the unknown protein structure that are highly homologous to the known template structure are constrained by "homology distance constraints," whereas the conformations of nonhomologous regions of the unknown protein are defined only by the potential energy function. A full energy function (excluding explicit solvent) is employed to ensure that the calculated structures have good conformational energies and are physically reasonable. As in NMR structure determinations, information on the consistency of the structure prediction is obtained by superposition of the resulting family of protein structures. In this paper, our homology modeling algorithm is described and compared with related homology modeling methods using spatial constraints derived from the structures of homologous proteins. The software is then used to predict the DNA-bound structures of three homeodomain proteins from the X-ray crystal structure of the engrailed homeodomain protein (Kissinger CR et al., 1990, Cell 63:579-590). The resulting backbone and side-chain conformations of the modeled yeast Mat alpha 2 and D. melanogaster Antennapedia homeodomains are excellent matches to the corresponding published X-ray crystal (Wolberger C et al., 1991, Cell 67:517-528) and NMR (Billeter M et al., 1993, J Mol Biol 234:1084-1097) structures, respectively. Examination of these structures of Msx-1 reveals a network of highly conserved surface salt bridges that

  11. Structure of Sad1-UNC84 homology (SUN) domain defines features of molecular bridge in nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhaocai; Du, Xiulian; Cai, Zheng; Song, Xiaomin; Zhang, Hongtao; Mizuno, Takako; Suzuki, Emi; Yee, Marla Rosanne; Berezov, Alan; Murali, Ramachandran; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry L; Greene, Mark I; Wang, Qiang

    2012-02-17

    The SUN (Sad1-UNC-84 homology) domain is conserved in a number of nuclear envelope proteins involved in nuclear migration, meiotic telomere tethering, and antiviral responses. The LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex, formed by the SUN and the nesprin proteins at the nuclear envelope, serves as a mechanical linkage across the nuclear envelope. Here we report the crystal structure of the SUN2 protein SUN domain, which reveals a homotrimer. The SUN domain is sufficient to mediate binding to the KASH (Klarsicht, ANC-1, and Syne homology) domain of nesprin 2, and the regions involved in the interaction have been identified. Binding of the SUN domain to the KASH domain is abolished by deletion of a region important for trimerization or by point mutations associated with nuclear migration failure. We propose a model of the LINC complex, where the SUN and the KASH domains form a higher ordered oligomeric network in the nuclear envelope. These findings provide the structural basis for understanding the function and the regulation of the LINC complex.

  12. VITAL NMR: Using Chemical Shift Derived Secondary Structure Information for a Limited Set of Amino Acids to Assess Homology Model Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, Michael C; Nesbitt, Anna E; Hallock, Michael J; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa; Tang, Ming; Harris, Jason B; Baudry, Jerome Y; Schuler, Mary A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2011-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  13. Structural characterization of the split pleckstrin homology domain in phospholipase C-gamma1 and its interaction with TRPC3.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wenyu; Yan, Jing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2006-04-28

    Phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma is unique among the PLC enzymes because each PLC-gamma isozyme contains a split pleckstrin homology (PH) domain with an SH2SH2SH3 tandem repeat insertion (where SH indicates Src homology domain) in the middle of its sequence. Split PH domains exist in a number of other proteins that play crucial signaling roles. However, little is known about the structure and function of split PH domains. The C-terminal half of the PLC-gamma split PH domain has been implicated to interact directly with the TRPC3 calcium channel, thereby providing a direct coupling mechanism between PLC-gamma and agonist-induced calcium entry. However, this interaction has not been proved by direct biochemical or structural studies. Here we determined the three-dimensional structure of the split PH domain of PLC-gamma1, and we found that the split PH domain of the enzyme folds into a canonical PH domain fold with high thermostability. The SH2SH2SH3 insertion between the beta3 and beta4 strands does not change the structure of the split PH domain. In contrast to the majority of phospholipid-binding PH domains, the PLC-gamma1 split PH domain lacks the signature lipid-binding motif located between the beta1 and beta2 strands. Consistent with this structural feature, the split PH domain of PLC-gamma1 does not bind to phospholipids. Multiple biochemical and biophysical experiments have argued against a direct interaction between TRPC3 and the C-terminal half of the PLC-gamma1 split PH domain. Our data pointed to the existence of a yet to be elucidated interaction mechanism between TRPC3 and PLC-gamma1.

  14. Gene cloning, homology comparison and analysis of the main functional structure domains of beta estrogen receptor in Jining Gray goat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-gang; Li, Hong-mei; Wang, Shu-ying; Huang, Li-bo; Guo, Hui-jun

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the molecular evolution and characteristic of beta estrogen receptor (ERβ) gene in Jining Gray goat in China, the entire ERβ gene from Jining Gray goat ovary was amplified, identified and sequenced, and the gene sequences were compared with those of other animals. Functional structural domains and variations in DNA binding domains (DBD) and ligand binding domains (LBD) between Jining Gray goat and Boer goat were analyzed. The results indicate that the ERβ gene in Jining Gray goat includes a 1584bp sequence with a complete open-reading-frame (ORF), encoding a 527 amino acid (aa) receptor protein. Compared to other species, the nucleotide homology is 73.9-98.9% and the amino acid homology is 79.5-98.5%. The main antigenic structural domains lie from the 97th aa to the 286th aa and from the 403rd aa to the 527th aa. The hydrophilicity and the surface probability of the structural domains are distributed throughout a range of amino acids. There are two different amino acids in the DBD and three different amino acids in the LBD between Jining Gray and Boer goats, resulting in dramatically different spatial structures for ERβ protein. These differences may explain the different biological activities of ERβ between the two goat species. This study firstly acquired the whole ERβ gene sequence of Jining Gray goat with a complete open reading frame, and analyzed its gene evolutionary relationship and predicted its mainly functional structural domains, which may very help for further understanding the genome evolution and gene diversity of goat ERβ.

  15. Integrating multi-scale data on homologous recombination into a new recognition mechanism based on simulations of the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darren; Boyer, Benjamin; Prévost, Chantal; Danilowicz, Claudia; Prentiss, Mara

    2015-01-01

    RecA protein is the prototypical recombinase. Members of the recombinase family can accurately repair double strand breaks in DNA. They also provide crucial links between pairs of sister chromatids in eukaryotic meiosis. A very broad outline of how these proteins align homologous sequences and promote DNA strand exchange has long been known, as are the crystal structures of the RecA-DNA pre- and postsynaptic complexes; however, little is known about the homology searching conformations and the details of how DNA in bacterial genomes is rapidly searched until homologous alignment is achieved. By integrating a physical model of recognition to new modeling work based on docking exploration and molecular dynamics simulation, we present a detailed structure/function model of homology recognition that reconciles extremely quick searching with the efficient and stringent formation of stable strand exchange products and which is consistent with a vast body of previously unexplained experimental results. PMID:26384422

  16. Molecular structure and chromosomal mapping of the human homolog of the agouti gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, H.Y.; Woychik, R.P.; Bultman, S.J. |; Loeffler, C.; Hansmann, I.; Chen, W.J.; Furdon, P.J.; Wilkison, W.; Powell, J.G.; Usala, A.L.

    1994-10-11

    The agouti (a) locus in mouse chromosome 2 normally regulates coat color pigmentation. The mouse agouti gene was recently cloned and shown to encode a distinctive 131-amino acid protein with a consensus signal peptide. Here the authors describe the cloning of the human homolog of the mouse agouti gene using an interspecies DNA-hybridization approach. Sequence analysis revealed that the coding region of the human agouti gene is 85% identical to the mouse gene and has the potential to encode a protein of 132 amino acids with a consensus signal peptide. Chromosomal assignment using somatic-cell-hybrid mapping panels and fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that the human agouti gene maps to chromosome band 20q11.2. This result revealed that the human agouti gene is closely linked to several traits, including a locus called MODY (for maturity onset diabetes of the young) and another region that is associated with the development of myeloid leukemia. Initial expression studies with RNA from several adult human tissues showed that the human agouti gene is expressed in adipose tissue and testis.

  17. Structures of homologous composite transposons carrying cbaABC genes from Europe and North America.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, D; Peel, M; Fava, F; Wyndham, R C

    1998-05-01

    IS1071 is a class II transposable element carrying a tnpA gene related to the transposase genes of the Tn3 family. Copies of IS1071 that are conserved with more than 99% nucleotide sequence identity have been found as direct repeats flanking a remarkable variety of catabolic gene sequences worldwide. The sequences of chlorobenzoate catabolic transposons found on pBRC60 (Tn5271) in Niagara Falls, N.Y., and on pCPE3 in Bologna, Italy, show that these transposons were formed from highly homologous IS1071 and cbaABC components (levels of identity, > 99.5 and > 99.3%, respectively). Nevertheless, the junction sequences between the IS1071L and IS1071R elements and the internal DNA differ by 41 and 927 bp, respectively, suggesting that these transposons were assembled independently on the two plasmids. The formation of the right junction in both transposons truncated an open reading frame for a putative aryl-coenzyme A ligase with sequence similarity to benzoate- and p-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligases of Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

  18. Structural features and gene-expression profiles of actin homologs in Porphyra yezoensis (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Kitade, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Michiko; Uji, Toshiki; Fukuda, Satoru; Endo, Hirotoshi; Saga, Naotsune

    2008-10-15

    The marine red alga Porphyra yezoensis contains an actin gene family consisting of at least four isoforms (PyACT1, 2, 3 and 4). The amino acid identity between isoforms exceeds 83%, and each contains a putative nuclear export signal (NES). We scanned the sequences for amino acids in regions homologous to the intermonomeric interface of actin filaments. Few residues expected to engage in cross-linking were conserved between the four isoforms. The results of the sequence analyses suggest that PyACT2 probably functions in the nucleus as a monomer (G-actin) or in other unconventional forms. In addition, the distribution and position of the introns were different from those in florideophycean actin genes. The expression level of PyACT3 in matured gametophytes was significantly higher than in those in a vegetative state, although the mRNA was detected at similar levels in both apical and basal parts of thalli. The expression levels of PyACT2 and 4, on the other hand, did not change significantly between the matured and vegetative gametophytes. The PyACT3 may serve as a molecular marker for monitoring thallus maturation in this species.

  19. Inhibitor and NAD+ binding to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase as derived from crystal structures and homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Ruf, A; de Murcia, G; Schulz, G E

    1998-03-17

    Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP, EC 2.4.2.30) are of clinical interest because they have potential for improving radiation therapy and chemotherapy of cancer. The refined binding structures of four such inhibitors are reported together with the refined structure of the unligated catalytic fragment of the enzyme. Following their design, all inhibitors bind at the position of the nicotinamide moiety of the substrate NAD+. The observed binding mode suggests inhibitor improvements that avoid other NAD(+)-binding enzymes. Because the binding pocket of NAD+ has been strongly conserved during evolution, the homology with ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins could be used to extend the bound nicotinamide, which is marked by the inhibitors, to the full NAD+ molecule.

  20. NMR structure of the conserved hypothetical protein TM0487 from Thermotoga maritima: implications for 216 homologous DUF59 proteins.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Marcius S; Herrmann, Torsten; Peti, Wolfgang; Wilson, Ian A; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2005-11-01

    The NMR structure of the conserved hypothetical protein TM0487 from Thermotoga maritima represents an alpha/beta-topology formed by the regular secondary structures alpha1-beta1-beta2-alpha2-beta3-beta4-alpha3- beta5-3(10)-alpha4, with a small anti-parallel beta-sheet of beta-strands 1 and 2, and a mixed parallel/anti-parallel beta-sheet of beta-strands 3-5. Similar folds have previously been observed in other proteins, with amino acid sequence identity as low as 3% and a variety of different functions. There are also 216 sequence homologs of TM0487, which all have the signature sequence of domains of unknown function 59 (DUF59), for which no three-dimensional structures have as yet been reported. The TM0487 structure thus presents a platform for homology modeling of this large group of DUF59 proteins. Conserved among most of the DUF59s are 13 hydrophobic residues, which are clustered in the core of TM0487. A putative active site of TM0487 consisting of residues D20, E22, L23, T51, T52, and C55 is conserved in 98 of the 216 DUF59 sequences. Asp20 is buried within the proposed active site without any compensating positive charge, which suggests that its pK(a) value may be perturbed. Furthermore, the DUF59 family includes ORFs that are part of a conserved chromosomal group of proteins predicted to be involved in Fe-S cluster metabolism.

  1. Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock: A new gaussian-based score function suitable for docking in homology modelled protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tøndel, Kristin; Anderssen, Endre; Drabløs, Finn

    2006-03-01

    Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock is a new empirical score function suitable for virtual library screening using homology modelled protein structures. Here, the score function is used in combination with the geometry search method Tabu search. A description of the protein binding site is generated using gaussian property fields like in Protein Alpha Shape Similarity Analysis (PASSA). Gaussian property fields are also used to describe the ligand properties. The overlap between the receptor and ligand hydrophilicity and lipophilicity fields is maximised, while minimising steric clashes. Gaussian functions introduce a smoothing of the property fields. This makes the score function robust against small structural variations, and therefore suitable for use with homology models. This also makes it less critical to include protein flexibility in the docking calculations. We use a fast and simplified version of the score function in the geometry search, while a more detailed version is used for the final prediction of the binding free energies. This use of a two-level scoring makes PAS-Dock computationally efficient, and well suited for virtual screening. The PAS-Dock score function is trained on 218 X-ray structures of protein- ligand complexes with experimental binding affinities. The performance of PAS-Dock is compared to two other docking methods, AutoDock and MOE-Dock, with respect to both accuracy and computational efficiency. According to this study, PAS-Dock is more computationally efficient than both AutoDock and MOE-Dock, and gives a better prediction of the free energies of binding. PAS-Dock is also more robust against structural variations than AutoDock.

  2. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria) rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Nsimba-Lubaki, M; Peeters, B; Broekaert, W F

    1985-05-01

    A lectin has been isolated from rhizomes of ground elder (Aegopodium podagraria) using a combination of affinity chromatography on erythrocyte membrane proteins immobilized on cross-linked agarose and hydroxyapatite, and ion-exchange chromatography. The molecular structure of the lectin was determined by gelfiltration, sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. It has an unusually high Mr (about 480000) and is most probably an octamer composed of two distinct types of subunits with slightly different Mr (about 60000). Hapten inhibition assays indicated that the Aegopodium lectin is preferentially inhibited by N-acetylgalactosamine. Nevertheless, it does not agglutinate preferentially blood-group-A erythrocytes. The ground-elder lectin is a typical non-seed lectin, which occurs virtually exclusively in the underground rhizomes. In this organ it is an abundant protein as it represents up to 5% of the total protein content. The lectin content of the rhizome tissue varies strongly according to its particular location along the organ. In addition, the lectin content changes dramatically as a function of the seasons. The ground-elder lectin differs from all other plant lectins by its unusually high molecular weight. In addition, it is the first lectin to be isolated from a species of the family Apiaceae.

  3. Structure of the polycomb group protein PCGF1 in complex with BCOR reveals basis for binding selectivity of PCGF homologs.

    PubMed

    Junco, Sarah E; Wang, Renjing; Gaipa, John C; Taylor, Alexander B; Schirf, Virgil; Gearhart, Micah D; Bardwell, Vivian J; Demeler, Borries; Hart, P John; Kim, Chongwoo A

    2013-04-02

    Polycomb-group RING finger homologs (PCGF1, PCGF2, PCGF3, PCGF4, PCGF5, and PCGF6) are critical components in the assembly of distinct Polycomb repression complex 1 (PRC1)-related complexes. Here, we identify a protein interaction domain in BCL6 corepressor, BCOR, which binds the RING finger- and WD40-associated ubiquitin-like (RAWUL) domain of PCGF1 (NSPC1) and PCGF3 but not of PCGF2 (MEL18) or PCGF4 (BMI1). Because of the selective binding, we have named this domain PCGF Ub-like fold discriminator (PUFD). The structure of BCOR PUFD bound to PCGF1 reveals that (1) PUFD binds to the same surfaces as observed for a different Polycomb group RAWUL domain and (2) the ability of PUFD to discriminate among RAWULs stems from the identity of specific residues within these interaction surfaces. These data show the molecular basis for determining the binding preference for a PCGF homolog, which ultimately helps determine the identity of the larger PRC1-like assembly.

  4. Toxicity and binding profile of lectins from the Genus canavalia on brine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins.

  5. Histochemical analysis of the chemical structure of blood group-related carbohydrate chains in serous cells of human submandibular glands using lectin staining and glycosidase digestion.

    PubMed

    Ito, N; Nishi, K; Nakajima, M; Okamura, Y; Hirota, T

    1989-07-01

    Using lectin staining methods in combination with exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion procedures, we analyzed the chemical structure of different types of blood group-related substances in serous cells of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human submandibular glands. Serous cells produced only H antigen; A and B antigens were not present, and the expression of H antigen is dependent on the secretor status of the tissue donor. Although reactivity with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) was not markedly reduced by alpha-L-fucosidase digestion, an affinity for peanut agglutinin (PNA) was seen after fucosidase digestion in the cells from secretors. In those from nonsecretors, no PNA reactivity appeared after enzyme digestion. On the other hand, sialidase digestion elicited PNA reactivity in serous cells irrespective of the donor's secretor status. PNA reactivity observed after fucosidase or sialidase digestion was susceptible to endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (endo-GalNAc-dase) digestion. SBA reactivity in UEA-I-negative cells from secretors, or in cells from fetuses and newborn infants, was markedly reduced by beta-galactosidase digestion. After galactosidase digestion, reactivity with Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin II (GSA-II) appeared in the corresponding cells. This GSA-II reactivity was almost completely eliminated by subsequent beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase digestion. Whereas PNA reactivity in these cells was not reduced by beta-galactosidase treatment, it was significantly diminished by endo-GalNAc-dase digestion. These results suggest that at least two kinds of precursor disaccharides are produced in submandibular serous cells, i.e., SBA-reactive D-galactose-(beta 1-3,4)-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and PNA-reactive D-galactose-(beta 1-3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine alpha 1-serine or threonine (O-glycosidically linked Type 3 chain or T antigen). Final fucosylation and synthesis of these two types of precursor chain appear to be under the control of the secretor

  6. Structural basis of the strict phospholipid binding specificity of the pleckstrin homology domain of human evectin-2.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Seiji; Kato, Ryuichi; Uchida, Yasunori; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2012-02-01

    Evectin-2 is a recycling endosomal protein involved in retrograde transport. Its primary sequence contains an N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and a C-terminal hydrophobic region. The PH domain of evectin-2 can specifically bind phosphatidylserine, which is enriched in recycling endosomes, and plays an essential role in retrograde transport from recycling endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. The structure of human evectin-2 PH domain in complex with O-phospho-L-serine has recently been reported and demonstrates how the head group of phosphatidylserine is recognized. However, it was not possible to elucidate from the structure why evectin-2 cannot bind phosphatidic acid or phosphatidylethanolamine, which share a common moiety with phosphatidylserine. Here, the crystal structure at 1.75 Å resolution of an apo form of human evectin-2 PH domain, in which the ligand-binding site is free from crystal packing and is thus appropriate for comparison with the structure of the complex, is reported. Comparison between the structures of the apo form and the O-phospho-L-serine complex revealed ligand-induced conformational change evoked by interaction between the carboxyl moiety of the head group of phosphatidylserine and the main-chain N atom of Thr14. This structural change effectively explains the strict ligand specificity of the PH domain of human evectin-2.

  7. Isolation and partial characterization of a lectin from a false brome grass (Brachypodium sylvaticum).

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, W J; Spaepen, C; Stinissen, H M; Carlier, A R

    1982-01-01

    A lectin has been isolated from embryos of a false brome grass species (Brachypodium sylvaticum) by affinity chromatography on immobilized N-acetylglucosamine. It is a dimeric protein of two identical subunits of mol.wt. 18 000. Although it resembles cereal lectins with respect to its biochemical and physicochemical properties, it differs structurally in several aspects from wheat-germ-agglutinin-like lectins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6816219

  8. Insights into the structure and inhibition of Giardia intestinalis arginine deiminase: homology modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Soto, Pedro Josué; Aguayo-Ortiz, Rodrigo; Yépez-Mulia, Lilián; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Medina-Franco, José Luis; Castillo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis arginine deiminase (GiADI) is an important metabolic enzyme involved in the energy production and defense of this protozoan parasite. The lack of this enzyme in the human host makes GiADI an attractive target for drug design against G. intestinalis. One approach in the design of inhibitors of GiADI could be computer-assisted studies of its crystal structure, such as docking; however, the required crystallographic structure of the enzyme still remains unresolved. Because of its relevance, in this work, we present a three-dimensional structure of GiADI obtained from its amino acid sequence using the homology modeling approximation. Furthermore, we present an approximation of the most stable dimeric structure of GiADI identified through molecular dynamics simulation studies. An in silico analysis of druggability using the structure of GiADI was carried out in order to know if it is a good target for design and optimization of selective inhibitors. Potential GiADI inhibitors were identified by docking of a set of 3196 commercial and 19 in-house benzimidazole derivatives, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were used to evaluate the stability of the ligand-enzyme complexes.

  9. Adaptive evolution of a novel Drosophila lectin induced by parasitic wasp attack.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Erin S; Schlenke, Todd A

    2012-02-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has long been used as a model for the molecular genetics of innate immunity. Such work has uncovered several immune receptors that recognize bacterial and fungal pathogens by binding unique components of their cell walls and membranes. Drosophila also act as hosts to metazoan pathogens such as parasitic wasps, which can infect a majority of individuals in natural populations, but many aspects of their immune responses against these more closely related pathogens are poorly understood. Here, we present data describing the transcriptional induction and molecular evolution of a candidate Drosophila anti-wasp immunity gene, lectin-24A. Lectin-24A has a secretion signal sequence and its lectin domain suggests a function in sugar group binding. Transcript levels of lectin-24A were induced significantly stronger and faster following wasp attack than following wounding or bacterial infection, demonstrating lectin-24A is not a general stress response or defense response gene but is instead part of a specific response against wasps. The major site of lectin-24A transcript production is the fat body, the main humoral immune tissue of flies. Interestingly, lectin-24A is a new gene of the D. melanogaster/Drosophila simulans clade, displaying very little homology to any other Drosophila lectins. Population genetic analyses of lectin-24A DNA sequence data from African and North American populations of D. melanogaster and D. simulans revealed gene length polymorphisms segregating at high frequencies as well as strong evidence of repeated and recent selective sweeps. Thus, lectin-24A is a rapidly evolving new gene that has seemingly developed functional importance for fly resistance against infection by parasitic wasps.

  10. Could plant lectins become promising anti-tumour drugs for causing autophagic cell death?

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Luo, Y; Zhou, T-T; Zhang, W-Z

    2013-10-01

    Plant lectins, a group of highly diverse carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-immune origin, are ubiquitously distributed through a variety of plant species, and have recently drawn rising attention due to their remarkable ability to kill tumour cells using mechanisms implicated in autophagy. In this review, we provide a brief outline of structures of some representative plant lectins such as concanavalin A, Polygonatum cyrtonema lectin and mistletoe lectins. These can target autophagy by modulating BNIP-3, ROS-p38-p53, Ras-Raf and PI3KCI-Akt pathways, as well as Beclin-1, in many types of cancer cells. In addition, we further discuss how plant lectins are able to kill cancer cells by modulating autophagic death, for therapeutic purposes. Together, these findings provide a comprehensive perspective concerning plant lectins as promising new anti-tumour drugs, with respect to autophagic cell death in future cancer therapeutics.

  11. Structure and Protein-Protein Interaction Studies on Chlamydia trachomatis Protein CT670 (YscO Homolog)

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzini, Emily; Singer, Alexander; Singh, Bhag; Lam, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Savchenko, Alexei; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2010-07-28

    Comparative genomic studies have identified many proteins that are found only in various Chlamydiae species and exhibit no significant sequence similarity to any protein in organisms that do not belong to this group. The CT670 protein of Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the proteins whose genes are in one of the type III secretion gene clusters but whose cellular functions are not known. CT670 shares several characteristics with the YscO protein of Yersinia pestis, including the neighboring genes, size, charge, and secondary structure, but the structures and/or functions of these proteins remain to be determined. Although a BLAST search with CT670 did not identify YscO as a related protein, our analysis indicated that these two proteins exhibit significant sequence similarity. In this paper, we report that the CT670 crystal, solved at a resolution of 2 {angstrom}, consists of a single coiled coil containing just two long helices. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation studies showed that in solution CT670 exists in both monomeric and dimeric forms and that the monomer predominates at lower protein concentrations. We examined the interaction of CT670 with many type III secretion system-related proteins (viz., CT091, CT665, CT666, CT667, CT668, CT669, CT671, CT672, and CT673) by performing bacterial two-hybrid assays. In these experiments, CT670 was found to interact only with the CT671 protein (YscP homolog), whose gene is immediately downstream of ct670. A specific interaction between CT670 and CT671 was also observed when affinity chromatography pull-down experiments were performed. These results suggest that CT670 and CT671 are putative homologs of the YcoO and YscP proteins, respectively, and that they likely form a chaperone-effector pair.

  12. Structure and function of an archaeal topoisomerase VI subunit with homology to the meiotic recombination factor Spo11.

    PubMed

    Nichols, M D; DeAngelis, K; Keck, J L; Berger, J M

    1999-11-01

    In all organisms, type II DNA topoisomerases are essential for untangling chromosomal DNA. We have determined the structure of the DNA-binding core of the Methanococcus jannaschii DNA topoisomerase VI A subunit at 2.0 A resolution. The overall structure of this subunit is unique, demonstrating that archaeal type II enzymes are distinct from other type II topoisomerases. However, the core structure contains a pair of domains that are also found in type IA and classic type II topoisomerases. Together, these regions may form the basis of a DNA cleavage mechanism shared among these enzymes. The core A subunit is a dimer that contains a deep groove that spans both protomers. The dimer architecture suggests that DNA is bound in the groove, across the A subunit interface, and that the two monomers separate during DNA transport. The A subunit of topoisomerase VI is homologous to the meiotic recombination factor, Spo11, and this structure can serve as a template for probing Spo11 function in eukaryotes.

  13. Structure and functional features of olive pollen pectin methylesterase using homology modeling and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Rodríguez-García, María I; Alché, Juan D

    2012-12-01

    Pectin methylesterases (PMEs), a multigene family of proteins with multiple differentially regulated isoforms, are key enzymes implicated in the carbohydrates (pectin) metabolism of cell walls. Olive pollen PME has been identified as a new allergen (Ole e 11) of potential relevance in allergy amelioration, since it exhibits high prevalence among atopic patients. In this work, the structural and functional characterization of two olive pollen PME isoforms and their comparison with other PME plants was performed by using different approaches: (1) the physicochemical properties and functional-regulatory motifs characterization, (2) primary sequence analysis, 2D and 3D comparative structural features study, (3) conservation and evolutionary analysis, (4) catalytic activity and regulation based on molecular docking analysis of a homologue PME inhibitor, and (5) B-cell epitopes prediction by sequence and structural based methods and protein-protein interaction tools, while T-cell epitopes by inhibitory concentration and binding score methods. Our results indicate that the structural differences and low conservation of residues, together with differences in physicochemical and posttranslational motifs might be a mechanism for PME isovariants generation, regulation, and differential surface epitopes generation. Olive PMEs perform a processive catalytic mechanism, and a differential molecular interaction with specific PME inhibitor, opening new possibilities for PME activity regulation. Despite the common function of PMEs, differential features found in this study will lead to a better understanding of the structural and functional characterization of plant PMEs and help to improve the component-resolving diagnosis and immunotherapy of olive pollen allergy by epitopes identification.

  14. Persistent homology and many-body atomic structure for medium-range order in the glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takenobu; Hiraoka, Yasuaki; Hirata, Akihiko; Escolar, Emerson G.; Nishiura, Yasumasa

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of the medium-range (MRO) order in amorphous materials and its relation to the short-range order is discussed. A new topological approach to extract a hierarchical structure of amorphous materials is presented, which is robust against small perturbations and allows us to distinguish it from periodic or random configurations. This method is called the persistence diagram (PD) and introduces scales to many-body atomic structures to facilitate size and shape characterization. We first illustrate the representation of perfect crystalline and random structures in PDs. Then, the MRO in amorphous silica is characterized using the appropriate PD. The PD approach compresses the size of the data set significantly, to much smaller geometrical summaries, and has considerable potential for application to a wide range of materials, including complex molecular liquids, granular materials, and metallic glasses.

  15. Crystal structure of the homology domain of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins Sld3/Treslin.

    PubMed

    Itou, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Sachiko; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication requires the formation of an active replicative helicase at the replication origins of chromosomal DNA. Yeast Sld3 and its metazoan counterpart Treslin are the hub proteins mediating protein associations critical for the helicase formation. Here, we show the crystal structure of the central domain of Sld3 that is conserved in Sld3/Treslin family of proteins. The domain consists of two segments with 12 helices and is sufficient to bind to Cdc45, the essential helicase component. The structure model of the Sld3-Cdc45 complex, which is crucial for the formation of the active helicase, is proposed.

  16. Purification, characterization and antibacterial potential of a lectin isolated from Apuleia leiocarpa seeds.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Aline de Souza; da Silva, Márcia Vanusa; Gomes, Francis Soares; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Malafaia, Carolina Barbosa; da Silva, Tulio Diego; Vaz, Antônio Fernando de Melo; da Silva, Alexandre Gomes; Arruda, Isabel Renata de Souza; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Carneiro-da-Cunha, Maria das Graças; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos

    2015-04-01

    Apuleia leiocarpa is a tree found in Caatinga that has great value in the timber industry. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins with several biotechnological applications. This study shows the isolation, characterization, and antibacterial activity of A. leiocarpa seed lectin (ApulSL). The lectin was chromatographically isolated from a crude extract (in 150 mM NaCl) by using a chitin column. ApulSL adsorbed to the matrix and was eluted using 1.0 M acetic acid. Native ApulSL was characterized as a 55.8-kDa acidic protein. SDS-PAGE showed three polypeptide bands, whereas two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed four spots. The peptides detected by MALDI TOF/TOF did not show sufficient homology (<30%) with the database proteins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested a disordered conformational structure, and fluorescence spectrum showed the presence of tyrosine residues in the hydrophobic core. The hemagglutinating activity of ApulSL was present even after heating to 100 °C, was Mn(2+)-dependent, and inhibited by N-acetylglucosamine, D(-)-arabinose, and azocasein. ApulSL demonstrated bacteriostatic and bactericide effects on gram-positive and gram-negative species, being more effective against three varieties of Xanthomonas campestris (MIC ranging from 11.2 to 22.5 μg/mL and MBC of 22.5 μg/mL). The results of this study reinforce the importance of biochemical prospecting of Caatinga by revealing the antibacterial potential of ApulSL.

  17. Probing the nature of the cluster effect observed with synthetic multivalent galactosides and peanut agglutinin lectin.

    PubMed

    Almant, Mehdi; Mastouri, Amira; Gallego-Yerga, Laura; García Fernandez, José Manuel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Kovensky, José; Morandat, Sandrine; El Kirat, Karim; Gouin, Sébastien G

    2013-01-07

    We designed a set of multi-galactosides with valencies ranging from one to seven and different spacer-arm lengths. The compounds display a high structural homology for a strict assessment of multivalent phenomena. The multimers were first evaluated by an enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) toward the peanut agglutinin (PNA). The binding affinity was shown to be dependent on the spacer-arm length, and cluster effects were observed for the galactosides bearing the shortest and the longest linkers. The latter compounds were shown to be much more potent PNA cross-linkers in a "sandwich assay". Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments also revealed the formation of soluble aggregates between heptavalent derivatives with medium or long linkers and the labeled PNA. ELLA experiments performed with valency-controlled clusters and labeled lectins are therefore not always devoid from aggregative processes. The precise nature of the multivalent interaction observed by ELLA for the compounds bearing the shortest linkers, which are unable to form PNA aggregates, was further investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The galactosides were grafted onto the tip of a cantilever and the PNA lectin onto a gold surface. Similar unbinding forces were registered when the valency of the ligands was increased, thus showing that the multimers cannot interact more strongly with PNA. Multiple binding events to the PNA were also never observed, thus confirming that a chelate binding mode does not operate with the multivalent galactosides, probably because the linkers are too short. Altogether, these results suggest that the cluster effect that operates in ELLA with the multimers is not related to additional PNA stabilizations and can be ascribed to local concentration effects that favor a dynamic turnover of the tethered galactosides in the PNA binding sites.

  18. Lectins and Tetrahymena - A review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-09-01

    The unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena is a complete organism, one of the most highly developed protozoans, which has specialized organelles performing each of the functions characteristic to the cells of higher ranked animals. It is also able to produce, store, and secrete hormones of higher ranked animals and also react to them. It produces lectins that can bind them and has functions, which are influenced by exogenous lectins. The review lists the observations on the relationship between lectins and Tetrahymena and try to construe them on the basis of the data, which are at our disposal. Considering the data, lectins can be used by Tetrahymena as materials for influencing conjugation, for stimulating hormone receptors, and by this, mimic the hormonal functions. Lectins can influence phagocytosis and movement of the cells as well as the cell division. As Tetrahymena can recognize both related and hostile cells by the help of lectins and surface sugars, it could be surmised a complex predator-prey system. This could determine the survival of the population as well as the nourishment conditions. When Tetrahymena is pathogenic, it can use lectins as virulence factors.

  19. A homology-derived structural model of the murine macrophage inflammatory protein, MIP-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    McKie, J H; Douglas, K T

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha), a monocyte cytokine, has roles postulated for it in neutrophil chemoattraction, the inflammatory response and the control of haemopoietic stem cell proliferation. The three-dimensional structure of MIP-1 alpha has been modelled structurally, based on its sequence similarity to interleukin-8 and related proteins. The predicted dimeric form of MIP-1 alpha contains two symmetry-related antiparallel alpha-helices lying at an angle across a beta-sheet. The interhelical region and the beta-sheet flooring it are discussed as the potential receptor-binding site in terms of the distribution of negatively charged amino-acid side-chains, which contrasts remarkably with the corresponding positively-charged locations for IL-8. The general topographical features of this (alpha + beta) structural family of cytokines and related proteins (including HLA-A2, PF-4) are discussed. The members of this cytokine family fall into two structural groups as the antiparallel helices (N to C directed) mounted across the beta-sheet platform can be located in a clockwise (e.g. HLA-A2) or anticlockwise (e.g. MIP-1 alpha) sense with respect to the beta-floor).

  20. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Green Split Peas (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-11-01

    Lectins have captured the attention of a large number of researchers on account of their various exploitable activities, including antitumor, immunomodulatory, antifungal, as well as HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities. A mannose/glucose-specific lectin was isolated from green split peas (a variety of Pisum sativum) and characterized. The purification step involved anion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column, cation-exchange chromatography on an SP-Sepharose column, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on Superdex 200. The purified lectin had a native molecular mass of around 50 kDa as determined by size exclusion chromatography. It appeared as a heterotetramer, composed of two distinct polypeptide bands with a molecular mass of 6 and 19 kDa, respectively, in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The N-terminal sequence of green split pea lectin shows some degree of homology compared to lectins from other legume species. Its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by glucose, mannose, and sucrose, and attenuated at pH values higher than 12 or lower than 3. Hemagglutinating activity was preserved at temperatures lower than 80 °C. The lectin did not show antifungal activity toward fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea, and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Green split pea lectin showed a mitogenic effect toward murine splenocytes and could inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  1. Isolation and analysis of mannose/trehalose/maltose specific lectin from jack bean with antibruchid activity.

    PubMed

    Shanmugavel, Sakthivelkumar; Velayutham, Veeramani; Kamalanathan, Tamilarasan; Periasamy, Mullainadhan; Munusamy, Arumugam; Sundaram, Janarthanan

    2016-10-01

    A lectin with insecticidal property against the stored product pest, Callosobruchus maculatus was successfully isolated from the seeds of Canavalia virosa using standard affinity chromatography. The isolated molecule typically behaved like a lectin in its characteristics. It agglutinated indicator red blood cells (RBC) in its native as well as enzyme treated conditions. The enzyme treated RBC types exhibited a very high hemagglutination (HA) titre values and this property of isolated molecule behaved like arcelin, the lectin-like molecules reported from several species of Phaseolus. As a characteristic feature of a lectin, the isolated molecule effectively inhibited the agglutination of indicator RBC types with simple and complex carbohydrates including glycoproteins. This nature of the isolated molecule also relate with characteristic feature of arcelin isoforms in inhibiting HA activity with complex glycoproteins as reported in many studies. Most interestingly, the present study disclosed trehalose as a potent inhibitor of C. virosa lectin. Therefore, feeding insect pests on the lectin like arcelin could serve as antibiosis factor/anti-insect activity. The molecular characteristics of this isolated molecule and its mass studies too revealed its homology with arcelin, arcelin-1, 2 and 6 isoforms of P. vulgaris and lectin from Canavalia cathartica, C. lineata and C. brasiliensis.

  2. Novel Lectin-Like Bacteriocins of Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Parret, Annabel H. A.; Temmerman, Koen; De Mot, René

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriocin LlpA, produced by Pseudomonas sp. strain BW11M1, is a peculiar antibacterial protein due to its homology to mannose-binding lectins mostly found in monocots (A. H. A. Parret, G. Schoofs, P. Proost, and R. De Mot, J. Bacteriol. 185:897-908, 2003). Biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 contains two llpA-like genes, named llpA1Pf-5 and llpA2Pf-5. Recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing llpA1Pf-5 or llpA2Pf-5 acquired bacteriocin activity and secreted a 31-kDa protein cross-reacting with LlpABW11M1 antibodies. Antibacterial activity of the recombinant proteins was evidenced by gel overlay assays. Analysis of the antimicrobial spectrum indicated that LlpA1Pf-5 and LlpA2Pf-5 are able to inhibit P. fluorescens strains, as well as the related mushroom pathogen Pseudomonas tolaasii. LlpA-type bacteriocins are characterized by a domain structure consisting of tandem monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains. Molecular phylogeny of these MMBL domains suggests that the individual MMBL domains within an LlpA protein have evolved separately toward a specific, as yet unknown, function or, alternatively, were acquired from different ancestral sources. Our observations are consistent with earlier observations, which hinted that MMBL-like bacteriocins represent a new family of antibacterial proteins, probably with a novel mode of action. PMID:16151105

  3. Structures of an intramembrane vitamin K epoxide reductase homolog reveal control mechanisms for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shixuan; Cheng, Wei; Fowle Grider, Ronald; Shen, Guomin; Li, Weikai

    2014-01-01

    The intramembrane vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) supports blood coagulation in humans and is the target of the anticoagulant warfarin. VKOR and its homologues generate disulphide bonds in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Here, to better understand the mechanism of VKOR catalysis, we report two crystal structures of a bacterial VKOR captured in different reaction states. These structures reveal a short helix at the hydrophobic active site of VKOR that alters between wound and unwound conformations. Motions of this 'horizontal helix' promote electron transfer by regulating the positions of two cysteines in an adjacent loop. Winding of the helix separates these 'loop cysteines' to prevent backward electron flow. Despite these motions, hydrophobicity at the active site is maintained to facilitate VKOR catalysis. Biochemical experiments suggest that several warfarin-resistant mutations act by changing the conformation of the horizontal helix. Taken together, these studies provide a comprehensive understanding of VKOR function.

  4. How the Reorganization Free Energy Affects the Reduction Potential of Structurally Homologous Cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Amadei, Andrea; Zaccanti, Francesco; Borsari, Marco; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto

    2014-05-01

    Differences in the reduction potential E(0) among structurally similar metalloproteins cannot always be fully explained on the basis of their 3-D structures. We investigate the molecular determinants to E(0) using the mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach named perturbed matrix method (PMM); after comparison with experimental values to assess the reliability of our calculations, we investigate the relationship between the change in free energy upon reduction ΔA(0) and the reorganization energy. We find that the reduction potential of cytochromes can be regarded as the result of the sum of two terms, one being mostly dependent on the energy fluctuations within a limited range around the mean transition energy and the second being mostly dependent linearly on the difference Δλ = λred - λox of the reorganization free energies for the ox → red (λred) and for the red → ox (λox) relaxations.

  5. The Caudal Skeleton of the Zebrafish, Danio rerio, from a Phylogenetic Perspective: A Polyural Interpretation of Homologous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Edward O.; Fuiten, Allison M.; Doosey, Michael H.; Lohman, Brian K.; Merkes, Christopher; Azuma, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the caudal skeleton of extant teleost fishes has been interpreted in two different ways. In a diural interpretation, a caudal skeleton is composed of two centra articulated with one to six hypurals. Most subsequent authors have followed this interpretation. In contrast, a polyural interpretation considers the teleost fin to be derived from a fully metameristic ancestral bauplan originally composed of a one-to-one relationship between neural arches, centra (when present), and hypurals. Three different interpretations of the identity and homology of skeletal components of the caudal skeleton of the teleost fish Danio rerio have been proposed, two from a diural perspective and one from a polyural perspective. We examine each caudal skeletal component of Danio rerio from both a developmental and phylogenetic perspective. We propose that a polyural interpretation of structures is consistent with the current interpretation of the basal neopterygian caudal fin for this model organism rather than the older diural interpretation that does not take into account the metamerism observed in caudal structures during development. The polyural interpretation suggests several shared evolutionary innovations of major clades that would remain undiscovered under the older diural naming paradigm and makes the terminology of the parts of the caudal fin of Danio rerio strictly comparable to more basal fishes. PMID:28250540

  6. Optimized method for TAG protein homology modeling: In silico and experimental structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Jyoti Singh; Peddinti, Rama Krishna

    2016-07-01

    The DNA glycosylases cleave CN glycosyl bond to release a free base and generate abasic sites concurrently. Function and structure of these enzymes in the pathogenic bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii and its closely related species are not well characterized. Inhibition of TAG enzyme is a promising drug design strategy against A. baumannii. Here optimized molecular modeling approaches were used to provide a structural scaffold of TAG. The recombinant TAG protein was expressed and purified to determine oligomeric state using size exclusion chromatography, which showed the existence of TAG protein as monomer (mwt ∼21kDa). Secondary structure and substrate binding were analyzed using CD are in good agreement with the in silico predictions. Near UV-CD spectrum shows the involvement of Tyr residues in substrate recognition. Molecular docking studies were performed to understand the molecular recognition interactions and this knowledge was used to identify the potent inhibitors using virtual screening. Residues crucial for DNA holding and enzyme catalysis are reconfirmed by the in silico mutational studies.

  7. Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites from weakly homologous template structures using meta-threading and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Surabhi; Brylinski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The identification of protein-protein interactions is vital for understanding protein function, elucidating interaction mechanisms, and for practical applications in drug discovery. With the exponentially growing protein sequence data, fully automated computational methods that predict interactions between proteins are becoming essential components of system-level function inference. A thorough analysis of protein complex structures demonstrated that binding site locations as well as the interfacial geometry are highly conserved across evolutionarily related proteins. Because the conformational space of protein-protein interactions is highly covered by experimental structures, sensitive protein threading techniques can be used to identify suitable templates for the accurate prediction of interfacial residues. Toward this goal, we developed eFindSite(PPI) , an algorithm that uses the three-dimensional structure of a target protein, evolutionarily remotely related templates and machine learning techniques to predict binding residues. Using crystal structures, the average sensitivity (specificity) of eFindSite(PPI) in interfacial residue prediction is 0.46 (0.92). For weakly homologous protein models, these values only slightly decrease to 0.40-0.43 (0.91-0.92) demonstrating that eFindSite(PPI) performs well not only using experimental data but also tolerates structural imperfections in computer-generated structures. In addition, eFindSite(PPI) detects specific molecular interactions at the interface; for instance, it correctly predicts approximately one half of hydrogen bonds and aromatic interactions, as well as one third of salt bridges and hydrophobic contacts. Comparative benchmarks against several dimer datasets show that eFindSite(PPI) outperforms other methods for protein-binding residue prediction. It also features a carefully tuned confidence estimation system, which is particularly useful in large-scale applications using raw genomic data. eFindSite(PPI) is

  8. Chagas disease: a homology model for the three-dimensional structure of the Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P0 antigenic protein.

    PubMed

    Gomez Barroso, Juan Arturo; Aguilar, Carlos Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Ribosomal P proteins form a "stalk" complex in the large subunit of the ribosomes. In Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, the complex is formed by five P protein members: TcP0, TcP1α, TcP1β, TcP2α and TcP2β. The TcP0 protein has 34 kDa, and TcP1 and TcP2 proteins have 10 kDa. The structure of T. cruzi P0 and the stalk complex TcP0-TcP1α-TcP1β-TcP2α-TcP2β have not been solved to date. In this work, we constructed a three-dimensional molecular model for TcP0 using homology modeling as implemented in the MODELLER 9v12 software. The model was constructed using different templates: the X-ray structures of the protein P0 from Pirococcus horikoshii, a segment from the Danio renio Ca(+2)/K(+) channel and the C-terminal peptide (C13) from T. cruzi ribosomal P2 protein; the Cryo-EM structure of Triticum aestivum P0 protein and the NMR structure of Homo sapiens P1 ribosomal protein. TcP0 has a 200-residue-long N-terminal, which is an α/β globular stable domain, and a flexible C-terminal, 120-residue-long domain. The molecular surface electrostatic potential and hydrophobic surface were calculated. The surface properties are important for the C-terminal's antigenic properties. They are also responsible for P0-specific binding to RNA26S and the binding to the P1-P2 proteins. We explored and identified protein interactions that may be involved in conformational stability. The structure proposed in this work represents a first structural report for the TcP0 protein.

  9. The self-inhibited structure of full-length PCSK9 at 1.9 A reveals structural homology with resistin within the C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Eric N; Knuth, Mark W; Li, Jun; Harris, Jennifer L; Lesley, Scott A; Spraggon, Glen

    2007-09-11

    Mutations in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) are strongly associated with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the blood plasma and, thereby, occurrence or resistance to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Despite this importance, relatively little is known about the biology of PCSK9. Here, the crystal structure of a full-length construct of PCSK9 solved to 1.9-A resolution is presented. The structure contains a fully folded C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD), showing a distinct structural similarity to the resistin homotrimer, a small cytokine associated with obesity and diabetes. This structural relationship between the CRD of PCSK9 and the resistin family is not observed in primary sequence comparisons and strongly suggests a distant evolutionary link between the two molecules. This three-dimensional homology provides insight into the function of PCSK9 at the molecular level and will help to dissect the link between PCSK9 and CHD.

  10. Molecular identification of aiiA homologous gene from endophytic Enterobacter species and in silico analysis of putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Rai, V Ravishankar

    2014-01-03

    The aiiA homologous gene known to encode AHL- lactonase enzyme which hydrolyze the N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing signaling molecules produced by Gram negative bacteria. In this study, the degradation of AHL molecules was determined by cell-free lysate of endophytic Enterobacter species. The percentage of quorum quenching was confirmed and quantified by HPLC method (p<0.0001). Amplification and sequence BLAST analysis showed the presence of aiiA homologous gene in endophytic Enterobacter asburiae VT65, Enterobacter aerogenes VT66 and Enterobacter ludwigii VT70 strains. Sequence alignment analysis revealed the presence of two zinc binding sites, "HXHXDH" motif as well as tyrosine residue at the position 194. Based on known template available at Swiss-Model, putative tertiary structure of AHL-lactonase was constructed. The result showed that novel endophytic strains of Enterobacter genera encode the novel aiiA homologous gene and its structural importance for future study.

  11. Modeling Human Serum Albumin Tertiary Structure to Teach Upper-Division Chemistry Students Bioinformatics and Homology Modeling Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrovic, Dus?an; Zlatovic´, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A homology modeling laboratory experiment has been developed for an introductory molecular modeling course for upper-division undergraduate chemistry students. With this experiment, students gain practical experience in homology model preparation and assessment as well as in protein visualization using the educational version of PyMOL…

  12. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  13. Structural and Functional Characterization of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain by Homology Modeling and Mutational Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Denison, Michael S.; Song, Yujuan; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Bonati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that is activated by a structurally diverse array of synthetic and natural chemicals, including toxic halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Analysis of the molecular events occurring in the AhR ligand binding and activation processes requires structural information on the AhR Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) B-containing ligand binding domain, for which no experimentally determined structure has been reported. With the availability of extensive structural information on homologous PAS-containing proteins, a reliable model of the mouse AhR PAS B domain was developed by comparative modeling techniques. The PAS domain structures of the functionally related hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) proteins, which exhibit the highest degree of sequence identity and similarity with AhR, were chosen to develop a two-template model. To confirm the features of the modeled domain, the effects of point mutations in selected residue positions on both TCDD binding to the AhR and TCDD-dependent transformation and DNA binding were analyzed. Mutagenesis and functional analysis results are consistent with the proposed model and confirm that the cavity modeled in the interior of the domain is indeed involved in ligand binding. Moreover, the physicochemical characteristics of some residues and of their mutants, along with the effects of mutagenesis on TCDD and DNA binding, also suggest some key features that are required for ligand binding and activation of mAhR at a molecular level, thus providing a framework for further studies. PMID:17223691

  14. Cloning and characterization of the lectin cDNA clones from onion, shallot and leek.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Engelborghs, I; Aelbers, H; Balzarini, J; Pusztai, A; van Leuven, F; Goldstein, I J; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Characterization of the lectins from onion (Allium cepa), shallot (A. ascalonicum) and leek (A. porrum) has shown that these lectins differ from previously isolated Alliaceae lectins not only in their molecular structure but also in their ability to inhibit retrovirus infection of target cells. cDNA libraries constructed from poly(A)-rich RNA isolated from young shoots of onion, shallot and leek were screened for lectin cDNA clones using colony hybridization. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from these three species revealed a high degree of sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and at the amino acid level. Apparently the onion, shallot and leek lectins are translated from mRNAs of ca. 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins (ca. 19 kDa) which are converted into the mature lectin polypeptides (12.5-13 kDa) after post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  15. Structural homology in the Solanaceae: analysis of genomic regions in support of synteny studies in tomato, potato and pepper.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sander A; Bargsten, Joachim W; Szinay, Dóra; van de Belt, José; Visser, Richard G F; Bai, Yuling; de Jong, Hans

    2012-08-01

    We have analysed the structural homology in euchromatin regions of tomato, potato and pepper with special attention for the long arm of chromosome 2 (2L). Molecular organization and colinear junctions were delineated using multi-color BAC FISH analysis and comparative sequence alignment. We found large-scale rearrangements including inversions and segmental translocations that were not reported in previous comparative studies. Some of the structural rearrangements are specific for the tomato clade, and differentiate tomato from potato, pepper and other Solanaceous species. Although local gene vicinity is largely preserved, there are many small-scale synteny perturbations. Gene adjacency in the aligned segments was frequently disrupted for 47% of the ortholog pairs as a result of gene and LTR retrotransposon insertions, and occasionally by single gene inversions and translocations. Our data also suggests that long distance intra-chromosomal rearrangements and local gene rearrangements have evolved frequently during speciation in the Solanum genus, and that small changes are more prevalent than large-scale differences. The occurrence of sonata and harbinger transposable elements and other repeats near or at junction breaks is considered in the light of repeat-mediated rearrangements and a reconstruction scenario for an ancestral 2L topology is discussed.

  16. Structural basis for the recognition of two consecutive mutually interacting DPF motifs by the SGIP1 μ homology domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Kohda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    FCHo1, FCHo2, and SGIP1 are key regulators of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Their μ homology domains (μHDs) interact with the C-terminal region of an endocytic scaffold protein, Eps15, containing fifteen Asp-Pro-Phe (DPF) motifs. Here, we show that the high-affinity μHD-binding site in Eps15 is a region encompassing six consecutive DPF motifs, while the minimal μHD-binding unit is two consecutive DPF motifs. We present the crystal structures of the SGIP1 μHD in complex with peptides containing two DPF motifs. The peptides bind to a novel ligand-binding site of the μHD, which is distinct from those of other distantly related μHD-containing proteins. The two DPF motifs, which adopt three-dimensional structures stabilized by sequence-specific intramotif and intermotif interactions, are extensively recognized by the μHD and are both required for binding. Thus, consecutive and singly scattered DPF motifs play distinct roles in μHD binding.

  17. Crystal structure of a Gammadelta T-cell Receptor Specific for the Human MHC class I Homolog MICA

    SciTech Connect

    B Xu; J Pizarro; M Holmes; C McBeth; V Groh; T Spies; R Strong

    2011-12-31

    {gamma}{delta} T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human {gamma}{delta} T cells of the V{sub {delta}}1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive V{sub {delta}}1 {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, {alpha}{beta}, and other {gamma}{delta} TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of V{sub {delta}}1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on {gamma}{delta} T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of {gamma}{delta} T-cell/target cell interfaces.

  18. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  19. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Two Lectins from Dwarf Elder (Sambucus ebulus L.) Blossoms Related to the Sam n1 Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Pilar; Cabrero, Patricia; Basterrechea, José E.; Tejero, Jesús; Cordoba-Diaz, Damian; Girbes, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Sambucus species contain a number of lectins with and without antiribosomal activity. Here, we show that dwarf elder (Sambucus ebulus L.) blossoms express two d-galactose-binding lectins that were isolated and purified by affinity chromatography and gel filtration. These proteins, which we named ebulin blo (A-B toxin) and SELblo (B-B lectin)—blo from blossoms—were subjected to molecular characterization and analysis by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and tryptic peptide fingerprinting. Both lectins share a high degree of amino acid sequence homology with Sambucus lectins related to the Sam n1 allergen. Ebulin blo, but not SELblo, was highly toxic by nasal instillation to mice. Overall, our results suggested that both lectins would belong to an allergen family exemplified by Sam n1 and could trigger allergy responses. Furthermore, they raise a concern about ebulin blo toxicity. PMID:24129061

  20. Structure-based design of an osteoclast-selective, nonpeptide Src homology 2 inhibitor with in vivo antiresorptive activity

    PubMed Central

    Shakespeare, William; Yang, Michael; Bohacek, Regine; Cerasoli, Franklin; Stebbins, Karin; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Azimioara, Mihai; Vu, Chi; Pradeepan, Selvi; Metcalf, Chester; Haraldson, Chad; Merry, Taylor; Dalgarno, David; Narula, Surinder; Hatada, Marcos; Lu, Xiaode; van Schravendijk, Marie Rose; Adams, Susan; Violette, Shelia; Smith, Jeremy; Guan, Wei; Bartlett, Catherine; Herson, Jay; Iuliucci, John; Weigele, Manfred; Sawyer, Tomi

    2000-01-01

    Targeted disruption of the pp60src (Src) gene has implicated this tyrosine kinase in osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and as a therapeutic target for the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone-related diseases. Herein we describe the discovery of a nonpeptide inhibitor (AP22408) of Src that demonstrates in vivo antiresorptive activity. Based on a cocrystal structure of the noncatalytic Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Src complexed with citrate [in the phosphotyrosine (pTyr) binding pocket], we designed 3′,4′-diphosphonophenylalanine (Dpp) as a pTyr mimic. In addition to its design to bind Src SH2, the Dpp moiety exhibits bone-targeting properties that confer osteoclast selectivity, hence minimizing possible undesired effects on other cells that have Src-dependent activities. The chemical structure AP22408 also illustrates a bicyclic template to replace the post-pTyr sequence of cognate Src SH2 phosphopeptides such as Ac-pTyr-Glu-Glu-Ile (1). An x-ray structure of AP22408 complexed with Lck (S164C) SH2 confirmed molecular interactions of both the Dpp and bicyclic template of AP22408 as predicted from molecular modeling. Relative to the cognate phosphopeptide, AP22408 exhibits significantly increased Src SH2 binding affinity (IC50 = 0.30 μM for AP22408 and 5.5 μM for 1). Furthermore, AP22408 inhibits rabbit osteoclast-mediated resorption of dentine in a cellular assay, exhibits bone-targeting properties based on a hydroxyapatite adsorption assay, and demonstrates in vivo antiresorptive activity in a parathyroid hormone-induced rat model. PMID:10944210

  1. Alpha-amylase from mung beans (Vigna radiata)--correlation of biochemical properties and tertiary structure by homology modelling.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pallavi; Lo Leggio, Leila; Mansfeld, Johanna; Ulbrich-Hofmann, Renate; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2007-06-01

    Alpha-amylase from germinated mung beans (Vigna radiata) has been purified 600-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity and a final specific activity of 437 U/mg. SDS-PAGE of the final preparation revealed a single protein band of 46 kDa. The optimum pH was 5.6. The energy of activation was determined to be 7.03 kcal/mol in the temperature range 15-55 degrees C. Km for starch was 1.6 mg/mL in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer, pH 5.5. Thermal inactivation studies at 70 degrees C showed first-order kinetics with rate constant (k) equal to 0.005 min(-1). Mung bean alpha-amylase showed high specificity for its primary substrate starch. Addition of EDTA (10 mM) caused irreversible loss of activity. Mung bean alpha-amylase is inhibited in a non-competitive manner by heavy metal ions, for example, mercury with a Ki of 110 microM. Homology modelling studies with mung bean alpha-amylase using barley alpha-amylases Amy 1 and Amy 2 as templates showed a very similar structure as expected from the high sequence identity. The model showed that alpha-amylase from mung beans has no sugar-binding site, instead it has a methionine. Furthermore, instead of two tryptophans, it has Val(277) and Lys(278), which are the conserved residues, important for proper folding and conformational stability.

  2. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs.

  3. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs. PMID:26407233

  4. Probing the cons and pros of lectin-induced immunomodulation: case studies for the mistletoe lectin and galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H J

    2001-07-01

    When imagining to monitor animal cells through a microscope with resolution at the molecular level, a salient attribute of their surfaces will be the abundance of glycan chains. They present galactosides at their termini widely extending like tentacles into the extracellular space. Their spatial accessibility and their potential for structural variability endow especially these glycan parts with capacity to act as docking points for molecular sensors (sugar receptors such as lectins). Binding and ligand clustering account for transmission of post-binding signals into the cell interior. The range of triggered activities has turned plant lectins into popular tools in cell biology and immunology. Potential for clinical application has been investigated rigorously only in recent years. As documented in vitro and in vivo for the galactoside-specific mistletoe lectin, its apparent immunomodulatory capacity reflected in upregulation of production of proinflammatory cytokines will not necessarily be clinically favorable but a double-edged sword. In fact, lectin application has been shown to stimulate tumor growth in cell lines, histocultures of human tumors and in two animal models using chemical carcinogenesis or tumor transplantation. When testing immunological effects of the endogenous lectin galectin-1, protection against disorders mediated by activated T cells came up for consideration. Elimination of these cells via CD7-dependent induction of apoptosis, and a shift to the Th2 response by the galectin, are factors to ameliorate disease states. This result encourages further efforts with other galectins. Functional redundancy, synergism, diversity or antagonism among galectins are being explored to understand the actual role of this class of endogenous lectins in inflammation. Regardless of the results of further preclinical testing for galectin-1, these two case studies break new ground in our understanding how glycans as ligands for lectins convey reactivity to

  5. New mannose-specific lectins from garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (Allium ursinum) bulbs.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1992-05-22

    Two new mannose-binding lectins were isolated from garlic (Allium sativum, ASA) and ramsons (Allium ursinum, AUA) bulbs, of the family Alliaceae, by affinity chromatography on immobilized mannose. The carbohydrate-binding specificity of these two lectins was studied by quantitative precipitation and hapten-inhibition assay. ASA reacted strongly with a synthetic linear (1----3)-alpha-D-mannan and S. cerevisiae mannan, weakly with a synthetic (1----6)-alpha-D-mannan, and failed to precipitate with galactomannans from T. gropengiesseri and T. lactis-condensi, a linear mannopentaose, and murine IgM. On the other hand, AUA gave a strong reaction of precipitation with murine IgM, and good reactions with S. cerevisiae mannan and both synthetic linear mannans, suggesting that the two lectins have somewhat different binding specificities for alpha-D-mannosyl units. Of the saccharides tested as inhibitors of precipitation, those with alpha-(1----3)-linked mannosyl units were the best inhibitors of ASA, the alpha-(1----2)-, alpha-(1----4)-, and alpha-(1----6)-linked mannobioses and biosides having less than one eighth the affinity of the alpha-(1----3)-linked compounds. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of ASA exhibits 79% homology with that of AUA, and moderately high homology (53%) with that of snowdrop bulb lectin, also an alpha-D-mannosyl-binding lectin.

  6. Purification and characterization of a novel beta-D-galactosides-specific lectin from Clitoria ternatea.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Haque, Shabirul; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-09-01

    A lectin present in seeds of Clitoria ternatea agglutinated trypsin-treated human B erythrocytes. The sugar specificity assay indicated that lectin belongs to Gal/Gal NAc-specific group. Hence the lectin, designated C. ternatea agglutinin (CTA), was purified by the combination of acetic acid precipitation, salt fractionation and affinity chromatography. HPLC gel filtration, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry indicated that the native lectin is composed of two identical subunits of molecular weight 34.7 kDa associated by non covalent bonds. The N-terminal sequence of CTA shared homology with Glycine max and Pisum sativum. Complete sequence was also found to be homologous to S-64 protein of Glycine max, suggesting that CTA probably exhibits both hemagglutination and probably sugar uptake activity. The carbohydrate binding specificity of the lectin was investigated by quantitative turbidity measurements, and percent inhibition assays. Based on these assays, we conclude that CTA binds beta-D: -galactosides, and also may has an extended specificity towards non-reducing terminal Neu5Acalpha2,6Gal.

  7. Crystal Structure of a Legionella pneumophila Ecto -Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase, A Structural and Functional Homolog of the Eukaryotic NTPDases

    SciTech Connect

    Vivian, Julian P.; Riedmaier, Patrice; Ge, Honghua; Le Nours, Jérôme; Sansom, Fiona M.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Byres, Emma; Dias, Manisha; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Cowan, Peter J.; d'Apice, Anthony J.F.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2010-04-19

    Many pathogenic bacteria have sophisticated mechanisms to interfere with the mammalian immune response. These include the disruption of host extracellular ATP levels that, in humans, is tightly regulated by the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase family (NTPDases). NTPDases are found almost exclusively in eukaryotes, the notable exception being their presence in some pathogenic prokaryotes. To address the function of bacterial NTPDases, we describe the structures of an NTPDase from the pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lpg1905/Lp1NTPDase) in its apo state and in complex with the ATP analog AMPPNP and the subtype-specific NTPDase inhibitor ARL 67156. Lp1NTPDase is structurally and catalytically related to eukaryotic NTPDases and the structure provides a basis for NTPDase-specific inhibition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activity of Lp1NTPDase correlates directly with intracellular replication of Legionella within macrophages. Collectively, these findings provide insight into the mechanism of this enzyme and highlight its role in host-pathogen interactions.

  8. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches.

  9. ERGIC-53 is a functional mannose-selective and calcium-dependent human homologue of leguminous lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Itin, C; Roche, A C; Monsigny, M; Hauri, H P

    1996-01-01

    Based on sequence homologies with leguminous lectins, the intermediate compartment marker ERGIC-53 was proposed to be a member of a putative new class of animal lectins associated with the secretory pathway. Independent, a promyelocytic protein, MR60, was purified by mannose-column chromatography, and a cDNA was isolated that matched MR60 peptide sequences. This cDNA was identical to that of ERGIC-53 and homologies with the animal lectin family of the galectins were noticed. Not all peptide sequences of MR60, however, were found in ERGIC-53, raising the possibility that another protein associated with ERGIC-53 may possess the lectin activity. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for a lectin function of ERGIC-53. Overexpressed ERGIC-53 binds to a mannose column in a calcium-dependent manner and also co-stains with mannosylated neoglycoprotein in a morphological binding assay. By using a sequential elution protocol we show that ERGIC-53 has selectivity for mannose and low affinity for glucose and GlcNAc, but no affinity for galactose. To experimentally address the putative homology of ERGIC-53 to leguminous lectins, a highly conserved protein family with an invariant asparagine essential for carbohydrate binding, we substituted the corresponding asparagine in ERGIC-53. This mutation, as well as a mutation affecting a second site in the putative carbohydrate recognition domain, abolished mannose-column binding and co-staining with mannosylated neoglycoprotein. These findings establish ERGIC-53 as a lectin and provide functional evidence for its relationship to leguminous lectins. Based on its monosaccharide specificity, domain organization, and recycling properties, we propose ERGIC-53 to function as a sorting receptor for glyco-proteins in the early secretory pathway. Images PMID:8868475

  10. Molecular cloning of a lectin cDNA from Alocasia macrorrhiza and prediction of its characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Ran; Wang, Jie; Huang, Bing-Qiu; Hou, Xue-Wen

    2006-12-01

    The cDNA of Alocasia macrorrhiza lectin (aml, GenBank accession number: DQ340864) was cloned by RACE-PCR and its characteristics were predicted by various bioinformatics tools. GSPs (Gene Specific Primers) were designed according to the conserved regions of the genes encoded for lectins and similar proteins from the same family Araceae. Total RNAs were extracted from the tubers of A macrorrhiza by Qiagen RNeasy mini kit. The 3'- and 5'-RACE-PCRs were performed with the isolated total RNAs by SMART(TM)RACE cDNA amplification kit from BD Biosciences Clontech Company, respectively. The purified PCR products were ligated with pMD 18-T vector, and the confirmed clones were sequenced. The full-length cDNA of aml was obtained by combination of 3'- and 5'-end sequences, and was then confirmed by full-length 3'-RACE-PCR. The aml cDNA is 1 124 bp long. The deduced amino acid length of AML lectin is 270 aa. Its relative molecular weight is 29.7 kD. The results of homologous analysis showed a high similarity between AML and other mannose-binding lectins and similar proteins from Araceae family. Two typical B-lectin domains and three mannose- binding motifs were found in the sequence of AML. With all these taken together, it can be concluded that this newly cloned aml cDNA encodes for a mannose-binding lectin.

  11. Replacement of the active surface of a thermophile protein by that of a homologous mesophile protein through structure-guided 'protein surface grafting'.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Divya; Kumar, Vijay; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Ahmed, Shubbir; Sharma, Swati; Datt, Manish; Singh, Balvinder; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2008-11-01

    Using several tens of rationally-selected substitutions, insertions and deletions of predominantly non-contiguous residues, we have remodeled the solvent-exposed face of a beta sheet functioning as the substrate-binding and catalytically-active groove of a thermophile cellulase (Rhodothermus marinus Cel12A) to cause it to resemble, both in its structure and function, the equivalent groove of a mesophile homolog (Trichoderma reesei Cel12A). The engineered protein, a mesoactive-thermostable cellulase (MT Cel12A) displays the temperature of optimal function of its mesophile ancestor and the temperature of melting of its thermophile ancestor, suggesting that such 'grafting' of a mesophile-derived surface onto a thermophile-derived structural scaffold can potentially help generate novel enzymes that recombine structural and functional features of homologous proteins sourced from different domains of life.

  12. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding the Drosophila homolog of the HMG-box SSRP family that recognizes specific DNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, S L; Housman, D E; Lippard, S J

    1993-01-01

    Recently an HMG-box protein denoted SSRP1, for structure-specific recognition protein 1, has been discovered which binds to specific DNA structural elements such as the bent, unwound conformations that occur upon the formation of intrastrand crosslinks by the anticancer drug cisplatin. The SSRP family includes the mouse protein T160, which recognizes recombination signal sequences. In order to delineate functional domains more clearly, a homolog of SSRP1 was cloned from Drosophila melanogaster. This homolog maps to polytene region 60A (1-4) and shares 54% identity with human SSRP1. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences among SSRP family members reveals 48% identity, with structural conservation in the carboxy terminus of the HMG box as well as domains of highly charged residues. Interestingly, however, the most highly conserved regions of the protein are in the less well understood amino terminus, strongly suggesting that this portion of the protein is critical for its function. Images PMID:8479916

  13. Deterrent activity of plant lectins on cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) oviposition.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Amin; Van Damme, Els J M; Peumans, Willy J; Smagghe, Guy

    2006-09-01

    A set of 14 plant lectins was screened in a binary choice bioassay for inhibitory activity on cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) oviposition. Coating of chickpea seeds (Cicer arietinum L.) with a 0.05% (w/v) solution of plant lectins caused a significant reduction in egg laying. Control experiments with heat inactivated lectin and BSA indicated that the observed deterrent effects are specific and require carbohydrate-binding activity. However, no clear correlation could be established between deterrent activity and sugar-binding specificity/molecular structure of the lectins. Increasing the insect density reduced the inhibitory effect of the lectins confirming that female insects are capable of adjusting their oviposition rates as a function of host availability.

  14. The Structure and Dynamics of Massive Early-Type Galaxies: On Homology, Isothermality, and Isotropy Inside One Effective Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, L. V. E.; Bolton, A.; Treu, T.; Czoske, O.; Auger, M. W.; Barnabè, M.; Vegetti, S.; Gavazzi, R.; Moustakas, L. A.; Burles, S.

    2009-09-01

    Based on 58 SLACS strong-lens early-type galaxies (ETGs) with direct total-mass and stellar-velocity dispersion measurements, we find that inside one effective radius massive elliptical galaxies with M eff gsim 3 × 1010 M sun are well approximated by a power-law ellipsoid, with an average logarithmic density slope of langγ'LDrang ≡ -dlog(ρtot)/dlog(r) = 2.085+0.025 -0.018 (random error on mean) for isotropic orbits with β r = 0, ±0.1 (syst.) and σ_{γ'} ≲ 0.20^{+0.04}_{-0.02} intrinsic scatter (all errors indicate the 68% CL). We find no correlation of γ'LD with galaxy mass (M eff), rescaled radius (i.e., R einst/R eff) or redshift, despite intrinsic differences in density-slope between galaxies. Based on scaling relations, the average logarithmic density slope can be derived in an alternative manner, fully independent from dynamics, yielding langγ'SRrang = 1.959 ± 0.077. Agreement between the two values is reached for langβ r rang = 0.45 ± 0.25, consistent with mild radial anisotropy. This agreement supports the robustness of our results, despite the increase in mass-to-light ratio with total galaxy mass: M eff vprop L 1.363±0.056 V,eff. We conclude that massive ETGs are structurally close to homologous with close to isothermal total density profiles (lsim10% intrinsic scatter) and have at most some mild radial anisotropy. Our results provide new observational limits on galaxy formation and evolution scenarios, covering 4 Gyr look-back time.

  15. Structure-specific endonucleases Xpf and Mus81 play overlapping but essential roles in DNA repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Koji; Narita, Takeo; Thanh Van, Pham; Iijima, Junko; Hirota, Kouji; Keka, Islam Shamima; Mohiuddin; Okawa, Katsuya; Hori, Tetsuya; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland; Whitby, Matthew C.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Kitagawa, Katsumi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occur frequently during replication in sister chromatids, and are dramatically increased when cells are exposed to chemotherapeutic agents including camptothecin. Such DSBs are efficiently repaired specifically by homologous recombination (HR) with the intact sister chromatid. HR hence plays pivotal roles in cellular proliferation and cellular tolerance to camptothecin. Mammalian cells carry several structure-specific endonucleases, such as Xpf-Ercc1 and Mus81-Eme1, in which Xpf and Mus81 are the essential subunits for enzymatic activity. Here we show the functional overlap between Xpf and Mus81 by conditionally inactivating Xpf in the chicken DT40 cell line, which has no Mus81 ortholog. Although mammalian cells deficient in either Xpf or Mus81 are viable, Xpf inactivation in DT40 cells was lethal, resulting in a marked increase in the number of spontaneous chromosome breaks. Similarly, inactivation of both Xpf and Mus81 in human HeLa cells and murine embryonic stem cells caused numerous spontaneous chromosome breaks. Furthermore, the phenotype of Xpf-deficient DT40 cells was reversed by ectopic expression of human Mus81-Eme1 or human Xpf-Ercc1 heterodimers. These observations indicate the functional overlap of Xpf-Ercc1 and Mus81-Eme1 in the maintenance of genomic DNA. Both Mus81-Eme1 and Xpf-Ercc1 contribute to the completion of HR as evidenced by the following data that the expression of Mus81-Eme1 or Xpf-Ercc1 diminished the number of camptothecin-induced chromosome breaks in Xpf-deficient DT40 cells, and preventing early steps in HR by deleting XRCC3 suppressed the inviability of Xpf-deficient DT40 cells. In summary, Xpf and Mus81 have a substantially overlapping function in completion of HR. PMID:23576554

  16. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu; Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki; Irimura, Tatsuro; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  17. Architecture of Deinococcus geothermalis biofilms on glass and steel: a lectin study.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Minna; Neu, Thomas R; Raulio, Mari; Kolari, Marko; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2008-07-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis is resistant to chemical and physical stressors and forms tenuous biofilms in paper industry. The architecture of its biofilms growing on glass and on stainless acid proof steel was studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescent lectins and nanobeads as in situ probes. Hydrophobic nanobeads adhered to the biofilms but did not penetrate to biofilm interior. In contrast, the biofilms were readily permeable towards many different lectins. A skeletal network of glycoconjugates, reactive with Dolichos biflorus and Maclura pomifera lectins, was prominent in the space inside the biofilm colony core but absent on the exterior. Cells in the core space of the biofilm were interconnected by a network of adhesion structures, reactive with Amaranthus caudatus lectin but with none of the 65 other tested lectins. The glycoconjugates connecting the individual cells to steel reacted with Phaseolus vulgaris lectin whereas those connecting to glass mainly reacted with A. caudatus lectin. Envelopes of all cells in the D. geothermalis biofilm reacted with several other lectins, with many different specificities. We conclude that numerous different glycoconjugates are involved in the adhesion and biofilm formation of D. geothermalis, possibly contributing its unique survival capacity when exposed to dehydration, biocidal chemicals and other extreme conditions.

  18. Analysis of meiotic chromosome structure and behavior in Robertsonian heterozygotes of Ellobius tancrei (Rodentia, Cricetidae): a case of monobrachial homology

    PubMed Central

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Tambovtseva, Valentina; Romanenko, Svetlana; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Synaptonemal complex (SC) chains were revealed in semisterile intraspecific F1 hybrids of Ellobius tancrei Blasius, 1884 (2n = 49, NF=56 and 2n=50, NF=56), heterozygous for Robertsonian (Rb) translocations. Chains were formed by Rb submetacentrics with monobrachial homology. Chromosome synapsis in spermatocytes of these hybrids was disturbed, apparently because of the problematic release of the chromosomes from the SC chains. These hybrids suffer from low fertility, and our data support the opinion that this is because a formation of Rb metacentrics with monobrachial homology within different races of the same species might be an initial event for the divergence of chromosomal forms. PMID:26752380

  19. A Structural Investigation into Oct4 Regulation by Orphan Nuclear Receptors, Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF) and Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1).

    PubMed

    Weikum, Emily R; Tuntland, Micheal L; Murphy, Michael N; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-10-27

    Oct4 is a transcription factor required for maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in stem cells. Prior to differentiation, Oct4 must be silenced to allow for the development of the three germ layers in the developing embryo. This fine-tuning is controlled by the nuclear receptors, liver receptor homolog-1 and germ cell nuclear factor. Liver receptor homolog-1 is responsible for driving the expression of Oct4 where germ cell nuclear factor represses its expression upon differentiation. Both receptors bind to a DR0 motif located within the Oct4 promoter. Here, we present the first structure of mouse germ cell nuclear factor DNA binding domain in complex with the Oct4 DR0. The overall structure revealed two molecules bound in a head-to-tail fashion on opposite sides of the DNA. Additionally, we solved the structure of the human liver receptor homolog-1 DNA binding domain bound to the same element. We explore the structural elements that govern Oct4 recognition by these two nuclear receptors.

  20. Structural insights into transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) from homology modeling, flexible docking, and mutational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoonji; Ryu, HyungChul; Kang, Dong Wook; Lee, Jeewoo; Lazar, Jozsef; Pearce, Larry V.; Pavlyukovets, Vladimir A.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Choi, Sun

    2011-04-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel composed of four monomers with six transmembrane helices (TM1-TM6). TRPV1 is found in the central and peripheral nervous system, and it is an important therapeutic target for pain relief. We describe here the construction of a tetrameric homology model of rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1). We experimentally evaluated by mutational analysis the contribution of residues of rTRPV1 contributing to ligand binding by the prototypical TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). We then performed docking analysis using our homology model. The docking results with capsaicin and RTX showed that our homology model was reliable, affording good agreement with our mutation data. Additionally, the binding mode of a simplified RTX (sRTX) ligand as predicted by the modeling agreed well with those of capsaicin and RTX, accounting for the high binding affinity of the sRTX ligand for TRPV1. Through the homology modeling, docking and mutational studies, we obtained important insights into the ligand-receptor interactions at the molecular level which should prove of value in the design of novel TRPV1 ligands.

  1. 3D structure prediction of human β1-adrenergic receptor via threading-based homology modeling for implications in structure-based drug designing.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Saeed, Maria; Halim, Sobia Ahsan; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease of left ventricular dysfunction accompanied by impairment of the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) signal cascade. The disturbed β1-AR function may be based on an elevated sympathetic tone observed in patients with heart failure. Prolonged adrenergic stimulation may induce metabolic and electrophysiological disturbances in the myocardium, resulting in tachyarrhythmia that leads to the development of heart failure in human and sudden death. Hence, β1-AR is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop effective and specific drug against this tempting pharmaceutical target is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure of Homo sapiens β1-AR (hsβADR1). This study encompasses elucidation of 3D structural and physicochemical properties of hsβADR1 via threading-based homology modeling. Furthermore, the docking performance of several docking programs including Surflex-Dock, FRED, and GOLD were validated by re-docking and cross-docking experiments. GOLD and Surflex-Dock performed best in re-docking and cross docking experiments, respectively. Consequently, Surflex-Dock was used to predict the binding modes of four hsβADR1 agonists. This study provides clear understanding of hsβADR1 structure and its binding mechanism, thus help in providing the remedial solutions of cardiovascular, effective treatment of asthma and other diseases caused by malfunctioning of the target protein.

  2. Homology among acid proteases: comparison of crystal structures at 3A resolution of acid proteases from Rhizopus chinensis and Endothia parasitica.

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, E; Swan, I D; Liu, M; Davies, D R; Jenkins, J A; Tickle, I J; Blundell, T L

    1977-01-01

    The molecular structures of two fungal acid proteases at 3 A resolution have been compared, and found to have similar secondary and tertiary folding. These enzymes are bilobal and have a pronounced cleft between the two lobes. This cleft has been identified as the active site region from inhibitor binding studies. The results of the comparison are discussed in terms of homology among the acid proteases in general. Images PMID:322132

  3. Effects of detergents on the oligomeric structures of hemolytic lectin CEL-III as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Goda, Shuichiro; Sadakata, Hitoshi; Unno, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic lectin CEL-III isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata forms transmembrane pores by self-oligomerization in target cell membranes. It also formed soluble oligomers in aqueous solution upon binding with specific carbohydrates under conditions of high pH and a high salt concentration. The size of the soluble CEL-III oligomers decreased when treated with detergents such as Triton X-100 and SDS. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements suggested that the dissociated unit of the oligomer was a tightly associated CEL-III heptamer. Without detergents in solution, these heptamers further assembled into larger 21mer oligomers, comprising three heptamers held together by relatively weak hydrophobic interactions.

  4. A putative carbohydrate-binding domain of the lactose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin has a similar amino acid sequence to that of the L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus anti-H(O) lectin.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1995-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a lactose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin II (CSA-II) was determined using a protein sequencer. After digestion of CSA-II with endoproteinase Lys-C or Asp-N, the resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then subjected to sequence analysis. Comparison of the complete amino acid sequence of CSA-II with the sequences of other leguminous seed lectins revealed regions of extensive homology. The amino acid sequence of a putative carbohydrate-binding domain of CSA-II was found to be similar to those of several anti-H(O) leguminous lectins, especially to that of the L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I).

  5. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes.

  6. Evidence that a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin is encoded by a family of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gitt, M A; Barondes, S H

    1986-01-01

    Two cDNA clones were isolated by immunoscreening a human hepatoma cDNA library with an antiserum that bound specifically to a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin with Mr of approximately 14,000. The deduced amino acid sequences of the inserts of these two clones show considerable homology with each other, the sequence of chicken skin beta-galactoside-binding lectin, and eight peptides derived from purified human lung lectin of Mr approximately 14,000. However, the sequence differences between the two hepatoma clones as well as among each clone and the lung peptides suggest that at least three variants of the gene encoding this lectin are expressed in human tissue. Images PMID:3020551

  7. Multifactorial resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to high-energy proton radiation: role of spore structural components and the homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Reitz, Günther; Li, Zuofeng; Klein, Stuart; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2012-11-01

    The space environment contains high-energy charged particles (e.g., protons, neutrons, electrons, α-particles, heavy ions) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources or trapped in the radiation belts. Protons constitute the majority (87%) of high-energy charged particles. Spores of Bacillus species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. In this study, spores of different Bacillus subtilis strains were used to study the effects of high energetic proton irradiation on spore survival. Spores of the wild-type B. subtilis strain [mutants deficient in the homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathways and mutants deficient in various spore structural components such as dipicolinic acid (DPA), α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) formation, spore coats, pigmentation, or spore core water content] were irradiated as air-dried multilayers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons with 218 MeV protons [with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 0.4 keV/μm] to various final doses up to 2500 Gy. Spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to proton radiation than wild-type spores, indicating that both HR and NHEJ DNA repair pathways are needed for spore survival. Spores lacking DPA, α/β-type SASP, or with increased core water content were also significantly more sensitive to proton radiation, whereas the resistance of spores lacking pigmentation or spore coats was essentially identical to that of the wild-type spores. Our results indicate that α/β-type SASP, core water content, and DPA play an important role in spore resistance to high-energy proton irradiation, suggesting their essential function as radioprotectants of the spore interior.

  8. Multifactorial Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spores to High-Energy Proton Radiation: Role of Spore Structural Components and the Homologous Recombination and Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Günther; Li, Zuofeng; Klein, Stuart; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The space environment contains high-energy charged particles (e.g., protons, neutrons, electrons, α-particles, heavy ions) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources or trapped in the radiation belts. Protons constitute the majority (87%) of high-energy charged particles. Spores of Bacillus species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. In this study, spores of different Bacillus subtilis strains were used to study the effects of high energetic proton irradiation on spore survival. Spores of the wild-type B. subtilis strain [mutants deficient in the homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathways and mutants deficient in various spore structural components such as dipicolinic acid (DPA), α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) formation, spore coats, pigmentation, or spore core water content] were irradiated as air-dried multilayers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons with 218 MeV protons [with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 0.4 keV/μm] to various final doses up to 2500 Gy. Spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to proton radiation than wild-type spores, indicating that both HR and NHEJ DNA repair pathways are needed for spore survival. Spores lacking DPA, α/β-type SASP, or with increased core water content were also significantly more sensitive to proton radiation, whereas the resistance of spores lacking pigmentation or spore coats was essentially identical to that of the wild-type spores. Our results indicate that α/β-type SASP, core water content, and DPA play an important role in spore resistance to high-energy proton irradiation, suggesting their essential function as radioprotectants of the spore interior. Key Words: Bacillus—Spores—DNA repair—Protection—High-energy proton radiation. Astrobiology 12, 1069–1077. PMID:23088412

  9. Homology and causes.

    PubMed

    Van Valen, L M

    1982-09-01

    Homology is resemblance caused by a continuity of information. In biology it is a unified developmental phenomenon. Homologies among and within individuals intergrade in several ways, so historical homology cannot be separated sharply from repetitive homology. Nevertheless, the consequences of historical and repetitive homologies can be mutually contradictory. A detailed discussion of the rise and fall of the "premolar-analogy" theory of homologies of mammalian molar-tooth cusps exemplifies such a contradiction. All other hypotheses of historical homology which are based on repetitive homology, such as the foliar theory of the flower considered phyletically, are suspect.

  10. Structural Studies of Apo Nosl, an Accessory Protein of the Nitrous Oxide Reductase System: Insights from Structural Homology with MerB, a Mercury Resistance Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Taubner, Lara M.; McGuirl, Michele A.; Dooley, David M.; Copie, Valerie

    2006-09-19

    The formation of the unique catalytic tetranuclear copper cluster (CuZ) of nitrous oxide reductase, N2OR, requires the coexpression of a multiprotein assembly apparatus encoded by the nosDFYL operon. NosL, one of the proteins encoded by this transcript, is a 20 kDa lipoprotein of the periplasm that has been shown to bind copper(I), although its function has yet to be detemined. Cu(I) EXAFS data collected on the holo protein demonstrated that features of the copper binding site are consistent with a role for this protein as a metallochaperone, a class of metal ion transporters involved in metal resistance, homeostasis, and metallocluster biosynthesis. To test this hypothesis and to gain insight into other potential functional roles for this protein in the N2OR system, the three-dimensional solution structure of apo NosL has been solved by solution NMR methods. The structure of apo NosL consists of two relatively independent homologous domains that adopt an unusual topology.

  11. Primary structure of a human mitochondrial protein homologous to the bacterial and plant chaperonins and to the 65-kilodalton mycobacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, S; Dudani, A K; Singh, B; Harley, C B; Gupta, R S

    1989-01-01

    The complete cDNA for a human mitochondrial protein designated P1, which was previously identified as a microtubule-related protein, has been cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of P1 shows strong homology (40 to 50% identical residues and an additional 20% conservative replacements) to the 65-kilodalton major antigen of mycobacteria, to the GroEL protein of Escherichia coli, and to the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (rubisco) subunit binding protein of plant chloroplasts. Similar to the case with the latter two proteins, which have been shown to act as chaperonins in the posttranslational assembly of oligomeric protein structures, it is suggested that P1 may play a similar role in mammalian cells. The observed high degree of homology between human P1 and mycobacterial antigen also suggests the possible involvement of this protein in certain autoimmune diseases. Images PMID:2568584

  12. Affinity of a galactose-specific legume lectin from Dolichos lablab to adenine revealed by X-ray cystallography.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Kartika N; Latha, Vakada Lavanya; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar; Suguna, Kaza

    2013-07-01

    Crystal structure analysis of a galactose-specific lectin from a leguminous food crop Dolichos lablab (Indian lablab beans) has been carried out to obtain insights into its quaternary association and lectin-carbohydrate interactions. The analysis led to the identification of adenine binding sites at the dimeric interfaces of the heterotetrameric lectin. Structural details of similar adenine binding were reported in only one legume lectin, Dolichos biflorus, before this study. Here, we present the structure of the galactose-binding D. lablab lectin at different pH values in the native form and in complex with galactose and adenine. This first structure report on this lectin also provides a high resolution atomic view of legume lectin-adenine interactions. The tetramer has two canonical and two DB58-like interfaces. The binding of adenine, a non-carbohydrate ligand, is found to occur at four hydrophobic sites at the core of the tetramer at the DB58-like dimeric interfaces and does not interfere with the carbohydrate-binding site. To support the crystallographic observations, the adenine binding was further quantified by carrying out isothermal calorimetric titration. By this method, we not only estimated the affinity of the lectin to adenine but also showed that adenine binds with negative cooperativity in solution.

  13. Sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) invariant chain and class II major histocompatibility complex: sequencing and structural analysis using 3D homology modelling.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniela S P; Reis, Marta I R; Nascimento, Diana S; do Vale, Ana; Pereira, Pedro J B; dos Santos, Nuno M S

    2007-07-01

    The present manuscript reports for the first time the sequencing and characterisation of sea bass (sb) MHCII alpha and beta chains and Ii chain cDNAs as well as their expression analysis under resting state. 3D homology modelling, using crystal structures from mammalian orthologues, has been used to illustrate and support putative structural homologies of the sea bass counterparts. The sbIi cDNA consists of 96 bp of 5'-UTR, a 843 bp open reading frame (ORF) and 899 bp of 3'-UTR including a canonical polyadenylation signal 16 nucleotides before the polyadenylation tail. The ORF was translated into a 280 amino acid sequence, in which all characteristic domains found in the Ii p41 human form could be identified, including the cytoplasmic N-terminus domain, the transmembrane (TM) region, the CLIP domain, the trimerization domain and the thyroglobulin (Tg) type I domain. The trimerization and Tg domains of sbIi were successfully modelled using the human counterparts as templates. Four different sequences of each class II alpha and beta MHCII were obtained from a single fish, apparently not derived from a single locus. All the characteristic features of the MHCII chain structure could be identified in the predicted ORF of sea bass alpha and beta sequences, consisting of leader peptide (LP), alpha1/beta1 and alpha2/beta2 domains, connecting peptide and TM and cytoplasmic regions. Furthermore, independently of the HLA-DR crystal structure used as template in homology modelling, a similar predicted 3D structure and trimeric quaternary architecture was obtained for sbMHC, with major deviations occurring only within the sea bass MHCII alpha1 domain.

  14. Structural insights into a novel interkingdom signaling circuit by cartography of the ligand-binding sites of the homologous quorum sensing LuxR-family.

    PubMed

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Degrassi, Giuliano; Venturi, Vittorio; Lamba, Doriano

    2013-10-15

    Recent studies have identified a novel interkingdom signaling circuit, via plant signaling molecules, and a bacterial sub-family of LuxR proteins, bridging eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Indeed pivotal plant-bacteria interactions are regulated by the so called Plant Associated Bacteria (PAB) LuxR solo regulators that, although closely related to the quorum sensing (QS) LuxR family, do not bind or respond to canonical quorum sensing N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), but only to specific host plant signal molecules. The large body of structural data available for several members of the QS LuxR family complexed with different classes of ligands (AHLs and other compounds), has been exploited to dissect the cartography of their regulatory domains through structure-based multiple sequence alignments, structural superimposition and a comparative analysis of the contact residues involved in ligand binding. In the absence of experimentally determined structures of members of the PAB LuxR solos subfamily, an homology model of its prototype OryR is presented, aiming to elucidate the architecture of its ligand-binding site. The obtained model, in combination with the cartography of the regulatory domains of the homologous QS LuxRs, provides novel insights into the 3D structure of its ligand-binding site and unveils the probable molecular determinants responsible for differences in selectivity towards specific host plant signal molecules, rather than to canonical QS compounds.

  15. Proteins with an Euonymus lectin-like domain are ubiquitous in Embryophyta

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cloning of the Euonymus lectin led to the discovery of a novel domain that also occurs in some stress-induced plant proteins. The distribution and the diversity of proteins with an Euonymus lectin (EUL) domain were investigated using detailed analysis of sequences in publicly accessible genome and transcriptome databases. Results Comprehensive in silico analyses indicate that the recently identified Euonymus europaeus lectin domain represents a conserved structural unit of a novel family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins, which will further be referred to as the Euonymus lectin (EUL) family. The EUL domain is widespread among plants. Analysis of retrieved sequences revealed that some sequences consist of a single EUL domain linked to an unrelated N-terminal domain whereas others comprise two in tandem arrayed EUL domains. A new classification system for these lectins is proposed based on the overall domain architecture. Evolutionary relationships among the sequences with EUL domains are discussed. Conclusion The identification of the EUL family provides the first evidence for the occurrence in terrestrial plants of a highly conserved plant specific domain. The widespread distribution of the EUL domain strikingly contrasts the more limited or even narrow distribution of most other lectin domains found in plants. The apparent omnipresence of the EUL domain is indicative for a universal role of this lectin domain in plants. Although there is unambiguous evidence that several EUL domains possess carbohydrate-binding activity further research is required to corroborate the carbohydrate-binding properties of different members of the EUL family. PMID:19930663

  16. Chemical modification studies on a lectin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast).

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, M; Basu, J; Ghosh, A; Chakrabarti, P

    1987-01-01

    The effect of chemical modification on a galactose-specific lectin isolated from a fatty acid auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated in order to identify the type of amino acids involved in its agglutinating activity. Modification of 50 free amino groups with succinic anhydride or citraconic anhydride led to an almost complete loss of activity. This could not be protected by the inhibitory sugar methyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside. Treatment with N-bromosuccinimide and N-acetylimidazole, for the modification of tryptophan and tyrosine residues, did not affect lectin activity. Modification of carboxy groups with glycine ethyl ester greatly affected lectin activity, although sugars afford partial protection. Modification of four thiol groups with N-ethylmaleimide was accompanied by a loss of 85% of the agglutinating activity, and two thiol groups were found to be present at the sugar-binding site of the lectin. Modification of 18 arginine residues with cyclohexane-1,2-dione and 26 histidine residues with ethoxyformic anhydride led to a loss of lectin activity. However, in these cases, modification was not protected by the abovementioned inhibitory sugar, suggesting the absence of these groups at the sugar-binding site. In all the cases, immunodiffusion studies with modified lectin showed no gross structural changes which could disrupt antigenic sites of the lectin. Images Fig. 5. PMID:3128265

  17. Comparison of a homology model and the crystallographic structure of human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) in a structure-based identification of inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguet, Laurence; Zhang, Ziding; Barbier, Maryse; Grigorov, Martin G.

    2006-02-01

    Human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) catalyzes the interconversion of cortisone into active cortisol. 11βHSD1 inhibition is a tempting target for the treatment of a host of human disorders that might benefit from blockade of glucocorticoid action, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes type 2. Here, we report an in silico screening study aimed at identifying new selective inhibitors of human 11βHSD1 enzyme. In the first step, homology modeling was employed to build the 3D structure of 11βHSD1. Further, molecular docking was used to validate the predicted model by showing that it was able to discriminate between known 11βHSD1 inhibitors or substrates and non-inhibitors. The homology model was found to reproduce closely the crystal structure that became publicly available in the final stages of this work. Finally, we carried out structure-based virtual screening experiments on both the homology model and the crystallographic structure with a database of 114'000 natural molecules. Among these, 15 molecules were consistently selected as inhibitors based on both the model and crystal structures of the enzyme, implying a good quality for the homology model. Among these putative 11βHSD1 inhibitors, two were flavonone derivatives that have already been shown to be potent inhibitors of the enzyme.

  18. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  19. Influence of Lectins on Constricting Ring Formation by Arthrobotrys dactyloides.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L; Walter, D E

    1991-04-01

    Incubation of Arthrobotrys dactyloides conidia in the presence of Radopholus citrophilus in lectin solutions with their corresponding sugars did not alter the stimulation of trap formation in solutions containing lectins alone. The lack of inhibition of lectin-stimulated trap formation by sugars or by lectin denaturation and the lack of lectin specificity indicate that the carbohydrate-binding regions of the particular lectins studied are not the stimulatory moieties of these macromolecules.

  20. Structural Characterization of the E2 Domain of APL-1, a C. Elegans Homolog of Human Amyloid Precursor Protein, and its Heparin Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopes, J.; Liu, X; Xu, X; Demeler, B; Folta-Stogniew, E; Li, C; Ha, Y

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid {beta}-peptide deposit found in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer disease is derived from a large heparin-binding protein precursor APP. The biological function of APP and its homologs is not precisely known. Here we report the x-ray structure of the E2 domain of APL-1, an APP homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, and compare it to the human APP structure. We also describe the structure of APL-1 E2 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a highly negatively charged disaccharide, which reveals an unexpected binding pocket between the two halves of E2. Based on the crystal structure, we are able to map, using site-directed mutagenesis, a surface groove on E2 to which heparin may bind. Our biochemical data also indicate that the affinity of E2 for heparin is influenced by pH: at pH 5, the binding appears to be much stronger than that at neutral pH. This property is likely caused by histidine residues in the vicinity of the mapped heparin binding site and could be important for the proposed adhesive function of APL-1.

  1. Structural Characterization of the E2 Domain of APL-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans Homolog of Human Amyloid Precursor Protein, and Its Heparin Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Hoopes, James T.; Liu, Xuying; Xu, Xiaomeng; Demeler, Borries; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa; Li, Chris; Ha, Ya

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid β-peptide deposit found in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer disease is derived from a large heparin-binding protein precursor APP. The biological function of APP and its homologs is not precisely known. Here we report the x-ray structure of the E2 domain of APL-1, an APP homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, and compare it to the human APP structure. We also describe the structure of APL-1 E2 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a highly negatively charged disaccharide, which reveals an unexpected binding pocket between the two halves of E2. Based on the crystal structure, we are able to map, using site-directed mutagenesis, a surface groove on E2 to which heparin may bind. Our biochemical data also indicate that the affinity of E2 for heparin is influenced by pH: at pH 5, the binding appears to be much stronger than that at neutral pH. This property is likely caused by histidine residues in the vicinity of the mapped heparin binding site and could be important for the proposed adhesive function of APL-1. PMID:19906646

  2. Seasonal lectin binding variations of thumb pad in the frog (Pelophylax ridibundus).

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Engin; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2014-01-01

    The thumb pad is one of the most common secondary sexual characteristics in frogs. Although it is known that amphibian skin has affinity for several lectins, there is no report regarding lectin-binding affinity of the thumb pad or its structural components. This study investigated localization and seasonal variation of specific carbohydrate moieties of glycoconjugates in both the epidermal and dermal components of the frog thumb pad at the light microscopic level using lectin histochemistry. The study consisted of four seasonal groups of the frog species, Pelophylax ridibundus (Synonym of Rana ridibunda): active, prehibernating, hibernating and posthibernating. Four horseradish peroxidase conjugated lectins were employed. It was found that dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and ulex europaeus (UEAI) gave positive reactions in both epidermal layers and breeding glands. These three lectins bound specific secretory cells in the breeding glands, and the distribution of the cells and epithelial lectin reactions exhibited seasonal changes. In addition, UEA-I and peanut agglutinin (PNA) showed an affinity in granular glands and the granular zone of mixed glands. Generally, epidermal lectin binding showed dense affinity during the posthibernation period. DBA, UEA-I, and WGA-specific cells in the mucous gland decreased gradually until the posthibernation period. These findings suggest that differences of lectin binding in the thumb pad may be related to functional activities and, thus, seasonal adaptations. Moreover, the presence of specific lectin-binding cells in the breeding glands indicated that they consisted of heterogeneous secretory cell composition or that the cells were at different secretory stages.

  3. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  4. Structural and functional analyses of a yeast mitochondrial ribosomal protein homologous to ribosomal protein S15 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H; Ellis, S R

    1990-01-01

    We have purified a small subunit mitochondrial ribosomal protein, MRPS28p, from the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sequence from the amino terminus of MRPS28p was used to design a degenerate oligonucleotide that was complementary to the MRPS28 gene. The MRPS28 gene was isolated and its sequence determined. The MRPS28 sequence encodes a 28 kDa protein that has a region of homology with ribosomal protein S15 of E. coli. This region spans the entire length of the E. coli protein, but as MRPS28p is larger, includes only the portion of the MRPS28p sequence from amino acids 150 to 238. Based on this homology, we predict that MRPS28p, like E. coli S15, interacts directly with small subunit rRNA and functions as an early protein in ribosome assembly. Cells carrying a disrupted chromosomal copy of MRPS28 are unable to respire and spontaneously lose portions of their mitochondrial genomes at a high frequency. These phenotypes are consistent with an essential role for MRPS28p in the assembly and/or function of the mitochondrial ribosome. Images PMID:2263452

  5. Structure of sorting nexin 11 (SNX11) reveals a novel extended phox homology (PX) domain critical for inhibition of SNX10-induced vacuolation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinxin; Xu, Tingting; Wu, Bin; Ye, Yinghua; You, Xiaojuan; Shu, Xiaodong; Pei, Duanqing; Liu, Jinsong

    2013-06-07

    Sorting nexins are phox homology (PX) domain-containing proteins involved in diverse intracellular endosomal trafficking pathways. The PX domain binds to certain phosphatidylinositols and is recruited to vesicles rich in these lipids. The structure of the PX domain is highly conserved, containing a three-stranded β-sheet, followed by three α-helices. Here, we report the crystal structures of truncated human SNX11 (sorting nexin 11). The structures reveal that SNX11 contains a novel PX domain, hereby named the extended PX (PXe) domain, with two additional α-helices at the C terminus. We demonstrate that these α-helices are indispensible for the in vitro functions of SNX11. We propose that this PXe domain is present in SNX10 and is responsible for the vacuolation activity of SNX10. Thus, this novel PXe domain constitutes a structurally and functionally important PX domain subfamily.

  6. Crystal Structure of the Cytoplasmic N-Terminal Domain of Subunit I, a Homolog of Subunit a, of V-ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Vyas, Nand K.; Baker, Matthew L.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2012-02-27

    Subunit 'a' is associated with the membrane-bound (VO) complex of eukaryotic vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase acidification machinery. It has also been shown recently to be involved in diverse membrane fusion/secretory functions independent of acidification. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal cytosolic domain from the Meiothermus ruber subunit 'I' homolog of subunit a. The structure is composed of a curved long central {alpha}-helix bundle capped on both ends by two lobes with similar {alpha}/{beta} architecture. Based on the structure, a reasonable model of its eukaryotic subunit a counterpart was obtained. The crystal structure and model fit well into reconstructions from electron microscopy of prokaryotic and eukaryotic vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPases, respectively, clarifying their orientations and interactions and revealing features that could enable subunit a to play a role in membrane fusion/secretion.

  7. Crystal structure and RNA-binding properties of an Hfq homolog from the deep-branching Aquificae: conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Kimberly A; Patterson-West, Jennifer; Randolph, Peter S; Mura, Cameron

    2017-04-01

    The host factor Hfq, as the bacterial branch of the Sm family, is an RNA-binding protein involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA expression and turnover. Hfq facilitates pairing between small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) and their corresponding mRNA targets by binding both RNAs and bringing them into close proximity. Hfq homologs self-assemble into homo-hexameric rings with at least two distinct surfaces that bind RNA. Recently, another binding site, dubbed the `lateral rim', has been implicated in sRNA·mRNA annealing; the RNA-binding properties of this site appear to be rather subtle, and its degree of evolutionary conservation is unknown. An Hfq homolog has been identified in the phylogenetically deep-branching thermophile Aquifex aeolicus (Aae), but little is known about the structure and function of Hfq from basal bacterial lineages such as the Aquificae. Therefore, Aae Hfq was cloned, overexpressed, purified, crystallized and biochemically characterized. Structures of Aae Hfq were determined in space groups P1 and P6, both to 1.5 Å resolution, and nanomolar-scale binding affinities for uridine- and adenosine-rich RNAs were discovered. Co-crystallization with U6 RNA reveals that the outer rim of the Aae Hfq hexamer features a well defined binding pocket that is selective for uracil. This Aae Hfq structure, combined with biochemical and biophysical characterization of the homolog, reveals deep evolutionary conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode, and lays a foundation for further studies of Hfq-associated RNA biology in ancient bacterial phyla.

  8. Differential expression of skin mucus C-type lectin in two freshwater eel species, Anguilla marmorata and Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Komiya, Kaoru; Yamashita, Hiroka; Nakamura, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Two types of lactose-specific lectins, galectin (AJL-1) and C-type lectin (AJL-2), were previously identified in the mucus of adult Anguilla japonica. Here, we compared the expression profiles of these two homologous lectins at the adult and juvenile stages between the tropical eel Anguilla marmorata and the temperate eel A. japonica. Only one lectin, predicted to be an orthologue of AJL-1 by LC-MS/MS, was detected in the mucus of adult A. marmorata. We also found that an orthologous gene to AJL-2 was expressed at very low levels, or not at all, in the skin of adult A. marmorata. However, we detected the gene expression of an AJL-2-orthologue in the skin of juvenile A. marmorata, and a specific antibody also detected the lectin in the juvenile fish epidermis. These findings suggest that expression profiles of mucosal lectins vary during development as well as between species in the Anguilla genus.

  9. Crystal Structure of a Fibroblast Growth Factor Homologous Factor (FHF) Defines a Conserved Surface on FHFs for Binding and Modulation of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, R.; Dover, K; Laezza, F; Shtraizent, N; Huang, X; Tchetchik, D; Eliseenkova, A; Goldfarb, M; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) produce sodium currents that underlie the initiation and propagation of action potentials in nerve and muscle cells. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) bind to the intracellular C-terminal region of the Nav alpha subunit to modulate fast inactivation of the channel. In this study we solved the crystal structure of a 149-residue-long fragment of human FHF2A which unveils the structural features of the homology core domain of all 10 human FHF isoforms. Through analysis of crystal packing contacts and site-directed mutagenesis experiments we identified a conserved surface on the FHF core domain that mediates channel binding in vitro and in vivo. Mutations at this channel binding surface impaired the ability of FHFs to co-localize with Navs at the axon initial segment of hippocampal neurons. The mutations also disabled FHF modulation of voltage-dependent fast inactivation of sodium channels in neuronal cells. Based on our data, we propose that FHFs constitute auxiliary subunits for Navs.

  10. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, M.E.; Chung, A.E.; Wewer, U.M.

    1995-03-20

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from {lambda} genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF-like repeats and the single thyroglobulin-type repeat are each encoded by separate exons. The carboxyl-terminal half of entactin displays sequence homology to the growth factor-like region of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, and in both genes this region is encoded by eight exons. The positions of four introns are also conserved in the homologous region of the two genes. These observations suggest that the entactin gene has evolved via exon shuffling. Finally, several sequence polymorphisms useful for gene linkage analysis were found in the 3{prime} noncoding region of the last exon. 52 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Isolation, characterization, molecular cloning and molecular modelling of two lectins of different specificities from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, L M; Van Damme, E J; Barre, A; Allen, A K; Van Leuven, F; Reynolds, C D; Rouge, P; Peumans, W J

    1999-01-01

    Two lectins have been isolated from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs. From their isolation by affinity chromatography, they are characterized as a mannose-binding lectin (SCAman) and a fetuin-binding lectin (SCAfet). SCAman preferentially binds oligosaccharides with alpha(1,3)- and alpha(1,6)-linked mannopyranosides. It is a tetramer of four identical protomers of approx. 13 kDa containing 119 amino acid residues; it is not glycosylated. The fetuin-binding lectin (SCAfet), which is not inhibited by any simple sugars, is also unglycosylated. It is a tetramer of four identical subunits of approx. 28 kDa containing 244 residues. Each 28 kDa subunit is composed of two 14 kDa domains. Both lectins have been cloned from a cDNA library and sequenced. X-ray crystallographic analysis and molecular modelling studies have demonstrated close relationships in sequence and structure between these lectins and other monocot mannose-binding lectins. A refined model of the molecular evolution of the monocot mannose-binding lectins is proposed. PMID:10229686

  12. Stability of Curcuma longa rhizome lectin: Role of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Himadri; Chattopadhyaya, Rajagopal

    2016-04-01

    Curcuma longa rhizome lectin, a mannose-binding protein of non-seed portions of turmeric, is known to have antifungal, antibacterial and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. We studied the role of complex-type glycans attached to asparagine (Asn) 66 and Asn 110 to elucidate the role of carbohydrates in lectin activity and stability. Apart from the native lectin, the characteristics of a deglycosylated Escherichia coli expressed lectin, high-mannose oligosaccharides at both asparagines and its glycosylation mutants N66Q and N110Q expressed in Pichia pastoris, were compared to understand the relationship between glycosylation and activity. Far UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra, fluorescence emission maximum, hemagglutination assay show no change in secondary or tertiary structures or sugar-binding properties between wild-type and aforementioned recombinant lectins under physiological pH. But reduced agglutination activity and loss of tertiary structure are observed in the acidic pH range for the deglycosylated and the N110Q protein. In thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnCl)-induced unfolding, the wild-type and high-mannose lectins possess higher stability compared with the deglycosylated recombinant lectin and both mutants, as measured by a higher Tm of denaturation or a greater free energy change, respectively. Reversibility experiments after thermal denaturation reveal that deglycosylated proteins tend to aggregate during thermal inactivation but the wild type shows a much greater recovery to the native state upon refolding. These results suggest that N-glycosylation in turmeric lectin is important for the maintenance of its proper folding upon changes in pH, and that the oligosaccharides help in maintaining the active conformation and prevent aggregation in unfolded or partially folded molecules.

  13. Arabidopsis myosin XI sub-domains homologous to the yeast myo2p organelle inheritance sub-domain target subcellular structures in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin XI motor proteins transport plant organelles on the actin cytoskeleton. The Arabidopsis gene family that encodes myosin XI has 13 members, 12 of which have sub-domains within the tail region that are homologous to well-characterized cargo-binding domains in the yeast myosin V myo2p. Little is presently known about the cargo-binding domains of plant myosin XIs. Prior experiments in which most or all of the tail regions of myosin XIs have been fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transiently expressed have often not resulted in fluorescent labeling of plant organelles. We identified 42 amino-acid regions within 12 Arabidopsis myosin XIs that are homologous to the yeast myo2p tail region known to be essential for vacuole and mitochondrial inheritance. A YFP fusion of the yeast region expressed in plants did not label tonoplasts or mitochondria. We investigated whether the homologous Arabidopsis regions, termed by us the “PAL” sub-domain, could associate with subcellular structures following transient expression of fusions with YFP in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven YFP::PAL sub-domain fusions decorated Golgi and six were localized to mitochondria. In general, the myosin XI PAL sub-domains labeled organelles whose motility had previously been observed to be affected by mutagenesis or dominant negative assays with the respective myosins. Simultaneous transient expression of the PAL sub-domains of myosin XI-H, XI-I, and XI-K resulted in inhibition of movement of mitochondria and Golgi. PMID:24187546

  14. The Human Homolog of Escherichia coli Endonuclease V Is a Nucleolar Protein with Affinity for Branched DNA Structures

    PubMed Central

    Laerdahl, Jon K.; Gran Neurauter, Christine; Heggelund, Julie E.; Thorgaard, Eirik; Strøm-Andersen, Pernille; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx) bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV), encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3′ of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV), many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3′-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription. PMID:23139746

  15. Novel eight-coordinated Cd(II) complexes with two homologous pyridine alcohols. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabłońska-Wawrzycka, Agnieszka; Stadnicka, Katarzyna; Masternak, Joanna; Zienkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2012-03-01

    Two novel cadmium(II) complexes with homologous pyridine alcohols: [Cd(2-MeOHPy)2(NO3)2] (1) and [Cd(2-EtOHPy)2(NO3)2] (2) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray crystallographic studies, spectroscopic (IR, 1H and 13C NMR) and thermal properties. IR, NMR and X-ray analysis have confirmed a bidentate fashion of coordination of heteroaromatic alcohols with Cd(II) ions. 2-MeOHPy bound directly to the central ion by N, O-donor atoms giving five-membered chelate ring but 2-EtOHPy formed less stable six-membered chelate ring. In the complex (1) and (2) bidentate nitrate ligands are arranged in cis position for organic ligands. In both cases cadmium(II) ions are eight-coordinated and shape of coordination polyhedral can be described as pseudo-dodecahedron (CdN2O6 chromophore type). The crystal packing of Cd(II) complexes are stabilized by intermolecular classical hydrogen bonds of Osbnd H⋯O and non-classical Csbnd H⋯O type. In addition, there are π-π stacking interactions between almost parallel-displaced pyridine rings of 2-hydroxymethylpyridine in the two neighbouring complex (1) molecules but the hydrogen interactions in (2) are formed by Csbnd H donor group of Py rings and π-electron system of neighbouring one.

  16. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C. )

    1991-03-15

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the {Delta}{sup 9} desaturase is developmentally regulated.

  17. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the African horse sickness virus VP7 trimer by homology modelling.

    PubMed

    Bekker, Shani; Burger, Pieter; van Staden, Vida

    2017-02-03

    VP7 is the major core protein of orbiviruses and is essential for virion assembly. African horse sickness virus (AHSV) VP7 self-assembles into highly insoluble crystalline particles - an attribute that may be related to the role of AHSV VP7 in virus assembly but also prevents crystallization. Given that this inherent insolubility is unique to AHSV VP7, we use amino acid sequence conservation analysis between AHSV VP7 and other orbiviruses to identify putative key residues that drive AHSV VP7 self-assembly. A homology model of the AHSV VP7 trimer was generated to analyze surface properties of the trimer and to identify surface residues as candidates for the AHSV VP7 trimer-trimer interactions that drive AHSV VP7 self-assembly. Nine regions were identified as candidate residues for future site-directed mutagenesis experiments that will likely result in a soluble AHSV VP7 protein. Additionally, we identified putative residues that function in the intermolecular interactions within the AHSV VP7 trimer as well as several epitopes. Given the many previous efforts of solubilizing AHSV VP7, we propose a useful strategy that will yield a soluble AHSV VP7 that can be used to study AHSV assembly and increase yield of recombinant vaccine preparations.

  18. Annotation and genetic diversity of the chicken collagenous lectins.

    PubMed

    Hamzić, Edin; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2015-06-01

    Collectins and ficolins are multimeric proteins present in various tissues and are actively involved in innate immune responses. In chickens, six different collagenous lectins have been characterized so far: mannose-binding lectin (MBL), surfactant protein A (SP-A), collectin 10 (COLEC10), collectin 11 (COLEC11), collectin 12 (COLEC12), lung lectin (LL) and one ficolin (FCN). However, the structural and functional features of the chicken collectins and ficolin are still not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were: (i) to make an overview of the genetic structure and function of chicken collectins and the ficolin, (ii) to investigate the variation in the chicken collectins and the ficolin gene in different chicken populations, and (iii) to assess the presence of MBL gene variants in different chicken populations. We performed comparative genomic analysis using publically available data. The obtained results showed that collectins and ficolins have conserved protein sequences and gene structure across all vertebrate groups and this is especially notable for COLEC10, COLEC11 and COLEC12. For the purpose of studying the genetic variation, 179 animals from 14 populations were genotyped using 31 SNPs covering five genomic regions. The obtained results revealed low level of heterozygosity in the collagenous lectins except for the COLEC12 gene and the LL-SPA-MBL region compared to heterozygosity at neutral microsatellite markers. In addition, the MBL gene variants were assessed in different chicken populations based on the polymorphisms in the promoter region. We observed 10 previously identified MBL variants with A2/A8 and A4 as the most frequent alleles.

  19. Interactions with lectins and agglutination profiles of clinical, food, and environmental isolates of Listeria.

    PubMed Central

    Facinelli, B; Giovanetti, E; Casolari, C; Varaldo, P E

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of preliminary trials with 14 collection strains of Listeria, five lectins (Canavalia ensiformis, concanavalin A; Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I; Helix pomatia agglutinin; Ricinus communis agglutinin; and Triticum vulgaris wheat germ agglutinin) were selected to set up a microtiter agglutination assay. The lectin agglutination profiles of 174 clinical, food, and environmental strains of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Listeria seeligeri were investigated. Data on the standard determination of the antigenic structure were available for clinical strains; nonclinical isolates were assigned to serogroup 1 or 4 with commercial antisera. The listeria-lectin interaction was related to serological type rather than species; in particular, the strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3a, 3b, and 7 were never agglutinated by G. simplicifolia lectin I. The five-lectin set proved to be capable of detecting differences between serologically identical isolates of L. monocytogenes. Of the 150 isolates of this species, 144 were distributed over 15 different lectin agglutination profiles and 6 autoagglutinated, the overall typeability being 96%. However, the profiles encountered among L. monocytogenes isolates were not randomly distributed. With strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 3b, the clinical isolates fell into only two of the eight patterns recorded overall; with strains of serogroup 4 and serovar 4b, food and environmental isolates were distributed over eight of the nine patterns found in total, while clinical isolates were distributed over five patterns. In a comparative study of 15 epidemiologically relevant isolates of L. monocytogenes from five distinct outbreaks, strains with identical phage types and/or DNA fingerprints displayed identical lectin profiles. The heterogeneity of agglutination profiles may form the basis of a new approach to L. monocytogenes typing

  20. Object-oriented Persistent Homology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    quantitative model which correlates the topological persistence of fullerene central cavity with the total curvature energy of the fullerene structure, the proposed method is used for the prediction of fullerene isomer stability. The efficiency and robustness of the present method are verified by more than 500 fullerene molecules. It is shown that the proposed persistent homology based quantitative model offers good predictions of total curvature energies for ten types of fullerene isomers. The present work offers the first example to design object-oriented persistent homology to enhance or preserve desirable features in the original data during the filtration process and then automatically detect or extract the corresponding topological traits from the data. PMID:26705370

  1. Object-oriented Persistent Homology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-15

    quantitative model which correlates the topological persistence of fullerene central cavity with the total curvature energy of the fullerene structure, the proposed method is used for the prediction of fullerene isomer stability. The efficiency and robustness of the present method are verified by more than 500 fullerene molecules. It is shown that the proposed persistent homology based quantitative model offers good predictions of total curvature energies for ten types of fullerene isomers. The present work offers the first example to design object-oriented persistent homology to enhance or preserve desirable features in the original data during the filtration process and then automatically detect or extract the corresponding topological traits from the data.

  2. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    quantitative model which correlates the topological persistence of fullerene central cavity with the total curvature energy of the fullerene structure, the proposed method is used for the prediction of fullerene isomer stability. The efficiency and robustness of the present method are verified by more than 500 fullerene molecules. It is shown that the proposed persistent homology based quantitative model offers good predictions of total curvature energies for ten types of fullerene isomers. The present work offers the first example to design object-oriented persistent homology to enhance or preserve desirable features in the original data during the filtration process and then automatically detect or extract the corresponding topological traits from the data.

  3. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Lactobacillus casei Reveals a Clonal Population Structure with Low Levels of Homologous Recombination▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Diancourt, Laure; Passet, Virginie; Chervaux, Christian; Garault, Peggy; Smokvina, Tamara; Brisse, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    Robust genotyping methods for Lactobacillus casei are needed for strain tracking and collection management, as well as for population biology research. A collection of 52 strains initially labeled L. casei or Lactobacillus paracasei was first subjected to rplB gene sequencing together with reference strains of Lactobacillus zeae, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and other species. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all 52 strains belonged to a single compact L. casei-L. paracasei sequence cluster, together with strain CIP107868 (= ATCC 334) but clearly distinct from L. rhamnosus and from a cluster with L. zeae and CIP103137T (= ATCC 393T). The strains were genotyped using amplified fragment length polymorphism, multilocus sequence typing based on internal portions of the seven housekeeping genes fusA, ileS, lepA, leuS, pyrG, recA, and recG, and tandem repeat variation (multilocus variable-number tandem repeats analysis [MLVA] using nine loci). Very high concordance was found between the three methods. Although amounts of nucleotide variation were low for the seven genes (π ranging from 0.0038 to 0.0109), 3 to 12 alleles were distinguished, resulting in 31 sequence types. One sequence type (ST1) was frequent (17 strains), but most others were represented by a single strain. Attempts to subtype ST1 strains by MLVA, ribotyping, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat characterization, and single nucleotide repeat variation were unsuccessful. We found clear evidence for homologous recombination during the diversification of L. casei clones, including a putative intragenic import of DNA into one strain. Nucleotides were estimated to change four times more frequently by recombination than by mutation. However, statistical congruence between individual gene trees was retained, indicating that recombination is not frequent enough to disrupt the phylogenetic signal. The developed multilocus sequence typing scheme should be useful for future studies of L. casei

  4. A Lectin-Based Glycomic Approach to Identify Characteristic Features of Xenopus Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Yasuko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Shingo; Hirabayashi, Jun; Ito, Yuzuru; Asashima, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface glycans show dynamic changes during cell differentiation. Several glycans are useful biomarkers of tumors, stem cells, and embryogenesis. Glycomic studies have been performed using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, which are powerful tools for glycan structural analysis but are difficult to use for small sample sizes. Recently, a lectin microarray system was developed for profiling cell surface glycome changes to terminal carbohydrate chains and branch types, using sample sizes of a few micrograms. In this study, we used the lectin microarray system for the first time to investigate stage-specific glycomes in Xenopus laevis embryos. Unsupervised cluster analysis of lectin microarray data indicated that glycan profiles changed sequentially during development. Nine lectin probes showed significantly different signals between early and the late-stage embryos: 4 showed higher signals in the early stages, and 5 exhibited higher signals in the late stages. The gene expression profiles of relevant glycosyltransferase genes support the lectin microarray data. Therefore, we have shown that lectin microarray is an effective tool for high-throughput glycan analysis in Xenopus embryogenesis, allowing glycan profiling of early embryos and small biopsy specimens. PMID:23457585

  5. [The influence of lectin isoforms of Bacillus subtilis saprophytic strain IMV B-7014 on viability of normal and cancer cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Pidhors'kyĭ, V S; Kovalenko, E O; Karpova, I S; Sashchuk, O V; Get'man, K I; Ruban, T O; Sukhorada, O M; Lukash, L L

    2012-01-01

    Structural and functional polymorphism of saprophytic bacterium lectin was demonstrated to be due to subunit organization of the molecule as it was shown for many lectins of plant and animal origin. Three isoforms of extracellular sialic acid-specific lectin produced by Bacillus subtilis saprophytic strain IMV B-7014 were discovered that differed for physicochemical and biological properties. The influence of the lectin isoforms on mammalian cells proliferation and morphology in vitro depends both on the subunit organization of the protein molecule and the type of cells under study.

  6. Unusual sugar specificity of banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca and its probable evolutionary origin. Crystallographic and modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, D D; Saikrishnan, K; Kumar, Prashant; Surolia, A; Sekar, K; Vijayan, M

    2005-10-01

    The crystal structure of a complex of methyl-alpha-D-mannoside with banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca reveals two primary binding sites in the lectin, unlike in other lectins with beta-prism I fold which essentially consists of three Greek key motifs. It has been suggested that the fold evolved through successive gene duplication and fusion of an ancestral Greek key motif. In other lectins, all from dicots, the primary binding site exists on one of the three motifs in the three-fold symmetric molecule. Banana is a monocot, and the three motifs have not diverged enough to obliterate sequence similarity among them. Two Greek key motifs in it carry one primary binding site each. A common secondary binding site exists on the third Greek key. Modelling shows that both the primary sites can support 1-2, 1-3, and 1-6 linked mannosides with the second residue interacting in each case primarily with the secondary binding site. Modelling also readily leads to a bound branched mannopentose with the nonreducing ends of the two branches anchored at the two primary binding sites, providing a structural explanation for the lectin's specificity for branched alpha-mannans. A comparison of the dimeric banana lectin with other beta-prism I fold lectins, provides interesting insights into the variability in their quaternary structure.

  7. Black widow spider α-latrotoxin: a presynaptic neurotoxin that shares structural homology with the glucagon-like peptide-1 family of insulin secretagogic hormones

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.; Habener, Joel F.

    2010-01-01

    α-Latrotoxin is a presynaptic neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the black widow spider Latrodectus tredecimguttatus. It exerts toxic effects in the vertebrate central nervous system by depolarizing neurons, by increasing [Ca2+]i and by stimulating uncontrolled exocytosis of neurotransmitters from nerve terminals. The actions of α-latrotoxin are mediated, in part, by a GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor referred to as CIRL or latrophilin. Exendin-4 is also a venom toxin, and it is derived from the salivary gland of the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. It acts as an agonist at the receptor for glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide (GLP-1), thereby stimulating secretion of insulin from pancreatic β-cells of the islets of Langerhans. Here is reported a surprising structural homology between α-latrotoxin and exendin-4 that is also apparent amongst all members of the GLP-1-like family of secretagogic hormones (GLP-1, glucagon, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, secretin, pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide). On the basis of this homology, we report the synthesis and initial characterization of a chimeric peptide (Black Widow GLP-1) that stimulates Ca2+ signaling and insulin secretion in human β-cells and MIN6 insulinoma cells. It is also reported here that the GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors for α-latrotoxin and exendin-4 share highly significant structural similarity in their extracellularly-oriented amino-termini. We propose that molecular mimicry has generated conserved structural motifs in secretagogic toxins and their receptors, thereby explaining the evolution of defense or predatory strategies that are shared in common amongst distantly related species including spiders, lizards, and snakes. Evidently, the toxic effects of α-latrotoxin and exendin-4 are explained by their ability to interact with GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors that normally mediate the actions of endogenous hormones or neuropeptides. PMID:9972293

  8. Computational methods for remote homolog identification.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiu-Feng; Xu, Dong

    2005-12-01

    As more and more protein sequences are available, homolog identification becomes increasingly important for functional, structural, and evolutional studies of proteins. Many homologous proteins were separated a very long time ago in their evolutionary history and thus their sequences share low sequence identity. These remote homologs have become a research focus in bioinformatics over the past decade, and some significant advances have been achieved. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review on computational techniques used in remote homolog identification based on different methods, including sequence-sequence comparison, and sequence-structure comparison, and structure-structure comparison. Other miscellaneous approaches are also summarized. Pointers to the online resources of these methods and their related databases are provided. Comparisons among different methods in terms of their technical approaches, their strengths, and limitations are followed. Studies on proteins in SARS-CoV are shown as an example for remote homolog identification application.

  9. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  10. Linking microfilaments to intracellular membranes: the actin-binding and vesicle-associated protein comitin exhibits a mannose-specific lectin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, E; Fucini, P; Stewart, M; Noegel, A A; Schleicher, M

    1996-01-01

    Comitin is a 24 kDa actin-binding protein from Dictyostelium discoideum that is located primarily on Golgi and vesicle membranes. We have probed the molecular basis of comitin's interaction with both actin and membranes using a series of truncation mutants obtained by expressing the appropriate cDNA in Escherichia coli. Comitin dimerizes in solution; its principle actin-binding activity is located between residues 90 and 135. The N-terminal 135 'core' residues of comitin contain a 3-fold sequence repeat that is homologous to several monocotyledon lectins and which retains key residues that determine these lectins' three-dimensional structure and mannose binding. These repeats of comitin appear to mediate its interaction with mannose residues in glycoproteins or glycolipids on the cytoplasmic surface of membrane vesicles from D.discoideum, and comitin can be released from membranes with mannose. Our data indicate that comitin binds to vesicle membranes via mannose residues and, by way of its interaction with actin, links these membranes to the cytoskeleton. Images PMID:8635456

  11. Rat and human colonic mucins bind to and inhibit adherence lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K; Petri, W A; Innes, D J; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of adherence by Entamoeba histolytica is mediated by a 170-kD Gal/GalNAc inhibitable lectin and is required for cytolysis and phagocytosis of mammalian target cells. We studied the biochemical mechanisms of the in vitro interaction between rat and human colonic mucins and axenic E. histolytica trophozoites. Crude mucus prevented amebic adherence to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by up to 70%. Purification of the colonic mucins by Sepharose 4B chromatography, nuclease digestion, and cesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in a 1,000-fold enrichment of the inhibitory mucins. Purified rat mucin inhibited amebic adherence to and cytolysis of homologous rat colonic epithelial cells. Oxidation and enzymatic cleavage of rat mucin Gal and GalNAc residues completely abrogated mucin inhibition of amebic adherence. The binding of rat 125I-mucin to amebae was galactose specific, saturable, reversible, and pH dependent. A monoclonal antibody specific for the 170-kD amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin completely inhibited the binding of rat 125I-mucin. Rat mucin bound to Affigel affinity purified the amebic lectin from conditioned medium. Colonic mucin glycoproteins act as an important host defense by binding to the parasite's adherence lectin, thus preventing amebic attachment to and cytolysis of host epithelial cells. Images PMID:2890655

  12. The near-atomic cryoEM structure of a flexible filamentous plant virus shows homology of its coat protein with nucleoproteins of animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Lasso, Gorka; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel; Valle, Mikel

    2015-12-16

    Flexible filamentous viruses include economically important plant pathogens. Their viral particles contain several hundred copies of a helically arrayed coat protein (CP) protecting a (+)ssRNA. We describe here a structure at 3.9 Å resolution, from electron cryomicroscopy, of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), a representative of the genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae). Our results allow modeling of the CP and its interactions with viral RNA. The overall fold of PepMV CP resembles that of nucleoproteins (NPs) from the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae), a group of enveloped (-)ssRNA viruses. The main difference between potexvirus CP and phlebovirus NP is in their C-terminal extensions, which appear to determine the characteristics of the distinct multimeric assemblies - a flexuous, helical rod or a loose ribonucleoprotein. The homology suggests gene transfer between eukaryotic (+) and (-)ssRNA viruses.

  13. The near-atomic cryoEM structure of a flexible filamentous plant virus shows homology of its coat protein with nucleoproteins of animal viruses

    PubMed Central

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Lasso, Gorka; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel; Valle, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    Flexible filamentous viruses include economically important plant pathogens. Their viral particles contain several hundred copies of a helically arrayed coat protein (CP) protecting a (+)ssRNA. We describe here a structure at 3.9 Å resolution, from electron cryomicroscopy, of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), a representative of the genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae). Our results allow modeling of the CP and its interactions with viral RNA. The overall fold of PepMV CP resembles that of nucleoproteins (NPs) from the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae), a group of enveloped (-)ssRNA viruses. The main difference between potexvirus CP and phlebovirus NP is in their C-terminal extensions, which appear to determine the characteristics of the distinct multimeric assemblies – a flexuous, helical rod or a loose ribonucleoprotein. The homology suggests gene transfer between eukaryotic (+) and (-)ssRNA viruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11795.001 PMID:26673077

  14. Spectral characters of lectin saccharide interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deyu; Jiang, Duxiao; Yuan, Chunwei

    1999-09-01

    In this paper we report attempts to directly detect the interaction behavior between erythrocyte and lectin concanavalin a (Con A) as well as phaseolus vulgaris (PHA) on the polystyrene film surface. In the procedure, an optical transducer based reflectance interferometry was set up and used to detect the film thickness change during the lectin adsorption and lectin- erythrocyte interaction. The specific interactions among Con A, PHA and erythrocyte were obtained. The solubility monosaccharide inhibition test confirmed that there is affinity between (alpha) - D-mannose and Con A.

  15. Building and Refining Protein Models within Cryo-electron Microscopy Density Maps Based on Homology Modeling and Multi-scale Structure Refinement

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Cheng, Lingpeng; Fang, Qin; Hong Zhou, Z.; Honig, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Summary Automatic modeling methods using cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) density maps as constrains are promising approaches to building atomic models of individual proteins or protein domains. However, their application to large macromolecular assemblies has not been possible largely due to computational limitations inherent to such unsupervised methods. Here we describe a new method, EM-IMO, for building, modifying and refining local structures of protein models using cryoEM maps as a constraint. As a supervised refinement method, EM-IMO allows users to specify parameters derived from inspections, so as to guide, and as a consequence, significantly speed up the refinement. An EM-IMO-based refinement protocol is first benchmarked on a data set of 50 homology models using simulated density maps. A multi-scale refinement strategy that combines EM-IMO-based and molecular dynamics (MD)-based refinement is then applied to build backbone models for the seven conformers of the five capsid proteins in our near-atomic resolution cryoEM map of the grass carp reovirus (GCRV) virion, a member of the aquareovirus genus of the Reoviridae family. The refined models allow us to reconstruct a backbone model of the entire GCRV capsid and provide valuable functional insights that are described in the accompanying publication. Our study demonstrates that the integrated use of homology modeling and a multi-scale refinement protocol that combines supervised and automated structure refinement offers a practical strategy for building atomic models based on medium- to high-resolution cryoEM density maps. PMID:20109465

  16. Molecular structures and antiproliferative activity of side-chain saturated and homologated analogs of 2-chloro-3-(n-alkylamino)-1,4-napthoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sanjima; Jadhav, Mahesh; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Patil, Yogesh; Nethaji, M.; Kasabe, Umesh; Kathawate, Laxmi; Konkimalla, V. Badireenath; Salunke-Gawali, Sunita

    2013-10-01

    Side chain homologated derivatives of 2-chloro-3-(n-alkylamino)-1,4-naphthoquinone {n-alkyl: pentyl; L-5, hexyl; L-6, heptyl; L-7 and octyl; L-8} have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, UV-visible spectroscopy and LC-MS. Compounds, L-4, {n-alkyl: butyl; L-4}, L-6 and L-8 have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The single crystal X-ray structures reveal that L-4 and L-8 crystallizes in P21 space group, while L-6 in P21/c space group. Molecules of L-4 and L-8 from polymeric chains through Csbnd H⋯O and Nsbnd H⋯O close contacts. L-6 is a dimer formed by Nsbnd H⋯O interaction. Slipped π-π stacking interactions are observed between quinonoid and benzenoid rings of L-4 and L-8. Orientations of alkyl group in L-4 and L-8 is on same side of the chain and polymeric chains run opposite to one another to form zip like structure to the alkyl groups. Antiproliferative activities of L-1 to L-8{n-alkyl: methyl; L-1, ethyl; L-2, propyl; L-3 and butyl; L-4} were studied in cancer cells of colon (COLO205), brain (U87MG) and pancreas (MIAPaCa2) where L-1, L-2 and L-3 were active in MIAPaCa2 (L-1 = L-2 > L-3) and COLO205 (L-2 = L-3 > L-1) and inactive in U87MG. From antiproliferative studies with compounds L-1 to L-8 it can be concluded that homologation of 2-chloro-3-(n-alkylamino)-1,4-napthoquinone with saturated methyl groups yielded tissue specific compounds such as L-2 (for MIAPaCa2) and L-3 (for COLO205) with optimal activity.

  17. Structural Motif-Based Homology Modeling of CYP27A1 and Site-Directed Mutational Analyses Affecting Vitamin D Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, David E.; Guo, YuDing; Jia, Zongchao; Jones, Glenville

    2006-01-01

    Human CYP27A1 is a mitochondrial cytochrome P450, which is principally found in the liver and plays important roles in the biological activation of vitamin D3 and in the biosynthesis of bile acids. We have applied a systematic analysis of hydrogen bonding patterns in 11 prokaryotic and mammalian CYP crystal structures to construct a homology-based model of CYP27A1. Docking of vitamin D3 structures into the active site of this model identified potential substrate contact residues in the F-helix, the β-3 sheet, and the β-5 sheet. Site-directed mutagenesis and expression in COS-1 cells confirmed that these positions affect enzymatic activity, in some cases shifting metabolism of 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 to favor 25- or 27-hydroxylation. The results suggest that conserved hydrophobic residues in the β-5 hairpin help define the shape of the substrate binding cavity and that this structure interacts with Phe-248 in the F-helix. Mutations directed toward the β-3a strand suggested a possible heme-binding interaction centered on Asn-403 and a structural role for substrate contact residues Thr-402 and Ser-404. PMID:16500955

  18. A coupling of homology modeling with multiple molecular dynamics simulation for identifying representative conformation of GPCR structures: a case study on human bombesin receptor subtype-3.

    PubMed

    Nowroozi, Amin; Shahlaei, Mohsen

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a computational pipeline was therefore devised to overcome homology modeling (HM) bottlenecks. The coupling of HM with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is useful in that it tackles the sampling deficiency of dynamics simulations by providing good-quality initial guesses for the native structure. Indeed, HM also relaxes the severe requirement of force fields to explore the huge conformational space of protein structures. In this study, the interaction between the human bombesin receptor subtype-3 and MK-5046 was investigated integrating HM, molecular docking, and MD simulations. To improve conformational sampling in typical MD simulations of GPCRs, as in other biomolecules, multiple trajectories with different initial conditions can be employed rather than a single long trajectory. Multiple MD simulations of human bombesin receptor subtype-3 with different initial atomic velocities are applied to sample conformations in the vicinity of the structure generated by HM. The backbone atom conformational space distribution of replicates is analyzed employing principal components analysis. As a result, the averages of structural and dynamic properties over the twenty-one trajectories differ significantly from those obtained from individual trajectories.

  19. Determining structure and function of steroid dehydrogenase enzymes by sequence analysis, homology modeling, and rational mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Duax, William L; Thomas, James; Pletnev, Vladimir; Addlagatta, Anthony; Huether, Robert; Habegger, Lukas; Weeks, Charles M

    2005-12-01

    The short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family of enzymes includes over 6,000 members identified in sequenced genomes. Of these enzymes, approximately 300 have been characterized functionally, and the three-dimensional crystal structures of approximately 40 have been reported. Since some SCOR enzymes are steroid dehydrogenases involved in hypertension, diabetes, breast cancer, and polycystic kidney disease, it is important to characterize the other members of the family for which the biological functions are currently unknown and to determine their three-dimensional structure and mechanism of action. Although the SCOR family appears to have only a single fully conserved residue, it was possible, using bioinformatics methods, to determine characteristic fingerprints composed of 30-40 residues that are conserved at the 70% or greater level in SCOR subgroups. These fingerprints permit reliable prediction of several important structure-function features including cofactor preference, catalytic residues, and substrate specificity. Human type 1 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isomerase (3beta-HSDI) has 30% sequence identity with a human UDP galactose 4-epimerase (UDPGE), a SCOR family enzyme for which an X-ray structure has been reported. Both UDPGE and 3-HSDI appear to trace their origins back to bacterial 3alpha,20beta-HSD. Combining three-dimensional structural information and sequence data on the 3alpha,20beta-HSD, UDPGE, and 3beta-HSDI subfamilies with mutational analysis, we were able to identify the residues critical to the dehydrogenase function of 3-HSDI. We also identified the residues most probably responsible for the isomerase activity of 3beta-HSDI. We test our predictions by specific mutations based on sequence analysis and our structure-based model.

  20. Genes for the Major Structural Components of Thermotogales Species’ Togas Revealed by Proteomic and Evolutionary Analyses of OmpA and OmpB Homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Petrus, Amanda K.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Ranjit, Chaman R.; Wu, Si; Brewer, Heather M.; Gogarten, J Peter; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Noll, Kenneth M.

    2012-06-29

    The unifying structural characteristic of members of the bacterial order Thermotogales is their toga, an unusual cell envelope that includes a loose-fitting sheath around each cell. Only two toga-associated structural proteins have been purified and characterized in Thermotoga maritima: the anchor protein OmpA1 (or Ompa) and the porin OmpB (or Ompb). The gene encoding OmpA1 (ompA1) was cloned and sequenced and later assigned to TM0477 in the genome sequence, but because no peptide sequence was available for OmpB, its gene (ompB) was not annotated. We identified six porin candidates in the genome sequence of T. maritima. Of these candidates, only one, encoded by TM0476, has all the characteristics reported for OmpB and characteristics expected of a porin including predominant b-sheet structure, a carboxy terminus porin anchoring motif, and a porin-specific amino acid composition. We highly enriched a toga fraction of cells for OmpB by sucrose gradient centrifugation and hydroxyapatite chromatography and analyzed it by LC/MS/MS. We found that the only porin candidate that it contained was the TM0476 product. This cell fraction also had b-sheet character as determined by circular dichroism, consistent with its enrichment for OmpB. We conclude that TM0476 encodes OmpB. A phylogenetic analysis of OmpB found orthologs encoded in syntenic locations in the genomes of all but two Thermotogales species. Those without orthologs have putative isofunctional genes in their place. Phylogenetic analyses of OmpA1 revealed that each species of the Thermotogales has one or two OmpA homologs. T. maritima has two OmpA homologs, encoded by ompA1 (TM0477) and ompA2 (TM1729), both of which were found in the toga protein-enriched cell extracts. These annotations of the genes encoding toga structural proteins will guide future examinations of the structure and function of this unusual lineage-defining cell sheath.

  1. Genes for the Major Structural Components of Thermotogales Species’ Togas Revealed by Proteomic and Evolutionary Analyses of OmpA and OmpB Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Petrus, Amanda K.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Ranjit, Chaman; Wu, Si; Brewer, Heather M.; Gogarten, J. Peter; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Noll, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    The unifying structural characteristic of members of the bacterial order Thermotogales is their toga, an unusual cell envelope that includes a loose-fitting sheath around each cell. Only two toga-associated structural proteins have been purified and characterized in Thermotoga maritima: the anchor protein OmpA1 (or Ompα) and the porin OmpB (or Ompβ). The gene encoding OmpA1 (ompA1) was cloned and sequenced and later assigned to TM0477 in the genome sequence, but because no peptide sequence was available for OmpB, its gene (ompB) was not annotated. We identified six porin candidates in the genome sequence of T. maritima. Of these candidates, only one, encoded by TM0476, has all the characteristics reported for OmpB and characteristics expected of a porin including predominant β-sheet structure, a carboxy terminus porin anchoring motif, and a porin-specific amino acid composition. We highly enriched a toga fraction of cells for OmpB by sucrose gradient centrifugation and hydroxyapatite chromatography and analyzed it by LC/MS/MS. We found that the only porin candidate that it contained was the TM0476 product. This cell fraction also had β-sheet character as determined by circular dichroism, consistent with its enrichment for OmpB. We conclude that TM0476 encodes OmpB. A phylogenetic analysis of OmpB found orthologs encoded in syntenic locations in the genomes of all but two Thermotogales species. Those without orthologs have putative isofunctional genes in their place. Phylogenetic analyses of OmpA1 revealed that each species of the Thermotogales has one or two OmpA homologs. T. maritima has two OmpA homologs, encoded by ompA1 (TM0477) and ompA2 (TM1729), both of which were found in the toga protein-enriched cell extracts. These annotations of the genes encoding toga structural proteins will guide future examinations of the structure and function of this unusual lineage-defining cell sheath. PMID:22768259

  2. Genes for the major structural components of Thermotogales species' togas revealed by proteomic and evolutionary analyses of OmpA and OmpB homologs.

    PubMed

    Petrus, Amanda K; Swithers, Kristen S; Ranjit, Chaman; Wu, Si; Brewer, Heather M; Gogarten, J Peter; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Noll, Kenneth M

    2012-01-01

    The unifying structural characteristic of members of the bacterial order Thermotogales is their toga, an unusual cell envelope that includes a loose-fitting sheath around each cell. Only two toga-associated structural proteins have been purified and characterized in Thermotoga maritima: the anchor protein OmpA1 (or Ompα) and the porin OmpB (or Ompβ). The gene encoding OmpA1 (ompA1) was cloned and sequenced and later assigned to TM0477 in the genome sequence, but because no peptide sequence was available for OmpB, its gene (ompB) was not annotated. We identified six porin candidates in the genome sequence of T. maritima. Of these candidates, only one, encoded by TM0476, has all the characteristics reported for OmpB and characteristics expected of a porin including predominant β-sheet structure, a carboxy terminus porin anchoring motif, and a porin-specific amino acid composition. We highly enriched a toga fraction of cells for OmpB by sucrose gradient centrifugation and hydroxyapatite chromatography and analyzed it by LC/MS/MS. We found that the only porin candidate that it contained was the TM0476 product. This cell fraction also had β-sheet character as determined by circular dichroism, consistent with its enrichment for OmpB. We conclude that TM0476 encodes OmpB. A phylogenetic analysis of OmpB found orthologs encoded in syntenic locations in the genomes of all but two Thermotogales species. Those without orthologs have putative isofunctional genes in their place. Phylogenetic analyses of OmpA1 revealed that each species of the Thermotogales has one or two OmpA homologs. T. maritima has two OmpA homologs, encoded by ompA1 (TM0477) and ompA2 (TM1729), both of which were found in the toga protein-enriched cell extracts. These annotations of the genes encoding toga structural proteins will guide future examinations of the structure and function of this unusual lineage-defining cell sheath.

  3. Fluorescent lectins for local in vivo visualization of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    KleinJan, Gijs Hendrik; Buckle, Tessa; van Willigen, Danny Michel; van Oosterom, Matthias Nathanaël; Spa, Silvia Johara; Kloosterboer, Harmen Egbert; van Leeuwen, Fijs Willem Bernhard

    2014-07-08

    Damage to peripheral nerves caused during a surgical intervention often results in function loss. Fluorescence imaging has the potential to improve intraoperative identification and preservation of these structures. However, only very few nerve targeting agents are available. This study describes the in vivo nerve staining capabilities of locally administered fluorescent lectin-analogues. To this end WGA, PNA, PHA-L and LEL were functionalized with Cy5 (λex max 640 nm; λem max 680 nm). Transfer of these imaging agents along the sciatic nerve was evaluated in Thy1-YFP mice (n = 12) after intramuscular injection. Migration from the injection site was assessed in vivo using a laboratory fluorescence scanner and ex vivo via fluorescence confocal microscopy. All four lectins showed retrograde movement and staining of the epineurium with a signal-to-muscle ratio of around two. On average, the longest transfer distance was obtained with WGA-Cy5 (0.95 cm). Since WGA also gave minimal uptake in the lymphatic system, this lectin type revealed the highest potential as a migration imaging agent to visualize nerves.

  4. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  5. Conjugation, number of Dewar resonance structures (DSs) in homologous polyzethrene and related conjugated polycyclic hydrocarbon series, and kinked versus straight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Jerry Ray

    2015-11-01

    Kinked polyzethrenes are more stable than linear polyzethrenes making them better candidates as materials for organic electronic devices (e.g., organic field effect transistors, nonlinear optics, and semiconductors) because of their greater singlet biradical properties. For series of molecules constructed by successive attachment of a given aufbau unit, we are able to derive analytical or recursion expressions relating certain properties. For example, starting with a few known number of Dewar resonance structures (DSs) for such a series, one is often able to derive analytical or recursion expressions for these DS values by our method of successive differences which then lead to either constant or Fibonacci numbers, respectively. The increasing order of π-electronic stability of isomers with the same number of Kekulé structures (K) is determined by their increasing number of DSs. Kinked polycyclic conjugated polyenes with a single classical structure (i.e., K = 1) are more conjugated and stable than their straight polycyclic isomers with a single classical structure.

  6. Structural investigation and homology modeling studies of native and truncated forms of alpha-amylases from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelmalek, Imen; Urdaci, Maria Camino; Ben Ali, Mamdouh; Denayrolles, Muriel; Chaignepain, Stephane; Limam, Ferid; Bejar, Samir; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib

    2009-11-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is well known for its ability to produce a large variety of hydrolytic enzymes for the degradation of plant polysaccharide material. Two alpha-amylases designated as ScAmy54 and ScAmy43 were biochemically characterized and predicted to play an important role in starch degradation. Those enzymes produce specific oligosaccharides, essentially maltotriose, that have a considerable commercial interest. The primary structures of the two enzymes were analyzed by N-terminal sequencing, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and cDNA cloning, and implied that the two proteins have the same N-terminal catalytic domain and ScAmy43 was produced from ScAmy54 by truncation of 96 amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal region. The result of genomic analysis suggested that the two enzymes originated from the same alpha-amylase gene and that truncation of ScAmy54 to ScAmy43 occurred probably during the S. sclerotiorum cultivation. The structural gene of ScAmy54 consisted of 9 exons and 8 introns, containing a single 1,500-bp open reading frame encoding 499 amino acids including a signal peptide of 21 amino acids. ScAmy54 exhibited high amino acid identity to other liquefying fungal alpha-amylases, essentially in the four conserved regions and in the putative catalytic triad. A 3D structure model of ScAmy54 and ScAmy43 was built using the 3D structure of 2guy from A. niger as template. ScAmy54 with three domains A, B, and C, including the well-known (beta/alpha)8-barrel motif in domain A, has a typical structure of the alpha-amylase family. ScAmy43 composed only of domains A and B constitutes a smallest fungal alpha-amylase with only a catalytic domain.

  7. Structural and catalytic properties of CMP kinase from Bacillus subtilis: a comparative analysis with the homologous enzyme from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C P; Ylisastigui-Pons, L; Serina, L; Sakamoto, H; Mantsch, H H; Neuhard, J; Bârzu, O; Gilles, A M

    1997-04-01

    CMP kinases from Bacillus subtilis and from Escherichia coli are encoded by the cmk gene (formerly known as jofC in B. subtilis and as mssA in E. coli). Similar in their primary structure (43% identity and 67% similarity in amino acid sequence), the two proteins exhibit significant differences in nucleotide binding and catalysis. ATP, dATP, and GTP are equally effective as phosphate donors with E. coli CMP kinase whereas GTP is a poor substrate with B. subtilis CMP kinase. While CMP and dCMP are the best phosphate acceptors of both CMP kinases, the specific activity with these substrates and ATP as donor are 7- to 10-fold higher in the E. coli enzyme; the relative Vm values with UMP and CMP are 0.1 for the B. subtilis CMP kinase and 0.01 for the E. coli enzyme. CMP increased the affinity of E. coli CMP kinase for ATP or for the fluorescent analog 3'-anthraniloyl dATP by one order of magnitude but had no effect on the B. subtilis enzyme. The differences in the catalytic properties of B. subtilis and E. coli CMP kinases might be reflected in the structure of the two proteins as inferred from infrared spectroscopy. Whereas the spectrum of B. subtilis CMP kinase is dominated by a band at 1633 cm-1 (representing beta type structures), the spectrum of the E. coli enzyme is dominated by two bands at 1653 and 1642 cm-1 associated with alpha-helical and unordered structures, respectively. CMP induced similar spectral changes in both proteins with a rearrangement of some of the beta-structures. ATP increases the denaturation temperature of B. subtilis CMP kinase by 9.3 degrees C, whereas in the case of the E. coli enzyme, binding of ATP has only a minor effect.

  8. Rapid affinity-purification and physicochemical characterization of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Akkaladevi; Swamy, Musti J

    2010-04-21

    The chito-oligosaccharide-specific lectin from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on chitin. After SDS/PAGE in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, the pumpkin phloem lectin yielded a single band corresponding to a molecular mass of 23.7 kDa, whereas ESI-MS (electrospray ionization MS) gave the molecular masses of the subunit as 24645 Da. Analysis of the CD spectrum of the protein indicated that the secondary structure of the lectin consists of 9.7% alpha-helix, 35.8% beta-sheet, 22.5% beta-turn and 32.3% unordered structure. Saccharide binding did not significantly affect the secondary and tertiary structures of the protein. The haemagglutinating activity of pumpkin phloem lectin was mostly unaffected in the temperature range 4-70 degrees C, but a sharp decrease was seen between 75 and 85 degrees C. Differential scanning calorimetric and CD spectroscopic studies suggest that the lectin undergoes a co-operative thermal unfolding process centred at approx. 81.5 degrees C, indicating that it is a relatively stable protein.

  9. Novel Animal Defenses against Predation: A Snail Egg Neurotoxin Combining Lectin and Pore-Forming Chains That Resembles Plant Defense and Bacteria Attack Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Ceolín, Marcelo; Ituarte, Santiago; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Sun, Jin; Fernández, Patricia E.; Heras, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    Although most eggs are intensely predated, the aerial egg clutches from the aquatic snail Pomacea canaliculata have only one reported predator due to unparalleled biochemical defenses. These include two storage-proteins: ovorubin that provides a conspicuous (presumably warning) coloration and has antinutritive and antidigestive properties, and PcPV2 a neurotoxin with lethal effect on rodents. We sequenced PcPV2 and studied whether it was able to withstand the gastrointestinal environment and reach circulation of a potential predator. Capacity to resist digestion was assayed using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), fluorescence spectroscopy and simulated gastrointestinal proteolysis. PcPV2 oligomer is antinutritive, withstanding proteinase digestion and displaying structural stability between pH 4.0–10.0. cDNA sequencing and protein domain search showed that its two subunits share homology with membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF)-like toxins and tachylectin-like lectins, a previously unknown structure that resembles plant Type-2 ribosome-inactivating proteins and bacterial botulinum toxins. The protomer has therefore a novel AB toxin combination of a MACPF-like chain linked by disulfide bonds to a lectin-like chain, indicating a delivery system for the former. This was further supported by observing PcPV2 binding to glycocalix of enterocytes in vivo and in culture, and by its hemaggutinating, but not hemolytic activity, which suggested an interaction with surface oligosaccharides. PcPV2 is able to get into predator’s body as evidenced in rats and mice by the presence of circulating antibodies in response to sublethal oral doses. To our knowledge, a lectin-pore-forming toxin has not been reported before, providing the first evidence of a neurotoxic lectin in animals, and a novel function for ancient and widely distributed proteins. The acquisition of this unique neurotoxic/antinutritive/storage protein may confer the eggs a survival advantage, opening new

  10. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of In-substituted GeSb{sub 6}Te{sub 10} with homologous structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kosuga, Atsuko Matsuzawa, Mie; Fujii, Yousuke; Nakai, Kazuki; Funahashi, Ryoji; Tachizawa, Takuya; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kifune, Kouichi

    2014-08-01

    We studied the crystal structure and thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline GeIn{sub x}Sb{sub 6−x}Te{sub 10} (x = 0, 0.18, 0.3, and 0.6). Rietveld and Le Bail analyses showed that all compositions crystallized in trigonal structures with a 51-layer period. Substituting In decreased both the lattice and electronic thermal conductivity, as well as markedly increased the Seebeck coefficient. We ascribed this increase to increases in the effective mass of the carriers, likely caused by the formation of additional energy states near the Fermi level. In GeIn{sub 0.6}Sb{sub 5.4}Te{sub 10}, we found a maximum ZT of 0.75 at 710 K, 1.9 times higher than that of GeSb{sub 6}Te{sub 10}.

  11. Crystal structure of the vitamin B3 transporter PnuC, a full-length SWEET homolog.

    PubMed

    Jaehme, Michael; Guskov, Albert; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2014-11-01

    PnuC transporters catalyze cellular uptake of the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) and belong to a large superfamily that includes the SWEET sugar transporters. We present a crystal structure of Neisseria mucosa PnuC, which adopts a highly symmetrical fold with 3+1+3 membrane topology not previously observed in any protein. The high symmetry of PnuC with a single NR bound in the center suggests a simple alternating-access translocation mechanism.

  12. Structure of the GH76 α-mannanase homolog, BT2949, from the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Andrew J.; Cuskin, Fiona; Spears, Richard J.; Dabin, Jerome; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Davies, Gideon J.

    2015-02-01

    A high-resolution structure of a noncanonical α-mannanase relevant to human health and nutrition has been solved via heavy-atom phasing of a selenomethionine derivative. The large bowel microbiota, a complex ecosystem resident within the gastrointestinal tract of all human beings and large mammals, functions as an essential, nonsomatic metabolic organ, hydrolysing complex dietary polysaccharides and modulating the host immune system to adequately tolerate ingested antigens. A significant member of this community, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, has evolved a complex system for sensing and processing a wide variety of natural glycoproducts in such a way as to provide maximum benefit to itself, the wider microbial community and the host. The immense ability of B. thetaiotaomicron as a ‘glycan specialist’ resides in its enormous array of carbohydrate-active enzymes, many of which are arranged into polysaccharide-utilization loci (PULs) that are able to degrade sugar polymers that are often inaccessible to other gut residents, notably α-mannan. The B. thetaiotaomicron genome encodes ten putative α-mannanases spread across various PULs; however, little is known about the activity of these enzymes or the wider implications of α-mannan metabolism for the health of both the microbiota and the host. In this study, SAD phasing of a selenomethionine derivative has been used to investigate the structure of one such B. thetaiotaomicron enzyme, BT2949, which belongs to the GH76 family of α-mannanases. BT2949 presents a classical (α/α){sub 6}-barrel structure comprising a large extended surface cleft common to other GH76 family members. Analysis of the structure in conjunction with sequence alignments reveals the likely location of the catalytic active site of this noncanonical GH76.

  13. Crystal structure of the ternary complex of a NaV C-terminal domain, a fibroblast growth factor homologous factor, and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaojian; Chung, Ben C; Yan, Haidun; Lee, Seok-Yong; Pitt, Geoffrey S

    2012-07-03

    Voltage-gated Na⁺ (Na(V)) channels initiate neuronal action potentials. Na(V) channels are composed of a transmembrane domain responsible for voltage-dependent Na⁺ conduction and a cytosolic C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates channel function through interactions with many auxiliary proteins, including fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) and calmodulin (CaM). Most ion channel structural studies have focused on mechanisms of permeation and voltage-dependent gating but less is known about how intracellular domains modulate channel function. Here we report the crystal structure of the ternary complex of a human Na(V) CTD, an FHF, and Ca²⁺-free CaM at 2.2 Å. Combined with functional experiments based on structural insights, we present a platform for understanding the roles of these auxiliary proteins in Na(V) channel regulation and the molecular basis of mutations that lead to neuronal and cardiac diseases. Furthermore, we identify a critical interaction that contributes to the specificity of individual Na(V) CTD isoforms for distinctive FHFs.

  14. Exploring 3D structure of human gonadotropin hormone receptor at antagonist state using homology modeling, molecular dynamic simulation, and cross-docking studies.

    PubMed

    Sakhteman, Amirhossein; Khoddami, Minasadat; Negahdaripour, Manica; Mehdizadeh, Arash; Tatar, Mohsen; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Human gonadotropin hormone receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor, is the target of many medications used in fertility disorders. Obtaining more structural information about the receptor could be useful in many studies related to drug design. In this study, the structure of human gonadotropin receptor was subjected to homology modeling studies and molecular dynamic simulation within a DPPC lipid bilayer for 100 ns. Several frames were thereafter extracted from simulation trajectories representing the receptor at different states. In order to find a proper model of the receptor at the antagonist state, all frames were subjected to cross-docking studies of some antagonists with known experimental values (Ki). Frame 194 revealed a reasonable correlation between docking calculated energy scores and experimental activity values (|r| = 0.91). The obtained correlation was validated by means of SSLR and showed the presence of no chance correlation for the obtained model. Different structural features reported for the receptor, such as two disulfide bridges and ionic lock between GLU90 and LYS 121 were also investigated in the final model.

  15. Morphogenesis of the medaka cerebellum, with special reference to the mesencephalic sheet, a structure homologous to the rostrolateral part of mammalian anterior medullary velum.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yasuda, Takako; Yoshimoto, Masami; Ito, Hironobu

    2010-01-01

    We have examined cerebellar morphogenesis after neural tube stage in medaka (Oryzias latipes), a ray-finned fish, by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry using anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and anti-acetylated tubulin antibodies. Our results indicate that the medaka cerebellum is formed in 4 successive stages: (1) formation and enlargement of the cerebellar primordia; (2) rostral midline fusion of the left/right halves of the cerebellar primordia; (3) formation of the cerebellar matrix zones in the midline and caudalmost regions of the primitive cerebellum, and (4) growth and differentiation of the cerebellum. Our results also show that cerebellar morphogenesis is different from that in mammals in 3 important points: the developmental origins of the primordia, directions along which cerebellar fusion proceeds, and number, locations and duration of the cerebellar matrix zones. During the course of this study, an alar-derived membranous structure between the cerebellum and the midbrain in the adult medaka brain was identified as the structure homologous to the rostrolateral part of the mammalian anterior medullary velum. We have named this structure in the adult teleostean brains as the 'mesencephalic sheet'. The present study indicates that there exists both conserved and divergent patterns in cerebellar morphogenesis in vertebrates.

  16. Structural dynamics of the monoamine transporter homolog LeuT from accelerated conformational sampling and channel analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, James R; Gedeon, Patrick C; Madura, Jeffry D

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial leucine transporter LeuT retains significant secondary structure similarities to the human monoamine transporters (MAT) such as the dopamine and serotonin reuptake proteins. The primary method of computational study of the MATs has been through the use of the crystallized LeuT structure. Different conformations of LeuT can give insight into mechanistic details of the MAT family. A conformational sampling performed through accelerated molecular dynamics simulations testing different combinations of the leucine substrate and bound sodium ions revealed seven distinct conformational clusters. Further analysis has been performed to target salt-bridge residues R30-D404, Y108-F253, and R5-D369 and transmembrane domains on both the seven isolated structures and the total trajectories. In addition, solvent accessibility of LeuT and its substrate binding pockets has been analyzed using a program for calculating channel radii. Occupation of the Na2 site stabilizes the outward conformation and should bind to the open outward conformation before the leucine and Na1 sodium while two possible pathways were found to be available for intracellular transport.

  17. A Homology Model Reveals Novel Structural Features and an Immunodominant Surface Loop/Opsonic Target in the Treponema pallidum BamA Ortholog TP_0326

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit; Anand, Arvind; Hawley, Kelly L.; LeDoyt, Morgan; La Vake, Carson J.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently demonstrated that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses characteristic BamA bipartite topology. Herein, we used immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) to show that only the β-barrel domain of TP_0326 contains surface-exposed epitopes in intact T. pallidum. Using the solved structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae BamA, we generated a homology model of full-length TP_0326. Although the model predicts a typical BamA fold, the β-barrel harbors features not described in other BamAs. Structural modeling predicted that a dome comprised of three large extracellular loops, loop 4 (L4), L6, and L7, covers the barrel's extracellular opening. L4, the dome's major surface-accessible loop, contains mainly charged residues, while L7 is largely neutral and contains a polyserine tract in a two-tiered conformation. L6 projects into the β-barrel but lacks the VRGF/Y motif that anchors L6 within other BamAs. IFA and opsonophagocytosis assay revealed that L4 is surface exposed and an opsonic target. Consistent with B cell epitope predictions, immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed that L4 is an immunodominant loop in T. pallidum-infected rabbits and humans with secondary syphilis. Antibody capture experiments using Escherichia coli expressing OM-localized TP_0326 as a T. pallidum surrogate further established the surface accessibility of L4. Lastly, we found that a naturally occurring substitution (Leu593 → Gln593) in the L4 sequences of T. pallidum strains affects antibody binding in sera from syphilitic patients. Ours is the first study to employ a “structure-to-pathogenesis” approach to map the surface topology of a T. pallidum OMP within the context of syphilitic infection. IMPORTANCE Previously, we reported that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses the bipartite topology characteristic of a BamA ortholog

  18. First evidence of protein G-binding protein in the most primitive vertebrate: serum lectin from lamprey (Lampetra japonica).

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhuang; Pang, Yue; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Zhen; Xiao, Rong; Jin, Minli; Han, Yinglun; Su, Peng; Lv, Li; Wang, Jihong; Li, QingWei

    2013-12-01

    The intelectins, a recently identified subgroup of extracellular animal lectins, are glycan-binding receptors that recognize glycan epitopes on foreign pathogens in host systems. Here, we have described NPGBP (novel protein G-binding protein), a novel serum lectin found in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica. RT-PCR yielded a 1005 bp cDNA sequence from the lamprey liver encoding a 334 amino acid secretory protein with homology to mammalian and aquatic organism intelectins. Gene expression analyses showed that the NPGBP gene was expressed in the blood, intestines, kidney, heart, gill, liver, adipose tissue and gonads. NPGBP was isolated by protein G-conjugated agarose immunoprecipitation, and SDS-PAGE analyses showed that NPGBP migrated as a specific band (∼35 and ∼124 kDa under reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively). These results suggested that NPGBP forms monomers and tetramers. NPGBP gene expression was induced by in vivo bacterial stimulation, and NPGBP showed different agglutination activities against pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. The induction of NPGBP suggested that it plays an important role in defense against microorganisms in the internal circulation system of the lamprey. When incubated with an unrelated antibody, the specific binding between NPGBP and protein G was competitively inhibited, indicating that NPGBP and the Fc region of Ig bind to the same site on protein G. We thus assume that the tertiary structure of NPGBP is similar to that of the Fc region of Ig. Additionally, NPGBP can effectively promote endothelial cell mitosis. These findings suggest that NPGBP plays a role in the immune defense against microorganisms, and this study represents one of the few examples of the characterization and functional analysis of an aquatic organism intelectin.

  19. Purification and partial characterization of a lectin protein complex, the clathrilectin, from the calcareous sponge Clathrina clathrus.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Domart-Coulon, Isabelle; Marie, Arul; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Müller, Werner E G; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise

    2016-10-01

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins were purified from the marine calcareous sponge Clathrina clathrus via affinity chromatography on lactose and N-acetyl glucosamine-agarose resins. Proteomic analysis of acrylamide gel separated protein subunits obtained in reducing conditions pointed out several candidates for lectins. Based on amino-acid sequence similarity, two peptides displayed homology with the jack bean lectin Concanavalin A, including a conserved domain shared by proteins in the L-type lectin superfamily. An N-acetyl glucosamine - binding protein complex, named clathrilectin, was further purified via gel filtration chromatography, bioguided with a diagnostic rabbit erythrocyte haemagglutination assay, and its activity was found to be calcium dependent. Clathrilectin, a protein complex of 3200kDa estimated by gel filtration, is composed of monomers with apparent molecular masses of 208 and 180kDa estimated on 10% SDS-PAGE. Nine internal peptides were identified using proteomic analyses, and compared to protein libraries from the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica and a calcareous sponge Sycon sp. from the Adriatic Sea. The clathrilectin is the first lectin isolated from a calcareous sponge and displays homologies with predicted sponge proteins potentially involved in cell aggregation and interaction with bacteria.

  20. Structure of trigger factor binding domain in biologically homologous complex with eubacterial ribosome reveals its chaperone action

    SciTech Connect

    Baram, David; Pyetan, Erez; Sittner, Assa; Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2010-07-13

    Trigger factor (TF), the first chaperone in eubacteria to encounter the emerging nascent chain, binds to the large ribosomal subunit in the vicinity of the protein exit tunnel opening and forms a sheltered folding space. Here, we present the 3.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the physiological complex of the large ribosomal subunit from the eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans with the N-terminal domain of TF (TFa) from the same organism. For anchoring, TFa exploits a small ribosomal surface area in the vicinity of proteins L23 and L29, by using its 'signature motif' as well as additional structural elements. The molecular details of TFa interactions reveal that L23 is essential for the association of TF with the ribosome and may serve as a channel of communication with the nascent chain progressing in the tunnel. L29 appears to induce a conformational change in TFa, which results in the exposure of TFa hydrophobic patches to the opening of the ribosomal exit tunnel, thus increasing its affinity for hydrophobic segments of the emerging nascent polypeptide. This observation implies that, in addition to creating a protected folding space for the emerging nascent chain, TF association with the ribosome prevents aggregation by providing a competing hydrophobic environment and may be critical for attaining the functional conformation necessary for chaperone activity.

  1. The N- and C-Terminal Domains Differentially Contribute to the Structure and Function of Dystrophin and Utrophin Tandem Calponin-Homology Domains.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surinder M; Bandi, Swati; Mallela, Krishna M G

    2015-11-24

    Dystrophin and utrophin are two muscle proteins involved in Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy. Both proteins use tandem calponin-homology (CH) domains to bind to F-actin. We probed the role of N-terminal CH1 and C-terminal CH2 domains in the structure and function of dystrophin tandem CH domain and compared with our earlier results on utrophin to understand the unifying principles of how tandem CH domains work. Actin cosedimentation assays indicate that the isolated CH2 domain of dystrophin weakly binds to F-actin compared to the full-length tandem CH domain. In contrast, the isolated CH1 domain binds to F-actin with an affinity similar to that of the full-length tandem CH domain. Thus, the obvious question is why the dystrophin tandem CH domain requires CH2, when its actin binding is determined primarily by CH1. To answer, we probed the structural stabilities of CH domains. The isolated CH1 domain is very unstable and is prone to serious aggregation. The isolated CH2 domain is very stable, similar to the full-length tandem CH domain. These results indicate that the main role of CH2 is to stabilize the tandem CH domain structure. These conclusions from dystrophin agree with our earlier results on utrophin, indicating that this phenomenon of differential contribution of CH domains to the structure and function of tandem CH domains may be quite general. The N-terminal CH1 domains primarily determine the actin binding function whereas the C-terminal CH2 domains primarily determine the structural stability of tandem CH domains, and the extent of stabilization depends on the strength of inter-CH domain interactions.

  2. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of chitin-binding lectin from Canna limbata seeds.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Theolyta S; Teixeira, Claudener S; Falcão, Maria A P; Junior, Vanir R Pinto; Santiago, Mayara Quiroz; Benevides, Raquel G; Delatorre, Plínio; Martins, Jorge L; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna S; Cavada, Benildo S; Campesatto, Eliane A; Rocha, Bruno A M

    2013-12-01

    Lectins are a structurally heterogeneous group of proteins or glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to a specific mono- or oligosaccharide. Monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins. In this study, we evaluated anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of monocot lectin from the Canna limbata seeds (CLL). To accomplish this, CLL was purified and subjected to pharmacological assays: abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate and Zymosan A-induced peritonitis tests. The CLL was purified by chromatographic chitin column, and the relative mass of 21 kDa observed in electrophoresis was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry, which also revealed that purified CLL consists of a dimer having a weight of 49,676 Da. The CLL showed nociceptive activity in the acetic acid test as well as peripheral antinociceptive response. The CLL also showed anti-inflammatory effect with the reduction of inflammation in the formalin test and neutrophil migration into the peritoneal cavity. This is the first report of anti-inflammatory activity for a monocot lectin, and it suggests a new pharmacological tool to understand inflammatory and antinociceptive processes mediated through lectins.

  3. Enzyme-accelerated and structure-guided crystallization of calcium carbonate: role of the carbonic anhydrase in the homologous system.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schlossmacher, Ute; Schröder, Heinz C; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Glasser, Gunnar; Korzhev, Michael; Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    The calcareous spicules from sponges, e.g. from Sycon raphanus, are composed of almost pure calcium carbonate. In order to elucidate the formation of those structural skeletal elements, the function of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), isolated from this species, during the in vitro calcium carbonate-based spicule formation, was investigated. It is shown that the recombinant sponge CA substantially accelerates calcium carbonate formation in the in vitro diffusion assay. A stoichiometric calculation revealed that the turnover rate of the sponge CA during the calcification process amounts to 25 CO2s(-1) × molecule CA(-1). During this enzymatically driven process, initially pat-like particles are formed that are subsequently transformed to rhomboid/rhombohedroid crystals with a dimension of ~50 μm. The CA-catalyzed particles are smaller than those which are formed in the absence of the enzyme. The Martens hardness of the particles formed is ~4 GPa, a value which had been determined for other biogenic calcites. This conclusion is corroborated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which revealed that the particles synthesized are composed predominantly of the elements calcium, oxygen and carbon. Surprising was the finding, obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, that the newly formed calcitic crystals associate with the calcareous spicules from S. raphanus in a highly ordered manner; the calcitic crystals almost perfectly arrange in an array orientation along the two opposing planes of the spicules, leaving the other two plane arrays uncovered. It is concluded that the CA is a key enzyme controlling the calcium carbonate biomineralization process, which directs the newly formed particles to existing calcareous spicular structures. It is expected that with the given tools new bioinspired materials can be fabricated.

  4. Inactivation and fragmentation of lectin from Bothrops leucurus snake venom by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, E. S.; Souza, M. A. A.; Vaz, A. F. M.; Coelho, L. C. B. B.; Aguiar, J. S.; Silva, T. G.; Guarnieri, M. C.; Melo, A. M. M. A.; Oliva, M. L. V.; Correia, M. T. S.

    2012-04-01

    Gamma radiation alters the molecular structure of biomolecules and is able to mitigate the action of snake venoms and their isolated toxins. The effect of γ-radiation on the folding of Bothrops lecurus venom lectin was measured by a hemagglutinating assay, intrinsic and bis-ANS fluorescence. Intrinsic and bis-ANS fluorescence analyses indicated that irradiation caused unfolding followed by aggregation of the lectin. Our results suggest that irradiation can lead to significant changes in the protein structure, which may promote the loss of its binding property and toxic action.

  5. Molecular modelling of CYP2B6 based on homology with the CYP2C5 crystal structure: analysis of enzyme-substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David F V; Lake, Brian G; Dickins, Maurice; Goldfarb, Peter S

    2002-01-01

    The results of homology modelling of CYP2B6 based on the CYP2C5 crystal structure is described in terms of substrates and inhibitors binding within the putative active site. In general these results are in agreement with currently available evidence from substrate metabolism, mode of inhibitor action and site-directed mutagenesis experiments within the CYP2B subfamily of enzymes. Consequently, the model based on the CYP2C5 template represents an advance on those models produced from bacterial P450s, such as CYP101 and CYP102. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) for substrates binding to CYP2B6 indicate a key role for hydrogen bonding, and lipophilic character, as determined by the log P parameter (where P is the octanol/water partition coefficient), is also of importance for explaining the variation in experimental binding affinity for CYP2B6 substrates. It is possible to estimate the binding energies for typical CYP2B6 substrates based on their properties and interactions with the enzyme, which show good concordance with experimental data in the form of apparent Km values.

  6. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members.

  7. Structure of the Cyclic Nucleotide-Binding Homology Domain of the hERG Channel and Its Insight into Type 2 Long QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Ng, Hui Qi; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-01-01

    The human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) channel is crucial for the cardiac action potential by contributing to the fast delayed-rectifier potassium current. Mutations in the hERG channel result in type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2). The hERG channel contains a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain (CNBHD) and this domain is required for the channel gating though molecular interactions with the eag domain. Here we present solution structure of the CNBHD of the hERG channel. The structural study reveals that the CNBHD adopts a similar fold to other KCNH channels. It is self-liganded and it contains a short β-strand that blocks the nucleotide-binding pocket in the β-roll. Folding of LQT2-related mutations in this domain was shown to be affected by point mutation. Mutations in this domain can cause protein aggregation in E. coli cells or induce conformational changes. One mutant-R752W showed obvious chemical shift perturbation compared with the wild-type, but it still binds to the eag domain. The helix region from the N-terminal cap domain of the hERG channel showed unspecific interactions with the CNBHD. PMID:27025590

  8. Observations on the structure of two human 7SK pseudogenes and on homologous transcripts in vertebrate species.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, P; Russell, S E; McWilliam, P; McQuaid, S; Pearson, C; Humphries, M M

    1987-01-01

    A comparison of the sequence of two human 7SK RNA pseudogenes, covering approx. 190 and 240 base-pairs of the structural gene, is presented. Both repeated elements are flanked by direct repeats and begin at the 5' end of the gene. Each terminates approx. 90 base-pairs short of the 3' end, the latter representing a continuous sequence and the former carrying an internal deletion of about 40 base-pairs, this region being flanked in the progenitor gene by short repeated sequences. Southern blotting using a human 7SK pseudogene probe illuminated a series of multiple restriction fragments in mammalian genomes, with generally fewer fragments in the genomes of birds and reptiles and a single reactive fragment in DNA from terrapin (Pseudemys scripta elegans) and Xenopus laevis (South African clawed toad). In the latter case this fragment was only detectable on long exposure under the hybridization stringencies employed. 7SK transcripts were readily detectable in all mammalian, avian, reptilian and amphibian species analysed, although the gene appeared to be expressed at rather low levels in the ovaries of Xenopus laevis, possibly accounting for its failure to have become dispersed via 'retroposition' in this species. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3663152

  9. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lectins PA-IL and PA-IIL Are Controlled by Quorum Sensing and by RpoS

    PubMed Central

    Winzer, Klaus; Falconer, Colin; Garber, Nachman C.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Camara, Miguel; Williams, Paul

    2000-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, many exoproduct virulence determinants are regulated via a hierarchical quorum-sensing cascade involving the transcriptional regulators LasR and RhlR and their cognate activators, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3O-C12-HSL) and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). In this paper, we demonstrate that the cytotoxic lectins PA-IL and PA-IIL are regulated via quorum sensing. Using immunoblot analysis, the production of both lectins was found to be directly dependent on the rhl locus while, in a lasR mutant, the onset of lectin synthesis was delayed but not abolished. The PA-IL structural gene, lecA, was cloned and sequenced. Transcript analysis indicated a monocistronic organization with a transcriptional start site 70 bp upstream of the lecA translational start codon. A lux box-type element together with RpoS (ςS) consensus sequences was identified upstream of the putative promoter region. In Escherichia coli, expression of a lecA::lux reporter fusion was activated by RhlR/C4-HSL, but not by LasR/3O-C12-HSL, confirming direct regulation by RhlR/C4-HSL. Similarly, in P. aeruginosa PAO1, the expression of a chromosomal lecA::lux fusion was enhanced but not advanced by the addition of exogenous C4-HSL but not 3O-C12-HSL. Furthermore, mutation of rpoS abolished lectin synthesis in P. aeruginosa, demonstrating that both RpoS and RhlR/C4-HSL are required. Although the C4-HSL-dependent expression of the lecA::lux reporter in E. coli could be inhibited by the presence of 3O-C12-HSL, this did not occur in P. aeruginosa. This suggests that, in the homologous genetic background, 3O-C12-HSL does not function as a posttranslational regulator of the RhlR/C4-HSL-dependent activation of lecA expression. PMID:11053384

  10. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  11. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Gardères, Johan; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Hamer, Bojan; Batel, Renato; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2015-08-07

    An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  12. [Lectin histochemical studies on the musk gland in the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus)].

    PubMed

    Aoki-Komori, S; Saito, T R; Umeda, M; Sugiyama, M; Takahashi, K W; Taniguchi, K

    1993-07-01

    The musk gland of the adult house musk shrews (Suncus murinus) of both sexes was studied lectin histochemically. The musk gland was a kind of scent gland, consisted of congregation of branched or unbranched simple tubuloalveolar gland holocrine in nature and was attached by an apocrine gland-like structure (sweat gland) in the deeper layer of its periphery. Acinar cells of the musk gland were distinguishable into three type from basal to luminal parts of the acinus; immature cells, mature cells and degenerating cells. There was no histological difference between both sexes. Lectin-binding pattern of the musk gland was examined in comparison with that of the sweat gland and ordinary sebaceous gland by histochemical staining techniques using seven lectins: ConA, RCA I, PNA, SBA, UEA-I, DBA, WGA, WGA and PNA labelled the duct of the musk gland more intense than the acinus. Several lectins showed a tendency to label the cells situated near the luminal surface more intense than those near the basement membrane in both the acinus and duct of the musk gland. In the sweat gland and ordinary sebaceous gland, the lectin-binding pattern was different with each other and from that in the musk gland. These findings suggest that the musk gland, sweat gland, and ordinary sebaceous gland are different to each other in nature of cells and the secretion.

  13. Chemical Lectinology: Tools for Probing the Ligands and Dynamics of Mammalian Lectins In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Belardi, Brian; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The importance and complexity associated with the totality of glycan structures, i.e. the glycome, has garnered significant attention from chemists and biologists alike. However, what is lacking from this biochemical picture is how cells, tissues, and organisms interpret glycan patterns and translate this information into appropriate responses. Lectins, glycan-binding proteins, are thought to bridge this gap by decoding the glycome and dictating cell fate based on the underlying chemical identities and properties of the glycome. Yet, our understanding of the in vivo ligands and function for most lectins is still incomplete. This review focuses on recent advances in chemical tools to study the specificity and dynamics of mammalian lectins in live cells. A picture emerges of lectin function that is highly sensitive to its organization, which in turn drastically shapes immunity and cancer progression. We hope this review will inspire biologists to make use of these new techniques and stimulate chemists to continue developing innovative approaches to probe lectin biology in vivo. PMID:26256477

  14. Effect of chum salmon egg lectin on tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ryo; Yamamoto, Shintaro; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Naude, Ryno; Muramoto, Koji

    2015-05-05

    The effect of a chum salmon egg lectin (CSL3) on tight junction (TJ) of Caco-2 cell monolayers was investigated. The lectin opened TJ as indicated by the decrease of the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) value and the increase of the permeation of lucifer yellow, which is transported via the TJ-mediated paracellular pathway. The effects of CSL3 were inhibited by the addition of 10 mM L-rhamnose or D-galactose which were specific sugars for CSL3. The lectin increased the intracellular Ca2+ of Caco-2 cell monolayers, that could be inhibited by the addition of L-rhamnose. The fluorescence immunostaining of β-actin in Caco-2 cell monolayers revealed that the cytoskeleton was changed by the CSL3 treatment, suggesting that CSL3 depolymerized β-actin to cause reversible TJ structural and functional disruption. Although Japanese jack bean lectin and wheat germ lectin showed similar effects in the decrease of the TER values and the increase of the intracellular Ca2+, they could not be inhibited by the same concentrations of simple sugars, such as D-glucose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine.

  15. Molecular mechanism of enzyme inhibition: prediction of the three-dimensional structure of the dimeric trypsin inhibitor from Leucaena leucocephala by homology modelling.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Rabia; Ali, Syed Abid; Kamal, Mustafa; Khan, Aftab Ahmed; Abbasi, Atiya

    2004-02-13

    Serine proteinase inhibitors are widely distributed in nature and inhibit the activity of enzymes like trypsin and chymotrypsin. These proteins interfere with the physiological processes such as germination, maturation and form the first line of defense against the attack of seed predator. The most thoroughly examined plant serine proteinase inhibitors are found in the species of the families Leguminosae, Graminae, and Solanaceae. Leucaena leucocephala belongs to the family Leguminosae. It is widely used both as an ornamental tree as well as cattle food. We have constructed a three-dimensional model of a serine proteinase inhibitor from L. leucocephala seeds (LTI) complexed with trypsin. The model was built based on its comparative homology with soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) using the program, MODELLER6. The quality of the model was assessed stereochemically by PROCHECK. LTI shows structural features characteristic of the Kunitz type trypsin inhibitor and shows 39% residue identity with STI. LTI consists of 172 amino acid residues and is characterized by two disulfide bridges. The protein is a dimer with the two chains being linked by a disulfide bridge. Despite the high similarity in the overall tertiary structure, significant differences exist at the active site between STI and LTI. The present study aims at analyzing these interactions based on the available amino acid sequences and structural data. We have also studied some functional sites such as phosphorylation, myristoylation, which can influence the inhibitory activity or complexation with other molecules. Some of the differences observed at the active site and functional sites can explain the unique features of LTI.

  16. Characterization of a novel human sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) having structural homology with c-Jun N-terminal kinase-interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Jagadish, Nirmala; Rana, Ritu; Selvi, Ramasamy; Mishra, Deepshikha; Garg, Manoj; Yadav, Shikha; Herr, John C.; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Hasegawa, Akiko; Koyama, Koji; Suri, Anil

    2005-01-01

    We report a novel SPAG9 (sperm-associated antigen 9) protein having structural homology with JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)-interacting protein 3. SPAG9, a single copy gene mapped to the human chromosome 17q21.33 syntenic with location of mouse chromosome 11, was earlier shown to be expressed exclusively in testis [Shankar, Mohapatra and Suri (1998) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 243, 561–565]. The SPAG9 amino acid sequence analysis revealed identity with the JNK-binding domain and predicted coiled-coil, leucine zipper and transmembrane domains. The secondary structure analysis predicted an α-helical structure for SPAG9 that was confirmed by CD spectra. Microsequencing of higher-order aggregates of recombinant SPAG9 by tandem MS confirmed the amino acid sequence and mono atomic mass of 83.9 kDa. Transient expression of SPAG9 and its deletion mutants revealed that both leucine zipper with extended coiled-coil domains and transmembrane domain of SPAG9 were essential for dimerization and proper localization. Studies of MAPK (mitogenactivated protein kinase) interactions demonstrated that SPAG9 interacted with higher binding affinity to JNK3 and JNK2 compared with JNK1. No interaction was observed with p38α or extracellular-signal-regulated kinase pathways. Polyclonal antibodies raised against recombinant SPAG9 recognized native protein in human sperm extracts and localized specifically on the acrosomal compartment of intact human spermatozoa. Acrosome-reacted spermatozoa demonstrated SPAG9 immunofluorescence, indicating its retention on the equatorial segment after the acrosome reaction. Further, anti-SPAG9 antibodies inhibited the binding of human spermatozoa to intact human oocytes as well as to matched hemizona. This is the first report of sperm-associated JNK-binding protein that may have a role in spermatozoa–egg interaction. PMID:15693750

  17. Homology, convergence and parallelism

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. PMID:26598721

  18. Overexpression of Nictaba-Like Lectin Genes from Glycine max Confers Tolerance toward Pseudomonas syringae Infection, Aphid Infestation and Salt Stress in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    PubMed Central

    Van Holle, Sofie; Smagghe, Guy; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved a sophisticated immune system that allows them to recognize invading pathogens by specialized receptors. Carbohydrate-binding proteins or lectins are part of this immune system and especially the lectins that reside in the nucleocytoplasmic compartment are known to be implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses. The class of Nictaba-like lectins (NLL) groups all proteins with homology to the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) lectin, known as a stress-inducible lectin. Here we focus on two Nictaba homologs from soybean (Glycine max), referred to as GmNLL1 and GmNLL2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein either transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or stably transformed in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells revealed a nucleocytoplasmic localization for the GmNLLs under study. RT-qPCR analysis of the transcript levels for the Nictaba-like lectins in soybean demonstrated that the genes are expressed in several tissues throughout the development of the plant. Furthermore, it was shown that salt treatment, Phytophthora sojae infection and Aphis glycines infestation trigger the expression of particular NLL genes. Stress experiments with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the NLLs from soybean yielded an enhanced tolerance of the plant toward bacterial infection (Pseudomonas syringae), insect infestation (Myzus persicae) and salinity. Our data showed a better performance of the transgenic lines compared to wild type plants, indicating that the NLLs from soybean are implicated in the stress response. These data can help to further elucidate the physiological importance of the Nictaba-like lectins from soybean, which can ultimately lead to the design of crop plants with a better tolerance to changing environmental conditions. PMID:27826309

  19. Mechanistic heterogeneity in site recognition by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of the ETS family transcription factors Ets-1 and PU.1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D; Wilson, W David; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-08-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a "dry" mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1 · DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages.

  20. A 3D structure model of integrin alpha 4 beta 1 complex: I. Construction of a homology model of beta 1 and ligand binding analysis.

    PubMed Central

    You, Tony J; Maxwell, David S; Kogan, Timothy P; Chen, Qi; Li, Jian; Kassir, Jamal; Holland, George W; Dixon, Richard A F

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that integrin alpha 4 beta 1 binds to the vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and fibronectin and plays an important role in signal transduction. Blocking the binding of VCAM to alpha 4 beta 1 is thought to be a way of controlling a number of disease processes. To better understand how various inhibitors might block the interaction of VCAM and fibronectin with alpha 4 beta 1, we began constructing a structure model for the integrin alpha 4 beta 1 complex. As the first step, we have built a homology model of the beta 1 subunit based on the I domain of the integrin CD11B subunit. The model, including a bound Mg(2+) ion, was optimized through a specially designed relaxation scheme involving restrained minimization and dynamics steps. The native ligand VCAM and two highly active small molecules (TBC772 and TBC3486) shown to inhibit binding of CS-1 and VCAM to alpha 4 beta 1 were docked into the active site of the refined model. Results from the binding analysis fit well with a pharmacophore model that was independently derived from active analog studies. A critical examination of residues in the binding site and analysis of docked ligands that are both potent and selective led to the proposal of a mechanism for beta 1/beta 7 ligand binding selectivity. PMID:11751331

  1. Mechanistic Heterogeneity in Site Recognition by the Structurally Homologous DNA-binding Domains of the ETS Family Transcription Factors Ets-1 and PU.1*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H.; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D.; Wilson, W. David; Poon, Gregory M. K.

    2014-01-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a “dry” mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1·DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages. PMID:24952944

  2. Isolation, characterization and molecular cloning of a leaf-specific lectin from ramsons (Allium ursinum L.).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-11-01

    Lectins were isolated from roots and leaves of ramsons and compared to the previously described bulb lectins. Biochemical analyses indicated that the root lectins AUAIr and AUAIIr are identical to the bulb lectins AUAI and AUAII, whereas the leaf lectin AUAL has no counterpart in the bulbs. cDNA cloning confirmed that the leaf lectin differs from the bulb lectins. Northern blot analysis further indicated that the leaf lectin is tissue-specifically expressed. Sequence comparisons revealed that the ramsons leaf lectin differs considerably from the leaf lectins of garlic, leek, onion and shallot.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the lectin from Dioclea rostrata Benth seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Delatorre, Plínio; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Melo, Luciana Magalhães; Souza, Emmanuel Prata de; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias da; Benevides, Raquel G.; Oliveira, Taiana Maia de; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Bezerra, Maria Júlia Barbosa; Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva da; Cunha, Francisco Assis Bezerra da; Freire, Valder Nogueira; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2006-02-01

    D. rostrata lectin was crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222 and diffracted to 1.87 Å resolution. Lectins from the Diocleinae subtribe (Leguminosae) are highly similar proteins that promote various biological activities with distinctly differing potencies. The structural basis for this experimental data is not yet fully understood. Dioclea rostrata lectin was purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion at 293 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.51, b = 88.22, c = 87.76 Å. Assuming the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit, the solvent content was estimated to be about 47.9%. A complete data set was collected at 1.87 Å resolution.

  4. An insecticidal N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectin gene from Griffonia simplicifolia (Leguminosae).

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, K; Huesing, J E; Shade, R E; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M; Murdock, L L

    1996-01-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia II, an N-acetylglucosamine-specific legume lectin, has insecticidal activity when fed to the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.). A cDNA clone encoding G. simplicifolia II was isolated from a leaf cDNA library, sequenced, and expressed in a bacterial expression system. The recombinant protein exhibited N-acetylglucosamine-binding and insecticidal activity against cowpea weevil, indicating that glycosylation and multimeric structure are not required for these properties. These results support the hypothesis that genes of the legume lectin gene family encode proteins that function in plant defense against herbivores. PMID:8587982

  5. The C-type lectin-like receptors of Dectin-1 cluster in natural killer gene complex.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianhui

    2012-08-01

    Natural killer gene complex (NKC) encodes a group of proteins with a single C-type lectin-like domain, (CTLD) which can be subdivided several subfamilies according to their structures and expression patterns. The receptors containing the conserved calcium binding sites in the CTLD fold belong to group II of C-type lectin superfamily and are expressed on myeloid cells and non- myeloid cells. The receptors lacking conserved calcium binding sites in the CTLD fold have evolved to bind ligands other than carbohydrates independently on calcium and thereby are named as C-type lectin-like receptors. The C-type lectin-like receptors are previously thought to be exclusively expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and enable NK cells to discriminate self, missing self or altered self. However, some C-type lectin-like receptors are identified in myeloid cells and are intensely investigated, recently. These myeloid C-type lectin-like receptors, especially Dectin-1 cluster, have a wide variety of ligands, including those of exogenous origin, and play important roles in the physiological functions and pathological processes including immune homeostasis, immune defenses, and immune surveillance. In this review, we summarize each member of the Dectin-1 cluster, including their structural profiles, expression patterns, signaling properties as well as known physiological functions.

  6. Converting the Highly Amyloidogenic Human Calcitonin into a Powerful Fibril Inhibitor by Three-dimensional Structure Homology with a Non-amyloidogenic Analogue*

    PubMed Central

    Andreotti, Giuseppina; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Avidan-Shpalter, Carmit; Amodeo, Pietro; Gazit, Ehud; Motta, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Irreversible aggregation limits bioavailability and therapeutic activity of protein-based drugs. Here we show that an aggregation-resistant mutant can be engineered by structural homology with a non-amyloidogenic analogue and that the aggregation-resistant variant may act as an inhibitor. This strategy has successfully been applied to the amyloidogenic human calcitonin (hCT). Including only five residues from the non-amyloidogenic salmon calcitonin (sCT), we obtained a variant, polar human calcitonin (phCT), whose solution structure was shown by CD, NMR, and calculations to be practically identical to that of sCT. phCT was also observed to be a potent amyloidogenesis inhibitor of hCT when mixed with it in a 1:1 ratio. Fibrillation studies of phCT and the phCT-hCT mixture mimicked the sCT behavior in the kinetics and shapes of the fibrils with a dramatic reduction with respect to hCT. Finally, the effect of phCT alone and of the mixture on the intracellular cAMP level in T47D cells confirmed for the mutant and the mixture their calcitonin-like activity, exhibiting stimulation effects identical to those of sCT, the current therapeutic form. The strategy followed appears to be suitable to develop new forms of hCT with a striking reduction of aggregation and improved activity. Finally, the inhibitory properties of the aggregation-resistant analogue, if confirmed for other amyloidogenic peptides, may favor a new strategy for controlling fibril formation in a variety of human diseases. PMID:21078667

  7. Unfolding energetics and stability of banana lectin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Sinha, Sharmistha; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-08-01

    The unfolding pathway of banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca was determined by isothermal denaturation induced by the chaotrope GdnCl. The unfolding was found to be a reversible process. The data obtained by isothermal denaturation provided information on conformational stability of banana lectin. The high values of DeltaG of unfolding at various temperatures indicated the strength of intersubunit interactions. It was found that banana lectin is a very stable and denatures at high chaotrope concentrations only. The basis of the stability may be attributed to strong hydrogen bonds of the order 2.5-3.1 A at the dimeric interface along with the presence of water bridges. This is perhaps very unique example in proteins where subunit association is not a consequence of the predominance of hydrophobic interactions.

  8. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  9. Bi(3n+1)Ti7Fe(3n-3)O(9n+11) Homologous Series: Slicing Perovskite Structure with Planar Interfaces Containing Anatase-like Chains.

    PubMed

    Batuk, Dmitry; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Filimonov, Dmitry S; Zakharov, Konstantin V; Volkova, Olga S; Vasiliev, Alexander; Hadermann, Joke; Abakumov, Artem M

    2016-02-01

    The n = 3-6 members of a new perovskite-based homologous series Bi(3n+1)Ti7Fe(3n-3)O(9n+11) are reported. The crystal structure of the n = 3 Bi10Ti7Fe6O38 member is refined using a combination of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data (a = 11.8511(2) Å, b = 3.85076(4) Å, c = 33.0722(6) Å, S.G. Immm), unveiling the partially ordered distribution of Ti(4+) and Fe(3+) cations and indicating the presence of static random displacements of the Bi and O atoms. All Bi(3n+1)Ti7Fe(3n-3)O(9n+11) structures are composed of perovskite blocks separated by translational interfaces parallel to the (001)p perovskite planes. The thickness of the perovskite blocks increases with n, while the atomic arrangement at the interfaces remains the same. The interfaces comprise chains of double edge-sharing (Fe,Ti)O6 octahedra connected to the octahedra of the perovskite blocks by sharing edges and corners. This configuration shifts the adjacent perovskite blocks relative to each other over a vector ½[110]p and creates S-shaped tunnels along the [010] direction. The tunnels accommodate double columns of the Bi(3+) cations, which stabilize the interfaces owing to the stereochemical activity of their lone electron pairs. The Bi(3n+1)Ti7Fe(3n-3)O(9n+11) structures can be formally considered either as intergrowths of perovskite modules and polysynthetically twinned modules of the Bi2Ti4O11 structure or as intergrowths of the 2D perovskite and 1D anatase fragments. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on Bi10Ti7Fe6O38 reveals that static atomic displacements of Bi and O inside the perovskite blocks are not completely random; they are cooperative, yet only short-range ordered. According to TEM, the interfaces can be laterally shifted with respect to each other over ±1/3a, introducing an additional degree of disorder. Bi10Ti7Fe6O38 is paramagnetic in the 1.5-1000 K temperature range due to dilution of the magnetic Fe(3+) cations with nonmagnetic Ti(4+). The n = 3, 4 compounds demonstrate a

  10. Bivalent Carbohydrate Binding Is Required for Biological Activity of Clitocybe nebularis Lectin (CNL), the N,N′-Diacetyllactosediamine (GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc, LacdiNAc)-specific Lectin from Basidiomycete C. nebularis*

    PubMed Central

    Pohleven, Jure; Renko, Miha; Magister, Špela; Smith, David F.; Künzler, Markus; Štrukelj, Borut; Turk, Dušan; Kos, Janko; Sabotič, Jerica

    2012-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that exert their biological activity by binding to specific cell glycoreceptors. We have expressed CNL, a ricin B-like lectin from the basidiomycete Clitocybe nebularis in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lectin, rCNL, agglutinates human blood group A erythrocytes and is specific for the unique glycan N,N′-diacetyllactosediamine (GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc, LacdiNAc) as demonstrated by glycan microarray analysis. We here describe the crystal structures of rCNL in complex with lactose and LacdiNAc, defining its interactions with the sugars. CNL is a homodimeric lectin, each of whose monomers consist of a single ricin B lectin domain with its β-trefoil fold and one carbohydrate-binding site. To study the mode of CNL action, a nonsugar-binding mutant and nondimerizing monovalent CNL mutants that retain carbohydrate-binding activity were prepared. rCNL and the mutants were examined for their biological activities against Jurkat human leukemic T cells and the hypersensitive nematode Caenorhabditis elegans mutant strain pmk-1. rCNL was toxic against both, although the mutants were inactive. Thus, the bivalent carbohydrate-binding property of homodimeric CNL is essential for its activity, providing one of the rare pieces of evidence that certain activities of lectins are associated with their multivalency. PMID:22298779

  11. Characterization of a Lectin from Lactarius deterrimus (Research on the Possible Involvement of the Fungal Lectin in Recognition between Mushroom and Spruce during the Early Stages of Mycorrhizae Formation).

    PubMed Central

    Giollant, M.; Guillot, J.; Damez, M.; Dusser, M.; Didier, P.; Didier, E.

    1993-01-01

    A lectin (LDetL) was isolated from carpophores of the mushroom Lactarius deterrimus, a specific symbiont of the spruce, by a combination of affinity, hydroxylapatite, and gel-filtration chromatography. Its molecular mass, as determined by gel filtration, is about 37,000 D, and its structure is dimeric, with two identical subunits assembled by noncovalent bonds. It appeared homogeneous on high-performance liquid chromatography gel filtration, but isoelectric focusing revealed microheterogeneity, with a main band in the pH zone near 6.5. Amino acid analysis showed that LDetL contains a large proportion of glycine and especially methionine. Hapten inhibition assay indicated that LDetL is most specific for [beta]-D-galactosyl(1->3)-D-N-acetyl galactosamine residues. The lectin was formed in the in vitro-cultivated mycelium, and anti-lectin antibodies revealed by indirect immunofluorescence the presence of lectin in the cell wall. Receptor sites for LDetL were found on the roots, especially on the root hairs, of axenically grown spruce seedlings. The lectin LDL previously isolated by us from the taxonomically related mushroom Lactarius deliciosus, a symbiont of the pine, does not bind to the spruce radicle. This suggests a role of the fungal lectin in recognition and specificity during the early stages of mycorrhizae formation. PMID:12231706

  12. Role of Lectins in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pueppke, Steven G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Ferguson, Ardene L.

    1978-01-01

    Three different assay procedures have been used to quantitate the levels of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lectin in various tissues of soybean plants. The assays used were a standard hemagglutination assay, a radioimmunoassay, and an isotope dilution assay. Most of the lectin in seeds was found in the cotyledons, but lectin was also detected in the embryo axis and the seed coat. Soybean lectin was present in all of the tissues of young seedlings, but decreased as the plants matured and was not detectable in plants older than 2 to 3 weeks. Soybean lectin isolated from seeds of several soybean varieties were identical when compared by several methods. PMID:16660384

  13. Identification of Novel O-Linked Glycosylated Toxoplasma Proteins by Vicia villosa Lectin Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kevin; Peng, Eric D.; Huang, Amy S.; Xia, Dong; Vermont, Sarah J.; Lentini, Gaelle; Lebrun, Maryse; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Bradley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii maintains its intracellular life cycle using an extraordinary arsenal of parasite-specific organelles including the inner membrane complex (IMC), rhoptries, micronemes, and dense granules. While these unique compartments play critical roles in pathogenesis, many of their protein constituents have yet to be identified. We exploited the Vicia villosa lectin (VVL) to identify new glycosylated proteins that are present in these organelles. Purification of VVL-binding proteins by lectin affinity chromatography yielded a number of novel proteins that were subjected to further study, resulting in the identification of proteins from the dense granules, micronemes, rhoptries and IMC. We then chose to focus on three proteins identified by this approach, the SAG1 repeat containing protein SRS44, the rhoptry neck protein RON11 as well as a novel IMC protein we named IMC25. To assess function, we disrupted their genes by homologous recombination or CRISPR/Cas9. The knockouts were all successful, demonstrating that these proteins are not essential for invasion or intracellular survival. We also show that IMC25 undergoes substantial proteolytic processing that separates the C-terminal domain from the predicted glycosylation site. Together, we have demonstrated that lectin affinity chromatography is an efficient method of identifying new glycosylated parasite-specific proteins. PMID:26950937

  14. A novel thyroglobulin-binding lectin from the brown alga Hizikia fusiformis and its antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingjiang; Tong, Changqing; Wu, Yue; Liu, Shuai; Li, Wei

    2016-06-15

    A lectin (HFL) was isolated from the brown alga, Hizikia fusiformis, through ion exchange on cellulose DE52 and HPLC with a TSK-gel G4000PWXL column. SDS-PAGE showed that HFL had a molecular mass of 16.1 kDa. The HPLC (with a TSK-gel G4000PWXL column) indicated that HFL is a tetramer in its native state. The total carbohydrate content was 41%. Glucose, galactose and fucose were the monosaccharide units of HFL, and the normalized mol% values were 6, 14 and 80, respectively. HFL contains a large amount of the acidic amino acid, Asx. The β-elimination reaction suggested that the oligosaccharide and peptide moieties of HFL may belong to the N-glucosidic linkage. The amino acid sequences, of about five segments of HFL, were acquired by MALDI-TOF/TOF, and the sequences have no homology with other lectins. HFL was found to agglutinate sheep erythrocytes. The hemagglutination activity was inhibited by thyroglobulin, from bovine thyroid, but not by any of the monosaccharides tested. The lectin reaction was independent of the presence of the divalent cation Ca(2+). HFL showed free radical scavenging activity against hydroxyl, DPPH and ABTS(+) radicals.

  15. Identification of Novel O-Linked Glycosylated Toxoplasma Proteins by Vicia villosa Lectin Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kevin; Peng, Eric D; Huang, Amy S; Xia, Dong; Vermont, Sarah J; Lentini, Gaelle; Lebrun, Maryse; Wastling, Jonathan M; Bradley, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii maintains its intracellular life cycle using an extraordinary arsenal of parasite-specific organelles including the inner membrane complex (IMC), rhoptries, micronemes, and dense granules. While these unique compartments play critical roles in pathogenesis, many of their protein constituents have yet to be identified. We exploited the Vicia villosa lectin (VVL) to identify new glycosylated proteins that are present in these organelles. Purification of VVL-binding proteins by lectin affinity chromatography yielded a number of novel proteins that were subjected to further study, resulting in the identification of proteins from the dense granules, micronemes, rhoptries and IMC. We then chose to focus on three proteins identified by this approach, the SAG1 repeat containing protein SRS44, the rhoptry neck protein RON11 as well as a novel IMC protein we named IMC25. To assess function, we disrupted their genes by homologous recombination or CRISPR/Cas9. The knockouts were all successful, demonstrating that these proteins are not essential for invasion or intracellular survival. We also show that IMC25 undergoes substantial proteolytic processing that separates the C-terminal domain from the predicted glycosylation site. Together, we have demonstrated that lectin affinity chromatography is an efficient method of identifying new glycosylated parasite-specific proteins.

  16. Patterns of sperm-specific histone variation in sea stars and sea urchins: primary structural homologies in the N-terminal region of spermatogenic H1.

    PubMed

    Massey, C B; Watts, S A

    1992-04-15

    An electrophoretic characterization of histones from pyloric caeca, testes, and sperm of Asterias vulgaris revealed a sperm/testes-specific variant of histone H1 significantly larger than its somatic counterpart from pyloric caeca. Additional proteins were observed in H1 regions of acetic acid-urea polyacrylamide gels in testicular extracts. Sperm or testis-specific variants of H2B observed in sea urchins were not found in the sea star. Evidence presented suggests that sperm- or testes-specific H1 species of intermediate mobility may arise from a single, slow-migrating H1 species (SpH1). Although an increase in nonspecific DNA binding by nuclear proteins must occur during the process of spermatogenesis, different organisms exhibit various patterns of sperm-specific protein mediating differential binding during the process. Sperm-specific variants of both H1 and H2B histones are observed in sea urchins, while the only variant observed in sea stars during spermatogenesis is SpH1. Sequencing of the N-terminus of SpH1 from A. vulgaris revealed a repeating tetrapeptide in residues 3-6 and 8-11 (Ser-Pro-Arg-Lys and Ser-Pro-Lys-Lys, respectively), homologous to repeats in the N-termini of sperm-specific H1s from sea urchins. Primary structure within critical, variable regions of molecules responsible for nonspecific DNA binding appear conserved in many organisms. The occurrence of repeating tetrapeptides in SpH1 and other DNA binding proteins suggests that such domains may function similarly in various chromatins undergoing regulated or reversible condensation.

  17. Rapid assays for lectin toxicity and binding changes that reflect altered glycosylation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-06-03

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids, or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, as well as those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also generate spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes expressed

  18. Identification and molecular structure analysis of a new noncoding RNA, a sbRNA homolog, in the silkworm Bombyx mori genome.

    PubMed

    Duarte Junior, Francisco Ferreira; de Lima Neto, Quirino Alves; Rando, Fabiana Dos Santos; de Freitas, Douglas Vinícius Bassalobre; Pattaro Júnior, José Renato; Polizelli, Lorena Gomes; Munhoz, Roxelle Ethienne Ferreira; Seixas, Flavio Augusto Vicente; Fernandez, Maria Aparecida

    2015-03-01

    The small noncoding group of RNAs called stem-bulge RNAs (sbRNAs), first reported in Caenorhabditis elegans, is described as molecules homologous to the Y RNAs, a specific class of noncoding RNAs that is present in vertebrates. This homology indicates the possibility of the existence of sbRNAs in other invertebrate organisms. In this work, we used bioinformatic tools and conserved sequences of sbRNAs from C. Elegans and Y RNAs to search for homologous sbRNA sequences in the Bombyx mori genome. This analysis led to the discovery of one noncoding gene, which was translated into RNA segments and comparatively analysed with segments from human and hamster Y RNAs and C. elegans sbRNAs in molecular dynamic simulations. This gene represents the first evidence for a new sbRNA-like noncoding RNA, the BmsbRNA gene, in this Lepidoptera genome.

  19. Structure of REC2, a recombinational repair gene of Ustilago maydis, and its function in homologous recombination between plasmid and chromosomal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, B P; Ferguson, D O; Holloman, W K

    1994-01-01

    Mutation in the REC2 gene of Ustilago maydis leads to defects in DNA repair, recombination, and meiosis. Analysis of the primary sequence of the Rec2 protein reveals a region with significant homology to bacterial RecA protein and to the yeast recombination proteins Dmc1, Rad51, and Rad57. This homologous region in the U. maydis Rec2 protein was found to be functionally sensitive to mutation, lending support to the hypothesis that Rec2 has a functional RecA-like domain essential for activity in recombination and repair. Homologous recombination between plasmid and chromosomal DNA sequences is reduced substantially in the rec2 mutant following transformation. The frequency can be restored to a level approaching, but not exceeding, that observed in the wild-type strain if transformation is performed with cells containing multiple copies of REC2. Images PMID:8065360

  20. Isothermal titration calorimetric and computational studies on the binding of chitooligosaccharides to pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Akkaladevi; Singla, Hitesh; Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Bulusu, Gopalakrishnan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Swamy, Musti J

    2011-04-14

    The interaction of chitooligosaccharides [(GlcNAc)(2-6)] with pumpkin phloem exudate lectin (PPL) was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry and computational methods. The dimeric PPL binds to (GlcNAc)(3-5) with binding constants of 1.26-1.53 × 10(5) M(-1) at 25 °C, whereas chitobiose exhibits approximately 66-fold lower affinity. Interestingly, chitohexaose shows nearly 40-fold higher affinity than chitopentaose with a binding constant of 6.16 × 10(6) M(-1). The binding stoichiometry decreases with an increase in the oligosaccharide size from 2.26 for chitobiose to 1.08 for chitohexaose. The binding reaction was essentially enthalpy driven with negative entropic contribution, suggesting that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals' interactions are the main factors that stabilize PPL-saccharide association. The three-dimensional structure of PPL was predicted by homology modeling, and binding of chitooligosaccharides was investigated by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, which showed that the protein binding pocket can accommodate up to three GlcNAc residues, whereas additional residues in chitotetraose and chitopentaose did not exhibit any interactions with the binding pocket. Docking studies with chitohexaose indicated that the two triose units of the molecule could interact with different protein binding sites, suggesting formation of higher order complexes by the higher oligomers of GlcNAc by their simultaneous interaction with two protein molecules.

  1. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  2. Structures of MART-126/27-35Peptide/HLA-A2 Complexes Reveal a Remarkable Disconnect between Antigen Structural Homology and T Cell Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Insaidoo, Francis K; Baxter, Tiffany K; Powell, Jr., Daniel J.; Johnson, Laura A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Baker, Brian M

    2008-09-17

    Small structural changes in peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules often result in large changes in immunogenicity, supporting the notion that T cell receptors are exquisitely sensitive to antigen structure. Yet there are striking examples of TCR recognition of structurally dissimilar ligands. The resulting unpredictability of how T cells will respond to different or modified antigens impacts both our understanding of the physical bases for TCR specificity as well as efforts to engineer peptides for immunomodulation. In cancer immunotherapy, epitopes and variants derived from the MART-1/Melan-A protein are widely used as clinical vaccines. Two overlapping epitopes spanning amino acid residues 26 through 35 are of particular interest: numerous clinical studies have been performed using variants of the MART-1 26-35 decamer, although only the 27-35 nonamer has been found on the surface of targeted melanoma cells. Here, we show that the 26-35 and 27-35 peptides adopt strikingly different conformations when bound to HLA-A2. Nevertheless, clonally distinct MART-1{sub 26/27-35}-reactive T cells show broad cross-reactivity towards these ligands. Simultaneously, however, many of the cross-reactive T cells remain unable to recognize anchor-modified variants with very subtle structural differences. These dichotomous observations challenge our thinking about how structural information on unligated peptide/MHC complexes should be best used when addressing questions of TCR specificity. Our findings also indicate that caution is warranted in the design of immunotherapeutics based on the MART-1 26/27-35 epitopes, as neither cross-reactivity nor selectivity is predictable based on the analysis of the structures alone.

  3. A Secreted Protein with Plant-Specific Cysteine-Rich Motif Functions as a Mannose-Binding Lectin That Exhibits Antifungal Activity1[W

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Suwa, You-ichi; Sawano, Yoriko; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Plants have a variety of mechanisms for defending against plant pathogens and tolerating environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Ginkbilobin2 (Gnk2) is a seed storage protein in gymnosperm that possesses antifungal activity and a plant-specific cysteine-rich motif (domain of unknown function26 [DUF26]). The Gnk2-homologous sequence is also observed in an extracellular region of cysteine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases that function in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the lectin-like molecular function of Gnk2 and the structural basis of its monosaccharide recognition. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments showed that mannan was the only yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell wall polysaccharide that interacted with Gnk2. Gnk2 also interacted with mannose, a building block of mannan, with a specificity that was similar to those of mannose-binding legume lectins, by strictly recognizing the configuration of the hydroxy group at the C4 position of the monosaccharide. The crystal structure of Gnk2 in complex with mannose revealed that three residues (asparagine-11, arginine-93, and glutamate-104) recognized mannose by hydrogen bonds, which defined the carbohydrate-binding specificity. These interactions were directly related to the ability of Gnk2 to inhibit the growth of fungi, including the plant pathogenic Fusarium spp., which were disrupted by mutation of arginine-93 or the presence of yeast mannan in the assay system. In addition, Gnk2 did not inhibit the growth of a yeast mutant strain lacking the α1,2-linked mannose moiety. These results provide insights into the molecular basis of the DUF26 protein family. PMID:25139159

  4. Purification of Two Novel Sugar Acid-binding Lectins from Haplomitrium Mnioides (bryophyte, Plantae) and their Preliminary Characterization.

    PubMed

    Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Two novel sugar acid-binding lectins were purified from Haplomitrium mnioides (Lindb.) Schust. using a procedure consisting of ammonium sulfate precipitation, G-50 gel filtration, hydroxyapatite chromatography, and HW-50 gel filtration. We reported their partial physicochemical properties: molecular weight, affinity for carbohydrates and organic acids, pH stability, and dependence of their hemagglutination activity on metal ions. We also determined their N-terminal amino acid sequences. H. mnioides lectins (HMLs) were monomers (one with a molecular weight of approximately 27 kDa, and the other with a molecular weight of approximately 105 kDa) under both nonreducing and reducing conditions. They were named HML27 and HML105, respectively. Both HMLs had an affinity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, D-glucuronic acid, D-glucaric acid, bovine submaxillary mucin, heparin, and organic acids, such as citrate, 2-oxoglutaric acid, and D-2-hydroxyglutarate. Furthermore, HML27 had an affinity for α-D-galacturonic acid, D-malate, L-malate, and pyruvate, while HML105 had an affinity for D-gluconic acid. HML27 and HML105 are novel plant lectins: they have an affinity for sugar acids and organic acids and specifically recognize the carboxyl group, and there is no homology between their N-terminal amino acid sequences and those of the previously described lectins and agglutinins.

  5. Conserved structural chemistry for incision activity in structurally non-homologous apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 and endonuclease IV DNA repair enzymes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Shin, David S.; Mol, Clifford D.; Izum, Tadahide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Mantha, Anil K.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Ivanov, Ivaylo N.; Hosfield, David J.; Maiti, Buddhadev; Pique, Mike E.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cunningham, Richard P.; Mitra, Sankar; Tainer, John A.

    2013-03-22

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA form spontaneously and as DNA base excision repair intermediates are the most common toxic and mutagenic in vivo DNA lesion. For repair, AP sites must be processed by 5' AP endonucleases in initial stages of base repair. Human APE1 and bacterial Nfo represent the two conserved 5' AP endonuclease families in the biosphere; they both recognize AP sites and incise the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the lesion, yet they lack similar structures and metal ion requirements. Here, we determined and analyzed crystal structures of a 2.4 ? resolution APE1-DNA product complex with Mg(2+) and a 0.92 Nfo with three metal ions. Structural and biochemical comparisons of these two evolutionarily distinct enzymes characterize key APE1 catalytic residues that are potentially functionally similar to Nfo active site components, as further tested and supported by computational analyses. We observe a magnesium-water cluster in the APE1 active site, with only Glu-96 forming the direct protein coordination to the Mg(2+). Despite differences in structure and metal requirements of APE1 and Nfo, comparison of their active site structures surprisingly reveals strong geometric conservation of the catalytic reaction, with APE1 catalytic side chains positioned analogously to Nfo metal positions, suggesting surprising functional equivalence between Nfo metal ions and APE1 residues. The finding that APE1 residues are positioned to substitute for Nfo metal ions is supported by the impact of mutations on activity. Collectively, the results illuminate the activities of residues, metal ions, and active site features for abasic site endonucleases.

  6. Homology recognition funnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dominic; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2009-10-01

    The recognition of homologous sequences of DNA before strand exchange is considered to be the most puzzling stage of homologous recombination. A mechanism for two homologous dsDNAs to recognize each other from a distance in electrolytic solution without unzipping had been proposed in an earlier paper [A. A. Kornyshev and S. Leikin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 366 (2001)]. In that work, the difference in the electrostatic interaction energy between homologous duplexes and between nonhomologous duplexes, termed the recognition energy, has been calculated. That calculation was later extended in a series of papers to account for torsional elasticity of the molecules. A recent paper [A. A. Kornyshev and A. Wynveen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 4683 (2009)] investigated the form of the potential well that homologous DNA molecules may feel when sliding along each other. A simple formula for the shape of the well was obtained. However, this latter study was performed under the approximation that the sliding molecules are torsionally rigid. Following on from this work, in the present article we investigate the effect of torsional flexibility of the molecules on the shape of the well. A variational approach to this problem results in a transcendental equation that is easily solved numerically. Its solutions show that at large interaxial separations the recognition well becomes wider and shallower, whereas at closer distances further unexpected features arise related to an abrupt change in the mean azimuthal alignment of the molecules. The energy surface as a function of interaxial separation and the axial shift defines what we call the recognition funnel. We show that it depends dramatically on the patterns of adsorption of counterions on DNA.

  7. A journey through the lectin pathway of complement-MBL and beyond.

    PubMed

    Garred, Peter; Genster, Ninette; Pilely, Katrine; Bayarri-Olmos, Rafael; Rosbjerg, Anne; Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2016-11-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin-10, collectin-11, and the ficolins (ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3) are soluble pattern recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. These proteins act as mediators of host defense and participate in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. They bind to conserved pathogen-specific structures and altered self-antigens and form complexes with the pentraxins to modulate innate immune functions. All molecules exhibit distinct expression in different tissue compartments, but all are found to a varying degree in the circulation. A common feature of these molecules is their ability to interact with a set of serine proteases named MASPs (MASP-1, MASP-2, and MASP-3). MASP-1 and -2 trigger the activation of the lectin pathway and MASP-3 may be involved in the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. Furthermore, MASPs mediate processes related to coagulation, bradykinin release, and endothelial and platelet activation. Variant alleles affecting expression and structure of the proteins have been associated with a variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases, most commonly as disease modifiers. Notably, the severe 3MC (Malpuech, Michels, Mingarelli, and Carnevale) embryonic development syndrome originates from rare mutations affecting either collectin-11 or MASP-3, indicating a broader functionality of the complement system than previously anticipated. This review summarizes the characteristics of the molecules in the lectin pathway.

  8. Lectin-binding by sporozoites of Elmeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fuller, A L; McDougald, L R

    2002-02-01

    Sporozoites of Eimeria tenella were reacted in vitro with 19 different lectins characterized with a variety of carbohydrate-binding properties. Nine lectins caused sporozoite agglutination, which was inhibited by the specific carbohydrates mannose, sialic acid, melibiose, D-galactose, or D-galNAc. When intact live or fixed whole sporozoites were reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectins, another nine lectins bound to sporozoites, giving weak to strong fluorescence but not agglutination. Of these, all nine lectins bound to surface sites, but four also bound to the refractile body. Two of the agglutinating lectins also bound to intracellular organelles of air-dried sporozoites. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that biotinylated lectins bound a wide variety of parasite proteins. Lectins with similar carbohydrate specificities had some similarity in binding patterns of parasite proteins, as well as marked differences. In a few cases lectins with different carbohydrate specificities bound common protein bands. Only one lectin (Dolichos biflorus) showed no evidence of binding to whole sporozoites, organelles, or proteins.

  9. Lectins, Interconnecting Proteins with Biotechnological/Pharmacological and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Priscila Marcelino dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are proteins extensively used in biomedical applications with property to recognize carbohydrates through carbohydrate-binding sites, which identify glycans attached to cell surfaces, glycoconjugates, or free sugars, detecting abnormal cells and biomarkers related to diseases. These lectin abilities promoted interesting results in experimental treatments of immunological diseases, wounds, and cancer. Lectins obtained from virus, microorganisms, algae, animals, and plants were reported as modulators and tool markers in vivo and in vitro; these molecules also play a role in the induction of mitosis and immune responses, contributing for resolution of infections and inflammations. Lectins revealed healing effect through induction of reepithelialization and cicatrization of wounds. Some lectins have been efficient agents against virus, fungi, bacteria, and helminths at low concentrations. Lectin-mediated bioadhesion has been an interesting characteristic for development of drug delivery systems. Lectin histochemistry and lectin-based biosensors are useful to detect transformed tissues and biomarkers related to disease occurrence; antitumor lectins reported are promising for cancer therapy. Here, we address lectins from distinct sources with some biological effect and biotechnological potential in the diagnosis and therapeutic of diseases, highlighting many advances in this growing field. PMID:28367220

  10. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators. PMID:12169094

  11. On the hodological criterion for homology.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as "the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function" and its redefinition after Darwin as "the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry" entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish "sameness."Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium.

  12. On the hodological criterion for homology

    PubMed Central

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as “the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function” and its redefinition after Darwin as “the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry” entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish “sameness.”Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium. PMID:26157357

  13. Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks

    PubMed Central

    Petri, G.; Expert, P.; Turkheimer, F.; Carhart-Harris, R.; Nutt, D.; Hellyer, P. J.; Vaccarino, F.

    2014-01-01

    Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186–198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and metrics concerned with node and link properties, e.g. degree-distribution, node centrality and modularity. Here, we study the characteristics of functional brain networks at the mesoscopic level from a novel perspective that highlights the role of inhomogeneities in the fabric of functional connections. This can be done by focusing on the features of a set of topological objects—homological cycles—associated with the weighted functional network. We leverage the detected topological information to define the homological scaffolds, a new set of objects designed to represent compactly the homological features of the correlation network and simultaneously make their homological properties amenable to networks theoretical methods. As a proof of principle, we apply these tools to compare resting-state functional brain activity in 15 healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion of placebo and psilocybin—the main psychoactive component of magic mushrooms. The results show that the homological structure of the brain's functional patterns undergoes a dramatic change post-psilocybin, characterized by the appearance of many transient structures of low stability and of a small number of persistent ones that are not observed in the case of placebo. PMID:25401177

  14. Evaluation of glycophenotype in breast cancer by quantum dot-lectin histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Camila G; Cabral Filho, Paulo E; Tenório, Denise P L; Santos, Beate S; Beltrão, Eduardo I C; Fontes, Adriana; Carvalho, Luiz B

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface glycoconjugates play an important role in differentiation/dedifferentiation processes and lectins are employed to evaluate them by several methodologies. Fluorescent probes are considered a valuable tool because of their ability to provide a particular view, and are more detailed and sensitive in terms of cell structure and molecular content. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression and distribution of glycoconjugates in normal human breast tissue, and benign (fibroadenoma), and malignantly transformed (invasive ductal carcinoma) breast tissues. For this, we used mercaptosuccinic acid-coated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with concanavalin A (Con A) or Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) lectins to detect α-D-glucose/mannose and L-fucose residues, respectively. The QD-lectin conjugates were evaluated by hemagglutination activity tests and carbohydrate inhibition assays, and were found to remain functional, keeping their fluorescent properties and carbohydrate recognition ability. Fluorescence images showed that different regions of breast tissue expressed particular types of carbohydrates. While the stroma was preferentially and intensely stained by QD-Con A, ductal cells were preferentially labeled by QD-UEA I. These results indicate that QD-lectin conjugates can be used as molecular probes and can help to elucidate the glycoconjugate profile in biological processes.

  15. Evaluation of glycophenotype in breast cancer by quantum dot-lectin histochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Camila G; Cabral Filho, Paulo E; Tenório, Denise PL; Santos, Beate S; Beltrão, Eduardo IC; Fontes, Adriana; Carvalho, Luiz B

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface glycoconjugates play an important role in differentiation/dedifferentiation processes and lectins are employed to evaluate them by several methodologies. Fluorescent probes are considered a valuable tool because of their ability to provide a particular view, and are more detailed and sensitive in terms of cell structure and molecular content. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression and distribution of glycoconjugates in normal human breast tissue, and benign (fibroadenoma), and malignantly transformed (invasive ductal carcinoma) breast tissues. For this, we used mercaptosuccinic acid-coated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with concanavalin A (Con A) or Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) lectins to detect α-D-glucose/mannose and L-fucose residues, respectively. The QD-lectin conjugates were evaluated by hemagglutination activity tests and carbohydrate inhibition assays, and were found to remain functional, keeping their fluorescent properties and carbohydrate recognition ability. Fluorescence images showed that different regions of breast tissue expressed particular types of carbohydrates. While the stroma was preferentially and intensely stained by QD-Con A, ductal cells were preferentially labeled by QD-UEA I. These results indicate that QD-lectin conjugates can be used as molecular probes and can help to elucidate the glycoconjugate profile in biological processes. PMID:24324334

  16. Use of lectins to in situ visualize glycoconjugates of extracellular polymeric substances in acidophilic archaeal biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R Y; Neu, T R; Bellenberg, S; Kuhlicke, U; Sand, W; Vera, M

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by meso- and thermoacidophilic metal-oxidizing archaea on relevant substrates have been studied to a limited extent. In order to investigate glycoconjugates, a major part of the EPS, during biofilm formation/bioleaching by archaea on pyrite, a screening with 75 commercially available lectins by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) has been performed. Three representative archaeal species, Ferroplasma acidiphilum DSM 28986, Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482T and a novel isolate Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 were used. In addition, Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur were studied. The results of FLBA indicate (i) 22 lectins bound to archaeal biofilms on pyrite and 21 lectins were binding to Acidianus sp. DSM 29099 biofilms on elemental sulfur; (ii) major binding patterns, e.g. tightly bound EPS and loosely bound EPS, were detected on both substrates; (iii) the three archaeal species produced various EPS glycoconjugates on pyrite surfaces. Additionally, the substratum induced different EPS glycoconjugates and biofilm structures of cells of Acidianus sp. DSM 29099. Our data provide new insights into interactions between acidophilic archaea on relevant surfaces and also indicate that FLBA is a valuable tool for in situ investigations on archaeal biofilms. PMID:25488256

  17. Synthesis of β-galactosylamides as ligands of the peanut lectin. Insights into the recognition process.

    PubMed

    Cano, María Emilia; Varela, Oscar; García-Moreno, María Isabel; García Fernández, José Manuel; Kovensky, José; Uhrig, María Laura

    2017-03-23

    The synthesis of mono and divalent β-galactosylamides linked to a hydroxylated chain having a C2 symmetry axis derived from l-tartaric anhydride is reported. Reference compounds devoid of hydroxyl groups in the linker were also prepared from β-galactosylamine and succinic anhydride. After functionalization with an alkynyl residue, the resulting building blocks were grafted onto different azide-equipped scaffolds through the copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Thus, a family of structurally related mono and divalent β-N-galactopyranosylamides was obtained and fully characterized. The binding affinities of the ligands towards the model lectin PNA were measured by the enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA). The IC50 values were significantly higher than that of galactose but the presence of hydroxyl groups in the aglycone chain improved lectin recognition. Docking and molecular dynamics experiments were in accordance with the hypothesis that a hydroxyl group properly disposed in the linker could mimic the Glc O3 in the recognition process. On the other hand, divalent presentation of the ligands led to lectin affinity enhancements.

  18. GMI1, a structural-maintenance-of-chromosomes-hinge domain-containing protein, is involved in somatic homologous recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Schleiffer, Alexander; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Ferscha, Stefan; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Kozák, Jaroslav; Angelis, Karel J; Kreil, David P; Schweizer, Dieter

    2011-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) pose one of the most severe threats to genome integrity, potentially leading to cell death. After detection of a DSB, the DNA damage and repair response is initiated and the DSB is repaired by non-homologous end joining and/or homologous recombination. Many components of these processes are still unknown in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this work, we characterized γ-irradiation and mitomycin C induced 1 (GMI1), a member of the SMC-hinge domain-containing protein family. RT-PCR analysis and promoter-GUS fusion studies showed that γ-irradiation, the radio-mimetic drug bleocin, and the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C strongly enhance GMI1 expression particularly in meristematic tissues. The induction of GMI1 by γ-irradiation depends on the signalling kinase Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) but not on ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Epistasis analysis of single and double mutants demonstrated that ATM acts upstream of GMI1 while the atr gmi1-2 double mutant was more sensitive than the respective single mutants. Comet assay revealed a reduced rate of DNA double-strand break repair in gmi1 mutants during the early recovery phase after exposure to bleocin. Moreover, the rate of homologous recombination of a reporter construct was strongly reduced in gmi1 mutant plants upon exposure to bleocin or mitomycin C. GMI1 is the first member of its protein family known to be involved in DNA repair.

  19. A lectin isolated from bananas is a potent inhibitor of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Michael D; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J; Markovitz, David M

    2010-03-19

    BanLec is a jacalin-related lectin isolated from the fruit of bananas, Musa acuminata. This lectin binds to high mannose carbohydrate structures, including those found on viruses containing glycosylated envelope proteins such as human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Therefore, we hypothesized that BanLec might inhibit HIV-1 through binding of the glycosylated HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. We determined that BanLec inhibits primary and laboratory-adapted HIV-1 isolates of different tropisms and subtypes. BanLec possesses potent anti-HIV activity, with IC(50) values in the low nanomolar to picomolar range. The mechanism for BanLec-mediated antiviral activity was investigated by determining if this lectin can directly bind the HIV-1 envelope protein and block entry of the virus into the cell. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed direct binding of BanLec to gp120 and indicated that BanLec can recognize the high mannose structures that are recognized by the monoclonal antibody 2G12. Furthermore, BanLec is able to block HIV-1 cellular entry as indicated by temperature-sensitive viral entry studies and by the decreased levels of the strong-stop product of early reverse transcription seen in the presence of BanLec. Thus, our data indicate that BanLec inhibits HIV-1 infection by binding to the glycosylated viral envelope and blocking cellular entry. The relative anti-HIV activity of BanLec compared favorably to other anti-HIV lectins, such as snowdrop lectin and Griffithsin, and to T-20 and maraviroc, two anti-HIV drugs currently in clinical use. Based on these results, BanLec is a potential component for an anti-viral microbicide that could be used to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

  20. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  1. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  2. Mannose-Binding Lectin Promoter Polymorphisms and Gene Variants in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients from Cantabria (Northern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Lavín-Alconero, Lucía; Sánchez-Velasco, Pablo; Guerrero-Alonso, M.-Ángeles; Ausín, Fernando; Fariñas, M.-Carmen; Leyva-Cobián, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is a central molecule of the innate immune system. Mannose-binding lectin 2 promoter polymorphisms and structural variants have been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis. However, contradictory results among different populations have been reported, resulting in no convincing evidence of association between mannose-binding lectin 2 and susceptibility to tuberculosis. For this reason, we conducted a study in a well genetically conserved Spanish population in order to shed light on this controversial association. We analysed the six promoter and structural mannose-binding lectin 2 gene variants in 107 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 441 healthy controls. Only D variant and HYPD haplotype were significantly more frequents in controls which would indicate that this allele could confer protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, but this difference disappeared after statistical correction. Neither the rest of alleles nor the haplotypes were significantly associated with the disease. These results would indicate that mannose-binding lectin promoter polymorphisms and gene variants would not be associated with an increased risk to pulmonary tuberculosis. Despite the slight trend of the D allele and HYPD haplotype in conferring protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, susceptibility to this disease would probably be due to other genetic factors, at least in our population. PMID:23304495

  3. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  4. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    de Miranda Santos, I K; Pereira, M E

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various 125I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  5. Non-labeled QCM Biosensor for Bacterial Detection using Carbohydrate and Lectin Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Huang, Mingchuan; Xiao, Caide; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Wang, Peng G.

    2008-01-01

    High percentages of harmful microbes or their secreting toxins bind to specific carbohydrate sequences on human cells at the recognition and attachment sites. A number of studies also show that lectins react with specific structures of bacteria and fungi. In this report, we take advantage of the fact that a high percentage of microorganisms have both carbohydrate and lectin binding pockets at their surface. We demonstrate here for the first time that a carbohydrate non-labeled mass sensor in combination with lectin-bacterial O-antigen recognition can be used for detection of high molecular weight bacterial targets with remarkably high sensitivity and specificity. A functional mannose self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in combination with lectin Con A was used as molecular recognition elements for the detection of E. coli W1485 using Quartz Crytsal Microbalance (QCM) as a transducer. The multivalent binding of Concanavalin A (Con A) to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) surface O-antigen favors the strong adhesion of E. coli to mannose modified QCM surface by forming bridges between these two. As a result, the contact area between cell and QCM surface increases that leads to rigid and strong attachment. Therefore it enhances the binding between E. coli and the mannose. Our results show a significant improvement of the sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate QCM biosensor with a experimental detection limit of a few hundred bacterial cells. The linear range is from 7.5 × 102 to 7.5 × 107 cells/mL that is four decade wider than the mannose alone QCM sensor. The change of damping resistances for E. coli adhesion experiments was no more than 1.4% suggesting that the bacterial attachment was rigid, rather than a viscoelastic behavior. Little non-specific binding was observed for Staphylococcus aureus and other proteins (Fetal Bovine serum, Erythrina cristagalli lectin). Our approach not only overcomes the challenges of applying QCM technology for bacterial detection but

  6. Immunological and structural homology between human T-cell leukemia virus type I envelope glycoprotein and a region of human interleukin-2 implicated in binding the. beta. receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kohtz, D.S.; Kohtz, J.D.; Puszkin, S. ); Altman, A. )

    1988-02-01

    The N-terminal segment of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) appears to mediate binding of the {beta} hIL-2 receptor. An affinity-purified antibody prepared against this peptide segment (p81) is shown here to cross-react with a homologous region of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) envelope glycoprotein, raising the interesting possibility that the envelope glycoprotein of HTLV-I can interact with the {beta} hIL-2 receptor.

  7. Bacterial putative metacaspase structure from Geobacter sulfureducens as a template for homology modeling of type II Triticum aestivum metacaspase (TaeMCAII).

    PubMed

    Dudkiewicz, Malgorzata Z; Piszczek, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Metacaspases, cysteine proteases belonging to the peptidase C14 family, are suspected of being involved in the programmed cell death of plants, although their sequences and substrate specificity differ from those of animal caspases. At present, the knowledge on the metacaspase reaction mechanism is based only on biochemical data and homology models constructed on caspase templates. Here we propose a novel template for metacaspase modeling and demonstrate important advantages in comparison to the conventionally used caspase templates. We also point out the connection between plant and bacterial metacaspases, underlining the prokaryotic roots of Programmed Cell Death (PCD).

  8. Atomic visualization of a flipped-back conformation of bisected glycans bound to specific lectins

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Masamichi; Kanagawa, Mayumi; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Hanashima, Shinya; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Glycans normally exist as a dynamic equilibrium of several conformations. A fundamental question concerns how such molecules bind lectins despite disadvantageous entropic loss upon binding. Bisected glycan, a glycan possessing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is potentially a good model for investigating conformational dynamics and glycan-lectin interactions, owing to the unique ability of this sugar residue to alter conformer populations and thus modulate the biological activities. Here we analyzed bisected glycan in complex with two unrelated lectins, Calsepa and PHA-E. The crystal structures of the two complexes show a conspicuous flipped back glycan structure (designated ‘back-fold’ conformation), and solution NMR analysis also provides evidence of ‘back-fold’ glycan structure. Indeed, statistical conformational analysis of available bisected and non-bisected glycan structures suggests that bisecting GlcNAc restricts the conformations of branched structures. Restriction of glycan flexibility by certain sugar residues may be more common than previously thought and impinges on the mechanism of glycoform-dependent biological functions. PMID:26971576

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a galactose-specific lectin from Dolichos lablab

    SciTech Connect

    Lavanya Latha, V.; Kulkarni, Kiran A.; Nagender Rao, R.; Siva Kumar, N.; Suguna, K.

    2006-02-01

    The galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of a leguminous plant, D. lablab, has been crystallized. Molecular-replacement solution using 3.0 Å X-ray diffraction data showed the lectin to be a tetramer. The galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of Dolichos lablab has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.99, b = 84.13, c = 93.15 Å, α = 89.92, β = 76.01, γ = 76.99°. X-ray diffraction data to a resolution of 3.0 Å have been collected under cryoconditions (100 K) using a MAR imaging-plate detector system mounted on a rotating-anode X-ray generator. Molecular-replacement calculations carried out using the available structures of legume lectins as search models revealed that the galactose-specific lectin from D. lablab forms a tetramer similar to soybean agglutinin; two such tetramers are present in the asymmetric unit.

  10. Effect of the lectin of Bauhinia variegata and its recombinant isoform on surgically induced skin wounds in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Neto, Luiz Gonzaga do Nascimento; Pinto, Luciano da Silva; Bastos, Rafaela Mesquita; Evaristo, Francisco Flávio Vasconcelos; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves de; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Júnior, Valdemiro Amaro da Silva; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

    2011-11-07

    Lectins are a structurally heterogeneous group of highly specific carbohydrate-binding proteins. Due to their great biotechnological potential, lectins are widely used in biomedical research. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the healing potential of the lectin of Bauhinia variegata (nBVL) and its recombinant isoform (rBVL-1). Following surgical creation of dorsal skin wounds, seven groups of mice were submitted to topical treatment for 12 days with lectin, D-galactose, BSA and saline. The animals were anesthetized and euthanized on POD 2, 7 and 12 in order to evaluate the healing potential of each treatment. The parameters considered included wound size, contraction rate, epithelialization rate and histopathological findings. Wound closure was fastest in animals treated with rBVL-1 (POD 7). nBVL was more effective than the controls. All skin layers were reconstructed and keratin deposition increased. Our findings indicate that the lectin of Bauhinia variegata possesses pro-healing properties and may be employed in the treatment of acute skin wounds.

  11. Applications of immunocolloids in light microscopy. III. Demonstration of antigenic and lectin-binding sites in semithin resin sections.

    PubMed

    Lucocq, J M; Roth, J

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that antigens or lectin-binding sites can be localized in sections from paraffin-embedded tissues with protein A or lectins bound to colloidal gold or colloidal silver (Roth J: J Histochem Cytochem 30:691, 1982 and 31:547, 1983). In the present study the protein A-gold technique and lectin-gold complexes have been applied to semithin sections (0.5-1.5 micron) of Epon- or low temperature Lowicryl K4M-embedded rat pancreas, kidney and submandibular gland. The results show that an increase in resolution and, therefore, in amount of information can be obtained. The optimal mode of imaging was determined on sections without counterstaining. Bright-field illumination gives the maximum information about the staining signal, while phase-contrast and Nomarski differential interference contrast give predominantly structural and, to a lesser extent, staining information. Polarization epi- and transillumination microscopy is inferior in all aspects. The application of a battery of lectin-gold complexes to rat submandibular gland revealed a specific staining pattern for each lectin in acinar and excretory duct cells.

  12. The three-dimensional solution structure of NaD1, a new floral defensin from Nicotiana alata and its application to a homology model of the crop defense protein alfAFP.

    PubMed

    Lay, Fung T; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Scanlon, Martin J; Anderson, Marilyn A; Craik, David J

    2003-01-03

    NMR spectroscopy and simulated annealing calculations have been used to determine the three-dimensional structure of NaD1, a novel antifungal and insecticidal protein isolated from the flowers of Nicotiana alata. NaD1 is a basic, cysteine-rich protein of 47 residues and is the first example of a plant defensin from flowers to be characterized structurally. Its three-dimensional structure consists of an alpha-helix and a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet that are stabilized by four intramolecular disulfide bonds. NaD1 features all the characteristics of the cysteine-stabilized alphabeta motif that has been described for a variety of proteins of differing functions ranging from antibacterial insect defensins and ion channel-perturbing scorpion toxins to an elicitor of the sweet taste response. The protein is biologically active against insect pests, which makes it a potential candidate for use in crop protection. NaD1 shares 31% sequence identity with alfAFP, an antifungal protein from alfalfa that confers resistance to a fungal pathogen in transgenic potatoes. The structure of NaD1 was used to obtain a homology model of alfAFP, since NaD1 has the highest level of sequence identity with alfAFP of any structurally characterized antifungal defensin. The structures of NaD1 and alfAFP were used in conjunction with structure-activity data for the radish defensin Rs-AFP2 to provide an insight into structure-function relationships. In particular, a putative effector site was identified in the structure of NaD1 and in the corresponding homology model of alfAFP.

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of the N-terminal region of the human formin-homology protein FHOD1

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Antje Rak, Alexey; Pylypenko, Olena; Ludwig, Diana; Geyer, Matthias

    2007-10-01

    The N-terminal region (1–339) of the human FHOD1 protein has been crystallized in two different crystal forms. A crystal of the (C31S,C71S) mutant diffracted to around 2.3 Å resolution. Formins are key regulators of actin cytoskeletal dynamics that constitute a diverse protein family that is present in all eukaryotes examined. They typically consist of more than 1000 amino acids and are defined by the presence of two conserved regions, namely the formin homology 1 and 2 domains. Additional conserved domains comprise a GTPase-binding domain for activation, a C-terminal autoregulation motif and an N-terminal recognition domain. In this study, the N-terminal region (residues 1–339) of the human formin homology domain-containing protein 1 (FHOD1) was purified and crystallized from 20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 10%(v/v) glycerol, 0.3 M magnesium chloride and 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.0. Native crystals belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 35.4, b = 73.9, c = 78.7 Å, α = 78.2, β = 86.2, γ = 89.7°. They contain two monomers of FHOD1 in the asymmetric unit and diffract to a resolution of 2.3 Å using a synchrotron-radiation source.

  14. Isothermal calorimetric analysis of lectin-sugar interaction.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Matsuo, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful tool for analyzing lectin-glycan interactions because it can measure the binding affinity and thermodynamic properties such as ∆H and ΔS in a single experiment without any chemical modification or immobilization. Here we describe a method for preparing glycan and lectin solution to minimize the buffer mismatch, setting parameters, and performing experiments.

  15. Glycan profiling of endometrial cancers using lectin microarray.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Sugiyama, Taro; Miyazawa, Masaki; Muramatsu, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kyoko; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Mikami, Mikio

    2012-10-01

    Cell surface glycans change during the process of malignant transformation. To characterize and distinguish endometrial cancer and endometrium, we performed glycan profiling using an emerging modern technology, lectin microarray analysis. The three cell lines, two from endometrial cancers [well-differentiated type (G1) and poorly differentiated type (G3)] and one from normal endometrium, were successfully categorized into three independent groups by 45 lectins. Furthermore, in cancer cells, a clear difference between G1 and G3 type was observed for the glycans recognized with six lectins, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), Sambucus sieboldiana agglutinin (SSA), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), Trichosanthes japonica agglutinin I (TJA-I), Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA), and Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPL). The lectin microarray analysis using G3 type tissues demonstrated that stage I and stage III or IV were distinguished depending on signal pattern of three lectins, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), BPL, and ACA. In addition, the analysis of the glycans on the ovarian cancer cells showed that only anticancer drug-sensitive cell lines had almost no activities to specific three lectins. Glycan profiling by the lectin microarray may be used to assess the characteristics of tumors and potentially to predict the success of chemotherapy treatment.

  16. Characterization of mannose binding lectin from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity capable of activating the lectin pathway of the complement system. A MBL gene was isolated from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The deduced protein