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Sample records for homologous recombination system

  1. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Holloman, William K.; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of Ustilago maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins. PMID:18502156

  2. Comparative and Evolutionary Analysis of the Bacterial Homologous Recombination Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C; Cornet, Emmanuel; Michel, Bénédicte

    2005-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a housekeeping process involved in the maintenance of chromosome integrity and generation of genetic variability. Although detailed biochemical studies have described the mechanism of action of its components in model organisms, there is no recent extensive assessment of this knowledge, using comparative genomics and taking advantage of available experimental data on recombination. Using comparative genomics, we assessed the diversity of recombination processes among bacteria, and simulations suggest that we missed very few homologs. The work included the identification of orthologs and the analysis of their evolutionary history and genomic context. Some genes, for proteins such as RecA, the resolvases, and RecR, were found to be nearly ubiquitous, suggesting that the large majority of bacterial genomes are capable of homologous recombination. Yet many genomes show incomplete sets of presynaptic systems, with RecFOR being more frequent than RecBCD/AddAB. There is a significant pattern of co-occurrence between these systems and antirecombinant proteins such as the ones of mismatch repair and SbcB, but no significant association with nonhomologous end joining, which seems rare in bacteria. Surprisingly, a large number of genomes in which homologous recombination has been reported lack many of the enzymes involved in the presynaptic systems. The lack of obvious correlation between the presence of characterized presynaptic genes and experimental data on the frequency of recombination suggests the existence of still-unknown presynaptic mechanisms in bacteria. It also indicates that, at the moment, the assessment of the intrinsic stability or recombination isolation of bacteria in most cases cannot be inferred from the identification of known recombination proteins in the genomes. PMID:16132081

  3. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  4. Innovation by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Devin L; Smith, Matthew A; Arnold, Frances H

    2013-12-01

    Swapping fragments among protein homologs can produce chimeric proteins with a wide range of properties, including properties not exhibited by the parents. Computational methods that use information from structures and sequence alignments have been used to design highly functional chimeras and chimera libraries. Recombination has generated proteins with diverse thermostability and mechanical stability, enzyme substrate specificity, and optogenetic properties. Linear regression, Gaussian processes, and support vector machine learning have been used to model sequence-function relationships and predict useful chimeras. These approaches enable engineering of protein chimeras with desired functions, as well as elucidation of the structural basis for these functions.

  5. [An efficient genetic knockout system based on linear DNA fragment homologous recombination for halophilic archaea].

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Wang; Chuang, Jiang; Jianhua, Liu; Xipeng, Liu

    2015-04-01

    With the development of functional genomics, gene-knockout is becoming an important tool to elucidate gene functions in vivo. As a good model strain for archaeal genetics, Haloferax volcanii has received more attention. Although several genetic manipulation systems have been developed for some halophilic archaea, it is time-consuming because of the low percentage of positive clones during the second-recombination selection. These classical gene knockout methods are based on DNA recombination between the genomic homologous sequence and the circular suicide plasmid, which carries a pyrE selection marker and two DNA fragments homologous to the upstream and downstream fragments of the target gene. Many wild-type clones are obtained through a reverse recombination between the plasmid and genome in the classic gene knockout method. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient gene knockout system to increase the positive clone percentage. Here we report an improved gene knockout method using a linear DNA cassette consisting of upstream and downstream homologous fragments, and the pyrE marker. Gene deletions were subsequently detected by colony PCR analysis. We determined the efficiency of our knockout method by deleting the xpb2 gene from the H. volcanii genome, with the percentage of positive clones higher than 50%. Our method provides an efficient gene knockout strategy for halophilic archaea.

  6. Genetic Modification in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by Homologous Recombination and CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Xue, Haipeng; Wu, Jianbo; Li, Shenglan; Rao, Mahendra S; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Genetic modification is an indispensable tool to study gene function in normal development and disease. The recent breakthrough of creating human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by defined factors (Takahashi et al., Cell 131:861-872, 2007) provides a renewable source of patient autologous cells that not only retain identical genetic information but also give rise to many cell types of the body including neurons and glia. Meanwhile, the rapid advancement of genome modification tools such as gene targeting by homologous recombination (Capecchi, Nat Rev Genet 6:507-512, 2005) and genome editing tools such as CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas (CRISPR-associated) system, TALENs (Transcription activator-like effector nucleases), and ZFNs (Zinc finger nucleases) (Wang et al., Cell 153:910-918, 2013; Mali et al., Science 339:823-826, 2013; Hwang et al., Nat Biotechnol 31:227-229, 2013; Friedland et al., Nat Methods 10(8):741-743, 2013; DiCarlo et al., Nucleic Acids Res 41:4336-4343, 2013; Cong et al., Science 339:819-823, 2013) has greatly accelerated the development of human genome manipulation at the molecular level. This chapter describes the protocols for making neural lineage reporter lines using homologous recombination and the CRISPR/Cas system-mediated genome editing, including construction of targeting vectors, guide RNAs, transfection into hPSCs, and selection and verification of successfully targeted clones. This method can be applied to various needs of hPSC genetic engineering at high efficiency and high reliability.

  7. A non-canonical DNA structure enables homologous recombination in various genetic systems.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tokiha; Ito, Yutaka; Terada, Tohru; Shibata, Takehiko; Mikawa, Tsutomu

    2009-10-30

    Homologous recombination, which is critical to genetic diversity, depends on homologous pairing (HP). HP is the switch from parental to recombinant base pairs, which requires expansion of inter-base pair spaces. This expansion unavoidably causes untwisting of the parental double-stranded DNA. RecA/Rad51-catalyzed ATP-dependent HP is extensively stimulated in vitro by negative supercoils, which compensates for untwisting. However, in vivo, double-stranded DNA is relaxed by bound proteins and thus is an unfavorable substrate for RecA/Rad51. In contrast, Mhr1, an ATP-independent HP protein required for yeast mitochondrial homologous recombination, catalyzes HP without the net untwisting of double-stranded DNA. Therefore, we questioned whether Mhr1 uses a novel strategy to promote HP. Here, we found that, like RecA, Mhr1 induced the extension of bound single-stranded DNA. In addition, this structure was induced by all evolutionarily and structurally distinct HP proteins so far tested, including bacterial RecO, viral RecT, and human Rad51. Thus, HP includes the common non-canonical DNA structure and uses a common core mechanism, independent of the species of HP proteins. We discuss the significance of multiple types of HP proteins. PMID:19729448

  8. Homology Requirements for Double-Strand Break-Mediated Recombination in a Phage λ-Td Intron Model System

    PubMed Central

    Parker, M. M.; Court, D. A.; Preiter, K.; Belfort, M.

    1996-01-01

    Many group I introns encode endonucleases that promote intron homing by initiating a double-strand break-mediated homologous recombination event. A td intron-phage λ model system was developed to analyze exon homology effects on intron homing and determine the role of the λ 5'-3' exonuclease complex (Redαβ) in the repair event. Efficient intron homing depended on exon lengths in the 35- to 50-bp range, although homing levels remained significantly elevated above nonbreak-mediated recombination with as little as 10 bp of flanking homology. Although precise intron insertion was demonstrated with extremely limiting exon homology, the complete absence of one exon produced illegitimate events on the side of heterology. Interestingly, intron inheritance was unaffected by the presence of extensive heterology at the double-strand break in wild-type λ, provided that sufficient homology between donor and recipient was present distal to the heterologous sequences. However, these events involving heterologous ends were absolutely dependent on an intact Red exonuclease system. Together these results indicate that heterologous sequences can participate in double-strand break-mediated repair and imply that intron transposition to heteroallelic sites might occur at break sites within regions of limited or no homology. PMID:8807281

  9. A system for assaying homologous recombination at the endogenous human thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, M.B.; Little, J.B. ); Potter, H. ); Yandell, D.W. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1991-08-01

    A system for assaying human interchromosomal recombination in vitro was developed, using a cell line containing two different mutant thymidine kinase genes (TK) on chromosomes 17. Heteroalleles were generated in the TK{sup +/+} parent B-lymphoblast cell line WIL-2 by repeated exposure to the alkylating nitrogen mustard ICR-191, which preferentially causes +1 or {minus}1 frameshifts. Resulting TK{sup {minus}/{minus}} mutants were selected in medium containing the toxic thymidine analog trifluorothymidine. In two lines, heterozygous frameshifts were located in exons 4 and 7 of the TK gene separated by {approx}8 kilobases. These lines undergo spontaneous reversion to TK{sup +} at a frequency of < 10{sup {minus}7}, and revertants can be selected in cytidine/hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine medium. The nature and location of these heteroallelic mutations make large deletions, rearrangements, nondisjunction, and reduplication unlikely mechanisms for reversion to TK{sup +}. The mode of reversion to TK{sup +} was specifically assessed by DNA sequencing, use of single-strand conformation polymorphisms, and analysis of various restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) linked to the TK gene on chromosome 17. The data suggest that a proportion of revertants has undergone recombination and gene conversion at the TK locus, with concomitant loss of frameshifts and allele loss at linked RFLPs. Models are presented for the origin of two recombinants.

  10. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  11. Repair of deletions and double-strand gaps by homologous recombination in a mammalian in vitro system.

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, R; Berg, P

    1991-01-01

    We have designed an in vitro system using mammalian nuclear extracts, or fractions derived from them, that can restore the sequences missing at double-strand breaks (gaps) or in deletions. The recombination substrates consist of (i) recipient DNA, pSV2neo with gaps or deletions ranging from 70 to 390 bp in the neo sequence, and (ii) donor DNAs with either complete homology to the recipient (pSV2neo) or plasmids whose homology with pSV2neo is limited to a 1.0- to 1.3-kbp neo segment spanning the gaps or deletions. Incubation of these substrates with various enzyme fractions results in repair of the recipient DNA's disrupted neo gene. The recombinational repair was monitored by transforming recA Escherichia coli to kanamycin resistance and by a new assay which measures the extent of DNA strand transfer from the donor substrate to the recipient DNA. Thus, either streptavidin- or antidigoxigenin-tagged beads are used to separate the biotinylated or digoxigeninylated recipient DNA, respectively, after incubation with the isotopically labeled donor DNA. In contrast to the transfection assay, the DNA strand transfer measurements are direct, quantitative, rapid, and easy, and they provide starting material for the characterization of the recombination products and intermediates. Accordingly, DNA bound to beads serves as a suitable template for the polymerase chain reaction. With appropriate pairs of oligonucleotide primers, we have confirmed that both gaps and deletions are fully repaired, that deletions can be transferred from the recipient DNA to the donor's intact neo sequence, and that cointegrant molecules containing donor and recipient DNA sequences are formed. Images PMID:1986239

  12. Homologous recombination in rat germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Takehashi, Masanori; Sanbo, Makoto; Morioka, Yuka; Tanaka, Takashi; Morimoto, Hiroko; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Shinohara, Takashi

    2011-07-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the only stem cells in the body with germline potential, which makes them an attractive target for germline modification. We previously showed the feasibility of homologous recombination in mouse SSCs and produced knockout (KO) mice by exploiting germline stem (GS) cells, i.e., cultured spermatogonia with SSC activity. In this study, we report the successful homologous recombination in rat GS cells, which can be readily established by their ability to form germ cell colonies on culture plates whose surfaces are hydrophilic and neutrally charged and thus limit somatic cell binding. We established a drug selection protocol for GS cells under hypoxic conditions. The frequency of the homologous recombination of the Ocln gene was 4.2% (2 out of 48 clones). However, these GS cell lines failed to produce offspring following xenogeneic transplantation into mouse testes and microinsemination, suggesting that long-term culture and drug selection have a negative effect on GS cells. Nevertheless, our results demonstrate the feasibility of gene targeting in rat GS cells and pave the way toward the generation of KO rats.

  13. The study on space-flight induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis thaliana using the related homologous recombination reporter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Lu, Jinying; Liu, Min; Li, Huasheng

    Usually, phenotype changes of plants were used to analayze the responding genetic damages. However, this method is time-consuming, laborious and needs a long period. Here, we developed an Arabidopsis thaliana homologous recombination reporter system, in which HR frequency and HR-related AtRAD54 gene expression level were used as mutagenic end points. Based on the system, effect of DNA damage by space-flight during the Shenzhou-9 mission was investigated. In this study, an Arabidopsis thaliana-line transgenic for GUS recombination substrates (R3L66, AtRAD54promoter:: GFP + GUS) was used to study the mutagenicity of space-flight, and the results showed that 13 days space-flight exposure of seedlings induced a significant increase in HRF compared with its ground-base three-dimensional clinostat (generally called a random positioning machine or RPM, an effective simulator of microgravity) controls and ground 1g controls. We also observed three-dimensional clinostat induced a significant increase in HRF and HR-related AtRAD54 gene expression level compared with ground 1g controls. Treatment with the ROS scavenger DMSO dramatically reduced the effects of simulated microgravity on the induction of HR and expression of the AtRAD54 gene, suggesting that ROS play a critical role in mediating the simulated microgravity mutagenic effects in plants. In order to understand the combined effects of radiation and microgravity (the main factors in space environment) on DNA damage, we further investigated the effects of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) n vivo in A. thaliana plants using the expression level of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene as mutagenic end points. The results showed that the modeled microgravity significantly inhibited the up-regulated expression of the AtRAD54 gene in bystander aerial plants after root irradiation, suggesting a repressive effect of microgravity on RIBE.

  14. Regulation of DNA Pairing in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Daley, James M.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Sung, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major mechanism for eliminating DNA double-strand breaks from chromosomes. In this process, the break termini are resected nucleolytically to form 3′ ssDNA (single-strand DNA) overhangs. A recombinase (i.e., a protein that catalyzes homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange) assembles onto the ssDNA and promotes pairing with a homologous duplex. DNA synthesis then initiates from the 3′ end of the invading strand, and the extended DNA joint is resolved via one of several pathways to restore the integrity of the injured chromosome. It is crucial that HR be carefully orchestrated because spurious events can create cytotoxic intermediates or cause genomic rearrangements and loss of gene heterozygosity, which can lead to cell death or contribute to the development of cancer. In this review, we will discuss how DNA motor proteins regulate HR via a dynamic balance of the recombination-promoting and -attenuating activities that they possess. PMID:25190078

  15. Intramolecular recombination between partially homologous sequences in Escherichia coli and Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Abastado, J P; Darche, S; Godeau, F; Cami, B; Kourilsky, P

    1987-01-01

    We describe a system to analyze the individual contribution of a single physical DNA end on intramolecular recombination between partially homologous sequences. We took advantage of this partial sequence divergence to measure the distance separating the DNA end from the final recombination event. We show that a single physical DNA end stimulates recombination when located in a region of homology. Recombination frequency decreases gradually with the distance from the DNA end. A recombinational hot spot is found at the end of the region of homology. A large insertion of unrelated DNA interferes asymmetrically with this process, suggesting that a recombinogenic signal propagates along the region of homology. Images PMID:3306681

  16. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    PubMed

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research. PMID:26907777

  17. [Knock out of bovine beta casein gene by homologous recombination].

    PubMed

    Xue, Ke; Li, Feng; Luo, Guang-Bin; Huang, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xue-Jin

    2007-05-01

    It has been reported that homologous recombination with Red system has been successfully used for knock-out. We try to work on the construction of the expression vector of Mammary Gland with Red system. This study takes CSN2 as a vector for gene target, which contains the complete bovine beta casein gene. Different homologous arms were designed and the CDS region of the beta casein gene was successfully knocked out. The efficiency was also explored for knocking out different DNA fragment. Based on the study, it is very convenient for making a deep research of the foreign gene expression under the regulation of CSN2 flanking region.

  18. How homologous recombination maintains telomere integrity.

    PubMed

    Tacconi, Eliana M C; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2015-06-01

    Telomeres protect the ends of linear chromosomes against loss of genetic information and inappropriate processing as damaged DNA and are therefore crucial to the maintenance of chromosome integrity. In addition to providing a pathway for genome-wide DNA repair, homologous recombination (HR) plays a key role in telomere replication and capping. Consistent with this, the genomic instability characteristic of HR-deficient cells and tumours is driven in part by telomere dysfunction. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which HR modulates the response to intrinsic cellular challenges that arise during telomere replication, as well as its impact on the assembly of telomere protective structures. How normal and tumour cells differ in their ability to maintain telomeres is deeply relevant to the search for treatments that would selectively eliminate cells whose capacity for HR-mediated repair has been compromised.

  19. Homologous Recombination—Experimental Systems, Analysis and Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is the most complex of all recombination events that shape genomes and produce material for evolution. Homologous recombination events are exchanges between DNA molecules in the lengthy regions of shared identity, catalyzed by a group of dedicated enzymes. There is a variety of experimental systems in E. coli and Salmonella to detect homologous recombination events of several different kinds. Genetic analysis of homologous recombination reveals three separate phases of this process: pre-synapsis (the early phase), synapsis (homologous strand exchange) and post-synapsis (the late phase). In E. coli, there are at least two independent pathway of the early phase and at least two independent pathways of the late phase. All this complexity is incongruent with the originally ascribed role of homologous recombination as accelerator of genome evolution: there is simply not enough duplication and repetition in enterobacterial genomes for homologous recombination to have a detectable evolutionary role, and therefore not enough selection to maintain such a complexity. At the same time, the mechanisms of homologous recombination are uniquely suited for repair of complex DNA lesions called chromosomal lesions. In fact, the two major classes of chromosomal lesions are recognized and processed by the two individual pathways at the early phase of homologous recombination. It follows, therefore, that homologous recombination events are occasional reflections of the continual recombinational repair, made possible in cases of natural or artificial genome redundancy. PMID:26442506

  20. Efficient Assembly of DNA Using Yeast Homologous Recombination (YHR).

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sunil; Shapland, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    The assembly of multiple DNA parts into a larger DNA construct is a requirement in most synthetic biology laboratories. Here we describe a method for the efficient, high-throughput, assembly of DNA utilizing the yeast homologous recombination (YHR). The YHR method utilizes overlapping DNA parts that are assembled together by Saccharomyces cerevisiae via homologous recombination between designed overlapping regions. Using this method, we have successfully assembled up to 12 DNA parts in a single reaction. PMID:27671941

  1. Homologous recombination in bovine pestiviruses. Phylogenetic and statistic evidence.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leandro Roberto; Weber, E Laura

    2004-12-01

    Bovine pestiviruses (Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1 (BVDV 1) and Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 2 (BVDV 2)) belong to the genus Pestivirus (Flaviviridae), which is composed of positive stranded RNA viruses causing significant economic losses world-wide. We used phylogenetic and bootstrap analyses to systematically scan alignments of previously sequenced genomes in order to explore further the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for variation in the virus. Previously published data suggested that homologous crossover might be one of the mechanisms responsible for the genomic rearrangements observed in cytopathic (cp) strains of bovine pestiviruses. Nevertheless, homologous recombination involves not just homologous crossovers, but also replacement of a homologous region of the acceptor RNA. Furthermore, cytopathic strains represent dead paths in evolution, since they are isolated exclusively from the fatal cases of mucosal disease. Herein, we report evidence of homologous inter-genotype recombination in the genome of a non-cytopathic (ncp) strain of Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1, the type species of the genus Pestivirus. We also show that intra-genotype homologous recombination might be a common phenomenon in both species of Pestivirus. This evidence demonstrates that homologous recombination contribute to the diversification of bovine pestiviruses in nature. Implications for virus evolution, taxonomy and phylogenetics are discussed.

  2. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair.

  3. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vink, Cornelis; Rudenko, Gloria; Seifert, H. Steven

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a microorganism are continuously modified. As a consequence, the host is forced to constantly adapt its humoral immune response against this pathogen. An antigenic change thus provides the microorganism with an opportunity to persist and/or replicate within the host (population) for an extended period of time or to effectively infect a previously infected host. In most cases, antigenic variation is caused by genetic processes that lead to modification of the amino acid sequence of a particular antigen or to alterations in the expression of biosynthesis genes that induce changes in expression of a variant antigen. Here, we will review antigenic variation systems that rely on homologous DNA recombination and which are found in a wide range of cellular, human pathogens, including bacteria (such as Neisseria spp., Borrelia spp., Treponema pallidum and Mycoplasma spp.), fungi (like Pneumocystis carinii) and parasites (such as the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei). Specifically, the various DNA recombination-based antigenic variation systems will be discussed with a focus on the employed mechanisms of recombination, the DNA substrates, and the enzymatic machinery involved. PMID:22212019

  4. Evidence for homologous recombination in Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Casal, Pablo E; Chouhy, Diego; Bolatti, Elisa M; Perez, Germán R; Stella, Emma J; Giri, Adriana A

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus, causes acute fever and joint pain in humans. Recently, endemic CHIKV infection outbreaks have jeopardized public health in wider geographical regions. Here, we analyze the phylogenetic associations of CHIKV and explore the potential recombination events on 152 genomic isolates deposited in GenBank database. The CHIKV genotypes [West African, Asian, East/Central/South African (ECSA)], and a clear division of ECSA clade into three sub-groups (I-II-III), were defined by Bayesian analysis; similar results were obtained using E1 gene sequences. A nucleotide identity-based approach is provided to facilitate CHIKV classification within ECSA clade. Using seven methods to detect recombination, we found a statistically significant event (p-values range: 1.14×10(-7)-4.45×10(-24)) located within the nsP3 coding region. This finding was further confirmed by phylogenetic networks (PHI Test, p=0.004) and phylogenetic tree incongruence analysis. The recombinant strain, KJ679578/India/2011 (ECSA III), derives from viruses of ECSA III and ECSA I. Our study demonstrates that recombination is an additional mechanism of genetic diversity in CHIKV that might assist in the cross-species transmission process.

  5. [Enzymatic control of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli cells and hyper-recombination].

    PubMed

    Bakhlanova, I V; Dudkina, A V; Baĭtin, D M

    2013-01-01

    The RecA protein is a major enzyme of homologous recombination in bacterial cell. Forming a right-handed helical filament on ssDNA, it provides a homology search between two DNA molecules and homologous strand exchange. The RecA protein not only defends the cell from exposure to ionizing radiation and UV-irradiation, but also ensures the recombination process in the course of normal cell growth. A number of wild-type or mutant RecA proteins demonstrate increased recombinogenic properties in vitro and in vivo as compared with the wild-type RecA protein from Escherichia coli, which leads to hyper-recombination. The hyper-rec activity of RecA proteins during the recombination process in many depends on the filamentation dynamics on ssDNA and DNA-transferase properties. Changes in filamentation and DNA-transferase abilities of RecA protein may be the result of not only specific amino-acid substitutions, but also the functioning of the cell enzymatic apparatus, including such proteins as RecO, RecR, RecF, RecX, DinI, SSB, PsiB. To date, the function of each of these proteins is identified at the molecular level. However, the role of some of them in the cell metabolism remains to be seen. Increase in recombination in vivo is not always useful for a cell and faces various limitations. Moreover, in the bacterial cell some mechanisms are activated, that cause genomic reorganization, directed to suppress the expression of hyper-active RecA protein. The ways of hyper-active RecA protein regulation are very interesting, and they are studied in different model systems. PMID:23808153

  6. Nonrandom homolog segregation at meiosis I in Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants lacking recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Luther; Smith, Gerald R

    2003-01-01

    Physical connection between homologous chromosomes is normally required for their proper segregation to opposite poles at the first meiotic division (MI). This connection is generally provided by the combination of reciprocal recombination and sister-chromatid cohesion. In the absence of meiotic recombination, homologs are predicted to segregate randomly at MI. Here we demonstrate that in rec12 mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which are devoid of meiosis-induced recombination, homologs segregate to opposite poles at MI 63% of the time. Residual, Rec12-independent recombination appears insufficient to account for the observed nonrandom homolog segregation. Dyad asci are frequently produced by rec12 mutants. More than half of these dyad asci contain two viable homozygous-diploid spores, the products of a single reductional division. This set of phenotypes is shared by other S. pombe mutants that lack meiotic recombination, suggesting that nonrandom MI segregation and dyad formation are a general feature of meiosis in the absence of recombination and are not peculiar to rec12 mutants. Rec8, a meiosis-specific sister-chromatid cohesin, is required for the segregation phenotypes displayed by rec12 mutants. We propose that S. pombe possesses a system independent of recombination that promotes homolog segregation and discuss possible mechanisms. PMID:12663528

  7. Generation of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Toietta, Gabriele; Pastore, Lucio; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Finegold, Milton; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lee, Brendan

    2002-02-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HD-Ad) represent a potentially valuable tool for safe and prolonged gene expression in vivo. The current approach for generating these vectors is based on ligation of the expression cassette into large plasmids containing the viral inverted terminal repeats flanking "stuffer" DNA to maintain a final size above the lower limit for efficient packaging into the adenovirus capsid (approximately 28 kb). The ligation to produce the viral plasmid is generally very inefficient. Similar problems in producing first-generation adenoviral (FG-Ad) vectors were circumvented with the development of a system taking advantage of efficient homologous recombination between a shuttle plasmid containing the expression cassette and a FG-Ad vector backbone in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183. Here we describe a method for fast and efficient generation of HD-Ad vector plasmids that can accommodate expression cassettes of any size up to 35 kb. To validate the system, we generated a HD-Ad vector expressing the fusion protein between beta-galactosidase and neomycin resistance genes under the control of the SR alpha promoter, and one expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The viruses were rescued and tested in vitro and for in vivo expression in mice. The data collected indicate the possibility for achieving a high level of hepatocyte transduction using HD-Ad vectors derived from plasmids obtained by homologous recombination in E. coli, with no significant alteration of liver enzymes and a less severe, transient thrombocytopenia in comparison with previous reports with similar doses of a FG-Ad vector. PMID:11829528

  8. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Edlarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  9. DNA sequence alignment by microhomology sampling during homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhi; Redding, Sy; Lee, Ja Yil; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Gaines, William A.; Sung, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Homologous recombination (HR) mediates the exchange of genetic information between sister or homologous chromatids. During HR, members of the RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases must somehow search through vast quantities of DNA sequence to align and pair ssDNA with a homologous dsDNA template. Here we use single-molecule imaging to visualize Rad51 as it aligns and pairs homologous DNA sequences in real-time. We show that Rad51 uses a length-based recognition mechanism while interrogating dsDNA, enabling robust kinetic selection of 8-nucleotide (nt) tracts of microhomology, which kinetically confines the search to sites with a high probability of being a homologous target. Successful pairing with a 9th nucleotide coincides with an additional reduction in binding free energy and subsequent strand exchange occurs in precise 3-nt steps, reflecting the base triplet organization of the presynaptic complex. These findings provide crucial new insights into the physical and evolutionary underpinnings of DNA recombination. PMID:25684365

  10. The Landscape of Realized Homologous Recombination in Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Didelot, Xavier; Jolley, Keith A.; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Falush, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recombination enhances the adaptive potential of organisms by allowing genetic variants to be tested on multiple genomic backgrounds. Its distribution in the genome can provide insight into the evolutionary forces that underlie traits, such as the emergence of pathogenicity. Here, we examined landscapes of realized homologous recombination of 500 genomes from ten bacterial species and found all species have “hot” regions with elevated rates relative to the genome average. We examined the size, gene content, and chromosomal features associated with these regions and the correlations between closely related species. The recombination landscape is variable and evolves rapidly. For example in Salmonella, only short regions of around 1 kb in length are hot whereas in the closely related species Escherichia coli, some hot regions exceed 100 kb, spanning many genes. Only Streptococcus pyogenes shows evidence for the positive correlation between GC content and recombination that has been reported for several eukaryotes. Genes with function related to the cell surface/membrane are often found in recombination hot regions but E. coli is the only species where genes annotated as “virulence associated” are consistently hotter. There is also evidence that some genes with “housekeeping” functions tend to be overrepresented in cold regions. For example, ribosomal proteins showed low recombination in all of the species. Among specific genes, transferrin-binding proteins are recombination hot in all three of the species in which they were found, and are subject to interspecies recombination. PMID:26516092

  11. Targeted mutagenesis by homologous recombination in D. melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yikang S.; Titen, Simon W.; Xie, Heng B.; Golic, Mary M.; Bastiani, Michael; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Brodsky, Michael; Rubin, Gerald M.; Golic, Kent G.

    2002-01-01

    We used a recently developed method to produce mutant alleles of five endogenous Drosophila genes, including the homolog of the p53 tumor suppressor. Transgenic expression of the FLP site-specific recombinase and the I-SceI endonuclease generates extrachromosomal linear DNA molecules in vivo. These molecules undergo homologous recombination with the corresponding chromosomal locus to generate targeted alterations of the host genome. The results address several questions about the general utility of this technique. We show that genes not near telomeres can be efficiently targeted; that no knowledge of the mutant phenotype is needed for targeting; and that insertional mutations and allelic substitutions can be easily produced. PMID:12080094

  12. Accelerated homologous recombination and subsequent genome modification in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Baena-Lopez, Luis Alberto; Alexandre, Cyrille; Mitchell, Alice; Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-01

    Gene targeting by 'ends-out' homologous recombination enables the deletion of genomic sequences and concurrent introduction of exogenous DNA with base-pair precision without sequence constraint. In Drosophila, this powerful technique has remained laborious and hence seldom implemented. We describe a targeting vector and protocols that achieve this at high frequency and with very few false positives in Drosophila, either with a two-generation crossing scheme or by direct injection in embryos. The frequency of injection-mediated gene targeting can be further increased with CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks within the region to be deleted, thus making homologous recombination almost as easy as conventional transgenesis. Our targeting vector replaces genomic sequences with a multifunctional fragment comprising an easy-to-select genetic marker, a fluorescent reporter, as well as an attP site, which acts as a landing platform for reintegration vectors. These vectors allow the insertion of a variety of transcription reporters or cDNAs to express tagged or mutant isoforms at endogenous levels. In addition, they pave the way for difficult experiments such as tissue-specific allele switching and functional analysis in post-mitotic or polyploid cells. Therefore, our method retains the advantages of homologous recombination while capitalising on the mutagenic power of CRISPR.

  13. Recombination walking: genetic selection of clones from pooled libraries of yeast artificial chromosomes by homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A M; Savinelli, E A; Couture, S M; Hannigan, G M; Han, Z; Selden, R F; Treco, D A

    1993-01-01

    Recombination walking is based on the genetic selection of specific human clones from a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library by homologous recombination. The desired clone is selected from a pooled (unordered) YAC library, eliminating labor-intensive steps typically used in organizing and maintaining ordered YAC libraries. Recombination walking represents an efficient approach to library screening and is well suited for chromosome-walking approaches to the isolation of genes associated with common diseases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8367472

  14. Homologous recombination deficiency: Exploiting the fundamental vulnerability of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) exhibit defective DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR) due to genetic and epigenetic alterations of HR pathway genes. Defective HR is an important therapeutic target in EOC as exemplified by the efficacy of platinum analogues in this disease, as well as the advent of poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors which exhibit synthetic lethality when applied to HR deficient cells. Here, we describe the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of HR deficient EOCs, discuss current and emerging approaches for targeting these tumors, and present challenges associated with these approaches focusing on development and overcoming resistance. PMID:26463832

  15. Enhancement of extra chromosomal recombination in somatic cells by affecting the ratio of homologous recombination (HR) to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ).

    PubMed

    Zaunbrecher, Gretchen M; Dunne, Patrick W; Mir, Bashir; Breen, Matthew; Piedrahita, Jorge A

    2008-01-01

    Advancements in somatic cell gene targeting have been slow due to the finite lifespan of somatic cells and the overall inefficiency of homologous recombination. The rate of homologous recombination is determined by mechanisms of DNA repair, and by the balance between homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). A plasmid-to-plasmid, extra chromosomal recombination system was used to study the effects of the manipulation of molecules involved in NHEJ (Mre11, Ku70/80, and p53) on HR/NHEJ ratios. In addition, the effect of telomerase expression, cell synchrony, and DNA nuclear delivery was examined. While a mutant Mre11 and an anti-Ku aptamer did not significantly affect the rate of NHEJ or HR, transient expression of a p53 mutant increased overall HR/NHEJ by 2.5 fold. However, expression of the mutant p53 resulted in increased aneuploidy of the cultured cells. Additionally, we found no relationship between telomerase expression and changes in HR/NHEJ. In contrast, cell synchrony by thymidine incorporation did not induce chromosomal abnormalities, and increased the ratio of HR/NHEJ 5-fold by reducing the overall rate of NHEJ. Overall our results show that attempts at reducing NHEJ by use of Mre11 or anti-Ku aptamers were unsuccessful. Cell synchrony via thymidine incorporation, however, does increase the ratio of HR/NHEJ and this indicates that this approach may be of use to facilitate targeting in somatic cells by reducing the numbers of colonies that need to be analyzed before a HR is identified.

  16. Reappearance from Obscurity: Mammalian Rad52 in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hanamshet, Kritika; Mazina, Olga M.; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. It is responsible for repair of the most harmful DNA lesions, DNA double-strand breaks and inter-strand DNA cross-links. HR function is also essential for proper segregation of homologous chromosomes in meiosis, maintenance of telomeres, and resolving stalled replication forks. Defects in HR often lead to genetic diseases and cancer. Rad52 is one of the key HR proteins, which is evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans. In yeast, Rad52 is important for most HR events; Rad52 mutations disrupt repair of DNA double-strand breaks and targeted DNA integration. Surprisingly, in mammals, Rad52 knockouts showed no significant DNA repair or recombination phenotype. However, recent work demonstrated that mutations in human RAD52 are synthetically lethal with mutations in several other HR proteins including BRCA1 and BRCA2. These new findings indicate an important backup role for Rad52, which complements the main HR mechanism in mammals. In this review, we focus on the Rad52 activities and functions in HR and the possibility of using human RAD52 as therapeutic target in BRCA1 and BRCA2-deficient familial breast cancer and ovarian cancer. PMID:27649245

  17. Reappearance from Obscurity: Mammalian Rad52 in Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Hanamshet, Kritika; Mazina, Olga M; Mazin, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. It is responsible for repair of the most harmful DNA lesions, DNA double-strand breaks and inter-strand DNA cross-links. HR function is also essential for proper segregation of homologous chromosomes in meiosis, maintenance of telomeres, and resolving stalled replication forks. Defects in HR often lead to genetic diseases and cancer. Rad52 is one of the key HR proteins, which is evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans. In yeast, Rad52 is important for most HR events; Rad52 mutations disrupt repair of DNA double-strand breaks and targeted DNA integration. Surprisingly, in mammals, Rad52 knockouts showed no significant DNA repair or recombination phenotype. However, recent work demonstrated that mutations in human RAD52 are synthetically lethal with mutations in several other HR proteins including BRCA1 and BRCA2. These new findings indicate an important backup role for Rad52, which complements the main HR mechanism in mammals. In this review, we focus on the Rad52 activities and functions in HR and the possibility of using human RAD52 as therapeutic target in BRCA1 and BRCA2-deficient familial breast cancer and ovarian cancer. PMID:27649245

  18. Induction of homologous recombination following in utero exposure to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Karia, Bijal; Martinez, Jo Ann; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2013-11-01

    Much of our understanding of homologous recombination, as well as the development of the working models for these processes, has been derived from extensive work in model organisms, such as yeast and fruit flies, and mammalian systems by studying the repair of induced double strand breaks or repair following exposure to genotoxic agents in vitro. We therefore set out to expand this in vitro work to ask whether DNA-damaging agents with varying modes of action could induce somatic change in an in vivo mouse model of homologous recombination. We exposed pregnant dams to DNA-damaging agents, conferring a variety of lesions at a specific time in embryo development. To monitor homologous recombination frequency, we used the well-established retinal pigment epithelium pink-eyed unstable assay. Homologous recombination resulting in the deletion of a duplicated 70 kb fragment in the coding region of the Oca2 gene renders this gene functional and can be visualized as a pigmented eyespot in the retinal pigment epithelium. We observed an increased frequency of pigmented eyespots in resultant litters following exposure to cisplatin, methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide, bleomycin, and etoposide with a contrasting decrease in the frequency of detectable reversion events following camptothecin and hydroxyurea exposure. The somatic genomic rearrangements that result from such a wide variety of differently acting damaging agents implies long-term potential effects from even short-term in utero exposures. PMID:24029142

  19. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Eldarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  20. Imatinib radiosensitises bladder cancer by targeting homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Boling; Kerr, Martin; Groselj, Blaz; Teo, Mark TW; Knowles, Margaret A; Bristow, Robert G; Phillips, Roger M; Kiltie, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality used to treat muscle-invasive bladder cancer, with patient outcomes similar to surgery. However, radioresistance is a significant factor in treatment failure. Cell-free extracts of muscle-invasive bladder tumours are defective in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), and this phenotype might be exploited clinically by combining radiotherapy with a radiosensitising drug that targets homologous recombination (HR), thereby sparing normal tissues with intact NHEJ. The response of the HR protein RAD51 to radiation is inhibited by the small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib. Stable RT112 bladder cancer Ku knockdown (Ku80KD) cells were generated using shRNA technology to mimic the invasive tumour phenotype, and also RAD51 knockdown (RAD51KD) cells to demonstrate imatinib’s pathway selectivity. Ku80KD, RAD51KD, non-silencing vector control and parental RT112 cells were treated with radiation in combination with either imatinib or lapatinib, which inhibits NHEJ, and cell survival assessed by clonogenic assay. Drug doses were chosen at approximately IC40 and IC10 (non-toxic) levels. Imatinib radiosensitised Ku80KD cells to a greater extent than RAD51KD or RT112 cells. In contrast, lapatinib radiosensitised RAD51KD and RT112 cells, but not Ku80KD cells. Taken together, our findings suggest a new application for imatinib in concurrent use with radiotherapy to treat muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:23302228

  1. Double-strand break-induced recombination between ectopic homologous sequences in somatic plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Puchta, H

    1999-01-01

    Homologous recombination between ectopic sites is rare in higher eukaryotes. To test whether double-strand breaks (DSBs) can induce ectopic recombination, transgenic tobacco plants harboring two unlinked, nonfunctional homologous parts of a kanamycin resistance gene were produced. To induce homologous recombination between the recipient locus (containing an I-SceI site within homologous sequences) and the donor locus, the rare cutting restriction enzyme I-SceI was transiently expressed via Agrobacterium in these plants. Whereas without I-SceI expression no recombination events were detectable, four independent recombinants could be isolated after transient I-SceI expression, corresponding to approximately one event in 10(5) transformations. After regeneration, the F1 generation of all recombinants showed Mendelian segregation of kanamycin resistance. Molecular analysis of the recombinants revealed that the resistance gene was indeed restored via homologous recombination. Three different kinds of reaction products could be identified. In one recombinant a classical gene conversion without exchange of flanking markers occurred. In the three other cases homologous sequences were transferred only to one end of the break. Whereas in three cases the ectopic donor sequence remained unchanged, in one case rearrangements were found in recipient and donor loci. Thus, ectopic homologous recombination, which seems to be a minor repair pathway for DSBs in plants, is described best by recombination models that postulate independent roles for the break ends during the repair process. PMID:10388832

  2. Transcription-coupled homologous recombination after oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Leizhen; Levine, Arthur Samuel; Lan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage induces genomic instability and may lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. As severe blockades to RNA polymerase II (RNA POLII) during transcription, oxidative DNA damage and the associated DNA strand breaks have a profoundly deleterious impact on cell survival. To protect the integrity of coding regions, high fidelity DNA repair at a transcriptionally active site in non-dividing somatic cells, (i.e., terminally differentiated and quiescent/G0 cells) is necessary to maintain the sequence integrity of transcribed regions. Recent studies indicate that an RNA-templated, transcription-associated recombination mechanism is important to protect coding regions from DNA damage-induced genomic instability. Here, we describe the discovery that G1/G0 cells exhibit Cockayne syndrome (CS) B (CSB)-dependent assembly of homologous recombination (HR) factors at double strand break (DSB) sites within actively transcribed regions. This discovery is a challenge to the current dogma that HR occurs only in S/G2 cells where undamaged sister chromatids are available as donor templates. PMID:27233112

  3. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  4. Is homologous recombination really an error-free process?

    PubMed Central

    Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Lambert, Sarah; Bertrand, Pascale; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is an evolutionarily conserved process that plays a pivotal role in the equilibrium between genetic stability and diversity. HR is commonly considered to be error-free, but several studies have shown that HR can be error-prone. Here, we discuss the actual accuracy of HR. First, we present the product of genetic exchanges (gene conversion, GC, and crossing over, CO) and the mechanisms of HR during double strand break repair and replication restart. We discuss the intrinsic capacities of HR to generate genome rearrangements by GC or CO, either during DSB repair or replication restart. During this process, abortive HR intermediates generate genetic instability and cell toxicity. In addition to genome rearrangements, HR also primes error-prone DNA synthesis and favors mutagenesis on single stranded DNA, a key DNA intermediate during the HR process. The fact that cells have developed several mechanisms protecting against HR excess emphasize its potential risks. Consistent with this duality, several pro-oncogenic situations have been consistently associated with either decreased or increased HR levels. Nevertheless, this versatility also has advantages that we outline here. We conclude that HR is a double-edged sword, which on one hand controls the equilibrium between genome stability and diversity but, on the other hand, can jeopardize the maintenance of genomic integrity. Therefore, whether non-homologous end joining (which, in contrast with HR, is not intrinsically mutagenic) or HR is the more mutagenic process is a question that should be re-evaluated. Both processes can be “Dr. Jekyll” in maintaining genome stability/variability and “Mr. Hyde” in jeopardizing genome integrity. PMID:24966870

  5. Is homologous recombination really an error-free process?

    PubMed

    Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Lambert, Sarah; Bertrand, Pascale; Lopez, Bernard S

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is an evolutionarily conserved process that plays a pivotal role in the equilibrium between genetic stability and diversity. HR is commonly considered to be error-free, but several studies have shown that HR can be error-prone. Here, we discuss the actual accuracy of HR. First, we present the product of genetic exchanges (gene conversion, GC, and crossing over, CO) and the mechanisms of HR during double strand break repair and replication restart. We discuss the intrinsic capacities of HR to generate genome rearrangements by GC or CO, either during DSB repair or replication restart. During this process, abortive HR intermediates generate genetic instability and cell toxicity. In addition to genome rearrangements, HR also primes error-prone DNA synthesis and favors mutagenesis on single stranded DNA, a key DNA intermediate during the HR process. The fact that cells have developed several mechanisms protecting against HR excess emphasize its potential risks. Consistent with this duality, several pro-oncogenic situations have been consistently associated with either decreased or increased HR levels. Nevertheless, this versatility also has advantages that we outline here. We conclude that HR is a double-edged sword, which on one hand controls the equilibrium between genome stability and diversity but, on the other hand, can jeopardize the maintenance of genomic integrity. Therefore, whether non-homologous end joining (which, in contrast with HR, is not intrinsically mutagenic) or HR is the more mutagenic process is a question that should be re-evaluated. Both processes can be "Dr. Jekyll" in maintaining genome stability/variability and "Mr. Hyde" in jeopardizing genome integrity. PMID:24966870

  6. Chimeric mitochondrial minichromosomes of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus: evidence for homologous and non-homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Shao, Renfu; Barker, Stephen C

    2011-02-15

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus, consists of 18 minichromosomes. Each minichromosome is 3 to 4 kb long and has 1 to 3 genes. There is unequivocal evidence for recombination between different mt minichromosomes in P. humanus. It is not known, however, how these minichromosomes recombine. Here, we report the discovery of eight chimeric mt minichromosomes in P. humanus. We classify these chimeric mt minichromosomes into two groups: Group I and Group II. Group I chimeric minichromosomes contain parts of two different protein-coding genes that are from different minichromosomes. The two parts of protein-coding genes in each Group I chimeric minichromosome are joined at a microhomologous nucleotide sequence; microhomologous nucleotide sequences are hallmarks of non-homologous recombination. Group II chimeric minichromosomes contain all of the genes and the non-coding regions of two different minichromosomes. The conserved sequence blocks in the non-coding regions of Group II chimeric minichromosomes resemble the "recombination repeats" in the non-coding regions of the mt genomes of higher plants. These repeats are essential to homologous recombination in higher plants. Our analyses of the nucleotide sequences of chimeric mt minichromosomes indicate both homologous and non-homologous recombination between minichromosomes in the mitochondria of the human body louse.

  7. BRCA1-directed, enhanced and aberrant homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Dever, Seth M; White, E Railey; Hartman, Matthew CT

    2012-01-01

    Despite intense studies, questions still remain regarding the molecular mechanisms leading to the development of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Research focused on elucidating the role of the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) in the DNA damage response may be of the most critical importance to understanding these processes. The BRCA1 protein has an N-terminal RING domain possessing E3 ubiquitin-ligase activity and a C-terminal BRCT domain involved in binding specific phosphoproteins. These domains are involved directly or indirectly in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. As the two terminal domains of BRCA1 represent two separate entities, understanding how these domains communicate and are functionally altered in regards to DSB repair is critical for understanding the development of BRCA1-related breast and ovarian cancers and for developing novel therapeutics. Herein, we review recent findings of how altered functions of these domains might lead to cancer through a mechanism of increased aberrant homologous recombination and possible implications for the development of BRCA1 inhibitors. PMID:22306997

  8. Accelerated protein engineering for chemical biotechnology via homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Nordwald, Erik M; Garst, Andrew; Gill, Ryan T; Kaar, Joel L

    2013-12-01

    Protein engineering has traditionally relied on random mutagenesis strategies to generate diverse libraries, which require high-throughput screening or selection methods to identify rare variants. Alternatively, approaches to semi-rational library construction can be used to minimize the screening load and enhance the efficiency by which improved mutants may be identified. Such methods are typically limited to characterization of relatively few variants due to the difficulties in generating large rational libraries. New tools from synthetic biology, namely multiplexed DNA synthesis and homologous recombination, provide a promising avenue to rapidly construct large, rational libraries. These technologies also enable incorporation of synthetically encoded features that permit efficient characterization of the fitness of each mutant. Extension of these tools to protein library design could complement rational protein design cycles in an effort to more systematically search complex fitness landscapes. The highly parallelized nature with which such libraries can be generated also has the potential to expand directed protein evolution from single protein targets to protein networks whose concerted activities are required for the biological function of interest. PMID:23540421

  9. Accelerated protein engineering for chemical biotechnology via homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Nordwald, Erik M; Garst, Andrew; Gill, Ryan T; Kaar, Joel L

    2013-12-01

    Protein engineering has traditionally relied on random mutagenesis strategies to generate diverse libraries, which require high-throughput screening or selection methods to identify rare variants. Alternatively, approaches to semi-rational library construction can be used to minimize the screening load and enhance the efficiency by which improved mutants may be identified. Such methods are typically limited to characterization of relatively few variants due to the difficulties in generating large rational libraries. New tools from synthetic biology, namely multiplexed DNA synthesis and homologous recombination, provide a promising avenue to rapidly construct large, rational libraries. These technologies also enable incorporation of synthetically encoded features that permit efficient characterization of the fitness of each mutant. Extension of these tools to protein library design could complement rational protein design cycles in an effort to more systematically search complex fitness landscapes. The highly parallelized nature with which such libraries can be generated also has the potential to expand directed protein evolution from single protein targets to protein networks whose concerted activities are required for the biological function of interest.

  10. A BRCA1-interacting lncRNA regulates homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Khurana, Simran; Kubben, Nard; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Oberdoerffer, Philipp; Gorospe, Myriam; Misteli, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in diverse biological processes. Upon DNA damage, cells activate a complex signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR). Using a microarray screen, we identify here a novel lncRNA, DDSR1 (DNA damage-sensitive RNA1), which is induced upon DNA damage. DDSR1 induction is triggered in an ATM-NF-κB pathway-dependent manner by several DNA double-strand break (DSB) agents. Loss of DDSR1 impairs cell proliferation and DDR signaling and reduces DNA repair capacity by homologous recombination (HR). The HR defect in the absence of DDSR1 is marked by aberrant accumulation of BRCA1 and RAP80 at DSB sites. In line with a role in regulating HR, DDSR1 interacts with BRCA1 and hnRNPUL1, an RNA-binding protein involved in DNA end resection. Our results suggest a role for the lncRNA DDSR1 in modulating DNA repair by HR.

  11. Genome-wide Transcriptome Profiling of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang; Lin, Curtis Chun-Jen; Mo, Wei; Dai, Hui; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Soo-Mi; Peng, Yang; Mo, Qianxing; Siwko, Stefan; Hu, Ruozhen; Lee, Ju-Seog; Hennessy, Bryan; Hanash, Samir; Mills, Gordon B.; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair deficiency predisposes to cancer development, but also sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damage-inducing therapeutics. Here we identify an HR-defect (HRD) gene signature, which can be used to functionally assess HR repair status without interrogating individual genetic alterations in cells. By using this HRD gene signature as a functional network analysis tool, we discover that simultaneous loss of two major tumor suppressors BRCA1 and PTEN extensively rewire the HR repair-deficient phenotype, which is found in cells with defects in either BRCA1 or PTEN alone. Moreover, the HRD gene signature serves as an effective drug discovery platform to identify agents targeting HR repair as potential chemo/radio-sensitizers. More importantly, this HRD gene signature is able to predict clinical outcomes across multiple cancer lineages. Our findings, therefore, provide a molecular profile of HR repair to assess its status at a functional network level, which can provide both biological insights and have clinical implications in cancer. PMID:24553445

  12. Homologous Recombination Is Necessary for Normal Lymphocyte Development▿

    PubMed Central

    Caddle, Lura B.; Hasham, Muneer G.; Schott, William H.; Shirley, Bobbi-Jo; Mills, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare but serious diseases with diverse genetic causes. Accumulating evidence suggests that defects in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair can underlie many of these syndromes. In this context, the nonhomologous end joining pathway of DSB repair is absolutely required for lymphoid development, but possible roles for the homologous recombination (HR) pathway have remained more controversial. While recent evidence suggests that HR may indeed be important to suppress lymphoid transformation, the specific relationship of HR to normal lymphocyte development remains unclear. We have investigated roles of the X-ray cross-complementing 2 (Xrcc2) HR gene in lymphocyte development. We show that HR is critical for normal B-cell development, with Xrcc2 nullizygosity leading to p53-dependent early S-phase arrest. In the absence of p53 (encoded by Trp53), Xrcc2-null B cells can fully develop but show high rates of chromosome and chromatid fragmentation. We present a molecular model wherein Xrcc2 is important to preserve or restore replication forks during rapid clonal expansion of developing lymphocytes. Our findings demonstrate a key role for HR in lymphoid development and suggest that Xrcc2 defects could underlie some human primary immunodeficiencies. PMID:18212067

  13. Manipulation of Homologous and Homoeologous Chromosome Recombination in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Lukaszewski, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Given the sizes of the three genomes in wheat (A, B, and D) and a limited number of chiasmata formed in meiosis, recombination by crossing-over is a very rare event. It is also restricted to very similar homologues; the pairing homoeologous (Ph) system of wheat prevents differentiated chromosomes from pairing and crossing-over. This chapter presents an overview and describes several systems by which the frequency or density of crossing-over can be increased, both in homologues and homoeologues. It also presents the standard system of E.R. Sears for engineering alien chromosome transfers into wheat. PMID:27511168

  14. High-Resolution Mapping of Homologous Recombination Events in rad3 Hyper-Recombination Mutants in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dominska, Margaret; Moriel-Carretero, María; Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Aguilera, Andrés; Petes, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisae RAD3 gene is the homolog of human XPD, an essential gene encoding a DNA helicase of the TFIIH complex involved in both nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription. Some mutant alleles of RAD3 (rad3-101 and rad3-102) have partial defects in DNA repair and a strong hyper-recombination (hyper-Rec) phenotype. Previous studies showed that the hyper-Rec phenotype associated with rad3-101 and rad3-102 can be explained as a consequence of persistent single-stranded DNA gaps that are converted to recombinogenic double-strand breaks (DSBs) by replication. The systems previously used to characterize the hyper-Rec phenotype of rad3 strains do not detect the reciprocal products of mitotic recombination. We have further characterized these events using a system in which the reciprocal products of mitotic recombination are recovered. Both rad3-101 and rad3-102 elevate the frequency of reciprocal crossovers about 100-fold. Mapping of these events shows that three-quarters of these crossovers reflect DSBs formed at the same positions in both sister chromatids (double sister-chromatid breaks, DSCBs). The remainder reflects DSBs formed in single chromatids (single chromatid breaks, SCBs). The ratio of DSCBs to SCBs is similar to that observed for spontaneous recombination events in wild-type cells. We mapped 216 unselected genomic alterations throughout the genome including crossovers, gene conversions, deletions, and duplications. We found a significant association between the location of these recombination events and regions with elevated gamma-H2AX. In addition, there was a hotspot for deletions and duplications at the IMA2 and HXT11 genes near the left end of chromosome XV. A comparison of these data with our previous analysis of spontaneous mitotic recombination events suggests that a sub-set of spontaneous events in wild-type cells may be initiated by incomplete NER reactions, and that DSCBs, which cannot be repaired by sister

  15. Repairing a double-strand chromosome break by homologous recombination: revisiting Robin Holliday's model.

    PubMed Central

    Haber, James E; Ira, Gregorz; Malkova, Anna; Sugawara, Neal

    2004-01-01

    Since the pioneering model for homologous recombination proposed by Robin Holliday in 1964, there has been great progress in understanding how recombination occurs at a molecular level. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one can follow recombination by physically monitoring DNA after the synchronous induction of a double-strand break (DSB) in both wild-type and mutant cells. A particularly well-studied system has been the switching of yeast mating-type (MAT) genes, where a DSB can be induced synchronously by expression of the site-specific HO endonuclease. Similar studies can be performed in meiotic cells, where DSBs are created by the Spo11 nuclease. There appear to be at least two competing mechanisms of homologous recombination: a synthesis-dependent strand annealing pathway leading to noncrossovers and a two-end strand invasion mechanism leading to formation and resolution of Holliday junctions (HJs), leading to crossovers. The establishment of a modified replication fork during DSB repair links gene conversion to another important repair process, break-induced replication. Despite recent revelations, almost 40 years after Holliday's model was published, the essential ideas he proposed of strand invasion and heteroduplex DNA formation, the formation and resolution of HJs, and mismatch repair, remain the basis of our thinking. PMID:15065659

  16. Repairing a double-strand chromosome break by homologous recombination: revisiting Robin Holliday's model.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E; Ira, Gregorz; Malkova, Anna; Sugawara, Neal

    2004-01-29

    Since the pioneering model for homologous recombination proposed by Robin Holliday in 1964, there has been great progress in understanding how recombination occurs at a molecular level. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one can follow recombination by physically monitoring DNA after the synchronous induction of a double-strand break (DSB) in both wild-type and mutant cells. A particularly well-studied system has been the switching of yeast mating-type (MAT) genes, where a DSB can be induced synchronously by expression of the site-specific HO endonuclease. Similar studies can be performed in meiotic cells, where DSBs are created by the Spo11 nuclease. There appear to be at least two competing mechanisms of homologous recombination: a synthesis-dependent strand annealing pathway leading to noncrossovers and a two-end strand invasion mechanism leading to formation and resolution of Holliday junctions (HJs), leading to crossovers. The establishment of a modified replication fork during DSB repair links gene conversion to another important repair process, break-induced replication. Despite recent revelations, almost 40 years after Holliday's model was published, the essential ideas he proposed of strand invasion and heteroduplex DNA formation, the formation and resolution of HJs, and mismatch repair, remain the basis of our thinking.

  17. Recovery of arrested replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone.

    PubMed

    Iraqui, Ismail; Chekkal, Yasmina; Jmari, Nada; Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows repair of DNA and provides support for DNA replication. Homologous recombination is therefore a major pathway that suppresses non-homology-mediated genome instability. Here, we report that recovery of impeded replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone. Using a fork-arrest-based assay in fission yeast, we demonstrate that a single collapsed fork can cause mutations and large-scale genomic changes, including deletions and translocations. Fork-arrest-induced gross chromosomal rearrangements are mediated by inappropriate ectopic recombination events at the site of collapsed forks. Inverted repeats near the site of fork collapse stimulate large-scale genomic changes up to 1,500 times over spontaneous events. We also show that the high accuracy of DNA replication during S-phase is impaired by impediments to fork progression, since fork-arrest-induced mutation is due to erroneous DNA synthesis during recovery of replication forks. The mutations caused are small insertions/duplications between short tandem repeats (micro-homology) indicative of replication slippage. Our data establish that collapsed forks, but not stalled forks, recovered by homologous recombination are prone to replication slippage. The inaccuracy of DNA synthesis does not rely on PCNA ubiquitination or trans-lesion-synthesis DNA polymerases, and it is not counteracted by mismatch repair. We propose that deletions/insertions, mediated by micro-homology, leading to copy number variations during replication stress may arise by progression of error-prone replication forks restarted by homologous recombination.

  18. Caffeine suppresses homologous recombination through interference with RAD51-mediated joint molecule formation.

    PubMed

    Zelensky, Alex N; Sanchez, Humberto; Ristic, Dejan; Vidic, Iztok; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E; Essers, Jeroen; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland

    2013-07-01

    Caffeine is a widely used inhibitor of the protein kinases that play a central role in the DNA damage response. We used chemical inhibitors and genetically deficient mouse embryonic stem cell lines to study the role of DNA damage response in stable integration of the transfected DNA and found that caffeine rapidly, efficiently and reversibly inhibited homologous integration of the transfected DNA as measured by several homologous recombination-mediated gene-targeting assays. Biochemical and structural biology experiments revealed that caffeine interfered with a pivotal step in homologous recombination, homologous joint molecule formation, through increasing interactions of the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament with non-homologous DNA. Our results suggest that recombination pathways dependent on extensive homology search are caffeine-sensitive and stress the importance of considering direct checkpoint-independent mechanisms in the interpretation of the effects of caffeine on DNA repair.

  19. Genetic battle between Helicobacter pylori and humans. The mechanism underlying homologous recombination in bacteria, which can infect human cells.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Katsuhiro; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that colonises the human stomach. The chronic infection it causes results in peptic ulcers and gastric cancers. H. pylori can easily establish a chronic infection even if the immune system attacks this pathogen with oxidative stress agents and immunoglobulins. This is attributed to bacterial defence mechanisms against these stresses. As a defence mechanism against oxidative stresses, in bacterial genomes, homologous recombination can act as a repair pathway of DNA's double-strand breaks (DSBs). Moreover, homologous recombination is also involved in the antigenic variation in H. pylori. Gene conversion alters genomic structures of babA and babB (encoding outer membrane proteins), resulting in escape from immunoglobulin attacks. Thus, homologous recombination in bacteria plays an important role in the maintenance of a chronic infection. In addition, H. pylori infection causes DSBs in human cells. Homologous recombination is also involved in the repair of DSBs in human cells. In this review, we describe the roles of homologous recombination with an emphasis on the maintenance of a chronic infection.

  20. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Therese; Ragu, Sandrine; Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-05-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  1. A role for homologous recombination proteins in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Bosshard, Sandra; Urban, Zuzanna; Mermod, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA breaks, especially double-stranded breaks (DSBs), by activating the DNA damage response (DDR), which encompasses DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint signaling. The DNA damage signal is transmitted to the checkpoint machinery by a network of specialized DNA damage-recognizing and signal-transducing molecules. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA repair proteins themselves may also directly contribute to the checkpoint control. Here, we investigated the role of homologous recombination (HR) proteins in normal cell cycle regulation in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. For this purpose, we used Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing the Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators (Fucci). Systematic siRNA-mediated knockdown of HR genes in these cells demonstrated that the lack of several of these factors alters cell cycle distribution, albeit differentially. The knock-down of MDC1, Rad51 and Brca1 caused the cells to arrest in the G2 phase, suggesting that they may be required for the G2/M transition. In contrast, inhibition of the other HR factors, including several Rad51 paralogs and Rad50, led to the arrest in the G1/G0 phase. Moreover, reduced expression of Rad51B, Rad51C, CtIP and Rad50 induced entry into a quiescent G0-like phase. In conclusion, the lack of many HR factors may lead to cell cycle checkpoint activation, even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, indicating that these proteins may play an essential role both in DNA repair and checkpoint signaling. PMID:26125600

  2. GENETIC MANIPULATION OF HOMOLOGOUS RECOMBINATION IN VIVO ATTENUATES INTESTINAL TUMORIGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    McIlhatton, Michael A.; Murnan, Kevin; Carson, Daniel; Boivin, Gregory P.; Croce, Carlo M.; Groden, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Although disruption of DNA repair capacity is unquestionably associated with cancer susceptibility in humans and model organisms, it remains unclear if the inherent tumor phenotypes of DNA repair deficiency syndromes can be regulated by manipulating DNA repair pathways. Loss-of-function mutations in BLM, a member of the RecQ helicase family, cause Bloom's syndrome (BS), a rare, recessive genetic disorder that predisposes to many types of cancer. BLM functions in many aspects of DNA homeostasis, including the suppression of homologous recombination (HR) in somatic cells. We investigated whether BLM overexpression, in contrast to loss-of-function mutations, attenuated the intestinal tumor phenotypes of ApcMin/+ and ApcMin/+;Msh2-/- mice, animal models of familial adenomatous polyposis coli (FAP). We constructed a transgenic mouse line expressing human BLM (BLM-Tg) and crossed it onto both backgrounds. BLM-Tg decreased adenoma incidence in a dose-dependent manner in our ApcMin/+ model of FAP, although levels of GIN were unaffected, and concomitantly increased animal survival over 50%. It did not reduce intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+;Msh2-/- mice. We used the pink-eyed unstable (pun) mouse model to demonstrate that increasing BLM dosage in vivo lowered endogenous levels of HR by two-fold. Our data suggests that attenuation of the Min phenotype is achieved through a direct effect of BLM-Tg on the HR repair pathway. These findings demonstrate that HR can be manipulated in vivo to modulate tumor formation at the organismal level. Our data suggests that lowering HR frequencies may have positive therapeutic outcomes in the context of specific hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes, exemplified by FAP. PMID:25908507

  3. Restriction-Stimulated Homologous Recombination of Plasmids by the Rece Pathway of Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Nussbaum, A.; Shalit, M.; Cohen, A.

    1992-01-01

    To test the double-strand break (DSB) repair model in recombination by the RecE pathway of Escherichia coli, we constructed chimeric phages that allow restriction-mediated release of linear plasmid substrates of the bioluminescence recombination assay in infected EcoRI(+) cells. Kinetics of DSB repair and expression of recombination products were followed by Southern hybridization and by the bioluminescence recombination assay, respectively. Plasmid recombinants were analyzed with restriction endonucleases. Our results indicate that a DSB can induce more than one type of RecE-mediated recombination. A DSB within the homology induced intermolecular recombination that followed the rules of the DSB repair model: (1) Recombination was enhanced by in vivo restriction. (2) Repair of the break depended on homologous sequences on the resident plasmid. (3) Break-repair was frequently associated with conversion of alleles that were cis to the break. (4) Conversion frequency decreased as the distance from the break increased. (5) Some clones contained a mixture of plasmid recombinants as expected by replication of a heteroduplex in the primary recombinant. The rules of the DSB repair model were not followed when recombination was induced by a DSB outside the homology. Both the cut and the uncut substrates were recipients in conversion events. Recombination events were associated with deletions that spanned the break site, but these deletions did not reach the homology. We propose that a break outside the homology may stimulate a RecE-mediated recombination pathway that does not involve direct participation of DNA ends in the homologous pairing reaction. PMID:1732167

  4. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed. PMID:24442504

  5. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed.

  6. High-throughput plasmid construction using homologous recombination in yeast: its mechanisms and application to protein production for X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Kimihiko

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a system for repairing the broken genomes of living organisms by connecting two DNA strands at their homologous sequences. Today, homologous recombination in yeast is used for plasmid construction as a substitute for traditional methods using restriction enzymes and ligases. This method has various advantages over the traditional method, including flexibility in the position of DNA insertion and ease of manipulation. Recently, the author of this review reported the construction of plasmids by homologous recombination in the methanol-utilizing yeast Pichia pastoris, which is known to be an excellent expression host for secretory proteins and membrane proteins. The method enabled high-throughput construction of expression systems of proteins using P. pastoris; the constructed expression systems were used to investigate the expression conditions of membrane proteins and to perform X-ray crystallography of secretory proteins. This review discusses the mechanisms and applications of homologous recombination, including the production of proteins for X-ray crystallography.

  7. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  8. Induction of intrachromosomal homologous recombination in human cells by raltitrexed, an inhibitor of thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Barbara Criscuolo; Wang, Yibin; Kilaru, Kasturi; Yang, Zhengguan; Bhasin, Alaukik; Wyatt, Michael D; Waldman, Alan S

    2008-10-01

    Thymidylate deprivation brings about "thymineless death" in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although the precise mechanism for thymineless death has remained elusive, inhibition of the enzyme thymidylate synthase (TS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of TMP, has served for many years as a basis for chemotherapeutic strategies. Numerous studies have identified a variety of cellular responses to thymidylate deprivation, including disruption of DNA replication and induction of DNA breaks. Since stalled or collapsed replication forks and strand breaks are generally viewed as being recombinogenic, it is not surprising that a link has been demonstrated between recombination induction and thymidylate deprivation in bacteria and lower eukaryotes. A similar connection between recombination and TS inhibition has been suggested by studies done in mammalian cells, but the relationship between recombination and TS inhibition in mammalian cells had not been demonstrated rigorously. To gain insight into the mechanism of thymineless death in mammalian cells, in this work we undertook a direct investigation of recombination in human cells treated with raltitrexed (RTX), a folate analog that is a specific inhibitor of TS. Using a model system to study intrachromosomal homologous recombination in cultured fibroblasts, we provide definitive evidence that treatment with RTX can stimulate accurate recombination events in human cells. Gene conversions not associated with crossovers were specifically enhanced several-fold by RTX. Additional experiments demonstrated that recombination events provoked by a double-strand break (DSB) were not impacted by treatment with RTX, nor was error-prone DSB repair via nonhomologous end-joining. Our work provides evidence that thymineless death in human cells is not mediated by corruption of DSB repair processes and suggests that an increase in chromosomal recombination may be an important element of cellular responses leading to thymineless death.

  9. Efficient homologous recombination-mediated genome engineering in zebrafish using TALE nucleases.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jimann; Chen, Jiakun; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2014-10-01

    Custom-designed nucleases afford a powerful reverse genetic tool for direct gene disruption and genome modification in vivo. Among various applications of the nucleases, homologous recombination (HR)-mediated genome editing is particularly useful for inserting heterologous DNA fragments, such as GFP, into a specific genomic locus in a sequence-specific fashion. However, precise HR-mediated genome editing is still technically challenging in zebrafish. Here, we establish a GFP reporter system for measuring the frequency of HR events in live zebrafish embryos. By co-injecting a TALE nuclease and GFP reporter targeting constructs with homology arms of different size, we defined the length of homology arms that increases the recombination efficiency. In addition, we found that the configuration of the targeting construct can be a crucial parameter in determining the efficiency of HR-mediated genome engineering. Implementing these modifications improved the efficiency of zebrafish knock-in generation, with over 10% of the injected F0 animals transmitting gene-targeting events through their germline. We generated two HR-mediated insertion alleles of sox2 and gfap loci that express either superfolder GFP (sfGFP) or tandem dimeric Tomato (tdTomato) in a spatiotemporal pattern that mirrors the endogenous loci. This efficient strategy provides new opportunities not only to monitor expression of endogenous genes and proteins and follow specific cell types in vivo, but it also paves the way for other sophisticated genetic manipulations of the zebrafish genome.

  10. Gene Disruption by Homologous Recombination in the Xylella fastidiosa Citrus Variegated Chlorosis Strain

    PubMed Central

    Gaurivaud, Patrice; Souza, Leonardo C. A.; Virgílio, Andrea C. D.; Mariano, Anelise G.; Palma, Renê R.; Monteiro, Patrícia B.

    2002-01-01

    Mutagenesis by homologous recombination was evaluated in Xylella fastidiosa by using the bga gene, coding for β-galactosidase, as a model. Integration of replicative plasmids by homologous recombination between the cloned truncated copy of bga and the endogenous gene was produced by one or two crossover events leading to β-galactosidase mutants. A promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was used to monitor the expression of the target gene and to select a cvaB mutant. PMID:12200328

  11. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks.

    PubMed

    Willis, Nicholas A; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-06-26

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing, direct evidence that BRCA gene products regulate homologous recombination at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking, due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. Here we report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mouse cells. Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the Brca1 carboxy (C)-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of Brca1 encoded by exon 11-two Brca1 elements implicated in tumour suppression-control Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination. Inactivation of either Brca1 or Brca2 increases the absolute frequency of 'long-tract' gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks, an outcome not observed in response to a site-specific endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double-strand break. Therefore, homologous recombination at stalled forks is regulated differently from homologous recombination at double-strand breaks arising independently of a replication fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract homologous recombination at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells.

  12. The role of AtMSH2 in homologous recombination in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Eyal; Yehuda, Elizabeth; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Avivi-Ragolsky, Naomi; Levy, Avraham A

    2006-01-01

    During homologous recombination (HR), a heteroduplex DNA is formed as a consequence of strand invasion. When the two homologous strands differ in sequence, a mismatch is generated. Earlier studies showed that mismatched heteroduplex often triggers abortion of recombination and that a pivotal component of this pathway is the mismatch repair Msh2 protein. In this study, we analysed the roles of AtMSH2 in suppression of recombination in Arabidopsis. We report that AtMSH2 has a broad range of anti-recombination effects: it suppresses recombination between divergent direct repeats in somatic cells or between homologues from different ecotypes during meiosis. This is the first example of a plant gene that affects HR as a function of sequence divergence and that has an anti-recombination meiotic effect. We discuss the implications of these results for plant improvement by gene transfer across species. PMID:16311517

  13. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    PubMed Central

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior. PMID:27148349

  14. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    PubMed

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior.

  15. Recovery of arrested replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone.

    PubMed

    Iraqui, Ismail; Chekkal, Yasmina; Jmari, Nada; Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows repair of DNA and provides support for DNA replication. Homologous recombination is therefore a major pathway that suppresses non-homology-mediated genome instability. Here, we report that recovery of impeded replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone. Using a fork-arrest-based assay in fission yeast, we demonstrate that a single collapsed fork can cause mutations and large-scale genomic changes, including deletions and translocations. Fork-arrest-induced gross chromosomal rearrangements are mediated by inappropriate ectopic recombination events at the site of collapsed forks. Inverted repeats near the site of fork collapse stimulate large-scale genomic changes up to 1,500 times over spontaneous events. We also show that the high accuracy of DNA replication during S-phase is impaired by impediments to fork progression, since fork-arrest-induced mutation is due to erroneous DNA synthesis during recovery of replication forks. The mutations caused are small insertions/duplications between short tandem repeats (micro-homology) indicative of replication slippage. Our data establish that collapsed forks, but not stalled forks, recovered by homologous recombination are prone to replication slippage. The inaccuracy of DNA synthesis does not rely on PCNA ubiquitination or trans-lesion-synthesis DNA polymerases, and it is not counteracted by mismatch repair. We propose that deletions/insertions, mediated by micro-homology, leading to copy number variations during replication stress may arise by progression of error-prone replication forks restarted by homologous recombination. PMID:23093942

  16. CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly) method of constructing megabase-sized DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianting; Wu, Ronghai; Xue, Xiaoli; Qin, Zhongjun

    2016-08-19

    Current DNA assembly methods for preparing highly purified linear subassemblies require complex and time-consuming in vitro manipulations that hinder their ability to construct megabase-sized DNAs (e.g. synthetic genomes). We have developed a new method designated 'CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly)' that directly uses large circular DNAs in a one-step in vivo assembly process. The large circular DNAs are co-introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae by protoplast fusion, and they are cleaved by RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to release the linear DNA segments for subsequent assembly by the endogenous homologous recombination system. The CasHRA method allows efficient assembly of multiple large DNA segments in vivo; thus, this approach should be useful in the last stage of genome construction. As a proof of concept, we combined CasHRA with an upstream assembly method (Gibson procedure of genome assembly) and successfully constructed a 1.03 Mb MGE-syn1.0 (Minimal Genome of Escherichia coli) that contained 449 essential genes and 267 important growth genes. We expect that CasHRA will be widely used in megabase-sized genome constructions. PMID:27220470

  17. Immunoglobulin knockout chickens via efficient homologous recombination in primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Schusser, Benjamin; Collarini, Ellen J; Yi, Henry; Izquierdo, Shelley Mettler; Fesler, Jeffrey; Pedersen, Darlene; Klasing, Kirk C; Kaspers, Bernd; Harriman, William D; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Etches, Robert J; Leighton, Philip A

    2013-12-10

    Gene targeting by homologous recombination or by sequence-specific nucleases allows the precise modification of genomes and genes to elucidate their functions. Although gene targeting has been used extensively to modify the genomes of mammals, fish, and amphibians, a targeting technology has not been available for the avian genome. Many of the principles of humoral immunity were discovered in chickens, yet the lack of gene targeting technologies in birds has limited biomedical research using this species. Here we describe targeting the joining (J) gene segment of the chicken Ig heavy chain gene by homologous recombination in primordial germ cells to establish fully transgenic chickens carrying the knockout. In homozygous knockouts, Ig heavy chain production is eliminated, and no antibody response is elicited on immunization. Migration of B-lineage precursors into the bursa of Fabricius is unaffected, whereas development into mature B cells and migration from the bursa are blocked in the mutants. Other cell types in the immune system appear normal. Chickens lacking the peripheral B-cell population will provide a unique experimental model to study avian immune responses to infectious disease. More generally, gene targeting in avian primordial germ cells will foster advances in diverse fields of biomedical research such as virology, stem cells, and developmental biology, and provide unique approaches in biotechnology, particularly in the field of antibody discovery. PMID:24282302

  18. Characterization of recombination intermediates from DNA injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes: evidence for a nonconservative mechanism of homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Maryon, E; Carroll, D

    1991-01-01

    Homologous recombination between DNA molecules injected into Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei is extremely efficient if injected molecules have overlapping homologous ends. Earlier work demonstrated that ends of linear molecules are degraded by a 5'----3' exonuclease activity, yielding 3' tails that participate in recombination. Here, we have characterized intermediates further advanced along the recombination pathway. The intermediates were identified by their unique electrophoretic and kinetic properties. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and hybridization with oligonucleotide probes showed that the intermediates had heteroduplex junctions within their homologous overlaps in which strands ending 3' were full length and those ending 5' were shortened. Additional characterization suggested that these intermediates had formed by the annealing of complementary 3' tails. Annealed junctions made in vitro were rapidly processed to products, indicating that they are on the normal recombination pathway. These results support a nonconservative, single-strand annealing mode of recombination. This recombination mechanism appears to be shared by many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and mammals. Images PMID:2038331

  19. Mutants of Streptomyces roseosporus that express enhanced recombination within partially homologous genes.

    PubMed

    Hosted, T J; Baltz, R H

    1996-10-01

    Streptomyces roseosporus mutants that express enhanced recombination between partially homologous (homeologous) sequences were isolated by selection for recombination between the bacteriophage phi C31 derivative KC570 containing the Streptomyces coelicolor glucose kinase (glk) gene and the S. roseosporus chromosome. The frequencies of homeologous recombination in the ehr mutants were determined by measuring the chromosomal insertion frequencies of plasmids containing S. coelicolor glnA or whiG genes. S. roseosporus ehr mutants showed 10(2)- to 10(4)-fold increases in homeologous recombination relative to Ehr+ strains, but no increase in homologous recombination. Southern hybridization analysis revealed single unique sites for the insertion of each of the plasmids, and the crossovers occurred in frame and in proper translational register, yielding functional chimeric glnA and whiG genes.

  20. Meiotic recombination at the Lmp2 hotspot tolerates minor sequence divergence between homologous chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Masayasu; Sagai, Tomoko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    1996-06-01

    Recombination is widely considered to linearly depend on the length of the homologous sequences. An 11% mismatch decreases the rate of phage-plasmid recombination 240-fold. Two single nucleotide mismatches, which reduce the longest uninterrupted stretch of similarity from 232 base pairs (bp) to 134 bp, reduce gene conversion in mouse L cells 20-fold. The efficiency of gene targeting through homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells can be increased by using an isogenic, rather than a non-isogenic, DNA construct. In this study we asked whether a high degree of sequence identity between homologous mouse chromosomes enhances meiotic recombination at a hotspot. Sites of meiotic recombination in the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region are not randomly distributed but are almost all clustered within short segments known as recombinational hotspots. The wm7 MHC haplotype, derived from Japanese wild mice Mus musculus molossinus, enhances meiotic recombination at a hotspot near the Lmp2 gene. Heterozygotes between the wm7 haplotype and the b or k haplotypes have yielded a high frequency of recombination (2.1%) in 1.3 kilobase kb segment of this hotspot. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  1. [The Engineering of a Yarrowia lipolytica Yeast Strain Capable of Homologous Recombination of the Mitochondrial Genome].

    PubMed

    Isakova, E P; Epova, E Yu; Sekova, V Yu; Trubnikova, E V; Kudykina, Yu K; Zylkova, M V; Guseva, M A; Deryabina, Yu I

    2015-01-01

    None of the studied eukaryotic species has a natural system for homologous recombination of the mitochondrial genome. We propose an integrated genetic construct pQ-SRUS, which allows introduction of the recA gene from Bacillus subtilis into the nuclear genome of an extremophilic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica. The targeting of recombinant RecA to the yeast mitochondria is provided by leader sequences (5'-UTR and 3'-UTR) derived from the SOD2 gene mRNA, which exhibits affinity to the outer mitochondrial membrane and thus provides cotranslational transport of RecA to the inner space of the mitochondria. The Y. lipolytica strain bearing the pQ-SRUS construct has the unique ability to integrate DNA constructs into the mitochondrial genome. This fact was confirmed using a tester construct, pQ-NIHN, intended for the introduction of the EYFP gene into the translation initiation region of the Y. lipolytica ND1 mitochondrial gene. The Y. lipolytica strain bearing pQ-SRUS makes it possible to engineer recombinant producers based on Y. lipolytica bearing transgenes in the mitochondrial genome. They are promising for the construction of a genetic system for in vivo replication and modification of the human mitochondrial genome. These strains may be used as a tool for the treatment of human mitochondrial diseases (including genetically inherited ones). PMID:26204776

  2. [An homologous recombination strategy to directly clone mammalian telemeres

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    We have pursued three goals over the past year. The first involved determining whether the HARY vector could be used for homologous integration in the human genome. The second was to ascertain whether inserted sequences could be amplified in preference to the endogenous DHFR genes. The third was to determine if the HARY insertion could provide an anchor point for long range restriction mapping. The progress in each goal is described.

  3. Rec A-independent homologous recombination induced by a putative fold-back tetraplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Arun Kumar; Roy, Kunal B

    2006-03-01

    We have recently reported that a GC-rich palindromic repeat sequence presumably adopts a stable fold-back tetraplex DNA structure under supercoiling. To establish the biological significance of this structure, we inserted this sequence between two direct repeat sequences, separated by 200 bp, in a plasmid. We then investigated the effect of this sequence on homologous recombination events. Here we report that the putative fold-back DNA tetraplex structure induces homologous recombination between direct repeat sequences. Interestingly, this recombination event is independent of recA, a major driving force for homologous recombination. We think that the fold-back structure forces the repeat sequences to come into close proximity and therefore leads to strand exchange. Although triplex-induced recombination has been well documented, our results for the first time directly establish the potential of a tetraplex structure to induce recA-independent homologous recombination in vivo. This finding might have a significant implication for site-directed gene deletion in the context of the correction of genetic defects.

  4. A mechanism for the suppression of homologous recombination in G1 cells.

    PubMed

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Noordermeer, Sylvie M; Wilson, Marcus D; Landry, Sébastien; Enchev, Radoslav I; Sherker, Alana; Munro, Meagan; Pinder, Jordan; Salsman, Jayme; Dellaire, Graham; Xia, Bing; Peter, Matthias; Durocher, Daniel

    2015-12-17

    DNA repair by homologous recombination is highly suppressed in G1 cells to ensure that mitotic recombination occurs solely between sister chromatids. Although many homologous recombination factors are cell-cycle regulated, the identity of the events that are both necessary and sufficient to suppress recombination in G1 cells is unknown. Here we report that the cell cycle controls the interaction of BRCA1 with PALB2-BRCA2 to constrain BRCA2 function to the S/G2 phases in human cells. We found that the BRCA1-interaction site on PALB2 is targeted by an E3 ubiquitin ligase composed of KEAP1, a PALB2-interacting protein, in complex with cullin-3 (CUL3)-RBX1 (ref. 6). PALB2 ubiquitylation suppresses its interaction with BRCA1 and is counteracted by the deubiquitylase USP11, which is itself under cell cycle control. Restoration of the BRCA1-PALB2 interaction combined with the activation of DNA-end resection is sufficient to induce homologous recombination in G1, as measured by RAD51 recruitment, unscheduled DNA synthesis and a CRISPR-Cas9-based gene-targeting assay. We conclude that the mechanism prohibiting homologous recombination in G1 minimally consists of the suppression of DNA-end resection coupled with a multi-step block of the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA damage sites that involves the inhibition of BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex assembly. We speculate that the ability to induce homologous recombination in G1 cells with defined factors could spur the development of gene-targeting applications in non-dividing cells. PMID:26649820

  5. Recombination-independent mechanisms and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis in plants.

    PubMed

    Da Ines, Olivier; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I

    2014-03-01

    Meiosis is the specialized eukaryotic cell division that permits the halving of ploidy necessary for gametogenesis in sexually reproducing organisms. This involves a single round of DNA replication followed by two successive divisions. To ensure balanced segregation, homologous chromosome pairs must migrate to opposite poles at the first meiotic division and this means that they must recognize and pair with each other beforehand. Although understanding of the mechanisms by which meiotic chromosomes find and pair with their homologs has greatly advanced, it remains far from being fully understood. With some notable exceptions such as male Drosophila, the recognition and physical linkage of homologs at the first meiotic division involves homologous recombination. However, in addition to this, it is clear that many organisms, including plants, have also evolved a series of recombination-independent mechanisms to facilitate homolog recognition and pairing. These implicate chromosome structure and dynamics, telomeres, centromeres, and, most recently, small RNAs. With a particular focus on plants, we present here an overview of understanding of these early, recombination-independent events that act in the pairing of homologous chromosomes during the first meiotic division. PMID:24375719

  6. Relative frequencies of homologous recombination between plasmids introduced into DNA repair-deficient and other mammalian somatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Moore, P D

    1990-07-01

    Twelve mammalian somatic cell lines, some of them DNA damage-sensitive mutants paired with their respective wild-type parental lines, were assayed for their ability to catalyze extrachromosomal, intermolecular homologous recombination between pSV2neo plasmid recombination substrates. All of the somatic cell lines analyzed are capable of catalyzing homologous recombination; however, there is a wide range of efficiencies with which they do so. Five human cell lines display a fourfold range of recombination frequencies, and six hamster cell lines vary almost 20-fold. Linearizing one of the recombination substrates stimulates recombination in all but one of the cell lines. Two of the three paired mutant cell lines display a threefold reduction in their ability to catalyze homologous recombination when compared to their respective parental cell lines, indicating that the mutations that render them sensitive to DNA damaging agents might also play a role in homologous recombination. PMID:2218721

  7. Hypervariable minisatellite DNA is a hotspot for homologous recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Wallace, L J; Moore, P D

    1990-01-12

    Hypervariable minisatellite DNA sequences are short tandemly repeated sequences that are present throughout the human genome and are implicated to enhance recombination. We have constructed a consensus hypervariable minisatellite sequence and analyzed its effect on homologous recombination in human cells in culture. The consensus sequence d(AGAGGTGGGCAGGTGG)6.5 is shown to stimulate homologous recombination up to 13.5-fold. The stimulation occurs at a distance and in both directions but does show a quantitative directionality. Stimulation occurs in a codominant manner, and the sequence is inherited equally in the products. Enhancement is maintained, but at a reduced level, when double-strand breaks are introduced into the substrates. Multiple unselected recombination events are promoted, and preferential stimulation of reciprocal exchange events is demonstrated. PMID:2295091

  8. Massive expansions of Dscam splicing diversity via staggered homologous recombination during arthropod evolution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher; Kim, Namshin; Roy, Meenakshi; Graveley, Brenton R

    2010-01-01

    The arthropod Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene can generate tens of thousands of protein isoforms via combinatorial splicing of numerous alternative exons encoding immunoglobulin variable domains organized into three clusters referred to as the exon 4, 6, and 9 clusters. Dscam protein diversity is important for nervous system development and immune functions. We have performed extensive phylogenetic analyses of Dscam from 20 arthropods (each containing between 46 and 96 alternative exons) to reconstruct the detailed history of exon duplication and loss events that built this remarkable system over 450 million years of evolution. Whereas the structure of the exon 4 cluster is ancient, the exon 6 and 9 clusters have undergone massive, independent expansions in each insect lineage. An analysis of nearly 2000 duplicated exons enabled detailed reconstruction of the timing, location, and boundaries of these duplication events. These data clearly show that new Dscam exons have arisen continuously throughout arthropod evolution and that this process is still occurring in the exon 6 and 9 clusters. Recently duplicated regions display boundaries corresponding to a single exon and the adjacent intron. The boundaries, homology, location, clustering, and relative frequencies of these duplication events strongly suggest that staggered homologous recombination is the major mechanism by which new Dscam exons evolve. These data provide a remarkably detailed picture of how complex gene structure evolves and reveal the molecular mechanism behind this process.

  9. A defect in homologous recombination leads to increased translesion synthesis in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Naiman, Karel; Pagès, Vincent; Fuchs, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance pathways allow cells to duplicate their genomes despite the presence of replication blocking lesions. Cells possess two major tolerance strategies, namely translesion synthesis (TLS) and homology directed gap repair (HDGR). TLS pathways involve specialized DNA polymerases that are able to synthesize past DNA lesions with an intrinsic risk of causing point mutations. In contrast, HDGR pathways are essentially error-free as they rely on the recovery of missing information from the sister chromatid by RecA-mediated homologous recombination. We have investigated the genetic control of pathway choice between TLS and HDGR in vivo in Escherichia coli. In a strain with wild type RecA activity, the extent of TLS across replication blocking lesions is generally low while HDGR is used extensively. Interestingly, recA alleles that are partially impaired in D-loop formation confer a decrease in HDGR and a concomitant increase in TLS. Thus, partial defect of RecA's capacity to invade the homologous sister chromatid increases the lifetime of the ssDNA.RecA filament, i.e. the ‘SOS signal’. This increase favors TLS by increasing both the TLS polymerase concentration and the lifetime of the TLS substrate, before it becomes sequestered by homologous recombination. In conclusion, the pathway choice between error-prone TLS and error-free HDGR is controlled by the efficiency of homologous recombination. PMID:27257075

  10. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is influenced by homologous recombination status

    SciTech Connect

    Sprong, Debbie; Janssen, Hilde L.; Vens, Conchita; Begg, Adrian C. . E-mail: a.begg@nki.nl

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of DNA repair in hypoxic radioresistance. Methods and Materials: Chinese hamster cell lines with mutations in homologous recombination (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRAC2, RAD51C) or nonhomologous end-joining (DNA-PKcs) genes were irradiated under normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic (<0.1% oxygen) conditions, and the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was calculated. In addition, Fanconi anemia fibroblasts (complementation groups C and G) were compared with fibroblasts from nonsyndrome patients. RAD51 foci were studied using immunofluorescence. Results: All hamster cell lines deficient in homologous recombination showed a decrease in OER (1.5-2.0 vs. 2.6-3.0 for wild-types). In contrast, the OER for the DNA-PKcs-deficient line was comparable to wild-type controls. The two Fanconi anemia cell strains also showed a significant reduction in OER. The OER for RAD51 foci formation at late times after irradiation was considerably lower than that for survival in wild-type cells. Conclusion: Homologous recombination plays an important role in determining hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. Lower OERs have also been reported in cells deficient in XPF and ERCC1, which, similar to homologous recombination genes, are known to play a role in cross-link repair. Because Fanconi anemia cells are also sensitive to cross-linking agents, this strengthens the notion that the capacity to repair cross-links determines hypoxic radiosensitivity.

  11. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  12. In vivo Importance of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair for Mouse Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Laure; Etienne, Olivier; Roque, Telma; Desmaze, Chantal; Haton, Céline; Mouthon, Marc-André; Bernardino-Sgherri, Jacqueline; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland; Boussin, François D.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the in vivo importance of the homologous recombination factor RAD54 for the developing mouse brain cortex in normal conditions or after ionizing radiation exposure. Contrary to numerous homologous recombination genes, Rad54 disruption did not impact the cortical development without exogenous stress, but it dramatically enhanced the radiation sensitivity of neural stem and progenitor cells. This resulted in the death of all cells irradiated during S or G2, whereas the viability of cells irradiated in G1 or G0 was not affected by Rad54 disruption. Apoptosis occurred after long arrests at intra-S and G2/M checkpoints. This concerned every type of neural stem and progenitor cells, showing that the importance of Rad54 for radiation response was linked to the cell cycle phase at the time of irradiation and not to the differentiation state. In the developing brain, RAD54-dependent homologous recombination appeared absolutely required for the repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation during S and G2 phases, but not for the repair of endogenous damages in normal conditions. Altogether our data support the existence of RAD54-dependent and -independent homologous recombination pathways. PMID:22666344

  13. Homologous recombination in pestiviruses: identification of three putative novel events between different subtypes/genogroups.

    PubMed

    Weber, Matheus Nunes; Streck, André Felipe; Silveira, Simone; Mósena, Ana Cristina Sbaraini; Silva, Mariana Soares da; Canal, Cláudio Wageck

    2015-03-01

    Viruses from the genus Pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae have a non-segmented, single-stranded RNA genome and can cause diseases in animals from the order Artiodactyla. Homologous recombination is rarely reported in this virus family. To detect possible recombination events, all complete pestivirus genomes that are available in GenBank were screened using distinct algorithms to detect genetic conversions and incongruent phylogenies. Three putative recombinant viruses derived from recombination from different pestivirus subtypes/genogroups were detected: Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) strain 3156, BVDV-2 strain JZ05-1 and Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strain IND/UK/LAL-290. The present study demonstrated that the pestivirus classification cannot be based only on the analysis of one fragment of the genome because genetic conversions can lead to errors. The designation of the recombinant forms (RF) provides a more informative structure for the nomenclature of the genetic variant. The present work reinforces that homologous recombination occurs in pestivirus populations under natural replication and describes the first evidence of recombination in BVDV-2.

  14. Engineering the Caenorhabditis elegans genome using Cas9-triggered homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Daniel J; Ward, Jordan D; Reiner, David J; Goldstein, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Study of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has provided important insights in a wide range of fields in biology. The ability to precisely modify genomes is critical to fully realize the utility of model organisms. Here we report a method to edit the C. elegans genome using the clustered, regularly interspersed, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease and homologous recombination. We demonstrate that Cas9 is able to induce DNA double-strand breaks with specificity for targeted sites and that these breaks can be repaired efficiently by homologous recombination. By supplying engineered homologous repair templates, we generated gfp knock-ins and targeted mutations. Together our results outline a flexible methodology to produce essentially any desired modification in the C. elegans genome quickly and at low cost. This technology is an important addition to the array of genetic techniques already available in this experimentally tractable model organism.

  15. The role of Deinococcus radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Katsuya; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Ishaque, Abu M; Ohba, Hirofumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Tejima, Kouhei; Onodera, Takefumi; Narumi, Issay

    2012-04-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits extraordinary resistance to the lethal effect of DNA-damaging agents, a characteristic attributed to its highly proficient DNA repair capacity. Although the D. radiodurans genome is clearly devoid of recBC and addAB counterparts as RecA mediators, the genome possesses all genes associated with the RecFOR pathway. In an effort to gain insights into the role of D. radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination, we generated recF, recO and recR disruptant strains and characterized the disruption effects. All the disruptant strains exhibited delayed growth relative to the wild-type, indicating that the RecF, RecO and RecR proteins play an important role in cell growth under normal growth conditions. A slight reduction in transformation efficiency was observed in the recF and recO disruptant strains compared to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, disruption of recR resulted in severe reduction of the transformation efficiency. On the other hand, the recF disruptant strain was the most sensitive phenotype to γ rays, UV irradiation and mitomycin C among the three disruptants. In the recF disruptant strain, the intracellular level of the LexA1 protein did not decrease following γ irradiation, suggesting that a large amount of the RecA protein remains inactive despite being induced. These results demonstrate that the RecF protein plays a crucial role in the homologous recombination repair process by facilitating RecA activation in D. radiodurans. Thus, the RecF and RecR proteins are involved in the RecA activation and the stability of incoming DNA, respectively, during RecA-mediated homologous recombination processes that initiated the ESDSA pathway in D. radiodurans. Possible mechanisms that involve the RecFOR complex in homologous intermolecular recombination and homologous recombination repair processes are also discussed. PMID:22321371

  16. Accurate modification of a chromosomal plasmid by homologous recombination in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, K.Y.; Schwartz, F.; Maeda, N.; Smithies, O.; Kucherlapati, R.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have examined the consequences of modifying mammalian cellular DAN sequences by homologous recombination. A plasmid carrying a 248-base-pair deletion in the neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene was introduced into hamster and human cells. The integrated, defective neo gene was used as a target for modification by a second round of transfection with a plasmid carrying a different (283-base-pair) deletion in the neo gene. Recombinants resulting in an intact neo gene were selected by their G418 resistance phenotype. The best ratio of homologous to nonhomologous recombination events was about 1:80. Analysis of the functional neo genes in various independent cell lines establish that simple crossovers (single and double) generated the wild-type neo genes.

  17. Sister cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between sister chromatids (sister bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes sister bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their sister. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for sister cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459

  18. Restriction-ligation-free (RLF) cloning: a high-throughput cloning method by in vivo homologous recombination of PCR products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Liu, Y; Chen, J; Tang, M J; Zhang, S L; Wei, L N; Li, C H; Wei, D B

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we optimized a restriction-ligation-free (RLF) method to save time and cost of constructing multiple plasmids with the same gene insert, and examined the efficacy of RLF on high-throughput multi-plasmid cloning. This method utilizes the precise DNA repair and recombination systems within Escherichia coli, which allows to bypass the in vitro restriction and ligation enzyme reactions commonly included in routine cloning procedures. A homologous arm is linked to the 5'-end of the forward primer used to amplify both the target gene and vector. A different homologous arm is linked to the 5'-end of the reverse primer. Therefore, genes can be cloned into the vectors by homologous recombination after co-transformation of the amplified target gene and the linearized vector, which bear the same homologous arm on either end. More than twenty-four different plasmids were generated by this method, which uses two simple polymerase chain reaction steps. This method is highly efficient in cloning any gene of interest into any vector at any site without sequence constraints, as no restriction and ligation reactions are required. PMID:26505379

  19. Change of Gene Structure and Function by Non-Homologous End-Joining, Homologous Recombination, and Transposition of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Goettel, Wolfgang; Messing, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to diploidization

  20. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    PubMed

    Goettel, Wolfgang; Messing, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to diploidization

  1. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    SciTech Connect

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos; Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de; Ferreira, Rogerio; Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  2. A ROS-Activatable Agent Elicits Homologous Recombination DNA Repair and Synergizes with Pathway Compounds.

    PubMed

    Thowfeik, Fathima Shazna; AbdulSalam, Safnas F; Wunderlich, Mark; Wyder, Michael; Greis, Kenneth D; Kadekaro, Ana L; Mulloy, James C; Merino, Edward J

    2015-11-01

    We designed ROS-activated cytotoxic agents (RACs) that are active against AML cancer cells. In this study, the mechanism of action and synergistic effects against cells coexpressing the AML oncogenes MLL-AF9 fusion and FLT3-ITD were investigated. One RAC (RAC1) had an IC50 value of 1.8±0.3 μm, with ninefold greater selectivity for transformed cells compared to untransformed cells. Treatment induced DNA strand breaks, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. Proteomics and transcriptomics revealed enhanced expression of the pentose phosphate pathway, DNA repair, and pathways common to cell stress. Western blotting confirmed repair by homologous recombination. Importantly, RAC1 treatment was synergistic in combination with multiple pathway-targeting therapies in AML cells but less so in untransformed cells. Together, these results demonstrate that RAC1 can selectively target poor prognosis AML and that it does so by creating DNA double-strand breaks that require homologous recombination.

  3. High-efficiency homologous recombination in the oil-producing alga Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Oliver; Benemann, Christina S E; Niyogi, Krishna K; Vick, Bertrand

    2011-12-27

    Algae have reemerged as potential next-generation feedstocks for biofuels, but strain improvement and progress in algal biology research have been limited by the lack of advanced molecular tools for most eukaryotic microalgae. Here we describe the development of an efficient transformation method for Nannochloropsis sp., a fast-growing, unicellular alga capable of accumulating large amounts of oil. Moreover, we provide additional evidence that Nannochloropsis is haploid, and we demonstrate that insertion of transformation constructs into the nuclear genome can occur by high-efficiency homologous recombination. As examples, we generated knockouts of the genes encoding nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, resulting in strains that were unable to grow on nitrate and nitrate/nitrite, respectively. The application of homologous recombination in this industrially relevant alga has the potential to rapidly advance algal functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:22123974

  4. High-efficiency homologous recombination in the oil-producing alga Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Oliver; Benemann, Christina S. E.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Vick, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Algae have reemerged as potential next-generation feedstocks for biofuels, but strain improvement and progress in algal biology research have been limited by the lack of advanced molecular tools for most eukaryotic microalgae. Here we describe the development of an efficient transformation method for Nannochloropsis sp., a fast-growing, unicellular alga capable of accumulating large amounts of oil. Moreover, we provide additional evidence that Nannochloropsis is haploid, and we demonstrate that insertion of transformation constructs into the nuclear genome can occur by high-efficiency homologous recombination. As examples, we generated knockouts of the genes encoding nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, resulting in strains that were unable to grow on nitrate and nitrate/nitrite, respectively. The application of homologous recombination in this industrially relevant alga has the potential to rapidly advance algal functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:22123974

  5. A ROS-Activatable Agent Elicits Homologous Recombination DNA Repair and Synergizes with Pathway Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Thowfeik, Fathima Shazna; AbdulSalam, Safnas F.; Wunderlich, Mark; Wyder, Michael; Greis, Kenneth D.; Kadekaro, Ana L.; Mulloy, James C.

    2016-01-01

    We designed ROS-activated cytotoxic agents (RACs) that are active against AML cancer cells. In this study, the mechanism of action and synergistic effects against cells coexpressing the AML oncogenes MLL-AF9 fusion and FLT3-ITD were investigated. One RAC (RAC1) had an IC50 value of 1.8 ± 0.3 µm, with ninefold greater selectivity for transformed cells compared to untransformed cells. Treatment induced DNA strand breaks, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. Proteomics and transcriptomics revealed enhanced expression of the pentose phosphate pathway, DNA repair, and pathways common to cell stress. Western blotting confirmed repair by homologous recombination. Importantly, RAC1 treatment was synergistic in combination with multiple pathway-targeting therapies in AML cells but less so in untransformed cells. Together, these results demonstrate that RAC1 can selectively target poor prognosis AML and that it does so by creating DNA double-strand breaks that require homologous recombination. PMID:26419938

  6. Homologous genetic recombination in the yellow head complex of nidoviruses infecting Penaeus monodon shrimp.

    PubMed

    Wijegoonawardane, Priyanjalie K M; Sittidilokratna, Nusra; Petchampai, Natthida; Cowley, Jeff A; Gudkovs, Nicholas; Walker, Peter J

    2009-07-20

    Yellow head virus (YHV) is a highly virulent pathogen of Penaeus monodon shrimp. It is one of six known genotypes in the yellow head complex of nidoviruses which also includes mildly pathogenic gill-associated virus (GAV, genotype 2) and four other genotypes (genotypes 3-6) that have been detected only in healthy shrimp. In this study, comparative phylogenetic analyses conducted on replicase- (ORF1b) and glycoprotein- (ORF3) gene amplicons identified 10 putative natural recombinants amongst 28 viruses representing all six genotypes from across the Indo-Pacific region. The approximately 4.6 kb genomic region spanning the two amplicons was sequenced for three putative recombinant viruses from Vietnam (genotype 3/5), the Philippines (genotype 5/2) and Indonesia (genotype 3/2). SimPlot analysis using these and representative parental virus sequences confirmed that each was a recombinant genotype and identified a recombination hotspot in a region just upstream of the ORF1b C-terminus. Maximum-likelihood breakpoint analysis predicted identical crossover positions in the Vietnamese and Indonesian recombinants, and a crossover position 12 nt upstream in the Philippine recombinant. Homologous genetic recombination in the same genome region was also demonstrated in recombinants generated experimentally in shrimp co-infected with YHV and GAV. The high frequency with which natural recombinants were identified indicates that genetic exchange amongst genotypes is occurring commonly in Asia and playing a significant role in expanding the genetic diversity in the yellow head complex. This is the first evidence of genetic recombination in viruses infecting crustaceans and has significant implications for the pathogenesis of infection and diagnosis of these newly emerging invertebrate pathogens.

  7. (A new method employing homologous recombination and YAC rescue to expedite gap filling long range mapping)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    We have embarked on three areas of research relevant to the telomere rescue strategy mediated by homologous recombination described in this proposal. First, we have constructed the telomere rescue vector. Second, we have carried out tests in yeast and mammalian cells to ascertain whether the various crucial components function. Finally, we have begun to develop the molecular reagents required to target the telomeric regions of chromosome 16. The specific progress in each area is described briefly below.

  8. DNA Polymerase POLN Participates in Cross-Link Repair and Homologous Recombination ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, George-Lucian; Madhavan, Mahesh V.; Mirchandani, Kanchan D.; McCaffrey, Ryan M.; Vinciguerra, Patrizia; D'Andrea, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    All cells rely on DNA polymerases to duplicate their genetic material and to repair or bypass DNA lesions. In humans, 16 polymerases have been identified, and each bears specific functions in genome maintenance. We identified here the recently discovered polymerase POLN to be involved in repair of DNA cross-links. Such DNA lesions are highly toxic and are believed to be repaired by the sequential activity of nucleotide excision repair, translesion synthesis, and homologous recombination mechanisms. By functionally assaying its role in these processes, we unraveled an unexpected involvement of POLN in homologous recombination. Moreover, we obtained evidence for physical and functional interaction of POLN with factors belonging to the Fanconi anemia pathway, a master regulator of cross-link repair. Finally, we show that POLN interacts and cooperates in DNA repair with the helicase HEL308, which shares a common origin with POLN in the Drosophila mus308 gene. Our data indicate that this novel polymerase-helicase complex participates in homologous recombination repair and is essential for cellular protection against DNA cross-links. PMID:19995904

  9. Genotoxicity/mutagenicity of formaldehyde revealed by the Arabidopsis thaliana plants transgenic for homologous recombination substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Fanghua; Liu, Ping; Wang, Ting; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-06-17

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a major industrial chemical and has been extensively used in the manufacture of synthetic resins and chemicals. The use of FA-containing industrial materials in daily life exposes human to FA extensively. Numerous studies indicate that FA is genotoxic, and can induce various genotoxic effects in vitro and in vivo. The primary DNA lesions induced by FA are DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). Recently, it has been reported that the homologous recombination (HR) mechanism is involved in the repair of DPCs, suggesting the homologous recombination could be a potential indicator for the genotoxicity/mutagenicity of FA. However, it has not yet been reported that organisms harboring recombination substrates are used for the detection of genotoxic/mutagenic effects of FA. In this present study, an Arabidopsis thaliana-line transgenic for GUS recombination substrates was used to study the genotoxicity/mutagenicity of FA, and the results showed that FA-exposure significantly increased the induction of HR in growing plants, but not in dormant seeds. We also observed an early up-regulation of expression of HR-related gene, AtRAD54, after FA-exposure. Moreover, the pretreatment with glutathione (GSH) suppressed drastically the induction of HR by FA-exposure.

  10. Ycs4 is Required for Efficient Double-Strand Break Formation and Homologous Recombination During Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soogil; Choi, Eui-Hwan; Kim, Keun Pil

    2015-07-01

    Condensin is not only responsible for chromosome condensation, but is also involved in double-strand break (DSB) processing in the cell cycle. During meiosis, the condensin complex serves as a component of the meiotic chromosome axis, and mediates both proper assembly of the synaptonemal complex and DSB repair, in order to ensure proper homologous chromosome segregation. Here, we used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to show that condensin participates in a variety of chromosome organization processes and exhibits crucial molecular functions that contribute to meiotic recombination during meiotic prophase I. We demonstrate that Ycs4 is required for efficient DSB formation and establishing homolog bias at the early stage of meiotic prophase I, which allows efficient formation of interhomolog recombination products. In the Ycs4 meiosis-specific allele (ycs4S), interhomolog products were formed at substantial levels, but with the same reduction in crossovers and noncrossovers. We further show that, in prophase chromosomal events, ycs4S relieved the defects in the progression of recombination interactions induced as a result of the absence of Rec8. These results suggest that condensin is a crucial coordinator of the recombination process and chromosome organization during meiosis.

  11. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous In Vivo Grouping (MORPHING) for Directed Enzyme Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Molina-Espeja, Patricia; Garcia-Ruiz, Eva; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Approaches that depend on directed evolution require reliable methods to generate DNA diversity so that mutant libraries can focus on specific target regions. We took advantage of the high frequency of homologous DNA recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to develop a strategy for domain mutagenesis aimed at introducing and in vivo recombining random mutations in defined segments of DNA. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING) is a one-pot random mutagenic method for short protein regions that harnesses the in vivo recombination apparatus of yeast. Using this approach, libraries can be prepared with different mutational loads in DNA segments of less than 30 amino acids so that they can be assembled into the remaining unaltered DNA regions in vivo with high fidelity. As a proof of concept, we present two eukaryotic-ligninolytic enzyme case studies: i) the enhancement of the oxidative stability of a H2O2-sensitive versatile peroxidase by independent evolution of three distinct protein segments (Leu28-Gly57, Leu149-Ala174 and Ile199-Leu268); and ii) the heterologous functional expression of an unspecific peroxygenase by exclusive evolution of its native 43-residue signal sequence. PMID:24614282

  12. Homologous recombination occurs in Entamoeba and is enhanced during growth stress and stage conversion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) has not been demonstrated in the parasitic protists Entamoeba histolytica or Entamoeba invadens, as no convenient method is available to measure it. However, HR must exist to ensure genome integrity, and possible genetic exchange, especially during stage conversion from trophozoite to cyst. Here we show the up regulation of mitotic and meiotic HR genes in Entamoeba during serum starvation, and encystation. To directly demonstrate HR we use a simple PCR-based method involving inverted repeats, which gives a reliable read out, as the recombination junctions can be determined by sequencing the amplicons. Using this read out, we demonstrate enhanced HR under growth stress in E. histolytica, and during encystation in E. invadens. We also demonstrate recombination between chromosomal inverted repeats. This is the first experimental demonstration of HR in Entamoeba and will help future investigations into this process, and to explore the possibility of meiosis in Entamoeba.

  13. Multi-Homologous Recombination-Based Gene Manipulation in the Rice Pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In Sun; Ahn, Il-Pyung

    2016-01-01

    Gene disruption by homologous recombination is widely used to investigate and analyze the function of genes in Fusarium fujikuroi, a fungus that causes bakanae disease and root rot symptoms in rice. To generate gene deletion constructs, the use of conventional cloning methods, which rely on restriction enzymes and ligases, has had limited success due to a lack of unique restriction enzyme sites. Although strategies that avoid the use of restriction enzymes have been employed to overcome this issue, these methods require complicated PCR steps or are frequently inefficient. Here, we introduce a cloning system that utilizes multi-fragment assembly by In-Fusion to generate a gene disruption construct. This method utilizes DNA fragment fusion and requires only one PCR step and one reaction for construction. Using this strategy, a gene disruption construct for Fusarium cyclin C1 (FCC1 ), which is associated with fumonisin B1 biosynthesis, was successfully created and used for fungal transformation. In vivo and in vitro experiments using confirmed fcc1 mutants suggest that fumonisin production is closely related to disease symptoms exhibited by F. fujikuroi strain B14. Taken together, this multi-fragment assembly method represents a simpler and a more convenient process for targeted gene disruption in fungi. PMID:27298592

  14. Characterization of promoters and stable transfection by homologous and nonhomologous recombination in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, B S; Cowman, A F

    1996-01-01

    Genetic studies of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum have been severely limited by the inability to introduce or modify genes. In this paper we describe a system of stable transfection of P. falciparum using a Toxoplasma gondii dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene, modified to confer resistance to pyrimethamine, as a selectable marker. This gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the P. falciparum calmodulin gene flanking sequences. Transfected parasites generally maintained plasmids episomally while under selection; however, parasite clones containing integrated forms of the plasmid were obtained. Integration occurred by both homologous and nonhomologous recombination. In addition to the flanking sequence of the P. falciparum calmodulin gene, the 5' sequences of the P. falciparum and P. chabaudi dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase genes were also shown to be transcriptionally active in P. falciparum. The minimal 5' sequence that possessed significant transcriptional activity was determined for each gene and short sequences containing important transcriptional control elements were identified. These sequences will provide considerable flexibility in the future construction of plasmid vectors to be used for the expression of foreign genes or for the deletion or modification of P. falciparum genes of interest. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692985

  15. Perturbing A-to-I RNA editing using genetics and homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Staber, Cynthia J; Gell, Selena; Jepson, James E C; Reenan, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for the chemical conversion of adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) in messenger RNA (mRNA) has been detected in numerous metazoans, especially those "most successful" phyla: Arthropoda, Mollusca, and Chordata. The requisite enzymes for A-to-I editing, ADARs (adenosine deaminases acting on RNA) are highly conserved and are present in every higher metazoan genome sequenced to date. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, represents an ideal model organism for studying A-to-I editing, both in terms of fundamental biochemistry and in relation to determining adaptive downstream effects on physiology and behavior. The Drosophila genome contains a single structural gene for ADAR (dAdar), yet the fruit fly transcriptome has the widest range of conserved and validated ADAR targets in coding mRNAs of any known organism. In addition, many of the genes targeted by dADAR have been genetically identified as playing a role in nervous system function, providing a rich source of material to investigate the biological relevance of this intriguing process. Here, we discuss how recent advances in the use of ends-out homologous recombination (HR) in Drosophila make possible both the precise control of the editing status for defined adenosine residues and the engineering of flies with globally altered RNA editing of the fly transcriptome. These new approaches promise to significantly improve our understanding of how mRNA modification contributes to insect physiology and ethology.

  16. Gene targeting and transgene stacking using intra genomic homologous recombination in plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Barone, Pierluigi; Smith, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Modern agriculture has created a demand for plant biotechnology products that provide durable resistance to insect pests, tolerance of herbicide applications for weed control, and agronomic traits tailored for specific geographies. These transgenic trait products require a modular and sequential multigene stacking platform that is supported by precise genome engineering technology. Designed nucleases have emerged as potent tools for creating targeted DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Exogenously supplied donor DNA can repair the targeted DSB by a process known as gene targeting (GT), resulting in a desired modification of the target genome. The potential of GT technology has not been fully realized for trait deployment in agriculture, mainly because of inefficient transformation and plant regeneration systems in a majority of crop plants and genotypes. This challenge of transgene stacking in plants could be overcome by Intra-Genomic Homologous Recombination (IGHR) that converts independently segregating unlinked donor and target transgenic loci into a genetically linked molecular stack. The method requires stable integration of the donor DNA into the plant genome followed by intra-genomic mobilization. IGHR complements conventional breeding with genetic transformation and designed nucleases to provide a flexible transgene stacking and trait deployment platform.

  17. Suppression of Meiotic Recombination by CENP-B Homologs in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Peter; Cam, Hugh P

    2015-11-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination (HR) is not uniform across eukaryotic genomes, creating regions of HR hot- and coldspots. Previous study reveals that the Spo11 homolog Rec12 responsible for initiation of meiotic double-strand breaks in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is not targeted to Tf2 retrotransposons. However, whether Tf2s are HR coldspots is not known. Here, we show that the rates of HR across Tf2s are similar to a genome average but substantially increase in mutants deficient for the CENP-B homologs. Abp1, which is the most prominent of the CENP-B family members and acts as the primary determinant of HR suppression at Tf2s, is required to prevent gene conversion and maintain proper recombination exchange of homologous alleles flanking Tf2s. In addition, Abp1-mediated suppression of HR at Tf2s requires all three of its domains with distinct functions in transcriptional repression and higher-order genome organization. We demonstrate that HR suppression of Tf2s can be robustly maintained despite disruption to chromatin factors essential for transcriptional repression and nuclear organization of Tf2s. Intriguingly, we uncover a surprising cooperation between the histone methyltransferase Set1 responsible for histone H3 lysine 4 methylation and the nonhomologous end joining pathway in ensuring the suppression of HR at Tf2s. Our study identifies a molecular pathway involving functional cooperation between a transcription factor with epigenetic regulators and a DNA repair pathway to regulate meiotic recombination at interspersed repeats.

  18. A New Type of Adenovirus Vector That Utilizes Homologous Recombination To Achieve Tumor-Specific Replication

    PubMed Central

    Bernt, Kathrin; Liang, Min; Ye, Xun; Ni, Shaoheng; Li, Zong-Yi; Ye, Sheng Long; Hu, Fang; Lieber, André

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new class of adenovirus vectors that selectively replicate in tumor cells. The vector design is based on our recent observation that a variety of human tumor cell lines support DNA replication of adenovirus vectors with deletions of the E1A and E1B genes, whereas primary human cells or mouse liver cells in vivo do not. On the basis of this tumor-selective replication, we developed an adenovirus system that utilizes homologous recombination between inverted repeats to mediate precise rearrangements within the viral genome resulting in replication-dependent activation of transgene expression in tumors (Ad.IR vectors). Here, we used this system to achieve tumor-specific expression of adenoviral wild-type E1A in order to enhance viral DNA replication and spread within tumor metastases. In vitro DNA replication and cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the mechanism of E1A-enhanced replication of Ad.IR-E1A vectors is efficiently and specifically activated in tumor cells, but not in nontransformed human cells. Systemic application of the Ad.IR-E1A vector into animals with liver metastases achieved transgene expression exclusively in tumors. The number of transgene-expressing tumor cells within metastases increased over time, indicating viral spread. Furthermore, the Ad.IR-E1A vector demonstrated antitumor efficacy in subcutaneous and metastatic models. These new Ad.IR-E1A vectors combine elements that allow for tumor-specific transgene expression, efficient viral replication, and spread in liver metastases after systemic vector application. PMID:12368342

  19. Is it time to split strategies to treat homologous recombinant deficiency in pancreas cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Min Yuen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy which tends to present with late stage disease. To date, identification of oncogenic drivers and aberrations has not led to effective targeted therapy. Approximately 5–15% of pancreatic cancer has an inheritable component. In fact, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is now recognized as a BRCA1/2-related cancer. Germline BRCA1/2 mutations can be found in up to 3.6–7% of unselected pancreatic cancer patients although the rates are significantly higher amongst patients with Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. Germline mutations of other components of DNA repair and homologous recombination have also been identified although at much lower frequency. Large sequencing efforts have further identified somatic mutations in these genes in a small subset of pancreatic cancers. Small series and case reports have suggested that pancreatic cancers harboring BRCA1/2 or other homologous repair gene mutations demonstrate enhanced response to platinum-based chemotherapy although this has not been prospectively validated. Clinical trials with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy in different clinical settings are currently on-going. A subtype of pancreatic adenocarcinoma as characterized by deficiency in homologous recombination exists although the optimal management strategy remains to be fully elucidated. PMID:27747088

  20. Ca2+ activates human homologous recombination protein Rad51 by modulating its ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Bugreev, Dmitry V.; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2004-01-01

    Human Rad51 (hRad51) protein plays a key role in homologous recombination and DNA repair. hRad51 protein forms a helical filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which performs the basic steps of homologous recombination: a search for homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and DNA strand exchange. hRad51 protein possesses DNA-dependent ATPase activity; however, the role of this activity has not been understood. Our current results show that Ca2+ greatly stimulates DNA strand exchange activity of hRad51 protein. We found that Ca2+ exerts its stimulatory effect by modulating the ATPase activity of hRad51 protein. Our data demonstrate that, in the presence of Mg2+, the hRad51-ATP-ssDNA filament is quickly converted to an inactive hRad51-ADP-ssDNA form, due to relatively rapid ATP hydrolysis and slow dissociation of ADP. Ca2+ maintains the active hRad51-ATP-ssDNA filament by reducing the ATP hydrolysis rate. These findings demonstrate a crucial role of the ATPase activity in regulation of DNA strand exchange activity of hRad51 protein. This mechanism of Rad51 protein regulation by modulating its ATPase activity is evolutionarily recent; we found no such mechanism for yeast Rad51 (yRad51) protein. PMID:15226506

  1. Production of a heterozygous mutant cell line by homologous recombination (single knockout).

    PubMed

    Mortensen, R

    2001-05-01

    Formerly UNIT 9.16, this unit takes a more appropriate place in Chapter 23, and has been updated and revised for this publication. Gene targeting by homologous recombination allows the introduction of specific mutations into any cloned gene. In this unit, the gene of interest is inactivated by interrupting its coding sequence with a positive selectable marker (e.g., neo). Expression of neo is obtained by including the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter in the construct. To enrich for clones in which the target gene has undergone homologous recombination over those in which random integration of the construct has occurred, a negative selectable marker, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK), is included in the construct outside the region of homology to the target gene. Depending upon the target gene, it may be easier to assemble the construct by adding the neo and TK genes to the cloned target gene or by adding two fragments of the target gene to a plasmid containing the neo and TK genes. PMID:18265206

  2. Unveiling novel RecO distant orthologues involved in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Marsin, Stéphanie; Mathieu, Aurélie; Kortulewski, Thierry; Guérois, Raphaël; Radicella, J Pablo

    2008-01-01

    The generation of a RecA filament on single-stranded DNA is a critical step in homologous recombination. Two main pathways leading to the formation of the nucleofilament have been identified in bacteria, based on the protein complexes mediating RecA loading: RecBCD (AddAB) and RecFOR. Many bacterial species seem to lack some of the components involved in these complexes. The current annotation of the Helicobacter pylori genome suggests that this highly diverse bacterial pathogen has a reduced set of recombination mediator proteins. While it is now clear that homologous recombination plays a critical role in generating H. pylori diversity by allowing genomic DNA rearrangements and integration through transformation of exogenous DNA into the chromosome, no complete mediator complex is deduced from the sequence of its genome. Here we show by bioinformatics analysis the presence of a RecO remote orthologue that allowed the identification of a new set of RecO proteins present in all bacterial species where a RecR but not RecO was previously identified. HpRecO shares less than 15% identity with previously characterized homologues. Genetic dissection of recombination pathways shows that this novel RecO and the remote RecB homologue present in H. pylori are functional in repair and in RecA-dependent intrachromosomal recombination, defining two initiation pathways with little overlap. We found, however, that neither RecOR nor RecB contributes to transformation, suggesting the presence of a third, specialized, RecA-dependent pathway responsible for the integration of transforming DNA into the chromosome of this naturally competent bacteria. These results provide insight into the mechanisms that this successful pathogen uses to generate genetic diversity and adapt to changing environments and new hosts. PMID:18670631

  3. Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Zheng, Yixian; Koshland, Douglas

    2010-08-27

    Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.

  4. Either Non-Homologous Ends Joining or Homologous Recombination Is Required to Repair Double-Strand Breaks in the Genome of Macrophage-Internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Klink, Magdalena; Brzezinska, Marta; Sulowska, Zofia; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs). These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ), in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA), NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD)], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA)]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages. PMID:24658131

  5. Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhucheng; Yang, Haijuan; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2008-07-08

    The RecA family of ATPases mediates homologous recombination, a reaction essential for maintaining genomic integrity and for generating genetic diversity. RecA, ATP and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) form a helical filament that binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), searches for homology, and then catalyses the exchange of the complementary strand, producing a new heteroduplex. Here we have solved the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli RecA-ssDNA and RecA-heteroduplex filaments. They show that ssDNA and ATP bind to RecA-RecA interfaces cooperatively, explaining the ATP dependency of DNA binding. The ATP {gamma}-phosphate is sensed across the RecA-RecA interface by two lysine residues that also stimulate ATP hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for DNA release. The DNA is underwound and stretched globally, but locally it adopts a B-DNA-like conformation that restricts the homology search to Watson-Crick-type base pairing. The complementary strand interacts primarily through base pairing, making heteroduplex formation strictly dependent on complementarity. The underwound, stretched filament conformation probably evolved to destabilize the donor duplex, freeing the complementary strand for homology sampling.

  6. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Audrey; Koch, Marc; Fischer, Benoit; Soutoglou, Evi

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR), a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1) is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) and Homologous Recombination (HR) repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerases (PARPs) TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation. PMID:26845027

  7. CDK-mediated RNF4 phosphorylation regulates homologous recombination in S-phase

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Kuntian; Deng, Min; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Chenming; Xu, Ziwen; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2015-01-01

    There are the two major pathways responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs): non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ operates throughout the cell-cycle, while HR is primarily active in the S/G2 phases suggesting that there are cell cycle-specific mechanisms that regulate the balance between NHEJ and HR. Here we reported that CDK2 could phosphorylate RNF4 on T26 and T112 and enhance RNF4 E3 ligase activity, which is important for MDC1 degradation and proper HR repair during S phase. Mutation of the RNF4 phosphorylation sites results in MDC1 stabilization, which in turn compromised HR during S-phase. These results suggest that in addition to drive cell cycle progression, CDK also targets RNF4, which is involved in the regulatory network of DSBs repair. PMID:25948581

  8. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zita; Kalousi, Alkmini; Furst, Audrey; Koch, Marc; Fischer, Benoit; Soutoglou, Evi

    2016-02-01

    DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR), a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1) is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) and Homologous Recombination (HR) repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerases (PARPs) TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation. PMID:26845027

  9. Complex in vivo Ligation Using Homologous Recombination and High-efficiency Plasmid Rescue from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Finnigan, Gregory C.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The protocols presented here allow for the facile generation of a wide variety of complex multipart DNA constructs (tagged gene products, gene fusions, chimeric proteins, and other variants) using homologous recombination and in vivo ligation in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). This method is straightforward, efficient and cost-effective, and can be used both for vector creation and for subsequent one-step, high frequency integration into a chromosomal locus in yeast. The procedure utilizes PCR with extended oligonucleotide “tails” of homology between multiple fragments to allow for reassembly in yeast in a single transformation followed by a method for highly efficient plasmid extraction from yeast (for transformation into bacteria). The latter is an improvement on existing methods of yeast plasmid extraction, which, historically, has been a limiting step in recovery of desired constructs. We describe the utility and convenience of our techniques, and provide several examples. PMID:26523287

  10. Homologous recombination and human health: the roles of BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Rohit; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Weiran; Jasin, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells, the defining step of which is homologous strand exchange directed by the RAD51 protein. The physiological importance of HR is underscored by the observation of genomic instability in HR-deficient cells and, importantly, the association of cancer predisposition and developmental defects with mutations in HR genes. The tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2, key players at different stages of HR, are frequently mutated in familial breast and ovarian cancers. Other HR proteins, including PALB2 and RAD51 paralogs, have also been identified as tumor suppressors. This review summarizes recent findings on BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins involved in human disease with an emphasis on their molecular roles and interactions. PMID:25833843

  11. Homologous recombination within the capsid gene of porcine circovirus type 2 subgroup viruses via natural co-infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies had reported homologous recombination between porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-group 1 (Gp1) and -group 2 (Gp2) viruses. Interestingly, the recombination events described thus far mapped either within the Rep gene sequences or the sequences flanking the Rep gene region. Previously, ...

  12. Construction of recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with bglS gene insertion into PEP4 locus by homologous recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Qi-he; Fu, Ming-liang; Wang, Jin-ling; Zhang, Hong-bo; He, Guo-qing

    2008-01-01

    The bglS gene encoding endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and sequenced in this study. The bglS expression cassette, including PGK1 promoter, bglS gene fused to the signal sequence of the yeast mating pheromone α-factor (MFα1S), and ADH1 terminator with G418-resistance as the selected marker, was constructed. Then one of the PEP4 allele of Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65 strain was replaced by bglS expression cassette using chromosomal integration of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated homologous recombination, and the bglS gene was expressed simultaneously. The recombinant strain S. cerevisiae (SC-βG) was preliminarily screened by the clearing hydrolysis zone formed after the barley β-glucan was hydrolyzed in the plate and no proteinase A (PrA) activity was measured in fermenting liquor. The results of PCR analysis of genome DNA showed that one of the PEP4 allele had been replaced and bglS gene had been inserted into the locus of PEP4 gene in recombinant strains. Different endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase assay methods showed that the recombinant strain SC-βG had high endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase expression level with the maximum of 69.3 U/(h·ml) after 60 h of incubation. Meanwhile, the Congo Red method was suitable for the determination of endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase activity during the actual brewing process. The current research implies that the constructed yeast strain could be utilized to improve the industrial brewing property of beer. PMID:18600782

  13. Generation of E3-deleted canine adenoviruses expressing canine parvovirus capsid by homologous recombination in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Mark D; Reid, Dorothy; Onions, David; Spibey, Norman; Nicolson, Lesley

    2002-02-01

    E3-deleted canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1) was generated by homologous recombination in bacterial cells, using an antibiotic resistance marker to facilitate the recovery of recombinants. This marker was flanked by unique restriction endonuclease sites, which allowed its subsequent removal and the insertion of cassettes expressing the canine parvovirus capsid at the E3 locus. Infectious virus was recovered following transfection of canine cells and capsid expression was observed by RT-PCR from one of the virus constructs. A second construct, containing a different promoter, showed delayed growth and genome instability which, based on the size difference between these inserts, suggests a maximum packaging size of 106 to 109% wild-type genome size for CAV-1. PMID:11853396

  14. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis.

    PubMed

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia; Altmannova, Veronika; Sebesta, Marek; Pacesa, Martin; Fugger, Kasper; Sorensen, Claus Storgaard; Lee, Marietta Y W T; Haracska, Lajos; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-20

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during recombination events in a PCNA interaction-dependent way but independently of its UvrD-like helicase domain. In accordance, we demonstrate that PARI inhibits HR in vivo, and its knockdown suppresses the UV sensitivity of RAD18-depleted cells. Our data reveal a novel human regulatory mechanism that limits the extent of HR and represents a new potential target for anticancer therapy.

  15. Homologous recombination induced by doxazosin mesylate and saw palmetto in the Drosophila wing-spot test.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Katiane Cella; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Lehmann, Mauricio; Reguly, Maria Luiza; Richter, Marc François; Andrade, Heloisa Helena Rodrigues de

    2013-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common tumor in men over 40 years of age. Acute urinary retention (AUR) is regarded as the most serious hazard of untreated BPH. α-Blockers, such as doxazosin mesylate, and 5-α reductase inhibitors, such as finasteride, are frequently used because they decrease both AUR and the need for BPH-related surgery. An extract of the fruit from American saw palmetto plant has also been used as an alternative treatment for BPH. The paucity of information available concerning the genotoxic action of these compounds led us to assess their activity as inducers of different types of DNA lesions using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster. Finasteride did not induce gene mutation, chromosomal mutation or mitotic recombination, which means it was nongenotoxic in our experimental conditions. On the other hand, doxazosin mesylate and saw palmetto induced significant increases in spot frequencies in trans-heterozygous flies. In order to establish the actual role played by mitotic recombination and by mutation in the genotoxicity observed, the balancer-heterozygous flies were also analyzed, showing no increment in the total spot frequencies in relation to the negative control, for both drugs. Doxazosin mesylate and saw palmetto were classified as specific inducers of homologous recombination in Drosophila proliferative cells, an event linked to the loss of heterozygosity.

  16. SimBac: simulation of whole bacterial genomes with homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas; Didelot, Xavier; Wilson, Daniel J.; De Maio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can exchange genetic material, or acquire genes found in the environment. This process, generally known as bacterial recombination, can have a strong impact on the evolution and phenotype of bacteria, for example causing the spread of antibiotic resistance across clades and species, but can also disrupt phylogenetic and transmission inferences. With the increasing affordability of whole genome sequencing, the need has emerged for an efficient simulator of bacterial evolution to test and compare methods for phylogenetic and population genetic inference, and for simulation-based estimation. We present SimBac, a whole-genome bacterial evolution simulator that is roughly two orders of magnitude faster than previous software and includes a more general model of bacterial evolution, allowing both within- and between-species homologous recombination. Since methods modelling bacterial recombination generally focus on only one of these two modes of recombination, the possibility to simulate both allows for a general and fair benchmarking. SimBac is available from https://github.com/tbrown91/SimBac and is distributed as open source under the terms of the GNU General Public Licence.

  17. Efficient chromosomal gene modification with CRISPR/cas9 and PCR-based homologous recombination donors in cultured Drosophila cells.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Romy; Hollmann, Manuel; Merk, Karin; Nitschko, Volker; Obermaier, Christina; Philippou-Massier, Julia; Wieland, Isabella; Gaul, Ulrike; Förstemann, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    The ability to edit the genome is essential for many state-of-the-art experimental paradigms. Since DNA breaks stimulate repair, they can be exploited to target site-specific integration. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/cas9 system from Streptococcus pyogenes has been harnessed into an efficient and programmable nuclease for eukaryotic cells. We thus combined DNA cleavage by cas9, the generation of homologous recombination donors by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and transient depletion of the non-homologous end joining factor lig4. Using cultured Drosophila melanogaster S2-cells and the phosphoglycerate kinase gene as a model, we reached targeted integration frequencies of up to 50% in drug-selected cell populations. Homology arms as short as 29 nt appended to the PCR primer resulted in detectable integration, slightly longer extensions are beneficial. We confirmed established rules for S. pyogenes cas9 sgRNA design and demonstrate that the complementarity region allows length variation and 5'-extensions. This enables generation of U6-promoter fusion templates by overlap-extension PCR with a standardized protocol. We present a series of PCR template vectors for C-terminal protein tagging and clonal Drosophila S2 cell lines with stable expression of a myc-tagged cas9 protein. The system can be used for epitope tagging or reporter gene knock-ins in an experimental setup that can in principle be fully automated.

  18. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Northall, Sarah J.; Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into homologous duplex DNA forming “Displacement loops” (D-loops), a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR), which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing. PMID:27548227

  19. The MMS22L-TONSL complex mediates recovery from replication stress and homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Lara; Panier, Stephanie; Wildenhain, Jan; Tkach, Johnny M.; Al-Hakim, Abdallah; Landry, Marie-Claude; Escribano-Diaz, Cristina; Szilard, Rachel K.; Young, Jordan T. F.; Munro, Meagan; Canny, Marella D.; Kolas, Nadine K.; Zhang, Wei; Harding, Shane M.; Ylanko, Jarkko; Mendez, Megan; Mullin, Michael; Sun, Thomas; Habermann, Bianca; Datti, Alessandro; Bristow, Robert G.; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Tyers, Michael D.; Brown, Grant W.; Durocher, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Summary Genome integrity is jeopardized each time DNA replication forks stall or collapse. Here, we report the identification of a complex composed of MMS22L (C6ORF167) and TONSL (NFKBIL2) that participates in the recovery from replication stress. MMS22L and TONSL are homologous to yeast Mms22 and plant Tonsoku/Brushy1, respectively. MMS22L-TONSL accumulates at regions of ssDNA associated with distressed replication forks or at processed DNA breaks, and its depletion results in high levels of endogenous DNA double-strand breaks caused by an inability to complete DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse. Moreover, cells depleted of MMS22L are highly sensitive to camptothecin, a topoisomerase I poison that impairs DNA replication progression. Finally, MMS22L and TONSL are necessary for the efficient formation of RAD51 foci after DNA damage and their depletion impairs homologous recombination. These results indicate that MMS22L and TONSL are genome caretakers that stimulate the recombination-dependent repair of stalled or collapsed replication forks. PMID:21055983

  20. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis.

    PubMed

    Northall, Sarah J; Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L

    2016-01-01

    Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into homologous duplex DNA forming "Displacement loops" (D-loops), a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR), which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing. PMID:27548227

  1. Deficiency in Homologous Recombination Renders Mammalian Cells More Sensitive to Proton Versus Photon Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Nicole; Fontana, Andrea O.; Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony; Coray, Adolf; Augsburger, Marc; Paganetti, Harald; Sartori, Alessandro A.; Pruschy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of the 2 major DNA repair machineries on cellular survival in response to irradiation with the 2 types of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The DNA repair and cell survival endpoints in wild-type, homologous recombination (HR)-deficient, and nonhomologous end-joining-deficient cells were analyzed after irradiation with clinically relevant, low-linear energy transfer (LET) protons and 200-keV photons. Results: All cell lines were more sensitive to proton irradiation compared with photon irradiation, despite no differences in the induction of DNA breaks. Interestingly, HR-deficient cells and wild-type cells with small interfering RNA-down-regulated Rad51 were markedly hypersensitive to proton irradiation, resulting in an increased relative biological effectiveness in comparison with the relative biological effectiveness determined in wild-type cells. In contrast, lack of nonhomologous end-joining did not result in hypersensitivity toward proton irradiation. Repair kinetics of DNA damage in wild-type cells were equal after both types of irradiation, although proton irradiation resulted in more lethal chromosomal aberrations. Finally, repair kinetics in HR-deficient cells were significantly delayed after proton irradiation, with elevated amounts of residual γH2AX foci after irradiation. Conclusion: Our data indicate a differential quality of DNA damage by proton versus photon irradiation, with a specific requirement for homologous recombination for DNA repair and enhanced cell survival. This has potential relevance for clinical stratification of patients carrying mutations in the DNA damage response pathways.

  2. XRCC3 is essential for proper double-strand break repair and homologous recombination in rice meiosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingwei; Wang, Mo; Tang, Ding; Li, Yafei; Xu, Meng; Gu, Minghong; Cheng, Zhukuan; Yu, Hengxiu

    2015-09-01

    RAD51 paralogues play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, which promote homologous pairing and strand exchange reactions in organisms ranging from yeast to vertebrates. XRCC3, a RAD51 paralogue, has been characterized in budding yeast, mouse, and Arabidopsis. In the present study, XRCC3 in rice was identified and characterized. The rice xrcc3 mutant exhibited normal vegetative growth but complete male and female sterility. Cytological investigations revealed that homologous pairing and synapsis were severely disrupted in the mutant. Meiotic chromosomes were frequently entangled from diplotene to metaphase I, resulting in chromosome fragmentation at anaphase I. The immunostaining signals from γH2AX were regular, implying that double-strand break (DSB) formation was normal in xrcc3 meiocytes. However, COM1 was not detected on early prophase I chromosomes, suggesting that the DSB end-processing system was destroyed in the mutant. Moreover, abnormal chromosome localization of RAD51C, DMC1, ZEP1, ZIP4, and MER3 was observed in xrcc3. Taken together, the results suggest that XRCC3 plays critical roles in both DSB repair and homologous chromosome recombination during rice meiosis. PMID:26034131

  3. XRCC3 is essential for proper double-strand break repair and homologous recombination in rice meiosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingwei; Wang, Mo; Tang, Ding; Li, Yafei; Xu, Meng; Gu, Minghong; Cheng, Zhukuan; Yu, Hengxiu

    2015-09-01

    RAD51 paralogues play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, which promote homologous pairing and strand exchange reactions in organisms ranging from yeast to vertebrates. XRCC3, a RAD51 paralogue, has been characterized in budding yeast, mouse, and Arabidopsis. In the present study, XRCC3 in rice was identified and characterized. The rice xrcc3 mutant exhibited normal vegetative growth but complete male and female sterility. Cytological investigations revealed that homologous pairing and synapsis were severely disrupted in the mutant. Meiotic chromosomes were frequently entangled from diplotene to metaphase I, resulting in chromosome fragmentation at anaphase I. The immunostaining signals from γH2AX were regular, implying that double-strand break (DSB) formation was normal in xrcc3 meiocytes. However, COM1 was not detected on early prophase I chromosomes, suggesting that the DSB end-processing system was destroyed in the mutant. Moreover, abnormal chromosome localization of RAD51C, DMC1, ZEP1, ZIP4, and MER3 was observed in xrcc3. Taken together, the results suggest that XRCC3 plays critical roles in both DSB repair and homologous chromosome recombination during rice meiosis.

  4. Involvement of single-stranded tails in homologous recombination of DNA injected into Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Maryon, E; Carroll, D

    1991-01-01

    Homologous recombination of DNA molecules injected into Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei is extremely efficient when those molecules are linear and have overlapping homologous ends. It was previously shown that a 5'----3' exonuclease activity in oocytes attacks injected linear DNAs and leaves them with single-stranded 3' tails. We tested the hypothesis that such tailed molecules are early intermediates on the pathway to recombination products. Substrates with 3' tails were made in vitro and injected into oocytes, where they recombined rapidly and efficiently. In experiments with mixed substrates, molecules with 3' tails entered recombination intermediates and products more rapidly than did molecules with flush ends. Molecules endowed in vitro with 5' tails also recombined efficiently in oocytes, but their rate was not faster than for flush-ended substrates. In most cases, the 5' tails served as templates for resynthesis of the 3' strands, regenerating duplex ends which then entered the normal recombination pathway. In oocytes from one animal, some of the 5' tails were removed, and this was exacerbated when resynthesis was partially blocked. Analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of recombination intermediates from 5'-tailed substrates confirmed that they had acquired 3' tails as a result of the action of the 5'----3' exonuclease. These results demonstrate that homologous recombination in oocytes proceeds via a pathway that involves single-stranded 3' tails. Molecular models incorporating this feature are discussed. Images PMID:2038330

  5. Recombination of homologous DNA fragments transfected into mammalian cells occurs predominantly by terminal pairing.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R A; Eliason, S L

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism by which double-strand cleavages stimulate the joining of plasmid DNA fragments introduced into cultured mammalian cells was investigated by cotransfecting pairs of plasmids encoding deletion mutations in a dominant selectable gene into LMtk- cells. Plasmid recombination substrates were produced by creating deletions of different sizes within the neo coding region of the pSV2neo plasmid. Complementing pairs of deleted plasmid DNAs were linearized at specific unique sites before cotransfection into mouse LMtk- cells by the calcium phosphate precipitation method. Cleaving one donor plasmid produced a 4- to 10-fold stimulation in the production of colonies able to survive in medium containing G-418. The linearization of the second plasmid further increased the efficiency by another factor of 6 to 15 when the cut was made on the opposite side of the homology, approximately equidistant from the center of the overlap. Fifty-seven individual G-418-resistant colonies representing the products of individual crosses were isolated, and the genomic DNAs containing the presumably integrated, functional recombinant neo genes were analyzed on Southern blots. A band consistent with the exchange of markers flanking the neo gene was present in 90% of the DNAs examined. In only one case was the pattern indicative of either a double crossover or a gene conversion event. These results support the idea that homologous extrachromosomal DNA fragments are joined through annealing of overlapping single-stranded ends. This DNA-joining phenomenon may represent the activity of cellular DNA repair enzymes; its relationship to genetic recombination occurring at the chromosomal level remains to be determined. Images PMID:3023971

  6. RSC facilitates Rad59-dependent homologous recombination between sister chromatids by promoting cohesin loading at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Oum, Ji-Hyun; Seong, Changhyun; Kwon, Youngho; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Sid, Amy; Ramakrishnan, Sreejith; Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Lee, Sang Eun; Shim, Eun Yong

    2011-10-01

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks by searching for, invading, and copying information from a homologous template, typically the homologous chromosome or sister chromatid. Tight wrapping of DNA around histone octamers, however, impedes access of repair proteins to DNA damage. To facilitate DNA repair, modifications of histones and energy-dependent remodeling of chromatin are required, but the precise mechanisms by which chromatin modification and remodeling enzymes contribute to homologous DNA repair are unknown. Here we have systematically assessed the role of budding yeast RSC (remodel structure of chromatin), an abundant, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, in the cellular response to spontaneous and induced DNA damage. RSC physically interacts with the recombination protein Rad59 and functions in homologous recombination. Multiple recombination assays revealed that RSC is uniquely required for recombination between sister chromatids by virtue of its ability to recruit cohesin at DNA breaks and thereby promoting sister chromatid cohesion. This study provides molecular insights into how chromatin remodeling contributes to DNA repair and maintenance of chromatin fidelity in the face of DNA damage.

  7. A Dominant Mutation in Human RAD51 Reveals Its Function in DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair Independent of Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anderson T; Kim, Taeho; Wagner, John E; Conti, Brooke A; Lach, Francis P; Huang, Athena L; Molina, Henrik; Sanborn, Erica M; Zierhut, Heather; Cornes, Belinda K; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sougnez, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B; Auerbach, Arleen D; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-08-01

    Repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks requires action of multiple DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination. Here, we report a de novo heterozygous T131P mutation in RAD51/FANCR, the key recombinase essential for homologous recombination, in a patient with Fanconi anemia-like phenotype. In vitro, RAD51-T131P displays DNA-independent ATPase activity, no DNA pairing capacity, and a co-dominant-negative effect on RAD51 recombinase function. However, the patient cells are homologous recombination proficient due to the low ratio of mutant to wild-type RAD51 in cells. Instead, patient cells are sensitive to crosslinking agents and display hyperphosphorylation of Replication Protein A due to increased activity of DNA2 and WRN at the DNA interstrand crosslinks. Thus, proper RAD51 function is important during DNA interstrand crosslink repair outside of homologous recombination. Our study provides a molecular basis for how RAD51 and its associated factors may operate in a homologous recombination-independent manner to maintain genomic integrity. PMID:26253028

  8. Integrated Mimicry of B Cell Antibody Mutagenesis Using Yeast Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wittrup, K. Dane

    2014-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation proceeds in vivo via a combination of point mutations, insertions, deletions, and combinatorial shuffling of light chains or portions of the heavy chain, thereby reducing the probability of trapping in local affinity optima in sequence space. In vivo homologous recombination in yeast can be exploited to mimic the broad spectrum of mutational types deployed by B cells, incorporating both receptor revision and receptor editing together with polymerase-directed point mutagenesis. This method was used to effect a 10,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-peptide single-chain antibody in three rounds of mutagenesis and screening, and a 1,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-protein single-chain antibody in a single round. When recombinational mutagenesis (CDR or chain shuffling) was directly compared to error-prone PCR, the recombinational approach yielded greater affinity improvement with substantially reduced divergence from germline sequences, demonstrating an advantage of simultaneously testing a broad range of mutational strategies. PMID:20645027

  9. Integrated mimicry of B cell antibody mutagenesis using yeast homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Swers, Jeffrey S; Yeung, Yik A; Wittrup, K Dane

    2011-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation proceeds in vivo via a combination of point mutations, insertions, deletions, and combinatorial shuffling of light chains or portions of the heavy chain, thereby reducing the probability of trapping in local affinity optima in sequence space. In vivo homologous recombination in yeast can be exploited to mimic the broad spectrum of mutational types deployed by B cells, incorporating both receptor revision and receptor editing together with polymerase-directed point mutagenesis. This method was used to effect a 10,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-peptide single-chain antibody in three rounds of mutagenesis and screening, and a 1,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-protein single-chain antibody in a single round. When recombinational mutagenesis (CDR or chain shuffling) was directly compared to error-prone PCR, the recombinational approach yielded greater affinity improvement with substantially reduced divergence from germline sequences, demonstrating an advantage of simultaneously testing a broad range of mutational strategies.

  10. Qualitative and Quantitative Assays of Transposition and Homologous Recombination of the Retrotransposon Tf1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sangesland, Maya; Atwood-Moore, Angela; Rai, Sudhir K; Levin, Henry L

    2016-01-01

    Transposition and homologous recombination assays are valuable genetic tools to measure the production and integration of cDNA from the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon Tf1 in the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Here we describe two genetic assays, one that measures the transposition activity of Tf1 by monitoring the mobility of a drug resistance marked Tf1 element expressed from a multi-copy plasmid and another assay that measures homologous recombination between Tf1 cDNA and the expression plasmid. While the transposition assay measures insertion of full-length Tf1 cDNA mediated by the transposon integrase, the homologous recombination assay measures levels of cDNA present in the nucleus and is independent of integrase activity. Combined, these assays can be used to systematically screen large collections of strains to identify mutations that specifically inhibit the integration step in the retroelement life cycle. Such mutations can be identified because they reduce transposition activity but nevertheless have wild-type frequencies of homologous recombination. Qualitative assays of yeast patches on agar plates detect large defects in integration and recombination, while the quantitative approach provides a precise method of determining integration and recombination frequencies.

  11. Recombination system for storage batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, B.; Ledjeff, K.; Winsel, A.

    1983-03-29

    A recombination system for catalytic oxidation of hydrogen in storage battery gases includes a gas supply duct which makes it possible for the combustible gas flowing through it to aspirate from the ambient the necessary combustion air, following the principle of a bunsen burner, and to entrain it to the recombination catalyst. In case of over-supply of gas, an acid separator positioned in the gas supply pipe counteracts the gas aspiration by means of its flow impedance and thereby makes the recombination system safe from overload. It can also be connected following a conventional recombiner, thereby increasing its effectiveness, by receiving the excess hydrogen from same and reacting it with the aid of the air aspiration.

  12. Frequent Homologous Recombination Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE/PPE Multigene Families: Potential Role in Antigenic Variability▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Karboul, Anis; Mazza, Alberto; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Ho, John L.; Brousseau, Roland; Mardassi, Helmi

    2008-01-01

    The PE and PPE (PE/PPE) multigene families of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are particularly GC-rich and share extensive homologous repetitive sequences. We hypothesized that they may undergo homologous recombination events, a mechanism rarely described in the natural evolution of mycobacteria. To test our hypothesis, we developed a specific oligonucleotide-based microarray targeting nearly all of the PE/PPE genes, aimed at detecting signals for homologous recombination. Such a microarray has never before been reported due to the multiplicity and highly repetitive and homologous nature of these sequences. Application of the microarray to a collection of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates (n = 33) representing prevalent spoligotype strain families in Tunisia allowed successful detection of six deleted genomic regions involving a total of two PE and seven PPE genes. Some of these deleted genes are known to be immunodominant or involved in virulence. The four precisely determined deletions were flanked by 400- to 500-bp stretches of nearly identical sequences lying mainly at the conserved N-terminal region of the PE/PPE genes. These highly homologous sequences thus serve as substrates to mediate both intergenic and intragenic homologous recombination events, indicating an important function in generating strain variation. Importantly, all recombination events yielded a new in-frame fusion chimeric gene. Hence, homologous recombination within and between PE/PPE genes likely increased their antigenic variability, which may have profound implications in pathogenicity and/or host adaptation. The finding of high prevalence (∼45% and ∼58%) for at least two of the genomic deletions suggests that they likely confer advantageous biological attributes. PMID:18820012

  13. Ectopic recombination within homologous immunoglobulin mu gene constant regions in a mouse hybridoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M D; Read, L R

    1992-01-01

    We have transferred a pSV2neo vector containing the wild-type constant region of the immunoglobulin mu gene (C mu) into the mutant hybridoma igm482, which bears a 2-bp deletion in the third constant-region exon of its haploid chromosomal mu gene (C mu 3). Independent igm482 transformants contain the wild-type immunoglobulin C mu region stably integrated in ectopic chromosomal positions. We report here that the wild-type immunoglobulin C mu region can function as the donor sequence in a gene conversion event which corrects the 2-bp deletion in the mutant igm482 chromosomal C mu 3 exon. The homologous recombination event restores normal immunoglobulin M production in the mutant cell. Images PMID:1406631

  14. Nap1 stimulates homologous recombination by RAD51 and RAD54 in higher-ordered chromatin containing histone H1.

    PubMed

    Machida, Shinichi; Takaku, Motoki; Ikura, Masae; Sun, Jiying; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kobayashi, Wataru; Kinomura, Aiko; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Horikoshi, Yasunori; Fukuto, Atsuhiko; Matsuda, Ryo; Ura, Kiyoe; Tashiro, Satoshi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination plays essential roles in mitotic DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and meiotic genetic recombination. In eukaryotes, RAD51 promotes the central homologous-pairing step during homologous recombination, but is not sufficient to overcome the reaction barrier imposed by nucleosomes. RAD54, a member of the ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling factor family, is required to promote the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing in nucleosomal DNA. In higher eukaryotes, most nucleosomes form higher-ordered chromatin containing the linker histone H1. However, the mechanism by which RAD51/RAD54-mediated homologous pairing occurs in higher-ordered chromatin has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that a histone chaperone, Nap1, accumulates on DSB sites in human cells, and DSB repair is substantially decreased in Nap1-knockdown cells. We determined that Nap1 binds to RAD54, enhances the RAD54-mediated nucleosome remodeling by evicting histone H1, and eventually stimulates the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing in higher-ordered chromatin containing histone H1. PMID:24798879

  15. Biochemical analysis of the human ENA/VASP-family proteins, MENA, VASP and EVL, in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Takaku, Motoki; Ueno, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    MENA, VASP and EVL are members of the ENA/VASP family of proteins and are involved in cytoplasmic actin remodeling. Previously, we found that EVL directly interacts with RAD51, an essential protein in the homologous recombinational repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stimulates the RAD51-mediated recombination reactions in vitro. The EVL-knockdown MCF7 cells exhibited a clear reduction in RAD51-foci formation, suggesting that EVL may function in the DSB repair pathway through RAD51-mediated homologous recombination. However, the DSB repair defects were less significant in the EVL-knockdown cells, implying that two EVL paralogues, MENA and VASP, may complement the EVL function in human cells. Therefore, in the present study, we purified human MENA, VASP and EVL as recombinant proteins, and compared their biochemical activities in vitro. We found that all three proteins commonly exhibited the RAD51 binding, DNA binding and DNA-annealing activities. Stimulation of the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing was also observed with all three proteins. In addition, surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that MENA, VASP and EVL mutually interacted. These results support the ideas that the ENA/VASP-family proteins are functionally redundant in homologous recombination, and that all three may be involved in the DSB repair pathway in humans.

  16. A heteromeric protein that binds to a meiotic homologous recombination hot spot: correlation of binding and hot spot activity.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Smith, G R

    1994-07-15

    Homologous recombination hot spots are DNA sites that increase the frequency of recombination in their vicinity. The M26 allele of the ade6 gene in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is the first meiotic hot spot with an identified unique nucleotide sequence. We have purified 40,000-fold a heteromeric protein, containing polypeptides Mts1 (70 kD) and Mts2 (28 kD), that binds to the M26 site. Binding in vitro strictly correlates with hot spot activity in vivo for numerous single base pair substitutions in the vicinity of the M26 site, indicating that Mts1/Mts2 activates the M26 site and promotes a rate-limiting step of meiotic recombination. These and other data suggest that homologous recombination may be regulated primarily by discrete DNA sites and proteins that interact with those sites. PMID:7958849

  17. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  18. A role for human homologous recombination factors in suppressing microhomology-mediated end joining

    PubMed Central

    Ahrabi, Sara; Sarkar, Sovan; Pfister, Sophia X.; Pirovano, Giacomo; Higgins, Geoff S.; Porter, Andrew C.G.; Humphrey, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are toxic lesions, which if improperly repaired can result in cell death or genomic instability. DSB repair is usually facilitated by the classical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ), or homologous recombination (HR) pathways. However, a mutagenic alternative NHEJ pathway, microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ), can also be deployed. While MMEJ is suppressed by C-NHEJ, the relationship between HR and MMEJ is less clear. Here, we describe a role for HR genes in suppressing MMEJ in human cells. By monitoring DSB mis-repair using a sensitive HPRT assay, we found that depletion of HR proteins, including BRCA2, BRCA1 or RPA, resulted in a distinct mutational signature associated with significant increases in break-induced mutation frequencies, deletion lengths and the annealing of short regions of microhomology (2–6 bp) across the break-site. This signature was dependent on CtIP, MRE11, POLQ and PARP, and thus indicative of MMEJ. In contrast to CtIP or MRE11, depletion of BRCA1 resulted in increased partial resection and MMEJ, thus revealing a functional distinction between these early acting HR factors. Together these findings indicate that HR factors suppress mutagenic MMEJ following DSB resection. PMID:27131361

  19. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G.; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival. PMID:25712090

  20. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and {gamma}-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  1. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-03-11

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival.

  2. Promotion of Homologous Recombination by SWS-1 in Complex with RAD-51 Paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    McClendon, T Brooke; Sullivan, Meghan R; Bernstein, Kara A; Yanowitz, Judith L

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs cytotoxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with high fidelity. Deficiencies in HR result in genome instability. A key early step in HR is the search for and invasion of a homologous DNA template by a single-stranded RAD-51 nucleoprotein filament. The Shu complex, composed of a SWIM domain-containing protein and its interacting RAD51 paralogs, promotes HR by regulating RAD51 filament dynamics. Despite Shu complex orthologs throughout eukaryotes, our understanding of its function has been most extensively characterized in budding yeast. Evolutionary analysis of the SWIM domain identified Caenorhabditis elegans sws-1 as a putative homolog of the yeast Shu complex member Shu2. Using a CRISPR-induced nonsense allele of sws-1, we show that sws-1 promotes HR in mitotic and meiotic nuclei. sws-1 mutants exhibit sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and fail to form mitotic RAD-51 foci following treatment with camptothecin. Phenotypic similarities between sws-1 and the two RAD-51 paralogs rfs-1 and rip-1 suggest that they function together. Indeed, we detect direct interaction between SWS-1 and RIP-1 by yeast two-hybrid assay that is mediated by the SWIM domain in SWS-1 and the Walker B motif in RIP-1 Furthermore, RIP-1 bridges an interaction between SWS-1 and RFS-1, suggesting that RIP-1 facilitates complex formation with SWS-1 and RFS-1 We propose that SWS-1, RIP-1, and RFS-1 compose a C. elegans Shu complex. Our work provides a new model for studying Shu complex disruption in the context of a multicellular organism that has important implications as to why mutations in the human RAD51 paralogs are associated with genome instability.

  3. Promotion of Homologous Recombination by SWS-1 in Complex with RAD-51 Paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    McClendon, T Brooke; Sullivan, Meghan R; Bernstein, Kara A; Yanowitz, Judith L

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs cytotoxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with high fidelity. Deficiencies in HR result in genome instability. A key early step in HR is the search for and invasion of a homologous DNA template by a single-stranded RAD-51 nucleoprotein filament. The Shu complex, composed of a SWIM domain-containing protein and its interacting RAD51 paralogs, promotes HR by regulating RAD51 filament dynamics. Despite Shu complex orthologs throughout eukaryotes, our understanding of its function has been most extensively characterized in budding yeast. Evolutionary analysis of the SWIM domain identified Caenorhabditis elegans sws-1 as a putative homolog of the yeast Shu complex member Shu2. Using a CRISPR-induced nonsense allele of sws-1, we show that sws-1 promotes HR in mitotic and meiotic nuclei. sws-1 mutants exhibit sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and fail to form mitotic RAD-51 foci following treatment with camptothecin. Phenotypic similarities between sws-1 and the two RAD-51 paralogs rfs-1 and rip-1 suggest that they function together. Indeed, we detect direct interaction between SWS-1 and RIP-1 by yeast two-hybrid assay that is mediated by the SWIM domain in SWS-1 and the Walker B motif in RIP-1 Furthermore, RIP-1 bridges an interaction between SWS-1 and RFS-1, suggesting that RIP-1 facilitates complex formation with SWS-1 and RFS-1 We propose that SWS-1, RIP-1, and RFS-1 compose a C. elegans Shu complex. Our work provides a new model for studying Shu complex disruption in the context of a multicellular organism that has important implications as to why mutations in the human RAD51 paralogs are associated with genome instability. PMID:26936927

  4. A dominant-negative pleiotrophin mutant introduced by homologous recombination leads to germ-cell apoptosis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Yeh, H J; Zhong, R; Li, Y S; Deuel, T F

    1999-06-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an 18-kDa heparin-binding secretory growth/differentiation factor for different cell types. Its gene is differentially expressed in both mesenchyme and central nervous system during development and highly expressed in a number of different human tumors. Recently, a PTN mutant was found to act as a dominant-negative effector of PTN signaling. We have now used homologous recombination to introduce the dominant-negative PTN mutant into embryonic stem cells to generate chimeric mice. All highly chimeric male mice with germinal epithelium exclusively derived from embryonic stem cells with the heterologous PTN mutation were sterile. Their testes were uniformly atrophic, and the spermatocytes were strikingly apoptotic at all stages of development. The results support a central role of PTN signaling in normal spermatogenesis and suggest that interruption of PTN signaling may lead to sterility in males.

  5. Molecular evidence that homologous recombination occurs in proliferating human somatic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Groden, J; Nakamura, Y; German, J

    1990-01-01

    A strategy has been developed to detect and characterize certain heritable genomic alterations that occur as cells proliferate in vitro. Multiple subclones of cells were isolated from two clonal lymphoblastoid cell lines--one from a boy with Bloom's syndrome (BS), a cancer-predisposing condition known to feature excessive somatic mutation, the other from a normal man. The DNAs from the cell lines were hybridized to a panel of probes that can detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms, and the patterns of polymorphism in the primary clones were compared with that in each of the secondary clones. In one of the BS secondary clones three loci, positioned distally on the long arm of chromosome 3 and that are heterozygous in the donor and all other cell lines derived from the primary clone, had lost heterozygosity and apparently had become homozygous; in contrast, heterozygous loci more proximal on 3q had retained their heterozygosity, as had those on 3p. Taking into account the pattern of chromosome instability uniquely characteristic of BS, the most plausible explanation for the alterations in the altered clone is that somatic recombination had occurred in vitro, via homologous chromatid interchange. Such spontaneous recombinational events in nonneoplastic, nonmutagenized cells may contribute to the high cancer incidence in BS and, by analogy, to cancer that arises in the general population. Images PMID:1971948

  6. Genome-Wide Demethylation Promotes Triplet Repeat Instability Independently of Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Vincent; Lin, Yunfu; Price, Brandee A.; Fyffe, Sharyl L.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Wilson, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat instability is intrinsic to a family of human neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanism leading to repeat length variation is unclear. We previously showed that treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) dramatically increases triplet repeat instability in mammalian cells. Based on previous reports that demethylation increases homologous recombination (HR), and our own observations that HR destabilizes triplet repeats, we hypothesized that demethylation alters repeat stability by stimulating HR. Here, we test that hypothesis at the Aprt (adenosine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus in CHO cells, where CpG demethylation and HR have both been shown to increase CAG repeat instability. We find that the rate of HR at the Aprt locus is not altered by demethylation. The spectrum of recombinants, however, was shifted from the usual 6:1 ratio of conversions to crossovers to more equal proportions in 5-aza-CdR-treated cells. The subtle influences of demethylation on HR at the Aprt locus are not sufficient to account for its dramatic effects on repeat instability. We conclude that 5-aza-CdR promotes triplet repeat instability independently of HR. PMID:18083071

  7. A barrier to homologous recombination between sympatric strains of the cooperative soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Wielgoss, Sébastien; Didelot, Xavier; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Liu, Xuan; Weedall, Gareth D; Velicer, Gregory J; Vos, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Myxococcus xanthus glides through soil in search of prey microbes, but when food sources run out, cells cooperatively construct and sporulate within multicellular fruiting bodies. M. xanthus strains isolated from a 16 × 16-cm-scale patch of soil were previously shown to have diversified into many distinct compatibility types that are distinguished by the failure of swarming colonies to merge upon encounter. We sequenced the genomes of 22 isolates from this population belonging to the two most frequently occurring multilocus sequence type (MLST) clades to trace patterns of incipient genomic divergence, specifically related to social divergence. Although homologous recombination occurs frequently within the two MLST clades, we find an almost complete absence of recombination events between them. As the two clades are very closely related and live in sympatry, either ecological or genetic barriers must reduce genetic exchange between them. We find that the rate of change in the accessory genome is greater than the rate of amino-acid substitution in the core genome. We identify a large genomic tract that consistently differs between isolates that do not freely merge and therefore is a candidate region for harbouring gene(s) responsible for self/non-self discrimination. PMID:27046334

  8. Homologous-recombination-deficient tumours are dependent on Polθ-mediated repair.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Raphael; Liu, Jessica C; Amunugama, Ravindra; Hajdu, Ildiko; Primack, Benjamin; Petalcorin, Mark I R; O'Connor, Kevin W; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Elledge, Stephen J; Boulton, Simon J; Yusufzai, Timur; D'Andrea, Alan D

    2015-02-12

    Large-scale genomic studies have shown that half of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) have alterations in genes regulating homologous recombination (HR) repair. Loss of HR accounts for the genomic instability of EOCs and for their cellular hyper-dependence on alternative poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP)-mediated DNA repair mechanisms. Previous studies have implicated the DNA polymerase θ (Polθ also known as POLQ, encoded by POLQ) in a pathway required for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, referred to as the error-prone microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) pathway. Whether Polθ interacts with canonical DNA repair pathways to prevent genomic instability remains unknown. Here we report an inverse correlation between HR activity and Polθ expression in EOCs. Knockdown of Polθ in HR-proficient cells upregulates HR activity and RAD51 nucleofilament assembly, while knockdown of Polθ in HR-deficient EOCs enhances cell death. Consistent with these results, genetic inactivation of an HR gene (Fancd2) and Polq in mice results in embryonic lethality. Moreover, Polθ contains RAD51 binding motifs and it blocks RAD51-mediated recombination. Our results reveal a synthetic lethal relationship between the HR pathway and Polθ-mediated repair in EOCs, and identify Polθ as a novel druggable target for cancer therapy.

  9. Population Genetic Analysis of Streptomyces albidoflavus Reveals Habitat Barriers to Homologous Recombination in the Diversification of Streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kun; Rong, Xiaoying; Pinto-Tomás, Adrián A.; Fernández-Villalobos, Marcela; Murillo-Cruz, Catalina

    2014-01-01

    Examining the population structure and the influence of recombination and ecology on microbial populations makes great sense for understanding microbial evolution and speciation. Streptomycetes are a diverse group of bacteria that are widely distributed in nature and a rich source of useful bioactive compounds; however, they are rarely subjected to population genetic investigations. In this study, we applied a five-gene-based multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme to 41 strains of Streptomyces albidoflavus derived from diverse sources, mainly insects, sea, and soil. Frequent recombination was detected in S. albidoflavus, supported by multiple lines of evidence from the pairwise homoplasy index (Φw) test, phylogenetic discordance, the Shimodaira-Hasegawa (SH) test, and network analysis, underpinning the predominance of homologous recombination within Streptomyces species. A strong habitat signal was also observed in both phylogenetic and Structure 2.3.3 analyses, indicating the importance of ecological difference in shaping the population structure. Moreover, all three habitat-associated groups, particularly the entomic group, demonstrated significantly reduced levels of gene flow with one another, generally revealing habitat barriers to recombination. Therefore, a combined effect of homologous recombination and ecology is inferred for S. albidoflavus, where dynamic evolution is at least partly balanced by the extent that differential distributions of strains among habitats limit genetic exchange. Our study stresses the significance of ecology in microbial speciation and reveals the coexistence of homologous recombination and ecological divergence in the evolution of streptomycetes. PMID:25416769

  10. Requirement for homologous recombination functions for expression of the mutA mistranslator tRNA-induced mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ren, L; Al Mamun, A A; Humayun, M Z

    2000-03-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli mutA mutator phenotype requires recA, recB, recC, ruvA, and ruvC gene, but not recD, recF, recO, or recR genes. Thus, the recBCD-dependent homologous recombination system is a component of the signal pathway that activates an error-prone DNA polymerase in mutA cells. PMID:10671469

  11. [Effect of endonuclease G depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and levels of homologous recombination in hela cells].

    PubMed

    Misic, V; El-Mogy, M; Geng, S; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator that also has roles outside of programmed cell death. It has been implicated as a defence DNase involved in the degradation of exogenous DNA after transfection of mammalian cells and in homologous recombination of viral and endogenous DNA. In this study, we looked at the effect of EndoG depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and the levels of homologous recombination in HeLa cells. We show that the proposed defence role of EndoG against uptake of non-viral DNA vectors does not extend to the cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, as targeting of EndoG expression by RNA interference failed to increase intracellular plasmid DNA levels. However, reducing EndoG levels in HeLa cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction of homologous recombination between two plasmid DNA substrates. These findings suggest that non-viral DNA vectors are also substrates for EndoG in its role in homologous recombination.

  12. Mitochondrial Genome Rearrangements in Glomus Species Triggered by Homologous Recombination between Distinct mtDNA Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Denis; Terrat, Yves; Halary, Sébastien; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Comparative mitochondrial genomics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide new avenues to overcome long-lasting obstacles that have hampered studies aimed at understanding the community structure, diversity, and evolution of these multinucleated and genetically polymorphic organisms. AMF mitochondrial (mt) genomes are homogeneous within isolates, and their intergenic regions harbor numerous mobile elements that have rapidly diverged, including homing endonuclease genes, small inverted repeats, and plasmid-related DNA polymerase genes (dpo), making them suitable targets for the development of reliable strain-specific markers. However, these elements may also lead to genome rearrangements through homologous recombination, although this has never previously been reported in this group of obligate symbiotic fungi. To investigate whether such rearrangements are present and caused by mobile elements in AMF, the mitochondrial genomes from two Glomeraceae members (i.e., Glomus cerebriforme and Glomus sp.) with substantial mtDNA synteny divergence, were sequenced and compared with available glomeromycotan mitochondrial genomes. We used an extensive nucleotide/protein similarity network-based approach to investigate dpo diversity in AMF as well as in other organisms for which sequences are publicly available. We provide strong evidence of dpo-induced inter-haplotype recombination, leading to a reshuffled mitochondrial genome in Glomus sp. These findings raise questions as to whether AMF single spore cultivations artificially underestimate mtDNA genetic diversity. We assessed potential dpo dispersal mechanisms in AMF and inferred a robust phylogenetic relationship with plant mitochondrial plasmids. Along with other indirect evidence, our analyses indicate that members of the Glomeromycota phylum are potential donors of mitochondrial plasmids to plants. PMID:23925788

  13. Mitochondrial genome rearrangements in glomus species triggered by homologous recombination between distinct mtDNA haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, Denis; Terrat, Yves; Halary, Sébastien; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Comparative mitochondrial genomics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide new avenues to overcome long-lasting obstacles that have hampered studies aimed at understanding the community structure, diversity, and evolution of these multinucleated and genetically polymorphic organisms.AMF mitochondrial (mt) genomes are homogeneous within isolates, and their intergenic regions harbor numerous mobile elements that have rapidly diverged, including homing endonuclease genes, small inverted repeats, and plasmid-related DNA polymerase genes (dpo), making them suitable targets for the development of reliable strain-specific markers. However, these elements may also lead to genome rearrangements through homologous recombination, although this has never previously been reported in this group of obligate symbiotic fungi. To investigate whether such rearrangements are present and caused by mobile elements in AMF, the mitochondrial genomes from two Glomeraceae members (i.e., Glomus cerebriforme and Glomus sp.) with substantial mtDNA synteny divergence,were sequenced and compared with available glomeromycotan mitochondrial genomes. We used an extensive nucleotide/protein similarity network-based approach to investigated podiversity in AMF as well as in other organisms for which sequences are publicly available. We provide strong evidence of dpo-induced inter-haplotype recombination, leading to a reshuffled mitochondrial genome in Glomus sp. These findings raise questions as to whether AMF single spore cultivations artificially underestimate mtDNA genetic diversity.We assessed potential dpo dispersal mechanisms in AMF and inferred a robust phylogenetic relationship with plant mitochondrial plasmids. Along with other indirect evidence, our analyses indicate that members of the Glomeromycota phylum are potential donors of mitochondrial plasmids to plants.

  14. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases1–3. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes4–8. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks9. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing10–12, direct evidence that BRCA genes regulate HR at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. We report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex13–16 can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mammalian cells. Tus/Ter-induced HR entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the BRCA1 C-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of BRCA1 encoded by exon 11—two BRCA1 elements implicated in tumor suppression—control Tus/Ter-induced HR. Inactivation of either BRCA1 or BRCA2 increases the absolute frequency of “long-tract” gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks—an outcome not observed in response to a restriction endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double strand break (DSB). Therefore, HR at stalled forks is regulated differently from HR at DSBs arising independently of a fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract HR at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells. PMID:24776801

  15. Arabidopsis thaliana siRNA biogenesis mutants have the lower frequency of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are involved in the regulation of plant development and response to stress. We have previously shown that mutants impaired in Dicer-like 2 (DCL2), DCL3 and DCL4, RDR2, RDR6 and NPRD1 are partially impaired in their response to stress and dcl2 and dcl3 plants are also impaired in transgenerational response to stress, including changes in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). Here, we have analyzed genome stability of dcl2, dcl3, dcl4, dcl2 dcl3, dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 and rdr6 mutants by measuring the non-induced and the stress-induced recombination frequency. We found that all mutants had the lower spontaneous HRF. The analysis of strand breaks showed that all tested Arabidopsis mutants had a higher level of spontaneous strand breaks, suggesting that the lower HRF is not due to the unusually low level of breaks. Exposure to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) resulted in an increase in the level of strand breaks in wild-type plants and a decrease in mutants. All mutants had the higher methylation of cytosines at CpG sites under non-induced conditions. Exposure to MMS resulted in a decrease in methylation level in wild-type plants and an increase in methylation in all dcl mutants. The expression of several DNA repair genes was altered in dcl4 plants under non-induced and induced conditions. Our data suggest that siRNA biogenesis may be essential for the maintenance of the genome stability and stress response in Arabidopsis. PMID:26901311

  16. The mismatch repair system reduces meiotic homeologous recombination and stimulates recombination-dependent chromosome loss.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S R; Hunter, N; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    1996-11-01

    Efficient genetic recombination requires near-perfect homology between participating molecules. Sequence divergence reduces the frequency of recombination, a process that is dependent on the activity of the mismatch repair system. The effects of chromosomal divergence in diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one copy of chromosome III is derived from a closely related species, Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been examined. Meiotic recombination between the diverged chromosomes is decreased by 25-fold. Spore viability is reduced with an observable increase in the number of tetrads with only two or three viable spores. Asci with only two viable spores are disomic for chromosome III, consistent with meiosis I nondisjunction of the homeologs. Asci with three viable spores are highly enriched for recombinants relative to tetrads with four viable spores. In 96% of the class with three viable spores, only one spore possesses a recombinant chromosome III, suggesting that the recombination process itself contributes to meiotic death. This phenomenon is dependent on the activities of the mismatch repair genes PMS1 and MSH2. A model of mismatch-stimulated chromosome loss is proposed to account for this observation. As expected, crossing over is increased in pms1 and msh2 mutants. Furthermore, genetic exchange in pms1 msh2 double mutants is affected to a greater extent than in either mutant alone, suggesting that the two proteins act independently to inhibit homeologous recombination. All mismatch repair-deficient strains exhibited reductions in the rate of chromosome III nondisjunction. PMID:8887641

  17. NAP1 family histone chaperones are required for somatic homologous recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Juan; Zhu, Yan; Zhou, Wangbin; Molinier, Jean; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is essential for maintaining genome integrity and variability. To orchestrate HR in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of DNA accessibility and restoration of chromatin organization after DNA repair. Histone chaperones function in nucleosome assembly/disassembly and could play a role in HR. Here, we show that the NUCLEOSOME ASSEMBLY PROTEIN1 (NAP1) family histone chaperones are required for somatic HR in Arabidopsis thaliana. Depletion of either the NAP1 group or NAP1-RELATED PROTEIN (NRP) group proteins caused a reduction in HR in plants under normal growth conditions as well as under a wide range of genotoxic or abiotic stresses. This contrasts with the hyperrecombinogenic phenotype caused by the depletion of the CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR-1 (CAF-1) histone chaperone. Furthermore, we show that the hyperrecombinogenic phenotype caused by CAF-1 depletion relies on NRP1 and NRP2, but the telomere shortening phenotype does not. Our analysis of DNA lesions, H3K56 acetylation, and expression of DNA repair genes argues for a role of NAP1 family histone chaperones in nucleosome disassembly/reassembly during HR. Our study highlights distinct functions for different families of histone chaperones in the maintenance of genome stability and establishes a crucial function for NAP1 family histone chaperones in somatic HR. PMID:22534127

  18. Intrachromosomal homologous recombination between inverted amplicons on opposing Y-chromosome arms.

    PubMed

    Lange, Julian; Noordam, Michiel J; van Daalen, Saskia K M; Skaletsky, Helen; Clark, Brian A; Macville, Merryn V; Page, David C; Repping, Sjoerd

    2013-10-01

    Amplicons--large, nearly identical repeats in direct or inverted orientation--are abundant in the male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) and provide targets for intrachromosomal non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Thus far, NAHR events resulting in deletions, duplications, inversions, or isodicentric chromosomes have been reported only for amplicon pairs located exclusively on the short arm (Yp) or the long arm (Yq). Here we report our finding of four men with Y chromosomes that evidently formed by intrachromosomal NAHR between inverted repeat pairs comprising one amplicon on Yp and one amplicon on Yq. In two men with spermatogenic failure, sister-chromatid crossing-over resulted in pseudoisoYp chromosome formation and loss of distal Yq. In two men with normal spermatogenesis, intrachromatid crossing-over generated pericentric inversions. These findings highlight the recombinogenic nature of the MSY, as intrachromosomal NAHR occurs for nearly all Y-chromosome amplicon pairs, even those located on opposing chromosome arms.

  19. Regulators of homologous recombination repair as novel targets for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Małgorzata; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.

    2015-01-01

    To cope with DNA damage, cells possess a complex signaling network called the ‘DNA damage response’, which coordinates cell cycle control with DNA repair. The importance of this network is underscored by the cancer predisposition that frequently goes along with hereditary mutations in DNA repair genes. One especially important DNA repair pathway in this respect is homologous recombination (HR) repair. Defects in HR repair are observed in various cancers, including hereditary breast, and ovarian cancer. Intriguingly, tumor cells with defective HR repair show increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic reagents, including platinum-containing agents. These observations suggest that HR-proficient tumor cells might be sensitized to chemotherapeutics if HR repair could be therapeutically inactivated. HR repair is an extensively regulated process, which depends strongly on the activity of various other pathways, including cell cycle pathways, protein-control pathways, and growth factor-activated receptor signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss how the mechanistic wiring of HR is controlled by cell-intrinsic or extracellular pathways. Furthermore, we have performed a meta-analysis on available genome-wide RNA interference studies to identify additional pathways that control HR repair. Finally, we discuss how these HR-regulatory pathways may provide therapeutic targets in the context of radio/chemosensitization. PMID:25852742

  20. Suppression of mutagenesis by Rad51D-mediated homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, J M; Tebbs, R S; Wilson, P F; Nham, P B; Salazar, E P; Nagasawa, H; Urbin, S S; Thompson, L H

    2005-11-15

    Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) restores chromatid breaks arising during DNA replication and prevents chromosomal rearrangements that can occur from the misrepair of such breaks. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs are identified that contribute in a nonessential but critical manner to HRR efficiency. We constructed and characterized a Rad51D knockout cell line in widely studied CHO cells. The rad51d mutant (51D1) displays sensitivity to a wide spectrum of induced DNA damage, indicating the broad relevance of HRR to genotoxicity. Untreated 51D1 cells exhibit {approx}5-fold elevated chromosomal breaks, a 12-fold increased rate of hprt mutation, and 4- to 10-fold increased rates of gene amplification at the dhfr and CAD loci, respectively. These results explicitly show the quantitative importance of HHR in preventing these types genetic alterations, which are associated with carcinogenesis. Thus, HRR copes in an error-free manner with spontaneous DNA damage encountered during DNA replication, and Rad51D is essential for this fidelity.

  1. PARP3 affects the relative contribution of homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guirouilh Barbat, Josée; Bonnet, Marie-Elise; Illuzzi, Giuditta; Ronde, Philippe; Gauthier, Laurent R.; Magroun, Najat; Rajendran, Anbazhagan; Lopez, Bernard S.; Scully, Ralph; Boussin, François D.; Schreiber, Valérie; Dantzer, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The repair of toxic double-strand breaks (DSB) is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity. The major mechanisms that cope with DSB are: homologous recombination (HR) and classical or alternative nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ versus A-EJ). Because these pathways compete for the repair of DSB, the choice of the appropriate repair pathway is pivotal. Among the mechanisms that influence this choice, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) end resection plays a critical role by driving cells to HR, while accurate C-NHEJ is suppressed. Furthermore, end resection promotes error-prone A-EJ. Increasing evidence define Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 3 (PARP3, also known as ARTD3) as an important player in cellular response to DSB. In this work, we reveal a specific feature of PARP3 that together with Ku80 limits DNA end resection and thereby helps in making the choice between HR and NHEJ pathways. PARP3 interacts with and PARylates Ku70/Ku80. The depletion of PARP3 impairs the recruitment of YFP-Ku80 to laser-induced DNA damage sites and induces an imbalance between BRCA1 and 53BP1. Both events result in compromised accurate C-NHEJ and a concomitant increase in DNA end resection. Nevertheless, HR is significantly reduced upon PARP3 silencing while the enhanced end resection causes mutagenic deletions during A-EJ. As a result, the absence of PARP3 confers hypersensitivity to anti-tumoral drugs generating DSB. PMID:24598253

  2. Dual roles for DNA polymerase eta in homologous DNA recombination and translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Takuo; Araki, Kasumi; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Harada, Kouji; Kikuchi, Koji; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Takeda, Shunichi

    2005-12-01

    Chicken B lymphocyte precursors and DT40 cells diversify their immunoglobulin-variable (IgV) genes through homologous recombination (HR)-mediated Ig gene conversion. To identify DNA polymerases that are involved in Ig gene conversion, we created DT40 clones deficient in DNA polymerase eta (poleta), which, in humans, is defective in the variant form of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-V). Poleta is an error-prone translesion DNA synthesis polymerase that can bypass UV damage-induced lesions and is involved in IgV hypermutation. Like XP-V cells, poleta-disrupted (poleta) clones exhibited hypersensitivity to UV. Remarkably, poleta cells showed a significant decrease in the frequency of both Ig gene conversion and double-strand break-induced HR when compared to wild-type cells, and these defects were reversed by complementation with human poleta. Our findings identify a DNA polymerase that carries out DNA synthesis for physiological HR and provides evidence that a single DNA polymerase can play multiple cellular roles. PMID:16337602

  3. The Knowns Unknowns: Exploring the Homologous Recombination Repair Pathway in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fenoy, Ignacio M.; Bogado, Silvina S.; Contreras, Susana M.; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Angel, Sergio O.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan parasite of medical and veterinary importance which causes toxoplasmosis in humans. Great effort is currently being devoted toward the identification of novel drugs capable of targeting such illness. In this context, we believe that the thorough understanding of the life cycle of this model parasite will facilitate the identification of new druggable targets in T. gondii. It is important to exploit the available knowledge of pathways which could modulate the sensitivity of the parasite to DNA damaging agents. The homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway may be of particular interest in this regard as its inactivation sensitizes other cellular models such as human cancer to targeted therapy. Herein we discuss the information available on T. gondii's HRR pathway from the perspective of its conservation with respect to yeast and humans. Special attention was devoted to BRCT domain-containing and end-resection associated proteins in T. gondii as in other experimental models such proteins have crucial roles in early/late steps or HRR and in the pathway choice for double strand break resolution. We conclude that T. gondii HRR pathway is a source of several lines of investigation that allow to to comprehend the extent of diversification of HRR in T. gondii. Such an effort will serve to determine if HRR could represent a potential targer for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27199954

  4. Real-time analysis of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Wade M; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Haber, James E

    2011-02-22

    The ability to induce synchronously a single site-specific double-strand break (DSB) in a budding yeast chromosome has made it possible to monitor the kinetics and genetic requirements of many molecular steps during DSB repair. Special attention has been paid to the switching of mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a process initiated by the HO endonuclease by cleaving the MAT locus. A DSB in MATa is repaired by homologous recombination--specifically, by gene conversion--using a heterochromatic donor, HMLα. Repair results in the replacement of the a-specific sequences (Ya) by Yα and switching from MATa to MATα. We report that MAT switching requires the DNA replication factor Dpb11, although it does not require the Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or the Mcm and Cdc45 helicase components. Using Southern blot, PCR, and ChIP analysis of samples collected every 10 min, we extend previous studies of this process to identify the times for the loading of Rad51 recombinase protein onto the DSB ends at MAT, the subsequent strand invasion by the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament into the donor sequences, the initiation of new DNA synthesis, and the removal of the nonhomologous Y sequences. In addition we report evidence for the transient displacement of well-positioned nucleosomes in the HML donor locus during strand invasion.

  5. EXD2 promotes homologous recombination by facilitating DNA-end resection

    PubMed Central

    Baddock, Hannah T.; Deshpande, Rajashree; Gileadi, Opher; Paull, Tanya T.; McHugh, Peter J; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) is critical for survival and genome stability of individual cells and organisms, but also contributes to the genetic diversity of species. A critical step in HR is MRN/CtIP-dependent end-resection that generates the 3′ single-stranded DNA overhangs required for the subsequent strand exchange reaction. Here, we identify EXD2 (EXDL2) as an exonuclease essential for DSB resection and efficient HR. EXD2 is recruited to chromatin in a damage-dependent manner and confers resistance to DSB-inducing agents. EXD2 functionally interacts with the MRN-complex to accelerate resection via its 3′-5′ exonuclease activity that efficiently processes dsDNA substrates containing nicks. Finally, we establish that EXD2 stimulates both short and long-range DSB resection, and thus together with MRE11 is required for efficient HR. This establishes a key role for EXD2 in controlling the initial steps of chromosomal break repair. PMID:26807646

  6. FIGNL1-containing protein complex is required for efficient homologous recombination repair

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingsong; Chen, Junjie

    2013-01-01

    The RAD51 recombinase plays a central role in homologous recombination (HR), which is critical for repair of DNA double-strand breaks, maintenance of genomic stability, and prevention of developmental disorders and cancer. Here, we report the identification of an RAD51-binding protein fidgetin-like 1 (FIGNL1). FIGNL1 specifically interacts with RAD51 through its conserved RAD51 binding domain. Cells depleted of FIGNL1 show defective HR repair. Interestingly, FIGNL1 is recruited to sites of DNA damage in a manner that is independent of breast cancer 2, early onset, RAD51, and probably, RAD51 paralogs. Conversely, FIGNL1 depletion does not affect the loading of RAD51 onto ssDNA. Our additional analysis uncovered KIAA0146, also known as scaffolding protein involved in DNA repair (SPIDR), as a binding partner of FIGNL1 and established that KIAA0146/SPIDR acts with FIGNL1 in HR repair. Collectively, our study uncovers a protein complex, which consists of FIGNL1 and KIAA0146/SPIDR, in DNA repair and provides potential directions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23754376

  7. The role of DNA double-strand breaks in spontaneous homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lettier, Gaëlle; Feng, Qi; de Mayolo, Adriana Antúnez; Erdeniz, Naz; Reid, Robert J D; Lisby, Michael; Mortensen, Uffe H; Rothstein, Rodney

    2006-11-10

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a source of genomic instability and the loss of heterozygosity in mitotic cells. Since these events pose a severe health risk, it is important to understand the molecular events that cause spontaneous HR. In eukaryotes, high levels of HR are a normal feature of meiosis and result from the induction of a large number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By analogy, it is generally believed that the rare spontaneous mitotic HR events are due to repair of DNA DSBs that accidentally occur during mitotic growth. Here we provide the first direct evidence that most spontaneous mitotic HR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by DNA lesions other than DSBs. Specifically, we describe a class of rad52 mutants that are fully proficient in inter- and intra-chromosomal mitotic HR, yet at the same time fail to repair DNA DSBs. The conclusions are drawn from genetic analyses, evaluation of the consequences of DSB repair failure at the DNA level, and examination of the cellular re-localization of Rad51 and mutant Rad52 proteins after introduction of specific DSBs. In further support of our conclusions, we show that, as in wild-type strains, UV-irradiation induces HR in these rad52 mutants, supporting the view that DNA nicks and single-stranded gaps, rather than DSBs, are major sources of spontaneous HR in mitotic yeast cells.

  8. Spontaneous slow replication fork progression elicits mitosis alterations in homologous recombination-deficient mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Therese; Magdalou, Indiana; Barascu, Aurélia; Técher, Hervé; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2014-01-14

    Homologous recombination deficient (HR(-)) mammalian cells spontaneously display reduced replication fork (RF) movement and mitotic extra centrosomes. We show here that these cells present a complex mitotic phenotype, including prolonged metaphase arrest, anaphase bridges, and multipolar segregations. We then asked whether the replication and the mitotic phenotypes are interdependent. First, we determined low doses of hydroxyurea that did not affect the cell cycle distribution or activate CHK1 phosphorylation but did slow the replication fork movement of wild-type cells to the same level than in HR(-) cells. Remarkably, these low hydroxyurea doses generated the same mitotic defects (and to the same extent) in wild-type cells as observed in unchallenged HR(-) cells. Reciprocally, supplying nucleotide precursors to HR(-) cells suppressed both their replication deceleration and mitotic extra centrosome phenotypes. Therefore, subtle replication stress that escapes to surveillance pathways and, thus, fails to prevent cells from entering mitosis alters metaphase progression and centrosome number, resulting in multipolar mitosis. Importantly, multipolar mitosis results in global unbalanced chromosome segregation involving the whole genome, even fully replicated chromosomes. These data highlight the cross-talk between chromosome replication and segregation, and the importance of HR at the interface of these two processes for protection against general genome instability.

  9. Rad51 Inhibits Translocation Formation by Non-Conservative Homologous Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Manthey, Glenn M.; Bailis, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a primary biological response to ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, and are likely to result from the inappropriate repair of the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are created. An abundance of repetitive sequences in eukaryotic genomes provides ample opportunity for such breaks to be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) between non-allelic repeats. Interestingly, in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae the central strand exchange protein, Rad51 that is required for DSB repair by gene conversion between unlinked repeats that conserves genomic structure also suppresses translocation formation by several HR mechanisms. In particular, Rad51 suppresses translocation formation by single-strand annealing (SSA), perhaps the most efficient mechanism for translocation formation by HR in both yeast and mammalian cells. Further, the enhanced translocation formation that emerges in the absence of Rad51 displays a distinct pattern of genetic control, suggesting that this occurs by a separate mechanism. Since hypomorphic mutations in RAD51 in mammalian cells also reduce DSB repair by conservative gene conversion and stimulate non-conservative repair by SSA, this mechanism may also operate in humans and, perhaps contribute to the genome instability that propels the development of cancer. PMID:20686691

  10. A second DNA binding site in human BRCA2 promotes homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlén, Åsa; Martin, Charlotte; Zhang, Xiaodong; Carreira, Aura

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 tumour-suppressor protein is well known for its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR); assisting the loading of RAD51 recombinase at DNA double-strand breaks. This function is executed by the C-terminal DNA binding domain (CTD) which binds single-stranded (ss)DNA, and the BRC repeats, which bind RAD51 and modulate its assembly onto ssDNA. Paradoxically, analysis of cells resistant to DNA damaging agents missing the CTD restore HR proficiency, suggesting another domain may take over its function. Here, we identify a region in the N terminus of BRCA2 that exhibits DNA binding activity (NTD) and provide evidence for NTD promoting RAD51-mediated HR. A missense variant detected in breast cancer patients located in the NTD impairs HR stimulation on dsDNA/ssDNA junction containing substrates. These findings shed light on the function of the N terminus of BRCA2 and have implications for the evaluation of breast cancer variants. PMID:27628236

  11. The proteasome factor Bag101 binds to Rad22 and suppresses homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Okada, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Junya; Kato, Akihiro; Hirota, Kouji; Taoka, Masato; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Kenshi; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Although RAD52 plays a critical role in the initiation of homologous recombination (HR) by facilitating the replacement of RPA with RAD51, the mechanism controlling RAD52 remains elusive. Here, we show that Bag101, a factor implicated in proteasome functioning, regulates RAD52 protein levels and subsequent HR. LC-MS/MS analysis identified Bag101 which binds to Rad22, the fission yeast homologue of RAD52. Bag101 reduced HR frequency through its overexpression and conversely, HR frequencies were enhanced when it was deleted. Consistent with this observation, Rad22 protein levels was reduced in cells where bag101 was overexpressed even when Rad22 transcription was up-regulated, suggesting the operation of proteasome-mediated Rad22 degradation. Indeed, Rad22 protein levels were stabilized in proteasome mutants. Rad22 physically interacted with the BAG domain of Bag101, and a lack of this domain enhanced HR frequency. Similarly, radiation exposure triggered the dissociation of these proteins so that Rad22 was stabilized and able to enhance HR. PMID:23779158

  12. A second DNA binding site in human BRCA2 promotes homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlén, Åsa; Martin, Charlotte; Zhang, Xiaodong; Carreira, Aura

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 tumour-suppressor protein is well known for its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR); assisting the loading of RAD51 recombinase at DNA double-strand breaks. This function is executed by the C-terminal DNA binding domain (CTD) which binds single-stranded (ss)DNA, and the BRC repeats, which bind RAD51 and modulate its assembly onto ssDNA. Paradoxically, analysis of cells resistant to DNA damaging agents missing the CTD restore HR proficiency, suggesting another domain may take over its function. Here, we identify a region in the N terminus of BRCA2 that exhibits DNA binding activity (NTD) and provide evidence for NTD promoting RAD51-mediated HR. A missense variant detected in breast cancer patients located in the NTD impairs HR stimulation on dsDNA/ssDNA junction containing substrates. These findings shed light on the function of the N terminus of BRCA2 and have implications for the evaluation of breast cancer variants. PMID:27628236

  13. Homologous recombination at the border: Insertion-deletions and the trapping of foreign DNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Prudhomme, Marc; Libante, Virginie; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Integration of foreign DNA was observed in the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) after transformation with DNA from a recombinant Escherichia coli bacteriophage λ carrying a pneumococcal insert. Segments of λ DNA replaced chromosomal sequences adjacent to the region homologous with the pneumococcal insert, whence the name insertion-deletion. Here we report that a pneumococcal insert was absolutely required for insertion-deletion formation, but could be as short as 153 bp; that the sizes of foreign DNA insertions (289–2,474 bp) and concomitant chromosomal deletions (45–1,485 bp) were not obviously correlated; that novel joints clustered preferentially within segments of high GC content; and that the crossovers in 29 independent novel joints were located 1 bp from the border or within short (3–10 nt long) stretches of identity (microhomology) between resident and foreign DNA. The data are consistent with a model in which the insert serving as a homologous recombination anchor favors interaction and subsequent illegitimate recombination events at microhomologies between foreign and resident sequences. The potential of homology- directed illegitimate recombination for genome evolution was illustrated by the trapping of functional heterologous genes. PMID:11854505

  14. A Heritable Recombination system for synthetic Darwinian evolution in yeast.

    PubMed

    Romanini, Dante W; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela; Mondol, Vanessa; Cornish, Virginia W

    2012-12-21

    Genetic recombination is central to the generation of molecular diversity and enhancement of evolutionary fitness in living systems. Methods such as DNA shuffling that recapitulate this diversity mechanism in vitro are powerful tools for engineering biomolecules with useful new functions by directed evolution. Synthetic biology now brings demand for analogous technologies that enable the controlled recombination of beneficial mutations in living cells. Thus, here we create a Heritable Recombination system centered around a library cassette plasmid that enables inducible mutagenesis via homologous recombination and subsequent combination of beneficial mutations through sexual reproduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using repair of nonsense codons in auxotrophic markers as a model, Heritable Recombination was optimized to give mutagenesis efficiencies of up to 6% and to allow successive repair of different markers through two cycles of sexual reproduction and recombination. Finally, Heritable Recombination was employed to change the substrate specificity of a biosynthetic enzyme, with beneficial mutations in three different active site loops crossed over three continuous rounds of mutation and selection to cover a total sequence diversity of 10(13). Heritable Recombination, while at an early stage of development, breaks the transformation barrier to library size and can be immediately applied to combinatorial crossing of beneficial mutations for cell engineering, adding important features to the growing arsenal of next generation molecular biology tools for synthetic biology. PMID:23412545

  15. Specific Mismatch Recognition in Heteroduplex Intermediates by p53 Suggests a Role in Fidelity Control of Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Dudenhöffer, Christine; Rohaly, Gabor; Will, Katrin; Deppert, Wolfgang; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that wild-type p53 inhibits homologous recombination. To analyze DNA substrate specificities in this process, we designed recombination experiments such that coinfection of simian virus 40 mutant pairs generated heteroduplexes with distinctly unpaired regions. DNA exchanges producing single C-T and A-G mismatches were inhibited four- to sixfold more effectively than DNA exchanges producing G-T and A-C single-base mispairings or unpaired regions of three base pairs comprising G-T/A-C mismatches. p53 bound specifically to three-stranded DNA substrates, mimicking early recombination intermediates. The KD values for the interactions of p53 with three-stranded substrates displaying differently paired and unpaired regions reflected the mismatch base specificities observed in recombination assays in a qualitative and quantitative manner. On the basis of these results, we would like to advance the hypothesis that p53, like classical mismatch repair factors, checks the fidelity of homologous recombination processes by specific mismatch recognition. PMID:9710617

  16. Nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are inducers of mitotic homologous recombination in the wing-spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dihl, R R; Bereta, M S; do Amaral, V S; Lehmann, M; Reguly, M L; de Andrade, H H R

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the widespread environmental pollutants 1-nitronaphthalene (1NN), 1,5-dinitronaphthalene (1,5DNN), 2-nitrofluorene (2NF) and 9-nitroanthracene (9NA), were investigated for genotoxicity in the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of Drosophila--using the high bioactivation (HB) cross. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated that all compounds assessed induced genetic toxicity, causing increased incidence of homologous somatic recombination. 2NF, 9NA and 1NN mutant clone induction is almost exclusively related to somatic recombination, although 1,5DNN-clone induction depends on both mutagenic and recombinagenic events. 1NN has the highest recombinagenic activity (approximately 100%), followed by 2NF (approximately 77%), 9NA (approximately 75%) and 1,5DNN (33%). 1NN is the compound with the strongest genotoxicity, with 9NA being approximately 40 times less potent than the former and 2NF and 1,5DNN approximately 333 times less potent than 1NN. The evidence indicating that the major effect observed in this study is an increased frequency of mitotic recombination emphasizes another hazard that could be associated to NPAHs--the increment in homologous recombination (HR). PMID:18440115

  17. A role for the p53 tumour suppressor in regulating the balance between homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, Sylvie; Luessing, Janna; Harte, Emma Christina; Voisin, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Loss of p53, a transcription factor activated by cellular stress, is a frequent event in cancer. The role of p53 in tumour suppression is largely attributed to cell fate decisions. Here, we provide evidence supporting a novel role for p53 in the regulation of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice. 53BP1, another tumour suppressor, was initially identified as p53 Binding Protein 1, and has been shown to inhibit DNA end resection, thereby stimulating non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Yet another tumour suppressor, BRCA1, reciprocally promotes end resection and homologous recombination (HR). Here, we show that in both human and mouse cells, the absence of p53 results in impaired 53BP1 focal recruitment to sites of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. This effect is largely independent of cell cycle phase and the extent of DNA damage. In p53-deficient cells, diminished localization of 53BP1 is accompanied by a reciprocal increase in BRCA1 recruitment to DSBs. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrate that DSB repair via NHEJ is abrogated, while repair via homology-directed repair (HDR) is stimulated. Overall, we propose that in addition to its role as an ‘effector’ protein in the DNA damage response, p53 plays a role in the regulation of DSB repair pathway choice. PMID:27655732

  18. (A new method employing homologous recombination and YAC rescue to expedite gap filling, long-range, mapping)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    We have embarked on three areas of research relevant to the telomere rescue strategy mediated by homologous recombination described in this proposal. First, we have constructed the telomere rescue vector. Second, we have carried out tests in yeast and mammalian cells to ascertain whether the various crucial components function. Finally, we have begun to develop the molecular reagents required to target the telomeric regions of chromosome 16. The specific progress in each area is described briefly. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  19. [A new method employing homologous recombination and YAC rescue to expedite gap filling long range mapping]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    We have embarked on three areas of research relevant to the telomere rescue strategy mediated by homologous recombination described in this proposal. First, we have constructed the telomere rescue vector. Second, we have carried out tests in yeast and mammalian cells to ascertain whether the various crucial components function. Finally, we have begun to develop the molecular reagents required to target the telomeric regions of chromosome 16. The specific progress in each area is described briefly below.

  20. Involvement of homologous recombination repair after proton-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rostek, C; Turner, E L; Robbins, M; Rightnar, S; Xiao, W; Obenaus, A; Harkness, T A A

    2008-03-01

    Protection from chronic exposure to cosmic radiation, which is primarily composed of protons, in future manned missions to Mars and beyond is considered to be a key unresolved issue. To model the effects of cosmic radiation on a living cell, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells harboring various deletions of DNA repair genes to investigate the response of cells to DNA strand breaks caused by exposure to 250 MeV proton irradiation (linear energy transfer of 0.41 keV/microm). In our study, DNA strand breaks induced by exposure to protons were predominantly repaired via the homologous recombination and postreplication repair pathways. We simulated chronic exposure to proton irradiation by treating cells from colonies that survived proton treatment, after several rounds of subculturing, to a second proton dose, as well as additional cell stressors. In general, cells cultured from proton surviving colonies were not more sensitive to secondary cell stressors. However, cells from rad52delta colonies that survived proton treatment showed increased resistance to secondary stressors, such as gamma-rays (1.17 and 1.33 MeV; 0.267 keV/microm), ultraviolet (UV) and proton irradiation and elevated temperatures. Resistance to secondary stressors was also observed in rad52delta cells that survived exposure to gamma-rays, rather than protons, but this was not observed to occur in rad52delta cells after UV irradiation. rad52delta cells that survived exposure to protons, followed by gamma-rays (proton surviving colonies were cultured prior to gamma-ray exposure), exhibited an additive effect, whereby these cells had a further increase in stress resistance. A genetic analysis indicated that increased stress resistance is most likely due to a second-site mutation that suppresses the rad52delta phenotype. We will discuss possible origins of these second-site mutations. PMID:18267950

  1. Signs of neutralization in a redundant gene involved in homologous recombination in Wolbachia endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Myriam; Giraud, Isabelle; Vavre, Fabrice; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2014-09-17

    Genomic reduction in bacterial endosymbionts occurs through large genomic deletions and long-term accumulation of mutations. The latter process involves successive steps including gene neutralization, pseudogenization, and gradual erosion until complete loss. Although many examples of pseudogenes at various levels of degradation have been reported, neutralization cases are scarce because of the transient nature of the process. Gene neutralization may occur due to relaxation of selection in nonessential genes, for example, those involved in redundant functions. Here, we report an example of gene neutralization in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of Wolbachia, a bacterial endosymbiont of arthropods and nematodes. The HR pathway is often depleted in endosymbiont genomes, but it is apparently intact in some Wolbachia strains. Analysis of 12 major HR genes showed that they have been globally under strong purifying selection during the evolution of Wolbachia strains hosted by arthropods, supporting the evolutionary importance of the HR pathway for these Wolbachia genomes. However, we detected signs of recent neutralization of the ruvA gene in a subset of Wolbachia strains, which might be related to an ancestral, clade-specific amino acid change that impaired DNA-binding activity. Strikingly, RuvA is part of the RuvAB complex involved in branch migration, whose function overlaps with the RecG helicase. Although ruvA is experiencing neutralization, recG is under strong purifying selection. Thus, our high phylogenetic resolution suggests that we identified a rare example of targeted neutralization of a gene involved in a redundant function in an endosymbiont genome.

  2. Signs of Neutralization in a Redundant Gene Involved in Homologous Recombination in Wolbachia Endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Badawi, Myriam; Giraud, Isabelle; Vavre, Fabrice; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Genomic reduction in bacterial endosymbionts occurs through large genomic deletions and long-term accumulation of mutations. The latter process involves successive steps including gene neutralization, pseudogenization, and gradual erosion until complete loss. Although many examples of pseudogenes at various levels of degradation have been reported, neutralization cases are scarce because of the transient nature of the process. Gene neutralization may occur due to relaxation of selection in nonessential genes, for example, those involved in redundant functions. Here, we report an example of gene neutralization in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of Wolbachia, a bacterial endosymbiont of arthropods and nematodes. The HR pathway is often depleted in endosymbiont genomes, but it is apparently intact in some Wolbachia strains. Analysis of 12 major HR genes showed that they have been globally under strong purifying selection during the evolution of Wolbachia strains hosted by arthropods, supporting the evolutionary importance of the HR pathway for these Wolbachia genomes. However, we detected signs of recent neutralization of the ruvA gene in a subset of Wolbachia strains, which might be related to an ancestral, clade-specific amino acid change that impaired DNA-binding activity. Strikingly, RuvA is part of the RuvAB complex involved in branch migration, whose function overlaps with the RecG helicase. Although ruvA is experiencing neutralization, recG is under strong purifying selection. Thus, our high phylogenetic resolution suggests that we identified a rare example of targeted neutralization of a gene involved in a redundant function in an endosymbiont genome. PMID:25230723

  3. Activation of homologous recombination DNA repair in human skin fibroblasts continuously exposed to X-ray radiation

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Andreyan N.; Grekhova, Anna; Pustovalova, Margarita; Ozerov, Ivan V.; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Lazareva, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular responses to protracted ionizing radiation exposures are poorly understood. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we studied the kinetics of DNA repair foci formation in normal human fibroblasts exposed to X-rays at a dose rate of 4.5 mGy/min for up to 6 h. We showed that both the number of γH2AX foci and their integral fluorescence intensity grew linearly with time of irradiation up to 2 h. A plateau was observed between 2 and 6 h of exposure, indicating a state of balance between formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, the number and intensity of foci formed by homologous recombination protein RAD51 demonstrated a continuous increase during 6 h of irradiation. We further showed that the enhancement of the homologous recombination repair was not due to redistribution of cell cycle phases. Our results indicate that continuous irradiation of normal human cells triggers DNA repair responses that are different from those elicited after acute irradiation. The observed activation of the error-free homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair pathway suggests compensatory adaptive mechanisms that may help alleviate long-term biological consequences and could potentially be utilized both in radiation protection and medical practices. PMID:26337087

  4. Activation of homologous recombination DNA repair in human skin fibroblasts continuously exposed to X-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Grekhova, Anna; Pustovalova, Margarita; Ozerov, Ivan V; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Lazareva, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-09-29

    Molecular and cellular responses to protracted ionizing radiation exposures are poorly understood. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we studied the kinetics of DNA repair foci formation in normal human fibroblasts exposed to X-rays at a dose rate of 4.5 mGy/min for up to 6 h. We showed that both the number of γH2AX foci and their integral fluorescence intensity grew linearly with time of irradiation up to 2 h. A plateau was observed between 2 and 6 h of exposure, indicating a state of balance between formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, the number and intensity of foci formed by homologous recombination protein RAD51 demonstrated a continuous increase during 6 h of irradiation. We further showed that the enhancement of the homologous recombination repair was not due to redistribution of cell cycle phases. Our results indicate that continuous irradiation of normal human cells triggers DNA repair responses that are different from those elicited after acute irradiation. The observed activation of the error-free homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair pathway suggests compensatory adaptive mechanisms that may help alleviate long-term biological consequences and could potentially be utilized both in radiation protection and medical practices. PMID:26337087

  5. Germline Gene Editing in Chickens by Efficient CRISPR-Mediated Homologous Recombination in Primordial Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Pedersen, Darlene; Ching, Kathryn H; Yi, Henry; Collarini, Ellen J; Izquierdo, Shelley; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Leighton, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in a large number of animal and plant species for genome editing. In chickens, CRISPR has been used to knockout genes in somatic tissues, but no CRISPR-mediated germline modification has yet been reported. Here we use CRISPR to target the chicken immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in primordial germ cells (PGCs) to produce transgenic progeny. Guide RNAs were co-transfected with a donor vector for homology-directed repair of the double-strand break, and clonal populations were selected. All of the resulting drug-resistant clones contained the correct targeting event. The targeted cells gave rise to healthy progeny containing the CRISPR-targeted locus. The results show that gene-edited chickens can be obtained by modifying PGCs in vitro with the CRISPR/Cas9 system, opening up many potential applications for efficient genetic modification in birds. PMID:27099923

  6. Germline Gene Editing in Chickens by Efficient CRISPR-Mediated Homologous Recombination in Primordial Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Pedersen, Darlene; Ching, Kathryn H.; Yi, Henry; Collarini, Ellen J.; Izquierdo, Shelley; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Leighton, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in a large number of animal and plant species for genome editing. In chickens, CRISPR has been used to knockout genes in somatic tissues, but no CRISPR-mediated germline modification has yet been reported. Here we use CRISPR to target the chicken immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in primordial germ cells (PGCs) to produce transgenic progeny. Guide RNAs were co-transfected with a donor vector for homology-directed repair of the double-strand break, and clonal populations were selected. All of the resulting drug-resistant clones contained the correct targeting event. The targeted cells gave rise to healthy progeny containing the CRISPR-targeted locus. The results show that gene-edited chickens can be obtained by modifying PGCs in vitro with the CRISPR/Cas9 system, opening up many potential applications for efficient genetic modification in birds. PMID:27099923

  7. Mutations induced by 1-nitrosopyrene and related compounds during DNA replication in human cells and induction of homologous recombination by these compounds.

    PubMed

    Maher, V M; Bhattacharyya, N P; Mah, M C; Boldt, J; Yang, J L; McCormick, J J

    1993-03-01

    The transformation of normal human cells into cancer cells is a multistep process. Evidence suggests that a minimum of five independent steps (changes) are required for the development of certain kinds of human cancer, as well as for malignant transformation of human cells in culture. Mutations are one of the mechanisms involved in bringing about such changes. A single DNA base substitution mutation can activate an oncogene or inactivate a tumor suppressor gene. Because the action of tumor suppressor genes is to prevent cells from becoming malignant, the activity of both copies of such genes must be eliminated before suppression is lifted. Homologous mitotic recombination between a mutant tumor suppressor gene allele and its non-mutant allele is one mechanism for accomplishing this. The present study was designed to investigate the mechanisms by which certain carcinogenic compounds found in diesel exhaust particles and structurally-related N-substituted aryl carcinogens induce such base substitution mutations and homologous recombination events in mammalian cells in culture, including human cells. The system we employed to determine rapidly the kinds of mutations induced by these compounds, as well as the location of the point mutations in the target gene, involved a circular DNA molecule (plasmid) carrying a small target gene, supF. The target gene was exposed in vitro to radiolabeled compounds and then was allowed to replicate in human cells where the mutations were formed. The sites of mutation induction were compared with the sites of stable binding of the carcinogens to the DNA (adducts). The system used to determine whether these agents could induce homologous recombination consisted of a thymidine kinase-deficient mouse L cell line with a recombination substrate stably integrated into the genome. To determine whether or not excision repair was involved in the mechanism by which carcinogens induced recombination, the recombination substrate was introduced

  8. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  9. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:26150486

  10. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  11. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this “dead” cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:26150486

  12. RecF and RecR Play Critical Roles in the Homologous Recombination and Single-Strand Annealing Pathways of Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacteria encode three DNA double-strand break repair pathways: (i) RecA-dependent homologous recombination (HR), (ii) Ku-dependent nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and (iii) RecBCD-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA). Mycobacterial HR has two presynaptic pathway options that rely on the helicase-nuclease AdnAB and the strand annealing protein RecO, respectively. Ablation of adnAB or recO individually causes partial impairment of HR, but loss of adnAB and recO in combination abolishes HR. RecO, which can accelerate annealing of single-stranded DNA in vitro, also participates in the SSA pathway. The functions of RecF and RecR, which, in other model bacteria, function in concert with RecO as mediators of RecA loading, have not been examined in mycobacteria. Here, we present a genetic analysis of recF and recR in mycobacterial recombination. We find that RecF, like RecO, participates in the AdnAB-independent arm of the HR pathway and in SSA. In contrast, RecR is required for all HR in mycobacteria and for SSA. The essentiality of RecR as an agent of HR is yet another distinctive feature of mycobacterial DNA repair. IMPORTANCE This study clarifies the molecular requirements for homologous recombination in mycobacteria. Specifically, we demonstrate that RecF and RecR play important roles in both the RecA-dependent homologous recombination and RecA-independent single-strand annealing pathways. Coupled with our previous findings (R. Gupta, M. Ryzhikov, O. Koroleva, M. Unciuleac, S. Shuman, S. Korolev, and M. S. Glickman, Nucleic Acids Res 41:2284–2295, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gks1298), these results revise our view of mycobacterial recombination and place the RecFOR system in a central position in homology-dependent DNA repair. PMID:26195593

  13. RecF and RecR Play Critical Roles in the Homologous Recombination and Single-Strand Annealing Pathways of Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Richa; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria encode three DNA double-strand break repair pathways: (i) RecA-dependent homologous recombination (HR), (ii) Ku-dependent nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and (iii) RecBCD-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA). Mycobacterial HR has two presynaptic pathway options that rely on the helicase-nuclease AdnAB and the strand annealing protein RecO, respectively. Ablation of adnAB or recO individually causes partial impairment of HR, but loss of adnAB and recO in combination abolishes HR. RecO, which can accelerate annealing of single-stranded DNA in vitro, also participates in the SSA pathway. The functions of RecF and RecR, which, in other model bacteria, function in concert with RecO as mediators of RecA loading, have not been examined in mycobacteria. Here, we present a genetic analysis of recF and recR in mycobacterial recombination. We find that RecF, like RecO, participates in the AdnAB-independent arm of the HR pathway and in SSA. In contrast, RecR is required for all HR in mycobacteria and for SSA. The essentiality of RecR as an agent of HR is yet another distinctive feature of mycobacterial DNA repair.IMPORTANCE This study clarifies the molecular requirements for homologous recombination in mycobacteria. Specifically, we demonstrate that RecF and RecR play important roles in both the RecA-dependent homologous recombination and RecA-independent single-strand annealing pathways. Coupled with our previous findings (R. Gupta, M. Ryzhikov, O. Koroleva, M. Unciuleac, S. Shuman, S. Korolev, and M. S. Glickman, Nucleic Acids Res 41:2284-2295, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gks1298), these results revise our view of mycobacterial recombination and place the RecFOR system in a central position in homology-dependent DNA repair. PMID:26195593

  14. A universal BMV-based RNA recombination system--how to search for general rules in RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Alejska, Magdalena; Figlerowicz, Magdalena; Malinowska, Nelli; Urbanowicz, Anna; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2005-07-07

    At present, there is no doubt that RNA recombination is one of the major factors responsible for the generation of new RNA viruses and retroviruses. Numerous experimental systems have been created to investigate this complex phenomenon. Consequently, specific RNA structural motifs mediating recombination have been identified in several viruses. Unfortunately, up till now a unified model of genetic RNA recombination has not been formulated, mainly due to difficulties with the direct comparison of data obtained for different RNA-based viruses. To solve this problem, we have attempted to construct a universal system in which the recombination activity of various RNA sequences could be tested. To this end, we have used brome mosaic virus, a model (+)RNA virus of plants, for which the structural requirements of RNA recombination are well defined. The effectiveness of the new homomolecular system has been proven in an experiment involving two RNA sequences derived from the hepatitis C virus genome. In addition, comparison of the data obtained with the homomolecular system with those generated earlier using the heteromolecular one has provided new evidence that the mechanisms of homologous and non-homologous recombination are different and depend on the virus' mode of replication.

  15. Disruption of ku70 involved in non-homologous end-joining facilitates homologous recombination but increases temperature sensitivity in the phytopathogenic fungus Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Gandía, Mónica; Xu, Shaomei; Font, Cristina; Marcos, Jose F

    2016-03-01

    The dominant mechanism to repair double-stranded DNA breaks in filamentous fungi is the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, and not the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that operates in the mutation of genes by replacement of target DNA for selection cassettes. The key to improve HR frequency is the inactivation of the NHEJ pathway by eliminating components of its Ku70/80 heterodimeric complex. We have obtained ku70 mutants of Penicillium digitatum, the main citrus postharvest pathogen. The increased efficiency of HR in Δku70 strains was demonstrated by the generation of mutants in two different chitin synthase genes (PdchsII and PdchsV). P. digitatum Δku70 strains showed no differences from the parental strain in vegetative growth, asexual development or virulence to citrus fruit, when experiments were conducted at the optimal temperature of 24°C. However, growth of Δku70 strains at temperatures higher than 24°C demonstrated a detrimental effect in axenic growth and conidia production. These observations are in agreement with previous studies describing differences between ku70 mutants and their parental strains in some fungal species, and must be taken into account for future applications of the Δku approach to increase HR efficiency in fungi. PMID:26895860

  16. Mutation of the BRCA1 SQ-cluster results in aberrant mitosis, reduced homologous recombination, and a compensatory increase in non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Beckta, Jason M; Dever, Seth M; Gnawali, Nisha; Khalil, Ashraf; Sule, Amrita; Golding, Sarah E; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Xu, Bo; Povirk, Lawrence F; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2015-09-29

    Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1) gene are catalysts for breast and ovarian cancers. Most mutations are associated with the BRCA1 N- and C-terminal domains linked to DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. However, little is known about the role of the intervening serine-glutamine (SQ) - cluster in the DNA damage response beyond its importance in regulating cell cycle checkpoints. We show that serine-to-alanine alterations at critical residues within the SQ-cluster known to be phosphorylated by ATM and ATR result in reduced homologous recombination repair (HRR) and aberrant mitosis. While a S1387A BRCA1 mutant - previously shown to abrogate S-phase arrest in response to radiation - resulted in only a modest decrease in HRR, S1387A together with an additional alteration, S1423A (BRCA12P), reduced HRR to vector control levels and similar to a quadruple mutant also including S1457A and S1524A (BRCA14P). These effects appeared to be independent of PALB2. Furthermore, we found that BRCA14P promoted a prolonged and struggling HRR late in the cell cycle and shifted DSB repair from HRR to non-homologous end joining which, in the face of irreparable chromosomal damage, resulted in mitotic catastrophe. Altogether, SQ-cluster phosphorylation is critical for allowing adequate time for completing normal HRR prior to mitosis and preventing cells from entering G1 prematurely resulting in gross chromosomal aberrations.

  17. Mutation of the BRCA1 SQ-cluster results in aberrant mitosis, reduced homologous recombination, and a compensatory increase in non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Beckta, Jason M; Dever, Seth M; Gnawali, Nisha; Khalil, Ashraf; Sule, Amrita; Golding, Sarah E; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Xu, Bo; Povirk, Lawrence F; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2015-09-29

    Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1) gene are catalysts for breast and ovarian cancers. Most mutations are associated with the BRCA1 N- and C-terminal domains linked to DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. However, little is known about the role of the intervening serine-glutamine (SQ) - cluster in the DNA damage response beyond its importance in regulating cell cycle checkpoints. We show that serine-to-alanine alterations at critical residues within the SQ-cluster known to be phosphorylated by ATM and ATR result in reduced homologous recombination repair (HRR) and aberrant mitosis. While a S1387A BRCA1 mutant - previously shown to abrogate S-phase arrest in response to radiation - resulted in only a modest decrease in HRR, S1387A together with an additional alteration, S1423A (BRCA12P), reduced HRR to vector control levels and similar to a quadruple mutant also including S1457A and S1524A (BRCA14P). These effects appeared to be independent of PALB2. Furthermore, we found that BRCA14P promoted a prolonged and struggling HRR late in the cell cycle and shifted DSB repair from HRR to non-homologous end joining which, in the face of irreparable chromosomal damage, resulted in mitotic catastrophe. Altogether, SQ-cluster phosphorylation is critical for allowing adequate time for completing normal HRR prior to mitosis and preventing cells from entering G1 prematurely resulting in gross chromosomal aberrations. PMID:26320175

  18. Extrachromosomal homologous DNA recombination in plant cells is fast and is not affected by CpG methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Puchta, H; Kocher, S; Hohn, B

    1992-01-01

    Using a sensitive transient assay, we investigated extrachromosomal homologous DNA recombination (ECR) in plant cells. As the plant genome is highly C methylated, we addressed the question of whether CpG methylation has an influence on DNA recombination efficiencies. Whereas the expression level of the fully CpG-methylated DNA molecules was reduced drastically, we found no significant changes in ECR efficiencies between two partly CpG-methylated plasmids or between one fully CpG-methylated and one nonmethylated plasmid. Using a modified polymerase chain reaction analysis, we were able to detect recombination between two fully CpG-methylated plasmids. Furthermore, we characterized the kinetics of the ECR reaction. Cotransfection of plasmids carrying truncated copies of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene resulted in enzyme activity with a delay of only half an hour compared with that of the plasmid carrying the functional marker gene. This indicates that the ECR reaction itself requires no more than 30 min. By polymerase chain reaction, we were able to detect the recombined GUS gene as early as 2 h after transfection. This result and the time course of the transient GUS activity indicate that ECR occurs mainly early after transfection. The biological significance of this finding is discussed, and properties of ECR and intrachromosomal recombination are compared. Images PMID:1630452

  19. LCR-initiated rearrangements at the IDS locus, completed with Alu-mediated recombination or non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Junko; Lee, Jennifer A; Breman, Amy M; Fernandes, Priscilla H; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Ward, Patricia A; Wolfe, Lynne A; Eng, Christine M; Del Gaudio, Daniela

    2011-07-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is caused by mutations in the IDS gene, which encodes the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. In ∼20% of MPS II patients the disorder is caused by gross IDS structural rearrangements. We identified two male cases harboring complex rearrangements involving the IDS gene and the nearby pseudogene, IDSP1, which has been annotated as a low-copy repeat (LCR). In both cases the rearrangement included a partial deletion of IDS and an inverted insertion of the neighboring region. In silico analyses revealed the presence of repetitive elements as well as LCRs at the junctions of rearrangements. Our models illustrate two alternative consequences of rearrangements initiated by non-allelic homologous recombination of LCRs: resolution by a second recombination event (that is, Alu-mediated recombination), or resolution by non-homologous end joining repair. These complex rearrangements have the potential to be recurrent and may be present among those MSP II cases with previously uncharacterized aberrations involving IDS.

  20. Cancer-associated mutations in BRC domains of BRCA2 affect homologous recombination induced by Rad51.

    PubMed

    Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Stavans, Joel

    2009-11-13

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 protein plays a major role in the regulation of Rad51-catalyzed homologous recombination. BRCA2 interacts with monomeric Rad51 primarily via conserved BRC domains and coordinates the formation of Rad51 filaments at double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks. A number of cancer-associated mutations in BRC4 and BRC2 domains have been reported. To elucidate their effects on homologous recombination, we studied Rad51 filament formation on single-stranded DNA and dsDNA substrates and Rad51-catalyzed strand exchange, in the presence of wild-type and mutated peptides of either BRC4 or BRC2. While the wild-type BRC2 and BRC4 peptides inhibited filament formation and, thus, strand exchange, the mutated forms decreased significantly these inhibitory effects. These results are consistent with a three-dimensional model for the interface between individual BRC repeats and Rad51. We suggest that mutations at sites crucial for the association between Rad51 and BRC domains impair the ability of BRCA2 to recruit Rad51 to dsDNA breaks, hampering recombinational repair.

  1. Temperate Phages Acquire DNA from Defective Prophages by Relaxed Homologous Recombination: The Role of Rad52-Like Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, Marianne; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Son, Olivier; Amarir-Bouhram, Jihane; Schbath, Sophie; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages (or phages) dominate the biosphere both numerically and in terms of genetic diversity. In particular, genomic comparisons suggest a remarkable level of horizontal gene transfer among temperate phages, favoring a high evolution rate. Molecular mechanisms of this pervasive mosaicism are mostly unknown. One hypothesis is that phage encoded recombinases are key players in these horizontal transfers, thanks to their high efficiency and low fidelity. Here, we associate two complementary in vivo assays and a bioinformatics analysis to address the role of phage encoded recombinases in genomic mosaicism. The first assay allowed determining the genetic determinants of mosaic formation between lambdoid phages and Escherichia coli prophage remnants. In the second assay, recombination was monitored between sequences on phage λ, and allowed to compare the performance of three different Rad52-like recombinases on the same substrate. We also addressed the importance of homologous recombination in phage evolution by a genomic comparison of 84 E. coli virulent and temperate phages or prophages. We demonstrate that mosaics are mainly generated by homology-driven mechanisms that tolerate high substrate divergence. We show that phage encoded Rad52-like recombinases act independently of RecA, and that they are relatively more efficient when the exchanged fragments are divergent. We also show that accessory phage genes orf and rap contribute to mosaicism. A bioinformatics analysis strengthens our experimental results by showing that homologous recombination left traces in temperate phage genomes at the borders of recently exchanged fragments. We found no evidence of exchanges between virulent and temperate phages of E. coli. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Rad52-like recombinases promote gene shuffling among temperate phages, accelerating their evolution. This mechanism may prove to be more general, as other mobile genetic elements such as ICE encode Rad52-like

  2. Srs2 and Mus81–Mms4 Prevent Accumulation of Toxic Inter-Homolog Recombination Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Keyamura, Kenji; Arai, Kota

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an evolutionally conserved mechanism that promotes genome stability through the faithful repair of double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA, and the recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATP-dependent DNA helicase Srs2 (a member of the highly conserved UvrD family of helicases) has multiple roles in regulating homologous recombination. A mutation (srs2K41A) resulting in a helicase-dead mutant of Srs2 was found to be lethal in diploid, but not in haploid, cells. In diploid cells, Srs2K41A caused the accumulation of inter-homolog joint molecule intermediates, increased the levels of spontaneous Rad52 foci, and induced gross chromosomal rearrangements. Srs2K41A lethality and accumulation of joint molecules were suppressed by inactivating Rad51 or deleting the Rad51-interaction domain of Srs2, whereas phosphorylation and sumoylation of Srs2 and its interaction with sumoylated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were not required for lethality. The structure-specific complex of crossover junction endonucleases Mus81 and Mms4 was also required for viability of diploid, but not haploid, SRS2 deletion mutants (srs2Δ), and diploid srs2Δ mus81Δ mutants accumulated joint molecule intermediates. Our data suggest that Srs2 and Mus81–Mms4 have critical roles in preventing the formation of (or in resolving) toxic inter-homolog joint molecules, which could otherwise interfere with chromosome segregation and lead to genetic instability. PMID:27390022

  3. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  4. Differential roles of homologous recombination pathways in Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin antigenic variation, DNA transformation and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Mehr, I J; Seifert, H S

    1998-11-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) pili undergo antigenic variation when the amino acid sequence of the pilin protein is changed, aiding in immune avoidance and altering pilus expression. Pilin antigenic variation occurs by RecA-dependent unidirectional transfer of DNA sequences from a silent pilin locus to the expressed pilin gene through high-frequency recombination events that occur at limited regions of homology. We show that the Gc recQ and recO genes are essential for pilin antigenic and phase variation and DNA repair but are not involved in natural DNA transformation. This suggests that a RecF-like pathway of recombination exists in Gc. In addition, mutations in the Gc recB, recC or recD genes revealed that a Gc RecBCD pathway also exists and is involved in DNA transformation and DNA repair but not in pilin antigenic variation. PMID:10094619

  5. Chi hotspots trigger a conformational change in the helicase-like domain of AddAB to activate homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Gilhooly, Neville S.; Carrasco, Carolina; Gollnick, Benjamin; Wilkinson, Martin; Wigley, Dale B.; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks is modulated by Chi sequences. These are recognised by helicase-nuclease complexes that process DNA ends for homologous recombination. Chi activates recombination by changing the biochemical properties of the helicase-nuclease, transforming it from a destructive exonuclease into a recombination-promoting repair enzyme. This transition is thought to be controlled by the Chi-dependent opening of a molecular latch, which enables part of the DNA substrate to evade degradation beyond Chi. Here, we show that disruption of the latch improves Chi recognition efficiency and stabilizes the interaction of AddAB with Chi, even in mutants that are impaired for Chi binding. Chi recognition elicits a structural change in AddAB that maps to a region of AddB which resembles a helicase domain, and which harbours both the Chi recognition locus and the latch. Mutation of the latch potentiates the change and moderately reduces the duration of a translocation pause at Chi. However, this mutant displays properties of Chi-modified AddAB even in the complete absence of bona fide hotspot sequences. The results are used to develop a model for AddAB regulation in which allosteric communication between Chi binding and latch opening ensures quality control during recombination hotspot recognition. PMID:26762979

  6. Independent intrachromosomal recombination events underlie the pericentric inversions of chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes homologous to human chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Goidts, Violaine; Szamalek, Justyna M; de Jong, Pieter J; Cooper, David N; Chuzhanova, Nadia; Hameister, Horst; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2005-09-01

    Analyses of chromosomal rearrangements that have occurred during the evolution of the hominoids can reveal much about the mutational mechanisms underlying primate chromosome evolution. We characterized the breakpoints of the pericentric inversion of chimpanzee chromosome 18 (PTR XVI), which is homologous to human chromosome 16 (HSA 16). A conserved 23-kb inverted repeat composed of satellites, LINE and Alu elements was identified near the breakpoints and could have mediated the inversion by bringing the chromosomal arms into close proximity with each other, thereby facilitating intrachromosomal recombination. The exact positions of the breakpoints may then have been determined by local DNA sequence homologies between the inversion breakpoints, including a 22-base pair direct repeat. The similarly located pericentric inversion of gorilla (GGO) chromosome XVI, was studied by FISH and PCR analysis. The p- and q-arm breakpoints of the inversions in PTR XVI and GGO XVI were found to occur at slightly different locations, consistent with their independent origin. Further, FISH studies of the homologous chromosomal regions in macaque and orangutan revealed that the region represented by HSA BAC RP11-696P19, which spans the inversion breakpoint on HSA 16q11-12, was derived from the ancestral primate chromosome homologous to HSA 1. After the divergence of orangutan from the other great apes approximately 12 million years ago (Mya), a duplication of the corresponding region occurred followed by its interchromosomal transposition to the ancestral chromosome 16q. Thus, the most parsimonious interpretation is that the gorilla and chimpanzee homologs exhibit similar but nonidentical derived pericentric inversions, whereas HSA 16 represents the ancestral form among hominoids.

  7. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University /Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

    2010-05-19

    - We extended our previous work on studying the time evolution of patterns associated with phase separation in conserved concentration fields. (6) Probabilistic Homology Validation - work on microstructure characterization is based on numerically studying the homology of certain sublevel sets of a function, whose evolution is described by deterministic or stochastic evolution equations. (7) Computational Homology and Dynamics - Topological methods can be used to rigorously describe the dynamics of nonlinear systems. We are approaching this problem from several perspectives and through a variety of systems. (8) Stress Networks in Polycrystals - we have characterized stress networks in polycrystals. This part of the project is aimed at developing homological metrics which can aid in distinguishing not only microstructures, but also derived mechanical response fields. (9) Microstructure-Controlled Drug Release - This part of the project is concerned with the development of topological metrics in the context of controlled drug delivery systems, such as drug-eluting stents. We are particularly interested in developing metrics which can be used to link the processing stage to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to the achieved system response in terms of drug release profiles. (10) Microstructure of Fuel Cells - we have been using our computational homology software to analyze the topological structure of the void, metal and ceramic components of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

  8. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

    2010-05-24

    - We extended our previous work on studying the time evolution of patterns associated with phase separation in conserved concentration fields. (6) Probabilistic Homology Validation - work on microstructure characterization is based on numerically studying the homology of certain sublevel sets of a function, whose evolution is described by deterministic or stochastic evolution equations. (7) Computational Homology and Dynamics - Topological methods can be used to rigorously describe the dynamics of nonlinear systems. We are approaching this problem from several perspectives and through a variety of systems. (8) Stress Networks in Polycrystals - we have characterized stress networks in polycrystals. This part of the project is aimed at developing homological metrics which can aid in distinguishing not only microstructures, but also derived mechanical response fields. (9) Microstructure-Controlled Drug Release - This part of the project is concerned with the development of topological metrics in the context of controlled drug delivery systems, such as drug-eluting stents. We are particularly interested in developing metrics which can be used to link the processing stage to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to the achieved system response in terms of drug release profiles. (10) Microstructure of Fuel Cells - we have been using our computational homology software to analyze the topological structure of the void, metal and ceramic components of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

  9. RecX Facilitates Homologous Recombination by Modulating RecA Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Paula P.; Carrasco, Begoña; Defeu Soufo, Clarisse; César, Carolina E.; Herr, Katharina; Kaufenstein, Miriam; Graumann, Peter L.; Alonso, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis recH342 strain, which decreases interspecies recombination without significantly affecting the frequency of transformation with homogamic DNA, carried a point mutation in the putative recX (yfhG) gene, and the mutation was renamed as recX342. We show that RecX (264 residues long), which shares partial identity with the Proteobacterial RecX (<180 residues), is a genuine recombination protein, and its primary function is to modulate the SOS response and to facilitate RecA-mediated recombinational repair and genetic recombination. RecX-YFP formed discrete foci on the nucleoid, which were coincident in time with RecF, in response to DNA damage, and on the poles and/or the nucleoid upon stochastic induction of programmed natural competence. When DNA was damaged, the RecX foci co-localized with RecA threads that persisted for a longer time in the recX context. The absence of RecX severely impaired natural transformation both with plasmid and chromosomal DNA. We show that RecX suppresses the negative effect exerted by RecA during plasmid transformation, prevents RecA mis-sensing of single-stranded DNA tracts, and modulates DNA strand exchange. RecX, by modulating the “length or packing” of a RecA filament, facilitates the initiation of recombination and increases recombination across species. PMID:23284295

  10. Topoisomerase II-Mediated DNA Damage Is Differently Repaired during the Cell Cycle by Non-Homologous End Joining and Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    de Campos-Nebel, Marcelo; Larripa, Irene; González-Cid, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (Top2) is a nuclear enzyme involved in several metabolic processes of DNA. Chemotherapy agents that poison Top2 are known to induce persistent protein-mediated DNA double strand breaks (DSB). In this report, by using knock down experiments, we demonstrated that Top2α was largely responsible for the induction of γH2AX and cytotoxicity by the Top2 poisons idarubicin and etoposide in normal human cells. As DSB resulting from Top2 poisons-mediated damage may be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR), we aimed to analyze both DNA repair pathways. We found that DNA-PKcs was rapidly activated in human cells, as evidenced by autophosphorylation at serine 2056, following Top2-mediated DNA damage. The chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs by wortmannin and vanillin resulted in an increased accumulation of DNA DSB, as evaluated by the comet assay. This was supported by a hypersensitive phenotype to Top2 poisons of Ku80- and DNA-PKcs- defective Chinese hamster cell lines. We also showed that Rad51 protein levels, Rad51 foci formation and sister chromatid exchanges were increased in human cells following Top2-mediated DNA damage. In support, BRCA2- and Rad51C- defective Chinese hamster cells displayed hypersensitivity to Top2 poisons. The analysis by immunofluorescence of the DNA DSB repair response in synchronized human cell cultures revealed activation of DNA-PKcs throughout the cell cycle and Rad51 foci formation in S and late S/G2 cells. Additionally, we found an increase of DNA-PKcs-mediated residual repair events, but not Rad51 residual foci, into micronucleated and apoptotic cells. Therefore, we conclude that in human cells both NHEJ and HR are required, with cell cycle stage specificity, for the repair of Top2-mediated reversible DNA damage. Moreover, NHEJ-mediated residual repair events are more frequently associated to irreversibly damaged cells. PMID:20824055

  11. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  12. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    SciTech Connect

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.

  13. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Parplys, Ann C; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G; Leung, Stanley G; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-11-16

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  14. RRP6/EXOSC10 is required for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Marin-Vicente, Consuelo; Domingo-Prim, Judit; Eberle, Andrea B; Visa, Neus

    2015-03-15

    The exosome acts on different RNA substrates and plays important roles in RNA metabolism. The fact that short non-coding RNAs are involved in the DNA damage response led us to investigate whether the exosome factor RRP6 of Drosophila melanogaster and its human ortholog EXOSC10 play a role in DNA repair. Here, we show that RRP6 and EXOSC10 are recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in S2 cells and HeLa cells, respectively. Depletion of RRP6/EXOSC10 does not interfere with the phosphorylation of the histone variant H2Av (Drosophila) or H2AX (humans), but impairs the recruitment of the homologous recombination factor RAD51 to the damaged sites, without affecting RAD51 levels. The recruitment of RAD51 to DSBs in S2 cells is also inhibited by overexpression of RRP6-Y361A-V5, a catalytically inactive RRP6 mutant. Furthermore, cells depleted of RRP6 or EXOSC10 are more sensitive to radiation, which is consistent with RRP6/EXOSC10 playing a role in DNA repair. RRP6/EXOSC10 can be co-immunoprecipitated with RAD51, which links RRP6/EXOSC10 to the homologous recombination pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that the ribonucleolytic activity of RRP6/EXOSC10 is required for the recruitment of RAD51 to DSBs.

  15. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    DOE PAGES

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; et al

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintainingmore » wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.« less

  16. Rapid Acquisition of Linezolid Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Role of Hypermutation and Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Shigekazu; Mizutani, Tomonori; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Kikuchi, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously reported the case of a 64-year-old man with mediastinitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus in which the infecting bacterium acquired linezolid resistance after only 14 days treatment with linezolid. We therefore investigated relevant clinical isolates for possible mechanisms of this rapid acquisition of linezolid resistance. Methods Using clinical S. aureus isolates, we assessed the in vitro mutation rate and performed stepwise selection for linezolid resistance. To investigate homologous recombination, sequences were determined for each of the 23S ribosomal RNA (23S rRNA) loci; analyzed sequences spanned the entirety of each 23S rRNA gene, including domain V, as well as the 16S-23S intergenic spacer regions. We additionally performed next-generation sequencing on clinical strains to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms compared to the N315 genome. Results Strains isolated from the patient prior to linezolid exposure (M5-M7) showed higher-level linezolid resistance than N315, and the pre-exposure strain (M2) exhibited more rapid acquisition of linezolid resistance than did N315. However, the mutation rates of these and contemporaneous clinical isolates were similar to those of N315, and the isolates did not exhibit any mutations in hypermutation-related genes. Sequences of the 23S rRNA genes and 16S-23S intergenic spacer regions were identical among the pre- and post-exposure clinical strains. Notably, all of the pre-exposure isolates harbored a recQ missense mutation (Glu69Asp) with respect to N315; such a lesion may have affected short sequence recombination (facilitating, for example, recombination among rrn loci). We hypothesize that this mechanism contributed to rapid acquisition of linezolid resistance. Conclusions Hypermutation and homologous recombination of the ribosomal RNA genes, including 23S rRNA genes, appear not to have been sources of the accelerated acquisition of linezolid resistance observed in our clinical case

  17. Targeting Homologous Recombination in Notch-Driven C. elegans Stem Cell and Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xinzhu; Michaelson, David; Tchieu, Jason; Cheng, Jin; Rothenstein, Diana; Feldman, Regina; Lee, Sang-gyu; Fuller, John; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Studer, Lorenz; Powell, Simon; Fuks, Zvi; Hubbard, E. Jane Albert; Kolesnick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian NOTCH1-4 receptors are all associated with human malignancy, although exact roles remain enigmatic. Here we employ glp-1(ar202), a temperature-sensitive gain-of-function C. elegans NOTCH mutant, to delineate NOTCH-driven tumor responses to radiotherapy. At ≤20°C, glp-1(ar202) is wild-type, whereas at 25°C it forms a germline stem cell⁄progenitor cell tumor reminiscent of human cancer. We identify a NOTCH tumor phenotype in which all tumor cells traffic rapidly to G2⁄M post-irradiation, attempt to repair DNA strand breaks exclusively via homology-driven repair, and when this fails die by mitotic death. Homology-driven repair inactivation is dramatically radiosensitizing. We show that these concepts translate directly to human cancer models. PMID:26120834

  18. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A; Reinert, Brian L; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A; Hromas, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5' end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3' single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5' end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5' DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5' overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ.

  19. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Reinert, Brian L.; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5’ end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3’ single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5’ end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5’ DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5’ overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ. PMID:26684013

  20. [An homologous recombination strategy to directly clone mammalian telemeres]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    We have pursued three goals over the past year. The first involved determining whether the HARY vector could be used for homologous integration in the human genome. The second was to ascertain whether inserted sequences could be amplified in preference to the endogenous DHFR genes. The third was to determine if the HARY insertion could provide an anchor point for long range restriction mapping. The progress in each goal is described.

  1. [An homologous recombination strategy to directly clone mammalian telomeres]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, G.M.

    1994-07-01

    We have pursued three goals over the past year. The first involved determining whether the HARY vector could be used for homologous integration in the human genome. The second was to ascertain whether inserted sequences could be amplified in preference to the endogenous DHFR genes. The third was to determine if the HARY insertion could provide an anchor point for long range restriction mapping. The progress in each goal is described in this report.

  2. IGF-1R inhibition enhances radiosensitivity and delays double-strand break repair by both non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Meenali M.; Lodhia, Kunal A.; Aleksic, Tamara; Gao, Shan; Protheroe, Andrew S.; Macaulay, Valentine M.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) enhances tumor cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation. It is not clear how this effect is mediated, nor whether this approach can be applied effectively in the clinic. We previously showed that IGF-1R depletion delays repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), unlikely to be explained entirely by reduction in homologous recombination (HR) repair. The current study tested the hypothesis that IGF-1R inhibition induces a repair defect that involves non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). IGF-1R inhibitor AZ12253801 blocked cell survival and radiosensitized IGF-1R over-expressing murine fibroblasts but not isogenic IGF-1R null cells, supporting specificity for IGF-1R. IGF-1R inhibition enhanced radiosensitivity in DU145, PC3 and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells, comparable to effects of ATM inhibition. AZ12253801-treated DU145 cells showed delayed resolution of γH2AX foci, apparent within 1hr of irradiation and persisting for 24hr. In contrast, IGF-1R inhibition did not influence radiosensitivity or γH2AX focus resolution in LNCaP-LN3 cells, suggesting that radiosensitization tracks with the ability of IGF-1R to influence DSB repair. To differentiate effects on repair from growth and cell survival responses, we tested AZ12253801 in DU145 cells at sub-SF50 concentrations that had no early (≤48hr) effects on cell cycle distribution or apoptosis induction. Irradiated cultures contained abnormal mitoses, and after 5 days IGF-1R inhibited cells showed enhanced radiation-induced polyploidy and nuclear fragmentation, consistent with the consequences of entry into mitosis with incompletely repaired DNA. AZ12253801 radiosensitized DNA-PK proficient but not DNA-PK deficient glioblastoma cells, and did not radiosensitize DNA-PK-inhibited DU145 cells, suggesting that in the context of DSB repair, IGF-1R functions in the same pathway as DNA-PK. Finally, IGF-1R inhibition attenuated repair by both NHEJ and

  3. The Z-DNA motif d(TG)30 promotes reception of information during gene conversion events while stimulating homologous recombination in human cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Wallace, L J; Moore, P D

    1990-02-01

    Tracts of the alternating dinucleotide polydeoxythymidylic-guanylic [d(TG)].polydeoxyadenylic-cytidylic acid [d(AC)], present throughout the human genome, are capable of readily forming left-handed Z-DNA in vitro. We have analyzed the effects of the Z-DNA motif d(TG)30 upon homologous recombination between two nonreplicating plasmid substrates cotransfected into human cells in culture. In this study, the sequence d(TG)30 is shown to stimulate homologous recombination up to 20-fold. Enhancement is specific to the Z-DNA motif; a control DNA fragment of similar size does not alter the recombination frequency. The stimulation of recombination is observed at a distance (237 to 1,269 base pairs away from the Z-DNA motif) and involves both gene conversion and reciprocal exchange events. Maximum stimulation is observed when the sequence is present in both substrates, but it is capable of stimulating when present in only one substrate. Analysis of recombination products indicates that the Z-DNA motif increases the frequency and alters the distribution of multiple, unselected recombination events. Specifically designed crosses indicate that the substrate containing the Z-DNA motif preferentially acts as the recipient of genetic information during gene conversion events. Models describing how left-handed Z-DNA sequences might promote the initiation of homologous recombination are presented. PMID:2405255

  4. DNA annealing by Redβ is insufficient for homologous recombination and the additional requirements involve intra- and inter-molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Erler, Axel; Fu, Jun; Kranz, Andrea; Tang, Jing; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Müller, Daniel; Sattler, Michael; Stewart, A. Francis

    2016-01-01

    Single strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) like Redβ initiate homologous recombination by annealing complementary DNA strands. We show that C-terminally truncated Redβ, whilst still able to promote annealing and nucleoprotein filament formation, is unable to mediate homologous recombination. Mutations of the C-terminal domain were evaluated using both single- and double stranded (ss and ds) substrates in recombination assays. Mutations of critical amino acids affected either dsDNA recombination or both ssDNA and dsDNA recombination indicating two separable functions, one of which is critical for dsDNA recombination and the second for recombination per se. As evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, the dsDNA recombination function relates to the Redα-Redβ protein-protein interaction, which requires not only contacts in the C-terminal domain but also a region near the N-terminus. Because the nucleoprotein filament formed with C-terminally truncated Redβ has altered properties, the second C-terminal function could be due to an interaction required for functional filaments. Alternatively the second C-terminal function could indicate a requirement for a Redβ-host factor interaction. These data further advance the model for Red recombination and the proposition that Redβ and RAD52 SSAPs share ancestral and mechanistic roots. PMID:27708411

  5. RAD6 Promotes Homologous Recombination Repair by Activating the Autophagy-Mediated Degradation of Heterochromatin Protein HP1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su; Wang, Chen; Sun, Luxi; Wang, Da-Liang; Chen, Lu; Huang, Zhuan; Yang, Qi; Gao, Jie; Yang, Xi-Bin; Chang, Jian-Feng; Chen, Ping; Lan, Li

    2014-01-01

    Efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is critical for the maintenance of genome stability. Unrepaired or misrepaired DSBs cause chromosomal rearrangements that can result in severe consequences, such as tumorigenesis. RAD6 is an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme that plays a pivotal role in repairing UV-induced DNA damage. Here, we present evidence that RAD6 is also required for DNA DSB repair via homologous recombination (HR) by specifically regulating the degradation of heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α). Our study indicates that RAD6 physically interacts with HP1α and ubiquitinates HP1α at residue K154, thereby promoting HP1α degradation through the autophagy pathway and eventually leading to an open chromatin structure that facilitates efficient HR DSB repair. Furthermore, bioinformatics studies have indicated that the expression of RAD6 and HP1α exhibits an inverse relationship and correlates with the survival rate of patients. PMID:25384975

  6. Loss of CtIP disturbs homologous recombination repair and sensitizes breast cancer cells to PARP inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Hiroaki; Motegi, Akira; Miki, Yoshio; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and therefore, new and improved approaches for the treatment of breast cancer are desperately needed. CtIP (RBBP8) is a multifunctional protein that is involved in various cellular functions, including transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair and the G1 and G2 cell cycle checkpoints. CtIP plays an important role in homologous recombination repair by interacting with tumor suppressor protein BRCA1. Here, we analyzed the expression profile of CtIP by data mining using published microarray data sets. We found that CtIP expression is frequently decreased in breast cancer patients, and the patient group with low-expressing CtIP mRNA is associated with a significantly lower survival rate. The knockdown of CtIP in breast cancer MCF7 cells reduced Rad51 foci numbers and enhanced f H2AX foci formation after f-irradiation, suggesting that deficiency of CtIP decreases homologous recombination repair and delays DNA double strand break repair. To explore the effect of CtIP on PARP inhibitor therapy for breast cancer, CtIP-depleted MCF7 cells were treated with PARP inhibitor olaparib (AZD2281) or veliparib (ABT-888). As in BRCA mutated cells, PARP inhibitors showed cytotoxicity to CtIP-depleted cells by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to decreased cell viability. Further, a xenograft tumor model in mice with MCF7 cells demonstrated significantly increased sensitivity towards PARP inhibition under CtIP deficiency. In summary, this study shows that low level of CtIP expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, and provides a rationale for establishing CtIP expression as a biomarker of PARP inhibitor response, and consequently offers novel therapeutic options for a significant subset of patients. PMID:26713604

  7. Pre-Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Stimulates DNA Double Strand Break End Resection, Promoting the Use of Homologous Recombination Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Murakami, Takeshi; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The choice of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway is determined at the stage of DSB end resection. Resection was proposed to control the balance between the two major DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here, we examined the regulation of DSB repair pathway choice at two-ended DSBs following ionizing radiation (IR) in G2 phase of the cell cycle. We found that cells pre-exposed to low-dose IR preferred to undergo HR following challenge IR in G2, whereas NHEJ repair kinetics in G1 were not affected by pre-IR treatment. Consistent with the increase in HR usage, the challenge IR induced Replication protein A (RPA) foci formation and RPA phosphorylation, a marker of resection, were enhanced by pre-IR. However, neither major DNA damage signals nor the status of core NHEJ proteins, which influence the choice of repair pathway, was significantly altered in pre-IR treated cells. Moreover, the increase in usage of HR due to pre-IR exposure was prevented by treatment with ATM inhibitor during the incubation period between pre-IR and challenge IR. Taken together, the results of our study suggest that the ATM-dependent damage response after pre-IR changes the cellular environment, possibly by regulating gene expression or post-transcriptional modifications in a manner that promotes resection. PMID:25826455

  8. The Elephant and the Blind Men: Making Sense of PARP Inhibitors in Homologous Recombination Deficient Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Silvana B.; Patel, Anand G.; Hurley, Rachel M.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is an important component of the base excision repair (BER) pathway as well as a regulator of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Previous studies have demonstrated that treatment of HR-deficient cells with PARP inhibitors results in stalled and collapsed replication forks. Consequently, HR-deficient cells are extremely sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Several explanations have been advanced to explain this so-called synthetic lethality between HR deficiency and PARP inhibition: (i) reduction of BER activity leading to enhanced DNA double-strand breaks, which accumulate in the absence of HR; (ii) trapping of inhibited PARP1 at sites of DNA damage, which prevents access of other repair proteins; (iii) failure to initiate HR by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer-dependent BRCA1 recruitment; and (iv) activation of the NHEJ pathway, which selectively induces error-prone repair in HR-deficient cells. Here we review evidence regarding these various explanations for the ability of PARP inhibitors to selectively kill HR-deficient cancer cells and discuss their potential implications. PMID:24062981

  9. The homologous recombination component EEPD1 is required for genome stability in response to developmental stress of vertebrate embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Changzoon; Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Reinert, Brian L.; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR), initiated by nuclease cleavage of branched structures at stalled forks. We previously reported that the 5′ nuclease EEPD1 is recruited to stressed replication forks, where it plays critical early roles in HR initiation by promoting fork cleavage and end resection. HR repair of stressed replication forks prevents their repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which would cause genome instability. Rapid cell division during vertebrate embryonic development generates enormous pressure to maintain replication speed and accuracy. To determine the role of EEPD1 in maintaining replication fork integrity and genome stability during rapid cell division in embryonic development, we assessed the role of EEPD1 during zebrafish embryogenesis. We show here that when EEPD1 is depleted, zebrafish embryos fail to develop normally and have a marked increase in death rate. Zebrafish embryos depleted of EEPD1 are far more sensitive to replication stress caused by nucleotide depletion. We hypothesized that the HR defect with EEPD1 depletion would shift repair of stressed replication forks to unopposed NHEJ, causing chromosome abnormalities. Consistent with this, EEPD1 depletion results in nuclear defects including anaphase bridges and micronuclei in stressed zebrafish embryos, similar to BRCA1 deficiency. These results demonstrate that the newly characterized HR protein EEPD1 maintains genome stability during embryonic replication stress. These data also imply that the rapid cell cycle transit seen during embryonic development produces replication stress that requires HR to resolve. PMID:26900729

  10. Homologous recombination in plant cells is enhanced by in vivo induction of double strand breaks into DNA by a site-specific endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Puchta, H; Dujon, B; Hohn, B

    1993-01-01

    Induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) is coupled to meiotic and mitotic recombination in yeast. We show that also in a higher eukaryote induction of DSBs is directly correlated with a strong enhancement of recombination frequencies. We cotransfected Nicotiana plumbaginifolia protoplasts with a plasmid carrying a synthetic I-SceI gene, coding for a highly sequence specific endonuclease, together with recombination substrates carrying an I-SceI-site adjacent to their homologous sequences. We measured efficiencies of extrachromosomal recombination, using a well established transient beta-glucuronidase (GUS) assay. GUS enzyme activities were strongly increased when a plasmid carrying the I-SceI gene in sense but not in antisense orientation with respect to the promoter was included in the transfections. The in vivo induced DSBs were detected in the recombination substrates by Southern blotting, demonstrating that the yeast enzyme is functional in plant cells. At high ratios of transfected I-SceI-genes to I-SceI-sites the majority of the I-SceI-sites in the recombination substrates are cleaved, indicating that the induction of the DSBs is the rate limiting step in the described recombination reaction. These results imply that in vivo induction of transient breaks at specific sites in the plant genome could allow foreign DNA to be targeted to these sites via homologous recombination. Images PMID:8255757

  11. Tetracycline Selective Pressure and Homologous Recombination Shape the Evolution of Chlamydia suis: A Recently Identified Zoonotic Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sandeep J; Marti, Hanna; Didelot, Xavier; Read, Timothy D; Dean, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Species closely related to the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) have recently been found to cause zoonotic infections, posing a public health threat especially in the case of tetracycline resistant Chlamydia suis (Cs) strains. These strains acquired a tet(C)-containing cassette via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Genomes of 11 Cs strains from various tissues were sequenced to reconstruct evolutionary pathway(s) for tet(C) HGT. Cs had the highest recombination rate of Chlamydia species studied to date. Admixture occurred among Cs strains and with Chlamydia muridarum but not with Ct Although in vitro tet(C) cassette exchange with Ct has been documented, in vivo evidence may require examining human samples from Ct and Cs co-infected sites. Molecular-clock dating indicated that ancestral clades of resistant Cs strains predated the 1947 discovery of tetracycline, which was subsequently used in animal feed. The cassette likely spread throughout Cs strains by homologous recombination after acquisition from an external source, and our analysis suggests Betaproteobacteria as the origin. Selective pressure from tetracycline may be responsible for recent bottlenecks in Cs populations. Since tetracycline is an important antibiotic for treating Ct, zoonotic infections at mutual sites of infection indicate the possibility for cassette transfer and major public health repercussions. PMID:27576537

  12. Tetracycline Selective Pressure and Homologous Recombination Shape the Evolution of Chlamydia suis: A Recently Identified Zoonotic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sandeep J.; Marti, Hanna; Didelot, Xavier; Read, Timothy D.; Dean, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Species closely related to the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) have recently been found to cause zoonotic infections, posing a public health threat especially in the case of tetracycline resistant Chlamydia suis (Cs) strains. These strains acquired a tet(C)-containing cassette via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Genomes of 11 Cs strains from various tissues were sequenced to reconstruct evolutionary pathway(s) for tet(C) HGT. Cs had the highest recombination rate of Chlamydia species studied to date. Admixture occurred among Cs strains and with Chlamydia muridarum but not with Ct. Although in vitro tet(C) cassette exchange with Ct has been documented, in vivo evidence may require examining human samples from Ct and Cs co-infected sites. Molecular-clock dating indicated that ancestral clades of resistant Cs strains predated the 1947 discovery of tetracycline, which was subsequently used in animal feed. The cassette likely spread throughout Cs strains by homologous recombination after acquisition from an external source, and our analysis suggests Betaproteobacteria as the origin. Selective pressure from tetracycline may be responsible for recent bottlenecks in Cs populations. Since tetracycline is an important antibiotic for treating Ct, zoonotic infections at mutual sites of infection indicate the possibility for cassette transfer and major public health repercussions. PMID:27576537

  13. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability by RAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloïse; Groesser, Torsten; Filippo, Joseph San; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams, Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-01-01

    Summary Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress, and RAD51AP1 is epistatic to the HR protein XRCC3. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds both dsDNA and a D-loop structure, and, only when able to interact with RAD51, greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement. PMID:17996711

  14. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability byRAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloise; Groesser, Torsten; San Filippo,Joseph; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams,Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-04-11

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds dsDNA and RAD51, and it greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide the first evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement.

  15. Transcriptional profile of the homologous recombination machinery and characterization of the EhRAD51 recombinase in response to DNA damage in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    López-Casamichana, Mavil; Orozco, Esther; Marchat, Laurence A; López-Camarillo, César

    2008-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, homologous recombination is an accurate mechanism to generate genetic diversity, and it is also used to repair DNA double strand-breaks. RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in recombinational DNA repair, including mre11, rad50, nsb1/xrs2, rad51, rad51c/rad57, rad51b/rad55, rad51d, xrcc2, xrcc3, rad52, rad54, rad54b/rdh54 and rad59 genes, have been studied in human and yeast cells. Notably, the RAD51 recombinase catalyses strand transfer between a broken DNA and its undamaged homologous strand, to allow damaged region repair. In protozoan parasites, homologous recombination generating antigenic variation and genomic rearrangements is responsible for virulence variation and drug resistance. However, in Entamoeba histolytica the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, DNA repair and homologous recombination mechanisms are still unknown. Results In this paper, we initiated the study of the mechanism for DNA repair by homologous recombination in the primitive eukaryote E. histolytica using UV-C (150 J/m2) irradiated trophozoites. DNA double strand-breaks were evidenced in irradiated cells by TUNEL and comet assays and evaluation of the EhH2AX histone phosphorylation status. In E. histolytica genome, we identified genes homologous to yeast and human RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in DNA double strand-breaks repair by homologous recombination. Interestingly, the E. histolytica RAD52 epistasis group related genes were differentially expressed before and after UV-C treatment. Next, we focused on the characterization of the putative recombinase EhRAD51, which conserves the typical architecture of RECA/RAD51 proteins. Specific antibodies immunodetected EhRAD51 protein in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Moreover, after DNA damage, EhRAD51 was located as typical nuclear foci-like structures in E. histolytica trophozoites. Purified recombinant EhRAD51 exhibited DNA binding and pairing activities and

  16. Recombinant expression systems for allergen vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2006-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy of future is likely to be based on allergy vaccines that contain engineered allergens modified to abolish or substantially reduce their IgE-binding activity in order to remove the risk of unwanted anaphylactic responses. The development of efficient systems for the production of recombinant allergens in sufficient quantities is requirement for establishing use of engineered allergens as components of allergy vaccines. This review outlines relative advantages and disadvantages of various heterologous systems for production of recombinant allergens. Microbial systems are most convenient and cost effective platforms for the production of recombinant allergens. However, lack of post-translational processing implies that some allergens have to be expressed in eukaryotic systems for proper folding and post-translational modifications such as glycosylation. Yeast systems can yield high levels of recombinant allergens but often are associated with hyper- glycosylation problems. Mammalian cell culture systems offer suitable post -translational modifications but are nearly hundred fold more expensive than microbial systems. The use of plants as bio-factories for production of recombinant allergens is emerging as a very attractive option as plants-based production system offer several advantages over other expression systems such as post translational processing of proteins, low production costs, scale up ability and enhanced safety due to absence of animal or human pathogens.

  17. A murine-ES like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem cells have been shown to exist in two functionally distinct pluripotent states, embryonic stem cells (ES cell)- and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), which are defined by the culture growth factor conditions. Human ES cells appear to exist in an epiblast-like state, which in comparison to their murine counterparts, is relatively difficult to propagate and manipulate. As a result, gene targeting is difficult and to-date only a handful of human knock-in or knock-out cell lines exist. We explored whether an alternative stem cell state exists for human stem cells as well, and demonstrate that manipulation of the growth factor milieu allows the derivation of a novel human stem cell type that displays morphological, molecular and functional properties of murine ES cells and facilitates gene targeting. As such, the murine ES-like state provides a powerful tool for the generation of recombinant human pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20569691

  18. Adenylosuccinate synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: homologous overexpression, purification and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lipps, G; Krauss, G

    1999-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate synthase (EC 6.3.4.4) catalyses the first committed step in the synthesis of adenosine. We have overexpressed the cloned gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ADE12) in S. cerevisiae. The recombinant enzyme exhibits similar kinetic behaviour to that of the native enzyme purified from S. cerevisiae. This ter-reactant dimeric enzyme shows Michaelis-Menten kinetics only with IMP. l-Aspartate and GTP display a weak negative co-operativity (Hill coefficient 0. 8-0.9). This negative co-operativity has not yet been reported for adenylosuccinate synthases from other organisms. Another unusual feature of the enzyme from S. cerevisiae is its negligible inhibition by adenine nucleotides and its pronounced inhibition by Cl(-) ions. PMID:10417315

  19. Germline Chromothripsis Driven by L1-Mediated Retrotransposition and Alu/Alu Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Nazaryan-Petersen, Lusine; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Bak, Mads; Jønson, Lars; Tommerup, Niels; Hancks, Dustin C; Tümer, Zeynep

    2016-04-01

    Chromothripsis (CTH) is a phenomenon where multiple localized double-stranded DNA breaks result in complex genomic rearrangements. Although the DNA-repair mechanisms involved in CTH have been described, the mechanisms driving the localized "shattering" process remain unclear. High-throughput sequence analysis of a familial germline CTH revealed an inserted SVAE retrotransposon associated with a 110-kb deletion displaying hallmarks of L1-mediated retrotransposition. Our analysis suggests that the SVAE insertion did not occur prior to or after, but concurrent with the CTH event. We also observed L1-endonuclease potential target sites in other breakpoints. In addition, we found four Alu elements flanking the 110-kb deletion and associated with an inversion. We suggest that chromatin looping mediated by homologous Alu elements may have brought distal DNA regions into close proximity facilitating DNA cleavage by catalytically active L1-endonuclease. Our data provide the first evidence that active and inactive human retrotransposons can serve as endogenous mutagens driving CTH in the germline.

  20. Real-time analysis of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Wade M.; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Haber, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to induce synchronously a single site-specific double-strand break (DSB) in a budding yeast chromosome has made it possible to monitor the kinetics and genetic requirements of many molecular steps during DSB repair. Special attention has been paid to the switching of mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a process initiated by the HO endonuclease by cleaving the MAT locus. A DSB in MATa is repaired by homologous recombination—specifically, by gene conversion—using a heterochromatic donor, HMLα. Repair results in the replacement of the a-specific sequences (Ya) by Yα and switching from MATa to MATα. We report that MAT switching requires the DNA replication factor Dpb11, although it does not require the Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or the Mcm and Cdc45 helicase components. Using Southern blot, PCR, and ChIP analysis of samples collected every 10 min, we extend previous studies of this process to identify the times for the loading of Rad51 recombinase protein onto the DSB ends at MAT, the subsequent strand invasion by the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament into the donor sequences, the initiation of new DNA synthesis, and the removal of the nonhomologous Y sequences. In addition we report evidence for the transient displacement of well-positioned nucleosomes in the HML donor locus during strand invasion. PMID:21292986

  1. The Meiotic Nuclear Lamina Regulates Chromosome Dynamics and Promotes Efficient Homologous Recombination in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Johannes; Göb, Eva; Baar, Johannes; Ortega, Sagrario; Benavente, Ricardo; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is the structural scaffold of the nuclear envelope and is well known for its central role in nuclear organization and maintaining nuclear stability and shape. In the past, a number of severe human disorders have been identified to be associated with mutations in lamins. Extensive research on this topic has provided novel important clues about nuclear lamina function. These studies have contributed to the knowledge that the lamina constitutes a complex multifunctional platform combining both structural and regulatory functions. Here, we report that, in addition to the previously demonstrated significance for somatic cell differentiation and maintenance, the nuclear lamina is also an essential determinant for germ cell development. Both male and female mice lacking the short meiosis-specific A-type lamin C2 have a severely defective meiosis, which at least in the male results in infertility. Detailed analysis revealed that lamin C2 is required for telomere-driven dynamic repositioning of meiotic chromosomes. Loss of lamin C2 affects precise synapsis of the homologs and interferes with meiotic double-strand break repair. Taken together, our data explain how the nuclear lamina contributes to meiotic chromosome behaviour and accurate genome haploidization on a mechanistic level. PMID:23382700

  2. Homologous recombination is elevated in some Werner-like syndromes but not during normal in vitro or in vivo senescence of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, R Z; Murano, S; Kurz, B; Shmookler Reis, R J

    1990-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a recessive genetic condition associated with markedly reduced replicative lifespans of cells in culture, high chromosomal instability in vivo and in vitro, and premature appearance of many characteristics of normal aging, including an increased incidence of cancer. We have monitored plasmid homologous recombination frequencies in diploid fibroblasts from 6 Werner or Werner-like syndrome patients, following transfection with a plasmid substrate containing 2 overlapping fragments of the TN5 Neor gene. Plasmid DNA recovered from these cells was then assayed for homologous recombination by (a) transformation of recA- bacteria to Ampr (indicating total viable plasmid) or Neor (indicating viable recombinant plasmid), and (b) by limited-cycle polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to co-amplify a recombinant fragment containing the overlap region, and a control region of the same plasmid, without bacterial transformation. Bacterial assay data indicated that recombination rates in 3 of the 6 WS strains were significantly elevated above normal controls; 4 of 6 appeared elevated by PCR assay. The highest-recombination WS strain showed evidence of reduced degradation of transfected plasmid DNA. For this small sample of WS strains, clinical severity of WS was not well correlated with recombination rate as determined by either assay (Pearson r = 0.78, not significant, for PCR assay); elevated recombination may, however, define a subset of WS at greatest risk for cancer and/or atherosclerosis. PCR assay of a hyperoxia-resistant HeLa cell line, displaying substantially increased chromosome breakage, indicated increased recombination between direct-repeat fragments. Nevertheless, elevated recombination in WS strains is unlikely to be secondary to impaired replicative capacity characteristic of WS cells, or to defective repair of chromosome damage which is increased in WS, since recombination in non-WS strains was unaffected by passage level or repeated UV

  3. Double replacement: strategy for efficient introduction of subtle mutations into the murine Col1a-1 gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Liu, X; Jaenisch, R

    1994-01-01

    A subtle mutation that rendered type I collagen resistant to mammalian collagenase has been introduced into the murine Col1a-1 (recently redesignated Cola-1) gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Initially, a "hit and run" procedure was used. Since two steps were required for introducing each mutation and more than one mutation was to be introduced in the same genomic region independently, we have developed a streamlined procedure that involves two sequential replacement-type homologous recombination events. In the first step, an internal deletion was introduced into the Col1a-1 locus along with the positive and negative selectable markers, neo and tk, to mark the region of interest. G418-resistant homologous recombinants were isolated and used in the second step in which the deleted Col1a-1 allele was replaced with a construct containing the desired mutation. Homologous recombinants containing the mutation were identified among the Tk- ES clones after selection with FIAU [1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodouracil (called fialuridine)]. Approximately 10% of such clones contained the desired mutation. The double replacement procedure greatly reduces the time and amount of work required to introduce mutations independently into the same or closely linked regions. Once the homologous recombinants derived from the first step are established, the introduction of other mutations into the deleted region becomes a one-step procedure. For X number of introduced mutations, 2X selections are required with the "hit and run" approach, but only X + 1 are required with the double-replacement method. This innovative procedure could be very useful in studies of gene structure and function as well as gene expression and regulation. Images PMID:8146196

  4. New Coffee Plant-Infecting Xylella fastidiosa Variants Derived via Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Denancé, Nicolas; Legendre, Bruno; Morel, Emmanuelle; Briand, Martial; Mississipi, Stelly; Durand, Karine; Olivier, Valérie; Portier, Perrine; Poliakoff, Françoise; Crouzillat, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium endemic to the Americas that has recently emerged in Asia and Europe. Although this bacterium is classified as a quarantine organism in the European Union, importation of plant material from contaminated areas and latent infection in asymptomatic plants have engendered its inevitable introduction. In 2012, four coffee plants (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) with leaf scorch symptoms growing in a confined greenhouse were detected and intercepted in France. After identification of the causal agent, this outbreak was eradicated. Three X. fastidiosa strains were isolated from these plants, confirming a preliminary identification based on immunology. The strains were characterized by multiplex PCR and by multilocus sequence analysis/typing (MLSA-MLST) based on seven housekeeping genes. One strain, CFBP 8073, isolated from C. canephora imported from Mexico, was assigned to X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa/X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi. This strain harbors a novel sequence type (ST) with novel alleles at two loci. The two other strains, CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8074, isolated from Coffea arabica imported from Ecuador, were allocated to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca. These two strains shared a novel ST with novel alleles at two loci. These MLST profiles showed evidence of recombination events. We provide genome sequences for CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8073 strains. Comparative genomic analyses of these two genome sequences with publicly available X. fastidiosa genomes, including the Italian strain CoDiRO, confirmed these phylogenetic positions and provided candidate alleles for coffee plant adaptation. This study demonstrates the global diversity of X. fastidiosa and highlights the diversity of strains isolated from coffee plants. PMID:26712553

  5. New Coffee Plant-Infecting Xylella fastidiosa Variants Derived via Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Denancé, Nicolas; Legendre, Bruno; Morel, Emmanuelle; Briand, Martial; Mississipi, Stelly; Durand, Karine; Olivier, Valérie; Portier, Perrine; Poliakoff, Françoise; Crouzillat, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium endemic to the Americas that has recently emerged in Asia and Europe. Although this bacterium is classified as a quarantine organism in the European Union, importation of plant material from contaminated areas and latent infection in asymptomatic plants have engendered its inevitable introduction. In 2012, four coffee plants (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) with leaf scorch symptoms growing in a confined greenhouse were detected and intercepted in France. After identification of the causal agent, this outbreak was eradicated. Three X. fastidiosa strains were isolated from these plants, confirming a preliminary identification based on immunology. The strains were characterized by multiplex PCR and by multilocus sequence analysis/typing (MLSA-MLST) based on seven housekeeping genes. One strain, CFBP 8073, isolated from C. canephora imported from Mexico, was assigned to X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa/X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi. This strain harbors a novel sequence type (ST) with novel alleles at two loci. The two other strains, CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8074, isolated from Coffea arabica imported from Ecuador, were allocated to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca. These two strains shared a novel ST with novel alleles at two loci. These MLST profiles showed evidence of recombination events. We provide genome sequences for CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8073 strains. Comparative genomic analyses of these two genome sequences with publicly available X. fastidiosa genomes, including the Italian strain CoDiRO, confirmed these phylogenetic positions and provided candidate alleles for coffee plant adaptation. This study demonstrates the global diversity of X. fastidiosa and highlights the diversity of strains isolated from coffee plants. PMID:26712553

  6. Homologous Recombination within Large Chromosomal Regions Facilitates Acquisition of β-Lactam and Vancomycin Resistance in Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Francois; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Whiteaker, James D.; Gilmore, Michael S.; Rice, Louis B.

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of DNA between Enterococcus faecium strains has been characterized both by the movement of well-defined genetic elements and by the large-scale transfer of genomic DNA fragments. In this work, we report on the whole-genome analysis of transconjugants resulting from mating events between the vancomycin-resistant E. faecium C68 strain and the vancomycin-susceptible D344RRF strain to discern the mechanism by which the transferred regions enter the recipient chromosome. Vancomycin-resistant transconjugants from five independent matings were analyzed by whole-genome sequencing. In all cases but one, the penicillin binding protein 5 (pbp5) gene and the Tn5382 vancomycin resistance transposon were transferred together and replaced the corresponding pbp5 region of D344RRF. In one instance, Tn5382 inserted independently downstream of the D344RRF pbp5 gene. Single nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis suggested that entry of donor DNA into the recipient chromosome occurred by recombination across regions of homology between donor and recipient chromosomes, rather than through insertion sequence-mediated transposition. The transfer of genomic DNA was also associated with the transfer of C68 plasmid pLRM23 and another putative plasmid. Our data are consistent with the initiation of transfer by cointegration of a transferable plasmid with the donor chromosome, with subsequent circularization of the plasmid-chromosome cointegrant in the donor prior to transfer. Entry into the recipient chromosome most commonly occurred across regions of homology between donor and recipient chromosomes. PMID:27431230

  7. TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination Produces Site-Directed DNA Base Change and Herbicide-Resistant Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; Chen, Chih Ying; Yang, Bing

    2016-05-20

    Over the last decades, much endeavor has been made to advance genome editing technology due to its promising role in both basic and synthetic biology. The breakthrough has been made in recent years with the advent of sequence-specific endonucleases, especially zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) guided nucleases (e.g., Cas9). In higher eukaryotic organisms, site-directed mutagenesis usually can be achieved through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair to the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by the exogenously applied nucleases. However, site-specific gene replacement or genuine genome editing through homologous recombination (HR) repair to DSBs remains a challenge. As a proof of concept gene replacement through TALEN-based HR in rice (Oryza sativa), we successfully produced double point mutations in rice acetolactate synthase gene (OsALS) and generated herbicide resistant rice lines by using TALENs and donor DNA carrying the desired mutations. After ballistic delivery into rice calli of TALEN construct and donor DNA, nine HR events with different genotypes of OsALS were obtained in T0 generation at the efficiency of 1.4%-6.3% from three experiments. The HR-mediated gene edits were heritable to the progeny of T1 generation. The edited T1 plants were as morphologically normal as the control plants while displayed strong herbicide resistance. The results demonstrate the feasibility of TALEN-mediated genome editing in rice and provide useful information for further genome editing by other nuclease-based genome editing platforms. PMID:27180265

  8. PTEN loss compromises homologous recombination repair in astrocytes: implications for GBM therapy with temozolomide or PARP inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    McEllin, Brian; Camacho, Cristel V.; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Hahm, Brandon; Tomimatsu, Nozomi; Bachoo, Robert M.; Burma, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are lethal brain tumors that are highly resistant to therapy. The only meaningful improvement in therapeutic response came from use of the SN1-type alkylating agent, temozolomide, in combination with ionizing radiation (IR). However, no genetic markers that might predict a better response to DNA alkylating agents have been identified in GBMs, except for loss of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) via promoter methylation. In this study, using genetically defined primary murine astrocytes as well as human glioma lines, we show that loss of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) confers sensitivity to N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), a functional analog of temozolomide. We find that MNNG induces replication-associated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are inefficiently repaired in PTEN-deficient astrocytes and trigger apoptosis. Mechanistically, this is because PTEN-null astrocytes are compromised in homologous recombination (HR), which is important for the repair of replication-associated DSBs. Our results suggest that reduced levels of Rad51 paralogs in PTEN-null astrocytes might underlie the HR deficiency of these cells. Importantly, the HR deficiency of PTEN-null cells renders them sensitive to the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor ABT-888 due to synthetic lethality. In sum, our results tentatively suggest that patients with PTEN-null GBMs (about 36%) may especially benefit from treatment with DNA alkylating agents such as temozolomide. Significantly, our results also provide a rational basis for treating the sub-group of patients who are PTEN deficient with PARP inhibitors in addition to the current treatment regimen of radiation and temozolomide. PMID:20530668

  9. Tousled kinase activator, gallic acid, promotes homologous recombinational repair and suppresses radiation cytotoxicity in salivary gland cells.

    PubMed

    Timiri Shanmugam, Prakash Srinivasan; Nair, Renjith Parameshwaran; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Caldito, Gloria; Abreo, Fleurette; Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan

    2016-04-01

    Accidental or medical radiation exposure of the salivary glands can gravely impact oral health. Previous studies have shown the importance of Tousled-like kinase 1 (TLK1) and its alternate start variant TLK1B in cell survival against genotoxic stresses. Through a high-throughput library screening of natural compounds, the phenolic phytochemical, gallic acid (GA), was identified as a modulator of TLK1/1B. This small molecule possesses anti-oxidant and free radical scavenging properties, but in this study, we report that in vitro it promotes survival of human salivary acinar cells, NS-SV-AC, through repair of ionizing radiation damage. Irradiated cells treated with GA show improved clonogenic survival compared to untreated controls. And, analyses of DNA repair kinetics by alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis and γ-H2AX foci immunofluorescence indicate rapid resolution of DNA breaks in drug-treated cells. Study of DR-GFP transgene repair indicates GA facilitates homologous recombinational repair to establish a functional GFP gene. In contrast, inactivation of TLK1 or its shRNA knockdown suppressed resolution of radiation-induced DNA tails in NS-SV-AC, and homology directed repair in DR-GFP cells. Consistent with our results in culture, animals treated with GA after exposure to fractionated radiation showed better preservation of salivary function compared to saline-treated animals. Our results suggest that GA-mediated transient modulation of TLK1 activity promotes DNA repair and suppresses radiation cytoxicity in salivary gland cells.

  10. Physiological homology between Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrate cardiovascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Choma, Michael A.; Suter, Melissa J.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The physiology of the Drosophila melanogaster cardiovascular system remains poorly characterized compared with its vertebrate counterparts. Basic measures of physiological performance remain unknown. It also is unclear whether subtle physiological defects observed in the human cardiovascular system can be reproduced in D. melanogaster. Here we characterize the cardiovascular physiology of D. melanogaster in its pre-pupal stage by using high-speed dye angiography and optical coherence tomography. The heart has vigorous pulsatile contractions that drive intracardiac, aortic and extracellular-extravascular hemolymph flow. Several physiological measures, including weight-adjusted cardiac output, body-length-adjusted aortic velocities and intracardiac shear forces, are similar to those in the closed vertebrate cardiovascular systems, including that of humans. Extracellular-extravascular flow in the pre-pupal D. melanogaster circulation drives convection-limited fluid transport. To demonstrate homology in heart dysfunction, we showed that, at the pre-pupal stage, a troponin I mutant, held-up2 (hdp2), has impaired systolic and diastolic heart wall velocities. Impaired heart wall velocities occur in the context of a non-dilated phenotype with a mildly depressed fractional shortening. We additionally derive receiver operating characteristic curves showing that heart wall velocity is a potentially powerful discriminator of systolic heart dysfunction. Our results demonstrate physiological homology and support the use of D. melanogaster as an animal model of complex cardiovascular disease. PMID:21183476

  11. Multifactorial Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spores to High-Energy Proton Radiation: Role of Spore Structural Components and the Homologous Recombination and Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Günther; Li, Zuofeng; Klein, Stuart; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The space environment contains high-energy charged particles (e.g., protons, neutrons, electrons, α-particles, heavy ions) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources or trapped in the radiation belts. Protons constitute the majority (87%) of high-energy charged particles. Spores of Bacillus species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. In this study, spores of different Bacillus subtilis strains were used to study the effects of high energetic proton irradiation on spore survival. Spores of the wild-type B. subtilis strain [mutants deficient in the homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathways and mutants deficient in various spore structural components such as dipicolinic acid (DPA), α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) formation, spore coats, pigmentation, or spore core water content] were irradiated as air-dried multilayers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons with 218 MeV protons [with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 0.4 keV/μm] to various final doses up to 2500 Gy. Spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to proton radiation than wild-type spores, indicating that both HR and NHEJ DNA repair pathways are needed for spore survival. Spores lacking DPA, α/β-type SASP, or with increased core water content were also significantly more sensitive to proton radiation, whereas the resistance of spores lacking pigmentation or spore coats was essentially identical to that of the wild-type spores. Our results indicate that α/β-type SASP, core water content, and DPA play an important role in spore resistance to high-energy proton irradiation, suggesting their essential function as radioprotectants of the spore interior. Key Words: Bacillus—Spores—DNA repair—Protection—High-energy proton radiation. Astrobiology 12, 1069–1077. PMID:23088412

  12. Multifactorial resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to high-energy proton radiation: role of spore structural components and the homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Reitz, Günther; Li, Zuofeng; Klein, Stuart; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2012-11-01

    The space environment contains high-energy charged particles (e.g., protons, neutrons, electrons, α-particles, heavy ions) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources or trapped in the radiation belts. Protons constitute the majority (87%) of high-energy charged particles. Spores of Bacillus species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. In this study, spores of different Bacillus subtilis strains were used to study the effects of high energetic proton irradiation on spore survival. Spores of the wild-type B. subtilis strain [mutants deficient in the homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathways and mutants deficient in various spore structural components such as dipicolinic acid (DPA), α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) formation, spore coats, pigmentation, or spore core water content] were irradiated as air-dried multilayers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons with 218 MeV protons [with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 0.4 keV/μm] to various final doses up to 2500 Gy. Spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to proton radiation than wild-type spores, indicating that both HR and NHEJ DNA repair pathways are needed for spore survival. Spores lacking DPA, α/β-type SASP, or with increased core water content were also significantly more sensitive to proton radiation, whereas the resistance of spores lacking pigmentation or spore coats was essentially identical to that of the wild-type spores. Our results indicate that α/β-type SASP, core water content, and DPA play an important role in spore resistance to high-energy proton irradiation, suggesting their essential function as radioprotectants of the spore interior. PMID:23088412

  13. Multifactorial resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to high-energy proton radiation: role of spore structural components and the homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Reitz, Günther; Li, Zuofeng; Klein, Stuart; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2012-11-01

    The space environment contains high-energy charged particles (e.g., protons, neutrons, electrons, α-particles, heavy ions) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources or trapped in the radiation belts. Protons constitute the majority (87%) of high-energy charged particles. Spores of Bacillus species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. In this study, spores of different Bacillus subtilis strains were used to study the effects of high energetic proton irradiation on spore survival. Spores of the wild-type B. subtilis strain [mutants deficient in the homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathways and mutants deficient in various spore structural components such as dipicolinic acid (DPA), α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) formation, spore coats, pigmentation, or spore core water content] were irradiated as air-dried multilayers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons with 218 MeV protons [with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 0.4 keV/μm] to various final doses up to 2500 Gy. Spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to proton radiation than wild-type spores, indicating that both HR and NHEJ DNA repair pathways are needed for spore survival. Spores lacking DPA, α/β-type SASP, or with increased core water content were also significantly more sensitive to proton radiation, whereas the resistance of spores lacking pigmentation or spore coats was essentially identical to that of the wild-type spores. Our results indicate that α/β-type SASP, core water content, and DPA play an important role in spore resistance to high-energy proton irradiation, suggesting their essential function as radioprotectants of the spore interior.

  14. I-SceI-mediated double-strand break does not increase the frequency of homologous recombination at the Dct locus in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fenina, Myriam; Simon-Chazottes, Dominique; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Soueid, Jihane; Langa, Francina; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel; Bernard, Bruno A; Panthier, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Targeted induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) at natural endogenous loci was shown to increase the rate of gene replacement by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells. The gene encoding dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) is specifically expressed in melanocytes and their precursors. To construct a genetic tool allowing the replacement of Dct gene by any gene of interest, we generated an embryonic stem cell line carrying the recognition site for the yeast I-SceI meganuclease embedded in the Dct genomic segment. The embryonic stem cell line was electroporated with an I-SceI expression plasmid, and a template for the DSB-repair process that carried sequence homologies to the Dct target. The I-SceI meganuclease was indeed able to introduce a DSB at the Dct locus in live embryonic stem cells. However, the level of gene targeting was not improved by the DSB induction, indicating a limited capacity of I-SceI to mediate homologous recombination at the Dct locus. These data suggest that homologous recombination by meganuclease-induced DSB may be locus dependent in mammalian cells.

  15. Reassessment of the role of Mut S homolog 5 in Ig class switch recombination shows lack of involvement in cis- and trans-switching.

    PubMed

    Guikema, Jeroen E J; Schrader, Carol E; Leus, Niek G J; Ucher, Anna; Linehan, Erin K; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried; Stavnezer, Janet

    2008-12-15

    When B cells are activated after immunization or infection, they exchange the gene encoding the Ig H chain C region by class switch recombination (CSR). CSR generally occurs by an intrachromosomal deletional recombination within switch (S) region sequences. However, approximately 10% of CSR events occur between chromosome homologs (trans- or interallele CSR), suggesting that the homologous chromosomes are aligned during CSR. Because the Mut S homolog 4 (Msh4) and Msh5 bind to Holliday junctions and are required for homologous recombination during meiosis in germ cells, we hypothesized these proteins might be involved in trans-chromosomal CSR (trans-CSR). Indeed, Msh4-Msh5 has recently been suggested to have a role in CSR. However, we find a large variety of alternative splice variants of Msh5 mRNA in splenic B cells rather than the full-length form found in testis. Most of these mRNAs are unlikely to be stable, suggesting that Msh5 might not be functional. Furthermore, we find that msh5 nullizygous B cells undergo CSR normally, have unaltered levels of trans-CSR, normal levels of DNA breaks in the Smu region, and normal S-S junctions. We also show that the S-S junctions from cis- and trans-CSR events have similar lengths of junctional microhomology, suggesting trans-CSR occurs by nonhomologous end joining as does intrachromosome (cis)-CSR. From these data, we conclude that Msh5 does not participate in CSR.

  16. 5-Fluorouracil sensitizes colorectal tumor cells towards double stranded DNA breaks by interfering with homologous recombination repair

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Upadhyayula Sai; Dyczkowski, Jerzy; Beißbarth, Tim; Gaedcke, Jochen; Mansour, Wael Y.; Borgmann, Kerstin; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Malignant tumors of the rectum are treated by neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. This involves a combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and double stranded DNA-break (DSB)-inducing radiotherapy. Here we explored how 5-FU cooperates with DSB-induction to achieve sustainable DNA damage in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. After DSB induction by neocarzinostatin, phosphorylated histone 2AX (γ-H2AX) rapidly accumulated but then largely vanished within a few hours. In contrast, when CRC cells were pre-treated with 5-FU, gammaH2AX remained for at least 24 hours. GFP-reporter assays revealed that 5-FU decreases the efficiency of homologous recombination (HR) repair. However, 5-FU did not prevent the initial steps of HR repair, such as the accumulation of RPA and Rad51 at nuclear foci. Thus, we propose that 5-FU interferes with the continuation of HR repair, e. g. the synthesis of new DNA strands. Two key mediators of HR, Rad51 and BRCA2, were found upregulated in CRC biopsies as compared to normal mucosa. Inhibition of HR by targeting Rad51 enhanced DNA damage upon DSB-inducing treatment, outlining an alternative way of enhancing therapeutic efficacy. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that interfering with HR represents a key mechanism to enhance the efficacy when treating CRC with DNA-damaging therapy. PMID:25909291

  17. Targeting Human α-Lactalbumin Gene Insertion into the Goat β-Lactoglobulin Locus by TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongmei; Liu, Jun; Cui, Chenchen; Song, Yujie; Ge, Hengtao; Hu, Linyong; Li, Qian; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Special value of goat milk in human nutrition and well being is associated with medical problems of food allergies which are caused by milk proteins such as β-lactoglobulin (BLG). Here, we employed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-assisted homologous recombination in goat fibroblasts to introduce human α-lactalbumin (hLA) genes into goat BLG locus. TALEN-mediated targeting enabled isolation of colonies with mono- and bi-allelic transgene integration in up to 10.1% and 1.1%, respectively, after selection. Specifically, BLG mRNA levels were gradually decreasing in both mo- and bi-allelic goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) while hLA demonstrated expression in GMECs in vitro. Gene-targeted fibroblast cells were efficiently used in somatic cell nuclear transfer, resulting in production of hLA knock-in goats directing down-regulated BLG expression and abundant hLA secretion in animal milk. Our findings provide valuable background for animal milk optimization and expedited development for agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:27258157

  18. Analysis of BRCA1 Variants in Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination and Single-Strand Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Towler, William I.; Zhang, Jie; Ransburgh, Derek J. R.; Toland, Amanda E.; Ishioka, Chikashi; Chiba, Natsuko; Parvin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Missense substitutions of uncertain clinical significance in the BRCA1 gene are a vexing problem in genetic counseling for women who have a family history of breast cancer. In this study, we evaluated the functions of 29 missense substitutions of BRCA1 in two DNA repair pathways. Repair of double-strand breaks by homology-directed recombination (HDR) had been previously analyzed for 16 of these BRCA1 variants, and 13 more variants were analyzed in this study. All 29 variants were also analyzed for function in double-strand break repair by the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. We found that among the pathogenic mutations in BRCA1, all were defective for DNA repair by either pathway. The HDR assay was accurate because all pathogenic mutants were defective for HDR, and all nonpathogenic variants were fully functional for HDR. Repair by SSA accurately identified pathogenic mutants, but several nonpathogenic variants were scored as defective or partially defective. These results indicated that specific amino acid residues of the BRCA1 protein have different effects in the two related DNA repair pathways, and these results validate the HDR assay as highly correlative with BRCA1-associated breast cancer. PMID:23161852

  19. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  20. Role for the Mammalian Swi5-Sfr1 Complex in DNA Strand Break Repair through Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Yufuko; Jasin, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In fission yeast, the Swi5-Sfr1 complex plays an important role in homologous recombination (HR), a pathway crucial for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we identify and characterize mammalian Swi5 and Sfr1 homologues. Mouse Swi5 and Sfr1 are nuclear proteins that form a complex in vivo and in vitro. Swi5 interacts in vitro with Rad51, the DNA strand-exchange protein which functions during HR. By generating Swi5−/− and Sfr1−/− embryonic stem cell lines, we found that both proteins are mutually interdependent for their stability. Importantly, the Swi5-Sfr1 complex plays a role in HR when Rad51 function is perturbed in vivo by expression of a BRC peptide from BRCA2. Swi5−/− and Sfr1−/− cells are selectively sensitive to agents that cause DNA strand breaks, in particular ionizing radiation, camptothecin, and the Parp inhibitor olaparib. Consistent with a role in HR, sister chromatid exchange induced by Parp inhibition is attenuated in Swi5−/− and Sfr1−/− cells, and chromosome aberrations are increased. Thus, Swi5-Sfr1 is a newly identified complex required for genomic integrity in mammalian cells with a specific role in the repair of DNA strand breaks. PMID:20976249

  1. Targeting Human α-Lactalbumin Gene Insertion into the Goat β-Lactoglobulin Locus by TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chenchen; Song, Yujie; Ge, Hengtao; Hu, Linyong; Li, Qian; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Special value of goat milk in human nutrition and well being is associated with medical problems of food allergies which are caused by milk proteins such as β-lactoglobulin (BLG). Here, we employed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-assisted homologous recombination in goat fibroblasts to introduce human α-lactalbumin (hLA) genes into goat BLG locus. TALEN-mediated targeting enabled isolation of colonies with mono- and bi-allelic transgene integration in up to 10.1% and 1.1%, respectively, after selection. Specifically, BLG mRNA levels were gradually decreasing in both mo- and bi-allelic goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) while hLA demonstrated expression in GMECs in vitro. Gene-targeted fibroblast cells were efficiently used in somatic cell nuclear transfer, resulting in production of hLA knock-in goats directing down-regulated BLG expression and abundant hLA secretion in animal milk. Our findings provide valuable background for animal milk optimization and expedited development for agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:27258157

  2. Ring-shaped architecture of RecR: implications for its role in homologous recombinational DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Il; Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Park, Soo Jeong; Eom, Soo Hyun; Song, Hyun Kyu; Suh, Se Won

    2004-05-19

    RecR, together with RecF and RecO, facilitates RecA loading in the RecF pathway of homologous recombinational DNA repair in procaryotes. The human Rad52 protein is a functional counterpart of RecFOR. We present here the crystal structure of RecR from Deinococcus radiodurans (DR RecR). A monomer of DR RecR has a two-domain structure: the N-terminal domain with a helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motif and the C-terminal domain with a Cys4 zinc-finger motif, a Toprim domain and a Walker B motif. Four such monomers form a ring-shaped tetramer of 222 symmetry with a central hole of 30-35 angstroms diameter. In the crystal, two tetramers are concatenated, implying that the RecR tetramer is capable of opening and closing. We also show that DR RecR binds to both dsDNA and ssDNA, and that its HhH motif is essential for DNA binding. PMID:15116069

  3. A large duplication associated with dominant white color in pigs originated by homologous recombination between LINE elements flanking KIT.

    PubMed

    Giuffra, Elisabetta; Törnsten, Anna; Marklund, Stefan; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Chardon, Patrick; Kijas, James M H; Anderson, Susan I; Archibald, Alan L; Andersson, Leif

    2002-10-01

    The Dominant White (I/KIT) locus is one of the major coat color loci in the pig. Previous studies showed that the Dominant White (I) and Patch (IP) alleles are both associated with a duplication including the entire KIT coding sequence. We have now constructed a BAC contig spanning the three closely linked tyrosine kinase receptor genes PDGFRA-KIT-KDR. The size of the duplication was estimated at about 450 kb and includes KIT, but not PDGFRA and KDR. Sequence analysis revealed that the duplication arose by unequal homologous recombination between two LINE elements flanking KIT. The same unique duplication breakpoint was identified in animals carrying the I and IP alleles across breeds, implying that Dominant White and Patch alleles are descendants of a single duplication event. An unexpected finding was that Piétrain pigs carry the KIT duplication, since this breed was previously assumed to be wild type at this locus. Comparative sequence analysis indicated that the distinct phenotypic effect of the duplication occurs because the duplicated copy lacks some regulatory elements located more than 150 kb upstream of KIT exon 1 and necessary for normal KIT expression.

  4. Distinct genetic control of homologous recombination repair of Cas9-induced double-strand breaks, nicks and paired nicks.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Lianne E M; Prakash, Rohit; Chen, Chun-Chin; Vanoli, Fabio; Cavallo, Francesca; Zhang, Yu; Jasin, Maria; Krawczyk, Przemek M

    2016-06-20

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are known to be powerful inducers of homologous recombination (HR), but single-strand breaks (nicks) have also been shown to trigger HR. Both DSB- and nick-induced HR ((nick)HR) are exploited in advanced genome-engineering approaches based on the bacterial RNA-guided nuclease Cas9. However, the mechanisms of (nick)HR are largely unexplored. Here, we applied Cas9 nickases to study (nick)HR in mammalian cells. We find that (nick)HR is unaffected by inhibition of major damage signaling kinases and that it is not suppressed by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) components, arguing that nick processing does not require a DSB intermediate to trigger HR. Relative to a single nick, nicking both strands enhances HR, consistent with a DSB intermediate, even when nicks are induced up to ∼1kb apart. Accordingly, HR and NHEJ compete for repair of these paired nicks, but, surprisingly, only when 5' overhangs or blunt ends can be generated. Our study advances the understanding of molecular mechanisms driving nick and paired-nick repair in mammalian cells and clarify phenomena associated with Cas9-mediated genome editing.

  5. RAP80-directed tuning of BRCA1 homologous recombination function at ionizing radiation-induced nuclear foci

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yiduo; Scully, Ralph; Sobhian, Bijan; Xie, Anyong; Shestakova, Elena; Livingston, David M.

    2011-01-01

    In response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), BRCA1 forms biochemically distinct complexes with certain other DNA damage response proteins. These structures, some of which are required for homologous recombination (HR)-type DSB repair, concentrate at distinct nuclear foci that demarcate sites of genome breakage. Polyubiquitin binding by one of these structures, the RAP80/BRCA1 complex, is required for efficient BRCA1 focal recruitment, but the relationship of this process to the execution of HR has been unclear. We found that this complex actively suppresses otherwise exaggerated, BRCA1-driven HR. By controlling the kinetics by which other BRCA1-interacting proteins that promote HR concentrate together with BRCA1 in nuclear foci, RAP80/BRCA1 complexes suppress excessive DSB end processing, HR-type DSB repair, and overt chromosomal instability. Since chromosomal instability emerges when BRCA1 HR function is either unbridled or absent, active tuning of BRCA1 activity, executed in nuclear foci, is important to genome integrity maintenance. PMID:21406551

  6. Genomic complexity profiling reveals that HORMAD1 overexpression contributes to homologous recombination deficiency in triple-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Johnathan; Weekes, Daniel; Shah, Vandna; Gazinska, Patrycja; Joshi, Shalaka; Sidhu, Bhavna; Gillett, Cheryl; Pinder, Sarah; Vanoli, Fabio; Jasin, Maria; Mayrhofer, Markus; Isaksson, Anders; Cheang, Maggie C.U.; Mirza, Hasan; Frankum, Jessica; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan; Vinayak, Shaveta; Ford, James M.; Telli, Melinda L.; Grigoriadis, Anita; Tutt, Andrew N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are characterised by a wide spectrum of genomic alterations, some of which might be caused by defects in DNA repair processes such as homologous recombination (HR). Despite this understanding, associating particular patterns of genomic instability with response to therapy has been challenging. Here, we show that Allelic-imbalanced Copy Number Aberrations (AiCNA) are more prevalent in TNBCs that respond to platinum-based chemotherapy, thus providing a candidate predictive biomarker for this disease. Furthermore, we show that a high level of AiCNA is linked with elevated expression of a meiosis-associated gene HORMAD1. Elevated HORMAD1 expression suppresses RAD51-dependent HR and drives the use of alternative forms of DNA repair, the generation of AiCNAs as well as sensitising cancer cells to HR targeting therapies. Our data therefore provides a mechanistic association between HORMAD1 expression, a specific pattern of genomic instability and an association with response to platinum-based chemotherapy in TNBC. PMID:25770156

  7. Excess Polθ functions in response to replicative stress in homologous recombination-proficient cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    de Rugy, T. Goullet; Bashkurov, M.; Datti, A.; Betous, R.; Guitton-Sert, L.; Cazaux, C.; Durocher, D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA polymerase theta (Polθ) is a specialized A-family DNA polymerase that functions in processes such as translesion synthesis (TLS), DNA double-strand break repair and DNA replication timing. Overexpression of POLQ, the gene encoding Polθ, is a prognostic marker for an adverse outcome in a wide range of human cancers. While increased Polθ dosage was recently suggested to promote survival of homologous recombination (HR)-deficient cancer cells, it remains unclear whether POLQ overexpression could be also beneficial to HR-proficient cancer cells. By performing a short interfering (si)RNA screen in which genes encoding druggable proteins were knocked down in Polθ-overexpressing cells as a means to uncover genetic vulnerabilities associated with POLQ overexpression, we could not identify genes that were essential for viability in Polθ-overexpressing cells in normal growth conditions. We also showed that, upon external DNA replication stress, Polθ expression promotes cell survival and limits genetic instability. Finally, we report that POLQ expression correlates with the expression of a set of HR genes in breast, lung and colorectal cancers. Collectively, our data suggest that Polθ upregulation, besides its importance for survival of HR-deficient cancer cells, may be crucial also for HR-proficient cells to better tolerate DNA replication stress, as part of a global gene deregulation response, including HR genes. PMID:27612511

  8. Production of Toxocara cati TES-120 Recombinant Antigen and Comparison with its T. canis Homolog for Serodiagnosis of Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hosein Falaki; Saidin, Syazwan; Noordin, Rahmah

    2015-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease caused by the infective larvae of Toxocara canis and T. cati. Diagnosis in humans is usually based on clinical symptoms and serology. Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits using T. canis excretory–secretory (TES) larval antigens are commonly used for serodiagnosis. Differences in the antigens of the two Toxocara species may influence the diagnostic sensitivity of the test. In this study, T. cati recombinant TES-120 (rTES-120) was cloned, expressed, and compared with its T. canis homolog in an IgG4-western blot. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of T. cati rTES-120 were 70% (33/47) and 100% (39/39), respectively. T. canis rTES-120 showed 57.4% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity. When the results of assays using rTES-120 of both species were considered, the diagnostic sensitivity was 76%. This study shows that using antigens from both Toxocara species may improve the serodiagnosis of toxocariasis. PMID:26033026

  9. Non-catalytic Roles for XPG with BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Homologous Recombination and Genome Stability.

    PubMed

    Trego, Kelly S; Groesser, Torsten; Davalos, Albert R; Parplys, Ann C; Zhao, Weixing; Nelson, Michael R; Hlaing, Ayesu; Shih, Brian; Rydberg, Björn; Pluth, Janice M; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K

    2016-02-18

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair, and incision-defective XPG mutations cause the skin cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum. Truncating mutations instead cause the neurodevelopmental progeroid disorder Cockayne syndrome, but little is known about how XPG loss results in this devastating disease. We identify XPG as a partner of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in maintaining genomic stability through homologous recombination (HRR). XPG depletion causes DNA double-strand breaks, chromosomal abnormalities, cell-cycle delays, defective HRR, inability to overcome replication fork stalling, and replication stress. XPG directly interacts with BRCA2, RAD51, and PALB2, and XPG depletion reduces their chromatin binding and subsequent RAD51 foci formation. Upstream in HRR, XPG interacts directly with BRCA1. Its depletion causes BRCA1 hyper-phosphorylation and persistent chromatin binding. These unexpected findings establish XPG as an HRR protein with important roles in genome stability and suggest how XPG defects produce severe clinical consequences including cancer and accelerated aging. PMID:26833090

  10. Distinct genetic control of homologous recombination repair of Cas9-induced double-strand breaks, nicks and paired nicks

    PubMed Central

    Vriend, Lianne E.M.; Prakash, Rohit; Chen, Chun-Chin; Vanoli, Fabio; Cavallo, Francesca; Zhang, Yu; Jasin, Maria; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are known to be powerful inducers of homologous recombination (HR), but single-strand breaks (nicks) have also been shown to trigger HR. Both DSB- and nick-induced HR (nickHR) are exploited in advanced genome-engineering approaches based on the bacterial RNA-guided nuclease Cas9. However, the mechanisms of nickHR are largely unexplored. Here, we applied Cas9 nickases to study nickHR in mammalian cells. We find that nickHR is unaffected by inhibition of major damage signaling kinases and that it is not suppressed by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) components, arguing that nick processing does not require a DSB intermediate to trigger HR. Relative to a single nick, nicking both strands enhances HR, consistent with a DSB intermediate, even when nicks are induced up to ∼1kb apart. Accordingly, HR and NHEJ compete for repair of these paired nicks, but, surprisingly, only when 5' overhangs or blunt ends can be generated. Our study advances the understanding of molecular mechanisms driving nick and paired-nick repair in mammalian cells and clarify phenomena associated with Cas9-mediated genome editing. PMID:27001513

  11. Recombination between homologous chromosomes induced by unrepaired UV-generated DNA damage requires Mus81p and is suppressed by Mms2p.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yi; Petes, Thomas D

    2015-03-01

    DNA lesions caused by UV radiation are highly recombinogenic. In wild-type cells, the recombinogenic effect of UV partially reflects the processing of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers into DNA gaps or breaks by the enzymes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. In this study, we show that unprocessed pyrimidine dimers also potently induce recombination between homologs. In NER-deficient rad14 diploid strains, we demonstrate that unexcised pyrimidine dimers stimulate crossovers, noncrossovers, and break-induced replication events. The same dose of UV is about six-fold more recombinogenic in a repair-deficient strain than in a repair-proficient strain. We also examined the roles of several genes involved in the processing of UV-induced damage in NER-deficient cells. We found that the resolvase Mus81p is required for most of the UV-induced inter-homolog recombination events. This requirement likely reflects the Mus81p-associated cleavage of dimer-blocked replication forks. The error-free post-replication repair pathway mediated by Mms2p suppresses dimer-induced recombination between homologs, possibly by channeling replication-blocking lesions into recombination between sister chromatids.

  12. Trypanosoma brucei BRCA2 acts in antigenic variation and has undergone a recent expansion in BRC repeat number that is important during homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Claire L; McCulloch, Richard

    2008-06-01

    Antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei has selected for the evolution of a massive archive of silent Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) genes, which are activated by recombination into specialized expression sites. Such VSG switching can occur at rates substantially higher than background mutation and is dependent on homologous recombination, a core DNA repair reaction. A key regulator of homologous recombination is BRCA2, a protein that binds RAD51, the enzyme responsible for DNA strand exchange. Here, we show that T. brucei BRCA2 has undergone a recent, striking expansion in the number of BRC repeats, a sequence element that mediates interaction with RAD51. T. brucei BRCA2 mutants are shown to be significantly impaired in antigenic variation and display genome instability. By generating BRCA2 variants with reduced BRC repeat numbers, we show that the BRC expansion is crucial in determining the efficiency of T. brucei homologous recombination and RAD51 localization. Remarkably, however, this appears not to be a major determinant of the activation of at least some VSG genes.

  13. Site-specific DNA double-strand break generated by I-SceI endonuclease enhances ectopic homologous recombination in Pyricularia oryzae.

    PubMed

    Arazoe, Takayuki; Younomaru, Tetsuya; Ohsato, Shuichi; Kimura, Makoto; Arie, Tsutomu; Kuwata, Shigeru

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the contribution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to somatic homologous recombination (HR) in Pyricularia oryzae, we established a novel detection/selection system of DSBs-mediated ectopic HR. This system consists of donor and recipient nonfunctional yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)/blasticidin S deaminase (BSD) fusion genes and the yeast endonuclease I-SceI gene as a recipient-specific DSB inducer. The system enables to detect and select ectopic HR events by the restoration of YFP fluorescence and blasticidin S resistance. The transformed lines with donor and recipient showed low frequencies of endogenous ectopic HR (> 2.1%). Compared with spontaneous HR, c. 20-fold increases in HR and absolute frequency of HR as high as 40% were obtained by integration of I-SceI gene, indicating that I-SceI-mediated DSB was efficiently repaired via ectopic HR. Furthermore, to validate the impact of DSB on targeted gene replacement (TGR), the transformed lines with a recipient gene were transfected with an exogenous donor plasmid in combination with the DSB inducer. TGR events were not observed without the DSB inducer, whereas hundreds of colonies resulting from TGR events were obtained with the DSB inducer. These results clearly demonstrated that the introduction of site-specific DSB promotes ectopic HR repair in P. oryzae. PMID:24517488

  14. RecQ helicase and RecJ nuclease provide complementary functions to resect DNA for homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Morimatsu, Katsumi; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinational DNA repair by the RecF pathway of Escherichia coli requires the coordinated activities of RecA, RecFOR, RecQ, RecJ, and single-strand DNA binding (SSB) proteins. These proteins facilitate formation of homologously paired joint molecules between linear double-stranded (dsDNA) and supercoiled DNA. Repair starts with resection of the broken dsDNA by RecQ, a 3′→5′ helicase, RecJ, a 5′→3′ exonuclease, and SSB protein. The ends of a dsDNA break can be blunt-ended, or they may possess either 5′- or 3′-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhangs of undefined length. Here we show that RecJ nuclease alone can initiate nucleolytic resection of DNA with 5′-ssDNA overhangs, and that RecQ helicase can initiate resection of DNA with blunt-ends or 3′-ssDNA overhangs by DNA unwinding. We establish that in addition to its well-known ssDNA exonuclease activity, RecJ can display dsDNA exonuclease activity, degrading 100–200 nucleotides of the strand terminating with a 5′-ssDNA overhang. The dsDNA product, with a 3′-ssDNA overhang, is an optimal substrate for RecQ, which unwinds this intermediate to reveal the complementary DNA strand with a 5′-end that is degraded iteratively by RecJ. On the other hand, RecJ cannot resect duplex DNA that is either blunt-ended or terminated with 3′-ssDNA; however, such DNA is unwound by RecQ to create ssDNA for RecJ exonuclease. RecJ requires interaction with SSB for exonucleolytic degradation of ssDNA but not dsDNA. Thus, complementary action by RecJ and RecQ permits initiation of recombinational repair from all dsDNA ends: 5′-overhangs, blunt, or 3′-overhangs. Such helicase–nuclease coordination is a common mechanism underlying resection in all organisms. PMID:25411316

  15. Sensitization of Pancreatic Cancers to Gemcitabine Chemoradiation by WEE1 Kinase Inhibition Depends on Homologous Recombination Repair.

    PubMed

    Kausar, Tasneem; Schreiber, Jason S; Karnak, David; Parsels, Leslie A; Parsels, Joshua D; Davis, Mary A; Zhao, Lili; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S; Morgan, Meredith A

    2015-10-01

    To improve the efficacy of chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer and begin to establish patient selection criteria, we investigated the combination of the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 with gemcitabine-radiation in homologous recombination (HR) repair proficient and deficient pancreatic cancers. Sensitization to gemcitabine-radiation by AZD1775 was assessed in pancreatic cancer cells by clonogenic survival and in patient-derived xenografts by tumor growth. The contributions of HR repair inhibition and G2 checkpoint abrogation to sensitization were assessed by γH2AX, BRCA2 manipulation, and RAD51 focus formation and pHistone H3 flow cytometry, respectively. We found that AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type but not BRCA2 mutant pancreatic cancer cells. In all cells, AZD1775 caused inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation. However, sensitization by AZD1775 was associated with persistent γH2AX and inhibition of RAD51 focus formation. In HR-proficient (BRCA2 wild-type) or -deficient (BRAC2 null) isogenic cells, AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type, but not in BRCA2 null cells, despite significant G2 checkpoint abrogation. In patient-derived pancreatic tumor xenografts, AZD1775 significantly inhibited tumor growth and impaired RAD51 focus formation in response to gemcitabine-radiation. In conclusion, WEE1 inhibition by AZD1775 is an effective strategy for sensitizing pancreatic cancers to gemcitabine chemoradiation. Although this sensitization is accompanied by inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation, this mechanism is not sufficient for sensitization. Our findings demonstrate that sensitization to chemoradiation by WEE1 inhibition results from inhibition of HR repair and suggest that patient tumors without underlying HR defects would benefit most from this therapy. PMID:26585231

  16. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  17. Germline and Somatic Mutations in Homologous Recombination Genes Predict Platinum Response and Survival in Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Peritoneal Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Kathryn P.; Walsh, Tom; Harrell, Maria I.; Lee, Ming K.; Pennil, Christopher C.; Rendi, Mara H.; Thornton, Anne; Norquist, Barbara M.; Casadei, Silvia; Nord, Alexander S.; Agnew, Kathy J.; Pritchard, Colin C.; Scroggins, Sheena; Garcia, Rochelle L.; King, Mary-Claire; Swisher, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Hallmarks of germline BRCA1/2-associated ovarian carcinomas include chemosensitivity and improved survival. The therapeutic impact of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair genes is uncertain. Experimental Design Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we assessed 390 ovarian carcinomas for germline and somatic loss-of-function mutations in 30 genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, and 11 other genes in the HR pathway. Results 31% of ovarian carcinomas had a deleterious germline (24%) and/or somatic (9%) mutation in one or more of the 13 HR genes: BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK1, CHEK2, FAM175A, MRE11A, NBN, PALB2, RAD51C, and RAD51D. Non-serous ovarian carcinomas had similar rates of HR mutations to serous carcinomas (28% vs. 31%, p=0.6), including clear cell, endometrioid, and carcinosarcoma. The presence of germline and somatic HR mutations was highly predictive of primary platinum sensitivity (p=0.0002) and improved overall survival (p=0.0006), with median overall survival 66 months in germline HR mutation carriers, 59 months in cases with a somatic HR mutation, and 41 months for cases without an HR mutation. Conclusions Germline or somatic mutations in HR genes are present in almost one-third of ovarian carcinomas, including both serous and non-serous histologies. Somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other HR genes have a similar positive impact on overall survival and platinum responsiveness as germline BRCA1/2 mutations. The similar rate of HR mutations in non-serous carcinomas supports their inclusion in PARP inhibitor clinical trials. PMID:24240112

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate enhances cellular radiosensitivity by inhibiting both DNA nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Koprinarova, Miglena; Botev, Peter; Russev, George

    2011-09-01

    HDAC inhibitors have been proposed as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. Their application would permit the use of lower radiation doses and would reduce the adverse effects of the treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms of their action remain unclear. In the present article, we have studied the radiosensitizing effect of sodium butyrate on HeLa cells. FACS analysis showed that it did not abrogate the γ-radiation imposed G2 cell cycle arrest. The dynamics of γ-H2AX foci disappearance in the presence and in the absence of butyrate, however, demonstrated that butyrate inhibited DSB repair. In an attempt to clarify which one of the two major DSBs repair pathways was affected, we synchronized HeLa cells in G1 phase and after γ-irradiation followed the repair of the DSBs by agarose gel electrophoresis. Since HR is not operational during G1 phase, by this approach we determined the rates of NHEJ only. The results showed that NHEJ decreased in the presence of butyrate. In another set of experiments, we followed the dynamics of disappearance of RAD51 foci in the presence and in the absence of butyrate after γ-radiation of HeLa cells. Since RAD51 takes part in HR only, this experiment allows the effect of butyrate on DSB repair by homologous recombination to be assessed. It showed that HR was also obstructed by butyrate. These results were confirmed by host cell reactivation assays in which the repair of plasmids containing a single DSB by NHEJ or HR was monitored. We suggest that after a DSB is formed, HDACs deacetylated core histones in the vicinity of the breaks in order to compact the chromatin structure and prevent the broken DNA ends from moving apart from each other, thus ensuring effective repair.

  19. The de-ubiquitylating enzymes USP26 and USP37 regulate homologous recombination by counteracting RAP80.

    PubMed

    Typas, Dimitris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Wiegant, Wouter W; Diakatou, Michaela; Helfricht, Angela; Thijssen, Peter E; van den Broek, Bram; van de Broek, Bram; Mullenders, Leon H; van Attikum, Haico

    2015-08-18

    The faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential to safeguard genome stability. DSBs elicit a signaling cascade involving the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8/RNF168 and the ubiquitin-dependent assembly of the BRCA1-Abraxas-RAP80-MERIT40 complex. The association of BRCA1 with ubiquitin conjugates through RAP80 is known to be inhibitory to DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). However, the precise regulation of this mechanism remains poorly understood. Through genetic screens we identified USP26 and USP37 as key de-ubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that limit the repressive impact of RNF8/RNF168 on HR. Both DUBs are recruited to DSBs where they actively remove RNF168-induced ubiquitin conjugates. Depletion of USP26 or USP37 disrupts the execution of HR and this effect is alleviated by the simultaneous depletion of RAP80. We demonstrate that USP26 and USP37 prevent excessive spreading of RAP80-BRCA1 from DSBs. On the other hand, we also found that USP26 and USP37 promote the efficient association of BRCA1 with PALB2. This suggests that these DUBs limit the ubiquitin-dependent sequestration of BRCA1 via the BRCA1-Abraxas-RAP80-MERIT40 complex, while promoting complex formation and cooperation of BRCA1 with PALB2-BRCA2-RAD51 during HR. These findings reveal a novel ubiquitin-dependent mechanism that regulates distinct BRCA1-containing complexes for efficient repair of DSBs by HR. PMID:26101254

  20. Introduction to 'Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the 'Cambrian explosion' arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to discuss

  1. Introduction to 'Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the 'Cambrian explosion' arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to discuss

  2. The cohesion protein SOLO associates with SMC1 and is required for synapsis, recombination, homolog bias and cohesion and pairing of centromeres in Drosophila Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rihui; McKee, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Cohesion between sister chromatids is mediated by cohesin and is essential for proper meiotic segregation of both sister chromatids and homologs. solo encodes a Drosophila meiosis-specific cohesion protein with no apparent sequence homology to cohesins that is required in male meiosis for centromere cohesion, proper orientation of sister centromeres and centromere enrichment of the cohesin subunit SMC1. In this study, we show that solo is involved in multiple aspects of meiosis in female Drosophila. Null mutations in solo caused the following phenotypes: 1) high frequencies of homolog and sister chromatid nondisjunction (NDJ) and sharply reduced frequencies of homolog exchange; 2) reduced transmission of a ring-X chromosome, an indicator of elevated frequencies of sister chromatid exchange (SCE); 3) premature loss of centromere pairing and cohesion during prophase I, as indicated by elevated foci counts of the centromere protein CID; 4) instability of the lateral elements (LE)s and central regions of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), as indicated by fragmented and spotty staining of the chromosome core/LE component SMC1 and the transverse filament protein C(3)G, respectively, at all stages of pachytene. SOLO and SMC1 are both enriched on centromeres throughout prophase I, co-align along the lateral elements of SCs and reciprocally co-immunoprecipitate from ovarian protein extracts. Our studies demonstrate that SOLO is closely associated with meiotic cohesin and required both for enrichment of cohesin on centromeres and stable assembly of cohesin into chromosome cores. These events underlie and are required for stable cohesion of centromeres, synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and a recombination mechanism that suppresses SCE to preferentially generate homolog crossovers (homolog bias). We propose that SOLO is a subunit of a specialized meiotic cohesin complex that mediates both centromeric and axial arm cohesion and promotes homolog bias as a component of chromosome

  3. The cohesion protein SOLO associates with SMC1 and is required for synapsis, recombination, homolog bias and cohesion and pairing of centromeres in Drosophila Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rihui; McKee, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Cohesion between sister chromatids is mediated by cohesin and is essential for proper meiotic segregation of both sister chromatids and homologs. solo encodes a Drosophila meiosis-specific cohesion protein with no apparent sequence homology to cohesins that is required in male meiosis for centromere cohesion, proper orientation of sister centromeres and centromere enrichment of the cohesin subunit SMC1. In this study, we show that solo is involved in multiple aspects of meiosis in female Drosophila. Null mutations in solo caused the following phenotypes: 1) high frequencies of homolog and sister chromatid nondisjunction (NDJ) and sharply reduced frequencies of homolog exchange; 2) reduced transmission of a ring-X chromosome, an indicator of elevated frequencies of sister chromatid exchange (SCE); 3) premature loss of centromere pairing and cohesion during prophase I, as indicated by elevated foci counts of the centromere protein CID; 4) instability of the lateral elements (LE)s and central regions of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), as indicated by fragmented and spotty staining of the chromosome core/LE component SMC1 and the transverse filament protein C(3)G, respectively, at all stages of pachytene. SOLO and SMC1 are both enriched on centromeres throughout prophase I, co-align along the lateral elements of SCs and reciprocally co-immunoprecipitate from ovarian protein extracts. Our studies demonstrate that SOLO is closely associated with meiotic cohesin and required both for enrichment of cohesin on centromeres and stable assembly of cohesin into chromosome cores. These events underlie and are required for stable cohesion of centromeres, synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and a recombination mechanism that suppresses SCE to preferentially generate homolog crossovers (homolog bias). We propose that SOLO is a subunit of a specialized meiotic cohesin complex that mediates both centromeric and axial arm cohesion and promotes homolog bias as a component of chromosome

  4. The Cohesion Protein SOLO Associates with SMC1 and Is Required for Synapsis, Recombination, Homolog Bias and Cohesion and Pairing of Centromeres in Drosophila Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rihui; McKee, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Cohesion between sister chromatids is mediated by cohesin and is essential for proper meiotic segregation of both sister chromatids and homologs. solo encodes a Drosophila meiosis-specific cohesion protein with no apparent sequence homology to cohesins that is required in male meiosis for centromere cohesion, proper orientation of sister centromeres and centromere enrichment of the cohesin subunit SMC1. In this study, we show that solo is involved in multiple aspects of meiosis in female Drosophila. Null mutations in solo caused the following phenotypes: 1) high frequencies of homolog and sister chromatid nondisjunction (NDJ) and sharply reduced frequencies of homolog exchange; 2) reduced transmission of a ring-X chromosome, an indicator of elevated frequencies of sister chromatid exchange (SCE); 3) premature loss of centromere pairing and cohesion during prophase I, as indicated by elevated foci counts of the centromere protein CID; 4) instability of the lateral elements (LE)s and central regions of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), as indicated by fragmented and spotty staining of the chromosome core/LE component SMC1 and the transverse filament protein C(3)G, respectively, at all stages of pachytene. SOLO and SMC1 are both enriched on centromeres throughout prophase I, co-align along the lateral elements of SCs and reciprocally co-immunoprecipitate from ovarian protein extracts. Our studies demonstrate that SOLO is closely associated with meiotic cohesin and required both for enrichment of cohesin on centromeres and stable assembly of cohesin into chromosome cores. These events underlie and are required for stable cohesion of centromeres, synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and a recombination mechanism that suppresses SCE to preferentially generate homolog crossovers (homolog bias). We propose that SOLO is a subunit of a specialized meiotic cohesin complex that mediates both centromeric and axial arm cohesion and promotes homolog bias as a component of chromosome

  5. Homology and Convergence in Vertebrate and Invertebrate Nervous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeman, David

    Each year the meeting of the American Neuroscience Society attracts over 20,000 members, reflecting the explosion of interest in this field that has occurred over the past few decades. Researchers from many disciplines are focusing their skills on the investigation of every aspect of nervous systems, and neuroscience now encompasses the entire range of endeavour from the study of the single molecules that make up neural membranes to the non-invasive observation of neural function in animals behaving in their natural environments. Advances over the past three decades in our understanding of nervous systems are impressive and come from a multifaceted approach to the study of both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. An almost unexpected by-product of the parallel investigation of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems that is explored in this article is the emergent view of an intricate web of evolutionary homology and convergence exhibited in the structure and function of the nervous systems of these two large, paraphyletic groups of animals.

  6. Homology and convergence in vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, D

    1999-08-01

    Each year the meeting of the American Neuroscience Society attracts over 20,000 members, reflecting the explosion of interest in this field that has occurred over the past few decades. Researchers from many disciplines are focusing their skills on the investigation of every aspect of nervous systems, and neuroscience now encompasses the entire range of endeavour from the study of the single molecules that make up neural membranes to the non-invasive observation of neural function in animals behaving in their natural environments. Advances over the past three decades in our understanding of nervous systems are impressive and come from a multifaceted approach to the study of both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. An almost unexpected by-product of the parallel investigation of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems that is explored in this article is the emergent view of an intricate web of evolutionary homology and convergence exhibited in the structure and function of the nervous systems of these two large, paraphyletic groups of animals.

  7. Homologous recombination enhancement conferred by the Z-DNA motif d(TG)30 is abrogated by simian virus 40 T antigen binding to adjacent DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Moore, P D

    1990-02-01

    The Z-DNA motif polydeoxythymidylic-guanylic [d(TG)].polydeoxyadenylic-cytidylic acid [d(AC)], present throughout eucaryotic genomes, is capable of readily forming left-handed Z-DNA in vitro and has been shown to promote homologous recombination. The effects of simian virus 40 T-antigen-dependent substrate replication upon the stimulation of recombination conferred by the Z-DNA motif d(TG)30 were analyzed. Presence of d(TG)30 adjacent to a T-antigen-binding site I can stimulate homologous recombination between nonreplicating plasmids, providing that T antigen is absent, in both simian CV-1 cells and human EJ cells (W. P. Wahls, L. J. Wallace, and P. D. Moore, Mol. Cell. Biol. 10:785-793). It has also been shown elsewhere that the presence of d(TG)n not adjacent to the T-antigen-binding site can stimulate homologous recombination in simian virus 40 molecules replicating in the presence of T antigen (P. Bullock, J. Miller, and M. Botchan, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:3948-3953, 1986). However, it is demonstrated here that d(TG)30 nine base pairs distant from a T-antigen-binding site bound with T antigen does not stimulate recombination between either replicating or nonreplicating substrates in somatic cells. The bound T antigen either prevents the d(TG)30 sequence from acquiring a recombinogenic configuration (such as left-handed Z-DNA), or it prevents the interaction of recombinase proteins with the sequence by stearic hindrance. PMID:2153923

  8. Protective Immunity Against Homologous and Heterologous Influenza Virus Lethal Challenge by Immunization with New Recombinant Chimeric HA2-M2e Fusion Protein in BALB/C Mice.

    PubMed

    Ameghi, Ali; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Baradaran, Behzad; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Aghaiypour, Khosrow

    2016-05-01

    Influenza is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease. The error prone RNA polymerase and segmented nature of the influenza A virus genome allow antigenic drift and shift, respectively. Therefore, most influenza vaccines are inefficient along time and against different viral subtypes. In this study, for the first time, protection properties of a new recombinant fusion of HA2 and M2e peptides originated from influenza virus A/Brisbane/59/2007-like (H1N1) in BALB/c mice model were investigated. After immunization of the BALB/c mice, the protection property of fusion peptide was determined by a neutralizing assay test. For further study, mice were lethal challenged by the (mouse adapted, A/PR8/34 [H1N1]) and heterologous (mouse adapted, A/Brisbane/10/2007 [H3N2]) influenza virus subtypes. Then, the lung viral titers, body weight, and survival rate of the immunized mice were monitored. The results showed that immunization by the M2e-HA2 recombinant fusion peptide provides strong protection against homologous challenge and an infirm protection against heterologous. These protections against homologous and heterologous influenza A virus challenges meant the universal nature of these recombinant peptides in an immunity manner against influenza A virus. However, more studies are needed to optimize this recombinant construction, and this experiment recommends HA2-M2e fusion peptide as a universal influenza A vaccine candidate. PMID:27058011

  9. XRCC3 ATPase activity is required for normal XRCC3-Rad51C complex dynamics and homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, N; Hinz, J; Kopf, V L; Segalle, K; Thompson, L

    2004-02-25

    Homologous recombinational repair is a major DNA repair pathway that preserves chromosomal integrity by removing double-strand breaks, crosslinks, and other DNA damage. In eukaryotic cells, the Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D) are involved in this process, although their exact functions are largely undetermined. All five paralogs contain ATPase motifs, and XRCC3 appears to exist in a single complex with Rad51C. To begin to examine the function of this Rad51C-XRCC3 complex, we generated mammalian expression vectors that produce human wild-type XRCC3 or mutant XRCC3 with either a non-conservative mutation (K113A) or a conservative mutation (K113R) in the GKT Walker A box of the ATPase motif. The three vectors were independently transfected into Xrcc3-deficient irs1SF CHO cells. Wild-type XRCC3 complemented irs1SF cells, albeit to varying degrees, while ATPase mutants had no complementing activity, even when the mutant protein was expressed at comparable levels to that in wild-type-complemented clones. Because of the mutants' dysfunction, we propose that ATP binding and hydrolyzing activities of XRCC3 are essential. We tested in vitro complex formation by wild-type and mutant XRCC3 with His6-tagged Rad51C upon coexpression in bacteria, nickel affinity purification, and western blotting. Wild-type and K113A mutant XRCC3 formed stable complexes with Rad51C and co-purified with Rad51C, while the K113R mutant did not and was predominantly insoluble. Addition of 5 mM ATP, but not ADP, also abolished complex formation by the wild-type proteins. These results suggest that XRCC3 is likely to regulate the dissociation and formation of Rad51C-XRCC3 complex through ATP binding and hydrolysis, with both processes being essential for the complex's ability to participate in HRR.

  10. A Recombinationally Repressed Region between Mat2 and Mat3 Loci Shares Homology to Centromeric Repeats and Regulates Directionality of Mating-Type Switching in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, SIS.; Klar, AJS.

    1997-01-01

    Cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe switch mating type by replacing genetic information at the transcriptionally active mat1 locus with sequences copied from one of two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P or mat3-M. By a process referred to as directionality of switching, cells predominantly switch to the opposite mat1 allele; the mat1-P allele preferentially recombines with mat3, while mat1-M selects the mat2. In contrast to efficient recombination at mat1, recombination within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval is undetectable. We defined the role of sequences between mat2 and mat3, designated the K-region, in directionality as well as recombinational suppression. Cloning and sequencing analysis revealed that a part of the K-region is homologous to repeat sequences present at centromeres, which also display transcriptional and recombinational suppression. Replacement of 7.5 kb of the K-region with the ura4(+) gene affected directionality in a variegated manner. Analysis of the swi6-mod locus, which was previously shown to affect directionality, in KΔ::ura4(+) strains suggested the existence of at least two overlapping directionality mechanisms. Our work furthers the model that directionality is regulated by cell-type-specific organization of the heterochromatin-like structure in the mating-type region and provides evidence that the K-region contributes to silencing of the mat2-mat3 interval. PMID:9258669

  11. S100A11 plays a role in homologous recombination and genome maintenance by influencing the persistence of RAD51 in DNA repair foci.

    PubMed

    Foertsch, Franziska; Szambowska, Anna; Weise, Anja; Zielinski, Alexandra; Schlott, Bernhard; Kraft, Florian; Mrasek, Kristin; Borgmann, Kerstin; Pospiech, Helmut; Grosse, Frank; Melle, Christian

    2016-10-17

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) is an essential process in maintenance of chromosomal stability. A key player of HR is the strand exchange factor RAD51 whose assembly at sites of DNA damage is tightly regulated. We detected an endogenous complex of RAD51 with the calcium-binding protein S100A11, which is localized at sites of DNA repair in HaCaT cells as well as in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) synchronized in S phase. In biochemical assays, we revealed that S100A11 enhanced the RAD51 strand exchange activity. When cells expressing a S100A11 mutant lacking the ability to bind Ca(2+), a prolonged persistence of RAD51 in repair sites and nuclear γH2AX foci was observed suggesting an incomplete DNA repair. The same phenotype became apparent when S100A11 was depleted by RNA interference. Furthermore, down-regulation of S100A11 resulted in both reduced sister chromatid exchange confirming the restriction of the recombination capacity of the cells, and in an increase of chromosomal aberrations reflecting the functional requirement of S100A11 for the maintenance of genomic stability. Our data indicate that S100A11 is involved in homologous recombination by regulating the appearance of RAD51 in DSB repair sites. This function requires the calcium-binding activity of S100A11. PMID:27590262

  12. Contribution of RecFOR machinery of homologous recombination to cell survival after loss of a restriction-modification gene complex.

    PubMed

    Handa, Naofumi; Ichige, Asao; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2009-07-01

    Loss of a type II restriction-modification (RM) gene complex, such as EcoRI, from a bacterial cell leads to death of its descendent cells through attack by residual restriction enzymes on undermethylated target sites of newly synthesized chromosomes. Through such post-segregational host killing, these gene complexes impose their maintenance on their host cells. This finding led to the rediscovery of type II RM systems as selfish mobile elements. The host prokaryote cells were found to cope with such attacks through a variety of means. The RecBCD pathway of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli repairs the lethal lesions on the chromosome, whilst it destroys restricted non-self DNA. recBCD homologues, however, appear very limited in distribution among bacterial genomes, whereas homologues of the RecFOR proteins, responsible for another pathway, are widespread in eubacteria, just like the RM systems. In the present work, therefore, we examined the possible contribution of the RecFOR pathway to cell survival after loss of an RM gene complex. A recF mutation reduced survival in an otherwise rec-positive background and, more severely, in a recBC sbcBC background. We also found that its effect is prominent in the presence of specific non-null mutant forms of the RecBCD enzyme: the resistance to killing seen with recC1002, recC1004, recC2145 and recB2154 is severely reduced to the level of a null recBC allele when combined with a recF, recO or recR mutant allele. Such resistance was also dependent on RecJ and RecQ functions. UV resistance of these non-null recBCD mutants is also reduced by recF, recJ or recQ mutation. These results demonstrate that the RecFOR pathway of recombination can contribute greatly to resistance to RM-mediated host killing, depending on the genetic background. PMID:19389761

  13. Hyperthermia adds to trabectedin effectiveness and thermal enhancement is associated with BRCA2 degradation and impairment of DNA homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Harnicek, Dominique; Kampmann, Eric; Lauber, Kirsten; Hennel, Roman; Cardoso Martins, Ana Sofia; Guo, Yang; Belka, Claus; Mörtl, Simone; Gallmeier, Eike; Kanaar, Roland; Mansmann, Ulrich; Hucl, Tomas; Lindner, Lars H; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Issels, Rolf D

    2016-07-15

    The tetrahydroisoquinoline trabectedin is a marine compound with approved activity against human soft-tissue sarcoma. It exerts antiproliferative activity mainly by specific binding to the DNA and inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). As homologous recombination repair (HRR)-deficient tumors are more susceptible to trabectedin, hyperthermia-mediated on-demand induction of HRR deficiency represents a novel and promising strategy to boost trabectedin treatment. For the first time, we demonstrate enhancement of trabectedin effectiveness in human sarcoma cell lines by heat and characterize cellular events and molecular mechanisms related to heat-induced effects. Hyperthermic temperatures (41.8 or 43°C) enhanced significantly trabectedin-related clonogenic cell death and G2/M cell cycle arrest followed by cell type-dependent induction of apoptosis or senescence. Heat combination increased accumulation of γH2AX foci as key marker of DSBs. Expression of BRCA2 protein, an integral protein of the HRR machinery, was significantly decreased by heat. Consequently, recruitment of downstream RAD51 to γH2AX-positive repair foci was almost abolished indicating relevant impairment of HRR by heat. Accordingly, enhancement of trabectedin effectiveness was significantly augmented in BRCA2-proficient cells by hyperthermia and alleviated in BRCA2 knockout or siRNA-transfected BRCA2 knockdown cells. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from sarcoma patients, increased numbers of nuclear γH2AX foci were detected after systemic treatment with trabectedin and hyperthermia of the tumor region. The findings establish BRCA2 degradation by heat as a key factor for a novel treatment strategy that allows targeted chemosensitization to trabectedin and other DNA damaging antitumor drugs by on-demand induction of HRR deficiency.

  14. Microhomology-mediated End Joining and Homologous Recombination share the initial end resection step to repair DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Lan N.; Li, Yongjiang; Shi, Linda Z.; Hwang, Patty Yi-Hwa; He, Jing; Wang, Hailong; Razavian, Niema; Berns, Michael W.; Wu, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) is a major pathway for Ku-independent alternative nonhomologous end joining, which contributes to chromosomal translocations and telomere fusions, but the underlying mechanism of MMEJ in mammalian cells is not well understood. In this study, we demonstrated that, distinct from Ku-dependent classical nonhomologous end joining, MMEJ—even with very limited end resection—requires cyclin-dependent kinase activities and increases significantly when cells enter S phase. We also showed that MMEJ shares the initial end resection step with homologous recombination (HR) by requiring meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (Mre11) nuclease activity, which is needed for subsequent recruitment of Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) and exonuclease 1 (Exo1) to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to promote extended end resection and HR. MMEJ does not require S139-phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX), suggesting that initial end resection likely occurs at DSB ends. Using a MMEJ and HR competition repair substrate, we demonstrated that MMEJ with short end resection is used in mammalian cells at the level of 10–20% of HR when both HR and nonhomologous end joining are available. Furthermore, MMEJ is used to repair DSBs generated at collapsed replication forks. These studies suggest that MMEJ not only is a backup repair pathway in mammalian cells, but also has important physiological roles in repairing DSBs to maintain cell viability, especially under genomic stress. PMID:23610439

  15. A dual role for mycobacterial RecO in RecA-dependent homologous recombination and RecA-independent single-strand annealing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Richa; Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Koroleva, Olga; Unciuleac, Mihaela; Shuman, Stewart; Korolev, Sergey; Glickman, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Mycobacteria have two genetically distinct pathways for the homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks: homologous recombination (HR) and single-strand annealing (SSA). HR is abolished by deletion of RecA and reduced in the absence of the AdnAB helicase/nuclease. By contrast, SSA is RecA-independent and requires RecBCD. Here we examine the function of RecO in mycobacterial DNA recombination and repair. Loss of RecO elicits hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents similar to that caused by deletion of RecA. We show that RecO participates in RecA-dependent HR in a pathway parallel to the AdnAB pathway. We also find that RecO plays a role in the RecA-independent SSA pathway. The mycobacterial RecO protein displays a zinc-dependent DNA binding activity in vitro and accelerates the annealing of SSB-coated single-stranded DNA. These findings establish a role for RecO in two pathways of mycobacterial DNA double-strand break repair and suggest an in vivo function for the DNA annealing activity of RecO proteins, thereby underscoring their similarity to eukaryal Rad52. PMID:23295671

  16. A dual role for mycobacterial RecO in RecA-dependent homologous recombination and RecA-independent single-strand annealing

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Koroleva, Olga; Unciuleac, Mihaela; Shuman, Stewart; Korolev, Sergey; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteria have two genetically distinct pathways for the homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks: homologous recombination (HR) and single-strand annealing (SSA). HR is abolished by deletion of RecA and reduced in the absence of the AdnAB helicase/nuclease. By contrast, SSA is RecA-independent and requires RecBCD. Here we examine the function of RecO in mycobacterial DNA recombination and repair. Loss of RecO elicits hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents similar to that caused by deletion of RecA. We show that RecO participates in RecA-dependent HR in a pathway parallel to the AdnAB pathway. We also find that RecO plays a role in the RecA-independent SSA pathway. The mycobacterial RecO protein displays a zinc-dependent DNA binding activity in vitro and accelerates the annealing of SSB-coated single-stranded DNA. These findings establish a role for RecO in two pathways of mycobacterial DNA double-strand break repair and suggest an in vivo function for the DNA annealing activity of RecO proteins, thereby underscoring their similarity to eukaryal Rad52. PMID:23295671

  17. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  18. Improved antiviral efficacy using TALEN-mediated homology directed recombination to introduce artificial primary miRNAs into DNA of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Timothy; Nicholson, Samantha; Ely, Abdullah; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Bloom, Kristie

    2016-09-30

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains an important global health problem. Currently licensed therapies have modest curative efficacy, which is as a result of their transient effects and limited action on the viral replication intermediate comprising covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). Gene editing with artificial HBV-specific endonucleases and use of artificial activators of the RNA interference pathway have shown anti-HBV therapeutic promise. Although results from these gene therapies are encouraging, maximizing durable antiviral effects is important. To address this goal, a strategy that entails combining gene editing with homology-directed DNA recombination (HDR), to introduce HBV-silencing artificial primary microRNAs (pri-miRs) into HBV DNA targets, is reported here. Previously described transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that target the core and surface sequences of HBV were used to introduce double stranded breaks in the viral DNA. Simultaneous administration of donor sequences encoding artificial promoterless anti-HBV pri-miRs, with flanking arms that were homologous to sequences adjoining the TALENs' targets, augmented antiviral efficacy. Analysis showed targeted integration and the length of the flanking homologous arms of donor DNA had a minimal effect on antiviral efficiency. These results support the notion that gene editing and silencing may be combined to effect improved inhibition of HBV gene expression.

  19. Alternative end-joining repair pathways are the ultimate backup for abrogated classical non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair: Implications for the formation of chromosome translocations.

    PubMed

    Iliakis, George; Murmann, Tamara; Soni, Aashish

    2015-11-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are the most deleterious lesions for the integrity of the genome, as their misrepair can lead to the formation of chromosome translocations. Cells have evolved two main repair pathways to suppress the formation of these genotoxic lesions: homology-dependent, error-free homologous recombination repair (HRR), and potentially error-prone, classical, DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (c-NHEJ). The most salient feature of c-NHEJ, speed, will largely suppress chromosome translocation formation, while sequence alterations at the junction remain possible. It is now widely accepted that when c-NHEJ is inactivated, globally or locally, an alternative form of end-joining (alt-EJ) removes DSBs. Alt-EJ operates with speed and fidelity markedly lower than c-NHEJ, causing thus with higher probability chromosome translocations, and generating more extensive sequence alterations at the junction. Our working hypothesis is that alt-EJ operates as a backup to c-NHEJ. Recent results show that alt-EJ can also backup abrogated HRR in G2 phase cells, again at the cost of elevated formation of chromosome translocations. These observations raise alt-EJ to a global rescuing mechanism operating on ends that have lost their chromatin context in ways that compromise processing by HRR or c-NHEJ. While responsible for eliminating from the genome highly cytotoxic DNA ends, alt-EJ provides this function at the price of increased translocation formation. Here, we analyze recent literature on the mechanisms of chromosome translocation formation and propose a functional hierarchy among DSB processing pathways that makes alt-EJ the global backup pathway. We discuss possible ramifications of this model in cellular DSB management and pathway choice, and analyze its implications in radiation carcinogenesis and the design of novel therapeutic approaches.

  20. Rosa26-GFP Direct Repeat (RaDR-GFP) Mice Reveal Tissue- and Age-Dependence of Homologous Recombination in Mammals In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Jennifer E.; Na, Li; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Winther, Kelly E.; Chow, Danielle N.; Kimoto, Takafumi; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya; Jonnalagadda, Vidya S.; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Singh, Vijay R.; Wadduwage, Dushan N.; Rajapakse, Jagath; So, Peter T. C.; Collier, Lara S.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is critical for the repair of double strand breaks and broken replication forks. Although HR is mostly error free, inherent or environmental conditions that either suppress or induce HR cause genomic instability. Despite its importance in carcinogenesis, due to limitations in our ability to detect HR in vivo, little is known about HR in mammalian tissues. Here, we describe a mouse model in which a direct repeat HR substrate is targeted to the ubiquitously expressed Rosa26 locus. In the Rosa26 Direct Repeat-GFP (RaDR-GFP) mice, HR between two truncated EGFP expression cassettes can yield a fluorescent signal. In-house image analysis software provides a rapid method for quantifying recombination events within intact tissues, and the frequency of recombinant cells can be evaluated by flow cytometry. A comparison among 11 tissues shows that the frequency of recombinant cells varies by more than two orders of magnitude among tissues, wherein HR in the brain is the lowest. Additionally, de novo recombination events accumulate with age in the colon, showing that this mouse model can be used to study the impact of chronic exposures on genomic stability. Exposure to N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, an alkylating agent similar to the cancer chemotherapeutic temozolomide, shows that the colon, liver and pancreas are susceptible to DNA damage-induced HR. Finally, histological analysis of the underlying cell types reveals that pancreatic acinar cells and liver hepatocytes undergo HR and also that HR can be specifically detected in colonic somatic stem cells. Taken together, the RaDR-GFP mouse model provides new understanding of how tissue and age impact susceptibility to HR, and enables future studies of genetic, environmental and physiological factors that modulate HR in mammals. PMID:24901438

  1. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, Richard W.; Moloy, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    A process for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  2. Alcohol homologation

    DOEpatents

    Wegman, R.W.; Moloy, K.G.

    1988-02-23

    A process is described for the homologation of an alkanol by reaction with synthesis gas in contact with a system containing rhodium atom, ruthenium atom, iodine atom and a bis(diorganophosphino) alkane to selectivity produce the next higher homologue.

  3. Homology-integrated CRISPR-Cas (HI-CRISPR) system for one-step multigene disruption in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zehua; Xiao, Han; Liang, Jing; Zhang, Lu; Xiong, Xiong; Sun, Ning; Si, Tong; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-05-15

    One-step multiple gene disruption in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a highly useful tool for both basic and applied research, but it remains a challenge. Here, we report a rapid, efficient, and potentially scalable strategy based on the type II Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR associated proteins (Cas) system to generate multiple gene disruptions simultaneously in S. cerevisiae. A 100 bp dsDNA mutagenizing homologous recombination donor is inserted between two direct repeats for each target gene in a CRISPR array consisting of multiple donor and guide sequence pairs. An ultrahigh copy number plasmid carrying iCas9, a variant of wild-type Cas9, trans-encoded RNA (tracrRNA), and a homology-integrated crRNA cassette is designed to greatly increase the gene disruption efficiency. As proof of concept, three genes, CAN1, ADE2, and LYP1, were simultaneously disrupted in 4 days with an efficiency ranging from 27 to 87%. Another three genes involved in an artificial hydrocortisone biosynthetic pathway, ATF2, GCY1, and YPR1, were simultaneously disrupted in 6 days with 100% efficiency. This homology-integrated CRISPR (HI-CRISPR) strategy represents a powerful tool for creating yeast strains with multiple gene knockouts.

  4. Cockroach homologs of praying mantis peripheral auditory system components.

    PubMed

    Yager, David D

    2005-07-01

    This study identifies the cuticular metathoracic structures in earless cockroaches that are the homologs to the peripheral auditory components in their sister taxon, praying mantids, and defines the nature of the cuticular transition from earless to eared in the Dictyoptera. The single, midline ear of mantids comprises an auditory chamber with complex walls that contain the tympana and chordotonal transduction elements. The corresponding area in cockroaches, between the furcasternum and coxae, has many socketed hairs arranged in discrete fields and the Nerve 7 chordotonal organ, the homolog of the mantis tympanal organ. The Nerve 7 chordotonal organ attaches at the apex of the lateral ventropleurite (LVp), which has the same shape and general structure as an auditory chamber wall. High-speed video shows that when the coxa moves toward the midline, the LVp rotates medially to stimulate socketed hairs, and also moves like a triangular hinge giving the chordotonal organ maximal in-out stimulation. Formation of the mantis auditory chamber from the LVp and adjacent structures would involve only enlargement, a shift toward the midline, and a mild rotation. Almost all proprioceptive function would be lost, which may constitute the major cost of building and maintaining the mantis ear. Isolation from leg movement dictates the position of the mantis ear in the midline and the rigid frame, formed by the cuticular knobs, which protects the chordotonal organs. PMID:15887266

  5. TRF2-RAP1 is required to protect telomeres from engaging in homologous recombination-mediated deletions and fusions.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rekha; Chen, Yong; Lei, Ming; Chang, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Repressor/activator protein 1 (RAP1) is a highly conserved telomere-interacting protein. Yeast Rap1 protects telomeres from non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), plays important roles in telomere length control and is involved in transcriptional gene regulation. However, a role for mammalian RAP1 in telomere end protection remains controversial. Here we present evidence that mammalian RAP1 is essential to protect telomere from homology directed repair (HDR) of telomeres. RAP1 cooperates with the basic domain of TRF2 (TRF2(B)) to repress PARP1 and SLX4 localization to telomeres. Without RAP1 and TRF2(B), PARP1 and SLX4 HR factors promote rapid telomere resection, resulting in catastrophic telomere loss and the generation of telomere-free chromosome fusions in both mouse and human cells. The RAP1 Myb domain is required to repress both telomere loss and formation of telomere-free fusions. Our results highlight the importance of the RAP1-TRF2 heterodimer in protecting telomeres from inappropriate processing by the HDR pathway. PMID:26941064

  6. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination RAD51, RAD51B, XRCC2, and XRCC3 genes and the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Wiśnik, Ewelina; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Skowrońska, Milena; Forma, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena; Różański, Waldemar; Krajewska, Wanda M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may induce individual variations in DNA repair capacity, which may in turn contribute to the risk of cancer developing. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays a critical role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and protecting against carcinogenic factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between prostate cancer risk and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in HRR, that is, RAD51 (rs1801320 and rs1801321), RAD51B (rs10483813 and rs3784099), XRCC2 (rs3218536), and XRCC3 (rs861539). Polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR in 101 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and 216 age- and sex-matched controls. A significant relationship was detected between the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism and increased prostate cancer risk. Our results indicate that the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism may contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility in Poland. PMID:26339569

  7. Inhibition of homologous recombination repair with Pentoxifylline targets G2 cells generated by radiotherapy and induces major enhancements of the toxicity of cisplatin and melphalan given after irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    The presentation reviews the modus operandi of the dose modifying drug Pentoxifylline and the dose enhancement factors which can be achieved in different cell types. Preclinical and clinical data show that Pentoxifylline improves the oxygenation of hypoxic tumours and enhances tumour control by irradiation. In vitro experiments demonstrate that Pentoxifylline also operates when oxygen is not limiting and produces dose modifying factors in the region of 1.2 – 2.0. This oxygen independent effect is poorly understood. In p53 mutant cells irradiation induces a G2 block which is abrogated by Pentoxifylline. The enhancement of cell kill observed when Pentoxifylline and irradiation are given together could arise from rapid entry of damaged tumour cells into mitosis and propagation of DNA lesions as the result of curtailment of repair time. Recovery ratios and repair experiments using CFGE after high dose irradiation demonstrate that Pentoxifylline inhibits repair directly and that curtailment of repair time is not the explanation. Use of the repair defective xrs1 and the parental repair competent CHO-K1 cell line shows that Pentoxifylline inhibits homologous recombination repair which operates predominantly in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. When irradiated cells residing in G2 phase are exposed to very low doses of cisplatin at a toxic dose of 5 %. (TC: 0.05) massive toxicity enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed in melanoma, squamous carcinoma and prostate tumour cell lines. Enhancements of radiotoxicity seen when Pentoxifylline and radiation are applied together are small and do not exceed a factor of 2.0. The capacity of Pentoxifyline to inhibit homologous recombination repair has not as yet been clinically utilized. A suitable application could be in the treatment of cervical carcinoma where irradiation and cisplatin are standard modality. In vitro data also strongly suggest that regimes where irradiation is used in combination with alkylating drugs may

  8. Nonhomologous end-joining repair plays a more important role than homologous recombination repair in defining radiosensitivity after exposure to high-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Kubo, Makoto; Ma, Hongyu; Nakagawa, Akiko; Yoshida, Yukari; Isono, Mayu; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation pose a major threat to cell survival. The cell can respond to the presence of DSBs through two major repair pathways: homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Higher levels of cell death are induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation when compared to low-LET radiation, even at the same physical doses, due to less effective and efficient DNA repair. To clarify whether high-LET radiation inhibits all repair pathways or specifically one repair pathway, studies were designed to examine the effects of radiation with different LET values on DNA DSB repair and radiosensitivity. Embryonic fibroblasts bearing repair gene (NHEJ-related Lig4 and/or HR-related Rad54) knockouts (KO) were used and their responses were compared to wild-type cells. The cells were exposed to X rays, spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) carbon ion beams as well as with carbon, iron, neon and argon ions. Cell survival was measured with colony-forming assays. The sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) values were calculated using the 10% survival dose of wild-type cells and repair-deficient cells. Cellular radiosensitivity was listed in descending order: double-KO cells > Lig4-KO cells > Rad54-KO cells > wild-type cells. Although Rad54-KO cells had an almost constant SER value, Lig4-KO cells showed a high-SER value when compared to Rad54-KO cells, even with increasing LET values. These results suggest that with carbon-ion therapy, targeting NHEJ repair yields higher radiosensitivity than targeting homologous recombination repair. PMID:25117625

  9. Increasing the efficiency of homologous recombination vector-mediated end joining repair by inhibition of Lig4 gene using siRNA in sheep embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wang; Yushuang, Wang; Lanlan, Huang; Zijian, Jian; Xinhua, Wang; Shouren, Liu; Wenhui, Pi

    2016-09-01

    In animal cells, inhibition of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway improves the efficiency of homologous recombination (HR)-mediated double-strand brakes (DSBs) repair. To improve the efficiency of HR in sheep embryo fibroblasts, the NHEJ key molecule DNA ligase 4 (Lig4) was suppressed by siRNA interference. Four pairs of siRNA targeting Lig4 were designed and chemically synthesized. These siRNA were electro-transferred into sheep embryo fibroblasts respectively. Compared with the control groups, two pairs of siRNA were identified to effectively inhibit the expression of sheep Lig4 gene by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. The plasmid rejoining assay was adopted for examining the efficiency of HR-mediated DSB repair. I-SceⅠ endonuclease linearized vector and siRNA were co-transfected into sheep embryo fibroblasts. Flow cytometry analysis of cells after transfection for 72 h showed that suppression of Lig4 using siRNAs increased the rejoining efficiency of HR vector by 3-4 times compared with the control groups. Therefore, enhanced HR vector rejoining frequency by instant inhabition of Lig4 gene provides theoretical basis for improving gene targeting efficiency of sheep embryo fibroblasts. PMID:27644744

  10. Homologous recombination as a potential target for caffeine radiosensitization in mammalian cells: reduced caffeine radiosensitization in XRCC2 and XRCC3 mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asaad, N. A.; Zeng, Z. C.; Guan, J.; Thacker, J.; Iliakis, G.

    2000-01-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of caffeine has been associated with the disruption of multiple DNA damage-responsive cell cycle checkpoints, but several lines of evidence also implicate inhibition of DNA repair. The role of DNA repair inhibition in caffeine radiosensitization remains uncharacterized, and it is unknown which repair process, or lesion, is affected. We show that a radiosensitive cell line, mutant for the RAD51 homolog XRCC2 and defective in homologous recombination repair (HRR), displays significantly diminished caffeine radiosensitization that can be restored by expression of XRCC2. Despite the reduced radiosensitization, caffeine effectively abrogates checkpoints in S and G2 phases in XRCC2 mutant cells indicating that checkpoint abrogation is not sufficient for radiosensitization. Another radiosensitive line, mutant for XRCC3 and defective in HRR, similarly shows reduced caffeine radiosensitization. On the other hand, a radiosensitive mutant (irs-20) of DNA-PKcs with a defect in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is radiosensitized by caffeine to an extent comparable to wild-type cells. In addition, rejoining of radiation-induced DNA DSBs, that mainly reflects NHEJ, remains unaffected by caffeine in XRCC2 and XRCC3 mutants, or their wild-type counterparts. These observations suggest that caffeine targets steps in HRR but not in NHEJ and that abrogation of checkpoint response is not sufficient to explain radiosensitization. Indeed, immortalized fibroblasts from AT patients show caffeine radiosensitization despite the checkpoint defects associated with ATM mutation. We propose that caffeine radiosensitization is mediated by inhibition of stages in DNA DSB repair requiring HRR and that checkpoint disruption contributes by allowing these DSBs to transit into irreparable states. Thus, checkpoints may contribute to genomic stability by promoting error-free HRR.

  11. DNA damage during the G0/G1 phase triggers RNA-templated, Cockayne syndrome B-dependent homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Böhm, Stefanie; Bernstein, Kara A; Shen, Zhiyuan; Tsang, Michael; Levine, Arthur S; Lan, Li

    2015-07-01

    Damage repair mechanisms at transcriptionally active sites during the G0/G1 phase are largely unknown. To elucidate these mechanisms, we introduced genome site-specific oxidative DNA damage and determined the role of transcription in repair factor assembly. We find that KU and NBS1 are recruited to damage sites independent of transcription. However, assembly of RPA1, RAD51C, RAD51, and RAD52 at such sites is strictly governed by active transcription and requires both wild-type Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSB) function and the presence of RNA in the G0/G1 phase. We show that the ATPase activity of CSB is indispensable for loading and binding of the recombination factors. CSB counters radiation-induced DNA damage in both cells and zebrafish models. Taken together, our results have uncovered a novel, RNA-based recombination mechanism by which CSB protects genome stability from strand breaks at transcriptionally active sites and may provide insight into the clinical manifestations of Cockayne syndrome. PMID:26100862

  12. RNA associated with a heterodimeric protein that activates a meiotic homologous recombination hot spot: RL/RT/PCR strategy for cloning any unknown RNA or DNA.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P

    1994-04-01

    The ade6-M26 mutation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe creates a meiotic homologous recombination hot spot. We have achieved 40,000-fold purification of a heterodimeric DNA-binding protein, Mts1/Mts2, that activates the recombination hot spot. Physical studies suggested the presence of a third subunit. It is demonstrated here that RNA molecules of approximately 210 nucleotides copurified with the heterodimer. To characterize the RNA component, it was necessary to develop a new strategy for cloning of the unknown, low-abundance, partially degraded RNAs that were present in purified Mts1/Mts2 protein preparations. The strategy uses RNA ligase to add DNA oligonucleotide priming sites to the RNA for subsequent reverse transcription and PCR (RNA ligase, reverse transcription-PCR, or RL/RT/PCR). This cloning procedure could be applied to the cloning of any unknown RNA or DNA molecules. Because the cDNA clones obtained from Mts1/Mts2 were largely heterogeneous, it seems likely that the RNAs copurified as a result of tight but nonspecific interactions with the heterodimeric protein. PMID:7518718

  13. Complex Homology and the Evolution of Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hillis, David M.; Zakon, Harold H.; Hofmann, Hans A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the complex evolution of animal nervous systems and discuss the ramifications of this complexity for inferring the nature of early animals. Although reconstructing the origins of nervous systems remains a central challenge in biology, and the phenotypic complexity of early animals remains controversial, a compelling picture is emerging. We now know that the nervous system and other key animal innovations contain a large degree of homoplasy, at least on the molecular level. Conflicting hypotheses about early nervous system evolution are due primarily to differences in the interpretation of this homoplasy. We highlight the need for explicit discussion of assumptions and discuss the limitations of current approaches for inferring ancient phenotypic states. PMID:26746806

  14. Expression of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effect on survival, homologous recombination and identification of genes involved in intracellular localization.

    PubMed

    La Ferla, Marco; Mercatanti, Alberto; Rocchi, Giulia; Lodovichi, Samuele; Cervelli, Tiziana; Pignata, Luca; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Galli, Alvaro

    2015-04-01

    The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) actively participates in a series of functions within the cell that include: mitosis, intracellular signaling, cell cycle regulation, transcription and DNA damage repair. Therefore, inhibition of PARP1 has a great potential for use in cancer therapy. As resistance to PARP inhibitors is starting to be observed in patients, thus the function of PARP-1 needs to be studied in depth in order to find new therapeutic targets. To gain more information on the PARP-1 activity, we expressed PARP-1 in yeast and investigated its effect on cell growth and UV induced homologous recombination. To identify candidate genes affecting PARP-1 activity and cellular localization, we also developed a yeast genome wide genetic screen. We found that PARP-1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, but when yeast was exposed to the PARP-1 inhibitor 6(5-H) phenantridinone (PHE), it recovered from the growth suppression. Moreover, we showed that PARP-1 produced PAR products in yeast and we demonstrated that PARP-1 reduced UV-induced homologous recombination. By genome wide screening, we identified 99 mutants that suppressed PARP-1 growth inhibition. Orthologues of human genes were found for 41 of these yeast genes. We determined whether the PARP-1 protein level was altered in strains which are deleted for the transcription regulator GAL3, the histone H1 gene HHO1, the HUL4 gene, the deubiquitination enzyme gene OTU1, the nuclear pore protein POM152 and the SNT1 that encodes for the Set3C subunit of the histone deacetylase complex. In these strains the PARP-1 level was roughly the same as in the wild type. PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in the snt1Δ than in the wild type strain; after UV radiation, PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in hho1 and pom152 deletion strains than in the wild type indicating that these functions may have a role on regulating PARP-1 level and activity in the nucleus.

  15. PFMFind: a system for discovery of peptide homology and function.

    PubMed

    Stojmirović, Aleksandar; Andreae, Peter; Boland, Mike; Jordan, Thomas William; Pestov, Vladimir G

    2013-01-01

    Protein Fragment Motif Finder (PFMFind) is a system that enables e cient discovery of relationships between short fragments of protein sequences using similarity search. It supports queries based on amino acid similarity matrices and position specific score matrices (PSSMs) obtained through an iterative procedure. PSSM construction is customisable through plugins written in Python. PFMFind consists of a GUI client, an index for fast similarity search and a relational database for storing search results and sequence annotations. It is written mostly in Python. The components of PFMFind communicate through TCP/IP sockets and can be located on different physical machines. PFMFind is freely available for download (under a GPL licence) from http://pfmfind.stojmirovic.org.

  16. DNA replication arrest leads to enhanced homologous recombination and cell death in meristems of rice OsRecQl4 mutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammalian BLM helicase is involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and homologous recombination (HR). These DNA transactions are associated tightly with cell division and are important for maintaining genome stability. However, unlike in mammals, cell division in higher plants is restricted mainly to the meristem, thus genome maintenance at the meristem is critical. The counterpart of BLM in Arabidopsis (AtRecQ4A) has been identified and its role in HR and in the response to DNA damage has been confirmed. However, the function of AtRecQ4A in the meristem during replication stress has not yet been well elucidated. Results We isolated the BLM counterpart gene OsRecQl4 from rice and analyzed its function using a reverse genetics approach. Osrecql4 mutant plants showed hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and enhanced frequency of HR compared to wild-type (WT) plants. We further analyzed the effect of aphidicolin—an inhibitor of S-phase progression via its inhibitory effect on DNA polymerases—on genome stability in the root meristem in osrecql4 mutant plants and corresponding WT plants. The following effects were observed upon aphidicolin treatment: a) comet assay showed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mutant plants, b) TUNEL assay showed enhanced DNA breaks at the root meristem in mutant plants, c) a recombination reporter showed enhanced HR frequency in mutant calli, d) propidium iodide (PI) staining of root tips revealed an increased incidence of cell death in the meristem of mutant plants. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the aphidicolin-sensitive phenotype of osrecql4 mutants was in part due to induced DSBs and cell death, and that OsRecQl4 plays an important role as a caretaker, maintaining genome stability during DNA replication stress in the rice meristem. PMID:23586618

  17. Archaeal Tuc1/Ncs6 Homolog Required for Wobble Uridine tRNA Thiolation Is Associated with Ubiquitin-Proteasome, Translation, and RNA Processing System Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Chavarria, Nikita E.; Hwang, Sungmin; Cao, Shiyun; Fu, Xian; Holman, Mary; Elbanna, Dina; Rodriguez, Suzanne; Arrington, Deanna; Englert, Markus; Uthandi, Sivakumar; Söll, Dieter; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    While cytoplasmic tRNA 2-thiolation protein 1 (Tuc1/Ncs6) and ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (Urm1) are important in the 2-thiolation of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U) at wobble uridines of tRNAs in eukaryotes, the biocatalytic roles and properties of Ncs6/Tuc1 and its homologs are poorly understood. Here we present the first report of an Ncs6 homolog of archaea (NcsA of Haloferax volcanii) that is essential for maintaining cellular pools of thiolated tRNALysUUU and for growth at high temperature. When purified from Hfx. volcanii, NcsA was found to be modified at Lys204 by isopeptide linkage to polymeric chains of the ubiquitin-fold protein SAMP2. The ubiquitin-activating E1 enzyme homolog of archaea (UbaA) was required for this covalent modification. Non-covalent protein partners that specifically associated with NcsA were also identified including UbaA, SAMP2, proteasome activating nucleotidase (PAN)-A/1, translation elongation factor aEF-1α and a β-CASP ribonuclease homolog of the archaeal cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 1 family (aCPSF1). Together, our study reveals that NcsA is essential for growth at high temperature, required for formation of thiolated tRNALysUUU and intimately linked to homologs of ubiquitin-proteasome, translation and RNA processing systems. PMID:24906001

  18. Sublethal concentrations of 17-AAG suppress homologous recombination DNA repair and enhance sensitivity to carboplatin and olaparib in HR proficient ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Eun; Battelli, Chiara; Watson, Jacqueline; Liu, Joyce; Curtis, Jennifer; Morse, Alexander N.; Matulonis, Ursula A.; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.

    2014-01-01

    The promise of PARP-inhibitors(PARPis) in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer(EOC) is tempered by the fact that approximately 50% of patients with homologous recombination (HR)-proficient tumors do not respond well to these agents. Combination of PARPis with agents that inhibit HR may represent an effective strategy to enhance their activity in HR-proficient tumors. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified that heat shock protein 90 inhibitors(HSP90i) may suppress HR and thus revert HR-proficient to HR-deficient tumors. Analysis of publicly available gene expression data showed that exposure of HR-proficient breast cancer cell lines to HSP90i 17-AAG(17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) downregulated HR, ATM and Fanconi Anemia pathways. In HR-proficient EOC cells, 17-AAG suppressed HR as assessed using the RAD51 foci formation assay and this was further confirmed using the Direct Repeat-GFP reporter assay. Furthermore, 17-AAG downregulated BRCA1 and/or RAD51 protein levels, and induced significantly more γH2AX activation in combination with olaparib compared to olaparib alone. Finally, sublethal concentrations of 17-AAG sensitized HR-proficient EOC lines to olaparib and carboplatin but did not affect sensitivity of the HR-deficient OVCAR8 line arguing that the 17-AAG mediated sensitization is dependent on suppression of HR. These results provide a preclinical rationale for using a combination of olaparib/17-AAG in HR-proficient EOC. PMID:24798692

  19. Gene CATCHR--gene cloning and tagging for Caenorhabditis elegans using yeast homologous recombination: a novel approach for the analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Holly E; Renihan, Stephanie; Spence, Andrew M; Cooperstock, Ramona L

    2005-01-01

    Expression patterns of gene products provide important insights into gene function. Reporter constructs are frequently used to analyze gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans, but the sequence context of a given gene is inevitably altered in such constructs. As a result, these transgenes may lack regulatory elements required for proper gene expression. We developed Gene Catchr, a novel method of generating reporter constructs that exploits yeast homologous recombination (YHR) to subclone and tag worm genes while preserving their local sequence context. YHR facilitates the cloning of large genomic regions, allowing the isolation of regulatory sequences in promoters, introns, untranslated regions and flanking DNA. The endogenous regulatory context of a given gene is thus preserved, producing expression patterns that are as accurate as possible. Gene Catchr is flexible: any tag can be inserted at any position without introducing extra sequence. Each step is simple and can be adapted to process multiple genes in parallel. We show that expression patterns derived from Gene Catchr transgenes are consistent with previous reports and also describe novel expression data. Mutant rescue assays demonstrate that Gene Catchr-generated transgenes are functional. Our results validate the use of Gene Catchr as a valuable tool to study spatiotemporal gene expression. PMID:16254074

  20. NuMA promotes homologous recombination repair by regulating the accumulation of the ISWI ATPase SNF2h at DNA breaks

    PubMed Central

    Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Liu, Jing; Salles, Daniela; Jayaraman, Swaathi; Dorfman, George; Gray, Matthew; Abad, Patricia; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Irudayaraj, Joseph M.; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Lelièvre, Sophie A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling factors play an active role in the DNA damage response by shaping chromatin to facilitate the repair process. The spatiotemporal regulation of these factors is key to their function, yet poorly understood. We report that the structural nuclear protein NuMA accumulates at sites of DNA damage in a poly[ADP-ribose]ylation-dependent manner and functionally interacts with the ISWI ATPase SNF2h/SMARCA5, a chromatin remodeler that facilitates DNA repair. NuMA coimmunoprecipitates with SNF2h, regulates its diffusion in the nucleoplasm and controls its accumulation at DNA breaks. Consistent with NuMA enabling SNF2h function, cells with silenced NuMA exhibit reduced chromatin decompaction after DNA cleavage, lesser focal recruitment of homologous recombination repair factors, impaired DNA double-strand break repair in chromosomal (but not in episomal) contexts and increased sensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. These findings reveal a structural basis for the orchestration of chromatin remodeling whereby a scaffold protein promotes genome maintenance by directing a remodeler to DNA breaks. PMID:24753406

  1. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amie L; Joyce, Kellie; Xie, Hong; Falank, Carolyne; Hinz, John M; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation. PMID:24561002

  2. Gene targeting by TALEN-induced homologous recombination in goats directs production of β-lactoglobulin-free, high-human lactoferrin milk.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chenchen; Song, Yujie; Liu, Jun; Ge, Hengtao; Li, Qian; Huang, Hui; Hu, Linyong; Zhu, Hongmei; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2015-05-21

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) is a major goat's milk allergen that is absent in human milk. Engineered endonucleases, including transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and zinc-finger nucleases, enable targeted genetic modification in livestock. In this study, TALEN-mediated gene knockout followed by gene knock-in were used to generate BLG knockout goats as mammary gland bioreactors for large-scale production of human lactoferrin (hLF). We introduced precise genetic modifications in the goat genome at frequencies of approximately 13.6% and 6.09% for the first and second sequential targeting, respectively, by using targeting vectors that underwent TALEN-induced homologous recombination (HR). Analysis of milk from the cloned goats revealed large-scale hLF expression or/and decreased BLG levels in milk from heterozygous goats as well as the absence of BLG in milk from homozygous goats. Furthermore, the TALEN-mediated targeting events in somatic cells can be transmitted through the germline after SCNT. Our result suggests that gene targeting via TALEN-induced HR may expedite the production of genetically engineered livestock for agriculture and biomedicine.

  3. The DNA damage checkpoint pathway promotes extensive resection and nucleotide synthesis to facilitate homologous recombination repair and genome stability in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Blaikley, Elizabeth J; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Kasparek, Torben R; Marguerat, Samuel; Sarkar, Sovan; Hulme, Lydia; Hussey, Sharon; Wee, Boon-Yu; Deegan, Rachel S; Walker, Carol A; Pai, Chen-Chun; Bähler, Jürg; Nakagawa, Takuro; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2014-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause chromosomal rearrangements and extensive loss of heterozygosity (LOH), hallmarks of cancer cells. Yet, how such events are normally suppressed is unclear. Here we identify roles for the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in facilitating homologous recombination (HR) repair and suppressing extensive LOH and chromosomal rearrangements in response to a DSB. Accordingly, deletion of Rad3(ATR), Rad26ATRIP, Crb2(53BP1) or Cdc25 overexpression leads to reduced HR and increased break-induced chromosome loss and rearrangements. We find the DNA damage checkpoint pathway facilitates HR, in part, by promoting break-induced Cdt2-dependent nucleotide synthesis. We also identify additional roles for Rad17, the 9-1-1 complex and Chk1 activation in facilitating break-induced extensive resection and chromosome loss, thereby suppressing extensive LOH. Loss of Rad17 or the 9-1-1 complex results in a striking increase in break-induced isochromosome formation and very low levels of chromosome loss, suggesting the 9-1-1 complex acts as a nuclease processivity factor to facilitate extensive resection. Further, our data suggest redundant roles for Rad3ATR and Exo1 in facilitating extensive resection. We propose that the DNA damage checkpoint pathway coordinates resection and nucleotide synthesis, thereby promoting efficient HR repair and genome stability.

  4. The DNA damage checkpoint pathway promotes extensive resection and nucleotide synthesis to facilitate homologous recombination repair and genome stability in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blaikley, Elizabeth J.; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Kasparek, Torben R.; Marguerat, Samuel; Sarkar, Sovan; Hulme, Lydia; Hussey, Sharon; Wee, Boon-Yu; Deegan, Rachel S.; Walker, Carol A.; Pai, Chen-Chun; Bähler, Jürg; Nakagawa, Takuro; Humphrey, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause chromosomal rearrangements and extensive loss of heterozygosity (LOH), hallmarks of cancer cells. Yet, how such events are normally suppressed is unclear. Here we identify roles for the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in facilitating homologous recombination (HR) repair and suppressing extensive LOH and chromosomal rearrangements in response to a DSB. Accordingly, deletion of Rad3ATR, Rad26ATRIP, Crb253BP1 or Cdc25 overexpression leads to reduced HR and increased break-induced chromosome loss and rearrangements. We find the DNA damage checkpoint pathway facilitates HR, in part, by promoting break-induced Cdt2-dependent nucleotide synthesis. We also identify additional roles for Rad17, the 9-1-1 complex and Chk1 activation in facilitating break-induced extensive resection and chromosome loss, thereby suppressing extensive LOH. Loss of Rad17 or the 9-1-1 complex results in a striking increase in break-induced isochromosome formation and very low levels of chromosome loss, suggesting the 9-1-1 complex acts as a nuclease processivity factor to facilitate extensive resection. Further, our data suggest redundant roles for Rad3ATR and Exo1 in facilitating extensive resection. We propose that the DNA damage checkpoint pathway coordinates resection and nucleotide synthesis, thereby promoting efficient HR repair and genome stability. PMID:24623809

  5. Dual inhibition of ATR and ATM potentiates the activity of trabectedin and lurbinectedin by perturbing the DNA damage response and homologous recombination repair

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Daniele G.; Selle, Frédéric; Morel, Claire; Galmarini, Carlos M.; Henriques, João A. P.; Larsen, Annette K.; Escargueil, Alexandre E.

    2016-01-01

    Trabectedin (Yondelis®, ecteinascidin-743, ET-743) is a marine-derived natural product approved for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Lurbinectedin is a novel anticancer agent structurally related to trabectedin. Both ecteinascidins generate DNA double-strand breaks that are processed through homologous recombination repair (HRR), thereby rendering HRR-deficient cells particularly sensitive. We here characterize the DNA damage response (DDR) to trabectedin and lurbinectedin in HeLa cells. Our results show that both compounds activate the ATM/Chk2 (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/checkpoint kinase 2) and ATR/Chk1 (ATM and RAD3-related/checkpoint kinase 1) pathways. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of Chk1/2, ATR or ATM is not accompanied by any significant improvement of the cytotoxic activity of the ecteinascidins while dual inhibition of ATM and ATR strongly potentiates it. Accordingly, concomitant inhibition of both ATR and ATM is an absolute requirement to efficiently block the formation of γ-H2AX, MDC1, BRCA1 and Rad51 foci following exposure to the ecteinascidins. These results are not restricted to HeLa cells, but are shared by cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, our data identify ATR and ATM as central coordinators of the DDR to ecteinascidins and provide a mechanistic rationale for combining these compounds with ATR and ATM inhibitors. PMID:27029031

  6. Gene targeting by TALEN-induced homologous recombination in goats directs production of β-lactoglobulin-free, high-human lactoferrin milk.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chenchen; Song, Yujie; Liu, Jun; Ge, Hengtao; Li, Qian; Huang, Hui; Hu, Linyong; Zhu, Hongmei; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) is a major goat's milk allergen that is absent in human milk. Engineered endonucleases, including transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and zinc-finger nucleases, enable targeted genetic modification in livestock. In this study, TALEN-mediated gene knockout followed by gene knock-in were used to generate BLG knockout goats as mammary gland bioreactors for large-scale production of human lactoferrin (hLF). We introduced precise genetic modifications in the goat genome at frequencies of approximately 13.6% and 6.09% for the first and second sequential targeting, respectively, by using targeting vectors that underwent TALEN-induced homologous recombination (HR). Analysis of milk from the cloned goats revealed large-scale hLF expression or/and decreased BLG levels in milk from heterozygous goats as well as the absence of BLG in milk from homozygous goats. Furthermore, the TALEN-mediated targeting events in somatic cells can be transmitted through the germline after SCNT. Our result suggests that gene targeting via TALEN-induced HR may expedite the production of genetically engineered livestock for agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:25994151

  7. DNA Ligase IV and Artemis Act Cooperatively to Suppress Homologous Recombination in Human Cells: Implications for DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR. PMID:23967291

  8. The DNA damage checkpoint pathway promotes extensive resection and nucleotide synthesis to facilitate homologous recombination repair and genome stability in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Blaikley, Elizabeth J; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Kasparek, Torben R; Marguerat, Samuel; Sarkar, Sovan; Hulme, Lydia; Hussey, Sharon; Wee, Boon-Yu; Deegan, Rachel S; Walker, Carol A; Pai, Chen-Chun; Bähler, Jürg; Nakagawa, Takuro; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2014-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause chromosomal rearrangements and extensive loss of heterozygosity (LOH), hallmarks of cancer cells. Yet, how such events are normally suppressed is unclear. Here we identify roles for the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in facilitating homologous recombination (HR) repair and suppressing extensive LOH and chromosomal rearrangements in response to a DSB. Accordingly, deletion of Rad3(ATR), Rad26ATRIP, Crb2(53BP1) or Cdc25 overexpression leads to reduced HR and increased break-induced chromosome loss and rearrangements. We find the DNA damage checkpoint pathway facilitates HR, in part, by promoting break-induced Cdt2-dependent nucleotide synthesis. We also identify additional roles for Rad17, the 9-1-1 complex and Chk1 activation in facilitating break-induced extensive resection and chromosome loss, thereby suppressing extensive LOH. Loss of Rad17 or the 9-1-1 complex results in a striking increase in break-induced isochromosome formation and very low levels of chromosome loss, suggesting the 9-1-1 complex acts as a nuclease processivity factor to facilitate extensive resection. Further, our data suggest redundant roles for Rad3ATR and Exo1 in facilitating extensive resection. We propose that the DNA damage checkpoint pathway coordinates resection and nucleotide synthesis, thereby promoting efficient HR repair and genome stability. PMID:24623809

  9. Genomic rearrangements at the FRA2H common fragile site frequently involve non-homologous recombination events across LTR and L1(LINE) repeats.

    PubMed

    Brueckner, Lena M; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Hess, Elisa M; Zheglo, Diana; Blumrich, Anne; Schwab, Manfred; Savelyeva, Larissa

    2012-08-01

    Common fragile sites (cFSs) are non-random chromosomal regions that are prone to breakage under conditions of replication stress. DNA damage and chromosomal alterations at cFSs appear to be critical events in the development of various human diseases, especially carcinogenesis. Despite the growing interest in understanding the nature of cFS instability, only a few cFSs have been molecularly characterised. In this study, we fine-mapped the location of FRA2H using six-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation and showed that it is one of the most active cFSs in the human genome. FRA2H encompasses approximately 530 kb of a gene-poor region containing a novel large intergenic non-coding RNA gene (AC097500.2). Using custom-designed array comparative genomic hybridisation, we detected gross and submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements involving FRA2H in a panel of 54 neuroblastoma, colon and breast cancer cell lines. The genomic alterations frequently involved different classes of long terminal repeats and long interspersed nuclear elements. An analysis of breakpoint junction sequence motifs predominantly revealed signatures of microhomology-mediated non-homologous recombination events. Our data provide insight into the molecular structure of cFSs and sequence motifs affected by their activation in cancer. Identifying cFS sequences will accelerate the search for DNA biomarkers and targets for individualised therapies.

  10. SETDB1, HP1 and SUV39 promote repositioning of 53BP1 to extend resection during homologous recombination in G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Meryem; Katsuki, Yoko; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Ogi, Tomoo; Shibata, Atsushi; Kakarougkas, Andreas; Jeggo, Penny

    2015-09-18

    Recent studies have shown that homologous recombination (HR) requires chromatin repression as well as relaxation at DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). HP1 and SUV39H1/2 are repressive factors essential for HR. Here, we identify SETDB1 as an additional compacting factor promoting HR. Depletion of HP1, SUV39, SETDB1 or BRCA1 confer identical phenotypes. The repressive factors, like BRCA1, are dispensable for the initiation of resection but promote the extension step causing diminished RPA or RAD51 foci and HR in irradiated G2 cells. Depletion of the compacting factors does not inhibit BRCA1 recruitment but at 8 h post IR, BRCA1 foci are smaller and aberrantly positioned compared to control cells. BRCA1 promotes 53BP1 repositioning to the periphery of enlarged foci and formation of a devoid core with BRCA1 becoming enlarged and localized internally to 53BP1. Depletion of the compacting factors precludes these changes at irradiation-induced foci. Thus, the repressive factors are required for BRCA1 function in promoting the repositioning of 53BP1 during HR. Additionally, depletion of these repressive factors in undamaged cells causes diminished sister chromatid association at centromeric sequences. We propose a model for how these findings may be functionally linked. PMID:26206670

  11. PARP targeting counteracts gliomagenesis through induction of mitotic catastrophe and aggravation of deficiency in homologous recombination in PTEN-mutant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Majuelos-Melguizo, Jara; Rodríguez, María Isabel; López-Jiménez, Laura; Rodríguez-Vargas, Jose M.; Martí Martín-Consuegra, Juan M.; Serrano-Sáenz, Santiago; Gavard, Julie; Mariano Ruiz de Almodóvar, J; Javier Oliver, F

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults and one of the most aggressive cancers. PARP-1 is a nuclear protein involved in multiple facets of DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. In this study we dissected the action of PARP inhibition in different GBM cell lines with either functional or mutated PTEN that confers resistance to diverse therapies. In PTEN mutant cells, PARP inhibition induced a severe genomic instability, exacerbated homologous recombination repair (HR) deficiency and down-regulated the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) factor BUBR1, leading to mitotic catastrophe (MC). EGFR gene amplification also represents a signature of genetic abnormality in GBM. To more effectively target GBM cells, co-treatment with a PARP inhibitor and an EGFR blocker, erlotinib, resulted in a strong suppression of ERK1/2 activation and in vivo the combined effect elicited a robust reduction in tumour development. In conclusion, PARP inhibition targets PTEN-deficient GBM cells through accentuation of SAC repression and aggravation of HR deficiency, leading to the induction of genomic instability and eventually deriving to mitotic catastrophe (MC); the inhibition of PARP and co-treatment with an inhibitor of pro-survival pathways strongly retarded in vivo gliomagenesis. PMID:25576921

  12. Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal exons of K-sam/FGFR2 by short homology-mediated recombination, generating preferential expression of specific messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Sasaki, H; Kuwahara, Y; Nezu, M; Shibuya, T; Sakamoto, H; Ishii, H; Yanagihara, K; Mafune, K; Makuuchi, M; Terada, M

    1999-12-15

    The K-sam gene was first identified as an amplified gene from human gastric cancer cell line KATOIII, and its product is identical to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. The K-sam gene is located on human chromosome 10q26 and is preferentially amplified in the poorly differentiated types, especially in the scirrhous type, of gastric cancers. During the course of studies on the structural characterization of the amplification units, we found that the carboxyl-terminal exons of K-sam were deleted in three of four of the scirrhous type of gastric cancer cell lines. These deletions generate preferential expression of mRNAs encoding K-sam proteins lacking the carboxyl-terminal region containing the tyrosine residues at positions 780, 784, and 813. The carboxyl-terminal region has been reported to have a sequence required for the inhibition of NIH3T3 transformation, indicating that cells with amplification of the truncated K-sam gene have a growth advantage during the carcinogenic process for the scirrhous type of gastric cancers. This is the first report showing the deletion of the carboxyl-terminal exons of the receptor-type of the protein tyrosine kinase gene. Sequence analysis of the DNA sequences surrounding the deletion junctions shows the presence of unique sequences and indicates the involvement of short homology-mediated recombination in the generation of these deletions. PMID:10626794

  13. Efficacy of soluble recombinant FliC protein from Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis as a potential vaccine candidate against homologous challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Masashi; Matsumoto, Wakako; Seike, Fumio; Tanaka, Yuuya; Teratani, Chie; Tozuka, Maki; Kashimoto, Takashige; Takehara, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2012-06-01

    FliC, the flagellin antigen of Salmonella Enteritidis, was tested as a vaccine candidate for protective effect against a homologous challenge in chickens. After immunization with recombinant FliC (rFliC) or administration of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 56 days old, the chickens were challenged with 10(9) colony-forming units of Salmonella Enteritidis at 76 days old. The vaccinated birds showed significantly decreased bacterial counts in the liver and cecal contents compared to those administered PBS at 7 days postchallenge, but the protection was partial. The replication experiment also showed a similar result. In both experiments, vaccination induced an increased level of serum anti-rFliC IgG, which was also reactive to the native flagella. The intestinal IgA level was slightly higher in the vaccinated birds than in the control. However, neither the proliferative response nor interferon-gamma secretion of splenic cells upon stimulation with rFliC was induced. Therefore, the effect of rFliC as a vaccine is limited, and further improvement is needed.

  14. Homologous Recombination-Independent Large Gene Cassette Knock-in in CHO Cells Using TALEN and MMEJ-Directed Donor Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Takenaga, Mitsumasa; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kamihira, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2015-10-09

    Gene knock-in techniques have rapidly evolved in recent years, along with the development and maturation of genome editing technology using programmable nucleases. We recently reported a novel strategy for microhomology-mediated end-joining-dependent integration of donor DNA by using TALEN or CRISPR/Cas9 and optimized targeting vectors, named PITCh (Precise Integration into Target Chromosome) vectors. Here we describe TALEN and PITCh vector-mediated integration of long gene cassettes, including a single-chain Fv-Fc (scFv-Fc) gene, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, with comparison of targeting and cloning efficiency among several donor design and culture conditions. We achieved 9.6-kb whole plasmid integration and 7.6-kb backbone-free integration into a defined genomic locus in CHO cells. Furthermore, we confirmed the reasonable productivity of recombinant scFv-Fc protein of the knock-in cells. Using our protocol, the knock-in cell clones could be obtained by a single transfection and a single limiting dilution using a 96-well plate, without constructing targeting vectors containing long homology arms. Thus, the study described herein provides a highly practical strategy for gene knock-in of large DNA in CHO cells, which accelerates high-throughput generation of cell lines stably producing any desired biopharmaceuticals, including huge antibody proteins.

  15. Making recombinant proteins in animals--different systems, different applications.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Michael K; Lacroix, Dan; Pothier, François; Sirard, Marc-André

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors represent a powerful tool to address the growing need for therapeutic recombinant proteins. The ability of transgenic animals to produce complex, biologically active recombinant proteins in an efficient and economic manner has stimulated a great deal of interest in this area. As a result, genetically modified animals of several species, expressing foreign proteins in various tissues, are currently being developed. However, the generation of transgenic animals is a cumbersome process and remains problematic in the application of this technology. The advantages and disadvantages of different transgenic systems in relation to other bioreactor systems are discussed.

  16. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination.

  17. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  18. Systemic delivery of recombinant proteins by genetically modified myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1991-12-06

    The ability to stably deliver recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would facilitate the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited diseases. To explore the feasibility of the use of genetically engineered myoblasts as a recombinant protein delivery system, stable transfectants of the murine C2C12 myoblast cell line were produced that synthesize and secrete high levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in vitro. Mice injected with hGH-transfected myoblasts had significant levels of hGH in both muscle and serum that were stable for at least 3 weeks after injection. Histological examination of muscles injected with {beta}-galactosidase-expressing C2C12 myoblasts demonstrated that many of the injected cells had fused to form multinucleated myotubes. Thus, genetically engineered myoblasts can be used for the stable delivery of recombinant proteins into the circulation.

  19. A simplified system for generating recombinant E3-deleted canine adenovirus-2.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zuo; Jiang, Qian; Liu, Jiasen; Guo, Dongchun; Quan, Chuansong; Li, Botao; Qu, Liandong

    2015-01-01

    Canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) has been used extensively as a vector for studying gene therapy and vaccine applications. We describe a simple strategy for generating a replication-competent recombinant CAV-2 using a backbone vector and a shuttle vector. The backbone plasmid containing the full-length CAV-2 genome was constructed by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli strain BJ5183. The shuttle plasmid, which has a deletion of 1478 bp in the nonessential E3 viral genome region, was generated by subcloning a fusion fragment containing the flanking sequences of the CAV-2 E3 region and expression cassette sequences from pcDNA3.1(+) into modified pUC18. To determine system effectiveness, a gene for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was inserted into the shuttle plasmid and cloned into the backbone plasmid using two unique NruI and SalI sites. Transfection of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells with the recombinant adenovirus genome containing the EGFP expression cassette resulted in infectious viral particles. This strategy provides a solid foundation for developing candidate vaccines using CAV-2 as a delivery vector. PMID:25450764

  20. An RNF168 fragment defective for focal accumulation at DNA damage is proficient for inhibition of homologous recombination in BRCA1 deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Meilen C.; Yanez, Diana A.; Stark, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF168 is a DNA damage response (DDR) factor that promotes monoubiquitination of H2A/H2AX at K13/15, facilitates recruitment of other DDR factors (e.g. 53BP1) to DNA damage, and inhibits homologous recombination (HR) in cells deficient in the tumor suppressor BRCA1. We have examined the domains of RNF168 important for these DDR events, including chromosomal HR that is induced by several nucleases (I-SceI, CAS9-WT and CAS9-D10A), since the inducing nuclease affects the relative frequency of distinct repair outcomes. We found that an N-terminal fragment of RNF168 (1-220/N221*) efficiently inhibits HR induced by each of these nucleases in BRCA1 depleted cells, and promotes recruitment of 53BP1 to DNA damage and H2AX monoubiquitination at K13/15. Each of these DDR events requires a charged residue in RNF168 (R57). Notably, RNF168-N221* fails to self-accumulate into ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF). Furthermore, expression of RNF168 WT and N221* can significantly bypass the role of another E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF8, for inhibition of HR in BRCA1 depleted cells, and for promotion of 53BP1 IRIF. We suggest that the ability for RNF168 to promote H2A/H2AX monoubiquitination and 53BP1 IRIF, but not RNF168 self-accumulation into IRIF, is important for inhibition of HR in BRCA1 deficient cells. PMID:24829461

  1. Phosphorylated (pT371)TRF1 is recruited to sites of DNA damage to facilitate homologous recombination and checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    McKerlie, Megan; Walker, John R.; Mitchell, Taylor R. H.; Wilson, Florence R.; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2013-01-01

    TRF1, a duplex telomeric DNA-binding protein, plays an important role in telomere metabolism. We have previously reported that a fraction of endogenous TRF1 can stably exist free of telomere chromatin when it is phosphorylated at T371 by Cdk1; however, the role of this telomere-free (pT371)TRF1 has yet to be fully characterized. Here we show that phosphorylated (pT371)TRF1 is recruited to sites of DNA damage, forming damage-induced foci in response to ionizing radiation (IR), etoposide and camptothecin. We find that IR-induced (pT371)TRF1 foci formation is dependent on the ATM- and Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1-mediated DNA damage response. While loss of functional BRCA1 impairs the formation of IR-induced (pT371)TRF1 foci, depletion of either 53BP1 or Rif1 stimulates IR-induced (pT371)TRF1 foci formation. In addition, we show that TRF1 depletion or the lack of its phosphorylation at T371 impairs DNA end resection and repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination. The lack of TRF1 phosphorylation at T371 also hampers the activation of the G2/M checkpoint and sensitizes cells to PARP inhibition, IR and camptothecin. Collectively, these results reveal a novel but important function of phosphorylated (pT371)TRF1 in facilitating DNA double-strand break repair and the maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:23997120

  2. Combining Heavy Ion Radiation and Artificial MicroRNAs to Target the Homologous Recombination Repair Gene Efficiently Kills Human Tumor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Zhiming; Wang Ping; Wang Hongyan; Zhang Xiangming; Wang Minli; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wang Ya

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Previously, we demonstrated that heavy ions kill more cells at the same dose than X-rays because DNA-clustered lesions produced by heavy ions affect nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair but not homologous recombination repair (HRR). We have also shown that our designed artificial microRNAs (amiRs) could efficiently target XRCC4 (an essential factor for NHEJ) or XRCC2 (an essential factor for HRR) and sensitize human tumor cells to X-rays. Based on these data, we were interested in testing the hypothesis that combining heavy ions and amiRs to target HRR but not NHEJ should more efficiently kill human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human tumor cell lines (U87MG, a brain tumor cell line, and A549, a lung cancer cell line) and their counterparts, overexpressed with amiR to target XRCC2, XRCC4 or both, were used in this study. Survival sensitivities were examined using a clonogenic assay after these cells were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. In addition, these cell lines were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to form xenografts and the tumor size was compared after the tumor areas were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. Results: Although targeting either XRCC4 (NHEJ factor) or XRCC2 (HRR factor) sensitized the human tumor cells to X-rays, in vitro and the xenograft animal model, targeting only XRCC2 but not XRCC4 sensitized the human tumor cells to heavy ions in vitro and in the xenograft animal model. Conclusions: Combining heavy ions with targeting the HRR pathway, but not the NHEJ pathway, could significantly improve the efficiency of tumor cell death.

  3. Rad51c- and Trp53-double-mutant mouse model reveals common features of homologous recombination-deficient breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Tumiati, M; Munne, P M; Edgren, H; Eldfors, S; Hemmes, A; Kuznetsov, S G

    2016-09-01

    Almost half of all hereditary breast cancers (BCs) are associated with germ-line mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes. However, the tumor phenotypes associated with different HR genes vary, making it difficult to define the role of HR in BC predisposition. To distinguish between HR-dependent and -independent features of BCs, we generated a mouse model in which an essential HR gene, Rad51c, is knocked-out specifically in epidermal tissues. Rad51c is one of the key mediators of HR and a well-known BC predisposition gene. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Rad51c invariably requires inactivation of the Trp53 tumor suppressor (TP53 in humans) to produce mammary carcinomas in 63% of female mice. Nonetheless, loss of Rad51c shortens the latency of Trp53-deficient mouse tumors from 11 to 6 months. Remarkably, the histopathological features of Rad51c-deficient mammary carcinomas, such as expression of hormone receptors and luminal epithelial markers, faithfully recapitulate the histopathology of human RAD51C-mutated BCs. Similar to other BC models, Rad51c/p53 double-mutant mouse mammary tumors also reveal a propensity for genomic instability, but lack the focal amplification of the Met locus or distinct mutational signatures reported for other HR genes. Using the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, we show that deletion of TP53 can rescue RAD51C-deficient cells from radiation-induced cellular senescence, whereas it exacerbates their centrosome amplification and nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, our data indicate that a trend for genomic instability and inactivation of Trp53 are common features of HR-mediated BCs, whereas histopathology and somatic mutation patterns are specific for different HR genes. PMID:26820992

  4. Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 4 (CHD4) Regulates Homologous Recombination DNA Repair, and Its Deficiency Sensitizes Cells to Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (PARP) Inhibitor Treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Hsieh, Hui-Ju; Dai, Hui; Hung, Wen-Chun; Li, Kaiyi; Peng, Guang; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2012-01-01

    To ensure genome stability, cells have evolved a robust defense mechanism to detect, signal, and repair damaged DNA that is generated by exogenous stressors such as ionizing radiation, endogenous stressors such as free radicals, or normal physiological processes such as DNA replication. Homologous recombination (HR) repair is a critical pathway of repairing DNA double strand breaks, and it plays an essential role in maintaining genomic integrity. Previous studies have shown that BRIT1, also known as MCPH1, is a key regulator of HR repair. Here, we report that chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is a novel BRIT1 binding partner that regulates the HR repair process. The BRCA1 C-terminal domains of BRIT1 are required for its interaction with CHD4. Depletion of CHD4 and overexpression of the ATPase-dead form of CHD4 impairs the recruitment of BRIT1 to the DNA damage lesions. As a functional consequence, CHD4 deficiency sensitizes cells to double strand break-inducing agents, reduces the recruitment of HR repair factor BRCA1, and impairs HR repair efficiency. We further demonstrate that CHD4-depleted cells are more sensitive to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor treatment. In response to DNA damage induced by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, CHD4 deficiency impairs the recruitment of DNA repair proteins BRIT1, BRCA1, and replication protein A at early steps of HR repair. Taken together, our findings identify an important role of CHD4 in controlling HR repair to maintain genome stability and establish the potential therapeutic implications of targeting CHD4 deficiency in tumors. PMID:22219182

  5. Inhibition of Homologous Recombination and Promotion of Mutagenic Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks Underpins Arabinoside-Nucleoside Analogue Radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Magin, Simon; Papaioannou, Maria; Saha, Janapriya; Staudt, Christian; Iliakis, George

    2015-06-01

    In concurrent chemoradiotherapy, drugs are used to sensitize tumors to ionizing radiation. Although a spectrum of indications for simultaneous treatment with drugs and radiation has been defined, the molecular mechanisms underpinning tumor radiosensitization remain incompletely characterized for several such combinations. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of radiosensitization by the arabinoside nucleoside analogue 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (araA) placing particular emphasis on the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), and compare the results to those obtained with fludarabine (F-araA) and cytarabine (araC). Postirradiation treatment with araA strongly sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation, but leaves unchanged DSB repair by NHEJ in logarithmically growing cells, in sorted G1 or G2 phase populations, as well as in cells in the plateau phase of growth. Notably, araA strongly inhibits DSB repair by homologous recombination (HRR), as assessed by scoring ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci, and in functional assays using integrated reporter constructs. Cells compromised in HRR by RNAi-mediated transient knockdown of RAD51 show markedly reduced radiosensitization after treatment with araA. Remarkably, mutagenic DSB repair compensates for HRR inhibition in araA-treated cells. Compared with araA, F-araA and araC are only modestly radiosensitizing under the conditions examined. We propose that the radiosensitizing potential of nucleoside analogues is linked to their ability to inhibit HRR and concomitantly promote the error-prone processing of DSBs. Our observations pave the way to treatment strategies harnessing the selective inhibitory potential of nucleoside analogues and the development of novel compounds specifically utilizing HRR inhibition as a means of tumor cell radiosensitization. PMID:25840584

  6. Recombinant production of mecasermin in E. coli expression system

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, S.; Babaeipour, V.; Seyedi, H.A. Eslampanah; Rahaie, M.; Mofid, M.R.; Haddad, L.; Namvaran, M.M.; Fallah, J.

    2014-01-01

    Human Insulin-like growth factor 1 (hIGF-1) consists of 70 amino acids in a single chain with three intermolecular disulfide bridges possessing valuable therapeutic effects. To date, numerous variants of specifically engineered hIGF-1 have been produced so as to improve hIGF-1 biological activity, stability and stronger binding to IGF-1 receptor. Mecasermin is one of the modified variants with one amino acid substitution near the N-terminal (T4I) approved for the treatment of growth failure diabetes, wound healing, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and severe primary IGF-1 deficiency. No scientific report for recombinant production of mecasermin in Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system has been sofar reported. In the present study, we therefore investigated the overexpression of mecasermin in two different E. coli strains in order to obtain higher yield of recombinant protein. To achieve this goal, mecasermin DNA encoding sequence was designed based on polypeptide sequence, optimized according to E. coli codon preference, and cloned in pET15b. Recombinant vector, pET15-mecasermin, transferred into two E. coli strains rigami B (DE3) and BL21 (DE3) and induced for expression in a small scale. Results revealed the E. coli Origami B (DE3) expression system was a preferable host for mecasermin production due to its high expression level being around twice as much as BL21 (DE3). Large scale mecasermin production was performed in batch culture and produced recombinant protein specifically confirmed by western blotting and mass spectroscopy. Since major part of recombinant mecasermin was expressed as inclusion body, isolation and refolding was accomplished through developed purification procedure, and finally recombinant protein was successfully purified by gel filtration chromatography. PMID:26339260

  7. Recombinant baculovirus isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac or BaculoDirect, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Additionally, many systems require a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay. Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  8. The HSP90 Inhibitor NVP-AUY922 Radiosensitizes by Abrogation of Homologous Recombination Resulting in Mitotic Entry with Unresolved DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bhide, Shreerang A.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Workman, Paul; Nutting, Christopher M.; Huddart, Robert A.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone responsible for the conformational maintenance of a number of client proteins that play key roles in cell cycle arrest, DNA damage repair and apoptosis following radiation. HSP90 inhibitors exhibit antitumor activity by modulating the stabilisation and activation of HSP90 client proteins. We sought to evaluate NVP-AUY922, the most potent HSP90 inhibitor yet reported, in preclinical radiosensitization studies. Principal Findings NVP-AUY922 potently radiosensitized cells in vitro at low nanomolar concentrations with a concurrent depletion of radioresistance-linked client proteins. Radiosensitization by NVP-AUY922 was verified for the first time in vivo in a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model in athymic mice, as measured by delayed tumor growth and increased surrogate end-point survival (p = <0.0001). NVP-AUY922 was shown to ubiquitously inhibit resolution of dsDNA damage repair correlating to delayed Rad51 foci formation in all cell lines tested. Additionally, NVP-AUY922 induced a stalled mitotic phenotype, in a cell line-dependent manner, in HeLa and HN5 cell lines irrespective of radiation exposure. Cell cycle analysis indicated that NVP-AUY922 induced aberrant mitotic entry in all cell lines tested in the presence of radiation-induced DNA damage due to ubiquitous CHK1 depletion, but resultant downstream cell cycle effects were cell line dependent. Conclusions These results identify NVP-AUY922 as the most potent HSP90-mediated radiosensitizer yet reported in vitro, and for the first time validate it in a clinically relevant in vivo model. Mechanistic analysis at clinically achievable concentrations demonstrated that radiosensitization is mediated by the combinatorial inhibition of cell growth and survival pathways, ubiquitous delay in Rad51-mediated homologous recombination and CHK1-mediated G2/M arrest, but that the contribution of cell cycle perturbation to

  9. Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC2 and XRCC3 homologous recombination repair genes and ovarian cancer in Polish women.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Magdalena M; Samulak, Dariusz; Romanowicz, Hanna; Jabłoński, Filip; Smolarz, Beata

    2016-04-01

    The variability, perceived in DNA repair genes, may be of clinical importance for evaluation of the risk of occurrence of a given type of cancer, its prophylactics and therapy. The aim of the present work was to evaluate associations between the risk of ovarian cancer and polymorphisms in the genes, encoding for two key proteins of homologous recombination: XRCC2 Arg188His (c. 563 G>A; rs3218536) and XRCC3 Thr241Met (c. 722 C>T; rs861539). The study consisted of 700 patients with ovarian cancer and 700 healthy subjects. Analysis of the gene polymorphisms was performed using PCR-RFLP (restriction length fragment polymorphism). We found a statistically significant increase of the 188His allele frequency (OR=4.01; 95% CI=3.40-4.72; p<.0001) of XRCC2 in ovarian cancer compared to healthy controls. There were no differences in the genotype and allele distributions and odds ratios of the XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism between patient and control groups. Association of these genetic polymorphisms with histological grading showed increased XRCC2 188Arg/His (OR=33.0; 95% CI=14.51-75.05; p<.0001) and 188His/His genotypes (OR=9.37; 95% CI=4.79-18.32; p<.0001) and XRCC3 241Thr/Met (OR=24.28; 95% CI=12.38-47.61; p<.0001) and 241Met/Met genotype frequencies (OR=17.00; 95% CI=8.42-34.28; p<.0001) in grading 1 (G1) as well as 188His (OR=2.78; 95% CI=2.11-3.69; p<.0001) and 241Met allele overrepresentation (OR=2.59; 95% CI=2.08-3.22; p<.0001) in G1 ovarian patients. Finally, with clinical FIGO staging under evaluation, an increase in XRCC2 188His/His homozygote and 188Arg/His heterozygote frequencies in staging I (SI) and XRCC3 Thr/Met heterozygote frequencies in SI was observed. The obtained results indicate that XRCC2 Arg188His and XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphisms may be positively associated with the incidence of ovarian carcinoma in the population of Polish women.

  10. DNA-PK inhibition causes a low level of H2AX phosphorylation and homologous recombination repair in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Urushihara, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Komatsu, Kenshi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2012-12-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of DNA-PK inhibition on DSB repair using fish cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A radiation sensitive mutant RIC1 strain showed a low level of DNA-PK activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads defects in HR repair and DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads a slight increase in the number of 53BP1 foci after DSBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads an alternative NHEJ that depends on 53BP1. -- Abstract: Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are known as DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. It has been reported that DNA-PK, a member of PI3 kinase family, promotes NHEJ and aberrant DNA-PK causes NHEJ deficiency. However, in this study, we demonstrate that a wild-type cell line treated with DNA-PK inhibitor and a mutant cell line with dysfunctional DNA-PK showed decreased HR efficiency in fish cells (Medaka, Oryzias latipes). Previously, we reported that the radiation-sensitive mutant RIC1 strain has a defect in the Histone H2AX phosphorylation after {gamma}-irradiation. Here, we showed that a DNA-PK inhibitor, NU7026, treatment resulted in significant reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci after {gamma}-irradiation in wild-type cells, but had no significant effect in RIC1 cells. In addition, RIC1 cells showed significantly lower levels of DNA-PK kinase activity compared with wild-type cells. We investigated NHEJ and HR efficiency after induction of DSBs. Wild-type cells treated with NU7026 and RIC1 cells showed decreased HR efficiency. These results indicated that aberrant DNA-PK causes the reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci and HR efficiency in RIC1 cells. We performed phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (Thr2609) and 53BP1 focus assay after {gamma}-irradiation. RIC1 cells showed significant reduction in the number of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs foci and no deference in the

  11. Use of the lambda Red recombinase system to produce recombinant prophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Moreno, Ruth; Acosta, Sandra; Hernalsteens, Jean Pierre; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2006-01-01

    Background The Red recombinase system of bacteriophage lambda has been used to inactivate chromosomal genes in E. coli K-12 through homologous recombination using linear PCR products. The aim of this study was to induce mutations in the genome of some temperate Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages. When phage genes are in the prophage state, they behave like chromosomal genes. This enables marker genes, such as antibiotic resistance genes, to be incorporated into the stx gene. Once the phages' lytic cycle is activated, recombinant Shiga toxin converting phages are produced. These phages can transfer the marker genes to the bacteria that they infect and convert. As the Red system's effectiveness decreased when used for our purposes, we had to introduce significant variations to the original method. These modifications included: confirming the stability of the target stx gene increasing the number of cells to be transformed and using a three-step PCR method to produce the amplimer containing the antibiotic resistance gene. Results Seven phages carrying two different antibiotic resistance genes were derived from phages that are directly involved in the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin-producing strains, using this modified protocol. Conclusion This approach facilitates exploration of the transduction processes and is a valuable tool for studying phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer. PMID:16984631

  12. Problem-Solving Test: Conditional Gene Targeting Using the Cre/loxP Recombination System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: gene targeting, knock-out mutation, bacteriophage, complementary base-pairing, homologous recombination, deletion, transgenic organisms, promoter, polyadenylation element, transgene, DNA replication, RNA polymerase, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, restriction endonuclease, polymerase chain…

  13. Microwave accelerated synthesis of isoxazole hydrazide inhibitors of the system xc- transporter: Initial homology model.

    PubMed

    Matti, Afnan A; Mirzaei, Joseph; Rudolph, John; Smith, Stephen A; Newell, Jayme L; Patel, Sarjubhai A; Braden, Michael R; Bridges, Richard J; Natale, Nicholas R

    2013-11-01

    Microwave accelerated reaction system (MARS) technology provided a good method to obtain selective and open isoxazole ligands that bind to and inhibit the Sxc- antiporter. The MARS provided numerous advantages, including: shorter time, better yield and higher purity of the product. Of the newly synthesized series of isoxazoles the salicyl hydrazide 6 exhibited the highest level of inhibitory activity in the transport assay. A homology model has been developed to summarize the SAR results to date, and provide a working hypothesis for future studies.

  14. Integrating multi-scale data on homologous recombination into a new recognition mechanism based on simulations of the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Darren; Boyer, Benjamin; Prévost, Chantal; Danilowicz, Claudia; Prentiss, Mara

    2015-12-01

    RecA protein is the prototypical recombinase. Members of the recombinase family can accurately repair double strand breaks in DNA. They also provide crucial links between pairs of sister chromatids in eukaryotic meiosis. A very broad outline of how these proteins align homologous sequences and promote DNA strand exchange has long been known, as are the crystal structures of the RecA-DNA pre- and postsynaptic complexes; however, little is known about the homology searching conformations and the details of how DNA in bacterial genomes is rapidly searched until homologous alignment is achieved. By integrating a physical model of recognition to new modeling work based on docking exploration and molecular dynamics simulation, we present a detailed structure/function model of homology recognition that reconciles extremely quick searching with the efficient and stringent formation of stable strand exchange products and which is consistent with a vast body of previously unexplained experimental results.

  15. Integrating multi-scale data on homologous recombination into a new recognition mechanism based on simulations of the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darren; Boyer, Benjamin; Prévost, Chantal; Danilowicz, Claudia; Prentiss, Mara

    2015-01-01

    RecA protein is the prototypical recombinase. Members of the recombinase family can accurately repair double strand breaks in DNA. They also provide crucial links between pairs of sister chromatids in eukaryotic meiosis. A very broad outline of how these proteins align homologous sequences and promote DNA strand exchange has long been known, as are the crystal structures of the RecA-DNA pre- and postsynaptic complexes; however, little is known about the homology searching conformations and the details of how DNA in bacterial genomes is rapidly searched until homologous alignment is achieved. By integrating a physical model of recognition to new modeling work based on docking exploration and molecular dynamics simulation, we present a detailed structure/function model of homology recognition that reconciles extremely quick searching with the efficient and stringent formation of stable strand exchange products and which is consistent with a vast body of previously unexplained experimental results. PMID:26384422

  16. A multi-Fc-species system for recombinant antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Moutel, Sandrine; El Marjou, Ahmed; Vielemeyer, Ole; Nizak, Clément; Benaroch, Philippe; Dübel, Stefan; Perez, Franck

    2009-01-01

    Background Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic projects often suffer from a lack of functional validation creating a strong demand for specific and versatile antibodies. Antibody phage display represents an attractive approach to select rapidly in vitro the equivalent of monoclonal antibodies, like single chain Fv antibodies, in an inexpensive and animal free way. However, so far, recombinant antibodies have not managed to impose themselves as efficient alternatives to natural antibodies. Results We developed a series of vectors that allow one to easily fuse single chain Fv antibodies to Fc domains of immunoglobulins, improving their sensitivity and facilitating their use. This series enables the fusion of single chain Fv antibodies with human, mouse or rabbit Fc so that a given antibody is no longer restricted to a particular species. This opens up unlimited multiplexing possibilities and gives additional value to recombinant antibodies. We also show that this multi-Fc species production system can be applied to natural monoclonal antibodies cloned as single chain Fv antibodies and we converted the widely used 9E10 mouse anti-Myc-tag antibody into a human and a rabbit antibody. Conclusion Altogether, this new expression system, that brings constant quality, sensitivity and unique versatility, will be important to broaden the use of recombinant and natural monoclonal antibodies both for laboratory and diagnosis use. PMID:19245715

  17. A homologous production system for Trichoderma reesei secreted proteins in a cellulase-free background.

    PubMed

    Uzbas, Fatma; Sezerman, Ugur; Hartl, Lukas; Kubicek, Christian P; Seiboth, Bernhard

    2012-02-01

    Recent demands for the production of biofuels from lignocellulose led to an increased interest in engineered cellulases from Trichoderma reesei or other fungal sources. While the methods to generate such mutant cellulases on DNA level are straightforward, there is often a bottleneck in their production since a correct posttranslational processing of these enzymes is needed to obtain highly active enzymes. Their production and subsequent enzymatic analysis in the homologous host T. reesei is, however, often disturbed by the concomitant production of other endogenous cellulases. As a useful alternative, we tested the production of cellulases in T. reesei in a genetic background where cellulase formation has been impaired by deletion of the major cellulase transcriptional activator gene xyr1. Three cellulase genes (cel7a, cel7b, and cel12a) were expressed under the promoter regions of the two highly expressed genes tef1 (encoding translation elongation factor 1-alpha) or cdna1 (encoding the hypothetical protein Trire2:110879). When cultivated on D: -glucose as carbon source, the Δxyr1 strain secreted all three cellulases into the medium. Related to the introduced gene copy number, the cdna1 promoter appeared to be superior to the tef1 promoter. No signs of proteolysis were detected, and the individual cellulases could be assayed over a background essentially free of other cellulases. Hence this system can be used as a vehicle for rapid and high-throughput testing of cellulase muteins in a homologous background.

  18. Systems biology of recombinant protein production using Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Borgmeier, Claudia; Bunk, Boyke; Stammen, Simon; Scherling, Christian; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Wittmann, Christoph; Jahn, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is the most widely used production host for recombinant proteins in both academia and industry. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium represents an increasingly used alternative for high yield intra- and extracellular protein synthesis. During the past two decades, multiple tools including gene expression plasmids and production strains have been developed. Introduction of free replicating and integrative plasmids into B. megaterium is possible via protoplasts transformation or transconjugation. Using His(6)- and StrepII affinity tags, the intra- or extracellular produced proteins can easily be purified in one-step procedures. Different gene expression systems based on the xylose controlled promoter P(xylA) and various phage RNA polymerase (T7, SP6, K1E) driven systems enable B. megaterium to produce up to 1.25g of recombinant protein per liter. Biomass concentrations of up to 80g/l can be achieved by high cell density cultivations in bioreactors. Gene knockouts and gene replacements in B. megaterium are possible via an optimized gene disruption system. For a safe application in industry, sporulation and protease-deficient as well as UV-sensitive mutants are available. With the help of the recently published B. megaterium genome sequence, it is possible to characterize bottle necks in the protein production process via systems biology approaches based on transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome data. The bioinformatical platform (Megabac, http://www.megabac.tu-bs.de) integrates obtained theoretical and experimental data. PMID:21943898

  19. Homologs of the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI Transporter Represent a New Family of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Henderson, Peter J. F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux systems are a major cause of resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria, including those pathogenic to humans, animals, and plants. These proteins are ubiquitous in these pathogens, and five families of bacterial multidrug efflux systems have been identified to date. By using transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, we recently identified the novel AceI (Acinetobacter chlorhexidine efflux) protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that conferred resistance to the biocide chlorhexidine, via an active efflux mechanism. Proteins homologous to AceI are encoded in the genomes of many other bacterial species and are particularly prominent within proteobacterial lineages. In this study, we expressed 23 homologs of AceI and examined their resistance and/or transport profiles. MIC analyses demonstrated that, like AceI, many of the homologs conferred resistance to chlorhexidine. Many of the AceI homologs conferred resistance to additional biocides, including benzalkonium, dequalinium, proflavine, and acriflavine. We conducted fluorimetric transport assays using the AceI homolog from Vibrio parahaemolyticus and confirmed that resistance to both proflavine and acriflavine was mediated by an active efflux mechanism. These results show that this group of AceI homologs represent a new family of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, which we have designated the proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) family of transport proteins. PMID:25670776

  20. Evo-devo and the search for homology ("sameness") in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Rolf; Moline, Philip

    2005-11-01

    Developmental biology and evolutionary studies have merged into evolutionary developmental biology ("evo-devo"). This synthesis already influenced and still continues to change the conceptual framework of structural biology. One of the cornerstones of structural biology is the concept of homology. But the search for homology ("sameness") of biological structures depends on our favourite perspectives (axioms, paradigms). Five levels of homology ("sameness") can be identified in the literature, although they overlap to some degree: (i) serial homology (homonomy) within modular organisms, (ii) historical homology (synapomorphy), which is taken as the only acceptable homology by many biologists, (iii) underlying homology (i.e., parallelism) in closely related taxa, (iv) deep evolutionary homology due to the "same" master genes in distantly related phyla, and (v) molecular homology exclusively at gene level. The following essay gives emphasis on the heuristic advantages of seemingly opposing perspectives in structural biology, with examples mainly from comparative plant morphology. The organization of the plant body in the majority of angiosperms led to the recognition of the classical root-shoot model. In some lineages bauplan rules were transcended during evolution and development. This resulted in morphological misfits such as the Podostemaceae, peculiar eudicots adapted to submerged river rocks. Their transformed "roots" and "shoots" fit only to a limited degree into the classical model which is based on either-or thinking. It has to be widened into a continuum model by taking over elements of fuzzy logic and fractal geometry to accommodate for lineages such as the Podostemaceae.

  1. Improvement of Bacillus sphaericus toxicity against dipteran larvae by integration, via homologous recombination, of the Cry11A toxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    PubMed Central

    Poncet, S; Bernard, C; Dervyn, E; Cayley, J; Klier, A; Rapoport, G

    1997-01-01

    Integrative plasmids were constructed to enable integration of foreign DNA into the chromosome of Bacillus sphaericus 2297 by in vivo recombination. Integration of the aphA3 kanamycin resistance gene by a two-step procedure demonstrated that this strategy was applicable with antibiotic resistance selection. Hybridization experiments evidenced two copies of the operon encoding the binary toxin from B. sphaericus in the recipient strain. The Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis cry11Aal gene (referred to as cry11A), encoding a delta-endotoxin with toxicity against Culex, Aedes, and Anopheles larvae, was integrated either by a single crossover event [strain 2297 (::pHT5601), harboring the entire recombinant plasmid] or by two successive crossover events [strain 2297 (::cry11A)]. The level of the Cry11A production in B. sphaericus was high; two crystalline inclusions were produced in strain 2297 (::pHT5601). Synthesis of the Cry11A toxin conferred toxicity to the recombinant strains against Aedes aegypti larvae, for which the parental strain was not toxic. Interestingly, the level of larvicidal activity of strain 2297 (::pHT5601) against Anopheles stephensi was as high as that of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and suggested synergy between the B. thuringiensis and B. sphaericus toxins. The toxicities of parental and recombinant B. sphaericus strains against Culex quinquefasciatus were similar, but the recombinant strains killed the larvae more rapidly. The production of the Cry11A toxin in B. sphaericus also partially restored toxicity for C. quinquefasciatus larvae from a population resistant to B. sphaericus 1593. In vivo recombination therefore appears to be a promising approach to the creation of new B. sphaericus strains for vector control. PMID:9361428

  2. Introduction to ‘Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution’

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso–ventral and anterior–posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the ‘Cambrian explosion’ arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to

  3. Systems Biology of Recombinant Protein Production in Bacillus megaterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Bunk, Boyke; Fürch, Tobias; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter

    Over the last two decades the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium was systematically developed to a useful alternative protein production host. Multiple vector systems for high yield intra- and extracellular protein production were constructed. Strong inducible promoters were combined with DNA sequences for optimised ribosome binding sites, various leader peptides for protein export and N- as well as C-terminal affinity tags for affinity chromatographic purification of the desired protein. High cell density cultivation and recombinant protein production were successfully tested. For further system biology based control and optimisation of the production process the genomes of two B. megaterium strains were completely elucidated, DNA arrays designed, proteome, fluxome and metabolome analyses performed and all data integrated using the bioinformatics platform MEGABAC. Now, solid theoretical and experimental bases for primary modeling attempts of the production process are available.

  4. A Sabin 3-derived poliovirus recombinant contained a sequence homologous with indigenous human enterovirus species C in the viral polymerase coding region.

    PubMed

    Arita, Minetaro; Zhu, Shuang-Li; Yoshida, Hiromu; Yoneyama, Tetsuo; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2005-10-01

    Outbreaks of poliomyelitis caused by circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) have been reported in areas where indigenous wild polioviruses (PVs) were eliminated by vaccination. Most of these cVDPVs contained unidentified sequences in the nonstructural protein coding region which were considered to be derived from human enterovirus species C (HEV-C) by recombination. In this study, we report isolation of a Sabin 3-derived PV recombinant (Cambodia-02) from an acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case in Cambodia in 2002. We attempted to identify the putative recombination counterpart of Cambodia-02 by sequence analysis of nonpolio enterovirus isolates from AFP cases in Cambodia from 1999 to 2003. Based on the previously estimated evolution rates of PVs, the recombination event resulting in Cambodia-02 was estimated to have occurred within 6 months after the administration of oral PV vaccine (99.3% nucleotide identity in VP1 region). The 2BC and the 3D(pol) coding regions of Cambodia-02 were grouped into the genetic cluster of indigenous coxsackie A virus type 17 (CAV17) (the highest [87.1%] nucleotide identity) and the cluster of indigenous CAV13-CAV18 (the highest [94.9%] nucleotide identity) by the phylogenic analysis of the HEV-C isolates in 2002, respectively. CAV13-CAV18 and CAV17 were the dominant HEV-C serotypes in 2002 but not in 2001 and in 2003. We found a putative recombination between CAV13-CAV18 and CAV17 in the 3CD(pro) coding region of a CAV17 isolate. These results suggested that a part of the 3D(pol) coding region of PV3(Cambodia-02) was derived from a HEV-C strain genetically related to indigenous CAV13-CAV18 strains in 2002 in Cambodia.

  5. Tubulin homolog TubZ in a phage-encoded partition system

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, María A.; Martin-Galiano, Antonio J.; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Andreu, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Partition systems are responsible for the process whereby large and essential plasmids are accurately positioned to daughter cells during bacterial division. They are typically made of three components: a centromere-like DNA zone, an adaptor protein, and an assembling protein that is either a Walker-box ATPase (type I) or an actin-like ATPase (type II). A recently described type III segregation system has a tubulin/FtsZ-like protein, called TubZ, for plasmid movement. Here, we present the 2.3 Å structure and dynamic assembly of a TubZ tubulin homolog from a bacteriophage and unravel the Clostridium botulinum phage c-st type III partition system. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we prove that a gene upstream from tubZ encodes the partner TubR and localize the centromeric region (tubS), both of which are essential for anchoring phage DNA to the motile TubZ filaments. Finally, we describe a conserved fourth component, TubY, which modulates the TubZ-R-S complex interaction. PMID:22538818

  6. Expression of factor VIII in recombinant and transgenic systems.

    PubMed

    Soukharev, Serguei; Hammond, David; Ananyeva, Natalya M; Anderson, Julia A M; Hauser, Charlotte A E; Pipe, Steven; Saenko, Evgueni L

    2002-01-01

    Deficiency in a coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) causes a genetic disorder hemophilia A, which is treated by repeated infusions of expensive FVIII products. Recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), the culmination of years of extensive international research, is an important alternative to plasma-derived FVIII (pdFVIII) and is considered to have a higher margin of safety. Advances in biotechnology allowed production of rFVIII at industrial scale, which significantly improved treatment of hemophilia A patients. We review the contemporary methods used for FVIII expression in mammalian cell culture systems and discuss the factors responsible for insufficient recoveries of rFVIII, such as inefficient accumulation of FVIII mRNA in the cell, complexity of the mechanisms of FVIII secretion, and instability of secreted FVIII. The approaches to improve the yield of rFVIII in cell culture systems include genetic engineering of B-domain-deleted FVIII, introduction of introns into FVIII cDNA constructs for more efficient processing and accumulation of FVIII mRNA, and introduction of mutations into chaperone-binding sites of FVIII to improve its secretion. Design of FVIII with prolonged half-life in vivo is considered as another promising direction in improving rFVIII protein and efficiency of hemophilia A therapy. As an alternative to expression of rFVIII in cell culture systems, we discuss production of rFVIII in transgenic animals, where high levels of rFVIII have been successfully secreted into milk. We also pay attention to the major limitations of this approach, such as safety issues associated with potential transmission of animal pathogens. Finally, we present a brief characterization of commercial recombinant FVIII products currently available on the market for hemophilia A treatment.

  7. Can systems biology help to separate evolutionary analogies (convergent homoplasies) from homologies?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Malcolm S; Notar, Julia C

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evolutionary analogies (homoplasies) of many kinds occur in diverse phylogenetic clades/lineages on both the animal and plant branches of the Tree of Life. Living organisms whose last common ancestors lived millions to hundreds of millions of years ago have later converged morphologically, behaviorally or at other levels of functionality (from molecular genetics through biochemistry, physiology and other organismic processes) as a result of long term strong natural selection that has constrained and channeled evolutionary processes. This happens most often when organisms belonging to different clades occupy ecological niches, habitats or environments sharing major characteristics that select for a relatively narrow range of organismic properties. Systems biology, broadly defined, provides theoretical and methodological approaches that are beginning to make it possible to answer a perennial evolutionary biological question relating to convergent homoplasies: Are at least some of the apparent analogies actually unrecognized homologies? This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of important aspects of this topic area. It also provides a resource describing many homoplasies that may be fruitful subjects for systems biological research.

  8. High-throughput charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, N. J.; Carolan, P. G.; McCone, J.; Walsh, M. J.; Wisse, M.

    2006-10-15

    A major upgrade to the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST has recently been implemented. The new system consists of a high-throughput spectrometer coupled to a total of 224 spatial channels, including toroidal and poloidal views of both neutral heating beams on MAST. Radial resolution is {approx}1 cm, comparable to the ion Larmor radius. The toroidal views are configured with 64 channels per beam, while the poloidal views have 32 channels per beam. Background channels for both poloidal and toroidal views are also provided. A large transmission grating is at the heart of the new spectrometer, with high quality single lens reflex lenses providing excellent imaging performance and permitting the full exploitation of the available etendue of the camera sensor. The charge-coupled device camera chosen has four-tap readout at a maximum aggregate speed of 8.8 MHz, and it is capable of reading out the full set of 224 channels in less than 4 ms. The system normally operates at 529 nm, viewing the C{sup 5+} emission line, but can operate at any wavelength in the range of 400-700 nm. Results from operating the system on MAST are shown, including impurity ion temperature and velocity profiles. The system's excellent spatial resolution is ideal for the study of transport barrier phenomena on MAST, an activity which has already been advanced significantly by data from the new diagnostic.

  9. Initiation of meiotic recombination in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Milorad; Sutherland, Jeanette H; Pérez-Martín, José; Holloman, William K

    2013-12-01

    A central feature of meiosis is the pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes. Ustilago maydis, a biotrophic fungus that parasitizes maize, has long been utilized as an experimental system for studying recombination, but it has not been clear when in the life cycle meiotic recombination initiates. U. maydis forms dormant diploid teliospores as the end product of the infection process. Upon germination, teliospores complete meiosis to produce four haploid basidiospores. Here we asked whether the meiotic process begins when teliospores germinate or at an earlier stage in development. When teliospores homozygous for a cdc45 mutation temperature sensitive for DNA synthesis were germinated at the restrictive temperature, four nuclei became visible. This implies that teliospores have already undergone premeiotic DNA synthesis and suggests that meiotic recombination initiates at a stage of infection before teliospores mature. Determination of homologous recombination in plant tissue infected with U. maydis strains heteroallelic for the nar1 gene revealed that Nar(+) recombinants were produced at a stage before teliospore maturation. Teliospores obtained from a spo11Δ cross were still able to germinate but the process was highly disturbed and the meiotic products were imbalanced in chromosomal complement. These results show that in U. maydis, homologous recombination initiates during the infection process and that meiosis can proceed even in the absence of Spo11, but with loss of genomic integrity.

  10. Production of recombinant botulism antigens: a review of expression systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, G M S G; Cunha, C E P; Salvarani, F M; Gonçalves, L A; Pires, P S; Conceição, F R; Lobato, F C F

    2014-08-01

    Botulism is a paralytic disease caused by intoxication with neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum. Despite their similar mechanism of action, the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are classified in eight serotypes (A to H). As to veterinary medicine, the impact of this disease is essentially economic, since different species of production animals can be affected, especially by BoNT/C and D. In human health, botulism is feared in a possible biological warfare, what would involve mainly the BoNT/A, B, E and F. In both cases, the most effective way to deal with botulism is through prevention, which involves vaccination. However, the current vaccines against this disease have several drawbacks on their process of production and, besides this, can be dangerous to producers since it requires certain level of biosafety. This way, recombinant vaccines have been shown to be a great alternative for the development of vaccines against both animal and human botulism. All BoNTs have a 50-kDa light chain (LC) and a 100-kDa heavy chain (HC). The latter one presents two domains of 50 kDa, called the N-terminal (HN) and C-terminal (HC) halves. Among these regions, the HC alone seem to confer the proper immune response against intoxication. Since innumerous studies describe the expression of these distinct regions using different systems, strategies, and protocols, it is difficult to define the best option for a viable vaccine production. Thereby, the present review describes the problematic of botulism and discusses the main advances for the viable production of vaccines for both human and veterinary medicine using recombinant antigens.

  11. Production of recombinant botulism antigens: a review of expression systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, G M S G; Cunha, C E P; Salvarani, F M; Gonçalves, L A; Pires, P S; Conceição, F R; Lobato, F C F

    2014-08-01

    Botulism is a paralytic disease caused by intoxication with neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum. Despite their similar mechanism of action, the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are classified in eight serotypes (A to H). As to veterinary medicine, the impact of this disease is essentially economic, since different species of production animals can be affected, especially by BoNT/C and D. In human health, botulism is feared in a possible biological warfare, what would involve mainly the BoNT/A, B, E and F. In both cases, the most effective way to deal with botulism is through prevention, which involves vaccination. However, the current vaccines against this disease have several drawbacks on their process of production and, besides this, can be dangerous to producers since it requires certain level of biosafety. This way, recombinant vaccines have been shown to be a great alternative for the development of vaccines against both animal and human botulism. All BoNTs have a 50-kDa light chain (LC) and a 100-kDa heavy chain (HC). The latter one presents two domains of 50 kDa, called the N-terminal (HN) and C-terminal (HC) halves. Among these regions, the HC alone seem to confer the proper immune response against intoxication. Since innumerous studies describe the expression of these distinct regions using different systems, strategies, and protocols, it is difficult to define the best option for a viable vaccine production. Thereby, the present review describes the problematic of botulism and discusses the main advances for the viable production of vaccines for both human and veterinary medicine using recombinant antigens. PMID:24930432

  12. Amino acid sequence homology among the 2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenases: mitochondrial and cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases form a homologous system with lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Birktoft, J J; Fernley, R T; Bradshaw, R A; Banaszak, L J

    1982-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of porcine heart mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; L-malate: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.37) has been compared with the sequences of six different lactate dehydrogenases (LDH; L-lactate: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27) and with the "x-ray" sequence of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (sMDH). The main points are that (i) all three enzymes are homologous; (ii) invariant residues in the catalytic center of these enzymes include a histidine and an internally located aspartate that function as a proton relay system; (iii) numerous residues important to coenzyme binding are conserved, including several glycines and charged residues; and (iv) amino acid side chains present in the subunit interface common to the MDHs and LDHs appear to be better conserved than those in the protein interior. It is concluded that LDH, sMDH, and mMDH are derived from a common ancestral gene and probably have similar catalytic mechanisms. PMID:6959107

  13. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  14. Homologous Elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3′ Regulatory Region of the Murine Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain (Igh) Locus Are Both Dispensable for Class-switch Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R.; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Eckhardt, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3′ regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established “pairs” of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3′ regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  15. Homologous elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3' regulatory region of the murine immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus are both dispensable for class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K; Eckhardt, Laurel A

    2011-08-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3' regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established "pairs" of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3' regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  16. Homologous elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3' regulatory region of the murine immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus are both dispensable for class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K; Eckhardt, Laurel A

    2011-08-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3' regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established "pairs" of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3' regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR.

  17. Selective Recombination System in Bombyx mori. I. Chromosome Specificity of the Modification Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ebinuma, Hiroyasu

    1987-01-01

    The effect of modifiers on recombination frequency between Ze and lem loci on chromosome 3 to elucidate the chromosome specificity of modification and the distribution of modifiers using Bombyx mori lines selected for high (H) and low (L) recombination rates between the pS and Y loci in chromosome 2 was investigated. By crossing to the Z (Ze lem/++) line, the recombination rate between the pS and Y loci in chromosome 2 was decreased from 28.18 to 23.33 in the H line and was increased from 4.92 to 16.05 in the L line. On the other hand, the recombination rate between the Ze and lem loci in chromosome 3 was increased from 16.21 to 20.21 in the Z line by crossing to the H line, but also increased to 19.02 by crossing to the L line. The significant correlation observed between the transformed recombination rates of chromosomes 2 and 3 in the (Z x L) x L backcross indicated that there were common factors modifying recombination frequency in chromosomes 2 and 3 or different factors linked to the same chromosomes. In the family of L x [(Z x L) x L] backcross, the distribution of transformed recombination rates indicated that there were several factors in the remaining chromosomes which were modifying recombination frequency in chromosome 2 but not in chromosome 3. It was also indicated that these factors were linked to different chromosomes than are the factors modifying recombination frequency in chromosome 3. In order to interpret these results, one genetic system model controlling recombination that consists of general and local recombination modifiers was proposed. The evolution of dynamic genetic systems that would effectively reduce recombinational load without reducing the advantage of recombination was discussed. PMID:17246408

  18. PsasM2I, a type II restriction-modification system in Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi: differential distribution of carrier strains in the environment and the evolutionary history of homologous RM systems in the Pseudomonas syringae complex.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, Tamara; Moscetti, Ilaria; Marchi, Guido

    2014-11-01

    A type II restriction-modification system was found in a native plasmid of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi MLLI2. Functional analysis of the methyltransferase showed that the enzyme acts by protecting the DNA sequence CTGCAG from cleavage. Restriction endonuclease expression in recombinant Escherichia coli cells resulted in mutations in the REase sequence or transposition of insertion sequence 1A in the coding sequence, preventing lethal gene expression. Population screening detected homologous RM systems in other P. savastanoi strains and in the Pseudomonas syringae complex. An epidemiological survey carried out by sampling olive and oleander knots in two Italian regions showed an uneven diffusion of carrier strains, whose presence could be related to a selective advantage in maintaining the RM system in particular environments or subpopulations. Moreover, carrier strains can coexist in the same orchards, plants, and knot tissues with non-carriers, revealing unexpected genetic variability on a very small spatial scale. Phylogenetic analysis of the RM system and housekeeping gene sequences in the P. syringae complex demonstrated the ancient acquisition of the RM systems. However, the evolutionary history of the gene complex also showed the involvement of horizontal gene transfer between related strains and recombination events.

  19. Effect of Recombination in the Evolutionary Dynamics of HIV under the Surveillance of Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Yang, Wenjing; Wang, Guanyu

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which has become one of the most destructive pandemics in history. The fact that HIV virus evolves very fast plays a central role in AIDS immunopathogenesis and the difficulty we face in finding a cure or a vaccine for AIDS. A distinguishing feature of HIV is its high frequency of recombination. The effect of recombination in the HIV evolution is not clear. We establish a mathematical model of the evolutionary dynamics. This model incorporates both point mutation and recombination for genetic diversity, and employs a fitness function developed by Wang and Deem (PRL 97, 188106, 2006) that accounts for the effect of immune system. Using this model, we explore the role of recombination in the battle between the virus population and the immune system, with a special focus on the condition under which recombination helps the virus population to escape from the immune system.

  20. Production of recombinant miraculin using transgenic tomatoes in a closed cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Fukukawa, Go; Kakuta, Hideo; Fukuda, Naoya; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2010-05-26

    We constructed a cultivation system with a controlled light period, light intensity, temperature, and CO(2) concentration for mass production of the taste-modifying protein miraculin from transgenic tomatoes. The tomato plants exhibited normal growth and produced over 270 g of fresh weight (FW) fruit per plant, with the recombinant miraculin concentration reaching up to 90 microg per g FW of tomatoes. The recombinant miraculin content of transgenic tomatoes was compared to that of plants grown in a netted greenhouse. The recombinant miraculin content of transgenic tomatoes grown in a closed cultivation system was more stable than that of tomatoes grown in a netted greenhouse, suggesting that the closed cultivation system is suitable for the production of recombinant miraculin. We estimate that 45 tFW of tomatoes and 4 kg of recombinant miraculin per 1,000 m(2) of cultivation area can be harvested per year. PMID:20426470

  1. Members of the RAD52 Epistasis Group Contribute to Mitochondrial Homologous Recombination and Double-Strand Break Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stein, Alexis; Kalifa, Lidza; Sia, Elaine A

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria contain an independently maintained genome that encodes several proteins required for cellular respiration. Deletions in the mitochondrial genome have been identified that cause several maternally inherited diseases and are associated with certain cancers and neurological disorders. The majority of these deletions in human cells are flanked by short, repetitive sequences, suggesting that these deletions may result from recombination events. Our current understanding of the maintenance and repair of mtDNA is quite limited compared to our understanding of similar events in the nucleus. Many nuclear DNA repair proteins are now known to also localize to mitochondria, but their function and the mechanism of their action remain largely unknown. This study investigated the contribution of the nuclear double-strand break repair (DSBR) proteins Rad51p, Rad52p and Rad59p in mtDNA repair. We have determined that both Rad51p and Rad59p are localized to the matrix of the mitochondria and that Rad51p binds directly to mitochondrial DNA. In addition, a mitochondrially-targeted restriction endonuclease (mtLS-KpnI) was used to produce a unique double-strand break (DSB) in the mitochondrial genome, which allowed direct analysis of DSB repair in vivo in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that loss of these three proteins significantly decreases the rate of spontaneous deletion events and the loss of Rad51p and Rad59p impairs the repair of induced mtDNA DSBs.

  2. A Gateway recombination herpesvirus cloning system with negative selection that produces vectorless progeny.

    PubMed

    Kunec, Dusan; van Haren, Sandra; Burgess, Shane C; Hanson, Larry A

    2009-01-01

    Crossover recombination based on the lambda phage integration/excision functions enables insertion of a gene of interest into a specific locus by a simple one-step in vitro recombination reaction. Recently, a highly efficient recombination system for targeted mutagenesis, which utilizes lambda phage crossover recombination cloning, has been described for a human herpesvirus 2 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). The disadvantages of the system are that it allows only neutral selection (loss of green fluorescent protein) of desired recombinants and that it regenerates herpesvirus progeny containing the BAC sequence inserted in the herpesvirus genome. In this study, the existing channel catfish herpesvirus (CCV) infectious clone (in the form of overlapping fragments) was modified to allow introduction of foreign genes by modified lambda phage crossover recombination cloning. This novel system enables negative and neutral selection and regenerates vectorless herpesvirus progeny. Construction of two CCV mutants expressing lacZ, one from the native CCV ORF5 promoter and the other from the immediate-early cytomegalovirus promoter, demonstrated the efficiency and reliability of this system. This novel cloning system enables rapid incorporation, direct delivery and high-level expression of foreign genes by a herpesvirus. This system has broad utility and could be used to facilitate development of recombinant viruses, viral vectors and better vaccines. PMID:18948138

  3. A complex organization of the gene encoding cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 in the mitochondrial genome of the dinoflagellate, Crypthecodinium cohnii: homologous recombination generates two different cox1 open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Norman, J E; Gray, M W

    2001-01-01

    In the course of investigating mitochondrial genome organization in Crypthecodinium cohnii, a non-photosynthetic dinoflagellate, we identified four EcoRI fragments that hybridize to a probe specific for cox1, the gene that encodes subunit 1 of cytochrome oxidase. Cloning and sequence characterization of the four fragments (5.7, 5.1, 4.1, 3.5 kilobase pairs) revealed that cox1 exists in four distinct but related contexts in C. cohnii mtDNA, with a central repeat unit flanked by one of two possible upstream (flanking domain 1 or 2) and downstream (flanking domain 3 or 4) regions. The majority of the cox1 gene is located within the central repeat; however, the C-terminal portion of the open reading frame extends into flanking domains 3 and 4, thereby creating two distinct cox1 coding sequences. The 3'-terminal region of one of the cox1 reading frames can assume an elaborate secondary structure, which potentially could act to stabilize the mature mRNA against nucleolytic degradation. In addition, a high density of small inverted repeats (15-22 base pairs) has been identified at the 5'-end of cox1, further suggesting that hairpin structures could be important for gene regulation. The organization of cox1 in C. cohnii mtDNA appears to reflect homologous recombination events within the central repeat between different cox1 sequence contexts. Such recombining repeats are a characteristic feature of plant (angiosperm) mtDNA, but they have not previously been described in the mitochondrial genomes of protists.

  4. Operation of an efficient site-specific recombination system of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, H; Yokoi, K; Machida, C; Matsuzaki, H; Oshima, Y; Matsuoka, K; Nakamura, K; Machida, Y

    1991-12-11

    Recombinase encoded by the R gene of pSR1 of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii mediates reciprocal recombination between two specific recombination sites (RSs) to induce excision or inversion of the DNA segment that is flanked by the RSs. We report here that site-specific recombination mediated by this system takes place effeciently in tobacco cells. To monitor the recombination events in tobacco cells, we have constructed two types of cryptic beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in such a way that recombination such as inversion of the construct or excision of the intervening sequence results in their expression. When these cryptic reporter constructs were transiently introduced together with the R gene by electroporation into protoplasts of tobacco cells, beta-glucuronidase activity was detected. The cryptic reporter genes, when stably resident in the chromosome of tobacco cells, were also activated by the R gene. Structural analyses of the genomic DNA isolated from these tobacco cells showed that the R protein did in fact catalyze precise recombination between two copies of RSs in tobacco cells, with resultant activation of the cryptic reporter genes. This observation provides the basis for development of a DNA technology whereby large regions of DNA can be manipulated in plant chromosomes. Potential uses of this recombination system are discussed.

  5. Expression and export: recombinant protein production systems for Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Fleissner, André; Dersch, Petra

    2010-07-01

    Several Aspergillus species, in particular Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae, are widely used as protein production hosts in various biotechnological applications. In order to improve the expression and secretion of recombinant proteins in these filamentous fungi, several novel genetic engineering strategies have been developed in recent years. This review describes state-of-the-art genetic manipulation technologies used for strain improvement, as well as recent advances in designing the most appropriate engineering strategy for a particular protein production process. Furthermore, current developments in identifying bottlenecks in the protein production and secretion pathways are described and novel approaches to overcome these limitations are introduced. An appropriate combination of expression vectors and optimized host strains will provide cell factories customized for each production process and expand the great potential of Aspergilli as biotechnology workhorses to more complex multi-step industrial applications.

  6. Extended homologous series of Sn-O layered systems: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Kirsten; Partoens, Bart; Lamoen, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Apart from the most studied tin-oxide compounds, SnO and SnO2, intermediate states have been claimed to exist for more than a hundred years. In addition to the known homologous series (Seko et al., 2008 [27]), we here predict the existence of several new compounds with an O concentration between 50% (SnO) and 67% (SnO2). All these intermediate compounds are constructed from removing one or more (101) oxygen layers of SnO2. Since the van der Waals (vdW) interaction is known to be important for the Sn-Sn interlayer distances, we use a vdW-corrected functional, and compare these results with results obtained with PBE and hybrid functionals. We present the electronic properties of the intermediate structures and we observe a decrease of the band gap when (i) the O concentration increases and (ii) more SnO-like units are present for a given concentration. The contribution of the different atoms to the valence and conduction band is also investigated.

  7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of RAD51-G172T and XRCC2-41657C/T Homologous Recombination Repair Genes and the Risk of Triple- Negative Breast Cancer in Polish Women.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Magdalena M; Samulak, Dariusz; Romanowicz, Hanna; Smolarz, Beata

    2015-09-01

    Double strand DNA breaks are the most dangerous DNA damage which, if non-repaired or misrepaired, may result in genomic instability, cancer transformation or cell death. RAD51 and XRCC2 encode proteins that are important for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. Therefore, genetic variability in these genes may contribute to the occurrence and progression of triple-negative breast cancer. The polymorphisms of the XRCC2 gene -41657C/T (rs718282) and of the RAD51 gene, -172G/T (rs1801321), were investigated by PCR-RFLP in 70 patients with triple-negative breast cancer and 70 age- and sex matched non-cancer controls. The obtained results demonstrated a significant positive association between the RAD51 T/T genotype and TNBC, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 4.94 (p = 0.001). The homozygous T/T genotype was found in 60 % of TNBC cases and in 14 % of the used controls. Variant 172 T allele of RAD51 increased cancer risk (OR = 2.81 (1.72-4.58), p < .0001). No significant associations were observed between -41657C/T genotype of XRCC2 and the incidence of TNBC. There were no significant differences between the distribution of XRCC2 -41657C/T genotypes in the subgroups assigned to histological grades. The obtained results indicate that the polymorphism of RAD51, but not of XRCC2 gene, may be positively associated with the incidence of triple-negative breast carcinoma in the population of Polish women.

  8. Transformation system for Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei) that favors homologous integration and employs reusable bidirectionally selectable markers.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Matthias G; Vitikainen, Marika; Uskonen, Pekka; Brunner, Kurt; Adam, Gerhard; Pakula, Tiina; Penttilä, Merja; Saloheimo, Markku; Mach, Robert L; Mach-Aigner, Astrid R

    2011-01-01

    Hypocrea jecorina is an industrially important filamentous fungus due to its effective production of hydrolytic enzymes. It has received increasing interest because of its ability to convert lignocellulosic biomass to monomeric sugars, which can be converted into biofuels or platform chemicals. Genetic engineering of strains is a highly important means of meeting the requirements of tailor-made applications. Therefore, we report the development of a transformation system that allows highly efficient gene targeting by using a tmus53 (human LIG4 homolog) deletion strain. Moreover, it permits the unlimited reuse of the same marker by employing a Cre/loxP-based excision system. Both marker insertion and marker excision can be positively selected for by combining resistance to hygromycin B and loss of sensitivity to fluoroacetamide. Finally, the marker pyr4, also positively selectable for insertion and loss, can be used to remove the cre gene.

  9. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments. PMID:26021569

  10. Prokaryotic High-Level Expression System in Producing Adhesin Recombinant Protein E of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Minoo; Bouzari, Saeed; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin; Jafari, Anis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adhesion protein E (PE) of Haemophilus influenzae is a 16 - 18 kDa protein with 160 amino acids which causes adhesion to epithelial cells and acts as a major factor in pathogenesis. Objectives: In this study, we performed cloning, expression and purification of PE as a candidate antigen for vaccine design upon further study. Materials and Methods: At first, the pe gene of NTHi ATCC 49766 strain (483 bp) was amplified by PCR. Then, to sequence the resulted amplicon, it was cloned into TA vector (pTZ57R/T). In the next step, the sequenced gene was sub-cloned in pBAD/gIII A vector and transformed into competent Escherichia coli TOP10. For overexpression, the recombinant bacteria were grown in broth medium containing arabinose and the recombinant protein was purified using metal affinity chromatography (Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid) (Ni-NTA agarose). Finally, the protein was detected using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophores (SDS-PAG) and confirmed by western blotting. Results: The cloned gene was confirmed by PCR, restriction digestion and sequencing. The sequenced gene was searched for homology in GenBank and 99% similarity was found to the already deposited genes in GenBank. Then we obtained PE using Ni-NTA agarose with up to 7 mg/mL concentration. Conclusions: The pe gene was successfully cloned and confirmed by sequencing. Finally, PE was obtained with high concentration. Due to high homology and similarity among the pe gene from NTHi ATCC 49766 and other NTHi strains in GenBank, we believe that the protein is a universal antigen to be used as a vaccine design candidate and further studies to evaluate its immunogenicity is underway. PMID:26034537

  11. An improved FORTRAN 77 recombinant DNA database management system with graphic extensions in GKS.

    PubMed

    Van Rompuy, L L; Lesage, C; Vanderhaegen, M E; Telemans, M P; Zabeau, M F

    1986-12-01

    We have improved an existing clone database management system written in FORTRAN 77 and adapted it to our software environment. Improvements are that the database can be interrogated for any type of information, not just keywords. Also, recombinant DNA constructions can be represented in a simplified 'shorthand', whereafter a program assembles the full nucleotide sequence from the contributing fragments, which may be obtained from nucleotide sequence databases. Another improvement is the replacement of the database manager by programs, running in batch to maintain the databank and verify its consistency automatically. Finally, graphic extensions are written in Graphical Kernel System, to draw linear and circular restriction maps of recombinants. Besides restriction sites, recombinant features can be presented from the feature lines of recombinant database entries, or from the feature tables of nucleotide databases. The clone database management system is fully integrated into the sequence analysis software package from the Pasteur Institute, Paris, and is made accessible through the same menu. As a result, recombinant DNA sequences can directly be analysed by the sequence analysis programs.

  12. Evaluation of selectivity in homologous multimodal chromatographic systems using in silico designed antibody fragment libraries.

    PubMed

    Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Woo, James; Krogh, Berit Olsen; Ahmadian, Haleh; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-12-24

    This study describes the in silico design, surface property analyses, production and chromatographic evaluations of a diverse set of antibody Fab fragment variants. Based on previous findings, we hypothesized that the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) constitute important binding sites for multimodal chromatographic ligands. Given that antibodies are highly diversified molecules and in particular the CDRs, we set out to examine the generality of this result. For this purpose, four different Fab fragments with different CDRs and/or framework regions of the variable domains were identified and related variants were designed in silico. The four Fab variant libraries were subsequently generated by site-directed mutagenesis and produced by recombinant expression and affinity purification to enable examination of their chromatographic retention behavior. The effects of geometric re-arrangement of the functional moieties on the multimodal resin ligands were also investigated with respect to Fab variant retention profiles by comparing two commercially available multimodal cation-exchange ligands, Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime, and two novel multimodal ligand prototypes. Interestingly, the chromatographic data demonstrated distinct selectivity trends between the four Fab variant libraries. For three of the Fab libraries, the CDR regions appeared as major binding sites for all multimodal ligands. In contrast, the fourth Fab library displayed a distinctly different chromatographic behavior, where Nuvia cPrime and related multimodal ligand prototypes provided markedly improved selectivity over Capto MMC. Clearly, the results illustrate that the discriminating power of multimodal ligands differs between different Fab fragments. The results are promising indications that multimodal chromatography using the appropriate multimodal ligands can be employed in downstream bioprocessing for challenging selective separation of product related variants. PMID:26654254

  13. Evaluation of selectivity in homologous multimodal chromatographic systems using in silico designed antibody fragment libraries.

    PubMed

    Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Woo, James; Krogh, Berit Olsen; Ahmadian, Haleh; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-12-24

    This study describes the in silico design, surface property analyses, production and chromatographic evaluations of a diverse set of antibody Fab fragment variants. Based on previous findings, we hypothesized that the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) constitute important binding sites for multimodal chromatographic ligands. Given that antibodies are highly diversified molecules and in particular the CDRs, we set out to examine the generality of this result. For this purpose, four different Fab fragments with different CDRs and/or framework regions of the variable domains were identified and related variants were designed in silico. The four Fab variant libraries were subsequently generated by site-directed mutagenesis and produced by recombinant expression and affinity purification to enable examination of their chromatographic retention behavior. The effects of geometric re-arrangement of the functional moieties on the multimodal resin ligands were also investigated with respect to Fab variant retention profiles by comparing two commercially available multimodal cation-exchange ligands, Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime, and two novel multimodal ligand prototypes. Interestingly, the chromatographic data demonstrated distinct selectivity trends between the four Fab variant libraries. For three of the Fab libraries, the CDR regions appeared as major binding sites for all multimodal ligands. In contrast, the fourth Fab library displayed a distinctly different chromatographic behavior, where Nuvia cPrime and related multimodal ligand prototypes provided markedly improved selectivity over Capto MMC. Clearly, the results illustrate that the discriminating power of multimodal ligands differs between different Fab fragments. The results are promising indications that multimodal chromatography using the appropriate multimodal ligands can be employed in downstream bioprocessing for challenging selective separation of product related variants.

  14. Cas9-assisted recombineering in C. elegans: genome editing using in vivo assembly of linear DNAs.

    PubMed

    Paix, Alexandre; Schmidt, Helen; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2016-09-01

    Recombineering, the use of endogenous homologous recombination systems to recombine DNA in vivo, is a commonly used technique for genome editing in microbes. Recombineering has not yet been developed for animals, where non-homology-based mechanisms have been thought to dominate DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate, using Caenorhabditis elegans, that linear DNAs with short homologies (∼35 bases) engage in a highly efficient gene conversion mechanism. Linear DNA repair templates with homology to only one side of a double-strand break (DSB) initiate repair efficiently, and short overlaps between templates support template switching. We demonstrate the use of single-stranded, bridging oligonucleotides (ssODNs) to target PCR fragments for repair of DSBs induced by CRISPR/Cas9 on chromosomes. Based on these findings, we develop recombineering strategies for precise genome editing that expand the utility of ssODNs and eliminate in vitro cloning steps for template construction. We apply these methods to the generation of GFP knock-in alleles and gene replacements without co-integrated markers. We conclude that, like microbes, metazoans possess robust homology-dependent repair mechanisms that can be harnessed for recombineering and genome editing. PMID:27257074

  15. Cas9-assisted recombineering in C. elegans: genome editing using in vivo assembly of linear DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Paix, Alexandre; Schmidt, Helen; Seydoux, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Recombineering, the use of endogenous homologous recombination systems to recombine DNA in vivo, is a commonly used technique for genome editing in microbes. Recombineering has not yet been developed for animals, where non-homology-based mechanisms have been thought to dominate DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate, using Caenorhabditis elegans, that linear DNAs with short homologies (∼35 bases) engage in a highly efficient gene conversion mechanism. Linear DNA repair templates with homology to only one side of a double-strand break (DSB) initiate repair efficiently, and short overlaps between templates support template switching. We demonstrate the use of single-stranded, bridging oligonucleotides (ssODNs) to target PCR fragments for repair of DSBs induced by CRISPR/Cas9 on chromosomes. Based on these findings, we develop recombineering strategies for precise genome editing that expand the utility of ssODNs and eliminate in vitro cloning steps for template construction. We apply these methods to the generation of GFP knock-in alleles and gene replacements without co-integrated markers. We conclude that, like microbes, metazoans possess robust homology-dependent repair mechanisms that can be harnessed for recombineering and genome editing. PMID:27257074

  16. Recombinative Reading Derived from Pseudoword Instruction in a Miniature Linguistic System

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Elenice S; Kohlsdorf, Marina; Quinteiro, Regiane S; de Melo, Raquel Maria; de Souza, Deisy das GraÇas; de Rose, Julio C; McIlvane, William J

    2011-01-01

    A miniature linguistic system was used to study acquisition of recombinative symbolic behavior. Three studies evaluated the teaching conditions of conditional discriminations with printed and spoken pseudowords that could potentially generate recombinative reading. Fifty-four college students across all studies learned to match 12 printed pseudowords to 12 spoken pseudowords. Some also matched pictures to the same spoken words. Each two-syllable pseudoword was formed by symbols from an arbitrarily created alphabet composed of four vowels and four consonants. Letters had univocal correspondence with phonemes. Recombinative receptive reading, comprehensive reading, and textual responding to pseudowords were periodically assessed. Experiment 1 (n  =  20) showed that recombinative reading increased as the number of trained words composed of the same symbols increased. Experiment 2 (n  =  14) showed that overtraining the same two words did not produce recombinative reading for most participants. Experiment 3 (n  =  20), in which training with pictures was omitted, showed that elemental control by within-syllable units can develop even when the trained pseudowords are meaningless (not related to pictures). The present results support the utility of the miniature linguistic system methodology for identifying and controlling environmental determinants of rudimentary reading skills. PMID:21541169

  17. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Brian H; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J; Engelke, David R

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant "CelTag" DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  18. Survival and induction of SOS in Escherichia coli treated with cisplatin, UV-irradiation, or mitomycin C are dependent on the function of the RecBC and RecFOR pathways of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Keller, K L; Overbeck-Carrick, T L; Beck, D J

    2001-06-01

    Resistance of tumors to drugs such as cisplatin and mitomycin C (MMC) is an important factor limiting their usefulness in cancer chemotherapy. The antitumor effects of these drugs are due to the formation of bifunctional adducts in DNA, with cisplatin causing predominantly intrastrand-crosslinks and MMC causing interstrand-crosslinks. The SOS chromotest was used to study the cellular mechanisms that process DNA damage in Escherichia coli exposed to cisplatin, ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and MMC and subsequently facilitate the production of a molecular signal for induction of the SOS response. Strains used in the SOS chromotest have a fusion of lacZ with the sfiA (sulA) gene so that the amount of SOS inducing signal, which is modulated by the ability of the cell to repair DNA, is measured by assaying beta-galactosidase activity. SOS induction in a strain proficient in homologous recombination (HR) was compared with that in isogenic strains deficient in HR due to a blocked RecBC pathway caused by a recB mutation or a blocked RecFOR pathway caused by a recO mutation. The effect of cisplatin treatment in a uvrA mutant strain blocked at the first step of NER was compared with that in an isogenic strain proficient in NER. Cellular resistance was measured as percent colony forming units (cfu) for cells treated with increasing doses of cisplatin, MMC and UV relative to that in untreated control cultures. The importance of both HR pathways for resistance to these treatments was demonstrated by decreased survival in mutants with the recB mutant being more sensitive than the recO mutant. SOS induction levels were elevated in the sensitive recB strain relative to the HR proficient strain possibly due to stalled and/or distorted replication forks at crosslinks in DNA. In contrast, induction of SOS was dependent on RecFOR activity that is thought to act at daughter strand gaps in newly synthesized DNA to mediate production of the signal for SOS induction. Proficiency in NER was

  19. Vaccination of Rhesus Macaques with Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Env V3 Elicits Neutralizing Antibody-Mediated Protection against Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus with a Homologous but Not a Heterologous V3 Motif

    PubMed Central

    Someya, Kenji; Cecilia, Dayaraj; Ami, Yasushi; Nakasone, Tadashi; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Burda, Sherri; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Naoto; Kaizu, Masahiko; Ando, Shuji; Okuda, Kenji; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Yamazaki, Shudo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    Although the correlates of vaccine-induced protection against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are not fully known, it is presumed that neutralizing antibodies (NAb) play a role in controlling virus infection. In this study, we examined immune responses elicited in rhesus macaques following vaccination with recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing an HIV-1 Env V3 antigen (rBCG Env V3). We also determined the effect of vaccination on protection against challenge with either a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MN) or a highly pathogenic SHIV strain (SHIV-89.6PD). Immunization with rBCG Env V3 elicited significant levels of NAb for the 24 weeks tested that were predominantly HIV-1 type specific. Sera from the immunized macaques neutralized primary HIV-1 isolates in vitro, including HIV-1BZ167/X4, HIV-1SF2/X4, HIV-1CI2/X4, and, to a lesser extent, HIV-1MNp/X4, all of which contain a V3 sequence homologous to that of rBCG Env V3. In contrast, neutralization was not observed against HIV-1SF33/X4, which has a heterologous V3 sequence, nor was it found against primary HIV-1 R5 isolates from either clade A or B. Furthermore, the viral load in the vaccinated macaques was significantly reduced following low-dose challenge with SHIV-MN, and early plasma viremia was markedly decreased after high-dose SHIV-MN challenge. In contrast, replication of pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD was not affected by vaccination in any of the macaques. Thus, we have shown that immunization with an rBCG Env V3 vaccine elicits a strong, type-specific V3 NAb response in rhesus macaques. While this response was not sufficient to provide protection against a pathogenic SHIV challenge, it was able to significantly reduce the viral load in macaques following challenge with a nonpathogenic SHIV. These observations suggest that rBCG vectors have the potential to deliver an appropriate virus immunogen for desirable immune elicitations. PMID:15650171

  20. Ancient homology of the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system points to an endosymbiotic origin of mitochondrial cristae.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Gómez, Sergio A; Slamovits, Claudio H; Dacks, Joel B; Baier, Kaitlyn A; Spencer, Katelyn D; Wideman, Jeremy G

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from an endosymbiotic α-proteobacterium. As an adaptation to maximize ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondria contain inner membrane invaginations called cristae. Recent work has characterized a multi-protein complex in yeast and animal mitochondria called MICOS (mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system), responsible for the determination and maintenance of cristae [1-4]. However, the origin and evolution of these characteristic mitochondrial features remain obscure. We therefore conducted a comprehensive search for MICOS components across the major groups that encompass eukaryotic diversity to determine the extent of conservation of this complex. We detected homologs for the majority of MICOS components among opisthokonts (the group containing animals and fungi), but only Mic60 and Mic10 were consistently identified outside this group. The conservation of Mic60 and Mic10 in eukaryotes is consistent with their central role in MICOS function [5-7], indicating that the basic mechanism for cristae determination arose early in evolution and has remained relatively unchanged. We found that eukaryotes with ultrastructurally simplified anaerobic mitochondria that lack cristae have also lost MICOS. We then searched for a prokaryotic MICOS and identified a homolog of Mic60 present only in α-proteobacteria, providing evidence for the endosymbiotic origin of mitochondrial cristae. Our study clarifies the origins of mitochondrial cristae and their subsequent evolutionary history, provides evidence for a general mechanism of cristae formation and maintenance in eukaryotes, and points to a new potential factor involved in membrane differentiation in prokaryotes.

  1. A Bacillus megaterium System for the Production of Recombinant Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Biedendieck, Rebekka

    2016-01-01

    For many years the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium has been used for the production and secretion of recombinant proteins. For this purpose it was systematically optimized. Plasmids with different inducible promoter systems, with different compatible origins, with small tags for protein purification and with various specific signals for protein secretion were combined with genetically improved host strains. Finally, the development of appropriate cultivation conditions for the production strains established this organism as a bacterial cell factory even for large proteins. Along with the overproduction of individual proteins the organism is now also used for the simultaneous coproduction of up to 14 recombinant proteins, multiple subsequently interacting or forming protein complexes. Some of these recombinant strains are successfully used for bioconversion or the biosynthesis of valuable components including vitamins. The titers in the g per liter scale for the intra- and extracellular recombinant protein production prove the high potential of B. megaterium for industrial applications. It is currently further enhanced for the production of recombinant proteins and multi-subunit protein complexes using directed genetic engineering approaches based on transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome data. PMID:27165321

  2. Recombinant microbial systems for the production of human collagen and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Báez, Julio; Olsen, David; Polarek, James W

    2005-12-01

    The use of genetically engineered microorganisms is a cost-effective, scalable technology for the production of recombinant human collagen (rhC) and recombinant gelatin (rG). This review will discuss the use of yeast (Pichia pastoris, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hansenula polymorpha) and of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus brevis) genetically engineered for the production of rhC and rG. P. pastoris is the preferred production system for rhC and rG. Recombinant strains of P. pastoris accumulate properly hydroxylated triple helical rhC intracellularly at levels up to 1.5 g/l. Coexpression of recombinant collagen with recombinant prolyl hydroxylase results in the synthesis of hydroxylated collagen with thermal stability similar to native collagens. The purified hydroxylated rhC forms fibrils that are structurally similar to fibrils assembled from native collagen. These qualities make rhC attractive for use in many medical applications. P. pastoris can also be engineered to secrete high levels (3 to 14 g/l ) of collagen fragments with defined length, composition, and physiochemical properties that serve as substitutes for animal-derived gelatins. The replacement of animal-derived collagen and gelatin with rhC and rG will result in products with improved safety, traceability, reproducibility, and quality. In addition, the rhC and rG can be engineered to improve the performance of products containing these biomaterials.

  3. A Bacillus megaterium System for the Production of Recombinant Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Biedendieck, Rebekka

    2016-01-01

    For many years the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium has been used for the production and secretion of recombinant proteins. For this purpose it was systematically optimized. Plasmids with different inducible promoter systems, with different compatible origins, with small tags for protein purification and with various specific signals for protein secretion were combined with genetically improved host strains. Finally, the development of appropriate cultivation conditions for the production strains established this organism as a bacterial cell factory even for large proteins. Along with the overproduction of individual proteins the organism is now also used for the simultaneous coproduction of up to 14 recombinant proteins, multiple subsequently interacting or forming protein complexes. Some of these recombinant strains are successfully used for bioconversion or the biosynthesis of valuable components including vitamins. The titers in the g per liter scale for the intra- and extracellular recombinant protein production prove the high potential of B. megaterium for industrial applications. It is currently further enhanced for the production of recombinant proteins and multi-subunit protein complexes using directed genetic engineering approaches based on transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome data.

  4. Systems and methods for the secretion of recombinant proteins in gram negative bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Withers, III, Sydnor T.; Dominguez, Miguel A; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Haitjema, Charles H.

    2016-08-09

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for producing recombinant proteins utilizing mutant E. coli strains containing expression vectors carrying nucleic acids encoding the proteins, and secretory signal sequences to direct the secretion of the proteins to the culture medium. Host cells transformed with the expression vectors are also provided.

  5. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Oxygen-Tolerant Cyanobacterial System (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Smith, H. O.; Maness, P.-C.

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this report is to develop an O{sub 2}-tolerant cyanobacterial system for continuous light-driven H{sub 2} production from water. The overall goal is to produce a cyanobacterial recombinant to produce H{sub 2} continuously.

  6. Development of a Competitive Binding Assay System with Recombinant Estrogen Receptors from Multiple Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT In the current study, we developed a new system using full-length recombinant baculovirus-expressed estrogen receptors which allows for direct comparison of binding across species. Estrogen receptors representing five vertebrate classes were compared: human (hERα), quai...

  7. Recombination dynamics of spatially confined electron-hole system in luminescent gold catalyzed silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Demichel, O; Calvo, V; Pauc, N; Besson, A; Noé, P; Oehler, F; Gentile, P; Magnea, N

    2009-07-01

    We study by time-resolved low temperature photoluminescence (PL) experiments of the electronic states of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) grown by gold catalyzed chemical vapor deposition and passivated by thermal SiO(2). The typical recombination line of free carriers in gold-catalyzed SiNWs (Au-SiNWs) is identified and studied by time-resolved experiments. We demonstrate that intrinsic Auger recombination governs the recombination dynamic of the dense e-h plasma generated inside the NW. In a few tens of nanoseconds after the pulsed excitation, the density of the initial electronic system rapidly decreases down to reach that of a stable electron-hole liquid phase. The comparison of the PL intensity decay time of Au-SiNWs with high crystalline quality and purity silicon layer allows us to conclude that the Au-SiNW electronic properties are highly comparable to those of bulk silicon crystal.

  8. Evolutionary remodeling in a visual system through extensive changes in the synaptic connectivity of homologous neurons.

    PubMed

    Shaw, S R; Moore, D

    1989-11-01

    The cellular mechanisms by which nervous systems evolve to match evolutionary changes occurring in the rest of the body remain largely unexplored. In a distal visual neuropil of a previously unexamined ancient dipteran family, Stratiomyidae, homologues of all of the periodic neurons known already from more recent Diptera can be recognized, occupying the same locations within the unit structure. This points to extreme developmental stasis for more than 200 million years, conserving both cell identity and position. The arborizations that some neurons make also have remained conservative, but others show marked differences between families in both size and branching patterns. At the electron-microscopical level, extensive differences in synaptic connectivity are found, some sufficient to radically redefine the systems roles of particular neurons. The findings bear out an earlier prediction that changes in the connectivity matrix linking conserved neurons may have been a major factor in implementing evolutionary change in the nervous system.

  9. The complement system in teleost fish: progress of post-homolog-hunting researches.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Miki; Tsujikura, Masakazu; Ichiki, Satoko; Vo, Tam K; Somamoto, Tomonori

    2011-12-01

    Studies on the complement system of bony fish are now finishing a stage of homologue-hunting identification of the components, unveiling existence of almost all the orthologues of mammalian complement components in teleost. Genomic and transcriptomic data for several teleost species have contributed much for the homologue-hunting research progress. Only an exception is identification of orthologues of mammalian complement regulatory proteins and complement receptors. It is of particular interest that teleost complement components often exist as multiple isoforms with possible functional divergence. This review summarizes research progress of teleost complement system following the molecular identification and sequence analysis of the components. The findings of extensive expression analyses of the complement components with special emphasis of their prominent extrahepatic expression, acute-phase response to immunostimulation and various microbial infections, and ontogenic development including maternal transfer are discussed to infer teleost-specific functions of the complement system. Importance of the protein level characterization of the complement components is also emphasized, especially for understanding of the isotypic diversity of the components, a unique feature of teleost complement system.

  10. Characterization and use of a recombinant retroviral system for the analysis of drug resistant HIV.

    PubMed

    Medina, D J; Tung, P P; Nelson, C J; Sathya, B; Casareale, D; Strair, R K

    1998-04-01

    A recombinant retroviral system was used for the analysis of early HIV breakthrough infection in the presence of antiviral drugs. The use of replication-defective HIV allowed a quantitative analysis of a single cycle of infection. This report characterizes this recombinant HIV system and demonstrates it's validity in comparison to standard assays. It is demonstrated that the protease inhibitor XM323 inhibits both early and late events in the HIV life-cycle, while dextran sulphate inhibits only early events. In addition, it is shown that this system can be used for detecting and quantitating drug resistant HIV. Thus, the use of this system may provide both novel information about the stage of the viral life-cycle inhibited and a preliminary assessment of the mechanism(s) responsible for breakthrough infection in the presence of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:9626950

  11. Molecular and neuronal homology between the olfactory systems of zebrafish and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Ahuja, Gaurav; Ivandic, Ivan; Syed, Adnan S.; Marioni, John C.; Korsching, Sigrun I.; Logan, Darren W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the two major olfactory organs of rodents, the olfactory mucosa (OM) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), unraveled the molecular basis of smell in vertebrates. However, some vertebrates lack a VNO. Here we generated and analyzed the olfactory transcriptome of the zebrafish and compared it to the olfactory transcriptomes of mouse to investigate the evolutionary and molecular relationship between single and dual olfactory systems. Our analyses revealed a high degree of molecular conservation, with orthologs of mouse olfactory cell-specific markers and all but one of their chemosensory receptor classes expressed in the single zebrafish olfactory organ. Zebrafish chemosensory receptor genes are expressed across a large dynamic range and their RNA abundance correlates positively with the number of neurons expressing that RNA. Thus we estimate the relative proportions of neuronal sub-types expressing different chemosensory receptors. Receptor repertoire size drives the absolute abundance of different classes of neurons, but we find similar underlying patterns in both species. Finally, we identified novel marker genes that characterize rare neuronal populations in both mouse and zebrafish. In sum, we find that the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning olfaction in teleosts and mammals are similar despite 430 million years of evolutionary divergence. PMID:26108469

  12. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Cyanobacterial System

    SciTech Connect

    Weyman, Philip D; Smith, Hamillton O.

    2014-12-03

    Photobiological processes are attractive routes to renewable H2 production. With the input of solar energy, photosynthetic microbes such as cyanobacteria and green algae carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, using sunlight energy to extract protons and high energy electrons from water. These protons and high energy electrons can be fed to a hydrogenase system yielding H2. However, most hydrogen-evolving hydrogenases are inhibited by O2, which is an inherent byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The rate of H2 production is thus limited. Certain photosynthetic bacteria are reported to have an O2-tolerant evolving hydrogenase, yet these microbes do not split water, and require other more expensive feedstocks. To overcome these difficulties, the goal of this work has been to construct novel microbial hybrids by genetically transferring O2-tolerant hydrogenases from other bacteria into a class of photosynthetic bacteria called cyanobacteria. These hybrid organisms will use the photosynthetic machinery of the cyanobacterial hosts to perform the water-oxidation reaction with the input of solar energy, and couple the resulting protons and high energy electrons to the O2-tolerant bacterial hydrogenase, all within the same microbe (Fig. 1). The ultimate goal of this work has been to overcome the sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme to O2 and address one of the key technological hurdles to cost-effective photobiological H2 production which currently limits the production of hydrogen in algal systems. In pursuit of this goal, work on this project has successfully completed many subtasks leading to a greatly increased understanding of the complicated [NiFe]-hydrogenase enzymes. At the beginning of this project, [NiFe] hydrogenases had never been successfully moved across wide species barriers and had never been heterologously expressed in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, the idea that whole, functional genes could be extracted from complicated, mixed-sequence meta-genomes was not

  13. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  14. Factors affecting recombinant Western equine encephalitis virus glycoprotein production in the baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Toth, Ann M; Geisler, Christoph; Aumiller, Jared J; Jarvis, Donald L

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to produce processed, soluble Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) glycoproteins for subunit therapeutic vaccine studies, we isolated twelve recombinant baculoviruses designed to express four different WEEV glycoprotein constructs under the transcriptional control of three temporally distinct baculovirus promoters. The WEEV glycoprotein constructs encoded full-length E1, the E1 ectodomain, an E26KE1 polyprotein precursor, and an artificial, secretable E2E1 chimera. The three different promoters induced gene expression during the immediate early (ie1), late (p6.9), and very late (polh) phases of baculovirus infection. Protein expression studies showed that the nature of the WEEV construct and the timing of expression both influenced the quantity and quality of recombinant glycoprotein produced. The full-length E1 product was insoluble, irrespective of the timing of expression. Each of the other three constructs yielded soluble products and, in these cases, the timing of expression was important, as higher protein processing efficiencies were generally obtained at earlier times of infection. However, immediate early expression did not yield detectable levels of every WEEV product, and expression during the late (p6.9) or very late (polh) phases of infection provided equal or higher amounts of processed, soluble product. Thus, while earlier foreign gene expression can provide higher recombinant glycoprotein processing efficiencies in the baculovirus system, in the case of the WEEV glycoproteins, earlier expression did not provide larger amounts of high quality, soluble recombinant glycoprotein product.

  15. Recombinant production of plant lectins in microbial systems for biomedical application - the frutalin case study.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Frutalin is a homotetrameric partly glycosylated α-D-galactose-binding lectin of biomedical interest from Artocarpus incisa (breadfruit) seeds, belonging to the jacalin-related lectins family. As other plant lectins, frutalin is a heterogeneous mixture of several isoforms possibly with distinct biological activities. The main problem of using such lectins as biomedical tools is that "batch-to-batch" variation in isoforms content may lead to inconstant results. The production of lectins by recombinant means has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with defined amino-acid sequences and more precise properties. In this mini review, we provide the strategies followed to produce two different forms of frutalin in two different microbial systems: Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. The processing and functional properties of the recombinant frutalin obtained from these hosts are compared to those of frutalin extracted from breadfruit. Emphasis is given particularly to recombinant frutalin produced in P. pastoris, which showed a remarkable capacity as biomarker of human prostate cancer and as apoptosis-inducer of cancer cells. Recombinant frutalin production opens perspectives for its development as a new tool in human medicine. PMID:25152749

  16. Recombinant production of plant lectins in microbial systems for biomedical application - the frutalin case study.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Frutalin is a homotetrameric partly glycosylated α-D-galactose-binding lectin of biomedical interest from Artocarpus incisa (breadfruit) seeds, belonging to the jacalin-related lectins family. As other plant lectins, frutalin is a heterogeneous mixture of several isoforms possibly with distinct biological activities. The main problem of using such lectins as biomedical tools is that "batch-to-batch" variation in isoforms content may lead to inconstant results. The production of lectins by recombinant means has the advantage of obtaining high amounts of proteins with defined amino-acid sequences and more precise properties. In this mini review, we provide the strategies followed to produce two different forms of frutalin in two different microbial systems: Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. The processing and functional properties of the recombinant frutalin obtained from these hosts are compared to those of frutalin extracted from breadfruit. Emphasis is given particularly to recombinant frutalin produced in P. pastoris, which showed a remarkable capacity as biomarker of human prostate cancer and as apoptosis-inducer of cancer cells. Recombinant frutalin production opens perspectives for its development as a new tool in human medicine.

  17. Molecular evolution of a Drosophila homolog of human BRCA2

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Sarah M.; Noor, Mohamed A. F.

    2009-01-01

    The human cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, functions in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination, and it appears to function via interaction of a repetitive region (“BRC repeats”) with RAD-51. A putatively simpler homolog, dmbrca2, was identified in Drosophila melanogaster recently and also affects mitotic and meiotic double-strand break repair. In this study, we examined patterns of repeat variation both within Drosophila pseudoobscura and among available Drosophila genome sequences. We identified extensive variation within and among closely related Drosophila species in BRC repeat number, to the extent that variation within this genus recapitulates the extent of variation found across the entire animal kingdom. We describe patterns of evolution across species by documenting recent repeat expansions (sometimes in tandem arrays) and homogenizations within available genome sequences. Overall, we have documented patterns and modes of evolution in a new model system of a gene which is important to human health. PMID:19554456

  18. Molecular evolution of a Drosophila homolog of human BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sarah M; Noor, Mohamed A F

    2009-11-01

    The human cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, functions in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination, and it appears to function via interaction of a repetitive region ("BRC repeats") with RAD-51. A putatively simpler homolog, dmbrca2, was identified in Drosophila melanogaster recently and also affects mitotic and meiotic double-strand break repair. In this study, we examined patterns of repeat variation both within Drosophila pseudoobscura and among available Drosophila genome sequences. We identified extensive variation within and among closely related Drosophila species in BRC repeat number, to the extent that variation within this genus recapitulates the extent of variation found across the entire animal kingdom. We describe patterns of evolution across species by documenting recent repeat expansions (sometimes in tandem arrays) and homogenizations within available genome sequences. Overall, we have documented patterns and modes of evolution in a new model system of a gene which is important to human health.

  19. Enrichment of intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants in a dual infection system using HIV-1 strain-specific siRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants in the form of unique or stable circulating recombinants forms (CRFs) are responsible for over 20% of infections in the worldwide epidemic. Mechanisms controlling the generation, selection, and transmission of these intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants still require further investigation. All intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants are generated and evolve from initial dual infections, but are difficult to identify in the human population. In vitro studies provide the most practical system to study mechanisms, but the recombination rates are usually very low in dual infections with primary HIV-1 isolates. This study describes the use of HIV-1 isolate-specific siRNAs to enrich intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants and inhibit the parental HIV-1 isolates from a dual infection. Results Following a dual infection with subtype A and D primary HIV-1 isolates and two rounds of siRNA treatment, nearly 100% of replicative virus was resistant to a siRNA specific for an upstream target sequence in the subtype A envelope (env) gene as well as a siRNA specific for a downstream target sequence in the subtype D env gene. Only 20% (10/50) of the replicating virus had nucleotide substitutions in the siRNA-target sequence whereas the remaining 78% (39/50) harbored a recombination breakpoint that removed both siRNA target sequences, and rendered the intersubtype D/A recombinant virus resistant to the dual siRNA treatment. Since siRNAs target the newly transcribed HIV-1 mRNA, the siRNAs only enrich intersubtype env recombinants and do not influence the recombination process during reverse transcription. Using this system, a strong bias is selected for recombination breakpoints in the C2 region, whereas other HIV-1 env regions, most notably the hypervariable regions, were nearly devoid of intersubtype recombination breakpoints. Sequence conservation plays an important role in selecting for recombination breakpoints, but the lack of breakpoints in many conserved

  20. Development of a reverse genetics system to generate recombinant Marburg virus derived from a bat isolate.

    PubMed

    Albariño, César G; Uebelhoer, Luke S; Vincent, Joel P; Khristova, Marina L; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; McElroy, Anita; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2013-11-01

    Recent investigations have shown the Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) to be a natural reservoir for marburgviruses. To better understand the life cycle of these viruses in the natural host, a new reverse genetics system was developed for the reliable rescue of a Marburg virus (MARV) originally isolated directly from a R. aegyptiacus bat (371Bat). To develop this system, the exact terminal sequences were first determined by 5' and 3' RACE, followed by the cloning of viral proteins NP, VP35, VP30 and L into expression plasmids. Novel conditions were then developed to efficiently replicate virus mini-genomes followed by the construction of full-length genomic clones from which recombinant wild type and GFP-containing MARVs were rescued. Surprisingly, when these recombinant MARVs were propagated in primary human macrophages, a dramatic difference was found in their ability to grow and to elicit anti-viral cytokine responses.

  1. Robust orthogonal recombination system for versatile genomic elements rearrangement in yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiuhui; Qi, Hao; Wu, Yi; Yuan, Yingjin

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangement of genomic DNA elements in a dynamic controlled fashion is a fundamental challenge. Site-specific DNA recombinases have been tamed as a powerful tool in genome editing. Here, we reported a DNA element rearrangement on the basis of a pairwise orthogonal recombination system which is comprised of two site-specific recombinases of Vika/vox and Cre/loxp in yeast Saccharomyces Creevisiae. Taking the advantage of the robust pairwise orthogonality, we showed that multi gene elements could be organized in a programmed way, in which rationally designed pattern of loxP and vox determined the final genotype after expressing corresponding recombinases. Finally, it was demonstrated that the pairwise orthogonal recombination system could be utilized to refine synthetic chromosome rearrangement and modification by loxP-mediated evolution, SCRaMbLE, in yeast cell carrying a completely synthesized chromosome III. PMID:26477943

  2. Robust orthogonal recombination system for versatile genomic elements rearrangement in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiuhui; Qi, Hao; Wu, Yi; Yuan, Yingjin

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangement of genomic DNA elements in a dynamic controlled fashion is a fundamental challenge. Site-specific DNA recombinases have been tamed as a powerful tool in genome editing. Here, we reported a DNA element rearrangement on the basis of a pairwise orthogonal recombination system which is comprised of two site-specific recombinases of Vika/vox and Cre/loxp in yeast Saccharomyces Creevisiae. Taking the advantage of the robust pairwise orthogonality, we showed that multi gene elements could be organized in a programmed way, in which rationally designed pattern of loxP and vox determined the final genotype after expressing corresponding recombinases. Finally, it was demonstrated that the pairwise orthogonal recombination system could be utilized to refine synthetic chromosome rearrangement and modification by loxP-mediated evolution, SCRaMbLE, in yeast cell carrying a completely synthesized chromosome III.

  3. In vivo site-specific recombination using the beta-rec/six system.

    PubMed

    Servert, Pilar; Díaz, Vicente; Lucas, Daniel; de la Cueva, Teresa; Rodriguez, Maria; García-Castro, Javier; Alonso, Juan; Martínez-A, Carlos; González, Manuel; Bernad, Antonio

    2008-07-01

    The prokaryotic beta serine recombinase (beta-rec) catalyzes site-specific recombination between two directly oriented six sites (93 bp) in mammalian cells, both in episomal and in chromosomally integrated substrates. The beta-rec/six exclusive intramolecular site-specific recombination (SSR) system has been proposed as a suitable approach when several independently controlled recombination events are needed in a single cell. Here we explored the use of the beta-rec/six system for selective induction of genome-targeted modifications. We generated and analyzed mouse transgenic lines (Tgbeta) expressing beta-rec under the control of the Lck promoter. beta-rec activity was demonstrated, and there was no evidence of alterations to thymic or peripheral T cell development. We developed two transgenic mouse lines harboring different target sequences (Tgrec and KOsix) and analyzed the effect of beta-rec expression on these animals. The results indicate that the beta-rec/six SSR system is functional for in vivo gene-targeting applications.

  4. Meiotic recombination in normal and cloned bulls and their offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homologous chromosome pairing and recombination are essential components of meiosis and sexual reproduction. The reshuffling of genetic material through breakage and reunion of chromatids ensure proper segregation of homologous chromosomes in reduction division and genetic diversity in the progeny....

  5. An Efficient Genome-Wide Fusion Partner Screening System for Secretion of Recombinant Proteins in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung-Hoon; Hyun Sung, Bong; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Park, Soon-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Mook; Kim, Mi-Jin; Lee, Cho-Ryong; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To produce rarely secreted recombinant proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed a novel genome-wide optimal translational fusion partner (TFP) screening system that involves recruitment of an optimal secretion signal and fusion partner. A TFP library was constructed from a genomic and truncated cDNA library by using the invertase-based signal sequence trap technique. The efficiency of the system was demonstrated using two rarely secreted proteins, human interleukin (hIL)-2 and hIL-32. Optimal TFPs for secretion of hIL-2 and hIL-32 were easily selected, yielding secretion of these proteins up to hundreds of mg/L. Moreover, numerous uncovered yeast secretion signals and fusion partners were identified, leading to efficient secretion of various recombinant proteins. Selected TFPs were found to be useful for the hypersecretion of other recombinant proteins at yields of up to several g/L. This screening technique could provide new methods for the production of various types of difficult-to-express proteins. PMID:26195161

  6. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment. PMID:26297626

  7. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment.

  8. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  9. THE STRUCTURES OF COILED-COIL DOMAINS FROM TYPE THREE SECRETION SYSTEM TRANSLOCATORS REVEAL HOMOLOGY TO PORE-FORMING TOXINS

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-01-01

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SS) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) which is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) is comprised of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 Å and 2.8 Å limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are comprised of extended length (114 Å in IpaB and 71 Å in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically-separate and functionally-distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events. PMID:22321794

  10. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Lynn C.; Costantino, Nina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. PMID:27624131

  11. Influence of expression system on chromophore binding and preservation of spectral properties in recombinant phytochrome A.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, W; Hill, C; Worm, K; Braslavsky, S E; Schaffner, K

    1996-03-15

    N-Terminal deletion mutants of the plant photoreceptor phytochrome, additionally truncated at two different positions at their C-terminal ends, were expressed both in Escherichia coli and in yeast (Pichia pastoris) and converted into chromoproteins upon chromophore incorporation. The start and end positions of the cDNA employed (phyA from oat) mimic the positions of tryptic cleavage (deletion of the first 64 amino acids, and stop codons after amino acid positions 425 or 595, generating 39-kDa and 59-kDa peptides, respectively. The absorption properties and photochromicity upon red/far-red irradiation of these mutants were compared with their tryptic counterparts derived from native oat phytochrome and with recombinant products possessing intact N-termini, but C-terminal positions identical to those of the corresponding tryptic fragments (45-kDa and 65-kDa peptides). All recombinant 65-kDa and 59kDa peptides bound the chromophore after expression and showed the appropriate absorption spectra of the Pr and the Pfr forms. The smaller chromopeptides (45-kDa and 39-kDa) behaved differently depending on the expression system employed. E. coli-derived peptides exhibited a phytochrome-like difference spectrum only when the intact N-terminus was present (45-kDa product). The recombinant 39-kDa peptide from E. coli was incapable of chromophore binding whereas the identical peptide sequence expressed by P. pastoris formed a chromoprotein with phycocyanobilin. This recombinant phytochrome fragment exhibited a difference spectrum (Pr-Pfr) with an even larger Pfr absorption band than the comparable tryptic 39-kDa fragment. Selectivity of chromophore incorporation and spectral properties suggest that interactions between protein domains of phytochrome control the protein folding and the Pr/Pfr absorption characteristics. Evidently, trypsin digestion down to the 39-kDa fragment affects protein conformation also in terms of Pfr conservation.

  12. AvrRxo1 Is a Bifunctional Type III Secreted Effector and Toxin-Antitoxin System Component with Homologs in Diverse Environmental Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Lindsay R.; Shidore, Teja; Long, John; Miao, Jiamin; Wu, Shuchi; Han, Qian; Zhou, Changhe; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Li, Jianyong; Zhao, Bingyu; Leach, Jan E.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are ubiquitous bacterial systems that may function in genome maintenance and metabolic stress management, but are also thought to play a role in virulence by helping pathogens survive stress. We previously demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola protein AvrRxo1 is a type III-secreted virulence factor that has structural similarities to the zeta family of TA toxins, and is toxic to plants and bacteria in the absence of its predicted chaperone Arc1. In this work, we confirm that AvrRxo1 and its binding partner Arc1 function as a TA system when expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequences of avrRxo1 homologs were culled from published and newly generated phytopathogen genomes, revealing that avrRxo1:arc1 modules are rare or frequently inactivated in some species and highly conserved in others. Cloning and functional analysis of avrRxo1 from Acidovorax avenae, A. citrulli, Burkholderia andropogonis, Xanthomonas translucens, and Xanthomonas euvesicatoria showed that some AvrRxo1 homologs share the bacteriostatic and Rxo1-mediated cell death triggering activities of AvrRxo1 from X. oryzae. Additional distant putative homologs of avrRxo1 and arc1 were identified in genomic or metagenomic sequence of environmental bacteria with no known pathogenic role. One of these distant homologs was cloned from the filamentous soil bacterium Cystobacter fuscus. avrRxo1 from C. fuscus caused watersoaking and triggered Rxo1-dependent cell collapse in Nicotiana benthamiana, but no growth suppression in E. coli was observed. This work confirms that a type III effector can function as a TA system toxin, and illustrates the potential of microbiome data to reveal new environmental origins or reservoirs of pathogen virulence factors. PMID:27391081

  13. Enzymatic characterization of recombinant nitrate reductase expressed and purified from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Phillip; Probst, Corinna; Dammeyer, Thorben; Buchmeier, Sabine; Jänsch, Lothar; Wissing, Josef; Tinnefeld, Philip; Mendel, Ralf R; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Kruse, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We established an expression and purification procedure for recombinant protein production in Neurospora crassa (N. crassa). This Strep-tag® based system was successfully used for purifying recombinant N. crassa nitrate reductase (NR), whose enzymatic activity was compared to recombinant N. crassa NR purified from Escherichia coli. The purity of the two different NR preparations was similar but NR purified from N. crassa showed a significantly higher nitrate turnover rate. Two phosphorylation sites were identified for NR purified from the endogenous expression system. We conclude that homologous expression of N. crassa NR yields a higher active enzyme and propose that NR phosphorylation causes enhanced enzymatic activity. PMID:25914160

  14. Enzymatic characterization of recombinant nitrate reductase expressed and purified from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Phillip; Probst, Corinna; Dammeyer, Thorben; Buchmeier, Sabine; Jänsch, Lothar; Wissing, Josef; Tinnefeld, Philip; Mendel, Ralf R; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Kruse, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We established an expression and purification procedure for recombinant protein production in Neurospora crassa (N. crassa). This Strep-tag® based system was successfully used for purifying recombinant N. crassa nitrate reductase (NR), whose enzymatic activity was compared to recombinant N. crassa NR purified from Escherichia coli. The purity of the two different NR preparations was similar but NR purified from N. crassa showed a significantly higher nitrate turnover rate. Two phosphorylation sites were identified for NR purified from the endogenous expression system. We conclude that homologous expression of N. crassa NR yields a higher active enzyme and propose that NR phosphorylation causes enhanced enzymatic activity.

  15. The semaphorontic view of homology

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Leandro C.S.; Rieppel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relation of homology is generally characterized as an identity relation, or alternatively as a correspondence relation, both of which are transitive. We use the example of the ontogenetic development and evolutionary origin of the gnathostome jaw to discuss identity and transitivity of the homology relation under the transformationist and emergentist paradigms respectively. Token identity and consequent transitivity of homology relations are shown to be requirements that are too strong to allow the origin of genuine evolutionary novelties. We consequently introduce the concept of compositional identity that is grounded in relations prevailing between parts (organs and organ systems) of a whole (organism). We recognize an ontogenetic identity of parts within a whole throughout the sequence of successive developmental stages of those parts: this is an intra‐organismal character identity maintained throughout developmental trajectory. Correspondingly, we recognize a phylogenetic identity of homologous parts within two or more organisms of different species: this is an inter‐species character identity maintained throughout evolutionary trajectory. These different dimensions of character identity—ontogenetic (through development) and phylogenetic (via shared evolutionary history)—break the transitivity of homology relations. Under the transformationist paradigm, the relation of homology reigns over the entire character (‐state) transformation series, and thus encompasses the plesiomorphic as well as the apomorphic condition of form. In contrast, genuine evolutionary novelties originate not through transformation of ancestral characters (‐states), but instead through deviating developmental trajectories that result in alternate characters. Under the emergentist paradigm, homology is thus synonymous with synapomorphy. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 578–587, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and

  16. Recombinant drugs-on-a-chip: The usage of capillary electrophoresis and trends in miniaturized systems - A review.

    PubMed

    Morbioli, Giorgio Gianini; Mazzu-Nascimento, Thiago; Aquino, Adriano; Cervantes, Cesar; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2016-09-01

    We present here a critical review covering conventional analytical tools of recombinant drug analysis and discuss their evolution towards miniaturized systems foreseeing a possible unique recombinant drug-on-a-chip device. Recombinant protein drugs and/or pro-drug analysis require sensitive and reproducible analytical techniques for quality control to ensure safety and efficacy of drugs according to regulatory agencies. The versatility of miniaturized systems combined with their low-cost could become a major trend in recombinant drugs and bioprocess analysis. Miniaturized systems are capable of performing conventional analytical and proteomic tasks, allowing for interfaces with other powerful techniques, such as mass spectrometry. Microdevices can be applied during the different stages of recombinant drug processing, such as gene isolation, DNA amplification, cell culture, protein expression, protein separation, and analysis. In addition, organs-on-chips have appeared as a viable alternative to testing biodrug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, demonstrating the capabilities of the miniaturized systems. The integration of individual established microfluidic operations and analytical tools in a single device is a challenge to be overcome to achieve a unique recombinant drug-on-a-chip device. PMID:27543014

  17. Nitrogenase and Homologs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase catalyzes biological nitrogen fixation, a key step in the global nitrogen cycle. Three homologous nitrogenases have been identified to date, along with several structural and/or functional homologs of this enzyme that are involved in nitrogenase assembly, bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis and methanogenic process, respectively. In this article, we provide an overview of the structures and functions of nitrogenase and its homologs, which highlights the similarity and disparity of this uniquely versatile group of enzymes. PMID:25491285

  18. Homology Directed Knockin of Point Mutations in the Zebrafish tardbp and fus Genes in ALS Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhipeng; Lissouba, Alexandra; Chen, Brian Edwin; Drapeau, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The methodology for site-directed editing of single nucleotides in the vertebrate genome is of considerable interest for research in biology and medicine. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 type II (Cas9) system has emerged as a simple and inexpensive tool for editing genomic loci of interest in a variety of animal models. In zebrafish, error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) has been used as a simple method to disrupt gene function. We sought to develop a method to easily create site-specific SNPs in the zebrafish genome. Here, we report simple methodologies for using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology directed repair using single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide donor templates (ssODN) for site-directed single nucleotide editing, for the first time in two disease-related genes, tardbp and fus. PMID:26930076

  19. Identification of a second homolog of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein that is expressed in the nervous system and secretory tissues of Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Boulianne, G L; Trimble, W S

    1995-01-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) is an ATPase known to have an essential role in intracellular membrane transport events. Recently, cDNA clones encoding a Drosophila melanogaster homolog of this protein, named dNSF, were characterized and found to be expressed in the nervous system. We now report the identification of a second homolog of NSF, called dNSF-2 within this species and report evidence that this ubiquitous and widely utilized fusion protein belongs to a multigene family. The predicted amino acid sequence of dNSF-2 is 84.5% identical to dNSF (hereafter named dNSF-1), 59% identical to NSF from Chinese hamster, and 38.5% identical to the yeast homolog SEC18. The highest similarity was found in a region of dNSF-2 containing one of two ATP-binding sites; this region is most similar to members of a superfamily of ATPases. dNSF-2 is localized to a region between bands 87F12 and 88A3 on chromosome 3, and in situ hybridization techniques revealed expression in the nervous system during embryogenesis and in several imaginal discs and secretory structures in the larvae. Developmental modulation of dNSF-2 expression suggests that quantitative changes in the secretory apparatus are important in histogenesis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7624376

  20. Homology among arsenate resistance determinants of R factors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, H L; Silver, S; Porter, F D; Rosen, B P

    1984-01-01

    Escherichia coli bearing R factors R773 or R46 or hybrid recombinant plasmids carrying the arsenic resistance determinants derived from these plasmids synthesized inducible polypeptides of similar apparent molecular weights when exposed to arsenite salts (R773 derivative, 64,000 and 16,000; R46 derivative, 62,000, 16,500, and 13,500). In addition, both plasmids encoded energy-dependent arsenate efflux systems and demonstrated DNA sequence homology by filter blot hybridization. Human isolates of arsenate- and arsenite-resistant enterobacteria were tested for homology with the arsenate operon of R773 by colony blot hybridization. Approximately one-third of the isolates hybridized strongly, and two-thirds showed little or no evidence of homology, suggesting the presence of two or more genetically distinct arsenate resistant determinants. Images PMID:6370124

  1. Destabilization of a Solar Prominence/Filament Field System by a Series of Eight Homologous Eruptive Flares Leading to a CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Innes, Davina E.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2015-09-01

    Homologous flares are flares that occur repetitively in the same active region, with similar structure and morphology. A series of at least eight homologous flares occurred in active region NOAA 11237 over 2011 June 16-17. A nearby prominence/filament was rooted in the active region, and situated near the bottom of a coronal cavity. The active region was on the southeast solar limb as seen from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, and on the disk as viewed from the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory/EUVI-B. The dual perspective allows us to study in detail behavior of the prominence/filament material entrained in the magnetic field of the repeatedly erupting system. Each of the eruptions were mainly confined, but expelled hot material into the prominence/filament cavity system (PFCS). The field carrying and containing the ejected hot material interacted with the PFCS and caused it to inflate, resulting in a step-wise rise of the PFCS approximately in step with the homologous eruptions. The eighth eruption triggered the PFCS to move outward slowly, accompanied by a weak coronal dimming. As this slow PFCS eruption was underway, a final “ejective” flare occurred in the core of the active region, resulting in strong dimming in the EUVI-B images and expulsion of a coronal mass ejection (CME). A plausible scenario is that the repeated homologous flares could have gradually destabilized the PFCS, and its subsequent eruption removed field above the acitive region and in turn led to the ejective flare, strong dimming, and CME.

  2. Oligonucleotide recombination enabled site-specific mutagenesis in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombineering refers to a strategy for engineering DNA sequences using a specialized mode of homologous recombination. This technology can be used for rapidly constructing precise changes in bacterial genome sequences in vivo. Oligo recombination is one type of recombineering that uses ssDNA olig...

  3. Meiotic recombination mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division at the origin of the haploid cells that eventually develop into the gametes. It therefore lies at the heart of Mendelian heredity. Recombination and redistribution of the homologous chromosomes arising during meiosis constitute an important source of genetic diversity, conferring to meiosis a particularly important place in the evolution and the diversification of the species. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing meiotic recombination has considerably progressed these last decades, benefiting from complementary approaches led on various model species. An overview of these mechanisms will be provided as well as a discussion on the implications of these recent discoveries. PMID:27180110

  4. A rapid BOD sensing system using luminescent recombinants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Kei; Ando, Tomotsugu; Murakami, Yuji; Morita, Yasutaka; Yamamura, Akira; Yokoyama, Kenji; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2003-11-15

    A biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensing system based on bacterial luminescence from recombinant Escherichia coli containing lux A-E genes from Vibrio fischeri has been developed. It was possible to use frozen cells of luminescent recombinants of E. coli as the bacterial reagents for measurement. Steady bioluminescence was observed during the incubation time between 90 and 150 min in the presence of a sole carbon source such as glucose, acetate, L-glutamate and BOD standard solution (GGA solution). This disposable bacterial reagent was applied to measure and detect organic pollution due to biodegradable substances in various wastewaters. The obtained values of this study showed a similar correlation with that of the conventional method for BOD determination (BOD5). Bacterial luminescence that was visualized with an imaging system using a charge coupled device (CCD) camera and a photomulti-counter demonstrated that this method could also be used for multi-sample detection of organic pollution due to biodegradable substances by using a microtiter plate. These results suggested for successful achievement of high-though-put detection of BOD in practical.

  5. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  6. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  7. Genetic recombination pathways and their application for genome modification of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Mikko; Tuuri, Timo; Savilahti, Harri

    2010-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from early human embryo and retain a potential to differentiate into all adult cell types. They provide vast opportunities in cell replacement therapies and are expected to become significant tools in drug discovery as well as in the studies of cellular and developmental functions of human genes. The progress in applying different types of DNA recombination reactions for genome modification in a variety of eukaryotic cell types has provided means to utilize recombination-based strategies also in human embryonic stem cells. Homologous recombination-based methods, particularly those utilizing extended homologous regions and those employing zinc finger nucleases to boost genomic integration, have shown their usefulness in efficient genome modification. Site-specific recombination systems are potent genome modifiers, and they can be used to integrate DNA into loci that contain an appropriate recombination signal sequence, either naturally occurring or suitably pre-engineered. Non-homologous recombination can be used to generate random integrations in genomes relatively effortlessly, albeit with a moderate efficiency and precision. DNA transposition-based strategies offer substantially more efficient random strategies and provide means to generate single-copy insertions, thus potentiating the generation of genome-wide insertion libraries applicable in genetic screens.

  8. Recombinants proteins for industrial uses: utilization of Pichia pastoris expression system

    PubMed Central

    Rabert, Claudia; Weinacker, Daniel; Pessoa, Adalberto; Farías, Jorge G.

    2013-01-01

    The innovation in industrial process with impact in the efficient production is the major challenge for actual industry. A high numerous of enzymes are utilized in at different level of process; the search for new alternatives with better characteristic has become a field of study of great interest, the recombinant protein achievement in a different host system is an alternative widely assessed for production of this. The microorganism Pichia pastoris has been used like a successful expression system in diverse areas, improved the yield and extraction-recovery of the product expressed. The reported of diverse authors in the production of enzymes with different application in industry is varied, in this review the different industry areas and the characteristic of the enzymes produced are detailed. PMID:24294221

  9. Recombinants proteins for industrial uses: utilization of Pichia pastoris expression system.

    PubMed

    Rabert, Claudia; Weinacker, Daniel; Pessoa, Adalberto; Farías, Jorge G

    2013-01-01

    The innovation in industrial process with impact in the efficient production is the major challenge for actual industry. A high numerous of enzymes are utilized in at different level of process; the search for new alternatives with better characteristic has become a field of study of great interest, the recombinant protein achievement in a different host system is an alternative widely assessed for production of this. The microorganism Pichia pastoris has been used like a successful expression system in diverse areas, improved the yield and extraction-recovery of the product expressed. The reported of diverse authors in the production of enzymes with different application in industry is varied, in this review the different industry areas and the characteristic of the enzymes produced are detailed.

  10. Recombinants proteins for industrial uses: utilization of Pichia pastoris expression system.

    PubMed

    Rabert, Claudia; Weinacker, Daniel; Pessoa, Adalberto; Farías, Jorge G

    2013-01-01

    The innovation in industrial process with impact in the efficient production is the major challenge for actual industry. A high numerous of enzymes are utilized in at different level of process; the search for new alternatives with better characteristic has become a field of study of great interest, the recombinant protein achievement in a different host system is an alternative widely assessed for production of this. The microorganism Pichia pastoris has been used like a successful expression system in diverse areas, improved the yield and extraction-recovery of the product expressed. The reported of diverse authors in the production of enzymes with different application in industry is varied, in this review the different industry areas and the characteristic of the enzymes produced are detailed. PMID:24294221