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Sample records for homotopic long-term depression

  1. The effect of age on the homotopic motor cortical long-term potentiation-like effect induced by quadripulse stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hanajima, Ritsuko; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Abe, Mitsunari; Nakamura, Koichiro; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Hamada, Masashi; Shimizu, Takahiro; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2017-04-06

    The reduction of plasticity with age has been shown by many previous papers in animal experiments. This issue can be studied in humans because several non-invasive brain stimulation techniques induce synaptic plasticity in the human brain. We investigated the influence of individuals' age on the responder rate of the long-term potentiation (LTP)-like effect induced by quadripulse magnetic stimulation (QPS). The participants were 107 healthy volunteers: 53 older participants (Mean ± SD 65.0 ± 1.5 years) and 54 younger participants (37.2 ± 8.7). The quadripulse stimulation with 5-ms inter-pulse interval (QPS5) was applied over the primary motor cortex (M1). We measured motor evoked potentials (MEPs) before QPS, and at five time points after QPS for up to 25 min. In each participant, average MEP amplitude (size) ratios were quantified. We first classified participants as responders and non-responders simply by comparing the size ratio with 1.0 for consistency with previous studies, then as "significant responders", "non-responders", and "opposite responders" for more detailed analysis by comparing the size ratio with the mean and standard deviation of the MEP size ratios of the sham condition. The degree of LTP-like effects induced by QPS5 was significantly smaller in the older group compared to the younger group. Also, the rates of responders and significant responders were lower in the older group (58 and 47%, respectively) compared to the younger group (80 and 76%, respectively). The age of the participants significantly affected the LTP-like effect induced by QPS5, which suggests that brain plasticity decreases with age.

  2. Long-term prognosis of depression in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, G. E.

    2000-01-01

    This article uses longitudinal data from a primary care sample to examine long-term prognosis of depression. A sample of 225 patients initiating antidepressant treatment in primary care completed assessments of clinical outcome (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the mood module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IIIR) 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months after initiating treatment. The proportion of patients continuing to meet criteria for major depression fell rapidly to approximately 10% and remained at approximately that level throughout follow-up. The proportion meeting criteria for remission (Hamilton Depression score of 7 or less) rose gradually to approximately 45%. Long-term prognosis (i.e. probability of remission at 6 months and beyond) was strongly related to remission status at 3 months (odds ratio 3.65; 95% confidence interval, 2.81-4.76) and only modestly related to various clinical characteristics assessed at baseline (e.g. prior history of recurrent depression, medical comorbidity, comorbid anxiety symptoms). The findings indicate that potentially modifiable risk factors influence the long-term prognosis of depression. This suggests that more systematic and effective depression treatment programmes might have an important effect on long-term course and reduce the overall burden of chronic and recurrent depression. PMID:10885162

  3. Long-term treatment of major depressive disorder with paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Duboff, E A

    1993-12-01

    Recurrent unipolar depression is a common, but undertreated disorder. Many patients require long-term maintenance therapy, and full doses of antidepressant agents may be preferred for the prevention of relapse. We report results of a 1-year, multicenter, open-label study of paroxetine (10 to 50 mg/day) in 433 patients with major depressive disorder, with additional data from 110 patients who entered a long-term extension of the study. The primary measures of efficacy were the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) total and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) severity of illness scores. During the first 6 weeks of therapy, the mean HAM-D total declined approximately 50% (from 27.9 to 13.5), with continued improvement, at an attenuated rate, throughout the first year. At the end of 1 year, the mean HAM-D total was 6.9. Similarly, the CGI severity of illness score declined from 4.6 at baseline to 2.8 at week 6 and to 1.7 at the end of 1 year. Remission was maintained in the population that entered the long-term extension, with mean HAM-D total and CGI severity of illness scores of 6.4 and 1.8, respectively, after 2.5 years, and 4.2 and 1.3 after 4 years. The most common adverse events reported during long-term treatment with paroxetine were somnolence, nausea, headache, and sweating. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed no clear correlation between the concentrations of paroxetine in plasma and either clinical efficacy or tolerability. There was no increased drug accumulation during long-term treatment. Side effects tended to occur early during therapy; and no new side effects emerged during the long-term extension. These results suggest that paroxetine is effective and well tolerated in the long-term treatment of depression.

  4. Stochastic Induction of Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, G.; Roque, A. C.; Simoes-de-Souza, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) of granule-Purkinje cell synapses are persistent synaptic alterations induced by high and low rises of the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]), respectively. The occurrence of LTD involves the activation of a positive feedback loop formed by protein kinase C, phospholipase A2, and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway, and its expression comprises the reduction of the population of synaptic AMPA receptors. Recently, a stochastic computational model of these signalling processes demonstrated that, in single synapses, LTD is probabilistic and bistable. Here, we expanded this model to simulate LTP, which requires protein phosphatases and the increase in the population of synaptic AMPA receptors. Our results indicated that, in single synapses, while LTD is bistable, LTP is gradual. Ca2+ induced both processes stochastically. The magnitudes of the Ca2+ signals and the states of the signalling network regulated the likelihood of LTP and LTD and defined dynamic macroscopic Ca2+ thresholds for the synaptic modifications in populations of synapses according to an inverse Bienenstock, Cooper and Munro (BCM) rule or a sigmoidal function. In conclusion, our model presents a unifying mechanism that explains the macroscopic properties of LTP and LTD from their dynamics in single synapses. PMID:27485552

  5. Long-term depression of excitatory synaptic transmission and its relationship to long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Artola, A; Singer, W

    1993-11-01

    In many brain areas, including the cerebellar cortex, neocortex, hippocampus, striatum and nucleus accumbens, brief activation of an excitatory pathway can produce long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission. In most preparations, induction of LTD has been shown to require a minimum level of postsynaptic depolarization and a rise in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i in the postsynaptic neurone. Thus, induction conditions resemble those described for the initiation of associative long-term potentiation (LTP). However, data from structures susceptible to both LTD and LTP suggest that a stronger depolarization and a greater increase in [Ca2+]i are required to induce LTP than to initiate LTD. The source of Ca2+ appears to be less critical for the differential induction of LTP and LTD than the amplitude of the Ca2+ surge, since the activation of voltage- and ligand-gated Ca2+ conductances as well as the release from intracellular stores have all been shown to contribute to both LTD and LTP induction. LTD is induceable even at inactive synapses if [Ca2+]i is raised to the appropriate level by antidromic or heterosynaptic activation, or by raising the extracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]o. These conditions suggest a rule (called here the ABS rule) for activity-dependent synaptic modifications that differs from the classical Hebb rule and that can account for both homosynaptic LTD and LTP as well as for heterosynaptic competition and associativity.

  6. Long-term depression at olfactory nerve synapses.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Hiroki; Yuan, Qi; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2005-04-27

    The synapses formed by the olfactory nerve (ON) convey sensory information to olfactory glomeruli, the first stage of central odor processing. Morphological and behavioral studies suggest that glomerular odor processing is plastic in neonate rodents. However, long-term synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of functional and structural plasticity, has not yet been demonstrated in this system. Here, we report that ON-->mitral cell (MC) synapses of 5- to 8-d-old mice express long-term depression (LTD) after brief low-frequency ON stimulation. Pharmacological techniques and imaging of presynaptic calcium signals demonstrate that ON-MC LTD is expressed presynaptically and requires the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors but does not require fast synaptic transmission. LTD at the ON--> MC synapse is potentially relevant for the establishment, maintenance, and experience-dependent refinement of odor maps in the olfactory bulb.

  7. Serotonin induces long-term depression at corticostriatal synapses.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Brian N; Capik, Nicole A; Alvarez, Veronica A; Lovinger, David M

    2011-05-18

    The striatum has important roles in motor control and action learning and, like many brain regions, receives multiple monoaminergic inputs. We have examined serotonergic modulation of rat and mouse corticostriatal neurotransmission and find that serotonin (5-HT) activates 5-HT(1b) receptors resulting in a long-term depression (LTD) of glutamate release and striatal output that we have termed 5-HT-LTD. 5-HT-LTD is presynaptically mediated, cAMP pathway dependent, and inducible by endogenous striatal 5-HT, as revealed by application of a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor. 5-HT-LTD is mutually occlusive with dopamine/endocannabinoid-dependent LTD, suggesting that these two forms of LTD act on the same corticostriatal terminals. Thus, serotonergic and dopaminergic mechanisms exist that may interact to persistently sculpt corticostriatal circuits, potentially influencing action learning and striatal-based disorders.

  8. Surviving Depression: Clinical Qualitative Analysis of Long-Term Survival for Ethnically Diverse, Depressed Patients.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Jeanne; Bromley, Elizabeth; Izquierdo, Adriana; Jones, Felica; Wells, Kenneth

    2017-08-01

    Depression is persistent and recurrent across ethnic groups. Few narrative analyses of long-term outcomes for ethnically diverse adults with depression exist. We combined 9 years of quantitative data, qualitative interviews at 10 years, clinician ratings of outcomes, and a community discussion group with the objective of describing long-term recovery and survival of diverse primary care patients after an episode of depression. Nearly half of participants were found to be depressed at some time over a 10-year period, and most cases across ethnic groups were judged to need further treatment. The ethnically diverse community members that analyzed the transcripts emphasized assets that participants showed in surviving multiple life stresses. Different sex and ethnic/racial groups had different characteristics of engaging in care, with Latino women in particular raising concerns about care engagement, coping with stress, and long-term outcomes.

  9. Systems biology perspectives on cerebellar long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Hideaki; Doi, Tomokazu; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapses is thought to be the cellular correlate of cerebellar associative learning. The molecular processes are, in brief, phosphorylation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) and their subsequent removal from the surface of the PF-PC synapse. In order to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms for cerebellar LTD and further the understanding of its computational role, we have investigated its systems biology and proposed the following hypotheses, some of which have already been experimentally verified: (1) due to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-protein kinase C (PKC) positive feedback loop, phosphorylation of AMPARs is an all-or-none event; (2) the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor detects concurrent PF and climbing fiber inputs, forming the cellular basis for associative learning, and (3) the local concentration of nitric oxide in the PC dendrite reflects the relevance of a given context, enabling context-dependent selection of learning modules within the cerebellum. In this review, we first introduce theoretical studies on cerebellar LTD, mainly focusing on our own published work, followed by a discussion of the effects of stochasticity, localization, diffusion, and scaffolding. Neurons embody two features that are apparently contradictory, yet necessary for synaptic memory: stability and plasticity. We will also present models for explaining how neurons solve this dilemma. In the final section, we propose a conceptual model in which a cascade of excitable dynamics with different time scales, i.e., Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release, the MAPK-PKC positive feedback loop, and protein kinase Mzeta (PKMzeta)-induced PKMzeta synthesis, provides a mechanism for stable memory that is still amenable to modifications. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Postsynaptic density-95 mimics and occludes hippocampal long-term potentiation and enhances long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Stein, Valentin; House, David R C; Bredt, David S; Nicoll, Roger A

    2003-07-02

    Previous studies have shown that overexpression of the protein PSD-95 (postsynaptic density-95) selectively enhances AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic responses in hippocampal pyramidal cells. To determine whether this effect is related to synaptic plasticity at these synapses, we examined whether PSD-95 expression mimics long-term potentiation (LTP), and also whether it influences LTP and long-term depression (LTD) in hippocampal slice cultures. Using simultaneous recording from transfected or infected cells and control pyramidal cells, we found that PSD-95, similar to LTP, increases the amplitude and frequency of miniature EPSCs. It also converts silent synapses to functional synapses, as does LTP. In addition, LTP is completely occluded in cells expressing PSD-95, whereas LTD is greatly enhanced. These results suggest that common mechanisms are involved in controlling synaptic AMPA receptors by PSD-95 and synaptic plasticity.

  11. Long-term incidence of depression and predictors of depressive symptoms in older stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Allan, Louise M; Rowan, Elise N; Thomas, Alan J; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; O'Brien, John T; Kalaria, Raj N

    2013-12-01

    Depression is common and an important consequence of stroke but there is limited information on the longer-term relationship between these conditions. To identify the prevalence, incidence and predictors of depression in a secondary-care-based cohort of stroke survivors aged over 75 years, from 3 months to up to 10 years post-stroke. Depression was assessed annually by three methods: major depression by DSM-IV criteria, the self-rated Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the observer-rated Cornell scale. We found the highest rates, 31.7% baseline prevalence, of depressive symptoms with the GDS compared with 9.7% using the Cornell scale and 1.2% using DSM-IV criteria. Incidence rates were 36.9, 5.90 and 4.18 episodes per 100 person years respectively. Baseline GDS score was the most consistent predictor of depressive symptoms at all time points in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Other predictors included cognitive impairment, impaired activities of daily living and in the early period, vascular risk factor burden and dementia. Our results emphasise the importance of psychiatric follow-up for those with early-onset post-stroke depression and long-term monitoring of mood in people who have had a stroke and remain at high risk of depression.

  12. Case managers speak out: responding to depression in community long-term care.

    PubMed

    Munson, Michelle; Proctor, Enola; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Ware, Norma

    2007-08-01

    This study sought to understand how case managers in one publicly funded health and social service system, community long-term care, understand and address depression among their clients. Four focus groups with a total of 18 case managers were conducted. Case managers were asked a series of questions about their perspectives on the recognition and treatment of depression, including subthreshold depression, in community long-term care. Case managers perceived addressing depression as complex because of competing demands. Furthermore, case managers perceived conflict between their current role and what it would take to expand their role to include addressing depression. Case managers suggested that in order to successfully improve the detection and treatment of depression in community long-term care, systemic changes, such as increased support and training, may be necessary, along with a shift in the professional role of case managers.

  13. EMDR as a treatment for long-term depression: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wood, Emily; Ricketts, Thomas; Parry, Glenys

    2017-08-18

    Current treatments for long-term depression - medication and psychotherapy - are effective for some but not all clients. New approaches need to be developed to complement the ones already available. This study was designed to test the feasibility of using an effective post-traumatic stress disorder treatment for people with long-term depression. A single-case experimental design with replications was undertaken as a feasibility study of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in treating long-term depression. Thirteen people with recurrent and/or long-term depression were recruited from primary care mental health services and given standard protocol EMDR for a maximum of 20 sessions. Levels of depression were measured before and after treatment and at follow-up, clients also rated their mood each day. Eight people engaged with the treatment; seven of these had clinically significant and statistically reliable improvement on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Daily mood ratings were highly variable both during baseline and intervention. EMDR is a feasible treatment for recurrent and/or long-term depression. Research on treatment efficacy and effectiveness is now required. EMDR may be an effective treatment for depression. EMDR could be considered if first-line approaches (CBT and counselling) have been tried and failed. EMDR may be particularly helpful for service users with a history of trauma. © 2017 The Authors. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  14. Dependence receptor involvement in subtilisin-induced long-term depression and in long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Stone, Trevor W; Darlington, L Gail; Forrest, Caroline M

    2016-11-12

    The serine protease subtilisin induces a form of long-term depression (LTD) which is accompanied by a reduced expression of the axo-dendritic guidance molecule Unco-ordinated-5C (Unc-5C). One objective of the present work was to determine whether a loss of Unc-5C function contributed to subtilisin-induced LTD by using Unc-5C antibodies in combination with the pore-forming agents Triton X-100 (0.005%) or streptolysin O in rat hippocampal slices. In addition we have assessed the effect of subtilisin on the related dependence receptor Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) and used antibodies to this protein for functional studies. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were analyzed in rat hippocampal slices and protein extracts were used for Western blotting. Subtilisin produced a greater loss of DCC than of Unc-5C, but the antibodies had no effect on resting excitability or fEPSPs and did not modify subtilisin-induced LTD. However, antibodies to DCC but not Unc-5C did reduce the amplitude of theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP). In addition, two inhibitors of endocytosis - dynasore and tat-gluR2(3Y) - were tested and, although the former compound had no effect on neurophysiological responses, tat-gluR2(3Y) did reduce the amplitude of subtilisin-induced LTD without affecting the expression of DCC or Unc-5C but with some loss of PostSynaptic Density Protein-95. The results support the view that the dependence receptor DCC may be involved in LTP and suggest that the endocytotic removal of a membrane protein or proteins may contribute to subtilisin-induced LTD, although it appears that neither Unc-5C nor DCC are involved in this process. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Major depressive disorder subtypes to predict long-term course

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Hanna M.; Cai, Tianxi; Gruber, Michael J.; Li, Junlong; de Jonge, Peter; Petukhova, Maria; Rose, Sherri; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoevers, Robert A.; Wardenaar, Klaas J.; Wilcox, Marsha A.; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Andrade, Laura Helena; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Bunting, Brendan; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia E.; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Levinson, Daphna; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Posada-Villa, Jose; Scott, Kate M.; Xavier, Miguel; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Variation in course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is not strongly predicted by existing subtype distinctions. A new subtyping approach is considered here. Methods Two data mining techniques, ensemble recursive partitioning and Lasso generalized linear models (GLMs) followed by k-means cluster analysis, are used to search for subtypes based on index episode symptoms predicting subsequent MDD course in the World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys. The WMH surveys are community surveys in 16 countries. Lifetime DSM-IV MDD was reported by 8,261 respondents. Retrospectively reported outcomes included measures of persistence (number of years with an episode; number of with an episode lasting most of the year) and severity (hospitalization for MDD; disability due to MDD). Results Recursive partitioning found significant clusters defined by the conjunctions of early onset, suicidality, and anxiety (irritability, panic, nervousness-worry-anxiety) during the index episode. GLMs found additional associations involving a number of individual symptoms. Predicted values of the four outcomes were strongly correlated. Cluster analysis of these predicted values found three clusters having consistently high, intermediate, or low predicted scores across all outcomes. The high-risk cluster (30.0% of respondents) accounted for 52.9-69.7% of high persistence and severity and was most strongly predicted by index episode severe dysphoria, suicidality, anxiety, and early onset. A total symptom count, in comparison, was not a significant predictor. Conclusions Despite being based on retrospective reports, results suggest that useful MDD subtyping distinctions can be made using data mining methods. Further studies are needed to test and expand these results with prospective data. PMID:24425049

  16. Major depressive disorder subtypes to predict long-term course.

    PubMed

    van Loo, Hanna M; Cai, Tianxi; Gruber, Michael J; Li, Junlong; de Jonge, Peter; Petukhova, Maria; Rose, Sherri; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoevers, Robert A; Wardenaar, Klaas J; Wilcox, Marsha A; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Andrade, Laura Helena; Bromet, Evelyn J; Bunting, Brendan; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia E; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Levinson, Daphna; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Posada-Villa, Jose; Scott, Kate M; Xavier, Miguel; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C

    2014-09-01

    Variation in the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is not strongly predicted by existing subtype distinctions. A new subtyping approach is considered here. Two data mining techniques, ensemble recursive partitioning and Lasso generalized linear models (GLMs), followed by k-means cluster analysis are used to search for subtypes based on index episode symptoms predicting subsequent MDD course in the World Mental Health (WMH) surveys. The WMH surveys are community surveys in 16 countries. Lifetime DSM-IV MDD was reported by 8,261 respondents. Retrospectively reported outcomes included measures of persistence (number of years with an episode, number of years with an episode lasting most of the year) and severity (hospitalization for MDD, disability due to MDD). Recursive partitioning found significant clusters defined by the conjunctions of early onset, suicidality, and anxiety (irritability, panic, nervousness-worry-anxiety) during the index episode. GLMs found additional associations involving a number of individual symptoms. Predicted values of the four outcomes were strongly correlated. Cluster analysis of these predicted values found three clusters having consistently high, intermediate, or low predicted scores across all outcomes. The high-risk cluster (30.0% of respondents) accounted for 52.9-69.7% of high persistence and severity, and it was most strongly predicted by index episode severe dysphoria, suicidality, anxiety, and early onset. A total symptom count, in comparison, was not a significant predictor. Despite being based on retrospective reports, results suggest that useful MDD subtyping distinctions can be made using data mining methods. Further studies are needed to test and expand these results with prospective data. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy: does it decrease depression at the long-term?

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Eveline Anne-Jet; Torensma, Bart; Honig, Adriaan; Vrouenraets, Bartholomeus Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with breast cancer survivors in 22%. Although breast reconstruction (BR) is intended to provide psychological improvements such as reducing depression, literature is inconclusive and without long-term follow-up. The objective is to evaluate the impact of BR after breast cancer related mastectomy on the long-term depression risk and assess predictive factors for depression. Methods Women who underwent a curative mastectomy between 1999 and 2009 were included. After a mean follow-up of more than 6 years after operation, the Beck Depression Inventory-13 (BDI-13) evaluated depressive symptoms. Multivariable regression analysis provided predictors for depression. Results A total of 139 patients, 34 (24.5%) with and 105 (75.5%) without BR, were analyzed. Seventy-seven patients (48.2%) were at high risk for mild (n=58), moderate (n=5) or severe (n=4) depression. There was a trend for slightly better BDI-13 outcomes for women who underwent BR (2 vs. 4; P=0.06). Living alone [odds ratio (OR): 2.16; P=0.04], low educational level (OR: 3.70; P<0.01) and adjuvant hormonal/endocrine-therapy (OR: 2.36; P=0.02) were associated with an increased depression risk. Conclusions BR has no clear influence on depressive symptoms on the long-term. Predictive factors should alert clinicians to assess depressive symptoms in specific breast cancer patients during follow-up. PMID:27563558

  18. Nuclear Translocation of Jacob in Hippocampal Neurons after Stimuli Inducing Long-Term Potentiation but Not Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Behnisch, Thomas; YuanXiang, PingAn; Bethge, Philipp; Parvez, Suhel; Chen, Ying; Yu, Jin; Karpova, Anna; Frey, Julietta U.; Mikhaylova, Marina; Kreutz, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In recent years a number of potential synapto-nuclear protein messengers have been characterized that are thought to be involved in plasticity-related gene expression, and that have the capacity of importin- mediated and activity-dependent nuclear import. However, there is a surprising paucity of data showing the nuclear import of such proteins in cellular models of learning and memory. Only recently it was found that the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein 2 (CREB2) transits to the nucleus during long-term depression (LTD), but not during long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission in hippocampal primary neurons. Jacob is another messenger that couples NMDA-receptor-activity to nuclear gene expression. We therefore aimed to study whether Jacob accumulates in the nucleus in physiological relevant models of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analyzed the dynamics of Jacob's nuclear import following induction of NMDA-receptor dependent LTP or LTD at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in rat hippocampal slices. Using time-lapse imaging of neurons expressing a Jacob-Green-Fluorescent-Protein we found that Jacob rapidly translocates from dendrites to the nucleus already during the tetanization period of LTP, but not after induction of LTD. Immunocytochemical stainings confirmed the nuclear accumulation of endogenous Jacob in comparison to apical dendrites after induction of LTP but not LTD. Complementary findings were obtained after induction of NMDA-receptor dependent chemical LTP and LTD in hippocampal primary neurons. However, in accordance with previous studies, high concentrations of NMDA and glycine as well as specific activation of extrasynaptic NMDA-receptors resembling pathological conditions induce an even more profound increase of nuclear Jacob levels. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these findings suggest that the two major forms of NMDA-receptor dependent

  19. Perinatal alcohol exposure in rat induces long-term depression of respiration after episodic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kervern, Myriam; Dubois, Christophe; Naassila, Mickael; Daoust, Martine; Pierrefiche, Olivier

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of alcohol exposure during pregnancy, which is responsible for fetal alcohol syndrome and the respiratory network functions, especially respiratory network plasticity (e.g., long-term facilitation) elicited after repeated short-lasting hypoxic episodes. The mechanism of induction of respiratory long-term facilitation involves 5-HT(2A/2C) receptors, which also participate in the response to hypoxia. Because fetal alcohol exposure is known to reduce serotonin centrally, and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, we hypothesized that alcohol exposure during gestation might impair respiratory long-term facilitation after hypoxic episodes. To analyze the effects of prenatal and postnatal alcohol exposure on respiratory long-term facilitation in 5- to 7-day-old rats. Respiratory frequency and amplitude were measured in vivo and in an in vitro rhythmic medullary slice before and after three hypoxia episodes or three applications of a 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor agonist in vitro. 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor mRNA was measured from the slice. Alcohol exposure impaired respiratory long-term facilitation and induced long-term depression of respiration in both in vivo and in vitro models. Alcohol altered 5-HT(2A/2C) mRNA expression, although 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist efficacy was not altered in increasing rhythmic activity in slices. However, a higher concentration of 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist was necessary to induce transient facilitation in slices from ethanol-exposed animals, suggesting disturbances in induction and maintenance mechanisms of respiratory long-term facilitation. Respiratory facilitation after repeated hypoxia was converted to long-term depression in rats treated with alcohol in utero. Alcohol exposure during pregnancy may therefore induce long-term maladaptive behavior of the respiratory system in neonates.

  20. Long-term morbidity in bipolar-I, bipolar-II, and unipolar major depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Forte, Alberto; Baldessarini, Ross J; Tondo, Leonardo; Vázquez, Gustavo H; Pompili, Maurizio; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    Long-term symptomatic status in persons with major depressive and bipolar disorders treated clinically is not well established, although mood disorders are leading causes of disability worldwide. To pool data on long-term morbidity, by type and as a proportion of time-at-risk, based on published studies and previously unreported data. We carried out systematic, computerized literature searches for information on percentage of time in specific morbid states in persons treated clinically and diagnosed with recurrent major depressive or bipolar I or II disorders, and incorporated new data from one of our centers. We analyzed data from 25 samples involving 2479 unipolar depressive and 3936 bipolar disorder subjects (total N=6415) treated clinically for 9.4 years. Proportions of time ill were surprisingly and similarly high across diagnoses: unipolar depressive (46.0%), bipolar I (43.7%), and bipolar II (43.2%) disorders, and morbidity was predominantly depressive: unipolar (100%), bipolar-II (81.2%), bipolar-I (69.6%). Percent-time-ill did not differ between UP and BD subjects, but declined significantly with longer exposure times. The findings indicate that depressive components of all major affective disorders accounted for 86% of the 43-46% of time in affective morbidity that occurred despite availability of effective treatments. These results encourage redoubled efforts to improve treatments for depression and adherence to their long-term use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Notation of Depression in Case Records of Older Adults in Community Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Enola K.

    2012-01-01

    Although significant numbers of social service clients experience mental health problems, virtually no research has examined the responsiveness of social service agencies to mental disorder. This article examines the extent to which client depression is reflected in records of a public social service agency, community long-term care (CLTC). Researchers assessed new, consenting CLTC clients for depression using standardized research criteria in a telephone interview. Agency case records were abstracted to determine the extent to which client depression was noted. Sensitivity and specificity of depression notation were 25.21 percent and 92.80 percent, respectively, indicating that agency records reflected depression for about one in four clients meeting depression criteria. Factors associated with accurate depression notation included cognitive impairments, low social support, psychotropic medications, and mental health treatment. The depression notation rates found are comparable to those in medical settings. Structured screening and assessment might enhance detection of mental disorder for social service clients. PMID:19275120

  2. Long-term effects of parental divorce timing on depression: A population-based longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Youn; Jang, Suk-Yong; Choi, Jae-Woo; Shin, Jaeyong; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-09-08

    We examined the long-term effects of parental divorce timing on depression using longitudinal data from the Korean Welfare Panel Study. Depression symptoms were measured using the 11 items of Center for Epidemiologic Scale for Depression (CES-D-11), and we categorized parental divorce timing into 'early childhood', 'adolescent' and 'none'. Although participants who experienced parental divorce during adolescence exhibited a significantly higher CES-D-11 score (p = .0468), 'early childhood' participants displayed the most increased CES-D-11 score compared to the control group (p = .0007). Conversely, among participants who were unsatisfied with their marriage, those who experienced parental divorce in early childhood showed lower CES-D-11 scores, while 'adolescent period' participants exhibited significantly higher CES-D-11 scores (p = .0131). We concluded that timing of parental divorce exerts substantial yet varied effects on long-term depression symptoms and future marriage satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Long-Term Effects of a Home-Visiting Intervention for Depressed Mothers and Their Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersten-Alvarez, Laura E.; Hosman, Clemens M. H.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; Van Doesum, Karin T. M.; Hoefnagels, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Background: Whereas preventive interventions for depressed mothers and their infants have yielded positive short-term outcomes, few studies have examined their long-term effectiveness. The present follow-up of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) is one of the first to examine the longer-term effects of an intervention for mothers with postpartum…

  4. Notation of Depression in Case Records of Older Adults in Community Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.

    2008-01-01

    Although significant numbers of social service clients experience mental health problems, virtually no research has examined the responsiveness of social service agencies to mental disorder. This article examines the extent to which client depression is reflected in records of a public social service agency, community long-term care (CLTC).…

  5. Notation of Depression in Case Records of Older Adults in Community Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.

    2008-01-01

    Although significant numbers of social service clients experience mental health problems, virtually no research has examined the responsiveness of social service agencies to mental disorder. This article examines the extent to which client depression is reflected in records of a public social service agency, community long-term care (CLTC).…

  6. Long-Term Effects of a Home-Visiting Intervention for Depressed Mothers and Their Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersten-Alvarez, Laura E.; Hosman, Clemens M. H.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; Van Doesum, Karin T. M.; Hoefnagels, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Background: Whereas preventive interventions for depressed mothers and their infants have yielded positive short-term outcomes, few studies have examined their long-term effectiveness. The present follow-up of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) is one of the first to examine the longer-term effects of an intervention for mothers with postpartum…

  7. Self-reported depression and perceived financial burden among long-term rectal cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Chongpison, Yuda; Hornbrook, Mark C; Harris, Robin B; Herrinton, Lisa J; Gerald, Joe K; Grant, Marcia; Bulkley, Joanna E; Wendel, Christopher S; Krouse, Robert S

    2016-11-01

    Types of surgery for rectal cancer (RC), including permanent ostomy (PO) or temporary ostomy followed by anastomosis (TO) or initial anastomosis (AN), can affect psychological and financial well-being during active treatment. However, these relationships have not been well studied among long-term survivors (≥5 years post-diagnosis). A mailed survey with 576 long-term RC survivors who were members of Kaiser Permanente was conducted in 2010-2011. Prevalence of current depression was ascertained using a score of ≤45.6 on the Short Form-12 version 2 mental component summary. Perceived financial burden was assessed using a Likert scale ranging from 0 (none) to 10 (severe). Regression analyses were used to measure associations after adjustment for covariates. The overall prevalence of depression was 24% among RC survivors with the highest prevalence among those with a history of PO (31%). The adjusted odds of depression among TO and AN survivors were lower than that among PO survivors, 0.42 (CI95% 0.20-0.89) and 0.59 (CI95% 0.37-0.93), respectively. Twenty-two percent perceived moderate-to-high current financial burden (≥4 points). PO survivors also reported higher mean financial burden than AN survivors (2.6 vs. 1.6, respectively; p = 0.002), but perceived burden comparably to TO survivors (2.3). Self-reported depression was associated with higher perceived financial burden (p < 0.001); surgical procedure history did not modify this relationship. Depression was reported frequently among these long-term RC survivors, particularly among PO survivors. Depression was associated with greater perception of financial burden. Screening for depression and assessing financial well-being might improve care among long-term RC survivors.Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Observer-rated depression in long-term care: frequency and risk factors.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G; Voyer, Philippe; Monette, Johanne; Champoux, Nathalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Vu, Minh; Dyachenko, Alina; Belzile, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe the prevalence and 6-month incidence of observer-rated depression in residents age 65 and over of long-term care (LTC) facilities; (2) to describe risk factors for depression, at baseline and over time. A multisite, prospective observational study was conducted in residents aged 65 and over of 7 LTC facilities. The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) was completed by nurses monthly for 6 months. We measured demographic, medical, and functional factors at baseline and monthly intervals, using data from research assessments, nurse interviews, and chart reviews. 274 residents were recruited and completed baseline depression assessments. The prevalence of depression (CSDD score of 6+) was 19.0%. The incidence of depression among those without prevalent depression was 73.3 per 100 person-years. A delirium diagnosis, pain, and diabetes were independently associated with prevalent depression. CSDD score at baseline and development of severe cognitive impairment at follow-up were independent risk factors for incident depression. A diagnosis of delirium and uncorrected visual impairment at follow-up occurred concurrently with incident depression. The results of this study have implications for the detection and prevention of depression in LTC. Delirium diagnosis, pain and diabetes at baseline were associated with prevalent depression; depression symptoms at baseline and development of severe cognitive impairment at follow-up were risk factors for incident depression.

  9. Adapting collaborative depression care for public community long-term care: using research-practice partnerships.

    PubMed

    Hasche, Leslie K; Lenze, Shannon; Brown, Teresa; Lawrence, Lisa; Nickel, Mike; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K

    2014-09-01

    This manuscript details potential benefits for using a research-practice partnership to adapt collaborative depression care for public community long-term care agencies serving older adults. We used sequential, multi-phase, and mixed methods approaches for documenting the process of adaptation within a case study. Systematic adaptation strategies are described, such as leveraging long-term research-practice collaborations, consulting with multiple stakeholders across all levels and disciplines, and balancing demands to monitor treatment fidelity, clinical outcomes, and implementation results. These examples demonstrate that researchers interested in implementation science need skills to negotiate the competing demands that arise from both the research and practice settings.

  10. Adapting Collaborative Depression Care for Public Community Long-Term Care: Using Research-Practice Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Shannon; Brown, Teresa; Lawrence, Lisa; Nickel, Mike; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2014-01-01

    Description This manuscript details potential benefits for using a research-practice partnership to adapt collaborative depression care for public community long-term care agencies serving older adults. We used sequential, multi-phase, and mixed methods approaches for documenting the process of adaptation within a case study. Systematic adaptation strategies are described, such as leveraging long-term research-practice collaborations, consulting with multiple stakeholders across all levels and disciplines, and balancing demands to monitor treatment fidelity, clinical outcomes, and implementation results. These examples demonstrate that researchers interested in implementation science need skills to negotiate the competing demands that arise from both the research and practice settings. PMID:24072560

  11. 24-hour-restraint stress induces long-term depressive-like phenotypes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lou, Jingyu; Song, Wei; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Beimeng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Song, Jinjing; Dong, Yujie; Chen, Shiqing; He, Lin; Xie, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of mental disorders, such as acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among survivors who were trapped in rubble during earthquake. Such long-term impaction of a single acute restraint stress has not been extensively explored. In this study, we subjected mice to 24-hour-restraint to simulate the trapping episode, and investigated the acute (2 days after the restraint) and long-term (35 days after the restraint) impacts. Surprisingly, we found that the mice displayed depression-like behaviors, decreased glucose uptake in brain and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis 35 days after the restraint. Differential expression profiling based on microarrays suggested that genes and pathways related to depression and other mental disorders were differentially expressed in both PFC and hippocampus. Furthermore, the depression-like phenotypes induced by 24-hour-restraint could be reversed by fluoxetine, a type of antidepressant drug. These findings demonstrated that a single severe stressful event could produce long-term depressive-like phenotypes. Moreover, the 24-hour-restraint stress mice could also be used for further studies on mood disorders. PMID:27609090

  12. 24-hour-restraint stress induces long-term depressive-like phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xixia; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lou, Jingyu; Song, Wei; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Beimeng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Song, Jinjing; Dong, Yujie; Chen, Shiqing; He, Lin; Xie, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Weidong

    2016-09-09

    There is an increasing risk of mental disorders, such as acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among survivors who were trapped in rubble during earthquake. Such long-term impaction of a single acute restraint stress has not been extensively explored. In this study, we subjected mice to 24-hour-restraint to simulate the trapping episode, and investigated the acute (2 days after the restraint) and long-term (35 days after the restraint) impacts. Surprisingly, we found that the mice displayed depression-like behaviors, decreased glucose uptake in brain and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis 35 days after the restraint. Differential expression profiling based on microarrays suggested that genes and pathways related to depression and other mental disorders were differentially expressed in both PFC and hippocampus. Furthermore, the depression-like phenotypes induced by 24-hour-restraint could be reversed by fluoxetine, a type of antidepressant drug. These findings demonstrated that a single severe stressful event could produce long-term depressive-like phenotypes. Moreover, the 24-hour-restraint stress mice could also be used for further studies on mood disorders.

  13. [The long-term course of depression and dementia in the aged].

    PubMed

    Oesterreich, K

    1989-01-01

    Results of measurements of geropsychiatric syndromes are different. The statements are based on application of various methods and investigations of non-comparable populations. Nevertheless it is possible to draw the following conclusions out of the scientific papers and experiences of our own: A chronicity of depressive long-term courses is expected on old and higher age. Somatic diseases and organic brain syndrome render more difficult the amelioration and pharmacotherapy. The symptoms of affective disorders in old age most differ from depression in early and adult biographic phase. The course of dementias take off age and attendant somatic illness. In old age increase dementias. Their prognosis is worse. Added somatic process affects the further course negatively and renders more difficult the therapy. Long-term courses of dementias in old and higher age complicate the precise differential-diagnostic attach on pathogenetics. Social influences take effect on the course of depression and dementia advantageously or disadvantageously.

  14. Long-Term Effects of Bereavement and Caregiver Intervention on Dementia Caregiver Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Haley, William E.; Bergman, Elizabeth J.; Roth, David L.; McVie, Theresa; Gaugler, Joseph E.; Mittelman, Mary S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the joint effects of bereavement and caregiver intervention on caregiver depressive symptoms Design and Methods Alzheimer’s caregivers from a randomized trial of an enhanced caregiver support intervention versus usual care who had experienced the death of their spouse (n = 254) were repeatedly assessed with the Geriatric Depression Scale prior to and following bereavement. Random effects regression growth curve analyses examined the effects of treatment group and bereavement while controlling for other variables Results The death of the care recipient led to reductions in depressive symptoms for both caregiving groups. Enhanced support intervention led to lower depressive symptoms compared with controls both before and after bereavement. Post-bereavement group differences were stronger for caregivers of spouses who did not previously experience a nursing home placement. These caregivers maintained these differences for more than 1 year after bereavement. Caregivers who received the enhanced support intervention were more likely to show long-term patterns of fewer depressive symptoms before and after bereavement, suggesting resilience, whereas control caregivers were more likely to show chronic depressive symptoms before and after the death of their spouse. Implications Caregiver intervention has the potential to alter the long-term course of the caregiving career. Such clinical strategies may also protect caregivers against chronic depressive symptoms that would otherwise persist long after caregiving ends. PMID:19139247

  15. Predicting long-term recovery from depression in community settings in Western Europe: evidence from ODIN.

    PubMed

    Dowrick, Christopher; Shiels, C; Page, H; Ayuso-Mateos, J L; Casey, P; Dalgard, O S; Dunn, G; Lehtinen, V; Salmon, P; Whitehead, M

    2011-02-01

    To test the impact of socio-economic and psychological adversity and healthcare on long-term recovery from depression. A community sample of 347 people with depressive disorders was followed up after 9 years. Baseline socio-economic adversity, social support, healthcare use, and psychiatric history were identified. Respondents completed self-report instruments on current depressive status (Beck depression inventory) and longstanding psychosocial adversity (sexual, physical or emotional abuse). Univariate analyses tested for association between recovery and respondent characteristics. Follow-up was achieved for 182 (52%) of the sample, of whom 75 (41%) indicated recovery from depression. Psychological adversity definitely and socio-economic adversity probably were associated with lack of recovery. Baseline healthcare had no apparent impact on outcome. Rurality and support after life events were associated with recovery. History of depression was associated with non-recovery. Psychological adversity is, and socio-economic adversity may be, associated with long-term non-recovery from depression in community settings.

  16. Long-term association between seizure outcome and depression after resective epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H.; Cong, X.; Devinsky, O.; Berg, A.T.; Vickrey, B.G.; Sperling, M.R.; Shinnar, S.; Langfitt, J.T.; Walczak, T.S.; Barr, W.B.; Dziura, J.; Bazil, C.W.; Spencer, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the association between long-term epilepsy surgery outcome and changes in depressive symptoms. Methods: Adults were enrolled between 1996 and 2001 in a multicenter prospective study to evaluate outcomes of resective epilepsy surgery. The extent of depressive symptoms and depression case status (none, mild, or moderate/severe) were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) preoperatively and 3, 12, 24, 48, and 60 months postoperatively. A mixed-model repeated-measures analysis was performed, adjusting for covariates of seizure location, gender, age, race, education, and seizure control. Results: Of the total 373 subjects, 256 were evaluated at baseline and 5 years after surgery. At baseline, 164 (64.1%) were not depressed, 34 (13.3%) were mildly depressed, and 58 (22.7%) had moderate to severe depression. After 5 years, 198 (77.3%) were not depressed, 20 (7.8%) were mildly depressed, and 38 (14.8%) were moderately to severely depressed. Five years after surgery, the reduction in mean change from baseline in BDI score was greater in subjects with excellent seizure control than in the fair and poor seizure control groups (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.02 respectively). Those with good seizure control had a greater reduction in BDI score than the poor seizure control group (p = 0.02) and borderline significant reduction compared with the fair seizure control group (p = 0.055). Conclusion: Although study participants had initial improvement in depressive symptoms, on average, after resective surgery, only patients with good or excellent seizure control had sustained long-term improvement in mood. PMID:22094480

  17. Improvement of Depression and Anxiety After Discontinuation of Long- Term Efavirenz Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mothapo, Khutso M; Schellekens, Arnt; van Crevel, Reinout; Keuter, Monique; Grintjes-Huisman, K; Koopmans, Peter; van der Ven, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients may be a late complication of efavirenz treatment. This study: 1) assessed the level of neuropsychiatric symptoms in HIV-infected patients on long-term efavirenz therapy; 2) explored the effect of a switch to non-efavirenz containing anti-retroviral treatment on neuropsychiatric symptoms. A consecutive series of 47 HIV-infected participants on long-term efavirenz treatment were included in an observational clinical trial. Participants completed three self-report questionnaires on neuropsychiatric symptoms. Patients switching to a non-efavirenz regimen were retested 2 weeks and 3 months after switching. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA to assess the effect of switching over time. A change in the percentage of patients scoring above norm scores after switching was analyzed using Chi square. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were common among HIV-infected patients on long-term efavirenz therapy, mainly depression, anxiety, stress, insufficiency in thinking and paranoia. After switching, these symptoms improved significantly to (near) normal levels. Our results show that neuropsychiatric symptoms are common among HIV-infected subjects and may be caused by long-term efavirenz use. Neuropsychiatric assessment, such as the Depression, Anxiety and Stress scale and Symptom Checklist 90, can identify those that may benefit from the discontinuation of efavirenz.

  18. The burden of depressive symptoms in the long-term treatment of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Conley, Robert R; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Zhu, Baojin; Faries, Douglas E; Kinon, Bruce J

    2007-02-01

    To prospectively measure the link between depressive symptoms and functional outcomes in the long-term treatment of people with schizophrenia. Data were drawn from a large, multi-site, 3-year, prospective, naturalistic, observational study, in which subjects with schizophrenia were assessed at enrollment and at 12-month intervals thereafter. Individuals who were "Depressed" (defined as a total score > or =16 on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale) at enrollment were compared to those "Non-depressed" on functional outcomes, using self-report measures, clinicians' ratings, and information from medical records. Statistical analyses included Generalized Estimation Equation and mixed regression analyses adjusted for individual characteristics. Longitudinal group comparisons across the 3-year study were augmented with a cross-sectional group comparison at enrollment. At enrollment, 39.4% (877/2228) of the participants were deemed Depressed. Across the 3-year study, the depressed cohort was significantly more likely than the Non-depressed to use relapse-related mental health services (emergency psychiatric services, sessions with psychiatrists); to be a safety concern (violent, arrested, victimized, suicidal); to have greater substance-related problems; and to report poorer life satisfaction, quality of life, mental functioning, family relationships, and medication adherence. Furthermore, changes in depressed status were associated with changes in functional outcomes. People with schizophrenia and concurrent depressive symptoms have poorer long-term functional outcomes compared to the Non-depressed. Their poorer quality of life, greater use of mental health services, and higher risk of involvement with law enforcement agencies underscore a need for special treatment interventions. Treatment of the non-psychotic dimensions of schizophrenia is a critical part of recovery.

  19. A calcineurin/AKAP complex is required for NMDA receptor-dependent long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Sandra; Biou, Virginie; Malenka, Robert C

    2010-09-01

    AKAP79/150 is a protein scaffold that is thought to position specific kinases (protein kinase A and C) and phosphatases (calcineurin) in appropriate synaptic domains so that their activities can regulate excitatory synaptic strength. Using a viral-mediated molecular replacement strategy in rat hippocampal slices, we found that AKAP is required for NMDA receptor-dependent long-term depression solely because of its interaction with calcineurin.

  20. The long-term effects of intimate partner violence on adolescent mothers’ depressive symptoms☆

    PubMed Central

    Lindhorst, Taryn; Oxford, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent mothers are at high risk of experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) which may increase their likelihood of depressive symptoms in adulthood, yet little is known about the long-term effects of IPV on adolescent mothers’ trajectories of depressive symptoms. The study reported here uses prospective data spanning 14 years from a study of 229 adolescent mothers from Washington State, USA to evaluate the effects of adolescent exposure to IPV on the trajectories of depressive symptoms over time, as well as the likelihood of depressive symptoms at age 28 years. After controlling for levels of economic insecurity, the results indicate that adolescent IPV and an early vulnerability to depression were significantly related to the intercept, but not the slope of the adult depressive symptom trajectories. Both cumulative and concurrent IPV predicted the likelihood of depressive symptoms at age 28 years. Follow-up analyses indicate that adolescent IPV is associated with greater levels of adult IPV, and that women who report both adolescent and adult IPV have the highest mean levels of depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that exposure to IPV in adolescence may alter the life course of young women, increasing their risk for continuing exposure to intimate partner violence in adulthood and its concomitant negative mental health effects. Efforts aimed at prevention and early intervention in IPV among adolescent mothers are important components of the clinical care of young mothers. PMID:18201807

  1. The long-term effects of intimate partner violence on adolescent mothers' depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lindhorst, Taryn; Oxford, Monica

    2008-03-01

    Adolescent mothers are at high risk of experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) which may increase their likelihood of depressive symptoms in adulthood, yet little is known about the long-term effects of IPV on adolescent mothers' trajectories of depressive symptoms. The study reported here uses prospective data spanning 14 years from a study of 229 adolescent mothers from Washington State, USA to evaluate the effects of adolescent exposure to IPV on the trajectories of depressive symptoms over time, as well as the likelihood of depressive symptoms at age 28 years. After controlling for levels of economic insecurity, the results indicate that adolescent IPV and an early vulnerability to depression were significantly related to the intercept, but not the slope of the adult depressive symptom trajectories. Both cumulative and concurrent IPV predicted the likelihood of depressive symptoms at age 28 years. Follow-up analyses indicate that adolescent IPV is associated with greater levels of adult IPV, and that women who report both adolescent and adult IPV have the highest mean levels of depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that exposure to IPV in adolescence may alter the life course of young women, increasing their risk for continuing exposure to intimate partner violence in adulthood and its concomitant negative mental health effects. Efforts aimed at prevention and early intervention in IPV among adolescent mothers are important components of the clinical care of young mothers.

  2. Long term efficacy of paroxetine in major depression: A study with plasma levels.

    PubMed

    Mauri, M C; Laini, V; Bitetto, A; Boscati, L; Scalvini, M; Mapelli, L; Rudelli, R

    1999-01-01

    Depressive disorders can be regarded as recurrent and chronic conditions that may reduce the quality of life and work output of patients. Data on the long-term efficacy of paroxetine appear to indicate that it is an effective maintenance treatment. Our aim was to measure paroxetine concentrations in plasma in order to optimize its clinical efficacy and tolerability during long-term treatment. We studied 35 patients aged 23-70 years, suffering from Major Depressive Disorder (recurrent). These patients received 10-50 mg of paroxetine once a day for one year; they were evaluated at baseline, after 2 weeks and then after 1,2,6,9 and 12 months by BPRS, HRS-D and HRS-A rating scales, and at the same time, any side-effects were assessed and samples for paroxetine plasma determination were also collected. Results confirmed the efficacy and tolerability of paroxetine for long-term treatment. We observed a curvilinear relationship between plasma paroxetine levels and improvement on the HRS-D with greater clinical amelioration at plasma levels between 20 and 70 ng/ml.

  3. Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Inhibition Promotes Long-Term Depression and Synaptic Tagging/Capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Korte, Martin; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2016-06-01

    A balance of protein synthesis and degradation is critical for the dynamic regulation and implementation of long-term memory storage. The role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in regulating the plasticity at potentiated synapses is well studied, but its roles in depressed synaptic populations remain elusive. In this study, we probed the possibility of regulating the UPS by inhibiting the proteasome function during the induction of protein synthesis-independent form of hippocampal long-term depression (early-LTD), an important component of synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that protein degradation is involved in early-LTD induction and interfering with this process facilitates early-LTD to late-LTD. We provide evidence here that under the circumstances of proteasome inhibition brain-derived neurotrophic factor is accumulated as plasticity-related protein and it drives the weakly depressed or potentiated synapses to associativity. Thus, UPS inhibition promotes LTD and establishes associativity between weakly depressed or potentiated synapses through the mechanisms of synaptic tagging/capture or cross-capture.

  4. Does long-term experience of nonstandard employment increase the incidence of depression in the elderly?

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mo-Yeol; Kang, Young-Joong; Lee, Woncheol; Yoon, Jin-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Our prospective study aimed to elucidate the effect of long-term experience of nonstandard employment status on the incidence of depression in elderly population using the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing (KLoSA) study. Methods: This study used the first- to fourth-wave cohorts of KLoSA. After the exclusion of the unemployed and participants who experienced a change in employment status during the follow-up periods, we analyzed a total of 1,817 participants. Employment contracts were assessed by self-reported questions:standard or nonstandard employment. The short form of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) served as the outcome measure. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between standard/nonstandard employees and development of depression. Results: The mean age of the participants was 53.90 (±7.21) years. We observed that nonstandard employment significantly increased the risk of depression. Compared with standard employees, nonstandard employees had a 1.5-fold elevated risk for depression after adjusting for age, gender, CES-D score at baseline, household income, occupation category, current marital status, number of living siblings, perceived health status, and chronic diseases [HR=1.461, 95% CI= (1.184, 1.805) ]. Moreover, regardless of other individual characteristics, the elevated risk of depression was observed among all kinds of nonstandard workers, such as temporary and day workers, full-time and part-time workers, and directly employed and dispatched labor. Conclusions: The 6-year follow-up study revealed that long-term experience of nonstandard employment status increased the risk of depression in elderly population in Korea. PMID:27108642

  5. Depletion of perineuronal nets enhances recognition memory and long-term depression in the perirhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Romberg, Carola; Yang, Sujeong; Melani, Riccardo; Andrews, Melissa R.; Horner, Alexa E.; Spillantini, Maria G.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Fawcett, James W.; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Saksida, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Perineuronal nets are extracellular matrix structures surrounding cortical neuronal cell bodies and proximal dendrites, and are involved in the control of brain plasticity and the closure of critical periods. Expression of the link protein Crtl1/Hapln1 in neurons has recently been identified as the key event triggering the formation of perineuronal nets. Here we show that the genetic attenuation of perineuronal nets in adult brain Crtl1 knockout mice enhances long term object recognition memory and facilitates long-term depression in the perirhinal cortex, a neural correlate of object recognition memory. Identical prolongation of memory follows localised digestion of perineuronal nets with chondroitinase ABC, an enzyme that degrades the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) components of PNNs. The memory-enhancing effect of chondroitinase ABC treatment attenuated over time, suggesting that regeneration of PNNs gradually restored control plasticity levels. Our findings indicate that perineuronal nets regulate both memory and experience-driven synaptic plasticity in adulthood. PMID:23595763

  6. Depression, anxiety and quality of life in caregivers of long-term home care patients.

    PubMed

    Yıkılkan, Hülya; Aypak, Cenk; Görpelioğlu, Süleyman

    2014-06-01

    Family caregivers of patient in long-term care facilities often have high rates of stress, burden and psychological illness. A descriptive study was carried out with 63 caregivers. Caregivers were asked to complete a demographic questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Short form 36 (SF-36), which measures health related quality of life (QoL). The majority of caregivers were female (79.4%), and most often the daughter of the patient in long-term care (47.6%). The mean BDI score of the sample was 18.8, and the mean BAI score was 20.0. Almost all the mean scores referring to the QoL were decreased (lower than 50), with the exception of mental health. On the SF-36 questionnaire, the lowest scores were observed on the role-emotional, role-physical, social functioning and vitality scales of the SF-36.

  7. Calcium as a trigger for cerebellar long-term synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Finch, Elizabeth A; Tanaka, Keiko; Augustine, George J

    2012-09-01

    Cerebellar long-term depression (LTD) is a form of long-term synaptic plasticity that is triggered by calcium(Ca2+) signals in the postsynaptic Purkinje cell. This Ca2+comes both from IP3-mediated release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, as well as from Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The Ca2+ signal that triggers LTD occurs locally within dendritic spines and is due to supralinear summation of signals coming from these two Ca2+ sources. The properties of this postsynaptic Ca2+signal can explain several features of LTD, such as its associativity, synapse specificity, and dependence on thetiming of synaptic activity, and can account for the slow kinetics of LTD expression. Thus, from a Ca2+ signaling perspective, LTD is one of the best understood forms of synaptic plasticity.

  8. Trends in long-term opioid therapy for noncancer pain among persons with a history of depression.

    PubMed

    Braden, Jennifer Brennan; Sullivan, Mark D; Ray, G Thomas; Saunders, Kathleen; Merrill, Joseph; Silverberg, Michael J; Rutter, Carolyn M; Weisner, Constance; Banta-Green, Caleb; Campbell, Cynthia; Von Korff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report trends in long-term opioid use among patients with a history of depression from two large health plans. Using claims data, age- and gender-adjusted rates for long-term (>90 days) opioid use episodes were calculated for 1997-2005, comparing those with and without a depression diagnosis in the prior 2 years. Opioid use characteristics were calculated for those with a long-term episode in 2005. Incident and prevalent long-term opioid use rates were three times higher in those with a history of depression. Prevalent long-term use per 1000 in patients with a history of depression increased from 69.8 to 125.9 at Group Health and from 84.3 to 117.5 at Kaiser Permanente of Northern California between 1997 and 2005. Those with a history of depression were more likely to receive a higher average daily dose, greater days supply, and Schedule II opioids than nondepressed persons. Persons with a history of depression are more likely to receive long-term opioid therapy for noncancer pain than those without a history of depression. Results suggest that long-term opioid therapy for noncancer pain is being prescribed to a different population in clinical practice than the clinical trial populations where opioid efficacy has been established.

  9. Pets, depression and long term survival in community living patients following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Erika; Thomas, Sue A.; Son, Heesook

    2011-01-01

    Evidence supports the contribution of depression, anxiety, and poor social support to mortality of hospitalized myocardial infarction (MI) patients. The contribution of depression to survival is independent of disease severity. Pet ownership, a non-human form of social support, has also been associated with one year survival of post-MI patients. The current study addresses whether pet ownership contributes independently to long term survival beyond the contributions of depression, anxiety, or low social support in post-MI patients who have already survived at least 6 months. Data from patients (N = 460) enrolled in the “Psychosocial Responses in the Home Automated External Defibrillator Trial (PR-HAT)”were used. Seventeen patients died during a median follow-up of 2.8 years. In Cox proportional hazards regression model that included depression, lack of pet ownership, and the interaction between depression and lack of pet ownership, not owning a pet was the only significant independent predictor of mortality (p = 0.036). The interaction between pet ownership and depression tended to be significant indicating that the effect of pet ownership on survival in this group of people who have supportive spouses/companions living with them may relate to depression. PMID:21857770

  10. Six-month trajectories of self-reported depressive symptoms in long-term care.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G; Voyer, Philippe; Monette, Johanne; Champoux, Nathalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Vu, Minh; Belzile, Eric; Bai, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common problem in long-term care (LTC) settings. We sought to characterize depression symptom trajectories over six months among older residents, and to identify resident characteristics at baseline that predict symptom trajectory. This study was a secondary analysis of data from a six-month prospective, observational, and multi-site study. Severity of depressive symptoms was assessed with the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) at baseline and with up to six monthly follow-up assessments. Participants were 130 residents with a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 15 or more at baseline and of at least two of the six monthly follow-up assessments. Individual resident GDS trajectories were grouped using hierarchical clustering. The baseline predictors of a more severe trajectory were identified using the Proportional Odds Model. Three clusters of depression symptom trajectory were found that described "lower," "intermediate," and "higher" levels of depressive symptoms over time (mean GDS scores for three clusters at baseline were 2.2, 4.9, and 9.0 respectively). The GDS scores in all groups were generally stable over time. Baseline predictors of a more severe trajectory were as follows: Initial GDS score of 7 or more, female sex, LTC residence for less than 12 months, and corrected visual impairment. The six-month course of depressive symptoms in LTC is generally stable. Most residents who experience a more severe symptom trajectory can be identified at baseline.

  11. Long term life dissatisfaction and subsequent major depressive disorder and poor mental health.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Teemu; Viinamäki, Heimo; Honkalampi, Kirsi; Lehto, Soili M; Hintikka, Jukka; Saharinen, Tarja; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli

    2011-08-23

    Poor mental health, especially due to depression, is one of the main public health problems. Early indicators of poor mental health in general population are needed. This study examined the relationship between long-term life dissatisfaction and subsequent mental health, including major depressive disorder. Health questionnaires were sent to a randomly selected population-based sample in 1998 and repeated in 1999 and 2001. In 2005, a clinically studied sub-sample (n = 330) was composed of subjects with (n = 161) or without (n = 169) repeatedly reported adverse mental symptoms at all three previous data collection times. Clinical symptom assessments were performed with several psychometric scales: life satisfaction (LS), depression (HDRS, BDI), hopelessness (HS), mental distress (GHQ), dissociative experiences (DES), and alexithymia (TAS). The long-term life dissatisfaction burden was calculated by summing these life satisfaction scores in 1998, 1999, 2001 and dividing the sum into tertiles. Psychiatric diagnoses were confirmed by SCID-I for DSM-IV in 2005. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the studied relationship. The previous life dissatisfaction burden associated with adverse socio-demographic, life style and clinical factors. In adjusted logistic regression analyses, it was independently and strongly associated with subsequent major depressive disorder in 2005, even when the concurrent LS score in 2005 was included in the model. Excluding those with reported major depressive disorder in 1999 did not alter this finding. MDD in 1999 was based on self-reports and not on structured interview and LS data in 2001-2005 was not available. The life satisfaction burden is significantly related to major depressive disorder and poor mental health, both in cross-sectional and longitudinal settings.

  12. Self-Rated Health and Long-Term Prognosis of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ambresin, Gilles; Chondros, Patty; Dowrick, Christopher; Herrman, Helen; Gunn, Jane M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Indicators of prognosis should be considered to fully inform clinical decision making in the treatment of depression. This study examines whether self-rated health predicts long-term depression outcomes in primary care. METHODS Our analysis was based on the first 5 years of a prospective 10-year cohort study underway since January 2005 conducted in 30 randomly selected Australian primary care practices. Participants were 789 adult patients with a history of depressive symptoms. Main outcome measures include risks, risk differences, and risk ratios of major depressive syndrome (MDS) on the Patient Health Questionnaire. RESULTS Retention rates during the 5 years were 660 (84%), 586 (74%), 560 (71%), 533 (68%), and 517 (66%). At baseline, MDS was present in 27% (95% CI, 23%–30%). Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data showed participants reporting poor or fair self-rated health had greater odds of chronic illness, MDS, and lower socioeconomic status than those reporting good to excellent self-rated health. For participants rating their health as poor to fair compared with those rating it good to excellent, risk ratios of MDS were 2.10 (95% CI, 1.60–2.76), 2.38 (95% CI, 1.77–3.20), 2.22 (95% CI, 1.70–2.89), 1.73 (95% CI, 1.30–2.28), and 2.15 (95% CI, 1.59–2.90) at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years, after accounting for missing data using multiple imputation. After adjusting for age, sex, multimorbidity, and depression status and severity, self-rated health remained a predictor of MDS up to 5 years. CONCLUSIONS Self-rated health offers family physicians an efficient and simple way to identify patients at risk of poor long-term depression outcomes and to inform therapeutic decision making. PMID:24445104

  13. Heterogeneity in long-term trajectories of depressive symptoms: Patterns, predictors and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Musliner, Katherine L.; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Eaton, William W.; Zandi, Peter P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that long-term trajectories of depressive symptoms vary greatly throughout the population, with some individuals experiencing few or no symptoms, some experiencing transient symptoms and others experiencing chronic depression. The goal of this paper was to review studies that examined heterogeneity in long-term trajectories of depressive symptoms and summarize the current knowledge regarding a) the number and patterns of trajectories and b) antecedents and outcomes associated with different trajectory patterns. Methods We conducted a systematic review of literature in the Medline and PsychINFO databases. Articles were included if they a) modeled trajectories of depressive symptoms, b) used a group-based trajectory modeling approach, c) followed participants for 5+ years and d) had a sample size of at least 200. Results We identified 25 studies from 24 separate cohorts. Most of the studies identified either 3 or 4 distinct trajectory classes. Trajectories varied in terms of severity (low, medium, high) and stability (stable, increasing, decreasing). In most studies, the majority of participants had consistently few or no depressive symptoms, but a notable minority (usually < 10%) reported persistent symptoms. Predictors of trajectories with greater symptom burden included female gender, lower income/education and non-white race. Other predictors were specific to different populations (i.e. mothers, older adults). High symptom burden trajectories were associated with poor psychiatric and psychosocial outcomes. Limitations Comparisons between studies were qualitative. Conclusions Trajectories of depression symptoms in the general population are heterogeneous, with most individuals showing minimal symptoms but a notable minority experiencing chronic high symptom burden. PMID:26745437

  14. Long term life dissatisfaction and subsequent major depressive disorder and poor mental health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Poor mental health, especially due to depression, is one of the main public health problems. Early indicators of poor mental health in general population are needed. This study examined the relationship between long-term life dissatisfaction and subsequent mental health, including major depressive disorder. Method Health questionnaires were sent to a randomly selected population-based sample in 1998 and repeated in 1999 and 2001. In 2005, a clinically studied sub-sample (n = 330) was composed of subjects with (n = 161) or without (n = 169) repeatedly reported adverse mental symptoms at all three previous data collection times. Clinical symptom assessments were performed with several psychometric scales: life satisfaction (LS), depression (HDRS, BDI), hopelessness (HS), mental distress (GHQ), dissociative experiences (DES), and alexithymia (TAS). The long-term life dissatisfaction burden was calculated by summing these life satisfaction scores in 1998, 1999, 2001 and dividing the sum into tertiles. Psychiatric diagnoses were confirmed by SCID-I for DSM-IV in 2005. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the studied relationship. Results The previous life dissatisfaction burden associated with adverse socio-demographic, life style and clinical factors. In adjusted logistic regression analyses, it was independently and strongly associated with subsequent major depressive disorder in 2005, even when the concurrent LS score in 2005 was included in the model. Excluding those with reported major depressive disorder in 1999 did not alter this finding. Limitations MDD in 1999 was based on self-reports and not on structured interview and LS data in 2001-2005 was not available. Conclusions The life satisfaction burden is significantly related to major depressive disorder and poor mental health, both in cross-sectional and longitudinal settings. PMID:21861908

  15. Long term outcome of thermal anterior capsulotomy for chronic, treatment refractory depression.

    PubMed

    Christmas, David; Eljamel, M Sam; Butler, Sharon; Hazari, Hiral; MacVicar, Robert; Steele, J Douglas; Livingstone, Alison; Matthews, Keith

    2011-06-01

    There is very limited evidence for the efficacy of any specific therapeutic intervention in chronic, treatment refractory major depression. Thermal anterior capsulotomy (ACAPS) is a rarely performed but established therapeutic procedure for this patient group. While benefit has been claimed, previous ACAPS reports have provided limited information. Detailed prospective reporting of therapeutic effects and side effects is required. To report a prospective study of therapeutic effect, mental status, quality of life, social functioning and neurocognitive functioning in individuals with chronic treatment refractory major depression, treated with ACAPS. A prospective case series of 20 patients treated with ACAPS between 1992 and 1999 were reassessed at a mean follow-up of 7.0±3.4 years. Data were collected preoperatively and at long term follow-up. Structural MRI was performed in 14 participants. According to a priori criteria, at long term follow-up, 50% were classified as 'responders' and 40% as 'remitters'. Fifty-five per cent were classified as 'improved'; 35% were 'unchanged'; and 10% had 'deteriorated'. Neurocognitive and personality testing were not significantly different at follow-up. A trend towards improvement in some aspects of executive neuropsychological functioning was observed. Significant adverse effects were infrequent and there were no deaths. ACAPS may represent an effective intervention for some patients with chronic, disabling, treatment refractory major depression that has failed to respond to other therapeutic approaches. The adverse effect burden within this population was modest, with no evidence of generalised impairment of neurocognitive functioning.

  16. Childhood attachment and abuse: long-term effects on adult attachment, depression, and conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Styron, T; Janoff-Bulman, R

    1997-10-01

    The primary aim was to determine the relative contributions of early attachment and abuse history to adult attachment, depression, and conflict resolution behaviors. Differences between abused and nonabused respondents were also assessed. A multi-scale questionnaire was completed by 879 college students. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to answer the primary research question, and analyses also compared the 26.4% of respondents who reported childhood abuse with those who did not. Respondents who indicated they had been abused as children reported less secure childhood and adult relationships than their nonabused counterparts. They were also more depressed and more likely to use destructive behaviors in conflict situations. Although both adult romantic attachment and respondents' depression scores were best accounted for by childhood attachment to mother and father rather than abuse history, the opposite pattern of results emerged for conflict resolution behaviors. In this case, abuse history was the stronger predictor, and parental attachment did not account for any significant additional variance. Results suggest that the long-term impact of childhood abuse may be mediated by early attachment experiences, whereas the long-term impact of abuse on conflict resolution behaviors may be considerably more direct.

  17. Cognitive tolerability following successful long term treatment of major depression and anxiety disorders with SSRi antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Dina; Vieta, Eduard; Fornaro, Michele; Perugi, Giulio

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims to evaluate cognitive tolerability profile of SSRIs in long-term treatment. The secondary aim is to explore differences of side effects profile between patients with major depression (MD) and anxiety disorders (AD). Sixty-seven consecutive patients, successfully treated with SSRIs in monotherapy for at least six months for MD or AD, were assessed for side effects, with a special focus on cognition. Over 20% of MD and AD patients in long term treatment with SSRIs reported cognitive symptoms including fatigue, inattentiveness, lack of concentration, memory impairment and apathy. Recall memory impairment, attention deficit and somnolence were most frequently rated as moderate or severe. There were no significant differences in SSRI cognitive side effects profile between MD and AD patients. Subjective measure of cognitive functioning, limited sample size, lack of a control group. A large proportion of depressed and anxious patients treated successfully with SSRIs for over six months reported cognitive, affective, motivational symptoms. These symptoms are likely to represent SSRI side effects rather than residual depressive symptomatology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Relapse rates after psychotherapy for depression - stable long-term effects? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Christiane; Hofmann, Mareike; Kruse, Johannes; Leichsenring, Falk

    2014-10-01

    Depression is the most common mental disorder. Effective psychotherapeutic treatments for depression exist; however, data on their long-term effectiveness beyond a time span of two years is still scarce. Our aim was to perform a meta-analysis, investigating (a) overall rates of relapse more than two years after psychotherapy (meta-analysis 1), and (b) if psychotherapy has more enduring effects than non-psychotherapeutic comparison conditions (e.g. pharmacotherapy, treatment as usual), again beyond a time span of two years post-therapy (meta-analysis 2). We searched electronic databases Medline, PsycINFO and the COCHRANE Library. Main selection criteria were (i) RCT of psychotherapy with follow-up interval of more than 2 years, (ii) primary diagnosis of depression, assessed by observer ratings, (iii) report of relapse at follow-up. We identified 11 studies, 6 of which included a non-psychotherapeutic comparison condition. Together they comprised long-term data of 966 patients. Mean follow-up duration was 4.4 years. The overall relapse rate at long-term follow-up was 0.39 (95% CI 0.29, 0.50). Psychotherapy resulted in significantly less relapses (53.1% vs. 71.1%, OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.32, 0.82, p=0.005) than comparison treatments. This finding corresponded to a number needed to treat (NNT) of 5.55. Results can only be preliminary as data was sparse and studies differed methodologically. Heterogeneity in the first meta-analysis was high (I(2)=82%). Results indicated publication bias. The relapse rate more than two years after psychotherapy is relatively high, but significantly lower compared to non-psychotherapeutic treatments. Multiannual follow-ups should routinely be included in future psychotherapy RCTs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of major depressive disorder and subthreshold depression among older adults in community long-term care.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jin; Hasche, Leslie K; Choi, Sunha; Proctor, Enola K; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This study extends existing knowledge regarding the continuum between major depression (MD) and subthreshold depression (SD) by examining differences in symptomology and associative factors for a subpopulation of older adults with functional disability. Our sample consisted of clients age 60 and above entering public community long term care derived from the baseline survey of a longitudinal study (315 non-depressed, 74 MD, and 221 SD). We used the Diagnostic Interview Schedule to establish diagnoses of MD, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) to assess SD, and other self-report measures to explore potential associative factors of demographics, comorbidity, social support, and stressors. No differences in CES-D identified symptoms occurred between the two groups. MD and SD were both associated with lower education, poorer social support, more severe medical conditions, and higher stress when compared to non-depressed older adults. Younger age and being female were associated solely with MD; whereas, worse perceived health and more trouble affording food were associated solely with SD. The only associative factor significantly different between MD and SD was age. Those with MD were more likely to be younger than those with SD. Our findings of symptom profiles and associative factors lend support to the continuum notion of depression. Identification of only older adults within the community long-term care service system who meet criteria for MD would leave many older adults, who also face multiple comorbidities, high levels of stress and social isolation, and substantial depressive symptoms undiagnosed and untreated.

  20. Purkinje cell stripes and long-term depression at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex comprises a stereotyped array of transverse zones and parasagittal stripes, built around multiple Purkinje cell subtypes, which is highly conserved across birds and mammals. This architecture is revealed in the restricted expression patterns of numerous molecules, in the terminal fields of the afferent projections, in the distribution of interneurons, and in the functional organization. This review provides an overview of cerebellar architecture with an emphasis on attempts to relate molecular architecture to the expression of long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (pf-PC) synapse. PMID:24734006

  1. Long-term depression triggers the selective elimination of weakly integrated synapses.

    PubMed

    Wiegert, J Simon; Oertner, Thomas G

    2013-11-19

    Long-term depression (LTD) weakens synaptic transmission in an activity-dependent manner. It is not clear, however, whether individual synapses are able to maintain a depressed state indefinitely, as intracellular recordings rarely exceed 1 h. Here, we combine optogenetic stimulation of identified Schaffer collateral axons with two-photon imaging of postsynaptic calcium signals and follow the fate of individual synapses for 7 d after LTD induction. Optogenetic stimulation of CA3 pyramidal cells at 1 Hz led to strong and reliable depression of postsynaptic calcium transients in CA1. NMDA receptor activation was necessary for successful induction of LTD. We found that, in the days following LTD, many depressed synapses and their "neighbors" were eliminated from the hippocampal circuit. The average lifetime of synapses on nonstimulated dendritic branches of the same neurons remained unaffected. Persistence of individual depressed synapses was highly correlated with reliability of synaptic transmission, but not with spine size or the amplitude of spine calcium transients. Our data suggest that LTD initially leads to homogeneous depression of synaptic function, followed by selective removal of unreliable synapses and recovery of function in the persistent fraction.

  2. Opioids induce dissociable forms of long-term depression of excitatory inputs to the dorsal striatum

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K; Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2014-01-01

    As prescription opioid analgesic abuse rates rise, so does the need to understand the long-term effects of opioid exposure on brain function. The dorsal striatum is an important site for drug-induced neuronal plasticity. We found that exogenously applied and endogenously released opioids induced long-term depression (OP-LTD) of excitatory inputs to the dorsal striatum in mice and rats. Mu and delta OP-LTD, although both being presynaptically expressed, were dissociable in that they summated, differentially occluded endocannabinoid-LTD and inhibited different striatal inputs. Kappa OP-LTD showed a unique subregional expression in striatum. A single in vivo exposure to the opioid analgesic oxycodone disrupted mu OP-LTD and endocannabinoid-LTD, but not delta or kappa OP-LTD. These data reveal previously unknown opioid-mediated forms of long-term striatal plasticity that are differentially affected by opioid analgesic exposure and are likely important mediators of striatum-dependent learning and behavior. PMID:24561996

  3. SPIN90 Modulates Long-Term Depression and Behavioral Flexibility in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Kang, Minkyung; Kim, Chong-Hyun; Huh, Yun Hyun; Cho, In Ha; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Kyung Hwun; Park, Chul-Seung; Rhee, Sangmyung; Lee, Yong-Seok; Song, Woo Keun

    2017-01-01

    The importance of actin-binding proteins (ABPs) in the regulation of synapse morphology and plasticity has been well established. SH3 protein interacting with Nck, 90 kDa (SPIN90), an Nck-interacting protein highly expressed in synapses, is essential for actin remodeling and dendritic spine morphology. Synaptic targeting of SPIN90 to spine heads or dendritic shafts depends on its phosphorylation state, leading to blockage of cofilin-mediated actin depolymerization and spine shrinkage. However, the physiological role of SPIN90 in long-term plasticity, learning and memory are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that Spin90-knockout (KO) mice exhibit substantial deficits in synaptic plasticity and behavioral flexibility. We found that loss of SPIN90 disrupted dendritic spine density in CA1 neurons of the hippocampus and significantly impaired long-term depression (LTD), leaving basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) intact. These impairments were due in part to deficits in AMPA receptor endocytosis and its pre-requisites, GluA1 dephosphorylation and postsynaptic density (PSD) 95 phosphorylation, but also by an intrinsic activation of Akt-GSK3β signaling as a result of Spin90-KO. In accordance with these defects, mice lacking SPIN90 were found to carry significant deficits in object-recognition and behavioral flexibility, while learning ability was largely unaffected. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a novel modulatory role for SPIN90 in hippocampal LTD and behavioral flexibility.

  4. Opioids induce dissociable forms of long-term depression of excitatory inputs to the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Brady K; Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2014-04-01

    As prescription opioid analgesic abuse rates rise, so does the need to understand the long-term effects of opioid exposure on brain function. The dorsal striatum is an important site for drug-induced neuronal plasticity. We found that exogenously applied and endogenously released opioids induced long-term depression (OP-LTD) of excitatory inputs to the dorsal striatum in mice and rats. Mu and delta OP-LTD, although both being presynaptically expressed, were dissociable in that they summated, differentially occluded endocannabinoid-LTD and inhibited different striatal inputs. Kappa OP-LTD showed a unique subregional expression in striatum. A single in vivo exposure to the opioid analgesic oxycodone disrupted mu OP-LTD and endocannabinoid-LTD, but not delta or kappa OP-LTD. These data reveal previously unknown opioid-mediated forms of long-term striatal plasticity that are differentially affected by opioid analgesic exposure and are likely important mediators of striatum-dependent learning and behavior.

  5. Cerebral blood flow velocity positively correlates with brain volumes in long-term remitted depression.

    PubMed

    Desmidt, Thomas; Andersson, Frédéric; Brizard, Bruno; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Patat, Frédéric; Gissot, Valérie; Belzung, Catherine; El-Hage, Wissam; Camus, Vincent

    2017-09-20

    Mechanisms involved in brain changes observed in major depression have been poorly investigated in clinical populations. Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been found in depressed patients and constitute a potential mechanism by which brain volume varies in depression. We have tested the association of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) as assessed with Transcranial Doppler (TCD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) as assessed with Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ASL-MRI) with Total Brain Volume (TBV) and the volume of seven subcortical regions, in currently depressed and long-term remitted patients. In addition, we have evaluated other potential confounders for the association depression/brain volume, including dimensional symptoms of depression, cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and antidepressants. Seventy-five individuals were recruited, divided in 3 equal groups (currently depressed, remitted individuals and healthy controls) and were submitted to clinical assessment, MRI and Transcranial Doppler. CBFV was positively correlated with TBV, Hippocampus and Thalamus volume, but only in remitted patients, who tend to have larger brains compared to both currently depressed and controls. CVRF were negatively associated with brain volumes in the 3 groups and antidepressant use was associated with larger Thalamus. We found no association between brain volumes and CBF as assessed with ASL-MRI, anhedonia, anxiety or psychomotor retardation. Greater CBFV may be a physiological mechanism by which brain is enlarged in remitted patients. Future studies should consider CBFV, CVRF and antidepressants as possible confounders for the association depression/brain volumes, especially in remitted patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Long-Term Effects of Maternal Depression: Early Childhood Physical Health as a Pathway to Offspring Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia; Najman, Jake

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cross sectional and retrospective studies have highlighted the long-term negative effects of maternal depression on offspring physical, social, and emotional development, but longitudinal research is needed to clarify the pathways by which maternal depression during pregnancy and early childhood affects offspring outcomes. The current study tested one developmental pathway by which maternal depression during pregnancy might negatively impact offspring mental health in young adulthood, via poor physical health in early childhood. Methods The sample consisted of 815 Australian youth and their mothers who were followed for 20 years. Mothers reported on their own depressive symptoms during pregnancy and offspring early childhood. Youth completed interviews about health-related stress and social functioning at age 20, and completed a questionnaire about their own depressive symptoms two to five years later. Results Path analysis indicated that prenatal maternal depressive symptoms predicted worse physical health during early childhood for offspring, and this effect was partially explained by ongoing maternal depression in early childhood. Offspring poor physical health during childhood predicted increased health-related stress and poor social functioning at age 20. Finally, increased health-related stress and poor social functioning predicted increased levels of depressive symptoms later in young adulthood. Maternal depression had a significant total indirect effect on youth depression via early childhood health and its psychosocial consequences. Conclusions Poor physical health in early childhood and its effects on young adults’ social functioning and levels of health related stress are one important pathway by which maternal depression has long-term consequences for offspring mental health. PMID:24060574

  7. Non-apoptotic function of BAD and BAX in long-term depression of synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Song; Li, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Summary It has recently been found that caspases not only function in apoptosis, but are also crucial for non-apoptotic processes such as NMDA receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission. It remains unknown, however, how caspases are activated and how neurons escape death in LTD. Here we show that caspase-3 is activated by the BAD-BAX cascade for LTD induction. This cascade is required specifically for NMDA receptor-dependent LTD but not for mGluR-LTD, and its activation is sufficient to induce synaptic depression. In contrast to apoptosis, however, BAD is activated only moderately and transiently and BAX is not translocated to mitochondria, resulting in only modest caspase-3 activation. We further demonstrate that the intensity and duration of caspase-3 activation determin whether it leads to cell death or LTD, thus fine-tuning of caspase-3 activation is critical in distinguishing between these two pathways. PMID:21609830

  8. Long-term changes in sleep and depressive symptoms of smokers in abstinence.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Coutiño, Ana; Calderón-Ezquerro, Carmen; Drucker-Colín, René

    2007-03-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of smoking cessation on objective measures of sleep. The present study assessed the long-term effects of tobacco smoking abstinence on sleep and depression. A total of 15 chronic smokers with Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) scores of less than 9 were evaluated. Subjects were screened for baseline data when they were smoking chronically. They underwent a 5-week psychological treatment for tobacco smoking, after which their depressive symptoms and sleep architecture were evaluated at 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months of abstinence. We report the results of the seven patients who completed 1 year of evaluations and of those patients who achieved only partial abstinence. Polysomnographic recordings were taken, level of depression was measured with the HAM-D, and urinary cotinine levels also were evaluated. HAM-D scores were analyzed with and without sleep items. Nicotine abstinence reduced latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and increased HAM-D scores, suggesting that chronic smokers have depressive symptoms that may be controlled by nicotine administration.

  9. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Increases Sensitivity to Long Term Losses among Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Christopher; Paulus, Martin P.; Dunlop, Boadie W.

    2013-01-01

    decision-making about long-term potential losses compared to MDD patients without PTSD. PMID:24116235

  10. Nitric oxide-dependent long-term depression but not endocannabinoid-mediated long-term potentiation is crucial for visual recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Barker, Gareth; Warburton, E Clea; Burattini, Costanza; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bashir, Zafar I

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in perirhinal cortex is essential for recognition memory. Nitric oxide and endocannabinoids (eCBs), which are produced in the postsynaptic cell and act on the presynaptic terminal, are implicated in mechanisms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in other brain regions. In this study, we examine these two retrograde signalling cascades in perirhinal cortex synaptic plasticity and in visual recognition memory in the rat. We show that inhibition of NO-dependent signalling prevented both carbachol- and activity (5 Hz)-dependent LTD but not activity (100 Hz theta burst)-dependent LTP in the rat perirhinal cortex in vitro. In contrast, inhibition of the eCB-dependent signalling prevented LTP but not the two forms of LTD in vitro. Local administration into perirhinal cortex of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NPA (2 μm) disrupted acquisition of long-term visual recognition memory. In contrast, AM251 (10 μm), a cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist, did not impair visual recognition memory. The results of this study demonstrate dissociation between putative retrograde signalling mechanisms in LTD and LTP in perirhinal cortex. Thus, LTP relies on cannabinoid but not NO signalling, whilst LTD relies on NO- but not eCB-dependent signalling. Critically, these results also establish, for the first time, that NO- but not eCB-dependent signalling is important in perirhinal cortex-dependent visual recognition memory. PMID:23671159

  11. Synaptic Function of Rab11Fip5: Selective Requirement for Hippocampal Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mohiuddin; Jurado, Sandra; Malenka, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) are among the major determinants of synaptic strength and can be trafficked into and out of synapses. Neuronal activity regulates AMPAR trafficking during synaptic plasticity to induce long-term changes in synaptic strength, including long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). Rab family GTPases regulate most membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells; particularly, Rab11 and its effectors are implicated in mediating postsynaptic AMPAR insertion during LTP. To explore the synaptic function of Rab11Fip5, a neuronal Rab11 effector and a candidate autism-spectrum disorder gene, we performed shRNA-mediated knock-down and genetic knock-out (KO) studies. Surprisingly, we observed robust shRNA-induced synaptic phenotypes that were rescued by a Rab11Fip5 cDNA but that were nevertheless not observed in conditional KO neurons. Both in cultured neurons and acute slices, KO of Rab11Fip5 had no significant effect on basic parameters of synaptic transmission, indicating that Rab11Fip5 is not required for fundamental synaptic operations, such as neurotransmitter release or postsynaptic AMPAR insertion. KO of Rab11Fip5 did, however, abolish hippocampal LTD as measured both in acute slices or using a chemical LTD protocol in cultured neurons but did not affect hippocampal LTP. The Rab11Fip5 KO mice performed normally in several behavioral tasks, including fear conditioning, but showed enhanced contextual fear extinction. These are the first findings to suggest a requirement for Rab11Fip5, and presumably Rab11, during LTD. PMID:25972173

  12. [Anxiety and depressive disorders in 4,425 long term benzodiazepine users in general practice].

    PubMed

    Pélissolo, A; Maniere, F; Boutges, B; Allouche, M; Richard-Berthe, C; Corruble, E

    2007-01-01

    .5%). An anxiety and depressive comorbidity wad found in 41.9% of the subjects. Some methodological limitations must be taken into account in the discussion of our results, and especially the fact that the included patients were not supposed to be totally representative of all patients consuming anxiolytic benzodiazepines in general practice. However, the size of our sample is sufficiently large to limit possible biases in patient selection. The main result of this study is that a great majority of the patients had significant symptomatology, in particular major depressive episodes and generalized anxiety disorder, often with marked severity and disability. These data are in line with the knowledge of a lack of efficacy of benzodiazepines in depressive and most anxiety disorders, despite long term treatment. They also confirm the current guidelines which recommend prescribing serotoninergic antidepressants, and not benzodiazepines, when long term treatments are needed for severe and chronic affective disorders. This epidemiologic study leads to the conclusion that a specific and attentive diagnostic assessment should be done in all patients receiving benzodiazepines for more than three months, in order to purpose in many cases other long term therapeutic strategies.

  13. Multiple receptors coupled to phospholipase C gate long-term depression in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se-Young; Chang, Jeff; Jiang, Bin; Seol, Geun-Hee; Min, Sun-Seek; Han, Jung-Soo; Shin, Hee-Sup; Gallagher, Michela; Kirkwood, Alfredo

    2005-12-07

    Long-term depression (LTD) in sensory cortices depends on the activation of NMDA receptors. Here, we report that in visual cortical slices, the induction of LTD (but not long-term potentiation) also requires the activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C (PLC) pathway. Using immunolesions in combination with agonists and antagonists, we selectively manipulated the activation of alpha1 adrenergic, M1 muscarinic, and mGluR5 glutamatergic receptors. Inactivation of these PLC-coupled receptors prevents the induction of LTD, but only when the three receptors were inactivated together. LTD is fully restored by activating any one of them or by supplying intracellular D-myo-inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). LTD was also impaired by intracellular application of PLC or IP3 receptor blockers, and it was absent in mice lacking PLCbeta1, the predominant PLC isoform in the forebrain. We propose that visual cortical LTD requires a minimum of PLC activity that can be supplied independently by at least three neurotransmitter systems. This essential requirement places PLC-linked receptors in a unique position to control the induction of LTD and provides a mechanism for gating visual cortical plasticity via extra-retinal inputs in the intact organism.

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gladding, Clare M; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Molnár, Elek

    2009-12-01

    The ability to modify synaptic transmission between neurons is a fundamental process of the nervous system that is involved in development, learning, and disease. Thus, synaptic plasticity is the ability to bidirectionally modify transmission, where long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTD) represent the best characterized forms of plasticity. In the hippocampus, two main forms of LTD coexist that are mediated by activation of either N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) or metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Compared with NMDAR-LTD, mGluR-LTD is less well understood, but recent advances have started to delineate the underlying mechanisms. mGluR-LTD at CA3:CA1 synapses in the hippocampus can be induced either by synaptic stimulation or by bath application of the group I selective agonist (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. Multiple signaling mechanisms have been implicated in mGluR-LTD, illustrating the complexity of this form of plasticity. This review provides an overview of recent studies investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying hippocampal mGluR-LTD. It highlights the role of key molecular components and signaling pathways that are involved in the induction and expression of mGluR-LTD and considers how the different signaling pathways may work together to elicit a persistent reduction in synaptic transmission.

  15. Enhanced AMPA receptor function promotes cerebellar long-term depression rather than potentiation

    PubMed Central

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses, thus resembling CX546 effects described at hippocampal synapses. Using the fluorescent calcium indicator dye Oregon Green BAPTA-2 and an ultra-high-speed CCD camera, we also monitored calcium transients in Purkinje cell dendrites. In the presence of CX546 in the bath, PF-evoked calcium transients were enhanced and prolonged, suggesting that CX546 not only enhances synaptic transmission, but also boosts dendritic calcium signaling at cerebellar synapses. In contrast to previous observations in the hippocampus, however, CX546 applied during cerebellar recordings facilitates long-term depression (LTD) rather than LTP at PF synapses. These findings show that ampakines selectively modify the LTP–LTD balance depending on the brain area and type of synapse, and may provide tools for the targeted regulation of synaptic memories. PMID:25403454

  16. Enhanced AMPA receptor function promotes cerebellar long-term depression rather than potentiation.

    PubMed

    van Beugen, Boeke J; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Hansel, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses, thus resembling CX546 effects described at hippocampal synapses. Using the fluorescent calcium indicator dye Oregon Green BAPTA-2 and an ultra-high-speed CCD camera, we also monitored calcium transients in Purkinje cell dendrites. In the presence of CX546 in the bath, PF-evoked calcium transients were enhanced and prolonged, suggesting that CX546 not only enhances synaptic transmission, but also boosts dendritic calcium signaling at cerebellar synapses. In contrast to previous observations in the hippocampus, however, CX546 applied during cerebellar recordings facilitates long-term depression (LTD) rather than LTP at PF synapses. These findings show that ampakines selectively modify the LTP-LTD balance depending on the brain area and type of synapse, and may provide tools for the targeted regulation of synaptic memories.

  17. Two Loci of expression for long-term depression at hippocampal mossy fiber-interneuron synapses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Saobo; McBain, Chris J

    2004-03-03

    Two distinct forms of long-term depression (LTD) exist at mossy fiber synapses between dentate gyrus granule cells and hippocampal CA3 stratum lucidum interneurons. Although induction of each form of LTD requires an elevation of postsynaptic intracellular Ca2+, at Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptor (CI-AMPAR) synapses, induction is NMDA receptor (NMDAR) dependent, whereas LTD at Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptor (CP-AMPAR) synapses is NMDAR independent. However, the expression locus of either form of LTD is not known. Using a number of criteria, including the coefficient of variation, paired-pulse ratio, AMPA-NMDA receptor activity, and the low-affinity AMPAR antagonist gamma-D-glutamyl-glycine, we demonstrate that LTD expression at CP-AMPAR synapses is presynaptic and results from reduced transmitter release, whereas LTD expression at CI-AMPAR synapses is postsynaptic. The N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-AP2-clathrin adaptor protein 2 inhibitory peptide pep2m occluded LTD expression at CI-AMPAR synapses but not at CP-AMPAR synapses, confirming that CI-AMPAR LTD involves postsynaptic AMPAR trafficking. Thus, mossy fiber innervation of CA3 stratum lucidum interneurons occurs via two parallel systems targeted to either Ca2+-permeable or Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptors, each with a distinct expression locus for long-term synaptic plasticity.

  18. Loss of long-term depression in the insular cortex after tail amputation in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The insular cortex (IC) is an important forebrain structure involved in pain perception and taste memory formation. Using a 64-channel multi-electrode array system, we recently identified and characterized two major forms of synaptic plasticity in the adult mouse IC: long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In this study, we investigate injury-related metaplastic changes in insular synaptic plasticity after distal tail amputation. We found that tail amputation in adult mice produced a selective loss of low frequency stimulation-induced LTD in the IC, without affecting (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-evoked LTD. The impaired insular LTD could be pharmacologically rescued by priming the IC slices with a lower dose of DHPG application, a form of metaplasticity which involves activation of protein kinase C but not protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. These findings provide important insights into the synaptic mechanisms of cortical changes after peripheral amputation and suggest that restoration of insular LTD may represent a novel therapeutic strategy against the synaptic dysfunctions underlying the pathophysiology of phantom pain. PMID:24398034

  19. May duration of untreated illness influence the long-term course of major depressive disorder?

    PubMed

    Altamura, A Carlo; Dell'osso, Bernardo; Vismara, Serena; Mundo, Emanuela

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this naturalistic study was to investigate the possible influence of the duration of untreated illness (DUI) on the long-term course of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). One hundred and thirteen patients with recurrent MDD, according to DSM-IV-TR criteria, followed up for 5 years, were selected, interviewed and their clinical charts were reviewed. The DUI was defined as the interval between the onset of the first depressive episode and the first adequate antidepressant treatment. The sample was divided into two groups according to the DUI: one group with a DUI12 months (n=38). The main demographic and clinical course variables were compared between the two groups using Student's t-tests or chi-square tests. Patients with a longer DUI showed an earlier age at onset (t=2.82, p=0.006) and a longer duration of illness (t=3.20, p=0.002) compared to patients with a shorter DUI. In addition, the total number of depressive episodes occurring before the first antidepressant treatment was higher in the group with a longer DUI (t=-2.223, p<0.03). Even though limited by the retrospective nature of the study, these preliminary findings would suggest that a longer DUI may negatively influence the course of MDD. Larger prospective studies are warranted to further investigate the role of the DUI within MDD.

  20. FAIM-L regulation of XIAP degradation modulates Synaptic Long-Term Depression and Axon Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mármol, Ramón; Barneda-Zahonero, Bruna; Soto, David; Andrés, Rosa Maria; Coccia, Elena; Gasull, Xavier; Planells-Ferrer, Laura; Moubarak, Rana S.; Soriano, Eduardo; Comella, Joan X.

    2016-01-01

    Caspases have recently emerged as key regulators of axonal pruning and degeneration and of long-term depression (LTD), a long-lasting form of synaptic plasticity. However, the mechanism underlying these functions remains unclear. In this context, XIAP has been shown to modulate these processes. The neuron-specific form of FAIM protein (FAIM-L) is a death receptor antagonist that stabilizes XIAP protein levels, thus preventing death receptor-induced neuronal apoptosis. Here we show that FAIM-L modulates synaptic transmission, prevents chemical-LTD induction in hippocampal neurons, and thwarts axon degeneration after nerve growth factor (NGF) withdrawal. Additionally, we demonstrate that the participation of FAIM-L in these two processes is dependent on its capacity to stabilize XIAP protein levels. Our data reveal FAIM-L as a regulator of axonal degeneration and synaptic plasticity. PMID:27767058

  1. [Comparative efficacy and tolerability of paroxetine and amitriptiline in long-term therapy preventing depressive recurrences].

    PubMed

    Mosolov, S N; Kostiukova, E G; Gorodnichev, A V; Timofeev, I V

    2005-01-01

    An open comparative randomized study of paroxetine (selective inhibitor of serotonin re-uptake) and tricyclic antidepressant amitriptiline has been conducted. These drugs were used for the treatment of 43 patients with recurrent depression (RD) with frequent relapses (ICD-10 F33.0-F33.2) during 12 months. There were 2 groups matched for demographic and clinical data, one included 21 patients treated by paroxetine and the other 22 patients switched to amitriptiline. Basing on clinical records and scores on a number of scales, i.e. HAM-D, CGI, quality of life, high efficacy of the drugs was confirmed, being estimated as 90,5% responders in the paroxetine group and 69,2% in the amitriptiline one, with the marked advantage of the former medication. The better tolerability, possibility of single intake and absence of severe side-effects argue for preferable use of paroxetine during long-term therapy in RD patients with frequent relapses.

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression in the cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sukjae Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent long-term depression (LTD), a type of synaptic plasticity, is characterized by a reduction in the synaptic response, mainly at the excitatory synapses of the neurons. The hippocampus and the cerebellum have been the most extensively studied regions in mGluR-dependent LTD, and Group 1 mGluR has been reported to be mainly involved in this synaptic LTD at excitatory synapses. However, mGluR-dependent LTD in other brain regions may be involved in the specific behaviors or diseases. In this paper, we focus on five cortical regions and review the literature that implicates their contribution to the pathogenesis of several behaviors and specific conditions associated with mGluR-dependent LTD. PMID:27847432

  3. Insulin induces long-term depression of VTA dopamine neurons via an endocannabinoid-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Liu, Shuai; Dias, Carine; Zou, Haiyan; Wong, Jovi C.Y.; Karunakaran, Subashini; Clee, Susanne M.; Phillips, Anthony; Boutrel, Benjamin; Borgland, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has drastically increased over the last few decades. Exploration into how hunger and satiety signals influence the reward system can help us to understand non-homeostatic mechanisms of feeding. Evidence suggests that insulin may act in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a critical site for reward-seeking behavior, to suppress feeding. However, the neural mechanisms underlying insulin effects in the VTA remain unknown. We demonstrate that insulin, a circulating catabolic peptide that inhibits feeding, can induce a long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory synapses onto VTA dopamine neurons. This effect requires endocannabinoid-mediated presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release. Furthermore, after a sweetened high fat meal, which elevates endogenous insulin levels, insulin-induced LTD is occluded. Finally, insulin in the VTA reduces food anticipatory behavior and conditioned place preference for food. Taken together, these results suggest that insulin in the VTA suppresses excitatory synaptic transmission and reduces salience of food-related cues. PMID:23354329

  4. System identification of mGluR-dependent long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Tambuyzer, Tim; Ahmed, Tariq; Taylor, C James; Berckmans, Daniel; Balschun, Detlef; Aerts, Jean-Marie

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances have started to uncover the underlying mechanisms of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent long-term depression (LTD). However, it is not completely clear how these mechanisms are linked, and it is believed that several crucial mechanisms remain to be revealed. In this study, we investigated whether system identification (SI) methods can be used to gain insight into the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. SI methods have been shown to be an objective and powerful approach for describing how sensory neurons encode information about stimuli. However, to our knowledge, it is the first time that SI methods have been applied to electrophysiological brain slice recordings of synaptic plasticity responses. The results indicate that the SI approach is a valuable tool for reverse-engineering of mGluR-LTD responses. We suggest that such SI methods can aid in unraveling the complexities of synaptic function.

  5. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K.; Lovinger, David M.; Mathur, Brian N.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for regulation of information storage and control of actions, as well as synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity; the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a “common pathway” are described. Here, we review the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate if all Gi/o-GPCR are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD. PMID:25160683

  6. Presynaptic long-term depression mediated by Gi/o-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Brady K; Lovinger, David M; Mathur, Brian N

    2014-11-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of the efficacy of synaptic transmission is now recognized as an important mechanism for the regulation of information storage and the control of actions, as well as for synapse, neuron, and circuit development. Studies of LTD mechanisms have focused mainly on postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptor trafficking. However, the focus has now expanded to include presynaptically expressed plasticity, the predominant form being initiated by presynaptically expressed Gi/o-coupled metabotropic receptor (Gi/o-GPCR) activation. Several forms of LTD involving activation of different presynaptic Gi/o-GPCRs as a 'common pathway' are described. We review here the literature on presynaptic Gi/o-GPCR-mediated LTD, discuss known mechanisms, gaps in our knowledge, and evaluate whether all Gi/o-GPCRs are capable of inducing presynaptic LTD.

  7. Postsynaptic Signals Mediating Induction of Long-Term Synaptic Depression in the Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kourrich, Saïd; Glasgow, Stephen D.; Caruana, Douglas A.; Chapman, C. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex receives a large projection from the piriform cortex, and synaptic plasticity in this pathway may affect olfactory processing. In vitro whole cell recordings have been used here to investigate postsynaptic signalling mechanisms that mediate the induction of long-term synaptic depression (LTD) in layer II entorhinal cortex cells. To induce LTD, pairs of pulses, using a 30-millisecond interval, were delivered at 1 Hz for 15 minutes. Induction of LTD was blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist APV and by the calcium chelator BAPTA, consistent with a requirement for calcium influx via NMDA receptors. Induction of LTD was blocked when the FK506 was included in the intracellular solution to block the phosphatase calcineurin. Okadaic acid, which blocks activation of protein phosphatases 1 and 2a, also prevented LTD. Activation of protein phosphatases following calcium influx therefore contributes to induction of LTD in layer II of the entorhinal cortex. PMID:18670611

  8. Anisomycin inhibits the late maintenance of long-term depression in rat hippocampal slices in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Frey, Julietta U

    2003-02-27

    Studies were performed to investigate whether electrically-induced long-term depression (LTD) within rat hippocampal slices in vitro shares any common cellular features with LTD in the intact animal, with particular emphasis being placed on mechanisms required for its late maintenance. Our initial studies have led to the development of stimulation protocols which are able to reliably produce different forms of LTD. Depending on the induction protocol applied, we are able to demonstrate a transient protein synthesis-independent early-LTD with a duration of up to 3-4 h, together with a de novo protein synthesis-dependent late-LTD lasting for at least 8 h. Furthermore, we are able to show input-specific LTD within the CA1 region, with expression shown only by those synapses specifically stimulated by a low-frequency protocol. These studies are important pre-requisites to investigate mechanisms of 'synaptic tagging' and 'late-associativity' during LTD.

  9. PICK1 interacts with PACSIN to regulate AMPA receptor internalization and cerebellar long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Anggono, Victor; Koç-Schmitz, Yeliz; Widagdo, Jocelyn; Kormann, Jan; Quan, Annie; Chen, Chih-Ming; Robinson, Phillip J; Choi, Se-Young; Linden, David J; Plomann, Markus; Huganir, Richard L

    2013-08-20

    The dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses is crucial for synaptic transmission, plasticity, learning, and memory. The protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) directly interacts with GluA2/3 subunits of the AMPARs. Although the role of PICK1 in regulating AMPAR trafficking and multiple forms of synaptic plasticity is known, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. Here, we report a unique interaction between PICK1 and all three members of the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) family and show that they form a complex with AMPARs. Our results reveal that knockdown of the neuronal-specific protein, PACSIN1, leads to a significant reduction in AMPAR internalization following the activation of NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons. The interaction between PICK1 and PACSIN1 is regulated by PACSIN1 phosphorylation within the variable region and is required for AMPAR endocytosis. Similarly, the binding of PICK1 to the ubiquitously expressed PACSIN2 is also regulated by the homologous phosphorylation sites within the PACSIN2-variable region. Genetic deletion of PACSIN2, which is highly expressed in Purkinje cells, eliminates cerebellar long-term depression. This deficit can be fully rescued by overexpressing wild-type PACSIN2, but not by a PACSIN2 phosphomimetic mutant, which does not bind PICK1 efficiently. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the interaction of PICK1 and PACSIN is required for the activity-dependent internalization of AMPARs and for the expression of long-term depression in the cerebellum.

  10. Long-Term Use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk of Glaucoma in Depression Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated whether the long-term use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) influences the risk of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in the Chinese ethnic population in Taiwan.The authors retrieved the data under analysis from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan and identified 26,186 newly diagnosed depression patients without preexisting glaucoma. The study cohort included 13,093 patients with over 1 year of SSRI use, and a comparison cohort of 13,093 patients who had never used SSRIs. The main outcome was a diagnosis of POAG or PACG during follow-up. The authors used univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models to assess the effects of SSRIs on the risk of POAG and PACG.The cumulative incidences of POAG and PACG between the SSRI and comparison cohorts exhibited nonsignificant differences (log-rank test P = .52 for POAG, P = .32 for PACG). The overall incidence of POAG in the SSRI cohort was nonsignificantly higher than that in the comparison cohort (1.51 versus 1.39 per 1000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.07 (95% confidence interval = 0.82-1.40). The overall incidence of PACG in the SSRI cohort was nonsignificantly lower than that in the comparison cohort (0.95 versus 1.11 per 1000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.85 (95% confidence interval = 0.62-1.18).The long-term use of SSRIs does not influence the risk of POAG or PACG in depression patients.

  11. Development of a Curriculum for Long-Term Care Nurses to Improve Recognition of Depression in Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Christine L.; Molinari, Victor; Bond, Jennifer; Smith, Michael; Hyer, Kathryn; Malphurs, Julie

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the severe consequences of depression in long-term care residents with dementia. Most health care providers are unprepared to recognize and to manage the complexity of depression in dementia. Targeted educational initiatives in nursing homes are needed to address this growing problem. This paper describes the…

  12. Long-Term Outcome of Adolescent Depression Initially Resistant to SSRI Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Benedetto; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen D.; Asarnow, Joan R.; Keller, Martin; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Kennard, Betsy; Mayes, Taryn; DeBar, Lynn; Lynch, Frances; Dickerson, John; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; McCracken, James T.; Spirito, Anthony; Onorato, Matthew; Zelazny, Jamie; Porta, Giovanna; Iyengar, Satish; Brent, David

    2011-01-01

    Objective We examined the long-term outcome of participants in the Treatment of SSRI-Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) study, a randomized trial of 334 adolescents (aged 12-18 years) with DSM-IV-defined major depression disorder initially resistant to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment who were and subsequently treated for 12 weeks with another SSRI, venlafaxine, another SSRI + cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or venlafaxine + CBT. Responders then continued with the same treatment through week 24, while non-responders were given open treatment. Method For the current study, patients were reassessed 48 (N=116) and 72 (N=130) weeks from intake. Data were gathered from February 2011 to February 2007. Standardized diagnostic interviews and measures of depression, suicidal ideation, related psychopathology and level of functioning were periodically administered. Remission was defined as ≥ 3 weeks with ≤ 1 clinically significant symptom and no associated functional impairment (score of 1 on the adolescent version of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation [A-LIFE], and relapse as ≥ 2 weeks with probable or definite depressive disorder (score of 3 or 4 on the A-LIFE). Mixed effects regression models were applied to estimate remission, relapse, and functional recovery. Results By 72 weeks, an estimated 61.1% of the randomized youths had reached remission. Randomly assigned treatment (first 12 weeks) did not influence remission rate or time to remission, but the group assigned to SSRI's had a more rapid decline in self-reported depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation than those assigned to venlafaxine (p<.05). Participants with more severe depression, greater dysfunction, and alcohol/drug use at baseline were less likely to remit. The depressive symptom trajectory of the remitters diverged from that of non-remitters by the first 6 weeks of treatment (p<.001). Of the 130 participants in remission at week 24, 25.4% relapsed in

  13. Dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction induced by amyloid-β transforms cortical long-term potentiation into long-term depression and produces memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castilla, Perla; Rodriguez-Duran, Luis F; Guzman-Ramos, Kioko; Barcenas-Femat, Alejandro; Escobar, Martha L; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition manifested by synaptic dysfunction and memory loss, but the mechanisms underlying synaptic failure are not entirely understood. Although dopamine is a key modulator of synaptic plasticity, dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction in AD has mostly been associated to noncognitive symptoms. Thus, we aimed to study the relationship between dopaminergic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in AD models. We used a transgenic model of AD (triple-transgenic mouse model of AD) and the administration of exogenous amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers into wild type mice. We found that Aβ decreased cortical dopamine levels and converted in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) into long-term depression (LTD) after high-frequency stimulation delivered at basolateral amygdaloid nucleus-insular cortex projection, which led to impaired recognition memory. Remarkably, increasing cortical dopamine and norepinephrine levels rescued both high-frequency stimulation -induced LTP and memory, whereas depletion of catecholaminergic levels mimicked the Aβ-induced shift from LTP to LTD. Our results suggest that Aβ-induced dopamine depletion is a core mechanism underlying the early synaptopathy and memory alterations observed in AD models and acts by modifying the threshold for the induction of cortical LTP and/or LTD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Coincident Activity of Converging Pathways Enables Simultaneous Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in Hippocampal CA1 Network In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Zhang, Xia; Xu, Lin

    2008-01-01

    Memory is believed to depend on activity-dependent changes in the strength of synapses, e.g. long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), which can be determined by the sequence of coincident pre- and postsynaptic activity, respectively. It remains unclear, however, whether and how coincident activity of converging efferent pathways can enable LTP and LTD in the pathways simultaneously. Here, we report that, in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, stimulation (600 pulses, 5 Hz) to Schaffer preceding to commissural pathway within a 40-ms timing window induced similar magnitudes of LTP in both pathways onto synapses of CA1 neurons, with varied LTP magnitudes after reversal of the stimulation sequence. In contrast, in urethane-anesthetized or freely-moving rats, the stimulation to Schaffer preceding to commissural pathway induced Schaffer LTP and commissural LTD simultaneously within a 40-ms timing window, without affecting synaptic efficacy in the reversed stimulation sequence. Coincident activity of Schaffer pathways confirmed the above findings under pentobarbital and urethane anesthesia. Thus, coincident activity of converging afferent pathways tends to switch the pathways to be LTP only or LTP/LTD depending on the activity states of the hippocampus. This network rule strengthens the view that activity-dependent synaptic plasticity may well contribute to memory process of the hippocampal network with flexibility or stability from one state to another. PMID:18682723

  15. Wip1 phosphatase modulates both long-term potentiation and long-term depression through the dephosphorylation of CaMKII.

    PubMed

    He, Zhi-Yong; Hu, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hong-Mei; Xing, Da; Ma, Quan-Hong; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2016-05-03

    Synaptic plasticity is an important mechanism that underlies learning and cognition. Protein phosphorylation by kinases and dephosphorylation by phosphatases play critical roles in the activity-dependent alteration of synaptic plasticity. In this study, we report that Wip1, a protein phosphatase, is essential for long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) processes. Wip1-deletion suppresses LTP and enhances LTD in the hippocampus CA1 area. Wip1 deficiency-induced aberrant elevation of CaMKII T286/287 and T305 phosphorylation underlies these dysfunctions. Moreover, we showed that Wip1 modulates CaMKII dephosphorylation. Wip1(-/-) mice exhibit abnormal GluR1 membrane expression, which could be reversed by the application of a CaMKII inhibitor, indicating that Wip1/CaMKII signaling is crucial for synaptic plasticity. Together, our results demonstrate that Wip1 phosphatase plays a vital role in regulating hippocampal synaptic plasticity by modulating the phosphorylation of CaMKII.

  16. Depression, social support, and long-term risk for coronary heart disease in a 13-year longitudinal epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Richard T; Hernandez, Evelyn M; Trout, Zoë M; Kleiman, Evan M; Bozzay, Melanie L

    2017-02-06

    Depression has been linked with long-term risk for a variety of physical health ailments, including coronary heart disease (CHD). Little is known about resilience factors that may attenuate this relationship. The current study assessed whether social support moderates the long-term risk for CHD associated with this disorder. Data were drawn from the Americans' Changing Lives study, a nationally representative longitudinal survey of adults in the United States. Participants (unweighted n=1636) completed initial assessments of functional social support, body mass index, recent history of major depression, CHD, hypertension, and diabetes. Participants were again assessed for CHD at a follow-up assessment 13 years later. Social support was found to moderate the relationship between depression and the occurrence of CHD 13 years later. Specifically, among individuals with low social support, depression was prospectively associated with CHD. In contrast, depression was not prospectively associated with CHD among individuals with high social support. The results indicate that social support may function as a resilience factor against the long-term cardiovascular risk associated with depression. Clinical interventions focusing on the development of social support systems are important not only for addressing depression itself, but also for associated long-term physical health outcomes.

  17. The 5-HT7 receptor triggers cerebellar long-term synaptic depression via PKC-MAPK.

    PubMed

    Lippiello, Pellegrino; Hoxha, Eriola; Speranza, Luisa; Volpicelli, Floriana; Ferraro, Angela; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Tempia, Filippo; Miniaci, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R) mediates important physiological effects of serotonin, such as memory and emotion, and is emerging as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cognitive disorders and depression. Although previous studies have revealed an expression of 5-HT7R in cerebellum, particularly at Purkinje cells, its functional role and signaling mechanisms have never been described. Using patch-clamp recordings in cerebellar slices of adult mice, we investigated the effects of a selective 5-HT7R agonist, LP-211, on the main plastic site of the cerebellar cortex, the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse. Here we show that 5-HT7R activation induces long-term depression of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse via a postsynaptic mechanism that involves the PKC-MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, a 5-HT7R antagonist abolished the expression of PF-LTD, produced by pairing parallel fiber stimulation with Purkinje cell depolarization; whereas, application of a 5-HT7R agonist impaired LTP induced by 1 Hz parallel fiber stimulation. Our results indicate for the first time that 5-HT7R exerts a fine regulation of cerebellar bidirectional synaptic plasticity that might be involved in cognitive processes and neuropsychiatric disorders involving the cerebellum.

  18. [Depressive, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorders as long-term sequelae of intensive care treatment].

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, H-P

    2016-03-01

    Modern intensive care medicine has led to increased survival rates even after severe life-threatening medical conditions. In self-critical and multidimensional outcome research, however, it must be considered that beyond survival rates treatment on intensive care units (ICU) can also be associated with high long-term rates of depressive, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorders. Significant correlations with increased somatic morbidity and mortality, persisting cognitive impairments and significant deficits in health-related quality of life must also be taken into consideration. Empirical analysis of the risk factors reveals that a history of premorbid depression, sociodemographic and socioeconomic variables, age, female sex, personality traits, the underlying pathophysiological condition requiring ICU treatment, mode of sedation and analgesia, life support measures, such as mechanical ventilation, manifold traumatic experiences and memories during the stay in the ICU are all of particular pathogenetic importance. In order to reduce principally modifiable risk factors several strategies are illustrated, including well-reflected intensive care sedation and analgesia, special prophylactic medication regarding the major risk of traumatic memories and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), psychological and psychotherapeutic interventions in states of increased acute stress symptoms and aids for personal memories and reorientation.

  19. Long-term depression in the sensorimotor cortex induced by repeated delivery of 10 Hz trains in vivo.

    PubMed

    Werk, C M; Klein, H S; Nesbitt, C E; Chapman, C A

    2006-06-19

    Memory consolidation in the neocortex is thought to be mediated in part by bi-directional modifications of synaptic strength. The sensorimotor cortex shows marked spontaneous activity near 10 Hz during both waking and sleep in the form of electroencephalographic spindle waves, and is also sensitive to electrical activation of inputs at 10 Hz. Induction of long-term synaptic depression in corpus callosum inputs to layer V of the sensorimotor cortex of the awake, adult rat requires repeated low-frequency stimulation over many days. To determine if 10 Hz stimulation may facilitate the induction of long-term depression, we compared the amounts of long-term depression induced by conventional 1 Hz trains, repeated delivery of 450 pairs of stimulation pulses using a 100 ms interpulse interval, and 45 short, 2 s, 10 Hz trains. Each pattern was delivered daily for 10 days and was matched for total duration and number of pulses. Changes in synaptic responses were assessed by monitoring field potentials evoked by stimulation of the corpus callosum. A facilitation of synaptic responses in layer V was observed during delivery of both paired-pulse trains and 10 Hz trains. There was no significant difference in long-term depression induced by 1 Hz stimulation and repeated paired-pulse stimulation, but 10 Hz trains induced significantly greater long-term depression than 1 Hz trains in both the early monosynaptic and late polysynaptic field potential components. The effectiveness of short 10 Hz trains for the induction of long-term depression suggests that synchronous population activity at frequencies near 10 Hz such as spindle waves may contribute to endogenous synaptic depression in sensorimotor cortex.

  20. Theta pulse stimulation: a natural stimulus pattern can trigger long-term depression but fails to reverse long-term potentiation in morphine withdrawn hippocampus area CA1.

    PubMed

    Hosseinmardi, Narges; Fathollahi, Yaghoub; Naghdi, Nasser; Javan, Mohammad

    2009-11-03

    The effects of chronic morphine exposure on synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of the hippocampal slice preparation using extracellular recordings of the population spike (PS) evoked in response to Schaffer collateral stimulation were studied. High frequency stimulation (HFS; 1X100 Hz) and theta pulse stimulation (TPS; 5 Hz trains for 3 min) were used as patterned activities. The results showed that in rats chronically treated with morphine (dependent group), TPS induced long-term depression (LTD) of PS in CA1 in the absence of in vitro morphine. This TPS-induced PS LTD was blocked in the presence of either AP5 (NMDAR antagonist) or CPX (A1 adenosine receptor antagonist) alone, but was not blocked when AP5 and CPX were co-applied. This TPS-induced PS LTD was also blocked in the presence of either 8-PT (a selective A1 adenosine receptor antagonist) or MRS1220 (a specific A3 receptor antagonist). Additionally, when TPS was applied prior to HFS, PS long-term potentiation (LTP) was blocked. However, when TPS was applied after HFS, there was no reversal of PS LTP in slices from dependent rats in contrast to controls which displayed reversal of LTP. Both the PS LTD and the absence of PS LTP reversal were blocked by in vitro application of morphine. It is concluded that morphine withdrawal was associated with greater depression of CA1 PS elicited by natural stimulus induced activity pattern. This effect was associated with changes in NMDA and adenosine receptors due to chronic morphine administration. Such an in vitro preparation could provide a novel paradigm to investigate withdrawal effects on synaptic plasticity.

  1. Postsynaptic Signal Transduction Models for Long-Term Potentiation and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Manninen, Tiina; Hituri, Katri; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren; Blackwell, Kim T.; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2010-01-01

    More than a hundred biochemical species, activated by neurotransmitters binding to transmembrane receptors, are important in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). To investigate which species and interactions are critical for synaptic plasticity, many computational postsynaptic signal transduction models have been developed. The models range from simple models with a single reversible reaction to detailed models with several hundred kinetic reactions. In this study, more than a hundred models are reviewed, and their features are compared and contrasted so that similarities and differences are more readily apparent. The models are classified according to the type of synaptic plasticity that is modeled (LTP or LTD) and whether they include diffusion or electrophysiological phenomena. Other characteristics that discriminate the models include the phase of synaptic plasticity modeled (induction, expression, or maintenance) and the simulation method used (deterministic or stochastic). We find that models are becoming increasingly sophisticated, by including stochastic properties, integrating with electrophysiological properties of entire neurons, or incorporating diffusion of signaling molecules. Simpler models continue to be developed because they are computationally efficient and allow theoretical analysis. The more complex models permit investigation of mechanisms underlying specific properties and experimental verification of model predictions. Nonetheless, it is difficult to fully comprehend the evolution of these models because (1) several models are not described in detail in the publications, (2) only a few models are provided in existing model databases, and (3) comparison to previous models is lacking. We conclude that the value of these models for understanding molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity is increasing and will be enhanced further with more complete descriptions and sharing of the published models. PMID:21188161

  2. Alcohol Impairs Long-Term Depression at the Cerebellar Parallel Fiber–Purkinje Cell Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Belmeguenai, Amor; Botta, Paolo; Weber, John T.; Carta, Mario; De Ruiter, Martijn; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Hansel, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Acute alcohol consumption causes deficits in motor coordination and gait, suggesting an involvement of cerebellar circuits, which play a role in the fine adjustment of movements and in motor learning. It has previously been shown that ethanol modulates inhibitory transmission in the cerebellum and affects synaptic transmission and plasticity at excitatory climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses. However, it has not been examined thus far how acute ethanol application affects long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) at excitatory parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses, which are assumed to mediate forms of cerebellar motor learning. To examine ethanol effects on PF synaptic transmission and plasticity, we performed whole cell patch-clamp recordings from Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slices. We found that ethanol (50 mM) selectively blocked PF–LTD induction, whereas it did not change the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents at PF synapses. In contrast, ethanol application reduced voltage-gated calcium currents and type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1)–dependent responses in Purkinje cells, both of which are involved in PF–LTD induction. The selectivity of these effects is emphasized by the observation that ethanol did not impair PF–LTP and that PF–LTP could readily be induced in the presence of the group I mGluR antagonist AIDA or the mGluR1a antagonist LY367385. Taken together, these findings identify calcium currents and mGluR1-dependent signaling pathways as potential ethanol targets and suggest that an ethanol-induced blockade of PF–LTD could contribute to the motor coordination deficits resulting from alcohol consumption. PMID:18922952

  3. Long-term depression is differentially expressed in distinct lamina of hippocampal CA1 dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Binu; Ahmed, Saheeb; Dean, Camin

    2015-01-01

    Information storage in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons is compartmentalized in proximal vs. distal apical dendrites, cell bodies, and basal dendrites. This compartmentalization is thought to be essential for synaptic integration. Differences in the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP) in each of these compartments have been described, but less is known regarding potential differences in long-term depression (LTD). Here, to directly compare LTD expression in each compartment and to bypass possible differences in input-specificity and stimulation of presynaptic inputs, we used global application of NMDA to induce LTD. We then examined LTD expression in each dendritic sub-region—proximal and distal apical, and basal dendrites—and in cell bodies. Interestingly, we found that distal apical dendrites exhibited the greatest magnitude of LTD of all areas tested and this LTD was maintained, whereas LTD in proximal apical dendrites was not maintained. In basal dendrites, LTD was also maintained, but the magnitude of LTD was less than in distal apical dendrites. Blockade of inhibition blocked LTD maintenance in both distal apical and basal dendrites. Population spikes recorded from the cell body layer correlated with apical dendrite field EPSP (fEPSP), where LTD was maintained in distal dendrites and decayed in proximal dendrites. On the other hand, LTD of basal dendrite fEPSPs was maintained but population spike responses were not. Thus E-S coupling was distinct in basal and apical dendrites. Our data demonstrate cell autonomous differential information processing in somas and dendritic sub-regions of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus, where LTD expression is intrinsic to distinct dendritic regions, and does not depend on the nature of stimulation and input specificity. PMID:25767434

  4. Early Impairment of Long-Term Depression in the Perirhinal Cortex of a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Burattini, Costanza; Casoli, Tiziana; Balietti, Marta; Fattoretti, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Visual recognition memory is early impaired in Alzheimer's disease. Long-term depression of synaptic transmission in the perirhinal cortex is critically involved in this form of memory. We found that synaptic transmission was impaired in perirhinal cortex slices obtained from 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, and that 3,000 pulses at 5 Hz induced long-term depression in perirhinal cortex slices from age-matched control mice, but not in those from Tg2576 mice. To our knowledge, these data provide the first evidence of synaptic transmission and long-term depression impairment in the perirhinal cortex in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease, and the earliest synaptic deficit in Tg2576 mice. PMID:22533438

  5. Socioeconomic position predicts long-term depression trajectory: a 13-year follow-up of the GAZEL cohort study.

    PubMed

    Melchior, M; Chastang, J-F; Head, J; Goldberg, M; Zins, M; Nabi, H; Younès, N

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with low socioeconomic position have high rates of depression; however, it is not clear whether this reflects higher incidence or longer persistence of disorder. Past research focused on high-risk samples, and risk factors of long-term depression in the population are less well known. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that socioeconomic position predicts depression trajectory over 13 years of follow-up in a community sample. We studied 12 650 individuals participating in the French GAZEL study. Depression was assessed by the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale in 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2008. These five assessments served to estimate longitudinal depression trajectories (no depression, decreasing depression, intermediate/increasing depression, persistent depression). Socioeconomic position was measured by occupational grade. Covariates included year of birth, marital status, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, negative life events and preexisting psychological and non-psychological health problems. Data were analyzed using multinomial regression, separately in men and women. Overall, participants in intermediate and low occupational grades were significantly more likely than those in high grades to have an unfavorable depression trajectory and to experience persistent depression (age-adjusted ORs: respectively 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.70 and 2.65, 95% CI 2.04-3.45 in men, 2.48, 95% CI 1.36-4.54 and 4.53, 95% CI 2.38-8.63 in women). In multivariate models, the socioeconomic gradient in long-term depression decreased by 21-59% in men and women. Long-term depression trajectories appear to follow a socioeconomic gradient; therefore, efforts aiming to reduce the burden of depression should address the needs of the whole population rather than exclusively focus on high-risk groups.

  6. Presynaptic Spike Timing-Dependent Long-Term Depression in the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Duque-Feria, Paloma; Paulsen, Ole; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a Hebbian learning rule important for synaptic refinement during development and for learning and memory in the adult. Given the importance of the hippocampus in memory, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms and functions of hippocampal STDP. In the present work, we investigated the requirements for induction of hippocampal spike timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) and spike timing-dependent long-term depression (t-LTD) and the mechanisms of these 2 forms of plasticity at CA3-CA1 synapses in young (P12–P18) mouse hippocampus. We found that both t-LTP and t-LTD can be induced at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses by pairing presynaptic activity with single postsynaptic action potentials at low stimulation frequency (0.2 Hz). Both t-LTP and t-LTD require NMDA-type glutamate receptors for their induction, but the location and properties of these receptors are different: While t-LTP requires postsynaptic ionotropic NMDA receptor function, t-LTD does not, and whereas t-LTP is blocked by antagonists at GluN2A and GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors, t-LTD is blocked by GluN2C or GluN2D subunit-preferring NMDA receptor antagonists. Both t-LTP and t-LTD require postsynaptic Ca2+ for their induction. Induction of t-LTD also requires metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, phospholipase C activation, postsynaptic IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, postsynaptic endocannabinoid (eCB) synthesis, activation of CB1 receptors and astrocytic signaling, possibly via release of the gliotransmitter d-serine. We furthermore found that presynaptic calcineurin is required for t-LTD induction. t-LTD is expressed presynaptically as indicated by fluctuation analysis, paired-pulse ratio, and rate of use-dependent depression of postsynaptic NMDA receptor currents by MK801. The results show that CA3-CA1 synapses display both NMDA receptor-dependent t-LTP and t-LTD during development and identify a

  7. Both NR2A and NR2B Subunits of the NMDA Receptor Are Critical for Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in the Lateral Amygdala of Horizontal Slices of Adult Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Tobias; Albrecht, Doris; Gebhardt, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) is implicated in emotional and social behaviors. We recently showed that in horizontal brain slices, activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a requirement for persistent synaptic alterations in the LA, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In the LA, NR2A- and NR2B-type NMDRs…

  8. Both NR2A and NR2B Subunits of the NMDA Receptor Are Critical for Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in the Lateral Amygdala of Horizontal Slices of Adult Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Tobias; Albrecht, Doris; Gebhardt, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) is implicated in emotional and social behaviors. We recently showed that in horizontal brain slices, activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a requirement for persistent synaptic alterations in the LA, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In the LA, NR2A- and NR2B-type NMDRs…

  9. A Computational Model for the AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation Master Switch Regulating Cerebellar Long-Term Depression.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, Andrew R; Aricescu, A Radu; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Calinescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    The expression of long-term depression (LTD) in cerebellar Purkinje cells results from the internalisation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) from the postsynaptic membrane. This process is regulated by a complex signalling pathway involving sustained protein kinase C (PKC) activation, inhibition of serine/threonine phosphatase, and an active protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTPMEG. In addition, two AMPAR-interacting proteins-glutamate receptor-interacting protein (GRIP) and protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1)-regulate the availability of AMPARs for trafficking between the postsynaptic membrane and the endosome. Here we present a new computational model of these overlapping signalling pathways. The model reveals how PTPMEG cooperates with PKC to drive LTD expression by facilitating the effect of PKC on the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP and thus their availability for trafficking. Model simulations show that LTD expression is increased by serine/threonine phosphatase inhibition, and negatively regulated by Src-family tyrosine kinase activity, which restricts the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP under basal conditions. We use the model to expose the dynamic balance between AMPAR internalisation and reinsertion, and the phosphorylation switch responsible for the perturbation of this balance and for the rapid plasticity initiation and regulation. Our model advances the understanding of PF-PC LTD regulation and induction, and provides a validated extensible platform for more detailed studies of this fundamental synaptic process.

  10. A Computational Model for the AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation Master Switch Regulating Cerebellar Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Gallimore, Andrew R.; Aricescu, A. Radu; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Calinescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    The expression of long-term depression (LTD) in cerebellar Purkinje cells results from the internalisation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) from the postsynaptic membrane. This process is regulated by a complex signalling pathway involving sustained protein kinase C (PKC) activation, inhibition of serine/threonine phosphatase, and an active protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTPMEG. In addition, two AMPAR-interacting proteins–glutamate receptor-interacting protein (GRIP) and protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1)–regulate the availability of AMPARs for trafficking between the postsynaptic membrane and the endosome. Here we present a new computational model of these overlapping signalling pathways. The model reveals how PTPMEG cooperates with PKC to drive LTD expression by facilitating the effect of PKC on the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP and thus their availability for trafficking. Model simulations show that LTD expression is increased by serine/threonine phosphatase inhibition, and negatively regulated by Src-family tyrosine kinase activity, which restricts the dissociation of AMPARs from GRIP under basal conditions. We use the model to expose the dynamic balance between AMPAR internalisation and reinsertion, and the phosphorylation switch responsible for the perturbation of this balance and for the rapid plasticity initiation and regulation. Our model advances the understanding of PF-PC LTD regulation and induction, and provides a validated extensible platform for more detailed studies of this fundamental synaptic process. PMID:26807999

  11. Long-term depression in vivo: effects of sex, stress, diet, and prenatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Titterness, Andrea K; Christie, Brian R

    2008-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic efficacy has proven a difficult phenomenon to examine in vivo, despite the ease with which it is induced in a variety of in vitro preparations. Prior exposure to an acute stressful episode does however seem to enhance the capacity of the hippocampus to exhibit LTD in vivo in male animals. In the present experiments, we examined the capacity for low-frequency stimuli (low-frequency stimulation (LFS)) to induce LTD in juvenile male and female animals following an acute stress episode. Interestingly, prior exposure to stress was only required for the induction of LTD in male animals, while both control and stressed female animals exhibited equivalent LTD. In animals that were exposed to ethanol in utero, a similar requirement for prior exposure to stress to elicit LTD was found for male, but not female animals. This prenatal ethanol exposure did not in itself alter the capacity for LTD induction in either sex; however, in utero food restriction did enhance LTD induction in both male and female animals, irrespective of whether they were exposed to stress just prior to being administered LFS. These results indicate that in utero dietary restriction more drastically affects CA1 LTD than in utero ethanol exposure. In addition, female animals seem to exhibit LTD in vivo in the absence of stress much more easily than their male counterparts.

  12. Effectiveness of long-term vortioxetine treatment of patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Vieta, Eduard; Loft, Henrik; Florea, Ioana

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of vortioxetine in patients treated at therapeutic doses (5-20mg/day) for both acute and maintenance treatment, patient-level data were pooled from 5 long-term (52-week), open-label extension studies of major depressive disorder. The mean (±standard deviation) MADRS total score improved from 17.1±10.2 at the start of maintenance therapy to 7.6±8.2 (observed cases [OC]) or 10.3±9.9 (last observation carried forward [LOCF]) at week 52. The mean HAM-A total scores improved from 11.3±6.9 to 6.0±6.0 (OC) or 7.5±6.7 (LOCF) and the mean CGI-S score improved from 3.11±1.20 to 1.94±1.08 (OC) or 2.27±1.26 (LOCF) at week 52. Response and remission rates increased over time. At week 52, the total response rate was 75.4% (n=916/1215, LOCF) and the total remission rate was 60.7% (n=738/1215, LOCF). There were no differences in effectiveness as assessed by MADRS total scores at week 52 in subgroups based on gender, age (<55 vs ≥55 years), baseline HAM-A total score (<20 vs ≥20), baseline MADRS total score (<30 vs ≥30), previous major depressive episodes (MDEs) (<3 vs ≥3) or current MDE duration (<6 vs ≥6 months) at the start of the lead-in studies, or response status (≥50% decrease in MADRS total score during the lead-in study). The most commonly reported adverse event during the maintenance period was nausea. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A stochastic signaling network mediates the probabilistic induction of cerebellar long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; De Schutter, Erik

    2012-07-04

    Many cellular processes involve a small number of molecules and undergo stochastic fluctuations in their levels of activity. Cerebellar long-term depression (LTD) is a form of synaptic plasticity expressed as a reduction in the number of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in Purkinje cells. We developed a stochastic model of the LTD signaling network, including a PKC-ERK-cPLA(2) positive feedback loop and mechanisms of AMPAR trafficking, and tuned the model to replicate calcium uncaging experiments. The signaling network activity in single synapses switches between two discrete stable states (LTD and non-LTD) in a probabilistic manner. The stochasticity of the signaling network causes threshold dithering and allows at the macroscopic level for many different and stable mean magnitudes of depression. The probability of LTD occurrence in a single spine is only modulated by the concentration and duration of the signal used to trigger it, and inputs with the same magnitude can give rise to two different responses; there is no threshold for the input signal. The stochasticity is intrinsic to the signaling network and not mostly dependent on noise in the calcium input signal, as has been suggested previously. The activities of the ultrasensitive ERK and of cPLA(2) undergo strong stochastic fluctuations. Conversely, PKC, which acts as a noise filter, is more constantly activated. Systematic variation of the biochemical population size demonstrates that threshold dithering and the absence of spontaneous LTD depend critically on the number of molecules in a spine, indicating constraints on spine size in Purkinje cells.

  14. The effects of light therapy on depression and sleep disruption in older adults in a long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mann-Chian; Sung, Huei-Chuan; Lee, Wen-Li; Smith, Graeme D

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of light therapy on depression and sleep disruption in older adults residing in a long-term care facility. Psychological morbidity is a problem commonly seen in older adults residing in long-term care facilities. Limited research has addressed the effect of light therapy on depression in this population. A quasi-experimental pretest and posttest design was used. Thirty-four participants in the experimental group received light therapy by sitting in front of a 10000-lux light box 30 min in the morning, three times a week for 4 weeks. Thirty-one participants in the control group received routine care without light therapy. Depression was measured by Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form at baseline and week 4. After receiving 4 weeks of light therapy, the mean depression score in the experimental group decreased from 7.24 (SD3.42) at pretest to 5.91 (SD 3.40) at posttest, and had a significant reduction (t = 2.22, P = 0.03). However, there was no significant difference in depression score and sleep disruption between the experimental group and control group. Light therapy might have the potential to reduce depressive symptoms and sleep disruption and may be a viable intervention to improve mental health of older adults in the long-term care facilities.

  15. Talking about depression: a qualitative study of barriers to managing depression in people with long term conditions in primary care.

    PubMed

    Coventry, Peter A; Hays, Rebecca; Dickens, Chris; Bundy, Christine; Garrett, Charlotte; Cherrington, Andrea; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2011-03-22

    The risk of depression is increased in people with long term conditions (LTCs) and is associated with poorer patient outcomes for both the depressive illness and the LTC, but often remains undetected and poorly managed. The aim of this study was to identify and explore barriers to detecting and managing depression in primary care in people with two exemplar LTCs: diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD). Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 19 healthcare professionals drawn predominately from primary care, along with 7 service users and 3 carers (n = 29). One focus group was then held with a set of 6 healthcare professionals and a set of 7 service users and 1 carer (n = 14). Interviews and the focus group were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed independently. The two data sets were then inspected for commonalities using a constant comparative method, leading to a final thematic framework used in this paper. Barriers to detecting and managing depression in people with LTCs in primary care exist: i) when practitioners in partnership with patients conceptualise depression as a common and understandable response to the losses associated with LTCs - depression in the presence of LTCs is normalised, militating against its recognition and treatment; ii) where highly performanced managed consultations under the terms of the Quality and Outcomes Framework encourage reductionist approaches to case-finding in people with CHD and diabetes, and iii) where there is uncertainty among practitioners about how to negotiate labels for depression in people with LTCs in ways that might facilitate shared understanding and future management. Depression was often normalised in the presence of LTCs, obviating rather than facilitating further assessment and management. Furthermore, structural constraints imposed by the QOF encouraged reductionist approaches to case-finding for depression in consultations for CHD and diabetes. Future work might focus on

  16. Factors Associated with Depression Assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 in Long-Term Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Goo, Ae-Jin; Song, Yun-Mi; Shin, Jinyoung; Ko, Hyeonyoung

    2016-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of depressive disorders and factors associated in long-term cancer survivors. A total of 702 long-term cancer survivors over 5-years in remission were recruited in a university-affiliated tertiary hospital in Korea. Self-report using the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 and the Fatigue Severity Scale assessed depression and fatigue, respectively. Demographic characteristics, cancer-related clinical characteristics, comorbidity, health behaviors, and physical symptoms were assessed through the review of medical records or a structured self-administered questionnaire. We identified 26.1% of patients who had a depressed mood or displayed a loss of interest. The most prevalent primary site of cancer was the stomach (65.2%), followed by lung, breast, colorectal, and thyroid cancer. We also found that 5.7% of subjects experienced double or triple primary cancers. Larger proportion among depressive group (89.1%) complained at least one physical problem than among non-depressive group (53.2%). Physical symptoms including sleep problems, dry mouth, indigestion, pain, decreased appetite, and febrile sense were more frequent in the depressive group than in the non-depressive group. The Fatigue Severity Scale scores were higher in the depressive group than in the non-depressive group (P<0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the highest tertile level of fatigue (odds ratio, 7.31; 95% confidence interval, 3.81-14.02) was associated with the increased risk of depression. These findings suggest that careful concern about depression is necessary in long-term cancer survivors. Fatigue may be a surrogate sign for depression, and warrants further evaluation.

  17. Long-Term Effects of Child Corporal Punishment on Depressive Symptoms in Young Adults: Potential Moderators and Mediators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Heather A.; Muller, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on a sample of 649 students from 3 New England colleges, this study examined the long-term effects of childhood corporal punishment on symptoms of depression and considered factors that may moderate or mediate the association. Similar to national studies, approximately 40% of the sample reported experiencing some level of corporal punishment…

  18. The Longitudinal Relationship between the Use of Long-Term Care and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pot, Anne Margriet; Deeg, Dorly J.H.; Twisk, Jos W.R.; Beekman, Aartjan T.F.; Zarit, Steven H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate the longitudinal relationship between transitions in the use of long-term care and older adults' depressive symptoms and to investigate whether this relationship could be explained by markers of older adults' underlying health, or other variables including demographics, personality, and partner…

  19. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Depression: A Preliminary Randomized Clinical Trial for Unemployed on Long-Term Sick Leave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folke, Fredrik; Parling, Thomas; Melin, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary study investigated the feasibility of a brief Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in a Swedish sample of unemployed individuals on long-term sick leave due to depression. Participants were randomized to a nonstandardized control condition (N = 16) or to the ACT condition (N = 18) consisting of 1 individual and 5 group…

  20. Long-Term Effects of Child Corporal Punishment on Depressive Symptoms in Young Adults: Potential Moderators and Mediators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Heather A.; Muller, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on a sample of 649 students from 3 New England colleges, this study examined the long-term effects of childhood corporal punishment on symptoms of depression and considered factors that may moderate or mediate the association. Similar to national studies, approximately 40% of the sample reported experiencing some level of corporal punishment…

  1. A Videotape-Based Training Method for Improving the Detection of Depression in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Stacey; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Schnelle, Betha; Stephens, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the effectiveness of a new training program for improving nursing staffs' detection of depression within long-term care facilities. The course was designed to increase recognition of the Minimal Data Set (MDS) Mood Trigger items, to be brief, and to rely on images rather than didactics. Design and Methods: This study…

  2. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Depression: A Preliminary Randomized Clinical Trial for Unemployed on Long-Term Sick Leave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folke, Fredrik; Parling, Thomas; Melin, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary study investigated the feasibility of a brief Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in a Swedish sample of unemployed individuals on long-term sick leave due to depression. Participants were randomized to a nonstandardized control condition (N = 16) or to the ACT condition (N = 18) consisting of 1 individual and 5 group…

  3. A Videotape-Based Training Method for Improving the Detection of Depression in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Stacey; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Schnelle, Betha; Stephens, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the effectiveness of a new training program for improving nursing staffs' detection of depression within long-term care facilities. The course was designed to increase recognition of the Minimal Data Set (MDS) Mood Trigger items, to be brief, and to rely on images rather than didactics. Design and Methods: This study…

  4. Long-term effectiveness of collaborative depression care in older primary care patients with and without PTSD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Domin; Fan, Ming-Yu; Unützer, Jürgen

    2011-07-01

    Depressed patients with comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more functionally impaired and may take longer to respond to depression treatment than patients without PTSD. This study examined the long-term effects of PTSD on depression severity, treatment response, and health care costs among older adults. Patients were recruited from 18 primary care clinics in five states. A total of 1801 patients aged 60 years or older with major depression or dysthymia were randomized to Improving Mood Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment (IMPACT) collaborative care or usual care. The study included 191 (10.6%) subjects who screened positive for PTSD. Depression severity, assessed by the Hopkins Depression Symptom Checklist, was used to estimate depression-free days (DFDs) over 24 months. Total health care costs included inpatient, outpatient, and pharmacy costs. Depressed patients with PTSD had higher depression severity than patients without PTSD symptoms at baseline. Over 2 years, intervention patients with PTSD symptoms had relatively the same benefits from collaborative care (99 more DFDs than usual care patients) as patients without PTSD (108 more DFDs than usual care) (p = 0.85). Total health care costs did not differ significantly for depressed patients with and without PTSD symptoms. Depressed older adults with PTSD symptoms were more depressed at baseline, but collaborative care (compared to usual care) produced similar improvements in depression severity in both groups. This reduction of depression symptoms was observed for up to 12 months after the intervention ended, suggesting that long-term improvements in depression are possible with collaborative care in patients with and without PTSD symptoms. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Ethanol acutely modulates mGluR1-dependent long-term depression in cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Su, Li-Da; Sun, Cheng-Long; Shen, Ying

    2010-07-01

    Acute and chronic ethanol exposure produces profound impairments in motor functioning. Individuals with lower sensitivity to the acute motor impairing effects of ethanol have an increased risk of developing alcohol dependence and abuse, and infants with subtle delays in motor coordination development may have an increased risk for subsequently developing alcoholism. Thus, understanding the mechanism by which ethanol disrupts motor functioning is very important. Parasagittal slices of the cerebellar vermis (250 microM thick) were prepared from P17 to 20 Sprague-Dawley rats. Whole-cell recordings of Purkinje cells were obtained with an Axopatch 200B amplifier. Parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic currents were sampled at 1 kHz and digitized at 10 kHz, and synaptic long-term depression (LTD) was observed in either external or internal application of ethanol for comparison. We determined whether ethanol acutely affects parallel fiber LTD using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from Purkinje cells. Application of ethanol both externally (50 mM) and internally (17 and 10 mM) significantly suppressed mGluR-mediate slow currents. Short-term external ethanol exposure (50 but not 17 mM) during tetanus blocked mGluR-dependent parallel fiber LTD. Furthermore, internal 17 and 10 mM ethanol completely inhibited this LTD. The results of the current study demonstrate that ethanol acutely suppresses parallel fiber LTD and may influence the mGluR-mediated slow current intracellularly. This study, plus previous evidence by Carta and colleagues (2006) and Belmeguenai and colleagues (2008), suggests significant actions of ethanol on mGluR-mediated currents and its dependent plasticity in brain.

  6. Nitric Oxide Regulates Input Specificity of Long-Term Depression and Context Dependence of Cerebellar Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Hideaki; Doi, Tomokazu; Doya, Kenji; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that multiple internal models are acquired in the cerebellum and that these can be switched under a given context of behavior. It has been proposed that long-term depression (LTD) of parallel fiber (PF)–Purkinje cell (PC) synapses forms the cellular basis of cerebellar learning, and that the presynaptically synthesized messenger nitric oxide (NO) is a crucial “gatekeeper” for LTD. Because NO diffuses freely to neighboring synapses, this volume learning is not input-specific and brings into question the biological significance of LTD as the basic mechanism for efficient supervised learning. To better characterize the role of NO in cerebellar learning, we simulated the sequence of electrophysiological and biochemical events in PF–PC LTD by combining established simulation models of the electrophysiology, calcium dynamics, and signaling pathways of the PC. The results demonstrate that the local NO concentration is critical for induction of LTD and for its input specificity. Pre- and postsynaptic coincident firing is not sufficient for a PF–PC synapse to undergo LTD, and LTD is induced only when a sufficient amount of NO is provided by activation of the surrounding PFs. On the other hand, above-adequate levels of activity in nearby PFs cause accumulation of NO, which also allows LTD in neighboring synapses that were not directly stimulated, ruining input specificity. These findings lead us to propose the hypothesis that NO represents the relevance of a given context and enables context-dependent selection of internal models to be updated. We also predict sparse PF activity in vivo because, otherwise, input specificity would be lost. PMID:17222054

  7. Effectiveness and outcome predictors of long-term lithium prophylaxis in unipolar major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baethge, Christopher; Gruschka, Philipp; Smolka, Michael N.; Berghöfer, Anne; Bschor, Tom; Müller-Oerlinghausen, Bruno; Bauer, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of lithium prophylaxis in unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) and to identify predictors of outcome including comedication. Methods In this long-term naturalistic study, clinical data from 55 patients with MDD (DSM-III-R) were collected prospectively in an outpatient clinic specializing in the treatment of affective disorders. Outcome measures Change in hospital admission rate (number and duration) during prophylaxis compared with the period before prophylaxis, Morbidity-Index during prophylaxis and time to first recurrence after initiation of lithium treatment. Results During an average follow-up period of 6.7 years, a significant decline in the number of days spent in hospital (p < 0.001; 52 d/yr less; 95; CI 31–73 d) and a low Morbidity-Index (mean 0.07) was observed. Only in 6 patients did medication have to be changed because of side-effects (n = 4) or a lack of efficacy (n = 2). None of the independent variables we analyzed proved to be important in predicting the outcome of lithium prophylaxis. Comedication was necessary in 21 patients. The overall outcome of their prophylactic treatment, however, did not differ from the group that did not receive comedication in the symptom-free intervals. Conclusions The results of this study, with its long observation period and the inclusion of comedication as a confounding variable, indicate that lithium is a potent prophylactic agent for unipolar MDD in a naturalistic setting. In contrast to the findings of others, age was not associated with the outcome of prophylaxis, and latency did not predict outcome. Contrary to doubts that have been raised in recent years with regard to the effectiveness of lithium in everyday clinical practice, lithium appears to be a safe and potent alternative to antidepressants. PMID:14517579

  8. Developmental shift from long-term depression to long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei: role of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Puyal, Julien; Grassi, Silvarosa; Dieni, Cristina; Frondaroli, Adele; Demêmes, Danielle; Raymond, Jaqueline; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2003-01-01

    The effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents on synaptic transmission in the ventral part of the medial vestibular nuclei (vMVN) were studied during postnatal development and compared with the changes in the expression of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subtypes, mGluR1 and mGluR5. During the first stages of development, HFS always induced a mGluR5- and GABAA-dependent long-term depression (LTD) which did not require NMDA receptor and mGluR1 activation. The probability of inducing LTD decreased progressively throughout the development and it was zero at about the end of the second postnatal week. Conversely, long-term potentiation (LTP) appeared at the beginning of the second week and its occurrence increased to reach the adult value at the end of the third week. Of interest, the sudden change in the LTP frequency occurred at the time of eye opening, about the end of the second postnatal week. LTP depended on NMDA receptor and mGluR1 activation. In parallel with the modifications in synaptic plasticity, we observed that the expression patterns and localizations of mGluR5 and mGluR1 in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) changed during postnatal development. At the earlier stages the mGluR1 expression was minimal, then increased progressively. In contrast, mGluR5 expression was initially high, then decreased. While mGluR1 was exclusively localized in neuronal compartments and concentrated at the postsynaptic sites at all stages observed, mGluR5 was found mainly in neuronal compartments at immature stages, then preferentially in glial compartments at mature stages. These results provide the first evidence for a progressive change from LTD to LTP accompanied by a distinct maturation expression of mGluR1 and mGluR5 during the development of the MVN. PMID:12972627

  9. Long-Term Fine Particulate Matter Exposure and Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Urban Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Lim, Youn-Hee; Bae, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myounghee; Jung, Kweon; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have associated short-term air pollution exposure with depression. Although an animal study showed an association between long-term exposure to particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and depression, epidemiological studies assessing the long-term association are scarce. Objective: We aimed to determine the association between long-term PM2.5 exposure and major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: A total of 27,270 participants 15–79 years of age who maintained an address within the same districts in Seoul, Republic of Korea, throughout the entire study period (between 2002 and 2010) and without a previous MDD diagnosis were analyzed. We used three district-specific exposure indices as measures of long-term PM2.5 exposure. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for potential confounding factors and measured at district and individual levels were constructed. We further conducted stratified analyses according to underlying chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Results: The risk of MDD during the follow-up period (2008–2010) increased with an increase of 10 μg/m3 in PM2.5 in 2007 [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.44; 95% CI: 1.17, 1.78], PM2.5 between 2007 and 2010 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.49), and 12-month moving average of PM2.5 until an event or censor (HR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.90). The association between long-term PM2.5 exposure and MDD was greater in participants with underlying chronic diseases than in participants without these diseases. Conclusion: Long-term PM2.5 exposure increased the risk of MDD among the general population. Individuals with underlying chronic diseases are more vulnerable to long-term PM2.5 exposure. Citation: Kim KN, Lim YH, Bae HJ, Kim M, Jung K, Hong YC. 2016. Long-term fine particulate matter exposure and major depressive disorder in a community-based urban cohort. Environ Health Perspect 124:1547–1553; http://dx.doi.org/10

  10. The Relationship Between Depressive Symptoms and Social Cognitive Processing in Partners of Long-Term Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Cohee, Andrea A.; Adams, Rebecca N.; Fife, Betsy L.; Von Ah, Diane M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Zoppi, Kathleen A.; Cella, David; Champion, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine 1) if depressive symptoms in partners of long-term breast cancer survivors (BCS) could be predicted by social cognitive processing theory, and 2) if partners of younger and older breast cancer survivors were differentially affected by the cancer experience. Design A cross-sectional, descriptive study utilizing self-report questionnaires. Setting Indiana University and 97 ECOG-ACRIN sites. Sample Partners of breast cancer survivors (n=508) diagnosed 3–8 years prior. Methods Secondary data mediation analyses were conducted to determine if cognitive processing mediated the relationship between social constraints and depressive symptoms. Age-related differences on all scales were tested. Main Research Variables Depressive symptoms; secondary variables included social constraints, cognitive processing (avoidance and intrusive thoughts), and potentially confounding variables. Findings Cognitive processing mediated the relationship between social constraints and depressive symptoms for partners (F(5,498) = 19.911, R2=.167, p<.001). Partners of young BCS reported worse outcomes on all measures than partners of older breast cancer survivors Conclusions As predicted by the social cognitive processing theory, cognitive processing mediated the relationship between social constraints and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, partners of younger BCS fared worse on social constraints, intrusive thoughts and depressive symptoms than partners of older BCS. Implications for Nursing Results provide support for using the social cognitive processing theory in intervention design with partners of long-term BCS to decrease depressive symptoms. PMID:27991603

  11. Diabetes mellitus- and ageing-induced changes in the capacity for long-term depression and long-term potentiation inductions: toward a unified mechanism.

    PubMed

    Artola, Alain

    2013-11-05

    Long-lasting type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are both associated with impaired cognitive function in humans. Animal models of DM have confirmed the detrimental effect of high blood glucose levels on learning and memory. What are the neural correlates of such impaired cognition? It is widely, although not universally, believed that long-lasting increase and decrease in synaptic strength, known as long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD), provide an important key to understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which memories are formed and stored. The majority of animal studies that examined the effect of DM on LTD and LTP used the streptozotocin (STZ) rodent model of type 1 DM, with the exception of a few that used genetic models of type 2 DM. Studies in STZ-DM rodents show that cellular processes underlying synapse strengthening or weakening are not altered. Rather, the capacity for LTP induction is reduced whereas that for LTD induction is enhanced. The mechanisms underlying DM-related changes in LTD and LTP inductions are still unknown. However, that the levels of effective postsynaptic depolarization for LTD and LTP inductions are concomitantly shifted in opposite directions put constraints on them. Moreover, that DM-, metaplasticity-, stress- and ageing-related changes in LTD and LTP inductions exhibit the very same phenomenology suggests that they might involve common mechanisms. Dissecting out the mechanisms responsible for DM-related changes in the capacity for LTD and LTP inductions is helping to improve treatment of impaired cognitive function in DM patients.

  12. Cocaine withdrawal impairs metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent long-term depression in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Chun; Yeh, Che-Ming; Wu, Mei-Ying; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2011-03-16

    Neuroadaptation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a central component of the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, has been implicated in the development of cocaine-induced psychomotor sensitization and relapse to cocaine seeking. However, little is known about the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying such adaptation. Using a mouse model of behavioral sensitization, we show that animals withdrawn from repeated cocaine exposure have a selective deficit in the ability to elicit metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent long-term depression (LTD) in the shell of the NAc in response to bath application of the group I mGluR agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG). Experiments conducted in the presence of the selective mGluR1 antagonists 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropachromen-carboxylate ethyl ester and (S)-(+)-α-amino-4-carboxy-2-methylbenzeneacetic acid, or the mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine, demonstrated that the impaired DHPG-LTD is likely attributable to a loss of mGluR5 function. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed significant downregulation of mGluR5, but not mGluR1, mRNA and protein levels in the NAc shell. The inhibitory effect of repeated cocaine exposure on DHPG-LTD was selectively prevented when cocaine was coadministered with the selective D(1)-like DA receptor antagonist (R)-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine. Furthermore, the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein in the NAc shell increased progressively after cocaine withdrawal, and the impairment of DHPG-LTD in the NAc shell was not found in slices from BDNF-knock-out mice after cocaine withdrawal. These results suggest that withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure may result in increased BDNF levels in the NAc shell, which leads to a selective downregulation of mGluR5 and thereby impairs the induction of mGluR-dependent LTD.

  13. Presynaptic D2 dopamine receptors control long-term depression expression and memory processes in the temporal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Jill; Isingrini, Elsa; Dal Bo, Gregory; Sagheby, Sara; Menegaux, Aurore; Tronche, François; Levesque, Daniel; Moquin, Luc; Gratton, Alain; Wong, Tak Pan; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Giros, Bruno

    2015-03-15

    Dysfunctional mesocorticolimbic dopamine signaling has been linked to alterations in motor and reward-based functions associated with psychiatric disorders. Converging evidence from patients with psychiatric disorders and use of antipsychotics suggests that imbalance of dopamine signaling deeply alters hippocampal functions. However, given the lack of full characterization of a functional mesohippocampal pathway, the precise role of dopamine transmission in memory deficits associated with these disorders and their dedicated therapies is unknown. In particular, the positive outcome of antipsychotic treatments, commonly antagonizing D2 dopamine receptors (D2Rs), on cognitive deficits and memory impairments remains questionable. Following pharmacologic and genetic manipulation of dopamine transmission, we performed anatomic, neurochemical, electrophysiologic, and behavioral investigations to uncover the role of D2Rs in hippocampal-dependent plasticity and learning. Naïve mice (n = 4-21) were used in the different procedures. Dopamine modulated both long-term potentiation and long-term depression in the temporal hippocampus as well as spatial and recognition learning and memory in mice through D2Rs. Although genetic deletion or pharmacologic blockade of D2Rs led to the loss of long-term potentiation expression, the specific genetic removal of presynaptic D2Rs impaired long-term depression and performances on spatial memory tasks. Presynaptic D2Rs in dopamine fibers of the temporal hippocampus tightly modulate long-term depression expression and play a major role in the regulation of hippocampal learning and memory. This direct role of mesohippocampal dopamine input as uncovered here adds a new dimension to dopamine involvement in the physiology underlying deficits associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Socio-demographic factors and long-term use of benzodiazepines in patients with depression, anxiety or insomnia.

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Cecilia; Ohlsson, Henrik; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Former studies that have attempted to characterize individual socio-demographic factors associated with long-term benzodiazepine use were based on relatively small sample sizes and/or self-reported data. Our aim was to clarify this using large-scale primary health care data from Sweden. The present study covered 71 primary health care centres containing individual-level data from a total of 919, 941 individuals who visited a primary health care centre (PHCC) during the period 2001-2007. From this database we selected individuals 25 years or older with depression, anxiety and/or insomnia and who were prescribed a benzodiazepine within 0-90 as well as 91-270 days after their first clinical diagnosis of depression, anxiety and/or insomnia. Older age (OR, 2.92, 95% CI, 2.28-3.84), middle SES (OR, 1.22, 95% CI, 1.08-1.38), being on social welfare (OR, 1.40, 95% CI, 1.23-1.62) and not being married were associated with higher long-term benzodiazepine use. The PHCCs only explained a small part of the individual variation in long-term benzodiazepine use. Awareness of the impact on long-term benzodiazepine use of certain individual-level socio-demographic factors is important for health care workers and decision-makers who should aim at targeting general interventions at all primary health care centres. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Serotonin increases the incidence of primary afferent-evoked long-term depression in rat deep dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Garraway, S M; Hochman, S

    2001-05-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is released in spinal cord by descending systems that modulate somatosensory transmission and can potently depress primary afferent-evoked synaptic responses in dorsal horn neurons. Since primary afferent activity-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) may contribute to central sensitization of nociception, we studied the effects of 5-HT on the expression of sensory-evoked LTP and long-term depression (LTD) in deep dorsal horn (DDH) neurons. Whole cell, predominantly current clamp, recordings were obtained from DDH neurons in transverse slices of neonatal rat lumbar spinal cord. The effect of 5-HT on dorsal-root stimulation-evoked synaptic responses was tested before, during, or after high-frequency conditioning stimulation (CS). In most cells (80%), 5-HT caused a depression of the naïve synaptic response. Even though 5-HT depressed evoked responses, CS in the presence of 5-HT was not only still capable of inducing LTD but also increased its incidence from 54% in controls to 88% (P < 0.001). Activation of ligands selective for 5-HT(1A/1B) and 5-HT(1B), but not 5-HT(2A/2C) or 5-HT(3) receptors, best reproduced these actions. 5-HT also potently depressed postconditioning synaptic responses regardless of whether the induced plasticity was LTP or LTD. Our results demonstrate that in addition to depressing the amplitude of evoked sensory input, 5-HT can also control the direction of its long-term modifiability, favoring the expression of LTD. These findings demonstrate cellular mechanisms that may contribute to the descending serotonergic control of nociception.

  16. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar…

  17. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar…

  18. Long-term impact of intrauterine fetal death on quality of life and depression: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gravensteen, Ida Kathrine; Helgadottir, Linda Bjørk; Jacobsen, Eva-Marie; Sandset, Per Morten; Ekeberg, Øivind

    2012-06-07

    Intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) is a serious incidence that has been shown to impact mothers' psychological well-being in the short-term. Long-term quality of life (QOL) and depression after IUFD is not known. This study aimed to determine the association between intrauterine fetal death and long-term QOL, well-being, and depression. Analyses were performed on collected data among 106 women with a history of intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) and 262 women with live births, 5-18 years after the event. Univariable and multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to quantify the association between previous fetal death and long-term QOL, well-being and depression. QOL was assessed using the QOL Index (QLI), symptoms of depression using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and subjective well-being using the General Health Questionnaire 20 (GHQ-20). More of the cases had characteristics associated with lower socioeconomic status and did not rate their health as good as did the controls. The QLI health and functioning subscale score was slightly but significantly lower in the cases than in the controls (22.3. vs 23.5, P = .023). The CES-D depressed affect subscale score (2.0 vs 1.0, P = 0.004) and the CES-D global score (7.4 vs 5.0, P = .017) were higher in the cases. Subjective well-being did not differ between groups (20.6 vs 19.4, P = .094). After adjusting for demographic and health-related variables, IUFD was not associated with global QOL (P = .674), subjective well-being (P = .700), or global depression score (adjusted odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.37-1.57). Women with previous IUFD, of which the majority have received short-term interventions, share the same level of long-term QOL, well-being and global depression as women with live births only, when adjusted for possible confounders. The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, with registration number NCT 00856076.

  19. Long-Term Associations of Justice Sensitivity, Rejection Sensitivity, and Depressive Symptoms in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bondü, Rebecca; Sahyazici-Knaak, Fidan; Esser, Günter

    2017-01-01

    Depressive symptoms have been related to anxious rejection sensitivity, but little is known about relations with angry rejection sensitivity and justice sensitivity. We measured rejection sensitivity, justice sensitivity, and depressive symptoms in 1,665 9-to-21-year olds at two points of measurement. Participants with high T1 levels of depressive symptoms reported higher anxious and angry rejection sensitivity and higher justice sensitivity than controls at T1 and T2. T1 rejection, but not justice sensitivity predicted T2 depressive symptoms; high victim justice sensitivity, however, added to the stabilization of depressive symptoms. T1 depressive symptoms positively predicted T2 anxious and angry rejection and victim justice sensitivity. Hence, sensitivity toward negative social cues may be cause and consequence of depressive symptoms and requires consideration in cognitive-behavioral treatment of depression. PMID:28955257

  20. Effect of long-term exposure to air pollution on anxiety and depression in adults: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Vert, Cristina; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; Martínez, David; Gotsens, Xavier; Gramunt, Nina; Cirach, Marta; Molinuevo, José Luis; Sunyer, Jordi; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Crous-Bou, Marta; Gascon, Mireia

    2017-08-01

    The association between exposure to air pollutants and mental disorders among adults has been suggested, although results are not consistent. To analyze the association between long-term exposure to air pollution and history of anxiety and depression disorders and of medication use (benzodiazepines and antidepressants) in adults living in Barcelona. A total of 958 adults (45-74 years old) residents in Barcelona, most of them having at least one of their parents diagnosed with dementia (86%), and participating in the ALFA (Alzheimer and Families) study, were included. We used Land Use Regression (LUR) models to estimate long-term residential exposure (period 2009-2014) to PM2.5, PM2.5 absorbance (PM2.5 abs), PM10, PM coarse, NO2 and NOx. Between 2013 and 2014 participants self-reported their history of anxiety and depression disorders and related medication use. The analysis was focused on those participants reporting outcome occurrence from 2009 onwards (until 2014). We observed an increased odds of history of depression disorders with increasing concentrations of all air pollutants [e.g. an increased odds of depression of 2.00 (95% CI; 1.37, 2.93) for each 10μg/m(3) NO2 increase]. Such associations were consistent with an increased odds of medication use in relation to higher concentrations of air pollutants [e.g. an increased odds of antidepressants use of 1.23 (1.04, 1.44) for each 20μg/m(3) NOx increase]. Associations regarding anxiety disorders did not reach statistical significance. Our study shows that increasing long-term exposure to air pollution may increase the odds of depression and the use of antidepressants and benzodiazepines. Further studies are needed to replicate our results and confirm this association. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Six-month outcomes of co-occurring delirium, depression, and dementia in long-term care.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G; Voyer, Philippe; Monette, Johanne; Champoux, Nathalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Vu, Minh; Belzile, Eric

    2014-12-01

    To describe the 6-month outcomes of co-occurring delirium (full syndrome and subsyndromal symptoms), depression, and dementia in a long-term care (LTC) population. Observational, prospective cohort study with 6-month follow-up conducted from 2005 to 2009. Seven LTC facilities in the province of Quebec, Canada. Newly admitted and long-term residents recruited consecutively from lists of residents aged 65 and older admitted for LTC, with stratification into groups with and without severe cognitive impairment. The study sample comprised 274 residents with complete data at baseline on delirium, dementia, and depression. Outcomes were 6-month mortality, functional decline (10-point decline from baseline on 100-point Barthel scale), and cognitive decline (3-point decline on 30-point Mini-Mental State Examination). Predictors included delirium (full syndrome or subsyndromal symptoms, using the Confusion Assessment Method), depression (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia), and dementia (chart diagnosis). The baseline prevalences of delirium, subsyndromal symptoms of delirium (SSD), depression, and dementia were 11%, 44%, 19%, and 66%, respectively. By 6 months, 10% of 274 had died, 19% of 233 had experienced functional decline, and 17% of 246 had experienced cognitive decline. An analysis using multivariable generalized linear models found the following significant interaction effects (P < .15): between depression and dementia for mortality, between delirium and depression for functional decline, and between SSD and dementia for cognitive decline. Co-occurrence of delirium, SSD, depression, and dementia in LTC residents appears to affect some 6-month outcomes. Because of limited statistical power, it was not possible to draw conclusions about the effects of the co-occurrence of some syndromes on poorer outcomes. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Long-Term Depressive Symptoms and Acculturative Stress Issues Among Immigrants From the Former Soviet Union.

    PubMed

    Baker, Cathy J

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies regarding depressive symptoms and acculturative stress among immigrants have been limited to the initial period after immigration. The relationships between depressive symptoms, acculturation, and acculturative stress among immigrants from the former Soviet Union were examined in this descriptive study. Eighty immigrants from the former Soviet Union who had immigrated within the past 20 years were recruited in various community locations. Participants (N = 80), including recent and longer residing immigrants, reported elevated depressive symptoms and acculturative stress. Acculturative stress predicted depressive symptoms, controlling for dominant culture (American) immersion. However, length of time in the United States was not associated with depressive symptoms, ethnic culture immersion, or acculturative stress. Our results suggest that elevated depressive symptoms are related to acculturative stress but are not confined to the initial adjustment period. Steps to decrease acculturative stress might help decrease depressive symptoms in immigrants regardless of the number of years lived in the United States. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Long Term Sertraline Effects on Neural Structures in Depressed and Nondepressed Adult Female Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Stephanie L.; Uberseder, Beth; Clark, Ashlee; Daunais, James B.; Johnston, Warwick D.; Neely, David; Massey, Adreanna; Williamson, Jeff D.; Kraft, Robert A.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Jones, Sara R.; Shively, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for mood and other disorders. However, their neural effects are difficult to study due to patient compliance and drug history variability, and rarely studied in those prescribed SSRIs for non-mood disorders. Here we evaluated SSRI effects on neural volumetrics in depressed and nondepressed monkeys. Methods 42 socially-housed cynomolgus monkeys were randomized to treatment balanced on pretreatment depressive behavior and body weight. Monkeys were trained for oral administration of placebo or 20mg/kg sertraline HCl daily for 18 months and depressive and anxious behavior recorded. Volumes of neural regions of interest in depression were measured in magnetic resonance images and analyzed by 2 (depressed, nondepressed) × 2 (placebo, sertraline) ANOVA. Results Sertraline reduced anxiety (p=0.04) but not depressive behavior (p=0.43). Left Brodmann’s Area (BA)32 was smaller in depressed than nondepressed monkeys (main effect of depression: p<0.05). Sertraline and depression status interacted to affect volumes of left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left BA24, right hippocampus (HC), and right anterior HC (sertraline X depression interactions: all p’s < 0.05). In the Placebo group, depressed monkeys had smaller right anterior HC and left ACC than nondepressed monkeys. In nondepressed monkeys, sertraline reduced right HC volume, especially right anterior HC volume. In depressed monkeys sertraline increased left ACC volume. In nondepressed monkeys, sertraline reduced left BA24 volumes resulting in smaller BA24 volumes in nondepressed than sertraline-treated depressed monkeys. Conclusions These observations suggest that SSRIs may differentially affect neural structures in depressed and nondepressed individuals. PMID:26116816

  4. Long term sertraline effects on neural structures in depressed and nondepressed adult female nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Willard, Stephanie L; Uberseder, Beth; Clark, Ashlee; Daunais, James B; Johnston, Warwick D; Neely, David; Massey, Adreanna; Williamson, Jeff D; Kraft, Robert A; Bourland, J Daniel; Jones, Sara R; Shively, Carol A

    2015-12-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for mood and other disorders. However, their neural effects are difficult to study due to patient compliance and drug history variability, and rarely studied in those prescribed SSRIs for non-mood disorders. Here we evaluated SSRI effects on neural volumetrics in depressed and nondepressed monkeys. 42 socially-housed cynomolgus monkeys were randomized to treatment balanced on pretreatment depressive behavior and body weight. Monkeys were trained for oral administration of placebo or 20 mg/kg sertraline HCl daily for 18 months and depressive and anxious behavior recorded. Volumes of neural regions of interest in depression were measured in magnetic resonance images and analyzed by 2 (depressed, nondepressed)×2 (placebo, sertraline) ANOVA. Sertraline reduced anxiety (p=0.04) but not depressive behavior (p=0.43). Left Brodmann's Area (BA) 32 was smaller in depressed than nondepressed monkeys (main effect of depression: p<0.05). Sertraline and depression status interacted to affect volumes of left Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC), left BA24, right hippocampus (HC), and right anterior HC (sertraline×depression interactions: all p's<0.05). In the Placebo group, depressed monkeys had smaller right anterior HC and left ACC than nondepressed monkeys. In nondepressed monkeys, sertraline reduced right HC volume, especially right anterior HC volume. In depressed monkeys sertraline increased left ACC volume. In nondepressed monkeys, sertraline reduced left BA24 volumes resulting in smaller BA24 volumes in nondepressed than sertraline-treated depressed monkeys. These observations suggest that SSRIs may differentially affect neural structures in depressed and nondepressed individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Involvement of cAMP-guanine nucleotide exchange factor II in hippocampal long-term depression and behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungmin; Kobayashi, Yuki; Seo, Hyunhyo; Kwak, Ji-Hye; Masuda, Akira; Lim, Chae-Seok; Lee, Hye-Ryeon; Kang, SukJae Joshua; Park, Pojeong; Sim, Su-Eon; Kogo, Naomi; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Itohara, Shigeyoshi

    2015-06-24

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate small GTPases that are involved in several cellular functions. cAMP-guanine nucleotide exchange factor II (cAMP-GEF II) acts as a target for cAMP independently of protein kinase A (PKA) and functions as a GEF for Rap1 and Rap2. Although cAMP-GEF II is expressed abundantly in several brain areas including the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus, its specific function and possible role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive processes remain elusive. Here, we investigated how cAMP-GEF II affects synaptic function and animal behavior using cAMP-GEF II knockout mice. We found that deletion of cAMP-GEF II induced moderate decrease in long-term potentiation, although this decrease was not statistically significant. On the other hand, it produced a significant and clear impairment in NMDA receptor-dependent long-term depression at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses of hippocampus, while microscopic morphology, basal synaptic transmission, and depotentiation were normal. Behavioral testing using the Morris water maze and automated IntelliCage system showed that cAMP-GEF II deficient mice had moderately reduced behavioral flexibility in spatial learning and memory. We concluded that cAMP-GEF II plays a key role in hippocampal functions including behavioral flexibility in reversal learning and in mechanisms underlying induction of long-term depression.

  6. ASIC1a regulates insular long-term depression and is required for the extinction of conditioned taste aversion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Guang; Liu, Ming-Gang; Deng, Shining; Liu, Yan-Mei; Shang, Lin; Ding, Jing; Hsu, Tsan-Ting; Jiang, Qin; Li, Ying; Li, Fei; Zhu, Michael Xi; Xu, Tian-Le

    2016-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) has been shown to play important roles in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Here we identify a crucial role for ASIC1a in long-term depression (LTD) at mouse insular synapses. Genetic ablation and pharmacological inhibition of ASIC1a reduced the induction probability of LTD without affecting that of long-term potentiation in the insular cortex. The disruption of ASIC1a also attenuated the extinction of established taste aversion memory without altering the initial associative taste learning or its long-term retention. Extinction of taste aversive memory led to the reduced insular synaptic efficacy, which precluded further LTD induction. The impaired LTD and extinction learning in ASIC1a null mice were restored by virus-mediated expression of wild-type ASIC1a, but not its ion-impermeable mutant, in the insular cortices. Our data demonstrate the involvement of an ASIC1a-mediated insular synaptic depression mechanism in extinction learning, which raises the possibility of targeting ASIC1a to manage adaptive behaviours. PMID:27924869

  7. Effects of Long Term Sertraline Treatment and Depression on Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Premenopausal Female Primates

    PubMed Central

    Shively, Carol A.; Register, Thomas C.; Appt, Susan E.; Clarkson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Major depressive disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) often co-occur in the same individuals. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for depression and other disorders, but their effects on CHD risk remain unclear. We determined the effects of a SSRI on coronary artery atherosclerosis (CAA) in an established nonhuman primate model used to clarify the association between depression and CAA. Methods 42 adult female cynomolgus macaques consuming a Western diet were characterized during an 18-month pretreatment phase, and assigned to SSRI (sertraline HCl 20 mg/kg, po, once/day) or Placebo balanced on pretreatment depression, body weight (BW), and iliac artery atherosclerosis extent measured via biopsy. After 18 months CAA extent was measured using histomorphometry. Results Before and during treatment depressed monkeys had lower BW, body mass index (BMI), and plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and higher heart rates during the pretreatment (p<0.01) but not the treatment phase (p=0.17). There were no pretreatment differences between the sertraline and placebo groups. Sertraline reduced anxious behavior but had no effect on BW, BMI, heart rate, plasma lipids, or depression. CAA, analyzed by a 2 (Depressed, Nondepressed) × 2 (Placebo, Sertraline) × 3 (coronary arteries) analysis of covariance adjusted for pretreatment iliac atherosclerosis, was greater in depressed than nondepressed monkeys (p<0.036), and in sertraline than placebo-treated monkeys (p=0.040). The observed CAA extent in depressed monkeys treated with sertraline was 4.9 times higher than in untreated depressed monkeys, and 6.5 times higher than in non-depressed monkeys, on average. Conclusions Depressed animals develop more CAA, and that longterm treatment with sertraline promotes CAA. PMID:25829239

  8. Effects of long-term sertraline treatment and depression on coronary artery atherosclerosis in premenopausal female primates.

    PubMed

    Shively, Carol A; Register, Thomas C; Appt, Susan E; Clarkson, Thomas B

    2015-04-01

    Major depressive disorder and coronary heart disease often co-occur in the same individuals. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for depression and other disorders, but their effects on coronary heart disease risk remain unclear. We determined the effects of an SSRI on coronary artery atherosclerosis (CAA) in an established nonhuman primate model used to clarify the association between depression and CAA. Forty-two adult female cynomolgus macaques consuming a Western diet were characterized during an 18-month pretreatment phase and assigned to SSRI (sertraline hydrochloride 20 mg/kg, per os, once a day) or placebo balanced on pretreatment depression, body weight (BW), and iliac artery atherosclerosis extent measured via biopsy. After 18 months, CAA extent was measured using histomorphometry. Before and during treatment, depressed monkeys had lower BW, body mass index, and plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and higher heart rates during the pretreatment (p < .01) but not the treatment phase (p = .17). There were no pretreatment differences between the sertraline and placebo groups. Sertraline reduced anxious behavior but had no effect on BW, body mass index, heart rate, plasma lipids, or depression. CAA, analyzed by a 2 (depressed, nondepressed) × 2 (placebo, sertraline) × 3 (coronary arteries) analysis of covariance adjusted for pretreatment iliac atherosclerosis, was greater in depressed than in nondepressed monkeys (p < .036), and in sertraline than in placebo-treated monkeys (p = .040). The observed CAA extent in depressed monkeys treated with sertraline was 4.9 times higher than that in untreated depressed monkeys, and 6.5 times higher than that in nondepressed monkeys, on average. Depressed animals developed more CAA, and long-term treatment with sertraline resulted in more extensive CAA.

  9. Low depressive symptom and mental distress scores in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Harila, Marika J; Niinivirta, Tomi I T; Winqvist, Satu; Harila-Saari, Arja H

    2011-04-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are thought to be at risk of psychological difficulties. We examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms and mental well-being in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at a mean age of 20 years after the cessation of therapy. Depressive symptoms were assessed with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21) and mental distress with General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) among 73 ALL survivors and 146 healthy controls. The ALL survivors obtained significantly lower BDI scores (P=0.046) compared with the controls, indicating less depressive symptoms among the ALL survivors. BDI scores indicated a significantly less frequent moderate or severe depression in the ALL survivors compared with the controls (P=0.039). BDI scores indicated no depression in 80.8% of the ALL survivors and 73.3% of the control group. The female ALL survivors obtained lower BDI scores than did the female controls (P=0.005). No difference was found in GHQ-12 scores between the survivors and the controls. Survivors of ALL reported fewer depressive symptoms and equal mental well-being compared with healthy controls. Our findings support the idea that childhood leukemia survivors' subjective experience of well-being is possibly affected by repressive adaptive style.

  10. Effect of Talbinah food consumption on depressive symptoms among elderly individuals in long term care facilities, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Badrasawi, Manal M; Shahar, Suzana; Manaf, Zahara Abd; Haron, Hasnah

    2013-01-01

    Talbinah is a barley syrup cooked with milk and sweetened by honey. In his famous Hadith on Talbinah, the Prophet Mohammad (SAW) recommended it when sad events happen for its effect on soothing hearts and relieving sadness. This 3-week crossover designed, randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effect of Talbinah on mood and depression among institutionalized elderly people in Seremban. A sample of 30 depressed elderly subjects (21 men and 9 women) was selected from the long term care facility. Three different interview-based validated scales (Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, and Profile of Mood States) were used to determine mood, depression, stress, and anxiety at week 0, 3, 4, and 7. The nutritional value of Talbinah was examined using proximate food analysis, minerals content analysis, and differential amino acid analysis. The results indicated that Talbinah is a high carbohydrate food (86.4%) and has a high tryptophan: branch chain amino acids ratio (1:2). A Wilcoxon nonparametric test showed that there was a statistically significant decrease on depression, stress, and mood disturbances scores among the intervention group (P < 0.05) for all parameters. In conclusion, Talbinah has the potential to reduce depression and enhance mood among the subjects. Ingestion of functional foods such as Talbinah may provide a mental health benefit to elderly people. PMID:23493965

  11. Effect of Talbinah food consumption on depressive symptoms among elderly individuals in long term care facilities, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Badrasawi, Manal M; Shahar, Suzana; Abd Manaf, Zahara; Haron, Hasnah

    2013-01-01

    Talbinah is a barley syrup cooked with milk and sweetened by honey. In his famous Hadith on Talbinah, the Prophet Mohammad (SAW) recommended it when sad events happen for its effect on soothing hearts and relieving sadness. This 3-week crossover designed, randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effect of Talbinah on mood and depression among institutionalized elderly people in Seremban. A sample of 30 depressed elderly subjects (21 men and 9 women) was selected from the long term care facility. Three different interview-based validated scales (Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, and Profile of Mood States) were used to determine mood, depression, stress, and anxiety at week 0, 3, 4, and 7. The nutritional value of Talbinah was examined using proximate food analysis, minerals content analysis, and differential amino acid analysis. The results indicated that Talbinah is a high carbohydrate food (86.4%) and has a high tryptophan: branch chain amino acids ratio (1:2). A Wilcoxon nonparametric test showed that there was a statistically significant decrease on depression, stress, and mood disturbances scores among the intervention group (P < 0.05) for all parameters. In conclusion, Talbinah has the potential to reduce depression and enhance mood among the subjects. Ingestion of functional foods such as Talbinah may provide a mental health benefit to elderly people.

  12. Meditation with yoga, group therapy with hypnosis, and psychoeducation for long-term depressed mood: a randomized pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Butler, Lisa D; Waelde, Lynn C; Hastings, T Andrew; Chen, Xin-Hua; Symons, Barbara; Marshall, Jonathan; Kaufman, Adam; Nagy, Thomas F; Blasey, Christine M; Seibert, Elizabeth O; Spiegel, David

    2008-07-01

    This randomized pilot study investigated the effects of meditation with yoga (and psychoeducation) versus group therapy with hypnosis (and psychoeducation) versus psychoeducation alone on diagnostic status and symptom levels among 46 individuals with long-term depressive disorders. Results indicate that significantly more meditation group participants experienced a remission than did controls at 9-month follow-up. Eight hypnosis group participants also experienced a remission, but the difference from controls was not statistically significant. Three control participants, but no meditation or hypnosis participants, developed a new depressive episode during the study, though this difference did not reach statistical significance in any case. Although all groups reported some reduction in symptom levels, they did not differ significantly in that outcome. Overall, these results suggest that these two interventions show promise for treating low- to moderate-level depression.

  13. Early Depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability: the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS)

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Joshua Z.; Disla, Norbelina; Moon, Yeseon Park; Paik, Myunghee C.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Wright, Clinton

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Depression is highly prevalent after stroke, and may influence recovery. We aimed to determine whether depressed mood acutely after stroke predicts subsequent disability and mortality. Methods As part of the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study, a population-based incident stroke case follow-up study performed in a multiethnic urban population, participants were asked about depressed mood within 7–10 days after stroke. Participants were followed every 6 months the first 2 years, and yearly thereafter for 5 years, for death and disability measured by the Barthel Index (BI). We fitted polytomous logistic regression models using canonical link to examine the association between depressed mood after stroke and disability, comparing moderate (BI 60–95) and severe (BI < 60) disability to no disability (BI ≥ 95). Cox-proportional hazards models were created to examine the association between depressed mood and mortality. Results A question about depressed mood within 7–10 days after stroke was asked in 340 of 655 ischemic stroke patients enrolled, and 139 reported that they felt depressed. In multivariate analyses controlling for socio-demographic factors, stroke severity, and medical conditions, depressed mood was associated with a greater odds of severe disability compared to no disability at one (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.07–7.91) and two years (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.29–10.71) after stroke. Depressed mood was not associated with all cause mortality or vascular death. Conclusion Depressed mood after stroke is associated with disability but not mortality after stroke. Early screening and intervention for mood disorders after stroke may improve outcomes and requires further research. PMID:20671256

  14. Changes in prefrontal-limbic function in major depression after 15 months of long-term psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Viviani, Roberto; Kessler, Henrik; Kächele, Horst; Cierpka, Manfred; Roth, Gerhard; George, Carol; Kernberg, Otto F; Bruns, Georg; Taubner, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of depression have demonstrated treatment-specific changes involving the limbic system and regulatory regions in the prefrontal cortex. While these studies have examined the effect of short-term, interpersonal or cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy, the effect of long-term, psychodynamic intervention has never been assessed. Here, we investigated recurrently depressed (DSM-IV) unmedicated outpatients (N = 16) and control participants matched for sex, age, and education (N = 17) before and after 15 months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Participants were scanned at two time points, during which presentations of attachment-related scenes with neutral descriptions alternated with descriptions containing personal core sentences previously extracted from an attachment interview. Outcome measure was the interaction of the signal difference between personal and neutral presentations with group and time, and its association with symptom improvement during therapy. Signal associated with processing personalized attachment material varied in patients from baseline to endpoint, but not in healthy controls. Patients showed a higher activation in the left anterior hippocampus/amygdala, subgenual cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortex before treatment and a reduction in these areas after 15 months. This reduction was associated with improvement in depressiveness specifically, and in the medial prefrontal cortex with symptom improvement more generally. This is the first study documenting neurobiological changes in circuits implicated in emotional reactivity and control after long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy.

  15. Changes in Prefrontal-Limbic Function in Major Depression after 15 Months of Long-Term Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Buchheim, Anna; Viviani, Roberto; Kessler, Henrik; Kächele, Horst; Cierpka, Manfred; Roth, Gerhard; George, Carol; Kernberg, Otto F.; Bruns, Georg; Taubner, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of depression have demonstrated treatment-specific changes involving the limbic system and regulatory regions in the prefrontal cortex. While these studies have examined the effect of short-term, interpersonal or cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy, the effect of long-term, psychodynamic intervention has never been assessed. Here, we investigated recurrently depressed (DSM-IV) unmedicated outpatients (N = 16) and control participants matched for sex, age, and education (N = 17) before and after 15 months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Participants were scanned at two time points, during which presentations of attachment-related scenes with neutral descriptions alternated with descriptions containing personal core sentences previously extracted from an attachment interview. Outcome measure was the interaction of the signal difference between personal and neutral presentations with group and time, and its association with symptom improvement during therapy. Signal associated with processing personalized attachment material varied in patients from baseline to endpoint, but not in healthy controls. Patients showed a higher activation in the left anterior hippocampus/amygdala, subgenual cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortex before treatment and a reduction in these areas after 15 months. This reduction was associated with improvement in depressiveness specifically, and in the medial prefrontal cortex with symptom improvement more generally. This is the first study documenting neurobiological changes in circuits implicated in emotional reactivity and control after long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy. PMID:22470470

  16. Endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression in a nociceptive synapse requires coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic transcription and translation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Sharleen; Burrell, Brian D

    2013-03-06

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) play an important role in long-term regulation of synaptic signaling in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, the role of transcription- and translation-dependent processes in presynaptic versus postsynaptic neurons was examined during eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity in the CNS of the leech. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of non-nociceptive afferents elicits eCB-dependent long-term depression (eCB-LTD) heterosynaptically in nociceptive synapses that lasts at least 2 h. Bath application of emetine, a protein synthesis inhibitor, blocked eCB-LTD after afferent LFS or exogenous eCB application, indicating that this depression was translation dependent. Bath application of actinomycin D, an irreversible RNA synthesis inhibitor, or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole 1-β-d-ribofurandoside (DRB), a reversible RNA synthesis inhibitor, also prevented eCB-LTD. Selective injection of DRB or emetine into the presynaptic or postsynaptic neuron before LFS indicated that eCB-LTD required transcription and translation in the postsynaptic neuron but only translation in the presynaptic cell. Depression observed immediately after LFS was also blocked when these transcription- and translation-dependent processes were inhibited. It is proposed that induction of eCB-LTD in this nociceptive synapse requires the coordination of presynaptic protein synthesis and postsynaptic mRNA and protein synthesis. These findings provide significant insights into both eCB-based synaptic plasticity and understanding how activity in non-nociceptive afferents modulates nociceptive pathways.

  17. Untreated depression during pregnancy: Short- and long-term effects in offspring. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S

    2017-02-07

    Aim of this systematic review is to assess short- and long-lasting effects of antenatal exposure to untreated maternal depressive symptoms. Pertinent articles were identified through combined searches of Science.gov, Cochrane library, and PubMed databases (through August 2015). Forty-three, selected articles revealed that untreated gestational depression and even depressive symptoms during pregnancy may have untoward effects on the developing fetus (hyperactivity, irregular fetal heart rate), newborns (increased cortisol and norepinephrine levels, decreased dopamine levels, altered EEG patterns, reduced vagal tone, stress/depressive-like behaviors, and increased rates of premature deaths and neonatal intensive care unit admission), and children (increased salivary cortisol levels, internalizing and externalizing problems, and central adiposity). During adolescence, an independent association exists between maternal antenatal mood symptoms and a slight increase in criminal behaviors. In contrast, the relationship between gestational depression and increased risks of prematurity and low birth weight remains controversial. Given this background, when making clinical decisions, clinicians should weigh the growing evidences suggesting the detrimental and prolonged effects in offspring of untreated antenatal depression and depressive symptoms during pregnancy against the known and emerging concerns associated with in utero exposure to antidepressants. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. DHHC8-dependent PICK1 palmitoylation is required for induction of cerebellar long-term synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gareth M; Hayashi, Takashi; Huganir, Richard L; Linden, David J

    2013-09-25

    The palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT) DHHC8 is implicated in synaptic regulation but few DHHC8 substrates are known. Here we report that DHHC8 binds and palmitoylates the PDZ domain-containing protein PICK1 at a cysteine residue that is essential for long-term synaptic depression (LTD) in cultured mouse cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Cerebellar LTD is palmitoylation-dependent and induction of LTD requires DHHC8. Furthermore, PICK1 is a critical DHHC8 substrate whose palmitoylation is necessary for LTD. These results identify the first DHHC8 substrate required for a specific form of synaptic plasticity and provide new insights into synaptic roles of palmitoylation.

  19. The mediating effects of depressive symptoms on nutritional status of older adults in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Li, I-C; Kuo, H-T; Lin, Y-C

    2013-07-01

    To test whether depressive symptoms mediate the effects of activities of daily living (ADLs) on nutritional status of older adults living in long-term care (LTC) facilities in Taiwan. A cross-sectional study. Seventy-three community-based LTC facilities in northern Taiwan. This study sampled 306 adults ranging in age from 65 to 97 years who were free of acute infection or disease and who were able to communicate. Nutritional status was assessed by the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) scale and depressive symptoms were assessed by the short form of the Geriatric Depressive Scale (GDS-SF). MNA scores revealed that 65% of the subjects were at risk for malnutrition (17 to 23.5 points). In addition, depressive symptoms partially mediated the relationship between ADLs and nutritional status, with 10.7% of the effect of depressive symptoms on nutritional status going through the mediator. Interventions to reduce depressive symptoms among institutionalized older adults should focus on improving nutritional status rather than promoting ADLs, which are believed to be difficult to change.

  20. Acute and long-term effectiveness of clozapine in treatment-resistant psychotic depression.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, R; Meltzer, H Y

    1996-08-15

    The treatment of refractory major depression, including the psychotic subtype, is a therapeutic challenge. Three cases of resistant psychotic depression were treated with clozapine monotherapy, an atypical antipsychotic drug effective in treatment-resistant schizophrenia and mania. Both psychotic and mood symptoms responded well to clozapine monotherapy, although response was delayed in one case. Tardive dyskinesia improved markedly, and tardive dystonia improved moderately in one patient. No patient relapsed during a follow-up period of 4-6 years of clozapine treatment. Clozapine was well-tolerated with few side effects. These observations suggest controlled trials of clozapine in the treatment of psychotic depression that fails to respond to electroconvulsive therapy or typical neuroleptics plus tricyclic antidepressants are indicated. The same is true for the use of clozapine in maintenance treatment for psychotic depression in those cases in which typical neuroleptic drugs are required, in order to reduce the risk of tardive dyskinesia and dystonia.

  1. Effects of anxiety on the long-term course of depressive disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Coryell, William; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Solomon, David; Leon, Andrew C.; Rice, John P.; Keller, Martin B.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is well established that the presence of prominent anxiety within depressive episodes portends poorer outcomes. Important questions remain as to which anxiety features are important to outcome and how sustained their prognostic effects are over time. Aims To examine the relative prognostic importance of specific anxiety features and to determine whether their effects persist over decades and apply to both unipolar and bipolar conditions. Method Participants with unipolar (n = 476) or bipolar (n = 335) depressive disorders were intensively followed for a mean of 16.7 years (s.d. = 8.5). Results The number and severity of anxiety symptoms, but not the presence of pre-existing anxiety disorders, showed a robust and continuous relationship to the subsequent time spent in depressive episodes in both unipolar and bipolar depressive disorder. The strength of this relationship changed little over five successive 5-year periods. Conclusions The severity of current anxiety symptoms within depressive episodes correlates strongly with the persistence of subsequent depressive symptoms and this relationship is stable over decades. PMID:21984801

  2. Assessment of different induction protocols to elicit long-term depression (LTD) in the rat visual cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hager, Audrey M; Dringenberg, Hans C

    2010-03-08

    Changes in synaptic efficacy, including long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), provide mechanisms for experience-induced plasticity of cortical and subcortical circuits. LTP is readily induced under drastically different experimental conditions (e.g., in vitro and in vivo). However, few studies have compared the effectiveness of different induction protocols to elicit synaptic depression, especially under in vivo conditions. Here, we assessed the effectiveness of four different low frequency stimulation (LFS) protocols, applied to the lateral geniculate nucleus, to induce LTD-like changes of local field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) recorded on the surface of the primary visual cortex (V1) of urethane-anesthetized rats. Three LFS protocols (900 pulses at 1 Hz; 1800 pulses at 1 Hz, 1800 pulses at 1 Hz, repeated three times), known to induce LTD in neocortical and hippocampal slice preparations, failed to induce synaptic depression. In contrast, strong low frequency burst stimulation (3 pulses/burst at 20 Hz, 900 bursts repeated at 1 Hz) resulted in significant, but transient ( approximately 20 min) depression of fPSPs in V1. This effect was resistant to systemic treatment with MK 801 (0.5 mg/kg) or local, cortical application of either APV (10 mM) or MCPG (10 mM), indicative of non-essential roles of N-methyl-d-aspartate and metabotropic glutamate receptors. A similar depressant effect was also observed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia. These experiments emphasize the resistance of the in vivo neocortex to express the long-lasting down-regulation of synaptic strength, observations that require integration into current models and theories regarding the functions of LTD as a homeostatic and experience-dependent plasticity mechanism.

  3. Brain activation patterns in major depressive disorder and work stress-related long-term sick leave among Swedish females.

    PubMed

    Sandström, Agneta; Säll, Roland; Peterson, Jonas; Salami, Alireza; Larsson, Anne; Olsson, Tommy; Nyberg, Lars

    2012-09-01

    Deficits in executive functioning and working memory associated with frontal lobe dysfunction are prominent in depression and work-related long-term sick leave (LTSL). This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate potential differences in brain activation patterns in these conditions. In addition, the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was examined and compared between groups. Since there is a clear overrepresentation of women in these diagnostic groups, and to ensure a more homogenous sample population, only women were included. To examine the neural correlates of relevant cognitive processes in patients on sick leave >90 days due to work-related LTSL, recently diagnosed patients with major depression Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV criteria, untreated), and healthy controls (n = 10, each group), a 2-back working memory task and a visual long-term memory task were administered during fMRI scanning. HPA axis functioning was investigated using a diurnal curve of saliva cortisol and a dexamethasone suppression test. Task performance was comparable among the three groups. Multivariate image analysis revealed that both memory tasks engaged a similar brain network in all three groups, including the prefrontal and parietal cortex. During the 2-back task, LTSL patients had significant frontal hypoactivation compared to controls and patients with depression. Saliva cortisol measurements showed a flattening of the diurnal rythmicity in LTSL patients compared to patients with depression and healthy contols. Taken together, these findings indicate that work stress-related LTSL and major depression are dissociable in terms of frontal activation and diurnal cortisol rhythmicity.

  4. Acute and long-term treatment of late-life major depressive disorder: duloxetine versus placebo.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael; Oakes, Tina Myers; Raskin, Joel; Liu, Peng; Shoemaker, Scarlett; Nelson, J Craig

    2014-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of duloxetine with placebo on depression in elderly patients with major depressive disorder. Multicenter, 24-week (12-week short-term and 12-week continuation), randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. United States, France, Mexico, Puerto Rico. Age 65 years or more with major depressive disorder diagnosis (one or more previous episode); Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥20; Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale total score ≥20. Duloxetine 60 or 120 mg/day or placebo; placebo rescue possible. Primary-Maier subscale of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) at week 12. Secondary-Geriatric Depression Scale, HAMD-17 total score, cognitive measures, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), Numeric Rating Scales (NRS) for pain, Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale, Patient Global Impression of Improvement in acute phase and acute plus continuation phase of treatment. Compared with placebo, duloxetine did not show significantly greater improvement from baseline on Maier subscale at 12 weeks, but did show significantly greater improvement at weeks 4, 8, 16, and 20. Similar patterns for Geriatric Depression Scale and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale emerged, with significance also seen at week 24. There was a significant treatment effect for all BPI items and 4 of 6 NRS pain measures in the acute phase, most BPI items and half of the NRS measures in the continuation phase. More duloxetine-treated patients completed the study (63% versus 55%). A significantly higher percentage of duloxetine-treated patients versus placebo discontinued due to adverse event (15.3% versus 5.8%). Although the antidepressant efficacy of duloxetine was not confirmed by the primary outcome, several secondary measures at multiple time points suggested efficacy. Duloxetine had significant and meaningful beneficial effects on pain. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Long-term depression and associativity in rat primary motor cortex following thalamic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Eckert, M J; Racine, R J

    2006-12-01

    Associativity is an attractive property of LTP in terms of its possible mechanism as a model for memory storage. In this study, we compare the effects of homosynaptic vs. associative stimulation on the induction of LTP and LTD in the neocortex of freely behaving rats. Using a callosal input to the motor cortex as a 'strong' input (one that potentiates reliably following homosynaptic stimulation), we paired activity of this pathway with a 'weak' thalamocortical pathway (one that does not potentiate when stimulated homosynaptically). Surprisingly, homosynaptic HFS caused a lasting depression of the field EPSP in the thalamocortical pathway. Analysis of this effect revealed that it was largely polysynaptic. Associative HFS (HFS applied to both pathways) not only failed to induce an LTP effect in the thalamocortical pathway, it increased the magnitude of the depression. Associative HFS did, however, facilitate LTP induction in the 'strong' callosal pathway. When comparing the effects of homosynaptic and associative LTD induction (HFS on one pathway anticorrelated with LFS on the other), we found that both protocols induced a similar magnitude of depression. These results show that HFS applied to the thalamocortical pathway causes a depression and this depression is enhanced, not reversed, by associative pairing with a strong input.

  6. Symptomatic depression after long-term steroid treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ros, Leszek Tomasz

    2004-09-01

    Good results of the treatment of mood disturbances and psychoses induced with steroid administration are in agreement with the fact described in literature of serotonin release reduction caused by steroids and possible relationship between depressive and psychotic manifestations and low seretonin level in cerebrospinal fluid. The patient had no head trauma in the past. He denied any loss of consciousness. The patient at the age of six years had type C virus hepatitis which changed into chronic hepatitis with a slight autoimmune component. He received six months oral steroid (prednisone) treatment in 20 mg daily dose resulting in symptomatic depression. The patient was treated by the author with sertraline from low doses up to 150 mg daily. A remission of the depressive illness and OCD was obtained. The author decided to treat the patient with sertraline in view of its high safety in somatic diseases and good tolerance.

  7. B-vitamins reduce the long-term risk of depression after stroke: The VITATOPS-DEP trial.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Osvaldo P; Marsh, Kylie; Alfonso, Helman; Flicker, Leon; Davis, Timothy M E; Hankey, Graeme J

    2010-10-01

    The consumption of certain B-vitamins through diet or supplementation decreases the total plasma concentration of homocysteine (tHcy) and may enhance response to standard antidepressant treatment. It is unclear if treatment with B-vitamins can reduce the long-term prevalence of depression in people at risk, such as stroke survivors. The purpose of this research was to determine if treatment with B-vitamins reduces the hazard of poststroke depression compared with placebo. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tHcy-lowering treatment with daily folic acid (2 mg), vitamin B6 (25 mg), and vitamin B12 (0.5 mg) for 1 to 10.5 years in survivors of stroke. The primary endpoint was the onset of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) major depression after randomization. Secondary outcomes were the prevalence of DSM-IV major or minor depression at the end of treatment. Other measured factors included age, gender, poststroke handicap associated with stroke, recurrence of strokes, cognitive impairment, and use of antidepressants. Among 273 people who completed the final assessment after 7.1 ± 2.1 years (mean ± standard deviation) of follow up, random assignment to B-vitamins was associated with a lower hazard of major depression compared with placebo (18.4% vs 23.3%, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.31-0.76) and a trend toward a lower odds of major or minor depression at the end of the trial compared with placebo (19.1% vs 27.7%; adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.58; 95%CI = 0.31-1.09). Long-term treatment of poststroke survivors with folic acid, B6, and B12 was associated with a reduction in the hazard of major depression in our patient population. If these findings can be validated externally, B-vitamin supplementation offers hope as an effective, safe, and affordable intervention to reduce the burden of poststroke depression.

  8. Long-Term Effects of Bereavement and Caregiver Intervention on Dementia Caregiver Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, William E.; Bergman, Elizabeth J.; Roth, David L.; McVie, Theresa; Gaugler, Joseph E.; Mittelman, Mary S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the joint effects of bereavement and caregiver intervention on caregiver depressive symptoms. Design and Methods: Alzheimer's caregivers from a randomized trial of an enhanced caregiver support intervention versus usual care who had experienced the death of their spouse (n = 254) were repeatedly…

  9. The Long-Term Effects of War Experiences on Children's Depression in the Republic of Croatia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brajsa-Zganec, A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: The aim of the study was to investigate whether different levels of depressive symptoms in early adolescent boys and girls could be predicted on the basis of war experiences, perceived available social support (instrumental support, support to self-esteem, belonging and acceptance) and extraversion. Methods:: The sample consisted of…

  10. Long-Term Effects of Bereavement and Caregiver Intervention on Dementia Caregiver Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, William E.; Bergman, Elizabeth J.; Roth, David L.; McVie, Theresa; Gaugler, Joseph E.; Mittelman, Mary S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the joint effects of bereavement and caregiver intervention on caregiver depressive symptoms. Design and Methods: Alzheimer's caregivers from a randomized trial of an enhanced caregiver support intervention versus usual care who had experienced the death of their spouse (n = 254) were repeatedly…

  11. The Long-Term Effects of War Experiences on Children's Depression in the Republic of Croatia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brajsa-Zganec, A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: The aim of the study was to investigate whether different levels of depressive symptoms in early adolescent boys and girls could be predicted on the basis of war experiences, perceived available social support (instrumental support, support to self-esteem, belonging and acceptance) and extraversion. Methods:: The sample consisted of…

  12. Depression, pain, exposure to stressful life events, and long-term outcomes in temporomandibular disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, S M; Laskin, D M; Frantsve, L M; Orr, T

    2001-06-01

    This study investigated the role of psychological factors in temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Orofacial pain patients' pretreatment levels of depression, disability caused by pain, and exposure to stressful life events were measured, and differences on these variables between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease patients and patients whose pain was of muscular origin (MPD) were evaluated. The use of these variables and patient diagnostic status in predicting response to treatment in a subsample of these patients was also evaluated. Before undergoing treatment, 258 patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Pain Disability Index (PDI), and the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS). Follow-up data on pain disability, current level of pain, depression, and satisfaction with treatment were obtained on 48 of these patients who were contacted at varying intervals after completing treatment. BDI scores obtained at the outset of treatment were significantly elevated and were positively correlated with SRRS and PDI scores. MPD patients had higher SRRS, BDI depression, and PDI pain disability scores than TMJ patients, and differences between the 2 groups in pain disability were greatest in areas that are often sources of interpersonal stress. Among follow-up patients, PDI scores declined after treatment, with MPD patients showing greater decreases than TMJ patients. Independent of patients' diagnostic status, their pretreatment PDI scores were predictive of their pain level at follow-up and were inversely related to their degree of satisfaction with treatment at follow-up; their pretreatment BDI scores were predictive of their depression level at follow-up. The findings are consistent with previous research indicating a link between emotional dysfunction and TMD and are largely supportive of the conclusion that psychological factors play a more pronounced role when pain is of muscular origin. Promising behavioral interventions are available for

  13. Primary Blast Injury Depressed Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation through Disruption of Synaptic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Edward W; Rwema, Steve H; Meaney, David F; Bass, Cameron R Dale; Morrison, Barclay

    2017-03-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a major threat to United States service members in military conflicts worldwide. The effects of primary blast, caused by the supersonic shockwave interacting with the skull and brain, remain unclear. Our group has previously reported that in vitro primary blast exposure can reduce long-term potentiation (LTP), the electrophysiological correlate of learning and memory, in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) without significant changes to cell viability or basal, evoked neuronal function. We investigated the time course of primary blast-induced deficits in LTP and the molecular mechanisms that could underlie these deficits. We found that pure primary blast exposure induced LTP deficits in a delayed manner, requiring longer than 1 hour to develop, and that these deficits spontaneously recovered by 10 days following exposure depending on blast intensity. Additionally, we observed that primary blast exposure reduced total α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1) subunit expression and phosphorylation of the GluR1 subunit at the serine-831 site. Blast also reduced the expression of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) and phosphorylation of stargazin protein at the serine-239/240 site. Finally, we found that modulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway ameliorated electrophysiological and protein-expression changes caused by blast. These findings could inform the development of novel therapies to treat blast-induced loss of neuronal function.

  14. Long-Term Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety in Mothers of Infants with Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Grønning Dale, Maria T.; Holmstrøm, Henrik; Eskedal, Leif T.; Landolt, Markus A.; Vollrath, Margarete E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between the severity of infants’ congenital heart defects (CHD) and their mothers’ symptoms of depression and anxiety from pregnancy to 18 months postpartum. Methods Mothers of infants with mild, moderate, or severe CHD (n = 162) and mothers (n = 44 400) within the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study were assessed with an eight-item short version (SCL-8) of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 at the 30th week of gestation and at 6 and 18 months postpartum. Results Only the postpartum mental health trajectory of mothers of infants with severe CHD deviated from the mental health trajectory of the cohort at 6 and 18 months postpartum, showing significantly elevated levels of depression and anxiety symptoms. Conclusions The results elucidate the relationship between infants’ CHD severity and maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety, possibly identifying a specifically vulnerable patient dyad in need of postoperative interventions. PMID:20558484

  15. Posttraumatic stress, depression and anxiety among adult long-term survivors of cancer in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Diana C M; Besier, Tanja; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Grabow, Desiree; Dieluweit, Ute; Hinz, Andreas; Kaatsch, Peter; Goldbeck, Lutz

    2010-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of posttraumatic stress, depression and anxiety in adults who have survived cancer (5 years) diagnosed in adolescence, as compared to healthy controls. Survivors (n=820) of cancer during adolescence (age M=30.4+/-6.0 years; M=13.7+/-6.0 years since diagnosis) and 1027 matched controls without history of cancer (age M=31.5+/-6.9 years) completed standardised questionnaires measuring posttraumatic stress, depression and anxiety. Additionally, sub-groups of 202 survivors and 140 controls with elevated scores received structured interviews to ascertain DSM-IV-diagnoses. A total of 22.4% of the survivors reported clinically relevant symptoms of posttraumatic stress, anxiety and/or depression compared to 14.0% of the controls (odds ratios [ORs] 1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-2.26). The odds of posttraumatic stress symptoms in male (OR 3.92, 95% CI 1.80-8.51) and female (OR 3.83, 95% CI 2.54-5.76) survivors were more than three times those in the controls. However, only female survivors reported symptoms of depression and anxiety significantly more often (respectively: OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.16-3.85; and OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.33-2.59) than the controls. A relevant subgroup of 24.3% of the survivors met DSM-IV criteria for at least one mental disorder compared to 15.3% of the controls. Survivors of cancer during adolescence show an elevated risk of presenting symptoms of posttraumatic stress, anxiety and/or depression during adulthood which is also reflected in a greater number of DSM-IV diagnoses when compared to controls. Comprehensive follow-up assessments should include the examination of possible psychological late effects of a cancer diagnosis in adolescence in order to identify survivors needing psychosocial interventions even years after the completion of successful medical treatment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Alteration in plasma corticosterone levels following long term oral administration of lead produces depression like symptoms in rats.

    PubMed

    Haider, Saida; Saleem, Sadia; Tabassum, Saiqa; Khaliq, Saima; Shamim, Saima; Batool, Zehra; Parveen, Tahira; Inam, Qurat-ul-ain; Haleem, Darakhshan J

    2013-03-01

    Lead toxicity is known to induce a broad range of physiological, biochemical and behavioral dysfunctions that may result in adverse effects on several organs, including the central nervous system. Long-term exposure to low levels of lead (Pb(2+)) has been shown to produce behavioral deficits in rodents and humans by affecting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These deficits are thought to be associated with altered brain monoamine neurotransmission and due to changes in glucocorticoids levels. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Pb(2+)exposure on growth rate, locomotor activity, anxiety, depression, plasma corticosterone and brain serotonin (5-HT) levels in rats. Rats were exposed to lead in drinking water (500 ppm; lead acetate) for 5 weeks. The assessment of depression was done using the forced swimming test (FST). Estimation of brain 5-HT was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Plasma corticosterone was determined by spectrofluorimetric method. The present study showed that long term exposure to Pb(2+) significantly decreased the food intake followed by the decrease in growth rate in Pb(2+)exposed rats as compared to control group. No significant changes in open field activity were observed following Pb(2+)exposure while significant increase in anxiogenic effect was observed. Increased plasma corticosterone and decreased 5-HT levels were exhibited by Pb(2+)exposed rats as compared to controls. A significant increase in depressive like symptoms was exhibited by Pb(2+)exposed rats as compared to control rats. The results are discussed in the context of Pb(2+) inducing a stress-like response in rats leading to changes in plasma corticosterone and brain 5-HT levels via altering tryptophan pyrrolase activity.

  17. Short- and long-term depression at glutamatergic synapses on hippocampal interneurons by group I mGluR activation.

    PubMed

    Le Duigou, Caroline; Holden, Thomas; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2011-04-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are expressed by many interneurons of the hippocampus. Although they have been implicated in short- and long-term synaptic plasticity of glutamatergic transmission, their roles in modulating transmission to interneurons are incompletely understood. The selective group I mGluR agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) acutely depressed transmission at synapses in the feed-forward inhibitory pathway made by Schaffer collaterals on interneurons in the rat hippocampal CA1 sub-field. DHPG elicited a qualitatively similar depression at synapses made by pyramidal neuron axon collaterals on interneurons in the feedback circuit in stratum oriens. Selective blockers revealed a link from mGluR1 to reversible, and mGluR5 to long-lasting, depression. The acute DHPG-induced depression was consistently accompanied by an elevation in paired-pulse ratio, implying a presynaptic decrease in release probability. However, it was also attenuated by blocking G-protein and Ca(2+) signalling within the postsynaptic neuron, arguing for a retrograde signalling cascade. The DHPG-evoked depression was unaffected by antagonists of CB1 and GABA(B) receptors but was occluded when presynaptic P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels were blocked. Finally, high-frequency stimulation delivered to an independent conditioning pathway evoked a heterosynaptic reversible depression, which was sensitive to group I mGluR antagonists. Group I mGluRs thus powerfully modulate synaptic excitation of hippocampal interneurons and mediate inter-synaptic cross-talk. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Synaptic Plasticity & Interneurons'.

  18. Activation of Synaptic Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Induces Long-Term Depression at GABAergic Synapses in CNS Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zheng-Quan; Liu, Yu-Wei; Shi, Wei; Dinh, Emilie Hoang; Hamlet, William R.; Curry, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) has been studied extensively at glutamatergic synapses in the CNS. However, much less is known about heterosynaptic long-term plasticity induced by mGluRs at inhibitory synapses. Here we report that pharmacological or synaptic activation of group II mGluRs (mGluR II) induces LTD at GABAergic synapses without affecting the excitatory glutamatergic transmission in neurons of the chicken cochlear nucleus. Coefficient of variation and failure rate analysis suggested that the LTD was expressed presynaptically. The LTD requires presynaptic spike activity, but does not require the activation of NMDA receptors. The classic cAMP-dependent protein kinase A signaling is involved in the transduction pathway. Remarkably, blocking mGluR II increased spontaneous GABA release, indicating the presence of tonic activation of mGluR II by ambient glutamate. Furthermore, synaptically released glutamate induced by electrical stimulations that concurrently activated both the glutamatergic and GABAergic pathways resulted in significant and constant suppression of GABA release at various stimulus frequencies (3.3, 100, and 300 Hz). Strikingly, low-frequency stimulation (1 Hz, 15 min) of the glutamatergic synapses induced heterosynaptic LTD of GABAergic transmission, and the LTD was blocked by mGluR II antagonist, indicating that synaptic activation of mGluR II induced the LTD. This novel form of long-term plasticity in the avian auditory brainstem may play a role in the development as well as in temporal processing in the sound localization circuit. PMID:24089501

  19. GABAergic Activities Control Spike Timing- and Frequency-Dependent Long-Term Depression at Hippocampal Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Makoto; Togashi, Kazunobu; Aihara, Takeshi; Hong, Kyonsoo

    2010-01-01

    GABAergic interneuronal network activities in the hippocampus control a variety of neural functions, including learning and memory, by regulating θ and γ oscillations. How these GABAergic activities at pre- and postsynaptic sites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differentially contribute to synaptic function and plasticity during their repetitive pre- and postsynaptic spiking at θ and γ oscillations is largely unknown. We show here that activities mediated by postsynaptic GABAARs and presynaptic GABABRs determine, respectively, the spike timing- and frequency-dependence of activity-induced synaptic modifications at Schaffer collateral-CA1 excitatory synapses. We demonstrate that both feedforward and feedback GABAAR-mediated inhibition in the postsynaptic cell controls the spike timing-dependent long-term depression of excitatory inputs (“e-LTD”) at the θ frequency. We also show that feedback postsynaptic inhibition specifically causes e-LTD of inputs that induce small postsynaptic currents (<70 pA) with LTP-timing, thus enforcing the requirement of cooperativity for induction of long-term potentiation at excitatory inputs (“e-LTP”). Furthermore, under spike-timing protocols that induce e-LTP and e-LTD at excitatory synapses, we observed parallel induction of LTP and LTD at inhibitory inputs (“i-LTP” and “i-LTD”) to the same postsynaptic cells. Finally, we show that presynaptic GABABR-mediated inhibition plays a major role in the induction of frequency-dependent e-LTD at α and β frequencies. These observations demonstrate the critical influence of GABAergic interneuronal network activities in regulating the spike timing- and frequency-dependences of long-term synaptic modifications in the hippocampus. PMID:21423508

  20. Effect of long-term caffeine administration on depressive-like behavior in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress.

    PubMed

    Pechlivanova, Daniela M; Tchekalarova, Jana D; Alova, Liana H; Petkov, Vesselin V; Nikolov, Rumen P; Yakimova, Krassimira S

    2012-08-01

    Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) was used to study the effects of a long-term treatment with either caffeine (8 mg/kg, orally) or desipramine (DMI) (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) in Wistar rats. The CUS procedure was applied for 6 weeks. Animals underwent a 2-week drug-free CUS procedure. Drugs were administered for 4 weeks alongside the stress and both drug and stress were continued throughout the behavioral testing period. CUS-exposed rats showed depressive-like behavior with reduced weight gain, reduced consumption of sucrose solution, increased immobility in the forced swimming test, and hypolocomotion in an open field. For the open field and elevated plus maze, calculation of an anxiety index confirmed that CUS increased anxiety, which was accompanied by an increase in the core temperature. DMI counteracted these physical and behavioral changes. Caffeine caused similar effects to DMI on weight gain, motor activity, anxiety level, and core temperature. In CUS-exposed rats, caffeine showed antidepressant and anxiolytic activity, accompanied by increased hippocampal dopamine and serotonin levels. However, no significant change in weight gain or core temperature was observed after caffeine treatment in CUS-exposed rats. These results suggest that, similar to the antidepressant DMI, long-term caffeine exposure exerts an antidepressant and anxiolytic effect in the CUS model. The involvement of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems is discussed.

  1. Robustness of retrieval properties against imbalance between long-term potentiation and depression of spike-timing-dependent plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Narihisa; Okada, Masato

    2003-12-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) has recently been shown in some physiological studies. STDP depends on the precise temporal relationship of presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes. Many authors have indicated that a precise balance between long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of STDP is significant for a stable learning. However, a situation in which the balance is maintained precisely is inconceivable in the brain. Using a method of the statistical neurodynamics, we show robust retrieval properties of spatiotemporal patterns in an associative memory model against the imbalance between LTP and LTD. When the fluctuation of LTD is assumed to obey a Gaussian distribution with mean 0 and variance δ2, the storage capacity takes a finite value even at large δ. This means that the balance between LTP and LTD of STDP need not be maintained precisely, but must be maintained on average. Furthermore, we found that the basin of attraction becomes smaller as δ increases while an initial critical overlap remains unchanged.

  2. Intrinsic and synaptic long-term depression of NTS relay of nociceptin- and capsaicin-sensitive cardiopulmonary afferents hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Bantikyan, Armenak; Song, Gang; Feinberg-Zadek, Paula; Poon, Chi-Sang

    2009-03-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the caudal medulla is a gateway for a variety of cardiopulmonary afferents important for homeostatic regulation and defense against airway and cardiovascular insults and is a key central target potentially mediating the response habituation to these inputs. Here, whole-cell and field population action potential recordings and infrared imaging in rat brainstem slices in vitro revealed a compartmental pain-pathway-like organization of capsaicin-facilitated vs. nocistatin-facilitated/nociceptin-suppressed neuronal clusters in an NTS region, which receives cardiopulmonary A- and C-fiber afferents with differing capsaicin sensitivities. All capsaicin-sensitive neurons and a fraction of nociceptin-sensitive neurons expressed N-methyl-D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent synaptic long-term depression (LTD) following afferent stimulation. All neurons also expressed activity-dependent decrease of excitability (intrinsic LTD), which converted to NMDA receptor-dependent intrinsic long-term potentiation after GABA(A) receptor blockade. Thus, distinct intrinsic and synaptic LTD mechanisms in the NTS specific to the relay of A- or C-fiber afferents may underlie the response habituation to persistent afferents hyperactivity that are associated with varying physiologic challenges and cardiopulmonary derangements-including hypertension, chronic cough, asthmatic bronchoconstriction, sustained elevated lung volume in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or in continuous positive-airway-pressure therapy for sleep apnea, metabolic acidosis, and prolonged exposure to hypoxia at high altitude.

  3. Properties of the corticostriatal long term depression induced by medial prefrontal cortex high frequency stimulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Braz, Barbara Y; Belforte, Juan E; Murer, M Gustavo; Galiñanes, Gregorio L

    2017-07-15

    Repetitive stimulation of cognitive forebrain circuits at frequencies capable of inducing corticostriatal long term plasticity is increasingly being used with therapeutic purposes in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. However, corticostriatal plasticity is rarely studied in the intact brain. Our aim was to study the mechanisms of corticostriatal long term depression (LTD) induced by high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the medial prefrontal cortex in vivo. Our main finding is that the LTD induced in the dorsomedial striatum by medial prefrontal cortex HFS in vivo (prefrontostriatal LTD) is not affected by manipulations that block or reduce the LTD induced in the dorsolateral striatum by motor cortex HFS in brain slices, including pharmacological dopamine receptor and CB1 receptor blockade, chronic nigrostriatal dopamine depletion, CB1 receptor genetic deletion and selective striatal cholinergic interneuron (SCIN) ablation. Conversely, like in the hippocampus and other brain areas, prefrontostriatal LTD is NMDA receptor dependent. Thus, we describe a novel form of corticostriatal LTD that operates in brain circuits involved in reward and cognition and could be relevant for understanding the therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hampered long-term depression and thin spine loss in the nucleus accumbens of ethanol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Spiga, Saturnino; Talani, Giuseppe; Mulas, Giovanna; Licheri, Valentina; Fois, Giulia R; Muggironi, Giulia; Masala, Nicola; Cannizzaro, Carla; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico; Diana, Marco

    2014-09-02

    Alcoholism involves long-term cognitive deficits, including memory impairment, resulting in substantial cost to society. Neuronal refinement and stabilization are hypothesized to confer resilience to poor decision making and addictive-like behaviors, such as excessive ethanol drinking and dependence. Accordingly, structural abnormalities are likely to contribute to synaptic dysfunctions that occur from suddenly ceasing the use of alcohol after chronic ingestion. Here we show that ethanol-dependent rats display a loss of dendritic spines in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) shell, accompanied by a reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and postsynaptic density 95-positive elements. Further analysis indicates that "long thin" but not "mushroom" spines are selectively affected. In addition, patch-clamp experiments from Nacc slices reveal that long-term depression (LTD) formation is hampered, with parallel changes in field potential recordings and reductions in NMDA-mediated synaptic currents. These changes are restricted to the withdrawal phase of ethanol dependence, suggesting their relevance in the genesis of signs and/or symptoms affecting ethanol withdrawal and thus the whole addictive cycle. Overall, these results highlight the key role of dynamic alterations in dendritic spines and their presynaptic afferents in the evolution of alcohol dependence. Furthermore, they suggest that the selective loss of long thin spines together with a reduced NMDA receptor function may affect learning. Disruption of this LTD could contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in alcohol dependence.

  5. Effect of the Initial Synaptic State on the Probability to Induce Long-Term Potentiation and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Michele; De Simone, Giada; Migliore, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are the two major forms of long-lasting synaptic plasticity in the mammalian neurons, and are directly related to higher brain functions such as learning and memory. Experimentally, they are characterized by a change in the strength of a synaptic connection induced by repetitive and properly patterned stimulation protocols. Although many important details of the molecular events leading to LTP and LTD are known, experimenters often report problems in using standard induction protocols to obtain consistent results, especially for LTD in vivo. We hypothesize that a possible source of confusion in interpreting the results, from any given experiment on synaptic plasticity, can be the intrinsic limitation of the experimental techniques, which cannot take into account the actual state and peak conductance of the synapses before the conditioning protocol. In this article, we investigate the possibility that the same experimental protocol may result in different consequences (e.g., LTD instead of LTP), according to the initial conditions of the stimulated synapses, and can generate confusing results. Using biophysical models of synaptic plasticity and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, we study how, why, and to what extent the phenomena observed at the soma after induction of LTP/LTD reflects the actual (local) synaptic state. The model and the results suggest a physiologically plausible explanation for why LTD induction is experimentally difficult to obtain. They also suggest experimentally testable predictions on the stimulation protocols that may be more effective. PMID:25762316

  6. Mild Concussion, but Not Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury, Is Associated with Long-Term Depression-Like Phenotype in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Nikita M; Halavi, Shina; Hamer, Mary; Semple, Bridgette D; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J; Baghchechi, Mohsen; Hiroto, Alex; Hartman, Richard E; Obenaus, André

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries can lead to long-lasting cognitive and motor deficits, increasing the risk of future behavioral, neurological, and affective disorders. Our study focused on long-term behavioral deficits after repeated injury in which mice received either a single mild CHI (mCHI), a repeated mild CHI (rmCHI) consisting of one impact to each hemisphere separated by 3 days, or a moderate controlled cortical impact injury (CCI). Shams received only anesthesia. Behavioral tests were administered at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 90 days post-injury (dpi). CCI animals showed significant motor and sensory deficits in the early (1-7 dpi) and long-term (90 dpi) stages of testing. Interestingly, sensory and subtle motor deficits in rmCHI animals were found at 90 dpi. Most importantly, depression-like behaviors and social passiveness were observed in rmCHI animals at 90 dpi. These data suggest that mild concussive injuries lead to motor and sensory deficits and affective disorders that are not observed after moderate TBI.

  7. Hampered long-term depression and thin spine loss in the nucleus accumbens of ethanol-dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Spiga, Saturnino; Talani, Giuseppe; Mulas, Giovanna; Licheri, Valentina; Fois, Giulia R.; Muggironi, Giulia; Masala, Nicola; Cannizzaro, Carla; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico; Diana, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism involves long-term cognitive deficits, including memory impairment, resulting in substantial cost to society. Neuronal refinement and stabilization are hypothesized to confer resilience to poor decision making and addictive-like behaviors, such as excessive ethanol drinking and dependence. Accordingly, structural abnormalities are likely to contribute to synaptic dysfunctions that occur from suddenly ceasing the use of alcohol after chronic ingestion. Here we show that ethanol-dependent rats display a loss of dendritic spines in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) shell, accompanied by a reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and postsynaptic density 95-positive elements. Further analysis indicates that “long thin” but not “mushroom” spines are selectively affected. In addition, patch-clamp experiments from Nacc slices reveal that long-term depression (LTD) formation is hampered, with parallel changes in field potential recordings and reductions in NMDA-mediated synaptic currents. These changes are restricted to the withdrawal phase of ethanol dependence, suggesting their relevance in the genesis of signs and/or symptoms affecting ethanol withdrawal and thus the whole addictive cycle. Overall, these results highlight the key role of dynamic alterations in dendritic spines and their presynaptic afferents in the evolution of alcohol dependence. Furthermore, they suggest that the selective loss of long thin spines together with a reduced NMDA receptor function may affect learning. Disruption of this LTD could contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in alcohol dependence. PMID:25122682

  8. Mild Concussion, but Not Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury, Is Associated with Long-Term Depression-Like Phenotype in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Mary; Semple, Bridgette D.; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Baghchechi, Mohsen; Hiroto, Alex; Hartman, Richard E.; Obenaus, André

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries can lead to long-lasting cognitive and motor deficits, increasing the risk of future behavioral, neurological, and affective disorders. Our study focused on long-term behavioral deficits after repeated injury in which mice received either a single mild CHI (mCHI), a repeated mild CHI (rmCHI) consisting of one impact to each hemisphere separated by 3 days, or a moderate controlled cortical impact injury (CCI). Shams received only anesthesia. Behavioral tests were administered at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 90 days post-injury (dpi). CCI animals showed significant motor and sensory deficits in the early (1–7 dpi) and long-term (90 dpi) stages of testing. Interestingly, sensory and subtle motor deficits in rmCHI animals were found at 90 dpi. Most importantly, depression-like behaviors and social passiveness were observed in rmCHI animals at 90 dpi. These data suggest that mild concussive injuries lead to motor and sensory deficits and affective disorders that are not observed after moderate TBI. PMID:26796696

  9. Long-term outcomes from the PEARLS randomized trial for the treatment of depression in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chaytor, Naomi; Ciechanowski, Paul; Miller, John W; Fraser, Robert; Russo, Joan; Unutzer, Jurgen; Gilliam, Frank

    2011-03-01

    Depression is associated with higher rates of suicide and lower quality of life in individuals with epilepsy. We previously published the 12-month outcome from our randomized clinical trial of PEARLS (Ciechanowski P, Chaytor N, Miller J, et al. Epilepsy Behav. Epub 5 July 2010). The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term effectiveness of PEARLS, a home-based collaborative care intervention consisting of problem-solving treatment, behavioral activation, and psychiatric consultation, in individuals with epilepsy. Patients were randomly assigned to PEARLS (N=40) or usual care (N=40), and assessed at baseline and 6, 12, and 18 months. Patients assigned to PEARLS achieved lower depression severity (P<0.05) (Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-20), lower suicidal ideation (P<0.02), and better emotional well being (QOLIE-31) (P<0.02) over 18 months, compared with patients given the usual care. The PEARLS program significantly reduces depressive symptoms in adults with epilepsy, and this effect is maintained for 18 months after baseline and for more than 1 year after completion of home visits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnostic interview study of the prevalence of depression among public employees engaged in long-term relief work in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Masaharu; Ueda, Yukiko; Nagai, Masato; Fujii, Senta; Oe, Misari

    2016-09-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake and in particular, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, have had a serious psychological impact on not only residents, but also relief workers in Fukushima. Although public employees work in highly stressful situations and play a very important role in long-term relief, their psychiatric features have yet to be clarified. The two aims of this study were to identify the current prevalence rate of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder among public employees working in the disaster area using diagnostic interviews, and to speculate on the psychosocial factors affecting their mental condition. We conducted diagnostic interviews and self-administered questionnaires with 168 public employees working in two coastal towns in Fukushima. Results showed that the current prevalence of depression among public employees is as high as 17.9%, in contrast to the relatively low prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (4.8%). Based on the results of self-administered questionnaires and interview contents, frequent exposure to strong complaints or anger from residents and role conflicts were considered the cause of the high prevalence of depression. The present study reveals the serious mental status of public employees working in Fukushima and sheds light on the urgent need to establish an efficient care network to provide adequate psychiatric intervention. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  11. Decreased frequency but not amplitude of quantal synaptic responses associated with expression of corticostriatal long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Lovinger, D M

    1997-11-01

    We have investigated the site of expression of striatal long-term synaptic depression (LTD) using analysis of Sr2+-induced asynchronous release of quanta from stimulated synapses. The cumulative amplitude distribution of Sr2+-induced asynchronous synaptic responses overlaps with that of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs), suggesting that Sr2+-induced asynchronous responses are quantal. Quantal amplitude at stimulated synapses is not significantly altered after LTD induction, whereas quantal frequency decreases after LTD induction. The decrease in quantal frequency is prevented when LTD expression is blocked by dialyzing 10 mM EGTA into the postsynaptic neuron. Our findings are most consistent with the idea that expression of striatal LTD involves decreased neurotransmitter release with no change in quantal amplitude, despite the fact that induction of striatal LTD involves postsynaptic mechanisms.

  12. Mechanisms of induction and expression of long-term depression at GABAergic synapses in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caillard, O; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaïarsa, J L

    1999-09-01

    Synaptic plasticity at excitatory glutamatergic synapses is believed to be instrumental in the maturation of neuronal networks. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we have studied the mechanisms of induction and expression of long-term depression at excitatory GABAergic synapses in the neonatal rat hippocampus (LTD(GABA-A)). We report that the induction of LTD(GABA-A) requires a GABA(A) receptor-mediated membrane depolarization, which is necessary to remove the Mg(2+) block from postsynaptic NMDA receptors. LTD(GABA-A) is associated with an increase in the coefficient of variation of evoked GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic currents and a decrease in the frequency, but not amplitude, of Sr(2+)-induced asynchronous GABA(A) quantal events. We conclude that LTD(GABA-A) induction requires the activation of both GABA(A) and NMDA postsynaptic receptors and that its expression is likely presynaptic.

  13. Deficient cerebellar long-term depression and impaired motor learning in mGluR1 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Aiba, A; Kano, M; Chen, C; Stanton, M E; Fox, G D; Herrup, K; Zwingman, T A; Tonegawa, S

    1994-10-21

    mGluR1 mutant mice are viable but show characteristic cerebellar symptoms such as ataxic gait and intention tremor. The anatomy of the cerebellum is not overtly disturbed. Excitatory synaptic transmission from parallel fibers (PFs) to Purkinje cells and that from climbing fibers (CFs) to Purkinje cells appear to be functional, and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels of Purkinje cells are normal. Both PF and CF synapses display normal short-term synaptic plasticity to paired stimuli. By marked contrast, long-term depression (LTD) is clearly deficient and conditioned eyeblink response is impaired. We conclude that mGluR1 is required for the induction of LTD and that the ataxic behavior and impaired eyeblink conditioning of the mGluR1 mutant mice are primarily due to deficient LTD.

  14. Glutamatergic synapses are structurally and biochemically complex because of multiple plasticity processes: long-term potentiation, long-term depression, short-term potentiation and scaling.

    PubMed

    Lisman, John

    2017-03-05

    Synapses are complex because they perform multiple functions, including at least six mechanistically different forms of plasticity. Here, I comment on recent developments regarding these processes. (i) Short-term potentiation (STP), a Hebbian process that requires small amounts of synaptic input, appears to make strong contributions to some forms of working memory. (ii) The rules for long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in CA3 have been clarified: induction does not depend obligatorily on backpropagating sodium spikes but, rather, on dendritic branch-specific N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) spikes. (iii) Late LTP, a process that requires a dopamine signal (and is therefore neoHebbian), is mediated by trans-synaptic growth of the synapse, a growth that occurs about an hour after LTP induction. (iv) LTD processes are complex and include both homosynaptic and heterosynaptic forms. (v) Synaptic scaling produced by changes in activity levels are not primarily cell-autonomous, but rather depend on network activity. (vi) The evidence for distance-dependent scaling along the primary dendrite is firm, and a plausible structural-based mechanism is suggested.Ideas about the mechanisms of synaptic function need to take into consideration newly emerging data about synaptic structure. Recent super-resolution studies indicate that glutamatergic synapses are modular (module size 70-80 nm), as predicted by theoretical work. Modules are trans-synaptic structures and have high concentrations of postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor. These modules function as quasi-independent loci of AMPA-mediated transmission and may be independently modifiable, suggesting a new understanding of quantal transmission.This article is part of the themed issue 'Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity.'

  15. Layer-specific endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission onto principal neurons in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjuan; Wang, Laijian; Li, Shuo; Tie, Xiaoxiu; Jiang, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Visually induced endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission (iLTD) mediates the maturation of GABAergic release in layer 2/3 of visual cortex. Here we examined whether the maturation of GABAergic transmission in other layers of visual cortex also requires endocannabinoids. The developmental plasticity of GABAergic neurotransmission onto the principal neurons in different layers of mouse visual cortex was examined in cortical slices by whole-cell recordings of inhibitory postsynaptic currents evoked by presynaptic inhibitory inputs. Theta burst stimulation of GABAergic inputs induced an endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission onto pyramidal cells in layer 2/3 from postnatal day (P)10 to 30 and in layer 5 from P10 to 40, whereas that of GABAergic inputs did not induce iLTD onto star pyramidal neurons in layer 4 at any time postnatally, indicating that this plasticity is laminar-specific. The developmental loss of iLTD paralleled the maturation of GABAergic inhibition in both layer 2/3 and layer 5. Visual deprivation delayed the developmental loss of iLTD in layers 3 and 5 during a critical period, while 2 days of light exposure eliminated iLTD in both layers. Furthermore, the GABAergic synapses in layers 2/3 and 5 did not normally mature in the type 1 cannabinoid receptor knock-out mice, whereas those in layer 4 did not require endocannabinoid receptor for maturation. These results suggest that visually induced endocannabinoid-dependent iLTD mediates the maturation of GABAergic release in extragranular layer rather than in granular layer of mouse visual cortex.

  16. Mirtazapine versus amitriptyline in the long-term treatment of depression: a double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, S A; Reimitz, P E; Zivkov, M

    1998-03-01

    Of 580 patients randomly assigned to short-term, double-blind treatment with either mirtazapine, amitriptyline or placebo, a total of 217 patients clinically judged to be responders subsequently continued on the same medication for up to 2 years in the long-term treatment study (mirtazapine, n = 74; amitriptyline, n = 86 and placebo, n = 57). The efficacy of mirtazapine in relapse prevention was seen in an analysis of the first 20 weeks data. Significantly fewer patients relapsed during treatment with mirtazapine compared with placebo (p < 0.05), and a significantly longer time to relapse was shown on the survival analysis. There was a significant advantage for amitriptyline compared with placebo in the first 20 weeks, with fewer patients relapsing. There was a significant advantage for mirtazapine compared with amitriptyline at 20 weeks seen on the survival analysis (p < 0.05). The significant advantage for mirtazapine compared with placebo was also seen in the prophylactic phase of treatment after 20 weeks. At the endpoint there were significantly more patients in the placebo group with a return of symptoms and significantly fewer showing sustained response. Amitriptyline was better than placebo with fewer patients suffering a recurrence of symptoms, but there was no difference from placebo in the proportion of patients with sustained response. Mirtazapine was well tolerated with a side-effect profile similar to that of placebo. The only adverse event reported significantly more frequently on mirtazapine than on placebo was weight gain. Objectively measured weight gain was more frequent with amitriptyline (22% of patients) compared with mirtazapine (13% of patients). Amitriptyline was associated with significantly more adverse events than either mirtazapine or placebo, in particular sedative and anticholinergic side effects. The efficacy of mirtazapine in reducing the risk of relapse and the recurrence of depression, which on some measures showed an advantage

  17. Canonical JAK-STAT signaling is pivotal for long-term depression at adult hippocampal temporoammonic-CA1 synapses.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Gemma; Irving, Andrew J; Harvey, Jenni

    2017-08-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is involved in numerous cellular processes and it is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, like Alzheimer disease. Recent studies identified a crucial role for this pathway in activity-dependent long-term depression (LTD) at hippocampal Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapses. However, it is unclear whether JAK-STAT signaling also regulates excitatory synaptic function at the anatomically distinct temporoammonic (TA) input to CA1 neurons. Here we demonstrate that LTD at adult TA-CA1 synapses involves JAK-STAT signaling, but unlike SC-CA1 synapses, requires rapid gene transcription. TA-CA1 LTD requires NMDA receptor activation and is independent of PI3K or ERK signaling. JAK-STAT signaling was critical for TA-CA1 LTD as inhibition of JAK or STAT blocked LTD induction and prevented NMDA-induced AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor internalization in hippocampal neurons. Moreover, an increase in phosphorylated JAK2 and STAT3 accompanied chemical induction of LTD and AMPA receptor internalization. STAT3-driven gene transcription was required for LTD as inhibition of STAT3-DNA binding, nuclear export, and gene transcription all prevented LTD induction. These data indicate an essential role for canonical JAK-STAT signaling in activity-dependent LTD at TA-CA1 synapses and provide valuable insight into the role of the TA input in hippocampal synaptic plasticity.-McGregor, G., Irving, A. J., Harvey, J. Canonical JAK-STAT signaling is pivotal for long-term depression at adult hippocampal temporoammonic-CA1 synapses. © FASEB.

  18. Combining pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy or monotherapy for major depression? A meta-analysis on the long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Karyotaki, E; Smit, Y; Holdt Henningsen, K; Huibers, M J H; Robays, J; de Beurs, D; Cuijpers, P

    2016-04-01

    The present meta-analysis aimed to examine to what extent combined pharmacotherapy with psychotherapy results in a different response to treatment compared to psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy alone in adults with major depression at six months or longer postrandomization. A systematic literature search resulted in 23 randomized controlled trials with 2184 participants. Combined treatment was compared to either psychotherapy or anti-depressant medication alone in both the acute phase and the maintenance phase. Odds ratios of a positive outcome were calculated for all comparisons. In acute phase treatment, combined psychotherapy with antidepressants outperformed antidepressants alone at six months or longer postrandomization in patients with major depressive disorder (OR=2.93, 95%CI 2.15-3.99, p<0.001). Heterogeneity was zero (95%CI 0-57%, p>0.05). However, combined therapy resulted in equal response to treatment compared to psychotherapy alone at six months or longer postrandomization. As for the maintenance treatment, combined maintenance psychotherapy with antidepressants resulted in better-sustained treatment response compared to antidepressants at six months or longer postrandomization (OR=1.61, 95%CI 1.14-2.27, p<0.05). Heterogeneity was zero (95%CI 0-68%, p>0.05). Combined therapy results in a superior enduring effect compared to antidepressants alone in patients with major depression. Psychotherapy is an adequate alternative for combined treatment in the acute phase as it is as effective as combined treatment in the long-term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dimorphic changes of some features of loving relationships during long-term use of antidepressants in depressed outpatients.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, Donatella; Akiskal, Hagop S; Udo, Mieko; Picchetti, Michela; Baroni, Stefano; Massimetti, Gabriele; Albanese, Francesco; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the possible changes of some features of loving relationships during long-term treatment of depression with both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclics (TCAs), by means of a specifically designed test, the so-called "Sex, Attachment, Love" (SALT) questionnaire. The sample was composed by 192 outpatients (123 women and 69 men, mean age±SD: 41.2±10.2 years), suffering from mild or moderate depression, according to DSM-IV-TR criteria, that were selected if they were treated with one antidepressant only for at least six months and were involved in a loving relationship. The results showed that SSRIs had a significant impact on the feelings of love and attachment towards the partner especially in men, while women taking TCAs complained of more sexual side effects than men. These data were supported also by the detection of a significant interaction between drug and sex on the "Love" and "Sex" domains. The present findings, while demonstrating a dimorphic effect of antidepressants on some component of loving relationships, need to be deepened in future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Social Pavlovian conditioning: Short- and long-term effects and the role of anxiety and depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Frank H.; Boger, Sabrina; Georgii, Claudio; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Blechert, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Today’s stressors largely arise from social interactions rather than from physical threat. However, the dominant laboratory model of emotional learning relies on physical stimuli (e.g. electric shock) whereas adequate models of social conditioning are missing, possibly due to more subtle and multilayered biobehavioral responses to such stimuli. To fill this gap, we acquired a broad set of measures during conditioning to negative social unconditioned stimuli, also taking into account long-term maintenance of conditioning and inter-individual differences. Fifty-nine healthy participants underwent a classical conditioning task with videos of actors expressing disapproving (US-neg) or neutral (US-neu) statements. Static images of the corresponding actors with a neutral facial expression served as CS+ and CS−, predicting US-neg and US-neu, respectively. Autonomic and facial-muscular measures confirmed differential unconditioned responding whereas experiential CS ratings, event-related potentials, and evoked theta oscillations confirmed differential conditioned responding. Conditioning was maintained at 1 month and 1 year follow-ups on experiential ratings, especially in individuals with elevated anxiety and depressive symptoms, documenting the efficiency of social conditioning and its clinical relevance. This novel, ecologically improved conditioning paradigm uncovered a remarkably efficient multi-layered social learning mechanism that may represent a risk factor for anxiety and depression. PMID:27614767

  1. Induction of Long-term Depression-like Plasticity by Pairings of Motor Imagination and Peripheral Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jochumsen, Mads; Signal, Nada; Nedergaard, Rasmus W; Taylor, Denise; Haavik, Heidi; Niazi, Imran K

    2015-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity are models of synaptic plasticity which have been associated with memory and learning. The induction of LTD and LTP-like plasticity, using different stimulation protocols, has been proposed as a means of addressing abnormalities in cortical excitability associated with conditions such as focal hand dystonia and stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the excitability of the cortical projections to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle could be decreased when dorsiflexion of the ankle joint was imagined and paired with peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) of the nerve supplying the antagonist soleus muscle. The effect of stimulus timing was evaluated by comparing paired stimulation timed to reach the cortex before, at and after the onset of imagined movement. Fourteen healthy subjects participated in six experimental sessions held on non-consecutive days. The timing of stimulation delivery was determined offline based on the contingent negative variation (CNV) of electroencephalography brain data obtained during imagined dorsiflexion. Afferent stimulation was provided via a single pulse ES to the peripheral nerve paired, based on the CNV, with motor imagination of ankle dorsiflexion. A significant decrease (P = 0.001) in the excitability of the cortical projection of TA was observed when the afferent volley from the ES of the tibial nerve (TN) reached the cortex at the onset of motor imagination based on the CNV. When TN stimulation was delivered before (P = 0.62), or after (P = 0.23) imagined movement onset there was no significant effect. Nor was a significant effect found when ES of the TN was applied independent of imagined movement (P = 0.45). Therefore, the excitability of the cortical projection to a muscle can be inhibited when ES of the nerve supplying the antagonist muscle is precisely paired with the onset of imagined movement.

  2. Long-Term Effects of a Screening Intervention for Depression on Suicide Rates among Japanese Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Sakashita, Tomoe

    2016-04-01

    To explore the long-term impact of a universal screening intervention for depression on suicide rates among older community-dwelling adults, with gender as an effect modifier. Controlled cohort study reporting long-term follow-up of previous research. Two sets of three municipalities in Japan were assigned as intervention and control regions and compared with the surrounding zone and prefecture. Intervention area residents aged 60 years and older (14,291) were invited to participate in a 2-year intervention (2005-2006). Four population-based dynamic cohorts of residents aged 65 years and older (1999-2010) were included as subjects, 6 years before and after the intervention started. At-risk residents within the intervention region (4,918) were invited for a two-step screening program; 2,552 participated in the program linked with care/support services for 2 years. An education program open to the public was held. Changes in suicide from a 6-year baseline to the 2-year intervention and a 4-year follow-up in the intervention region (11,700 adults ≥65 years) were compared with a matched control and two comparison areas using mixed-effects negative binomial regression models. Suicide rates among older adults exposed to screening were compared with those of the control region. Suicide rates in the intervention region decreased by 48%, which was significantly greater than in the three comparison areas. The program's benefits lasted longer for women than men. Screening exposure may be associated with decreased suicide risk over the 4-year follow-up. Universal screening may decrease suicide rates among older adults, with potential gender differences in treatment response. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Sodium Channel β4 Auxiliary Subunit Selectively Controls Long-Term Depression in Core Nucleus Accumbens Medium Spiny Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xincai; Saha, Sucharita; Gao, Guangping; Lasek, Amy W.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Guildford, Melissa; Tapper, Andrew R.; Martin, Gilles E.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for generating the initial rapid depolarization of neuronal membrane potential during action potentials (APs) that enable cell-to-cell communication, the propagation of signals throughout the brain, and the induction of synaptic plasticity. Although all brain neurons express one or several variants coding for the core pore-forming sodium channel α subunit, the expression of the β (β1–4) auxiliary subunits varies greatly. Of particular interest is the β4 subunit, encoded by the Scn4b gene, that is highly expressed in dorsal and ventral (i.e., nucleus accumbens – NAc) striata compared to other brain regions, and that endows sodium channels with unique gating properties. However, its role on neuronal activity, synaptic plasticity, and behaviors related to drugs of abuse remains poorly understood. Combining whole-cell patch-clamp recordings with two-photon calcium imaging in Scn4b knockout (KO) and knockdown mice, we found that Scn4b altered the properties of APs in core accumbens medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These alterations are associated with a reduction of the probability of MSNs to evoke spike-timing-dependent long-term depression (tLTD) and a reduced ability of backpropagating APs to evoke dendritic calcium transients. In contrast, long-term potentiation (tLTP) remained unaffected. Interestingly, we also showed that amphetamine-induced locomotor activity was significantly reduced in male Scn4b KO mice compared to wild-type controls. Taken together, these data indicate that the Scn4b subunit selectively controls tLTD by modulating dendritic calcium transients evoked by backpropagating APs. PMID:28243192

  4. Induction of Long-term Depression-like Plasticity by Pairings of Motor Imagination and Peripheral Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jochumsen, Mads; Signal, Nada; Nedergaard, Rasmus W.; Taylor, Denise; Haavik, Heidi; Niazi, Imran K.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity are models of synaptic plasticity which have been associated with memory and learning. The induction of LTD and LTP-like plasticity, using different stimulation protocols, has been proposed as a means of addressing abnormalities in cortical excitability associated with conditions such as focal hand dystonia and stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the excitability of the cortical projections to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle could be decreased when dorsiflexion of the ankle joint was imagined and paired with peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) of the nerve supplying the antagonist soleus muscle. The effect of stimulus timing was evaluated by comparing paired stimulation timed to reach the cortex before, at and after the onset of imagined movement. Fourteen healthy subjects participated in six experimental sessions held on non-consecutive days. The timing of stimulation delivery was determined offline based on the contingent negative variation (CNV) of electroencephalography brain data obtained during imagined dorsiflexion. Afferent stimulation was provided via a single pulse ES to the peripheral nerve paired, based on the CNV, with motor imagination of ankle dorsiflexion. A significant decrease (P = 0.001) in the excitability of the cortical projection of TA was observed when the afferent volley from the ES of the tibial nerve (TN) reached the cortex at the onset of motor imagination based on the CNV. When TN stimulation was delivered before (P = 0.62), or after (P = 0.23) imagined movement onset there was no significant effect. Nor was a significant effect found when ES of the TN was applied independent of imagined movement (P = 0.45). Therefore, the excitability of the cortical projection to a muscle can be inhibited when ES of the nerve supplying the antagonist muscle is precisely paired with the onset of imagined movement. PMID:26648859

  5. Resting state synchrony in long-term abstinent alcoholics: Effects of a current major depressive disorder diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fein, George; Camchong, Jazmin; Cardenas, Valerie A; Stenger, Andy

    2017-03-01

    Alcoholism is characterized by a lack of control over an impulsive and compulsive drive toward excessive alcohol consumption despite significant negative consequences; our previous work demonstrated that successful abstinence is characterized by decreased resting-state synchrony (RSS) as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), within appetitive drive networks and increased RSS in emotion regulation and inhibitory executive control networks. Our hypothesis is that LTAA (Long-Term Abstinent Alcoholics) with a current major depressive disorder (MDD) drank primarily to deal with the negative affect associated with their MDD and not because of a heightened externalizing diathesis (including heightened appetitive drive), and consequently, in achieving and maintaining abstinence, such individuals would not exhibit the RSS adaptations characteristic of pure alcoholics. We studied 69 NSAC (Non Substance Abusing Controls) and 40 LTAA (8 with current MDD, 32 without a current MDD) using resting-state fMRI and seed based connectivity analyses. In the inhibitory executive control network (nucleus accumbens vs. left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), LTAA with a current MDD showed increased synchrony compared to NSAC. In the emotion regulation executive control network (subgenual anterior cingulate cortex vs. right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), LTAA with current MDD did not show increased RSS. In the appetitive drive networks (nucleus accumbens vs, aspects of the caudate nucleus and thalamus), LTAA with a current MDD did not show a reduction of RSS compared to NSAC, but LTAA without a current MDD did. These results suggest different pathways to their alcohol dependence in LTAA with vs. without a current MDD, and different patterns of brain activity in long-term abstinence, suggesting different treatment needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effectiveness of group reminiscence therapy for loneliness, anxiety and depression in older adults in long-term care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Syed Elias, Sharifah Munirah; Neville, Christine; Scott, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Loneliness, anxiety and depression are common problems for older adults in long-term care. Reminiscence therapy is a non-pharmacological intervention that may be of some benefit. In comparison to individual reminiscence therapy, group reminiscence therapy is a preferred option when dealing with the resource constraints of long-term care. The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature in order to explore the effectiveness of group reminiscence therapy for older adults with loneliness, anxiety and depression in long-term care. Results indicated that group reminiscence therapy is an effective treatment for depression in older adults, however to date, there is limited research support for its effectiveness to treat loneliness and anxiety. Further research and an improvement in methodological quality, such as using qualitative and mixed methods approaches, is recommended to help establish an evidence base and provide better understanding of the effectiveness of group reminiscence therapy.

  7. Long-term effects of adolescent smoking on depression and socioeconomic status in adulthood in an urban African American cohort.

    PubMed

    Strong, Carol; Juon, Hee-Soon; Ensminger, Margaret E

    2014-06-01

    Despite known adverse causal effects of cigarette smoking on mental health, findings for the effects of adolescent cigarette smoking on later depression and socioeconomic status remain inconclusive. Previous studies have had shorter follow-up periods and did not have a representative portion of the African American population. Using an analytical method that matches adolescent smokers with nonsmokers on childhood and background variables, this study aims to provide evidence on the effects of adolescent regular smoking on adult depression and socioeconomic status. Our longitudinal study is from the Woodlawn Study that followed 1,242 African Americans in Chicago from 1966-1967 (at age 6-7) through 2002-2003 (at age 42-43). We used a propensity score matching method to find a regular and a non-regular adolescent smoking group with similar childhood socioeconomic and family background and first grade academic and behavioral performance. We compared the matched samples to assess the longitudinal effects of adolescent smoking on adult outcomes. Comparing the matched 199 adolescent regular smokers and 199 non-regular smokers, we found statistical support for the effects of adolescent cigarette smoking on later educational attainment (OR, 2.13; 95 % CI, 1.34, 3.39) and long-term unemployment (OR, 1.74; 95 % CI, 1.11, 2.75), but did not find support for the effects on adulthood major depressive disorders. With a community population of urban African Americans followed for 40 years, our study contributes to the understanding of the relationships between adolescent smoking and later educational attainment and employment.

  8. Daily activity level improvement with antidepressant medications predicts long-term clinical outcomes in outpatients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Manish K; Teer, Raymond B; Minhajuddin, Abu; Greer, Tracy L; Rush, A John; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2017-01-01

    independently predicts long-term clinical outcomes. Brief systematic assessment of activity impairment during the course of antidepressant treatment can help inform clinical decision-making. PMID:28352180

  9. mGlu5 receptors and cellular prion protein mediate amyloid-β-facilitated synaptic long-term depression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Neng-Wei; Nicoll, Andrew J.; Zhang, Dainan; Mably, Alexandra J.; O’Malley, Tiernan; Purro, Silvia A.; Terry, Cassandra; Collinge, John; Walsh, Dominic M.; Rowan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) are currently regarded as paramount in the potent and selective disruption of synaptic plasticity by Alzheimer’s disease amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Non-NMDAR mechanisms remain relatively unexplored. Here we describe how Aβ facilitates NMDAR-independent long-term depression of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus in vivo. Synthetic Aβ and Aβ in soluble extracts of Alzheimer’s disease brain usurp endogenous acetylcholine muscarinic receptor-dependent long-term depression, to enable long-term depression that required metabotropic glutamate-5 receptors (mGlu5Rs). We also find that mGlu5Rs are essential for Aβ-mediated inhibition of NMDAR-dependent long-term potentiation in vivo. Blocking Aβ binding to cellular prion protein with antibodies prevents the facilitation of long-term depression. Our findings uncover an overarching role for Aβ-PrPC-mGlu5R interplay in mediating both LTD facilitation and LTP inhibition, encompassing NMDAR-mediated processes that were previously considered primary. PMID:24594908

  10. Ethanol attenuation of long-term depression in the nucleus accumbens can be overcome by activation of TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Renteria, Rafael; Jeanes, Zachary M; Morrisett, Richard A

    2014-11-01

    Altered expression of synaptic plasticity within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) constitutes a critical neuroadaptive response to ethanol (EtOH) and other drugs of abuse. We have previously reported that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term depression (LTD) is markedly affected by chronic intermittent ethanol exposure in vivo; however, endocannabinoid (eCB)-dependent synaptic depression, despite being very well-documented in the dorsal striatum, is much less well understood in the NAc. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology was used to investigate interactions between these different plasticity-induction systems. Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were measured in the NAc shell and NMDAR-LTD was induced by a pairing protocol (500 stimuli at 1 Hz stimulation [low-frequency stimulation (LFS)] paired with postsynaptic depolarization to -50 mV). AM251, a CB1 receptor antagonist, was used to determine whether this form of LTD is modulated by eCBs. To determine the effect of EtOH on a purely eCB-dependent response in the NAc, depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) was used in the presence of 40 mM EtOH. Finally, we determined whether the enhancement of eCB signaling with URB597, a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, and AM404, an anandamide re-uptake inhibitor would also modulate LFS LTD in the presence of NMDAR blockade or EtOH. In the presence of AM251, the LFS pairing protocol resulted in NMDAR-dependent long-term potentiation that was blocked with either EtOH or DL-APV. We also found that DSE in the NAc shell was blocked by AM251 and suppressed by EtOH. Enhanced eCB signaling rescued NAc-LTD expression in the presence of EtOH through a distinct mechanism requiring activation of TRPV1 receptors. EtOH modulation of synaptic plasticity in the NAc is dependent upon a complex interplay between NMDARs, eCBs, and TRPV1 receptors. These findings demonstrate a novel form of TRPV1-dependent LTD in the NAc shell that may be critical

  11. To what extent do single symptoms from a depression rating scale predict risk of long-term sickness absence among employees who are free of clinical depression?

    PubMed

    Rugulies, Reiner; Hjarsbech, Pernille U; Aust, Birgit; Christensen, Karl Bang; Andersen, Rikke Voss; Borg, Vilhelm

    2013-10-01

    Depression rating scales have predicted long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in previous studies. With this study, we investigated to what extent single symptoms from a depression rating scale predicted LTSA among employees who were free of clinical depression. We studied 6,670 female employees in the Danish eldercare sector. Frequency of 12 depressive symptoms over the last 2 weeks was assessed with the Major Depression Inventory. A symptom was considered as elevated if it was present at least "slightly more than half of the time." Data were linked to a national register on LTSA (≥3 weeks). We calculated hazard ratios (HR) from Cox's proportional hazard models to analyze whether a symptom predicted time to onset of LTSA during a 1-year follow-up. Analyses were adjusted for age, family status, health behaviors, occupational group, and previous LTSA. Of the 12 symptoms, three predicted LTSA after adjustment for covariates: "felt low in spirits and sad" (HR = 1.41, 95 % CI = 1.05-1.89), "felt lacking in energy and strength" (HR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.08-1.64), and "had trouble sleeping at night" (HR = 1.38, 95 % CI = 1.09-1.74). Among female eldercare workers free of clinical depression, feelings of low spirits and sadness, feelings of lack of energy and strength, and sleep disturbances predict risk of LTSA. Interventions that decrease the prevalence of these symptoms might contribute to a reduction in LTSA in this population.

  12. Synaptic P-Rex1 signaling regulates hippocampal long-term depression and autism-like social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Chai, Anping; Wang, Lifang; Ma, Yuanlin; Wu, Zhiliu; Yu, Hao; Mei, Liwei; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Chen; Yue, Weihua; Xu, Lin; Rao, Yi; Zhang, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of highly inheritable mental disorders associated with synaptic dysfunction, but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain to be clarified. Here we report that autism in Chinese Han population is associated with genetic variations and copy number deletion of P-Rex1 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchange factor 1). Genetic deletion or knockdown of P-Rex1 in the CA1 region of the hippocampus in mice resulted in autism-like social behavior that was specifically linked to the defect of long-term depression (LTD) in the CA1 region through alteration of AMPA receptor endocytosis mediated by the postsynaptic PP1α (protein phosphase 1α)–P-Rex1–Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) signaling pathway. Rescue of the LTD in the CA1 region markedly alleviated autism-like social behavior. Together, our findings suggest a vital role of P-Rex1 signaling in CA1 LTD that is critical for social behavior and cognitive function and offer new insight into the etiology of ASDs. PMID:26621702

  13. Locus Coeruleus Stimulation Facilitates Long-Term Depression in the Dentate Gyrus That Requires Activation of β-Adrenergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Niels; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity comprises a cellular mechanism through which the hippocampus most likely enables memory formation. Neuromodulation, related to arousal, is a key aspect in information storage. The activation of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons by novel experience leads to noradrenaline release in the hippocampus at the level of the dentate gyrus (DG). We explored whether synaptic plasticity in the DG is influenced by activation of the LC via electrical stimulation. Coupling of test-pulses that evoked stable basal synaptic transmission in the DG with stimulation of the LC induced β-adrenoreceptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) at perforant path–DG synapses in adult rats. Furthermore, persistent LTD (>24 h) induced by perforant path stimulation also required activation of β-adrenergic receptors: Whereas a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist (propranolol) prevented, an agonist (isoproterenol) strengthened the persistence of LTD for over 24 h. These findings support the hypothesis that persistent LTD in the DG is modulated by β-adrenergic receptors. Furthermore, LC activation potently facilitates DG LTD. This suggests in turn that synaptic plasticity in the DG is tightly regulated by activity in the noradrenergic system. This may reflect the role of the LC in selecting salient information for subsequent synaptic processing in the hippocampus. PMID:24464942

  14. FAAH inhibition produces antidepressant-like efforts of mice to acute stress via synaptic long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Xia

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the major degradative enzyme of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), produced antidepressant behavioral responses, but its underlying mechanism is not clear. Here we find that a systemic administration of the FAAH inhibitor PF3845 or an intra-CA1 application of AEA elicits an in vivo long-term depression (LTD) at excitatory glutamatergic CA3-CA1 synapses of the hippocampus. The PF3845- and/or AEA-elicited LTD are abolished by the LTD-blocking peptide Tat-GluR2. PF3845 significantly decreases passive behavioral coping of naïve mice to acute inescapable stress, which is also abolished by Tat-GluR2 peptide. However, PF3845 does not significantly affect sucrose assumption ratio of mice receiving chronic administration of corticosterone. These results suggest that FAAH inhibitors are able to produce antidepressant effects in naïve animals in response to acute stress through LTD at hippocampal glutamatergic CA3-CA1 synapses.

  15. A Model of Induction of Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Including RKIP Inactivation of Raf and MEK

    PubMed Central

    Hepburn, Iain; Jain, Anant; Gangal, Himanshu; Yamamoto, Yukio; Tanaka-Yamamoto, Keiko; De Schutter, Erik

    2017-01-01

    We report an updated stochastic model of cerebellar Long Term Depression (LTD) with improved realism. Firstly, we verify experimentally that dissociation of Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) from Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) is required for cerebellar LTD and add this interaction to an earlier published model, along with the known requirement of dissociation of RKIP from Raf kinase. We update Ca2+ dynamics as a constant-rate influx, which captures experimental input profiles accurately. We improve α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4 isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor interactions by adding phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of AMPA receptors when bound to glutamate receptor interacting protein (GRIP). The updated model is tuned to reproduce experimental Ca2+ peak vs. LTD amplitude curves at four different Ca2+ pulse durations as closely as possible. We find that the updated model is generally more robust with these changes, yet we still observe some sensitivity of LTD induction to copy number of the key signaling molecule Protein kinase C (PKC). We predict natural variability in this number by stochastic diffusion may influence the probabilistic LTD response to Ca2+ input in Purkinje cell spines and propose this as an extra source of stochasticity that may be important also in other signaling systems. PMID:28220061

  16. Impaired cognition, sensorimotor gating, and hippocampal long-term depression in mice lacking the prostaglandin E2 EP2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Savonenko, A.; Munoz, P.; Melnikova, T.; Wang, Q.; Liang, X.; Breyer, R. M.; Montine, T. J.; Kirkwood, A.; Andreasson, K.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a neuronal immediate early gene that is regulated by N-methyl D aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity. COX-2 enzymatic activity catalyzes the first committed step in prostaglandin synthesis. Recent studies demonstrate an emerging role for the downstream PGE2 EP2 receptor in diverse models of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and a significant function in models of neurological disease including cerebral ischemia, Familial Alzheimer’s disease, and Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Little is known, however, about the normal function of the EP2 receptor in behavior and cognition. Here we report that deletion of the EP2 receptor leads to significant cognitive deficits in standard tests of fear and social memory. EP2 −/− mice also demonstrated impaired prepulse inhibition (PPI) and heightened anxiety, but normal startle reactivity, exploratory behavior, and spatial reference memory. This complex behavioral phenotype of EP2−/− mice was associated with a deficit in long-term depression (LTD) in hippocampus. Our findings suggest that PGE2 signaling via the EP2 receptors plays an important role in cognitive and emotional behaviors that recapitulate some aspects of human psychopathology related to schizophrenia. PMID:19416671

  17. The association of perseverative negative thinking with depression, anxiety and emotional distress in people with long term conditions: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Trick, Leanne; Watkins, Edward; Windeatt, Stacey; Dickens, Chris

    2016-12-01

    Depression is common in people with long term conditions, and is associated with worse medical outcomes. Previous research shows perseverative negative thinking (e.g. worry, rumination) predicts subsequent depression and worse medical outcomes, suggesting interventions targeting perseverative negative thinking could improve depression and medical outcomes. Previous studies recruited healthy individuals, however. This review aimed to determine the temporal relationship and strength of prospective association of perseverative negative thinking with depression, anxiety and emotional distress in people with long term conditions. Four electronic databases were searched for studies including standardised measures of perseverative negative thinking and depression, anxiety or emotional distress, and which presented prospective associations. Findings were narratively synthesized. Thirty studies were identified in a range of long term conditions. Perseverative negative thinking and subsequent depression, anxiety or emotional distress were significantly correlated in the majority of studies (bivariate r=0.23 to r=0.73). 25 studies controlled for confounders, and in 15 perseverative negative thinking predicted subsequent depression, anxiety or emotional distress. Results varied according to condition and study quality. Six of 7 studies found bivariate associations between depression, anxiety or emotional distress and subsequent perseverative negative thinking, though 2 studies controlling for key covariates found no association. Few studies assessed the impact of perseverative negative thinking on medical outcomes. Strongest evidence supported perseverative negative thinking predicting subsequent depression, anxiety and emotional distress in people with long term conditions. Further prospective research is warranted to clarify the association of perseverative negative thinking with subsequent poor medical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid and Delayed Effects of Pulsed Radiofrequency on Neuropathic Pain: Electrophysiological, Molecular, and Behavioral Evidence Supporting Long-Term Depression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ren-Yu; Liao, Chia-Chi; Tsai, Shih-Ying; Yen, Chen-Tung; Lin, Chii-Wann; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Lin, Wei-Tso; Chang, Chi-Heng; Wen, Yeong-Ray

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) has been widely employed for ameliorating clinical neuropathic pain. How PRF alters electrophysiological transmission and modulates biomolecular functions in neural tissues has yet to be clarified. We previously demonstrated that an early application of low-voltage bipolar PRF adjacent to the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) reduced acute neuropathic pain in animals. By contrast, the present study investigated how PRF alters postsynaptic sensitization to produce early and delayed effects on neuropathic pain. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 5-minute session of PRF could rapidly produce selective long-term depression (LTD) on C-fiber-mediated spinal sensitization and sustain the effect through the long-lasting inhibition of injury-induced ERK-MAPK activation. This may explain the prolonged analgesic effect of PRF on chronic neuropathic pain. Experiments were conducted on both normal rats and neuropathic pain rats that received spinal nerve ligation (SNL) 8 days prior. An animal laboratory in a medical center of a university in Taiwan. We first compared changes in field potentials in the L5 superficial spinal dorsal horn (SDH) that were evoked by conditioning electrical stimuli in the sciatic nerve in male adult rats before (as the baseline) and after PRF stimulation for at least 2 hours. Bipolar PRF was applied adjacent to the L5 DRG at an intensity of 5 V for 5 minutes, whereas the control rats were treated with sham applications. The electrophysiological findings were tested for any correlation with induction of spinal phospho-ERK (p-ERK) in normal and neuropathic pain rats. We then investigated the delayed effect of PRF on SNL-maintained pain behaviors for 2 weeks as well as p-ERK in SDH among the control, SNL, and PRF groups. Finally, potential injury in the DRGs after PRF stimulation was evaluated through behavioral observations and ATF-3, a neuronal stress marker. In the evoked field-potential study, the recordings mediated

  19. Pragmatic randomized controlled trial of long-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy for treatment-resistant depression: the Tavistock Adult Depression Study (TADS)

    PubMed Central

    Fonagy, Peter; Rost, Felicitas; Carlyle, Jo-anne; McPherson, Susan; Thomas, Rachel; Pasco Fearon, RM; Goldberg, David; Taylor, David

    2015-01-01

    This pragmatic randomized controlled trial tested the effectiveness of long-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy (LTPP) as an adjunct to treatment-as-usual according to UK national guidelines (TAU), compared to TAU alone, in patients with long-standing major depression who had failed at least two different treatments and were considered to have treatment-resistant depression. Patients (N=129) were recruited from primary care and randomly allocated to the two treatment conditions. They were assessed at 6-monthly intervals during the 18 months of treatment and at 24, 30 and 42 months during follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the 17-item version of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17), with complete remission defined as a HDRS-17 score ≤8, and partial remission defined as a HDRS-17 score ≤12. Secondary outcome measures included self-reported depression as assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory - II, social functioning as evaluated by the Global Assessment of Functioning, subjective wellbeing as rated by the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure, and satisfaction with general activities as assessed by the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. Complete remission was infrequent in both groups at the end of treatment (9.4% in the LTPP group vs. 6.5% in the control group) as well as at 42-month follow-up (14.9% vs. 4.4%). Partial remission was not significantly more likely in the LTPP than in the control group at the end of treatment (32.1% vs. 23.9%, p=0.37), but significant differences emerged during follow-up (24 months: 38.8% vs. 19.2%, p=0.03; 30 months: 34.7% vs. 12.2%, p=0.008; 42 months: 30.0% vs. 4.4%, p=0.001). Both observer-based and self-reported depression scores showed steeper declines in the LTPP group, alongside greater improvements on measures of social adjustment. These data suggest that LTPP can be useful in improving the long-term outcome of treatment-resistant depression. End

  20. Long-Term Outcomes of an Australian Universal Prevention Trial of Anxiety and Depression Symptoms in Children and Youth: An Evaluation of the Friends Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Paula M.; Farrell, Lara J.; Ollendick, Thomas H.; Dadds, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term effectiveness of the FRIENDS Program in reducing anxiety and depression in a sample of children from Grade 6 and Grade 9 in comparison to a control condition. Longitudinal data for Lock and Barrett's (2003) universal prevention trial is presented, along with data from 12-month follow-up to 24- and 36-month…

  1. The GABA[subscript A] Receptor Agonist Muscimol Induces an Age- and Region-Dependent Form of Long-Term Depression in the Mouse Striatum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaoqun; Yao, Ning; Chergui, Karima

    2016-01-01

    Several forms of long-term depression (LTD) of glutamatergic synaptic transmission have been identified in the dorsal striatum and in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Such experience-dependent synaptic plasticity might play important roles in reward-related learning. The GABA[subscript A] receptor agonist muscimol was recently found to trigger a…

  2. The GABA[subscript A] Receptor Agonist Muscimol Induces an Age- and Region-Dependent Form of Long-Term Depression in the Mouse Striatum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaoqun; Yao, Ning; Chergui, Karima

    2016-01-01

    Several forms of long-term depression (LTD) of glutamatergic synaptic transmission have been identified in the dorsal striatum and in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Such experience-dependent synaptic plasticity might play important roles in reward-related learning. The GABA[subscript A] receptor agonist muscimol was recently found to trigger a…

  3. For Individuals with Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Institution of CPAP therapy is Associated with an Amelioration of Symptoms of Depression which is Sustained Long Term

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Daniel J.; Karatinos, Gillian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the sustainability of an improvement in symptoms of depression using CPAP therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Patients/Methods: Patients referred to our center for evaluation of obstructive sleep apnea who had a respiratory disturbance index (RDI) of ≥15 and who demonstrated a significant response to CPAP (50% or greater drop in RDI), were evaluated for symptoms of depression using the Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen for Medical Patients (BDI). These individuals were asked to complete the BDI assessment again after 4 to 6 weeks of treatment with CPAP (short-term follow-up), and then reassessed approximately one year later (long-term follow-up). Results: In this group of patients, the institution of CPAP therapy resulted in a significant decrease in those symptoms of depression assessed by the BDI at both the short-term and long-term follow-up periods. Conclusions: For patients with OSA who continue CPAP therapy, we noted a statistically significant, sustained improvement in those symptoms of depression measured by the BDI. Citation: Schwartz DJ; Karatinos G. For individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, institution of cpap therapy is associated with an amelioration of symptoms of depression which is sustained long term. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(6):631-635. PMID:17993046

  4. The long-term effects of methamphetamine exposure during pre-adolescence on depressive-like behaviour in a genetic animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Moné; Harvey, Brian H; Cockeran, Marike; Brink, Christiaan B

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant and drug of abuse, commonly used early in life, including in childhood and adolescence. Adverse effects include psychosis, anxiety and mood disorders, as well as increased risk of developing a mental disorder later in life. The current study investigated the long-term effects of chronic METH exposure during pre-adolescence in stress-sensitive Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats (genetic model of depression) and control Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats. METH or vehicle control was administered twice daily from post-natal day 19 (PostND19) to PostND34, followed by behavioural testing at either PostND35 (early effects) or long-lasting after withdrawal at PostND60 (early adulthood). Animals were evaluated for depressive-like behaviour, locomotor activity, social interaction and object recognition memory. METH reduced depressive-like behaviour in both FSL and FRL rats at PostND35, but enhanced this behaviour at PostND60. METH also reduced locomotor activity on PostND35 in both FSL and FRL rats, but without effect at PostND60. Furthermore, METH significantly lowered social interaction behaviour (staying together) in both FRL and FSL rats at PostND35 and PostND60, whereas self-grooming time was significantly reduced only at PostND35. METH treatment enhanced exploration of the familiar vs. novel object in the novel object recognition test (nORT) in FSL and FRL rats on PostND35 and PostND60, indicative of reduced cognitive performance. Thus, early-life METH exposure induce social and cognitive deficits. Lastly, early-life exposure to METH may result in acute antidepressant-like effects immediately after chronic exposure, whereas long-term effects after withdrawal are depressogenic. Data also supports a role for genetic predisposition as with FSL rats.

  5. The effects of comorbidity in defining major depression subtypes associated with long-term course and severity

    PubMed Central

    Wardenaar, K. J.; van Loo, H. M.; Cai, T.; Fava, M.; Gruber, M. J.; Li, J.; de Jonge, P.; Nierenberg, A. A.; Petukhova, M. V.; Rose, S.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoevers, R. A.; Wilcox, M. A.; Alonso, J.; Bromet, E. J.; Bunting, B.; Florescu, S. E.; Fukao, A.; Gureje, O.; Hu, C.; Huang, Y. Q.; Karam, A. N.; Levinson, D.; Medina Mora, M. E.; Posada-Villa, J.; Scott, K. M.; Taib, N. I.; Viana, M. C.; Xavier, M.; Zarkov, Z.; Kessler, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although variation in long-term course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is not strongly predicted by existing symptom subtype distinctions, recent research suggests that prediction can be improved by using machine learning methods. However, it is not known whether these distinctions can be refined by added information about comorbid conditions. The current report presents results on this question. Methods Data come from 8,261 respondents with lifetime DSM-IV MDD in the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys. Outcomes include four retrospectively-reported measures of persistence-severity of course (years in episode; years in chronic episodes, hospitalization for MDD; disability due to MDD). Machine learning methods (regression tree analysis; lasso, ridge, and elastic net penalized regression) followed by k-means cluster analysis were used to augment previously-detected subtypes with information about prior comorbidity to predict these outcomes. Results Predicted values were strongly correlated across outcomes. Cluster analysis of predicted values found 3 clusters with consistently high, intermediate, or low values. The high-risk cluster (32.4% of cases) accounted for 56.6–72.9% of high persistence, high chronicity, hospitalization, and disability. This high-risk cluster had both higher sensitivity and likelihood-ratio positive (relative proportions of cases in the high-risk cluster versus other clusters having the adverse outcomes) than in a parallel analysis that excluded measures of comorbidity as predictors. Conclusions Although results using the retrospective data reported here suggest that useful MDD subtyping distinctions can be made with machine learning and clustering across multiple indicators of illness persistence-severity, replication is need with prospective data to confirm this preliminary conclusion. PMID:25066141

  6. Transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation induces a long-term depression-like plasticity of the human blink reflex.

    PubMed

    Pilurzi, Giovanna; Mercante, Beniamina; Ginatempo, Francesca; Follesa, Paolo; Tolu, Eusebio; Deriu, Franca

    2016-02-01

    The beneficial effects of trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) on several neurological disorders are increasingly acknowledged. Hypothesized mechanisms include the modulation of excitability in networks involved by the disease, and its main site of action has been recently reported at brain stem level. Aim of this work was to test whether acute TNS modulates brain stem plasticity using the blink reflex (BR) as a model. The BR was recorded from 20 healthy volunteers before and after 20 min of cyclic transcutaneous TNS delivered bilaterally to the infraorbital nerve. Eleven subjects underwent sham-TNS administration and were compared to the real-TNS group. In 12 subjects, effects of unilateral TNS were tested. The areas of the R1 and R2 components of the BR were recorded before and after 0 (T0), 15 (T15), 30 (T30), and 45 (T45) min from TNS. In three subjects, T60 and T90 time points were also evaluated. Ipsi- and contralateral R2 areas were significantly suppressed after bilateral real-TNS at T15 (p = 0.013), T30 (p = 0.002), and T45 (p = 0.001), while R1 response appeared unaffected. The TNS-induced inhibitory effect on R2 responses lasted up to 60 min. Real- and sham-TNS protocols produced significantly different effects (p = 0.005), with sham-TNS being ineffective at any time point tested. Bilateral TNS was more effective (p = 0.009) than unilateral TNS. Acute TNS induced a bilateral long-lasting inhibition of the R2 component of the BR, which resembles a long-term depression-like effect, providing evidence of brain stem plasticity produced by transcutaneous TNS. These findings add new insight into mechanisms of TNS neuromodulation and into physiopathology of those neurological disorders where clinical benefits of TNS are recognized.

  7. Roles of p75NTR, long-term depression and cholinergic transmission in anxiety and acute stress coping

    PubMed Central

    Martinowich, Keri; Schloesser, Robert J.; Lu, Yuan; Jimenez, Dennisse V.; Paredes, Daniel; Greene, Joshua S.; Greig, Nigel H.; Manji, Husseini K.; Lu, Bai

    2011-01-01

    Background Stress is causally associated with anxiety. While the underlying cellular mechanisms are not well understood, the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) have been implicated in stress response. p75NTR is a pan-neurotrophin receptor expressed almost exclusively in BFCNs in adult brain. The present study investigates whether and how p75NTR, via regulation of the cholinergic system and hippocampal synaptic plasticity, influences stress-related behaviors. Methods We used a combination of slice electrophysiology, behavioral analyses, pharmacology, in vivo microdialysis and neuronal activity mapping to assess the role of p75NTR in mood and stress-related behaviors and its underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Results We show that acute stress enables hippocampal long-term depression (LTD) in adult wild-type mice, but not in mice lacking p75NTR. The p75NTR mutant mice also exhibit two distinct behavioral impairments: baseline anxiety-like behavior and a deficit in coping with and recovering from stressful situations. Blockade of stress-enabled LTD with a GluA2-derived peptide impaired stress recovery without affecting baseline anxiety. Pharmacological manipulations of cholinergic transmission mimicked the p75NTR perturbation in both baseline anxiety and responses to acute stress. Finally, we show evidence of misregulated cholinergic signaling in animals with p75NTR deletion. Conclusions Our results suggest that loss of p75NTR leads to changes in hippocampal cholinergic signaling, which may be involved in regulation of stress-enabled hippocampal LTD and in modulating behaviors related to stress and anxiety. PMID:21978521

  8. Endocannabinoids Mediate Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor-Dependent Long-Term Depression in the Adult Medial Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Martin, Henry G S; Bernabeu, Axel; Lassalle, Olivier; Bouille, Clément; Beurrier, Corinne; Pelissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure; Manzoni, Olivier J

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic inputs into the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are associated with attention and cognition; however there is evidence that acetylcholine also has a role in PFC dependent learning and memory. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in the PFC can induce synaptic plasticity, but the underlying mechanisms remain either opaque or unresolved. We have characterized a form of mAChR mediated long-term depression (LTD) at glutamatergic synapses of layer 5 principal neurons in the adult medial PFC. This mAChR LTD is induced with the mAChR agonist carbachol and inhibited by selective M1 mAChR antagonists. In contrast to other cortical regions, we find that this M1 mAChR mediated LTD is coupled to endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) signaling. Inhibition of the principal eCB CB1 receptor blocked carbachol induced LTD in both rats and mice. Furthermore, when challenged with a sub-threshold carbachol application, LTD was induced in slices pretreated with the monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor JZL184, suggesting that the eCB 2-arachidonylglyerol (2-AG) mediates M1 mAChR LTD. Yet, when endogenous acetylcholine was released from local cholinergic afferents in the PFC using optogenetics, it failed to trigger eCB-LTD. However coupling patterned optical and electrical stimulation to generate local synaptic signaling allowed the reliable induction of LTD. The light-electrical pairing induced LTD was M1 mAChR and CB1 receptor mediated. This shows for the first time that connecting excitatory synaptic activity with coincident endogenously released acetylcholine controls synaptic gain via eCB signaling. Together these results shed new light on the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity in the adult PFC and expand on the actions of endogenous cholinergic signaling.

  9. Endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of afferent excitatory synapses in hippocampal pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Péterfi, Zoltán; Urbán, Gabriella M; Papp, Orsolya I; Németh, Beáta; Monyer, Hannah; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Mackie, Ken; Freund, Tamás F; Hájos, Norbert; Katona, István

    2012-10-10

    Although endocannabinoids have emerged as essential retrograde messengers in several forms of synaptic plasticity, it remains controversial whether they mediate long-term depression (LTD) of glutamatergic synapses onto excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampus. Here, we show that parvalbumin- and somatostatin/metabotropic glutamate receptor 1(a) (mGlu(1a))-positive GABAergic interneurons express diacylglycerol lipase-α (DGL-α), a synthesizing enzyme of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), albeit at lower levels than principal cells. Moreover, this lipase accumulates postsynaptically around afferent excitatory synapses in all three cell types. To address the role of retrograde 2-AG signaling in LTD, we investigated two forms: (1) produced by postsynaptic spiking paired with subsequent presynaptic stimulation or (2) induced by group I mGlu activation by (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG). Neither form of LTD was evoked in the presence of the mGlu(5) antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine], the DGL inhibitor THL [N-formyl-l-leucine (1S)-1-[[(2S,3S)-3-hexyl-4-oxo-2-oxetanyl]methyl]dodecyl ester], or the intracellularly applied Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA in CA1 pyramidal cells, fast-spiking interneurons (representing parvalbumin-containing cells) and interneurons projecting to stratum lacunosum-moleculare (representing somatostatin/mGlu(1a)-expressing interneurons). Both forms of LTD were completely absent in CB(1) cannabinoid receptor knock-out mice, whereas pharmacological blockade of CB(1) led to inconsistent results. Notably, in accordance with their lower DGL-α level, a higher stimulation frequency or higher DHPG concentration was required for LTD induction in interneurons compared with pyramidal cells. These findings demonstrate that hippocampal principal cells and interneurons produce endocannabinoids to mediate LTD in a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different manner. The shifted induction threshold implies that

  10. Folic Acid Alters Methylation Profile of JAK-STAT and Long-Term Depression Signaling Pathways in Alzheimer's Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Liu, Huan; Yu, Min; Zhang, Xumei; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Hongbo; Wilson, John X; Huang, Guowei

    2016-11-01

    Dementia has emerged as a major societal issue because of the worldwide aging population and the absence of any effective treatment. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that evidently plays a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Folate acts through one-carbon metabolism to support the methylation of multiple substrates including DNA. We aimed to test the hypothesis that folic acid supplementation alters DNA methylation profiles in AD models. Mouse Neuro-2a cells expressing human APP695 (N2a-APP cells) were incubated with folic acid (2.8-20 μmol/L). AD transgenic mice were fed either folate-deficient or control diets and gavaged daily with water or folic acid (600 μg/kg). Gene methylation profiles were determined by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-DNA microarray (MeDIP-chip). Differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were determined by Quantitative Differentially Methylated Regions analysis, and differentially methylated genes (DMGs) carrying at least three DMRs were selected for pathway analysis. Folic acid up-regulated DNA methylation levels in N2a-APP cells and AD transgenic mouse brains. Functional network analysis of folic acid-induced DMGs in these AD models revealed subnetworks composed of 24 focus genes in the janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway and 12 focus genes in the long-term depression (LTD) signaling pathway. In conclusion, these results revealed a role for folic acid in the JAK-STAT and LTD signaling pathways which may be relevant to AD pathogenesis. This novel finding may stimulate reinvestigation of folic acid supplementation as a prophylactic or therapeutic treatment for AD.

  11. Heterosynaptic long-term depression of craniofacial nociception: divergent effects on pain perception and blink reflex in man.

    PubMed

    Yekta, Sareh Said; Lamp, Susanne; Ellrich, Jens

    2006-04-01

    Noxious low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of presynaptic nerve fibers induces long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission. In vitro studies suggest a sole homosynaptic effect. Consequently, the present study addressed the hypothesis that LTD of craniofacial nociception in man is mediated by a homosynaptic mechanism. Nociceptive supraorbital afferents were excited by electric pulses via a concentric electrode in ten healthy volunteers. The electrically evoked bilateral blink reflex (BR) was recorded from both orbicularis oculi muscles by surface electrodes. The BR was evoked in blocks of ten electric stimuli each (0.1 Hz) with an interblock interval of 8 min. Conditioning noxious LFS (1 Hz, 20 min) was applied via concentric electrode either to the same site as BR test stimuli (ipsilateral) or to the corresponding contralateral forehead area (contralateral). LFS and test stimulus intensities corresponded to about threefold the pain threshold. After three baseline stimulus blocks, either conditioning ipsilateral or contralateral LFS were applied or stimulation was interrupted for 20 min as a control task. Afterwards, test stimulation blocks were continued for 40 min. Each volunteer participated in all three sessions on different days. Noxious LFS induced LTD of the BR independently from the side of conditioning stimulation. Pain perception decreased after ipsilateral LFS but not after contralateral LFS. The bilateral effect of noxious LFS on the BR provides evidence for heterosynaptic LTD based on bilateral projections of supraorbital nerve afferents onto spinal trigeminal nuclei. The divergent effect on pain perception may be due to a preferential contralateral projection of nociceptive afferents onto reflex interneurons but not onto trigeminothalamic projection neurons.

  12. Endocannabinoids Mediate Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor-Dependent Long-Term Depression in the Adult Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Henry G. S.; Bernabeu, Axel; Lassalle, Olivier; Bouille, Clément; Beurrier, Corinne; Pelissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure; Manzoni, Olivier J.

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic inputs into the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are associated with attention and cognition; however there is evidence that acetylcholine also has a role in PFC dependent learning and memory. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in the PFC can induce synaptic plasticity, but the underlying mechanisms remain either opaque or unresolved. We have characterized a form of mAChR mediated long-term depression (LTD) at glutamatergic synapses of layer 5 principal neurons in the adult medial PFC. This mAChR LTD is induced with the mAChR agonist carbachol and inhibited by selective M1 mAChR antagonists. In contrast to other cortical regions, we find that this M1 mAChR mediated LTD is coupled to endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) signaling. Inhibition of the principal eCB CB1 receptor blocked carbachol induced LTD in both rats and mice. Furthermore, when challenged with a sub-threshold carbachol application, LTD was induced in slices pretreated with the monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor JZL184, suggesting that the eCB 2-arachidonylglyerol (2-AG) mediates M1 mAChR LTD. Yet, when endogenous acetylcholine was released from local cholinergic afferents in the PFC using optogenetics, it failed to trigger eCB-LTD. However coupling patterned optical and electrical stimulation to generate local synaptic signaling allowed the reliable induction of LTD. The light—electrical pairing induced LTD was M1 mAChR and CB1 receptor mediated. This shows for the first time that connecting excitatory synaptic activity with coincident endogenously released acetylcholine controls synaptic gain via eCB signaling. Together these results shed new light on the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity in the adult PFC and expand on the actions of endogenous cholinergic signaling. PMID:26648844

  13. Reassessment of long-term depression in cerebellar Purkinje cells in mice carrying mutated GluA2 C terminus

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Ito, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission from parallel fibers (PFs) to a Purkinje cell (PC) in the cerebellum has been considered to be a core mechanism of motor learning. Recently, however, discrepancies between LTD and motor learning have been reported in mice with a mutation that targeted the expression of PF–PC LTD by blocking AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor internalization regulated via the phosphorylation of AMPA receptors. In these mice, motor learning behavior was normal, but no PF–PC LTD was observed. We reexamined slices obtained from these GluA2 K882A and GluA2 Δ7 knockin mutants at 3–6 mo of age. The conventional protocols of stimulation did not induce LTD in these mutant mice, as previously reported, but surprisingly, LTD was induced using certain modified protocols. Such modifications involved increases in the number of PF stimulation (from one to two or five), replacement of climbing fiber stimulation with somatic depolarization (50 ms), filling a patch pipette with a Cs+-based solution, or extension of the duration of conjunction. We also found that intracellular infusion of a selective PKCα inhibitor (Gö6976) blocked LTD induction in the mutants, as in WT, suggesting that functional compensation occurred downstream of PKCα. The possibility that LTD in the mutants was caused by changes in membrane resistance, access resistance, or presynaptic property was excluded. The present results demonstrate that LTD is inducible by intensified conjunctive stimulations even in K882A and Δ7 mutants, indicating no contradiction against the LTD hypothesis of motor learning. PMID:27551099

  14. Acute food deprivation enhances fear extinction but inhibits long-term depression in the lateral amygdala via ghrelin signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Chun; Chou, Dylan; Yeh, Che-Ming; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2016-02-01

    Fear memory-encoding thalamic input synapses to the lateral amygdala (T-LA) exhibit dynamic efficacy changes that are tightly correlated with fear memory strength. Previous studies have shown that auditory fear conditioning involves strengthening of synaptic strength, and conversely, fear extinction training leads to T-LA synaptic weakening and occlusion of long-term depression (LTD) induction. These findings suggest that the mechanisms governing LTD at T-LA synapses may determine the behavioral outcomes of extinction training. Here, we explored this hypothesis by implementing food deprivation (FD) stress in mice to determine its effects on fear extinction and LTD induction at T-LA synapses. We found that FD increased plasma acylated ghrelin levels and enhanced fear extinction and its retention. Augmentation of fear extinction by FD was blocked by pretreatment with growth hormone secretagogue receptor type-1a antagonist D-Lys(3)-GHRP-6, suggesting an involvement of ghrelin signaling. Confirming previous findings, two distinct forms of LTD coexist at thalamic inputs to LA pyramidal neurons that can be induced by low-frequency stimulation (LFS) or paired-pulse LFS (PP-LFS) paired with postsynaptic depolarization, respectively. Unexpectedly, we found that FD impaired the induction of PP-LFS- and group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced LTD, but not LFS-induced LTD. Ghrelin mimicked the effects of FD to impair the induction of PP-LFS- and DHPG-induced LTD at T-LA synapses, which were blocked by co-application of D-Lys(3)-GHRP-6. The sensitivity of synaptic transmission to 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine was not altered by either FD or ghrelin treatment. These results highlight distinct features of fear extinction and LTD at T-LA synapses.

  15. Vortioxetine (Lu AA21004) in the long-term open-label treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Hansen, Thomas; Florea, Ioana

    2012-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the investigational drug vortioxetine (Lu AA21004) in the long-term treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. Patients entered this 52-week, open-label extension study after completing an 8-week lead-in study. Safety and tolerability were evaluated at regular intervals on the basis of spontaneously reported adverse events (AEs), clinical safety laboratory tests, vital signs, ECG and physical examination. Effectiveness of treatment was assessed using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score. A total of 535 patients were treated and 61.3% (n = 328) completed the study, resulting in 393 patient years of exposure to vortioxetine. AEs reported by ≥10% of patients were nausea, headache, and nasopharyngitis. Taken together, six patients had eight AEs related to sexual dysfunction. There were no clinically significant safety findings with respect to mean changes of vital signs, weight, ECG parameters, or clinical laboratory values. Patients entered the extension study with a mean MADRS total score of 13.5 ± 8.7. The mean MADRS total score decreased (improved) by approximately 8 points to 5.5 ± 6.0 at Week 52 (OC). By the end of the study, the proportion of responders had increased from 63% to 94% (OC), as had the proportion in remission (MADRS ≤10), increasing from 42% to 83% (OC). Patients in remission (n = 226) at the start of this study had a relapse rate (MADRS ≥22) of 9.7%. As with all open-label studies, the conclusions that can be drawn are limited by the lack of a placebo control, making it difficult to assess causality of any changes in outcome measures. However, on the basis of these findings, vortioxetine (2.5, 5, 10 mg/day) demonstrated a favourable safety and tolerability profile and maintained effectiveness over 12 months of treatment. This study has the ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00694304.

  16. Impact of sleep complaints and depression outcomes among participants in the standard medical intervention and long-term exercise study of exercise and pharmacotherapy for depression.

    PubMed

    Combs, Kory; Smith, Patrick J; Sherwood, Andrew; Hoffman, Benson; Carney, Robert M; Freedland, Kenneth; Craighead, W Edward; Blumenthal, James A

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise and sertraline on disordered sleep in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods The Standard Medical Intervention and Long-term Exercise study randomized the patients with MDD (n = 202) to one of four arms: a) supervised exercise, b) home-based exercise, c) sertraline therapy, and d) placebo pill. Sleep disturbance was assessed with three sleep-related items from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) before and after 4 months of treatment. The patients were followed for 12 months to assess the prognostic value of sleep disturbance on MDD relapse and recovery.Results Comparison of the active treatment and placebo groups showed no treatment differences in HAM-D sleep complaints after 4 months (p = 0.758). However, residual insomnia symptoms after treatment were strongly associated with elevated depressive symptoms assessed by the HAM-D after 4 months (β = 0.342, p < 0.0001) and MDD relapse (odds ratio, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.10; p = 0.004) assessed at 1-year follow-up (16 months after randomization). Neither exercise nor sertraline was associated with greater improvements in sleep disturbance compared with the placebo controls. However, residual symptoms of insomnia after successful treatment of MDD predicted relapse, highlighting the clinical importance of addressing insomnia in patients with MDD.

  17. Differences in symptoms, functioning, and quality of life between women on long-term sick-leave with musculoskeletal pain with and without concomitant depression.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Gunilla Brodda; Linder, Jürgen; Ekholm, Kristina Schüldt; Ekholm, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to describe the differences in symptoms, functioning and quality of life between women on long-term sick-leave due to protracted musculoskeletal pain with and without concomitant depression. Descriptive and comparisons with/without comorbid depression. 332 female patients were examined by three specialist physicians in psychiatry, orthopedic surgery, and rehabilitation medicine and assigned to four groups according to the ICD-10 diagnoses: low back/joint disorders (LBJ, n = 150), myalgia (M, n = 43), fibromyalgia (FM, n = 87), or depression without somatic pain diagnosis (DE, n = 52). Patients with somatic pain conditions LBJ, M, or FM showed more activity-related difficulties if concomitant depression was present during the activities 'focusing attention', 'making decisions', and 'undertaking a single task'; and in the domains 'energy level', 'memory functions', 'emotional functions', and 'optimism/pessimism'. Patients with FM and concomitant depression perceived higher pain intensity than patients in group DE. No statistically significant differences in physically related activities were noted between each of the somatic pain conditions with and without coexisting depression. FM patients with coexisting depression reported fewer painful sites on their pain drawings compared with FM-patients without depression. Patients with LBJ or FM and concomitant depression reported lower quality of life in the dimensions vitality, social functioning, emotional role, and mental health. Comorbid depression affected disability and restricted working capacity by reducing mental activity and functioning but not by affecting physical activity problems. Women on long-term sick-leave, who have concomitant depression with LBJ or FM, also have more difficulties in focusing attention, making decisions, and carrying out tasks, and with memory functions and optimism/pessimism, as well as reduced quality of life in the dimensions of vitality, social functioning, emotional role

  18. The relationship between trait vulnerability and anxiety and depressive diagnoses at long-term follow-up of Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Julie A; Power, Kevin G; Durham, Robert C

    2004-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between measures of trait vulnerability and long-term outcome in 83 patients diagnosed and treated for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) 8-14 years previously. Diagnostic status was assessed by structured interview, and trait affect, trait anxiety and trait depression were measured by the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) and the Personal Style Inventory (PSI), respectively. Trait measures were all highly inter-correlated, and patients with diagnoses of GAD, social phobia and depressive disorders at long-term follow-up recorded very poor scores on all three scales. Trait anxiety recorded pre-treatment was also related to both anxiety and depression at long-term follow-up. However, trait depression showed no significant association with panic disorder. Increased numbers of comorbid diagnoses were strongly related to high levels of both trait anxiety and negative affect (NA). The findings suggest that patients reporting high trait anxiety or NA may suffer from a chronic course of disorder and higher levels of comorbidity over the longer term.

  19. Social support as a predictor of the outcome of depressive and anxiety disorder in short-term and long-term psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Olavi; Ojanen, Sakari; Jääskeläinen, Tuija; Knekt, Paul

    2014-04-30

    Social support is known to be important for well-being of individuals, but it is not clear how it predicts psychotherapy outcome in patients suffering from depressive or anxiety disorders. The aim of the present study was to study the prediction of social support on the outcome of short-term and long-term psychotherapy. In the Helsinki Psychotherapy Study, 326 psychiatric outpatients, aged 20-46 years, and suffering from depressive or anxiety disorders, were randomly assigned to short-term psychotherapy (short-term psychodynamic or solution-focused) or long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy. The level of social support at baseline was assessed using the Brief Inventory of Social Support and Integration (BISSI). Psychiatric symptoms were assessed with the Symptom Check List, Global Severity Index (SCL-90-GSI) at baseline and four times during a 3-year follow-up. Patients with a high level of social support before treatment benefitted more from long-term than short-term therapy at the 3-year follow-up, whereas patients with a low level of social support experienced no such benefit. Pretreatment social support seems to predict differentially short- and long-term psychotherapy and thus needs to be acknowledged when evaluating patient's resources and treatment options. More research is needed to verify these findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CA1 Pyramidal Cell Theta-Burst Firing Triggers Endocannabinoid-Mediated Long-Term Depression at Both Somatic and Dendritic Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Younts, Thomas J.; Chevaleyre, Vivien

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are retrograde lipid messengers that, by targeting presynaptic type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs), mediate short- and long-term synaptic depression of neurotransmitter release throughout the brain. Short-term depression is typically triggered by postsynaptic, depolarization-induced calcium rises, whereas long-term depression is induced by synaptic activation of Gq/11 protein-coupled receptors. Here we report that a physiologically relevant pattern of postsynaptic activity, in the form of theta-burst firing (TBF) of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, can trigger long-term depression of inhibitory transmission (iLTD) in rat hippocampal slices. Paired recordings between CA1 interneurons and pyramidal cells, followed by post hoc morphological reconstructions of the interneurons' axon, revealed that somatic and dendritic inhibitory synaptic inputs equally expressed TBF-induced iLTD. Simultaneous recordings from neighboring pyramidal cells demonstrated that eCB signaling triggered by TBF was highly restricted to only a single, active cell. Furthermore, pairing submaximal endogenous activation of metabotropic glutamate or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with submaximal TBF unmasked associative iLTD. Although CB1Rs are also expressed at Schaffer-collateral excitatory terminals, long-term plasticity under various recording conditions was spared at these synapses. Consistent with this observation, TBF also shifted the balance of excitation and inhibition in favor of excitatory throughput, thereby altering information flow through the CA1 circuit. Given the near ubiquity of burst-firing activity patterns and CB1R expression in the brain, the properties described here may be a general means by which neurons fine tune the strength of their inputs in a cell-wide and cell-specific manner. PMID:23966696

  1. Assessing efficacy/effectiveness and safety/tolerability profiles of adjunctive pramipexole in bipolar depression: acute versus long-term data.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Ketter, Terence A

    2013-11-01

    Bipolar depression represents the most difficult-to-treat phase of bipolar disorder, mood-stabilizing compounds and second-generation antipsychotics being only partially effective, whereas the use of antidepressants is highly controversial because of risks of inefficacy, switching, rapid cycling, and increased suicidality. Among various augmentative pharmacological treatments, compounds with dopamine-enhancing activity have been shown to be variably beneficial in the treatment of bipolar depression with drug-resistance features. In particular, pramipexole - a dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist - showed antidepressant properties in bipolar depressed patients in both randomized-controlled trials and open acute and follow-up reports. The present review aims to provide an updated perspective on the use of adjunctive pramipexole in bipolar depression, taking into account randomized-controlled trials, as well as open naturalistic studies, with a specific focus on the evaluation of acute versus long-term data in terms of effectiveness and tolerability. Despite methodological differences, short-term studies support the acute efficacy and tolerability/safety of adjunctive pramipexole, whereas open extended observations seem to confirm the effectiveness of the compound, with some additional concern in terms of safety and tolerability issues. Adjunctive pramipexole may be a valid option in both the acute and the long-term treatment of drug-resistant bipolar depression, with possible superior tolerability in the short term.

  2. Long-Term Effects of the Family Check-Up in Public Secondary School on Diagnosed Major Depressive Disorder in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Connell, Arin M; Dishion, Thomas J

    2017-03-01

    Given the public health importance of depression, the identification of prevention programs with long-term effects on reducing the rate of depression is of critical importance, as is the examination of factors that may moderate the magnitude of such prevention effects. This study examines the impact of the Family Check-Up, delivered in public secondary schools beginning in sixth grade, on the development of major depression in adulthood (aged 28-30). The multilevel intervention program included (a) a universal classroom-based intervention focused on problem solving and peer relationship skills, (b) the Family Check-Up (selected), a brief assessment-based intervention designed to motivate parents to improve aspects of family functioning when warranted, and (c) family management treatment (indicated), focused on improving parenting skills. Demographic (gender and ethnicity) and baseline risk factors (family conflict, academic problems, antisocial behavior, and peer deviance) were examined as possible moderators in logistic regression analyses. Intervention effects on depression were moderated by baseline family conflict and academic performance, with stronger intervention effects for youth with low grade point averages and from low-conflict families at baseline. Such findings extend the emerging literature on prevention programs with long-term effects on depression, and highlight directions for future research to enhance such effects.

  3. Long-Term Corticosterone Exposure Decreases Insulin Sensitivity and Induces Depressive-Like Behaviour in the C57BL/6NCrl Mouse

    PubMed Central

    van Donkelaar, Eva L.; Vaessen, Koen R. D.; Pawluski, Jodi L.; Sierksma, Annerieke S.; Blokland, Arjan; Cañete, Ramón; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress or long-term administration of glucocorticoids disrupts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal system leading to continuous high levels of glucocorticoids and insulin resistance (IR). This pre-diabetic state can eventually develop into type 2 diabetes mellitus and has been associated with a higher risk to develop depressive disorders. The mechanisms underlying the link between chronic stress, IR and depression remains unclear. The present study aimed to establish a stress-depression model in mice to further study the effects of stress-induced changes upon insulin sensitivity and behavioural consequences. A pilot study was conducted to establish the optimal administration route and a pragmatic measurement of IR. Subsequently, 6-month-old C57BL/6NCrl mice were exposed to long-term oral corticosterone treatment via the drinking water. To evaluate insulin sensitivity changes, blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured at different time-points throughout treatment and mice were behaviourally assessed in the elevated zero maze (EZM), forced swimming test (FST) and open field test to reveal behavioural changes. Long-term corticosterone treatment increased body weight and decreased insulin sensitivity. The latter was revealed by a higher IR index and increased insulin in the plasma, whereas blood glucose levels remained unchanged. Corticosterone treatment induced longer immobility times in the FST, reflecting depressive-like behaviour. No effects were observed upon anxiety as measured in the EZM. The effect of the higher body weight of the CORT treated animals at time of testing did not influence behaviour in the EZM or FST, as no differences were found in general locomotor activity. Long-term corticosterone treatment via the drinking water reduces insulin sensitivity and induces depressive-like behaviour in the C57BL/6 mouse. This mouse model could thus be used to further explore the underlying mechanisms of chronic stress-induced T2DM and its

  4. Long-term corticosterone exposure decreases insulin sensitivity and induces depressive-like behaviour in the C57BL/6NCrl mouse.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Eva L; Vaessen, Koen R D; Pawluski, Jodi L; Sierksma, Annerieke S; Blokland, Arjan; Cañete, Ramón; Steinbusch, Harry W M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress or long-term administration of glucocorticoids disrupts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal system leading to continuous high levels of glucocorticoids and insulin resistance (IR). This pre-diabetic state can eventually develop into type 2 diabetes mellitus and has been associated with a higher risk to develop depressive disorders. The mechanisms underlying the link between chronic stress, IR and depression remains unclear. The present study aimed to establish a stress-depression model in mice to further study the effects of stress-induced changes upon insulin sensitivity and behavioural consequences. A pilot study was conducted to establish the optimal administration route and a pragmatic measurement of IR. Subsequently, 6-month-old C57BL/6NCrl mice were exposed to long-term oral corticosterone treatment via the drinking water. To evaluate insulin sensitivity changes, blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured at different time-points throughout treatment and mice were behaviourally assessed in the elevated zero maze (EZM), forced swimming test (FST) and open field test to reveal behavioural changes. Long-term corticosterone treatment increased body weight and decreased insulin sensitivity. The latter was revealed by a higher IR index and increased insulin in the plasma, whereas blood glucose levels remained unchanged. Corticosterone treatment induced longer immobility times in the FST, reflecting depressive-like behaviour. No effects were observed upon anxiety as measured in the EZM. The effect of the higher body weight of the CORT treated animals at time of testing did not influence behaviour in the EZM or FST, as no differences were found in general locomotor activity. Long-term corticosterone treatment via the drinking water reduces insulin sensitivity and induces depressive-like behaviour in the C57BL/6 mouse. This mouse model could thus be used to further explore the underlying mechanisms of chronic stress-induced T2DM and its

  5. Perceived Impeding Factors for Return-to-Work after Long-Term Sickness Absence Due to Major Depressive Disorder: A Concept Mapping Approach

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Gabe; Hees, Hiske L.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Lagerveld, Suzanne E.; Schene, Aart H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to explore various stakeholder perspectives regarding factors that impede return-to-work (RTW) after long-term sickness absence related to major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods Concept mapping was used to explore employees', supervisors' and occupational physicians' perspectives on these impeding factors. Results Nine perceived themes, grouped in three meta-clusters were found that might impede RTW: Person, (personality / coping problems, symptoms of depression and comorbid (health) problems, employee feels misunderstood, and resuming work too soon), Work (troublesome work situation, too little support at work, and too little guidance at work) and Healthcare (insufficient mental healthcare and insufficient care from occupational physician). All stakeholders regarded personality/coping problems and symptoms of depression as the most important impeding theme. In addition, supervisors emphasized the importance of mental healthcare underestimating the importance of the work environment, while occupational physicians stressed the importance of the lack of safety and support in the work environment. Conclusions In addition to the reduction of symptoms, more attention is needed on coping with depressive symptoms and personality problems in the work environment support in the work environment and for RTW in mental healthcare, to prevent long term sickness absence. PMID:24454786

  6. A pilot trial of acceptance and commitment therapy for symptoms of depression and anxiety in older adults residing in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Davison, Tanya E; Eppingstall, Barbara; Runci, Susannah; O'Connor, Daniel W

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and acceptability of a psychological intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) to improve symptoms of depression and anxiety among older adults living in long-term care. Forty one residents aged between 63 and 97 years (M = 85.3 years) participated in this study. Residents were allocated to receive either a 12 session ACT intervention implemented by trainee psychology therapists or a wait-list control group. Measures of depression and anxiety were collected at baseline and 8 week post-intervention, and residents who received the intervention were tracked for three months. A treatment satisfaction questionnaire was administered to residents who received the intervention and a sample of 10 facility staff members. Using an intention to treat approach and controlling for baseline scores, scores on depression measures were significantly lower after the ACT intervention than after the wait-list control. These outcomes were maintained at three-month follow-up. Treatment satisfaction was rated highly by both residents and their care staff. This preliminary trial suggests that ACT shows promise as a therapeutic approach to address symptoms of depression in long-term care.

  7. Long-term effects of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) treatment: a 1-year safety study in mild to moderate depression.

    PubMed

    Brattström, Axel

    2009-04-01

    Long-term safety and the effects of a St. John's wort (SJW) extract Ze 117 (Hypericum perforatum) were evaluated in the treatment of patients with depression. An open multicentre safety study with 440 out-patients suffering from mild to moderate depression according to ICD-10 was conducted. Patients were treated for up to 1 year with 500 mg St. John's wort extract per day (Ze 117). Evaluation criteria were safety (adverse event frequency) and influence on depression (HAM-D, CGI). Two hundred and seventeen (49%) patients reported 504 adverse events, 30 (6%) of which were possibly or probably related to the treatment. Gastrointestinal and skin complaints were the most common events associated with treatment. No age-related difference in the safety of the applied medication was found. The long-term intake of up to 1 year of the study medication did not result in any changes in clinical chemistry and electrocardiogram recordings. Body mass index (BMI) did not change either. Mean HAM-D scores decreased steadily from 20.58 at baseline to 12.07 at week 26 and to 11.18 at week 52. Mean CGI scores decreased from 3.99 to 2.20 at week 26 and 2.19 at week 52. Therefore, St. John's wort extract ZE 117 is a safe and effective way to treat mild to moderate depression over long periods of time, and therefore seems especially suitable for a relapse prevention.

  8. Potential long-term effects of a mind-body intervention for women with major depressive disorder: sustained mental health improvements with a pilot yoga intervention.

    PubMed

    Kinser, Patricia Anne; Elswick, R K; Kornstein, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Despite pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic advances over the past decades, many individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) experience recurrent depressive episodes and persistent depressive symptoms despite treatment with the usual care. Yoga is a mind-body therapeutic modality that has received attention in both the lay and research literature as a possible adjunctive therapy for depression. Although promising, recent findings about the positive mental health effects of yoga are limited because few studies have used standardized outcome measures and none of them have involved long-term follow-up beyond a few months after the intervention period. The goal of our research study was to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of a yoga intervention for women with MDD using standardized outcome measures and a long follow-up period (1year after the intervention). The key finding is that previous yoga practice has long-term positive effects, as revealed in both qualitative reports of participants' experiences and in the quantitative data about depression and rumination scores over time. Although generalizability of the study findings is limited because of a very small sample size at the 1-year follow-up assessment, the trends in the data suggest that exposure to yoga may convey a sustained positive effect on depression, ruminations, stress, anxiety, and health-related quality of life. Whether an individual continues with yoga practice, simple exposure to a yoga intervention appears to provide sustained benefits to the individual. This is important because it is rare that any intervention, pharmacologic or non-pharmacologic, for depression conveys such sustained effects for individuals with MDD, particularly after the treatment is discontinued. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of patients' attributions of the immediate effects of treatment of depression on long-term effectiveness of behavioural activation and antidepressant medication.

    PubMed

    Moradveisi, Latif; Huibers, Marcus J H; Arntz, Arnoud

    2015-06-01

    Patients' attributions of effects of treatment are important, as these can affect long-term outcome. Most studies so far focused on the influence of attributions to medication for anxiety and depression disorders. We investigated the effects of patients' attributions made after acute treatment on the long-term outcome of antidepressant medication (ADM) and psychological treatment (behavioural activation, BA). Data are based on a randomized trial testing the effectiveness of BA vs. ADM for major depression (MDD) in Iran. Patients with MDD (N = 100) were randomized to BA (N = 50) or ADM (N = 50). Patients' attributions were assessed at post-test (after completion of the treatments). Scores on an attribution questionnaire were factor analysed, and factor scores were retained as predictors of depressive symptoms at 1-year follow-up. Regression analysis was used to test whether attributions predicted depressive symptoms at 1-yr follow-up, controlling for symptom level, condition, and their interaction at post-test. Belief in coping efficacy was the only attribution factor significantly predicting 1-year HRSD scores, controlling for condition, post-test HRSD and their interaction. It also mediated the condition differences at follow-up. Credit to self was the single attribution factor that predicted BDI follow-up scores, controlling for condition, posttest BDI, and their interaction. It partially mediated the condition differences on the BDI at follow-up. Attribution to increased coping capacities and giving credit to self appear essential. In the long-term (at 1 year follow-up), the difference in outcome between BA and ADM (with BA being superior to ADM) is at least partially mediated by attributions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of short term and long term Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field on depressive disorder in mice: Involvement of nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Madjid Ansari, Alireza; Farzampour, Shahrokh; Sadr, Ali; Shekarchi, Babak; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan

    2016-02-01

    Previous reports on the possible effects of Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields (ELF MF) on mood have been paradoxical in different settings while no study has yet been conducted on animal behavior. In addition, it was shown that ELF MF exposure makes an increase in brain nitric oxide level. Therefore, in the current study, we aimed to assess the possible effect(s) of ELF MF exposure on mice Forced Swimming Test (FST) and evaluate the probable role of the increased level of nitric oxide in the observed behavior. Male adult mice NMRI were recruited to investigate the short term and long term ELF MF exposure (0.5 mT and 50 Hz, single 2h and 2 weeks 2h a day). Locomotor behavior was assessed by using open-field test (OFT) followed by FST to evaluate the immobility time. Accordingly, NΩ-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester 30 mg/kg was used to exert anti-depressant like effect. According to the results, short term exposure did not alter the immobility time, whereas long term exposure significantly reduces immobility time (p<0.01). However, it was revealed that the locomotion did not differ among all experimental groups. Short term exposure reversed the anti-depressant like effect resulting from 30 mg/kg of NΩ-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (p<0.01). It has been concluded that long term exposure could alter the depressive disorder in mice, whereas short term exposure has no significant effect. Also, reversing the anti-depressant activity of L-NAME indicates a probable increase in the brain nitric oxide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Long term effects of childhood trauma on cortisol stress reactivity in adulthood and relationship to the occurrence of depression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akiko; Poon, Lucia; Papadopoulos, Andrew S; Kumari, Veena; Cleare, Anthony J

    2014-12-01

    Childhood trauma may have longstanding effects on individuals' propensity to react adversely to stress, and also predisposes individuals to suffer from depression. The current study aimed to examine stress reactivity in individuals with and without a history of childhood trauma by measuring cortisol responses to the passive viewing of stressful images, specifically including images relevant to childhood trauma. In addition, participants with and without a diagnosis of current depression were studied to investigate whether cortisol stress reactivity may underlie resilience or vulnerability to depression. The study involved 17 healthy participants with and 24 without a history of childhood trauma; and 21 depressed patients with and 18 without a history of childhood trauma. Salivary cortisol was measured before, during and after participants were shown affectively laden images, including standardised scenes from the International Affective Picture System and also images suggestive of childhood abuse. Cortisol stress reactivity to the passive image viewing was compared between groups. In those who had experienced childhood trauma, cortisol stress responses were overall low and the same in those who were depressed and those who were not (mean stress reactivity variable - depressed: 0.8 nmol/l; non-depressed: 0.72 nmol/l). In contrast, cortisol stress reactivity was raised in depressed subjects relative to those who were not depressed in those without a history of childhood trauma (mean stress reactivity variable - depressed: 3.75 nmol/l; non-depressed: 0.1 nmol/l). A history of childhood trauma has longstanding effects on adulthood cortisol responses to stress, particularly in that depressed individuals with a history of childhood trauma show blunted cortisol responses. However, there were no differences between abused depressed and abused non-depressed subjects on cortisol stress responses, suggesting that such a finding does not explain subsequent susceptibility to

  12. Daily cognitive appraisals, daily affect, and long-term depressive symptoms: the role of self-esteem and self-concept clarity in the stress process.

    PubMed

    Lee-Flynn, Sharon C; Pomaki, Georgia; Delongis, Anita; Biesanz, Jeremy C; Puterman, Eli

    2011-02-01

    The current study investigated how self-esteem and self-concept clarity are implicated in the stress process both in the short and long term. Initial and 2-year follow-up interviews were completed by 178 participants from stepfamily unions. In twice-daily structured diaries over 7 days, participants reported their main family stressor, cognitive appraisals (perceived stressor threat and stressor controllability), and negative affect. Results of multilevel modeling indicated that high self-esteem ameliorated the effect of daily negative cognitive appraisals on daily negative affect. Self-concept clarity also buffered the effect of low self-self-esteem on depressive symptoms 2 years later. Our findings point to the vulnerability of those having low self-esteem or low self-concept clarity in terms of both short- and long-term adaptation to stress. They indicate the need for the consideration of such individual differences in designing stress management interventions.

  13. Association of long-term patterns of depressive symptoms and attention/executive function among older men with and without human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Nicole M; Surkan, Pamela J; Treisman, Glenn J; Sacktor, Ned C; Irwin, Michael R; Teplin, Linda A; Stall, Ron; Martin, Eileen M; Becker, James T; Munro, Cynthia; Levine, Andrew J; Jacobson, Lisa P; Abraham, Alison G

    2017-08-01

    Older HIV-infected men are at higher risk for both depression and cognitive impairments, compared to HIV-uninfected men. We evaluated the association between longitudinal patterns of depressive symptoms and attention/executive function in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men aged 50+ years to understand whether HIV infection influenced the long-term effect of depression on attention/executive function. Responses to the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale and attention/executive function tests (Trail Making Test Part B and Symbol Digit Modalities Test) were collected semiannually from May 1986 to April 2015 in 1611 men. Group-based trajectory models, stratified by HIV status, were used to identify latent patterns of depressive symptoms and attention/executive function across 12 years of follow-up. We identified three depression patterns for HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men (rare/never 50.0 vs. 60.6%, periodically depressed 29.6 vs. 24.5%, chronic high 20.5 vs.15.0%, respectively) and three patterns of attention/executive function for HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men (worst-performing 47.4 vs. 45.1%; average 41.9 vs. 47.0%; best-performing 10.7 vs. 8.0%, respectively). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess associations between depression patterns and worst-performing attention/executive function. Among HIV-uninfected men, those in the periodically depressed and chronic high depressed groups had higher odds of membership in the worst-performing attention/executive function group (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.45, 95% CI 1.04, 2.03; AOR = 2.25, 95% CI 1.49, 3.39, respectively). Among HIV-infected men, patterns of depression symptoms were not associated with patterns of attention/executive function. Results suggest that HIV-uninfected, but not HIV-infected, men with chronic high depression are more likely to experience a long-term pattern of attention/executive dysfunction.

  14. Effects of maternal postpartum depression in a well-resourced sample: Early concurrent and long-term effects on infant cognitive, language, and motor development.

    PubMed

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne; Tharner, Anne; Krogh, Marianne Thode; Vaever, Mette Skovgaard

    2016-12-01

    This study examined early and long-term effects of maternal postpartum depression on cognitive, language, and motor development in infants of clinically depressed mothers. Participants were 83 mothers and their full-term born children from the urban region of Copenhagen, Denmark. Of this group, 28 mothers were diagnosed with postnatal depression three to four months postpartum in a diagnostic interview. Cognitive, language, and motor development was assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development third edition, when the infants were 4 and 13 months of age. We found that maternal postpartum depression was associated with poorer cognitive development at infant age four months, the effect size being large (Cohen's d = 0.8) and with similar effects for boys and girls. At 13 months of age infants of clinical mothers did not differ from infants of non-clinical mothers. At this time most (79%) of the clinical mothers were no longer, or not again, depressed. These results may indicate that maternal depression can have an acute, concurrent effect on infant cognitive development as early as at four months postpartum. At the same time, in the absence of other risk factors, this effect may not be enduring. The main weaknesses of the study include the relatively small sample size and that depression scores were only available for 35 of the non-clinical mothers at 13 months. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Remission and Recovery in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Acute and Long-Term Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Silva, Susan G.; Tonev, Simon; Rohde, Paul; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Curry, John F.; Emslie, Graham J.; Reinecke, Mark; March, John

    2009-01-01

    The remission and recovery rates of adolescent patients with depression who were treated with fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, their combination, and placebos were examined through a multisite clinical trial. It is concluded that most depressed adolescents who received such therapies achieved remission at the end of nine months.

  16. Long-term effects of psychotherapy on moderate depression: a comparative study of narrative therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rodrigo T; Gonçalves, Miguel M; Fassnacht, Daniel B; Machado, Paulo P P; Sousa, Inês

    2014-01-01

    In a previous clinical controlled trial (Lopes et al., 2014), narrative therapy (NT) showed promising results in ameliorating depressive symptoms with comparable outcomes to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) when patients completed treatment. This paper aims to assess depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in this clinical sample at follow-up. Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 Interpersonal Relations Scale, naturalistic prospective follow-up assessment was conducted at 21 and 31 months after the last treatment session. At follow-up, patients kept improving in terms of depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems. The odds that a patient maintained recovery from depressive symptoms at follow-up were five times higher than the odds that a patient maintained recovery from interpersonal problems. In the same way, the odds of a patient never recovering from interpersonal problems were five times higher than the odds of never recovering from depressive symptoms. The study did not control for the natural course of depression or treatment continuation. For depressed patients with greater interpersonal disabilities, longer treatment plans and alternative continuation treatments should be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Remission and Recovery in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Acute and Long-Term Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Silva, Susan G.; Tonev, Simon; Rohde, Paul; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Curry, John F.; Emslie, Graham J.; Reinecke, Mark; March, John

    2009-01-01

    The remission and recovery rates of adolescent patients with depression who were treated with fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, their combination, and placebos were examined through a multisite clinical trial. It is concluded that most depressed adolescents who received such therapies achieved remission at the end of nine months.

  18. Long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial comparing acceptance and commitment therapy and standard cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Forman, Evan M; Shaw, Jena A; Goetter, Elizabeth M; Herbert, James D; Park, Jennie A; Yuen, Erica K

    2012-12-01

    The present study represents one of the first comparisons of the long-term effectiveness of traditional cognitive behavior therapy (i.e., Beckian cognitive therapy; CT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). One hundred thirty-two anxious or depressed outpatients were randomly assigned to receive either CT or ACT, and were assessed at posttreatment (n=90) and at 1.5-year (n=91) follow-up. As previously reported, the two treatments were equivalently effective at posttreatment according to measures of depression, anxiety, overall (social/occupational/symptom-related) functioning, and quality of life. However, current results suggest that treatment gains were better maintained at follow-up in the CT condition. Clinical significance analyses revealed that, at follow-up, one-third more CT patients were in the clinically normative range in terms of depressive symptoms and more than twice as many CT patients were in the normative range in terms of functioning levels. The possible long-term advantage of CT relative to ACT in this population is discussed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Gender differences in the long-term associations between post-traumatic stress disorder and depression symptoms: Findings from the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Horesh, Danny; Lowe, Sarah R.; Galea, Sandro; Uddin, Monica; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression are known to be highly co-morbid. However, previous findings regarding the nature of this co-morbidity have been inconclusive. This study prospectively examined whether PTSD and depression are distinct constructs in an epidemiologic sample, as well as assessed the directionality of the PTSD-depression association across time. Methods 942 Detroit residents (males: n = 387; females: n = 555) were interviewed by phone at three time points, one year apart. At each time point, they were assessed for PTSD (using the PCL-C), depression (PHQ-9), trauma exposure, and stressful life events. Results First, a confirmatory factor analysis showed PTSD and depression to be two distinct factors at all 3 waves of assessments (W1, W2, and W3). Second, chi-square analysis detected significant differences between observed and expected rates of comorbidity at each time point, with significantly more no-disorder and comorbid cases, and significantly fewer PTSD only and depression only cases, than would be expected by chance alone. Finally, a cross-lagged analysis revealed a bidirectional association between PTSD and depression symptoms across time for the entire sample, as well as for women separately, wherein PTSD symptoms at an early wave predicted later depression symptoms, and vice versa. For men, however, only the paths from PTSD symptoms to subsequent depression symptoms were significant. Conclusions Across time, PTSD and depression are distinct, but correlated, constructs among a highly-exposed epidemiologic sample. Women and men differ in both the risk of these conditions, and the nature of the long-term associations between them. PMID:25044027

  20. Long-term consequences of pubertal timing for youth depression: Identifying personal and contextual pathways of risk

    PubMed Central

    RUDOLPH, KAREN D.; TROOP-GORDON, WENDY; LAMBERT, SHARON F.; NATSUAKI, MISAKI N.

    2015-01-01

    This research explored sex differences in the pathways linking pubertal timing to depression across 4 years. A sample of 167 youth (M age = 12.41 years, SD = 1.19) and their caregivers completed measures of puberty and semistructured interviews of interpersonal stress and youth depression. Youth reported on psychological (negative self-focus, anxious arousal) and social–behavioral (coping) characteristics; parents reported on youths’ social–behavioral characteristics (withdrawal/social problems) and deviant peer affiliations. Early maturation predicted stable high trajectories of depression in girls; although early maturing boys showed low initial levels of depression, they did not differ from girls by the final wave of the study. Latent growth curve analyses identified several psychological, social–behavioral, and interpersonal pathways accounting for the contribution of pubertal timing to initial and enduring risk for depression in girls as well as emerging risk for depression in boys. These findings provide novel insight into multilevel processes accounting for sex differences in depression across the adolescent transition. PMID:25422971

  1. Long-term postpartum anxiety and depression-like behavior in mother rats subjected to maternal separation are ameliorated by palatable high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Morris, Margaret J

    2010-03-17

    While the effects of maternal separation on pups are well studied, the impact on dams has attracted little attention. The consumption of palatable food is known to dampen stress responses in animals, and emotions influence food choice in humans. Here we examined the early- and long-term impacts of maternal separation on behavioral profile of the dams, and the effects of palatable cafeteria high-fat diet (HFD). After littering, Sprague-Dawley female rats were subjected to prolonged separation, S180 (180 min) or brief separation, S15 (15 min/day) from postnatal days (PND) 2-14. At 4 weeks postpartum, half the dams were assigned to HFD. Anxiety and depression-like behaviors were assessed pre- and post-diet. Compared to S15 dams, S180 dams consuming chow demonstrated increased anxiety and depression-like behaviors assessed by elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim (FST) tests, respectively. These behavioral deficits were observed at 4 weeks, and persisted until 17 weeks postpartum. The S180 dams also had increased plasma corticosterone concentration compared to S15 dams, which coincided with increased hypothalamic CRH mRNA and reduced hippocampal GR mRNA expression, suggesting possible dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Interestingly, continuous provision of HFD improved the behavioral deficits observed in S180 dams with significant reduction of hypothalamic CRH mRNA expression. These data are the first to describe long-term detrimental behavioral impacts of separation in dams, suggesting this may provide a model of postpartum depression. Moreover, they support the notion of long-term beneficial effects of 'comfort food' on stress responses. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Socioeconomic position and depression in South African adults with long-term health conditions: a longitudinal study of causal pathways.

    PubMed

    Elwell-Sutton, T; Folb, N; Clark, A; Fairall, L R; Lund, C; Bachmann, M O

    2017-08-14

    There is convincing evidence that lower socioeconomic position is associated with increased risk of mental disorders. However, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. This study aims to elucidate the causal pathways between socioeconomic position and depression symptoms in South African adults. Two possible causal theories are examined: social causation, which suggests that poor socioeconomic conditions cause mental ill health; and social drift, which suggests that those with poor mental health are more likely to drift into poor socioeconomic circumstances. The study used longitudinal and cross-sectional observational data on 3904 adults, from a randomised trial carried out in 38 primary health care clinics between 2011 and 2012. Structural equation models and counterfactual mediation analyses were used to examine causal pathways in two directions. First, we examined social causation pathways, with language (a proxy for racial or ethnic category) being treated as an exposure, while education, unemployment, income and depression were treated as sequential mediators and outcomes. Second, social drift was explored with depression treated as a potential influence on health-related quality of life, job loss and, finally, income. The results suggest that the effects of language on depression at baseline, and on changes in depression during follow-up, were mediated through education and income but not through unemployment. Adverse effects of unemployment and job loss on depression appeared to be mostly mediated through income. The effect of depression on decreasing income appeared to be mediated by job loss. These results suggest that both social causation and social selection processes operate concurrently. This raises the possibility that people could get trapped in a vicious cycle in which poor socioeconomic conditions lead to depression, which, in turn, can cause further damage to their economic prospects. This study also suggests that modifiable factors such

  3. Long-term effects of cognitive therapy on biological rhythms and depressive symptoms: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mondin, Thaíse Campos; Cardoso, Taiane de Azevedo; Jansen, Karen; Silva, Giovanna Del Grande da; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos; Silva, Ricardo Azevedo da

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the effect of cognitive therapy on biological rhythm and depressive and anxious symptoms in a twelve-month follow-up period. In addition, correlations between the reduction of depression and anxiety symptoms and the regulation of biological rhythm were observed. This was a randomized clinical trial with young adults from 18 to 29 years of age who were diagnosed with depression. Two models of psychotherapy were used: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Narrative Cognitive Therapy (NCT). Biological rhythm was assessed with the Biological Rhythm Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN). Severity of depressive and anxious symptoms was assessed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), respectively. The sample included 97 patients who were divided within the protocols of psychotherapy. There was a significant reduction in depressive and anxious symptoms (p<0.001) and an increase on regulation of biological rhythm (p<0.05) at the twelve-month follow-up. Moreover, we showed a positive correlation between the reduction of depressive symptoms and regulation of biological rhythm (r=0.638; p<0.001) and between the reduction of anxious symptoms and regulation of biological rhythm (r=0.438; p<0.001). Both models showed that cognitive therapy was effective on the reduction of depressive and anxious symptoms and on the regulation of biological rhythm at a twelve-month follow-up evaluation. This study highlights the association between biological rhythm and symptoms of depression and anxiety. We did not assess genetic, hormonal or neurochemical factors and we did not include patients under pharmaceutical treatment or those with severe symptomatology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Safety and efficacy of olanzapine in the long-term treatment of Japanese patients with bipolar I disorder, depression: an integrated analysis.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Hideaki; Tohen, Mauricio; McDonnell, David P; Fujikoshi, Shinji; Case, Michael; Kanba, Shigenobu; Takahashi, Michihiro; Gomez, Juan-Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Safety and efficacy of long-term olanzapine treatment in Japanese patients with bipolar depression were assessed. An integrated analysis of data from two studies was performed in olanzapine-treated patients (n = 165) with bipolar depression. Study 1 was a 6-week, double-blind, global study. Patients were randomly assigned to olanzapine or placebo followed by 18 weeks of open-label treatment. Study 2 was an open-label extension of Study 1 involving only Japanese patients. Patients assigned to Pre-olanzapine and Pre-placebo in Study 1 were treated for 24 weeks (total olanzapine exposure 42 or 48 weeks) and newly recruited patients (New-olanzapine) were treated for 48 weeks. Safety outcomes included treatment-emergent adverse events and changes in metabolic parameters. Efficacy outcome was assessed with Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale score. Forty-three percent of patients completed the 42- or 48-week olanzapine treatment period. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event was weight increased (47.9%). Significant increases were seen in weight (3.5 kg), and in fasting glucose (3.5 mg/dL), fasting total cholesterol (8.1 mg/dL), and fasting triglycerides (35.1 mg/dL). Remission rates (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score ≤12 at any time) were 79.8% for the Pre-olanzapine group, 90.2% for the Pre-placebo group, and 85.0% for the New-olanzapine group. No patents developed mania during treatment. Long-term use of olanzapine in a Japanese population with bipolar depression is associated with increases in weight and fasting metabolic measures, and also with improved depressive symptoms with avoidance of mania. Clinicians must carefully consider the benefits and risks of long-term therapy with olanzapine. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  5. Three-Year long-term outcome of 458 naturalistically treated inpatients with major depressive episode: severe relapse rates and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Seemüller, Florian; Meier, Sebastian; Obermeier, Michael; Musil, Richard; Bauer, Michael; Adli, Mazda; Kronmüller, Klaus; Holsboer, Florian; Brieger, Peter; Laux, Gerd; Bender, Wolfram; Heuser, Isabella; Zeiler, Joachim; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Riedel, Michael; Falkai, Peter; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    In randomized controlled trials, maintenance treatment for relapse prevention has been proven to be efficacious in patients responding in acute treatment, its efficacy in long-term outcome in "real-world patients" has yet to be proven. Three-year long-term data from a large naturalistic multisite follow-up were presented. Severe relapse was defined as suicide, severe suicide attempt, or rehospitalization. Next to relapse rates, possible risk factors including antidepressant medication were identified using univariate generalized log-rank tests and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model for time to severe relapse. Overall data of 458 patients were available for analysis. Of all patients, 155 (33.6%) experienced at least one severe relapse during the 3-year follow-up. The following variables were associated with a shorter time to a severe relapse in univariate and multivariate analyses: multiple hospitalizations, presence of avoidant personality disorder, continuing antipsychotic medication, and no further antidepressant treatment. In comparison with other studies, the observed rate of severe relapse during 3-year period is rather low. This is one of the first reports demonstrating a beneficial effect of long-term antidepressant medication on severe relapse rates in naturalistic patients. Concomitant antipsychotic medication may be a proxy marker for treatment resistant and psychotic depression.

  6. Longitudinal Changes in Psychological States in Online Health Community Members: Understanding the Long-Term Effects of Participating in an Online Depression Community.

    PubMed

    Park, Albert; Conway, Mike

    2017-03-20

    significantly or at least as much as members of other online communities. On the basis of these findings, we contribute practical suggestions for designing online depression communities to enhance psychosocial benefit gains for members. We consider these results to be an important step toward a better understanding of the impact of prolonged participation in an online depression community, in addition to providing insights into the long-term psychosocial well-being of members.

  7. Longitudinal Changes in Psychological States in Online Health Community Members: Understanding the Long-Term Effects of Participating in an Online Depression Community

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Mike

    2017-01-01

    emotion-related language usage of depression community members are improving either significantly or at least as much as members of other online communities. On the basis of these findings, we contribute practical suggestions for designing online depression communities to enhance psychosocial benefit gains for members. We consider these results to be an important step toward a better understanding of the impact of prolonged participation in an online depression community, in addition to providing insights into the long-term psychosocial well-being of members. PMID:28320692

  8. Long-term safety and efficacy of armodafinil in bipolar depression: A 6-month open-label extension study.

    PubMed

    Ketter, Terence A; Amchin, Jess; Frye, Mark A; Gross, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    Safe/well-tolerated treatments for bipolar I depression remain limited. We assessed safety/tolerability of adjunctive open-label armodafinil, a wakefulness-promoting agent evaluated in 3 acute, controlled efficacy studies with variable efficacy results. Completers of three 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled adjunctive armodafinil studies (150-200 mg/day added to ongoing stable maintenance doses of 1 or 2 protocol-defined mood stabilizers) in bipolar I depression could enter this 6-month, open-label extension study. Objectives included evaluation of safety/tolerability (primary) and efficacy (secondary). 867 patients enrolled; 863 received ≥1 dose of armodafinil and 506 (58%) completed the 6-month study. Headache, insomnia, and anxiety were the most common adverse events (AEs) reported, whereas akathisia, nausea, sedation/somnolence, and weight increase were uncommon. Mean measures assessing emergence of mania, anxiety, insomnia, or suicidality showed no worsening. Discontinuations due to AEs occurred in 57 (7%) patients. Serious AEs occurred in 27 (3%) patients and were considered treatment-related in 8 (1%) patients. Depressive symptoms improved over the 6 months, as did patient functioning. Lack of placebo control. Adjunctive armodafinil was generally safe and well tolerated over 6 months of open-label treatment at 150-200 mg/day when taken with protocol-defined mood stabilizers for bipolar I depression. This 6-month open-label study suggested that armodafinil augmentation of bipolar maintenance therapies may have a favorable risk profile and may improve depressive symptoms in some patients with bipolar I depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-Term Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Long-Term Care What Is Long-Term Care? Long-term care involves a variety of services ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) Most Care Provided at Home Long-term care is provided ...

  10. Development of the psychometric property of a Minimum Data-Set-Based Depression Rating Scale for use in long-term care facilities in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, C Y; Lan, C F; Chang, P L; Li, I C

    2015-01-01

    Our aim is to develop the psychometric property of the Minimum Data-Set-Based Depression Rating Scale (MDS-DRS) to ensure its use to assess service needs and guide care plans for institutionalized residents. 378 residents were recruited from the Haoran Senior Citizen Home in northern Taiwan. The MDS-DRS and GDS-SF were used to identify observable features of depression symptoms in the elderly residents. A total of 378 residents participated in this study. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve indicated that the MDS-DRS has a 43.3% sensitivity and a 90.6% specificity when screening for depression symptoms. The total variance, explained by the two factors 'sadness' and 'distress,' was 58.1% based on the factor analysis. Reliable assessment tools for nurses are important because they allow the early detection of depression symptoms. The MDS-DRS items perform as well as the GDS-SF items in detecting depression symptoms. Furthermore, the MDS-DRS has the advantage of providing information to staff about care process implementation, which can facilitate the identification of areas that need improvement. Further research is needed to validate the use of the MDS-DRS in long-term care facilities.

  11. Symptoms of depression and anxiety predict treatment response and long-term physical health outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Matcham, Faith; Norton, Sam; Scott, David L; Steer, Sophia; Hotopf, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this analysis is to examine the longitudinal impact of symptoms of depression/anxiety on treatment response, long-term disease activity and physical disability in RA. Secondary analysis of clinical trial data was performed. Data were collected at baseline and at 6-monthly intervals for 2 years. The EuroQoL (EQ-5D(TM)) indicated depression/anxiety symptom severity. Our primary outcomes of interest were (i) DAS-28 and (ii) physical disability measured via the HAQ. Secondary outcomes were: tender and swollen joint counts, patient global assessment, ESR and odds of reaching clinical remission. Multilevel models were used to assess the impact of baseline and persistent depression/anxiety on outcomes over 2 years. Data from 379 patients were included. After adjusting for covariates, baseline depression/anxiety symptoms were associated with increased DAS-28 outcomes and increased tender joint counts. Persistent depression/anxiety symptoms were associated with increased DAS-28 scores, HAQ scores, tender joint counts and patient global assessment of disease activity, and reduced odds of reaching clinical remission. Patients with symptoms of depression/anxiety at baseline also showed a 50% reduction in prednisolone treatment effect, in comparison with patients with no symptoms of depression/anxiety at baseline. Baseline and persistent symptoms of depression/anxiety are associated with poorer health outcomes over time, as well as reduced treatment response. Mental health should be routinely measured both in clinical practice and in research, and managed alongside rheumatological disease to optimize health outcomes. Further research is required to examine whether treatment of mental disorders can improve rheumatological outcomes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  12. Symptoms of depression and anxiety predict treatment response and long-term physical health outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Sam; Scott, David L.; Steer, Sophia; Hotopf, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this analysis is to examine the longitudinal impact of symptoms of depression/anxiety on treatment response, long-term disease activity and physical disability in RA. Methods. Secondary analysis of clinical trial data was performed. Data were collected at baseline and at 6-monthly intervals for 2 years. The EuroQoL (EQ-5DTM) indicated depression/anxiety symptom severity. Our primary outcomes of interest were (i) DAS-28 and (ii) physical disability measured via the HAQ. Secondary outcomes were: tender and swollen joint counts, patient global assessment, ESR and odds of reaching clinical remission. Multilevel models were used to assess the impact of baseline and persistent depression/anxiety on outcomes over 2 years. Results. Data from 379 patients were included. After adjusting for covariates, baseline depression/anxiety symptoms were associated with increased DAS-28 outcomes and increased tender joint counts. Persistent depression/anxiety symptoms were associated with increased DAS-28 scores, HAQ scores, tender joint counts and patient global assessment of disease activity, and reduced odds of reaching clinical remission. Patients with symptoms of depression/anxiety at baseline also showed a 50% reduction in prednisolone treatment effect, in comparison with patients with no symptoms of depression/anxiety at baseline. Conclusion. Baseline and persistent symptoms of depression/anxiety are associated with poorer health outcomes over time, as well as reduced treatment response. Mental health should be routinely measured both in clinical practice and in research, and managed alongside rheumatological disease to optimize health outcomes. Further research is required to examine whether treatment of mental disorders can improve rheumatological outcomes. PMID:26350486

  13. Long-term effects of early adolescent methamphetamine exposure on depression-like behavior and the hypothalamic vasopressin system in mice.

    PubMed

    Joca, Lauren; Zuloaga, Damian G; Raber, Jacob; Siegel, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) has neurotoxic effects on the adult human brain that can lead to deficits in behavior and cognition. However, relatively little research has examined the behavioral or neurotoxic effects of MA in adolescents. The rising rates of adolescent MA use make it imperative that we understand the long-term effects of MA exposure on the adolescent brain and how these effects may differ from those seen in adults. In this study, the long-term effects of MA exposure during early adolescence on behavior and the vasopressin system in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus in late adolescent and adult male and female C57BL/6J mice were examined. MA exposure increased depression-like behavior in the Porsolt forced swim test in both late adolescent and adult male and female mice. Late adolescent male mice exposed to MA also showed a decrease in the number of vasopressin-immunoreactive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus compared to sex-matched saline-treated controls. Thus, similar to humans exposed to MA during adolescence, mice exposed to MA during adolescence show increased depression-like behavior later in life. These changes in behavior may be related to MA-induced alterations in vasopressin and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, especially in males. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. 5-HT4-Receptors Modulate Induction of Long-Term Depression but Not Potentiation at Hippocampal Output Synapses in Acute Rat Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Wawra, Matthias; Fidzinski, Pawel; Heinemann, Uwe; Mody, Istvan; Behr, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The subiculum is the principal target of CA1 pyramidal cells and mediates hippocampal output to various cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. The majority of subicular pyramidal cells are burst-spiking neurons. Previous studies indicated that high frequency stimulation in subicular burst-spiking cells causes presynaptic NMDA-receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) whereas low frequency stimulation induces postsynaptic NMDA-receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD). In the present study, we investigate the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 (5-HT4) receptor activation and blockade on both forms of synaptic plasticity in burst-spiking cells. We demonstrate that neither activation nor block of 5-HT4 receptors modulate the induction or expression of LTP. In contrast, activation of 5-HT4 receptors facilitates expression of LTD, and block of the 5-HT4 receptor prevents induction of short-term depression and LTD. As 5-HT4 receptors are positively coupled to adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1), 5-HT4 receptors might modulate PKA activity through AC1. Since LTD is blocked in the presence of 5-HT4 receptor antagonists, our data are consistent with 5-HT4 receptor activation by ambient serotonin or intrinsically active 5-HT4 receptors. Our findings provide new insight into aminergic modulation of hippocampal output. PMID:24505387

  15. Activation of presynaptic and postsynaptic ryanodine-sensitive calcium stores is required for the induction of long-term depression at GABAergic synapses in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caillard, O; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaïarsa, J L

    2000-09-01

    The role of internal calcium stores in the induction of long-term depression at GABAergic synapses was investigated in the neonatal rat hippocampus. Whole-cell recordings of CA3 pyramidal neurons were performed on hippocampal slices from neonatal (2-4 d old) rats. In control conditions, tetanic stimulation (TS) evoked an NMDA-dependent long-term depression of GABA(A) receptor-mediated postsynaptic responses (LTD(GABA-A)). LTD(GABA-A) was prevented when the cells were loaded with ruthenium red, a blocker of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) stores, whereas loading the cells with heparin, a blocker of IP3-induced Ca2+ release stores, had no effect. The effects of ryanodine, another compound that interferes with CICR stores, were also investigated. Intracellular injection of ryanodine prevented the induction of LTD(GABA-A) only when the TS was preceded by depolarizing pulses that increase intracellular Ca2+ concentration. When applied in the bath, ryanodine prevented the induction of LTD(GABA-A). Altogether, these results suggest that ryanodine acts as a Ca2+-dependent blocker of CICR stores and that the induction of LTD(GABA-A) required the activation of both presynaptic and postsynaptic CICR stores.

  16. A Paradigm for Single-Case Research: The Time Series Study of a Long-Term Psychotherapy for Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Enrico E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Study articulates model for single-case research in psychotherapy. Saw patient with major depressive disorder for 2.5 years of psychotherapy. Videotaped sessions and obtained assessments of change at regular intervals. Used time-series analysis to model fluctuations in therapy process. Bidirectional analysis of causal effects showed that influence…

  17. Long-Term Outcome of a School-Based, Universal Approach to Prevention of Depression in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Susan H.; Sheffield, Jeanie K.; Donovan, Caroline L.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the 2-, 3-, and 4-year outcomes of a school-based, universal approach to the prevention of adolescent depression. Despite initial short-term positive effects, these benefits were not maintained over time. Adolescents who completed the teacher-administered cognitive-behavioral intervention did not differ…

  18. Remission and Recovery in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Acute and Long-term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Silva, Susan G.; Tonev, Simon; Rohde, Paul; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Curry, John F.; Emslie, Graham J.; Reinecke, Mark; March, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective We examine remission rate probabilities, recovery rates, and residual symptoms across 36 weeks in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method TADS, a multisite clinical trial, randomized 439 adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) to 12 weeks of treatment to fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), their combination (COMB), or pill placebo (PBO). The PBO group, treated openly after week 12, was not included in the subsequent analyses. Treatment differences in remission rates and probabilities of remission over time are compared. Recovery rates in remitters at week 12 (acute phase remitters) and week 18 (continuation phase remitters) are summarized. We also examined whether residual symptoms at the end of 12 weeks of acute treatment predicted later remission. Results At Week 36, the estimated remission rates for intention-to-treat cases were: COMB: 60%, FLX: 55%; CBT: 64%; overall: 60%. Paired comparisons reveal that at week 24 all active treatments converge on remission outcomes. The recovery rate at Week 36 was 65% for acute phase remitters and 71% for continuation phase remitters, with no significant between-treatment differences in recovery rates. Residual symptoms at the end of acute treatment predicted failure to achieve remission at weeks 18 and 36. Conclusions The majority of depressed adolescents in all three treatment modalities achieved remission at the end of nine months of treatment. PMID:19127172

  19. A multi-wave study of organizational justice at work and long-term sickness absence among employees with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hjarsbech, Pernille U; Christensen, Karl Bang; Bjorner, Jakob B; Madsen, Ida E H; Thorsen, Sannie V; Carneiro, Isabella G; Christensen, Ulla; Rugulies, Reiner

    2014-03-01

    Mental health problems are strong predictors of long-term sickness absence (LTSA). In this study, we investigated whether organizational justice at work - fairness in resolving conflicts and distributing work - prevents risk of LTSA among employees with depressive symptoms. In a longitudinal study with five waves of data collection, we examined a cohort of 1034 employees with depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms and organizational justice were assessed by self-administered questionnaires and information on LTSA was derived from a national register. Using Poisson regression analyses, we calculated rate ratios (RR) for the prospective association of organizational justice and change in organizational justice with time to onset of LTSA. All analyses were sex stratified. Among men, intermediate levels of organizational justice were statistically significantly associated with a decreased risk of subsequent LTSA after adjustment for covariates [RR 0.49, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.26-0.91]. There was also a decreased risk for men with high levels of organizational justice although these estimates did not reach statistical significance after adjustment (RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.20-1.10). We found no such results for women. In both sexes, neither favorable nor adverse changes in organizational justice were statistically significantly associated with the risk of LTSA. This study shows that organizational justice may have a protective effect on the risk of LTSA among men with depressive symptoms. A protective effect of favorable changes in organizational justice was not found.

  20. Major Depression as a Predictor of Poor Long-Term Survival in a Brazilian Stroke Cohort (Study of Stroke Mortality and Morbidity in Adults) EMMA study.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Roberta Ferreira; Santos, Itamar de Souza; Alencar, Airlane Pereira; Benseñor, Isabela Martins; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    The influence of poststroke depression on long-term survival is poorly investigated. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the influence of major depression disorder (MDD) on long-term survival in the participants from The Study of Stroke Mortality and Morbidity in Adults (EMMA Study) in São Paulo, Brazil. We prospectively evaluated ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke (HS) cases from the EMMA Study. Baseline and stroke characteristics and cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated according to MDD assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire, which was applied 30 days after index event and periodically during 1-year follow-up. We performed Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, as well as crude and multiple Cox proportional hazards models. In this subset of the EMMA Study, we evaluated 164 (85.9%) patients with ischemic stroke and 27 (14.1%) with HS. Among these, overall incidence of MDD was 25.1% during 1 year of follow-up, regardless stroke subtype. The peak rate of major depression postacute event was beyond 1 month. We observed a lower survival rate among individuals who developed poststroke MDD than among those who did not develop this condition after 1 year of follow-up (85.4% versus 96.5%, log rank P = .006). After multiple analysis, we kept a higher risk of all-cause mortality among those who developed MDD compared to participants without MDD (hazard ratio = 4.60, 95% confidence interval = 1.36-15.55, P = .01). Our findings suggest that incident MDD is a potential marker of poor prognosis 1 year after stroke. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of Desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d Versus Placebo in the Long-Term Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized, Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vialet, Cécile; Hwang, Eunhee; Tourian, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine long-term (11-month) antidepressant efficacy of desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d across a broad range of clinical and functional outcomes in patients with major depressive disorder. Method: Adult outpatients (≥ 18 years) with major depressive disorder (DSM-IV criteria) and a 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) total score ≥ 20 at screening and baseline who responded to 8 weeks of open-label desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d and had a continuing stable response through week 20 were randomly assigned to receive placebo or desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d in a 6-month, double-blind, randomized withdrawal period. Depressive symptoms were evaluated using the HDRS-17, 6-item HDRS, and Clinical Global Impressions–Severity of Ilness and –Improvement (CGI-S, CGI-I). Health outcomes included the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire and the World Health Organization 5-Item Well-Being Index (WHO-5). The trial was conducted from June 2009 to March 2011 at 87 study sites in 14 countries worldwide. Results: Of 874 patients enrolled in open-label treatment, 548 patients were randomly assigned to receive double-blind placebo (n = 276) or desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d (n = 272). At the end of the 6-month double-blind treatment, improvements in depressive symptoms were better maintained among the desvenlafaxine- than placebo-treated patients on all efficacy endpoints (all P ≤ .001); in the desvenlafaxine group, 21.8% (vs 42.9% in the placebo group) had CGI-I ratings of 5, 6, and 7 (minimally worse/much worse/very much worse), and 74.4% met criteria for remission (placebo: 54.2%). WPAI and WHO-5 scores indicated significantly better productivity and well-being with continued desvenlafaxine (vs placebo, P ≤ .001). Conclusions: Long-term treatment with desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d maintained improvements in major depressive disorder among adult outpatients who exhibited a stable therapeutic response. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT

  2. Chronic social defeat induces long-term behavioral depression of aggressive motivation in an invertebrate model system.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jacqueline; Rillich, Jan; Stevenson, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    Losing a fight against a conspecific male (social defeat) induces a period of suppressed aggressiveness and general behaviour, often with symptoms common to human psychiatric disorders. Agonistic experience is also discussed as a potential cause of consistent, behavioral differences between individuals (animal "personality"). In non-mammals, however, the impact of single agonistic encounters typically last only hours, but then again studies of repeated intermittent defeat (chronic social defeat) are seldom. We report the effect of chronic social defeat in adult male crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus), for which all known behavioral effects of defeat last only 3 h. Firstly, after 48 h social isolation, crickets that experienced 5 defeats at 24 h intervals against the same, weight-matched opponent exhibited suppressed aggressiveness lasting >24 h, which was still evident when the animals were matched against an unfamiliar opponent at the last trial. Secondly, this longer-term depression of aggression also occurred in 48 h isolated crickets that lost 6 fights at 1 h intervals against unfamiliar opponents at each trial. Thirdly, crickets isolated as larvae until adult maturity (>16 days) were significantly more aggressive, and less variable in their aggressiveness at their very first fight than 48 h isolates, and also significantly more resilient to the effects of chronic social defeat. We conclude that losing an aggressive encounter in crickets has a residual effect, lasting at least 24 h, that accumulates when repeated defeats are experienced, and leads to a prolonged depression of aggressive motivation in subordinates. Furthermore, our data indicate that social interactions between young adults and possibly larvae can have even longer, possibly lifelong influences on subsequent behavior. Social subjugation is thus likely to be a prime determinant of inter-individual behavioral differences in crickets. Our work also opens new avenues for investigating proximate

  3. Long-term course of severe depression: late remission and recurrence may be found in a follow-up after 38–53 years

    PubMed Central

    Crona, Lisa; Brådvik, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This study is a follow-up of inpatients diagnosed with severe depression/melancholia between 1956 and 1969. During this period, all inpatients at the Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Lund, were rated on a multidimensional diagnostic schedule on discharge. There were 471 patients born from 1920 onward. In the present follow-up, 2006 to 2010, 169 survivors could be traced. They were asked to participate in the study involving a telephone interview, in which a structured life chart was used. Of the patients contacted, 16 were ill or confused and 3 did not remember ever being depressed, leaving 150 who could participate. Seventy-five of these agreed to participate in the study. Long-term course of depression was evaluated by cluster analysis and compared to background variables, such as heredity for depression, perceived parental rearing behaviour, and treatment of index depressive episode. Using a cluster analysis the patients could be separated into six clusters describing the course: i) single or few episodes followed by long-lasting remission; ii) single or few episodes followed by long-lasting remission, although shorter; iii) single or few episodes followed by late recurrence; iv) single or few episodes, but more frequently ill, followed by late recurrence; v) several episodes followed by lasting remission; vi) chronic course of episodes. Remission or recurrence could therefore occur even after more than a decade. In summary, there was a short-term course with or without recurrence or a chronic course with or without late remission. Heredity for depression was significantly related to a chronic course with or without late remission. PMID:25478118

  4. Long-term functioning and sleep quality in patients with major depressive disorder treated with extended-release quetiapine fumarate.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, David V; Locklear, Julie; Svedsäter, Henrik; Datto, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patients' functioning and sleep quality during extended-release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR) maintenance treatment. A double-blind, randomized-withdrawal maintenance study of quetiapine XR monotherapy was carried out in patients with major depressive disorder. Following 4-8 weeks of open-label quetiapine XR and 12-18 weeks of open-label quetiapine XR stabilization (50, 150, or 300 mg/day), eligible patients were randomized to quetiapine XR (50, 150, or 300 mg/day) or placebo. Secondary variables of the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were used to assess functioning and sleep quality and are reported here. Quetiapine XR significantly maintained functioning versus placebo. Changes in the least squares means (LSM) from randomization in the SDS total scores were as follows: -0.45, quetiapine XR (P<0.05), versus 0.44, placebo. Quetiapine XR significantly maintained SDS domains 'social life/leisure' (-0.19; P<0.05) and 'family life/home responsibilities' (-0.22; P<0.05) versus placebo (0.13 and 0.10, respectively). Quetiapine XR significantly maintained sleep quality (LSM change in PSQI total scores: 0.06, quetiapine XR vs. 1.35, placebo; P<0.001), with five of seven PSQI components being significant for quetiapine XR versus placebo. In conclusion, quetiapine XR (50-300 mg/day) monotherapy better maintains overall functioning and sleep quality than placebo in patients with major depressive disorder.

  5. Nampt is required for long-term depression and the function of GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Liana Roberts; Zorumski, Charles F.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an essential coenzyme/cosubstrate for many biological processes in cellular metabolism. The rate-limiting step in the major pathway of mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis is mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). Previously, we showed that mice lacking Nampt in forebrain excitatory neurons (CamKIIαNampt−/− mice) exhibited hyperactivity, impaired learning and memory, and reduced anxiety-like behaviors. However, it remained unclear if these functional effects were accompanied by synaptic changes. Here, we show that CamKIIαNampt−/− mice have impaired induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the Schaffer collateral pathway, but normal induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), at postnatal day 30. Pharmacological assessments demonstrated that CamKIIαNampt−/− mice also display dysfunction of synaptic GluN2B (NR2B)-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) prior to changes in NMDAR subunit expression. These results support a novel, important role for Nampt-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis in LTD and in the function of GluN2B–containing NMDARs. PMID:26481044

  6. Induction of long-term potentiation and depression is reflected by corresponding changes in secretion of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Aicardi, Giorgio; Argilli, Emanuela; Cappello, Silvia; Santi, Spartaco; Riccio, Massimo; Thoenen, Hans; Canossa, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophins play an important role in modulating activity-dependent neuronal plasticity. In particular, threshold levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are required to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) in acute hippocampal slices. Conversely, the administration of exogenous BDNF prevents the induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the visual cortex. A long-standing missing link in the analysis of this modulatory role of BDNF was the determination of the time-course of endogenous BDNF secretion in the same organotypic preparation in which LTP and LTD are elicited. Here, we fulfilled this requirement in slices of perirhinal cortex. Classical theta-burst stimulation patterns evoking LTP lasting >180 min elicited a large increase in BDNF secretion that persisted 5-12 min beyond the stimulation period. Weaker theta-burst stimulation patterns leading only to the initial phase of LTP (≈35 min) were accompanied by a smaller increase in BDNF secretion lasting <1 min. Sequestration of BDNF by TrkB-IgG receptor bodies prevented LTP. Low-frequency stimulations leading to LTD were accompanied by reductions in BDNF secretion that never lasted beyond the duration of the stimulation. PMID:15505222

  7. Protease Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2) Induces Long-Term Depression in the Hippocampus through Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4)

    PubMed Central

    Shavit-Stein, Efrat; Artan-Furman, Avital; Feingold, Ekaterina; Ben Shimon, Marina; Itzekson-Hayosh, Zeev; Chapman, Joab; Vlachos, Andreas; Maggio, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) are involved in regulating synaptic transmission and plasticity in the brain. While it is well-accepted that PAR1 mediates long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synaptic strength, the role of PAR2 in synaptic plasticity remains not well-understood. In this study, we assessed the role of PAR2-signaling in plasticity at hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Using field potential recordings, we report that PAR2-activation leads to long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission through a protein kinase A -dependent, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 -mediated mechanism, which requires the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. These results demonstrate that the effects of PAR2 on synaptic plasticity are distinct from what is observed upon PAR1-activation. Thus, we propose that the activation of different classes of PARs, i.e., PAR1 and PAR2, may set the threshold of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal network by balancing LTP and LTD. PMID:28303089

  8. Nampt is required for long-term depression and the function of GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Stein, Liana Roberts; Zorumski, Charles F; Imai, Shin-Ichiro; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2015-10-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential coenzyme/cosubstrate for many biological processes in cellular metabolism. The rate-limiting step in the major pathway of mammalian NAD(+) biosynthesis is mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). Previously, we showed that mice lacking Nampt in forebrain excitatory neurons (CamKIIαNampt(-/-) mice) exhibited hyperactivity, impaired learning and memory, and reduced anxiety-like behaviors. However, it remained unclear if these functional effects were accompanied by synaptic changes. Here, we show that CamKIIαNampt(-/-) mice have impaired induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the Schaffer collateral pathway, but normal induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), at postnatal day 30. Pharmacological assessments demonstrated that CamKIIαNampt(-/-) mice also display dysfunction of synaptic GluN2B (NR2B)-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) prior to changes in NMDAR subunit expression. These results support a novel, important role for Nampt-mediated NAD(+) biosynthesis in LTD and in the function of GluN2B-containing NMDARs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term Effectiveness of Modified Electroconvulsive Therapy Compared With Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xi-Long; Xu, Wei-Qin; Le, Ya-Juan; Dai, Xiong-Kai

    2016-06-01

    This retrospective study recruited 150 patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) who received modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT) and 150 cases treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), which aimed to compare the short- and long-term effectiveness, as well as economic outcomes, of MECT and rTMS with a large sample size in patients with recurrent MDD. The results showed that the response rate of patients in the rTMS group was lower than that in the MECT group (46.0% vs 58.7%, p < 0.05). Patients in the rTMS group had elevated rate of dizziness, but reduced rates of poor memory and headache, as well as lower costs compared with the MECT group (p < 0.05). Importantly, we found that the relapse-free survival of patients was similar between the rTMS and MECT groups in the long term. In conclusion, rTMS is an alternative method for MECT in the treatment of patients with recurrent MDD.

  10. The eIF2α kinase PERK limits the expression of hippocampal metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Mimi A; Ma, Tao; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Antion, Marcia D; Cavener, Douglas R; Hoeffer, Charles A; Klann, Eric

    2014-04-16

    The proper regulation of translation is required for the expression of long-lasting synaptic plasticity. A major site of translational control involves the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 α (eIF2α) by PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase (PERK). To determine the role of PERK in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, we used the Cre-lox expression system to selectively disrupt PERK expression in the adult mouse forebrain. Here, we demonstrate that in hippocampal area CA1, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent long-term depression (LTD) is associated with increased eIF2α phosphorylation, whereas stimulation of early- and late-phase long-term potentiation (E-LTP and L-LTP, respectively) is associated with decreased eIF2α phosphorylation. Interesting, although PERK-deficient mice exhibit exaggerated mGluR-LTD, both E-LTP and L-LTP remained intact. We also found that mGluR-LTD is associated with a PERK-dependent increase in eIF2α phosphorylation. Our findings are consistent with the notion that eIF2α phosphorylation is a key site for the bidirectional control of persistent forms of synaptic LTP and LTD and suggest a distinct role for PERK in mGluR-LTD.

  11. MHC class I immune proteins are critical for hippocampus-dependent memory and gate NMDAR-dependent hippocampal long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Nelson, P Austin; Sage, Jennifer R; Wood, Suzanne C; Davenport, Christopher M; Anagnostaras, Stephan G; Boulanger, Lisa M

    2013-09-01

    Memory impairment is a common feature of conditions that involve changes in inflammatory signaling in the brain, including traumatic brain injury, infection, neurodegenerative disorders, and normal aging. However, the causal importance of inflammatory mediators in cognitive impairments in these conditions remains unclear. Here we show that specific immune proteins, members of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC class I), are essential for normal hippocampus-dependent memory, and are specifically required for NMDAR-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD) in the healthy adult hippocampus. In β2m(-/-)TAP(-/-)mice, which lack stable cell-surface expression of most MHC class I proteins, NMDAR-dependent LTD in area CA1 of adult hippocampus is abolished, while NMDAR-independent forms of potentiation, facilitation, and depression are unaffected. Altered NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of β2m(-/-)TAP(-/-)mice is accompanied by pervasive deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory, including contextual fear memory, object recognition memory, and social recognition memory. Thus normal MHC class I expression is essential for NMDAR-dependent hippocampal synaptic depression and hippocampus-dependent memory. These results suggest that changes in MHC class I expression could be an unexpected cause of disrupted synaptic plasticity and cognitive deficits in the aging, damaged, and diseased brain.

  12. Reduction mammaplasty improves levels of anxiety, depression and body image satisfaction in patients with symptomatic macromastia in the short and long term.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Panzano, Esther; Gascón-Catalán, Ana; Sousa-Domínguez, Ramón; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patricia; García-Campayo, Javier; Güemes-Sánchez, Antonio

    2017-01-11

    To evaluate the psychological consequences (anxiety, depression and body image dissatisfaction) of symptomatic macromastia and the effectiveness of breast reduction surgery in re-establishing the mental health of the patient in the short and long term. 119 patients over 18 years old who had been diagnosed with symptomatic macromastia were assessed, before surgery, one month after the operation and one year later. Patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Body Image Dissatisfaction subscale of the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI-2). Participants were also asked about their physical appearance, social relationships and their satisfaction with regards to clothing and dress. The average age of the patients was 40.7 (SD = 12.02), 80.2% had a body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2). Before surgery, we found psychological distress with values indicating clinical anxiety and body image dissatisfaction. Younger women (< 36 years old) were more psychologically affected. At one month after surgery, there were significant improvements: there were lower scores for anxiety (p < 0.001), depression (p < 0.001) and body image dissatisfaction (p < 0.001). When compared with the pre-surgery scores, all these results showed improvement one year after the intervention (p < 0.001). There were also improvements in social relationships (p < 0.001) and satisfaction with clothing and dress. Reduction mammaplasty can alleviate the psychological impact of symptomatic macromastia.

  13. Dopamine-dependent long-term depression is expressed in striatal spiny neurons of both direct and indirect pathways: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bagetta, Vincenza; Picconi, Barbara; Marinucci, Silvia; Sgobio, Carmelo; Pendolino, Valentina; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Fusco, Francesca R; Giampà, Carmen; Calabresi, Paolo

    2011-08-31

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are divided into two subpopulations exerting distinct effects on motor behavior. Transgenic mice carrying bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) able to confer cell type-specific expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) for dopamine (DA) receptors have been developed to characterize differences between these subpopulations. Analysis of these mice, in contrast with original pioneering studies, showed that striatal long-term depression (LTD) was expressed in indirect but not in the direct pathway MSNs. To address this mismatch, we applied a new approach using combined BAC technology and receptor immunohistochemistry. We demonstrate that, in physiological conditions, DA-dependent LTD is expressed in both pathways showing that the lack of synaptic plasticity found in D(1) eGFP mice is associated to behavioral deficits. Our findings suggest caution in the use of this tool and indicate that the "striatal segregation" hypothesis might not explain all synaptic dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease.

  14. The Effects of Lifestyle Interventions on (Long-Term) Weight Management, Cardiometabolic Risk and Depressive Symptoms in People with Psychotic Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bruins, Jojanneke; Jörg, Frederike; Bruggeman, Richard; Slooff, Cees; Corpeleijn, Eva; Pijnenborg, Marieke

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to estimate the effects of lifestyle interventions on bodyweight and other cardiometabolic risk factors in people with psychotic disorders. Additionally, the long-term effects on body weight and the effects on depressive symptoms were examined. Material and Methods We searched four databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared lifestyle interventions to control conditions in patients with psychotic disorders. Lifestyle interventions were aimed at weight loss or weight gain prevention, and the study outcomes included bodyweight or metabolic parameters. Results The search resulted in 25 RCTs -only 4 were considered high quality- showing an overall effect of lifestyle interventions on bodyweight (effect size (ES) = −0.63, p<0.0001). Lifestyle interventions were effective in both weight loss (ES = −0.52, p<0.0001) and weight-gain-prevention (ES = −0.84, p = 0.0002). There were significant long-term effects, two to six months post-intervention, for both weight-gain-prevention interventions (ES = −0.85, p = 0.0002) and weight loss studies (ES = −0.46, p = 0.02). Up to ten studies reported on cardiometabolic risk factors and showed that lifestyle interventions led to significant improvements in waist circumference, triglycerides, fasting glucose and insulin. No significant effects were found for blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Four studies reported on depressive symptoms and showed a significant effect (ES = −0.95, p = 0.05). Conclusion Lifestyle interventions are effective in treating and preventing obesity, and in reducing cardiometabolic risk factors. However, the quality of the studies leaves much to be desired. PMID:25474313

  15. Regulation of fear extinction by long-term depression: The roles of endocannabinoids and brain derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Maxwell R; Arnold, Jonathon; Hatton, Sean N; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2017-02-15

    The extinction of a conditioned fear response is of great interest in the search for a means of ameliorating adverse neurobiological changes resulting from stress. The discovery that endocannibinoid (EC) levels are inversely related to the extent of such stress, and that the amygdala is a primary site mediating stress, suggests that ECs in this brain region might play a major role in extinction. Supporting this are the observations that the basolateral complex of the amygdala shows an increase in ECs only during extinction and that early clinical trials indicate that cannabinoid-like agents, when taken orally by patients suffering from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), reduce insomnia and nightmares. In order to optimize the potential of these agents to ameliorate symptoms of PTSD four important questions need to be answered: first, what is the identity of the cells that release ECs in the amygdala during extinction; second, what are their sites of action; third, what roles do the ECs play in the alleviation of long- depression (LTD), a process central to extinction; and finally, to what extent does brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) facilitate the release of ECs? A review of the relevant literature is presented in an attempt to answer these questions. It is suggested that the principal cell involved in EC synthesis and release during extinction is the so-called excitatory extinction neuron in the basal nucleus of the amygdala. Furthermore that the main site of action of the ECs is the adjacent calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibitory interneurons, whose normal role of blocking the excitatory neurons is greatly diminished. The molecular pathways leading (during extinction trials) to the synthesis and release of ECs from synaptic spines of extinction neurons, that is potentiated by BDNF, are also delineated in this review. Finally, consideration is given to how the autocrine action of BDNF, linked to the release of ECs, can lead to the sustained release

  16. The impact of chronic mild stress on long-term depressive behavior in rats which have survived sepsis.

    PubMed

    Steckert, Amanda V; Dominguini, Diogo; Michels, Monique; Abelaira, Helena M; Tomaz, Débora B; Sonai, Beatriz; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; da Silva, Júlia B I; Réus, Gislaine Z; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-11-01

    The present study was created to investigate the effects of chronic mild stress (CMS) on the depressive behavior and neurochemical parameters of rats that were subjected to sepsis. Wistar rats were subjected to a CMS protocol, and sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and perforation (CLP). The animals were then divided into 4 separate groups; Control + Sham (n = 20), Control + CLP (n = 30), CMS + Sham (n = 20) and CMS + CLP (n = 30). Body weight, food and water intake and mortality were measured on a daily basis for a period of 10 days after the induction of sepsis. Locomotor activity, splash and forced swimming tests were performed ten days after CLP. At the end of the test period, the animals were euthanized, and the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were removed to determine the levels of cytokines and oxidative damage. Our results show that there was no significant interaction between CMS and CLP in relation to locomotor activity and the forced swimming test. However, we did observe a significant decrease in total grooming time in the Control + CLP and CMS + Sham groups, with the CMS + CLP group showing behavior similar to that of the control animals. This was found to be related to a decrease in the levels of brain cytokines, and not to oxidative damage parameters. Collectively, our results suggest that a previous stress caused by CMS can protect the brain against the systemic acute and severe stress elicited by sepsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-Term Seizure, Quality of Life, Depression, and Verbal Memory Outcomes in a Controlled Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgical Series Using Portuguese-Validated Instruments.

    PubMed

    Dias, Luis Augusto; Angelis, Geisa de; Teixeira, Wagner Afonso; Casulari, Luiz Augusto

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate long-term surgical outcomes in patients treated for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy compared with a similar group of patients who underwent a preoperative evaluation. Patient interviews were conducted by an independent neuropsychologist and included a sociodemographic questionnaire and validated versions of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Adverse Events Profile, Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31, and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Seventy-one patients who underwent surgery and 20 who underwent mesial temporal lobe epilepsy preoperative evaluations were interviewed. After an 81-month mean postoperative follow-up, 44% of the surgical patients achieved complete seizure relief according to the Engel classification and 68% according to the International League Against Epilepsy classification. The surgical group had a significantly lower prevalence of depression (P = 0.002) and drug-related adverse effects (P = 0.002). Improvement on unemployment (P = 0.02) was achieved but not on driving or education. Delayed verbal memory recall was impaired in 76% of the surgical and 65% of the control cases (P = 0.32). Regarding the Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31, the operated patients scored higher in their total score (mean, 75.44 vs. mean, 60.08; P < 0.001) and in all but the cognitive functioning domain irrespective of the follow-up length. Seizure control, Beck Depression Score, and Adverse Events Profile severity explained 73% of the variance in the surgical group quality of life. Our study found that, although surgical treatment was effective, its impact on social indicators was modest. Moreover, the self-reported quality of life relied not only on seizure control but also on depressive symptoms and antiepileptic drug burden. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Single fluoxetine treatment before but not after stress prevents stress-induced hippocampal long-term depression and spatial memory retrieval impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Huili; Dai, Chunfang; Dong, Zhifang

    2015-07-28

    A growing body of evidence has shown that chronic treatment with fluoxetine, a widely prescribed medication for treatment of depression, can affect synaptic plasticity in the adult central nervous system. However, it is not well understood whether acute fluoxetine influences synaptic plasticity, especially on hippocampal CA1 long-term depression (LTD), and if so, whether it subsequently impacts hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Here, we reported that LTD facilitated by elevated-platform stress in hippocampal slices was completely prevented by fluoxetine administration (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before stress. The LTD was not, however, significantly inhibited by fluoxetine administration immediately after stress. Similarly, fluoxetine incubation (10 μM) during electrophysiological recordings also displayed no influence on the stress-facilitated LTD. In addition, behavioral results showed that a single fluoxetine treatment 30 min before but not after acute stress fully reversed the impairment of spatial memory retrieval in the Morris water maze paradigm. Taken together, these results suggest that acute fluoxetine treatment only before, but not after stress, can prevent hippocampal CA1 LTD and spatial memory retrieval impairment caused by behavioral stress in adult animals.

  19. Asynchronous Pre- and Postsynaptic Activity Induces Associative Long-Term Depression in Area CA1 of the Rat Hippocampus in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debanne, Dominique; Gahwiler, Beat H.; Thompson, Scott M.

    1994-02-01

    Associative long-term depression (LTD) was induced in hippocampal slice cultures with repeated low-frequency (0.3 Hz) stimulation of the Schaffer collateral pathway, only when such stimuli were preceded by intracellular injection of brief depolarizing current pulses in the postsynaptic CA1 pyramidal cell. The decrease in excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude lasted >30 min, could be reversed by induction of potentiation, could be induced at previously potentiated inputs, was input-specific, and did not require activation or potentiation of other inputs. The magnitude of the depression depended upon the time interval between depolarization and stimulation and upon the duration of the depolarizing pulse. LTD was not observed in neurons impaled with electrodes containing a Ca2+ chelator. LTD could not be induced in the presence of an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, suggesting that voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx is necessary but not sufficient for LTD induction. We conclude that associative LTD results when synaptic activity follows postsynaptic depolarization within a circumscribed time window.

  20. Requirement of rapid Ca2+ entry and synaptic activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors for the induction of long-term depression in adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Satoru; Connor, John A

    1998-01-01

    During block of γ-aminobutyric acid-A-mediated inhibition, low-frequency stimulation (2 Hz, 900 pulses) to Schaffer collateral-CA1 neuron synapses of adult rat hippocampus induced an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-independent, postsynaptic Ca2+-dependent depression of synaptic strength (long-term depression; LTD). Ratio imaging with fura-2 revealed moderate dendritic [Ca2+] increases (≈500 nM) during only the initial ≈30 s of the 7.5 min stimulation period. Conditioning for 30 s was, however, insufficient to induce LTD. The [Ca2+] changes were insensitive to the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist (+)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). MCPG, however, completely blocked LTD when present during conditioning. The [Ca2+] changes were abolished by postsynaptic hyperpolarization (-110 mV at the soma). Hyperpolarizing neurons to -110 mV during conditioning significantly attenuated LTD induction. LTD induction was also blocked by the postsynaptic presence of the protein kinase C inhibitor peptide PKC(19-36). These results suggest that LTD induction in adult hippocampus by prolonged low-frequency stimulation depends on both a rapid Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive channels and synaptic stimulation of mGluRs which may be coupled to phospholipase C. PMID:9714858

  1. Contribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels to homosynaptic long-term depression in the CA1 region in vitro.

    PubMed

    Christie, B R; Schexnayder, L K; Johnston, D

    1997-03-01

    Homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic efficacy was induced in field excitatory postsynaptic potentials by administration of 900 pulses at either 1 or 3 Hz in 2- to 3-wk-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The stimulation was administered via a bipolar stimulating electrode placed immediately adjacent to the recording electrode in the stratum radiatum region of the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Equivalent LTD induction occurred whether the slices were maintained at room temperature or at 32 degrees C. Lowering bath Ca2+ to 0 mM, or increasing it to 4 mM, prevented the induction of the depression. The NMDA receptor antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (50 microM) reversibly blocked the induction of homosynaptic LTD. In addition, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) antagonist nimodipine (10 microM) and the R- and T-type VGCC antagonist NiCl2 (25 microM) also prevented homosynaptic LTD induction. These results indicate that in addition to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity, Ca2+ influx via VGCCs can play an important role in the induction and expression of LTD induced by low-frequency stimulation in the hippocampal formation.

  2. Long-term depression and suicidal ideation outcomes subsequent to emancipation from foster care: pathways to psychiatric risk in the Métis population.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Violet

    2014-02-28

    Major depressive episode (MDE) and suicidal ideation (SI) associated with history of foster care placement (HxFCP), and mediating effects of psychosocial and socioeconomic factors through which placement may confer psychiatric risks in the years subsequent to emancipation were examined in a national sample of 7534 Métis. More than one third of emancipated respondents reported past year MDE, a prevalence rate nearly 50% higher than the rate of MDE among Métis respondents without a history of placement in foster care. The 25% lifetime prevalence rate of SI in the emancipated group was more than twice the rate observed in the non-fostered group. Direct effects of HxFCP on post placement MDE and SI were significant in multivariate logistic regression analyses, even when effects of childhood predispositional risk factors were controlled statistically. Emancipated individuals were unduly affected by psychosocial and socioeconomic disadvantages signifying pathways that linked foster care placement history and psychiatric status. Main mediators of the effects demonstrated using effect decomposition procedures were self-esteem, income, and community adversity. The findings warrant consideration of foster care history in clarifying the complex etiologies of suicidal ideation and major depressive episode in the Métis population and risk factors ensuing in the intervening years as integral to the process linking placement to long-term psychiatric outcomes.

  3. (G2019S) LRRK2 causes early-phase dysfunction of SNpc dopaminergic neurons and impairment of corticostriatal long-term depression in the PD transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Chou, Jun-Shiao; Chen, Chu-Yu; Chen, Ying-Ling; Weng, Yi-Hsin; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Lu, Chin-Song; Chang, Ya-Ming; Wang, Hung-Li

    2014-08-01

    Twelve- to sixteen-month-old (G2019S) LRRK2 transgenic mice prepared by us displayed progressive neuronal death of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopaminergic cells. In the present study, we hypothesized that prior to a late-phase death of SNpc dopaminergic neurons, (G2019S) LRRK2 also causes an early-phase neuronal dysfunction of SNpc dopaminergic cells in the (G2019S) LRRK2 mouse. Eight to nine-month-old (G2019S) LRRK2 transgenic mice exhibited the symptom of hypoactivity in the absence of the degeneration of SNpc dopaminergic neurons or nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings of SNpc dopaminergic cells in brain slices demonstrated a significant decrease in spontaneous firing frequency of SNpc dopaminergic neurons of 8-month-old (G2019S) LRRK2 mice. Carbon fiber electrode amperometry recording using striatal slices showed that (G2019S) LRRK2 transgenic mice at the age of 8 to 9months display an impaired evoked dopamine release in the dorsolateral striatum. Normal nigrostriatal dopaminergic transmission is required for the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity expressed at corticostriatal glutamatergic synapses of striatal medium spiny neurons. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings showed that in contrast to medium spiny neurons of 8 to 9-month-old wild-type mice, high-frequency stimulation of corticostriatal afferents failed to induce long-term depression (LTD) of corticostriatal EPSCs in medium spiny neurons of (G2019S) LRRK2 mice at the same age. Our study provides the evidence that mutant (G2019S) LRRK2 causes early-phase dysfunctions of SNpc dopaminergic neurons, including a decrease in spontaneous firing rate and a reduction in evoked dopamine release, and impairment of corticostriatal LTD in the (G2019S) LRRK2 transgenic mouse.

  4. Protein Synthesis Inhibitors Did Not Interfere with Long-Term Depression Induced either Electrically in Juvenile Rats or Chemically in Middle-Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Abdul-Karim

    2016-01-01

    In testing the hypothesis that long-term potentiation (LTP) maintenance depends on triggered protein synthesis, we found no effect of protein synthesis inhibitors (PSIs) on LTP stabilization. Similarly, some studies reported a lack of effect of PSIs on long-term depression (LTD); the lack of effect on LTD has been suggested to be resulting from the short time recordings. If this proposal were true, LTD might exhibit sensitivity to PSIs when the recording intervals were enough long. We firstly induced LTD by a standard protocol involving low frequency stimulation, which is suitable for eliciting NMDAR-LTD in CA1 area of hippocampal slices obtained from juvenile Sprague-Dawley rats. This LTD was persistent for intervals in range of 8-10 h. Treating slices with anisomycin, however, did not interfere with the magnitude and persistence of this form of LTD. The failure of anisomycin to block synaptic-LTD might be relied on the age of animal, the type of protein synthesis inhibitors and/or the inducing protocol. To verify whether those variables altogether were determinant, NMDA or DHPG was used to chemically elicit LTD recorded up to 10 h on hippocampal slices obtained from middle-aged rats. In either form of LTD, cycloheximide did not interfere with LTD stabilization. Furthermore, DHPG application did show an increase in the global protein synthesis as assayed by radiolabeled methodology indicating that though triggered protein synthesis can occur but not necessarily required for LTD expression. The findings confirm that stabilized LTD in either juvenile, or middle-aged rats can be independent of triggered protein synthesis. Although the processes responsible for the independence of LTD stabilization on the triggered protein synthesis are not yet defined, these findings raise the possibility that de novo protein synthesis is not universally necessary.

  5. ERK1/2 but not p38 MAP kinase is essential for the long-term depression in mouse cerebellar slices.

    PubMed

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Kakegawa, Wataru; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2006-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is essential for synaptic plasticity and learning. In the hippocampus, three different MAPK subfamilies, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK and c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK), selectively regulate activity-dependent glutamate receptor trafficking during long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD), and depotentiation after LTP, respectively. Although LTP and LTD at cerebellar parallel fibre (PF)-Purkinje cell synapses are thought to be controlled by glutamate receptor trafficking, the involvement of MAPK subfamilies has not been systemically studied in cerebellar slice preparations. To clarify the role of the MAPK cascade in cerebellar LTD, we performed biochemical and electrophysiological analyses using ICR mouse cerebellar slices. Immunoblot analyses using phosphorylation-specific antibodies for MAPKs revealed that among the three MAPKs, ERK1/2 was specifically activated by phorbol ester, which could induce LTD in cerebellar slices. In addition, U0126, a specific inhibitor of the MAPK kinase-ERK1/2 pathway, abrogated the induction of LTD in cerebellar slices, whereas SB203580 and SP600125, specific inhibitors of p38 MAPK and JNK, respectively, had no effect. Although metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) has been suggested as a possible downstream target of ERK1/2 in cell-culture preparations, mGluR1-activated slow excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were not affected by U0126 treatment in slices. These findings indicate that unlike hippocampal LTD mediated by p38 MAPK, glutamate receptor trafficking during cerebellar LTD was regulated by a distinct mechanism involving ERK1/2 in slice preparations.

  6. Protein Synthesis Inhibitors Did Not Interfere with Long-Term Depression Induced either Electrically in Juvenile Rats or Chemically in Middle-Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In testing the hypothesis that long-term potentiation (LTP) maintenance depends on triggered protein synthesis, we found no effect of protein synthesis inhibitors (PSIs) on LTP stabilization. Similarly, some studies reported a lack of effect of PSIs on long-term depression (LTD); the lack of effect on LTD has been suggested to be resulting from the short time recordings. If this proposal were true, LTD might exhibit sensitivity to PSIs when the recording intervals were enough long. We firstly induced LTD by a standard protocol involving low frequency stimulation, which is suitable for eliciting NMDAR-LTD in CA1 area of hippocampal slices obtained from juvenile Sprague-Dawley rats. This LTD was persistent for intervals in range of 8–10 h. Treating slices with anisomycin, however, did not interfere with the magnitude and persistence of this form of LTD. The failure of anisomycin to block synaptic-LTD might be relied on the age of animal, the type of protein synthesis inhibitors and/or the inducing protocol. To verify whether those variables altogether were determinant, NMDA or DHPG was used to chemically elicit LTD recorded up to 10 h on hippocampal slices obtained from middle-aged rats. In either form of LTD, cycloheximide did not interfere with LTD stabilization. Furthermore, DHPG application did show an increase in the global protein synthesis as assayed by radiolabeled methodology indicating that though triggered protein synthesis can occur but not necessarily required for LTD expression. The findings confirm that stabilized LTD in either juvenile, or middle-aged rats can be independent of triggered protein synthesis. Although the processes responsible for the independence of LTD stabilization on the triggered protein synthesis are not yet defined, these findings raise the possibility that de novo protein synthesis is not universally necessary. PMID:27517693

  7. Effect of low intensity low-frequency stimuli on long-term depression in the rat hippocampus area CA1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongfei; Zhang, Wencai; Wang, Ming; Ruan, Diyun; Chen, Jutao

    2012-08-08

    Normally long-term depression (LTD) is difficult to be induced in naïve adult rats in vivo, but it can be induced in the juvenile females and acute-stressed adult males. Using these rats as LTD models, we find in our previous study that LTD induction by the classical low-frequency stimuli (LFS) may be associated with sleep. During sleep, endogenous field potential oscillations presented in the neocortical and hippocampal circuits play important roles in synaptic downscaling as well as memory consolidations. Generally, LTD can be considered as a special synaptic downscaling and the classical LFS is very similar to such endogenous oscillations. Thus, we speculate whether we can design a new LFS which is more similar to such oscillations and whether LTD can be induced by it in naïve adult rats? In this study, we found that in the naïve adult rats anesthetized in sleep stage, the classical LFS could not induce LTD, however, a low-intensity LFS, an endogenous oscillation-like one, could induce LTD. Furthermore, in the rats anesthetized in wakefulness stage, neither the classical nor the low-intensity LFS could induce LTD. Our study showed that in the naïve adult rats, LTD could be induced by the oscillation-like LFS in the sleep stage anesthesia, suggesting that LTD may physiologically occur during sleep and be inhibited in wakefulness stage. Our study suggested that in the hippocampus LTD may be a potential long-term synaptic plasticity underlying sleep-dependent memory consolidations.

  8. Hippocampal long-term depression is facilitated by the acquisition and updating of memory of spatial auditory content and requires mGlu5 activation.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Birte; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2017-03-15

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are key cellular processes that support memory formation. Whereas increases of synaptic strength by means of LTP may support the creation of a spatial memory 'engram', LTD appears to play an important role in refining and optimising experience-dependent encoding. A differentiation in the role of hippocampal subfields is apparent. For example, LTD in the dentate gyrus (DG) is enabled by novel learning about large visuospatial features, whereas in area CA1, it is enabled by learning about discrete aspects of spatial content, whereby, both discrete visuospatial and olfactospatial cues trigger LTD in CA1. Here, we explored to what extent local audiospatial cues facilitate information encoding in the form of LTD in these subfields. Coupling of low frequency afferent stimulation (LFS) with discretely localised, novel auditory tones in the sonic hearing, or ultrasonic range, facilitated short-term depression (STD) into LTD (>24 h) in CA1, but not DG. Re-exposure to the now familiar audiospatial configuration ca. 1 week later failed to enhance STD. Reconfiguration of the same audiospatial cues resulted anew in LTD when ultrasound, but not non-ultrasound cues were used. LTD facilitation that was triggered by novel exposure to spatially arranged tones, or to spatial reconfiguration of the same tones were both prevented by an antagonism of the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGlu5. These data indicate that, if behaviourally salient enough, the hippocampus can use audiospatial cues to facilitate LTD that contributes to the encoding and updating of spatial representations. Effects are subfield-specific, and require mGlu5 activation, as is the case for visuospatial information processing. These data reinforce the likelihood that LTD supports the encoding of spatial features, and that this occurs in a qualitative and subfield-specific manner. They also support that mGlu5 is essential for synaptic encoding of spatial

  9. Long-term clinical outcomes of care management for chronically depressed primary care patients: a report from the depression in primary care project.

    PubMed

    Klinkman, Michael S; Bauroth, Sabrina; Fedewa, Stacey; Kerber, Kevin; Kuebler, Julie; Adman, Tanya; Sen, Ananda

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies examining depression disease management report improvements in short-term outcomes, but less is known about whether improvements are sustainable over time. This study evaluated the sustained clinical effectiveness of low-intensity depression disease management in chronically depressed patients. The Depression in Primary Care (DPC) intervention was introduced in 5 primary care practices in the University of Michigan Health System, with 5 matched practices selected as control sites. Clinicians were free to refer none, some, or all of their depressed patients at their discretion. Core clinical outcomes of remission and serial change in Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8) scores for 728 DPC enrollees observed for up to 18 months after enrollment were compared with those for 78 patients receiving usual care who completed mailed questionnaires at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. DPC enrollees had sustained improvement in remission rates and reduced-function days over the full 18 months. Mean change in the PHQ-8 score over each 6-month interval was more favorable for DPC enrollees than for usual care patients, and the proportion of DPC enrollees in remission was higher at 6 months (43.4% vs 33.3%; P = .11), 12 months (52.0% vs 33.9%; P = .012), and 18 months (49.2% vs 27.3%; P = .004). Multivariate analysis controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, baseline severity, and comorbid medical illness confirmed that DPC enrollees had significantly more reduction in depressive symptom burden over 18 months. The DPC intervention produced sustained improvement in clinical outcomes over 18 months in a cohort of chronically depressed patients with persistent symptoms despite active treatment.

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor activation lowers the threshold for NMDA-receptor-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression in the hippocampus through activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Coussens, C M; Kerr, D S; Abraham, W C

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 on homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) were examined in hippocampal slices obtained from adrenal-intact adult male rats. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway and recorded in stratum radiatum of area CA1. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) was delivered at LTD threshold (2 bouts of 600 pulses, 1 Hz, at baseline stimulation intensity). LFS of the Schaffer collaterals did not produce significant homosynaptic LTD in control slices. However, identical conditioning in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 (10 microM) produced a robust LTD, which was blocked by the selective glucocorticoid antagonist RU-38486. The LTD induced by glucocorticoid receptor activation was dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, because the specific NMDA receptor antagonist D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5) blocked the facilitation. However, the facilitation of LTD was not due to a potentiation of the isolated NMDA receptor potential by RU-28362. The facilitation of LTD by RU-28362 was also blocked by coincubation of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) antagonist nimodipine. Selective activation of the L-type VDCCs by the agonist Bay K 8644 also facilitated LTD induction. Both nimodipine and D-AP5 were effective in blocking the facilitation of LTD by Bay K 8644. These results indicate that L-type VDCCs can contribute to NMDA-receptor-dependent LTD induction.

  11. Lgr4 Protein Deficiency Induces Ataxia-like Phenotype in Mice and Impairs Long Term Depression at Cerebellar Parallel Fiber-Purkinje Cell Synapses*

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xin; Duan, Yanhong; Zeng, Qingwen; Pan, Hongjie; Qian, Yu; Li, Dali; Cao, Xiaohua; Liu, Mingyao

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction causes ataxia characterized by loss of balance and coordination. Until now, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of several types of inherited cerebellar ataxia have not been completely clarified. Here, we report that leucine-rich G protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4/Gpr48) is highly expressed in Purkinje cells (PCs) in the cerebellum. Deficiency of Lgr4 leads to an ataxia-like phenotype in mice. Histologically, no obvious morphological changes were observed in the cerebellum of Lgr4 mutant mice. However, the number of PCs was slightly but significantly reduced in Lgr4−/− mice. In addition, in vitro electrophysiological analysis showed an impaired long term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-PC (PF-PC) synapses in Lgr4−/− mice. Consistently, immunostaining experiments showed that the level of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (Creb) was significantly decreased in Lgr4−/− PCs. Furthermore, treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist, rescued phospho-Creb in PCs and reversed the impairment in PF-PC LTD in Lgr4−/− cerebellar slices, indicating that Lgr4 is an upstream regulator of Creb signaling, which is underlying PF-PC LTD. Together, our findings demonstrate for first time an important role for Lgr4 in motor coordination and cerebellar synaptic plasticity and provide a potential therapeutic target for certain types of inherited cerebellar ataxia. PMID:25063812

  12. Prophylactic efficacy of fluoxetine, escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, and concomitant psychotherapy in major depressive disorder: outcome after long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Peselow, Eric D; Tobia, Gabriel; Karamians, Reneh; Pizano, Demetria; IsHak, Waguih William

    2015-02-28

    The acute efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) is well established; however their role in longer-term prevention of recurrence remains unconfirmed. This study aims at examining: the prophylactic efficacy of four commonly used SSRIs in MDD in a naturalistic setting with long-term follow-up, the effect of concomitant cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and the predictors of outcome. In a prospective cohort study, 387 patients who either remitted or responded following treatment with four different SSRIs-fluoxetine, escitalopram, sertraline and paroxetine-were followed up over several years. During an average follow-up period of 34.5 months, 76.5% of patients experienced MDD recurrence. Escitalopram and fluoxetine showed a numerically higher prophylactic efficacy than paroxetine and sertraline but the difference was statistically insignificant. The prophylactic efficacy for SSRI-only treatment was limited, with a recurrence rate of 82.0%, compared to 59.0% of patient recurrence rate in concomitant Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). The relatively small size of the CBT group and the lack of randomization may undermine the extrapolation of its findings to clinical practice. Nevertheless, the study preliminary data may help in defining the clinical utility of antidepressants and CBT in the prophylaxis from MDD recurrence.

  13. Failure to Recognize Novelty after Extended Methamphetamine Self-Administration Results from Loss of Long-Term Depression in the Perirhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Michael D; Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Schwendt, Marek; Leong, Kah-Chung; Peters, Jamie; See, Ronald E; Reichel, Carmela M

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to methamphetamine (meth) can produce lasting memory impairments in humans and rodents. We recently demonstrated that extended access meth self-administration results in novel object recognition (NOR) memory deficits in rats. Recognition of novelty depends upon intact perirhinal (pRh) cortex function, which is compromised by meth-induced downregulation of GluN2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. NMDA receptors containing this subunit have a critical role in pRh long-term depression (LTD), one of the primary physiological processes thought to underlie object recognition memory. We hypothesized that meth-induced downregulation of GluN2B receptors would compromise pRh LTD, leading to loss of NOR memory. We found that meth self-administration resulted in an inability to induce pRh LTD following 1 Hz stimulation, an effect that was reversed with bath application of the NMDA receptor partial agonist D-cycloserine (DCS). In addition, pRh microinfusion of DCS restored meth-induced memory deficits. Furthermore, blockade of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors with Ro 25-6981 prevented DCS restoration of pRh LTD in meth subjects. Thus, targeting pRh LTD may be a promising strategy to treat meth-induced cognitive impairment.

  14. Long-term depression-inducing stimuli promote cleavage of the synaptic adhesion molecule NGL-3 through NMDA receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and presenilin/γ-secretase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyejin; Lee, Eun-Jae; Song, Yoo Sung; Kim, Eunjoon

    2014-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) reduces the functional strength of excitatory synapses through mechanisms that include the removal of AMPA glutamate receptors from the postsynaptic membrane. LTD induction is also known to result in structural changes at excitatory synapses, including the shrinkage of dendritic spines. Synaptic adhesion molecules are thought to contribute to the development, function and plasticity of neuronal synapses largely through their trans-synaptic adhesions. However, little is known about how synaptic adhesion molecules are altered during LTD. We report here that NGL-3 (netrin-G ligand-3), a postsynaptic adhesion molecule that trans-synaptically interacts with the LAR family of receptor tyrosine phosphatases and intracellularly with the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95, undergoes a proteolytic cleavage process. NGL-3 cleavage is induced by NMDA treatment in cultured neurons and low-frequency stimulation in brain slices and requires the activities of NMDA glutamate receptors, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and presenilin/γ-secretase. These results suggest that NGL-3 is a novel substrate of MMPs and γ-secretase and that NGL-3 cleavage may regulate synaptic adhesion during LTD. PMID:24298159

  15. Impairments of long-term depression induction and motor coordination precede Aβ accumulation in the cerebellum of APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Yuki; Ishizeki, Masato; Watamura, Naoto; Toba, Junya; Yoshii, Aya; Inoue, Takafumi; Ohshima, Toshio

    2014-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that represents the most common type of dementia among elderly people. Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides in extracellular Aβ plaques, produced from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via sequential processing by β- and γ-secretases, impair hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and cause cognitive dysfunction in AD patients. Here, we report that Aβ peptides also impair another form of synaptic plasticity; cerebellar long-term depression (LTD). In the cerebellum of commonly used AD mouse model, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, Aβ plaques were detected from 8 months and profound accumulation of Aβ plaques was observed at 18 onths of age. Biochemical analysis revealed relatively high levels of APP protein and Aβ in the cerebellum of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. At pre-Aβ accumulation stage, LTD induction, and motor coordination are disturbed. These results indicate that soluble Aβ oligomers disturb LTD induction and cerebellar function in AD mouse model. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Long-term depression of inhibitory synaptic transmission induced by spike-timing dependent plasticity requires coactivation of endocannabinoid and muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Juan; Fernández de Sevilla, David; Couve, Alejandro; Buño, Washington; Fuenzalida, Marco

    2013-12-01

    The precise timing of pre-postsynaptic activity is vital for the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) or depression (LTD) at many central synapses. We show in synapses of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons in vitro that spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) protocols that induce LTP at glutamatergic synapses can evoke LTD of inhibitory postsynaptic currents or STDP-iLTD. The STDP-iLTD requires a postsynaptic Ca(2+) increase, a release of endocannabinoids (eCBs), the activation of type-1 endocananabinoid receptors and presynaptic muscarinic receptors that mediate a decreased probability of GABA release. In contrast, the STDP-iLTD is independent of the activation of nicotinic receptors, GABAB Rs and G protein-coupled postsynaptic receptors at pyramidal neurons. We determine that the downregulation of presynaptic Cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein Kinase A pathways is essential for the induction of STDP-iLTD. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which the activation of cholinergic neurons and retrograde signaling by eCBs can modulate the efficacy of GABAergic synaptic transmission in ways that may contribute to information processing and storage in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. miR-191 and miR-135 are required for long-lasting spine remodelling associated with synaptic long-term depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhonghua; Yu, Danni; Gu, Qin-Hua; Yang, Yanqin; Tu, Kang; Zhu, Jun; Li, Zheng

    2014-02-01

    Activity-dependent modification of dendritic spines, subcellular compartments accommodating postsynaptic specializations in the brain, is an important cellular mechanism for brain development, cognition and synaptic pathology of brain disorders. NMDA receptor-dependent long-term depression (NMDAR-LTD), a prototypic form of synaptic plasticity, is accompanied by prolonged remodelling of spines. The mechanisms underlying long-lasting spine remodelling in NMDAR-LTD, however, are largely unclear. Here we show that LTD induction causes global changes in miRNA transcriptomes affecting many cellular activities. Specifically, we show that expression changes of miR-191 and miR-135 are required for maintenance but not induction of spine restructuring. Moreover, we find that actin depolymerization and AMPA receptor exocytosis are regulated for extended periods of time by miRNAs to support long-lasting spine plasticity. These findings reveal a miRNA-mediated mechanism and a role for AMPA receptor exocytosis in long-lasting spine plasticity, and identify a number of candidate miRNAs involved in LTD.

  18. Phosphorylation of threonine-19 of PSD-95 by GSK-3β is required for PSD-95 mobilization and long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher D; Kim, Myung Jong; Hsin, Honor; Chen, Yelin; Sheng, Morgan

    2013-07-17

    Activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is required for long-term depression (LTD) via molecular mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Here, we report that PSD-95, a major scaffold protein of the postsynaptic density (PSD) that promotes synaptic strength, is phosphorylated on threonine-19 (T19) by GSK-3β. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, phosphorylation of T19 increases rapidly with chemical LTD and is attenuated by pharmacologic or genetic suppression of GSK-3β. In organotypic rat hippocampal slices, we find that a nonphosphorylatable PSD-95 mutant (T19A) tagged with photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (PAGFP) shows enhanced stability in dendritic spines versus wild-type PSD-95, whereas the phosphomimetic mutant (PSD-95-T19D) is more readily dispersed. Further, overexpression of PSD-95-T19A, but not WT-PSD-95, impairs AMPA receptor internalization and the induction of LTD. These data indicate that phosphorylation on T19 by GSK-3β destabilizes PSD-95 within the PSD and is a critical step for AMPA receptor mobilization and LTD.

  19. Phosphorylation of Threonine-19 of PSD-95 by GSK-3β is Required for PSD-95 Mobilization and Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christopher D.; Kim, Myung Jong; Hsin, Honor; Chen, Yelin

    2013-01-01

    Activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is required for long-term depression (LTD) via molecular mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Here, we report that PSD-95, a major scaffold protein of the postsynaptic density (PSD) that promotes synaptic strength, is phosphorylated on threonine-19 (T19) by GSK-3β. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, phosphorylation of T19 increases rapidly with chemical LTD and is attenuated by pharmacologic or genetic suppression of GSK-3β. In organotypic rat hippocampal slices, we find that a nonphosphorylatable PSD-95 mutant (T19A) tagged with photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (PAGFP) shows enhanced stability in dendritic spines versus wild-type PSD-95, whereas the phosphomimetic mutant (PSD-95-T19D) is more readily dispersed. Further, overexpression of PSD-95-T19A, but not WT-PSD-95, impairs AMPA receptor internalization and the induction of LTD. These data indicate that phosphorylation on T19 by GSK-3β destabilizes PSD-95 within the PSD and is a critical step for AMPA receptor mobilization and LTD. PMID:23864697

  20. The role of dendritic action potentials and Ca2+ influx in the induction of homosynaptic long-term depression in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, B R; Magee, J C; Johnston, D

    1996-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic efficacy at CA1 synapses is believed to be a Ca(2+)-dependent process. We used high-speed fluorescence imaging and patch-clamp techniques to quantify the spatial distribution of changes in intracellular Ca2+ accompanying the induction of LTD at Schaffer collateral synapses in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Low-frequency stimulation (3 Hz), which was subthreshold for action potentials, produced small changes in [Ca2+]i and failed to elicit LTD. Increasing the stimulus strength so that action potentials were generated produced both robust LTD and increases in [Ca2+]i. Back-propagating action potentials at 3 Hz in the absence of synaptic stimulation also produced increases in [Ca2+]i, but failed to induce LTD. When subthreshold synaptic stimulation was paired with back-propagating action potentials, however, large increases in [Ca2+]i were observed and robust LTD was induced. The LTD was blocked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) antagonist APV, and stimulus-induced increases in [Ca2+]i were reduced throughout the neuron under these conditions. The LTD was also dependent on Ca2+ influx via voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), because LTD was severely attenuated or blocked by both nimodipine and Ni2+. These findings suggest that back-propagating action potentials can exert a powerful control over the induction of LTD and that both VGCCs and NMDArs are involved in the induction of this form of plasticity.

  1. Lgr4 protein deficiency induces ataxia-like phenotype in mice and impairs long term depression at cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xin; Duan, Yanhong; Zeng, Qingwen; Pan, Hongjie; Qian, Yu; Li, Dali; Cao, Xiaohua; Liu, Mingyao

    2014-09-19

    Cerebellar dysfunction causes ataxia characterized by loss of balance and coordination. Until now, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of several types of inherited cerebellar ataxia have not been completely clarified. Here, we report that leucine-rich G protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4/Gpr48) is highly expressed in Purkinje cells (PCs) in the cerebellum. Deficiency of Lgr4 leads to an ataxia-like phenotype in mice. Histologically, no obvious morphological changes were observed in the cerebellum of Lgr4 mutant mice. However, the number of PCs was slightly but significantly reduced in Lgr4(-/-) mice. In addition, in vitro electrophysiological analysis showed an impaired long term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-PC (PF-PC) synapses in Lgr4(-/-) mice. Consistently, immunostaining experiments showed that the level of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (Creb) was significantly decreased in Lgr4(-/-) PCs. Furthermore, treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist, rescued phospho-Creb in PCs and reversed the impairment in PF-PC LTD in Lgr4(-/-) cerebellar slices, indicating that Lgr4 is an upstream regulator of Creb signaling, which is underlying PF-PC LTD. Together, our findings demonstrate for first time an important role for Lgr4 in motor coordination and cerebellar synaptic plasticity and provide a potential therapeutic target for certain types of inherited cerebellar ataxia. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Failure to Recognize Novelty after Extended Methamphetamine Self-Administration Results from Loss of Long-Term Depression in the Perirhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Michael D; Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Schwendt, Marek; Leong, Kah-Chung; Peters, Jamie; See, Ronald E; Reichel, Carmela M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to methamphetamine (meth) can produce lasting memory impairments in humans and rodents. We recently demonstrated that extended access meth self-administration results in novel object recognition (NOR) memory deficits in rats. Recognition of novelty depends upon intact perirhinal (pRh) cortex function, which is compromised by meth-induced downregulation of GluN2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. NMDA receptors containing this subunit have a critical role in pRh long-term depression (LTD), one of the primary physiological processes thought to underlie object recognition memory. We hypothesized that meth-induced downregulation of GluN2B receptors would compromise pRh LTD, leading to loss of NOR memory. We found that meth self-administration resulted in an inability to induce pRh LTD following 1 Hz stimulation, an effect that was reversed with bath application of the NMDA receptor partial agonist D-cycloserine (DCS). In addition, pRh microinfusion of DCS restored meth-induced memory deficits. Furthermore, blockade of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors with Ro 25-6981 prevented DCS restoration of pRh LTD in meth subjects. Thus, targeting pRh LTD may be a promising strategy to treat meth-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:25865928

  3. Arsenic downregulates gene expression at the postsynaptic density in mouse cerebellum, including genes responsible for long-term potentiation and depression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong; Li, Sheng; Sun, Yahui; Dong, Wei; Piao, Fengyuan; Piao, Yongjun; Liu, Shuang; Guan, Huai; Yu, Shengbo

    2014-08-04

    Arsenic (As) is a neurotoxin induces dysfunction of learning and memory. Research has indicated that cerebellum may be involved in arsenic-induced impairment of learning and memory. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these effects remain unclear. This study screened for the differentially expressed genes related to the long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTP and LTD) at the cerebellar postsynaptic density (PSD) of mice following exposure to arsenic, and we provide evidence of the mechanism by which arsenic adversely affects the functions of learning and memory. Here, SPF mice were exposed to 1ppm, 2ppm and 4ppm As2O3 for 60 days. The ultrastructure of the synapses in cerebella of these mice was observed via transmission electron microscopy. The cerebellum global gene expression of mice exposed to 4ppm As2O3 was determined through GeneChip analysis. We used the web tool DAVID to analyze the Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathways that were significantly enriched among the differentially expressed genes. Our observations of synaptic ultrastructure showed that the thickness of the cerebellar PSD was reduced in mice exposed to arsenic. Go analysis revealed the PSD as a significantly altered cellular component. KEGG pathway analysis showed that LTP and LTD were affected by arsenic with highest statistical significance, and 20 differentially expressed genes were associated with them. Among these differentially expressed genes, significant decreases in the mRNA expressions of CaMKII, Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Itpr1, Grm1 and PLCβ4 related to the LTP and LTD were found at the PSD of mouse cerebellum exposed to arsenic. The downregulation of these genes was further confirmed via real-time reverse transcription PCR or Western blot at 1ppm, 2ppm and 4ppm As2O3. Our results indicate that the 7 genes with in cerebellar PSDs may be involved in arsenic-induced neurotoxicity, including impairment of learning and memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  4. Effects of long-term antidepressant treatment on oxidative status in major depressive disorder: a 24-week follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Kotan, Vahap Ozan; Sarandol, Emre; Kirhan, Emine; Ozkaya, Guven; Kirli, Selcuk

    2011-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a devastating disease that afflicts large populations and has also been accepted to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Oxidative stress seems to play an essential role in the relationship of MDD and CVD. We aimed to determine the level of oxidative stress in patients with MDD and to investigate the effects of long-term antidepressant (AD) treatment on the oxidative-antioxidative system parameters and CVD risk factors. Fifty patients who fully met the fourth Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for MDD and 44 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Control visits of the patients were repeated 6weeks, 12weeks and 24weeks after beginning of the AD treatment. Lipid profiles, oxidation and oxidizability of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins (expressed as apo B-b-MDA and apo B-Δ-MDA, respectively), levels of plasma malondialdehyde (p-MDA), total antioxidative capacity (TAOC), antioxidant molecules and antioxidant enzyme activities including paraoxonase/arylesterase, red blood cell superoxide dismutase (RBC-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase were determined during 24-week of follow-up period. According to the results of the study, p-MDA, apo B-b-MDA and RBC-SOD activity were increased and arylesterase activity was decreased in MDD patients. Body mass index (BMI), vitamin A and total cholesterol levels in MDD patients increased after 24-weeks of AD treatment. RBC-SOD activity, TAOC, p-MDA and apo B-b-MDA levels were decreased; paraoxonase/arylesterase activities and apo B-Δ-MDA were increased at the end of 24th week. Oxidative stress, demonstrated in MDD patients, was partly improved during 24weeks of AD treatment. Increase in paraoxonase/arylesterase activities and decrease in p-MDA and apo B-b-MDA levels after 24weeks seem to be beneficial for reduction of CVD risk in MDD patients. However increased BMI and apo B-Δ-MDA levels are negative cardiovascular effects of

  5. Long Term Prognosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... TERM PROGNOSIS The long-term outlook of pediatric cardiomyopathy continues to be unpredictable because it occurs with ... a child also depends on the type of cardiomyopathy and the stage the disease is first diagnosed. ...

  6. Long-term deficiency of circulating and hippocampal insulin-like growth factor I induces depressive behavior in adult mice: A potential model of geriatric depression

    PubMed Central

    Mitschelen, Matthew; Yan, Han; Farley, Julie A.; Warrington, Junie P.; Han, Song; Hereñú, Claudia B.; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan; Bailey-Downs, Lora C.; Bass, Caroline E.; Sonntag, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies support the hypothesis that deficiency of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) in adults contributes to depression, but direct evidence is limited. Many psychological and pro-cognitive effects have been attributed to IGF-1, but appropriate animal models of adult-onset IGF-1 deficiency are lacking. In this study, we use a viral-mediated Cre-loxP system to knockout the Igf1 gene in either the liver, neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus, or both. Knockout of liver Igf1 reduced serum IGF-1 levels by 40% and hippocampal IGF-1 levels by 26%. Knockout of Igf1 in CA1 reduced hippocampal IGF-1 levels by 13%. The most severe reduction in hippocampal IGF-1 occurred in the group with knockouts in both liver and CA1 (36% reduction), and was associated with a 3.5-fold increase in immobility in the forced swim test. Reduction of either circulating or hippocampal IGF-1 levels did not alter anxiety measured in an open field and elevated plus maze, nor locomotion in the open field. Furthermore, local compensation for deficiencies in circulating IGF-1 did not occur in the hippocampus, nor were serum levels of IGF-1 upregulated in response to the moderate decline of hippocampal IGF-1 caused by the knockouts in CA1. We conclude that adult-onset IGF-1 deficiency alone is sufficient to induce a depressive phenotype in mice. Furthermore, our results suggest that individuals with low brain levels of IGF-1 are at increased risk for depression and these behavioral effects are not ameliorated by increased local IGF-1 production or transport. Our study supports the hypothesis that the natural IGF-1 decline in aging humans may contribute to geriatric depression. PMID:21524689

  7. Gene-environment interactions affect long-term depression (LTD) through changes in dopamine receptor affinity in Snap25 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Michael; Allan, Andrea M.; Partridge, L. Donald; Wilson, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Genes and environmental conditions interact in the development of cognitive capacities and each plays an important role in neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia. Multiple studies have indicated that the gene for the SNARE protein SNAP-25 is a candidate susceptibility gene for ADHD, as well as schizophrenia, while maternal smoking is a candidate environmental risk factor for ADHD. We utilized mice heterozygous for a Snap25 null allele and deficient in SNAP-25 expression to model genetic effects in combination with prenatal exposure to nicotine to explore genetic and environmental interactions in synaptic plasticity and behavior. We show that SNAP-25 deficient mice exposed to prenatal nicotine exhibit hyperactivity and deficits in social interaction. Using a high frequency stimulus electrophysiological paradigm for long-term depression (LTD) induction, we examined the roles of dopaminergic D2 receptors (D2Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs), both critical for LTD induction in the striatum. We found that prenatal exposure to nicotine in Snap25 heterozygote null mice produced a deficit in the D2R-dependent induction of LTD, although CB1R regulation of plasticity was not impaired. We also show that prenatal nicotine exposure altered the affinity and/or receptor coupling of D2Rs, but not the number of these receptors in heterozygote null Snap25 mutants. These results refine the observations made in the coloboma mouse mutant, a proposed mouse model of ADHD, and illustrate how gene × environmental influences can interact to perturb neural functions that regulate behavior. PMID:23939223

  8. Acid-sensing ion channel 1a is required for mGlu receptor dependent long-term depression in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mango, D; Braksator, E; Battaglia, G; Marcelli, S; Mercuri, N B; Feligioni, M; Nicoletti, F; Bashir, Z I; Nisticò, R

    2017-01-27

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), members of the degenerin/epithelial Na(+) channel superfamily, are widely distributed in the mammalian nervous system. ASIC1a is highly permeable to Ca(2+) and are thought to be important in a variety of physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. To further understand the role of ASIC1a in synaptic transmission and plasticity, we investigated metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus. We found that ASIC1a channels mediate a component of LTD in P30-40 animals, since the ASIC1a selective blocker psalmotoxin-1 (PcTx1) reduced the magnitude of LTD induced by application of the group I mGlu receptor agonist (S)-3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) or induced by paired-pulse low frequency stimulation (PP-LFS). Conversely, PcTx1 did not affect LTD in P13-18 animals. We also provide evidence that ASIC1a is involved in group I mGlu receptor-induced increase in action potential firing. However, blockade of ASIC1a did not affect DHPG-induced polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis, suggesting the involvement of some other molecular partners in the functional crosstalk between ASIC1a and group I mGlu receptors. Notably, PcTx1 was able to prevent the increase in GluA1 S845 phosphorylation at the post-synaptic membrane induced by group I mGlu receptor activation. These findings suggest a novel function of ASIC1a channels in the regulation of group I mGlu receptor synaptic plasticity and intrinsic excitability.

  9. Cocaine Withdrawal Impairs mGluR5-Dependent Long-Term Depression in Nucleus Accumbens Shell Neurons of Both Direct and Indirect Pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Chun; Liang, Ying-Ching; Lee, Cheng-Che; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that animals withdrawn from repeated cocaine exposure exhibited a selective deficit in the ability to elicit metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-dependent long-term depression (LTD) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell. To determine whether such impairment occurs in the NAc in a cell-type-specific manner, we used bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the control of gene regulatory elements for the dopamine D1 receptor (Drd1) or dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2) to identify distinct subpopulations of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). We found that bath application of group I mGluR agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) reliably induced LTD in both NAc shell and core MSNs of wild-type, hemizygous Drd1-eGFP, and Drd2-eGFP mice. Confirming our previous results, cocaine withdrawal selectively impaired DHPG-LTD in NAc shell Drd1-expressing direct and Drd2-expressing indirect pathway MSNs. We also found that the expression of DHPG-LTD in NAc MSNs was not affected by the Ca(2+)-permeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor antagonist 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine. Furthermore, systemic administration of mGluR5-negative allosteric modulator fenobam before the daily injection of cocaine preserved mGluR5 function and significantly reduced the expression of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization. These results reveal that withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure may result in the impairment of NAc mGluR5-LTD in a subregion- but not cell-type-specific manner and suggests that pharmacological antagonism of mGluR5 may represent a potential strategy for reducing cocaine-induced addictive behaviors.

  10. Chronic intermittent alcohol disrupts the GluN2B-associated proteome and specifically regulates group I mGlu receptor-dependent long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Wills, Tiffany A; Baucum, Anthony J; Holleran, Katherine M; Chen, Yaoyi; Pasek, Johanna G; Delpire, Eric; Tabb, David L; Colbran, Roger J; Winder, Danny G

    2017-03-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are major targets of both acute and chronic alcohol, as well as regulators of plasticity in a number of brain regions. Aberrant plasticity may contribute to the treatment resistance and high relapse rates observed in alcoholics. Recent work suggests that chronic alcohol treatment preferentially modulates both the expression and subcellular localization of NMDARs containing the GluN2B subunit. Signaling through synaptic and extrasynaptic GluN2B-NMDARs has already been implicated in the pathophysiology of various other neurological disorders. NMDARs interact with a large number of proteins at the glutamate synapse, and a better understanding of how alcohol modulates this proteome is needed. We employed a discovery-based proteomic approach in subcellular fractions of hippocampal tissue from chronic intermittent alcohol (CIE)-exposed C57Bl/6J mice to gain insight into alcohol-induced changes in GluN2B signaling complexes. Protein enrichment analyses revealed changes in the association of post-synaptic proteins, including scaffolding, glutamate receptor and PDZ-domain binding proteins with GluN2B. In particular, GluN2B interaction with metabotropic glutamate (mGlu)1/5 receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD)-associated proteins such as Arc and Homer 1 was increased, while GluA2 was decreased. Accordingly, we found a lack of mGlu1/5 -induced LTD while α1 -adrenergic receptor-induced LTD remained intact in hippocampal CA1 following CIE. These data suggest that CIE specifically disrupts mGlu1/5 -LTD, representing a possible connection between NMDAR and mGlu receptor signaling. These studies not only demonstrate a new way in which alcohol can modulate plasticity in the hippocampus but also emphasize the utility of this discovery-based proteomic approach to generate new hypotheses regarding alcohol-related mechanisms.

  11. Gating of long-term depression by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II through enhanced cGMP signalling in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Shin-ya; Hirano, Tomoo

    2013-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fibre synapses on a cerebellar Purkinje cell has been regarded as a cellular basis for motor learning. Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has been implicated in the LTD induction as an important Ca2+-sensing molecule, the underlying signalling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we attempted to explore the potential signalling pathway underlying the CaMKII involvement in LTD using a systems biology approach, combined with validation by electrophysiological and FRET imaging experiments on a rat cultured Purkinje cell. Model simulation predicted the following cascade as a candidate mechanism for the CaMKII contribution to LTD: CaMKII negatively regulates phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1), subsequently facilitates the cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signalling pathway and down-regulates protein phosphatase 2A (PP-2A), thus supporting the LTD-inducing positive feedback loop consisting of mutual activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). This model suggestion was corroborated by whole-cell patch clamp recording experiments. In addition, FRET measurement of intracellular cGMP concentration revealed that CaMKII activation causes sustained increase of cGMP, supporting the signalling mechanism of LTD induction by CaMKII. Furthermore, we found that activation of the cGMP/PKG pathway by nitric oxide (NO) can support LTD induction without activation of CaMKII. Thus, this study clarified interaction between NO and Ca2+/CaMKII, two important factors required for LTD. PMID:23297306

  12. Long-term effects of nicotine on the forced swimming test in mice: an experimental model for the study of depression caused by smoke.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Carmen; Tedesco, Michele; Bellomo, Maria; Caputi, Achille P; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2006-10-01

    Large evidence showing an association between depression and tobacco smoking is known. Nicotine is the active chemical responsible for smoking addiction, and its withdrawal may induce in smokers greater sensitivity to stress. Our aim has been to investigate the links between tobacco addiction and depression by studying the long-term effects of repeated administration of nicotine followed by dependence, to forced swimming test, serotonin content and 5-HT(1A) expression in diencephalon. Dependence has been induced by daily subcutaneous injection in mice of nicotine (2mg/kg four injections daily) for 15 days and assessed after nicotine withdrawal with an abstinence scale; control animals received daily subcutaneous injection of saline for the same period. Experiments on forced swimming test have been carried out at t=0 (last day of nicotine or saline treatment), and 15, 30, 45 and 60 days after saline or nicotine withdrawal. Both control mice and nicotine mice have been pre-treated with oral 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (12.5-50mg/kg), precursor of serotonin, before forced swimming test. Nicotine mice have shown on forced swimming test a significant increase of immobility time compared to control mice. This increase was not evident in nicotine mice treated with 5-hydroxy-tryptophan and treatment with the selective serotonin receptorial antagonist WAY 100635 (WAY) abolished 5-hydroxy-tryptophan effects. Evaluation of diencephalic serotonin, performed at t=0 showed an increase of diencephalic serotonin content, while serotonin measured 15, 30, 45 and 60 days after nicotine withdrawal, was significantly reduced in nicotine mice compared to control mice. Western blot analysis showed a great reduction of 5-HT(1A) receptor expression in nicotine mice measured at t=0 (last day of treatment) and at 15 and 30 days after nicotine withdrawal compared to control mice. Our results show that (i) behavioural alterations estimated with forced swimming test and (ii) changes in diencephalic

  13. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Self-Help for the Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in People with Long-Term Physical Health Conditions: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Farrand, Paul; Woodford, Joanne

    2015-08-01

    Depression and anxiety are prevalent comorbidities in people with long-term physical health conditions; however, there is limited access to evidence-based treatments for comorbid mental health difficulties. This study is a meta-analysis examining the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural self-help for physical symptoms, depression and anxiety in people with long-term conditions. This study involves a systematic search of electronic databases supplemented by expert contact, reference and citation checking and grey literature. The meta-analysis yielded a small effect size for 11 studies reporting primary outcomes of depression (g = -0.20) and 8 studies anxiety (g = -0.21) with a large effect size (g = -1.14) for 1 study examining physical health symptoms. There were no significant moderators of the main effect. Limited evidence supports cognitive behavioural self-help for depression, anxiety and physical symptoms in people with long-term conditions. Small effect sizes for depression and anxiety may result from failure to recruit participants with clinical levels of these difficulties at baseline.

  14. Effects of resistance and all-round, functional training on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities: a 'randomized' controlled trial [ISRCTN87177281

    PubMed Central

    Chin A Paw, Marijke JM; van Poppel, Mireille NM; Twisk, Jos WR; van Mechelen, Willem

    2004-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity may improve different aspects of wellbeing in older people, such as quality of life, vitality and depression. However, there is little experimental evidence to support this assumption. Therefore, we examined the effect of different training protocols on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities. Methods Subjects (n = 173, aged 64 to 94 years, living in long-term care facilities), were randomized to six months of three different moderate-intensity group exercise training protocols, or to an 'educational' control condition. Exercise consisted of two 45–60-minute training sessions per week of 1) resistance training; 2) all-round, functional training; or 3) a combination of both. Perceived health, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), the Vitality Plus Scale (VPS) and the Dementia Quality of Life questionnaire (DQoL) were administered at baseline and after six months. Results In the combined training group a small but significant decline was seen in perceived health, DQoL and VPS score compared to the control group. Conclusions We conclude that neither strength training nor all-round, functional training of moderate intensity is effective in improving quality of life, vitality or depression of older people living in long-term care facilities. PMID:15233841

  15. Evidence for a fragile X mental retardation protein-mediated translational switch in metabotropic glutamate receptor-triggered Arc translation and long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Niere, Farr; Wilkerson, Julia R; Huber, Kimberly M

    2012-04-25

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-stimulated protein synthesis and long-term synaptic depression (mGluR-LTD) are altered in the mouse model of fragile X syndrome, Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mice. Fmr1 encodes fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a dendritic RNA binding protein that functions, in part, as a translational suppressor. It is unknown whether and how FMRP acutely regulates LTD and/or the rapid synthesis of new proteins required for LTD, such as the activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). The protein phosphatase PP2A dephosphorylates FMRP, which contributes to translational activation of some target mRNAs. Here, we report that PP2A and dephosphorylation of FMRP at S500 are required for an mGluR-induced, rapid (5 min) increase in dendritic Arc protein and LTD in rat and mouse hippocampal neurons. In Fmr1 KO neurons, basal, dendritic Arc protein levels and mGluR-LTD are enhanced, but mGluR-triggered Arc synthesis is absent. Lentiviral-mediated expression of wild-type FMRP in Fmr1 KO neurons suppresses basal dendritic Arc levels and mGluR-LTD, and restores rapid mGluR-triggered Arc synthesis. A phosphomimic of FMRP (S500D) suppresses steady-state dendritic Arc levels but does not rescue mGluR-induced Arc synthesis. A dephosphomimic of FMRP (S500A) neither suppresses dendritic Arc nor supports mGluR-induced Arc synthesis. Accordingly, S500D-FMRP expression in Fmr1 KO neurons suppresses mGluR-LTD, whereas S500A-FMRP has no effect. These data support a model in which phosphorylated FMRP functions to suppress steady-state translation of Arc and LTD. Upon mGluR activation of PP2A, FMRP is rapidly dephosphorylated, which contributes to rapid new synthesis of Arc and mGluR-LTD.

  16. Life Stress and the Long-Term Treatment Course of Recurrent Depression: III. Nonsevere Life Events Predict Recurrence for Medicated Patients over 3 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott M.; Torres, Leandro D.; Guillaumot, Julien; Harkness, Kate L.; Roberts, John E.; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David

    2006-01-01

    Research has consistently documented the significance of severe life events for onset of major depression. Theory, however, suggests other forms of stress are relevant for depression's recurrence. Nonsevere life events were tested in relation to depression for 126 patients with recurrent depression in a 3-year randomized maintenance protocol. Life…

  17. Life Stress and the Long-Term Treatment Course of Recurrent Depression: III. Nonsevere Life Events Predict Recurrence for Medicated Patients over 3 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott M.; Torres, Leandro D.; Guillaumot, Julien; Harkness, Kate L.; Roberts, John E.; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David

    2006-01-01

    Research has consistently documented the significance of severe life events for onset of major depression. Theory, however, suggests other forms of stress are relevant for depression's recurrence. Nonsevere life events were tested in relation to depression for 126 patients with recurrent depression in a 3-year randomized maintenance protocol. Life…

  18. Staufen 2 Regulates mGluR Long-Term Depression and Map1b mRNA Distribution in Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebeau, Genevieve; Miller, Linda C.; Tartas, Maylis; McAdam, Robyn; Laplante, Isabel; Badeaux, Frederique; DesGroseillers, Luc; Sossin, Wayne S.; Lacaille, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    The two members of the Staufen family of RNA-binding proteins, Stau1 and Stau2, are present in distinct ribonucleoprotein complexes and associate with different mRNAs. Stau1 is required for protein synthesis-dependent long-term potentiation (L-LTP) in hippocampal pyramidal cells. However, the role of Stau2 in synaptic plasticity remains…

  19. Staufen 2 Regulates mGluR Long-Term Depression and Map1b mRNA Distribution in Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebeau, Genevieve; Miller, Linda C.; Tartas, Maylis; McAdam, Robyn; Laplante, Isabel; Badeaux, Frederique; DesGroseillers, Luc; Sossin, Wayne S.; Lacaille, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    The two members of the Staufen family of RNA-binding proteins, Stau1 and Stau2, are present in distinct ribonucleoprotein complexes and associate with different mRNAs. Stau1 is required for protein synthesis-dependent long-term potentiation (L-LTP) in hippocampal pyramidal cells. However, the role of Stau2 in synaptic plasticity remains…

  20. Effects of Long-Term AA Attendance and Spirituality on the Course of Depressive Symptoms in Individuals with Alcohol Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Claire E.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Tonigan, J. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is associated with depression. Although attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings predicts reductions in drinking, results have been mixed about the salutary effects of AA on reducing depressive symptoms. In this single-group study, early AA affiliates (n=253) were recruited, consented, and assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. Lagged growth models were used to investigate the predictive effect of AA attendance on depression, controlling for concurrent drinking and treatment attendance. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and was administered at baseline 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Additional predictors of depression tested included spiritual gains, [Religious Background and Behavior questionnaire (RBB)] and completion of 12-step work [(Alcoholics Anonymous Inventory (AAI)]. Eighty-five percent of the original sample provided follow-up data at 24 months. Overall, depression decreased over the 24 month follow-up period. AA attendance predicted later reductions in depression (slope=−3.40, p= 0.01) even after controlling for concurrent drinking and formal treatment attendance. Finally, increased spiritual gains (RBB) also predicted later reductions in depression (slope=−0.10, p=0.02) after controlling for concurrent drinking, treatment, and AA attendance. In sum, reductions in alcohol consumption partially explained decreases in depression in this sample of early AA affiliates, and other factors such as AA attendance and increased spiritual practices also accounted for reductions in depression beyond that explained by drinking. PMID:26076099

  1. Effects of long-term AA attendance and spirituality on the course of depressive symptoms in individuals with alcohol use disorder.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Claire E; Pearson, Matthew R; Tonigan, J Scott

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is associated with depression. Although attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings predicts reductions in drinking, results have been mixed about the salutary effects of AA on reducing depressive symptoms. In this single-group study, early AA affiliates (n = 253) were recruited, consented, and assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months. Lagged growth models were used to investigate the predictive effect of AA attendance on depression, controlling for concurrent drinking and treatment attendance. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and was administered at baseline 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Additional predictors of depression tested included spiritual gains (Religious Background and Behavior questionnaire [RBB]) and completion of 12-step work (Alcoholics Anonymous Inventory [AAI]). Eighty-five percent of the original sample provided follow-up data at 24 months. Overall, depression decreased over the 24 month follow-up period. AA attendance predicted later reductions in depression (slope = -3.40, p = .01) even after controlling for concurrent drinking and formal treatment attendance. Finally, increased spiritual gains (RBB) also predicted later reductions in depression (slope = -0.10, p = .02) after controlling for concurrent drinking, treatment, and AA attendance. In summary, reductions in alcohol consumption partially explained decreases in depression in this sample of early AA affiliates, and other factors such as AA attendance and increased spiritual practices also accounted for reductions in depression beyond that explained by drinking. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Reciprocal relationship between unhealthy eating behaviours and depressive symptoms from childhood to adolescence: 10-year follow-up of the Child and Adolescent Behaviors in Long-Term Evolution study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Chi; Luh, Dih-Lin; Lin, Ching-I; Chiang, Yi-Chen; Hung, Chao-Chia; Wang, Sabrina; Wu, Chi-Chen; Hurng, Baai-Shyun; Chang, Yi-Han; Yen, Lee-Lan; Chang, Hsing-Yi

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the reciprocal relationship between unhealthy eating behaviours and depressive symptoms from childhood to adolescence. Unhealthy eating behaviours were measured by the frequencies of eating foods with excess salt, sugar or fat in the past week. Depressive symptoms in the past two weeks were measured using a seven-item scale. Hierarchical linear growth models were used to analyse longitudinal associations between unhealthy eating behaviours and depressive symptoms. Time-fixed variables (sex, parents' education level and household monthly income) and time-varying variables (parents' marital status, family activities, body weight, vegetable or fruit consumption, exercising and smoking) were controlled for. The Child and Adolescent Behaviors in Long-Term Evolution study, which commenced in 2001 and has annual follow-up. Students (n 2630) followed from 2nd grade (8 years old in 2002) to 11th grade. The frequency of unhealthy eating behaviours in the previous year and the difference between the frequency in the previous and successive year were positively associated with the initiation and growth rate of depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms in the previous year and the difference in depressive symptoms between the previous and successive year were positively associated with the initial state and growth rate of unhealthy eating behaviours. Our results suggest a reciprocal relationship between depressive symptoms and unhealthy eating behaviours. This relationship should be considered when developing programmes targeting depressive symptoms and unhealthy diet in children and adolescents.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of combined exercise and psycho-education for low-SES women: short- and long-term outcomes in the reduction of stress and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    van der Waerden, Judith E B; Hoefnagels, Cees; Hosman, Clemens M H; Souren, Pierre M; Jansen, Maria W J

    2013-08-01

    Exercise may have both a preventive and a therapeutic impact on mental health problems. The Exercise without Worries intervention aims to reduce stress and depressive symptoms in low-SES women by means of a group-based program combining physical exercise and psycho-education. Between September 2005 and May 2008, 161 Dutch low-SES women with elevated stress or depressive symptom levels were randomly assigned to the combined exercise/psycho-education intervention (EP), exercise only (E) or a waiting list control condition (WLC). The E condition provided low to moderate intensity stretching, strength, flexibility, and body focused training as well as relaxation, while the EP program integrated the exercise with cognitive-behavioral techniques. Depressive symptoms (CES-D) and perceived stress (PSS) were measured before and immediately after the intervention and at 2, 6 and 12 month follow-up. Multilevel linear mixed-effects models revealed no differential patterns in reduction of CES-D or PSS scores between the EP, E and WLC groups on the short (post-test and 2 month follow-up) or long term (6 and 12 months follow-up). Depressive symptom outcomes were moderated by initial depressive symptom scores: women from the EP and E groups with fewer initial symptoms benefited from participation on the short term. Further, women in the EP and E groups with the lowest educational level reported more stress reduction at post-test than women with higher educational levels. In the overall target population of low-SES women, no indications were found that the Exercise without Worries course reduced depressive symptom and stress levels on the short or long term. The findings do suggest, however, that exercise alone or in combination with psycho-education may be a viable prevention option for certain groups of disadvantaged women. Especially those low-SES women with less severe initial problems or those with low educational attainment should be targeted for future depression prevention

  4. The long-term association of OCD and depression and its moderators: A four-year follow up study in a large clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Tibi, L; van Oppen, P; van Balkom, A J L M; Eikelenboom, M; Rickelt, J; Schruers, K R J; Anholt, G E

    2017-07-01

    Depression is the most common comorbidity in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, the mechanisms of depressive comorbidity in OCD are poorly understood. We assessed the directionality and moderators of the OCD-depression association over time in a large, prospective clinical sample of OCD patients. Data were drawn from 382 OCD patients participating at the Netherlands Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Association (NOCDA) study. Cross-lagged, structural equation modeling analyses were used to assess the temporal association between OCD and depressive symptoms. Assessments were conducted at baseline, two-year and four-year follow up. Cognitive and interpersonal moderators of the prospective association between OCD and depressive symptoms were tested. Cross-lagged analyses demonstrated that OCD predicts depressive symptoms at two-year follow up and not vice a versa. This relationship disappeared at four-year follow up. Secure attachment style moderated the prospective association between OCD and depression. Depressive comorbidity in OCD might constitute a functional consequence of the incapacitating OCD symptoms. Both OCD and depression symptoms demonstrated strong stability effects between two-year and four-year follow up, which may explain the lack of association between them in that period. Among OCD patients, secure attachment represents a buffer against future depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Perceptions of control and long-term recovery from rape.

    PubMed

    Regehr, C; Cadell, S; Jansen, K

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between perceptions of control and symptoms of both long-term depression and post-traumatic stress was examined. Enduring beliefs of personal competence and control were found to be associated with lower rates of depression and stress and to be stronger predictors of long-term recovery than were rape-specific attributions. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  6. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  7. Long-Term Reciprocal Associations Between Depressive Symptoms and Number of Chronic Medical Conditions: Longitudinal Support for Black-White Health Paradox.

    PubMed

    Assari, Shervin; Burgard, Sarah; Zivin, Kara

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has identified a Black-White health paradox, which can be defined as less frequent depression despite a higher prevalence of chronic medical conditions among Blacks compared to Whites in the USA. Based on this paradox, we would expect weaker associations between chronic medical conditions and depression among Blacks than Whites. However, the literature on this topic is mostly cross-sectional and has provided findings that contradict the Black-White health paradox. The present longitudinal study extends prior research by assessing Black-White differences in reciprocal associations between number of chronic medical conditions and depressive symptoms over a 25-year period. Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives Study that followed 1034 surviving Black and White respondents for 25 years from 1986 to 2011. Chronic medical conditions were measured based on a count of self-reported physician diagnoses including hypertension, diabetes, chronic lung disease, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and arthritis at baseline (1986) and follow-up (2011). Depressive symptoms were also measured at baseline and follow-up using a 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. Multi-group structural equation modeling was used to assess reciprocal associations between baseline and subsequent depressive symptoms and baseline and subsequent chronic medical conditions comparing Black and White respondents. Among White but not Black respondents, a higher number of chronic medical conditions at baseline predicted a greater increase in depressive symptoms over 25 years of follow-up. Among Whites but not Blacks, individuals with more depressive symptoms at baseline developed more chronic medical conditions over time. Findings documented Black-White differences in reciprocal associations between chronic medical conditions and depressive symptoms over time. Our study provides longitudinal evidence for the Black-White health paradox across mid and later

  8. The Clinical Research Center for Depression Study: Baseline Characteristics of a Korean Long-Term Hospital-Based Observational Collaborative Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Suk; Jeong, Seung Hee; Kim, Jung-Bum; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Yim, Hyeon-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Objective The Clinical Research Center for Depression (CRESCEND) study is a 9-year observational collaborative prospective cohort study for the clinical outcomes in participants with depressive disorders in Korea. In this study, we examined the baseline characteristics of the depressive participants as the hospital-based cohort. Methods Participants were assessed using various instruments including the Clinical Global Impression scale, 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition, Scale for Suicide Ideation, and World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment instruments-abbreviated version. Also, personal histories of medical and psychiatric illnesses and the range of socio-epidemiologic and clinical data were collected from each participant. Results One thousand one hundred eighty three participants were recruited from 18 hospitals. The mean age of the participants was 47.9±15.9 year-old, 74.4% were female, 82.9% had been diagnosed of major depressive disorder, 40.9% were experiencing their first depressive episode, and 21.4% had a past history of suicide attempts. The majority (85.3%) of the participants were moderately to severely ill. The average HDRS-17 was 19.8±6.1. Significant gender differences at baseline were shown in age, education, marriage, employment, religion, and first depressive episode. Conclusion The baseline findings in the CRESCEND study showed some different characteristics of depression in Korea, suggesting a possibility of ethnic and cultural factors in depression. PMID:21519530

  9. Baseline Depressive Symptoms, Completion of Study Assessments, and Behavior Change in a Long-Term Dietary Intervention Among Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Julie B; Pierce, John P; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Cadmus-Bertram, Lisa A; Flatt, Shirley W; Madanat, Hala; Newman, Vicky A; Nichols, Jeanne F; Natarajan, Loki

    2015-12-01

    Depressive symptoms can lower adherence and change in dietary studies. Behavioral activation may reduce these effects. This study aims to assess relationships among depressive symptoms on adherence and dietary change in the Women's Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) Study Secondary analyses from the WHEL Study, which achieved major dietary change in breast cancer survivors (N = 2817), were conducted. Logistic regressions were undertaken of baseline depressive symptoms (six-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)) with (1) completion of 1- and 4-year study assessments and (2) validated change in dietary behavior in the intervention group. In the comparison group (vs. intervention), depressive symptoms lowered completion of dietary recalls and clinic visits [4 years: odds ratio (OR) = 2.0; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-3.0]. The behaviorally oriented intervention achieved major change in those furthest from study targets, although changes were lower in those with depressive symptoms: fruit/vegetable (+37.2 %), fiber (+49.0 %), and fat (-22.4 %). Behavioral activation in dietary change interventions can overcome the impact of depressive symptoms.

  10. Depressive disorder as a long-term antecedent risk factor for incident back pain: a 13-year follow-up study from the Baltimore Epidemiological Catchment Area sample.

    PubMed

    Larson, S L; Clark, M R; Eaton, W W

    2004-02-01

    The co-occurrence of affective distress and back pain is well documented but the relationship between them is less certain. This study examines the relationship between lifetime occurrence of depressive disorder and incident back pain reported over a 13-year period. The Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study is a prospective study of a household-residing cohort, selected probabilistically from East Baltimore in 1981. Between 1982-3 (wave 2) and again between 1993-6 (wave 3), a follow-up study of the original cohort was conducted. Questions on depressive disorder and back pain were drawn from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate whether depressive disorder acts as a risk factor for incident back pain. In cross-sectional analyses, lifetime occurrence of depressive disorder was a significant correlate of lifetime prevalence of back pain at wave 1 (OR = 1.6, P = 0.01). During the 13-year follow-up, across three data collection points, there was an increase in the risk for incident back pain when depressive disorder was present at baseline (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.03, 3.4). However, during the short-term follow-up period of 1 year, between baseline and wave 2, depressive disorder at baseline was unrelated to first-ever reports of back pain. Lifetime depressive disorder in both waves 1 (baseline) and 2 (1 year later) was associated with a more than three times greater risk for a first-ever report of back pain during the 12 to 13 year follow-up period, in comparison to those who did not have depressive disorder at waves 1 or 2 (OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.4, 7.8). Back pain at wave 1 was not significantly associated with an increased risk for depression in the longitudinal analysis (OR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.5, 1.4). Depressive disorder appears to be a risk factor for incident back pain independent of other characteristics often associated with back pain. Back pain is not a short-term consequence of depressive disorder but emerges over

  11. Long-term cost-effectiveness of collaborative care (vs usual care) for people with depression and comorbid diabetes or cardiovascular disease: a Markov model informed by the COINCIDE randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Elizabeth M; Ntais, Dionysios; Coventry, Peter; Bower, Peter; Lovell, Karina; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Baguley, Clare; Gask, Linda; Dickens, Chris; Davies, Linda M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of collaborative care (vs usual care) for treating depression in patients with diabetes and/or coronary heart disease (CHD). Setting 36 primary care general practices in North West England. Participants 387 participants completed baseline assessment (collaborative care: 191; usual care: 196) and full or partial 4-month follow-up data were captured for 350 (collaborative care: 170; usual care: 180). 62% of participants were male, 14% were non-white. Participants were aged ≥18 years, listed on a Quality and Outcomes Framework register for CHD and/or type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, with persistent depressive symptoms. Patients with psychosis or type I/II bipolar disorder, actively suicidal, in receipt of services for substance misuse, or already in receipt of psychological therapy for depression were excluded. Intervention Collaborative care consisted of evidence-based low-intensity psychological treatments, delivered over 3 months and case management by a practice nurse and a Psychological Well Being Practitioner. Outcome measures As planned, the primary measure of cost-effectiveness was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY)). A Markov model was constructed to extrapolate the trial results from short-term to long-term (24 months). Results The mean cost per participant of collaborative care was £317 (95% CI 284 to 350). Over 24 months, it was estimated that collaborative care was associated with greater healthcare usage costs (net cost £674 (95% CI −30 953 to 38 853)) and QALYs (net QALY gain 0.04 (95% CI −0.46 to 0.54)) than usual care, resulting in a cost per QALY gained of £16 123, and a likelihood of being cost-effective of 0.54 (willingness to pay threshold of £20 000). Conclusions Collaborative care is a potentially cost-effective long-term treatment for depression in patients with comorbid physical and mental illness. The estimated

  12. Long-term cost-effectiveness of collaborative care (vs usual care) for people with depression and comorbid diabetes or cardiovascular disease: a Markov model informed by the COINCIDE randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Elizabeth M; Ntais, Dionysios; Coventry, Peter; Bower, Peter; Lovell, Karina; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Baguley, Clare; Gask, Linda; Dickens, Chris; Davies, Linda M

    2016-10-07

    To evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of collaborative care (vs usual care) for treating depression in patients with diabetes and/or coronary heart disease (CHD). 36 primary care general practices in North West England. 387 participants completed baseline assessment (collaborative care: 191; usual care: 196) and full or partial 4-month follow-up data were captured for 350 (collaborative care: 170; usual care: 180). 62% of participants were male, 14% were non-white. Participants were aged ≥18 years, listed on a Quality and Outcomes Framework register for CHD and/or type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, with persistent depressive symptoms. Patients with psychosis or type I/II bipolar disorder, actively suicidal, in receipt of services for substance misuse, or already in receipt of psychological therapy for depression were excluded. Collaborative care consisted of evidence-based low-intensity psychological treatments, delivered over 3 months and case management by a practice nurse and a Psychological Well Being Practitioner. As planned, the primary measure of cost-effectiveness was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY)). A Markov model was constructed to extrapolate the trial results from short-term to long-term (24 months). The mean cost per participant of collaborative care was £317 (95% CI 284 to 350). Over 24 months, it was estimated that collaborative care was associated with greater healthcare usage costs (net cost £674 (95% CI -30 953 to 38 853)) and QALYs (net QALY gain 0.04 (95% CI -0.46 to 0.54)) than usual care, resulting in a cost per QALY gained of £16 123, and a likelihood of being cost-effective of 0.54 (willingness to pay threshold of £20 000). Collaborative care is a potentially cost-effective long-term treatment for depression in patients with comorbid physical and mental illness. The estimated cost per QALY gained was below the threshold recommended by English decision

  13. Oral health-related quality of life and depression/anxiety in long-term recurrence-free patients after treatment for advanced oral squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Alexander J; Danner, Daniel; Freier, Kolja; Hofele, Christof; Becker-Bikowski, Kirsten; Engel, Michael

    2012-06-01

    This report focuses on the association between oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and depression/anxiety of a homogeneous group of cancer patients who were recurrence-free for 8 years after treatment for advanced oral squamous cell. Participants were 24 patients (mean age 55 years, 75% men) treated with neoadjuvant concurrent radiochemotherapy followed by surgery with a mean recurrence-free period of 95 months (from 39 to 164 months). The OHRQoL (OHIP) and the anxiety/depression (HADS) were assessed twice (1 year between t1 and t2). OHRQoL was impaired in this group (mean OHIP score 65 units). In cross-lagged correlation analysis, the correlation between OHRQoL to t1 and depression to t2 was significant and greater than the non-significant correlation for depression to t1 and OHRQoL to t2 indicating that OHRQoL predicts depression better than vice versa. However, the difference in the correlation coefficients was not significant (ZPF-test). The same was true for OHRQoL and anxiety. The OHRQoL measured with the OHIP was impaired in comparison to the normal population. In the limitations of the study design and bearing the small sample size in mind, the results give evidence that OHRQoL predicts psychological outcomes, namely depression and anxiety, better than vice versa.

  14. Child protection and adult depression: evaluating the long-term consequences of evacuating children to foster care during World War II.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Nina; Santavirta, Torsten

    2014-03-01

    This paper combined data collected from war time government records with survey data including background characteristics, such as factors that affected eligibility, to examine the adult depression outcomes of individuals who were evacuated from Finland to temporary foster care in Sweden during World War II. Using war time government records and survey data for a random sample of 723 exposed individuals and 1321 matched unexposed individuals, the authors conducted least squares adjusted means comparison to examine the association between evacuation and adult depression (Beck Depression Inventory). The random sample was representative for the whole population of evacuees who returned to their biological families after World War II. The authors found no statistically significant difference in depressive symptoms during late adulthood between the two groups; for example, the exposed group had a 0.41 percentage points lower average Beck Depression Inventory score than the unexposed group (p = 0.907). This study provides no support for family disruption during early childhood because of the onset of sudden shocks elevating depressive symptoms during late adulthood. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Long-term testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.; Graves, G.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Land-based gas turbines are significantly different from automotive gas turbines in that they are designed to operate for 50,000 h or greater (compared to 5,000--10,000 h). The primary goal of this research is to determine the long-term survivability of ceramic materials for industrial gas turbine applications. Research activities in this program focus on the evaluation of the static tensile creep and stress rupture (SR) behavior of three commercially available structural ceramics which have been identified by the gas turbine manufacturers as leading candidates for use in industrial gas turbines. For each material investigated, a minimum of three temperatures and four stresses will be used to establish the stress and temperature sensitivities of the creep and SR behavior. Because existing data for many candidate structural ceramics are limited to testing times less than 2,000 h, this program will focus on extending these data to times on the order of 10,000 h, which represents the lower limit of operating time anticipated for ceramic blades and vanes in gas turbine engines. A secondary goal of the program will be to investigate the possibility of enhancing life prediction estimates by combining interrupted tensile SR tests and tensile dynamic fatigue tests in which tensile strength is measured as a function of stressing rate. The third goal of this program will be to investigate the effects of water vapor upon the SR behavior of the three structural ceramics chosen for the static tensile studies by measuring the flexural strength as a function of stressing rate at three temperatures.

  16. Long-term bicycle riding ameliorates the depression of the patients undergoing hemodialysis by affecting the levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-18.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunhui; Ma, Hui; Yang, Lei; Xiao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Hemodialysis patients with depression have a higher risk of death and hospitalization. Although there is pharmacological management for the depression of hemodialysis patients, the adverse effect of the drug limits the use. The nonpharmacological way, bicycle riding, may be an effective way for the therapy of the depression in hemodialysis patients. However, the underlying mechanism of this relationship is still not fully explained, while interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) are associated with depression and exercise. Thus, the effects of bicycle riding on the levels of the interleukin were explored. One hundred and eighty-nine patients with chronic hemodialysis were selected and randomly assigned to three groups of medicine (MG, received 20-mg escitalopram daily), medicine and aerobic exercise (MAG, received 20-mg escitalopram daily and bicycle riding six times weekly), and only aerobic exercise (AG, received 20-mg placebo daily and bicycle riding six times weekly). The whole experiment lasted for 18 weeks. The quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey) and depression severity according to criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition [DSM-IV] were measured before and at the end of this study. The serum levels of IL-6 and IL-18 were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. The quality of life was improved and depression severity was reduced significantly in the MAG and AG groups when compared with the MG group (P<0.05). Serum levels of IL-6 and IL-18 were the highest in the MG group, moderate in the MAG group and the lowest in AG group. On the other hand, the serum levels of IL-6 and IL-18 were closely associated with depression scores (P<0.05). Aerobic exercise improves the quality of life and ameliorates the depression severity of the patients undergoing hemodialysis by affecting the levels of IL-6 and IL-18. Bicycle riding is a potential way for the depression therapy of the patients with

  17. Long-term bicycle riding ameliorates the depression of the patients undergoing hemodialysis by affecting the levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-18

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunhui; Ma, Hui; Yang, Lei; Xiao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Hemodialysis patients with depression have a higher risk of death and hospitalization. Although there is pharmacological management for the depression of hemodialysis patients, the adverse effect of the drug limits the use. The nonpharmacological way, bicycle riding, may be an effective way for the therapy of the depression in hemodialysis patients. However, the underlying mechanism of this relationship is still not fully explained, while interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) are associated with depression and exercise. Thus, the effects of bicycle riding on the levels of the interleukin were explored. Participants and methods One hundred and eighty-nine patients with chronic hemodialysis were selected and randomly assigned to three groups of medicine (MG, received 20-mg escitalopram daily), medicine and aerobic exercise (MAG, received 20-mg escitalopram daily and bicycle riding six times weekly), and only aerobic exercise (AG, received 20-mg placebo daily and bicycle riding six times weekly). The whole experiment lasted for 18 weeks. The quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey) and depression severity according to criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition [DSM-IV] were measured before and at the end of this study. The serum levels of IL-6 and IL-18 were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results The quality of life was improved and depression severity was reduced significantly in the MAG and AG groups when compared with the MG group (P<0.05). Serum levels of IL-6 and IL-18 were the highest in the MG group, moderate in the MAG group and the lowest in AG group. On the other hand, the serum levels of IL-6 and IL-18 were closely associated with depression scores (P<0.05). Conclusion Aerobic exercise improves the quality of life and ameliorates the depression severity of the patients undergoing hemodialysis by affecting the levels of IL-6 and IL-18. Bicycle riding is a potential

  18. Safety and tolerability of dexmecamylamine (TC-5214) adjunct to ongoing antidepressant therapy in patients with major depressive disorder and an inadequate response to antidepressant therapy: results of a long-term study.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Raj; Desai, Dhaval; Szamosi, Johan; Wilson, Ellis; Hosford, David; Dunbar, Geoffrey; Eriksson, Hans

    2015-02-01

    Safety and tolerability are important considerations when selecting patients' treatment for major depressive disorder. We report the long-term safety and tolerability of the nicotinic channel modulator dexmecamylamine (TC-5214), adjunct to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)/serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) in patients with major depressive disorder and who had an inadequate response to antidepressants. This 52-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study explored the long-term safety and tolerability of dexmecamylamine. Patients were randomized 3:1 to receive flexibly dosed dexmecamylamine 1 to 4 mg adjunct to SSRI/SNRI or placebo plus SSRI/SNRI. The patient population comprised inadequate responders from 2 Phase III acute dexmecamylamine studies (NCT01157078 [study 002], NCT01153347 [study 004]) and de novo patients who responded inadequately during a 6-week open-label antidepressant treatment period preceding randomization. Safety and tolerability were assessed by monitoring adverse events, vital signs, and physical and laboratory parameters. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed on most efficacy-related end points. Sustained efficacy was analyzed using logistic regression. Overall, 813 patients were randomized (610 received dexmecamylamine, 203 received placebo). In total, 82.4% and 84.6% of patients, respectively, experienced an adverse event. Adverse events occurring more frequently with dexmecamylamine vs placebo were constipation (19.6% vs 6.0%), dizziness (12.0% vs 7.0%), and dry mouth (9.7% vs 5.0%). Back pain (2.8% vs 8.5%), weight increase (4.4% vs 7.0%), and fatigue (5.6 % vs 7.5%) occurred more frequently in placebo-treated patients. No notable differences were observed between dexmecamylamine and placebo for any secondary end point. In this long-term study, safety and tolerability of dexmecamylamine were consistent with that reported in acute Phase III studies of dexmecamylamine.

  19. Online attentional bias modification training targeting anxiety and depression in unselected adolescents: Short- and long-term effects of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    de Voogd, E L; Wiers, R W; Prins, P J M; de Jong, P J; Boendermaker, W J; Zwitser, R J; Salemink, E

    2016-12-01

    Based on information processing models of anxiety and depression, we investigated the efficacy of multiple sessions of online attentional bias modification training to reduce attentional bias and symptoms of anxiety and depression, and to increase emotional resilience in youth. Unselected adolescents (N = 340, age: 11-18 years) were randomly allocated to eight sessions of a dot-probe, or a visual search-based attentional training, or one of two corresponding placebo control conditions. Cognitive and emotional measures were assessed pre- and post-training; emotional outcome measures also at three, six and twelve months follow-up. Only visual search training enhanced attention for positive information, and this effect was stronger for participants who completed more training sessions. Symptoms of anxiety and depression reduced, whereas emotional resilience improved. However, these effects were not especially pronounced in the active conditions. Thus, this large-scale randomized controlled study provided no support for the efficacy of the current online attentional bias modification training as a preventive intervention to reduce symptoms of anxiety or depression or to increase emotional resilience in unselected adolescents. However, the absence of biased attention related to symptomatology at baseline, and the large drop-out rates at follow-up preclude strong conclusions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Limbic system white matter microstructure and long-term treatment outcome in major depressive disorder: a diffusion tensor imaging study using legacy data.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Wouter S; Perlis, Roy H; Smoller, Jordan W; Zeng-Treitler, Qing; Gainer, Vivian S; Murphy, Shawn N; Churchill, Susanne E; Kohane, Isaac S; Shenton, Martha E; Iosifescu, Dan V

    2014-02-01

    Treatment-resistant depression is a common clinical occurrence among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but its neurobiology is poorly understood. We used data collected as part of routine clinical care to study white matter integrity of the brain's limbic system and its association to treatment response. Electronic medical records of multiple large New England hospitals were screened for patients with an MDD billing diagnosis, and natural language processing was subsequently applied to find those with concurrent diffusion-weighted images, but without any diagnosed brain pathology. Treatment outcome was determined by review of clinical charts. MDD patients (n = 29 non-remitters, n = 26 partial-remitters, and n = 37 full-remitters), and healthy control subjects (n = 58) were analyzed for fractional anisotropy (FA) of the fornix and cingulum bundle. Failure to achieve remission was associated with lower FA among MDD patients, statistically significant for the medial body of the fornix. Moreover, global and regional-selective age-related FA decline was most pronounced in patients with treatment-refractory, non-remitted depression. These findings suggest that specific brain microstructural white matter abnormalities underlie persistent, treatment-resistant depression. They also demonstrate the feasibility of investigating white matter integrity in psychiatric populations using legacy data.

  1. The noradrenaline metabolite MHPG is a candidate biomarker between the depressive, remission, and manic states in bipolar disorder I: two long-term naturalistic case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Masatake; Nishino, Satoshi; Numata, Yukio; Okubo, Yoshiro; Sato, Tadahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of the depressive and manic states in bipolar disorder I (BDI) is a challenge for psychiatrists. Despite the recognized importance of the switch phenomenon, the precise mechanisms underlying this process are yet to be shown. We conducted a naturalistic study in two BDI patients to determine whether biological markers (monoamine metabolites and brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF]) are associated with the switch between depressive and manic states. Case presentation and methods Blood sampling and mood assessments were performed at 2-week intervals over a period of 2 (Case 1, n=72) and 6 (Case 2, n=183) years. Plasma concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Plasma BDNF was assayed by sandwich ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Results MHPG had the highest standardized coefficient (β) in the multiple regression analysis. We found a significant positive correlation between Young Mania Rating Scale scores and plasma MHPG levels (Case 1: ρ=0.429; Case 2: ρ=0.488), and a significant negative correlation between Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores and MHPG levels (Case 1: ρ=−0.542; Case 2: ρ=−0.465). Conversely, no significant correlation was found between the level of BDNF and the presence of a manic or depressive state, and although HVA had a slightly stronger correlation than MHPG, the levels of neither of these were found to significantly correlate with the symptoms. Conclusion These data suggest that peripheral MHPG levels (which is related to noradrenaline levels in the brain) could be used as a biomarker of mood states in BDI. The noradrenaline level in the brain is likely to reflect the clinical characteristics of the switch process in BDI, and has prognostic significance for the treatment of both manic and depressive states. PMID:25709459

  2. Long-term Outcomes after Severe Shock

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Cristina M.; Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Jones, Jason P.; Kuttler, Kathryn G.; Lanspa, Michael J.; Wilson, Emily L.; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Brown, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe shock is a life-threatening condition with very high short-term mortality. Whether the long-term outcomes among survivors of severe shock are similar to long-term outcomes of other critical illness survivors is unknown. We therefore sought to assess long-term survival and functional outcomes among 90-day survivors of severe shock and determine whether clinical predictors were associated with outcomes. Methods Seventy-six patients who were alive 90 days after severe shock (received ≥1 mcg/kg/min of norepinephrine equivalent) were eligible for the study. We measured three-year survival and long-term functional outcomes using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, the EuroQOL 5-D-3L, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised and an employment instrument. We also assessed the relationship between in-hospital predictors and long-term outcomes. Results The mean long-term survival was 5.1 years: 82% (62/76) of patients survived, of whom 49 were eligible for follow-up. Patients who died were older than patients who survived. Thirty-six patients completed a telephone interview a mean of five years after hospital admission. The patients’ Physical Functioning scores were below US population norms (p<0.001), whereas mental health scores were similar to population norms. Nineteen percent of the patients had symptoms of depression, 39% had symptoms of anxiety and 8% had symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. Thirty-six percent were disabled, and 17% were working full time. Conclusions Early survivors of severe shock had a high three-year survival rate. Patients’ long term physical and psychological outcomes were similar to those reported for cohorts of less severely ill ICU survivors. Anxiety and depression were relatively common, but only a few patients had symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This study supports the observation that acute illness severity does not determine long-term

  3. Long-term outcomes after severe shock.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Cristina M; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Jones, Jason P; Kuttler, Kathryn G; Lanspa, Michael J; Wilson, Emily L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Brown, Samuel M

    2015-02-01

    Severe shock is a life-threatening condition with very high short-term mortality. Whether the long-term outcomes among survivors of severe shock are similar to long-term outcomes of other critical illness survivors is unknown. We therefore sought to assess long-term survival and functional outcomes among 90-day survivors of severe shock and determine whether clinical predictors were associated with outcomes. Seventy-six patients who were alive 90 days after severe shock (received ≥1 μg/kg per minute of norepinephrine equivalent) were eligible for the study. We measured 3-year survival and long-term functional outcomes using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, the EuroQOL 5-D-3L, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and an employment instrument. We also assessed the relationship between in-hospital predictors and long-term outcomes. The mean long-term survival was 5.1 years; 82% (62 of 76) of patients survived, of whom 49 were eligible for follow-up. Patients who died were older than patients who survived. Thirty-six patients completed a telephone interview a mean of 5 years after hospital admission. The patients' Physical Functioning scores were below U.S. population norms (P < 0.001), whereas mental health scores were similar to population norms. Nineteen percent of the patients had symptoms of depression, 39% had symptoms of anxiety, and 8% had symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. Thirty-six percent were disabled, and 17% were working full-time. Early survivors of severe shock had a high 3-year survival rate. Patients' long-term physical and psychological outcomes were similar to those reported for cohorts of less severely ill intensive care unit survivors. Anxiety and depression were relatively common, but only a few patients had symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This study supports the observation that acute illness severity does not determine long-term outcomes. Even extremely

  4. Acute renal failure induced by markedly decreased appetite secondary to a depressive episode after discontinuation of long-term lithium therapy in an elderly patient with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Okada, Akira

    2014-05-16

    Some elderly patients on chronic lithium therapy for bipolar disorder and their doctors may be faced with a therapeutic dilemma over whether or not to continue prescribing/taking lithium given their increased risk of reduced renal function. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who discontinued lithium therapy due to increased risk factors for renal injury. After discontinuation, she experienced markedly decreased appetite secondary to a depressive episode, and developed acute renal failure, which subsequently progressed to a more advanced stage of chronic kidney disease. This case suggests that extreme care must be taken to prevent the recurrence of depression in elderly patients with bipolar disorder who discontinue lithium therapy, even when they had been emotionally stable for a long time while receiving lithium. Medications other than lithium for bipolar disorder may be needed at the time lithium therapy is discontinued.

  5. Long-term repercussions of a pulmonary rehabilitation program on the indices of anxiety, depression, quality of life and physical performance in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Rossane Frizzo de; Teixeira, Paulo José Zimermann; Becker Júnior, Benno; Michelli, Maurício; Godoy, Dagoberto Vanoni de

    2009-02-01

    To assess the 24-month effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation program (PRP) on anxiety, depression, quality of life and physical performance of COPD patients. Thirty patients with COPD (mean age, 60.8 +/- 10 years; 70% males) participated in a 12-week PRP, which included 24 physical exercise sessions, 24 respiratory rehabilitation sessions, 12 psychotherapy sessions and 3 educational sessions. All patients were evaluated at baseline (pre-PRP), at the end of the treatment (post-PRP) and two years later (current) by means of four instruments: the Beck Anxiety Inventory; the Beck Depression Inventory; Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire; and the six-minute walk test (6MWT). The comparison between the pre-PRP and post-PRP values revealed a significant decrease in the levels of anxiety (pre-PRP: 10.7 +/- 6.3; post-PRP: 5.5 +/- 4.4; p = 0.0005) and depression (pre-PRP: 11.7 +/- 6.8; post-PRP: 6.0 +/- 5.8; p = 0.001), as well as significant improvements in the distance covered on the 6MWT (pre-PRP: 428.6 +/- 75.0 m; post-PRP: 474.9 +/- 86.3 m; p = 0.03) and the quality of life index (pre-PRP: 51.0 +/- 15.9; post-PRP: 34.7 +/- 15.1; p = 0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences between the post-PRP and current evaluation values. The benefits provided by the PRP in terms of the indices of anxiety, depression and quality of life, as well as the improved 6MWT performance, persisted throughout the 24-month study period.

  6. Psychoticism and paranoid ideation in patients with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder: prevalence, response to treatment, and impact on short- and long-term treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Dording, Christina M; Mischoulon, David; Goodness, Tracie M; Baer, Lee; Clain, Alisabet; Stewart, Jonathan W; Matthews, John D; McGrath, Patrick J; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Fava, Maurizio; Papakostas, George I

    2010-08-01

    Objective/Introduction: We sought to characterize the impact of the 90-item Symptom Checklist (SCL-90) subscales for paranoid ideation (PI) and psychoticism (P) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), on acute antidepressant response and on relapse prevention. Subjects with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders-diagnosed nonpsychotic MDD were recruited into a clinical trial of open-label fluoxetine 10-60 mg/day for 12 weeks, followed by double-blind randomization of responders (n=262) to fluoxetine continuation or placebo for 12 months. PI and P were assessed with the patient-rated SCL-90. The association of these symptoms with response to treatment was assessed by logistic regression. We found significant decreases in PI and P during acute treatment phase for fluoxetine responders and nonresponders, although only 10.3% and 7.5% of patients experienced a >50% reduction in PI and P scores, respectively. Neither PI nor P scores significantly predicted time to relapse. P scores predicted a lower response rate to treatment with fluoxetine. The results of the present study suggest that there is a significant relationship between the presence of psychoticism in patients with nonpsychotic MDD, and the likelihood of overall depressive symptom improvement following a trial of monotherapy with fluoxetine. An increased burden of psychoticism in depressed subjects may confer poorer response to fluoxetine, but not increased risk of relapse among fluoxetine responders.

  7. Positive psychology interventions in people aged 50-79 years: long-term effects of placebo-controlled online interventions on well-being and depression.

    PubMed

    Proyer, René T; Gander, Fabian; Wellenzohn, Sara; Ruch, Willibald

    2014-01-01

    Various positive psychology interventions have been experimentally tested, but only few studies addressed the effects of such activities in participants aged 50 and above. We tested the impact of four self-administered positive psychology interventions in an online setting (i.e., gratitude visit, three good things, three funny things, and using signature strengths in a new way) on happiness and depressive symptoms in comparison with a placebo control exercise (i.e., early memories). A total of 163 females aged 50-79 tried the assigned interventions or the placebo control exercise for one week and completed measures on happiness and depressive symptoms at five times (pre- and post-test, 1, 3, and 6 months). Three out of the four interventions (i.e., gratitude visit, three good things, and using signature strengths in a new way) increased happiness, whereas two interventions (three funny things and using signature strengths in a new way) led to a reduction of depressive symptoms on at one post-measure. Positive psychology interventions yield similar results for people aged 50 and above as for younger people. The dissemination of such interventions via the Internet offers a valuable opportunity for older age groups as well.

  8. Usefulness of the QRS-T angle to improve long-term risk stratification of patients with acute myocardial infarction and depressed left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Virgós-Lamela, Alejandro; Bouzas-Cruz, Noelia; López-López, Andrea; Castiñeira-Busto, María; Fernández-Garda, Rita; García-Castelo, Alberto; Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; García-Acuña, José María; Abu-Assi, Emad; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-04-15

    In light of the low cost, the widespread availability of the electrocardiogram, and the increasing economic burden of the health-related problems, we aimed to analyze the prognostic value of automatic frontal QRS-T angle to predict mortality in patients with left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). About 467 consecutive patients discharged with diagnosis of AMI and with LV ejection fraction ≤40% were followed during 3.9 years (2.1 to 5.9). From them, 217 patients (47.5%) died. The frontal QRS-T angle was higher in patients who died (116.6±52.8 vs 77.9±55.1, respectively, p<0.001). The QRS-T angle value of 90° was the most accurate to predict all-cause cardiac death. After multivariate analysis, frontal QRS-T angle remained as an excellent predictor of all-cause and cardiac deaths, increasing the mortality 6% per each 10°. For the global mortality, the hazard ratio for a QRS-T angle>90° was 2.180 (1.558 to 3.050), and for the combined end point of cardiac death and appropriate implantable cardioverter defribrillator therapy, it was 2.385 (1.570 to 3.623). This independent predictive value was maintained even after adjusting by bundle brunch block, ST-elevation AMI, and its localization. In conclusion, a wide automatic frontal QRS-T angle (>90°) is a good discriminator of long-term mortality in patients with LV systolic dysfunction after an AMI. The ability to easily measure it from a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram together with its prognostic value makes the frontal QRS-T angle an attractive tool to help clinicians to improve risk stratification of those patients.

  9. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Plitnick, Barbara A; Lok, Anna; Jones, Geoffrey E; Higgins, Patricia; Hornick, Thomas R; Rea, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Background Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. Methods The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level “bluish-white” lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light–dark and rest–activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest–activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. Results The lighting intervention significantly (P<0.05) decreased global sleep scores from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The lighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light–dark and rest–activity patterns, suggesting an increase in circadian entrainment. The lighting intervention significantly (P<0.05) reduced depression scores from the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia and agitation scores from the Cohen–Mansfield Agitation Inventory. Conclusion A lighting intervention, tailored to increase daytime circadian stimulation, can be used to increase sleep quality and improve behavior in patients with ADRD. The present field study, while

  10. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Plitnick, Barbara A; Lok, Anna; Jones, Geoffrey E; Higgins, Patricia; Hornick, Thomas R; Rea, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD), with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level "bluish-white" lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light-dark and rest-activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest-activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. The lighting intervention significantly (P<0.05) decreased global sleep scores from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The lighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light-dark and rest-activity patterns, suggesting an increase in circadian entrainment. The lighting intervention significantly (P<0.05) reduced depression scores from the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia and agitation scores from the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. A lighting intervention, tailored to increase daytime circadian stimulation, can be used to increase sleep quality and improve behavior in patients with ADRD. The present field study, while promising for application, should be replicated using a

  11. Case presentation: long-term treatment.

    PubMed

    Glucksman, Myron L

    2013-01-01

    The long-term (14 years) psychodynamic psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy of a depressed, suicidal, self-mutilating female patient is described. Her diagnoses included Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, and Recurrent Major Depression. Treatment was punctuated with repeated hospitalizations for self-mutilation (cutting) and suicidal ideation. A major determinant for her psychopathology was sexual abuse by her father from ages 6 to 14. This resulted in feelings of guilt and rage that she repressed and acted out through self-mutilating and suicidal behavior. A prolonged negative transference gradually became ambivalent, then positive. This was associated with her internalization of the healing qualities of the therapeutic relationship. She also gained insight into the reasons for her need to punish herself. Her initial self-representation as unworthy and bad was transformed into perceiving herself as a worthwhile, loving person. This case illustrates the role of long-term treatment for a complex, life-threatening, psychiatric disorder.

  12. Speech signal recognition with the homotopic representation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, F.; Pocci, P.; Prina-Ricotti, L.

    1981-02-01

    Speech recognition by a computer, using homotopic representation, is introduced, including the algorithm and the processing mode for the speech signal, the result of a vowel recognition experiment, and the result of a phonetic transcription experiment with simple words composed of four phonemes. The signal is stored in a delay line of M elements and N = M + 1 outputs. Homotopic defines a pair of outputs symmetrical to the exit located in the central element of the delay line. When the products of sample homotopic outputs of the first sequence of pair sampling are found, they are separately summed to the products of the following processing. This procedure is repeated continuously so that at every instant the transform function is the result of the last processing and the weighted sum of the previous result. In tests a female /o/ is recognized as /a/. Of 320 test phonemes, 15 are mistaken and 7 are dubious.

  13. Long-term environmental stewardship.

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Michael David

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this Supplemental Information Source Document is to effectively describe Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). More specifically, this document describes the LTES and Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Programs, distinguishes between the LTES and LTS Programs, and summarizes the current status of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project.

  14. Long-term urethral catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bruce; Dickens, Nicola

    This article discusses long-term urethral catheterisation, focusing on the relevant anatomy and physiology, indications for the procedure, catheter selection and catheter care. It is important that nurses have a good working knowledge of long-term catheterisation as the need for this intervention will increase with the rise in chronic health conditions and the ageing population.

  15. The Long-Term Effects of Maternal Postnatal Depression on a Child's Intelligence Quotient: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies Based on 974 Cases.

    PubMed

    Sui, Guoyuan; Pan, Bochen; Liu, Guangcong; Liu, Guangying; Wang, Lie

    2016-11-01

    Epidemiologists have explored the relationship between maternal postnatal depression (PND) and the intelligence quotient (IQ) of the resulting offspring, but the results remain inconclusive. This study aims to analyze the literature regarding the association between maternal PND and a child's IQ. A search of articles in PubMed, Web of Science, and MEDLINE databases from inception to September 2015 was conducted and supplemented by a manual search of relevant reference lists. The following search terms were used: (postpartum OR postnatal OR puerperal) AND (depression OR depressive symptoms OR blues OR dysthymia OR disorders OR psychosis) AND (intelligence quotient OR IQ OR intelligence tests OR intelligence OR cognitive OR cognition) AND (children OR child OR adolescent OR offspring) AND (cohort OR prospective OR follow-up OR follow OR longitudinal). Articles exploring the association between maternal PND and IQ of offspring aged 2 years and older were included. A total of 510 records were retrieved. Two authors independently selected eligible studies and extracted data. Three authors assessed the quality of the studies. To explore the associations between maternal PND and full IQ and verbal IQ, random-effects meta-analyses were performed, followed by subgroup analysis of impact on full IQ. Nine articles were eligible for review. On the basis of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, 7 studies were considered to be of high quality. When one study of participants aged 3.8 years was excluded from the meta-analysis, the pooled weighted mean difference of full IQ between the children of PND mothers and non-PND mothers was -4.086 (95% CI, -6.578 to -1.594), and the pooled standard mean difference of verbal IQ between the children of PND mothers and non-PND mothers was -0.361 (95% CI, -0.564 to -0.158). Subgroup analysis showed that the child's age at evaluation, diagnostic method of PND, study quality, and socioeconomic status did not affect the mean difference in full IQ between

  16. Long term therapy of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Rouillon, Frédéric

    2004-04-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common (lifetime prevalence: 5.1%), recurrent condition, which often heralds other psychiatric disorders, notably depression. As by definition it is a disorder progressing over months, treatment should be designed on a long term basis. And yet, few studies have been conducted beyond the classical 6-8 weeks characterizing the acute treatment phase. This is especially true of anxiolytics, but also of antidepressants, with the exception of paroxetine and venlafaxine, which are the only drugs approved in this indication in Western countries. The efficacy of psychotherapy, notably relaxation and cognitive-behavioral therapy, is established in the treatment of GAD, but its preferred indications and possible combination with antidepressants are still to be specified. Long term, not to say very long term studies of GAD, as well as depression, will still be required in the future to improve its management and specify therapeutic modalities (combination treatment, optimal duration, continuous or intermittent therapy, choice of psychotherapeutic techniques or agents, em leader ). Early and adequately prolonged treatment should not only result in more numerous remission periods, but also in decreased frequency of co-morbidities whether depressive, addictive, or of another nature, and should also reduce the social impact of GAD.

  17. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  18. Extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1-dependent metabotropic glutamate receptor 5-induced long-term depression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis is disrupted by cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Grueter, Brad A; Gosnell, Heather B; Olsen, Christopher M; Schramm-Sapyta, Nicole L; Nekrasova, Tanya; Landreth, Gary E; Winder, Danny G

    2006-03-22

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is a key component of the CNS stress and reward circuit. Synaptic plasticity in this region could in part underlie the persistent behavioral alterations in generalized anxiety and addiction. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) have been implicated in stress, addiction, and synaptic plasticity, but their roles in the BNST are unknown. We find that activation of group I mGluRs in the dorsal BNST induces depression of excitatory synaptic transmission through two distinct mechanisms. First, a combined activation of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 and mGluR5) induces a transient depression that is cannabinoid 1 receptor dependent. Second, as with endocannabinoid-independent group I mGluR long-term depression (LTD) in the adult hippocampus, we find that activation of mGluR5 induces an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent LTD. Surprisingly, our data demonstrate that this LTD requires the ERK1 rather than ERK2 isoform, establishing a key role for this isoform in the CNS. Finally, we find that this LTD is dramatically reduced after multiple exposures but not a single exposure to cocaine, suggesting a role for this form of plasticity in the actions of psychostimulants on anxiety and reward circuitries and their emergent control of animal behavior.

  19. Prediction of Long-Term Treatment Response to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Using Scalp and Source Loudness Dependence of Auditory Evoked Potentials (LDAEP) Analysis in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bun-Hee; Park, Young-Min; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Shim, Miseon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) is inversely related to central serotonergic activity, with a high LDAEP reflecting weak serotonergic neurotransmission and vice versa, though the findings in humans have been less consistent. In addition, a high pretreatment LDAEP appears to predict a favorable response to antidepressant treatments that augment the actions of serotonin. The aim of this study was to test whether the baseline LDAEP is correlated with response to long-term maintenance treatment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: Scalp N1, P2 and N1/P2 LDAEP and standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography-localized N1, P2, and N1/P2 LDAEP were evaluated in 41 MDD patients before and after they received antidepressant treatment (escitalopram (n = 32, 10.0 ± 4.0 mg/day), sertraline (n = 7, 78.6 ± 26.7 mg/day), and paroxetine controlled-release formulation (n = 2, 18.8 ± 8.8 mg/day)) for more than 12 weeks. A treatment response was defined as a reduction in the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score of >50% between baseline and follow-up. Results: The responders had higher baseline scalp P2 and N1/P2 LDAEP than nonresponders (p = 0.017; p = 0.036). In addition, changes in total BDI score between baseline and follow-up were larger in subjects with a high baseline N1/P2 LDAEP than those with a low baseline N1/P2 LDAEP (p = 0.009). There were significantly more responders in the high-LDAEP group than in the low-LDAEP group (p = 0.041). Conclusions: The findings of this study reveal that a high baseline LDAEP is associated with a clinical response to long-term antidepressant treatment. PMID:25794285

  20. Re-experiencing phenomena following a disaster: The long-term predictive role of intrusion symptoms in the development of post-trauma depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lawrence-Wood, Ellie; Van Hooff, Miranda; Baur, Jenelle; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2016-01-15

    Contention in the literature regarding the diagnostic utility of intrusion symptoms highlights that they have high sensitivity but low specificity in predicting PTSD. They are highly prevalent following a range of traumatic events, and across a range of disorders. The prevalence of intrusion symptoms in the absence of PTSD suggests their relevance to the development of other psychopathology. Therefore, the predictive role of intrusion symptoms for other post-trauma psychopathology was examined using data from an epidemiological, longitudinal sample of adults recruited in childhood. From 5 phases of data collection for this sample, these analyses focused on the 20 year and 28 year follow-ups (n=583). Lifetime exposure to trauma was assessed using a modified set of 10 Criterion-A events from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), with PTSD assessed in reference to a self-nominated worst lifetime event, and other DSM-IV disorder also assessed using the CIDI. Results showed that the presence of intrusion symptoms without PTSD at the 20 year follow-up was predictive of increased risk at 28 years for depressive but not anxiety disorders. There was limited psychopathology in the sample, reducing the power to examine many individual disorders. Furthermore, trauma history and psychiatric symptoms were retrospectively reported, introducing the possibility of recall bias. Together the findings suggest that intrusion symptoms may play an aetiological role in the development and/or maintenance of disorders other than PTSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Emotional distress in 652 Dutch very long-term survivors of childhood cancer, using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS).

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Ivana M M; van Dorp, Wendy; Hop, Wim C J; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; de Vries, Andrica C H; Pieters, Rob; Aarsen, Femke K; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2013-10-01

    After a more successful treatment of pediatric cancer, the number of childhood cancer survivors is progressively increasing. Consequently, awareness of psychological late sequelae is important. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used as a screening tool for emotional distress in a single center cohort of 652 childhood cancer survivors (median age 23 y [range, 15 to 46 y], median follow-up time 15 y [range, 5 to 42 y]). Results were compared with a control group of 440 Dutch subjects. A higher HADS score linearly reflect a higher level of emotional distress, and a score ≥15 is indicative of clinically significant emotional distress. Mean HADS score of the childhood cancer survivors was not different from the control group (P=0.38). Survivors exposed to global central nervous system (CNS) irradiation had a significantly higher HADS score than the control group (8.3±6.6; P=0.05) as well as other survivors (P=0.01). Forty-three survivors (7%) had a HADS score ≥15. Survivors with a HADS score ≥15 were variously spread over the diagnostic-related and treatment-related subgroups. Linear regression analysis showed that high educational achievement (β=-1.28; P<0.01) and age at the time of the study (β=0.08; P=0.03) were both significantly associated with the HADS score. Emotional distress does not occur more often in childhood cancer survivors than in the normal population. No disease-related or treatment-related variable was independently associated with emotional distress.

  2. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of venlafaxine extended release and a long-term extension study for patients with major depressive disorder in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kamijima, Kunitoshi; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Asami, Yuko; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko; Imaeda, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess antidepressant efficacy and safety of venlafaxine extended release in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). We carried out a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized study using fixed (75 mg/day) and flexible (75–225 mg/day, most patients attained to 225 mg/day) doses, followed by the long-term, open-labeled, extension study. Outpatients aged at least 20 years diagnosed with MDD were included. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17) score at week 8; secondary efficacy measures included the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology self-report version, HAM-D6, and Clinical Global Impression scales in the double-blinded study. Overall, 538 patients were randomized; significant differences were observed in the primary efficacy variable in the fixed-dose group (−10.76; P=0.031), but not in the flexible-dose (−10.37; P=0.106) group compared with placebo (−9.25). However, the flexible-dose group showed significant efficacy in several secondary measures. Treatment-related adverse events in the treatment period were 51.7 and 67.8% in the fixed-dose and flexible-dose groups, respectively, versus 38.8% with placebo. Throughout the study period, no Japanese-specific adverse events were observed. Thus, venlafaxine extended release was efficacious and safe for MDD treatment in Japan. PMID:26513202

  3. Long-Term, Open-Label, Safety Study of Edivoxetine 12 to 18 mg Once Daily as Adjunctive Treatment for Patients With Major Depressive Disorder Who Are Partial Responders to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ball, Susan G; Atkinson, Sarah; Sparks, JonDavid; Bangs, Mark; Goldberger, Celine; Dubé, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy of adjunctive edivoxetine hydrochloride (hereafter edivoxetine), a highly selective and potent norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was assessed in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) experiencing partial response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. Data are from a multicenter, 54-week, open-label trial of adjunctive edivoxetine 12 to 18 mg once daily in patients with MDD who had experienced partial response by history to 6 or more weeks of current selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy and who had a 17-item GRID Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total score 16 or higher at study entry. Safety measures included discontinuation rate, treatment-emergent adverse events, serious adverse events, and vital signs. Efficacy measures included the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Of 608 patients, 328 (54%) completed the open-label adjunctive treatment. Study discontinuation due to adverse events occurred in 17.0%, and there were 13 serious adverse events (1 death). Treatment-emergent adverse events 5% or higher were nausea, hyperhidrosis, constipation, headache, dry mouth, dizziness, vomiting, insomnia, and upper respiratory tract infection. Mean increases were observed in systolic blood pressure (range, 0.0-2.3 mm Hg), diastolic blood pressure (range, 1.9-3.3 mm Hg), and pulse (range, 5.9-8.4 beats per minute). Mean improvements on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (-17.0) were observed from baseline to week 54. The safety profile from this study provides an overview of outcomes associated with edivoxetine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition as an adjunctive treatment in patients with MDD who were treated up to 1 year.

  4. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of venlafaxine extended release and a long-term extension study for patients with major depressive disorder in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kamijima, Kunitoshi; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Itamura, Rio; Asami, Yuko; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko; Imaeda, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess antidepressant efficacy and safety of venlafaxine extended release in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). We carried out a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized study using fixed (75 mg/day) and flexible (75-225 mg/day, most patients attained to 225 mg/day) doses, followed by the long-term, open-labeled, extension study. Outpatients aged at least 20 years diagnosed with MDD were included. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17) score at week 8; secondary efficacy measures included the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology self-report version, HAM-D6, and Clinical Global Impression scales in the double-blinded study. Overall, 538 patients were randomized; significant differences were observed in the primary efficacy variable in the fixed-dose group (-10.76; P=0.031), but not in the flexible-dose (-10.37; P=0.106) group compared with placebo (-9.25). However, the flexible-dose group showed significant efficacy in several secondary measures. Treatment-related adverse events in the treatment period were 51.7 and 67.8% in the fixed-dose and flexible-dose groups, respectively, versus 38.8% with placebo. Throughout the study period, no Japanese-specific adverse events were observed. Thus, venlafaxine extended release was efficacious and safe for MDD treatment in Japan.

  5. AICHA: An atlas of intrinsic connectivity of homotopic areas.

    PubMed

    Joliot, Marc; Jobard, Gaël; Naveau, Mikaël; Delcroix, Nicolas; Petit, Laurent; Zago, Laure; Crivello, Fabrice; Mellet, Emmanuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie

    2015-10-30

    Atlases of brain anatomical ROIs are widely used for functional MRI data analysis. Recently, it was proposed that an atlas of ROIs derived from a functional brain parcellation could be advantageous, in particular for understanding how different regions share information. However, functional atlases so far proposed do not account for a crucial aspect of cerebral organization, namely homotopy, i.e. that each region in one hemisphere has a homologue in the other hemisphere. We present AICHA (for Atlas of Intrinsic Connectivity of Homotopic Areas), a functional brain ROIs atlas based on resting-state fMRI data acquired in 281 individuals. AICHA ROIs cover the whole cerebrum, each having 1-homogeneity of its constituting voxels intrinsic activity, and 2-a unique homotopic contralateral counterpart with which it has maximal intrinsic connectivity. AICHA was built in 4 steps: (1) estimation of resting-state networks (RSNs) using individual resting-state fMRI independent components, (2) k-means clustering of voxel-wise group level profiles of connectivity, (3) homotopic regional grouping based on maximal inter-hemispheric functional correlation, and (4) ROI labeling. AICHA includes 192 homotopic region pairs (122 gyral, 50 sulcal, and 20 gray nuclei). As an application, we report inter-hemispheric (homotopic and heterotopic) and intra-hemispheric connectivity patterns at different sparsities. ROI functional homogeneity was higher for AICHA than for anatomical ROI atlases, but slightly lower than for another functional ROI atlas not accounting for homotopy. AICHA is ideally suited for intrinsic/effective connectivity analyses, as well as for investigating brain hemispheric specialization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Capsaicin-sensitive C- and A-fibre nociceptors control long-term potentiation-like pain amplification in humans.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Florian; Magerl, Walter; Klein, Thomas; Greffrath, Wolfgang; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2015-09-01

    Long-term potentiation in the spinal dorsal horn requires peptidergic C-fibre activation in animals. Perceptual correlates of long-term potentiation following high-frequency electrical stimulation in humans include increased sensitivity to electrical stimuli at the high frequency stimulation site (homotopic pain-long-term potentiation) and increased sensitivity to pinprick surrounding the high frequency stimulation site (heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation, equivalent to secondary hyperalgaesia). To characterize the peripheral fibre populations involved in induction of pain-long-term potentiation, we performed two selective nerve block experiments in 30 healthy male volunteers. Functional blockade of TRPV1-positive nociceptors by high-concentration capsaicin (verified by loss of heat pain) significantly reduced pain ratings to high frequency stimulation by 47% (P < 0.001), homotopic pain-long-term potentiation by 71% (P < 0.01), heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation by 92% (P < 0.001) and the area of secondary hyperalgesia by 76% (P < 0.001). The selective blockade of A-fibre conduction by nerve compression (verified by loss of first pain to pinprick) significantly reduced pain ratings to high frequency stimulation by 37% (P < 0.01), but not homotopic pain-long-term potentiation (-5%). It had a marginal effect on heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation (-35%, P = 0.059), while the area of secondary hyperalgesia remained unchanged (-2%, P = 0.88). In conclusion, all nociceptor subclasses contribute to high frequency stimulation-induced pain (with a relative contribution of C > Aδ fibres, and an equal contribution of TRPV1-positive and TRPV1-negative fibres). TRPV1-positive C-fibres are the main inducers of both homotopic and heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation. TRPV1-positive A-fibres contribute substantially to the induction of heterotopic pain-long-term potentiation. TRPV1-negative C-fibres induce a component of homotopic self-facilitation but not

  7. Depression, anxiety and self-care behaviours of young adults with Type 2 diabetes: results from the International Diabetes Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success (MILES) Study.

    PubMed

    Browne, J L; Nefs, G; Pouwer, F; Speight, J

    2015-01-01

    Young adults with Type 2 diabetes have higher physical morbidity and mortality than other diabetes sub-groups, but differences in psychosocial outcomes have not yet been investigated. We sought to compare depression and anxiety symptoms and self-care behaviours of young adults with Type 2 diabetes with two matched control groups. Using cross-sectional survey data from the Australian and Dutch Diabetes Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success (MILES) studies, we matched 93 young adults (aged 18-39 years) with Type 2 diabetes (case group) with: (i) 93 older adults ( ≥ 40 years) with Type 2 diabetes (Type 2 diabetes control group; matched on country, gender, education, diabetes duration and insulin use) and (ii) 93 young adults with Type 1 diabetes (Type 1 diabetes control group; matched on country, gender, age and education). Groups were compared with regard to depression symptoms (nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire), anxiety symptoms (seven-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder questionnaire) and frequency of selected self-care behaviours (single item per behaviour). Participants in the case group had higher depression scores (Cohen's d = 0.40) and were more likely to have clinically meaningful depressive symptoms (Cramer's V = 0.23) than those in the Type 2 diabetes control group. Participants in the case group had statistically equivalent depression scores to the Type 1 diabetes control group. The groups did not differ in anxiety scores. Those in the case group were less likely than both control groups to take insulin as recommended (Cramer's V = 0.24-0.34), but there were no significant differences between the groups in oral medication-taking. The case group were less likely than the Type 2 diabetes control group to eat healthily (Cramer's V = 0.16), and less likely than the Type 1 diabetes control group to be physically active (Cramer's V = 0.15). Our results suggest that Type 2 diabetes is as challenging as Type 1 diabetes for young adults

  8. Long-term prophylaxis in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew J; Goodwin, Guy M

    2006-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a major cause of disability, and the prevention of relapse is a key management goal. Pharmacological interventions, effectively delivered through enhanced clinical care, are central to long-term management. This article summarises the available evidence for a range of pharmacological options, and provides guidance on common issues in clinical management in line with current practice guidelines. The use of medications for long-term prophylaxis should be considered in all patients meeting criteria for bipolar I disorder. Increasing high-quality evidence from randomised trials informs management decisions relating to both novel agents, such as lamotrigine and olanzapine, and longer-established therapies, such as lithium and valproate, in monotherapy. Medications taken long-term in bipolar disorder differ in the extent to which they protect against manic and depressive relapse. Consequently, the emerging challenge is to understand how combination treatments can enhance efficacy and effectiveness based on data from controlled trials rather than random polypharmacy. Clinical care can be enhanced with effective education about the illness, and the use of strategies to improve treatment adherence and the recognition and management of stressors or prodromal symptoms. Where available, a range of specific psychological interventions can be effective as an adjunct to medication. When discontinuation of prophylaxis is necessary, gradual tapering of dose over weeks or months is recommended.

  9. Long-term parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ladefoged, Karin; Jarnum, Stig

    1978-01-01

    Nineteen patients (11 women and eight men) aged 20-68 received long-term parenteral nutrition, mostly at home, for six to 63 months (mean 19 months). Indications for LTPN were extensive, active Crohn's disease in three patients, intestinocutaneous fistulas in three, and short-bowel syndrome in the remaining 13 patients. Subclavian or intra-atrial (Broviac) catheters were most commonly used, for which the average life was four and seven months respectively. Complications of long-term parenteral nutrition included pneumothorax in four out of 48 subclavian vein punctures. Catheter-induced thrombosis of central veins was shown by phlebography 17 times in nine patients, and eight episodes of total occlusion occurred. Two of these patients had pulmonary infarction. Nineteen episodes of catheter sepsis occurred in 11 patients, but only one was fatal. Complications related to intestinal disease included intra-abdominal abscesses and intestinal fistulas, and disturbances of liver function. Five patients died, though in only two was death related to long-term parenteral nutrition. One of these patients died from catheter sepsis, the other had subdural haematoma possibly caused by anticoagulant treatment. Eight of the 14 surviving patients still needed parenteral nutrition. All received a disability pension, but six had an acceptable quality of life with almost normal social activities. Despite problems such as difficulties in maintaining standardised infusion programmes, it was concluded that long-term parenteral nutrition at home is practicable and consistent with an acceptable quality of life. ImagesFIG 2 PMID:98199

  10. Long-term data archiving

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2009-01-01

    Long term data archiving has much value for chemists, not only to retain access to research and product development records, but also to enable new developments and new discoveries. There are some recent regulatory requirements (e.g., FDA 21 CFR Part 11), but good science and good business both benefit regardless. A particular example of the benefits of and need for long term data archiving is the management of data from spectroscopic laboratory instruments. The sheer amount of spectroscopic data is increasing at a scary rate, and the pressures to archive come from the expense to create the data (or recreate it if it is lost) as well as its high information content. The goal of long-term data archiving is to save and organize instrument data files as well as any needed meta data (such as sample ID, LIMS information, operator, date, time, instrument conditions, sample type, excitation details, environmental parameters, etc.). This editorial explores the issues involved in long-term data archiving using the example of Raman spectral databases. There are at present several such databases, including common data format libraries and proprietary libraries. However, such databases and libraries should ultimately satisfy stringent criteria for long term data archiving, including readability for long times into the future, robustness to changes in computer hardware and operating systems, and use of public domain data formats. The latter criterion implies the data format should be platform independent and the tools to create the data format should be easily and publicly obtainable or developable. Several examples of attempts at spectral libraries exist, such as the ASTM ANDI format, and the JCAMP-DX format. On the other hand, proprietary library spectra can be exchanged and manipulated using proprietary tools. As the above examples have deficiencies according to the three long term data archiving criteria, Extensible Markup Language (XML; a product of the World Wide Web

  11. Novel agonists for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors reverse metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression in the hippocampus of wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, a model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lara; Sardone, Lara M.; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Ciranna, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and modulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons. We have previously shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate glutamate-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. In particular, we have shown that activation of 5-HT7 receptors reversed metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD) in wild-type (wt) and in Fmr1 KO mice, a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome in which mGluR-LTD is abnormally enhanced, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptor agonists might be envisaged as a novel therapeutic strategy for Fragile X Syndrome. In this perspective, we have characterized the basic in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of novel molecules with high binding affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and we have tested their effects on synaptic plasticity using patch clamp on acute hippocampal slices. Here we show that LP-211, a high affinity selective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors, reverses mGluR-LTD in wt and Fmr1 KO mice, correcting a synaptic malfunction in the mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. Among novel putative agonists of 5-HT7 receptors, the compound BA-10 displayed improved affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and improved in vitro pharmacokinetic properties with respect to LP-211. BA-10 significantly reversed mGluR-LTD in the CA3-CA1 synapse in wt and Fmr1KO mice, indicating that BA-10 behaved as a highly effective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors and reduced exaggerated mGluR-LTD in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. On the other side, the compounds RA-7 and PM-20, respectively arising from in vivo metabolism of LP-211 and BA-10, had no effect on mGluR-LTD thus did not behave as agonists of 5-HT7 receptors in our conditions. The present results provide information about the structure-activity relationship of novel 5-HT7 receptor agonists and indicate that LP-211 and BA-10 might be used as novel pharmacological tools for the therapy of Fragile X Syndrome

  12. Novel agonists for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors reverse metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression in the hippocampus of wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, a model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lara; Sardone, Lara M; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Ciranna, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and modulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons. We have previously shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate glutamate-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. In particular, we have shown that activation of 5-HT7 receptors reversed metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD) in wild-type (wt) and in Fmr1 KO mice, a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome in which mGluR-LTD is abnormally enhanced, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptor agonists might be envisaged as a novel therapeutic strategy for Fragile X Syndrome. In this perspective, we have characterized the basic in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of novel molecules with high binding affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and we have tested their effects on synaptic plasticity using patch clamp on acute hippocampal slices. Here we show that LP-211, a high affinity selective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors, reverses mGluR-LTD in wt and Fmr1 KO mice, correcting a synaptic malfunction in the mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. Among novel putative agonists of 5-HT7 receptors, the compound BA-10 displayed improved affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and improved in vitro pharmacokinetic properties with respect to LP-211. BA-10 significantly reversed mGluR-LTD in the CA3-CA1 synapse in wt and Fmr1KO mice, indicating that BA-10 behaved as a highly effective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors and reduced exaggerated mGluR-LTD in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. On the other side, the compounds RA-7 and PM-20, respectively arising from in vivo metabolism of LP-211 and BA-10, had no effect on mGluR-LTD thus did not behave as agonists of 5-HT7 receptors in our conditions. The present results provide information about the structure-activity relationship of novel 5-HT7 receptor agonists and indicate that LP-211 and BA-10 might be used as novel pharmacological tools for the therapy of Fragile X Syndrome.

  13. Slice orientation and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation determine the involvement of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit GluN2B in hippocampal area CA1 long-term depression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The contribution of different GluN2 subunits of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to the induction of bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity is a controversial topic. As both supporting and refuting evidence for the hypothesis of subunit specialization in opposing directions of plasticity has accumulated since it was first proposed a few years ago, we hypothesize that differences in experimental conditions may have in part contributed to some of the inconsistent results from these studies. Here we investigate the controversial hypothesis that long-term depression (LTD) is preferentially induced by GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in area CA1 of hippocampal slices. Results We find that brain slices from 2-3 week old rats prepared in the sagittal orientation have GluN2B-independent LTD whereas slices prepared in the coronal orientation have GluN2B-dependent LTD. There was no difference between the orientations in the fraction of the NMDAR EPSC sensitive to a GluN2B-selective antagonist, leading us to believe that the intracellular signaling properties of the NMDARs were different in the two preparations. Coronal slices had greater association of LTD-related intracellular signaling protein RasGRF1 with GluN2B relative to sagittal slices. Antagonism of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in the sagittal slices returned LTD to a GluN2B-dependent form and increased the association of GluN2B with RasGRF1. Conclusions These results suggest a novel form of NMDAR modulation by mAChRs and clarify some disagreement in the literature. PMID:22082088

  14. Long-term oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Kent L; Porte, Phillip

    2011-02-01

    This article provides an overview of the status of long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT). In the United States, payment cutbacks are occurring as a result of congressionally mandated competitive bidding and capped rental programs. These Medicare programs are discussed. These legislative and regulatory changes may result in reduced patient access to appropriate oxygen-delivery systems that meet medical needs, including optimal ambulation. Prescribing LTOT is addressed in this article, as is the need for adequate patient education. The importance of appropriate monitoring and reassessment is presented. The use of an LTOT collaborative care model is discussed. Although the new intermittent flow oxygen-delivery systems have potential benefits, there is consensus that each patient should be tested on the specific device because of variability in delivery and patient response. Feasible locations for patient education and monitoring are identified.

  15. Suicidal Behavior in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osgood, Nancy J.; Brant, Barbara A.

    1990-01-01

    Surveyed administrators of 463 long-term care facilities concerning overt suicides and intentional life-threatening behaviors. Data revealed that White males were highest risk group. Refusal to eat, drink, or take medications were most common suicidal behaviors. Depression, loneliness, feelings of family rejection, and loss were significant…

  16. Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share Asthma Medicines: Long-term Control Page Content Article Body Corticosteroids Synthetic versions of ... form, they are used exclusively for long-term control; they are not very effective for acute symptoms. ...

  17. Consumer Direction in Long-Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Generations, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Issue includes 17 theme articles on long-term care, covering legal issues, federal role, state programs, demonstration programs, family caregivers, home health care, home care workers, culturally appropriate long-term care, financial support, and cognitive impairments. (SK)

  18. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  19. AB055. Long term NIV

    PubMed Central

    Siopi, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, non-invasive mechanical ventilation has evolved into one of the most evidence-based areas of respiratory medicine, with many indications in acute or chronic respiratory failure. From the first application of negative pressure models during poliomyelitis epidemics to the new sophisticated positive pressure models, and the development of the “intelligent ventilators”, there has been a long time course. Undoubtedly the spur was given by better understanding of respiratory physiology during sleep and the shift of healthcare towards a chronic base. Novel randomized controlled trials (RCTs) established the use of NIV in acute respiratory failure due to exacerbations of COPD, as well as acute pulmonary edema and weaning from invasive mechanical ventilation. Long-term NIV has been used in neuromuscular diseases for many decades, first in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and then spreading to other disorders of this category, increasing survival in inherited neuromuscular diseases. NIV should be initiated early in the course of the disease, when symptomatic nocturnal hypoventilation is detected. Combined with cough augmentation (physiotherapy, insufflation-exsufflation devices) and percutaneous gastrostomy feeding, it can delay tracheostomy and invasive ventilation. In ALS patients NIV improves the quality of life and increases survival, especially when there is no bulbar involvement. The right time to initiate ventilation in this group of patients is not well established since it is difficult to detect signs and symptom of respiratory impairment. Patients seem to benefit from an early application of NIV, and their personal decisions should always be considered before any intervention. In patients with chest wall disorders NIV—despite the fact that RCTs are lacking—has proved its value in many uncontrolled trials and numerous reports. It seems to improve the work of breathing, sleep architecture, nocturnal and daytime arterial blood gases. The

  20. Stapedectomy - long-term report.

    PubMed

    Shea, J J

    1982-01-01

    The long-term results with large fenestra stapedectomy with vein graft and Teflon piston are compared with results with the small fenestra stapedectomy with teflon piston directly into the vestibule. There were 1,943 operations in the former group and 2,155 in the latter when compared in 1970. One hundred consecutive patients from the beginning of each group with follow-up to present were compared. Results were generally the same with no great change in 15 and 20 years as compared to those at 5 years. The complication of perilymph fistula was caused by creating an opening in the footplate much larger than the prosthesis and was eliminated by interposing a living oval window seal if the opening was much larger than the prosthesis and a flap of lining membrane from the promontory when it was not. Other factors that influence a good result are discussed, including the type and the diameter of the piston used, the type of living oval window seal and the method of attachment to the incus. The small fenestra operation was found to be superior to the large, not only for the hearing gain achieved, but the case of performance and the freedom from complications due to migration of the prosthesis and/or the oval window seal. At present we have done about all that can be done for the conductive components. What remains is the sensorineural component which our studies indicate may be due to an autoimmune response.

  1. Long-term corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.

    1998-05-29

    The scope of this activity is to assess the long-term corrosion properties of metallic materials under consideration for fabricating waste package containers. Three classes of metals are to be assessed: corrosion resistant, intermediate corrosion resistant, and corrosion allowance. Corrosion properties to be evaluated are general, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, and galvanic corrosion. The performance of these materials will be investigated under conditions that are considered relevant to the potential emplacement site. Testing in four aqueous solutions, and vapor phases above them, and at two temperatures are planned for this activity. (The environmental conditions, test metals, and matrix are described in detail in Section 3.0.) The purpose and objective of this activity is to obtain the kinetic and mechanistic information on degradation of metallic alloys currently being considered for waste package containers. This information will be used to provide assistance to (1) waste package design (metal barrier selection) (E-20-90 to E-20-92), (2) waste package performance assessment activities (SIP-PA-2), (3) model development (E-20-75 to E-20-89). and (4) repository license application.

  2. Long-Term Planning in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This report presents the concepts and issues discussed at a Regional Symposium on Long-term Planning in Higher Education held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, September 21-30, 1986. Chapter 1 explores some fundamental issues about the rationale for the objectives of long-term planning. It defines long-term planning in higher education, considers its…

  3. Long Term TOA - M Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-30

    A Long-Term TOA and Constrained Surface Radiation Budget Project A Long-Term TOA and Constrained Surface Readiation Budget Dataset Using Merged CERES, ... and apply the knowledge to existing data to develop long-term (nearly 30 years) consistent and calibrated data product (TOA irradiances ...

  4. Long-term solar-terrestrial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The results of an 18-month study of the requirements for long-term monitoring and archiving of solar-terrestrial data is presented. The value of long-term solar-terrestrial observations is discussed together with parameters, associated measurements, and observational problem areas in each of the solar-terrestrial links (the sun, the interplanetary medium, the magnetosphere, and the thermosphere-ionosphere). Some recommendations are offered for coordinated planning for long-term solar-terrestrial observations.

  5. Effects of acute electromagnetic fields exposure on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity during resting state.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bin; Shao, Qing; Chen, Zhiye; Ma, Lin; Wu, Tongning

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we aimed to investigate the possible effects of acute radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. We designed a controllable LTE-related EMF exposure environment at 2.573 GHz and performed the 30 min real/sham exposure experiments on human brain under the safety limits. The resting state fMRI signals were collected before and after EMF exposure. Then voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity method was utilized to evaluate the acute effects of LTE EMF exposure on the homotopic functional connectivity between two human hemispheres. Based on our previous research, we further demonstrated that the 30 min short-term LTE EMF exposure would modulate the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity in resting state around the medial frontal gyrus and the paracentral lobule during the real exposure.

  6. [Perspectives in long-term care insurance].

    PubMed

    Pick, P

    2007-03-01

    Twelve years after its introduction, long-term care insurance is back on the agenda and up for political reform. This paper shows why long-term care insurance needs to be reformed. The two central aspects on which reform projects focus are addressed: firstly, the structural improvement of nursing care and long-term care insurance and, secondly, the creation of a sustained financing. The principal conclusion is that, while there is a broad consensus about the structural improvement of long-term care insurance, opinions differ widely in the matter of its sustained financing. As a consequence, a coherent financing concept has yet to emerge.

  7. New Mathematics of Information: Homotopical and Higher Categorical Foundations of Information and Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-13

    specialists in mathematics , logic, and computer science with diverse backgrounds rang- ing from homotopical algebra and category theory to theoretical and...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0227 New Mathematics of Information Homotopical Steven Awodey CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY Final Report 09/24/2014 DISTRIBUTION A...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 13-09-2014 FINAL 15 JUNE 2011 - 30 APR 2014 FINAL REPORT FOR AWARD: "NEW MATHEMATICS OF

  8. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web…

  9. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web…

  10. Long Term Preservation of Digital Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorie, Raymond A.

    The preservation of digital data for the long term presents a variety of challenges from technical to social and organizational. The technical challenge is to ensure that the information, generated today, can survive long term changes in storage media, devices, and data formats. This paper presents a novel approach to the problem. It distinguishes…

  11. Long-Term Nutrition: A Clinician's Guide to Successful Long-Term Enteral Access in Adults.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Matthew L; Mir, Fazia A; Boumitri, Christine; Palmer, Lena B; Evans, David C; Kiraly, Laszlo N; Nguyen, Douglas L

    2016-09-22

    Long-term nutrition support requires long-term enteral access. To ensure the success of long-term enteral access, many factors need to be taken into consideration. This article represents a guide to placing and maintaining access in patients requiring long-term nutrition and addresses many of the common questions regarding long-term enteral access, such as indications, types of access, feeding after access placed, and recognition and treatment of potential complications. This guide will help the clinician establish and maintain access to maximize nutrition in patients requiring long-term nutrition.

  12. Effect of climate fluctuation on long-term vegetation dynamics in Carolina bay wetlands

    Treesearch

    Chrissa Stroh; Diane De Steven; Glenn Guntenspergen

    2008-01-01

    Carolina bays and similar depression wetlands of the U. S. Southeastern Coastal Plain have hydrologic regimes that are driven primarily by rainfall. Therefore, climate fluctuations such as drought cycles have the potential to shape long-term vegetation dynamics. Models suggest two potential long-term responses to hydrologic fluctuations, either cyclic change...

  13. Long-term outcomes of major upper extremity replantations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wendy KY; Kaur, Manraj Nirmal; Thoma, Achilleas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term outcomes of major upper extremity replantations are infrequently reported. It is believed that replantation is indicated for amputations at all levels in children and for all distal amputations in adults. Replantations of arm or proximal forearm amputations in adults are controversial. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of major upper extremity replantations, defined as those that are transmetacarpal, through the wrist, forearm, elbow or arm. METHODS: A review of these types of replantations performed at the authors’ institution from 2002 to 2012 was conducted. Patients’ strength, range of motion and two-point discrimination were assessed. Patients completed the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), the Michigan Hand Questionnaire (MHQ), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS). RESULTS: Seventeen patients underwent major upper extremity replantation surgery. The majority (16 of 17 [94%]) of the included patients were male. Of 17 patients, 13 (76.5%) required reoperations. The mean (± SD) DASH score of seven patients who consented to completing all questionnaires was 75.4±14.2 of 100 (range 59.2 to 91.1). On the MHQ, the mean score for affected hand function was 16% compared with 84% in the unaffected hand. Patients generally demonstrated at least mild levels of anxiety and depression on the HADS. DISCUSSION: The results suggest that major upper extremity injuries and replantations have a significant impact on patients’ long-term hand function, and produce long-term anxiety and depressive symptoms. PMID:25152640

  14. Paying for long-term care.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, C L; Bodenheimer, T

    1994-01-01

    Everyone agrees that insurance for long-term care is inadequate in the United States. Disagreement exists, however, on whether such insurance should be provided through the private or public sector. Private insurance generally uses the experience-rating principle that persons with higher risk of illness are charged higher premiums. For private insurance for long-term care, this principle creates a dilemma. Most policies will be purchased by the elderly; yet, because the elderly have a high risk of needing long-term care, only about 20% of them can afford the cost of premiums. A public-private partnership by which the government partially subsidizes private long-term-care insurance is unlikely to resolve this dilemma. Only a social insurance program for long-term care can provide universal, affordable, and equitable coverage. PMID:8128712

  15. Suicides and Suicide Attempts during Long-Term Treatment with Antidepressants: A Meta-Analysis of 29 Placebo-Controlled Studies Including 6,934 Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Braun, Cora; Bschor, Tom; Franklin, Jeremy; Baethge, Christopher

    It is unclear whether antidepressants can prevent suicides or suicide attempts, particularly during long-term use. We carried out a comprehensive review of long-term studies of antidepressants (relapse prevention). Sources were obtained from 5 review articles and by searches of MEDLINE, PubMed Central and a hand search of bibliographies. We meta-analyzed placebo-controlled antidepressant RCTs of at least 3 months' duration and calculated suicide and suicide attempt incidence rates, incidence rate ratios and Peto odds ratios (ORs). Out of 807 studies screened 29 were included, covering 6,934 patients (5,529 patient-years). In total, 1.45 suicides and 2.76 suicide attempts per 1,000 patient-years were reported. Seven out of 8 suicides and 13 out of 14 suicide attempts occurred in antidepressant arms, resulting in incidence rate ratios of 5.03 (0.78-114.1; p = 0.102) for suicides and of 9.02 (1.58-193.6; p = 0.007) for suicide attempts. Peto ORs were 2.6 (0.6-11.2; nonsignificant) and 3.4 (1.1-11.0; p = 0.04), respectively. Dropouts due to unknown reasons were similar in the antidepressant and placebo arms (9.6 vs. 9.9%). The majority of suicides and suicide attempts originated from 1 study, accounting for a fifth of all patient-years in this meta-analysis. Leaving out this study resulted in a nonsignificant incidence rate ratio for suicide attempts of 3.83 (0.53-91.01). Therapists should be aware of the lack of proof from RCTs that antidepressants prevent suicides and suicide attempts. We cannot conclude with certainty whether antidepressants increase the risk for suicide or suicide attempts. Researchers must report all suicides and suicide attempts in RCTs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Hospital diversification into long-term care.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Fennell, M; Mor, V

    2001-01-01

    In the 1990s, acute care hospitals in the United States encountered an unstable operating environment created by a series of transformations in the health care delivery system and long-term-care market. Confronted with an array of economic pressures and demographic changes, hospitals were motivated to engage in long-term-care diversification, such as establishing a long-term-care unit or providing home health services, as a means of entering new markets and ensuring financial stability. This article examines the organizational, market, and community factors associated with this strategic activity among a national sample of urban and rural hospitals.

  17. Behavioral and systemic consequences of long-term inflammatory challenge.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christina W; Elfving, Betina; Lund, Sten; Wegener, Gregers

    2015-11-15

    Inflammatory reactions are involved in a diversity of diseases, including major depressive disorder. Cytokines act as intercellular signaling molecules and mediators of inflammation between the periphery and the brain. Within the brain, evidence from animal studies of acute inflammation has shown that elevated cytokine levels are linked to behavioral responses of sickness and depression-like behavior. Although chronic inflammation is more translational to human depression than acute studies, little is known on central cytokine expression and associated behavioral responses following chronic immune challenges. The present study assessed behavioral changes and a selection of cytokines in the brain and in the blood in rats randomized to receive a single or 8week administration with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 600μg/kg, i.p.) or saline. Acute and long-term LPS treatments caused similar sickness and depression-like behavior. Chronic LPS administration did not have an effect on blood cytokine levels, indicating endotoxin tolerance, whereas increased fasting blood glucose was observed, indicating insulin resistance, a metabolic consequence of chronic inflammation. While a single LPS injection produced a generalized cytokine response in the brain, long-term LPS administration produced a specific central cytokine response with increased interleukin (IL)-1β and interferon (IFN)-γ. These cytokines can explain the behavioral changes observed, and could indicate microglia activation, although future studies are needed to uncover this assumption. Taken together, although the behavioral outcome was similar between acute and chronic LPS administration, the central cytokine response was distinct. As the long-term LPS paradigm also posed a metabolic demand, this setting may reflect a more translational insight into inflammatory reactions in human depression, and could prove useful for assessing cytokine down-stream effects and experimental antidepressant drug products.

  18. Review of long-term results of stereotactic psychosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon-Chan; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Choi, Chang-Rak

    2002-09-01

    Stereotactic psychosurgery is an effective method for treating some medically intractable psychiatric illnesses. However, it is unfamiliar and the long-term clinical results have not been reported in Asia. The long-term results of psychosurgery are evaluated and the neuroanatomical basis is discussed. Twenty-one patients underwent stereotactic psychosurgery for medically intractable psychiatric illnesses since 1993. All were referred from psychiatrists for these disorders. Two patients showed aggressive behavior, 12 had obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and seven had depression with anxiety disorders. Bilateral amygdalotomy and subcaudate tractotomy were performed for aggressive behavior, limbic leucotomy was performed for OCD, and subcaudate tractotomy with or without cingulotomy was performed for depression with anxiety. OCD was evaluated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS), the visual analogue scale, the Clinical Global Impression Scale, and the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS). The Mini-Mental State Examination and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised were used for the evaluation of aggressive behavior. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) was used for evaluation of depression. Ventriculography was used in the first seven patients and magnetic resonance imaging-guided stereotaxy was used in the recent 14 cases for localization of the target. The lesions were made with a radiofrequency lesion generator. OAS scores in the two patients with aggressive behavior during follow up declined from 8 to 2 with clinical improvement. All 12 patients with OCD returned to their previous life and showed the mean YBOCS scores decreased from 34 to 3. Ten patients with OCD could be followed up (mean 45 months). All patients returned to their previous social life. In seven patients with depression with anxiety, HAMD scores declined from 28.5 to 16.5. There was no operative mortality and no significant morbidity except for one case of mild

  19. Long Term Effects of Food Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop chronic arthritis. Brain and nerve damage A Listeria infection can lead to meningitis, an inflammation of ... brain. If a newborn infant is infected with Listeria , long-term consequences may include mental retardation, seizures, ...

  20. Mental Health in Long Term Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Herbert

    1978-01-01

    There are many ways in which long-term care facilities attempt to cope with the mental health problems of the elderly. The author reviews five factors crucial to effective care for the aged in these facilities. (Author/RK)

  1. Roadmap to Long-Term Monitoring Optimization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This roadmap focuses on optimization of established long-term monitoring programs for groundwater. Tools and techniques discussed concentrate on methods for optimizing the monitoring frequency and spatial (three-dimensional) distribution of wells ...

  2. Long-term-care legal update.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1998-04-01

    As more nurses move from the acute care setting to long-term-care and home health care, different practice issues arise. To maximize liability protection, nurses must understand the legal issues unique to each delivery system.

  3. Evidence-based long term care design.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Margaret P

    2009-01-01

    Research on the impact of the built environment in long-term care settings continues to grow. This article focuses on work conducted and published since 2000, when an earlier review on research on dementia and design was published. The vast majority of research that addressed neurological conditions in residents in long-term care settings (assisted living and nursing homes) relates to Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

  4. Long Term Outcomes after Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Long term outcomes after liver transplantation are major determinants of quality of life and of the value of this heroic treatment. As short term outcomes are excellent, our community is turning to take a harder look at long term outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to review these outcomes, and highlight proposed treatments, as well as pressing topics needing to be studied. A systemic review of the English literature was carried in PubMed, covering all papers addressing long term outcomes in pediatric liver transplant from 2000-2013. Late outcomes after pediatric liver transplant affect the liver graft in the form of chronic liver dysfunction. The causes include rejection particularly humoral rejection, but also de novo autoimmune hepatitis, and recurrent disease. The metabolic syndrome is a major factor in long term cardiovascular complication risk. Secondary infections, kidney dysfunction and malignancy remain a reality of those patients. There is growing evidence of late cognitive and executive function delays affecting daily life productivity as well as likely adherence. Finally, despite a good health status, quality of life measures are comparable to those of children with chronic diseases. Long term outcomes are the new frontier in pediatric liver transplantation. Much is needed to improve graft survival, but also to avoid systemic morbidities from long term immunosuppression. Quality of life is a new inclusive measure that will require interventions and innovative approaches respectful not only on the patients but also of their social circle. PMID:24511516

  5. Occurrence of depressive tendency and associated social factors among elderly persons forced by the Great East Japan Earthquake and nuclear disaster to live as long-term evacuees: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yujiro; Iwasa, Hajime; Goto, Aya; Yoshida, Kazuki; Matsuda, Kumiko; Iwamitsu, Yumi; Yasumura, Seiji

    2017-09-03

    This study examined the incidence of depression and associated factors among elderly persons from Iitate village after the March 2011 earthquake. This was a prospective cohort study. As a baseline survey, in May 2010 a self-assessment Basic Checklist (BCL) was distributed to 1611 elderly villagers, of which 1277 responded. Of these respondents, 885 without a tendency to depression (69.3%) were given a follow-up survey in May 2013. The BCL was used to assess depression tendency, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), physical function, nutritional status, oral function, homeboundness, cognitive function and social activities. Univariate analysis was used to examine differences in risk between those with a presence of depression tendency (PDT) and those without (non-PDT) depending on demographic and BCL variables. Variables found to be significant were analysed by Poisson regression analysis. Of the 438 respondents in the second survey, 163 (37.2%) showed depression tendency. PDT risk was significantly increased by female gender, age, history of diabetes and cognitive disorder. It was significantly reduced by increased IADL. Engagement in social activities decreased PDT risk in rental accommodation. Renters faced a higher risk of PDT than persons evacuated in groups to purpose-built housing. The inclusion of social activities in the multivariate Poisson regression analysis weakened this effect. Female gender, a history of diabetes, reduced IADL and a tendency to cognitive disorder each independently affected PDT risk. These findings may inform future responses to earthquakes and the technical disasters that may accompany them. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Natural patterns of activity and long-term synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Ole; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2010-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission is traditionally elicited by massively synchronous, high-frequency inputs, which rarely occur naturally. Recent in vitro experiments have revealed that both LTP and long-term depression (LTD) can arise by appropriately pairing weak synaptic inputs with action potentials in the postsynaptic cell. This discovery has generated new insights into the conditions under which synaptic modification may occur in pyramidal neurons in vivo. First, it has been shown that the temporal order of the synaptic input and the postsynaptic spike within a narrow temporal window determines whether LTP or LTD is elicited, according to a temporally asymmetric Hebbian learning rule. Second, backpropagating action potentials are able to serve as a global signal for synaptic plasticity in a neuron compared with local associative interactions between synaptic inputs on dendrites. Third, a specific temporal pattern of activity — postsynaptic bursting — accompanies synaptic potentiation in adults. PMID:10753798

  7. No Evidence for Long-Term Causal Associations Between Symptoms of Premature Ejaculation and Symptoms of Anxiety, Depression, and Sexual Distress in a Large, Population-Based Longitudinal Sample.

    PubMed

    Ventus, Daniel; Gunst, Annika; Kärnä, Antti; Jern, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is one of the most common male sexual complaints, but its etiology is unclear. Psychological problems, such as symptoms of anxiety and depression, have traditionally been seen as causal or maintaining etiological components of PE, and previous cross-sectional studies have found weak positive associations between them. The aim of the present study was to test possible causal pathways over time between PE and symptoms of the psychological problems anxiety, depression, and sexual distress. A sample of 985 male Finnish twins and brothers of twins completed a questionnaire in 2006 and 2012. Significant bivariate correlations were found both within and across time between PE and the psychological problems. When fitting structural equation models to test hypothesized causal pathways, symptoms of anxiety and sexual distress at the first measurement time point did not predict future PE. Likewise, PE symptoms at the first measurement did not predict increments or decrements in anxiety, sexual distress, or depression later on. These null findings regarding hypothesized associations may partly be explained by the relatively long time between measurements, or that the measures possibly did not capture the aspects of anxiety that are related to PE.

  8. Long-term symptom relief after septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sundh, Carolina; Sunnergren, Ola

    2015-10-01

    The results for long-term symptom relief after septoplasty are contradictory in reviewed publications but the findings suggest that results are unsatisfactory. In this study, we analyzed and compared short- and long-term symptom relief after septoplasty and factors possibly associated with symptom relief. 111 patients that underwent septoplasty between 2008 and 2010 were included in the study. Medical charts were reviewed for preoperative characteristics and assessments. Data on short-term symptom relief (6 months) were retrieved from the Swedish National Quality Registry for Septoplasty; data on long-term symptom relief (34-70 months) were collected through a questionnaire. Upon the 34-70 month follow-up, 53% of the patients reported that symptoms either remained or had worsened and 83% reported nasal obstruction. Degree of symptom relief was significantly higher among patients not reporting nasal obstruction than among patients reporting nasal obstruction at long-term follow-up. The proportion of patients that reported "my symptoms are gone" declined from 53% after 6 months to 18% after 34-70 months. None of the factors taken into consideration, age at surgery, gender, follow-up time, primary operation/reoperation, history of nasal trauma, self-reported allergy, rhinometric obstruction, or same sided rhinometric, clinical and subjective nasal obstruction were associated with symptom relief. The long-term results after septoplasty are unsatisfactory. A majority of patients report that their symptoms remain after septoplasty.

  9. HOMAR: A computer code for generating homotopic grids using algebraic relations: User's manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moitra, Anutosh

    1989-07-01

    A computer code for fast automatic generation of quasi-three-dimensional grid systems for aerospace configurations is described. The code employs a homotopic method to algebraically generate two-dimensional grids in cross-sectional planes, which are stacked to produce a three-dimensional grid system. Implementation of the algebraic equivalents of the homotopic relations for generating body geometries and grids are explained. Procedures for controlling grid orthogonality and distortion are described. Test cases with description and specification of inputs are presented in detail. The FORTRAN computer program and notes on implementation and use are included.

  10. HOMAR: A computer code for generating homotopic grids using algebraic relations: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Anutosh

    1989-01-01

    A computer code for fast automatic generation of quasi-three-dimensional grid systems for aerospace configurations is described. The code employs a homotopic method to algebraically generate two-dimensional grids in cross-sectional planes, which are stacked to produce a three-dimensional grid system. Implementation of the algebraic equivalents of the homotopic relations for generating body geometries and grids are explained. Procedures for controlling grid orthogonality and distortion are described. Test cases with description and specification of inputs are presented in detail. The FORTRAN computer program and notes on implementation and use are included.

  11. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed. PMID:27678359

  12. Valuing a long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Mellen, C M

    1992-10-01

    The business valuation industry generally uses at least one of three basic approaches to value a long-term care facility: the cost approach, sales comparison approach, or income approach. The approach that is chosen and the resulting weight that is applied to it depend largely on the circumstances involved. Because a long-term care facility is a business enterprise, more weight usually is given to the income approach which factors into the estimate of value both the tangible and intangible assets of the facility.

  13. Keratoprosthesis: a long-term review.

    PubMed Central

    Barnham, J. J.; Roper-Hall, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    A keratoprosthesis (KP), is an artificial cornea which is inserted into an opacified cornea in an attempt to restore useful vision or, less commonly, to make the eye comfortable in painful keratopathy. Results o a retrospective study of 35 patients, with 55 KP insertions, are reviewed with regard to visual acuity, length of time vision is maintained, retention time, and complication. Overall there were a number of long-term real successes, eith retention of the KP and maintenance of improved vision in eyes not amenable to conventional treatment. Careful long-term follow-up was needed, with further surgical procedures often being necessary. Images PMID:6860613

  14. [Fetal pain: immediate and long term consequences].

    PubMed

    Houfflin Debarge, Véronique; Dutriez, Isabelle; Pusniak, Benoit; Delarue, Eléonore; Storme, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    Several situations are potentially painful for fetuses, such as malformations and invasive procedures. Nociceptive pathways are known to be functional at 26 weeks. Even if it is not possible to evaluate the fetal experience of pain, it is essential to examine its immediate and long-term consequences. As early as the beginning of the second trimester, hemodynamic and hormonal responses are observed following fetal nociceptive stimulation, In experimental studies, long-term changes have been noted in the corticotrop axis, subsequent responses to pain, and behavior after perinatal nociceptive stimulation.

  15. Nature-assisted rehabilitation for reactions to severe stress and/or depression in a rehabilitation garden: long-term follow-up including comparisons with a matched population-based reference cohort.

    PubMed

    Währborg, Peter; Petersson, Ingemar F; Grahn, Patrik

    2014-03-01

    To determine the effect of a nature-assisted rehabilitation programme in a group of patients with reactions to severe stress and/or mild to moderate depression. Changes in sick-leave status and healthcare consumption in these patients were compared with those in a matched population-based reference cohort (treatment as usual). Retrospective cohort study with a matched reference group from the general population. A total of 118 participants referred to a nature-assisted rehabilitation programme, and 678 controls recruited from the Skåne Health Care Register. For both groups, information on sick leave was extracted from the National Social Insurance Register and on healthcare consumption data from the Skåne Health Care Register. The interventional rehabilitation programme was designed as a multimodal programme involving professionals from horticulture and medicine. The programme was conducted in a rehabilitation garden, designed especially for this purpose. A significant reduction in healthcare consumption was noted among participants in the programme compared with the reference population. The main changes were a reduction in outpatient visits to primary healthcare and a reduction in inpatient psychiatric care. No significant difference in sick-leave status was found. A structured, nature-based rehabilitation programme for patients with reactions to severe stress and/or depression could be beneficial, as reflected in reduced healthcare consumption.

  16. Long-term and preventative treatment for seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Westrin, Asa; Lam, Raymond W

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent major depressive disorder with regular seasonal patterns, commonly known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD), has evoked substantial research in the last two decades. It is now recognised that SAD is a common condition with prevalence rates between 0.4% and 2.9% of the general population, and that patients with SAD experience significant morbidity and impairment in psychosocial function. There is good evidence that bright light therapy and antidepressant medications are effective for the short-term treatment of SAD; however, given that SAD is characterised by recurrent major depressive episodes, long-term and maintenance treatment must be considered. Unfortunately, there are few studies of longer term (>8 weeks) and maintenance (preventative) treatments for SAD. The weight of evidence suggests that light therapy usually needs to be continued daily throughout the winter season because of rapid relapse when light is stopped too early in the treatment period. However, some studies support the use of antidepressants to continue the response from a brief (1-2 weeks) course of light therapy early in the depressive episode, as soon as the first symptoms emerge in autumn. Only small studies have examined preventative treatment (before onset of symptoms) with light therapy, all of which have methodological limitations. The best evidence for preventative treatment in SAD comes from antidepressant studies. Three large, randomised, placebo-controlled studies have shown that preventative treatment with bupropion XL reduces the recurrence rate of depressive episodes in patients with SAD. Given the limitations in the evidence base and the inconsistent recurrence rate of winter depressive episodes, clinical recommendations for long-term and preventative treatment must individualise treatment choices and weigh potential benefits against possible adverse effects.

  17. The impact of chronic depression on acute and long-term outcomes in a randomized trial comparing selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor monotherapy versus each of 2 different antidepressant medication combinations.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sharon C; Haley, Charlotte L; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Fava, Maurizio; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Warden, Diane; Morris, David W; Kurian, Benji T; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Rush, A John

    2012-07-01

    To compare sociodemographic and clinical features, acute and continuation treatment outcomes, and adverse events/side effect burden between outpatients with chronic (current episode > 2 years) versus nonchronic major depressive disorder (MDD) who were treated with combination antidepressant therapy or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) monotherapy. 663 outpatients with chronic (n = 368) or nonchronic (n = 295) moderate to severe DSM-IV-TR MDD (17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score ≥ 16) were enrolled from March 2008 through September 2009 in a single-blind 7-month prospective randomized trial conducted at 6 primary and 9 psychiatric care sites across the United States. Participants were treated with escitalopram monotherapy plus placebo or 1 of 2 combination treatments (bupropion sustained-release [SR] + escitalopram or venlafaxine extended-release [XR] + mirtazapine). Analyses compared baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, rates of remission (at least 1 of the last 2 consecutive scores on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report [QIDS-SR16] < 6, with the other < 8), and adverse events/side effect burden (Frequency, Intensity, and Burden of Side Effects Ratings) obtained at 12 and 28 weeks. Participants with chronic MDD were at greater socioeconomic disadvantage and had greater medical and psychiatric disease burden. The chronic and nonchronic groups did not differ in rates of remission at 12 weeks (35.9% vs 42.0%, respectively; odds ratio [OR] = 0.778, P = .1500; adjusted OR [AOR] = 0.956, P = .8130) or at 28 weeks (41.0% vs 49.8%, respectively; OR = 0.706, P = .0416; AOR = 0.837, P = .3448). Participants with chronic MDD had higher final QIDS-SR(16) scores and smaller overall percent changes in QIDS-SR(16) from baseline to exit, but these differences did not remain after adjusting for covariates. There were no significant differences in adverse events or side effect burden. No significant

  18. Predictors and long-term health outcomes of eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Denis R.; Sandler, Dale P.; Hall, Janet E.; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2017-01-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa may have long-term effects on overall and reproductive health. We studied predictors of self-reported eating disorders and associations with later health events. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) for these associations in 47,759 participants from the Sister Study. Two percent (n = 967) of participants reported a history of an eating disorder. Risk factors included being non-Hispanic white, having well-educated parents, recent birth cohort (OR = 2.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.01–2.32 per decade), and having a sister with an eating disorder (OR = 3.68, CI: 1.92–7.02). As adults, women who had experienced eating disorders were more likely to smoke, to be underweight, to have had depression, to have had a later first birth, to have experienced bleeding or nausea during pregnancy, or to have had a miscarriage or induced abortion. In this descriptive analysis, we identified predictors of and possible long-term health consequences of eating disorders. Eating disorders may have become more common over time. Interventions should focus on prevention and mitigation of long-term adverse health effects. PMID:28700663

  19. Long-Term Memory and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, John

    2011-01-01

    The English National Curriculum Programmes of Study emphasise the importance of knowledge, understanding and skills, and teachers are well versed in structuring learning in those terms. Research outcomes into how long-term memory is stored and retrieved provide support for structuring learning in this way. Four further messages are added to the…

  20. Long-Term Memory and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, John

    2011-01-01

    The English National Curriculum Programmes of Study emphasise the importance of knowledge, understanding and skills, and teachers are well versed in structuring learning in those terms. Research outcomes into how long-term memory is stored and retrieved provide support for structuring learning in this way. Four further messages are added to the…

  1. Professionalism in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubinski, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists who serve elders in a variety of long-term care settings have a variety of professional skills and responsibilities. Fundamental to quality service is knowledge of aging and communication changes and disorders associated with this process, institutional alternatives, and the changing nature of today's elders in…

  2. Long-Term Impacts of Educational Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deming, David James

    2010-01-01

    The school accountability movement has led to a marked increase in the use of standardized test scores to measure school and teacher productivity, yet little is known about the correlation between test score gains and improvements in long-term outcomes. In the first chapter of my dissertation, I study the impact of a school choice policy in…

  3. Long-term studies of dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Jean P

    2002-02-26

    Dopamine agonists have long been used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). In more recent years these drugs have also been proved safe and effective as initial therapy in lieu of levodopa in the treatment of PD. Long-term levodopa therapy is associated with motor complications, including fluctuating response patterns and dyskinesia. By initially introducing a dopamine agonist as symptomatic drug therapy, it may be possible to postpone the use of levodopa and delay or prevent the development of motor complications. Recently, four clinical trials have explored this hypothesis by comparing the long-term response and side effects of levodopa with dopamine agonist therapy. The drugs studied have included ropinirole, pramipexole, cabergoline, and pergolide. In each of these projects, the occurrence of motor complications, such as wearing off and dyskinesia, was significantly less in the subjects assigned to initiation of therapy with a dopamine agonist. The addition of levodopa could be postponed by many months or even several years. Therefore, these long-term studies of dopamine agonists support the initiation of a dopamine agonist instead of levodopa in an effort to postpone levodopa-related motor complications. This therapeutic approach may be particularly appropriate in PD patients with a long treatment horizon on the basis of age and general good health. The extension phase of the long-term study comparing pramipexole with levodopa is ongoing, and follow-up information may help to establish the value of this treatment strategy.

  4. Long Term Care Aide. Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbee, Judy

    This course outline is intended to assist the instructor in the development of a curriculum for a long-term care aide program by specifying one component of the curriculum--the objectives. These objectives, or competencies expected as outcomes for student performance on completion of the program, describe the capabilities an individual must…

  5. Long-term lysimeter data on evapotranspiration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long term crop evapotranspiration (ET) data measured using large weighing lysimeters have only been gathered in a few places in the world, yet are of great importance for ground truthing of many models of plant water use, mesoscale climate, remote sensing estimation of ET, climate change and climate...

  6. Who Recommends Long-Term Care Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Bershadsky, Boris; Bershadsky, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Making good consumer decisions requires having good information. This study compared long-term-care recommendations among various types of health professionals. Design and Methods: We gave randomly varied scenarios to a convenience national sample of 211 professionals from varying disciplines and work locations. For each scenario, we…

  7. Professionalism in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubinski, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists who serve elders in a variety of long-term care settings have a variety of professional skills and responsibilities. Fundamental to quality service is knowledge of aging and communication changes and disorders associated with this process, institutional alternatives, and the changing nature of today's elders in…

  8. Evaluating Long-Term Disability Insurance Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Jan

    1992-01-01

    This report analyzes the factors involved in reviewing benefits and services of employer-sponsored group long-term disability plans for higher education institutions. Opening sections describe the evolution of disability insurance and its shape today. Further sections looks at the complex nature of "value" within a plan, relationship…

  9. LONG TERM HYDROLOGICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (LTHIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    LTHIA is a universal Urban Sprawl analysis tool that is available to all at no charge through the Internet. It estimates impacts on runoff, recharge and nonpoint source pollution resulting from past or proposed land use changes. It gives long-term average annual runoff for a lan...

  10. Long-Term Stability of Tutor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the extent to which tutor ratings remained stable in the long term by evaluating 291 ratings of 140 tutors at Maastricht University in the Netherlands between 1992 and 1995. The results indicated that, if the aggregated score and overall judgement are used to interpret the precision of individual scores, four and two occasions,…

  11. Urethroplasty for hypospadias: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Glassman, C N; Machlus, B J; Kelalis, P P

    1980-06-01

    A retrospective study of patients who had undergone multi-staged hypospadias repair at the Mayo Clinic was undertaken to identify long-term problems associated with this surgery. Patients were queried concerning their satisfaction with quality of urinary stream; penile erection and ejaculation; sexual function and fertility; and cosmetic appearance.

  12. LONG TERM HYDROLOGICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (LTHIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    LTHIA is a universal Urban Sprawl analysis tool that is available to all at no charge through the Internet. It estimates impacts on runoff, recharge and nonpoint source pollution resulting from past or proposed land use changes. It gives long-term average annual runoff for a lan...

  13. Very Long Term Memory for Tacit Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rhianon; Reber, Arthur S.

    1980-01-01

    Very long-term memory for abstract materials was examined for subjects who had served in a synthetic grammar learning experiment two years earlier. Knowledge of these grammars was retained. The form and structure of knowledge and the manner in which it is put to use remained similar to the original. (Author/RD)

  14. Long-term opioid therapy reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Von Korff, Michael; Kolodny, Andrew; Deyo, Richard A; Chou, Roger

    2011-09-06

    In the past 20 years, primary care physicians have greatly increased prescribing of long-term opioid therapy. However, the rise in opioid prescribing has outpaced the evidence regarding this practice. Increased opioid availability has been accompanied by an epidemic of opioid abuse and overdose. The rate of opioid addiction among patients receiving long-term opioid therapy remains unclear, but research suggests that opioid misuse is not rare. Recent studies report increased risks for serious adverse events, including fractures, cardiovascular events, and bowel obstruction, although further research on medical risks is needed. New data indicate that opioid-related risks may increase with dose. From a societal perspective, higher-dose regimens account for the majority of opioids dispensed, so cautious dosing may reduce both diversion potential and patient risks for adverse effects. Limiting long-term opioid therapy to patients for whom it provides decisive benefits could also reduce risks. Given the warning signs and knowledge gaps, greater caution and selectivity are needed in prescribing long-term opioid therapy. Until stronger evidence becomes available, clinicians should err on the side of caution when considering this treatment.

  15. Long-term fixed income market structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Luca

    2004-02-01

    Long-term fixed income market securities present a strong positive correlation in daily returns. By using a metrical approach and considering “modified” time series, I show how it is possible to show a more complex structure which depends strictly on the maturity date.

  16. Long-term function after restorative proctocolectomy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J M D; Banerjee, A; Ahuja, N; Jewell, D P; Mortensen, N J McC

    2005-05-01

    Early functional outcome after restorative proctocolectomy and formation of an ileoanal pouch is known to be good, but there are minimal data on the long-term function of the pouch. The aim of this study was to look at the long-term functional outcome in patients who had undergone restorative proctocolectomy and formation of an ileoanal pouch. A total of 151 consecutive patients (96 males, 55 females) who underwent ileoanal pouch surgery between April 1983 and May 1993 were identified. Functional outcomes from the previous 12 months were appraised by a standardized questionnaire. The median age at surgery was 31 years (range, 6-63 years), with a median follow-up of 142 months (range, 100-221 months). Eighteen patients have had their pouches excised, with another patient being defunctioned. Therefore 19 patients (13 percent) had suffered pouch failure. Altogether, 115 patients were available for follow-up, and 98 patients (85 percent) returned questionnaires. The median pouch-emptying frequency was five times (range, 1-17) during the day and one time (range, 0-6) at night. A total of 74 percent of patients had perfect continence during the day. Most of the patients had no life-style restrictions related to the pouch, and 98 percent of patients would recommend a pouch to others. Long-term functional outcome after ileoanal pouch surgery is good in most patients. For patients requiring proctocolectomy, ileoanal pouch surgery can now be recommended as an excellent long-term option.

  17. Long-Term Impacts of Educational Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deming, David James

    2010-01-01

    The school accountability movement has led to a marked increase in the use of standardized test scores to measure school and teacher productivity, yet little is known about the correlation between test score gains and improvements in long-term outcomes. In the first chapter of my dissertation, I study the impact of a school choice policy in…

  18. Long-Term Stability of Tutor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the extent to which tutor ratings remained stable in the long term by evaluating 291 ratings of 140 tutors at Maastricht University in the Netherlands between 1992 and 1995. The results indicated that, if the aggregated score and overall judgement are used to interpret the precision of individual scores, four and two occasions,…

  19. Who Recommends Long-Term Care Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Bershadsky, Boris; Bershadsky, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Making good consumer decisions requires having good information. This study compared long-term-care recommendations among various types of health professionals. Design and Methods: We gave randomly varied scenarios to a convenience national sample of 211 professionals from varying disciplines and work locations. For each scenario, we…

  20. Long-term disability in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Sanne M; Spijker, Jan; Licht, Carmilla M M; Hardeveld, Florian; de Graaf, Ron; Batelaan, Neeltje M; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Beekman, Aartjan T F

    2016-07-19

    This longitudinal study aims to investigate differences in long-term disability between social anxiety disorder (SAD), panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA), panic disorder without agoraphobia (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and multiple anxiety disorders (multiple AD), focusing on the effects of different course trajectories (remission, recurrence and chronic course) and specific symptom dimensions (anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour). Data were used from participants with no psychiatric diagnosis (healthy controls, n = 647) or with a current anxiety disorder (SAD, n = 191; PDA, n = 90; PD, n = 84; GAD, n = 110; multiple AD, n = 480). Severity of anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour symptoms was measured using the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Fear Questionnaire. The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II was used to measure disability. Long-term disability was most prevalent in participants with SAD and multiple AD, and lowest in PDA and PD. GAD had an intermediate position. Anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour were associated with more long-term disability in anxiety disorders than course trajectories. Various anxiety disorders have different disability levels over 4 years of time, therefore diagnostic distinction is important for treatment focus. Anxiety arousal and avoidance behaviour are major predictors for long-term disability in anxiety disorders.

  1. Long-Term Stability of Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyyppa, Markku T.; Maki, Juhani; Alanen, Erkki; Impivaara, Olli; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability of social participation was investigated in a representative urban population of 415 men and 579 women who had taken part in the nationwide Mini-Finland Health Survey in the years 1978-1980 and were re-examined 20 years later. Stability was assessed by means of the following tracking coefficients: kappa, proportion of…

  2. Long-Term Care Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Peter

    2003-01-01

    This article provides a framework for understanding how