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  1. Collected Papers in Structural Mechanics Honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr. (Compiler); Nemeth, Michael P. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    This special publication contains a collection of structural mechanics papers honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr. presented at the 46th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference held in Austin, Texas, April 18-21, 2005. Contributors to this publication represent a small number of those influenced by Dr. Starnes' technical leadership, his technical prowess and diversity, and his technical breath and depth in engineering mechanics. These papers cover some of the research areas Dr. Starnes investigated, which included buckling, postbuckling, and collapse of structures; composite structural mechanics, residual strength and damage tolerance of metallic and composite structures; and aircraft structural design, certification and verification. He actively pursued technical understanding and clarity, championed technical excellence, and modeled humility and perseverance.

  2. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-01-01

    Nine AGU members are among the 102 researchers that U.S. president Barack Obama announced on 23 December as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

  3. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    Sean C. Solomon, director of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, has been selected as one of 10 recipients of the National Medal of Science, the White House announced on 3 October. The medal is considered the highest U.S. honor for achievement and leadership in advancing the field of science. Solomon served as AGU president from 1996 to 1998 and currently is the principal investigator of NASA's MESSENGER mission to Mercury. He will receive the medal at a White House ceremony later this year.

  4. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-01-01

    Several AGU members are among scientists recently honored by the Royal Society of Canada (RSC). Keith Hipel, with the Department of Systems Design Engineering at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, received the Sir John William Dawson Medal in recognition of “important and sustained contributions in two domains of interest to RSC or in interdisciplinary research.” Andrew Weaver, with the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, received the Miroslaw Romanowski Medal “for significant contributions to the resolution of scientific aspects of environmental problems or for important improvements to the quality of an ecosystem in all aspects—terrestrial, atmospheric and aqueous—brought about by scientific means.” In addition, the following AGU members were honored as new RSC fellows: Bernard Paul Boudreau, Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Dante Canil, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria; Raymond Desjardins, Research Branch, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Keiko Hattori, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; and Danny Summers, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

  5. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-03-01

    Four AGU members are among the 18 individuals the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) will honor during its 150th annual meeting in April. William J. Borucki, space scientist at the NASA Ames Research Laboratory and science principal investigator for the Kepler Mission, is the recipient of the Henry Draper Medal "for his founding concept and visionary leadership of Kepler." John Gosling, senior research associate in the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and retired laboratory fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will receive the Arctowski Medal. Gosling was selected for his work on the generation of energetic solar events, including distinguishing solar flares and coronal mass ejections. David Karl, professor of oceanography at the University of Hawai`i, Mānoa, is the recipient of the Alexander Agassiz Medal. NAS notes Karl's leadership in establishing multidisciplinary ocean-observing systems, detecting decadal regime shifts in pelagic ecosystems, and insights on biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. J. William Schopf, distinguished professor of paleobiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, is the recipient of the NAS Award in Early Earth and Life Sciences, presented in 2013 with the Charles Doolittle Walcott Medal. Schopf is being honored for his studies of microscopic fossils that represent the earliest forms of life on Earth and for leadership of large collaborative research groups.

  6. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots.Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes.Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  7. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots. Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes. Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  8. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    More than a dozen AGU members are among 94 researchers announced by U.S. president Barack Obama on 26 September as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. The award, which is coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President, is considered the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. This year's recipients include Jeffrey Book, Naval Research Laboratory; Jonathan Cirtain, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Fotini Katopodes Chow, University of California, Berkeley; Elizabeth Cochran, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); Ian Howat, Ohio State University; Christiane Jablonowski, University of Michigan; Justin Kasper, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; Elena Litchman, Michigan State University; James A. Morris Jr., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); Erin M. Oleson, NOAA; Victoria Orphan, California Institute of Technology; Sasha Reed, USGS; David Shelly, USGS; and Feng Wang, University of California, Berkeley. Five AGU members are among 10 U.S. representatives recently selected for International Arctic Science Committee working groups. The AGU members, chosen as representatives through the U.S. National Academies review process, are Atmosphere Working Group member James Overland, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA; Cryosphere Working Group members Walter Meier, University of Colorado at Boulder, and Elizabeth Hunke, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marine Working Group member Mary-Louise Timmermans, Yale University; and Terrestrial Working Group member Vanessa Lougheed, University of Texas at El Paso.

  9. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2011-10-01

    Three AGU members are among the 10 recipients of this year's Heinz Awards, announced on 13 September by Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences at Pennsylvania State University, in University Park, was recognized for his polar ice discoveries that showed that abrupt climate change is possible and for engaging his students, policy makers, and the public.Joan Kleypas, a marine ecologist and geologist at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration's National Center for Atmospheric Research, was honored for conducting seminal research on how changes in temperature and in seawater chemistry and acidity have affected coral reefs and for identifying ways to bolster coral reef health. Nancy Rabalais, executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, in Chauvin, was cited for her pioneering research of severe oxygen depletion in the Gulf of Mexico and her commitment to reducing water pollution through education and public policy. The awards program "recognizes individuals creating and implementing workable solutions to the problems the world faces through invention, research, and education while inspiring the next generation of modern thinkers," according to the foundation. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.

  10. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    Three AGU members are among the 10 recipients of this year's Heinz Awards, announced on 13 September by Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences at Pennsylvania State University, in University Park, was recognized for his polar ice discoveries that showed that abrupt climate change is possible and for engaging his students, policy makers, and the public. Joan Kleypas, a marine ecologist and geologist at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration's National Center for Atmospheric Research, was honored for conducting seminal research on how changes in temperature and in seawater chemistry and acidity have affected coral reefs and for identifying ways to bolster coral reef health. Nancy Rabalais, executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, in Chauvin, was cited for her pioneering research of severe oxygen depletion in the Gulf of Mexico and her commitment to reducing water pollution through education and public policy. The awards program “recognizes individuals creating and implementing workable solutions to the problems the world faces through invention, research, and education while inspiring the next generation of modern thinkers,” according to the foundation. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.

  11. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-08-01

    AGU president-elect Margaret Leinen has been selected as the new vice chancellor for marine sciences, director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and dean of the School of Marine Sciences at the University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego), the university announced on 25 July. Leinen, who is currently executive director of the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute and associate provost of Marine and Environmental Initiatives at Florida Atlantic University, will join UC San Diego in October 2013. Leinen served as assistant director for geosciences and coordinator of environmental research and education at the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 2000 to 2007 and as dean of the Graduate School of Oceanography and vice provost for marine programs at the University of Rhode Island from 1991 to 2000. "Dr. Leinen's experience leading innovation and creating collaborative programs make[s] her the right choice for Scripps and a key campus partner in implementing UC San Diego's strategic plan," stated UC San Diego chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.

  12. Celebration of DOE's 35th Anniversary and the Secretary of Energy's Honor Awards, Keynote Address: Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Steven Chu gives a keynote address marking the thirty-fifth anniversary of the Department of Energy (DOE). He highlights outstanding achievements of the Department and its scientists. Several of the Department's many Nobel Prize winners over the years are mentioned.

  13. Honor Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Howard

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "honor" and describes how the word has been taken for granted in schools. He explains that "honor" traditionally, has had two meanings, and that the National Honor Society (NHS) reflects the most ancient of them. Like Aristotle, who described honor in his "Nicomachean Ethics" as "the prize of virtue and the…

  14. Nontraditional Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinghorn, Janice Rye; Smith, Whitney Womack

    2013-01-01

    While honors programs and colleges often proclaim the importance of recruiting and retaining a diverse group of high-ability students, many are still exclusionary and predicated on assumptions about the student body that are no longer valid. The structure and programming of honors can thus prohibit the full participation of nontraditional students…

  15. Focus on Advancing High Performance Mass Spectrometry, Honoring Dr. Richard D. Smith, Recipient of the 2013 Award for a Distinguished Contribution in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Muddiman, David C.; Loo, Joseph

    2014-10-18

    This special focus issue of the Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry celebrates the accomplishments of Dr. Richard D. Smith, the recipient of the 2013ASMS Award for a Distinguished Contribution in Mass Spectrometry, and who serves as a Battelle Fellow, Chief Scientist in the Biological Sciences Division, and Director of Proteomics Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA. The award is for his development of the electrodynamic ion funnel.

  16. Honors and Institutional Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransdell, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Honors colleges and programs often evolve in response to a mandate from boards of regents or trustees. Such mandates can lead to new or accelerated change within the institution, change that in many cases is linked to and represented by honors. Such has been the case at Western Kentucky University (WKU), where the honors program has played a key…

  17. Housing Honors. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Linda, Ed.; Kay, Lisa W., Ed.; Poe, Rachael, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Honors administrators spend much of their time explaining and describing what honors is and does. When they talk about what honors looks like nationally, they should have answers to the following important questions: How pervasive is the model of separate honors facilities?; How pervasive are the legendary closets that honors programs have so…

  18. Can Faculty Afford Honors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzy, Annmarie

    2012-01-01

    In "Costs and Benefits in the Economy of Honors," Richard Badenhausen identifies several pressing issues regarding the economic status of honors in the current financial climate of higher education, including the role of faculty in addressing those issues. In her response to Badenhausen's essay, Annmarie Guzy, a faculty member at the…

  19. The Honor System Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marie, Kristen L.

    2005-01-01

    An honor system library can be created inside the library media center (LMC). Where students can access free books and magazines that require no formal checkouts. The honor library system at Washington High School, Fremont, California, has become self-sustaining. As many students, parents and teachers donate quality material. No student is ever…

  20. The Culture of Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article Chancellor Susan Koch considers the value of the honors program at her institute, the University of Illinois at Springfield. She begins by reflecting on her own under graduate experience at her alma mater, Dakota State University and explains how her experience there helped her to create the honors program at the University of…

  1. Honors Education and Global Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.

    2012-01-01

    An issue of "Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council" devoted to "Honors Around the Globe" is an important opportunity to consider the role of honors in creating international awareness and understanding. Honors faculty and administrators have become increasingly active in global cross-communication through, for…

  2. Honoring our helpers

    PubMed Central

    Talanow, Roland; Giesel, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Radiology Case Reports honors the reviewers who donated their time and expertise throughout the year 2013 to the high quality and success of this journal. PMID:24967015

  3. Honoring our helpers

    PubMed Central

    Talanow, Roland; Giesel, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Radiology Case Reports honors the reviewers who donated their time and expertise throughout the year 2015 to the high quality and success of this journal. PMID:27200155

  4. The CHROME Honors Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Eleanor

    2002-01-01

    The CHROME Honors Program was designed as a two-week residential program for 9th and 1Oth grade students participating in CHROME clubs. The curriculum focused on the health sciences with instruction from: (1) the science and health curriculum of the Dozoretz National Program for Minorities in Applied Sciences (DNIMAS) Program of Norfolk State University (NSU); (2) the humanities curriculum of the NSU Honors Program; (3) NASA-related curriculum in human physiology. An Advisory Committee was formed to work with the Project Coordinator in the design of the summer program.

  5. Civic Tolerance among Honors Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Gordon; Shepherd, Gary

    2014-01-01

    As important as cognitive outcomes are in assessing the educational merits of honors programs, the authors ask whether honors programs affect the values and social attitudes of their students differently than other students: in particular, whether honors students are more or less tolerant than other students and, if so, in what ways and why. There…

  6. The Catalytic Impact of Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, discussion about the value of honors education focuses on the outcomes for students: enhancement of skill sets that are (a) academic, (b) social, (c) leadership-oriented, (d) personal, and (e) vocational or professional. These are all real outcomes, but they can also be achieved outside honors. What makes honors special is that it…

  7. Honors Scholar Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehner, Margaret

    A proposal is presented for an Honors Scholar Program at Moraine Valley Community College in response to the need to provide gifted students with the extra challenges they seek. After providing a rationale for the program, the membership of the steering committee and curriculum committees that would develop and guide the program is designated.…

  8. Profit, Productivity, and Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuman, Sam

    2014-01-01

    In an ominously steady progression over the past decades, education in general, higher education in particular, and even honors education have increasingly been contextualized in the realm of the marketplace. Cost/benefit analyses of colleges and universities are examined; institutions in terms of their price to consumers (students and their…

  9. The Honors Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triplet, Rodney G.

    The Honors Program at Northern State University (South Dakota) is an ongoing, enriched program for academically talented and highly motivated students. Its purposes are to (1) stimulate creativity, intellectual curiosity, and critical evaluation of ideas and behavior; (2) enhance skills in critical research, writing, and speaking; and (3) develop…

  10. Honors: Getting Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etheridge, Sandra Y.

    This paper provides a description of the development of an honors program at Gulf Coast Community College (GCCC). The description is organized around three flow charts corresponding to different stages in the program's development, and which are followed by more detailed explanations. The first flow chart deals with program planning and…

  11. Honors as Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dan R.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of honor societies and programs on a university campus is an important component of its reputation for excellence. While we may quibble with the methodologies employed by various rankings, reputation is one of the key drivers of choice when students and their families are making that all-important decision about which university to…

  12. Mothers in Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killinger, Mimi; Binder-Hathaway, Rachel; Mitchell, Paige; Patrick, Emily

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four honors mothers as they offer sage advice. They argue convincingly that they are motivated, focused students who bring rich diversity to college programs. They further report disturbing marginalization and isolation that could be ameliorated with support and increased sensitivity on the part of…

  13. Undocumented in Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aramburo, Kimberly; Bhavsar, Suketu

    2013-01-01

    During her time at the Kellogg Honors College at Cal Poly Pomona, Suketu Bhavsar has encountered several high-achieving students who, after coming to trust her, have revealed themselves to her as undocumented. These students came to the United States as children through non-legal channels, generally brought by their families, who were searching…

  14. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun with Dr. Eberhard Rees and R.W. Cook at a press conference concerning Dr. Von Braun's assignment to NASA headquarters and Dr. Rees' subsequent assignment as Marshall Center director.

  16. Dr. von Braun at 'Wernher von Braun Day' Celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    In 1970 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (right) was reassigned to NASA Headquarters to serve as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Prior to his transfer, Dr. von Braun was honored for his career in Huntsville, Alabama, with the celebration of 'Wernher von Braun Day.' Among those participating were Alabama Governor Albert Brewer (left) and Alabama Senator John Sparkman (center). (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public library)

  17. The Honors College Phenomenon. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sederberg, Peter C., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    One enduring, and perhaps endearing, characteristic of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) is its commitment to pluralism. NCHC recognizes that excellent honors educational opportunities can be cultivated across the diverse settings of American higher education from two-year community colleges through large, comprehensive research…

  18. Honors Sells . . . But Who's Paying?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzy, Annmarie

    2014-01-01

    High school students on the college prep track are going to greater lengths to become competitive applicants for honors programs and their attendant scholarships, especially in the face of escalating college costs. All stakeholders in honors education--students, families, teachers, and administrators--face steeper financial challenges than they…

  19. Establishing Community College Honors Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, James

    Drawing from a literature review and survey of community colleges with honors programs, this paper presents a series of recommended strategies and tactics for the establishment and continuation of community college honors programs. The recommendations are structured around the five developmental stages of academic innovation identified by S. V.…

  20. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Dr. Christian Barnard.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Christian Barnard Tours Marshall Space Flight Center. Shown in Dr. Von Braun's office are (left to right): Dr. Ernst Sthulinger, a representative from General Electric, Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Dr. Christian Barnard, and Dr. Eberhard Rees.

  1. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2012-05-07

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  2. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2016-07-12

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  3. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest [U.S. Energy Secretary

    2016-07-12

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  4. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest

    2014-02-03

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  5. Priorities for Quality Honors Education: A Delphi Study on Honors Program and College Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Honors education has grown exponentially across the country, and a great deal of variation currently exists among programs. The National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) has adopted lists of the Basic Characteristics of Fully Developed Honors Programs (Madden, 1994) and Honors Colleges (Sederberg, 2005) to guide new and developing programs, but no…

  6. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  7. Honors in the Master's: A New Perspective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ginkel, Stan; Van Eijl, Pierre; Pilot, Albert; Zubizarreta, John

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, there is a growing interest in honors education, not only in the bachelor's but also in the master's degree. The Dutch government, for instance, is actively promoting excellence in both bachelor's and master's degrees through honors programs (Siriusteam). Most Dutch universities have honors programs at the bachelor's level or are…

  8. PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE--HONORS PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEYMANN, HANS G.

    TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE INSTRUCTION FOR SUPERIOR STUDENTS THE FRESHMAN ENGLISH HONORS PROGRAM AT LENOIR RHYNE COLLEGE, NORTH CAROLINA, WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1965. THE NEED FOR LONG RANGE EVALUATION AND THE PRESENT METHOD OF EVALUATING THE HONORS PROGRAM ARE DISCUSSED. A BRIEF DESCRIPTION IS ALSO GIVEN OF THE METHOD BY WHICH HONOR STUDENTS ARE SELECTED…

  9. Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt, a life for astronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaganescu, Nicolae-Florin

    2004-12-01

    Irene Bredt (b.1911 at Bonn) obtained her Doctorate in Physics in 1937; in the same year she became a scientific researcher at the German Research Center for Aviation at Trauen, led by Prof. Dr. Eugen Sänger. Soon, the young but efficient Dr. Irene Bredt became the first assistant of Dr. Sänger, who married her (1951). During 1973-1978, Dr. Bredt was in correspondence with Prof. Dr. Nikolae-Florin Zaganescu and helped him to familiarize the Romanian readers with Prof. Sänger's life and achievements. As for Dr. Bredt's life, she specified three main periods of her activity: 1937-1942, when she was researcher in charge of thermodynamic problems of liquid-fuelled rocket engines at Trauen 1942-1945, when she was Senior Researcher in charge of Ramjet in flight performances at Ainring, and also coauthored the Top Secret Technical report entitled 'A Rocket Engine for a Long-Range Bomber', which was finished in 1941 but edited only in 1944 the post world war II period, when she was Scientific Advisor or Director at various civil and military research institutes, universities, etc. Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt helped her husband to develop many scientific theories like Ramjet thermodynamic theory, and photon rocket theory and also in establishing IAF and IAA. In 1970, Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt was honored with 'Hermann Oberth Gold Medal' for her impressive scientific activity.

  10. Eagle Feathers, the Highest Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverhead, Pete

    Following his own advice that elders of the tribe share their knowledge so that "the way of the Indians would come back to the children of today," Pete Beaverhead (1899-1975) tells of the traditions of respect and honor surrounding the eagle feather in a booklet illustrated with black and white drawings. The eagle is an Indian symbol of power and…

  11. The Evolutionary Basis of Honor Cultures.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Andrzej; Gelfand, Michele J; Borkowski, Wojciech; Cohen, Dov; Hernandez, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Around the globe, people fight for their honor, even if it means sacrificing their lives. This is puzzling from an evolutionary perspective, and little is known about the conditions under which honor cultures evolve. We implemented an agent-based model of honor, and our simulations showed that the reliability of institutions and toughness of the environment are crucial conditions for the evolution of honor cultures. Honor cultures survive when the effectiveness of the authorities is low, even in very tough environments. Moreover, the results show that honor cultures and aggressive cultures are mutually dependent in what resembles a predator-prey relationship described in the renowned Lotka-Volterra model. Both cultures are eliminated when institutions are reliable. These results have implications for understanding conflict throughout the world, where Western-based strategies are exported, often unsuccessfully, to contexts of weak institutional authority wherein honor-based strategies have been critical for survival. PMID:26607976

  12. If Honors Students Were People: Holistic Honors Education. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuman, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Although honors students are highly motivated and intellectually promising, they are not empty cognitive vessels ready to be filled with professorial knowledge. They are, instead, complex, multifaceted young people, sometimes troubled, often delighted and delightful. While at college they are learning how to live their lives not just as…

  13. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center director Wernher Von Braun and his family were honored with a series of events prior to his relocation to Washington, D.C. where he was assigned duties at NASA headquarters as deputy associate administrator for planning. Here he is shown with General Richard Drury and Hazel Toftoy, widow of General H.N. Toftoy.

  14. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, examines an ordinary man's shoe outfitted for use in the Saturn I workshop. Pictured from the left in the Saturn I workshop mockup are William Brooksbank, propulsion and vehicle engineering laboratory; Dr. Paine; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Center director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, Executive Officer in the Office Of The Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, Deputy Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, Technical. the shoe Dr. Paine is holding has a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about on the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desires.

  15. Connect the Book. Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, this month's featured book is "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." The book was written by Doreen Rappaport and illustrated by Bryan Collier (Jump at the Sun, 2001. 40p. ISBN 0786807148). This pictorial biography of the world-renowned civil rights leader has one of the most striking…

  16. An Agenda for the Future of Research in Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariz, George

    2016-01-01

    Research in honors has become a priority for the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC), and the phrase presents the honors community with an interesting ambiguity about the appropriate focus for future studies. Potential topics might include the progress of honors students in comparison to their non-honors cohorts; the criteria for selecting…

  17. Conferencias a la Memoria de la Dra. Lydia J. Roberts 1967, 1969-1973 (Conferences in Memory of Dr. Lydia J. Roberts 1967, 1969-1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras.

    This publication includes eleven lectures presented as part of a conference given honoring Dr. Lydia J. Roberts. Seven of the papers are written in the English language and four in Spanish. Most of the papers relate to the topic of nutrition, but a few pay tribute to Dr. Roberts in recognition of her distinguished leadership and teacher of human…

  18. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left) and Fred W. Kelley examine a ST-100 Stellar Instrument Platform in the astrionics lab. Dr. Von Braun, then deputy associate administrator for planning, NASA, was visiting on the anniversary of the establishment of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  19. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Shown viewing the Apollo telescope mockup are, from left to right, Charles Donlan, deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director; William Horton, astrionics lab; Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA deputy administrator; Warner Kuers, director of the ME lab.

  20. Dr. Daniel Carter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  1. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, stands in front of a Saturn IB Launch Vehicle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Dr. Von Braun was Marshall's first Center Director (1960-1970). Under his leadership Marshall was responsible for the development of the Saturn rockets, the Skylab project and getting the United States into Space and landing on the moon with the Apollo missions.

  2. Congress Honors Glenn, Apollo 11 Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Congress honored storied NASA astronauts John Glenn, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin on Wednesday, with the Gold Medal, Congress' highest expression of national appreciation for dis...

  3. Academic Integrity in Honor Code and Non-Honor Code Environments: A Qualitative Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Donald; Trevino, Linda Klebe; Butterfield, Kenneth D.

    1999-01-01

    Survey data from 4,285 students in 31 colleges and universities indicates students at schools with academic honor codes view the issue of academic integrity in a fundamentally different way than do students at non-honor code institutions. This difference seems to stem from the presence of an honor code and its influence on the way students think…

  4. Honors as a Transformative Experience: The Role of Liberal Arts Honors Programs in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    In the past, an honors program at a community college may have seemed like a contradiction in terms. After all, honors students at four-year colleges are thought to be the best of the best, while community college students are often considered "diamonds in the rough." Many community college honors students have intellectual abilities that may not…

  5. Fundrai$ing for Honor$: A Handbook. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Larry R.

    2009-01-01

    To many honors administrators, fundraising is alien and frightening. This monograph is directed primarily to honors deans and directors, who have widely varying experience with fundraising. It may also be useful reading for those staff members, faculty, and development officers who have some responsibility for honors fundraising. It focuses on…

  6. An Effective Honors Composition Class Improves Honors Retention Rates: Outcomes and Statistical Prestidigitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzy, Annmarie

    2014-01-01

    Annmarie Guzy teaches honors composition at the University of South Alabama. This essay discusses her observation that students who took her class were more likely to complete the honors program, which led to her wondering what elements of her course might give students an edge in honors program completion. As an English professor with training in…

  7. The Honors Thesis: A Handbook for Honors Directors, Deans, and Faculty Advisors. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mark; Lyons, Karen; Weiner, Norman

    2014-01-01

    This handbook is intended to help all those who design, administer, and implement honors thesis programs--honors directors, deans, staff, faculty, and advisors--evaluate their thesis programs, solve pressing problems, select more effective requirements or procedures, or introduce an entirely new thesis program. The authors' goal is to provide…

  8. Keeping the Honor in Honorary Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Most American colleges and universities honor alumni, donors, and others through not only degrees, but also named buildings, chairs, and other forms of recognition. Recent controversies, however, suggest that boards should think twice before bestowing such honors. Trustees should establish transparent and consistent standards for the process by…

  9. Improving African American Achievement in Geometry Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Adrian B.

    2010-01-01

    This case study evaluated the significance of implementing an enrichment mathematics course during the summer to rising African American ninth graders entitled, "Geometry Honors Preview." In the past, 60 to 70 percent of African American students in this school district had withdrawn from Geometry Honors by the second academic quarter. This study…

  10. Honors in Honduras: Engaged Learning in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folds-Bennett, Trisha; Twomey, Mary Pat

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge in honors education is providing experiences through which students deeply engage ideas and content so that their analytical abilities and core beliefs and values are transformed. The College of Charleston Honors College aimed to stimulate critical thinking and examination of core values through a more holistic approach to…

  11. Honors as Whole-Person Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William M.

    2015-01-01

    The Oral Roberts University Honors Program attracts a significant number of students each year, both as incoming freshmen and currently enrolled students, seeking a richer academic experience. While the honors program offers a higher-level academic challenge, its value lies beyond what is simply learned in the classroom. The program contributes to…

  12. Antiplagiarism Software Takes on the Honor Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasley, Paula

    2008-01-01

    Among the 100-odd colleges with academic honor codes, plagiarism-detection services raise a knotty problem: Is software compatible with a system based on trust? The answer frequently devolves to the size and culture of the university. Colleges with traditional student-run honor codes tend to "forefront" trust, emphasizing it above all else. This…

  13. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the astronautics lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics lab.

  14. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the Astronautics Lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics Lab.

  15. School violence and the culture of honor.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan P; Osterman, Lindsey L; Barnes, Collin D

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that a sociocultural variable known as the culture of honor would be uniquely predictive of school-violence indicators. Controlling for demographic characteristics associated in previous studies with violent crime among adults, we found that high-school students in culture-of-honor states were significantly more likely than high-school students in non-culture-of-honor states to report having brought a weapon to school in the past month. Using data aggregated over a 20-year period, we also found that culture-of-honor states had more than twice as many school shootings per capita as non-culture-of-honor states. The data revealed important differences between school violence and general patterns of homicide and are consistent with the view that many acts of school violence reflect retaliatory aggression springing from intensely experienced social-identity threats.

  16. Could shame and honor save cooperation?

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Jennifer; Hauert, Christoph; Traulsen, Arne; Milinski, Manfred

    2012-03-01

    Shame and honor are mechanisms that expose behavior that falls outside the social norm. With recent six-player public goods experiments, we demonstrated that the threat of shame or the promise of honor led to increased cooperation. Participants were told in advance that after ten rounds two participants would be asked to come forward and write their names on the board in front of the fellow group members. In the shame treatment, the least cooperative players were exposed and wrote their names under the sentence "I donated least" while the honored participants wrote their name under "I donated most." In both the shame and honor treatments, participants contributed approximately 50% more to the public good, as compared with the control treatment in which all players retained their anonymity. Here, we also discuss how shame and honor differ from full transparency, and some of the challenges to understanding how anonymity and exposure modify behavior. PMID:22808336

  17. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2013-07-01

    The Geological Society of America's (GSA) new class of medal and award recipients and fellows includes many AGU members. Medal and award recipients are Stephen G. Pollock, University of Southern Maine: GSA Distinguished Service Award; John R. Wheaton, Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology: John C. Frye Award; Clifford A. Jacobs, National Science Foundation (NSF): Outstanding Contributions Award, Geoinformatics Division; Peter Bird, University of California, Los Angeles (emeritus): George P. Woollard Award, Geophysics Division; Chunmiao Zheng, University of Alabama: O. E. Meinzer Award, Hydrogeology Division; Gerhard Wörner, Georg August Universität Göttingen: Distinguished Geologic Career Award, Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; Alan D. Howard, University of Virginia: G. K. Gilbert Award, Planetary Geology Division; Michael E. Perkins, University of Utah: Kirk Bryan Award for Research Excellence, Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; and Peter J. Hudleston, University of Minnesota: Career Contribution Award, Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.

  18. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    S. Fred Singer, atmospheric and space physicist, received the Lifetime Achievement in Climate Science from the Non-Governmental International Panel on Climate Change at its Ninth International Conference on Climate Change, which took place on 7-9 July in Las Vegas, Nev.

  19. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-11-01

    Two AGU members are principal investigators on a project at the University of Colorado's National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) that recently received the 2011 Governor's Award for High-Impact Research from Colorado governor John Hickenlooper. NSIDC technical services manager David Gallaher and NSIDC director Mark Serreze have been involved with the center's Green Data Center, which has saved significant energy. Cornell University astronomy professor Steven Squyres is the new chairman of the NASA Advisory Council, which offers guidance and policy advice to the NASA administrator, the agency announced on 2 November. Squyres previously served on the council during the 1990s and also served as chairman of the former NASA Space Science Advisory Committee.

  20. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    S. Bradley Moran has taken a post as assistant director, ocean sciences, for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. He will focus on implementing the U.S. Ocean Science Policy and assume responsibility for a broad range of ocean, coastal, and marine resource-related matters. Moran is on leave as a professor at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography. He most recently served as program director in the chemical oceanography program at the National Science Foundation.

  1. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    Pascal Richet, a faculty member of the Physique des Minéraux et des Magmas, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, has been selected as the recipient of a Humboldt Research Award. Given by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, this award is conferred in recognition of lifetime achievements in research.

  2. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recently announced its 2013 class of new members. They include Gregory Asner, faculty scientist in the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, Calif.; Mark Cane, G. Unger Vetlesen Professor of Earth and Climate Sciences in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, N. Y.; Kenneth Farley, W. M. Keck Foundation Professor of Geochemistry and chair of the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena; Terry Plank, professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Lamont-Doherty; and John Seinfeld, Louis E. Nohl Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Caltech.

  3. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-12-01

    Twenty-three AGU members are among the newly elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, announced on 25 November 2013. They are Lance F. Bosart, University at Albany, State University of New York; William Henry Brune III, Pennsylvania State University; Robert H. Byrne, University of South Florida; Walter K. Dodds, Kansas State University; Sherilyn Claire Fritz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Kevin P. Furlong, Pennsylvania State University; Arnold L. Gordon, Columbia University; Thomas A. Herring, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Malcolm Hughes, University of Arizona; Thomas C. Johnson, University of Minnesota Duluth; Jack A. Kaye, NASA; Samuel P. Kounaves, Tufts University; Klaus S. Lackner, Columbia University; Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma; Jean-Bernard Minster, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego (UCSD); Kenneth H. Nealson, University of Southern California; Walter Clarkson Pitman III, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; James E. Quick, Southern Methodist University; Ross J. Salawitch, University of Maryland, College Park; Didier Sornette, ETH Zürich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology); Michael Stein, University of Chicago; Bradley M. Tebo, Oregon Health and Science University; and Mark H. Thiemens, UCSD.

  4. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-01-01

    Peter Molnar, professor of geological sciences at the University of Colorado at Boulder, is the recipient of the 2014 Crafoord Prize in Geosciences, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (RAS) announced on 16 January. RAS noted that the award is being presented to Molnar "for his ground-breaking contribution to the understanding of global tectonics, in particular the deformation of continents and the structure and evolution of mountain ranges, as well as the impact of tectonic processes on ocean-atmosphere circulation and climate." The award, which comes with a prize of 4 million Swedish kronor (about US$600,000), was established in 1980 to promote international basic research in astronomy, mathematics, geosciences, biosciences, and rheumatoid arthritis. According to RAS, those disciplines were chosen to complement those for which the Nobel Prizes are awarded.

  5. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Sallie Chisholm received the National Medal of Science from U.S. president Barack Obama during a 1 February ceremony at the White House. Chisholm, a biological oceanographer, was cited for her "contributions to the discovery and understanding of the dominant photosynthetic organisms in the ocean, promotion of the field of microbial oceanography and influence on marine policy and management." Chisholm is the Lee and Geraldine Martin Professor of Environmental Studies and a professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  6. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-01-01

    U.S. president Barack Obama recently announced his intent to appoint several people, four of whom are AGU members, to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, an independent agency of the U.S. federal government that provides independent scientific and technical oversight of the Department of Energy's program for managing and disposing of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. The appointees include Jean Bahr, professor in the Department of Geoscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; Susan Brantley, distinguished professor of geosciences and director of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at The Pennsylvania State University; Efi Foufoula-Georgiou, professor of civil engineering and director of the National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics at the University of Minnesota; and Mary Lou Zoback, consulting professor in the Environmental Earth System Science Department at Stanford University.

  7. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-10-01

    Two AGU members are among the 23 new MacArthur fellows for 2012, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced on 2 October. Geochemist Terry Plank, a professor in Columbia University's Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, was cited for "probing the usually invisible but remarkably powerful thermal and chemical forces deep below the Earth's crust that drive the motion of tectonic plate collisions." The MacArthur Foundation cited marine ecologist Nancy Rabalais, executive director and professor at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, for "documenting the environmental and economic consequences of hypoxic zones in the Gulf of Mexico and informing strategies for restoring the degraded waters of the Gulf and the Mississippi River basin." Each fellow will each receive $500,000 in no-strings-attached support over the next 5 years.

  8. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    Two AGU members are among the 23 new MacArthur fellows for 2012, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced on 2 October. Geochemist Terry Plank, a professor in Columbia University's Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, was cited for “probing the usually invisible but remarkably powerful thermal and chemical forces deep below the Earth's crust that drive the motion of tectonic plate collisions.” The MacArthur Foundation cited marine ecologist Nancy Rabalais, executive director and professor at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, for “documenting the environmental and economic consequences of hypoxic zones in the Gulf of Mexico and informing strategies for restoring the degraded waters of the Gulf and the Mississippi River basin.” Each fellow will each receive $500,000 in no-strings-attached support over the next 5 years.

  9. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Julie Brigham-Grette, department head of the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Department of Geosciences, has been selected as the new chair of the Polar Research Board (PRB) of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, "with the responsibility of promoting excellence in polar science and providing independent scientific guidance to federal agencies and the nation on science issues in the Arctic, Antarctic and cold regions of the world."

  10. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Elizabeth Ambos is the new executive officer of the Council on Undergraduate Research, an international not-for-profit organization focused on increasing undergraduate research opportunities. Most recently, Ambos has served as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research Initiatives and Partnerships for the California State University Chancellor's Office. Anthony Beasley has been appointed as the next director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, a facility of the National Science Foundation (NSF), operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Beasley has served as chief operating officer and project manager of the National Ecological Observatory Network, an NSF-funded continental-scale observatory designed to detect ecological change and enable forecasting of its impacts.

  11. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    Tim Killeen has been appointed president of the Research Foundation for the State University of New York (SUNY) and SUNY vice chancellor for research, effective 9 July. Killeen has been assistant director for geosciences at the U.S. National Science Foundation since July 2008. As SUNY's research foundation president, Killeen will be responsible for the supervision and operation of the largest, most comprehensive university-connected U.S. research foundation, according to a foundation statement. Killeen served as AGU president from 2006 to 2008 and was director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research from 2000 to 2008.

  12. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-10-01

    Many AGU members are among the American Meteorological Society's (AMS) 2013 honorary members, awardees, lecturers, and fellows. Among the AMS honorary members is Susan Solomon, the Ellen Swallow Richards Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dennis Hartmann, of the University of Washington, Seattle, is the recipient of AMS's Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal "for significant contributions to the synthesis of knowledge of radiative and dynamical processes leading to a deeper understanding of the climate system." R. Alan Plumb, professor of meteorology at MIT, receives the Jule G. Charney Award "for fundamental contributions to the understanding of geophysical fluid dynamics, stratospheric dynamics, chemical transport, and the general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans." The Verner E. Suomi Award has been given to Richard Johnson, professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, "for exquisite design of rawinsonde networks in field campaigns and insightful analysis of interactions between convective clouds and the largescale atmospheric circulation." W. Kendall Melville, professor of oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, has been awarded the Sverdrup Gold Medal Award "for pioneering contributions in advancing knowledge on the role of surface wave breaking and related processes in air-sea interaction." AMS announced that Laurence Armi, also a professor of oceanography at Scripps, is recipient of the Henry Stommel Research Award "for his deeply insightful studies of stratified flow, his pioneering work on boundary mixing and other turbulent mechanisms."

  13. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    Many AGU members are among the American Meteorological Society's (AMS) 2013 honorary members, awardees, lecturers, and fellows. Among the AMS honorary members is Susan Solomon, the Ellen Swallow Richards Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dennis Hartmann, of the University of Washington, Seattle, is the recipient of AMS's Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal “for significant contributions to the synthesis of knowledge of radiative and dynamical processes leading to a deeper understanding of the climate system.” R. Alan Plumb, professor of meteorology at MIT, receives the Jule G. Charney Award “for fundamental contributions to the understanding of geophysical fluid dynamics, stratospheric dynamics, chemical transport, and the general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans.” The Verner E. Suomi Award has been given to Richard Johnson, professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, “for exquisite design of rawinsonde networks in field campaigns and insightful analysis of interactions between convective clouds and the largescale atmospheric circulation.” W. Kendall Melville, professor of oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, has been awarded the Sverdrup Gold Medal Award “for pioneering contributions in advancing knowledge on the role of surface wave breaking and related processes in air-sea interaction.” AMS announced that Laurence Armi, also a professor of oceanography at Scripps, is recipient of the Henry Stommel Research Award “for his deeply insightful studies of stratified flow, his pioneering work on boundary mixing and other turbulent mechanisms.”

  14. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    John W. Hess has been appointed the new president of the Geological Society of America Foundation beginning in 2015, succeeding Geoff Feiss. Hess is currently the executive director of the Geological Society of America.

  15. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-02-01

    Marshall Shepherd, professor of geography in the University of Georgia's Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, Athens, began a 1-year term as president-elect of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) on 22 January. In 2013 he will assume the presidency of the society. Also, five AGU members recently were elected as AMS councilors, with terms expiring in 2015: José Fuentes, Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Richard Johnson, Atmospheric Science Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Christa Peters-Lidard, Hydrological Sciences Branch at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; Wassila Thiaw, Climate Prediction Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Camp Springs, Md.; and Chidong Zhang, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Fla.

  16. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-05-01

    Among the new members elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in May are five AGU members: Richard Edwards, George and Orpha Gibson Chair of Earth Systems Sciences and Distinguished McKnight University Professor, Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; T. Mark Harrison, director, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, and professor of geology, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles; David Sandwell, professor of geophysics, Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (president of the AGU Geodesy section); Benjamin Santer, physicist and atmospheric scientist, Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, Calif.; and Steven Wofsy, Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Science, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Four AGU members are among the 2011 prizewinners announced by the Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) of the American Astronomical Society on 19 May. The prizes will be presented at the joint meeting of DPS and the European Planetary Science Congress in October. William Ward of the Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Tex., is the recipient of the Gerard P. Kuiper Prize for outstanding contributions to the field of planetary science. DPS indicated that Ward originally proposed and evaluated “many dynamical processes that are now cornerstones of current theories of how planets form and evolve” and that his “visionary ideas form the foundation for a significant portion of current work in planetary formation and dynamics.”

  17. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    The recently released list of 2013-2014 Fulbright Scholars includes 9 AGU members working on diverse topics. They include Michael Coe, senior scientist/coordinator of the Amazon group at the Woods Hole Research Center, whose topic is "Agricultural expansion in the Brazilian Cerrado and consequences for the water cycle"; Benjamin Crosby, associate professor, Department of Geosciences, Idaho State University, on the topic "Taking the pulse of Chilean rivers: Enhancing educational and academic opportunities in a time of rapid change"; David Fitzjarrald, senior research associate, Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, on the topic "Landscape heterogeneity and Amazonian mesoclimate: Fostering critical understanding of observations and model output"; and Syed Hasan, professor of geology, Department of Geosciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, who will be teaching courses in waste management.

  18. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    Lisa Tauxe, distinguished professor of geophysics in the Geosciences Research Division and department chair and deputy director for education at Scripps Institution of Oceanography of the University of California, San Diego, received the Franklin Institute's Benjamin Franklin Medal in Earth and Environmental Science "for the development of observational techniques and theoretical models providing an improved understanding of the behavior of, and variations in intensity of, the Earth's magnetic field through geologic time."

  19. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-10-01

    Agricultural ecologist David Lobell is among the 2103 class of MacArthur Fellows, the MacArthur Foundation announced on 25 September. Lobell, an associate professor in Stanford University's Department of Environmental Earth System Science, is one of 24 people to win the "genius award" this year. The citation for Lobell notes that he "unearths and connects richly informative sources of data to investigate the impact of climate change on crop production and food security around the globe. His multidisciplinary background in remote sensing, statistics, ecosystem modeling, land use, and agronomy informs his approach and enables him to draw significant insights from enormous and diverse data sets on weather, agricultural practices, and natural resources such as soil and water." Each MacArthur Fellow receives a no-strings-attached stipend of $625,000 over 5 years.

  20. [Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].

    PubMed

    Janković, S; Susić, V; Sokić, D; Lević, Z

    1996-01-01

    With this brief review we honor the memory of the great French doctor Jean Baptiste Edouard Gélineau. Dr. Gélineau was born on December 23, 1828 at Blaye, Gironde, close to the Bordeaux region. His name is connected with the first clinical description of the disease for which he, both by the right of the primacy as well as ad valorem of his first two names, coined the name "narcolepsy". He was the first to notice the intrinsically evanescent symptoms of narcolepsy, such as excessive daytime somnolence, imperative sleep habits and cataplexy or "astasia" as he called it, and incorporate them into a single clinical syndrome. In 1881 Gélineau discussed Kaffe's case of "maladie du sommeil" as a proof of the existence of the new disease described a year before. As a good clinical observer Gélineau noticed the close relation of emotional engagement and astasia. His attitude was that narcolepsy was a nosologic entity, a disease sui generis, but admitted that it could appear purely as a symptom only. This was in discordance with the views in England where (in 1928) Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson repudiated such convictions; in 1930 Lhermitte still shared the same opinion. Gélineau differentiated narcolepsy from epilepsy with the elegance of clinical reasoning. Overall, Gélineau described three elements of the narcoleptic pentade. Sleep paralyses were first described by Mitchell in 1876, and were first attributed to narcolepsy by Wilson in 1928; in 1930 Lhermitte first described hypnapompic, and Daniels, in 1934, hypnagogic sleep paralysis. Hypnagogic hallucinations were described by Maury in 1848 and subsequently by de Saint Denis in 1867. In twenties they were thoroughly studiesed during the epidemic encephalitis and after the Big War in 1922 by Levy. The life story of Dr. Gélineau covers multivarious activities. As a young student of the Rochefort Navy Medical School he took part in the fight against colera which deluged the city of La Rochelle. In 1849 he

  1. The Mentor/Talented Students Honors Program at SUNY Rockland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Samuel; Hazelton, Nancy; McNamara, James; Kahn, Robert

    This paper consists of four sections by different authors. Section 1: History of Honors at SUNY Rockland. (by Samuel Draper, founder of Honor's Program). Discusses the development of the honors program at Rockland Community College from the late 1960's. Honors courses originated in the late 1960's and in 1977 the college founded the Mentor…

  2. Consider Your Man Card Reissued: Masculine Honor and Gun Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuffelton, Amy

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Amy Shuffelton addresses school shootings through an investigation of honor and masculinity. Drawing on recent scholarship on honor, including Bernard Williams's "Shame and Necessity" and Kwame Anthony Appiah's "The Honor Code," Shuffelton points out that honor has been misconstrued as exclusively a matter of…

  3. Honors Privatization: A Professor's and Three Students' Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nock, Destenie; Plummer, Justice; Wilson, Ashleigh R.; Cundall, Michael K., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Gary Bell's essay, "The Profit Motive in Honors Education," raises important questions about the future of honors education--questions that will have the greatest impact on honors students. The voices of those students are not typically included in discussions about the funding and administration of honors even though they have crucial…

  4. Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende Team) were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under Dr. von Braun's leadership, MSFC developed the Saturn V launch vehicle, which placed the first men, two American astronauts, on the Moon. Wernher von Braun's life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  5. Dr Pugh: a poisoner?

    PubMed

    Paull, J D; Morris, G M

    2012-07-01

    On 16 February 1845 the Reverend W. H. Browne, rector of St John's Church in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, wrote in his journal, "My dear Wife died very suddenly almost immediately after and in consequence of taking a preparation of Hyd. Cyan. Acid prepared & supplied by Dr Pugh". This journal entry raises a number of questions. Was Dr Pugh treating a condition which he thought merited that treatment or was it a ghastly mistake? Was Caroline Browne suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis? Was hydrocyanic acid an accepted treatment at that time? Did Mrs Browne take the wrong dose? Was an incorrect concentration of the drug prepared by Dr Pugh? Did he use the wrong pharmacopoeia in preparing the hydrocyanic acid? Why was there no inquest? Only some of these questions can be answered. PMID:23230685

  6. Dr. Eberhard Rees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees served as director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from March 1, 1970 until January 19, 1973 when he retired from NASA. Prior to his appointment as Director, Rees served as the Center's deputy director under Dr. Wernher von Braun, 1960-1970. Rees came to the United States as part of the Dr. Wernher von Braun's German Rocket team following World War II. He transferred to Huntsville, Alabama from Fort Bliss, Texas in 1950 to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal. From 1956 to 1960 he served as deputy director of development operations at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency under von Braun. In 1960 Rees was transferred to NASA's Marshall Center.

  7. Dr Pugh: a poisoner?

    PubMed

    Paull, J D; Morris, G M

    2012-07-01

    On 16 February 1845 the Reverend W. H. Browne, rector of St John's Church in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, wrote in his journal, "My dear Wife died very suddenly almost immediately after and in consequence of taking a preparation of Hyd. Cyan. Acid prepared & supplied by Dr Pugh". This journal entry raises a number of questions. Was Dr Pugh treating a condition which he thought merited that treatment or was it a ghastly mistake? Was Caroline Browne suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis? Was hydrocyanic acid an accepted treatment at that time? Did Mrs Browne take the wrong dose? Was an incorrect concentration of the drug prepared by Dr Pugh? Did he use the wrong pharmacopoeia in preparing the hydrocyanic acid? Why was there no inquest? Only some of these questions can be answered.

  8. Then & Now: Research Pays Off for All Americans / Dr. Virginia Apgar: Keeping Score at Baby's First Cry | NIH ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the division of congenital defects at the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (now the March of Dimes) and received many honors and awards for her work. To Find Out More Learn more about Dr. Apgar through the Profiles in Science program of the National Library of Medicine and ...

  9. The McAndrews Leadership Lecture: February 2015, by Dr Scott Haldeman. Challenges of the Past, Challenges of the Present.

    PubMed

    Haldeman, Scott; McAndrews, George P; Goertz, Christine; Sportelli, Louis; Hamm, Anthony W; Johnson, Claire

    2015-12-01

    The McAndrews Leadership Lecture was developed by the American Chiropractic Association to honor the legacy of Jerome F. McAndrews, DC, and George P. McAndrews, JD, and their contributions to the chiropractic profession. This article is a transcription of the presentation made by Dr Scott Haldeman on February 28, 2015, in Washington, DC, at the National Chiropractic Leadership Conference.

  10. 1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 (structure no. 735) on left, DR 2 (structure no. 736) in center, and DR 3 (structure no. 737) looking north 30 degrees west, with tracking radar (large radome) and satcom (satellite communication) system in small radome in view between DR 2 and DR 3 antennae. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. Fred Haise Honored at Aerospace Appreciation Night

    NASA Video Gallery

    Retired NASA astronaut and test pilot Fred Haise was honored recently by the Lancaster, Calif., Jethawks baseball team at its Aerospace Appreciation Night. Best known as one of the Apollo 13 crew, ...

  12. Honor crimes: review and proposed definition.

    PubMed

    Elakkary, Sally; Franke, Barbara; Shokri, Dina; Hartwig, Sven; Tsokos, Michael; Püschel, Klaus

    2014-03-01

    There is every reason to believe that honor based violence is one of the forms of domestic violence that is being practiced against females all over the world. This type of violence includes a wide range of crimes, the severest of which is honor killing. Many studies have adopted different definitions for the so-called honor killing. In this paper some of these definitions are discussed and a working definition is proposed. The scope of the problem worldwide is presented. Honor killing goes beyond ethnicity, class, and religion. It is a very old phenomenon that was practiced in ancient Rome, guided by penal codes. Some of the older as well as new penal codes are discussed concerning this matter from different regions of the world. The different efforts of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations in combating this problem are also presented.

  13. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  14. Dr. Howard Jones, Jr. (1910-2015): In Memoriam

    PubMed Central

    Oehninger, S.; Kruger, T.F.

    2015-01-01

    We honor the life of Howard W. Jones, Jr., MD, 104, a pioneer and visionary in reproductive medicine, a dedicated mentor, internationally renowned gynecological surgeon, and the father of in vitro fertilization IVF) in the United States. Dr. Jones founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine, in Norfolk, Virginia, at Eastern Virginia Medical School, in 1983. Today, IVF has grown exponentially not only in its direct application but also in the development of newer techniques would have been unimaginable a couple of decades ago. Throughout the years Dr. Howard has been a teacher and a mentor to many around the world. To us he also was a friend, a supporter at the time of difficult decisions, someone who would inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning and untangling some of the complexities of the field, even of the human condition. His leadership, vision, knowledge, enthusiasm and inquisitive mind will be missed.

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A camerman catches Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, his son, Peter, and daughter, Martgrit, as they arrive at the employee picnic held to celebrate man's first landing on the moon 6 days earlier. In the foreground is David R. Newby, Director of Administration and Technical Services at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

  17. Ask Dr. Sue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the need for child care providers to be sure children in their care who are between the ages of 15 months and 5 years have had Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine. Urges child care center staff to avoid use of bean bag infant cushions and to inform parents about the hazards posed by the cushions. (DR)

  18. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, explains the purpose of a thermal curtain in the mockup of a Saturn I workshop to U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon of Alabama. The Congressman visited the Marshall Center on March 2, 1968 to tour the workshop and to visit Marshall Center facilities.

  19. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon (D.-Al) inspects the food preparation area of the Saturn I workshop mockup during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center. Explaining the operation of the food preparation area to the congressman is Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director.

  20. Honoring Leslie A. Geddes - Farewell ...

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Honor thy father and thy mother, say the Holy Scriptures[1], for they at least gave thee this biological life, but honor thy teachers, too, for they gave thee knowledge and example. Leslie Alexander Geddes took off on a long, long trip, Sunday October 25, 2009, leaving his body for medical and research use. The departing station was West Lafayette, Indiana, where he set foot in 1974, at Purdue University, stamping there a unique deep imprint, similar and probably more profound than the one left at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), Houston, Texas, in the period 1955-1974. Memories came back as a flood the minute after a message broke the news to me: When I first met him visiting the Department of Physiology at BCM back in 1962, my first Classical Physiology with Modern Instrumentation Summer Course ... The versatile Physiograph was the main equipment, an electronic-mechanical three or four channel recorder that could pick up a variety of physiological variables. Les and his collaborators had introduced also the impedance pneumograph, which was a simplified version of previous developments made by others. It became a ubiquitous unit that trod many roads in the hands of eager and curious students. Ventricular fibrillation and especially its counterpart, defibrillation, stand out as subjects occupying his concern along the years. Many were the students recruited to such effort and long is the list of papers on the subject. Physiological signals attracted considerable part of his activities because one of his perennial mottos was measurement is essential in physiology. He has written thirteen books and over eight hundred scientific papers, receiving also several prizes and distinctions. Not only his interests stayed within the academic environment but an industrial hue was manifested in over 20 USA patents, all applied to medical use. History of science and technology was another area in which, often with Hebbel Hoff, he uncovered astounding and delightful information

  1. Honoring Controversy: Using Real-World Problems to Teach Critical Thinking in Honors Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargas, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    In this article Sarita Cargas suggests that getting honors students used to analyzing controversies will contribute to their developing a disposition toward critical thinking. She goes on to say that the value of teaching critical-thinking skills complements the movement of many honors programs toward teaching more than just disciplinary content.…

  2. A Handbook for Honors Programs at Two-Year Colleges. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Theresa A.

    2006-01-01

    This monograph is an idea book for two-year institutions thinking of adding an honors program to their list of academic offerings, and as such aspires to provide a useful description of the many options available to honors education for the several audiences who, as a matter of course, may become stakeholders in the operation of a two-year college…

  3. Honors and Non-Honors Student Engagement: A Model of Student, Curricular, and Institutional Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Ellen; Shores, Melanie; Sloane, Michael; Dantzler, John; Shields, Catherine; Shader, Karen; Newcomer, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply several measures of learning and engagement to a comparable cohort of honors and non-honors students in order to generate a preliminary model of student engagement. Specific purposes were the following: (1) to determine the feasibility for use of several measures of student characteristics that may affect…

  4. Profiles in Performing Arts Medicine Courage--A Tribute to Dr. Alice Brandfonbrener.

    PubMed

    Manchester, Ralph A

    2015-09-01

    I was honored and privileged to join Dr. Robert Sataloff in delivering a tribute to Dr. Alice Brandfonbrener at the 2015 Symposium on the Medical Problems of Performing Artists in Snowmass, Colorado. As virtually everyone who reads this journal knows, Dr. Brandfonbrener organized the first symposium (then focused on the medical problems of musicians), was the founding editor of Medical Problems of Performing Artists, and was the first president of the Performing Arts Medicine Association. She died in 2014, just prior to last year's symposium. This year, after Dr. Sataloff presented a very engaging overview of Alice's career and impressive accomplishments, I gave a short address that was based on some of the editorials Alice wrote in this journal during her 20 year tenure as editor. I have chosen a few examples of how the courage that she demonstrated in launching an international medical conference, a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a professional association continued to present itself in her writing.

  5. Dr. Faustus: Theist or Atheist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karim, Shah Mohammad Sanaul; Fathema, Fawzia; Hakim, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Faustus is the greatest but the most controversial of Marlowe's plays. Among the causes of controversy, whether Dr. Faustus is an atheist or theist deserves utmost attention. This paper is intended to deal with the issue. Though at various stages of the development of the action, Dr. Faustus abjures Trinity, resorts to necromancy, becomes…

  6. Research Center Renaming Will Honor Senator Domenici

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    New Mexico Tech and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will rename the observatory's research center on the New Mexico Tech campus to honor retiring U.S. Senator Pete V. Domenici in a ceremony on May 30. The building that serves as the scientific, technical, and administrative center for the Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescopes will be named the "Pete V. Domenici Science Operations Center." The building previously was known simply as the "Array Operations Center." Sen. Pete V. Domenici Sen. Pete V. Domenici "The new name recognizes the strong and effective support for science that has been a hallmark of Senator Domenici's long career in public service," said Dr. Fred Lo, NRAO Director. New Mexico Tech President Daniel H. Lopez said Sen. Domenici has always been a supporter of science and research in Socorro and throughout the state. "He's been a statesman for New Mexico, the nation -- and without exaggeration -- for the world," Lopez said. "Anyone with that track record deserves this recognition." Van Romero, Tech vice president of research and economic development, has served as the university's main lobbyist in Washington, D.C., for more than a decade. He said Sen. Domenici has always been receptive to new ideas and willing to take risks. "Over the years, Sen. Domenici has always had time to listen to our needs and goals," Romero said. "He has served as a champion of New Mexico Tech's causes and we owe him a debt of gratitude for all his efforts over the decades." Originally dedicated in 1988, the center houses offices and laboratories that support VLA and VLBA operations. The center also supports work on the VLA modernization project and on the international Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) project. Work on ALMA at the Socorro center and at the ALMA Test Facility at the VLA site west of Socorro has focused on developing and testing equipment to be deployed at the ALMA site in Chile's Atacama

  7. Prioritizing Service to the Academically Talented: The Honors College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Deborah L.; Holloway, Alexandria

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes community college honors programs and courses, emphasizing in particular the Honors College at Miami Dade College in Florida. The chapter discusses pros and cons of honors programs and courses in the context of their appropriateness to the community college mission of open access and egalitarianism. (Contains 1 table.)

  8. Assessing Social Justice as a Learning Outcome in Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klos, Naomi Yavneh; Eskine, Kendall; Pashkevich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Whether at public or private, secular or faith-based institutions, questions of social justice and civic engagement are an increasing focus of attention in honors education. The emphasis on modes of learning that are, in the terms of the National Collegiate Honors Council's 2014 "Definition of Honors Education," "measurably broader,…

  9. Access, Not Exclusion: Honors at a Public Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, E. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to the high standards that the Honors College at West Virginia University and other campuses across the nation have established, we are witnessing a shift in the way honors colleges prepare the next great generation of thinkers and doers. Honors colleges give individual students access to the kind of educational opportunities and…

  10. The Influence of the College Environment on Honors Students' Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Madden, Katherine; Jensen, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Honors programs at colleges and universities are one way to provide additional learning opportunities to enhance the undergraduate experience for students. Honors programs provide students academically enriching activities through small classes, research, internships, and community service (National Collegiate Honors Council, n.d.). To further the…

  11. Costs and Benefits in the Economy of Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badenhausen, Richard

    2012-01-01

    To be in honors is to be engaged in many different economic arrangements and exchanges. Honors educators work in concert with their admissions offices while recruiting high-achieving students whose decisions often hinge on how much money the institution can offer in the form of discounts to tuition and financial aid. Honors programs that tie…

  12. Re-Envisioning the Honors Senior Project: Experience as Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Kevin; Cureton, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    One of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program is that it creates opportunities for undergraduate research, opportunities that frequently culminate in a senior thesis or capstone project. This article describes how the University of Texas at Arlington Honors College integrated…

  13. Legal History Meets the Honors Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Robert B., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the "Law and Culture" course that he developed to teach in the Butler University Honors Program. The course looks at some landmark periods or events in legal history and explores how those events were the product of their culture, and how they affected their culture. Among the events or periods that the author…

  14. An Honorable Seduction: Thematic Studies in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worby, Diana Z.

    By using a thematic approach and by drawing on other disciplines for breadth, English teachers can "honorably seduce" career-oriented students into a love affair with literature and draw them back into the English curriculum. For example, a teacher's conversation with a student focusing on fathers and sons led the teacher to suggest that the…

  15. Ben van der Veken Honor Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, James

    2015-02-01

    In acclamation of Ben van der Veken, a former editor of Spectrochimica Acta, many co-authors and friends have submitted papers in his honor. He has collaborated with many scientists from the United States, Russia, England, Scotland as well as some in other countries. His research is known throughout the world.

  16. Honors Education and Stone-Campbell Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willerton, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the Stone-Campbell tradition, which produced the North American Disciples of Christ and Churches of Christ. In this tradition he finds the distinctive combination of three emphases to promote civic virtues in an honors context: (1) the individual pursuit of truth; (2) reliance on Scripture; and (3) the drive…

  17. Benedict Arnold: A Question of Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolosi, Annie; O'Connell, Libby Haight; Rust, Mead

    2003-01-01

    The spring 2003 The Idea Book for Educators highlights television programming from the Arts and Entertainment Network (A&E), the History Channel, and the Biography Channel, with a focus on an A&E original movie premiere, "Benedict Arnold: A Question of Honor." The booklet contains the following materials: "A&E Study Guide: Benedict Arnold: A…

  18. Understanding Scientific Ideas: An Honors Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Joan; Schueler, Paul

    At Raritan Valley Community College (RVCC) in New Jersey, an honors philosophy course was developed which taught mathematics and science concepts independent of computational skill. The course required that students complete a weekly writing assignment designed as a continuous refinement of logical reasoning development. This refinement was…

  19. Innovation Labs: A Professional Approach to Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bormans, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Honors education at Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences (RUAS) focuses on students who are willing to invest more in their study than the average student. Selection criteria are the students' willingness to develop beyond what is offered in the regular curriculum and are not based on previous accomplishments. The additional challenge of the…

  20. The Profit Motive in Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Honors has specifically and historically done a commendable job of tailoring education to the special needs and challenges of the most intellectually and academically capable young people, the future leaders and innovators of society, but the introduction of an imperative to make money threatens to corrupt the whole enterprise. For this reason,…

  1. A Global Endeavor: Honors Undergraduate Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killinger, Mimi; Spies, Kate; Runyambo, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Like many other universities of its kind, the University of Maine (UMaine) has a centralized body, the Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR), charged with engaging motivated students in independent learning and in the creation of new knowledge. UMaine furthermore has an honors college that is likewise committed to fostering undergraduate…

  2. Honoring Our Veterans through Poetry Prewriting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Jill

    This lesson uses the informational power of the Internet for a prewriting activity. Through various Internet sites, students gather information about the history and celebration practices associated with Veterans Day. Following the prewriting activity, students write content-rich poems that honor veterans. During the 45-minute prewriting session,…

  3. On Einstein's Path, essays in honor of Engelbert Schucking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Alex

    This collection of essays in honor of Engelbert Schucking spans the gamut of research in general relativity and presents a lively and personal account of current work in the field. Contributions include: E.L. Schucking: Jordan, Pauli, Politics, Brecht... and a Variable Gravitational Constant J.L. Anderson: Thomson Scattering in an Expanding Universe A. Ashtekar & T.A. Schilling: Geometrical Formulation of Quantum Mechanics J. Baugh, D.R. Finkelstein, H. Saller, and Zhong Tang: General Covariance is Bose-Einstein Statistics S.L. Bazanski: The Split and Propagation of Light Rays in Relativity L. Bel: How to Define a Unique Vacuum in Cosmology P.G. Bergmann: EIH Theory and Noether's Theorem W.B. Bonnor: The Static Cylinder in General Relativity C.H. Brahns: Gravity and the Tenacious Scalar Field D. Brill: The Cavendish Experiment in General Relativity Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Wave Maps in General Relativity T. Damour: General Relativty and Experiment J. Ehlers: Some Developments in Newtonian Cosmology G.F.R. Ellis & H. van Elst: Deviation of Geodesics in FLRW Spacetime Geometries S. Frittelli & E.T. Newman: Poincar Pseudo-symmetries in Asymptotically Flat Spacetimes E.N. Glass: Taub Numbers and Asymptotic Invariants J.N. Goldberg: Second Class Constraints F.W. Hehl, A. Macias, E.W. Mielke, & Yu.N. Obukhov: On the Structure of the Energy-momentum and the Spin Currents in Dirac's Electron

  4. Advanced Fuel Cycle Technology: Special Session in Honor of Dr. Michael Lineberry

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme

    2014-06-01

    The US DOE recently initiated an effort to develop accident tolerant fuel designs for potential use in commercial power reactors. Evaluation of various fuel design concepts will require a broad array of testing that will include performance attributes at both steady state and transient irradiation conditions. The first stage of the transient testing program is intended to establish the relative performance limits of each proposed concept and to support development of first-draft fuel performance models. It is anticipated that this data can subsequently be used as the basis for larger scale qualification testing. This initial stage of the testing program is outlined in this paper.

  5. Teaching Peace with Dr. Seuss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Rosemarie; Podesta, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Educators seeking novel ways to instill conflict-resolution skills in young children should consider Dr. Seuss, whose books provide a synthesis of fantasy and reality that works for teaching values endemic to peace education. This paper discusses how students can learn peace and educators can teach peace using Dr. Seuss books, examining steps to…

  6. Dr. Barnett's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.

    1990-04-01

    In 1986, AstroPower was a tiny R D company located at the University of Delaware. Like many other entrepreneurs in the field at that time, the company's president, Dr. Allen Barnett, had a good idea, a good research staff, and the dream of becoming a successful manufacturer of photovoltaic (PV) cells. If the Newark, Del. company's projections remain on track, Barnett plans to become the third largest PV manufacturer in the United States by the end of next year. Were it not for the company's performance to date, such a claim might well be dismissed as idle dreaming. AstroPower Inc. is pursuing a two-pronged strategy: to rapidly bring a new thin-crystal silicon PV cell to commercialization; and, in the meantime, to gain experience in manufacturing and distributing conventional single-crystal and polycrystal silicon cells. The company sold approximately 200 kilowatts (kWp) of cells last year (about half single-crystal and half polycrystal). Its current production capacity is 360 kWp. The company and its products are described.

  7. McBirney honored with Bowen Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.; McBirney, Alexander R.

    Alexander R. McBirney of the University of Oregon received the 1990 N. L. Bowen Award of the Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology section of AGU for outstanding contributions to volcanic geology and to the understanding of physical processes in magmas. The citation, deliverd by Bruce D. Marsh on December 5 at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony in San Francisco, and McBirney's response are presented below.

  8. Armstrong Receives Space Medal of Honor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong receives the first Congressional Space Medal of Honor from President Jimmy Carter, assisted by Captain Robert Peterson. Armstrong, one of six astronauts to be presented the medal during ceremonies held in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), was awarded for his performance during the Gemini 8 mission and the Apollo 11 mission when he became the first human to set foot upon the Moon.

  9. Armstrong Awarded Space Medal of Honor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong receives the first Congressional Space Medal of Honor from President Jimmy Carter, assisted by Captain Robert Peterson. Armstrong, one of six astronauts to be presented the medal during ceremonies held in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), was awarded for his performance during the Gemini 8 mission and the Apollo 11 mission when he became the first human to set foot upon the Moon.

  10. The McAndrews Leadership Lecture: February 2015, by Dr Scott Haldeman. Challenges of the Past, Challenges of the Present

    PubMed Central

    Haldeman, Scott; McAndrews, George P.; Goertz, Christine; Sportelli, Louis; Hamm, Anthony W.; Johnson, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The McAndrews Leadership Lecture was developed by the American Chiropractic Association to honor the legacy of Jerome F. McAndrews, DC, and George P. McAndrews, JD, and their contributions to the chiropractic profession. This article is a transcription of the presentation made by Dr Scott Haldeman on February 28, 2015, in Washington, DC, at the National Chiropractic Leadership Conference. PMID:26770177

  11. 5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 antenna in background. Photograph shows on left side at bottom foundation berm and along right side bottom stanchion concrete foundations at bottom structural steel assembly. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. The Other Culture: Science and Mathematics Education in Honors. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Ellen B., Ed.; Garbutt, Keith, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This monograph addresses the current needs for science education at all levels of higher education. It proceeds from assumptions that the national debate for scientific understanding matters. It explores science in society and strategies for curricular integration in honors. The hope is that this monograph will further the discussion of science…

  13. Honoring Progress: An Update on the NGA Center Honor States. Volume 1, Issue 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartney, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This bimonthly newsletter provides information about the progress of the Honor States Grant Program, a governor-led effort to improve college--and work-ready graduation rates. This issue explores efforts by governors and state policymakers to experiment with alternative compensation policies that can improve teacher quality. Compensation…

  14. Honoring Progress: An Update on the NGA Center Honor States. Volume 1, Issue 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartney, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This bimonthly newsletter provides information about the progress of the Honor States Grant Program, a governor-led effort to improve college- and work-ready graduation rates. This issue explores strategies that governors and state policymakers are using to define and assess college and work readiness, Progress of three states in assessment is…

  15. A Handbook for Honors Administrators. NCHC Monographs in Honors Education Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Ada

    1995-01-01

    This handbook is intended to serve as an on-campus companion and guide for honors administrators, helping them to define and solidify their positions within their institutions. "Everyone knows" what deans or department heads are: what their responsibilities are, how they fit into the institutional hierarchy, who reports to them and to…

  16. Honoring Progress: An Update on the NGA Center Honor States. Volume 1, Issue 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartney, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This bimonthly newsletter provides information about the progress of the Honor States Grant Program, a governor-led effort to improve college--and work-ready graduation rates. This issue spotlights the "supply-side" of high school redesign, exploring how state policymakers are working to expand the supply of high-quality high schools. The…

  17. Faculty and Academic Integrity: The Influence of Current Honor Codes and Past Honor Code Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Donald L.; Butterfield, Kenneth D.; Trevino, Linda Klebe

    2003-01-01

    Found that faculty at honor-code schools have more positive attitudes toward their schools' academic integrity policies and allow the system to take care of monitoring and disciplinary activities. Faculty in noncode institutions have less positive attitudes and are more likely to take personal actions designed to deal with cheaters. Faculty in…

  18. Honoring Progress: An Update on the NGA Center Honor States. Volume 1, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawe, Torrey, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This bimonthly newsletter provides information about the progress of the Honor States Grant Program, a governor-led effort to improve college- and work-ready graduation rates. This issue explores science, technology, engineering, and math education (STEM), a priority for governors as they try to enhance workforce competitiveness in a global…

  19. Preparing Tomorrow's Global Leaders: Honors International Education. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Mary Kay, Ed.; Klein, Kim, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    In our diverse and interconnected world, expanding students' horizons beyond the classrooms and laboratories of home campuses is increasingly important. Even some of the brightest honors students remain naïve to the causes and ramifications of current world events and lack the necessary intercultural skills to become effective ethical leaders with…

  20. Building a Vibrant Honors Community among Commuter Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ginkel, Stan; van Eijl, Pierre; Pilot, Albert; Zubizarreta, John

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that honors programs often provide active networks of students that contribute to the development of the students' talents (De Boer & van Eijl; van Eijl, Pilot & Wolfensberger). These contact networks are also described as "learning communities" (Wilson et al.) and "honors communities" (van Eijl,…

  1. Notes toward an Excellent Marxist-Elitist Honors Admissions Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    This essay demonstrates that the honors community is still primarily focused on maintaining the highest levels of academic quality and integrity, but this focus is in sharp contrast to the national dialogue outside academia that more often focuses on mere completion or credentials. The author, Jerry Herron of the honors college at Wayne State…

  2. Building Bridges between Science Courses Using Honors Organic Chemistry Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Timothy; Pontrello, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Introductory undergraduate science courses are traditionally offered as distinct units without formalized student interaction between classes. To bridge science courses, the authors used three Honors Organic Chemistry projects paired with other science courses. The honors students delivered presentations to mainstream organic course students and…

  3. Survey of Honors Programs: A Resource Inventory and Directory, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeague, Patricia M., Comp.; And Others

    Drawing from a 1984 survey conducted by Moraine Valley Community College, this report provides composite and individual descriptions of 19 community college honors programs. Section I provides an overview of the survey on community college honors programs, which sought information on the organization of the program; the curriculum; and honors…

  4. Editor's Essay: Honoring Native Languages, Defeating the Shame.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambler, Marjane

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of the articles in this issue of the Tribal College Journal, which demonstrate how tribal colleges are gradually creating places where Native languages are safe. Asserts that a place where the language is honored is a place that education, too, becomes honored, and that recognizing Native languages leads to self-esteem and…

  5. Meeting the Aims of Honors in the Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    While little data-based research is available on the use of technology in the honors classroom, data on the nature of online honors courses are even rarer. In undergraduate education generally, enrollment in online courses has been increasing annually, outpacing enrollment in traditional, face-to-face environments. During fall 2011, more than 6.7…

  6. An Augustinian Culture of Learning for Interdisciplinary Honors Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ste. Antoine, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Any attempt to discern the purpose of honors education and to integrate it with the unique ethos of a Christian institution can prove to be difficult. Yet, describing and articulating a sense of purpose is essential for an honors program to justify itself. This essay contends that a philosophy of education based on Augustine's "Confessions" can…

  7. Career Paths of Postsecondary Honors Education Program Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humerickhouse, Kimberly D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the paths taken by individuals who hold administrative positions in post-secondary honors education programs. The research sought common professional and educational experiences that current honors education program administrators believe prepared them for the position. This study included the…

  8. Selecting for Honors Programs: A Matter of Motivational Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerheijm, Ron; Weerheijm, Jeske

    2012-01-01

    The honors programs at the Universities of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands were almost all initiated around 2008 and thus so far have yielded few data about outcomes, but we have a broad consensus that the honors programs should provide a better-than-average professional for the workplace and should give students a chance to perform to the…

  9. Honors Dissertation Abstracts: A Bounded Qualitative Meta-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Debra K.; Banning, James H.

    2012-01-01

    A potential source of useful information about undergraduate honors education can be found in doctoral dissertation abstracts that focus on honors. Debra Holman and James Banning of Colorado State University sought to explore this resource by undertaking a bounded qualitative meta-study of such abstracts using document analysis. Three…

  10. Moral Decision Making and Nontoleration of Honor Code Offenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffey, Arthur E.; Porter, David B.

    1992-01-01

    Explored differences in moral development and attitudes toward nontoleration clause of Honor Code of U.S. Air Force Academy between cadets who were convicted honor violators (n=24) and control group of nonviolators (n=162). Found that, as cadet moral development increased from year to year, acceptance and internalization of principle of…

  11. Creating Opportunities for Peer Leadership in Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leichliter, Marie E.

    2013-01-01

    Honors educators are privileged to work with exceptional students who are also some of the most engaged and motivated students on campus. These students often seek opportunities within their honors experience to study abroad, join community service organizations, conduct research, participate in internships, and develop their leadership skills.…

  12. The Problematics of Postmodernism: The Double-Voiced Honors Canon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Tim

    Honors education is not immune from the current controversy concerning the role of the literary canon. Indeed, the problem seems especially crucial for honors programs, for their curriculums are often multi-disciplinary in their approaches to culture and history. The solution may lie in what Linda Hutcheon calls the "poetics of the postmodern."…

  13. A Quality Instrument for Effective Honors Program Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Although the number of honors programs and colleges has grown dramatically over the last twenty years to over a thousand programs nationally, little has been done to develop consistency of standards in honors. In the interest of seeking consistency, the author designed a research study to provide initial insights into assessable measures that a…

  14. The Minority Honors Program in Energy-Related Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kish, Evelyn Rubio; Santa Rita, Emilio

    In 1984, Bronx Community College (BCC) established the Minority Honors Program in Energy Related Curricula, a partnership between their academic honors program and the U.S. Department of Energy. The program's goal is to increase the participation of minorities in the fields of Computer Science, Electrical Technology, Engineering Science, Data…

  15. Turning Points: Improving Honors Student Preparation for Thesis Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patino, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an action research study that had as its primary goal to increase retention of honors college students at Arizona State University by implementing an additional advising session during the fifth semester of their academic career. Introducing additional, strategically-timed support for the honors thesis and demystifying the…

  16. Special issue dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Edward H

    2002-01-01

    This special issue of the "Cardiovascular Drug Reviews" is dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr., who died on Dec. 9th, 2000 at the Princeton Medical Center in New Jersey at the age of 85. Dr. Ahrens was the Director of the Lipid Metabolism Laboratory at the Rockefeller University. Dr. Alexander Scriabine conceived the idea for the issue at the special memorial symposium held at the Rockefeller University on Feb. 05, 2002 under the auspices of The New York Lipid and Vascular Biology Research Club. Dr. Ahrens was the first president of the club. He started this club with Drs. Howard Eder and DeWitt Goodman. Dr. Eder thought that it would be a fitting attribute to honor one of the founding fathers of the club by hosting a memorial symposium. I, as the President of the club for that academic year, had no hesitation in accepting the proposal. This year will be the 40th anniversary of the club and its continued success provides a glimpse of the fine legacy left behind by Dr. Ahrens. Dr. Ahrens also played a pivotal role in the establishment of the Journal of Lipid Research. This is the 43rd year of the journal and in this commemorative issue we are reproducing a review he wrote for the 25th anniversary of the journal. I was never personally acquainted with Dr. Ahrens. However, I am honored that I got this opportunity to pay tribute to a great scientist whose work has contributed immensely to the progress of lipid research. He was a person who touched many lives and still continues to do so. My involvement in the remembrance of Dr. Ahrens shows that science not only impacts your contemporaries but also generations that follow you. Scientific research is a journey where you can leave your trails behind and be remembered for your work long after your departure from this world. Dr. Ahrens contributed immensely to the understanding of cholesterol metabolism. In the early stages of his career he showed that phospholipids solubilize fat in the blood. Now we know

  17. Opera subculture and suicide for honor.

    PubMed

    Stack, Steven

    2002-06-01

    The influence of music-based subcultures on suicidality has been the subject of much debate but little scholarly research. While previous work has documented that suicide is a remarkably frequent cause of death in opera, it has not explored the related consequences on opera's audience. In particular, the possible influence of the opera subculture on suicide acceptability has been largely unexplored. Suicide in the case of life without honor, the "Madame Butterfly Effect," is a theme in opera. Persons who are drawn into and/or influenced by the opera subculture of honor are hypothesized to be more accepting of suicide in the case of dishonor to one's family. Data are from the national general social surveys (N = 845). A multivariate logistic regression analysis finds that opera fans are 2.37 times more accepting of suicide because of dishonor than nonfans. Only two variables, religiosity and education, are more closely related to suicide acceptability than opera fanship. These are the first empirical results on the subject of opera and suicide acceptability.

  18. Honor Codes and Other Contextual Influences on Academic Integrity: A Replication and Extension to Modified Honor Code Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Donald L.; Trevino, Linda Klebe; Butterfield, Kenneth D.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the influence of modified honor codes, an alternative to traditional codes that is gaining popularity on larger campuses. Also tested the model of student academic dishonesty previously suggested by McCabe and Trevino. Found that modified honor codes are associated with lower levels of student dishonesty and that the McCabe Trevino…

  19. Fear of the Loss of Honor: Implications of Honor-Based Violence for the Development of Youth and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedem, Mina; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Violence committed against young women, and in some cases young men, who are considered to have violated honor-based norms are reported in several countries, making honor-based violence (HBV) a global concern. This article is an overview of research in this area and summarizes key findings from a Swedish program of research dedicated…

  20. Dr. John Richardson: Arctic Doctor

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C. Stuart

    1988-01-01

    Dr. John Richardson was foremost among a special breed of men, the surgeon-naturalists, one of whom accompanied every exploration party sent out by Great Britain. In addition to performing medical duties, the surgeon-naturalist was expected to identify and collect specimens of plants, animals, and rocks. Dr. Richardson was a member of two of the arctic expeditions led by Sir John Franklin, and participated in the search for the long-overdue third Franklin expedition. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21253036

  1. "Honor," collectivity, and agnation: emerging risk factors in "honor"-based violence.

    PubMed

    Payton, Joanne

    2014-11-01

    "Honor"-based violence (HBV) is increasingly recognized as form of violence against women and girls, but is neither fully conceptualized nor integrated into risk management strategies that are increasingly used to address gender-based violence in Europe and Anglophone states. This article will argue that there are grounds for the differentiation of HBV as a sub-category of gender-based violence which may affect risk management. Research was based in an analysis of 40 case files taken from Arabic- and Kurdish-speaking clients of a London nongovernment organization (NGO) providing services to women facing violence. Interrelations were found between "honor," agnation, and collectivity in their experiences of violence, with ramifications for service provision. PMID:24671044

  2. A Tradition Unlike Any Other: Research on the Value of an Honors Senior Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, H. Kay

    2016-01-01

    An honors senior thesis introduces students into a world of scholarship and professional activity in a way that no single course, either semester- or year-long, can do (Anderson, Lyons, and Weiner). Many honors educators consider honors thesis work to be the defining honors experience. For graduate schools, employers, and the students themselves,…

  3. Mission, Performance Indicators, and Assessment in U.S. Honors: A View from the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartelds, Vladimir; Drayer, Lyndsay; Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.

    2012-01-01

    A mission statement that identifies the goals and aims of an honors program is a key step in program development. The National Collegiate Honors Council's Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program states unequivocally that a successful honors program "has a clear mandate from the institution's administration in the form of a…

  4. Propensity Score Analysis of an Honors Program's Contribution to Students' Retention and Graduation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Robert R.; Lacy, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Honors directors and deans know or presume that retention and graduation rates of honors students substantially exceed those of non-honors students. In our research, we have attempted to better determine what portion of this success is attributable to the academic and other benefits of honors programs as opposed to the background characteristics…

  5. Wally Schirra Greets Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Apollo 7 Commander Walter M. Schirra, Jr., left, greets Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director, Marshall Space Flight Center and Dr. Kurt Debus, Right, KSC Director, during a prelaunch mission briefing held at the Florida Spaceport.

  6. And the Top Honor Goes to Voc Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hettinger, James

    1998-01-01

    Ray Chelewski is the first vocational-technical educator to win Walt Disney's top teaching honor. Chelewski is an agriculture teacher at the Presque Isle Regional Technology Center in northeast Maine. (JOW)

  7. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-22

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  8. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  9. White Dwarfs in SDSS DR9 and DR10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile Fusillo, Nicola Pietro; Gänsicke, Boris; Koester, Detlev

    2015-06-01

    Currently the largest catalogue of spectroscopically identified WDs is based on the 7th Data Release (DR) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and contains over 20000 WDs (Kleinman et al. 2013). However, only a fraction of all WDs in the photometric footprint of SDSS have been spectroscopically followed up. Using DR7 spectroscopy as a training sample, we developed a method to select high confidence photometric WD candidates. The novelty of our selection is that it allows us to assign to any object with multi-colour and proper motion data a well-defined "probability of being a white dwarf" (or a contaminant). Exploiting this selection method we compiled a catalogue (Gentile Fusillo et al. in prep) which currently covers the entire photometric footprint of SDSS, 14555sq deg, with a limiting magnitude of g ≤ 19. The catalogue contains over 20000 high-confidence WDs and WD candidates 11500 of which have not yet been followed up with Sloan spectroscopy. Even though, so far, our catalogue relies only SDSS we plan to extend the sky coverage as additional deep multi-colour large area surveys become available. DR10 includes over 1.4 million spectra taken with the new BOSS spectrograph, which improves over the original SDSS spectograph in both resolution and wavelength coverage, but has so far not been systematically mined for WD science. As part of this project, we also inspected over 8000 BOSS spectra of bright (g ≤ 19) colour selected sources and classified 1765 new WDs. We used this independent, spectroscopically confirmed sample to further validate our selection method. Finally we discuss possible application of our catalogue , focusing on the selection and follow up of 9 new DZs which show strong pollution from elements other than Ca and IR excess emission emission consistent with the presence of debris discs.

  10. [The American bacteriologist: Dr. Meyer].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Li, Zhi-ping

    2009-01-01

    Karl F. Meyer who was born in Switzerland was American famous bacteriologist of 20th century. During the World War II, Dr. Meyer urged the U. S. military to take positive reply measures against the bacteria war started by Japanese army and achieved significant accomplishments in the preventive and therapeutic theory of plague as well as the manufacture of plague vaccine. After the World War II, Meyer devoted to the scientific field of plague prevention and made great achievements in the area of animal diseases and public health. In 1951, he received the Lasker Award of America.

  11. Interview with Dr. Charley Zeanah

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Charles Zeanah is the Mary K. Sellars-Polchow Chair in Psychiatry, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Vice Chair for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans. He is also Executive Director of the Institute for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health at Tulane. He is the recipient of multiple awards including the Irving Phillips Award for Prevention, (AACAP), the Presidential Citation for Distinguished Research and Leadership in Infant Mental Health (American Orthopsychiatric Association), the Sarah Haley Memorial Award for Clinical Excellence (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), the Blanche F. Ittelson Award for Research in Child Psychiatry (APA), and the Serge Lebovici Award for International Contributions in Infant Mental Health (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Dr. Zeanah is a Distinguished Fellow of AACAP, a Distinguished Fellow of the APA and a Board Member of Zero to Three. He is the Editor of Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3rd edition) considered as the state of the art textbook and standard reference in the field of Infant Mental Health. PMID:23667354

  12. Characteristics of medical students completing an honors program in pathology.

    PubMed

    Fenderson, B A; Hojat, M; Damjanov, I; Rubin, E

    1999-11-01

    The Honors Program in pathology at Jefferson Medical College provides a voluntary enrichment opportunity for students who have demonstrated a superior ability to cope with the pathology curriculum and who rank in the upper fifth of their class. This study was performed to determine whether honor students possess cognitive and psychosocial attributes that distinguish them from their classmates. Students from five academic years (entering classes 1991 to 1995) were divided into 3 groups: (1) those who completed the Honors Program (n = 85), (2) those in the top 20% of the class who were offered the option but chose not to participate in the Honors Program (n = 128), and (3) students who did not qualify for the program (n = 953). Comparisons between these three groups were made on the basis of selected measures of academic achievement retrieved from the Jefferson Longitudinal Study database and psychosocial data obtained from a questionnaire completed during the first-year orientation. Students who completed the Honors Program in pathology had scored higher on the physical science section of the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and had obtained higher first-year grade point averages than students in both of the other groups. Subsequently, they attained higher second-year grade point averages and scored higher on Step 1 and Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), compared with their peers in the other groups. There were no significant differences in psychosocial measures between honor students and the rest of the cohort (group 3). However, students in the top 20% of the class who declined the invitation to participate in the Honors Program (group 2) showed higher scores on the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the Eysenck Emotional Instability (Neuroticism) Scale than did their classmates. Despite these differences, students who completed the Honors Program (group 1) and eligible students who declined participation (group 2) selected

  13. Honor your father and your mother.

    PubMed

    Schuiling, G A

    2001-12-01

    While on the one hand there is much mutual love and care in the relationship between parents and their offspring, there may, on the other hand, be also much mutual 'sound and fury', which sometimes is far from 'signifying nothing' (William Shakespeare, Macbeth). Indeed, from conception on, individuals are confronted with parent-offspring conflicts of all kinds. Initially these conflicts concern physiological matters (implantation, nutrition, weaning, etc.), but later in life the accent is on psychological ('you must this', 'you must that', 'don't do that' etc.) and social affairs, and phenomena such as child abuse, infanticide and incest may occur. It is, therefore, certainly not self-evident that children honor their parents. To reinforce their position, parents (societies) may appeal to a 'divine' commandment which helps them make their children suppress any tendency to conflict toward them (and hence to their culture), so that children conform to their parents' norms and values. When such psychological and sociological parent-offspring conflicts are not resolved satisfactorily, it can be suggested, children may (consciously or unconsciously) have aggressive feelings toward their parents: Freud's 'Oedipus complex'. This complex, it is argued, can also be seen as a parent-offspring conflict. Given their biological basis, parent-offspring conflicts can hardly be considered as abnormal. Conflicts between adults and their offspring have always existed and will always exist, simply because it is inherent in our genetic make-up: parents and offspring of sexually reproducing species--humans included--are only about 50% genetically related and hence have different interests at all levels of being. Indeed, parent-offspring conflicts are such stuff as we are made on, and our little life is rounded with its consequences (adapted from William Shakespeare, The Tempest). PMID:11840575

  14. Honor killing attitudes amongst adolescents in Amman, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Manuel; Ghuneim, Lana

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines attitudes towards honor crimes amongst a sample of 856 ninth grade students (mean age = 14.6, SD = 0.56) from 14 schools in Amman, Jordan. Descriptive findings suggest that about 40% of boys and 20% of girls believe that killing a daughter, sister, or wife who has dishonored the family can be justified. A number of theoretically meaningful predictors were examined: Findings suggest that attitudes in support of honor killings are more likely amongst adolescents who have collectivist and patriarchal world views, believe in the importance of female chastity amongst adolescents, and morally neutralize aggressive behavior in general. Findings for parental harsh discipline are mixed: While the father's harsh discipline is predictive of honor killing attitudes, the mother's behavior is not. Furthermore, support for honor killing is stronger amongst male adolescents and adolescents for low education backgrounds. After controlling for other factors religion and the intensity of religious beliefs are not associated with support for honor killings. Models were tested separately for male and female respondents and suggested no systematic differences in predictors. Limitations and implications are discussed.

  15. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  16. Naming patterns reveal cultural values: patronyms, matronyms, and the U.S. culture of honor.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan P; Carvallo, Mauricio; Imura, Mikiko

    2014-02-01

    Four studies examined the hypothesis that honor norms would be associated with a pronounced use of patronyms, but not matronyms, for naming children. Study 1 shows that men who endorse honor values expressed a stronger desire to use patronyms (but not matronyms) for future children, an association that was mediated by patriarchal attitudes. Study 2 presents an indirect method for assessing state patronym and matronym levels. As expected, patronym scores were significantly higher in honor states and were associated with a wide range of variables linked previously to honor-related dynamics. Study 3a shows that following the terrorist attacks of 9/11, patronyms increased in honor states, but not in non-honor states. Likewise, priming men with a fictitious terrorist attack (Study 3b) increased the association between honor ideology and patronym preferences. Together, these studies reveal a subtle social signal that reflects the masculine values of an honor culture. PMID:24201292

  17. Honors Programs at Colleges and Universities in the Southern Region of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Dena Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the major characteristics of honors programs at colleges and universities in the southern region of the United States and to review the perceptions of honors programs directors relating to the effectiveness of and challenges facing honors programs at these institutions. A survey was administered to…

  18. 34 CFR 654.1 - What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM General § 654.1 What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program? Under the Robert C. Byrd...

  19. 34 CFR 654.1 - What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM General § 654.1 What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program? Under the Robert C. Byrd...

  20. 34 CFR 654.1 - What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM General § 654.1 What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program? Under the Robert C. Byrd...

  1. 34 CFR 654.1 - What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM General § 654.1 What is the Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program? Under the Robert C. Byrd...

  2. Engaging Honors Students in Purposeful Planning through a Concept Mapping Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Melissa L.; Podjed, Stephanie; Taasan, Sean

    2013-01-01

    In Larry Clark's monograph chapter on the education of academically talented college students, he challenged honors educators to consider their role in helping students find their path, particularly through the addition of self-reflection and exploratory projects in honors courses. In an honors first-year experience (FYE) course for science,…

  3. Variability and Similarity in Honors Curricula across Institution Size and Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cognard-Black, Andrew J.; Savage, Hallie

    2016-01-01

    When a well-developed honors curriculum is paired with co-curricular opportunities, it serves to distinguish an institution's honors education. Together, these curricular and co-curricular experiences are described as best practices in the National Collegiate Honors Council's (NCHC's) "Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors…

  4. Exploring Relationships of Metacognition and University Honors Students' Academic Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Susan Denise

    2012-01-01

    University honors programs emerged in the 1920s, growing to over 1,000 programs in existence today. Honors programs provide enhanced educational opportunities to students who excel academically. University honors students are experts who effectively apply metacognitive knowledge, strategies, and experiences to enhance academic behavior. Although…

  5. Committed to the Honor Code: An Investment Model Analysis of Academic Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dix, Emily L.; Emery, Lydia F.; Le, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Educators worldwide face challenges surrounding academic integrity. The development of honor codes can promote academic integrity, but understanding how and why honor codes affect behavior is critical to their successful implementation. To date, research has not examined how students' "relationship" to an honor code predicts…

  6. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, greets vice president Spiro T. Agnew in the Launch Control Center for the Apollo 14 mission. Between Dr. Von Braun and Mr. Agnew are their Royal Highnesses, The Prince and Princess of Spain. The royal visitors greeted the launch control team in th enter after the launch of Apollo 14.

  7. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at a picnic.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, stakes claim to a table for the picnic celebrating man's first lunar landing. With Dr. Von Braun are his wife, Maria (seated, right), and son, Peter (back to camera). His daughter, Margrit, was also present, but is hidden from view by friends in this view.

  8. Dr. von Braun Discusses 'Bottle Suit' Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun (center), then Chief of the Guided Missile Development Division at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, discusses a 'bottle suit' model with Dr. Heinz Haber (left), an expert on aviation medicine, and Willey Ley, a science writer on rocketry and space exploration. The three men were at the Disney studios appearing in the motion picture, entitled 'Man in Space.'

  9. An Interview with Dr. Robert W. Young.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silentman, Irene

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Robert W. Young discusses what led him to work in the Navajo Nation and to begin studying Navajo, the method he used for developing a Navajo orthography, his professional relationship with Dr. William Morgan, the system they used to develop an English-Navajo dictionary, his views on language loss, and his greatest accomplishment--a reservation…

  10. A resolution honoring Dr. James Schlesinger, former Secretary of Defense, Secretary of Energy, and Director of Central Intelligence.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Sessions, Jeff [R-AL

    2014-06-11

    06/11/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3620; text as passed Senate: CR S3607-3608) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Dr. Haakon Sæthre: a Norwegian neuroscientist and his resistance against Nazi Germany.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Haakon Sæthre was a leader of Norwegian neurology and psychiatry. He was resourceful, compassionate and had immense pride in his independent homeland. He described Sæthre-Chotzen syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type III). When Nazi Germany occupied Norway during World War II, Sæthre fearlessly and actively resisted, from revoking his medical association membership, to hiding persecuted Jews as patients in his psychiatric ward and aiding in their escape to Sweden, to managing the largest "illegal" food warehouse in Oslo with Danish humanitarian aid. As a prominent and noticeable citizen, he was arrested and executed by the Nazis in reprisal for the resistance's assassination of a hated Norwegian Nazi. His legacy lives on in Norway, where he was honored by a scholarship fund, a portrait and multiple plaques at Ullevål Hospital, and a street and memorial statue in his hometown. He was a hero and should be remembered by all who practice neurology.

  12. Dr. Lenke Horvath (1917-1991): Creator of Pediatric Neurosurgery in Romania.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dumitru; Moisa, Horatiu Alexandru; Nica, Dan Aurel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2016-04-01

    The development of neurosurgery as an independent specialty took place with great difficulty in Romania. In this respect, the most revered personalities are those of Professor Alexandru Moruzzi (1900-1957) (in Iasi) and Professor Dimitrie Bagdasar (1893-1946) (in Bucharest), who are the fathers of modern neurosurgery in Romania. Professor Bagdasar was schooled in Professor Harvey Cushing's clinic in Boston and is credited with creating the first completely independent neurosurgical unit in Romania. His legacy was carried on with honor by Professor Constantin Arseni (1912-1994), who, in 1975, tasked Dr. Lenke Horvath (1917-1991) with creating the first autonomous pediatric neurosurgery unit in Bucharest. This article is a small tribute to the founder of pediatric neurosurgery in Romania and one of the female pioneer neurosurgeons, who, by personal example of dedication and hard work, radically changed medical thinking and neurosurgery in Romania.

  13. Improving Retention and Fit by Honing an Honors Admissions Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia Joanne; Zagurski, John Thomas Vitus

    2013-01-01

    Since SAT and ACT tests have been long-suspected and then shown to contain class and race biases while not accurately predicting retention, the Schedler Honors College at the University of Central Arkansas (UCA) shifted to a holistic, multi-criterion selection process, de-emphasizing standardized tests, and then analyzed the outcomes. This essay…

  14. Mentors, Muses, and Mutuality: Honoring Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Anne

    2012-01-01

    I describe feminist community psychology principles that have the potential to expand and enrich mentoring and that honor Barbara Snell Dohrenwend, a leader who contributed to the research, theory, and profession of community psychology. I reflect on the affect that Barbara Dohrenwend had on life and on the development of feminist community…

  15. Honors Education and the Prospects for Academic Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, George M.

    2008-01-01

    Honors education has the potential to serve as the foundation for reform of undergraduate education. Calls for reform during the last three decades have not resulted in change, in large measure because of the failure to engage the faculty and students in the effort. While prescriptions for change have abounded, conditions on campus and within…

  16. Codes, Ciphers, and Cryptography--An Honors Colloquium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karls, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    At the suggestion of a colleague, I read "The Code Book", [32], by Simon Singh to get a basic introduction to the RSA encryption scheme. Inspired by Singh's book, I designed a Ball State University Honors Colloquium in Mathematics for both majors and non-majors, with material coming from "The Code Book" and many other sources. This course became…

  17. The Impact of Honors on the Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The development of an honors program at Rogers State University a decade ago brought about significant positive changes to the campus, where more than three-quarters of the students are the first in their families to attend college. Throughout the years, these young scholars have elevated academic discourse across campus and delivered an impact…

  18. Exploratory Honors Students: Academic Major and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carduner, Jessie; Padak, Gary M.; Reynolds, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we investigated the academic major and career decision-making processes of honors college students who were declared as "exploratory" students in their freshman year at a large, public, midwestern university. We used semistandardized interviews and document analysis as primary data collection methods to answer four…

  19. Against Teleology in an Honors Great Books Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan-Haughey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Chronologically presented courses that span centuries often catalyze unwitting buy-in to unexamined narratives of progress. While useful for helping students make connections between the human past, present, and future, Great Books honors curricula like the one used at the University of Maine have a few inherent problems that require careful…

  20. 38 CFR 3.802 - Medal of Honor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certificate issued in which the right of the person named in the certificate to the special pension is set... have received during the period beginning the first day of the month after the date of the event for... payment using the monthly Medal of Honor pension rates in effect from the first day of the month after...

  1. Honors Futures Course: Orwell's "1984"--Myth or Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Barbara

    An overview is provided of an honors futures course offered at Isothermal Community College and entitled "Orwell's '1984': Myth or Reality." The paper traces the sequence of class activities, discussion topics, and student assignments for the 11-week course. The following issues are discussed, both within and outside of the context of related…

  2. Nontraditional Honors and the Hopefulness of Summer Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Having read the essay on "Nontraditional Honors" by Janice Rye Kinghorn and Whitney Womack Smith, author Angela Salas writes that it offered her reminders about the fears and insecurities students carry with them. It also offered Salas the opportunity to reconsider the behaviors she was seeing in her class. She grew to see student…

  3. Signifying Difference: The Nontraditional Student and the Honors Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    In their essay "Nontraditional Honors," Janice Rye Kinghorn and Whitney Womack Smith state that students who are "twenty-five-years of age and older are usually considered nontraditional." However, they first acknowledge that "traditional" and "nontraditional" are "constructed and slippery terms."…

  4. Benjamin Banneker Honors College: Gateway to Scientific and Technical Doctorates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Elaine P.

    1990-01-01

    Illustrates the prominent role that historically Black institutions, such as Prairie View A & M University, play in Black progress in higher education. Programs like the Banneker Honors College of Prairie View can expand Black participation as researchers and practitioners in a highly technical society while also increasing the Black…

  5. Communicating about Sexuality: An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Honors Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozema, Hazel J.

    A course in the honors program (a sophomore level social science seminar) at Millikin University offers an interdisciplinary approach to communication and sexuality, functions as a course in the Gender Studies Minor curriculum, and provides a needed source of sex education for the campus. The purpose of the course is to facilitate communication…

  6. An American Honors Program in the Arab Gulf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yyelland, Byrad

    2012-01-01

    The first Western honors program to be established in the Arab Gulf is offered in Doha, Qatar, on a small satellite campus of an American university. Doha is the capital city of Qatar, a sovereign Arab state physically located on a small peninsula bordering Saudi Arabia in the south and jutting into the Persian Gulf. With a population of only 1.7…

  7. Laboratories for Educational Innovation: Honors Programs in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.; Van Eijl, Pierre; Pilot, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In Dutch universities, honors programs are a fast growing development. The first such programs started in 1993. Twenty years later a large number of programs are implemented at nearly all research universities and also at many universities of applied sciences in the Netherlands. Recent data have revealed significant diversity in the types and…

  8. Thinking and Rethinking: The Practical Value of an Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, James

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how James Herbert's career transition to working on the Educational EQuality Project for the College Board and the National Endowment for the Humanities confirmed his belief that a liberal education in honors was good preparation for life. He proposes that his work experience may be illuminating to those who are now…

  9. Hommage a Rene Jeanneret (Festschrift in Honor of Rene Jeanneret).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travaux Neuchatelois de Linguistique (TRANEL), 1992

    1992-01-01

    This festschrift in honor of Rene Jeanneret, administrator of the Center for Applied Linguistics at Neuchatel University (Switzerland), contains the following papers (all papers are written in French with two exceptions): "A Walk with Rene Jeanneret Through the Garden of Applied Linguistics"; "--Thank You.--No Thank You!"; "The Interface between…

  10. Honoring the Trust: Quality and Cost Containment in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massy, William F.

    This book asserts that improvements in quality and cost containment are required not only for the well-being of individual institutions of higher education, but also to honor the trust placed in academe by society. The book outlines a practical program for improvement. The chapters of part 1, "The Case for Change," are: (1) "The Erosion of Trust";…

  11. Community Building at Honors Programs in Continental Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkel, Nico; van Rees, Floris; Ruis, Margit; Sloots, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Many universities in the United States and Europe offer honors programs to meet the demands of gifted and intelligent students. One of the standard goals of these programs is to build an intellectual learning community. Establishing a community can be difficult because it requires that students show an active attitude and initiative. Many…

  12. Honors Workshop for Middle School Science Teachers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisner, Gerald W.; Lee, Ernest W.

    The Honors Workshop for Middle School Science Teachers was designed to address teachers' conceptual understanding of basic scientific principles, student misconceptions and how to deal with them, and observation and measurement techniques. For 4 weeks in summer and on 6 Saturdays during 2 academic years, 30 leaders among science teachers from the…

  13. The Egalitarianism of Honors at a Polytechnic University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Soraya M.

    2015-01-01

    The Kellogg Honors College (KHC) is a distinctive community within Cal Poly Pomona (CPP), a public university in Southern California and one of twenty-three universities in the California State University (CSU) system. With over 22,000 students, CPP is the second-largest polytechnic university in the United States. The university's goal is to…

  14. Honors and the Humanities: Necessary as Air and Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Angela Marie

    2015-01-01

    In a cultural environment that maintains that post-secondary education ought to produce job ready graduates, the importance of the liberal arts and the competencies they teach, along with the questions they engage, often comes up for debate. In such a culture, honors may appear frivolous, elitist, and rear-guard. Angela Marie Salas defends both…

  15. Why Honors Is a Hard Sell in the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelen-Eigles, Deborah; Milner, Janice Levinsohn

    2014-01-01

    At the college president's request and after attending the 2013 NCHC conference in New Orleans, the authors developed a comprehensive honors program framework and spent the spring semester of 2014 sharing it with units across the college for discussion and feedback. The response was overwhelmingly positive. Despite the many benefits of this…

  16. An Honors Koan: Selling Water by the River

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portnoy, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Since Jerry Herron begins his forum essay, "Notes toward an Excellent Marxist-Elitist Honors Admissions Policy," with his anecdotal True Genealogical Confessions, Jeffery Portnoy, writes here that he feels feel obligated to begin in a similar mode. One side of Portnoy's family was in the real estate business in St. Louis, and the other…

  17. Honors in Chile: New Engagements in the Higher Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skewes, Juan Carlos; Sampaio, Carlos Alberto Cioce; Conway, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    Honors programs are rare in Latin America, and in Chile they were unknown before 2003. At the Universidad Austral de Chile, an interdisciplinary group of scholars linked to environmental studies put forward a pilot project for implementing a new experience in higher education. Challenged by an educational environment where (i) apathy and…

  18. An Elusive Honor: Psychology, Behavior, and the Nobel Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickren, Wade E.

    2003-01-01

    Apart from economics, the human sciences have not generally been rewarded with high honors from the world community. Psychology has been awarded the distinction of a Nobel Prize only when it has served a role in explicating human behavior in relation to economics. Yet psychological science has played no small part in the work of a number of Nobel…

  19. An Honors Interdisciplinary Community-Based Research Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, David; Terlecki, Melissa; Watterson, Nancy; Ratmansky, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how two faculty members at Cabrini College--one from biology and the other from psychology--incorporated interdisciplinary community-based research in an honors course on environmental watershed issues. The course, Environmental Psychology, was team-taught in partnership with a local watershed organization, the Valley Creek…

  20. To Participate or Not to Participate: The Perceptions of Gifted Students regarding an Honors Program at a Private Southeastern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Gerri Ann

    2010-01-01

    The number of students who become completers of an honors program on college campuses is low. A mixed methods approach was utilized to determine the perceptions of gifted students regarding an honors program at a private, Southeastern university. Students who were honors program participants, honors program drop-outs, and qualified…

  1. Letter to Dr. Felix Bronner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Dear Dr. Bronner: I have been reading in The Physiologist the letters from senior physiologists for many years with great interest. It is impressive that many of the respondents are still pursuing scientific endeavours in their 70's and some even in their 80's. The interesting task is to ponder the relative causative proportions of heredity and environment responsible. One wonders whether knowing something about physiology engenders longer and more productive lives? I suspect so because of the accompanying self-discipline. But another factor would seem to be the pervasive joy of working in this profession. I have been fortunate to be able to acquire the joy of physiology during my graduate studies at Illinois, and to have been able to carry it over here at NASA, Ames Research Center for the past 40 years. A truly academic style research environment at a federal research center is rare. The trick to a joyous research career is to overcome those ever-present slings and arrows of outrageous fortune with dignity whenever possible. To that end I have found solace and guidance in reading the history of warfare and its leaders, especially Sun Tsu's The Art of War and Clauswitz's On War. I became eligible for retirement in 1993, but to insure domestic tranquility and also the joy of pursuing my research hobby have continued working in the laboratory on human research. It is troubling to see that funding for individual scientists conducting human research is declining rapidly, along with their new ideas; perhaps the old ones are more comfortable. Hopefully I can provide a similar response when I'm 80! Thanks for your interest. Sincerely, John Greenleaf

  2. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  3. NRAO Astronomer Honored by American Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), received the American Astronomical Society's (AAS) Helen B. Warner Prize on January 11, at the society's meeting in Seattle, Washington. The prize is awarded annually for "a significant contribution to observational or theoretical astronomy during the five years preceding the award." Presented by AAS President Debra Elmegreen, the prize recognized Ransom "for his astrophysical insight and innovative technical leadership enabling the discovery of exotic, millisecond and young pulsars and their application for tests of fundamental physics." "Scott has made landmark contributions to our understanding of pulsars and to using them as elegant tools for investigating important areas of fundamental physics. We are very proud that his scientific colleagues have recognized his efforts with this prize," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. A staff astronomer at the NRAO since 2004, Ransom has led efforts using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope and other facilities to study pulsars and use them to make advances in areas of frontier astrophysics such as gravitational waves and particle physics. In 2010, he was on a team that discovered the most massive pulsar yet known, a finding that had implications for the composition of pulsars and details of nuclear physics, gravitational waves, and gamma-ray bursts. Ransom also is a leader in efforts to find and analyze rapidly-rotating millisecond pulsars to make the first direct detection of the gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein. In other work, he has advanced observational capabilities for finding millisecond pulsars in globular clusters of stars and investigated how millisecond pulsars are formed. A graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY, Ransom served as an artillery officer in the U.S. Army. After leaving the Army, he earned a Ph.D. at Harvard University in 2001, and was a postdoctoral fellow

  4. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  5. But Dr. Meisels Is Not Convinced.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisels, Samuel J.

    1987-01-01

    Commenting on the Gesell Institute's response to his original article concerning the Gesell assessments, Dr. Meisels continues to maintain that the Gesell readiness tests lack sufficient proof of validity. (BB)

  6. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Goddard rocket with four rocket motors. This rocket attained an altitude of 200 feet in a flight, November 1936, at Roswell, New Mexico. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  7. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  8. [The life of Dr. John William Heron, the second superintendent of Chejungwon].

    PubMed

    Kim, D K; Kim, T S

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to overview the life of John W. Heron, M. D. who was the first appointed medical missionary to Korea by the Presbyterian Church USA. Although he was a competent doctor as well as a devoted missionary, he is not well-known yet, because he died early after 5 years' service in Korea. Dr. Heron was born in Derbyshire, England on June 15, 1856. His father, Rev. E. S. Heron, was a Scotch Minister of Congregational Church. His family emigrated to America in 1870 when he was fourteen years old and settled in Knoxville, Tennessee. In 1881, he was admitted to the University of Tennessee Medical School and graduated with highest honors in 1883. After training in New York University Hospital, he refused the offer of professorship from the University of Tennessee to become a medical missionary to Korea. He arrived in Seoul on June 21, 1885 and began to work in Royal Government Hospital, Chejungwon, the predecessor of Severance Hospital. In 1887, he became the superintendent of the Hospital following Dr. Horace N. Allen. He also worked for the Royal family and sometimes traveled to the rural areas to care for the patients. He started Chejungwon Church which later became Namdaemoon Presbyterian Church. In 1887, Dr. Heron worked as a member of the Bible translation committee and in 1889, he was elected as the chairman of the Public Committee of the Presbyterian Churches. In 1890, he established 'The Korean Religious Tract Society (Chosunsyungkyoseohoi) with Underwood and Ohlinger. The society published and replenished Christian books, periodical magazines and booklets. In the Summer of 1890, Dr. Heron did his best to take care of the sick suffering from an epidemic dysentery and himself got infected because of the terrible overwork. He passed away on July 26th, 1890. On his deathbed, he told his soldier and native friends around him as follow: "Jesus loves you. He gave His life for you. Stand by Him!" The martyrdom of Dr. Heron should be remembered in

  9. [[The Lactéol's laboratory of Dr Boucard (Laboratoire du Dr Boucard].

    PubMed

    Raynal, Cécile; Lefebvre, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Shortly before 1910, Dr Boucard creates his laboratory in Paris. It manufactures and sells a drug based on lactic ferments the " Lactéol du Dr Boucard" (Dr's Boucard Lactéol) that will make the fortune of the physician. The article explains Dr Boucard's life and his relationship with the arts (painting and photography), and tells the story of his laboratory until the 2000s, referring to the pharmacists who succeeded them, as well as the various buildings where were elaborated Lactéol's variants. PMID:27281930

  10. Honors biomedical instrumentation--a course model for accelerated design.

    PubMed

    Madhok, Jai; Smith, Ryan J; Thakor, Nitish V

    2009-01-01

    A model for a 16-week Biomedical Instrumentation course is outlined. The course is modeled in such a way that students learn about medical devices and instrumentation through lecture and laboratory sessions while also learning basic design principles. Course material covers a broad range of topics from fundamentals of sensors and instrumentation, guided laboratory design experiments, design projects, and eventual protection of intellectual property, regulatory considerations, and entry into the commercial market. Students eventually complete two design projects in the form of a 'Challenge' design project as well as an 'Honors' design project. Sample problems students solve during the Challenge project and examples of past Honors projects from the course are highlighted. PMID:19964766

  11. Career and Technology Center Honors Julie Hartman | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On May 7, Julie Hartman was honored by the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC) for her support of the CTC’s Biomedical Sciences Program. As an education program specialist for Outreach and Special Programs at NCI at Frederick, Hartman is responsible for NCI at Frederick’s participation in the program, which is designed to offer Frederick County high school students hands-on, practical laboratory experience beyond the typical classroom setting. 

  12. High-Impact Recruiting: A Focus Group of Prospective Honors Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, David M.; Goodwin, Kristy

    2014-01-01

    In 2013-2014, the Governors State University (GSU) Honors Program was faced with a need to evolve from a two-year honors program serving juniors and seniors only to a four-year honors program. This need was born out of the university's transition to a four-year university in 2014-2015. This mandate led to some concerns that the author, the newly…

  13. Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger Sign Citizenship Certificates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    The members of the Peenemuende team and their family members were awarded the United States citizenship on April 14, 1955. Pictured here is Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (middle) and Dr. Wernher von Braun signing U.S. citizenship certificates. Martin Schilling is at left.

  14. Geophysical survey of 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4, 100-D Area

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this Geophysical Survey was to verify the location of the 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4. A surface monument currently marks its location. The crib is 10 feet by 10 feet and 15 feet deep. Ground-Penetrating Radar was the geophysical method selected to conduct the investigation.

  15. Life history, code of honor, and emotional responses to inequality in an economic game.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eric J; Forster, Daniel E; McCullough, Michael E

    2014-10-01

    The code of honor, which is characterized by a preoccupation with reputation and willingness to take retaliatory action, has been used extensively to explain individual and cultural differences in peoples' tendencies to behave aggressively. However, research on the relationship between the code of honor and emotional responses to social interactions has been limited in scope, focusing primarily on anger in response to insults and reputational threats. Here we broaden this scope by examining the relationship between code of honor and emotional reactions in response to an unfair economic exchange that resulted in unequal monetary earnings among 3 laboratory participants. We found that endorsement of the code of honor was related to anger and envy in response to unfair monetary distributions. Interestingly, code of honor predicted envy above and beyond what could be accounted for by anger, but the converse was not the case. This suggests that the code of honor influenced perceptions of how subjects viewed their own earnings relative to those of others, which consequently was responsible for their apparent anger as a result of the economic transaction. Furthermore, the unique relationship between code of honor and envy was present only for subjects who received unfair treatment and not for subjects who merely witnessed unfair treatment. Additionally, we replicated previous findings that harsh childhood environmental conditions are associated with endorsement of the code of honor, highlighting the potential value of incorporating a life history theoretical approach to investigating individual differences in endorsement of the code of honor.

  16. A price to pay: Turkish and Northern American retaliation for threats to personal and family honor.

    PubMed

    Uskul, Ayse K; Cross, Susan E; Günsoy, Ceren; Gerçek-Swing, Berna; Alözkan, Cansu; Ataca, Bilge

    2015-01-01

    Two studies investigated retaliatory responses to actual honor threats among members of an honor culture (Turkey) and a dignity culture (northern United States). The honor threat in these studies was based on previous research which has shown that honesty is a key element of the conception of honor and that accusations of dishonesty are threatening to one's honor. In both studies, participants wrote an essay describing the role of honesty in their lives and received feedback on their essay accusing them of being dishonest (vs. neutral feedback). Turkish participants retaliated more strongly than did northern U.S. participants against the person who challenged their honesty by assigning him/her to solve more difficult tangrams over easy ones (Study 1) and by choosing sensory tasks of a higher level of intensity to complete (Study 2). Study 2 added a relational honor condition, in which participants wrote about honesty in their parents' lives and examined the role of individual differences in honor values in retaliation. Endorsement of honor values significantly predicted retaliation among Turkish participants in the relational honor attack condition, but not among northern U.S. participants.

  17. Life history, code of honor, and emotional responses to inequality in an economic game.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eric J; Forster, Daniel E; McCullough, Michael E

    2014-10-01

    The code of honor, which is characterized by a preoccupation with reputation and willingness to take retaliatory action, has been used extensively to explain individual and cultural differences in peoples' tendencies to behave aggressively. However, research on the relationship between the code of honor and emotional responses to social interactions has been limited in scope, focusing primarily on anger in response to insults and reputational threats. Here we broaden this scope by examining the relationship between code of honor and emotional reactions in response to an unfair economic exchange that resulted in unequal monetary earnings among 3 laboratory participants. We found that endorsement of the code of honor was related to anger and envy in response to unfair monetary distributions. Interestingly, code of honor predicted envy above and beyond what could be accounted for by anger, but the converse was not the case. This suggests that the code of honor influenced perceptions of how subjects viewed their own earnings relative to those of others, which consequently was responsible for their apparent anger as a result of the economic transaction. Furthermore, the unique relationship between code of honor and envy was present only for subjects who received unfair treatment and not for subjects who merely witnessed unfair treatment. Additionally, we replicated previous findings that harsh childhood environmental conditions are associated with endorsement of the code of honor, highlighting the potential value of incorporating a life history theoretical approach to investigating individual differences in endorsement of the code of honor. PMID:24866523

  18. A price to pay: Turkish and Northern American retaliation for threats to personal and family honor.

    PubMed

    Uskul, Ayse K; Cross, Susan E; Günsoy, Ceren; Gerçek-Swing, Berna; Alözkan, Cansu; Ataca, Bilge

    2015-01-01

    Two studies investigated retaliatory responses to actual honor threats among members of an honor culture (Turkey) and a dignity culture (northern United States). The honor threat in these studies was based on previous research which has shown that honesty is a key element of the conception of honor and that accusations of dishonesty are threatening to one's honor. In both studies, participants wrote an essay describing the role of honesty in their lives and received feedback on their essay accusing them of being dishonest (vs. neutral feedback). Turkish participants retaliated more strongly than did northern U.S. participants against the person who challenged their honesty by assigning him/her to solve more difficult tangrams over easy ones (Study 1) and by choosing sensory tasks of a higher level of intensity to complete (Study 2). Study 2 added a relational honor condition, in which participants wrote about honesty in their parents' lives and examined the role of individual differences in honor values in retaliation. Endorsement of honor values significantly predicted retaliation among Turkish participants in the relational honor attack condition, but not among northern U.S. participants. PMID:26227549

  19. Dr. Wernher von Braun Laid to Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paper Clip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. Dr. von Braun died in Alexandria, Va., on June 16, 1977, seven years after his NASA appointment. This photo was taken at the site where he was laid to rest.

  20. DR and CR: Recent advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Schaefer-Prokop, C M; De Boo, D W; Uffmann, M; Prokop, M

    2009-11-01

    After some initial reluctance, nowadays transition from conventional analogue-to-digital radiographic technique is realized in the vast majority of institutions. The eventual triumph of digital over conventional technique is related to its undoubted advantages with respect to image quality and improved image handling in the context of a picture archiving and communication system. CR represents the older system, which matured over decades and experienced some important recent improvements with respect to dose efficiency and work-flow efficiency that strengthened its position. It represents a very versatile, economically attractive system that is equally suited for integrated systems as well as for cassette-based imaging at the bedside. DR systems offer superb image quality and realistic options for dose reduction based on their high dose efficiency. While for a long time only integrated systems were on the market suited for a large patient throughput, also mobile DR systems became recently available. While for the next years, it is likely that DR and CR systems will coexist, the long term perspective of CR will depend on further innovations with respect to dose efficiency and signal-to-noise characteristics while for DR economical aspects and broader availability of mobile systems will play a role. PMID:19695809

  1. Dr. Akira Tonomura: Master of Experimental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Akira Tonomura, Hitachi Fellow, passed away on May 2, 2012 at the age of 70. As a classmate at the University of Tokyo and his long-time friend, I would like to describe my personal memory of Tonomura and a brief review of his contributions to fundamental physics.

  2. Dr. von Braun Visits Huntsville Boys Club

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun, Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and chairman of this year's United Givers Fund (UGF) drive at MSFC, takes time out from the problems of sending a man to the Moon to talk baseball with 11-year-old Randy Smith at the Huntsville Boys Club.

  3. Dr. Wernher Von Braun presents a certificate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, presents a humorous certificate to Major General Charles W. Eifler, commanding general of Redstone Arsenal, at the close of a farewell luncheon for the general prior to General Eifler moving to a new European duty station.

  4. Walt Disney and Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Werhner von Braun, then Chief, Guided Missile Development Operation Division at Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, was visited by Walt Disney in 1954. In the 1950's, von Braun worked with Disney Studio as a technical director, making three films about space exploration for television. A model of the V-2 rocket is in background.

  5. ["Allergy testing" with "Dr. Voll electroacupuncture"].

    PubMed

    Bresser, H

    1993-06-01

    Electroacupuncture according to Dr. Voll (EAV) is one of the numerous unconventional methods propagated for allergy testing in Germany. From an experimental examination for "drug testing" of this method, it can be concluded that EAV is unsuitable for any form of allergy testing.

  6. An Interview with Dr. Deborah W. Proctor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2007-01-01

    In an interview, Dr. Deborah W. Proctor, eCurriculum Director for Academic Innovations/ Minnesota Online and Co-Chair for the MERLOT International Conference, outlines her academic path that led to her current position and interests. As e-Curriculum Director for Academic Innovations in the Office of the Chancellor she works with system…

  7. Interview [with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey, author of "Reading Educational Research: How to Avoid Getting Statistically Snookered." During the interview, Bracey explains why he considers the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as a "weapon of mass destruction" and that he sees nothing to suggest that NCLB has improved schools.…

  8. ORAC-DR: Astronomy data reduction pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie; Cavanagh, Brad; Currie, Malcolm J.; Gibb, Andy

    2013-10-01

    ORAC-DR is a generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure; it includes specific data processing recipes for a number of instruments. It is used at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, AAT, and LCOGT. This pipeline runs at the JCMT Science Archive hosted by CADC to generate near-publication quality data products; the code has been in use since 1998.

  9. A TRIBUTE TO DR. WILLIAM PENN WATKINSON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. William Penn Watkinson (known to colleagues as "Penn") of EPA¿s health research lab (National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory) of Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, died Wednesday, December 13 after a battle with lung cancer. He was a member of the Pulmonar...

  10. Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby: The Complete Eugenicist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodwell, Grant

    1997-01-01

    Profiles the work of Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby, a late 19th-century propagandist for eugenics. Eugenics is a science that deals with the transmission of hereditary racial traits, coupled with a desire to use this for the elimination of social ills. Discusses Saleeby's work with the Eugenics Education Society. (MJP)

  11. Dr. Israel Cuellar (1946-2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamarripa, Manuel X.

    2009-01-01

    On September 7th, 2008, the mental health field lost a trailblazing researcher and clinician as he lost his battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Israel Cuellar made significant contributions to the study of acculturation including its importance in delivering appropriate mental health…

  12. DCEG Symposium to Honor Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr. | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer On May 6, the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) will sponsor a symposium to honor 50 years of leadership from its founding director, Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., M.D., who stepped down from the position in July 2012. The conference, entitled “Cancer Epidemiology: From Pedigrees to Populations,” will highlight critical findings in cancer epidemiology from the last 50 years, as well as opportunities for future research directions. Long History of Leadership and Discovery

  13. Property and the body: Applying Honoré

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Muireann

    2007-01-01

    This paper argues that the new commercial and quasi‐commercial activities of medicine, scientists, pharmaceutical companies and industry with regard to human tissue has given rise to a whole new way of valuing our bodies. It is argued that a property framework may be an effective and constructive method of exploring issues arising from this. The paper refers to A M Honoré's theory of ownership and aims to show that we have full liberal ownership of our own bodies and as such can be considered to be self‐owners. PMID:17971463

  14. Nonprofit Board Membership for Health Care Professionals: Honor or Responsibility?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce M; Calderwood, James A

    2016-09-01

    Physicians and other health care professionals are often invited to serve on nonprofit boards. Although service on a nonprofit board is an honor, it carries a large responsibility. Many health care professionals are unaware of the level of commitment and involvement board service requires, particularly fiduciary boards, which have accompanying risks and legal functions. In the present article, the authors describe the activities and responsibilities of a fiduciary board member. They also provide a checklist of questions to ask before agreeing to serve on a board and discuss how to decide whether one is the right fit for a specific board position. PMID:27571299

  15. A College Honors Seminar on Evolution and Intelligent Design: Successes and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01

    College honors courses provide an opportunity to tackle controversial topics in an atmosphere that encourages active learning, critical thinking, and open discussion. This venue is particularly appropriate for examining the debate about teaching intelligent design (ID) in public school science classes. A one-credit honors enrichment seminar taught…

  16. A Guide to Newbery Medal Winners and Honor Books, 1977-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinman, Judith R.; Henderson, Darwin L.

    Intended for use by teachers, librarians, and parents, this guide analyzes Newbery Award Medal and honor winning books (1977 through 1984) for sexism. Following a statement of criteria, established by the American Library Association concerning the type of book that should receive the medal and honor citations, and the guidelines used to determine…

  17. Comparison of Characteristics of Selected College and University Honors Programs Throughout the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidich, Alan

    A series of evaluative studies were conducted of the honors program of the College of Arts and Sciences of the University of South Carolina (USC) by the university's Counseling Bureau. In order to compare USC's honors program, which began in 1965, with those of other institutions, a questionnaire was mailed to 315 public and private colleges and…

  18. Achievement Motivation in Rural African-American Female High School Honor Graduates. Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Dale F.; And Others

    This report examines motivational variables and support structures that influenced the success of African American females who graduated with honors from a rural Georgia high school. Case studies focus on the nature of the honor graduates' friendships and the role that friendship may have played in motivating these students to become honor…

  19. The Challenge of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Honors Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Students with autism are increasingly present on college campuses, and because many young adults with autism are cognitively gifted, it follows that honors programs and colleges are obliged to be aware of this "invisible" disability and be ready to accommodate, and educate, honors students on the autism spectrum. Susan Yager describes…

  20. The Role of the Honors Program in the Community College Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeague, Patricia M.

    Drawing from a literature review and experiences at Moraine Valley Community College, this paper examines the role of the community college honors program in meeting the special needs of superior students; analyzes the characteristics of effective and innovative programs and curricula; and discusses how an honors program can become…

  1. The Honors Program in English at Central High School, St. Joseph, Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Virginia F.

    High school honors programs can help meet the needs of students who have an extra measure of intellectual ability and the desire to learn in depth, become independent, and pursue special interests. This paper points out how little is done nationwide to help gifted students and urges schools to institute honors programs. It then describes an…

  2. Honors Composition: A Possible Alternative in the Two-Year College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Jean Bolen

    Since 1975, an honors course in freshman composition has been offered at Emanuel County Junior College (ECJC), a unit of the University System of Georgia, for academically superior students whose needs may not be met by the standard curriculum. The process of identifying honors students involves screening entering students to identify those who…

  3. Dancing with the Stars: Stepping up and Stepping out in Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinndorf, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most profound statements in James Herbert's lead essay-simple as it seems at the very beginning of his piece, "Thinking and Rethinking: The Practical Value of an Honors Education," concerns his discovery early in his career that "a liberal education in honors was good preparation for life." Stressing the importance…

  4. Effects of Participation in a Post-Secondary Honors Program with Covariate Adjustment Using Propensity Score

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furtwengler, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to determine the extent to which participation in a post-secondary honors program affected academic achievement. Archival data were collected on three cohorts of high-achieving students at a large public university. Propensity scores were calculated on factors predicting participation in honors and used as the covariate.…

  5. Setting Them Free: Students as Co-Producers of Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gorp, Bouke; Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.; de Jong, Nelleke

    2012-01-01

    While the attractions and advantages of freedom that differentiates honors education from regular teaching are both theoretically and practically significant, the authors' experience at Utrecht University in the Netherlands has demonstrated drawbacks that need to be addressed and resolved in creating effective honors education. Freedom poses…

  6. The Cultural Encounters Model: Incorporating Campus Events into the Honors Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfrehm, James; Sullivan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Honors students are, almost by definition, committed to excellence. As a result, they tend to be overextended (Guzy). They also "tend to be more eager, exploratory, and experienced than their non-honors counterparts" (Achterberg 77). They typically take a full load of coursework while at the same time juggling clubs, learning…

  7. I Want Some Freedom for My People: Baptists, Great Texts, and Honors Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Hebert and Matthew T. McBee's (2007) recent study of gifted university students examines how an honors program can function as a community for social, intellectual, and psychological growth. In particular, they find that honors programs offer advantageous support for gifted students in navigating social isolation, in questioning traditional…

  8. Striving for Our Best and Brightest Selves: Making Honors Central to the Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The fall 2014 entering honors class as Westminster College was drawn from the largest applicant pool in the program's almost three-decade history. Far from focusing on perks, 68% of these entering students claimed it was the interesting honors curriculum that caused them to submit an application. As for the larger applicant pool itself, the top…

  9. How Effective Is Honor Code Reporting over Instructor- Implemented Measures? A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Schmidt, Marcelo; Wei, Tianlan

    2013-01-01

    Honor codes have become increasingly popular at institutions of higher education as a means of reducing violations of academic integrity such as cheating and other academically dishonest acts. Previous research on honor code effectiveness has been limited to correlational research designs that preclude the examination of cause-and-effect…

  10. Dr. von Braun and Dr. Stuhlinger With a Model of the Nuclear-Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, taken at the Walt Disney Studios in California, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger are shown discussing the concepts of nuclear-electric spaceships designed to undertake the mission to the planet Mars. As a part of the Disney 'Tomorrowland' series on the exploration of space, the nuclear-electric vehicles were shown in the last three television films, entitled 'Mars and Beyond,' which first aired in December 1957.

  11. An Exploration of the Value of Service-Learning: Characteristics of Traditional and Honor Service-Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Lori; Williams, Elizabeth; Russell, Brittany

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the value of service for undergraduate students enrolled in an Honors and a non-Honors section of a service-learning course. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to identify if students who participated in an Honors (n = 18) section of a service-learning course show greater gains in attitudes and skills associated with…

  12. The Impact of Involvement in Mortar Board Senior Honor Society on Lifelong Views of Civic Engagement and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Daniel James

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact that involvement in Mortar Board National Senior Honor Society has on lifelong views of civic engagement and leadership. Mortar Board Senior Honor Society is a collegiate honor society established in 1918 that recognizes students for their outstanding contributions to their college or university community in the…

  13. Ubiquitous Laptop Usage in Higher Education: Effects on Student Achievement, Student Satisfaction, and Constructivist Measures in Honors and Traditional Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurst, Christian; Smarkola, Claudia; Gaffney, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    Three years of graduating business honors cohorts in a large urban university were sampled to determine whether the introduction of ubiquitous laptop computers into the honors program contributed to student achievement, student satisfaction and constructivist teaching activities. The first year cohort consisted of honors students who did not have…

  14. Global collapse of the DR21 filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying the most massive and dense star-forming clump in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing DR21 and DR21(OH), we obtained observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. For that, we used molecular line data from our 13CO 1→0, CS 2→1, and N_2H^+ 1→0 survey of the Cygnus X region (FCRAO) and high-angular resolution observations in isotopomeric lines of CO, CS, HCO^+, N_2H^+, and H_2CO, obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. The observations reveal a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e. dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO^+ and 12CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of ˜0.6 km s-1 and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10-3 M_⊙ yr-1 for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M_⊙ at densities of around 10^5 cm-3 within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting (with free-fall times much shorter than sound crossing times and low virial parameter α). The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large scales and is now in a state of global gravitational

  15. Centennial Presidential Perspective: Dr. Alfred Blalock

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Claude A.; George, Timothy J.; Conte, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Great men are not a common occurrence. Indeed, they are a rare find. Though respected and lauded in their time, it is only in retrospect that their true contributions can be adequately measured as a surgeon, an educator and a scientist. Such is the case of Dr. Alfred Blalock. Many have considered him the father of modern cardiac surgery. All consider his “blue baby” operation to be one of the landmarks of cardiac surgery and, as the chief of surgery at Johns Hopkins, he trained many who would become the leaders of our discipline. His continual reach for excellence helped him to not only affect, but revolutionize the paradigm of surgical research, an understanding of the physiology of shock and the surgical management of pulmonic stenosis/atresia. Dr. Blalock was the 30th president of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery and his presidential address was given in 1951. PMID:22248679

  16. Introduction of Dr. Andrew V Schally

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Valdés, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    I first met Dr. Andrew V Schally (PhD, MDhc (Multi), DSc, Distinguished Medical Research Scientist, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Professor of Pathology and Department of Medicine,
Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA) many years ago, probably around the beginning of the 1990's in one of his visits to Mexico City (Figure 1). He has many friends in my country since some of the investigations that led to the development of the LHRH agonists were made in a couple of Mexican hospitals in collaboration with some outstanding Mexican physicians that I will mention later. In that time, I was the head of the Department of Urology of the Mexican National Cancer Institute and our Director, Dr. Jaime de la Garza, invited him for a meeting. I was surprised by his humbleness, intelligence and easy going personality, in spite of being a Nobel Prize scientist. PMID:26112485

  17. Dr. Wernher von Braun In His Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paperclip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. This photo depicts von Braun in his office at MSFC.

  18. Dr.L: Distributed Recursive (Graph) Layout

    2007-11-19

    Dr. L provides two-dimensional visualizations of very large abstract graph structures. it can be used for data mining applications including biology, scientific literature, and social network analysis. Dr. L is a graph layout program that uses a multilevel force-directed algorithm. A graph is input and drawn using a force-directed algorithm based on simulated annealing. The resulting layout is clustered using a single link algorithm. This clustering is used to produce a coarsened graph (fewer nodes)more » which is then re-drawn. this process is repeated until a sufficiently small graph is produced. The smallest graph is drawn and then used as a basis for drawing the original graph by refining the series of coarsened graphs that were produced. The layout engine can be run in serial or in parallel.« less

  19. Dr. Wernher Von Braun examines a ruby crystal.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, and Dr. Eberhard Rees (left), deputy director, technical, examine a ruby crystal used in laser experiments in the Marshall Center's Space Sciences Laboratory.

  20. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    PubMed

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  1. 1895: Dr W G Grace's golden summer.

    PubMed Central

    Toghill, P.

    1995-01-01

    One hundred years ago there was another wonderful summer. Dr. W G Grace, England's greatest cricketer, in his 47th year, completed his "century of centuries" and scored 2346 runs. This remarkable achievement was celebrated with enthusiasm and affection by the Victorian public. In more practical terms generous testimonials raised 9073 pound sterling 8s 6d, which made it a golden summer in more ways than one. Images p618-a PMID:7663257

  2. Dr Amos G Babcock - fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    The War of 1812-14 between the United States of America and Great Britain gave rise to several journals relating the sufferings of prisoners of war confined in prison ships and gaols in England. One of these is A Journal of a Young Man from Massachusetts, said to have been written by Dr Amos G Babcock, an American ship's surgeon, and first published in 1816. This article sets out arguments for and against the truth of this assertion.

  3. Working with Dr. Per V. Bruel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade Kjaer, Svend

    2002-11-01

    For more than a decade I have had the pleasure to work as an application specialist together with--and for--Dr. Bruel, one of the founders of the Bruel & Kjaer Company, famous for sound and vibration measurement instrumentation, often nicknamed ''Green Boxes.'' It has been a great experience for me, and I recall this period in my life as one where I was much inspired by Dr. Bruel's methods, both as a private person and with his work as a director for the company and leader of both the sales and the innovation departments. In this presentation I will highlight some funny stories that are told about Dr. Bruel combined with the episodes that I have experienced myself. In short, the most simple way to characterize this rather complex person is maybe by repeating his vision statement for the company: ''We shall have fun and we shall make money. On the other hand we shall not have so much fun that we do not make any money, and we shall not make so much money that we do not have any fun!'' For Per Bruel, acoustics is one of his great hobbies. He has others such as cars, airplanes, motorbikes (he is the lucky owner of a Danish Nimbus) and wine.

  4. Dr. Wernher Von Braun talkes with George Hardy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    George Hardy of the Marshall Space Flight center's Astronautics Laboratory, talks with Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), deputy associate administrator for planning. Dr. Von Braun was inspecting the mockup of the Saturn workshop during a visit to the Marshall Center. The visit coincided with the 10th anniversary celebration of the center of which Dr. Von Braun was director until March 1, 1970.

  5. Interview with Dr Joseph Murray (by Francis L Delmonico).

    PubMed

    Murray, Joseph

    2002-10-01

    The Editors asked Dr Delmonico to interview Dr Joseph Murray, winner of the Nobel prize in Medicine 1990 for performing the first successful renal transplant, to record recollections of the issues of the 1950s, when clinical transplantation was born, on Dr Murray's medical career in transplantation, and on some contemporary issues.

  6. DR JOHN ADAMCZYK AND DR LONNIE REID EXAMINE SOFTWARE FOR THE NEW START-UP SOFTWARE - ELECTRONICS - A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    DR JOHN ADAMCZYK AND DR LONNIE REID EXAMINE SOFTWARE FOR THE NEW START-UP SOFTWARE - ELECTRONICS - AND COMMUNICATIONS - SEC - INCUBATOR OPENED MAY 1 1999 AS PART OF THE LEWIS INCUBATOR FOR TECHNOLOGY - LIFT

  7. HLA-DR alleles determine responsiveness to Borrelia burgdoferi antigens

    PubMed Central

    Iliopoulou, Bettina Panagiota; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Huber, Brigitte T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Arthritis is a prominent manifestation of Lyme disease, caused upon infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). Persistent chronic Lyme arthritis, even after antibiotic treatment, is linked to HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4) and related alleles. On the contrary, Lyme patients who resolve arthritis within 3 months post-infection show an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*1101 (DR11). The aim of this study was to analyze the underlying mechanism by which HLA-DR alleles confer genetic susceptibility or resistance to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Methods We generated DR11 transgenic (tg) mice on a murine class II−/− background and compared their immune response to Bb-antigens to that of DR4 tg mice after immunization with Bb outer surface protein (Osp)A or infection with live Bb. Results We report that the T cells of OspA-immunized and Bb-infected DR11 tg mice were defective in IFN-γ production compared to those of DR4 mice. On the other hand, DR11 tg mice developed higher titers of anti-OspA and anti-Bb Abs, respectively, than DR4 mice. In accordance with this observation, we found that Bb-infected DR11 tg mice had decreased spirochetal burden compared to DR4 mice, measured by qPCR. Conclusion This study provides direct evidence that in the presence of HLA-DR11 the immune response against Bb-antigens is directed towards a protective Ab response. In contrast, an inflammatory Th1 response is induced in the presence of DR4. These observations offer an explanation for the differential genetic susceptibility of DR4+ and DR11+ individuals for the development of chronic Lyme arthritis and eventually the progression to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. PMID:19950279

  8. NASA honors Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Apollo 13 astronaut and Biloxi native Fred Haise Jr. smiles during a Dec. 2 ceremony at Gorenflo Elementary School in Biloxi honoring his space career. During the ceremony, Haise was presented with NASA's Ambassador of Exploration Award (an encased moon rock). He subsequently presented the moon rock to Gorenflo officials for display at the school. Haise is best known as one of three astronauts who nursed a crippled Apollo 13 spacecraft back to Earth during a perilous 1970 mission. Although he was unable to walk on the moon as planned for that mission, Haise ended his astronaut career having logged 142 hours and 54 minutes in space. During the ceremony, he praised all those who contributed to the space program.

  9. "Shades of Foreign Evil": "Honor Killings" and "Family Murders" in the Canadian Press.

    PubMed

    Shier, Allie; Shor, Eran

    2016-09-01

    This article compares murder cases labeled "honor killings" with cases labeled "family/spousal murders" in the Canadian news media, exploring the construction of boundaries between these two practices. We conducted a systematic qualitative content analysis, examining a sample of 486 articles from three major Canadian newspapers between 2000 and 2012. Our analysis shows that "honor killings" are framed in terms of culture and ethnic background, presenting a dichotomy between South Asian/Muslim and Western values. Conversely, articles presenting cases as "family/spousal murders" tend to focus on the perpetrators' personalities or psychological characteristics, often ignoring factors such as culture, patriarchy, honor, and shame. PMID:26712236

  10. A tribute to Dr. Robert C. Allen, an inspirational teacher, humanitarian, and friend (Nov. 18, 1950-Mar. 24, 2005).

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Greene, Jill A; Long, William B

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Robert C. Allen was a gifted educator, as well as experienced ophthalmologist, who was a close personal friend of Dr. Edlich at the University of Virginia Health System. While serving on the faculty at the University of Virginia Health System, Dr. Allen proved to be a compassionate physician, who developed close personal relationships with the residents, faculty, and his patients. Dr. Allen was invited by Dr Edlich to be a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants. When Dr. Allen told Dr. Edlich that he had ocular melanoma in 2000, this news was a wake-up call to Dr. Edlich on the need to prevent skin cancer, as well as ocular melanoma. Empowered by this news, Dr. Edlich was honored to co-author four articles on skin cancer prevention, as well as the latest article focusing on prevention of ocular melanoma. The Ocular Melanoma Foundation (Richmond, VA (USA)) was founded in 2003 by Dr. Robert C. Allen to increase awareness, enhance education, and provide advocacy among both patients and health care professionals regarding this rare, but potentially lethal cancer. It has a website that provides patient information, up-to-date information and enables communication/ discourse between and among patients and practitioners (admin@ocularmelanoma.org). Dr. Allen died on March 24, 2005, at his home surrounded by family and loved ones. When surgeons are faced with challenging healthcare diseases, Dr. Edlich's mentor, Dr. Owen Wangensteen, advised Dr. Edlich that he should seek the advice and guidance of skilled basic scientists, who are familiar with the problem. Dr. Wangensteen is recognized as the greatest surgical teacher during the 20th century. Consequently, Dr. Edlich enlisted the advice and guidance from the two co-authors of the next article regarding the scientific basis for the selection of sunglasses to prevent the development of cataracts, pterygia, skin cancer, as well as ocular melanoma. Dr. Reichow is a Professor

  11. Multiwavelength observations of two B-star nurseries - DR 15 and DR 20

    SciTech Connect

    Odenwald, S.F.; Campbell, M.F.; Shivanandan, K.; Schwartz, P.; Fazio, G.G.; Moseley, H. Colby College, Waterville, ME Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1990-01-01

    New observations of DR 15 and 20 are reported as part of a study of compact H II regions in the Cyg X region. The radio and FIR data for these objects, when combined with (C-12)O maps, IRAS imagery, and optical photographs, provide new insights into the structure of this complex region and the nature of the star-formation process there. The observations show that DR 15 may consist of one or two B0 ZAMS stars whose H I regions have formed a low-density cavity within a molecular cloud. DR 20 appears to be a young OB cluster. The cluster is dominated by an O5.5 ZAMS star and also contains an approximately 3500-yr-old B0 star appearing as a compact H II region, along with weak FIR sources that may be B0-star candidates. 36 refs.

  12. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    PubMed Central

    Asche, G

    1996-01-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history. Images p1398-a PMID:8616743

  13. Singultus foetalis and Dr. Alfons Mermann.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher C; Petroianu, Georg A

    2016-01-01

    During intrauterine life, hiccups are universally present, their incidence peaking in the third trimester. Alfons Mermann (1852-1908), a gynecologist from Mannheim, Germany, best known for having established the Luisenheim Woechnerinnenasyl [lying-in asylum] there in 1887, is viewed as the first physician to name and describe singultus foetalis [fetal hiccups] in a modern peer-reviewed scientific publication. This short report attempts to shed some light on the work of Dr. Mermann and to explore whether or not he was indeed the first to recognize this phenomenon. PMID:26529591

  14. Dr. Jan Rogers with Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Jan Rogers, project scientist for the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an obejct (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials sciences program.

  15. Honor Societies: A Simple Role Concept and Some Suggestions for Chapters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Harry V.

    1975-01-01

    Article described three basic types of honor socities, with a few examples of each, and presented some general notions and practical suggestions for chapters based on the concept of intelligent partnership. (Author/RK)

  16. Honor Listing Update, 1990: A Variety Pack (Books for the Teenage Reader).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Donelson, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Reviews eight books on the 1990 honor listing for adolescents including historical fiction, biographies, fictional stories of farm families, a personal experience account, a fantasy/occult romance, and a collection of short stories. (PRA)

  17. Special Issue on Signal Processing for Mechanical Systems in Honor of Professor Simon Braun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassois, Spilios D.

    2016-06-01

    This Special Issue is in honor of a pioneer of the area of Signal Processing for Mechanical Systems and, at the same time, Founding Editor of the Journal of Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing (MSSP), Professor Simon Braun.

  18. White dwarfs identified in LAMOST DR 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jincheng; Zhao, Jingkun; Tziamtzis, Anestis; Liu, Jifeng; Li, Lifang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a catalogue of 1056 spectroscopically identified hydrogen-dominated white dwarfs (DAWDs), 34 helium-dominated white dwarfs (DBWDs) and 276 white dwarf main sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Large sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey data release 2 (DR2). 383 DAWDs, 4 DBWDs and 138 WDMSs are new identifications after cross-match with literature. There are ˜4100 k spectra in total from DR 2. The low ratio of white dwarfs found in LAMOST is attributed to biased selection of LAMOST input catalogue and much brighter targets relative to stars observed in Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this paper, a new DAWD selection method is adopted as a new attempt and supplement to the traditional methods. The effective temperature, surface gravity, mass, cooling age and distance of high signal-to-noise DAWDs are estimated. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be ˜0.6 M⊙, which is consistent with previous work. The parameters of WDMS binaries are also provided in this paper. As the foundation of our future work, which is to identify more WDs with debris disc, WDs found in LAMOST showed a lot of potential. Interesting infrared-excess WDs will be reported in our forthcoming paper.

  19. Honoring silence and valuing community: living leadership in 21st century teaching-learning.

    PubMed

    Backer Condon, Barbara; Hegge, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    Leadership is a very personal concept. The methods implemented by leaders often reflect philosophical beliefs and theoretical underpinnings. This column, while recognizing that leadership styles are indeed personal, proffers living leadership in nursing education through two key leadership attitudes. These attitudes are honoring silence and valuing community. Honoring silence is discussed as recognizing the multiple dimensions of silence, and valuing community is presented in light of the humanbecoming community models change concepts: moving-initiating, anchoring-shifting, and pondering-shaping.

  20. [Dr. Hideyo Noguchi and Hajime Hoshi].

    PubMed

    Misawa, M

    1991-01-01

    Hajime Hoshi is a founder of Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company and of Hoshi University. He became acquainted with Dr. Hideyo Noguchi in the United States in 1901 during his study abroad. Hoshi often stayed overnight at Noguchi's apartment in Philadelphia. Hoshi and Noguchi were both from Fukushima, Japan, and Hoshi was three years older than Noguchi. Both persons had been good friends until Hoguchi died in 1928. Hoshi and Noguchi together had met Hirobumo Ito and Thomas Edison. In 1906, Hoshi came back to Japan after a 12-year stay in the United States. The financial support by Hoshi enabled the only and one temporary returning of Noguchi to Japan in 1915. In this paper, the friendship between the famous two persons is described in detail.

  1. [Dr. Hideyo Noguchi and Hajime Hoshi].

    PubMed

    Misawa, M

    1991-01-01

    Hajime Hoshi is a founder of Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company and of Hoshi University. He became acquainted with Dr. Hideyo Noguchi in the United States in 1901 during his study abroad. Hoshi often stayed overnight at Noguchi's apartment in Philadelphia. Hoshi and Noguchi were both from Fukushima, Japan, and Hoshi was three years older than Noguchi. Both persons had been good friends until Hoguchi died in 1928. Hoshi and Noguchi together had met Hirobumo Ito and Thomas Edison. In 1906, Hoshi came back to Japan after a 12-year stay in the United States. The financial support by Hoshi enabled the only and one temporary returning of Noguchi to Japan in 1915. In this paper, the friendship between the famous two persons is described in detail. PMID:11623302

  2. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella Typhimurium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  3. Entrevue avec le Dr Charley Zeanah

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Le Dr Charles Zeanah est titulaire de la chaire de psychiatrie Mary K. Sellars-Polchow, professeur de pédiatrie clinique et vice-président de la pédopsychiatrie au département de psychiatrie et des sciences du comportement de la faculté de médecine de l’Université Tulane, à la Nouvelle-Orléans. Il est également directeur général de l’institut de la santé mentale des nourrissons et des jeunes enfants de Tulane. Il est récipiendaire de nombreux prix, notamment le prix de prévention Irving Phillips (AACAP), la mention élogieuse présidentielle pour sa recherche et son leadership exceptionnels en santé mentale des nourrissons (American Orthopsychiatric Association), le prix d’excellence clinique Sarah Haley Memorial (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), le prix de recherche en pédopsychiatrie Blanche F. Ittelson (APA), et le prix Serge Lebovici Award soulignant les contributions internationales à la santé mentale des nourrissons (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Le Dr Zeanah est fellow distingué de l’AACAP, fellow distingué de l’APA et membre du conseil d’administration de Zero to Three. Il est l’éditeur scientifique de Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3e édition) qui est considéré comme étant le manuel de pointe et la référence de base du domaine de la santé mentale des nourrissons.

  4. Goldie Brangman Remembers the Operation to Save Dr King.

    PubMed

    Koch, Evan; Brangman, Goldie

    2015-12-01

    In September 1958 the Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr was stabbed and nearly assassinated. Surgeons at Harlem Hospital in New York City removed a 17.8-cm (7-in)-long letter opener from Dr King's chest. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Goldie Brangman remembers this event because she participated in Dr King's anesthetic. This article correlates Brangman's memories with published accounts of the event. It also places the event within the context of the modern civil rights movement that Dr King led. PMID:26742331

  5. Goldie Brangman Remembers the Operation to Save Dr King.

    PubMed

    Koch, Evan; Brangman, Goldie

    2015-12-01

    In September 1958 the Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr was stabbed and nearly assassinated. Surgeons at Harlem Hospital in New York City removed a 17.8-cm (7-in)-long letter opener from Dr King's chest. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Goldie Brangman remembers this event because she participated in Dr King's anesthetic. This article correlates Brangman's memories with published accounts of the event. It also places the event within the context of the modern civil rights movement that Dr King led.

  6. Inspiring Exemplary Teaching and Learning: Perspectives on Teaching Academically Talented College Students--A Companion Piece to "Teaching and Learning in Honors." National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Larry, Ed.; Zubizarreta, John, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This monograph is a companion piece to "Teaching and Learning in Honors." The authors in this monograph are dedicated to exploring the sometimes magical, sometimes ordinary, sometimes rewarding, sometimes challenging connections between good teaching and deep, lasting learning. Questions regarding students' learning, pedagogical…

  7. The DraC usher in Dr fimbriae biogenesis of uropathogenic E. coli Dr(+) strains.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piatek, Beata; Kur, Marta; Wilkanowicz, Sabina; Piatek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2010-05-01

    Biogenesis of Dr fimbriae encoded by the dra gene cluster of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains requires the chaperone-usher pathway. This secretion system is based on two non-structural assembly components, the DraB periplasmic chaperone and DraC outer-membrane usher. The DraB controls the folding of DraE subunits, and DraC forms the assembly and secretion platform for polymerization of subunits in linear fibers. In this study, mutagenesis of the DraC N-terminus was undertaken to select residues critical for Dr fimbriae bioassembly. The DraC-F4A, DraC-C64, DraC-C100A and DraC-W142A significantly reduced the adhesive ability of E. coli strains. The biological activity of the DraC mutants as a assembly platform for Dr fimbriae polymerization was verified by agglutination of human erythrocytes and adhesion to DAF localized at the surface of CHO-DAF(+) and HeLa cells. The residue F4 of the DraC usher conserved among FGL and FGS chaperone-assembled adhesive organelles can be used to design pillicides blocking the biogenesis of Dr fimbriae. Because the draC and afaC-III genes share 100% identity the range of the virulence determinant inhibitors could also be extended to E. coli strains encoding afa-3 gene cluster. The investigations performed showed that the usher N-terminus plays an important role in biogenesis of complete fiber.

  8. Reexamining the Writings of Dr. Seuss To Promote Character Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dave F.; Varady, Joe

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of children's literature by Dr. Seuss in the middle school classroom to help students explore issues of their character and social development, adult expectations, and changes in their personal environment. Discusses themes addressed in selected Dr. Seuss books, and how these can be used as thematic units for classroom…

  9. Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

  10. Dr. Albert Carr--Science Educator 1930-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The very first issue of "Educational Perspectives" was published in October of 1962. Dr. Albert Carr wrote one of the inaugural essays on the topic of current developments in science education, and he went on to write several other articles for the journal. This article shares why Dr. Albert Carr's colleagues remember him for his…

  11. Biotechnology Symposium - In Memoriam, the Late Dr. Allan Zipf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A one-day biotechnology symposium was held at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), Normal, AL on June 4, 2004 in memory of the late Dr. Allan Zipf (Sept 1953-Jan 2004). Dr. Zipf was a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, AAMU, who collaborated extensively with ARS/MS...

  12. Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher 2012 Wilder Silver Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher, Oregon State University, was awarded the 2012 Wilder Medal by the American Pomological Society for his contributions to hazelnut genetics and cultivar development. Dr. Mehlenbacher took over the leadership of the Oregon State University hazelnut breeding program in 1986 aft...

  13. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  14. Framing Honors Physical Geology around Critical Thinking and Communication Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The honors section of freshman geology at LSU has 20-35 highly motivated students with ACT scores above 30. They are usually non-majors and have had no exposure to geosciences in high school. Teaching geology in Louisiana is challenging because there are virtually no rocks exposed at the surface and students with creationist beliefs are common. In addition to exams, this course requires a series of projects: plate reconstruction, minerals in the home, a metaphor for geologic time, volcano research paper, group project on volcanoes, water resources, and a comparison essay on Hurricane Katrina and the 1927 flood of the Mississippi river. The purpose of the projects is to promote critical thinking and communication skills as well as allow students to explore in greater depth topics relevant to their every day lives such as hurricanes. Critical thinking skills emphasized are interrelated processes and systems, variable temporal/spatial scales, and analysis of controversial topics such as the age of the Earth. This course is certified by LSU's Communication across the Curriculum (CxC) program as communication intensive in written and visual communication. CxC certification requires that 40% of grading depend on communication activities. Written communication exercises focus on organization, audience, incorporation and coordination of visual elements, and proper citation of sources. Visual communication exercises include working with maps, charts and graphs, and a group project where they create a poster and/or stand alone slide presentation on volcanoes geared to a middle school audience. Topics such as origin and quality of tap water, how much copper ore is used to build their home, and local geoharzards such as the Baton Rouge Fault generate a higher interest level and higher retention of information. Preliminary assessment is positive including improved exam results, higher student evaluations, recruitment of geology majors, and anecdotal evidence of long term

  15. Computational simulations of frictional losses in pipe networks confirmed in experimental apparatusses designed by honors students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, Nicholas A.; Hynes, Eric; Kutz, April

    2015-11-01

    Lectures in introductory fluid mechanics at NIU are a combination of students with standard enrollment and students seeking honors credit for an enriching experience. Most honors students dread the additional homework problems or an extra paper assigned by the instructor. During the past three years, honors students of my class have instead collaborated to design wet-lab experiments for their peers to predict variable volume flow rates of open reservoirs driven by gravity. Rather than learn extra, the honors students learn the Bernoulli head-loss equation earlier to design appropriate systems for an experimental wet lab. Prior designs incorporated minor loss features such as sudden contraction or multiple unions and valves. The honors students from Spring 2015 expanded the repertoire of available options by developing large scale set-ups with multiple pipe networks that could be combined together to test the flexibility of the student team's computational programs. The engagement of bridging the theory with practice was appreciated by all of the students such that multiple teams were able to predict performance within 4% accuracy. The challenges, schedules, and cost estimates of incorporating the experimental lab into an introductory fluid mechanics course will be reported.

  16. The 1850 Webster/Parkman Trial: Dr. Keep's forensic evidence.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2003-03-01

    Shortly before two o'clock on a chilly November afternoon in 1849, the celebrated Harvard physician and surgeon, Dr. George Parkman, left his home on Boston's fashionable Beacon Hill, expecting to return in a few hours. He was never seen alive again. This account describes Parkman's brutal murder and explores the dynamics which preceded this crime. It explains how and why Dr. John White Webster, MD, Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy at Harvard University, killed Dr. Parkman and unsuccessfully attempted to destroy the physical evidence. Webster's subsequent trial, conviction and ultimate punishment are also detailed. The Parkman-Webster case remains one of the classic murders in the annals of American crime. Compelling dental evidence presented by the famous American dentist, Dr. Nathan Cooley Keep, directly led to the conviction of Dr. Webster. This graphic, ground-breaking case clearly established the viable role of forensic dentistry in legal criminal investigation.

  17. Carbon Stars from LAMOST DR2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Cui, Wenyuan; Liu, Chao; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the new catalog of carbon stars from the LAMOST DR2 catalog. In total, 894 carbon stars are identified from multiple line indices measured from the stellar spectra. We are able to identify the carbon stars by combining the CN bands in the red end with C2 and other lines. Moreover, we also classify the carbon stars into spectral sub-types of C–H, C–R, and C–N. These sub-types show distinct features in the multi-dimensional line indices, implying that in the future they can be used to identify carbon stars from larger spectroscopic data sets. While the C–N stars are clearly separated from the others in the line index space, we find no clear separation between the C–R and C–H sub-types. The C–R and C–H stars seem to smoothly transition from one to another. This may hint that the C–R and C–H stars may not be different in their origins, instead their spectra look different because of different metallicities. Due to the relatively low spectral resolution and lower signal-to-noise ratio, the ratio of 12C/13C is not measured and thus the C–J stars are not identified.

  18. Dr. Otto "Tiger" Freer: inventor and innovator.

    PubMed

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Every neurosurgeon develops his or her own standard approach to common intracranial pathologies in terms of the order in which different stages are performed and which instruments are used to perform individual tasks. The majority of the basic steps in performing a craniotomy are learned through repetition and practice during residency training. Significant amounts of energy are devoted to mastering technical skills and developing an operative rhythm. What often receives little attention is the historical origin of the instruments that make the work possible. The Freer elevator represents a particularly interesting example. To people unfamiliar with the accomplishments of turn-of-the-century laryngologist Otto "Tiger" Freer, it can be assumed that the name of the instrument in one's hand is simply named for what it can do, that is, to "free" the nasal mucosa from the bony and cartilaginous septum during the transsphenoidal approach. The technique this master surgeon spent his life and career perfecting is now repeated almost daily by skull base neurosurgeons approaching pathologies from the inferior frontal lobe to the foramen magnum. In reviewing his life and work, the authors of this paper discovered an interesting creative process that led to the design of the eponymous instrument. Additionally, they discovered important advances toward the development of the transnasal approach and in our understanding of the anterior skull base. They present a historical perspective on the life and accomplishments of Dr. Freer and the ubiquitous surgical instrument that he invented and popularized. PMID:22853830

  19. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  20. Carbon Stars from LAMOST DR2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Cui, Wenyuan; Liu, Chao; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the new catalog of carbon stars from the LAMOST DR2 catalog. In total, 894 carbon stars are identified from multiple line indices measured from the stellar spectra. We are able to identify the carbon stars by combining the CN bands in the red end with C2 and other lines. Moreover, we also classify the carbon stars into spectral sub-types of C-H, C-R, and C-N. These sub-types show distinct features in the multi-dimensional line indices, implying that in the future they can be used to identify carbon stars from larger spectroscopic data sets. While the C-N stars are clearly separated from the others in the line index space, we find no clear separation between the C-R and C-H sub-types. The C-R and C-H stars seem to smoothly transition from one to another. This may hint that the C-R and C-H stars may not be different in their origins, instead their spectra look different because of different metallicities. Due to the relatively low spectral resolution and lower signal-to-noise ratio, the ratio of 12C/13C is not measured and thus the C-J stars are not identified.

  1. Dr. Hall and the work cure.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kathlyn L

    2005-01-01

    Herbert James Hall, MD (1870-1923), was a pioneer in the systematic and organized study of occupation as therapy for persons with nervous and mental disorders that he called the "work cure." He began his work in 1904 during the early years of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the United States. His primary interest was the disorder neurasthenia, a condition with many symptoms including chronic fatigue, stress, and inability to work or perform everyday tasks. The prevailing treatment of the day was absolute bed rest known as the "rest cure." Hall believed that neurasthenia was not caused by overwork but by faulty living habits that could be corrected through an ordered life schedule and selected occupations. He identified several principles of therapy that are still used today including graded activity and energy conservation. Dr. Adolph Meyer credits Hall for organizing the ideas on the therapeutic use of occupation (Meyer, 1922). Hall also provided the name American Occupational Therapy Association for the professional organization and served as the fourth president. For his many contributions to the profession Hall deserves to be recognized as a major contributor to the development and organization of occupational therapy. PMID:23927746

  2. Dr. Otto "Tiger" Freer: inventor and innovator.

    PubMed

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Every neurosurgeon develops his or her own standard approach to common intracranial pathologies in terms of the order in which different stages are performed and which instruments are used to perform individual tasks. The majority of the basic steps in performing a craniotomy are learned through repetition and practice during residency training. Significant amounts of energy are devoted to mastering technical skills and developing an operative rhythm. What often receives little attention is the historical origin of the instruments that make the work possible. The Freer elevator represents a particularly interesting example. To people unfamiliar with the accomplishments of turn-of-the-century laryngologist Otto "Tiger" Freer, it can be assumed that the name of the instrument in one's hand is simply named for what it can do, that is, to "free" the nasal mucosa from the bony and cartilaginous septum during the transsphenoidal approach. The technique this master surgeon spent his life and career perfecting is now repeated almost daily by skull base neurosurgeons approaching pathologies from the inferior frontal lobe to the foramen magnum. In reviewing his life and work, the authors of this paper discovered an interesting creative process that led to the design of the eponymous instrument. Additionally, they discovered important advances toward the development of the transnasal approach and in our understanding of the anterior skull base. They present a historical perspective on the life and accomplishments of Dr. Freer and the ubiquitous surgical instrument that he invented and popularized.

  3. Dr. Samuel Ting, nobel laureate, visits SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Nobel laureate Professor Samuel C. C. Ting of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology pauses for a photo in the Space Station Processing Facility. Dr. Ting is directing an experiment, an international collaboration of some 37 universities and laboratories, using a state-of-the-art particle physics detector called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), which will fly on a future launch to the International Space Station. Using the unique environment of space, the AMS will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS flew initially as a Space Shuttle payload on the June 1998 mission STS-91 that provided the investigating team with data on background sources and verified the detector's performance under actual space flight conditions. The detector's second space flight is scheduled to be launched on mission UF-4 October 2003 for installation on the Space Station as an attached payload. Current plans call for operating the detector for three years before it is returned to Earth on the Shuttle. Using the Space Station offers the science team the opportunity to conduct the long-duration research above the Earth's atmosphere necessary to collect sufficient data required to accomplish the science objectives.

  4. 78 FR 29781 - Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J. Charbeneau; In the Matter of Detroit Edison Company (Fermi...

  5. Honors and High-Ability Students: Factors That Predict Academic Efficacy, Critical Thinking Skills, and Academic Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Jessica Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the quantitative study was threefold: (a) to examine high-ability students in and outside an honors program at a midwestern comprehensive university to determine differences in background and demographic characteristics between honors participants and nonparticipants of similar ability; (b) to determine differences in academic…

  6. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  7. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  8. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  9. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  10. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose...

  11. A resolution honoring the life of pioneering astronaut Dr. Sally Ride and expressing the condolences of the Senate on her death.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Boxer, Barbara [D-CA

    2012-08-02

    08/02/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S6012-6013; text as passed Senate: CR S6013; text of measure as introduced: CR S5993) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Oligonucleotide-genotyping as a method of detecting the HLA-DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, -DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, -DR4-Dw15, and -DR4-D"KT2" haplotypes in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Obata, F; Ito, I; Kaneko, T; Ohkubo, M; Ishimoto, A L; Abe, A; Kashiwagi, N

    1989-05-01

    We synthesized pairs of four different oligonucleotides, F22, F29, F42, and F158, to analyse the HLA-DR2 (DRw15) and -DR4 haplotypes in the Japanese population. After enzymatically amplifying the HLA-DRB1 gene, we hybridized the oligonucleotide probes with DNA extracted from 42 donors. Hybridization was completed between F22 and the DNA of haplotype DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, between F29 and the DNA of DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, between F42 and the DNA of DR4-D"KT2", and between F158 and the DNA of DR4-Dw15. In keeping with the nucleotide sequences of the probes, F29 hybridized also with DNA from the DR9-Dw23 haplotype and F158 with that from some of the DRw8 haplotypes (DRw8-Dw8.3) in the Japanese population. Results of this study demonstrate that the four oligonucleotides make useful probes for detecting the haplotypes above.

  13. The decisive decade. Interview: Dr. Nafis Sadik.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The interview with Dr. Nafis Sadik, Director of the UN Family Planning Association (UNFPA), involved questions about the Fund's major achievements, the effect of withdrawal of US funds on UNFPA programs, the role of UNFPA in bridging environmental, population, and development objectives as stated in the Bruntland Commission initiatives, awareness building, the role of UNFPA in dealing with resource deficits in countries with high growth populations, the seriousness of the 1990s decade as critical to the future. and UNFPA's priorities for the next 10 years. The Fund's accomplishments are in getting political systems to recognize as an important part of development, in broadening the concept of population to include quality of life and spatial distribution and growth, and in obtaining funding to continue operating without US funds. The US withdrawal of funds has affected UNFPA's funding in Africa since 1985. UNFPA is actively working to help other agencies integrate FP into conservation strategies, and to consider the education of women and provision for FP information in a variety of programs. Sustainable development must occur at the grass roots level, or from the ground up. Programs must be implemented with an understanding of local needs and desires and with cultural sensitivity. A review of findings over 20 years led to an understanding that many countries had no strategy or plans for population programs even with a lot of development assistance, and programs were transplanted without consideration of local needs. UNFPA is not urging that national development strategies must incorporate population planning, and to target education to young people who will soon be entering reproductive ages during the decade ahead. Governments have begun to recognize that the next 10 years will determine the future, and population does affect the crisis of resources. UNFPA's priorities are to the education of youth, to design special curricula in schools for educating about

  14. [Dr. Halfdan Mahler's speech in Guatemala].

    PubMed

    Mahler, H

    1989-12-01

    A major focus of Dr. Mahler throughout his life has been the war against female discrimination and to reduce the extreme inequalities between men and women. The Latin American Region of IPPF selected the participation of women as its goal for the decade of the 90's. It is known that fertility is inversely related to female education and occupation, and that the poorest homes worldwide are those headed by poor and illiterate women. The number of female-headed households is increasing and in Barbados, Dominica, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama and Uruguay these have increased by 31% Married women often find that their husbands are the main obstacles to family planning services. Violence against women takes many forms including physical abuse, adolescent pregnancy, psychological and economic stress, the "machismo" syndrome, and having unwanted pregnancies. Latin America and the Caribbean pregnancy and illegal abortion account for the high mortality rates among those 15-19. Men must face the consequences of the socioeconomic conditions that they have created for women. For example if FPP were designed to really reflect a women's perspective such programs would have reached the goals of success. He recommends that IPPF's goal for the Year 2000 will be to have 9 women to each man in Committees of 10. He suggests that changes towards women must begin with the men themselves so that policies and programs reflect these new attitudes. If society wants a less aggressive and materialistic world, then the role of women must be raised so that her contribution can be felt worldwide.

  15. [Dr. Elizabeth Ross: heroine and victim of the World War I in Serbia].

    PubMed

    Mikić, Želimir; Lešić, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    At the beginning of 1915, several months after the World War I started, Serbia was in an extremely difficult situation.The country was war-ravaged, full of sick and wounded soldiers, there was a desperate shortage of doctors, nurses and other medical personnel, and the epidemic of typhus fever exploded and violently attacked the entire country. At that time, however, a number of both foreign allied medical missions and individual volunteers, from various countries, mostly from Great Britain, came to Serbia to help. Among them mostly were women, and they were of enormous support to Serbia in that grave situation. It is estimated that there were more than 600 foreign women volunteers in Serbia at that time and that 22 of them died there. Dr. Elizabeth Ross was one of those brave volunteers who came to Serbia early in 1915. That noble Scottish lady doctor was born in 1878 and finished her medical studies at the University of Glasgow in 1901. After graduation she worked in various places in Great Britain until 1909, when she went to Persia (Iran), where she worked until the beginning of the so called Great War. When she heard of the urgent need in Serbia she left Persia as soon as she could and volunteered to serve in Serbia. She came to Kragujevac at the beginning of January 1915, where she worked at the First Military Reserve Hospital, which at that time was actually a typhus hospital. Working there intensively and devotedly for several weeks under shocking conditions she contracted typhus herself and died there on her 37th birthday on February 14th, 1915. She was buried in Kragujevac, next to two British ladies who also died in Serbia of typhus. Her grave was restored in 1980 when the town of Kragujevac started holding commemorations at the graveside every February 14th at noon to honor her and all other brave and noble women who lost their lives helping Serbia at that unfortunate time.

  16. A Team Approach to Enhance Scholarship Among Honors Students in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Jukkala, Angela M; Miltner, Rebecca S; Morrison, Shannon L; Gisiger-Camata, Sylvia; Todd, Allison; Moneyham, Linda D; Meneses, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    Honors programs within schools of nursing have the potential to enhance young nurses' interest in developing programs of research early in their careers and can thus contribute to the successful development of nursing knowledge. Such programs also provide opportunities to enhance knowledge and skill in leadership and teamwork at a critical time during the development of their professional nurse identity. This article presents the successful approach one organization took when revising its honors program to meet the current needs of students, society, and the profession. PMID:27405203

  17. Honoring silence and valuing community: living leadership in 21st century teaching-learning.

    PubMed

    Backer Condon, Barbara; Hegge, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    Leadership is a very personal concept. The methods implemented by leaders often reflect philosophical beliefs and theoretical underpinnings. This column, while recognizing that leadership styles are indeed personal, proffers living leadership in nursing education through two key leadership attitudes. These attitudes are honoring silence and valuing community. Honoring silence is discussed as recognizing the multiple dimensions of silence, and valuing community is presented in light of the humanbecoming community models change concepts: moving-initiating, anchoring-shifting, and pondering-shaping. PMID:24740944

  18. A Team Approach to Enhance Scholarship Among Honors Students in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Jukkala, Angela M; Miltner, Rebecca S; Morrison, Shannon L; Gisiger-Camata, Sylvia; Todd, Allison; Moneyham, Linda D; Meneses, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    Honors programs within schools of nursing have the potential to enhance young nurses' interest in developing programs of research early in their careers and can thus contribute to the successful development of nursing knowledge. Such programs also provide opportunities to enhance knowledge and skill in leadership and teamwork at a critical time during the development of their professional nurse identity. This article presents the successful approach one organization took when revising its honors program to meet the current needs of students, society, and the profession.

  19. Evidence for a new HLA class II determinant present on cells from HLA-DR1 and/or -DR4 individuals.

    PubMed

    Lepage, V; Alcalay, D; Douay, C; Mallet, C; Loiseau, P; Degos, L; Colombani, M; Colombani, J

    1985-02-01

    Evidence for a new HLA class II specificity is presented. It is recognized by LE serum, which reacts with most DR1 and/or DR4 individuals (r = 0.86). Its frequency in the French population is 0.33. Absorption-elution experiments showed that the serum reactivity was not due to a mixture of anti-DR1 and anti-DR4 antibodies, but to a single antibody population which could be absorbed on and eluted from both DR1(+) or DR4(+) cells. LE specificity seemed to be expressed on DR but not on DQ molecules since the serum reacted with and could be absorbed by DR+,DQw- cells; it did not react with a DR-,DQw+ mutant cell, but did react with the DR+,DQw+ parental cell. The relationship between LE specificity and MC1 and Te23 specificities remains to be determined. PMID:2581334

  20. Pathogenesis of Afa/Dr Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Servin, Alain L.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few years, dramatic increases in our knowledge about diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) pathogenesis have taken place. The typical class of DAEC includes E. coli strains harboring AfaE-I, AfaE-II, AfaE-III, AfaE-V, Dr, Dr-II, F1845, and NFA-I adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC); these strains (i) have an identical genetic organization and (ii) allow binding to human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) (Afa/DrDAF subclass) or carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (Afa/DrCEA subclass). The atypical class of DAEC includes two subclasses of strains; the atypical subclass 1 includes E. coli strains that express AfaE-VII, AfaE-VIII, AAF-I, AAF-II, and AAF-III adhesins, which (i) have an identical genetic organization and (ii) do not bind to human DAF, and the atypical subclass 2 includes E. coli strains that harbor Afa/Dr adhesins or others adhesins promoting diffuse adhesion, together with pathogenicity islands such as the LEE pathogenicity island (DA-EPEC). In this review, the focus is on Afa/Dr DAEC strains that have been found to be associated with urinary tract infections and with enteric infection. The review aims to provide a broad overview and update of the virulence aspects of these intriguing pathogens. Epidemiological studies, diagnostic techniques, characteristic molecular features of Afa/Dr operons, and the respective role of Afa/Dr adhesins and invasins in pathogenesis are described. Following the recognition of membrane-bound receptors, including type IV collagen, DAF, CEACAM1, CEA, and CEACAM6, by Afa/Dr adhesins, activation of signal transduction pathways leads to structural and functional injuries at brush border and junctional domains and to proinflammatory responses in polarized intestinal cells. In addition, uropathogenic Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following recognition of β1 integrin as a receptor, enter epithelial cells by a zipper-like, raft- and microtubule-dependent mechanism. Finally, the presence of other, unknown virulence factors and the way that

  1. 74. ARAII. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. ARA-II. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and others at controls of SL-1. August 8, 1959. Ineel photo no. 59-4109. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. GOES-R with Dr. Kathy Sullivan and Tim Samaras

    NASA Video Gallery

    This short video features highlights from a live Nationwide broadcast that took place on April 3, 2012, from the studio of NASA Goddard TV. NOAA’s Deputy Administrator and Chief Scientist Dr. Ka...

  3. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  4. Dr. von Braun Escorts President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center Director Dr. Wernher von Braun explains a detail from a Saturn IB mockup and engine to President John F. Kennedy, Vice President Lyndon Johnson and other guests, September 11, 1962.

  5. NES Live Video Chat: Dr. John C. Mather

    NASA Video Gallery

    NES welcomed Nobel Prize winner Dr. John C. Mather for a video webchat on May 17, 2011. He spoke about the James Webb Space Telescope and how it gives us a look into the past to see how galaxies ha...

  6. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the launch of Apollo 11.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mission officials relax, all smiles, a few moments after the successful launch of the Apollo 11 spacecraft by Saturn V vehicle AS-506. Relieved of the tension of waiting through the countdown are (left to right) Charles W. Matthews, NASA deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center; Dr. George E. Meuller, NASA associate administrator for manned spaceflight, and Lt. General Samuel C. Phillips, director of the Apollo program.

  7. Portrait of Dr. Von Braun with Walt Disney, 1954.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn project, also worked with Disney studios as a technical director in making three films about Space Exploration for television. Disney's tour of Marshall in 1965 was Von Braun's hope for a renewed public interest in the future of the Space Program at NASA.

  8. Dr. Peter Emil Becker and the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Hill, Frank

    2013-08-01

    In 1985 the physician after whom Becker Muscular Dystrophy is named, German neurologist Dr. Peter Emil Becker (1908-2000), published an autobiographical article in the American Journal of Medical Genetics in which he disavowed any association with the Nazi Party. A closer look at the evidence, however, suggests otherwise. Review of war records and related sources raise concern for Dr. Becker's affiliation with the Nazi Party and his contributions to its ideology.

  9. Dr-FtsA, an actin homologue in Deinococcus radiodurans differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ functions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S

    2014-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes homologues of divisome proteins including FtsZ and FtsA. FtsZ of this bacterium (Dr-FtsZ) has been recently characterized. In this paper, we study FtsA of D. radiodurans (Dr-FtsA) and its involvement in regulation of FtsZ function. Recombinant Dr-FtsA showed neither ATPase nor GTPase activity and its polymerization was ATP dependent. Interestingly, we observed that Dr-FtsA, when compared with E. coli FtsA (Ec-FtsA), has lower affinity for both Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. Also, Dr-FtsA showed differential effects on GTPase activity and sedimentation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. For instance, Dr-FtsA stimulated GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ while GTPase activity of Ec-FtsZ was reduced in the presence of Dr-FtsA. Stimulation of GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ by Dr-FtsA resulted in depolymerization of Dr-FtsZ. Dr-FtsA effects on GTPase activity and polymerization/depolymerisation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ did not change significantly in the presence of ATP. Recombinant E. coli expressing Dr-FtsA showed cell division inhibition in spite of in trans expression of Dr-FtsZ in these cells. These results suggested that Dr-FtsA, although it lacks ATPase activity, is still functional and differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ function in vitro.

  10. Biochemical characteristic of biofilm of uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr(+) strains.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piątek, Beata; Wilkanowicz, Sabina; Bruździak, Piotr; Piątek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2013-07-19

    Urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli are very common health problem in the developed countries. The virulence of the uropathogenic E. coli Dr(+) IH11128 is determined by Dr fimbriae, which are homopolymeric structures composed of DraE subunits with the DraD protein capping the fiber. In this study, we have analyzed the structural and biochemical properties of biofilms developed by E. coli strains expressing Dr fimbriae with or without the DraD tip subunit and the surface-exposed DraD protein. We have also demonstrated that these E. coli strains form biofilms on an abiotic surface in a nutrient-dependent fashion. We present evidence that Dr fimbriae are necessary during the first stage of bacterial interaction with the abiotic surface. In addition, we reveal that the DraD alone is also sufficient for the initial surface attachment at an even higher level than Dr fimbriae and that chloramphenicol is able to reduce the normal attachment of the analyzed E. coli. The action of chloramphenicol also shows that protein synthesis is required for the early events of biofilm formation. Additionally, we have identified reduced exopolysaccharide coverage in E. coli that express only Dr fimbrial polyadhesins at the cell surface with or without the DraD capping subunit.

  11. Learning from the Histories of Rhetoric: Essays in Honor of Winifred Bryan Horner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enos, Theresa, Ed.

    This collection of 11 essays honors Winifred Bryan Horner for her sustained effort to establish that the special nature of rhetoric and composition leads teachers to theorize practice and to apply theory in their own classrooms. The collection urges those in the field to learn from histories of rhetoric in order to draw rhetoric and composition…

  12. The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. 2000 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Each year the Newbery and Caldecott Medals are awarded by the American Library Association for the most distinguished American children's books published the previous year. With its annotations for all winning titles and honor books since the inception of the awards (Newbery in 1922 to be awarded annually to the author of the most distinguished…

  13. Milton M. Holland: Panola County Recipient of the Medal of Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This publication features an article about Milton M. Holland, a black American from East Texas, who is credited with being the first black Texan to have won the Congressional Medal of Honor during the U.S. Civil War. The articles in the issue concern Milton Holland and other black Americans who served in the Civil War. The articles include:…

  14. The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. 2011 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALA Editions, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Updated to include the 2011 award and honor books, this new edition of the annual guide to the Newbery and Caldecott awards gathers together the books deemed most distinguished in American children's literature and illustration since the inception of the renowned prizes. Librarians and teachers everywhere rely on this guidebook for quick reference…

  15. Information Literacy Instruction and Assessment in an Honors College Science Fundamentals Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Corey M.; Anelli, Carol M.; Galbraith, Betty J.; Green, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    The Washington State University Honors College course, UH 290, "Science as a Way of Knowing," engages freshmen in scientific inquiry and scholarly literature research. The UH 290 instructor, a learning design consultant, and two librarians collaborated to develop and deliver the course's information literacy curriculum. The team used…

  16. When Poetry became Ethnography and Other Flying Pig Tales in Honor of Dell Hymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahnmann-Taylor, Melisa

    2011-01-01

    Cahnmann-Taylor remembers her first encounter with Dell Hymes at an open mic event at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association. She puzzles his complex stance on the role ethnographic poems might play in one's ethnographic project. In Dell Hymes's honor, she shares a poetic rendering of a speech event from her bilingual…

  17. The Fierce Urgency of now: Honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. in and out of the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazemek, Francis E.

    1988-01-01

    Explores how educators and their students can best honor Martin Luther King, Jr.'s, memory by using his life and works as a catalyst for acting upon school and society in a way that fosters social change. (Author/BJV)

  18. The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. 2012 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALA Editions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Updated to include the 2012 award and honor books, this new edition of the annual guide to the Newbery and Caldecott awards gathers together the books deemed most distinguished in American children's literature and illustration since the inception of the renowned prizes. Librarians and teachers everywhere rely on this guidebook for quick reference…

  19. Access to Excellence: Assignment to Honors English Classes in the Transition from Middle to High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamoran, Adam

    A study examined the processes and criteria of assignment to honors English classes in the context of the transition from middle to high school. Five midwestern school districts--four public school districts and one Catholic diocese--participated in the study. Data consisted of interviews with school staff, school records, and student survey…

  20. Mobile Engagement at Scottsdale Community College: The Apple iPad in an English Honors Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tualla, Larry Tech

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation reports on an action research study that sought to discover how a new WiFi, tablet computing device, the Apple iPad, affected, enhanced, and impacted student engagement in an English Honors course at Scottsdale Community College. The researcher was also the instructor in the two semester, first-year, college composition sequence…

  1. Setting the Table for Diversity. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Lisa L., Ed.; Kotinek, Jonathan D., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This monograph provides a cross section of policy and practice through the voices and experiences of honors faculty, staff, and students from across the nation. While far from comprehensive, this volume does pick up different strands of thinking on diversity to present a rich and complicated understanding of what diversity is, why it is important,…

  2. A Research-Focused Honors Program for High-Ability Teacher-Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Marged; Howley, Aimee A.; Helfrich, Sara; Harrison, Lisa; Gillam, Mary Beth; Safran, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Honors programs represent one way that secondary schools and undergraduate programs address the needs of academically talented students. Evidence suggests that these programs contribute to positive student outcomes in terms of achievement, social development, and career preparation. Because colleges of education produce graduates who typically…

  3. More Than 100 Gather to Honor Joost Oppenheim on His 80th Birthday | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer They came from as far away as Russia and Japan, and from as nearby as the NCI at Frederick/Fort Detrick campus, Bethesda, and Baltimore, all with one purpose: to honor the mentor, colleague, and friend they have in Joost Oppenheim, as he celebrated his 80th birthday.

  4. Honoring the Personal Response: A Strategy for Serving the Public Hunger for Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Many groups of adult museum visitors welcome the invitation to make personal connections to works of art. Time for individual reflection and sharing with others may enable relationships to deepen and new insights to emerge. This article describes an approach to gallery teaching that honors the memories, associations, and emotions that visitors…

  5. Honors Student Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning: When Teacher becomes Facilitator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, John

    2013-01-01

    In 1986, Paul Friedman and Reva Jenkins-Friedman introduced "Fostering Academic Excellence through Honors Programs" by warning readers that "One might assume that the brightest college undergraduates feel well served during their years on campus and that procedures for educating them are common knowledge." The research on the importance of honors…

  6. A Case Study of University Honors Students in Humanities through a Disciplinary Literacy Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisco, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Students face challenging texts in higher education, whether they are discipline-specific journal articles or great works of literature. Building on research in content area reading and disciplinary literacy, this case study explores the various stances undergraduate honors students take when coping with challenging texts while enrolled in a…

  7. Librarian and Faculty Collaboration in Honors 301.88: An Interdisciplinary Computer Applications Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Hunter College librarians and faculty collaborated in an interdisciplinary honors survey designed to familiarize undergraduates with electronic research tools and with statistical, geographical, desktop publishing, and graphics software. Participating librarians cited consumption of staff time, lack of a chain of command, and communications…

  8. Imagination and the Humanities in Honors across the Disciplines at a Jesuit University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Not every student has done honors work in the humanities, but all students experience research at a human level that necessarily recalls the work of the humanities. This article describes how Joe Kraus, a professor of literature at the University of Scranton, was inspired to see applied humanities in stories of human experiences, which helped him…

  9. Sea Lions and Honors Students: More in Common than You May Think

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindemann-Biolsi, Kristy L.

    2014-01-01

    One can easily find a link between the general principles of learning in relation to both nonhuman and human animals. What may be a more difficult but equally important parallel is how these learning principles are applied to the training of animals and the teaching of honors students. The author considers what teachers can learn from observing…

  10. Do Honors Students Have More Potential for Excellence in Their Professional Lives?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scager, Karin; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Keesen, Fried; Mainhard, M. Tim; Pilot, Albert; Wubbels, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Universities in many countries increasingly value talent, and do so by developing special honors programs for their top students. The selection process for these programs often relies on the students' prior achievements in school. Research has shown, however, that school grades do not sufficiently predict academic success. According to Renzulli's…

  11. Questionnaire Responses of High-School Honors Applicants Who Did Not Complete Any Course Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Ruth S.

    Los Angeles City College encourages twelfth-graders from nearby high schools, judged by their counselors to be capable of college course work, to request admission to classes in the High-School Honors program. Attrition, paricularly between submission of class requests and attendance past the first weeks of class, is great. The present study…

  12. Counting Coup: A True Story of Basketball and Honor on the Little Big Horn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Larry

    In Plains Indian tradition, a warrior gained honor and glory by "counting coup," touching his enemy in battle and living to tell the tale. This is a modern story of counting coup that follows a talented young woman named Sharon LaForge, a gifted basketball player and a descendant of one of George Armstrong Custer's Indian scouts. Although the…

  13. Honoring the Past, Changing the Future: Bringing Native American Voices into Dance Theory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prichard, Robin

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of Native American perspectives adds an important voice in honoring the multiplicities of histories and cultures inherent in American society. And yet, teachers run the risk of committing unknown offenses if they are not familiar with the potential pitfalls that longstanding asymmetrical power relations between cultures can produce.…

  14. Playing with Light: Adventures in Optics and Spectroscopy for Honors and Majors General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Staveren, Marie N.; Edwards, Kimberly D.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lab was developed for use in an undergraduate honors and majors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to optics, spectroscopy, and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This lab includes four mini-experiments exploring total internal reflection, the tunneling of light, spectra of sparklers and colored candles, and emission…

  15. Comparison of Dental Students' Academic Performance Using Honors/Pass/Fail and Letter Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leske, Gary S.; Ripa, Louis

    1985-01-01

    Performance in a second-year course in pedodontics/orthodontics for three classes at the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine who received grades under an honors/pass/fail system was compared to that of three academically comparable classes that received letter grades. (Author/MLW)

  16. The Tutorial Education Program: An Honors Program for Brazilian Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleith, Denise de Souza; Costa, Aderson Luiz, Jr.; de Alencar, Eunice M. L. Soriano

    2012-01-01

    The Tutorial Education Program is an honors program for Brazilian undergraduates, sponsored by the Ministry of Education. Based on philosophical principles of tutorial education in which small groups of academic talented students are guided by a tutor, the program is designed to support groups of undergraduates who demonstrate outstanding…

  17. Essential Characteristics of an Highly Resilient Judge: A Case Study of the Honorable Richard Jones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericksen, Charles Aaron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore judicial resiliency through the personal experiences and perspectives of an experienced trial court judge, the Honorable Richard Jones. This exploratory case study examined the coping skills, traits, and attributes exhibited by Judge Jones over his career and in particular through the experience of…

  18. A Service-Learning Project: Linking an Art Museum, Honors Students, and the Visual Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cempellin, Leda

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the structure, challenges, and outcomes of a service-learning project experimented by an art historian in an innovative special topics course Museum Experience, cross-listed with an Honors art appreciation course. The discussion includes: creating a new course content planned according to a multidisciplinary perspective…

  19. Collaborative Design: Building Task-Specific Rubrics in the Honors Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenow, Ce

    2014-01-01

    As someone who values collaboration with her students, supports students' ownership of their own learning, and looks for opportunities to increase their critical learning skills, Ce Rosenow finds many benefits to using task-specific rubrics that evolve from class discussion. She explains that this process is ideal for honors students because of…

  20. "The Endless Appetite": Honors Education and the Spirit of the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In a world that no longer privileges thinking, Andrew Martino writes here that we might need to consider what we are asking of our students--and why--when we ask them to think. This article presents a declaration of how Martino thinks honors education can serve as a resistant force against the increasing encroachment of a wholly utilitarian…

  1. Chladniite: A New Mineral Honoring the Father of Meteoritics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, T. J.; Steele, I. M.; Keil, K.; Leonard, B. F.; Endress, M.

    1993-07-01

    cell. A total of 17 lines were observed in the powder pattern. Chladniite is hexagonal, R 3(bar), a = 14.967 angstroms, c = 42.595 angstroms, beta = 120 degrees. Attempts to determine the structure of chladniite are in progress. Chladniite is named for Ernst Florens Friedrich Chladni (1756-1827), who is widely regarded as the "Father of Meteoritics." After his initial training as a lawyer, Chladni turned his attention to science, particularly problems in acoustics. He was not, however, able to obtain a permanent position and embarked upon the life of a nomad, traveling among the great cities of Europe lecturing about acoustics. During these travels, he eventually gained an interest in meteoritics. It was Chladni's pioneering book of 1794 that, for the first time, presented strong evidence for an extraterrestrial origin of meteoritic stones and irons [5]. In addition, Chladni argued that meteorites must have been the building blocks of all planets and argued that a large iron core must exist inside the Earth. During his extensive travels, Chladni also established a meteorite collection that can still be seen at Humboldt University in Berlin. It is appropriate that a mineral be named in his honor as we approach the 200th anniversary of the publication of his monumental work. References: [1] McCoy et al. (1993) Meteoritics, in press. [2] Fuchs et al. (1967) GCA, 21, 1711-1719. [3] Araki and Moore (1981) Am. Mineral., 66, 827-842. [4] Livingstone (1980) Min. Mag., 43, 833-836. [5] Chladni (1794) Riga, J. F. Hartknoch (in German); reprinted (with introduction by G. Hoppe) by Akad. Verlagsgesellschaft Geest & Portig K.-G. (1982) (in German).

  2. Don't tread on me: masculine honor ideology in the U.S. and militant responses to terrorism.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Collin D; Brown, Ryan P; Osterman, Lindsey L

    2012-08-01

    Using both college students and a national sample of adults, the authors report evidence linking the ideology of masculine honor in the U.S. with militant responses to terrorism. In Study 1, individuals' honor ideology endorsement predicted, among other outcomes, open-ended hostile responses to a fictitious attack on the Statue of Liberty and support for the use of extreme counterterrorism measures (e.g., severe interrogations), controlling for right-wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, and other covariates. In Study 2, the authors used a regional classification to distinguish honor state respondents from nonhonor state respondents, as has traditionally been done in the literature, and showed that students attending a southwestern university desired the death of the terrorists responsible for 9/11 more than did their northern counterparts. These studies are the first to show that masculine honor ideology in the U.S. has implications for the intergroup phenomenon of people's responses to terrorism.

  3. Don't tread on me: masculine honor ideology in the U.S. and militant responses to terrorism.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Collin D; Brown, Ryan P; Osterman, Lindsey L

    2012-08-01

    Using both college students and a national sample of adults, the authors report evidence linking the ideology of masculine honor in the U.S. with militant responses to terrorism. In Study 1, individuals' honor ideology endorsement predicted, among other outcomes, open-ended hostile responses to a fictitious attack on the Statue of Liberty and support for the use of extreme counterterrorism measures (e.g., severe interrogations), controlling for right-wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, and other covariates. In Study 2, the authors used a regional classification to distinguish honor state respondents from nonhonor state respondents, as has traditionally been done in the literature, and showed that students attending a southwestern university desired the death of the terrorists responsible for 9/11 more than did their northern counterparts. These studies are the first to show that masculine honor ideology in the U.S. has implications for the intergroup phenomenon of people's responses to terrorism. PMID:22551662

  4. Study of photoluminescence properties of thin films DR1

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Ulya, Naily

    2015-09-30

    Fabrication of thin films DR1 have been carried out by the EFA-PDF (Electric Field-Assisted Physical Vapor Deposition) method to obtain films with parallel dipole arrangement. Molecular deposition process is performed by applying an electric field that is placed between the substrate ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) and copper mesh. The resulting films were characterized by using a spectrofluorometer. Analysis of the emission spectrum, indicate that DR1 molecules in the film oriented perpendicular to the substrate and arranged in parallel order (H-aggregate). As an effect, the peak of the emission spectrum appears stronger along with the increase of electric field strength.

  5. Sequence and evolution of HLA-DR7- and -DRw53-associated beta-chain genes.

    PubMed

    Young, J A; Wilkinson, D; Bodmer, W F; Trowsdale, J

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones representing products of the DR7 and DRw53 beta-chain genes were isolated from the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line MANN (DR7,DRw53,DQw2, DPw2). The DRw53 beta sequence was identical to a DRw53 beta sequence derived from cells with a DR4 haplotype. In contrast, the DR7 beta sequence was as unrelated to DR4 beta sequence as it was to other DR beta-related genes, except at the 3'-untranslated region. These results suggest that the DR7 and DR4 haplotypes may have been derived relatively recently from a common ancestral haplotype and that the DR4 and DR7 beta-chain genes have undergone more rapid diversification in their beta 1 domains, most probably as a result of natural selection, than have the DRw53 beta-chain genes. Short tracts of sequence within the DR7 and DRw53 beta 1 domains were shared with other DR beta sequences, indicating that exchanges of genetic information between beta 1 domains of DR beta-related genes have played a part in their evolution. Serological analysis of mouse L-cell transfectants expressing surface HLA-DR7 molecules, confirmed by antibody binding and allelic sequence comparisons, identified amino acid residues that may be critical to the binding of a monomorphic DR- and DP-specific monoclonal antibody.

  6. US Department of Energy High School Student Supercomputing Honors Program: A follow-up assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The US DOE High School Student Supercomputing Honors Program was designed to recognize high school students with superior skills in mathematics and computer science and to provide them with formal training and experience with advanced computer equipment. This document reports on the participants who attended the first such program, which was held at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during August 1985.

  7. ESO Receives Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Award in Science Category

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    In a ceremony held in Washington, D.C. (USA) on June 6, 2005, ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, received the coveted 21st Century Achievement Award from the Computerworld Honors Program for its visionary use of information technology in the Science category. Sybase, a main database server vendor and member of the Chairmen's Committee, nominated ESO's Data Flow System in recognition of its contributions to the global information technology revolution and its positive impact on society.

  8. Dinner honoring John Herrington, the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Buffy Sainte-Marie sings during a dinner at the Debus Conference Center in the KSC Visitor Complex. The dinner honored John B. Herrington, the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113. In addition to the dinner at KSC, several hundred Native Americans from around the country attended a symposium in Orlando commemorating the launch event. Buffy Sainte-Marie is Cree.

  9. High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics: A Volume in Honor of Syun-iti Akimoto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghnani, Murli H.; Syono, Yasuhiko

    In recognition of the profound contributions made by Professor Syun-iti Akimoto in high pressure-high temperature research, which have enhanced our understanding of the earth's interior, and for his tireless efforts in furthering the U.S.-Japan cooperative research program, it is most fitting to dedicate this volume to him. This volume in honor of Professor Akimoto is a symbol of cooperation in international science that is exemplified by his contributions.

  10. The influence of culture of honor and emotional intelligence in the acculturation of Moroccan immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Zafra, Esther; El Ghoudani, Karima

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a normal process of people seeking new opportunities, work, or leisure in societies. The way people adapt to a new country (acculturation) is a complex process in which immigrants' evaluations about the culture of origin and their perceptions of the host country interact. The combination of these two factors produces four types of acculturation: separation, assimilation, integration, and marginalization. Several variables, such as personality, attitudes, and emotional intelligence, have been studied to help explain this process. However, the impact of a culture of honor and its interaction with other variables remains an open question that may help to explain how migrants can better adjust to their host culture. In this study, we examine the influence of the culture of honor (social) and emotional intelligence (individual) on acculturation. In a sample of 129 Moroccan women (mean age = 29, SD = 9.40) immigrants in Spain (mean time in Spain = 6 years, SD = 3.60), we investigated the relations among the variables of interest. Our results show that no significant differences emerged in the scores given for culture of honor (CH) and the acculturation strategies of the Moroccan immigrant women F(3, 99) = .233; p = .87. However women who preferred the integration strategy scored highest on emotional intelligence (EI), whereas the assimilated immigrants showed the lowest scores for EI F(3, 92) = 4.63; p = .005. Additionally, only in the case of integration does EI mediate between CH and the value given to the immigrant's own and host cultures (p <.001).

  11. The influence of culture of honor and emotional intelligence in the acculturation of Moroccan immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Zafra, Esther; El Ghoudani, Karima

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a normal process of people seeking new opportunities, work, or leisure in societies. The way people adapt to a new country (acculturation) is a complex process in which immigrants' evaluations about the culture of origin and their perceptions of the host country interact. The combination of these two factors produces four types of acculturation: separation, assimilation, integration, and marginalization. Several variables, such as personality, attitudes, and emotional intelligence, have been studied to help explain this process. However, the impact of a culture of honor and its interaction with other variables remains an open question that may help to explain how migrants can better adjust to their host culture. In this study, we examine the influence of the culture of honor (social) and emotional intelligence (individual) on acculturation. In a sample of 129 Moroccan women (mean age = 29, SD = 9.40) immigrants in Spain (mean time in Spain = 6 years, SD = 3.60), we investigated the relations among the variables of interest. Our results show that no significant differences emerged in the scores given for culture of honor (CH) and the acculturation strategies of the Moroccan immigrant women F(3, 99) = .233; p = .87. However women who preferred the integration strategy scored highest on emotional intelligence (EI), whereas the assimilated immigrants showed the lowest scores for EI F(3, 92) = 4.63; p = .005. Additionally, only in the case of integration does EI mediate between CH and the value given to the immigrant's own and host cultures (p <.001). PMID:25012470

  12. Cut throat injuries and honor killings: review of 15 cases in eastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Bora; Celbis, Osman; Kaya, Atılhan

    2013-05-01

    Throat cuts could be of homicidal, suicidal or accidental origin. In the cases of death from cut throat, suicide can be distinguished from homicide based on the type and location of the wound and crime scene investigation. The purpose of the current study is to attract attention to the instructive findings for origin determination in deaths by cut throat according to the number and characteristics of the wounds and crime scene investigation. We have reviewed the files of autopsies performed between the years of 2000 and 2010, and compared with previously published case reports; all results were summarized in the current study. The results showed that 60% of cases were male, 40% were female, with 27.9 years of average age. The mean number of wounds was calculated to be 34.3 per case for honor homicides, 7.4 per case for other homicides, and 2.0 per case for suicides. Numbers of wounds were approximately 5 times higher in the honor homicides compared to other homicides. If the number of wounds were excessive, possibility of honor killings should be taken into account. When the killer was a parent not in psychosis, hesitation cuts were detected. Additional lesions were present in 46.7% of the cases, and they were assessed as homicide. Presence of vertebral notch and spinal cord cuts, which require a substantial amount of force and pressure via sharp tools, indicates homicide.

  13. STATISTICAL STUDY OF 2XMMi-DR3/SDSS-DR8 CROSS-CORRELATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanxia; Zhou Xinlin; Zhao Yongheng; Wu Xuebing

    2013-02-01

    Cross-correlating the XMM-Newton 2XMMi-DR3 catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, we obtain one of the largest X-ray/optical catalogs and explore the distribution of various classes of X-ray emitters in the multidimensional photometric parameter space. Quasars and galaxies occupy different zones while stars scatter in them. However, X-ray active stars have a certain distributing rule according to spectral types. The earlier the type of stars, the stronger its X-ray emitting. X-ray active stars have a similar distribution to most stars in the g - r versus r - i diagram. Based on the identified samples with SDSS spectral classification, a random forest algorithm for automatic classification is performed. The result shows that the classification accuracy of quasars and galaxies adds up to more than 93.0% while that of X-ray emitting stars only amounts to 45.3%. In other words, it is easy to separate quasars and galaxies, but it is difficult to discriminate X-ray active stars from quasars and galaxies. If we want to improve the accuracy of automatic classification, it is necessary to increase the number of X-ray emitting stars, since the majority of X-ray emitting sources are quasars and galaxies. The results obtained here will be used for the optical spectral survey performed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also named the Guo Shou Jing Telescope), which is a Chinese national scientific research facility operated by the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  15. Dr. Seuss's Sound Words: Playing with Phonics and Spelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    Boom! Br-r-ring! Cluck! Moo!--exciting sounds are everywhere. Whether visiting online sites that play sounds or taking a "sound hike," ask your students to notice the sounds they hear, then write their own book, using sound words, based on Dr. Seuss's "Mr. Brown Can MOO! Can You?" During the three 45-minute sessions, grade K-2 students will:…

  16. Another Use for Dr. Seuss: Reading for Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Janice J.; Baker, Pamela Hudson

    2012-01-01

    Time is limited. Teachers often struggle to address the diverse needs of learners in their classrooms, especially when faced with academic and social skills concerns. Finding effective ways to teach social skills in the context of academic instruction makes sense. Books by Dr. Seuss provide a variety of high-interest stories that can be used to…

  17. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Congressman Gerald R. fod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in April, 1964, Congressman Gerald R. Ford, Jr. Republican of Michigan, was warmly greeted by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director. Ford, along with two other congressmen, visited the center for a briefing on the Saturn program and for a tour of the facilities.

  18. 3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. 2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 degrees west and and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. 7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete showing embedment anchors, foundation steel base plate, vertical member with small diameter turnbuckles, antenna assembly in background, and story board for scale. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  2. Dr. Chad E. Finn, 2013 Wilder Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Chad Finn took over the leadership of the USDA-ARS small fruit breeding program in Corvallis, Oregon in 1993 after three years working as an extension horticulturist in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since taking over this program he has developed what is...

  3. A Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Curriculum: Playing the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Sydney Gurewitz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses curriculum for young children centered around the beliefs and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His works are interpreted in a human rights context in which children find their voice in the peaceable resolution of everyday conflicts. Describes the Child of the Day program. (Author/RWB)

  4. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Washington State Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia, WA. Div. of Instructional Programs and Services.

    The Washington State Resource Guide on Martin Luther King, Jr., supplies a wide variety of materials for use with all grade levels in classroom and assembly presentations in public schools. The goal is for every child enrolled in Washington State schools to learn about Dr. King during the days of January 15 to January 17. Resolutions supporting an…

  5. Gifted Kids, Social Issues, and the Works of Dr. Seuss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granada, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Gifted students often share a sense of justice and a concern for the welfare of mankind and the planet. This humanitarian feeling may sometimes be overlooked, given today's academic focus. The author has taken an in-depth look at the works of Theodor Geisel, popularly known as Dr. Seuss, and moved beyond his whimsical illustrations and wordplay to…

  6. 39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, TR chains, and special checkout target control located in CSMR in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. Trial by Newspaper: The Strange Case of Dr. Karl Muck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sheldon S.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the case of Dr. Karl Muck, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra who was accused of espionage in 1917. Suggests that the espionage charge was a fiction created by newspapers, beginning with "The Providence Journal." Concludes that Muck admitted to being a spy rather than reveal the name of the woman with whom he had an extramarital…

  8. Dr. von Braun With a Model of a Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Dr. von Braun stands beside a model of the upper stage (Earth-returnable stage) of the three-stage launch vehicle built for the series of the motion picture productions of space flight produced by Walt Disney in the mid-1950's.

  9. Oxygen and Metastasis: A Conversation with Dr. Nick Restifo

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Nick Restifo, a senior investigator in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, discusses his recently published study finding that Oxygen, a molecule necessary for life, paradoxically aids cancer metastasis to the lung by impairing cancer-killing immune cells.

  10. Bullying Among Teenage Girls: An Interview with Dr. Harriet Mosatche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevention Researcher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Harriet Mosatche is an advice columnist on a web site for teen girls, as well as the Senior Director of Research and Programs at the Girl Scouts of the USA. Because of these dual roles, she has a unique perspective on the bullying issue. In this interview she answers a number of questions about bullying among teenage girls, including how boys…

  11. 6. View of DR 3 antenna typical backstay concrete stanchion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of DR 3 antenna typical back-stay concrete stanchion showing embedded anchors and structural steel leg with pin attachment. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. 28. View of data test area for DR data take ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. Effect of Selenium on HLA-DR Expression of Thyrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Balázs, Csaba; Kaczur, Viktória

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) represent the most frequent forms of the organ-specific autoimmune thyroid disorders that result from interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Selenium has been shown to exert a beneficial effect on the autoimmune thyroiditis. In spite of therapeutical effect of selenium on autoimmunity, the mechanism of its action has not been revealed. Objective. To determine whether selenium in vitro thyrocytes cultures are able to influence the HLA-DR molecule expression of human thyrocytes and production of free oxygen radicals. Method. Thyrocytes were prepared from human thyroid gland and cultured in vitro in the presence of interferon-γ and sodium selenite. The expression of HLA-DR molecules induced by interferon-γ in the presence of sodium selenite of various concentration was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Results. Selenium has a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the expression of HLA-DR molecules of thyrocytes induced by interferon-γ. This effect of selenium was in the inverse correlation with antioxidative capacity. Conclusion. Beneficial effect of selenium on autoimmune mechanism is a complex mechanism in which the inhibitory effect on HLA-DR molecule expression and antioxidative capacity are involved into therapy of autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:22400102

  14. Dr Skateboard's Action Science: Teaching Physics in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to create student interest and promote new connections to the understanding of fundamental physics concepts, there is a need for new approaches and methods that are both contemporary and relevant. Dr Skateboard's Action Science, a curriculum supplement comprising video instruction and classroom activities, is an example that focuses on…

  15. CGS3DR: UKIRT CGS3 data reduction software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, Alan; Beard, Steven M.; Lightfoot, John F.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Daly, Phil N.

    2014-11-01

    CGS3DR is data reduction software for the UKIRT CGS3 mid-infrared grating spectrometer instrument. It includes a command-line interface and a GUI. The software, originally on VMS, was ported to Unix. It uses Starlink (ascl:1110.012) infrastructure libraries.

  16. 18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees west to backside transmitter building 101 and in left foreground showing site well system building. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. The life and legacy of Dr. Lee Baldwin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper outlines the life and legacy of the late Dr. Ransom L. Baldwin, V. The purpose was to highlight the impact his teaching and research had on the international energy and protein metabolism communities at their fourth international conference. The paper will be presented at the outset of ...

  18. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large

  19. Functional polymorphism of each of the two HLA-DR beta chain loci demonstrated with antigen-specific DR3- and DRw52-restricted T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    HLA-DR3- and HLA-DRw52-associated functional polymorphism was investigated with selected tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific T cell clones. We have shown earlier that HLA-DR antigens are encoded by two distinct loci, DR beta I and DR beta III. The alloantigenic determinant(s) defined by the serological HLA-DR3 specificity map to the former, while the supratypic HLA-DRw52 determinants map to DR beta III. Furthermore, we have recently recognized by DNA sequencing three alleles of HLA- DRw52 at locus DR beta III, referred to as 52 a, b, and c. Our objective was to correlate the pattern of T cell restriction with the gene products of individual DR beta chain loci and with the three newly described alleles of locus DR beta III. Among the selected T cell clones, 5 reacted exclusively when TT was presented by HLA-DR3+ APCs (TT-DR3-APC). In contrast, two T cell clones were stimulated by TT- DRw52-APC. More specifically, these two T cell clones (Clones 10 and 16) were stimulated by different subsets of TT-DRw52-APC. Clone 16 responded to some DR3 and TT-DRw6-APC, while clone 10 was stimulated by other TT-DR3 and TT-DRw6, and all TT-DR5-APC. This same pattern of DRw52 restriction was found in panel, as well as in family studies. Because this suggested a correlation with the pattern of DRw52 polymorphism observed earlier by DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide hybridization, the APC used in these experiments were typed for the 52 a, b, and c alleles of locus DR beta III by allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. This distribution overlapped exactly with the stimulation pattern defined by the T cell clones. Clone 16 responded to TT-52a-APC, clone 10 to TT-52b-APC, and both clones to a TT-52c-APC. The response of the T cell clones was inhibited differentially by mAbs to DR. Raising TT concentration, or increasing HLA-class II expression with INF-gamma both affected the magnitude of response of the TT- specific clones but did not modify their specificities. These results demonstrate that

  20. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine | NIH ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ruth Holst presented FNLM Chairman Dr. Donald West King with the Distinguished Public Service Award at the ... all that the Library does. Sincerely, Donald West King, M.D., Chairman Friends of the National Library ...

  1. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity.

    PubMed

    Mommen, Geert P M; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D; Poelen, Martien C M; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4(+)T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides,i.e.the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4(+)T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease.

  2. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Mommen, Geert P. M.; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4+ T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides, i.e. the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4+ T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease. PMID:26764012

  3. PREFACE: Polycrystal Modelling with Experimental Integration: A Symposium Honoring Carlos Tomé (San Diego, CA, USA, February 27-March 3 2011) Polycrystal Modelling with Experimental Integration: A Symposium Honoring Carlos Tomé (San Diego, CA, USA, February 27-March 3 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A.

    2012-03-01

    This special issue contains selected contributions from invited speakers to the 'Polycrystal Modelling with Experimental Integration: A Symposium Honoring Carlos Tomé', held as part of the 2011 TMS Annual Meeting and Exhibition, that took place on February 27-March 3, 2011 in San Diego, CA, USA. This symposium honored the remarkable contributions of Dr Carlos N Tomé to the field of mechanical behavior of polycrystalline materials, on the occasion of his 60th birthday. Throughout his career, Dr Tomé has pioneered the theoretical and numerical development of models of polycrystal mechanical behavior, with emphasis on the role played by texture and microstructure on the anisotropic behavior of engineering materials. His many contributions have been critical in establishing a strong connection between models and experiments, and in bridging different scales in the pursuit of robust multiscale models with experimental integration. Among his achievements, the numerical codes that Dr Tomé and co-workers have developed are extensively used in the materials science and engineering community as predictive tools for parameter identification, interpretation of experiments, and multiscale calculations in academia, national laboratories and industry. The symposium brought together materials scientists and engineers to address current theoretical, computational and experimental issues related to microstructure-property relationships in polycrystalline materials deforming in different regimes, including the effects of single crystal anisotropy, texture and microstructure evolution. Synergetic studies, involving different crystal plasticity-based models, including multiscale implementations of the latter, and measurements of global and local textures, internal strains, dislocation structures, twinning, phase distribution, etc, were discussed in more than 90 presentations. The papers in this issue are representative of the different length-scales, materials, and experimental and

  4. Human T cells expressing V beta 8 do not predominantly recognize DR2 alloantigen.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Crosby, I; Gecim, I E; Sells, R A

    1992-06-01

    A panel of seven monoclonal antibodies recognizing human T-cell antigen receptor (TcR) V alpha or V beta subsets has been used to measure TcR gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes and mixed lymphocyte culture responses (MLR) between DR2- and DR2+ (DRw15+) donors. There were no significant differences between DR2- and DR2+ donors in per cent T cells in fresh peripheral blood labelled with any of these antibodies, which included an antibody recognizing V beta 8. This indicates strongly that increased negative selection of V beta 8+ T cells does not occur in DR2+ compared with DR2- individuals. In MLR between DR2- and DR2+ donors the only significant change compared with fresh peripheral lymphocytes was that T cells expressing V beta 5.1 were decreased in DR2- lymphocyte populations responding to DR2 alloantigen. No changes in levels of V beta 8+ T cells were detected in MLR between DR2- and DR2+ donors. This suggests that V beta 8+ T cells are not predominantly reactive against DR2 (DRw15). The data support the concept that alloreactivity against a single class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatch is mediated by T cells expressing a range of different TcR V beta molecules.

  5. NSF CAREER: Establishing at the University of New Mexico a Student Residential College/Honors Program with Extensive Faculty Involvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    As the educational component of my CAREER grant, I proposed integrating in an organized and widespread manner aspects of a Residential College / Honors Program into the culture of the University of New Mexico (UNM). Having such a program would provide UNM students the benefit of enhanced interactions with a variety of professors outside the classroom on a regular and personal basis. It would result not only in more visibility of professors' research and knowledge to students, but also in additional personal mentoring and encouragement. Similar programs already exist at Northwestern, Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, and Princeton Universities, to name a few. As a student, I myself experienced the benefits of a Residential College Program at Northwestern University. In the first year of my CAREER award, I volunteered and served on a campus-wide Honors College Task Force wherein we generated a report for the Provost as to whether UNM should pursue establishing an Honors College having a residential component. Through this experience, I learned that there are many other faculty across campus excited about the possibilities offered by a Residential College / Honors Program, but also about the hurdles involved in gaining momentum and campus-wide and administrative support for such an endeavor. Here, I will present what I see as the benefits of a Residential College / Honors Program at Universities, my vision for one at UNM, and the challenges encountered and lessons learned thus far.

  6. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  7. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is an exceptionally bright source of radio emission called DR21. Visible light images reveal no trace of what is happening in this region because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The upper image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun leads a tour of the S-IC checkout area.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees, Charles Schultze, James Webb, Elmer Staats, Comptroller General of the United States, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun tour the S-IC checkout area in the Marshall Space Flight Center quality lab.

  9. 21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his newly completed building at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and the alley north of Washington Street in about 1900 or 1901. In 1901, the building seen here was enlarged by the construction of an addition of similar design immediately to the north (left). Virtually the entire west elevation of the initial building is depicted in this view. Credit ADLAPR. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] & TOPPING OFF CEREMONIES SPEAKER DR. DEBUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. Kurt H. Debus, KSC's first director, was a major speaker at the ceremonies ''topping off'' the Vehicle Assembly Building on April 14, 1965. A crawler-transporter is at the right. At the time of its completion, the 129 million cubic foot structure was the largest building in the world. Originally designed and built to accommodate the Saturn V/Apollo used in Project Apollo, the VAB was later modified for its role in the Space Shuttle program.

  11. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  12. 8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, third from left vertical member at first level above foundation level, showing small diameter turnbuckle stays, vertical member with flange connection, and various struts and connectors with antenna assembly in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. Dr. von Braun In Front of a Display of Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    In this photo, Director of the US Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) Development Operations Division, Dr. Wernher von Braun, is standing before a display of Army missiles celebrating ABMA's Fourth Open House. The missiles in the background include (left to right) a satellite on a Juno II shroud with a Nike Ajax pointing left in front of a Jupiter missile. The Lacrosse is in front of the Juno II. The Nike Hercules points skyward in front of the Juno II and the Redstone.

  14. 4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 106 east face through antenna and partial view of satcom communication dome (attached to radar transmitter building 102) in left side of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. Of brain and bone: the unusual case of Dr. A.

    PubMed

    Narvid, J; Gorno-Tempini, M L; Slavotinek, A; Dearmond, S J; Cha, Y H; Miller, B L; Rankin, K

    2009-06-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive decline in social conduct and a focal pattern of frontal and temporal lobe damage. Its biological basis is still poorly understood but the focality of the brain degeneration provides a powerful model to study the cognitive and anatomical basis of social cognition. Here, we present Dr. A, a patient with a rare hereditary bone disease (hereditary multiple exostoses) and FTD (pathologically characterized as Pick's disease), who presented with a profound behavioral disturbance characterized by acquired sociopathy. We conducted a detailed genetic, pathological, neuroimaging and cognitive study, including a battery of tests designed to investigate Dr. A's abilities to understand emotional cues and to infer mental states and intentions to others (theory of mind). Dr. A's genetic profile suggests the possibility that a mutation causing hereditary multiple exostoses, Ext2, may play a role in the pattern of neurodegeneration in frontotemporal dementia since knockout mice deficient in the Ext gene family member, Ext1, show severe CNS defects including loss of olfactory bulbs and abnormally small cerebral cortex. Dr. A showed significant impairment in emotion comprehension, second order theory of mind, attribution of intentions, and empathy despite preserved general cognitive abilities. Voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI images showed significant atrophy in the medial and right orbital frontal and anterior temporal regions with sparing of dorsolateral frontal cortex. This case demonstrates that social and emotional dysfunction in FTD can be dissociated from preserved performance on classic executive functioning tasks. The specific pattern of anatomical damage shown by VBM emphasizes the importance of the network including the superior medial frontal gyrus as well as temporal polar areas, in regulation of social cognition and theory of mind. This case provides new evidence regarding the

  16. ORAC-DR: A generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie

    2015-03-01

    ORAC-DR is a general purpose data reduction pipeline system designed to be instrument and observatory agnostic. The pipeline works with instruments as varied as infrared integral field units, imaging arrays and spectrographs, and sub-millimeter heterodyne arrays and continuum cameras. This paper describes the architecture of the pipeline system and the implementation of the core infrastructure. We finish by discussing the lessons learned since the initial deployment of the pipeline system in the late 1990s.

  17. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  18. Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2004-11-01

    On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place. PMID:15666497

  19. Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2004-11-01

    On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place.

  20. Dr.LiTHO: a development and research lithography simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fühner, Tim; Schnattinger, Thomas; Ardelean, Gheorghe; Erdmann, Andreas

    2007-03-01

    This paper introduces Dr.LiTHO, a research and development oriented lithography simulation environment developed at Fraunhofer IISB to flexibly integrate our simulation models into one coherent platform. We propose a light-weight approach to a lithography simulation environment: The use of a scripting (batch) language as an integration platform. Out of the great variety of different scripting languages, Python proved superior in many ways: It exhibits a good-natured learning-curve, it is efficient, available on virtually any platform, and provides sophisticated integration mechanisms for existing programs. In this paper, we will describe the steps, required to provide Python bindings for existing programs and to finally generate an integrated simulation environment. In addition, we will give a short introduction into selected software design demands associated with the development of such a framework. We will especially focus on testing and (both technical and user-oriented) documentation issues. Dr.LiTHO Python files contain not only all simulation parameter settings but also the simulation flow, providing maximum flexibility. In addition to relatively simple batch jobs, repetitive tasks can be pooled in libraries. And as Python is a full-blown programming language, users can add virtually any functionality, which is especially useful in the scope of simulation studies or optimization tasks, that often require masses of evaluations. Furthermore, we will give a short overview of the numerous existing Python packages. Several examples demonstrate the feasibility and productiveness of integrating Python packages into custom Dr.LiTHO scripts.

  1. Early growth response-1 is a regulator of DR5-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, D; Natoni, A; Keane, M; Samali, A; Szegezdi, E

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces tumour cell apoptosis by binding to death receptor 4 (DR4) and DR5. DR4 and DR5 activation however can also induce inflammatory and pro-survival signalling. It is not known how these different cellular responses are regulated and what the individual role of DR4 vs DR5 is in these processes. Methods: DNA microarray study was carried out to identify genes differentially expressed after DR4 and DR5 activation. RT–PCR and western blotting was used to examine the expression of early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) and the proteins of the TRAIL signalling pathway. The function of Egr-1 was studied by siRNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression of a dominant-negative version of Egr-1. Results: We show that the immediate early gene, Egr-1, regulates TRAIL sensitivity. Egr-1 is constitutively expressed in colon cancer cells and further induced upon activation of DR4 or DR5. Our results also show that DR4 mediates a type II, mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic pathway, whereas DR5 induces a mitochondrion-independent, type I apoptosis in HCT15 colon carcinoma cells. Egr-1 drives c-FLIP expression and the short splice variant of c-FLIP (c-FLIPS) specifically inhibits DR5 activation. Conclusion: Selective knockdown of c-FLIPS sensitises cells to DR5-induced but not DR4-induced apoptosis and Egr-1 exerts an effect as an inhibitor of the DR5-induced apoptotic pathway, possibly by regulating the expression of c-FLIPS. PMID:20087343

  2. ESO Receives Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Award in Science Category

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    In a ceremony held in Washington, D.C. (USA) on June 6, 2005, ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the southern Hemisphere, received the coveted 21st Century Achievement Award from the Computerworld Honors Program for its visionary use of information technology in the Science category. Sybase, a main database server vendor and member of the Chairmen's Committee, nominated ESO's Data Flow System in recognition of its contributions to the global information technology revolution and its positive impact on society. The citations reads: "ESO has revolutionized the operations of ground-based astronomical observatories with a new end-to-end data flow system, designed to improve the transmission and management of astronomical observations and data over transcontinental distances." This year's awards, in 10 categories, were presented at a gala event at the National Building Museum, attended by over 250 guests, including leaders of the information technology industry, former award recipients, judges, scholars, and diplomats representing many of the 54 countries from which the 17-year-old program's laureates have come. "The Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Awards are presented to companies from around the world whose visionary use of information technology promotes positive social, economic and educational change," said Bob Carrigan, president and CEO of Computerworld and chairman of the Chairmen's Committee of the Computerworld Honors Program. "The recipients of these awards are the true heroes of the information age and have been appropriately recognized by the leading IT industry chairmen as true revolutionaries in their fields." ESO PR Photo 18/05 ESO PR Photo 18/05 ESO Receives the Award in the Science Category [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 496 pix - 53k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 992 pix - 470k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1250 x 1550 pix - 1.1M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 18/05: Receiving the Computerworld 21st Century Achievement Award for Science

  3. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries at the Redstone Arsenal airfield.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George E. Mueller, center, associate administrator for manned space flight, is flanked by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, and Dr. Eberhard Rees at the Redstone Arsenal airstrip. the associate adminstrator was making his annual staff visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  4. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

    2007-12-18

    This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LAMOST DR2 white dwarfs (Guo+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Zhao, J.; Tziamtzis, A.; Liu, J.; Li, L.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    LAMOST DR1 released 2204860 spectra, which included 717660 objects from the pilot survey, observed from 2011 October to 2012 June and 1487200 objects from the regular survey from 2012 September to 2013 June. DR2, which included DR1, released 1588 746 new spectra during the second year in 2014. (4 data files).

  6. Prospective HLA-DR matching in cadaveric renal transplants: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Mendez, R; Iwaki, Y; Mendez, R; Bogaard, T; Self, B

    1983-03-01

    We reviewed 77 potential cadaveric allograft recipients who had undergone prospective HLA-A and B locus and HLA-DR antigen identification. Matching was accomplished, giving first priority to HLA-DR compatibility and relying on HLA-A and B antigen matching only in situations of total HLA-DR incompatibility. Complete HLA-DR identification occurred in 56 per cent of all patients. There were 15 patients (19.5 per cent) who received a 2/2 HLA-DR perfect match, with 86.7 plus or minus 8.8 per cent 1-year actuarial graft survival, and 41 (53 per cent) who received a 1/2 HLA-DR match, with 58.2 plus or minus 7.8 per cent 1-year actual allograft survival. Finally, 21 patients (27 per cent) received a 0/2 HLA-DR match, with 64.9 plus or minus 10.7 per cent actual survival. These results and their mirrored mismatching results showed statistically significant allograft success in only the HLA-DR 2/2 matches. Matching for HLA 2 DR donors proved a statistically significant success over the other HLA-DR allograft matches and the older controversial matching system based on HLA-A and B locus antigens. The restricted gene polymorphism of the HLA-DR systems allows for a relatively high percentage of perfect HLA-DR matches.

  7. Magmas and their sources: A special issue honoring Frederick A. Frey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael O.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Huang, Shichun; Hickey-Vargas, Rosemary

    2016-07-01

    This special issue is dedicated to Frederick A. Frey (Fig. 1), a pioneer in the use of trace element geochemistry (especially the rare-earth elements, REE) to interpret the origin and evolution of basalts and andesites, peridotites, granites, meteorites, tektites and even sediments. Fred's remarkable career spans more than 5 decades starting in 1964 with his seminal paper with advisor Larry Haskin entitled "rare earths in oceanic basalts" (Frey and Haskin, 1964). Given that Fred was an Associate Editor of Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (GCA) for 20 years, GCA is a highly appropriate venue for this collection of twenty-seven new scientific papers in his honor.

  8. Green Team Recognized with HHS Green Champion Award Honorable Mention | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Courtesy of the NCI at Frederick Green Team The NCI at Frederick Green Team received a Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champion Award honorable mention in June for the team’s plant swap initiative, begun in October 2012.  “The Green Team has been doing a great job this past year, and it is wonderful that their efforts have been recognized by the HHS through the Green Champion Awards,” said Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director of the NCI Office of Scientific Operations (OSO). 

  9. HLA-DR9 and DR14 are associated with the allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in hematologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Kim, Ju-Young; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Cho, Sang-Heon; Park, Seon-Yang; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2014-01-01

    Allopurinol, a widely used urate-lowering agent, is a leading cause of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), especially in patients with HLA-B*58:01. Despite its routine use for the prevention of tumor lysis-related hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy, the risk of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity has not been investigated in patients with hematologic malignancies. This retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the incidence and risk factors of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in patients at least 18 years of age with hematologic malignancies. We reviewed 463 patients who had ever taken allopurinol for the prevention of hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy and had undergone serologic HLA typing as a pre-transplant evaluation from January 2000 to May 2010. Thirteen (2.8%) patients experienced maculopapular eruptions (MPE) and none experienced SCARs. Among subtypes of underlying hematologic malignancies, percentage of chronic myeloid leukemia was significantly higher in the allopurinol hypersensitivity group compared with the tolerant group (23.1% (3/13) vs. 5.9% (26/440), P = 0.044). According to HLA subtypes, the incidence of allopurinol-induced MPE was 4.0% in HLA-B58 (+) patients (2/50) and 2.7% in HLA-B58 (-) patients (11/403) but this difference was statistically insignificant. In contrast to HLA-B58, the frequencies of DR9 and DR14 were significantly higher in the allopurinol-induced MPE group compared with the allopurinol tolerant group (38.5% (5/13) vs. 13.6% (53/443), P = 0.019, and 38.5% (5/13) vs. 15.6% (41/440), P = 0.038, respectively). In conclusion, HLA-DR9 and DR14, but not HLA-B58, are associated with hypersensitivity reaction by allopurinol when administered in patients with hematologic malignancy prior to chemotherapy.

  10. Human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne pollen allergen Lol p III (rye III) is associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Meyers, D A; Bias, W B; Marsh, D G

    1989-05-01

    A well-characterized allergen of Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen, Lol p III, has been used as a model antigen to study the genetic control of the human immune response. Associations between HLA type and IgE or IgG antibody (Ab) responsiveness to Lol p III were studied in two groups of skin-test-positive Caucasoid adults (N = 135 and 67). We found by nonparametric and parametric analyses that immune responsiveness to Lol p III was significantly associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5. No association was found between any DQ type and immune responsiveness to Lol p III. Geometric mean IgE or IgG Ab levels to Lol p III were not different between B8+, DR3+ subjects and B8-, DR3+ subjects, showing that HLA-B8 had no influence on the association. Lol p III IgG Ab data obtained on subjects after grass antigen immunotherapy showed that 100% of DR3 subjects and 100% of DR5 subjects were Ab+. A comparison of all the available protein sequences of DRB gene products showed that the first hypervariable region of DR3 and DR5 (and DRw6), and no other region, contains the sequence Glu9-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Ser13. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that immune responsiveness to the allergen Lol p III is associated with this amino acid sequence in the first hypervariable region of the DR beta 1 polypeptide chain.

  11. Dynamic star formation in the massive DR21 filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. In addition, magnetic fields may play a decisive role in the star-formation process since they influence the efficiency of gas infall onto the protostar. Aims: By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. Methods: We use molecular line data from our 13CO 1 to 0, CS 2 to 1, and N2H+ 1 to 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and high-angular resolution observations in isotopomeric lines of CO, CS, HCO+, N2H+, and H2CO, obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope, to investigate the distribution of the different phases of molecular gas. Gravitational infall is identified by the presence of inverse P Cygni profiles that are detected in optically thick lines, while the optically thinner isotopomers are found to reach a peak in the self-absorption gap. Results: We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO+ and 12CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of 0.6 km s-1 and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10-3 M_⊙ yr-1 for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M_⊙ at densities of around 105 cm-3 within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting (with free-fall times much shorter

  12. Planning and implementing an honors degree in environmental science curricula: a case study from the University of Delaware, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, Delphis

    2015-04-01

    Environmental degradation is undermining the sustainability of our planet. The multi-faceted nature of environmental stressors, which inherently couples human-environment interactions across space and time, necessitates that we train environmental scientists holistically within an interdisciplinary framework. Recruiting top-notch honors students to major in the environmental sciences is a critical step to ensure that we have the human capital to tackle complicated environmental problems successfully. Planning and implementing an honors degree is no trivial task. Based upon a recently completed and implemented set of programmatic revisions*, this poster showcases a successful example of an honors curriculum in environmental science to recruit and educate dynamic thinkers capable of improving the quality of our environment. The interdisciplinary environmental science program at the University of Delaware emphasizes the cross-cutting among earth's spheres through a core set of courses which employ a quantitative approach which is supplemented by several environmental policy courses. The core is coupled with six different thematic concentrations (students choose one) which permit the student to delve into a particular area of environmental science. The honors component of the degree consists of twelve additional credits. These credits are met through a specially designed introductory environmental course, a field experience requiring data collection, analysis, and write-up, a capstone course, and one other environmentally related course. The environmental sciences honors curriculum outlined in this poster may serve as a useful guide to others wishing to establish an honors program of their own in environmental science to recruit and prepare the next generation to mitigate environmental degradation. -------------- * Please note that the planning process for the environmental programs was and is the collective effort of many dedicated people. Current members of the

  13. "Half a Century of Evolution of Neonatology: A Witness's Story" : Dr. K. C. Chaudhuri Lifetime Achievement Award Oration Delivered at AIIMS, New Delhi on 7th September 2014.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, Dharmapuri

    2015-12-01

    Lifetime achievement awards are awarded to recognize contributions during the career of an individual, rather than for a single or multiple contributions of a person in his/her field of specialty. I am highly honored being the recipient of the Dr. K. C. Chaudhuri Lifetime Achiement Award Oration. The award for me is significant for several reasons: First being associated with legendary figure such as Dr. Chaudhuri, secondly being recognized by my fellow Indian colleagues. Finally, it also marks half a century of my experience in development of subspecialty of neonatology in US. Some fifty and odd years ago, as an young novice from India I joined the mainstream of this evolution, thanks to my professors and mentors in US and thanks to America, the land of opportunity. During this odyssey, I met many great men and women of science and intellect, saw great scientific discoveries, many innovations, combined with social changes that led to significant reduction of neonatal mortality rates in the industrialized Western countries. I also saw the "Globalization" of "Modern Neonatology" in which I participated with vigor; thus, improving the newborn care in four corners of the world. I am proud that I had the opportunity to contribute a little to growth of neonatology in US and outside the US. This is the story of my professional life. The message of my life story for the younger generation is : Dream big, never give up your dreams. Hardwork, maintaining your integrity, and honesty are the three precepts that will define your character and you will be rewarded in the long run.

  14. Honoring Choices Minnesota: Preliminary Data from a Community-Wide Advance Care Planning Model

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kent S; Kottke, Thomas E; Schettle, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) increases the likelihood that individuals who are dying receive the care that they prefer. It also reduces depression and anxiety in family members and increases family satisfaction with the process of care. Honoring Choices Minnesota is an ACP program based on the Respecting Choices model of La Crosse, Wisconsin. The objective of this report is to describe the process, which began in 2008, of implementing Honoring Choices Minnesota in a large, diverse metropolitan area. All eight large healthcare systems in the metropolitan area agreed to participate in the project, and as of April 30, 2013, the proportion of hospitalized individuals 65 and older with advance care directives in the electronic medical record was 12.1% to 65.6%. The proportion of outpatients aged 65 and older was 11.6% to 31.7%. Organizations that had sponsored recruitment initiatives had the highest proportions of records containing healthcare directives. It was concluded that it is possible to reduce redundancy by recruiting all healthcare systems in a metropolitan area to endorse the same ACP model, although significantly increasing the proportion of individuals with a healthcare directive in their medical record requires a campaign with recruitment of organizations and individuals. PMID:25516036

  15. Honoring Choices Minnesota: preliminary data from a community-wide advance care planning model.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kent S; Kottke, Thomas E; Schettle, Sue

    2014-12-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) increases the likelihood that individuals who are dying receive the care that they prefer. It also reduces depression and anxiety in family members and increases family satisfaction with the process of care. Honoring Choices Minnesota is an ACP program based on the Respecting Choices model of La Crosse, Wisconsin. The objective of this report is to describe the process, which began in 2008, of implementing Honoring Choices Minnesota in a large, diverse metropolitan area. All eight large healthcare systems in the metropolitan area agreed to participate in the project, and as of April 30, 2013, the proportion of hospitalized individuals 65 and older with advance care directives in the electronic medical record was 12.1% to 65.6%. The proportion of outpatients aged 65 and older was 11.6% to 31.7%. Organizations that had sponsored recruitment initiatives had the highest proportions of records containing healthcare directives. It was concluded that it is possible to reduce redundancy by recruiting all healthcare systems in a metropolitan area to endorse the same ACP model, although significantly increasing the proportion of individuals with a healthcare directive in their medical record requires a campaign with recruitment of organizations and individuals.

  16. DR Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services in the West (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.; Kiliccote, S.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility however, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado "test system". We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating reserves: frequency regulation, contingency reserve, and flexibility (or ramping) reserve. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves.

  17. The inflammasome: in memory of Dr. Jurg Tschopp.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, M; Skeldon, A; Saleh, M

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, Jurg Tschopp introduced the concept of the inflammasome. This exciting discovery of a macromolecular complex that senses 'danger' and initiates the inflammatory response contributed to a renaissance in the fields of innate immunity and cell death. Jurg led the biochemical characterization of the inflammasome complex and demonstrated that spontaneous hyperactivation of this interleukin (IL)-1β processing machinery is the molecular basis of a spectrum of hereditary periodic fever syndromes, caused by mutated forms of the inflammasome scaffolding receptor, NLRP3. The identification of the underlying mechanism in these disorders has led to their now successful therapy, with the use of the IL-1 receptor antagonist in the clinic. Jurg's pioneering work has subsequently defined a number of inflammasome agonists ranging from microbial molecules expressed during infection, to triggers of sterile inflammation, most notably gout-associated uric acid crystals, asbestos, silica and nanoparticles. More recently, Jurg introduced the critical new concept of the metabolic inflammasome, which senses metabolic stress and contributes to the onset of the metabolic syndrome associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Jurg was an outstanding and skillful biochemist, an elegant and rigorous researcher often far ahead of his peers. He was a truly amiable person, fair, generous and inspiring, and will be most remembered for his infectious enthusiasm. We write this review article on the inflammasome in his honor and dedicate it to his memory.

  18. Regulation of human peripheral blood monocyte DR antigen expression in vitro by lymphokines and recombinant interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Sztein, M B; Steeg, P S; Johnson, H M; Oppenheim, J J

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro regulation of adult human monocyte DR antigen expression was studied. Normally about 75% of freshly obtained human peripheral blood monocytes express DR antigens as determined by anti-DR and complement-mediated cytotoxicity assays. DR expression on monocytes in unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures persisted to variable degrees for up to 5 d of incubation. However, when the mononuclear cells were thoroughly depleted of nonadherent cells, cultured monocytes consistently exhibited progressively decreased DR expression over 2-5 d of incubation. Readdition of nonadherent cells to the adherent cell population prevented or delayed this decrease in monocyte DR antigen expression. Thus, monocyte DR expression diminished markedly during in vitro incubation; however, the presence of nonadherent cells somehow interfered with this process. In other experiments, peripheral adherent monocytes, which had been cultured for 2-3 d to reduce their DR expression, could be induced to reexpress DR antigens after 2 d of incubation with unpurified lymphokine-containing culture supernatants, recombinant human interferon-alpha, or recombinant human gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). The reinduction of DR expression on human monocytes by lymphokines was abrogated by an antiserum produced to the synthetic N-terminal amino acids of human IFN-gamma, indicating that IFN-gamma is the active mediator in the lymphokine-containing preparations. Monocytes cultured with lymphokines or recombinant interferons also could initiate a significantly greater mixed lymphocyte response than control monocytes. Thus, IFN-gamma-containing lymphokines and recombinant interferons are required to induce human monocyte DR expression and accessory cell capacity in vitro, since in their absence monocytes become DR antigen-deficient. Finally, incubation of unfractionated human mononuclear cells with anti-human IFN-gamma also promoted the loss of monocyte DR expression. These findings suggest

  19. [DR image denoising based on Laplace-Impact mixture model].

    PubMed

    Feng, Guo-Dong; He, Xiang-Bin; Zhou, He-Qin

    2009-07-01

    A novel DR image denoising algorithm based on Laplace-Impact mixture model in dual-tree complex wavelet domain is proposed in this paper. It uses local variance to build probability density function of Laplace-Impact model fitted to the distribution of high-frequency subband coefficients well. Within Laplace-Impact framework, this paper describes a novel method for image denoising based on designing minimum mean squared error (MMSE) estimators, which relies on strong correlation between amplitudes of nearby coefficients. The experimental results show that the algorithm proposed in this paper outperforms several state-of-art denoising methods such as Bayes least squared Gaussian scale mixture and Laplace prior.

  20. Halo Stream candidates in the LAMOST DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingkun

    2015-08-01

    We have detected eight stellar halo stream candidates in the solar neighborhood using a sample including 64,819 FGK metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -0.7) dwarfs extracted from the cross-match among the LAMOST DR2, WISE, 2MASS and PPMXL catalogues. With the strategy of halo stream detection in Klement et al, several significant ‘phase-space overdensi- ties” of stars on very similar orbits are identified. Three structures are known previously. Five new halo stream candidates are also found. The kinematics and metallicity of these stream candidates are then analyzed. Detailed element abundance are needed to better know the ori-gin of these streams.

  1. STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. Her third spaceflight will be an historic one for Baker, a medical doctor, as she oversees the series of scientific investigations that will be conducted during the first docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. Baker and six fellow crew members -- four Americans and two Russian cosmonauts -- will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during a 10- minute launch window opening at 3:32 p.m. EDT.

  2. STS-72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Looking elated at the prospect of his upcoming spaceflight, STS- 72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. The trip into space will be the first for Barry, a medical doctor who also has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He and five fellow crew members will soon depart for Launch Pad 39, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately 49-minute window opening at about 4:18 am EST, January 11.

  3. Dr. Christopher Kraft looks over packaged 'parasol' in bldg 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Christopher C. Kraft J. (left), JSC Director, and George A Post, JSC Crew Systems Division, look over the packaged 'parasol' during fabrication and checkout of the umbrella-like mechanical device in the Technical Services shop in bldg 10 at JSC. The 'parasol' is designed to fit into the T027 experiment photometer canister. The canopy portion of the 'parasol' measures 24 feet by 22 feet. The 'parasol' is one of several sunscreen possibilities being considered for use in shading the overheated Skylab 1 Orbital Workshop.

  4. Rapidity: The Special Relativity Work of Dr. Vladimir Karapetoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Hamilton

    2014-03-01

    Between 1924 and 1944 Dr. Vladimir Karapetoff, a professor in the electrical engineering department of Cornell University, authored 11 papers on the topic of special relativity. While his initial papers focused on the then popular oblique angle treatment of special relativity, he soon became a vocal proponent of performing special relativistic calculations using rapidity, a technique that emphasizes the hyperbolic geometric nature of Minkowski space-time. While rapidity has fallen out of usage with the exception of a specialized dialect within particle physics, it offers interesting technical and pedagogical perspectives on the geometrical nature of space-time not evident in the present day relativistic parlance.

  5. 89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at 65 percent completion showing erection process. Antenna system designed and factory construction by D.S. Kennedy & Company., Comasset, MA, 1958. Note scanner radar building in background. Official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photographer, 11 July, 1960, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-824. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980…

  7. Clinical and molecular studies in full trisomy 22: Further delineation of the phenotype and review of the literature. Reply to Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.A.; Graham, J.M. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} responds to the comments by Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek regarding the implications of meiotic versus somatic chromosomal aberrations. The survival time of the patient may depend on the detection of mosicism; the discussion of the existence of full trisomy 22 remains controversial. 2 refs.

  8. Pathogenesis of Human Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Expressing Afa/Dr Adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): Current Insights and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as “silent pathogens” with the capacity to emerge as “pathobionts” for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:25278576

  9. Governor's Conference on Drug Dependence and Abuse. An Occasional Paper of the Honors College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliken, William G.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Following Governor Milliken's address, Dr. Dana Farnsworth defines the problem in terms of who's involved, to what extent, and with which drugs. His presentation focuses primarily on the motives of affluent young people who experiment with or become dependent upon hallucinogens, marihuana and amphetamines. He deals extensively with the drastically…

  10. M-giant star candidates identified in LAMOST DR 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Lépine, Sébastien; Li, Jing; Chen, Li; Hou, Jin-Liang; Yang, Ming; Li, Guang-Wei; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui

    2015-08-01

    We perform a discrimination procedure with the spectral index diagram of TiO5 and CaH2+CaH3 to separate M giants from M dwarfs. Using the M giant spectra identified from LAMOST DR1 with high signal-to-noise ratio, we have successfully assembled a set of M giant templates, which show more reliable spectral features. Combining with the M dwarf/subdwarf templates in Zhong et al., we present an extended library of M-type templates which includes not only M dwarfs with a well-defined temperature and metallicity grid but also M giants with subtypes from M0 to M6. Then, the template-fitting algorithm is used to automatically identify and classify M giant stars from LAMOST DR1. The resulting catalog of M giant stars is cross-matched with 2MASS JHKs and WISE W1/W2 infrared photometry. In addition, we calculated the heliocentric radial velocity of all M giant stars by using the cross-correlation method with the template spectrum in a zero-velocity rest frame. Using the relationship between the absolute infrared magnitude MJ and our classified spectroscopic subtype, we derived the spectroscopic distance of M giants with uncertainties of about 40%. A catalog of 8639 M giants is provided. As an additional result of this analysis, we also present a catalog of 101 690 M dwarfs/subdwarfs which are processed by our classification pipeline.

  11. CENSUS OF BLUE STARS IN SDSS DR8

    SciTech Connect

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g – r){sub 0} < –0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types.

  12. PREFACE: Eighth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination (DR2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Orel, Ann E.

    2011-07-01

    In dissociative recombination (DR), a molecular ion captures an electron and falls apart. One might initially conclude that this process is relatively simple. However, a review of the DR literature over the past 60 years, since the pioneering papers of Sir David Bates [1], shows that the study of DR has proved to be highly challenging for both theorists and experimentalists. Both this challenge and the ubiquitous importance of the process have made its study rewarding, endlessly interesting, and full of surprises. DR is fundamentally the interaction of an electronic continuum with a vibrational continuum often connected by quasibound intermediate states. Autoionization in the first continuum competes with dissociation in the second. DR occurs at the total energy of an ion plus a free electron and is in the same region as vibrationally excited Rydberg states and other neutral superexcited states. All these states interact with each other prior to dissociation, forming a complex that controls the quantum yields of products. The complexity of the process has required both innovation and ingenuity on the part of both theorists and experimentalists. Over the years, it has become apparent that in order to compare theoretical and experimental results, the experiments must identify the electronic, vibrational and for low mass ions, the rotational state. The traditional disagreement between theoretical and experimental results has been due, in part, to the sensitivity of DR cross sections and rate constants to the state of the recombining ion. Great progress has been made in recent years in both flowing afterglow and storage ring experiments aimed at reducing this uncertainty. The latest advances and insights in theory and experiment were the topics of the Eighth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination held at the Granlibakken Lodge at Lake, Tahoe, California, 16-20 August 2010. The conference was part of a series of conferences on DR that started at Chateau

  13. Abnormal urothelial HLA-DR expression in interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Bottazzo, G F

    1992-03-01

    Interstitial cystitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the urinary bladder that predominantly afflicts middle-age women. The end stage of the disease is ulceration of the urothelium, the so-called Hunner's ulcer. The aetiology of interstitial cystitis remains obscure. We have studied bladder biopsies from 22 cases of interstitial cystitis and control groups consisting of six cases of bacterial cystitis and eight healthy women. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed on the biopsies using murine MoAbs to human HLA class I molecules, and class II molecules, HLA-DP, HLA-DQ and HLA-DR. In interstitial cystitis, bacterial cystitis and normal controls most cells expressed HLA class I products. In six cases of interstitial cystitis and one case of bacterial cystitis there was evidence of HLA class I hyperexpression. In normal bladder and bacterial cystitis HLA class II expression was restricted to submucosal dendritic cells, Langerhans cells macrophages, vascular endothelial cells and activated lymphocytes. All but two cases of interstitial cystitis showed surface expression of HLA-DR (but not HLA-DP or DQ). In all cases of interstitial cystitis there was an increase in the numbers of macrophages, activated lymphocytes and vascular endothelial cells expressing HLA class II molecules within the submucosa. These findings provide further evidence for the importance of inappropriate HLA molecule expression in a disease suspected of having an autoimmune pathogenesis and where cellular autoimmune mechanisms play a decisive role in the destruction of the target cells--the bladder urothelium.

  14. Brno Studies in English. Volume Eight. Charisteria Iosepho Vachek Sexagenario Oblata (Festschrift in Honor of Josef Vachek's Sixtieth Birthday).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firbas, Jan, Ed.; Hladky, Josef, Ed.

    This festscrift is presented in honor of Josef Vachek, founder of the linguistic section of the Department of English and American studies of the Purkyne University. Papers in the collection represent a wide spectrum of research and thought in linguistics and the English language and are authored by the following: (1) J. Firbas, Brno; (2) M.…

  15. An Evaluation of the Trends of Realism in Caldecott Winner and First Honor Books 1966-1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John A., Jr.; Napier, Georgia

    To determine if there were any consistent tendencies toward the abstract or toward impressionism in the illustration of children's books between the years 1966 and 1986, a study examined the illustrations of Caldecott winners and Honor books. The study replicated John Stewig's study (using his evaluation instrument) of the same topic which covered…

  16. Saving the Time of the Library User through Subject Access Innovation: Papers in Honor of Pauline Atherton Cochrane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, William J., Ed.

    This book contains the following papers in honor of Pauline Atherton Cochrane on subject access issues in library and information science: (1) "Obstacles in Progress in Mechanized Subject Access and the Necessity of a Paradigm Change" (Robert Fugmann); (2) "On MARC and the Nature of Text Searching: A Review of Pauline Cochrane's Inspirational…

  17. Establishing a Latin American University Honors Program: The Case of Campus Monterrey, Tecnológico De Monterrey, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Mohammed Ayub; Morales-Menendez, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    The university honors program of Campus Monterrey, Tecnológico de Monterrey, evolved from the international degree program that was first offered in the spring semester of 2002. Originally six programs were offered in the School of Business and School of Engineering: (1) BA Business Administration; (2) BA Financial Management; (3) BA Finance and…

  18. The Heritage of Herding and Southern Homicide: Examining the Ecological Foundations of the Code of Honor Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baller, Robert D.; Zevenbergen, Matthew P.; Messner, Steven F.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine the ecological foundations of the thesis of a "code of honor" as an explanation for southern homicide. Specifically, they consider the effects of indicators of ethnic groups that migrated from herding economies (the Scotch-Irish), cattle and pig herding, and the relative importance of agricultural production across different…

  19. The Jackson State University Honors Dormitory: An Evaluation of Design, Construction, and Maintenance. Report to the Mississippi Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This report assesses: (1) whether the Jackson State University (JSU) Honors Dormitory required nearly $1 million in repairs two years after it was built because of inappropriate design, construction, and maintenance; and (2) if the state or university has legal recourse to recover damages resulting from inferior design and/or construction…

  20. From Bhopal to Cold Fusion: A Case-Study Approach to Writing Assignments in Honors General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamely-Wiik, Donna M.; Haky, Jerome E.; Galin, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Faculty from the chemistry and English departments have developed a combined second-semester honors general chemistry and college writing course that fosters critical thinking through challenging writing assignments. Examples of case-study writing assignments and guidelines are provided that faculty at other institutions can adapt in similar…