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Sample records for hood river counties

  1. Hood River Production Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Patty

    1991-07-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program authorizes the development of artificial production facilities to raise chinook salmon and steelhead for enhancement in the Hood, Umatilla, Walla Walla, Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers and elsewhere. On February 26, 1991 the Council agreed to disaggregate Hood River from the Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, and instead, link the Hood River Master Plan (now the Hood River Production Plan) to the Pelton Ladder Project (Pelton Ladder Master Plan 1991).

  2. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  3. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  4. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  5. Mineral and geothermal resource potential of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Clackamas and Hood River Counties, Oregon. Summary report and map

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The potential for near-surface mineral resources in the Mount Hood Wilderness is low. Geochemical data suggest two areas of weak epithermal mineralization in the Zigzag Mountain part of the wilderness: (1) the Lost Creek-Burnt Lake-Cast Creek-Short Creek area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver mineralization occurs; and (2) the Lady Creek-Laurel Hill area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has associated propylitic alteration resulting in some porphyry-type copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc mineralization. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F, 120/sup 0/C) hot-water systems in the wilderness is moderate to high. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) and two parts have been included in geothermal lease areas. Rock and gravel sources are present within the wilderness; however, quantities of similar and more accessible deposits are available outside the wilderness. Deposits outside the wilderness are large enough to supply local demand in the foreseeable future.

  6. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  7. Hood River Pelton Ladder Studies : Annual Report 1995.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik A.; French, Rod A.; Ritchey, Alan D.

    1996-09-01

    Data collected from this program will provide the baseline information needed to (1) evaluate various management options for implementing the Hood River Production Plan and (2) determine any post-project impacts the Hood River Production Plan has on indigenous populations of resident fish.

  8. Hood River Production Program : Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Coccoli, Holly; Lambert, Michael

    2000-02-01

    Effective habitat protection and rehabilitation are essential to the long-term recovery of anadromous fish populations in the Hood River subbasin. This Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was prepared to advance the goals of the Hood River Production Program (HRRP) which include restoring self-sustaining runs of spring chinook salmon and winter and summer steelhead. The HRPP is a fish supplementation and monitoring and evaluation program initiated in 1991 and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program. The HRPP is a joint effort of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Using recent watershed assessment and federal watershed analysis reports, this Plan reviews the historic and current condition of riparian, instream and upland habitats; natural watershed processes; anadromous and resident fish populations; identifies limiting factors, and indicates those subbasin areas that need protection or are likely to respond to restoration. Primary habitat restoration needs were identified as (1) improved fish screening and upstream adult passage at water diversions; (2) improved spawning gravel availability, instream habitat structure and diversity; and (3) improved water quality and riparian conditions. While several early action projects have been initiated in the Hood River subbasin since the mid 1990s, this Plan outlines additional projects and strategies needed to protect existing high quality habitat, correct known fish survival problems, and improve the habitat capacity for natural production to meet HRPP goals.

  9. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1998-08-01

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  10. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik A.; French, Rod A.; Ritchey, Alan D.

    1995-09-01

    In 1992, the Northwest Power Planning Council approved the Hood River and Pelton ladder master plans within the framework of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The master plans define an approach for implementing a hatchery supplementation program in the Hood River subbasin. The hatchery program as defined in the master plans is called the Hood River Hatchery Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP will be phased in over several years and will be jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs (CTWS) Reservation. In December 1991, a monitoring and evaluation program was implemented in the Hood River subbasin to collect life history and production information on stocks of anadromous salmonids returning to the Hood River subbasin. The program was implemented to provide the baseline information needed to: (1) evaluate various management options for implementing the HRPP and (2) determine any post-project impacts the HRPP has on indigenous populations of resident fish. Information collected during the 1992-94 fiscal years will also be used to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) evaluating the program`s impact on the human environment. To begin construction on project facilities, it was proposed that the HRPP be implemented in two phases. Phase I would include work that would fall under a {open_quotes}categorical exclusion{close_quotes} from NEPA, and Phase II would include work requiring an EIS prior to implementation. This report summarizes the life history and escapement data collected in the Hood River subbasin and the status work of implemented under Phase I of the HR Life history and escapement data will be used to: (1) test the assumptions on which harvest and escapement goals for the Hood River and Pelton ladder master plans are based and (2) develop biologically based management recommendations for implementing the HRPP.

  11. Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

    2003-12-01

    This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

  12. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation : Annual Reports for 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik A.; French, Rod A.; Lambert, Michael B.

    1998-01-01

    The primary goals of the Hood River Production Program is to (1) increase subbasin production of wild summer and winter steelhead and (2) reintroduce spring chinook salmon into the Hood River subbasin.

  13. 75 FR 62755 - Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon; Cooper Spur-Government Camp Land Exchange

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... of land owned by Mt. Hood Meadows Oreg., LLC, in Hood River County, Oregon. DATES: Comments... land owned by Mt. Hood Meadows Oreg., LLC, in Hood River County, Oregon. The Omnibus legislation states... potential effects to resource areas including wildlife, fisheries, water quality, wetlands and...

  14. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies and Hood River Fish Habitat Project, 1998 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Michael B.; McCanna, Joseph P.; Jennings, Mick

    1999-12-01

    The Hood River subbasin is home to four species of anadromous salmonids: chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and sea run cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki). Indigenous spring chinook salmon were extirpated during the late 1960's. The naturally spawning spring chinook salmon currently present in the subbasin are progeny of Deschutes stock. Historically, the Hood River subbasin hatchery steelhead program utilized out-of-basin stocks for many years. Indigenous stocks of summer and winter steelhead were listed in March 1998 by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a ''Threatened'' Species along with similar genetically similar steelhead in the Lower Columbia Basin.

  15. Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Ken; Cain, Thomas C.; Heller, David A.

    1988-03-01

    Fisheries habitat improvement work is being done on priority drainages in the Clackamas and Rood River sub-basins under program measure 704(c), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This report describes the work completed in 1987 for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) project number 84-11, the Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program. The program is composed of six projects: Collawash River Habitat Improvement Project; Collawash River Falls Passage Improvement Project, Oak Grove Fork Habitat Improvement Project; Lake Branch/West Fork Hood River Habitat Improvement Project; Fifteenmile Creek Habitat Improvement Project; and Abundance, Behavior, and Habitat Utilization by Coho Salmon and Steelhead Trout in Fish Creek, Oregon, As Influenced by Habitat Enhancement. This ongoing program was initiated in 1984, although some of the projects were begun with BPA funding support as early as 1983. The projects are complemented by a variety of habitat improvement and management activities funded from a variety of Forest Service sources. This report describes the activities implemented for five of the six projects. A separate annual report on the 1987 habitat improvement and monitoring/evaluation efforts in the Fish Creek drainage has been prepared. Species for management emphasis include spring chinook and coho salmon, and summer and winter steelhead trout. Project work in 1987 primarily focused on increasing the quantity and quality of available rearing habitat, and improving access at passage barriers. The underlying theme of the improvement work has been to increase habitat diversity through the introduction of ''structure''. Structure provided by logs and boulders serves to deflect, pond, or otherwise disrupt flow patterns within a stream channel. This alteration of flow patterns results in formation of an increased number of habitat niches (i.e. pools, glides, alcoves, etc. ) in which a

  16. 78 FR 56650 - Boundary Description and Final Map for Roaring Wild and Scenic River, Mount Hood National Forest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Forest Service Boundary Description and Final Map for Roaring Wild and Scenic River, Mount Hood National...'s Office of the Mount Hood National Forest, 16400 Champion Way, Sandy, Oregon 97055. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Information may be obtained by contacting the following office: Mount Hood...

  17. Portland, Mount Hood, & Columbia River Gorge, Oregon, Perspective View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Portland, the largest city in Oregon, is located on the Columbia River at the northern end of the Willamette Valley. On clear days, Mount Hood highlights the Cascade Mountains backdrop to the east. The Columbia is the largest river in the American Northwest and is navigable up to and well beyond Portland. It is also the only river to fully cross the Cascade Range, and has carved the Columbia River Gorge, which is seen in the left-central part of this view. A series of dams along the river, at topographically favorable sites, provide substantial hydroelectric power to the region.

    This perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a Landsat satellite image, and a false sky. Topographic expression is vertically exaggerated two times.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data substantially help in analyzing Landsat images by revealing the third dimension of Earth's surface, topographic height. The Landsat archive is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey's Eros Data Center (USGS EDC).

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet

  18. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Hood River Fish Habitat Project : Annual Progress Report 1999-2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Michael B.; McCanna, Joseph P.; Jennings, Mick

    2001-02-01

    The Hood River subbasin is home to four species of anadromous salmonids: chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and sea run cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki). Indigenous spring chinook salmon were extirpated during the late 1960's. The naturally spawning spring chinook salmon currently present in the subbasin are progeny of Deschutes stock. Historically, the Hood River subbasin hatchery steelhead program utilized out-of-basin stocks for many years. Indigenous stocks of summer and winter steelhead were listed in March 1998 by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a ''Threatened'' Species along with similar genetically similar steelhead in the Lower Columbia Basin. This annual report summarizes work for two consecutive contract periods: the fiscal year (FY) 1999 contract period was 1 October, 1998 through 30 September, 1999 and 1 October, 1999 through 30 September, 2000 for FY 2000. Work implemented during FY 1999 and FY 2000 included (1) acclimation of hatchery spring chinook salmon and hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts, (2) spring chinook salmon spawning ground surveys on the West Fork Hood River (3) genetic analysis of steelhead and cutthroat [contractual service with the ODFW], (4) Hood River water temperature studies, (5) Oak Springs Hatchery (OSH) and Round Butte Hatchery (RBH) coded-wire tagging and clipping evaluation, (6) preparation of the Hood River Watershed Assessment (Coccoli et al., December 1999) and the Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan (Coccoli et al., February 2000), (7) project implementation of early action habitat protection and restoration projects, (8) Pelton Ladder evaluation studies, (9) management oversight and guidance to BPA and ODFW engineering on HRPP facilities, and (10) preparation of an annual report summarizing project objectives for FY 1999 and FY 2000.

  19. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, 2008 Annual Report : October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Robert E.; Olsen, Erik A.

    2009-09-28

    This report summarizes the life history and production data collected in the Hood River subbasin during FY 2008. Included is a summary of jack and adult life history data collected at the Powerdale Dam trap on seventeen complete run years of winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon, and on fifteen complete run years of summer steelhead. Also included are summaries of (1) the hatchery winter steelhead broodstock collection program; (2) hatchery production releases in the Hood River subbasin; (3) subbasin wild summer and winter steelhead smolt production, (4) numbers of hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts leaving the subbasin; (5) smolt migration timing past Bonneville Dam, (6) wild and hatchery steelhead smolt-to-adult survival rates; (7) wild summer and winter steelhead egg to smolt survival rates; and (8) streamflow at selected locations in the Hood River subbasin. Data will be used in part to (1) evaluate the HRPP relative to its impact on indigenous populations of resident and anadromous salmonids (see Ardren Draft), (2) evaluate the HRPP's progress towards achieving the biological fish objectives defined in the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) and the Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program (HDR|FishPro, ODFW, and CTWSRO 2008), (3) refine spawner escapement objectives to more accurately reflect subbasin carrying capacity, and (4) refine estimates of subbasin smolt production capacity to more accurately reflect current and potential subbasin carrying capacity.

  20. 10. LOOKING SOUTH IN BOP SHOP AT FUME HOOD AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. LOOKING SOUTH IN BOP SHOP AT FUME HOOD AND SPARE OXYGEN LANCES ON THE SERVICE FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  1. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik

    2000-09-01

    This report summarizes the life history and production data collected in the Hood River subbasin during FY 1998 and 1999. Included is a summary of jack and adult life history data collected at the Powerdale Dam trap on eight complete run years of winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon, and on seven complete run years of summer steelhead. Also included are summaries of (1) the hatchery winter steelhead broodstock collection program; (2) hatchery production releases in the Hood River subbasin; (3) the number of outmigrant wild rainbow-steelhead and hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts; and (4) streamflow at selected locations in the Hood River subbasin. Data will be used in part to (1) evaluate the HRPP with respect to its impact on indigenous populations of resident and anadromous salmonids, (2) refine spawner escapement objectives to more accurately reflect subbasin carrying capacity, and (3) refine estimates of subbasin smolt production capacity to more accurately reflect current and potential subbasin carrying capacity. Baseline information on indigenous populations of resident and anadromous salmonids will continue to be collected for several years prior to full implementation of the Hood River Production Program.

  2. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik

    2009-09-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded the development of two master plans which outline the rationale, and general approach, for implementing a defined group of projects that are an integral part of a comprehensive watershed goal to 'Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of anadromous and resident fish within the Hood River Subbasin'. The Hood River Production Master Plan and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1992. Action items identified in the two master plans, as well as in a later document entitled 'Hood River/Pelton Ladder Master Agreement' (ODFW and CTWSRO Undated), are designed to achieve two biological fish objectives: (1) to increase production of wild summer and winter steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to levels commensurate with the subbasins current carrying capacity and (2) re-establishing a self-sustaining population of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Numerical fish objectives for subbasin escapement, spawner escapement, and subbasin harvest are defined for each of these species in Coccoli (2000). Several projects are presently funded by the BPA to achieve the Hood River subbasin's numerical fish objectives for summer and winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon. They include BPA project numbers 1998-021-00 (Hood River Fish Habitat), 1998-053-03 (Hood River Production Program - CTWSRO: M&E), 1998-053-07 (Parkdale Fish Facility), 1998-053-08 (Powerdale/Oak Springs O&M), and 1998-053-12 (Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study). Collectively, they are implemented under the umbrella of what has come to be defined as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO). Strategies for achieving the HRPP's biological fish objectives for the Hood River subbasin were initially

  3. Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01

    The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) project strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if project goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the project, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.

  4. Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

    2008-04-28

    The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt

  5. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2003-11-01

    Project No. 1998-021-00. There are only two culverts on Baldwin Creek that will be eliminated or modified. Work was initiated on the removal of one of these culverts, and the replacement of the other. The landowner was agreeable and NEPA was initiated. The modification/elimination of these culverts is scheduled for FY 04. The culvert on Graham Creek is a county road, and will be addressed as a fish passage barrier by Hood River County. The Evans Creek culvert was prepared for modification in FY 02, however due to a lengthy permitting process the instream work period was missed. This project is on the schedule for the instream work period of 2003. OBJECTIVE 7--Construct riparian fence to stabilize and improve the riparian zone along the East Fork Hood River and tributaries. Two riparian fencing projects were completed on East Fork Hood River tributaries. The first was on Baldwin Creek, and the second was on Shelly Creek.

  6. Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study; Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Hood River, Final Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, Michael

    2003-05-01

    There is a considerable interest in using hatcheries to speed the recovery of wild populations. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), under the authority of the Northwest Power Planning Act, is currently funding several hatchery programs in the Columbia Basin as off-site mitigation for impacts to salmon and steelhead caused by the Columbia River federal hydropower system. One such project is located on the Hood River, an Oregon tributary of the Columbia. These hatchery programs cost the region millions of dollars. However, whether such programs actually improve the status of wild fish remains untested. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hood River hatchery program as required by the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, by the Oregon Plan for Coastal Salmonids, by NMFS ESA Section 4(d) rulings, and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Wild Fish Management Policy (OAR 635-07-525 through 529) and the ODFW Hatchery Fish Gene Resource Management Policy (OAR 635-07-540 through 541). The Hood River supports two populations of steelhead, a summer run and a winter run. They spawn only above the Powerdale Dam, which is a complete barrier to all salmonids. Since 1991 every adult passed above the dam has been measured, cataloged and sampled for scales. Therefore, we have a DNA sample from every adult steelhead that went over the dam to potentially spawn in the Hood River from 1991 to the present. Similar numbers of hatchery and wild fish have been passed above the dam during the last decade. During the 1990's 'old' domesticated hatchery stocks of each run (multiple generations in the hatchery, out-of-basin origin; hereafter H{sub old}) were phased out, and conservation hatchery programs were started for the purpose of supplementing the two wild populations (hereafter 'new' hatchery stocks, H{sub new}). These samples gave us the unprecedented ability to estimate, via microsatellite-based pedigree

  7. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  8. Hood River PIT-tag interrogation system efficiency study. Annual report of U.S. Geological Survey activities: November 2010-October 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jezorek, Ian G.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    An additional USGS-CRRL task, under contract number 50150, was to build three antennas for use with Destron-Fearing 2001F-ISO PIT tag readers. These antennas would be 5 used at the East Fork Hood River Acclimation site. They would be placed in the outflow channel to inform managers about the number of PIT tagged steelhead smolts released to the Hood River after a period of acclimation when some mortality and predation might occur. 

  9. Persistence of the impact of the Hood River Conservation Project on typical and peak loads three years after weatherization

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.L.; Stovall, T.K.; Tonn, B.E.

    1992-02-01

    The Hood River Conservation Project (HRCP) was a major residential retrofit demonstration project, operated by Pacific Power Light Company (Pacific Power) between 1984 and 1988, and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). The project was designed to install as many cost-effective retrofit measures in as many electrically heated homes as possible in the community of Hood River, Oregon. The Pacific Power HRCP planners statistically selected a special group of 320 Hood River homes that represented a cross-section of the community. The end-use loads (electric space heating, electric water heating, and woodfuel space heating) and the interior temperatures of these homes were monitored for one year before weatherization and three years after weatherization. After more than four years of submetered data collection, 220 single-family, detached homes were available for analysis in the second load study. Weather was normalized for the four heating seasons by matching one day from the pre-program year with one day from each postretrofit year.

  10. Persistence of the impact of the Hood River Conservation Project on typical and peak loads three years after weatherization

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.L.; Stovall, T.K.; Tonn, B.E.

    1992-02-01

    The Hood River Conservation Project (HRCP) was a major residential retrofit demonstration project, operated by Pacific Power & Light Company (Pacific Power) between 1984 and 1988, and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). The project was designed to install as many cost-effective retrofit measures in as many electrically heated homes as possible in the community of Hood River, Oregon. The Pacific Power HRCP planners statistically selected a special group of 320 Hood River homes that represented a cross-section of the community. The end-use loads (electric space heating, electric water heating, and woodfuel space heating) and the interior temperatures of these homes were monitored for one year before weatherization and three years after weatherization. After more than four years of submetered data collection, 220 single-family, detached homes were available for analysis in the second load study. Weather was normalized for the four heating seasons by matching one day from the pre-program year with one day from each postretrofit year.

  11. Lidar-enhanced geologic mapping, examples from the Medford and Hood River areas, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, T. J.; McClaughry, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Lidar-based 3-foot digital elevation models (DEMs) and derivatives (slopeshade, hillshade, contours) were used to help map geology across 1700 km2 (650 mi2) near Hood River and Medford, Oregon. Techniques classically applied to interpret coarse DEMs and small-scale topographic maps were adapted to take advantage of lidar's high resolution. Penetration and discrimination of plant cover by the laser system allowed recognition of fine patterns and textures related to underlying geologic units and associated soils. Surficial geologic maps were improved by the ability to examine tiny variations in elevation and slope. Recognition of low-relief features of all sizes was enhanced where pixel elevation ranges of centimeters to meters, established by knowledge of the site or by trial, were displayed using thousands of sequential colors. Features can also be depicted relative to stream level by preparing a DEM that compensates for gradient. Near Medford, lidar-derived contour maps with 1- to 3-foot intervals revealed incised bajada with young, distal lobes defined by concentric contour lines. Bedrock geologic maps were improved by recognizing geologic features associated with surface textures and patterns or topographic anomalies. In sedimentary and volcanic terrain, structure was revealed by outcrops or horizons lying at one stratigraphic level. Creating a triangulated irregular network (TIN) facet from positions of three or more such points gives strike and dip. Each map area benefited from hundreds of these measurements. A more extensive DEM in the plane of the TIN facet can be subtracted from surface elevation (lidar DEM) to make a DEM with elevation zero where the stratigraphic horizon lies at the surface. The distribution of higher and lower stratigraphic horizons can be shown by highlighting areas similarly higher or lower on the same DEM. Poor fit of contacts or faults projected between field traverses suggest the nature and amount of intervening geologic structure

  12. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01

    This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water

  13. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 – September 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstenberger, Ryan

    2009-07-27

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  14. The 1980 Polallie Creek debris flow and subsequent dam-break flood, East Fork Hood River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallino, Gary L.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1984-01-01

    At approximately 9 p.m. on December 25, 1980, intense rainfall and extremely wet antecedent conditions combined to trigger a landslide of approximately 5,000 cubic yards at the head of Polallie Creek Canyon on the northeast flank of Mount Hood. The landslide was transformed rapidly into a debris flow, which surged down the channel at velocities between about 40 and 50 ft/s, eroding and incorporating large volumes of channel fill and uprooted vegetation. When it reached the debris fan at the confluence with the East Fork Hood River, the debris flow deposited approximately 100,000 cubic yards of saturated, poorly sorted debris to a maximum thickness of 35 ft, forming a 750-ft-long temporary dam across the channel. Within approximately 12 minutes, a lake of 85 acre-feet formed behind the blockage, breached the dam, and sent a flood wave down the East Fork Hood River. The combined debris flow and flood resulted in one fatality and over $13 million in damage to a highway, bridges, parks, and a water-supply pipeline. Application of simple momentum- and energy-balance equations, and uniform flow equations resulted in debris flow peak discharges ranging from 50,000 ft3/s to 300,000 ft3/s at different locations in the Polallie Creek Canyon. This wide range is attributed to temporary damming at the boulder- and log-rich flow front in narrow, curving reaches of the channel. When the volume of the solid debris was subtracted out, assuming a minimum peak debris-flow discharge of 100,000 ft3/s at the canyon mouth, a minimum peak-water discharge of 40,000 ft3/s was obtained. A computer dam-break model simulated peak flow for the outbreak flood on the East Fork Hood River in the range of 20,000 to 30,000 ft3/s using various breach shapes and durations of breach between 5 and 15 minutes. A slope conveyance computation 0.25 mi downstream from the dam gave a peak water discharge (solids subtracted out) for the debris-laden flood of 12,000 to 20,000 ft3/s, depending on the channel

  15. Residential and service-population exposure to multiple natural hazards in the Mount Hood region of Clackamas County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathie, Amy M.; Wood, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to document residential and service-population exposure to natural hazards in the rural communities of Clackamas County, Oregon, near Mount Hood. The Mount Hood region of Clackamas County has a long history of natural events that have impacted its small, tourism-based communities. To support preparedness and emergency-management planning in the region, a geospatial analysis of population exposure was used to determine the number and type of residents and service populations in flood-, wildfire-, and volcano-related hazard zones. Service populations are a mix of residents and tourists temporarily benefitting from local services, such as retail, education, or recreation. In this study, service population includes day-use visitors at recreational sites, overnight visitors at hotels and resorts, children at schools, and community-center visitors. Although the heavily-forested, rural landscape suggests few people are in the area, there are seasonal peaks of thousands of visitors to the region. “Intelligent” dasymetric mapping efforts using 30-meter resolution land-cover imagery and U.S. Census Bureau data proved ineffective at adequately capturing either the spatial distribution or magnitude of population at risk. Consequently, an address-point-based hybrid dasymetric methodology of assigning population to the physical location of buildings mapped with a global positioning system was employed. The resulting maps of the population (1) provide more precise spatial distributions for hazard-vulnerability assessments, (2) depict appropriate clustering due to higher density structures, such as apartment complexes and multi-unit commercial buildings, and (3) provide new information on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of people utilizing services within the study area. Estimates of population exposure to flooding, wildfire, and volcanic hazards were determined by using overlay analysis in a geographic information system

  16. 78 FR 56650 - Boundary Description and Final Map for Sandy Wild and Scenic River, Upper Portion, Mount Hood...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Hood National Forest, Oregon AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: In..., VA 22209, and at the Supervisor's Office of the Mount Hood National Forest, 16400 Champion Way, Sandy... office: Mount Hood National Forest, 16400 Champion Way Sandy, Oregon 97055, 503-668-1700,...

  17. 17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing plan of bars in top flange, elevation of girder reinforcement, plan of bars in bottom flange - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  18. 18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing elevation of center pier, elevation and plan of north and south abutments, sections of abutments, pier, and pier footings - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  19. 15. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919,' showing general plan, plan of top chord, elevation of main girder, transverse section, plan section at deck level. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  20. Identifying the Sources of Methane in Shallow Groundwaters in Parker and Hood Counties, Texas through Noble Gas Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Nicot, J. P.; Hall, C. M.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    With rising demands for cleaner domestic energy resources, horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques in unconventional hydrocarbon exploration have been extensively developed. However, the observation that some water wells have showed elevated concentrations of dissolved methane and other light hydrocarbons has caused public concern regarding unconventional energy extraction. In this contribution, we present noble gas data of production shale gases from the Barnett and Strawn Formations, as well as nearby groundwater samples in south-central Texas. The Barnett Shale located in the Fort Worth Basin at an average depth of ~2300 m is one of the most prominent shale gas plays in the U.S. This DOE-sponsored study explores the potential of noble gases for fingerprinting shale gas and thus, for identifying the sources of gas in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale, due either to natural hydrocarbon occurrences or potentially related to gas production from unconventional energy resources. A total of 35 groundwater samples were collected in Parker and Hood counties in areas where high amounts of methane (>10 mg/L) were detected in shallow groundwater. Two gas samples were also collected directly from groundwater wells where bubbling methane was present. Preliminary results show that He concentrations in water samples, in excess of up to three orders of magnitude higher than expected atmospheric values are directly correlated with methane concentrations. 3He/4He ratio values vary from 0.030 to 0.889 times the atmospheric ratio with the lowest, more pure radiogenic contributions being associated with highest methane levels. The presence of crustally-produced radiogenic 40Ar is also apparent in groundwater samples with 40Ar/36Ar ratios up to 316. A combined analysis of 40Ar/36Ar ratios from groundwater wells bubbling gas and that of shale gas suggests that the source of this methane is not the heavily exploited Barnett Shale, but rather, the Strawn Formation.

  1. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-62)and the Hood River Fisheries Project Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0241)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2001-09-14

    The project area is located on the Hood River, near river-mile 11 (Township 2 North, Range 9 East, Section 29). The Hood River flows south to north, adjacent to the project area with Joe's Creek entering on the east bank. Joe's Creek is an intermittent stream approximately 1,000 feet long on a high alluvial terrace at the base of a talus slope. Farmers Irrigation District (FID) proposes modifying the intake and flume of the irrigation district's canal in order to reduce sediment that enters the canal. The modification consists of redistributing boulders and stream bottom material to shift the existing thalweg of Hood River toward the west, away from the intake, and installing two sediment excluder sills in the upper portion of the canal. The FID also proposes installing a new transmission water line, which will replace an existing trestle and flume that presently links the irrigation district intake to a canal system that transports water into the low croplands of the Hood River Valley. In addition to the new transmission water line, a new fish screen would be constructed which necessitates a fish bypass that returns fish back to the Hood River. The existing fish screen is an older obsolete concept and the existing fish bypass consists of a small diameter flexible culvert. FID proposes a bypass system that not only returns fish to the Hood River but also increases fisheries habitat availability in the watershed. To accomplish this, a new channel would be created between the existing irrigation canal and Joe's Creek. The area of proposed new channel construction is entirely upland. Proposed alterations in Joe's Creek consist of rearing pool creation, the installation of two culverts (one under an existing road and one near the outlet to Hood River), creation of a plunge pool at the outlet of the upper culvert and a series of jump pools extending 50 feet east of the confluence with the Hood River. The existing channel would be recontoured to handle bypass flows and

  2. 2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the north, looking over the flooded fields between Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, just upstream of the Prado Dam site. File number written on negative: R & H 80 024. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-91) - Hood River Fish Habitat (Evans Creek Culvert Replacement)

    SciTech Connect

    Yarde, Richard

    2002-10-01

    BPA and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO) propose to remove a culvert acting as a fish passage barrier, and replace it with a bridge. The culvert is located on a private residential / farm access road on Evans Creek, a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. The culvert will be replaced with a clear-span bridge in order to eliminate the passage barrier and open several miles of stream as fish habitat.

  4. 16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919,' showing detail of floor beam at central pier, half section of cantilever slab at end of bridge, floor beam end panels, slab reinforcing, plan of slab reinforcing, diagram of slab bars, typical floor girder. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  5. Updating Older Fume Hoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, G. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Provides information on updating older fume hoods. Areas addressed include: (1) adjustment of the hood's back baffle; (2) hood air leakage; (3) light level; (4) hood location in relation to room traffic and room air; and (5) establishing and maintaining hood performance. (JN)

  6. 'Cobra Hoods'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation flips back and forth between left and right eye images of the odd rock formation dubbed 'Cobra Hoods' (center top). The images were taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Rover scientists say this resistant rock is unlike anything they've seen on Mars so far. Spirit will investigate the rock in coming sols. These pictures was captured on sol 156 (June 11, 2004).

  7. 1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the northeast taken from the northeast extremity of the canyon, showing, in the middle distance, the confluence of Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, site of the future Prado Dam. File number written on negative: R & H 80 026. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  8. Eruption-related lahars and sedimentation response downstream of Mount Hood: Field guide to volcaniclastic deposits along the Sandy River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Tom C.; Scott, William E.; Vallance, James W.; Pringle, Patrick T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Late Holocene dome-building eruptions at Mount Hood during the Timberline and Old Maid eruptive periods resulted in numerous dome-collapse pyroclastic flows and lahars that moved large volumes of volcaniclastic sediment into temporary storage in headwater canyons of the Sandy River. During each eruptive period, accelerated sediment loading to the river through erosion and remobilization of volcanic fragmental debris resulted in very high sediment-transport rates in the Sandy River during rain- and snowmelt-induced floods. Large sediment loads in excess of the river's transport capacity led to channel aggradation, channel widening, and change to a braided channel form in the lowermost reach of the river, between 61 and 87 km downstream from the volcano. The post-eruption sediment load moved as a broad bed-material wave, which in the case of the Old Maid eruption took ~2 decades to crest 83 km downstream. Maximum post-eruption aggradation levels of at least 28 and 23 m were achieved in response to Timberline and Old Maid eruptions. In each case, downstream aggradation cycles were initiated by lahars, but the bulk of the aggradation was achieved by fluvial sediment transport and deposition. When the high rates of sediment supply began to diminish, the river degraded, incising the channel fills and forming progressively lower sets of degradational terraces. A variety of debris-flow, hyperconcentrated-flow, and fluvial (upper and lower flow regime) deposits record the downstream passage of the sediment waves that were initiated by these eruptions. The deposits also presage a hazard that may be faced by communities along the Sandy River when volcanic activity at Mount Hood resumes.

  9. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards of the Mount Hood Region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Scott, W.E.; Pierson, T.C.; Costa, J.E.; Gardner, C.A.; Vallance, J.W.; Major, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Snow-clad Mount Hood dominates the Cascade skyline from the Portland metropolitan area to the wheat fields of Wasco and Sherman Counties. The mountain contributes valuable water, scenic, and recreational resources that help sustain the agricultural and tourist segments of the economies of surrounding cities and counties. Mount Hood is also one of the major volcanoes of the Cascade Range, having erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, most recently during two episodes in the past 1,500 yr. The last episode ended shortly before the arrival of Lewis and Clark in 1805. When Mount Hood erupts again, it will severely affect areas on its flanks and far downstream in the major river valleys that head on the volcano. Volcanic ash may fall on areas up to several hundred kilometers downwind. The purpose of the volcano hazard report USGS Open-File Report 97-89 (Scott and others, 1997) is to describe the kinds of hazardous geologic events that have happened at Mount Hood in the past and to show which areas will be at risk when such events occur in the future. This data release contains the geographic information system (GIS) data layers used to produce the Mount Hood volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-89. Both proximal and distal hazard zones were delineated by scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory and depict various volcano hazard areas around the mountain. A second data layer contains points that indicate estimated travel times of lahars.

  10. Occurrence and distribution of pesticides in surface waters of the Hood River basin, Oregon, 1999-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Temple, Whitney B.; Johnson, Henry M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey analyzed pesticide and trace-element concentration data from the Hood River basin collected by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) from 1999 through 2009 to determine the distribution and concentrations of pesticides in the basin's surface waters. Instream concentrations were compared to (1) national and State water-quality standards established to protect aquatic organisms and (2) concentrations that cause sublethal or lethal effects in order to assess their potential to adversely affect the health of salmonids and their prey organisms. Three salmonid species native to the basin are listed as "threatened" under the U.S. Endangered Species Act: bull trout, steelhead, and Chinook salmon. A subset of 16 sites was sampled every year by the ODEQ for pesticides, with sample collection targeted to months of peak pesticide use in orchards (March-June and September). Ten pesticides and four pesticide degradation products were analyzed from 1999 through 2008; 100 were analyzed in 2009. Nineteen pesticides were detected: 11 insecticides, 6 herbicides, and 2 fungicides. Two of four insecticide degradation products were detected. All five detected organophosphate insecticides and the one detected organochlorine insecticide were present at concentrations exceeding water-quality standards, sublethal effects thresholds, or acute toxicity values in one or more samples. The frequency of organophosphate detection in the basin decreased during the period of record; however, changes in sampling schedule and laboratory reporting limits hindered clear analysis of detection frequency trends. Detected herbicide and fungicide concentrations were less than water-quality standards, sublethal effects thresholds, or acute toxicity values. Simazine, the most frequently detected pesticide, was the only herbicide detected at concentrations within an order of magnitude (factor of 10) of concentrations that impact salmonid olfaction. Some detected

  11. Good Practices for Hood Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikell, William G.; Drinkard, William C.

    1984-01-01

    Describes safety practices for laboratory fume hoods based on certain assumptions of hood design and performance. Also discusses the procedures in preparing to work at a hood. A checklist of good hood practices is included. (JM)

  12. Low flow fume hood

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Feustel, Helmut E.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

    2002-01-01

    A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

  13. 13. View of interior, north wall featuring fume hood, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of interior, north wall featuring fume hood, facing north (Note: B/W scale on fume hood is in 1/2 ft increments) - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  14. 13. Southwest corner of burning hood and incinerator. North wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Southwest corner of burning hood and incinerator. North wall of scrubber cell room. Looking southwest. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

  15. Building No. 905, showing typical aqua medias or rain hoods ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building No. 905, showing typical aqua medias or rain hoods - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. DETAIL OF EAVES AND HOODS OVER WINDOWS ON NORTHEAST END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF EAVES AND HOODS OVER WINDOWS ON NORTHEAST END OF NORTHWEST SIDE, WITH SEABEE STATUE IN BACKGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. 5. AEROVANE FAN HOOD FROM NORTHWEST. MANWAY SHAFT DOORS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AEROVANE FAN HOOD FROM NORTHWEST. MANWAY SHAFT DOORS AND METAL FRAGMENT AT RIGHT REAR. - Consolidation Coal Company Mine No. 11, Aerovane Fan, East side of State Route 936, Midlothian, Allegany County, MD

  18. 7. Process areas room. Incinerator and glove boxes (hoods) to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Process areas room. Incinerator and glove boxes (hoods) to the right. Filter boxes to the left. Looking south. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

  19. Description of the Pungo River formation in Beaufort County

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimrey, Joel O.

    1965-01-01

    This report describes the lithology and stratigraphy of the Pungo River Formation that underlies part of Beaufort County, North Carolina. The formation contains potentially economic beds of phosphatic sand. It is composed of interbedded phosphatic clays, diatomaceous clays, phosphatic limestones, silty claystones, coquinas, calcareous clays, and phosphatic sands. The P2 0-, content of the phosphatic sands ranges up to a known maximum of about 21 percent of the raw core sample. The above materials usually occur in definite zones, or horizons, in the formation that may be traced laterally across the county.

  20. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Brazos River Alluvium Aquifer, Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Houston, Natalie A.; Braun, Christopher L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Brazos River alluvium aquifer underlies the Brazos River in Texas from Bosque County to Fort Bend County. The aquifer, one of 21 minor aquifers in the State, supplies water for irrigation, domestic, stock, and commercial use. The Brazos River alluvium aquifer likely will become more important in the future as demand for water increases statewide. A thorough understanding of the hydrogeology of the alluvium aquifer will be the foundation for future studies in the area. During October 2006-April 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, conducted a study to delineate the altitude of the top, altitude of the base, and thickness of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, and to compile and summarize available hydraulic property (specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity) data. A digital elevation model was used as the altitude of the top of the aquifer. The altitude of the base of the aquifer was generated using data from wells. The study area encompasses the Brazos River alluvium aquifer in parts of Bosque, Hill, McLennan, Falls, Robertson, Milam, Brazos, Burleson, Grimes, Washington, Waller, Austin, and Fort Bend Counties and a 1.5-mile-wide lateral buffer adjacent to the aquifer. The results of this study will be used by the Texas Water Development Board for input into a ground-water availability model.

  1. Hood: Answers in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood Coll., Frederick, MD.

    The president of Hood College, a liberal arts college for women located in Frederick, Maryland, considers the challenges confronting American higher education and describes what one college is doing to meet them. A description of Hood College and American higher education is provided. Seven sections focus on the following: (1) matters of equity…

  2. 76 FR 13616 - Picayune Wood Treating Site Picayune, Pearl River County, MS; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... AGENCY Picayune Wood Treating Site Picayune, Pearl River County, MS; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Picayune Wood Treating Site located in Picayune, Pearl River County, Mississippi for publication. DATES..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2011-0201 or Site name Picayune Wood Treating Superfund Site...

  3. Hydrologic data: south branch Casselman River, Garrett County, and Marsh Run, Washington County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilleary, John T.

    1984-01-01

    This report is a compilation of well construction data, lithologic and geophysical logs, and water level and water quality data for selected wells and springs in the South Branch Casselman River and Marsh Run drainage basins, Garrett and Washington Counties, Maryland. The report contains, for the two areas combined, records of 202 wells and 57 springs; periodic water level measurements and field determinations of specific conductance, pH, and water temperature for 33 wells and 7 springs; geophysical logs for 1 well and lithologic logs for 113 wells; and multi-year water-level data for 9 observation wells. (USGS)

  4. Year-round monitoring of contaminants in Neal and Rogers Creeks, Hood River Basin, Oregon, 2011-12, and assessment of risks to salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Temple, Whitney B.; Morace, Jennifer L.; Nilsen, Elena B.; Alvarez, David; Masterson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide presence in streams is a potential threat to Endangered Species Act listed salmonids in the Hood River basin, Oregon, a primarily forested and agricultural basin. Two types of passive samplers, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), were simultaneously deployed at four sites in the basin during Mar. 2011–Mar. 2012 to measure the presence of pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The year-round use of passive samplers is a novel approach and offers several new insights. Currently used pesticides and legacy contaminants, including many chlorinated pesticides and PBDEs, were present throughout the year in the basin’s streams. PCBs were not detected. Time-weighted average water concentrations for the 2-month deployment periods were estimated from concentrations of chemicals measured in the passive samplers. Currently used pesticide concentrations peaked during spring and were detected beyond their seasons of expected use. Summed concentrations of legacy contaminants in Neal Creek were highest during July–Sept., the period with the lowest streamflows. Endosulfan was the only pesticide detected in passive samplers at concentrations exceeding Oregon or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality thresholds. A Sensitive Pesticide Toxicity Index (SPTI) was used to estimate the relative acute potential toxicity among sample mixtures. The acute potential toxicity of the detected mixtures was likely greater for invertebrates than for fish and for all samples in Neal Creek compared to Rogers Creek, but the indices appear to be low overall (<0.1). Endosulfans and pyrethroid insecticides were the largest contributors to the SPTIs for both sites. SPTIs of some discrete (grab) samples from the basin that were used for comparison exceeded 0.1 when some insecticides (azinphos methyl, chlorpyrifos, malathion) were detected at concentrations near or

  5. Year-Round Monitoring of Contaminants in Neal and Rogers Creeks, Hood River Basin, Oregon, 2011-12, and Assessment of Risks to Salmonids

    PubMed Central

    Hapke, Whitney B.; Morace, Jennifer L.; Nilsen, Elena B.; Alvarez, David A.; Masterson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide presence in streams is a potential threat to Endangered Species Act listed salmonids in the Hood River basin, Oregon, a primarily forested and agricultural basin. Two types of passive samplers, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), were simultaneously deployed at four sites in the basin during Mar. 2011–Mar. 2012 to measure the presence of pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The year-round use of passive samplers is a novel approach and offers several new insights. Currently used pesticides and legacy contaminants, including many chlorinated pesticides and PBDEs, were present throughout the year in the basin’s streams. PCBs were not detected. Time-weighted average water concentrations for the 2-month deployment periods were estimated from concentrations of chemicals measured in the passive samplers. Currently used pesticide concentrations peaked during spring and were detected beyond their seasons of expected use. Summed concentrations of legacy contaminants in Neal Creek were highest during July–Sept., the period with the lowest streamflows. Endosulfan was the only pesticide detected in passive samplers at concentrations exceeding Oregon or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality thresholds. A Sensitive Pesticide Toxicity Index (SPTI) was used to estimate the relative acute potential toxicity among sample mixtures. The acute potential toxicity of the detected mixtures was likely greater for invertebrates than for fish and for all samples in Neal Creek compared to Rogers Creek, but the indices appear to be low overall (<0.1). Endosulfans and pyrethroid insecticides were the largest contributors to the SPTIs for both sites. SPTIs of some discrete (grab) samples from the basin that were used for comparison exceeded 0.1 when some insecticides (azinphos methyl, chlorpyrifos, malathion) were detected at concentrations near or

  6. Year-Round Monitoring of Contaminants in Neal and Rogers Creeks, Hood River Basin, Oregon, 2011-12, and Assessment of Risks to Salmonids.

    PubMed

    Hapke, Whitney B; Morace, Jennifer L; Nilsen, Elena B; Alvarez, David A; Masterson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide presence in streams is a potential threat to Endangered Species Act listed salmonids in the Hood River basin, Oregon, a primarily forested and agricultural basin. Two types of passive samplers, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), were simultaneously deployed at four sites in the basin during Mar. 2011-Mar. 2012 to measure the presence of pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The year-round use of passive samplers is a novel approach and offers several new insights. Currently used pesticides and legacy contaminants, including many chlorinated pesticides and PBDEs, were present throughout the year in the basin's streams. PCBs were not detected. Time-weighted average water concentrations for the 2-month deployment periods were estimated from concentrations of chemicals measured in the passive samplers. Currently used pesticide concentrations peaked during spring and were detected beyond their seasons of expected use. Summed concentrations of legacy contaminants in Neal Creek were highest during July-Sept., the period with the lowest streamflows. Endosulfan was the only pesticide detected in passive samplers at concentrations exceeding Oregon or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality thresholds. A Sensitive Pesticide Toxicity Index (SPTI) was used to estimate the relative acute potential toxicity among sample mixtures. The acute potential toxicity of the detected mixtures was likely greater for invertebrates than for fish and for all samples in Neal Creek compared to Rogers Creek, but the indices appear to be low overall (<0.1). Endosulfans and pyrethroid insecticides were the largest contributors to the SPTIs for both sites. SPTIs of some discrete (grab) samples from the basin that were used for comparison exceeded 0.1 when some insecticides (azinphos methyl, chlorpyrifos, malathion) were detected at concentrations near or exceeding

  7. 76 FR 39774 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Black Warrior River, Demopolis, Marengo County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Black Warrior River, Demopolis... governing the operation of the Yo-Yo vertical lift span bridge across the Black Warrior River, mile 219.0... span bridge across the Black Warrior River, mile 219.0, in Demopolis, Marengo County, AL. The...

  8. Uranium deposits in Fall River County, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, Henry; Bales, W.E.

    1954-01-01

    In 1951 uranium deposits contained carnotite were discovered in the southern Black Hills near Edgemont, Fall River County, S. Dak. Numerous carnotite deposits have since been found in sandstones in the Inyan Kara group of early Cretaceous age, and uranium-bearing material has been discovered in the Pennsylvania Minnelusa sandstone of Pennsylvanian age and the Deadwood formation of Cambrian age in the southern Black Hills. Ore has been produced only from the Inyan Kara group, mostly within an area of about 30 square miles along the southwest flank of the Black Hills uplift between Dewey and Hot Springs in Custer and Fall River Counties. In addition, occurrences of uranium in other parts of the Black Hills and the surrounding area are known or reported from sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks of pre-Cambrian to Tertiary age. The upper and lowermost formations of the Inyan Kara group - the Fall River and Lakota sandstones - contain the productive uranium deposits. These terrestrial formations are composed predominantly of massive sandstone lenses within units of thinly bedded sandstone and mudstone, but locally these formations contain abundant mudstone and thinly bedded sandstone. Massive sandstone lenses in the Lakota sandstone commonly overlap and truncate underlying lenses. The lenses are separated by thin units of thinly bedded sandstone and mudstone. Iron stain, carbonaceous material, thin seams of gypsum, ripple marks, concretions, and fossil roots are common in the mudstone and thinly bedded portions of these formations. Some high angle normal faults of small displacement are found in the area containing the largest number of uranium occurrences in the Inyan Kara group. Although no ore deposits seen were cut by faults, high-angle fractures parallel and at right angles to the faults contain carnotite for short distances. The productive uranium deposits are most common where the Fall River and Lakota sandstones locally contain a large proportion of

  9. Energy efficient laboratory fume hood

    DOEpatents

    Feustel, Helmut E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a low energy consumption fume hood that provides an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A low-flow fume hood in accordance with the present invention works on the principal of providing an air supply, preferably with low turbulence intensity, in the face of the hood. The air flow supplied displaces the volume currently present in the hood's face without significant mixing between the two volumes and with minimum injection of air from either side of the flow. This air flow provides a protective layer of clean air between the contaminated low-flow fume hood work chamber and the laboratory room. Because this protective layer of air will be free of contaminants, even temporary mixing between the air in the face of the fume hood and room air, which may result from short term pressure fluctuations or turbulence in the laboratory, will keep contaminants contained within the hood. Protection of the face of the hood by an air flow with low turbulence intensity in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 75% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance.

  10. Hoods for Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Harold; and others

    Detailed discussions are presented dealing with the selection and design of fume hoods for science laboratories. Areas covered include--(1) air flow design, (2) materials properties, (3) location in the laboratory, (4) testing and adjustment, (5) exhaust systems, and (6) hazards of fume discharges. (JT)

  11. 81. Neg. No. F63, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, HOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    81. Neg. No. F-63, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HOOD DEPARTMENT - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. Indian River County Environmental Education Instructional Guide. Social Studies, Grade Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    The teaching guide presents social studies activities to help ninth graders learn about environmental concepts, problems, and responsibilities. Based on the Indian River County environment in Florida, it is part of a series for teachers, students, and community members. The introduction describes the county's geography, natural resources,…

  13. 5. VIEW OF SITE A FROM SOUTH END OF HOOD, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF SITE A FROM SOUTH END OF HOOD, FACING NORTH (BUILDINGS 117, 120, 122, 116, 128, and 121 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  14. 6. VIEW OF THE BRIQUETTING PRESS AND CHIP CLEANING HOOD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF THE BRIQUETTING PRESS AND CHIP CLEANING HOOD. SCRAPS OF ENRICHED URANIUM FROM MACHINING OPERATIONS WERE CLEANED IN A SOLVENT BATH, THEN PRESSED INTO BRIQUETTS. THE BRIQUETTS WERE USED AS FEED MATERIAL FOR THE FOUNDRY. (4/4/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 77 FR 47058 - Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency; Notice of Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency... comments on the draft environmental impact statement for the Middle Fork American River Project No....

  16. 77 FR 39675 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt... changed to the Whitman District Ranger. This 2012 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision will replace and supercede the 2004 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision only where necessary...

  17. 75 FR 61417 - South River Watershed Dam No. 10A, Augusta County, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation Service South River Watershed Dam No. 10A, Augusta County, VA AGENCY... not being prepared for the rehabilitation of South River Watershed Dam No. 10A, Augusta...

  18. Refraction seismic studies in the Miami River, Whitewater River, and Mill Creek valleys, Hamilton and Butler Counties, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, Joel S.

    1963-01-01

    Between September 17 and November 9, 1962, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Ohio Division of Water, Miami Conservancy District, and c,ty of Cincinnati, Ohio, co.,:ducted a refraction seismic study in Hamilton and Butler Counties, southwest Ohio. The area lies between Hamilton, Ohio, and the Ohio River and includes a preglacial valley now occupied by portions of the Miami River, Whitewater River, and Mill Creek. The valley is partially filled with glacial debris which yields large quantities of good-quality water. The object of the study was to determine the thickness of these glacial deposits and the shape of the preglacial valley.

  19. Geologic and hydrogeologic information for a geodatabase for the Brazos River Alluvium Aquifer, Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2007-01-01

    During July-October 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), developed geologic and hydrogeologic information for a geodatabase for use in development of a Groundwater Availability Model (GAM) of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer along the Brazos River from Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas. The report provides geologic and hydrogeologic information for a study area that encompasses the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, a 1/2-mile-wide lateral buffer surrounding the aquifer, and the rocks immediately underlying the aquifer. The geodatabase involves use of a thematic approach to create layers of feature data using a geographic information system. Feature classes represent the various types of data that are keyed to spatial location and related to one another within the geodatabase. The 1/2-mile-wide buffer surrounding the aquifer was applied to include data from wells constructed primarily in alluvium but outside the boundary of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer. A 1/2- by 1/2-mile grid was generated on the study area to facilitate uniform distribution of data for eventual input into the GAM. Data were compiled primarily from drillers and borehole geophysical logs from government agencies and universities, hydrogeologic sections and maps from published reports, and agency files. The geodatabase contains 450 points with geologic data and 280 points with hydrogeologic data.

  20. Interview with Leroy Hood.

    PubMed

    Hood, Leroy

    2013-06-01

    Leroy Hood has an MD from Johns Hopkins and a PhD from Caltech. He was a professor at Caltech for 22 years, at the University of Washington for 8 years, and has been President and co-founder of the Institute for Systems Biology for the past 13 years. His interests include technology development, molecular immunology, genomics, systems biology, cancer and neurodegeneration. He has published more than 700 papers, has 36 patents and has been involved in the start-up of 13 different companies. He has won numerous awards including the Lasker Award (1987), the Kyoto Prize (2002), the Russ Prize (2011) and, most recently, the Medal of Science (2011). He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineer and the Institute of Medicine. He is currently focused on taking a systems approach to disease. Here he talks to Lisa Parks, Assistant Commissioning Editor of Bioanalysis.

  1. 75 FR 77826 - White River National Forest; Eagle County, CO; Beaver Creek Mountain Improvements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... Forest Service White River National Forest; Eagle County, CO; Beaver Creek Mountain Improvements AGENCY... Creek Mountain Improvements'' in the subject line. The scoping notice and map can be reviewed/downloaded...: --Update mountain facilities and infrastructure in order to provide the highest quality guest...

  2. 77 FR 23599 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, Charles County, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    .... Ronald Houck, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Baltimore, MD; telephone 410-576-2674, email Ronald.L.Houck@uscg...; Potomac River, Charles County, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 27). We received one comment on the... the commenter concerning the proposed regulations. The commenter, Mr. David R. Horning of...

  3. 222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    RUELAS, B.H.

    2007-03-26

    The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory.

  4. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  5. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  6. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  7. Fishes of the Blackwater River Drainage, Tucker County, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cincotta, Daniel A.; Welsh, Stuart; Wegman, Douglas P.; Oldham, Thomas E.; Hedrick, Lara B.

    2015-01-01

    The Blackwater River, a tributary of the upper Cheat River of the Monongahela River, hosts a modest fish fauna. This relatively low diversity of fish species is partly explained by its drainage history. The Blackwater was once part of the prehistoric, northeasterly flowing St. Lawrence River. During the Pleistocene Epoch, the fauna was significantly affected by glacial advance and by proglacial lakes and their associated overflows. After the last glacial retreat, overflow channels, deposits, and scouring altered drainage courses and connected some of the tributaries of the ancient Teays and Pittsburgh drainages. These major alterations allowed the invasion of fishes from North America's more species-rich southern waters. Here we review fish distributions based on 67 surveys at 34 sites within the Blackwater River drainage, and discuss the origin and status of 37 species. Within the Blackwater River watershed, 30 species (20 native, 10 introduced) have been reported from upstream of Blackwater Falls, whereas 29 (26 native, 3 introduced) have been documented below the Falls. Acid mine drainage, historic lumbering, and human encroachment have impacted the Blackwater's ichthyofauna. The fishes that have been most affected are Salvelinus fontinalis (Brook Trout), Clinostomus elongatus (Redside Dace), Nocomis micropogon (River Chub), Hypentelium nigricans (Northern Hog Sucker), Etheostoma flabellare (Fantail Darter), and Percina maculata(Blackside Darter). The first two species incurred range reductions, whereas the latter four were probably extirpated. In the 1990s, acid remediation dramatically improved the water quality of the river below Davis. Recent surveys in the lower drainage revealed 15 fishes where none had been observed since at least the 1940s; seven of these (Cyprinella spiloptera [Spotfin Shiner], Luxilus chrysocephalus [Striped Shiner], Notropis photogenis [Silver Shiner], N. rubellus [Rosyface Shiner];Micropterus dolomieu

  8. Channel change on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Santa Cruz River, an ephemeral river that drains 8,581 square miles in southeastern Arizona, has a long history of channel instability. Since the late 19th century, lateral channel erosion has caused extensive property damage, particularly in Pima County. During the flood of 1983, about $100 million damage was caused in the Tucson area alone; most damage resulted from bank erosion on the Santa Cruz River and its tributaries. The nature, magni- tude, location, and frequency of channel change on the Santa Cruz River were highly variable in time and space from 1936 through 1986 along a 70-mile reach in Pima County, Arizona. Four mechanisms of lateral channel change--channel migration, avulsion and meander cutoff, channel widening, and arroyo widening--were identified on the Santa Cruz River. The dominant mechanism in a reach depends on channel morphology and flood magnitude. The dominant vertical change has been degradation. The timing and magnitude of channel change at a particular location are controlled primarily by hydroclimatic factors such as magnitude, duration, intensity, and frequency of precipitation and floods. The location of channel change and its magnitude in response to a given discharge are controlled largely by topographic, geologic, hydraulic, and artificial factors. Although much of the present morphology of the Santa Cruz River is the result of recent large floods, a direct link between hydroclimatic con- ditions and channel change is not always evident because resistance of the channel to erosion varies with time. (USGS)

  9. Design for a Miniature Portable Fume Hood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Ronald A.; Wait, Samuel C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the design of undergraduate chemical laboratory fume hoods. Proves that folding the sides and top permit the hood and its duct hose to be stored in a standard 18-inch-wide laboratory cabinet. (WRM)

  10. Is Robin Hood Alive in Your Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royer, Sharon E.

    2002-01-01

    Considers whether the tales of Robin Hood should be presented as fact or fiction. Discusses the appropriateness of the tales for use in literature programs. Presents arguments for Robin Hood as fact and arguments for Robin Hood as fiction. Considers different versions of the tale. (SG)

  11. Effects of bank storage and well pumping on base flow, Carmel River, Monterey County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Maloney, L. M.; Williams, J. G.

    1987-06-01

    Bank storage contributions to base flow may be important on alluvial rivers with highly permeable bank materials, such as the lower Carmel River, Monterey County, California. The recharge phase of bank storage occurs during flood stage in the river when a hydraulic gradient exists from the river into the banks. In general, discharge from bank storage is most important on the recession limb of individual floods, with most stored water typically being discharged within 2-3 flood periods. As the river stage continues to fall, a hydraulic gradient from the banks to the river will be maintained and stored water will drain from the banks. On the Carmel River, the seasonal recession limb provides conditions of a gradually declining stage over several months. In 1982, a moderately wet year, bank storage contributions were detected two months after the last peak flow of the winter rainy season, during a period of critical importance to steelhead trout and probably to riparian vegetation. However, in 1983, an extremely wet year, bank storage was undetectable two months after the season's last peak flow, probably because the sustained base flow from the upper basin overwhelmed the more transient bank storage contribution. Groundwater withdrawal from the alluvial aquifer locally lowered the water table so that streamflow was influent to the banks in the reach of major pumping wells. This effect was striking in its persistence, whether the Carmel River was gaining or losing overall in its alluvial reach. Pumping rates were roughly comparable to flow losses across the well field.

  12. Effect of bank protection measures, Stehekin River, Chelan County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the lower Stehekin River was conducted to study the effects on flood elevations and velocities from four bank protection and flood prevention measures that are being contemplated as a means of reducing erosional losses of river bank property. These measures are: bank armoring, armored revetment levees, spur dikes, and redevelopment of old cutoff channels. The banks at seven study sites could be armored without adverse effect on the flood velocities and elevations. The largest increases due to armoring--up to 1.6 ft/sec in velocity and 1 ft in elevation--occurred in the vicinity of sites 5, 6, and 7 where the gradient of the river channel is about 50 ft/mi and the velocities are high to begin with (about 6 to 13 ft/sec). The use of a levee in conjunction with armoring on the northeast bank from sites 5 to 7 would increase the velocities as much as 2.8 ft/sec and increase the elevation as much as 1 ft, but it would also provide some flood protection to the east bank, which is frequently inundated. Spur dikes were considered a practical alternative only at site 3, where reduced bank erosion may occur without aggravating flood inundation or erosion elsewhere. The rerouting of flood flow through an old cutoff channel near site 1 increased the velocity by 3.2 ft/sec and the elevation by 1 ft for the 100-year flood; however, it would move floodwater away from residential property where bank erosion is a problem. The few other old channels that shortcut river bends where much erosion occurs are apparently already part of the channel during floods. (Author 's abstract)

  13. Geochemical map of the North Fork John Day River Roadless Area, Grant County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.

    1986-01-01

    The North Fork John Day River Roadless Area comprised 21,210 acres in the Umatilla and Wallowa-Whitman National Forests, Grant County, Oregon, about 30 miles northwest of Baker, Oregon. The irregularly shaped area extends for about 1 mile on both sides of a 25-mile segment of the North Fork John Day River from Big Creek on the west to North Fork John Day Campground on the east. Most of the roadless area is in the northern half of the Desolation Butte 15-minute quadrangle. The eastern end of the area is in parts of the Granite and Trout Meadows 7½-minute quadrangles.

  14. A reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Clarion River Roadless Area, Allegheny National Forest, Elk County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickling, N.L.; Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Adrian, Betty M.

    1983-01-01

    Semiquantitative emission spectrographic analyses for 31 elements were determined on 9 stream-sediment samples and 18 bedrock samples from the Clarion River Roadless Area, Elk County, Pennsylvania. All sample localities are given in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. Brief descriptions of bedrock samples are also included. Rocks analyzed are mostly sandstone, and siltstone. The analytical data do not indicate the presence of mineralized rock in the study area.

  15. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the valley-fill aquifer in the Arkansas River valley, Pueblo County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Hurr, R.T.; Moore, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer of the Arkansas River valley in Pueblo County, Colorado is presented in a series of three maps. The map shows: (1) the altitude and configuration of the bedrock surface beneath the valley-fill material; (2) the altitude and configuration of the water table in the spring of 1966; and (3) the saturation thickness of the valley-fill aquifer in the spring of 1966. (USGS)

  16. Robin Hood Comes of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhouse, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    Considers how while some Robin Hood books are clearly intended for young readers, others blur the boundaries, sometimes in ways that help break down artificial boundaries dividing fiction for children from that for adults. Explores the legend's long history to help understand why the story lends itself to such a wide variety of retellings.…

  17. Streamflow and water quality of the Grand Calumet River, Lake County, Indiana, and Cook County, Illinois, October 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.; Wangsness, David J.

    1987-01-01

    A diel (24-hour) water-quality survey was done to investigate the sources of dry-weather waste inputs attributable to other than permitted point-source effluent and to evaluate the waste-load assimilative capacity of the Grand Calumet River, Lake County, Indiana, and Cook County, Illinois, in October 1984. Flow in the Grand Calumet River consists almost entirely of municipal and industrial effluents which comprised more than 90% of the 500 cu ft/sec flow observed at the confluence of the East Branch Grand Calumet River and the Indiana Harbor Ship Canal during the study. At the time of the study, virtually all of the flow in the West Branch Grand Calumet River was municipal effluent. Diel variations in streamflow of as much as 300 cu ft/sec were observed in the East Branch near the ship canal. The diel variation diminished at the upstream sampling sites in the East Branch. In the West Branch, the diel variation in flow was quite drastic; complete reversals of flow were observed at sampling stations near the ship canal. Average dissolved-oxygen concentrations at stations in the East Branch ranged from 5.7 to 8.2 mg/L and at stations in the West Branch from 0.8 to 6.6 mg/L. Concentrations of dissolved solids, suspended solids, biochemical-oxygen demand, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphorus were substantially higher in the West Branch than in the East Branch. In the East Branch, only the Indiana Stream Pollution Control Board water-quality standards for total phosphorus and phenol were exceeded. In the West Branch, water-quality standards for total ammonia, chloride, cyanide, dissolved solids, fluoride, total phosphorus, mercury, and phenol were exceeded and dissolved oxygen was less than the minimum allowable. Three areas of significant differences between cumulative effluent and instream chemical-mass discharges were identified in the East Branch and one in the West Branch. The presence of unidentified waste inputs in the East Branch were indicated by

  18. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  19. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  20. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  1. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  2. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  3. 77 FR 26825 - Iowa River Railroad, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Marshall and Hardin Counties, IA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... Surface Transportation Board Iowa River Railroad, Inc.--Abandonment Exemption--in Marshall and Hardin Counties, IA On April 17, 2012, Iowa River Railroad, Inc. (IRR) filed with the Surface Transportation Board... 1072X and must be sent to: (1) Surface Transportation Board, 395 E Street SW., Washington, DC...

  4. Sediment cores and chemistry for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon Habitat Restoration Project, Boundary County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Gary J.; Weakland, Rhonda J.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Cox, Stephen E.; Williams, Marshall L.

    2012-01-01

    The Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, in cooperation with local, State, Federal, and Canadian agency co-managers and scientists, is assessing the feasibility of a Kootenai River habitat restoration project in Boundary County, Idaho. This project is oriented toward recovery of the endangered Kootenai River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population, and simultaneously targets habitat-based recovery of other native river biota. Projects currently (2010) under consideration include modifying the channel and flood plain, installing in-stream structures, and creating wetlands to improve the physical and biological functions of the ecosystem. River restoration is a complex undertaking that requires a thorough understanding of the river. To assist in evaluating the feasibility of this endeavor, the U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed the physical and chemical nature of sediment cores collected at 24 locations in the river. Core depths ranged from 4.6 to 15.2 meters; 21 cores reached a depth of 15.2 meters. The sediment was screened for the presence of chemical constituents that could have harmful effects if released during restoration activities. The analysis shows that concentrations of harmful chemical constituents do not exceed guideline limits that were published by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2006.

  5. 15. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,312(463AM4)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory FacilityHood VentilationMechanical' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,312(463A-M-4)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory Facility-Hood Ventilation-Mechanical' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Battery Test Office & Storage Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  6. Current distribution of North American river otters in central and eastern Oklahoma, with seven new county records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrett, Dominic A.; Leslie,, David M.

    2010-01-01

    In 1984 and 1985, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation reintroduced North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) from coastal Louisiana into eastern Oklahoma. Those reintroductions and immigration from Arkansas and possibly northeastern Texas allowed river otters to become reestablished in eastern Oklahoma. Our goals were to determine the contemporary distribution of river otters in central and eastern Oklahoma with voucher specimens, sign surveys, and mail surveys and to compare proportion of positive detections among watersheds. We report new distributional records with voucher specimens from seven counties (Adair, Bryan, Coal, Johnston, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Tulsa) in Oklahoma. We also provide locality information for specimens collected from four counties (Haskell, McCurtain, Muskogee, Wagoner) where river otters were described in published literature but no voucher specimens existed. During winter and spring 2006 and 2007, we visited 340 bridge sites in 28 watersheds in eastern and central Oklahoma and identified river otter signs in 16 counties where river otters were not previously documented in published literature or by voucher specimens. Proportion of positive sites within each watershed ranged 0–100%. Mail surveys suggested that river otters occurred in eight additional counties where they were not previously documented by published literature, voucher specimens, or sign-survey efforts.

  7. 3. VIEW OF SITE A FROM HOOD AVENUE, FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF SITE A FROM HOOD AVENUE, FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST. (BUILDINGS 116, 117, 120, 118, 128, AND 122 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  8. Water-Quality Data for the Lower Russian River Basin, Sonoma County, California, 2003-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anders, Robert; Davidek, Karl; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sonoma County Water Agency, began a study to determine the chemical, microbiological, and isotopic composition of the surface water and ground water in selected areas of the Lower Russian River Basin, Sonoma County, California. This report is a compilation of the hydrologic and water-quality data collected from 10 Russian River sites, 1 gravel-terrace pit site, 12 ground-water sites, 11 tributary sites including Mark West Creek, and 2 estuary sites between the city of Healdsburg and the Pacific Ocean, for the period August 2003 to September 2004. Field measurements made included streamflow, barometric pressure, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, and turbidity. Water samples were analyzed for nutrients, major ions, total and dissolved organic carbon, trace elements, mercury, wastewater compounds, total coliform, Escherichia coli, Enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Discharge measurements and sampling techniques were modified to accommodate the very low summer flows at most of the tributaries, and discharge measurements were made with an acoustic Doppler velocity meter at the estuary river site to overcome the complexities associated with tidal influences.

  9. The functional morphology of hooding in cobras.

    PubMed

    Young, Bruce A; Kardong, Kenneth V

    2010-05-01

    Many snakes, particularly cobras, form as part of a defensive display, a hood, an active lateral expansion of their neck skin and underlying musculature and ribs. We identified muscle groups possibly involved in hooding based on their attachments on the specialized ribs of the neck. We then used a combination of morphology, kinematic analysis, morphometrics, electromyography and muscle stimulation to test hypotheses about the functional basis of hooding. We confirmed that hood protraction and erection is an active process that begins cranially and extends caudally, often in stages, through the combined action of several sets of muscles. One set of axial muscles (levator costae and supracostalis lateralis superior) coursing along a line of action to rib displacement are the prime erectors acting to lift the hood. However, a second set of muscles connecting ribs to skin primarily keep the skin taut, rather than to displace the ribs relative to the vertebrae. A third set of muscles coursing between ribs function primarily to transmit forces between adjacent ribs rather than to move ribs. The maintenance of the erect hood requires continued muscle activity. Hood relaxation is due to both active muscle contraction of a fourth set of axial muscles and to passive recoil events in the costovertebral ligaments. The shape of the fully erect hood is reflective of the morphometrics of the underlying ribs, while the duration and kinematics of hood erection and relaxation are related to the behavioral context of the display.

  10. Ground-water quality in northern Ada County, lower Boise River basin, Idaho, 1985-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parliman, D.J.; Spinazola, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    In October 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Idaho Division of Environmental Quality, Boise Regional Office (IDEQ-BRO), began a comprehensive study of ground-water quality in the lower Boise River Basin. The study in northern Ada County has been completed, and this report presents selected results of investigations in that area. Results and discussion presented herein are based on information in publications listed under “References Cited” on the last page of this Fact Sheet.

  11. Floods on Yahara River, Lake Mendota to Lake Kegonsa, Dane County, Wisconsin, 1971

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmstrom, Barry K.; Lawrence, Carl L.

    1971-01-01

    The profile and an approximate outline of the flooded area for the regional (100-year) flood has been determined for a 21.3-mile reach of the Yahara River, Dane County, Wisconsin, from State Highway 113 at the head of Lake Mendota downstream to the dam at the outlet of Lake Kegonsa. The reach consists principally of lake surface, which results in large amounts of flood-storage volume. The regional-flood profile ranges from 1.7 feet to 3.1 feet above normal low-water elevation.

  12. Flood of February 1980 along the Agua Fria River, Maricopa County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomsen, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The flood of February 20, 1980, along the Agua Fria River below Waddell Dam, Maricopa County, Ariz., was caused by heavy rains during February 13-20. The runoff filled Lake Pleasant and resulted in the largest release--66,600 cubic feet per second--from the reservoir since it was built in 1927; the maximum inflow to the reservoir was about 73,300 cubic feet per second. The area inundated by the releases includes about 28 miles along the channel from the mouth of the Agua Fria River to the Beardsley Canal flume crossing 5 miles downstream from Waddell Dam. The flood of 1980 into Lake Pleasant has a recurrence interval of about 47 years, whereas the flood of record (1919) has a recurrence interval of about 100 years. (USGS)

  13. Dissolved-oxygen regime of the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the Jordan River in Salt Lake County decrease considerably as the river flows northward. Mean concentrations of dissolved oxygen decreased from 8.1 milligrams per liter at the Jordan Narrows to 4.7 milligrams per liter at 500 North Street during April 1981 to September 1982. Coincident with the decrease, the biochemical-oxygen demand increased from 5 to 7 milligrams per liter. About 50 percent of the dissolved-oxygen concentrations and 90 percent of the 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand measured downstream from 1700 South Street exceeded the State intended-use standards. An estimated 6. million pounds of oxygen-demanding substances as measured by 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand were discharged to the Jordan River during 1981 from point sources downstream from 9000 South Street. Seven wastewater-treatment plants contributed 77 percent of this load, nonstorm base flows contributed 22 percent, and storm flows less than 1 percent. The Surplus Canal diversion at 2100 South Street removed about 70 percent of this load, and travel time of about 1 day also decreased the actual effects of the load on the river. Reaeration rates during September and October were quite high (average K2 at 20 degrees Celsius was about 12 per day) between the Jordan Narrows and 9000 South Street, but they decreased to 2.4 per day in the reach from 1330 South to 1800 North Streets. (USGS)

  14. Experimental salinity alleviation at Malaga Bend of the Pecos River, Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Havens, John S.; Wilkins, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    Upward-leaking brine, from a confined aquifer at the base of the Rustler Formation, mixes with fresher water in a shallow aquifer , resulting in discharge to the Pecos River in southern Eddy County, New Mexico, of about 0.5 cubic feet per second of saturated brine. Pumping brine from the aquifer at a rate greater than 0.5 cubic feet per second lowered the potentiometric head in the confined aquifer. From July 22, 1963, through December 1968, approximately 3,878 acre-feet of brine had been pumped into the Northeast Depression. The depression leaked brine to the Pecos River. Water downgradient of the depression increased in specific conductance ranging from 1,500 to 99,400 milligrams per liter chloride and water levels near the depression increased over 3 feet from 1963 to 1968. For water years 1952-63, the Pecos River gained about 240 tons per day of chloride in the reach from Malaga gaging station to Pierce Canyon Crossing. The average chloride gain to the Pecos River from July 1963 to August 1966 was 167 tons per day; the 1967-68 gain increased to 256 tons per day after a major flood in August 1966. (USGS)

  15. Geology of the Canyon Reservoir site on the Guadalupe River, Comal County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, William O.; Welder, Frank A.

    1955-01-01

    In response to a request by Colonel Harry O. Fisher, District Engineer of the Fort Worth District of the Corps of Engineers, United States Army (letter of Dec. 13, 1954), a reconnaissance investigation was made of the geology of the Canyon (F-1) reservoir site on the Guadalupe River in Comal County, Tex. The purpose of the investigation was to study the geology in relation to possible leakage - particularly leakage of water that might then be lost from the drainage area of the Guadalupe River - and to add to the general knowledge of the ground-water hydrology of the San Antonio area. The dam (F-1) was originally designed for flood control and conservation only, with provision for the addition of a power unit if feasible. Since the completion of the investigation by the Corps of Engineers, the city of San Antonio has expressed an interest in the reservoir as a possible source of public water supply. The Corps of Engineers has made a thorough engineering and geologic study of the dam site (Corps of Engineers, 1950), which has Congressional approval. The geology and water resources of Comal County have been studied by George (1952). The rocks studied are those within the reservoir area and generally below the 1,000-foot contour as shown on the Smithson Valley quadrangle of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  16. 33 CFR 117.1045 - Hood Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hood Canal. 117.1045 Section 117.1045 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1045 Hood Canal. The draw of the...

  17. 33 CFR 117.1045 - Hood Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hood Canal. 117.1045 Section 117.1045 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1045 Hood Canal. The draw of the...

  18. Genetics of barley hooded suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Cristina; Pozzi, Carlo; Santi, Luca; Müller, Judith; Wang, Yamei; Stile, Maria Rosaria; Rossini, Laura; Stanca, Michele; Salamini, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    The molecular basis of the barley dominant Hooded (K) mutant is a duplication of 305 bp in intron IV of the homeobox gene Bkn3. A chemical mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify genetical factors that participate in Bkn3 intron-mediated gene regulation. Plants from recurrently mutagenized KK seeds were examined for the suppression of the hooded awn phenotype induced by the K allele and, in total, 41 suK (suppressor of K) recessive mutants were identified. Complementation tests established the existence of five suK loci, and alleles suKB-4, suKC-33, suKD-25, suKE-74, and suKF-76 were studied in detail. All K-suppressed mutants showed a short-awn phenotype. The suK loci have been mapped by bulked segregant analysis nested in a standard mapping procedure based on AFLP markers. K suppressor loci suKB, B, E, and F all map in a short interval of chromosome 7H, while the locus suKD is assigned to chromosome 5H. A complementation test between the four suK mutants mapping on chromosome 7H and the short-awn mutant lks2, located nearby, excluded the allelism between suK loci and lks2. The last experiment made clear that the short-awn phenotype of suK mutants is due to a specific dominant function of the K allele, a function that is independent from the control on hood formation. The suK loci are discussed as candidate participants in the regulation of Bkn3 expression. PMID:15166167

  19. Water-surface elevations and channel characteristics for a selected reach of the Applegate River, Jackson County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, David Dell; Alexander, Clyde W.

    1970-01-01

    In land-use planning for the Applegate River and its flood plain, consideration should be given to (1) preservation of the recreational attributes of the area, (2) allowance for optimum development of the flood plain's natural resources, and (3) protection of the rights of private landowners. Major factors that influence evaluation of the above considerations are the elevations and characteristics of floods. Heretofore, such flood data for the Applegate River have been inadequate to evaluate the flood potential or to use as a basis for delineating reasonable land-use zones. Therefore, at the request of Jackson County, this study was made to provide flood elevations, water-surface profiles, and channel characteristics (geometry and slope) for a reach of the Applegate River from the Jackson-Josephine County line upstream to the Applegate damsite (fig. 1). A similar study was previously made for reaches of adjacent Rogue River and Elk Creek (Harris, 1970).

  20. Hydrogeology of the West Branch Delaware River basin, Delaware County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    along the southern divide. The depth to the top of the Marcellus Shale ranges from 3,240 ft along the northern basin divide to 4,150 ft along the southern basin divide. Yields of wells completed in the aquifer are as high as 500 gallons per minute (gal/min). Springs from fractured sandstone bedrock are an important source of domestic and small municipal water supplies in the West Branch Delaware River Basin and elsewhere in Delaware County. The average yield of 178 springs in Delaware County is 8.5 gal/min with a median yield of 3 gal/min. An analysis of two low-flow statistics indicates that groundwater contributions from fractured bedrock compose a significant part of the base flow of the West Branch Delaware River and its tributaries.

  1. Reconnaissance of toxic substances in the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Kendall R.

    1984-01-01

    A reconnaissance of toxic substances in the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah, was made during July, 1980 to October, 1982 as part of a larger study of the river that included studies of sanitary quality, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity. Samples for toxic substances were collected at five sites on the Jordan River, at three major tributaries, and at six storm drains. The toxic substance that most frequently exceeded State standards was total mercury. About 78 percent of the 138 samples for total mercury exceeded the State standard of 0.05 microgram per liter. Other toxic substances that exceeded State standards were: Ammonia-18 percent of the samples analyzed, cadmium--9 percent, copper-9 percent, zinc--6 percent, and lead--2 percent. One sample for cyanide and one for iron also exceeded State standards. The diversity of toxic substances with concentrations large enough to cause them to be problems increased from the upstream sampling site at the Jordan Narrows to the next two downstream sites at 9000 South and 5800 South Streets. Concentrations of trace elements in stream-bottom materials also increased in a downstream direction. Substantial increases first were observed at 5800 South Street, and they were sustained throughout the downstream study area. Iron is transported in the greatest quantity of all the trace elements studied, with a mean load of 110 pounds per day. Notable loads of barium, boron, lead , and zinc also are transported by the river. DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, heptachlor, methoxychlor, PCB, and 2,4-D were detected in bottom materials; and DDE, Silvex, and 2,4-D were detected in water samples. Of 112 organic compounds in the Environmental Protection Agency 's priority pollutant list, only chloroform was detected in the storm drains that empty into the Joran River. Several metals and phenol also were detected in the samples for priority pollutants. (USGS)

  2. Channel-changing processes on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.C.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Lateral channel change on the mainly ephemeral Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, causes damage and has spawned costly efforts to control bank erosion. Aerial photographs, historical data, and field observations are used to document the history of channel change since 1936. Variability in the nature and degree of channel change over time and space is shown. Three major channel change processes are: (1) migration by bank erosion during meander migration or initiation; (2) avulsion by overbank flooding and flood plain incision; (3) widening by erosion of low, cohesionless banks during floods and arroyo widening by undercutting and mass wasting of deeply incised vertical walls. The first process generally is a product of low to moderate flows or waning high flows; the others result mainly from higher flows, though sensitive arroyo walls may erode during relatively low flows. Channel morphology, bank resistance, and hydrology are factors determining the dominant channel-changing process on a particular reach of the river. Present river morphology reflects high flows since the 1960's.

  3. Quaternary eolian dunes in the Savannah River valley, Jasper County, South Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swezey, Christopher S.; Schultz, Arthur P.; González, Wilma Alemán; Bernhardt, Christopher E.; Doar, William R.; Garrity, Christopher P.; Mahan, Shannon A.; McGeehin, John P.

    2013-09-01

    Sand hills in the Savannah River valley in Jasper County (South Carolina, USA) are interpreted as the remnants of parabolic eolian dunes composed of sand derived from the Savannah River and stabilized by vegetation under prevailing climate conditions. Optically stimulated luminescence ages reveal that most of the dunes were active ca. 40 to 19 ka ago, coincident with the last glacial maximum (LGM) through early deglaciation. Modern surface winds are not sufficient for sustained eolian sand transport. When the dunes were active, winds blew at velocities of at least 4 m/s from west to east, and some vegetation was present. The ratio of annual precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (P:PE) was less than the modern ratio of 1.23 and may have been < 0.30, caused by stronger winds (which would have resulted in greater evaporation) and/or reduced precipitation. The Savannah River dunes are part of a larger assemblage of eolian dunes that were active in the eastern United States during and immediately after the LGM, suggesting that eolian sediment behavior in this region has been controlled by regional forcing mechanisms during the Quaternary.

  4. Base flow (1966-2005) and streamflow gain and loss (2006) of the Brazos River, McLennan County to Fort Bend County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turco, Michael J.; East, Jeffery W.; Milburn, Matthew S.

    2007-01-01

    During 2006?07, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, did a study to quantify historical (water years 1966?2005) base flow and streamflow gains and losses from two streamflow-measuring surveys (March and August 2006) in the Brazos River from McLennan County to Fort Bend County, Texas. The Brazos River is hydraulically connected to the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, which in turn is hydraulically connected to several underlying aquifers, the outcrops of which occur in laterally adjacent layers generally parallel to the coast (major aquifers, Carrizo-Wilcox and Gulf Coast, and minor aquifers, Queen City, Sparta, and Yegua-Jackson). Hydrograph separation was done using the USGS computer program Hydrograph Separation and Analysis with historical streamflow from 10 USGS gaging stations, three on the Brazos River and seven on selected tributaries to the Brazos River. Streamflow data for computation of gains and losses were collected in March 2006 from 36 sites on the Brazos River and 19 sites on 19 tributaries to the Brazos River; and in August 2006 from 28 sites on the Brazos River and 16 sites on tributaries. Hydrograph separation and associated analyses indicate an appreciable increase in base flow as a percentage of streamflow in the reach of the Brazos River that crosses the outcrops of the Carrizo-Wilcox, Queen City, Sparta, and Yegua-Jackson aquifers compared to that in the adjacent upstream reach (on average from about 43 percent to about 60 percent). No increase in base flow as a percentage of streamflow in the reach of the Brazos River crossing the Gulf Coast aquifer compared to that in the adjacent upstream reach was indicated. Streamflow gains and losses computed for March 2006 for 35 reaches defined by pairs of sites on the Brazos River indicated that five reaches were verifiably gaining streamflow (computed gain exceeded potential flow measurement error) and none were verifiably losing streamflow. Four of

  5. Shallow Groundwater Movement in the Skagit River Delta Area, Skagit County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.

    2009-01-01

    Shallow groundwater movement in an area between the lower Skagit River and Puget Sound was characterized by the U.S. Geological Survey to assist Skagit County and the Washington State Department of Ecology with the identification of areas where water withdrawals from existing and new wells could adversely affect streamflow in the Skagit River. The shallow groundwater system consists of alluvial, lahar runout, and recessional outwash deposits composed of sand, gravel, and cobbles, with minor lenses of silt and clay. Upland areas are underlain by glacial till and outwash deposits that show evidence of terrestrial and shallow marine depositional environments. Bedrock exposures are limited to a few upland outcrops in the southwestern part of the study area, and consist of metamorphic, sedimentary, and igneous rocks. Water levels were measured in 47 wells on a quarterly basis (August 2007, November 2007, February 2008, and May 2008). Measurements from 34 wells completed in the shallow groundwater system were used to construct groundwater-level and flow-direction maps and perform a linear-regression analysis to estimate the overall, time averaged shallow groundwater-flow direction and gradient. Groundwater flow in the shallow groundwater system generally moves in a southwestward direction away from the Skagit River and toward the Swinomish Channel and Skagit Bay. Local groundwater flow towards the river was inferred during February 2008 in areas west and southwest of Mount Vernon. Water-level altitudes varied seasonally, however, and generally ranged from less than 3 feet (August 2007) in the west to about 15 feet (May 2008) in the east. The time-averaged, shallow groundwater-flow direction derived from regression analysis, 8.5 deg south of west, was similar to flow directions depicted on the quarterly water-level maps. Seasonal changes in groundwater levels in most wells in the Skagit River Delta follow a typical pattern for shallow wells in western Washington. Water

  6. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for the counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District in Florida, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.; Berry, Darbi R.

    2016-07-28

    The irrigated acreage that was field verified in 2015 for the 13 counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District (113,134 acres) is about 6 percent higher than the estimated acreage published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (107,217 acres)

  7. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. 334.450 Section 334.450 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army...

  8. 75 FR 53264 - Restricted Area in Cape Fear River and Tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Restricted Area in Cape Fear River and Tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Army requested that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) revise...

  9. 75 FR 53197 - Restricted Area in Cape Fear River and Tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Restricted Area in Cape Fear River and Tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Army requested that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps)...

  10. 75 FR 11511 - Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest; Mt. Ashland Ski Area Expansion, Jackson County, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Forest Service Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest; Mt. Ashland Ski Area Expansion, Jackson County, OR...-03004-PA, to conditionally authorize expansion of the Mt. Ashland Ski Area. SUMMARY: In September 2004, the Forest Service issued a Record of Decision (ROD) for the Mt. Ashland Ski Area (MASA)...

  11. Numerical simulation of laboratory fume hood airflow performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.T.; Reither, R.

    1998-12-31

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been used to predict airflow patterns in laboratory fume hoods. The simulation includes bypass fume hood primary operational features including the top and bottom bypasses, front airfoils, and rear-slotted baffles. All results were validated experimentally, and the simulation was found to adequately predict fume hood airflow patterns. The results indicate that fume hood flow patterns are highly dependent on inlet flow boundary conditions so that the computation must include the near field room airflow. Additionally, the study included the effects on the fume hood airflow of sash height changes, an operator positioned outside the fume hood, and equipment within the main fume hood chamber. It was shown that for conditions of a fully open sash height, a person in front of the fume hood, and an object inside the fume hood, the fume hood experiences a loss of containment of the flow.

  12. Bathymetry and Near-River Topography of the Naches and Yakima Rivers at Union Gap and Selah Gap, Yakima County, Washington, August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, M.C.; Fosness, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Yakima County is collaborating with the Bureau of Reclamation on a study of the hydraulics and sediment-transport in the lower Naches River and in the Yakima River between Union Gap and Selah Gap in Washington. River bathymetry and topographic data of the river channels are needed for the study to construct hydraulic models. River survey data were available for most of the study area, but river bathymetry and near-river topography were not available for Selah Gap, near the confluence of the Naches and Yakima Rivers, and for Union Gap. In August 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey surveyed the areas where data were not available. If possible, the surveys were made with a boat-mounted, single-beam echo sounder attached to a survey-grade Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) global positioning system (GPS). An RTK GPS rover was used on a walking survey of the river banks, shallow river areas, and river bed areas that were impenetrable to the echo sounder because of high densities of macrophytes. After the data were edited, 95,654 bathymetric points from the boat survey with the echo sounder and 1,069 points from the walking survey with the GPS rover were used in the study. The points covered 4.6 kilometers on the Yakima River and 0.6 kilometers on the Naches River. GPS-surveyed points checked within 0.014 to 0.047 meters in the horizontal direction and -0.036 to 0.078 meters in the vertical direction compared to previously established survey control points

  13. Appraisal of water-quality conditions, lower Black River, Windsor County, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toppin, K.W.

    1983-01-01

    Six hydroelectric power dams are planned along a 22-mile reach of the lower Black River in southeastern Windsor County, Vermont. Data were collected at 10 stations, during water years 1977-81, to appraise quality conditions before construction. Average specific conductance of Black River is 101 micromhos indicating low concentrations of dissolved solids. Concentrations of common constituents and minor elements were generally low and within safe levels for aquatic life. Near-saturated dissolved oxygen concentrations and relatively low mean total organic carbon concentrations indicate little oxygen-consuming substances in Black River. Mean total nitrogen concentrations ranged from 0.31 mg/L (milligrams per liter) to 0.61 mg/L. The highest concentrations were most likely due to secondary waste discharges entering the river. Nitrate was the primary form of inorganic nitrogen, mean concentrations ranged from 0.13 to 0.27 mg/L. Concentrations seem high enough to promote excessive algal growth in the proposed Hawks Mountain Reservoir. Mean concentrations of total phosphorus ranged from 0.014 to 0.112 mg/L as P. Maximum concentrations at all stations generally exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency suggested levels for water entering lakes and reservoirs. Mean orthophosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.005 to 0.029 mg/L, suggesting a potential for nuisance algal conditions to develop in the proposed reservoir. Mean algal growth potential concentrations ranged from 1.3 to 8.8 mg/L, falling within the moderately high to high productivity range. No pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls were detected. (USGS)

  14. Uranium-bearing sandstone in the White River badlands, Pennington County, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, George William; Levish, Murray

    1955-01-01

    The uranium mineral uranocircite, a barium uranyl phosphate, occurs in a channel sandstone in the Chadron formation of Oligocene age in the White River badlands, Pennington County, S. Dak. A vertical section of the basal l-foot of the channel contains 0.25 percent uranium. Small amounts of metatyuyamunite (?) occur in the upper part of a freshwater limestone bed in the Chadron formation, and carnotite occurs in chalcedony veins in the overlying Brule formation, also of Oligocene age. The source of the uranium is thought to have been volcanic ash in the Brule formation and the overlying rocks of Miocene age. Downward moving ground water may have leached this uranium and deposited it in the rocks below.

  15. Hydrogeology and water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    A growing user population within the Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma, has increased the need for drinking water. The North Canadian River alluvium is a reliable source of ground water for agriculture, industry, and cities in Canadian County and is the only ground-water source capable of meeting large demands. This study was undertaken to collect and analyze data to describe the hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium within the Concho Reserve. The alluvium forms a band about 2 miles long and 0.5 mile wide along the southern edge of the Concho Reserve. Thickness of the alluvium ranges from 19 to 75 feet thick and averages about 45 feet in the study area. Well cuttings and natural gamma-ray logs indicate the alluvium consists of interfingering lenses of clay, silt, and sand. The increase of coarse-grained sand and the decrease of clay and silt with depth suggests that the water-bearing properties of the aquifer within the study area improve with depth. A clay layer in the upper part of the aquifer may be partially responsible for surface water ponding in low areas after above normal precipitation and may delay the infiltration of potentially contaminated water from land surface. Specific conductance measurements indicate the ground-water quality improves in a northern direction towards the terrace. Water-quality properties, bacteria counts, major ion and nutrient concentrations, trace-element and radionuclide concentrations, and organic compound concentrations were measured in one ground-water sample at the southern edge of the Concho Reserve and comply with the primary drinking-water standards. Measured concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and total dissolved solids exceed the secondary maximum contaminant levels set for drinking water. The ground water is a calcium sulfate bicarbonate type and is considered very hard, with a hardness of 570 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

  16. Calibration of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority, developed a validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates2 (RMA2) hydrodynamic model of parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (Three Rivers) to help assess the effects of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) on the rivers. The hydrodynamic model was used to drive a water-quality model of the study area that was capable of simulating the transport and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria and chemical constituents under open-water conditions. The study area includes 14 tributary streams and parts of the Three Rivers where they enter and exit Allegheny County, an area of approximately 730 square miles (mi2). The city of Pittsburgh is near the center of the county, where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers join to form the headwaters of the Ohio River. The Three Rivers are regulated by a series of fixed-crest dams, gated dams, and radial (tainter) gates and serve as the receiving waters for tributary streams, CSOs, and SSOs. The RMA2 model was separated into four individual segments on the basis of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigational pools in the study area (Dashields; Emsworth; Allegheny River, Pool 2; and Braddock), which were calibrated individually using measured water-surface slope, velocity, and discharge during high- and low-flow conditions. The model calibration process included the comparison of water-surface elevations at five locations and velocity profiles at more than 80 cross sections in the study area. On the basis of the calibration and validation results that included water-surface elevations and velocities, the model is a representative simulation of the Three Rivers flow patterns for discharges ranging from 4,050 to 47,400 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) on the Allegheny River, 2,550 to 40,000 ft3/s on the Monongahela River, and 10,900 to 99,000 ft3/s on the Ohio River. The Monongahela River was

  17. Base-flow investigation on the Sacramento River, September 25, 1985, near Sunspot, Otero County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagel, Clint D.

    1990-01-01

    On September 25, 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a base-flow investigation to better define the surface-water resources of the Sacramento River drainage basin in Otero County , south-central New Mexico. The investigation included all flow in the Sacramento River from the initial point of flow to the point of zero flow 20.1 river miles downstream. A total of 12 discharge measurements, 3 observations of zero flow and 2 observations of initial flow were obtained during this investigation. Discharge measurements and observations showed a general increase in discharge from river mile 22.4 to a discharge of 6.69 cu ft/sec at river mile 8.4. Discharge then decreased from river mile 8.4 to zero flow at river mile 3.3. Specific conductance and water temperature also were taken concurrently with the discharge measurements. Specific conductance of water generally decreased in a downstream direction from 600 microsiemens/cm at 25 C at river mile 21.9 to 330 microsiemens/cm at 25C at river mile 4.6. (USGS)

  18. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  19. Low-flow study of the Pike River Basin, Racine and Kenosha counties, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, Stephen J.

    1976-01-01

    The low-flow characteristics of the Pike River basin, Racine and Kenosha Counties were studied to determine the feasibility of Public Law 566 watershed-protection practices. Two seepage runs, one in October 1973, and the other in September 1974, showed that most of the low flow is combined treated-sewage and industrial cooling-water discharge. This effluent was 4.66 cubic feet per second (1.3 cubic metres per second) on September 19, 1974, and discharged into the headwaters of the Pike River; near the mouth the discharge was essentially the same. During drought this effluent could be lost gradually by evapotranspiration and by seepage to the ground-water reservoir. The Q7,2 discharge estimate near the mouth is 0.0 cubic foot per second. Water temperatures October 25-26, 1973, ranged from 9.5 to 16 degrees Celsius, whereas those for. September 19-20, 1974, ranged from 10 to 22 degrees Celsius. Dissolved oxygen October 25-26, 1973, ranged from 4 to 13.5 milligrams per litre; for September 19-20, 1974, the range was from 6.0 to 12.5 milligrams per litre. Specific conductance October 25-26, 1973, ranged from 480 to 1,350 micromhos; for September 19-20, 1974, the range was from 380 to 1,400 micromhos.

  20. Ecological studies of a regulated stream: Huntington River, Emery County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Winget, R.N.

    1984-04-30

    A 36.9 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ reservoir constructed on Huntington River, Emery County, Utah, resulted in changes in physical habitat, water quality, temperature, and flow regime. The greatest changes in physical habitat resulted from: (1) sediment additions from dam and road construction plus erosion of reservoir basin during filling; and (2) changing stream flow from a spring high runoff regime to a moderated flow regime. Elimination of spring nutrient concentration peaks and overall reduction of total dissolved nutrient availability in the river plus moderate reductions in pH were the most apparent water quality changes below the reservoir. Water temperature changes were an increased diurnal and seasonal constancy, summer depression, and winter elevation, generally limited to a 10-12 km reach below the dam. Physical and chemical changes altered macroinvertebrate community structure, with changes greatest near the dam and progressively less as distance downstream increased. Below the dam: (1) more environmentally tolerant taxa increased their dominance; (2) relative numbers of smaller sized individuals increased in relation to larger individuals; and (3) filter feeding, collector/gatherers, and scapers gained an advantage over shredders. Macroinvertebrate taxa with small instar larvae present from late summer to early fall were negatively impacted by the unnaturally high July and August flows. The reservoir became a physical barrier to downstream larval drift and upcanyon and downcanyon immigration of adults, resulting in reduced numbers of several species above and below the reservoir. 50 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Stream channel cross sections for a reach of the Boise River in Ada County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hortness, Jon E.; Werner, Douglas C.

    1999-01-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency produces maps of areas that are likely to be inundated during major floods, usually the 100-year, or 1-percent probability, flood. The maps, called Flood Insurance Rate Maps, are used to determine flood insurance rates for homes, businesses, or other structures located in flood-prone areas. State and local governments also use these maps for help with, among other things, development planning and disaster mitigation. During the period October 1997 through December 1998, the initial phase of a hydraulic analysis project of the Boise River from Barber Dam to the Ada/Canyon County boundary, the U.S. Geological Survey collected stream channel cross-section data at 238 locations along the river and documented 108 elevation reference marks established for horizontal and vertical control. In the final phase of the project, the Survey will use these data to determine water-surface elevations for the 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods and to define floodway limits. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will use the results of this hydraulic analysis to update the 100- and 500-year flood boundaries and the floodway limits on their Flood Insurance Rate Maps.

  2. Petrographic analyses of Knobloch coal seam (Paleocene), Powder River County, southeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    A single core of Knobloch coal from Powder River County, southeast Montana, was drilled to obtain samples for coal quality studies. The coal occurs in the lower Tongue River Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The Knobloch coal core (63 ft long) was divided into 1-ft increments and analyzed using chemical and petrographic methods. Definite variations in maceral content were seen. Preliminary studies show relationship between ash, gelinite, inertinite, and humodetrinite contents. A zone of low gelinite, low humodetrinite, and high inertinite, located in the lower quarter of the seam, implies a period of severe oxidation occurred, possibly as swamp fires. Four zones of high inertinite and high humodetrinite (three in the upper half and one in the lower half of the seam) indicate fluctuations in the water table, allowing moderate oxidation and weathering of plant material and subsequent mechanical reworking of humic grains. Near the center of the seam, a zone of high inertinite, high humodetrinite, and high ash content suggests water levels were high enough to allow significant sediment influx as well as reworking of the humic materials. These conclusions suggest the Knobloch coal is autochthonous and hypautochthonous in origin, a result of several water-table fluctuations and/or climatic changes due to drought.

  3. Geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer, Garden County, Western Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, Gregory V.; Cannia, James C.

    1995-01-01

    In 1993, a 3-year study was begun to describe the geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer near Oshkosh, Garden County, Nebraska. The study's objectives are to evaluate the geohydrologic characteristics of the alluvial aquifer and to establish a network of observation wells for long-term monitoring of temporal variations and spatial distributions of nitrate and major-ion concentrations. Monitor wells were installed at 11 sites near Oshkosh. The geohydrology of the aquifer was characterized based on water-level measurements and two short-term aquifer tests. Bimonthly water samples were collected and analyzed for pH, specific conductivity, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients that included dissolved nitrate. Concentrations of major ions were defined from analyses of semiannual water samples. Analyses of the geohydrologic and water-quality data indicate that the aquifer is vulnerable to nitrate contamination. These data also show that nitrate concentrations in ground water flowing into and out of the study area are less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Concentration Level of 10 milligrams per liter for drinking water. Ground water from Lost Creek Valley may be mixing with ground water in the North Platte River Valley, somewhat moderating nitrate concentrations near Oshkosh.

  4. Development of an Impervious-Surface Database for the Little Blackwater River Watershed, Dorchester County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milheim, Lesley E.; Jones, John W.; Barlow, Roger A.

    2007-01-01

    Many agricultural and forested areas in proximity to National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) are under increasing economic pressure for commercial or residential development. The upper portion of the Little Blackwater River watershed - a 27 square mile area within largely low-lying Dorchester County, Maryland, on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay - is important to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) because it flows toward the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (BNWR), and developmental impacts of areas upstream from the BNWR are unknown. One of the primary concerns for the Refuge is how storm-water runoff may affect living resources downstream. The Egypt Road project (fig. 1), for which approximately 600 residential units have been approved, has the potential to markedly change the land use and land cover on the west bank of the Little Blackwater River. In an effort to limit anticipated impacts, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (Maryland DNR) recently decided to purchase some of the lands previously slated for development. Local topography, a high water table (typically 1 foot or less below the land surface), and hydric soils present a challenge for the best management of storm-water flow from developed surfaces. A spatial data coordination group was formed by the Dorchester County Soil and Conservation District to collect data to aid decisionmakers in watershed management and on the possible impacts of development on this watershed. Determination of streamflow combined with land cover and impervious-surface baselines will allow linking of hydrologic and geologic factors that influence the land surface. This baseline information will help planners, refuge managers, and developers discuss issues and formulate best management practices to mitigate development impacts on the refuge. In consultation with the Eastern Region Geospatial Information Office, the dataset selected to be that baseline land cover source was the June-July 2005 National

  5. Transport and deposition of asbestos-rich sediment in the Sumas River, Whatcom County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Anderson, Scott W.; Barbash, Jack E.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Cox, Stephen E.; Norton, Katherine K.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Spanjer, Andrew R.; Foreman, James R.

    2016-02-08

    Heavy sediment loads in the Sumas River of Whatcom County, Washington, increase seasonal turbidity and cause locally acute sedimentation. Most sediment in the Sumas River is derived from a deep-seated landslide of serpentinite that is located on Sumas Mountain and drained by Swift Creek, a tributary to the Sumas River. This mafic sediment contains high amounts of naturally occurring asbestiform chrysotile. A known human-health hazard, asbestiform chrysotile comprises 0.25–37 percent, by mass, of the total suspended sediment sampled from the Sumas River as part of this study, which included part of water year 2011 and all of water years 2012 and 2013. The suspended-sediment load in the Sumas River at South Pass Road, 0.6 kilometers (km) downstream of the confluence with Swift Creek, was 22,000 tonnes (t) in water year 2012 and 49,000 t in water year 2013. The suspended‑sediment load at Telegraph Road, 18.8 km downstream of the Swift Creek confluence, was 22,000 t in water year 2012 and 27,000 t in water year 2013. Although hydrologic conditions during the study were wetter than normal overall, the 2-year flood peak was only modestly exceeded in water years 2011 and 2013; runoff‑driven geomorphic disturbance to the watershed, which might have involved mass wasting from the landslide, seemed unexceptional. In water year 2012, flood peaks were modest, and the annual streamflow was normal. The fact that suspended-sediment loads in water year 2012 were equivalent at sites 0.6 and 18.8 km downstream of the sediment source indicates that the conservation of suspended‑sediment load can occur under normal hydrologic conditions. The substantial decrease in suspended-sediment load in the downstream direction in water year 2013 was attributed to either sedimentation in the intervening river reach, transfer to bedload as an alternate mode of sediment transport, or both.The sediment in the Sumas River is distinct from sediment in most other river systems because of the

  6. Transport and deposition of asbestos-rich sediment in the Sumas River, Whatcom County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Anderson, Scott W.; Barbash, Jack E.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Cox, Stephen E.; Norton, Katherine K.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Spanjer, Andrew R.; Foreman, James R.

    2016-02-08

    Heavy sediment loads in the Sumas River of Whatcom County, Washington, increase seasonal turbidity and cause locally acute sedimentation. Most sediment in the Sumas River is derived from a deep-seated landslide of serpentinite that is located on Sumas Mountain and drained by Swift Creek, a tributary to the Sumas River. This mafic sediment contains high amounts of naturally occurring asbestiform chrysotile. A known human-health hazard, asbestiform chrysotile comprises 0.25–37 percent, by mass, of the total suspended sediment sampled from the Sumas River as part of this study, which included part of water year 2011 and all of water years 2012 and 2013. The suspended-sediment load in the Sumas River at South Pass Road, 0.6 kilometers (km) downstream of the confluence with Swift Creek, was 22,000 tonnes (t) in water year 2012 and 49,000 t in water year 2013. The suspended‑sediment load at Telegraph Road, 18.8 km downstream of the Swift Creek confluence, was 22,000 t in water year 2012 and 27,000 t in water year 2013. Although hydrologic conditions during the study were wetter than normal overall, the 2-year flood peak was only modestly exceeded in water years 2011 and 2013; runoff‑driven geomorphic disturbance to the watershed, which might have involved mass wasting from the landslide, seemed unexceptional. In water year 2012, flood peaks were modest, and the annual streamflow was normal. The fact that suspended-sediment loads in water year 2012 were equivalent at sites 0.6 and 18.8 km downstream of the sediment source indicates that the conservation of suspended‑sediment load can occur under normal hydrologic conditions. The substantial decrease in suspended-sediment load in the downstream direction in water year 2013 was attributed to either sedimentation in the intervening river reach, transfer to bedload as an alternate mode of sediment transport, or both.The sediment in the Sumas River is distinct from sediment in most other river systems because of the

  7. Transport and deposition of asbestos-rich sediment in the Sumas River, Whatcom County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Anderson, Scott W.; Barbash, Jack E.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Cox, Stephen E.; Norton, Katherine K.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Spanjer, Andrew R.; Foreman, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy sediment loads in the Sumas River of Whatcom County, Washington, increase seasonal turbidity and cause locally acute sedimentation. Most sediment in the Sumas River is derived from a deep-seated landslide of serpentinite that is located on Sumas Mountain and drained by Swift Creek, a tributary to the Sumas River. This mafic sediment contains high amounts of naturally occurring asbestiform chrysotile. A known human-health hazard, asbestiform chrysotile comprises 0.25–37 percent, by mass, of the total suspended sediment sampled from the Sumas River as part of this study, which included part of water year 2011 and all of water years 2012 and 2013. The suspended-sediment load in the Sumas River at South Pass Road, 0.6 kilometers (km) downstream of the confluence with Swift Creek, was 22,000 tonnes (t) in water year 2012 and 49,000 t in water year 2013. The suspended‑sediment load at Telegraph Road, 18.8 km downstream of the Swift Creek confluence, was 22,000 t in water year 2012 and 27,000 t in water year 2013. Although hydrologic conditions during the study were wetter than normal overall, the 2-year flood peak was only modestly exceeded in water years 2011 and 2013; runoff‑driven geomorphic disturbance to the watershed, which might have involved mass wasting from the landslide, seemed unexceptional. In water year 2012, flood peaks were modest, and the annual streamflow was normal. The fact that suspended-sediment loads in water year 2012 were equivalent at sites 0.6 and 18.8 km downstream of the sediment source indicates that the conservation of suspended‑sediment load can occur under normal hydrologic conditions. The substantial decrease in suspended-sediment load in the downstream direction in water year 2013 was attributed to either sedimentation in the intervening river reach, transfer to bedload as an alternate mode of sediment transport, or both.The sediment in the Sumas River is distinct from sediment in most other river systems because of the

  8. Water quality and hydrology of the Silver River Watershed, Baraga County, Michigan, 2005-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, Thomas L.; Sullivan, Daniel J.; Rachol, Cynthia M.; Ellis, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The Silver River Watershed comprises about 69 square miles and drains part of northeastern Baraga County, Michigan. For generations, tribal members of the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community have hunted and fished in the watershed. Tribal government and members of Keweenaw Bay Indian Community are concerned about the effect of any development within the watershed, which is rural, isolated, and lightly populated. For decades, the area has been explored for various minerals. Since 2004, several mineral-exploration firms have been actively investigating areas within the watershed; property acquisition, road construction, and subsurface drilling have taken place close to tributary streams of the Silver River. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, conducted a multi-year water-resources investigation of the Silver River Watershed during 2005-08. Methods of investigation included analyses of streamflow, water-quality sampling, and ecology at eight discrete sites located throughout the watershed. In addition, three continuous-record streamgages located within the watershed provided stage, discharge, specific conductance, and water-temperature data on an hourly basis. Water quality of the Silver River Watershed is typical of many streams in undeveloped areas of Upper Michigan. Concentrations of most analytes typically were low, although several exceeded applicable surface-water-quality standards. Seven samples had concentrations of copper that exceeded the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality standards for wildlife, and one sample had concentrations of cyanide that exceeded the same standards. Concentrations of total mercury at all eight sampling sites exceeded the Great Lakes Basin water-quality standard, but the ratio of methylmercury to total mercury was similar to the 5 to 10 percent found in most natural waters. Concentrations of arsenic and chromium in bed sediments were near the threshold-effect concentration. A qualitative

  9. Water temperature profiles for reaches of the Raging River during summer baseflow, King County, western Washington, July 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Opatz, Chad C.

    2016-03-22

    Re-introducing wood into rivers where it was historically removed is one approach to improving habitat conditions in rivers of the Pacific Northwest. The Raging River drainage basin, which flows into the Snoqualmie River at Fall City, western Washington, was largely logged during the 20th century and wood was removed from its channel. To improve habitat conditions for several species of anadromous salmonids that spawn and rear in the Raging River, King County Department of Transportation placed untethered log jams in a 250-meter reach where wood was historically removed. The U.S. Geological Survey measured longitudinal profiles of near-streambed temperature during summer baseflow along 1,026 meters of channel upstream, downstream, and within the area of wood placements. These measurements were part of an effort by King County to monitor the geomorphic and biological responses to these wood placements. Near-streambed temperatures averaged over about 1-meter intervals were measured with a fiber‑optic distributed temperature sensor every 30 minutes for 7 days between July 7 and 13, 2015. Vertical temperature profiles were measured coincident with the longitudinal temperature profile at four locations at 0 centimeters (cm) (at the streambed), and 35 and 70 cm beneath the streambed to document thermal dynamics of the hyporheic zone and surface water in the study reach.

  10. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the valley-fill aquifer in the Arkansas River valley, Crowley and Otero Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Hurr, R.T.; Moore, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer of the Arkansas River valley in Crowley and Otero Counties, Colorado is presented in a series of three maps. The map shows: (1) the altitude and configuration of the bedrock surface beneath the valley-fill material; (2) the altitude and configuration of the water table in the spring of 1966; and (3) the saturation thickness of the valley-fill aquifer in the spring of 1966. (USGS)

  11. Hydrographs showing groundwater levels for selected wells in the Puyallup River watershed and vicinity, Pierce and King Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, R.C.; Julich, R.J.; Justin, G.B.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrographs of groundwater levels for selected wells in and adjacent to the Puyallup River watershed in Pierce and King Counties, Washington, are presented using an interactive Web-based map of the study area to illustrate changes in groundwater levels on a monthly and seasonal basis. The interactive map displays well locations that link to the hydrographs, which in turn link to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System, Groundwater Site Inventory System.

  12. Hydrogeology of the Little Spokane River Basin, Spokane, Stevens, and Pend Oreille Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahle, Sue C.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.

    2013-01-01

    A study of the hydrogeologic framework of the Little Spokane River Basin was conducted to identify and describe the principal hydrogeologic units in the study area, their hydraulic characteristics, and general directions of groundwater movement. The Little Spokane River Basin includes an area of 679 square miles in northeastern Washington State covering parts of Spokane, Stevens, and Pend Oreille Counties. The groundwater system consists of unconsolidated sedimentary deposits and isolated, remnant basalt layers overlying crystalline bedrock. In 1976, a water resources program for the Little Spokane River was adopted into rule by the State of Washington, setting instream flows for the river and closing its tributaries to further uses. Spokane County representatives are concerned about the effects that additional groundwater development within the basin might have on the Little Spokane River and on existing groundwater resources. Information provided by this study will be used in future investigations to evaluate the effects of potential increases in groundwater withdrawals on groundwater and surface-water resources in the basin. The hydrogeologic framework consists of eight hydrogeologic units: the Upper aquifer, Upper confining unit, Lower aquifers, Lower confining unit, Wanapum basalt unit, Latah unit, Grande Ronde basalt unit, and Bedrock. The Upper aquifer is composed mostly of sand and gravel and varies in thickness from 4 to 360 ft, with an average thickness of 70 ft. The aquifer is generally finer grained in areas farther from main outwash channels. The estimated horizontal hydraulic conductivity ranges from 4.4 to 410,000 feet per day (ft/d), with a median hydraulic conductivity of 900 ft/d. The Upper confining unit is a low-permeability unit consisting mostly of silt and clay, and varies in thickness from 5 to 400 ft, with an average thickness of 100 ft. The estimated horizontal hydraulic conductivity ranges from 0.5 to 5,600 ft/d, with a median hydraulic

  13. Streamwater quality at selected sites in the Fraser River basin, Grand County, Colorado, water years 1991-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bails, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the effect of population growth on streamwater quality in the Fraser River Basin, the U.S. Geological Survey did a study in cooperation with the Grand County Commissioners and the East Grand County Water Quality Board. During water years 1991 through 2000, the study determined that concentrations of un-ionized ammonia and nitrite plus nitrate in the streamwater of the basin are within Colorado State streamwater?quality standards. The study also found that concentrations of chloride are largest at the headwaters and decrease downstream; however, chloride loading in the stream has the opposite relation. Most nutrient loading to the Fraser River happens January through May. Concentrations of ammonia at Fraser River downstream from Vasquez Creek at Winter Park had a downward trend through the period of the study. Nitrite plus nitrate had upward and downward trends at different sites and over different time spans. Orthophosphorus concentrations had upward trends at two sites. In general, the streamwater quality in the Fraser River Basin is good and is not out of compliance with State standards.

  14. Simulation of ground-water flow in the Cedar River alluvium, northwest Black Hawk County and southwest Bremer County, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaap, Bryan D.; Savoca, Mark E.; Turco, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    In general, once high ground-water levels occur, either because of high Cedar River water Abstract levels or above normal local precipitation or both, ground-water in the central part of the study area along Highway 218 flows toward the south rather than following shorter flow paths to the Cedar River. Intermittent streams in the study area discharge substantial amounts of water from the ground-water flow system.

  15. Preliminary Assessment of Landslides Along the Florida River Downstream from Lemon Reservoir, La Plata County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, William H.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, William L.; Kibler, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly two-dozen shallow landslides were active during spring 2005 on a hillside located along the east side of the Florida River about one kilometer downstream from Lemon Reservoir in La Plata County, southwestern Colorado. Landslides on the hillside directly threaten human safety, residential structures, a county roadway, utilities, and the Florida River, and indirectly threaten downstream areas and Lemon Dam. Most of the area where the landslides occurred was burned during the 2002 Missionary Ridge wildfire. We performed geologic mapping, subsurface exploration and sampling, radiocarbon dating, and shallow ground-water and ground-displacement monitoring to assess landslide activity. Active landslides during spring 2005 were as large as 35,000 m3 and confined to colluvium. Debris flows were mobilized from most of the landslides, were as large as 1,500 m3, and traveled as far as 250 m. Landslide activity was triggered by elevated ground-water pressures within the colluvium caused by infiltration of snowmelt. Landslide activity ceased as ground-water pressures dropped during the summer. Shallow landslides on the hillside appear to be much more likely following the Missionary Ridge fire because of the loss of tree root strength and evapotranspiration. We used monitoring data and observations to develop preliminary, approximate rainfall/snowmelt thresholds above which shallow landslide activity can be expected. Landslides triggered during spring 2005 occurred within a 1.97 x 107 m3 older landslide that extends, on average, about 40 m into bedrock. The south end of this older landslide appears to have experienced deep secondary landsliding. Radiocarbon dating of sediments at the head of the older landslide suggests that the landslide was active about 1,424-1,696 years ago. A relatively widespread wildfire may have preceded the older landslide, and the landslide may have occurred during a wetter time. The wetter climate and effects of the wildfire would likely have

  16. Evaluation of the Edgegard Laminar Flow Hood

    PubMed Central

    Coriell, Lewis L.; McGarrity, Gerard J.

    1970-01-01

    In a horizontal back-to-front flow high-efficiency particulate air-filtered laminar hood, it is shown that a Blake bottle obstruction to the air flow causes a downstream cone of turbulent air which can draw microbial contamination into the work area of the hood. In controlled experiments, contamination with T3 coliphage was reduced by a series of perforations around the open edge of the hood which eliminates the cone of turbulent air. The average reduction in phage counts was 90.75, 86.79, 91.12, and 98.92%, depending upon the site of nebulization. The phage counts were reduced in 48 of the 51 tests. Images PMID:5485728

  17. Study of how sash movement affects performance of fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, T.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted to determine how sash movements affect the performance of fume hoods. The performance of two fume hoods was studied as the sashes were moved from closed to open position at speeds of 2 ft/s, 1.5 ft/s, and 1 ft/s. The tests were conducted with fume hoods operated at both constant volume and variable air volume. The tests indicate that sash movements can disturb airflow patterns at the face of the hood and potentially affect the performance of the hood. The effect of the sash movement varied with hood type and speed of sash movement. The faster sash movements of 2 ft/s and 1.5 ft/s had a greater effect on the performance of the hoods than the slower movement of 1 ft/s. Constant-volume hoods and variable-air-volume hoods were both affected by sash movements. Constant-volume hoods set to a full open face velocity of 60 ft/min were more susceptible to the sash movement than at 100 ft/min full open face velocity. The performance of variable-air-volume hoods is affected not only by sash movement speed but also by the response time of the controller. The drop in face velocity that occurs when the sash is moved is determined by the speed of the VAV controller. The required response time for containment depends on the fume hood design and the speed of the sash movement.

  18. 75 FR 18144 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on... INFORMATION CONTACT: For more information regarding this meeting, contact Connie Athman; Mt. Hood...

  19. 75 FR 21220 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Action of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on Tuesday... meeting, contact Connie Athman; Mt. Hood National Forest; 16400 Champion Way; Sandy, Oregon 97055;...

  20. 76 FR 19314 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Salem, Oregon... Connie Athman, Mt. Hood National Forest, 16400 Champion Way, Sandy, Oregon 97055. Comments may also...

  1. 76 FR 53114 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Sandy, Oregon. The... September 26, 2011, and begin at 10 a.m ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at Mt. Hood National...

  2. 46 CFR 118.425 - Galley hood fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. 118.425 Section... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fixed Fire Extinguishing and Detecting Systems § 118.425 Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. (a) A grease extraction hood required by § 118.400 of this part must meet UL 710 “Exhaust...

  3. 46 CFR 118.425 - Galley hood fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. 118.425 Section... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fixed Fire Extinguishing and Detecting Systems § 118.425 Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. (a) A grease extraction hood required by § 118.400 of this part must meet UL 710 “Exhaust...

  4. 76 FR 58768 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting location change. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in... Home, Oregon; (541) 367-5168. Written comments should be sent to Connie Athman, Mt.Hood National...

  5. Water-quality reconnaissance of the Pascagoula and Escatawpa Rivers, Jackson County, Mississippi, May 1974 to July 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.

    1980-01-01

    Short-term, water-quality reconnaissances along the downstream reaches of the Pascagoula and Escatawpa Rivers in Jackson County , Miss., indicate that stream quality during the period May 1974 to July 1978 was affected by wastewater discharges as well as river discharge and the extent of tidal intrusion. Specific conductances on the Pascagoula River ranged from less than 100 to more than 40,000 micromhos per centimeter and increased downstream. Specific conductance also increased with depth at downstram sites, indicating density stratification. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations were also affected by density stratification but were generally greater than 4.0 milligrams per liter in both rivers. Analyses of 5-day biochemical oxygen demand and nutrient concentrations indicate that oxidation of both carbonaceous and nitrogenous materials significantly affected the waste assimilative capacity of the rivers. Concentrations of pesticides and most trace elements in both the water column and the bottom sediments were zero or very small. Titanium concentrations were less than 220 micrograms per liter in the water column and 6,500 micrograms per gram in bottom sediments. Small concentrations of oil and grease, PCB's, and phenols were also detected. Fecal coliform and fecal streptococcal bacteria concentrations were generally greater in the Escatawpa River and ranged from about 10 to 18,000 colonies per 100 milliliters of water. (USGS)

  6. Ground-water data of selected test holes and wells along the Arkansas river in Muskogee County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, H.H.; Hart, D.L.; Knott, R.K.

    1965-01-01

    The data in this report were collected during the period 1958-64 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers, as part of a comprehensive study of the ground-water resources of the alluvium along the Arkansas and Verdigris Rivers between Moffett and Catoosa, Oklahoma (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to make the hydrologic data obtained during the study of ground water in the alluvium along the Arkansas River in Muskogee County readily available to the public. The data in this report should be useful in predicting geologic and hydrologic conditions when drilling new wells. Table 1 gives information on the sizes, depths, yields, and other characteristics of wells in the area. The table also provides a key to the additional information for each well site given in tables 2 through 6. Table 2 gives logs for the materials penetrated at test holes and wells in the report area; table 3 gives depths to water measured in wells; table 4 includes chemical analyses of water from wells; table 5 gives laboratory determinations of particle-size distribution of earth samples collected from test holes and wells; and table 6 gives coefficients of permeability and other hydrologic properties of earth samples from the selected test holes. Similar data for Sequoyah County, LeFlore-Haskell Counties, and Wagoner-Rogers Counties are available in other open-file reports. An interpretive report, 'Hydrology of the alluvium of the Arkansas River, Muskogee, Oklahoma, to Fort Smith, Arkansas,' by Harry H. Tanaka and Jerrald R. Hollowell will be published as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1809-T.

  7. Ground-water data of selected test holes and wells along the Verdigris River in Wagoner and Rogers Counties, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, H.H.; Hart, D.L.; Knott, R.K.

    1965-01-01

    The data in this report were collected during the period 1958-64 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers, as part of a comprehensive study of the ground-water resources of the alluvium along the Arkansas and Verdigris Rivers between Moffett and Catoosa, Oklahoma (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to make the hydrologic data obtained during the study of ground water in the alluvium along the Verdigris River in Wagoner and Rogers Counties readily available to the public. The data in this report should be useful in predicting geologic and hydrologic conditions when drilling new wells. Table 1 gives information on the sizes, depths, yields, and other characteristics of wells in the area. The table also provides a key to the additional information for each well site given in tables 2 through 6. Table 2 gives logs for the materials penetrated at test holes and wells in the report area; table 3 gives depths to water measured in wells; table 4 includes chemical analyses of water from wells; table 5 gives laboratory determinations of particle-size distribution of earth samples collected from test holes and wells; and table 6 gives coefficients of permeability and other hydrologic properties of earth samples from the selected test holes. Similar data for Sequoyah County, LeFlore-Haskell Counties, and Muskogee County are available in other open-file reports. An interpretive report, 'Hydrology of the alluvium of the Arkansas River, Muskogee, Oklahoma, to Fort Smith, Arkansas,' by Harry H. Tanaka and Jerrald R. Hollowell will be published as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1809-T.

  8. Ground-water data of selected test holes and wells along the Arkansas River in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, H.H.; Hart, D.L.; Knott, R.K.

    1965-01-01

    The data in this report were collected during the period 1958-64 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers, as part of a comprehensive study of the ground-water resources of the alluvium along the Arkansas and Verdigris Rivers between Moffett and Catoosa, Oklahoma (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to make the hydrologic data obtained during the study of ground water in the alluvium along the Arkansas River in Sequoyah County readily available to the public. The data in this report should be useful in predicting geologic and hydrologic conditions when drilling new wells. Table 1 gives information on the sizes, depths, yields, and other characteristics of wells in the area. The table also provides a key to the additional information for each well site given in tables 2 through 6. Table 2 gives logs for the materials penetrated at test holes and wells in the report area; table 3 gives depths to water measured in wells; table 4 includes chemical analyses of water from wells; table 5 gives laboratory determinations of particle-size distribution of earth samples collected from test holes and wells; and table 6 gives coefficients of permeability and other hydrologic properties of earth samples from the selected test holes. Similar data for LeFlore-Haskell Counties, Muskogee County, and Wagoner-Rogers Counties are available in other open-file reports. An interpretive report, 'Hydrology of the alluvium of the Arkansas River, Muskogee, Oklahoma, to Fort Smith, Arkansas,' by Harry H. Tanaka and Jerrald R. Hollowell will be published as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1809-T.

  9. Population sizes and group characteristics of Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) in Poyang Lake Wetland

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, Ming-Qin; GUO, Hong; JIANG, Jian-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Both the Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) have limited population sizes and are considered endangered by domestic Chinese and international agencies. To document the current size of their respective populations and characterize their groups, between October 2012 and April 2013 we undertook fieldwork at four nature reserve areas within the Poyang Lake wetlands. We divided Poyanghu National Nature Reserve (PYH) into the Wucheng (PWC) and Hengfeng areas (PHF), because each are each located in different counties. Our fieldwork showed that the Siberian Crane occurred mainly in PYH (364 in the PHF, 158 in the PWC) and the Nanjishan Wetland National Nature Reserve (NJS, with 200 individuals). The Hooded Crane was mainly distributed in PYH (302 in the PHF and 154 in the PWC). Family groups accounted for more than 50% of the total number of groups among both species, with Hooded Cranes forming more family groups than Siberian Cranes. Typically, these groups were formed of two adults with one offspring (Siberian Crane), and two adults with two offspring (Hooded Crane), with the mean family group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane being respectively 2.65±0.53 (n=43) and 3.09±0.86 (n=47) individuals per group. The mean collective group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane included 28.09±24.94 (n=23) and 28.94±27.97 (n=16) individuals per group, respectively, with the proportion of juveniles among Hooded Cranes being more than double that seen among the Siberian Cranes. PMID:25297076

  10. Geohydrology and model analysis of stream-aquifer system along the Arkansas River in Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlap, L.E.; Lindgren, Richard J.; Sauer, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made, in cooperation with the Division of Water Resources, Kansas State Board of Agriculture, to determine geohydrologic conditions in an area comprising nearly 850,000 acres along the Arkansas River valley in Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas. The Arkansas River meanders atop and interacts hydraulically with the area's multilayered, unconsolidated aquifer system. Declines in static water levels in wells in the heavily pumped lower aquifer ranged from 20 to 80 feet during 1974-80. The river is dry in much of the area. A digital computer model was calibrated to simulate the trends of historic water levels. Simulated 1974-80 conditions depicted an average annual recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system of 66,900 acre-feet from precipitation and 36,200 acre-feet from river and canal seepage and boundary inflow. Simulated average annual discharge consisted of 634,800 acre-feet from pumpage and boundary outflow. Simulated average annual recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system was 531,700 acre-feet less than average annual discharge, indicating the ground-water resource is currently (1982) being mined in the study area. Simulation also indicated that there would be sufficient saturated thickness in 2005 for irrigation if 1980 hydrologic conditions continued. Seepage losses from the Arkansas River and irrigation canals are a major source of recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system. Therefore, the amount of flow in the Arkansas River would be important in determining the rate of future water-level declines in the study area. Streamflow seepage losses could be decreased by (1) decreasing the number of wells pumping in the study area in order to reduce downward leakage from the valley aquifer, or (2) increasing streamflow discharge in order to recharge the valley aquifer. The rate and direction of flow between the river and the valley aquifer depend on the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed and the hydraulic gradient between the

  11. Geomorphic response to channel modifications of Skuna River at the State Highway 9 crossing at Bruce, Calhoun County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.V.; Turnipseed, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    Skuna River at State Highway 9 at Bruce, Calhoun County, Mississippi, has geomorphically responded to channel modifications by lowering of the channel bed through degradation, which heightened and steepened channel banks and induced widening. Skuna River Canal (Skuna River) has typically degraded about 16.5 feet and widened about 150 feet from 1925 (when constructed) to 1992. Old Skuna River has degraded and widened about 11 feet and 40 feet, respectively, from 1921 to 1991. Skuna River Canal tributary has degraded about 6 feet from 1921 to 1991. Most of the geomorphic response on the Old River and the tributary seems to be a consequence of modifications of the canal. The bankfull discharge of the canal has increased about 1,450 percent, and the channel slope has decreased about 34 percent from 1925 to 1989. The bankfull stream power has been decreasing since 1980. The bankfull channel width-depth ratio has been increasing since 1975, which indicates the canal has been widening more than degrading since 1975. As much as 1 foot of additional degradation and 40 feet of additional widening are projected through 2010 on Skuna River Canal in the vicinity of State Highway 9. About 70 feet of additional widening could occur before the canal reaches quasi-equilibrium, which will likely be reached after 2010. If Old Skuna River and Skuna River Canal tributary degrade as much as the canal, which is doubtful, then about 6 and 11 feet of additional degradation could occur by 2010 on the Old Skuna River and the tributary, respectively, at State Highway 9. Old Skuna River and the tributary could both widen an additional 30 feet in the next 10 to 20 years. The channel low-stage thalweg of Skuna River Canal is beginning to meander around sandbars inducing lateral erosion of the channel banks. The widening projections in this report do not directly account for lateral erosion and are considered to be a minimum for the typical channel reach. Lateral erosion will likely have a

  12. Geochemical and palynological indicators of the paleoecology of the River Gem coal bed, Whitley County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Ruppert, L.F.; Eble, C.F.; Graham, U.M.

    1996-01-01

    The River Gem coal bed (upper Westphalian A) was sampled at five sites in a single mine in Whitley County, Kentucky. Previous petrographic and sulfur analyses of the collected interval samples showed that the coal bed could be divided into a basal low-sulfur lithotype, a middle high-sulfur bone lithotype and an upper high-sulfur lithotype. At one location a high-sulfur rider unit is present. In this study we have conducted detailed palynological analyses on all of the interval samples and ash geochemistry on the upper high-sulfur lithotype intervals and two of the basal high-sulfur basal lithotype intervals. Geochemical analyses show that As and Pb are generally high in the high-sulfur upper lithotypes from all five sites. Carbonates, having associated high levels of Ba and Sr, are important in the ash geochemistry of the lower, low-sulfur lithotypes. Ga, Ge and W are enriched in the higher vitrinite lithotypes among the low-sulfur samples. The basal lithotype at each of two sites, which was analyzed in detail, is enriched in yttrium plus the lighter rare earth elements. The basal low-sulfur lithotypes are dominated by arboreous lycopod spores. The middle, low-sulfur portion of the bed is dominated by herbaceous lycopsids (Densosporites) at the base of the unit and becomes increasingly enriched in Lycospora towards the top of the unit indicating that the peat-forming environment became wetter. The greatest arboreous lycopod spore abundances in the upper, high-sulfur portion the bed, along with an overlying marine roof, indicates that peat deposition was terminated by a marine inundation.

  13. Pollutant Removal Efficiency of Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Sherman, Alexander D.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2011-07-01

    Capture efficiency (CE) of exhaust from a natural gas cooking range was quantified for three common designs of residential range hoods in laboratory experiments: (A) microwave exhaust combination; (B) short hood with grease-screen-covered air inlet at bottom; and (C) deep, open hood exhausting at top. Devices were evaluated at varying installation heights, at highest and lowest fan settings, and with the hood installed 15 cm away from back wall with intent to improve CE for front burners. Each configuration was evaluated for the oven and for three cooktop burner combinations (two back, two front, one front and one back). At highest fan settings and standard installation against the wall, Hoods A and C captured back cooktop burner exhaust at > 90 percent and Hood B at > 80 percent. In this configuration, CE for front burner exhaust was 73-78 percent for Hoods A and C but only 46-63 percent for Hood B. CEs followed similar patterns but were substantially lower on the lowest fan speed. Installing the hood away from the wall improved CE for oven and front burners on Hood A at low speed, but substantially reduced CE for back burners for all hoods at low and high speed.

  14. Persistence of Change: Fume Hood Campaign Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feder, Elah; Robinson, Jennifer; Wakefield, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability initiatives typically operate for a limited time period, but it is often unclear whether they have lasting effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine a laboratory fume hood campaign, in order to identify factors that might contribute or detract from long-term change persistence. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  15. 7 CFR 927.11 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... District shall include all the counties in the State of Oregon except for Hood River and Wasco counties. (2) Mid-Columbia District shall include Hood River and Wasco counties in the State of Oregon, and...

  16. 7 CFR 927.11 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... District shall include all the counties in the State of Oregon except for Hood River and Wasco counties. (2) Mid-Columbia District shall include Hood River and Wasco counties in the State of Oregon, and...

  17. Effects of ground-water withdrawals on the Rock River and associated valley aquifer, eastern Rock County, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Richard J.; Landon, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    Model results indicate that the additional water withdrawn by wells due to anticipated increased ground-water withdrawals was derived from a decrease in net leakage of ground water from the aquifer to the streams. The simulations indicated that the increased ground-water withdrawals and normal precipitation resulted in an increase in induced infiltration from the Rock River of 0.1 cubic feet per second for the Luverne Municipal well field and 0.3 cubic feet per second for the Rock County Rural Water well field. Maximum drawdowns ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 feet near the three well fields. For drought conditions, the simulated streamflow losses constituted approximately 30 percent and nearly 65 percent of the flows in the Rock River for the Luverne Municipal and Rock County Rural Water well fields, respectively. Maximum drawdowns ranged from 3.8 to 7.0 feet near the three well fields. Transient simulations with anticipated increased ground-water withdrawals and drought conditions indicated declines in hydraulic heads ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 feet per year in the vicinity of the three well fields, except for near the Rock River

  18. Map showing geochemical summary for the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas, Butte and Plumas counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jocelyn A.; Sorensen, Martin L.

    1985-01-01

    The Bald Rock Roadless Area consists of 3,850 acres in Butte County, Calif. The Middle Rock Feather River Roadless Area consists of 29,300 acres ub Butte and Plumas Counties, Calif. Both roadless areas are in the Plumas National Forest and are on the west slope of the northern Sierra Nevada southwest of Quincy, Calif. (fig. 1). The two roadless areas are alined along the Middle Fork of the Feather River where they include the narrow canyon bottoms and precipitous sidewalls of the Middle Fork and several tributary drainages. Altitudes range from 800 ft in the canyon of the Middle Fork to approximately 6,600 ft at the northwest corner of the map area. The geology of the roadless areas has been briefly summarized by Sorenson and Pietropaoll (1982). This paper summarizes and interprets the semiquantitative emission spectrographic analyses of 106 rock sample and 165 samples of nonmagnetics heavy-mineral stream-sediment concentrates from the Blad Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area (Sorenson and others, 1982).

  19. An analysis of wintertime surface wind fields in the Upper Green River Basin of Sublette County, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Brittni R.

    Observations of high ozone mixing ratios in Sublette County, Wyoming, recently resulted in the region being designated to be in marginal non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone. Many interrelated factors influence the frequency and extent of elevated ozone episodes, including meteorological factors, through their effect on pollutant dilution and dispersion. Surface wind field patterns in the Upper Green River Basin (UGRB) of Sublette County, Wyoming, were therefore examined using observations from a network of surface monitoring stations for 2011, when many ozone episodes occurred, and for 2012, when, in contrast, there were none. The synoptic conditions associated with each pattern are described using output from the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model. Five patterns are described. They confirm that elevated ozone is often associated with light and variable winds. However, there are also days when moderate afternoon southeasterly flow leads to observations of elevated ozone on the west side of the basin. These southeasterly winds are identified as barrier winds caused by southwesterly flow at 700mb. Recognition of this wind pattern facilitates future forecasting of periods likely to experience potentially elevated ozone in the region. The merit of adding additional monitoring sites from the Upper Green River Basin Wintertime Ozone Wind Field Investigation (O3w) and the Upper Green River Ozone Study (UGWOS) of 2012 to the current monitoring network is also discussed.

  20. Growth of age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Bellgraph, Brian J.; Thompson, Bradley E.; Hayes, Daniel B.; Riley, Timothy S.

    2006-12-01

    We sampled ten sites within the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan. In 2001, age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were collected to determine growth rates. In 2002, emergence dates of steelhead were determined by observational studies and age-0 steelhead and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) were collected to determine growth rates. Steelhead emergence occurred from late June to mid-July 2002. Growth rates of both species varied among branches within the watershed (P<0.05). Steelhead growth varied from 0.24 to 0.42 mm/day and brook trout growth varied from 0.22 to 0.37 mm/day.

  1. Geochemical map of the Chama River Canyon Wilderness and contiguous roadless area, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgley, Jennie L.

    1986-01-01

    The Chama River Canyon Wilderness, in Rio Arriba County, north-central New Mexico, covers 50,300 acres (20,364 hectares) within the Coyote and Cuba Ranger Districts of the Santa Fe National Forest and the Canjilon Ranger District of the Carson National Forest. In 1979 the U.S. Forest Service, under the Forest Service Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE II) program, designated three additional areas, contiguous to the wilderness, for further planning to assess wilderness characteristics. These areas, totaling 4,800 acres (1,945 hectares), were collectively designated Roadless area 03098; they have since been dropped from consideration. 

  2. Reconnaissance survey of site 7 of the proposed Three Rivers Regional Landfill and Technology Center, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Cabak, M.A.; Beck, M.L.; Gillam, C.; Sassaman, K.E.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the archaeological investigation of Site 7 of the proposed Three Rivers Regional Landfill and Technology Center in Aiken County on the United States Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Pedestrian and subsurface survey techniques were used to investigate the 1,403-acre project area. Survey resulted in the discovery of 23 previously unrecorded sites and 11 occurrences; six previously recorded sites were also investigated. These sites consist of six prehistoric sites, nine historic sites, and 14 sites with both prehistoric and historic components. Sites locations and project area boundaries are provided on a facsimile of a USGS 7.5 topographic map. The prehistoric components consist of very small, low-density lithic and ceramic scatters; most contain less than 10 artifacts. Six of the prehistoric components are of unknown cultural affiliation, the remaining prehistoric sites were occupied predominately in the Woodland period. The historic sites are dominated by postbellum/modem home places of tenant and yeoman farmers but four historic sites were locations of antebellum house sites (38AK136, 38AK613, 38AK660, and 38AK674). The historic sites also include an African-American school (38AK677).

  3. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Mount Hood 30- by 60-minute Quadrangle, Northern Cascade Range, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.

    1995-01-01

    This map shows the geology of the central and eastern parts of the Cascade Range in northern Oregon. The Quaternary andesitic stratovolcano of Mount Hood dominates the northwest quarter of the quadrangle, but nearly the entire area is underlain by arc-related volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Cascade Range. Most stratigraphic units were emplaced since middle Miocene time, and all are Oligocene or younger. Despite the proximity of the map area to the Portland metropolitan area, large parts remained virtually unstudied or known only from limited reconnaissance until the late 1970s. A notable exception is the area surrounding Mount Hood, where mapping and chemical analyses by Wise (1969) provided a framework for geologic interpretation. Mapping since 1975 was conducted first to understand the stratigraphy and structure of the Columbia River Basalt Group (Anderson, 1978; Vogt, 1981; J.L. Anderson, in Swanson and others, 1981; Vandiver-Powell, 1978; Burck, 1986) and later to examine the geothermal potential of Mount Hood (Priest and others, 1982). Additional mapping was completed in 1985 for a geologic map of the Cascade Range in Oregon (Sherrod and Smith, 1989). From 1987 to 1990, detailed mapping was conducted in three 15-minute quadrangles on a limited basis (D.R. Sherrod, unpublished mapping) (see fig. 1 for index to mapping). An ongoing volcanic hazards study of Mount Hood by the U.S. Geological Survey (Scott and others, 1994) has provided the catalyst for completing the geologic map of the Mount Hood 30-minute by 60-minute quadrangle. As of June 1994, only two broad areas still remain largely unmapped. One of these areas, labeled 'unmapped' on the geologic map, lies in the Salmon River valley south of Zigzag along the west margin of the quadrangle. Although strata of the Columbia River Basalt Group in the Salmon River valley were mapped in detail by Burck (1986), the overlying middle and upper(?) Miocene lava flows, volcaniclastic strata, and intrusions

  4. Flow pattern in regional aquifers and flow relations between the lower Colorado River valley and regional aquifers in six counties of southeastern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    The lower Colorado River discussed in this report consists of the 318- river-mile reach from Mansfield Dam near Austin, Texas, to the Gulf of Mexico. The river is underlain directly or indirectly by six regional aquifers the Trinity Group, Edwards, Carrizo-Wilcox, Queen City, Sparta, and Gulf Coast; the Trinity Group aquifer is further subdivided into the lower Trinity, middle Trinity, and upper Trinity aquifers. Generalized potentiometric-surface maps of each regional aquifer show the ground-water-flow pattern near the river valley. Each regional aquifer discharges water to the lower Colorado River valley, particularly in the outcrop area of each aquifer. Only the Gulf Coast aquifer in central Wharton County appears to be recharged by water in the river valley. A summary map shows those subreaches of the lower Colorado River that gain water from the aquifers and those subreaches that lose water to the aquifers.

  5. Containment testing for occupied and unoccupied laboratory chemical hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Greenley, P.L.; DiBerardinis, L.J.; Lorch, F.A.

    1999-07-01

    Containment of hazards in a laboratory chemical hood is based on the principle that air drawn through the face area of the hood is sufficient to overcome the many challenges at or near the opening. Challenges to overcome include, but are not limited to, air velocities near the hood, movement of the researcher, people walking past the hood, location of equipment inside the hood, size of the sash opening, and the shape and configuration of entrance conditions. To overcome these challenges, a sufficient face velocity must be maintained. Determining that proper face velocity must be maintained. Determining that proper face velocity for a given hood should be resolved by the system designer, facility safety officer, and researcher with these and other issues in mind. This research tests for containment at 100 feet per minute (fpm) face velocity on occupied hoods and tests the same hoods for containment at the reduced velocity of 60 fpm when unoccupied. Three laboratory chemical hoods of different sizes with several ash positions are used. The test results show that under ideal conditions in a test laboratory, an unoccupied hood (without a manikin) at 60 fpm contains as good as, if not better than, an occupied hood (with a manikin) at 100 fpm, as measured by the tracer gas tests specified in ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995, Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods (ASHRAE 1995). Further testing is needed to determine if this relationship is the same under conditions of actual use, i.e., cluttered hoods and presence of cross-drafts.

  6. Geology and structure of the Pine River, Florida River, Carbon Junction, and Basin Creek gas seeps, La Plata County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassett, James E.; Condon, Steven M.; Huffman, A. Curtis; Taylor, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: This study was commissioned by a consortium consisting of the Bureau of Land Management, Durango Office; the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission; La Plata County; and all of the major gas-producing companies operating in La Plata County, Colorado. The gas-seep study project consisted of four parts; 1) detailed surface mapping of Fruitland Formation coal outcrops in the above listed seep areas, 2) detailed measurement of joint and fracture patterns in the seep areas, 3) detailed coal-bed correlation of Fruitland coals in the subsurface adjacent to the seep areas, and 4) studies of deep-seated seismic patterns in those seep areas where seismic data was available. This report is divided into three chapters labeled 1, 2, and 3. Chapter 1 contains the results of the subsurface coal-bed correla-tion study, chapter 2 contains the results of the surface geologic mapping and joint measurement study, and chapter 3, contains the results of the deep-seismic study. A preliminary draft of this report was submitted to the La Plata County Group in September 1996. All of the members of the La Plata Group were given an opportunity to critically review the draft report and their comments were the basis for revising the first draft to create this final version of a geologic report on the major La Plata County gas seeps located north of the Southern Ute Indian Reservation.

  7. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for the counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District in Florida, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.; Berry, Darbi R.

    2016-07-28

    The irrigated acreage that was field verified in 2015 for the 13 counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District (113,134 acres) is about 6 percent higher than the estimated acreage published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (107,217 acres) for 2012; however, this 2012 value represents acreage for the entire portion of all 13 counties, not just the Suwannee River Water Management District portion. Differences between the 2015 field-verified acreage totals and those published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for 2012 may occur because (1) irrigated acreage for some specific crops increased or decreased substantially during the 3-year interval due to commodity prices or economic changes, (2) calculated field-verified irrigated acreage may be an overestimate because irrigation was assumed if an irrigation system was present and therefore the acreage was counted as irrigated, when in fact that may not have been the case as some farmers may not have used their irrigation systems during this growing period even if they had a crop in the field, or (3) the amount of irrigated acreages published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for selected crops may be underestimated in some cases.

  8. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for the counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District in Florida, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.; Berry, Darbi R.

    2016-01-01

    The irrigated acreage that was field verified in 2015 for the 13 counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District (113,134 acres) is about 6 percent higher than the estimated acreage published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (107,217 acres) for 2012; however, this 2012 value represents acreage for the entire portion of all 13 counties, not just the Suwannee River Water Management District portion. Differences between the 2015 field-verified acreage totals and those published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for 2012 may occur because (1) irrigated acreage for some specific crops increased or decreased substantially during the 3-year interval due to commodity prices or economic changes, (2) calculated field-verified irrigated acreage may be an overestimate because irrigation was assumed if an irrigation system was present and therefore the acreage was counted as irrigated, when in fact that may not have been the case as some farmers may not have used their irrigation systems during this growing period even if they had a crop in the field, or (3) the amount of irrigated acreages published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for selected crops may be underestimated in some cases.

  9. Synthesis of historical archaeological sites on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The object of this report is to provide historical synthesis of the Savannah River Plant region integrated with the historical archeological record. The first chapter discusses the historic research concerns of the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program, the Physical Geography of the Savannah River Plant in regard to climate, coil, and vegetation, and the Human Geography of the region. Chapter 2 presents the Chronology of historic sites from the archarological record on the Savannah River Plant. Chapter 3 discusses the Settlement of the Savannah River Valley and the Agricultural Land use on the Savannah River Plant. Chapter 4 presents the results of historic research into the Mill Dams located on the Savannah River Plant their political importance and location. Chapter 5 discribes the Archaeological Methodology used and the Archaeological Resources of the Savannah River Plant. Chapter 6 present the Conclusions and Recommendations of the Savannah River Plant Archaeological Research Program in regards to the historical archeological sites on the Savannah River Plant. 80 refs., 13 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

    2008-06-30

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  11. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  12. Floodplain disconnection, changes in river corridor complexity, and implications for river restoration along lower Deer Creek, Tehama County, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Tompkins, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    River channels and floodplains are inextricably linked elements of river ecosystems, and hydrologic inter- connections sustain geomorphic and ecological values. Many river channels and floodplains have been disconnected in California, prompting river managers to consider floodplain reconnection to restore degraded waterways. Deer Creek, a 600 km2 tributary to the Sacramento River still supports reproduction of native spring-run Chinook salmon in its upper reaches. However, its lower, alluvial reaches were channelized, cleared, and partially leveed by a 1949 US Army Corps of Engineers flood control project. The catchment of Deer Creek is largely undisturbed, so its flow regime and sediment load are largely unimpaired. Thus the potential exists to restore lower Deer Creek to something like its complex, ecologically-productive pre-disturbance conditions if artificial constraints are removed, and thus levee setbacks have been proposed for Deer Creek to reduce concentration of flows in the main channel and allow the main channel to become more hydraulically rough with vegetation and gravel bars. We made detailed measurements of pre- disturbance channel conditions from 1938 aerial photographs and compared those measurements with recent aerial photographs to document the project-induced changes. We measured decreases in riffle habitat (up to 84%), pool habitat (up to 100%), cumulative channel length (up to 72%), shaded riverine aquatic habitat (up to 81%) and riparian vegetation (up to 94%), and increases in riffle spacing (up to 1162%), pool spacing (up to 178%), and low flow channel width (up to 84%) between 1938 and 1999. These results suggest that significant and persistent reductions in river corridor complexity can be associated with floodplain disconnection, and provide an estimate of restoration potential for floodplain reconnection on lower Deer Creek.

  13. Bank Topography, Bathymetry, and Current Velocity of the Lower Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington, May 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Dinehart, Randal L.; Moran, Edward H.

    2008-01-01

    The removal of two dams from the mainstem of the Elwha River is expected to cause a broad range of changes to the river and nearby coastal ecosystem. The U.S. Geological Survey has documented aspects of the condition of the river to allow analysis of ecological responses to dam removal. This report documents the bank topography, river bathymetry, and current velocity data collected along the lower 0.5 kilometer of the Elwha River, May 15-17, 2006. This information supplements nearshore and beach surveys done in 2006 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound program near the Elwha River delta in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington.

  14. Geology and ground water in Russian River Valley areas and in Round, Laytonville, and Little Lake Valleys, Sonoma and Mendocino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardwell, G.T.

    1965-01-01

    This report describes the occurrence, availability, and quality of ground water in seven valley areas along the course of the Russian River in Sonoma and Mendocino Counties, Calif., and in three valleys in the upper drainage reach of the Eel River in Mendocino County. Except for the westward-trending lower Russian River valley, the remaining valley areas along the Russian River (Healdsburg, Alexander, Cloverdale, Sanel, Ukiah, and Potter Valleys) lie in northwest-trending structurally controlled depressions formed in marine rocks of Jurassic and Cretaceous age. The principal aquifer in all the valleys is the alluvium of Recent age, which includes highly permeable channel deposits of gravel and sand. Water for domestic, irrigation, industrial, and other uses is developed by (1) direct diversion from the Russian River and its tributaries, (2) withdrawal of ground water and river water from shallow wells near the river, and (3) withdrawals of ground water from wells in alluvial deposits at varying distances from the river. Surface water in the Russian River and most tributaries is of good chemical quality. The water is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type and contains 75,200 parts per million of dissolved solids. Ground water is also of good chemical quality throughout most of the drainage basin, but the concentration of dissolved solids (100-300 parts per million) is somewhat higher than that in the surface water. Round, Laytonville, and Little Lake Valleys are in central and northern Mendocino County in the drainage basin of the northwestward flowing Eel River. In Round Valley the alluvium of Recent age yields water of good chemical quality in large quantities. Yields are lower and the chemical quality poorer in Laytonville Valley. Ground water in Little Lake Valley is relatively undeveloped. Selected descriptions of wells, drillers' logs, chemical analyses, and hydrographs showing water-level fluctuations are included in the report. Accompanying maps show the

  15. Efficient and Cost-Effective Use of Adjustable Canopy Hoods in a Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothchild, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Suggests the use of small canopy hoods that provide flexibility of vertical and horizontal adjustment over the lab bench as a replacement for permanent hoods. Includes many safety related instances where canopy hoods should be used. (MVL)

  16. Polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) contamination of the Pine River, Gratiot, and Midland Counties, Michigan.

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, J L; Powers, R A

    1978-01-01

    Michigan Chemical Corporation, St. Louis, Michigan manufactured PBB from 1970 until November 20, 1974. Studies in 1974 showed significant quantities of PBB in effluent discharged from the facility and in water, fish, ducks, and sediments from the Pine River. Fish uptake rates and bioconcentration factors were estimated. Followup surveys over the three year period since the termination of PBB production indicate a decline in PBB loadings to the river but no significant corresponding decline of PBB levels in sediments, fish and duck tissue. A Michigan Department of Public Health warning against consumption of Pine River fish from St. Louis downstream to its confluence with Chippewa River remains in effect. PMID:209975

  17. Loads and yields of selected constituents in streams and rivers of Monroe County, New York, 1984-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrologic data collected in Monroe County since the 1980s and earlier, including long-term records of streamflow and chemical loads, provide a basis for assessment of water-management practices. All monitored streams except Northrup Creek showed a slight (nonsignificant) overall decrease in annual streamflow over their period of record; Northrup Creek showed a slight increase. The highest yields of all constituents except chloride and sulfate were at Northrup Creek; these values exceeded those of the seven Irondequoit Creek basin sites and the Genesee River site. The highest yields of dissolved chloride were at the most highly urbanized site (Allen Creek), whereas the highest yields of dissolved sulfate were at the most upstream Irondequoit Creek sites -- Railroad Mills (active) and Pittsford (inactive). Yields of all constituents in the Genesee River at the Charlotte Pump Station were within the range of those at the Irondequoit Creek basin sites. The four active Irondequoit Creek basin sites showed significant downward trends in flow-adjusted loads of ammonia + organic nitrogen, possibly from the conversion of agricultural land to suburban land. Two active sites (Allen Creek and Blossom Road) and one inactive site (Thomas Creek) showed downward trends in loads of ammonia. All active sites showed significant upward trends in dissolved chloride loads. Northrup Creek showed a significant downward trend in total phosphorus load since the improvement in phosphorus removal at the Spencerport wastewater-treatment plant, and upward trends in dissolved chloride and sulfate loads. The Genesee River at the Charlotte Pump Station showed significant downward trends in loads of ammonia + organic nitrogen and chloride, and an upward trend in loads of orthophosphate. The improved treatment or diversion of sewage-treatment-plant-effluent has produced decreased yields of some constituents throughout the county, particularly in the Irondequoit Creek basin, where the loads of

  18. Statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.

    1998-01-01

    To better understand flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 28-mile reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. Dye was injected at a site on Piru Creek, and fluorescence of river water was measured continuously at four sites and intermittently at two sites. Discharge measurements were also made at the six sites. The time of travel of the dye, peak dye concentration, and time-variance of time-concentration curves were obtained at each site. The long tails of the time-concentration curves are indicative of sources/sinks within the river, such as riffles and pools, or transient bank storage. A statistical analysis of the data indicates that, in general, the transport characteristics follow Fickian theory. These data and previously collected discharge data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). DAFLOW solves a simplified form of the diffusion-wave equation and uses empirical relations between flow rate and cross-sectional area, and flow rate and channel width. BLTM uses the velocity data from DAFLOW and solves the advection-dispersion transport equation, including first-order decay. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of dye mass in the middle, ephemeral, subreaches, and (2) ground-water recharge does not explain the loss of dye mass in the uppermost and lowermost, perennial, subreaches. This loss of mass was simulated using a linear decay term. The loss of mass in the perennial subreaches may be caused by a combination of photodecay or adsorption/desorption.

  19. Fecal-Indicator Bacteria in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers and Selected Tributaries, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckwalter, Theodore F.; Zimmerman, Tammy M.; Fulton, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were determined in 1,027 water-quality samples collected from July 2001 through August 2005 during dry- (72-hour dry antecedent period) and wet-weather (48-hour dry antecedent period and at least 0.3 inch of rain in a 24-hour period) conditions in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (locally referred to as the Three Rivers) and selected tributaries in Allegheny County. Samples were collected at five sampling sites on the Three Rivers and at eight sites on four tributaries to the Three Rivers having combined sewer overflows. Water samples were analyzed for three fecal-indicator organisms fecal coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci bacteria. Left-bank and right-bank surface-water samples were collected in addition to a cross-section composite sample at each site. Concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci were detected in 98.6, 98.5, and 87.7 percent of all samples, respectively. The maximum fecal-indicator bacteria concentrations were collected from Sawmill Run, a tributary to the Ohio River; Sawmill Run at Duquesne Heights had concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci of 410,000, 510,000, and 180,000 col/100 mL, respectively, following a large storm. The samples collected in the Three Rivers and selected tributaries frequently exceeded established recreational standards and criteria for bacteria. Concentrations of fecal coliform exceeded the Pennsylvania water-quality standard (200 col/100 mL) in approximately 63 percent of the samples. Sample concentrations of E. coli and enterococci exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) water-quality criteria (235 and 61 col/100 mL, respectively) in about 53 and 47 percent, respectively, of the samples. Fecal-indicator bacteria were most strongly correlated with streamflow, specific conductance, and turbidity. These correlations most frequently were observed in samples collected from tributary sites. Fecal

  20. Water-quality conditions near the confluence of the Snake and Boise Rivers, Canyon County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Etheridge, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) have been established under authority of the Federal Clean Water Act for the Snake River-Hells Canyon reach, on the border of Idaho and Oregon, to improve water quality and preserve beneficial uses such as public consumption, recreation, and aquatic habitat. The TMDL sets targets for seasonal average and annual maximum concentrations of chlorophyll-a at 14 and 30 micrograms per liter, respectively. To attain these conditions, the maximum total phosphorus concentration at the mouth of the Boise River in Idaho, a tributary to the Snake River, has been set at 0.07 milligrams per liter. However, interactions among chlorophyll-a, nutrients, and other key water-quality parameters that may affect beneficial uses in the Snake and Boise Rivers are unknown. In addition, contributions of nutrients and chlorophyll-a loads from the Boise River to the Snake River have not been fully characterized. To evaluate seasonal trends and relations among nutrients and other water-quality parameters in the Boise and Snake Rivers, a comprehensive monitoring program was conducted near their confluence in water years (WY) 2009 and 2010. The study also provided information on the relative contribution of nutrient and sediment loads from the Boise River to the Snake River, which has an effect on water-quality conditions in downstream reservoirs. State and site-specific water-quality standards, in addition to those that relate to the Snake River-Hells Canyon TMDL, have been established to protect beneficial uses in both rivers. Measured water-quality conditions in WY2009 and WY2010 exceeded these targets at one or more sites for the following constituents: water temperature, total phosphorus concentrations, total phosphorus loads, dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, and chlorophyll-a concentrations (WY2009 only). All measured total phosphorus concentrations in the Boise River near Parma exceeded the seasonal target of 0.07 milligram per liter. Data collected

  1. Determination of channel capacity of the Merced River downstream from Merced Falls Dam, Merced County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, J.C.; Bertoldi, G.L.

    1968-01-01

    Peak flows in Dry Creek, as measured 18.7 miles upstream from the mouth of Dry Creek, will be attenuated due to channel storage and will increase the discharge of the Merced River at Cressey by only about 50 per cent of t he Dry Creek peak discharge. Furthermore, Dry Creek seldom carries floodflows during periods of high water on the Merced River.

  2. Chemical quality of the Saw Mill River, Westchester County, New York, 1981-83

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Surface waters, bottom sediments and coatings formed on artificial substrates (ceramic tiles) were analyzed to evaluate the chemical quality of the Saw Mill River, New York. Heavy metals, nutrients, and organic contaminants were studied. Dissolved orthophosphate concentrations were highest in the lower third of the river. Dissolved manganese was the only metal to exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria. Arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations were highest in waters from the lowest 4 river miles. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc in bottom sediments from the lowest 3 river miles were greater than in upstream sediments. Concentrations of nine heavy metals were higher on tiles emplaced below river mile 3 than on tiles upstream. Few organic compounds were detected in the water column; none persisted at all sites. Chlordane, DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) were found in bottom sediments throughout the basin. PCB concentrations were highest in the lowest 6 river miles; the other organic compounds exhibited no spatial patterns. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were most abundant in bottom sediments from the lowest 2 river miles. Collectively the distribution of contaminants indicates that river quality deteriorates in the lower, more heavily urbanized reach. (USGS)

  3. 75 FR 52360 - Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project, El Dorado County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project, El Dorado.../EIS for the Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project (Project). Depending on which alternative is selected, the proposed restoration project may include continuing...

  4. 75 FR 55539 - Crooked Creek Reservoir Repair; White River National Forest, Eagle County, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Crooked Creek Reservoir Repair; White River National Forest, Eagle... Repair project on the Sopris Ranger District of the White River National Forest was published in the Federal Register (86 FR 24215). The Forest Service has decided to cancel the preparation of this EIS....

  5. 76 FR 1381 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, Charles County, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do... Coast Guard proposes to establish special local regulations during the ``Potomac River Sharkfest Swim'' amateur swim, a marine event to be held on the waters of the Potomac River on May 22, 2011. These...

  6. 40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oregon: Crook County, Deschutes County, Hood River County, Jefferson County, Klamath County, Lake County, Sherman County, Wasco County....

  7. 40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oregon: Crook County, Deschutes County, Hood River County, Jefferson County, Klamath County, Lake County, Sherman County, Wasco County....

  8. 40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oregon: Crook County, Deschutes County, Hood River County, Jefferson County, Klamath County, Lake County, Sherman County, Wasco County....

  9. 40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oregon: Crook County, Deschutes County, Hood River County, Jefferson County, Klamath County, Lake County, Sherman County, Wasco County....

  10. Boundary of the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This vector data set delineates the approximate boundary of the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer (ERWVFA). This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. The boundary of the ERWVFA was developed by combining information from two data sources. The first data source was a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the Leadville quadrangle developed by Day and others (1999). The location of Quaternary sediments was used as a first approximation of the ERWVFA. The boundary of the ERWVFA was further refined by overlaying the geologic map with Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) scanned images of 1:24,000 topographic maps (U.S. Geological Survey, 2001). Where appropriate, the boundary of the ERWVFA was remapped to correspond with the edge of the valley-fill aquifer marked by an abrupt change in topography at the edge of the valley floor throughout the Eagle River watershed. The boundary of the ERWVFA more closely resembles a hydrogeomorphic region presented by Rupert (2003, p. 8) because it is based upon general geographic extents of geologic materials and not on an actual aquifer location as would be determined through a rigorous hydrogeologic investigation.

  11. Determination of channel capacity of the Mokelumne River downstream from Camanche Dam, San Joaquin and Sacramento Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.G.

    1972-01-01

    This study evaluates the adequacy of a 39-mile reach of the Mokelumne River in San Joaquin and Sacramento Counties, California, to carry planned flood releases between Camanche Reservoir and the Bensons Ferry Bridge near Thornton. The flood releases from Camanche Reservoir are to be restricted, insofar as possible, so that the flows in the Mokelumne River will not exceed 5,000 cfs (cubic feet per second) as measured at the gaging station below Camanche Dam. Areas of inundation and computed floodwater profiles are based on channel conditions in late 1970 and on observed water-surface profiles during flood releases of about 5,000 cfs in January 1969 and January 1970. The inundated area shown on the maps (appendix A) and the water-surface elevations indicated on the cross sections (appendix G) are for the flood releases of those dates. The following conclusions are contingent on there being no levee failures during periods of high flow and no significant channel changes since the flood release of January 1970. 1. High tides in San Francisco Bay and, to a greater degree, flood stages on the Cosumnes River, cause backwater in the study reach. Severe backwater conditions occurring simultaneously with a flow of 5,000 cfs in the Mokelumne River can increase the flood stage 4 to 6 feet at Bensons Ferry Bridge (cross section 1). Backwater effects decrease in an upstream direction and are less than 0.5 foot at cross section 35, a river distance of 8.6 miles upstream from cross section 1, and 1.5 miles downstream from the Peltier Road bridge. 2. In the reach between cross sections 1 and 35, a 5,000 cfs release from Camanche Reservoir with maximum backwater effect (measured at cross section 1 at the mouth of the Cosumnes River) is confined within the natural or leveed banks except on the right bank flood plain between cross sections 12 and 19. 3. Upstream from cross section 35, there is overbank flooding at a flow of 5,000 cfs between cross sections 48 and 51, and 62 and 67

  12. Numerical Simulation of Pollutants' Transport and Fate in AN Unsteady Flow in Lower Bear River, Box Elder County, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salha, A. A.; Stevens, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents numerical application and statistical development of Stream Water Quality Modeling (SWQM) as a tool to investigate, manage, and research the transport and fate of water pollutants in Lower Bear River, Box elder County, Utah. The concerned segment under study is the Bear River starting from Cutler Dam to its confluence with the Malad River (Subbasin HUC 16010204). Water quality problems arise primarily from high phosphorus and total suspended sediment concentrations that were caused by five permitted point source discharges and complex network of canals and ducts of varying sizes and carrying capacities that transport water (for farming and agriculture uses) from Bear River and then back to it. Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has designated the entire reach of the Bear River between Cutler Reservoir and Great Salt Lake as impaired. Stream water quality modeling (SWQM) requires specification of an appropriate model structure and process formulation according to nature of study area and purpose of investigation. The current model is i) one dimensional (1D), ii) numerical, iii) unsteady, iv) mechanistic, v) dynamic, and vi) spatial (distributed). The basic principle during the study is using mass balance equations and numerical methods (Fickian advection-dispersion approach) for solving the related partial differential equations. Model error decreases and sensitivity increases as a model becomes more complex, as such: i) uncertainty (in parameters, data input and model structure), and ii) model complexity, will be under investigation. Watershed data (water quality parameters together with stream flow, seasonal variations, surrounding landscape, stream temperature, and points/nonpoint sources) were obtained majorly using the HydroDesktop which is a free and open source GIS enabled desktop application to find, download, visualize, and analyze time series of water and climate data registered with the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System

  13. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, N.C.; restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, N.C.; restricted area. 334.450 Section 334.450 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army...

  14. Flood-plain delineation for Occoquan River, Wolf Run, Sandy Run, Elk Horn Run, Giles Run, Kanes Creek, Racoon Creek, and Thompson Creek, Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soule, Pat LeRoy

    1978-01-01

    Water-surface profiles of the 25-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence interval discharges have been computed for all streams and reaches of channels in Fairfax County, Virginia, having a drainage area greater than 1 square mile except for Dogue Creek, Little Hunting Creek, and that portion of Cameron Run above Lake Barcroft. Maps having a 2-foot contour interval and a horizontal scale of 1 inch equals 100 feet were used for base on which flood boundaries were delineated for 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods to be expected in each basin under ultimate development conditions. This report is one of a series and presents a discussion of techniques employed in computing discharges and profiles as well as the flood profiles and maps on which flood boundaries have been delineated for the Occoquan River and its tributaries within Fairfax County and those streams on Mason Neck within Fairfax County tributary to the Potomac River. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. 78 FR 40391 - Special Local Regulations; Dinghy Poker Run, Middle River; Baltimore County, Essex, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... certain portion of the Middle River, which includes Frog Mortar Creek, Dark Head Creek, Hopkins...

  16. Meteorological, water-temperature, and discharge data for the Mattole River basin, Humboldt County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, R.D.; Jackman, Alan P.

    1983-01-01

    To overcome a major difficulty in the testing of the validity of river-temperature models - the lack of adequate precise synoptic data for an entire river basin - synoptic meteorologic, water-temperature, and discharge data were obtained in the Mattole River Basin in northern California during the period June 10 through August 31, 1975. The variables monitored were water temperature in the main channel and major tributaries, wind velocity, wet-bulb and dry-bulb air temperature, total hemispherical incoming radiation, total incoming shortwave radiation, discharge in the main channel and major tributaries, and average velocity and axial dispersion coefficients in the main channel. This report describes the experimental design and the instrumentation and procedures followed to insure the best possible information, and it presents a detailed set of data which can be used in testing river-temperature models. (USGS)

  17. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Glaspey, Douglas J.

    2008-01-30

    Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

  18. Phosphorus removal mechanisms at the Yellow River Sweetwater Creek Water Reclamation Facility, Gwinnett County, Georgia. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Borowy, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    This research investigated the capabilities of the Yellow River Sweetwater Creek Water Reclamation Facility in Gwinnett County, GA. to remove phosphorus biologically. Phosphorus levels and removal locations were analyzed in plant operational units (sampling events), while in reactor experiments (pilot studies), waste was subjected to various conditions to promote-biological phosphorus release and uptake. Analysis of plant conditions at the time of experimentation indicates that one-half of the plant phosphorus removal is accomplished biologically through incorporation of phosphorus in microbial cells during growth. It does not appear, however, that enhanced biological phosphorus removal (BPR) is possible due to wastestream characteristics and/or microbial population. It was noted that the basic anaerobic-aerobic sequence associated with enhanced BPR appears to be occurring with the secondary clarifier sludge blanket and return to compartment A of the nitrification basin.

  19. Survey of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) population in the Upper Little Tennessee River watershed, Macon and Swain Counties, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    During the months May--November 1992, as part of the Western North Carolina Alliance upper Little Tennessee River watershed survey, streams in the North Carolina portion (Macon and Swain Counties) of the watershed were surveyed for the presence of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). The purposes of this survey were threefold: (1) To use this sensitive, pollution-intolerant species as an indicator organism for high quality waters. (2) To assist the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, the US Forest Service, and private landowners in managing for and protecting this popular game fish. (3) To locate possible stocks of pure ``southern Appalachian strain`` brook trout. Research is currently underway at the University of Tennessee and Auburn University to determine whether there is in fact a distinct southem subspecies or race of S. fontinalis. This author is one of those who is inclined to believe there is.

  20. Calibration and potential uses of a digital water-quality model for the Arkansas River in Pueblo County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goddard, Kimball E.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 1-year study to calibrate and demonstrate the use of a steady-state water quality model for a 42-mile reach of the Arkansas River in Pueblo County, Colo. Based on the calibration, the model is capable of accurately predicting concentrations of carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand, total organic nitrogen, total nitrite, and total orthophosphate; predicted concentrations of total ammonia, total nitrate, and dissolved oxygen will be somewhat less accurate. Additional data are needed to determine the model 's capability to predict concentrations of coliform bacteria. Potential uses of the model were demonstrated by simulating the effects of different waste water discharges on streamflow quality, using water-quality and stream-discharge data provided by the Pueblo Area Council of Governments. Selected results for carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and total ammonia from three simulations illustrate the capability of the model. (USGS)

  1. 46 CFR 181.425 - Galley hood fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... meeting the applicable sections of NFPA 17 or NFPA 17A (both incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600... Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. (a) A grease extraction hood required by 46 CFR 181.400 must meet UL 710 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) or other standard specified by the...

  2. 46 CFR 181.425 - Galley hood fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... meeting the applicable sections of NFPA 17 or NFPA 17A (both incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600... Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. (a) A grease extraction hood required by 46 CFR 181.400 must meet UL 710 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) or other standard specified by the...

  3. 46 CFR 181.425 - Galley hood fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... meeting the applicable sections of NFPA 17 or NFPA 17A (both incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600... Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. (a) A grease extraction hood required by 46 CFR 181.400 must meet UL 710 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) or other standard specified by the...

  4. Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register flows

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, I.S.; Wray, C.P.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

    2001-09-01

    Flow measurement at residential registers using flow hoods is becoming more common. These measurements are used to determine if the HVAC system is providing adequate comfort, appropriate flow over heat exchangers and in estimates of system energy losses. These HVAC system performance metrics are determined by using register measurements to find out if individual rooms are getting the correct airflow, and in estimates of total air handler flow and duct air leakage. The work discussed in this paper shows that commercially available flow hoods are poor at measuring flows in residential systems. There is also evidence in this and other studies that flow hoods can have significant errors even when used on the non-residential systems they were originally developed for. The measurement uncertainties arise from poor calibrations and the sensitivity of exiting flow hoods to non-uniformity of flows entering the device. The errors are usually large--on the order of 20% of measured flow, which is unacceptably high for most applications. Active flow hoods that have flow measurement devices that are insensitive to the entering airflow pattern were found to be clearly superior to commercially available flow hoods. In addition, it is clear that current calibration procedures for flow hoods may not take into account any field application problems and a new flow hood measurement standard should be developed to address this issue.

  5. The effect of thermal loading on laboratory fume hood performance.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J D; Chessin, S J; Chesnovar, B W; Lillquist, D R

    2000-11-01

    A modified version of the ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods was used to evaluate the relationship between thermal loading in a laboratory fume hood and subsequent tracer gas leakage. Three types of laboratory burners were used, alone and in combination, to thermally challenge the hood. Heat output from burners was measured in BTU/hr, which was based on the fuel heat capacity and flow rate. Hood leakage was measured between 2824 and 69,342 BTU/hr. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was released at 23.5 LPM for each level of thermal loading. Duct temperature was also measured during the heating process. Results indicate a linear relationship for both BTU/hr vs. hood leakage and duct temperature vs. hood leakage. Under these test conditions, each increase of 10,000 BTU/hr resulted in an additional 4 ppm SF6 in the manikin's breathing zone (r2 = 0.68). An additional 3.1 ppm SF6 was measured for every 25 degrees F increase in duct temperature (r2 = 0.60). Both BTU/hr and duct temperature models showed p < 0.001. For these tests, BTU/hr was a better predictor of hood leakage than duct temperature. The results of this study indicate that heat output may compromise fume hood performance. This finding is consistent with those of previous studies.

  6. Mt. Hood Tech Prep Demonstration Project. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Thomas R.

    The Mt. Hood Tech Prep Demonstration Project provides technical education to students in grades 9-14 plus opportunities to continue into apprenticeship or four-year college programs. The consortium includes seven Oregon local school districts, Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC), and active business and industry partners. An estimated 1,500 students…

  7. 46 CFR 181.425 - Galley hood fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. (a) A grease extraction hood required by 46 CFR 181.400 must meet UL 710 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) or other standard specified by the Commandant... meeting the applicable sections of NFPA 17 or NFPA 17A (both incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR...

  8. 75 FR 54846 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Action of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For more information regarding this meeting, contact Connie Athman; Mt....

  9. 46 CFR 181.425 - Galley hood fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. (a) A grease extraction hood required by 46 CFR 181.400 must meet UL 710 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) or other standard specified by the Commandant... meeting the applicable sections of NFPA 17 or NFPA 17A (both incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR...

  10. 14 CFR 93.61 - General rules: Lake Hood segment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General rules: Lake Hood segment. 93.61 Section 93.61 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Area § 93.61 General rules: Lake Hood segment. (a) No person may operate an aircraft at an...

  11. 76 FR 14897 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Salem, Oregon....

  12. Hydrologic data for the San Juan and Animas River valleys in the Farmington, Aztec, Bloomfield, and Cedar Hill areas, San Juan County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, D.P.; Shelton, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    In July 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a three-year study in San Juan County, New Mexico, to determine the concentrations of chemical constituents in the groundwater in the San Juan and Animas River valleys and to determine the direction and rate of groundwater flow and its relation to river stage. The study was conducted in cooperation with the San Juan County Commission and the New Mexico Oil Conservation Division. The data that was collected during the first 1-1/2 yr of the study is completed. The report includes well records for 51 wells and water levels from 23 wells, hydrographs from four observation wells and one river stage site, and available chemical analyses from 50 wells and 14 surface water sites. Water samples from six wells and one surface-water site were analyzed for purgeable organic chemicals; none were detected. (Lantz-PTT)

  13. Seasonal changes in ground-water levels in the shallow aquifer near Hagerman and the Pecos River, Chaves County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garn, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Pecos River near Hagerman in Chaves County, New Mexico, historically has been a gaining stream. In 1938, the slope of the water table in the shallow alluvial aquifer near Hagerman was toward the Pecos River. By 1950, a large water-table depression had formed in the alluvial aquifer southwest of Hagerman. Continued enlargement of this depression could reverse the direction of groundwater flow to the Pecos River. Water levels were measured during 1981-85 in wells along a section extending from the Pecos River to a point within the depression. Although the water-table depression has not caused a perennial change in direction of groundwater flow, it has caused a seasonal reversal in the slope of the water table between the river and the depression during the growing season when pumpage from the shallow aquifer is the greatest. (USGS)

  14. Water Resources of the Ground-Water System in the Unconsolidated Deposits of the Colville River Watershed, Stevens County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahle, Sue C.; Longpre, Claire I.; Smith, Raymond R.; Sumioka, Steve S.; Watkins, Anni M.; Kresch, David L.

    2003-01-01

    A study of the water resources of the ground-water system in the unconsolidated deposits of the Colville River Watershed provided the Colville River Watershed Planning Team with an assessment of the hydrogeologic framework, preliminary determinations of how the shallow and deeper parts of the ground-water system interact with each other and the surface-water system, descriptions of water-quantity characteristics including water-use estimates and an estimated water budget for the watershed, and an assessment of further data needs. The 1,007-square-mile watershed, located in Stevens County in northeastern Washington, is closed to further surface-water appropriations throughout most of the basin during most seasons. The information provided by this study will assist local watershed planners in assessing the status of water resources within the Colville River Watershed (Water Resources Inventory Area 59). The hydrogeologic framework consists of glacial and alluvial deposits that overlie bedrock and are more than 700 feet thick in places. Twenty-six hydrogeologic sections were constructed, using a map of the surficial geology and drillers' logs for more than 350 wells. Seven hydrogeologic units were delineated: the Upper outwash aquifer, the Till confining unit, the Older outwash aquifer, the Colville Valley confining unit, the Lower aquifer, the Lower confining unit, and Bedrock. Synoptic stream discharge measurements made in September 2001 identified gaining and losing reaches over the unconsolidated valley deposits. During the September measurement period, the Colville River gained flow from the shallow ground-water system near its headwaters to the town of Valley and lost flow to the shallow ground-water system from Valley to Chewelah. Downstream from Chewelah, the river generally lost flow, but the amounts lost were small and within measurement error. Ground-water levels indicate that the Lower aquifer and the shallow ground-water system may act as fairly

  15. Water-quality conditions near the confluence of the Snake and Boise Rivers, Canyon County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Etheridge, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) have been established under authority of the Federal Clean Water Act for the Snake River-Hells Canyon reach, on the border of Idaho and Oregon, to improve water quality and preserve beneficial uses such as public consumption, recreation, and aquatic habitat. The TMDL sets targets for seasonal average and annual maximum concentrations of chlorophyll-a at 14 and 30 micrograms per liter, respectively. To attain these conditions, the maximum total phosphorus concentration at the mouth of the Boise River in Idaho, a tributary to the Snake River, has been set at 0.07 milligrams per liter. However, interactions among chlorophyll-a, nutrients, and other key water-quality parameters that may affect beneficial uses in the Snake and Boise Rivers are unknown. In addition, contributions of nutrients and chlorophyll-a loads from the Boise River to the Snake River have not been fully characterized. To evaluate seasonal trends and relations among nutrients and other water-quality parameters in the Boise and Snake Rivers, a comprehensive monitoring program was conducted near their confluence in water years (WY) 2009 and 2010. The study also provided information on the relative contribution of nutrient and sediment loads from the Boise River to the Snake River, which has an effect on water-quality conditions in downstream reservoirs. State and site-specific water-quality standards, in addition to those that relate to the Snake River-Hells Canyon TMDL, have been established to protect beneficial uses in both rivers. Measured water-quality conditions in WY2009 and WY2010 exceeded these targets at one or more sites for the following constituents: water temperature, total phosphorus concentrations, total phosphorus loads, dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, and chlorophyll-a concentrations (WY2009 only). All measured total phosphorus concentrations in the Boise River near Parma exceeded the seasonal target of 0.07 milligram per liter. Data collected

  16. Geothermal assessment of the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas, Box Elder County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Klauk, R.H.; Budding, K.E.

    1984-07-01

    The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) has been researching the low-temperature geothermal resource potential in Utah. This report, part of an area-wide geothermal research program along the Wasatch Front, concerns the study conducted in the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas in Box Elder County, Utah. The primary purpose of the study is to identify new areas of geothermal resource potential. There are seven known low-temperature geothermal areas in this part of Box Elder County. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques used in the study include a temperature survey, chemical analysis of well and spring waters, and temperature-depth measurements in accessible wells. The geothermal reconnaissance techniques identified three areas which need further evaluation of their low-temperature geothermal resource potential. Area 1 is located in the area surrounding Little Mountain, area 2 is west and southwest of Plymouth, and area 3 is west and south of the Cutler Dam. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  17. Evaluation of surface-water/ground-water interactions in the Santa Clara River Valley, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichard, Eric George; Crawford, Steven M.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Martin, Peter; Land, Michael; Nishikawa, Tracy

    1999-01-01

    The interactions of surface water and ground water along the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, were evaluated by analyzing river-discharge and water-quality data and geohydrologic information collected by the U.S. Geological Survey between 1993 and 1995 for the Piru, Fillmore, and Santa Paula subbasins. Measurements of discharge and water quality were made at multiple locations along the Santa Clara River and its tributaries at eight different time periods during different releases from Lake Piru. Geologic, hydraulic, and water-quality data were collected from three new multiple-completion ground-water monitoring wells. These data, together with data collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Southern California Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) study, were analyzed in order to quantify rates and locations of ground-water recharge and discharge within the river, characterize the correlation of recharge and discharge rates with ground-water conditions and reservoir releases, and better characterize the three-dimensional ground-water flow system. Analysis of the data indicates that the largest amount of ground-water recharge from the river consistently occurs in the Piru subbasin. Some ground-water recharge from the river may occur in the upper part of the Fillmore subbasin. Increases in sulfate concentrations indicate that increases in flow at the lower ends of the Piru and Fillmore subbasins result from high-sulfate ground-water discharge. Increases in flow in the lower part of the Santa Paula subbasin are not accompanied by significant sulfate increases. Several sets of regressions indicate possible correlation between net flow changes in the river and depths to ground water and release rates from Lake Piru. These statistical relations may be of use for evaluating alternative Lake Piru release strategies. Data on the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen from the ground-water monitoring wells that were installed as part of this

  18. Water-quality characteristics and ground water quantity of the Fraser River Watershed, Grand County, Colorado, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauch, Nancy J.; Bails, Jeffrey B.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Grand County Board of County Commissioners, conducted a 4-year study to assess ground- and surface-water-quality conditions and ground-water quantity in the 302-square-mile Fraser River watershed in north-central Colorado. The Fraser River flows north about 28 miles from the headwaters near the Continental Divide, through the towns of Winter Park, Fraser, Tabernash, and Granby, and is one of the major tributaries to the Upper Colorado River. Increasing urban development, as well as the seasonal influx of tourists, is placing more demands on the water resources in the Fraser River watershed. A ground-water sampling network of 11 wells was established to represent different aquifer systems (alluvial, Troublesome Formation, Precambrian granite), land uses (urban, nonurban), and areas with or without individual septic disposal system use. The well network was sampled for ground-water quality on a semiannual basis from August 1998 through September 2001. The sampling included field properties and the collection of water samples for analysis of major ions, trace elements, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, bacteria, methylene blue active substances, and radon-222. One surface-water site, on the Fraser River just downstream from the town of Tabernash, Colorado, was sampled bimonthly from August 1998 through September 2001 to assess the cumulative effects of natural and human processes on water quality in the upper part of the Fraser River watershed. Surface-water-quality sampling included field properties and the collection of water-quality samples for analysis of major ions, trace elements, nutrients, organic carbon, and bacteria. Ground water was a calcium-bicarbonate type water and is suitable as a drinking-water, domestic, municipal, industrial, and irrigation source. In general, no widespread ground-water-quality problems were indicated. All pH values and concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, fluoride

  19. Water quality in the lower Puyallup River valley and adjacent uplands, Pierce County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebbert, J.C.; Bortleson, Gilbert C.; Fuste, L.A.; Prych, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The quality of most ground and surface water within and adjacent to the lower Puyallup River valley is suitable for most typical uses; however, some degradation of shallow groundwater quality has occurred. High concentrations of iron and manganese were found in groundwater, sampled at depths of < 40 ft, from wells tapping alluvial aquifers and in a few wells tapping deeper aquifers. Volatile and acid- and base/neutral-extractable organic compounds were not detected in either shallow or deep groundwater samples. The quality of shallow groundwater was generally poorer than that of deep water. Deep ground water (wells set below 100 ft) appears suitable as a supplementary water supply for fish-hatchery needs. Some degradation of water quality, was observed downstream from river mile 1.7 where a municipal wastewater-treatment plant discharges into the river. In the Puyallup River, the highest concentrations of most trace elements were found in bed sediments collected downstream from river mile 1.7. Median concentrations of arsenic, lead, and zinc were higher in bed sediments from small streams compared with those from the Puyallup River, possibly because the small stream drainages, which are almost entirely within developed areas, receive more urban runoff as a percentage of total flow. Total-recoverable trace-element concentrations exceeded water-quality criteria for acute toxicity in the Puyallup River and in some of the small streams. In most cases, high concentrations of total-recoverable trace elements occurred when suspended-sediment concentrations were high. Temperatures in all streams except Wapato Creek and Fife Dutch were within limits (18 C) for Washington State class A water. Minimum dissolved oxygen concentrations were relatively low at 5.6 and 2.0 mg/L, respectively, for Wapato Creek and Fife Dutch. The poorest surface-water quality, which can be characterized as generally unsuitable for fish, was in Fife Dutch, a manmade channel and therefore

  20. Sanitary quality of the Jordan River in Salt Lake County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, K.R.

    1984-01-01

    This investigation of the sanitary quality of the Jordan River was conducted from July 1980 to October 1982 using indicator bacteria rather than specific pathogens. A serious sanitary problem was identified. Concentrations of total coliform bacteria often exceeded 5,000 colonies per 100 milliliters and concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria often exceeded 2,000 colonies per 100 milliliters in the lower reaches of the river. At times these levels were greatly exceeded. The most conspicuous aspect of the bacteriological data is its extreme variability. Seven waste-water treatment plants, seven major tributaries, numerous storm conduits, irrigation-return flow, and other sources all contribute to the dynamic system that determines the sanitary quality of the river. Because of this variability the sanitary quality of the river cannot be predicted at any one time. In general, concentrations of all three indicator bacteria increased in a downstream direction. Storm runoff from urban areas contributed large concentrations of indicator bacteria to the river. Regression analysis of 9 years of data collected at 1700 South Street showed a significant positive correlation between both fecal coliform and fecal streptococcal concentrations versus time. Concentrations of fecal coliform and fecal streptococci have both been increasing since 1974 at 1700 South Street. (USGS)

  1. Population sizes and group characteristics of Siberian Crane (Leuco-geranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) in Poyang Lake Wetland.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ming-Qin; Guo, Hong; Jiang, Jian-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Both the Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) have limited population sizes and are considered endangered by domestic Chinese and international agencies. To document the current size of their respective populations and characterize their groups, between October 2012 and April 2013 we undertook fieldwork at four nature reserve areas within the Poyang Lake wetlands. We divided Poyanghu National Nature Reserve (PYH) into the Wucheng (PWC) and Hengfeng areas (PHF), because each are each located in different counties. Our fieldwork showed that the Siberian Crane occurred mainly in PYH (364 in the PHF, 158 in the PWC) and the Nanjishan Wetland National Nature Reserve (NJS, with 200 individuals). The Hooded Crane was mainly distributed in PYH (302 in the PHF and 154 in the PWC). Family groups accounted for more than 50% of the total number of groups among both species, with Hooded Cranes forming more family groups than Siberian Cranes. Typically, these groups were formed of two adults with one offspring (Siberian Crane), and two adults with two offspring (Hooded Crane), with the mean family group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane being respectively 2.65 ± 0.53 (n=43) and 3.09 ± 0.86 (n=47) individuals per group. The mean collective group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane included 28.09 ± 24.94 (n=23) and 28.94 ± 27.97 (n=16) individuals per group, respectively, with the proportion of juveniles among Hooded Cranes being more than double that seen among the Siberian Cranes.

  2. Population sizes and group characteristics of Siberian Crane (Leuco-geranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) in Poyang Lake Wetland.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ming-Qin; Guo, Hong; Jiang, Jian-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Both the Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) have limited population sizes and are considered endangered by domestic Chinese and international agencies. To document the current size of their respective populations and characterize their groups, between October 2012 and April 2013 we undertook fieldwork at four nature reserve areas within the Poyang Lake wetlands. We divided Poyanghu National Nature Reserve (PYH) into the Wucheng (PWC) and Hengfeng areas (PHF), because each are each located in different counties. Our fieldwork showed that the Siberian Crane occurred mainly in PYH (364 in the PHF, 158 in the PWC) and the Nanjishan Wetland National Nature Reserve (NJS, with 200 individuals). The Hooded Crane was mainly distributed in PYH (302 in the PHF and 154 in the PWC). Family groups accounted for more than 50% of the total number of groups among both species, with Hooded Cranes forming more family groups than Siberian Cranes. Typically, these groups were formed of two adults with one offspring (Siberian Crane), and two adults with two offspring (Hooded Crane), with the mean family group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane being respectively 2.65 ± 0.53 (n=43) and 3.09 ± 0.86 (n=47) individuals per group. The mean collective group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane included 28.09 ± 24.94 (n=23) and 28.94 ± 27.97 (n=16) individuals per group, respectively, with the proportion of juveniles among Hooded Cranes being more than double that seen among the Siberian Cranes. PMID:25297076

  3. Geology, Hydrology, and Water Quality of the Little Blackwater River Watershed, Dorchester County, Maryland, 2006-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, Brandon J.; DeJong, Benjamin D.; Phelan, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The Little Blackwater River watershed is a low-lying tidal watershed in Dorchester County, Maryland. The potential exists for increased residential development in a mostly agricultural watershed that drains into the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. Groundwater and surface-water levels were collected along with water-quality samples to document hydrologic and geochemical conditions within the watershed prior to potential land-use changes. Lithologic logs were collected in the Little Blackwater River watershed and interpreted with existing geophysical logs to conceptualize the shallow groundwater-flow system. A shallow water table exists in much of the watershed as shown by sediment cores and surface geophysical surveys. Water-table wells have seasonal variations of 6 feet, with the lowest water levels occurring in September and October. Seasonally low water-table levels are lower than the stage of the Little Blackwater River, creating the potential for surface-water infiltration into the water table. Two stream gages, each equipped with stage, velocity, specific conductance, and temperature sensors, were installed at the approximate mid-point of the watershed and near the mouth of the Little Blackwater River. The gages recorded data continuously and also were equipped with telemetry. Discharge calculated at the mouth of the Little Blackwater River showed a seasonal pattern, with net positive discharge in the winter and spring months and net negative discharge (flow into the watershed from Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and Fishing Bay) in the summer and fall months. Continuous water-quality records showed an increase in specific conductance during the summer and fall months. Discrete water-quality samples were collected during 2007--08 from 13 of 15 monitoring wells and during 2006--09 from 9 surface-water sites to characterize pre-development conditions and the seasonal variability of inorganic constituents and nutrients. The highest mean values of

  4. Hydrogeologic framework and groundwater/surface-water interactions of the upper Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, central Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Ely, D. Matthew; Hinkle, Stephen R.; Kahle, Sue C.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogeology, hydrology, and geochemistry of groundwater and surface water in the upper (western) 860 square miles of the Yakima River Basin in Kittitas County, Washington, were studied to evaluate the groundwater-flow system, occurrence and availability of groundwater, and the extent of groundwater/surface-water interactions. The study area ranged in altitude from 7,960 feet in its headwaters in the Cascade Range to 1,730 feet at the confluence of the Yakima River with Swauk Creek. A west-to-east precipitation gradient exists in the basin with the western, high-altitude headwaters of the basin receiving more than 100 inches of precipitation per year and the eastern, low-altitude part of the basin receiving about 20 inches of precipitation per year. From the early 20th century onward, reservoirs in the upper part of the basin (for example, Keechelus, Kachess, and Cle Elum Lakes) have been managed to store snowmelt for irrigation in the greater Yakima River Basin. Canals transport water from these reservoirs for irrigation in the study area; additional water use is met through groundwater withdrawals from wells and surface-water withdrawals from streams and rivers. Estimated groundwater use for domestic, commercial, and irrigation purposes is reported for the study area. A complex assemblage of sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous bedrock underlies the study area. In a structural basin in the southeastern part of the study area, the bedrock is overlain by unconsolidated sediments of glacial and alluvial origin. Rocks and sediments were grouped into six hydrogeologic units based on their lithologic and hydraulic characteristics. A map of their extent was developed from previous geologic mapping and lithostratigraphic information from drillers’ logs. Water flows through interstitial space in unconsolidated sediments, but largely flows through fractures and other sources of secondary porosity in bedrock. Generalized groundwater-flow directions within the

  5. Herbicide concentrations in and loads transported by the Conestoga River and Pequea Creek, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Lloyd A.; Koerkle, Edward H.; Takita, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    Water samples were collected from four streams in Lancaster County from 1992 through 1995 and analyzed for selected herbicides. Samples were collected from the Little Conestoga Creek near Churchtown, Mill Creek (a tributary to the Conestoga River) at Elshelman Mill Road near Lyndon, the Conestoga River at Conestoga, and Pequea Creek at Martic Forge. Most samples were collected from stormflow that occurred during the growing season. Samples were analyzed for alachlor, aldrin, atrazine, chlordane, cyanazine, dieldrin, malathion, metolachlor, propazine, simazine, and toxaphene. Most samples had detectable concentrations of alachlor, atrazine, metolachlor, and simazine, and the loads of these constituents that were transported during each of the 4 years were computed. Of the samples collected from each of the streams?Little Conestoga Creek, Mill Creek, Conestoga River, and Pequea Creek?10, 12, 15, and 18 percent, respectively, had atrazine concentrations greater than 3.0 micrograms per liter, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level. Loads of atrazine, metolochlor, and simazine were greater than loads of any other herbicides. The largest loads were transported during 1994. Loads of atrazine transported by the four streams during periods of storm- flow from May to September 1994 totaled 3.46, 28.3, 263, and 46.8 pounds, respectively. The total loads of atrazine transported by the four streams?Little Conestoga Creek, Mill Creek, Conestoga River, and Pequea Creek?during calendar year 1994 were 6.48, 54.1, 498, and 102 pounds, respectively. A little less than half the atrazine load transported by each stream?45, 39, 42, and 42 percent, respectively?was transported during storms that occurred from May through September. Average annual yields of atrazine for the period 1992-95 were 0.59, 0.64, 0.68, and 0.51 pounds per square mile from the Little Conestoga Creek, Mill Creek, Conestoga River, and Pequea Creek, respectively. Average annual yields of

  6. Storm and flood of July 31-August 1, 1976, in the Big Thompson River and Cache la Poudre River basins, Larimer and Weld Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCain, Jerald F.; Shroba, R.R.

    1979-01-01

    PART A: Devastating flash floods swept through the canyon section of Larimer County in north-central Colorado during the night of July 31-August I, 1976, causing 139 deaths, 5 missing persons, and more than $35 million in total damages. The brunt of the storms occurred over the Big Thompson River basin between Drake and Estes Park with rainfall amounts as much as 12 inches being reported during the storm period. In the Cache la Poudre River basin to the north, a rainfall amount of 10 inches was reported for one locality while 6 inches fell over a widespread area near the central part of the basin. The storms developed when strong low-level easterly winds to the rear of a polar front pushed a moist, conditionally unstable airmass upslope into the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Orographic uplift released the convective instability, and light south-southeasterly winds at middle and upper levels allowed the storm complex to remain nearly stationary over the foothills for several hours. Minimal entrainment of relatively moist air at middle and upper levels, very low cloud bases, and a slightly tilted updraft structure contributed to a high precipitation efficiency. Intense rainfall began soon after 1900 MDT (Mountain Daylight Time) in the Big Thompson River and the North Fork Cache la Poudre River basins. A cumulative rainfall curve developed for Glen Comfort from radar data indicates that 7.5 inches of rain fell during the period 1930-2040 MDT on July 31. In the central part of the storm area west of Fort Collins, the heaviest rainfall began about 2200 MDT on July 31 and continued until 0100 MDT on August 1. Peak discharges were extremely large on many streams in the storm area-exceeding previously recorded maximum discharges at several locations. The peak discharge of the Big Thompson River at the gaging station at the canyon mouth, near Drake was 31,200 cubic feet per second or more than four times the previous maximum discharge of 7,600 cubic feet per second at

  7. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. 571.113... Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571.113 Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. S1. Purpose and scope. This standard establishes the requirement for providing a hood latch system or hood latch systems....

  8. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. 571.113... Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571.113 Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. S1. Purpose and scope. This standard establishes the requirement for providing a hood latch system or hood latch systems....

  9. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. 571.113... Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571.113 Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. S1. Purpose and scope. This standard establishes the requirement for providing a hood latch system or hood latch systems....

  10. Initial historic overview of the Savannah River Plant, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    This historic overview begins with the initial European contacts in the southeastern United States. Specific information about the Savannah River Plant site is not available until circa 1750 when the first settlement of the area began. The overview becomes more specific as it advances chronologically toward the present. (ACR)

  11. 76 FR 4818 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Old Brazos River, Freeport, Brazoria County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... process of cutting the steel truss members off of the swing span, while keeping the span balanced on the... balancing process for the swing span will prevent it from being able to open for emergencies. Per 33 CFR 117... operation of the Union Pacific Railroad Swing Span Bridge across the Old Brazos River, mile 4.4, at...

  12. 77 FR 64541 - Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge, Liberty County, TX; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... process for Trinity River NWR. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (72 FR... comments in a notice of availability in the Federal Register (77 FR 18853-18856; March 28, 2012). The..., including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and...

  13. 77 FR 18853 - Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge, Liberty County, TX; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... will announce upcoming public meetings in local news media. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments or... this process through a notice in the Federal Register (72 FR 45059; August 10, 2007). The Trinity River... opportunities available to the public, including opportunities for wildlife observation and photography,...

  14. 77 FR 64538 - Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, Washington and Yamhill Counties, OR, Draft Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... process through a notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 67763; November 3, 2010). Tualatin River National... and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. Background The CCP Process The... photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least...

  15. 33 CFR 165.554 - Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station, Susquehanna River, Dauphin County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Three Mile Island... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.554 Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station... waters of the Susquehanna River in the vicinity of the Three Mile Island Generating Station bounded by...

  16. 33 CFR 165.554 - Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station, Susquehanna River, Dauphin County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Three Mile Island... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.554 Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station... waters of the Susquehanna River in the vicinity of the Three Mile Island Generating Station bounded by...

  17. 33 CFR 165.554 - Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station, Susquehanna River, Dauphin County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Three Mile Island... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.554 Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station... waters of the Susquehanna River in the vicinity of the Three Mile Island Generating Station bounded by...

  18. 33 CFR 165.554 - Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station, Susquehanna River, Dauphin County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Three Mile Island... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.554 Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station... waters of the Susquehanna River in the vicinity of the Three Mile Island Generating Station bounded by...

  19. 33 CFR 165.554 - Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station, Susquehanna River, Dauphin County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Three Mile Island... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.554 Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station... waters of the Susquehanna River in the vicinity of the Three Mile Island Generating Station bounded by...

  20. Environmental baseline study of the Huron River Watershed, Baraga and Marquette Counties, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Weaver, Thomas L.; Cannon, William F.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes results of a study to establish water-quality and geochemical baseline conditions within a small watershed in the Lake Superior region. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a survey of water-quality parameters and soil and streambed sediment geochemistry of the 83 mi2 Huron River Watershed in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Streamflow was measured and water-quality samples collected at a range of flow conditions from six sites on the major tributaries of the Huron River. All water samples were analyzed for a suite of common ions, nutrients, and trace metals. In addition, water samples from each site were analyzed for unfiltered total and methylmercury once during summer low-flow conditions. Soil samples were collected from 31 sites, with up to 4 separate samples collected at each site, delineated by soil horizon. Streambed sediments were collected from 11 sites selected to cover most of the area drained by the Huron River system. USGS data were supplemented with ecological assessments completed in 2006 by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality using a modified version of their Great Lakes Environmental Assessment Section procedure 51, and again during 2008 using volunteers under supervision of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Results from this study define a hydrological, geological, and environmental baseline for the Huron River Watershed prior to any significant mineral exploration or development. Results from the project also serve to refine the design of future regional environmental baseline studies in the Lake Superior Basin.

  1. Hydrogeology of the western part of the Salt River Valley area, Maricopa County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, James G.; Pool, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Salt River Valley is a major population and agricultural center of more than 3,000 mi2 in central Arizona (fig. 1). The western part of the Salt River Valley area (area of this report) covers about 1,500 mi2. The Phoenix metropolitan area with a population of more than 1.6 million in 1985 (Valley National Bank, 1987) is located within the valley. The watersheds of the Salt, Verde, and Agua Fria Rivers provide the valley with a reliable but limited surface-water supply that must be augmented with ground water even in years of plentiful rainfall. Large-scale ground-water withdrawals began in the Salt River Valley in the early part of the 20th century; between 1915 and 1983, the total estimated ground-water pumpage was 81 million acre-ft (U.S. Geological Survey, 1984). Because of the low average annual rainfall and high potential evapotranspiration, the principal sources of ground-water recharge are urban runoff, excess irrigation, canal seepage and surface-water flows during years of higher-than-normal rainfall. Withdrawals greatly exceed recharge and, in some area, ground-water levels have declines as much as 350 ft (Laney and other, 1978; Ross, 1978). In the study area, ground-water declines of more than 300 ft have occurred in Deer Valley and from Luke Air Force Base north to Beardsley. As a result, a large depression of the water table has developed west of Luke Air Force Base (fig. 2). Ground-water use has decreased in recent years because precipitation and surface-water supplies have been greater than normal. Increased precipitation also caused large quantities of runoff to be released into the normally dry Salt and Gila River channels. From February 1978 to June 1980, streamflow losses of at least 90,000 acre-ft occurred between Jointhead Dam near the east boundary of the study area and Gillespie Dam several miles southwest of the west edge of the study area (Mann and Rhone, 1983). Consequently, ground-water declines in a large part of the basin have

  2. Georectification of historical aerial photos to track meander change in Wood River, Klamath County, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C.; Hughes, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Wood River in Oregon’s Upper Klamath Basin is a meandering channel draining the southeastern slopes of Crater Lake National Park. Its valley floor is heavily grazed and highly altered by a series of irrigation channels that have substantially affected the river’s spring-fed flow regime and morphology. Despite efforts to restore the river’s hydrology, very little information is available about the river’s geomorphology. Using high-resolution LIDAR data from 2004 and georectified aerial photos from 1940-2009, we analyzed meander changes along the Wood River in the geomorphic context of its valley floor and meander belt. Aerial photos were scanned to produce digital images with sub-meter pixels, then georectified with a second-order polynomial transformation. Nine or fewer ground-control points were used for each photo to achieve an overall root-mean-square error value of 0.6 - 0.7 m. The scarcity of buildings and changes in the road and fence networks over the study period required the partial use of “natural pattern matching” during photo rectification. Semi-permanent patterns of fan erosion on the upper valley floor and hydrogeomorphic wetland patterns in lower valley provided the primary bases for natural pattern matching, further aided by the use of transparency during photo overlaying. Six prototypes of meander change were identified: extension, compression, translation, rotation, compound heading, and cutoff. Of these types, extension of meanders was the most frequently occurring. However, the effects of extension were counteracted by numerous meander cutoffs, which nominally affected sinuosity, but actually shortened the channel by about 1 km, or about 3%. Cutoffs were most frequent in the upper reaches of the river, where valley slope is higher, the meander belt is wider, and accommodation space was adequate to promote relatively high initial sinuosity. In these reaches, some cutoffs appear to have initiated downstream transfers of bedload

  3. Fume hood performance: Face velocity variability inconsistent air volume systems

    SciTech Connect

    Volin, C.E.; Joao, R.V.; Gershey, E.L.; Reiman, J.S.; Party, E.

    1998-09-01

    A 3-year survey of 366 bench-type fume hoods in working laboratories in conventional, constant air volume settings showed that face velocities varied greatly from unit to unit and over time. Fume hoods with bypasses performed better than those without; however, even newly fabricated bypass hoods exhibited large variations. These variations were due to several factors; however, face velocities at 100 {+-} 10 ft/min at working sash heights in the range of 20 to 40 cm (8 to 16 inches) were attainable. The use of smoke showed poor containment, especially at face velocities below 85 ft/min (0.425 m/s) or above 130 ft/min (0.65 m/s) and when the hoods were obstructed by large items placed on the work surface. Auxiliary/supplemental air created unstable face velocities and poor smoke patterns. The analysis of 3 years of fume hood monitoring showed clearly the need for and importance of a maintenance program where the fume hood lower slots are cleaned and fans, ducts, dampers, and hoods are checked periodically.

  4. Geology and ground-water conditions of Clark County Washington, with a description of a major alluvial aquifer along the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mundorff, Maurice John

    1964-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the ground-water resources of the populated parts of Clark County. Yields adequate for irrigation can be obtained from wells inmost farmed areas in Clark County, Wash. The total available supply is sufficient for all foreseeable irrigation developments. In a few local areas aquifers are fine-grained, and yields of individual wells are low. An enormous ground-water supply is available from a major alluvial aquifer underlying the flood plain of the Columbia River in the vicinity of Vancouver, Camas, and Washougal, where the aquifer is recharged, in part, by infiltration from the river. Yields of individual wells are large, ranging to as much as 4,000 gpm (gallons per minute). Clark County lies along the western flank of the Cascade Range. in the structural lowland (Willamette-Puget trough) between those mountains and the Coast Ranges to the west. The area covered by the report includes the urban, the suburban, and most of the agricultural lands in the county. These lands lie on a Series of nearly fiat plains and benches which rise steplike from the level of the Columbia River (a few feet above sea level) to about 800 feet above sea level. Clark County is-drained by the Columbia River (the trunk stream of the Pacific Northwest) and its tributaries. The Columbia River forms the southern and western boundaries of the county. Although the climate of the county is considered to be humid, the precipitation ranging from about 37 to more than 110 inches annually in various parts of the county, the unequal seasonal distribution (about 1.5 inches total for ;July and August in the agricultural area) makes irrigation highly desirable for most .crops and essential for some specialized crops. Consolidated rocks of Eocene to Miocene age, chiefly volcanic lava flows and pyroclastics but including some sedimentary strata, crop out in the foothills of the Cascades in the eastern part of the county and underlie the younger

  5. Characterization of mercury contamination in the Androscoggin River, Coos County, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chalmers, Ann; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Degnan, James R.; Coles, James; Agee, Jennifer L.; Luce, Darryl

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of total mercury (THg) and MeHg in sediment, pore water, and biota in the Androscoggin River were elevated downstream from the former chloralkali facility compared with those upstream from reference sites. Sequential extraction of surface sediment showed a distinct difference in Hg speciation upstream compared with downstream from the contamination site. An upstream site was dominated by potassium hydroxide-extractable forms (for example, organic-Hg or particle-bound Hg(II)), whereas sites downstream from the point source were dominated by more chemically recalcitrant forms (largely concentrated nitric acid-extractable), indicative of elemental mercury or mercurous chloride. At all sites, only a minor fraction (less than 0.1 percent) of THg existed in chemically labile forms (for example, water extractable or weak acid extractable). All metrics indicated that a greater percentage of mercury at an upstream site was available for Hg(II)-methylation compared with sites downstream from the point source, but the absolute concentration of bioavailable Hg(II) was greater downstream from the point source. In addition, the concentration of tin-reducible inorganic reactive mercury, a surrogate measure of bioavailable Hg(II) generally increased with distance downstream from the point source. Whereas concentrations of mercury species on a sediment-dry-weight basis generally reflected the relative location of the sample to the point source, river-reach integrated mercury-species inventories and MeHg production potential (MPP) rates reflected the amount of fine-grained sediment in a given reach. THg concentrations in biota were significantly higher downstream from the point source compared with upstream reference sites for smallmouth bass, white sucker, crayfish, oligochaetes, bat fur, nestling tree swallow blood and feathers, adult tree swallow blood, and tree swallow eggs. As with tin-reducible inorganic reactive mercury, THg in smallmouth bass also increased

  6. Water quality in the New River from Calexico to the Salton Sea, Imperial County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Setmire, James G.

    1984-01-01

    The New River enters the United States at Calexico, Calif., after it crosses the international boundary. Water-quality data from routine collection indicated that the New River was degraded by high organic and bacterial content. Intensive sampling for chemical and physical constituents and properties of the river was done May 9-13, 1977, to quantify the chemical composition of the water and to identify water-quality problems. Concentrations of total organic carbon in the New River at Calexico ranged from 80 to 161 milligrams per liter and dissolved organic carbon ranged from 34 to 42 milligrams per liter; the maximum chemical oxygen demand was 510 milligrams per liter. Intensive sampling for chemical and biological characteristics was done in the New River from May 1977 to June 1978 to determine the occurrence of the organic material and its effects on downstream water quality. Dissolved-oxygen concentration was measured along longitudinal profiles of the river from Calexico to the Salton Sea. A dissolved-oxygen sag downstream from the Calexico gage varied seasonally. The sag extended farther downstream and had lower concentrations of dissolved oxygen during the summer months than during the winter months. The sag of zero dissolved-oxygen concentration extended 26 miles in July 1977. In December 1976, the sag extended 20 miles but the minimum dissolved-oxygen concentration was 2.5 milligrams per liter. The greatest diel (24-hour) variation in dissolved-oxygen concentration occurred in the reach from the Calexico gage to Lyons Crossing, 8.8 miles downstream. High concentrations of organic material were detected as far as Highway 80, 19.5 miles downstream from the international boundary. Biological samples analyzed for benthic invertebrates showed that water at the Calexico and Lyons Crossing sites, nearest the international boundary, was of such poor quality that very few bottom-dwelling organisms could survive. Although the water was of poor quality at Keystone

  7. Selected hydrologic data, Arkansas River basin, Pueblo and southeastern Fremont counties, Colorado, 1975-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Doug; Edelmann, Patrick

    1980-01-01

    Selcted hydrologic data collected in 1975-80 as part of water-quality investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey in Pueblo and southeastern Fremont Counties, Colo., are presented in this report. The data, in tabular form, consist of streamflow-discharge measurements for 33 sites, channel-geometry measurements for 97 sites, traveltime data for 12 sites, and field and laboratory water-quality analyses for 194 sites. Federal, state, and local officials may find these data useful in making decisions relating to the management of water resources of the area. (USGS)

  8. Sediment discharge in the Santa Clara River Basin, Ventura and Los Angeles Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Rhea P.

    1979-01-01

    Sediment data collected in the Santa Clara River in California basin, during the 1967-75 water years were analyzed to determine the particle size and quantity of sediment transported past three gaging stations. The total sediment discharge of the basin , computed from records of Santa Clara River at Montalvo for water years 1968-75, was 63.5 million tons, of which 59.5 million tons was carried in suspension and an estimated 4 million tons was transported as unsampled sediment discharge. About 17.7 million tons, or 28 percent of the total sediment discharge, was coarse sediment (particles larger than 0.062 millimeter). Most of the sediment was transported during only a few days of floodflow each year. During the 1968-75 water years, approximately 55 percent of the total sediment was transported in 2 days and 92 percent was transported in 53 days. The long-term (1928-75) average annual sediment discharge of the Santa Clara River at Montalvo is estimated at 3.67 million tons. Of that quantity, 2.58 million tons consisted of fine sediment and 1.09 million tons consisted of coarse sediment. A sediment budget for the Santa Clara River basin was estimated for sediment discharges under both natural and actual conditions. The major difference between natural and actual sediment discharges of the Santa Clara River basin is the sediment intercepted upstream from Lake Piru. The combined trap efficiency of Lake Piru and Pyramid Lake approaches 100 percent. Sediment deposited in these reservoirs resulted in about a 6-percent reduction of sediment to the Santa Clara River basin during the historical period (1928-75) and a 12-percent reduction during the period most affected by dams (1953-75). Sediment losses to the basin by gravel mining, diversion of flows, and interception of sediment in the Castaic Creek basin resulted in additional reductions of 2 percent during the period 1928-75 and 4 percent during the period 1953-75. (Kosco-USGS)

  9. Estimates of Sediment Load Prior to Dam Removal in the Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Higgins, Johnna L.; Bryant, Mark K.

    2009-01-01

    Years after the removal of the two dams on the Elwha River, the geomorphology and habitat of the lower river will be substantially influenced by the sediment load of the free-flowing river. To estimate the suspended-sediment load prior to removal of the dams, the U.S. Geological Survey collected suspended-sediment samples during water years 2006 and 2007 at streamflow-gaging stations on the Elwha River upstream of Lake Mills and downstream of Glines Canyon Dam at McDonald Bridge. At the gaging station upstream of Lake Mills, discrete samples of suspended sediment were collected over a range of streamflows including a large peak in November 2006 when suspended-sediment concentrations exceeded 7,000 milligrams per liter, the highest concentrations recorded on the river. Based on field measurements in this study and from previous years, regression equations were developed for estimating suspended-sediment and bedload discharge as a function of streamflow. Using a flow duration approach, the average total annual sediment load at the gaging station upstream of Lake Mills was estimated at 327,000 megagrams with a range of uncertainty of +57 to -34 percent (217,000-513,000 megagrams) at the 95 percent confidence level; 77 percent of the total was suspended-sediment load and 23 percent was bedload. At the McDonald Bridge gaging station, daily suspended-sediment samples were obtained using an automated pump sampler, and concentrations were combined with the record of streamflow to calculate daily, monthly, and annual suspended-sediment loads. In water year 2006, an annual suspended-sediment load of 49,300 megagrams was determined at the gaging station at McDonald Bridge, and a load of 186,000 megagrams was determined upstream at the gaging station upstream of Lake Mills. In water year 2007, the suspended-sediment load was 75,200 megagrams at McDonald Bridge and 233,000 megagrams upstream of Lake Mills. The large difference between suspended-sediment loads at both gaging

  10. 77 FR 71195 - Final Fair Market Rents for the Housing Choice Voucher Program and Moderate Rehabilitation Single...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Rents (FMRs). SUMMARY: This notice updates the FMRs for Hood River County, OR, based on a survey of... toll-free.) SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FY 2012 FMRs for Hood River County, OR, were over 20 percent lower than they were in FY 2011. While FMRs for Hood River County increased in FY 2013, they were...

  11. In situ vitrification melt and confinement hood performance review

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, C.M.

    1990-09-01

    This document consolidates and organizes information available concerning in situ vitrification (ISV) melt behavior and confinement hood performance. This information is derived from reports of various scaled ISV tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objective of this document is twofold: (1) to serve as a central reference of information concerning the reported melt and confinement hood performance under various operating conditions and (2) to identify ISV melt and hood characteristics that require alteration or further investigation through either additional field tests or laboratory experiments. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Flood elevations for the Soleduck River at Sol Duc Hot Springs, Clallam County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Elevations and inundation areas of a 100-year flood of the Soleduck River, Washington, were determined by the U.S. Geological Survey for the area in the vicinity of the Sol Duc Hot Springs resort, a public facility in the Olympic National Park that under Federal law must be located beyond or protected from damage by a 100-year flood. Results show that most flooding could be eliminated by raising parts of an existing dike. In general, little flood damage is expected, except at the southern end of an undeveloped airstrip that could become inundated and hazardous due to flow from a tributary. The airstrip is above the 100-year flood of the Soleduck River.

  13. Wolf River at Memphis, Tennessee: floodflow characteristics along proposed Interstate Highway 240, Shelby County

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Randolph, William J.; Gamble, Charles R.

    1973-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey at the request of Mr. Henry Derthick, Engineer of Structures of the Tennessee Department of Transportation, under the authority of a cooperative agreement between the two agencies. It supplements information contained in a report with the same title dated September 1966. The Department of Transportation proposes to construct a segment of Interstate Highway 240 and several bridges across the Wolf River on the northern side off Memphis, Shelby Count. Mt. Derthick has requested an analysis of the 50-year flood or the maximum flood of record to determine the possible effect of the proposed construction on flood profiles along the Wolf River.

  14. Shore phases of the Green River formation in northern Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Wilmont H.

    1926-01-01

    and the climatic conditions under which the deposits accumulated. From the same evidence the writer has also endeavored to determine the kinds and relative abundance of both plant and animal life that existed in the Green River lake and on the adjacent land. Such evidence is fragmentary, as was to be expected, but it serves well as a basis for fur her study and interpretation.

  15. Preimpoundment water quality of the Wild Rice River, Norman County, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tornes, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Water samples have been collected at two sites on the Wild Rice River since September 1974 to establish baseline water-quality characteristics before construction of a reservoir for recreation and flood control near Twin Valley, Minn. A decline in water quality between the sites is shown by mean total phosphorus concentrations, which increase from 0.06 to 0.10 milligram per liter downstream, and mean turbidity, which increases from 12 to 24 units downstream. Phosphorus and ammonia concentrations, as high as 0.31 and 2.7 milligrams per liter, respectively, could be the result of domestic waste input to the river upstream from Hendrum. Biochemical oxygen demand concentrations were significantly higher during spring runoff than during the rest of the year. Four out of 90 bacteria samples taken at Twin Valley indicate the presence of human fecal material, though bacteria densities do not exceed recommendations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for public-water supplies. The dominace of organic-pollution tolerant phytoplankton in 49 out of 78 samples also indicates degradation of the river quality at Twin Valley. Nutrient concentrations at Twin Valley have no apparent effect on phytoplankton concentrations. None of the consitituents sampled were found to exceed recommended concentrations for public-water supplies.

  16. Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.L.; Ralston, D.R.; Allman, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Low to moderate temperature (< 150/sup 0/C) geothermal fluids are being developed in the southern Raft River Valley of Idaho. Five deep geothermal wells ranging in depth from 4911 feet to 6543 feet (1490 to 1980 meters) and two intermediate depth (3858 feet or 1170 meters) injection wells have been drilled within the Raft River KGRA. Several shallower (1423-500 feet or 430-150 meters) wells have also been constructed to monitor the environmental effects of geothermal development of the shallower aquifer systems. Sampling of water from wells within the KGRA has been conducted since the onset of the project in 1974. Five analytical laboratories have conducted analyses on waters from the KGRA. Charge-balance error calculations conducted on the data produced from these laboratories indicated that data from three laboratories were reliable while two were not. A method of equating all data was established by using linear regression analyses on sets of paired data from various laboratories. The chemical data collected from the deep geothermal wells indicates that a two reservoir system exists within the Raft River KGRA. Each reservoir is associated with a major structural feature. These features are known as the Bridge Fault System (BFS) and the Narrows Structure (NS).

  17. Herpetological monitoring and assessment on the Trinity River, Trinity County, California—Final report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snover, Melissa L.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of the Trinity River Restoration Program is to rehabilitate the fisheries on the dam-controlled Trinity River. However, maintaining and enhancing other wildlife populations through the restoration initiative is also a key objective. Foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) and western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) have been identified as important herpetological species on which to focus monitoring efforts due to their status as California state-listed species of concern and potential listing on the U.S. Endangered Species List. We developed and implemented a monitoring strategy for these species specific to the Trinity River with the objectives of establishing baseline values for probabilities of site occupancy, colonization, and local extinction; identifying site characteristics that correlate with the probability of extinction; and estimating overall trends in abundance. Our 3-year study suggests that foothill yellow-legged frogs declined in the probability of site occupancy. Conversely, our results suggest that western pond turtles increased in both abundance and the probability of site occupancy. The short length of our study period makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions, but these results provide much-needed baseline data. Further monitoring and directed studies are required to assess how habitat changes and management decisions relate to the status and trend of these species over the long term.

  18. Herpetological monitoring and assessment on the Trinity River, Trinity County, California—Final report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snover, Melissa L.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-14

    The primary goal of the Trinity River Restoration Program is to rehabilitate the fisheries on the dam-controlled Trinity River. However, maintaining and enhancing other wildlife populations through the restoration initiative is also a key objective. Foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) and western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) have been identified as important herpetological species on which to focus monitoring efforts due to their status as California state-listed species of concern and potential listing on the U.S. Endangered Species List. We developed and implemented a monitoring strategy for these species specific to the Trinity River with the objectives of establishing baseline values for probabilities of site occupancy, colonization, and local extinction; identifying site characteristics that correlate with the probability of extinction; and estimating overall trends in abundance. Our 3-year study suggests that foothill yellow-legged frogs declined in the probability of site occupancy. Conversely, our results suggest that western pond turtles increased in both abundance and the probability of site occupancy. The short length of our study period makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions, but these results provide much-needed baseline data. Further monitoring and directed studies are required to assess how habitat changes and management decisions relate to the status and trend of these species over the long term.

  19. Vulnerbility of production wells in the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system to saltwater intrusion from the Delaware River in Camden, Gloucester, and Salem Counties, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Navoy, Anthony S.; Voronin, Lois M.; Modica, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system is hydraulically connected to the Delaware River in parts of Camden and Gloucester Counties, New Jersey, and has more limited contact with the river in Salem County, New Jersey. The aquifer system is used widely for water supply, and 122 production wells that are permitted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection to pump more than 100,000 gallons per year in the three counties are within 2 miles of the river. During drought, saltwater may encroach upstream from the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay to areas where the aquifer system is recharged by induced infiltration through the Delaware River streambed. During the drought of the mid-1960's, water with a chloride concentration in excess of potability standards (250 mg/L (milligrams per liter)) encroached into the reach of the river that recharges the aquifer system. The vulnerability of the major production wells in the area to similar saltwater encroachment in the future is a concern to water managers. This vulnerability was evaluated by investigating two scenarios: (1) a one-time recurrence of the conditions approximating those that occurred in the1960's, and (2) the recurrence of those same conditions on an annual basis. Results of ground-water-flow simulation in conjunction with particle tracking and one-dimensional transport analysis indicate that the wells that are most vulnerable to saltwater intrusion are those in the Morris and Delair well fields in Camden County. A single 30-day event during which the concentration of dissolved chloride or sodium exceeds 2,098 mg/L or 407 mg/L, respectively, in the Delaware River would threaten the potability of water from these wells, given New Jersey drinking-water standards of 250 mg/L for dissolved chloride and 50 mg/L for dissolved sodium. This chloride concentration is about six times that observed in the river during the 1960's drought. An annually occurring 1-month event during which the concentrations of

  20. Use of carboxylated microspheres to assess transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts at the Russian River water supply facility, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Anders, R.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Seymour, D.; Jasperse, J.

    2007-01-01

    Carboxylated microspheres were employed as surrogates to assess the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvumoocysts during forced- and natural-gradient tests conducted in July and October 2004. The tests involved poorly-sorted, near-surface sediments where groundwater is pumped from an alluvial aquifer underlying the Russian River, Sonoma County, CA. In an off channel infiltration basin and within the river, a mixture (2-, 3-, and 5- ??m diameters) of fluorescently-labeled carboxylated microspheres and bromide tracers were used in two injection and recovery test to assess sediment removal efficiency for the microspheres. Bottom sediments varied considerably in their filtration efficiency for Cryptosporidium.

  1. Preliminary survey of antibiotic-resistant fecal indicator bacteria and pathogenic Escherichia coli from river-water samples collected in Oakland County, Michigan, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Duris, Joseph W.; Aichele, Stephen S.

    2005-01-01

    A preliminary study was done in Oakland County, Michigan, to determine the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliform bacteria and enterococci), antibiotic resistance patterns of these two groups, and the presence of potentially pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli). For selected sites, specific members of these groups [E. coli, Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis)] were isolated and tested for levels of resistance to specific antibiotics used to treat human infections by pathogens in these groups and for their potential to transfer these resistances. In addition, water samples from all sites were tested for indicators of potentially pathogenic E. coli by three assays: a growth-based assay for sorbitol-negative E. coli, an immunological assay for E. coli O157, and a molecular assay for three virulence and two serotype genes. Samples were also collected from two non-urbanized sites outside of Oakland County. Results from the urbanized Oakland County area were compared to those from these two non-urbanized sites. Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations exceeded State of Michigan recreational water-quality standards and (or) recommended U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) standards in samples from all but two Oakland County sites. Multiple-antibiotic-resistant fecal coliform bacteria were found at all sites, including two reference sites from outside the county. Two sites (Stony Creek and Paint Creek) yielded fecal coliform isolates resistant to all tested antibiotics. Patterns indicative of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)- producing fecal coliform bacteria were found at eight sites in Oakland County and E. coli resistant to clinically significant antibiotics were recovered from the River Rouge, Clinton River, and Paint Creek. Vancomycin-resistant presumptive enterococci were found at six sites in Oakland County and were not found at the reference sites. Evidence of acquired antibiotic resistances was

  2. MOUNT HOOD WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area of the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area of the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248 degree F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in these areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  3. Mount Hood Wilderness and adjacent areas, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted in 1980. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain, where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in three areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  4. Intensive archeological survey of the proposed Saltcrete area of the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Research manuscript series 172

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.

    1981-06-01

    An intensive archeological survey of the proposed Saltcrete (200-Z) area of the Defense Waste Processing Facility on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina was conducted. The purpose was to locate, describe and assess the archeological resources within the proposed construction area and to provide the Department of Energy with the recommendations as to the significance of the resources. This report presents a summary of the background, methods, results and recommendations resulting from the Saltcrete area intensive survey.

  5. Water-quality assessment of White River between Lake Sequoyah and Beaver Reservoir, Washington County, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terry, J.E.; Morris, E.E.; Bryant, C.T.

    1982-01-01

    The Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology and U.S. Geological Survey conducted a water quality assessment be made of the White River and, that a steady-state digital model be calibrated and used as a tool for simulating changes in nutrient loading. The city of Fayetteville 's wastewater-treatment plant is the only point-source discharger of waste effluent to the river. Data collected during synoptic surveys downstream from the wastewater-treatment plan indicate that temperature, dissolved oxygen, dissolved solids, un-ionized ammonia, total phosphorus, and floating solids and depositable materials did not meet Arkansas stream standards. Nutrient loadings below the treatment plant result in dissolved oxygen concentrations as low as 0.0 milligrams per liter. Biological surveys found low macroinvertebrate organism diversity and numerous dead fish. Computed dissolved oxygen deficits indicate that benthic demands are the most significant oxygen sinks in the river downstream from the wastewater-treatment plant. Benthic oxygen demands range from 2.8 to 11.0 grams per meter squared per day. Model projections indicate that for 7-day, 10-year low-flow conditions and water temperature of 29 degrees Celsius, daily average dissolved oxygen concentrations of 6.0 milligrams per liter can be maintained downstream from the wastewater-treatment plant if effluent concentrations of ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and ammonia nitrogen are 7.5 (5.0 5-day demand) and 2 milligrams per liter respectively. Model sensitivity analysis indicate that dissolved oxygen concentrations were most sensitive to changes in stream temperature. (USGS)

  6. Water-quality conditions in the New River, Imperial County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Setmire, James G.

    1979-01-01

    The New River, when entering the United States at Calexico, Calif., often contains materials which have the appearance of industrial and domestic wastes. Passage of some of these materials is recognized by a sudden increase in turbidity over background levels and the presence of white particulate matter. Water samples taken during these events are usually extremely high in organic content. During a 4-day reconnaissance of water quality in May 1977, white-to-brown extremely turbid water crossed the border on three occasions. On one of these occasions , the water was intensively sampled. The total organic-carbon concentration ranged from 80 to 161 milligrams per liter (mg/l); dissolved organic carbon ranged from 34 to 42 mg/l, and the chemical oxygen demand was as high as 510 mg/l. River profiles showed a dissolved-oxygen sag, with the length of the zone of depressed dissolved-oxygen concentrations varying seasonally. During the summer months, dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the river were lower and the zone of depressed dissolved-oxygen concentrations was longer. The largest increases in dissolved-oxygen concentration from reaeration occurred at the three drop structures and the rock weir near Seeley. The effects of oxygen demanding materials crossing the border extended as far as Highway 80, 19.5 miles downstream from the international boundary at Calexico. Fish kills and anaerobic conditions were also detected as far as Highway 80. Standard bacteria indicator tests for fecal contamination showed a very high health-hazard potential near the border. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Streamflow in the upper Santa Cruz River basin, Santa Cruz and Pima Counties, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condes de la Torre, Alberto

    1970-01-01

    Streamflow records obtained in the upper Santa Cruz River basin of southern Arizona, United States, and northern Sonora, Mexico, have been analyzed to aid in the appraisal of the surface-water resources of the area. Records are available for 15 sites, and the length of record ranges from 60 years for the gaging station on the Santa .Cruz River at Tucson to 6 years for Pantano Wash near Vail. The analysis provides information on flow duration, low-flow frequency magnitude, flood-volume frequency and magnitude, and storage requirements to maintain selected draft rates. Flood-peak information collected from the gaging stations has been projected on a regional basis from which estimates of flood magnitude and frequency may be made for any site in the basin. Most streams in the 3,503-square-mile basin are ephemeral. Ground water sustains low flows only at Santa Cruz River near Nogales, Sonoita Creek near Patagonia, and Pantano Wash near Vail. Elsewhere, flow occurs only in direct response to precipitation. The median number of days per year in which there is no flow ranges from 4 at Sonoita Creek near Patagonia to 335 at Rillito Creek near Tomson. The streamflow is extremely variable from year to year, and annual flows have a coefficient of variation close to or exceeding unity at most stations. Although the amount of flow in the basin is small most of the time, the area is subject to floods. Most floods result from high-intensity precipitation caused by thunderstorms during the period ,July to September. Occasionally, when snowfall at the lower altitudes is followed by rain, winter floods produce large volumes of flow.

  8. Sediment load and distribution in the lower Skagit River, Skagit County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Grossman, Eric E.; Mastin, Mark C.; Huffman, Raegan L.

    2016-08-17

    The Skagit River delivers about 40 percent of all fluvial sediment that enters Puget Sound, influencing flood hazards in the Skagit lowlands, critically important estuarine habitat in the delta, and some of the most diverse and productive agriculture in western Washington. A total of 175 measurements of suspended-sediment load, made routinely from 1974 to 1993, and sporadically from 2006 to 2009, were used to develop and evaluate regression models of sediment transport (also known as “sediment-rating curves”) for estimating suspended-sediment load as a function of river discharge. Using a flow-range model and 75 years of daily discharge record (acquired from 1941 to 2015), the mean annual suspended-sediment load for the Skagit River near Mount Vernon, Washington, was estimated to be 2.5 teragrams (Tg, where 1 Tg = 1 million metric tons). The seasonal model indicates that 74 percent of the total annual suspended‑sediment load is delivered to Puget Sound during the winter storm season (from October through March), but also indicates that discharge is a poor surrogate for suspended‑sediment concentration (SSC) during the summer low-flow season. Sediment-rating curves developed for different time periods revealed that the regression model slope of the SSC-discharge relation increased 66 percent between the periods of 1974–76 and 2006–09 when suspended-sediment samples were collected, implying that changes in sediment supply, channel hydraulics, and (or) basin hydrology occurred between the two time intervals. In the relatively wet water year 2007 (October 1, 2006, through September 30, 2007), an automated sampler was used to collect daily samples of suspended sediment from which an annual load of 4.5 Tg was calculated, dominated by a single large flood event that contributed 1.8 Tg, or 40 percent of the total. In comparison, the annual load calculated for water year 2007 using the preferred flow-range model was 4.8 Tg (+6.7 percent), in close agreement with

  9. Sediment load and distribution in the lower Skagit River, Skagit County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Grossman, Eric E.; Mastin, Mark C.; Huffman, Raegan L.

    2016-08-17

    The Skagit River delivers about 40 percent of all fluvial sediment that enters Puget Sound, influencing flood hazards in the Skagit lowlands, critically important estuarine habitat in the delta, and some of the most diverse and productive agriculture in western Washington. A total of 175 measurements of suspended-sediment load, made routinely from 1974 to 1993, and sporadically from 2006 to 2009, were used to develop and evaluate regression models of sediment transport (also known as “sediment-rating curves”) for estimating suspended-sediment load as a function of river discharge. Using a flow-range model and 75 years of daily discharge record (acquired from 1941 to 2015), the mean annual suspended-sediment load for the Skagit River near Mount Vernon, Washington, was estimated to be 2.5 teragrams (Tg, where 1 Tg = 1 million metric tons). The seasonal model indicates that 74 percent of the total annual suspended‑sediment load is delivered to Puget Sound during the winter storm season (from October through March), but also indicates that discharge is a poor surrogate for suspended‑sediment concentration (SSC) during the summer low-flow season. Sediment-rating curves developed for different time periods revealed that the regression model slope of the SSC-discharge relation increased 66 percent between the periods of 1974–76 and 2006–09 when suspended-sediment samples were collected, implying that changes in sediment supply, channel hydraulics, and (or) basin hydrology occurred between the two time intervals. In the relatively wet water year 2007 (October 1, 2006, through September 30, 2007), an automated sampler was used to collect daily samples of suspended sediment from which an annual load of 4.5 Tg was calculated, dominated by a single large flood event that contributed 1.8 Tg, or 40 percent of the total. In comparison, the annual load calculated for water year 2007 using the preferred flow-range model was 4.8 Tg (+6.7 percent), in close agreement with

  10. 14 CFR 93.61 - General rules: Lake Hood segment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Area § 93.61 General rules: Lake Hood segment. (a) No person may operate an aircraft at an altitude... paragraph (a) of this section) shall operate that airplane at an altitude of at least 600 feet MSL...

  11. 14 CFR 93.61 - General rules: Lake Hood segment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Area § 93.61 General rules: Lake Hood segment. (a) No person may operate an aircraft at an altitude... paragraph (a) of this section) shall operate that airplane at an altitude of at least 600 feet MSL...

  12. 14 CFR 93.61 - General rules: Lake Hood segment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Area § 93.61 General rules: Lake Hood segment. (a) No person may operate an aircraft at an altitude... paragraph (a) of this section) shall operate that airplane at an altitude of at least 600 feet MSL...

  13. 14 CFR 93.61 - General rules: Lake Hood segment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Area § 93.61 General rules: Lake Hood segment. (a) No person may operate an aircraft at an altitude... paragraph (a) of this section) shall operate that airplane at an altitude of at least 600 feet MSL...

  14. 76 FR 26182 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Hood Canal, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). ] Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... of the Hood Canal floating drawbridge near Port Gamble, Washington to test an operational change...

  15. 77 FR 12514 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hood Canal, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may submit a request... drawbridge operating regulation for the Hood Canal floating drawbridge near Port Gamble. This...

  16. 77 FR 28767 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hood Canal, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... (77 FR 12514). We received 17 comments on the proposed ] rule. No public meeting was requested, and... regulation for the Hood Canal floating drawbridge near Port Gamble. This modification will relieve heavy...

  17. Resource Management: Futuristic Concept a Reality at Hood College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speers, Mary Louise; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Resource Management Center at Hood College (Maryland) provides home economics students with facilities to study and practice resource conservation, nutrition and preventive health maintenance, and community outreach. (SK)

  18. Hydrogeologic framework and groundwater/surface-water interactions of the upper Yakima River Basin, Kittitas County, central Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Ely, D. Matthew; Hinkle, Stephen R.; Kahle, Sue C.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogeology, hydrology, and geochemistry of groundwater and surface water in the upper (western) 860 square miles of the Yakima River Basin in Kittitas County, Washington, were studied to evaluate the groundwater-flow system, occurrence and availability of groundwater, and the extent of groundwater/surface-water interactions. The study area ranged in altitude from 7,960 feet in its headwaters in the Cascade Range to 1,730 feet at the confluence of the Yakima River with Swauk Creek. A west-to-east precipitation gradient exists in the basin with the western, high-altitude headwaters of the basin receiving more than 100 inches of precipitation per year and the eastern, low-altitude part of the basin receiving about 20 inches of precipitation per year. From the early 20th century onward, reservoirs in the upper part of the basin (for example, Keechelus, Kachess, and Cle Elum Lakes) have been managed to store snowmelt for irrigation in the greater Yakima River Basin. Canals transport water from these reservoirs for irrigation in the study area; additional water use is met through groundwater withdrawals from wells and surface-water withdrawals from streams and rivers. Estimated groundwater use for domestic, commercial, and irrigation purposes is reported for the study area. A complex assemblage of sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous bedrock underlies the study area. In a structural basin in the southeastern part of the study area, the bedrock is overlain by unconsolidated sediments of glacial and alluvial origin. Rocks and sediments were grouped into six hydrogeologic units based on their lithologic and hydraulic characteristics. A map of their extent was developed from previous geologic mapping and lithostratigraphic information from drillers’ logs. Water flows through interstitial space in unconsolidated sediments, but largely flows through fractures and other sources of secondary porosity in bedrock. Generalized groundwater-flow directions within the

  19. 250 years of historic occupation on Steel Creek, Savannah River Plant, Barnwell County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the investigation of seven historic archaeological sites on the uppper coastal plain of the South Atlantic Slope in South Carolina. These seven sites are located on the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant in the Steel Creek watershed. This project has its beginnings in 1980, when the Department of Energy initiated the reactivation of the L Reactor. At that time, the plan called for an increased thermal water discharage. In 1980, the Savannah River Plant Archaeological Research Program (SRP-ARP) conducted an intensive archaeological survey of the Steel Creek terrace edge and bottomland. In early 1984, the Department of Energy made the decision to construct a dam and create a cooling lake (L-Lake) on Steel Creek. This required a new survey. The new project initially was to be an intensive survey of the entire proposed lake area. However, construction time constraints changed the general outline of the project into a two-phased survey of the area. The first phase of the project was a survey of the dam, borrow area, discharge structure, and diversion canal. Ten sites were identified, none of which were considered eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. The second phase of the project was the intensive survey of the lake and embankment. Twenty-six sites were located in that portion of the survey, 11 of which were considered eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places.

  20. Water-quality investigations of the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah, 1980-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Water-quality studies were conducted on the Jordan River, Utah, to investigate specific problems: dissolved oxygen, toxic substances, sanitary quality, and turbidity and suspended sediment. The dissolved oxygen decreased from 8 milligrams per liter at the Jordan Narrows to less than 5 milligrams per liter at 500 North Street. Chemical oxygen demand increased about 23 percent and biochemical oxygen demand increased 90 percent. Nearly 78 percent of the water samples analyzed for total mercury exceeded the State intended-use standard of 0.05 microgram per liter. Concentrations of ammonia, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc exceeded the standards periodically. The pesticides DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, methoxychlor, and 2,4-D were occasionally detected in bottom materials. Most were present in quantities of less than 15 micrograms per kilogram. Concentrations of three indicator bacteria (total coliform, fecal coliform, and fecal streptococcus) increased in a downstream direction. Concentrations of total coliform bacteria often exceeded 5,000 colonies per 100 milliliters and concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria often exceeded 2,000 colonies per 100 milliliters. The primary sources of turbidity in the Jordan River are Utah Lake and discharges from the wastewater-treatment plants. Large values of turbidity were measured at the Jordan Narrows with a summer mean value of 88 nephelometer turbidity units (NTU) and a winter mean value of 43 NTU. (USGS)

  1. Geothermal resource analysis in the Big Wood River Valley, Blaine County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Street, L.V.

    1990-10-01

    A geochemical investigation of both thermal and nonthermal springs in the Wood River area was conducted to determine possible flowpaths, ages of the waters, and environmental implications. Seven thermal springs and five cold springs were sampled for major cations and anions along with arsenic, lithium, boron, deuterium and oxygen-18. Eight rocks, representative of outcrops at or near the thermal occurrences were sampled and analyzed for major and trace elements. The Wood River area hydrothermal springs are dilute Na-HCO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} type waters. Calculated reservoir temperatures do not exceed 100{degree}C, except for Magic Hot Springs Landing well (108{degree}C with Mg correction). The isotope data suggest that the thermal water is not derived from present-day precipitation, but from precipitation when the climate was much colder and wetter. Intrusive igneous rocks of the Idaho batholith have reacted with the hydrothermal fluids at depth. The co-location of the thermal springs and mining districts suggests that the structures acting as conduits for the present-day hydrothermal fluids were also active during the emplacement of the ore bodies.

  2. Health assessment for Green River Disposal, Inc. , Daviess County, Kentucky, Region 4. CERCLIS No. KYD980501076. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-30

    The Green River Disposal, Inc. site - located on approximately 14 acres - in Daviess County, Kentucky, has been added (Update 7) to the National Priorities List by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Landfill and drum disposal operations were conducted on the property from 1970 until the facility was closed in 1984. Domestic and industrial wastes were accepted at the site. Industrial wastes included aluminum dross saltcake, steel dust, phenolic resin, paint, ferrocyanide, and oils. On the basis of the information reviewed, ATSDR has concluded that the site may be of public health concern because of long-term exposure to contaminants off-site at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. As noted in the Human Exposure Pathways Section above, results from a single sampling suggest that human exposure to substantive levels of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (BEHP) might be occurring through potable and household uses of groundwater from a few of the private wells in the area. Human exposure to metals and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from wastes and contaminated soils and sediments might occur to on-site intruders and to remedial workers. Additional information is needed to more fully evaluate releases, migration, and resulting contaminant levels at points of potential human exposure, as well as associated potential health concerns.

  3. Preliminary correlation of geologic units in three coreholes along the Savannah River in Burke and Screven Counties, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Falls, W.F. ); Prowell, D.C. ); Edwards, L.E.; Frederiksen, N.O.; Gibson, T.G.; Bybell, L.M.; Gohn, G.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Preliminary lithologic and paleontologic correlations of geologic units in three deep coreholes along the Savannah River in Burke and Screven Counties in Georgia show four Upper Cretaceous units and five Tertiary units in a dip-oriented cross section. The basal unit of the Upper Cretaceous section consists of nonmarine sediments and is stratigraphically equivalent to the Cape Fear Formation. The next two successive units vary from nonmarine and marginal-marine sediments in up-dip areas to more marine sediments in down-dip areas. These strata are equivalent to the Middendorf Formation and the Black Creek Group. The uppermost unit of the Cretaceous sediments is present only in the down-dip cores and consists predominantly of marginal-marine sediments. This unit is probably equivalent to the Peedee Formation in South Carolina. Units in the Tertiary sediments include at least two Paleocene units, two middle Eocene units, and an upper Eocene unit. The lower unit in the Paleocene, the Ellenton Formation, consists of marginal-marine and marine clays and sands, whereas, the upper unit in the Paleocene consists of nonmarine kaolinitic clays and coarse sands and is probably equivalent to the Williamsburg Formation. The two middle Eocene units consist of marine sands, clays, and limestones and are correlative with the Congaree and Santee Formation. The upper Eocene unit, the Barnwell Group, includes marginal-marine clays and sands in up-dip areas and marine sands, clays and limestones in down-dip areas.

  4. Assessment of water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1989-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess ground-water and surface-water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District in northern Palm Beach County from 1989 to 1994. Contamination of the surficial aquifer system and availability of a potable water supply have become of increasing concern. The study consisted of sampling 11 ground-water wells and 14 surface- water sites for determination of major inorganic constituents and physical characteristics, trace metals, nitrogen and phosphorus species, and synthetic organic compounds. Sodium and chloride concentrations exceeded Florida drinking-water standards in ground water at two wells, dissolved- solids concentrations at five ground-water wells and one surface-water site, and color values at all 11 ground-water wells and all 14 surface-water sites. Other constituents also exhibited concentrations that exceeded drinking-water standards. Cadmium and zinc concentrations exceeded the standards in ground water at one well, and lead concentrations exceeded the standard in ground water at five wells. Nitrogen and phosphorus specie concentrations did not exceed respective drinking-water standards in any ground-water or surface-water samples. Several synthetic organic compounds were detected at or above 50 micrograms per liter in water samples collected from six ground-water wells and three surface-water sites.

  5. Gravity data from the San Pedro River Basin, Cochise County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Winester, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Arizona Water Science Center in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Geodetic Survey has collected relative and absolute gravity data at 321 stations in the San Pedro River Basin of southeastern Arizona since 2000. Data are of three types: observed gravity values and associated free-air, simple Bouguer, and complete Bouguer anomaly values, useful for subsurface-density modeling; high-precision relative-gravity surveys repeated over time, useful for aquifer-storage-change monitoring; and absolute-gravity values, useful as base stations for relative-gravity surveys and for monitoring gravity change over time. The data are compiled, without interpretation, in three spreadsheet files. Gravity values, GPS locations, and driving directions for absolute-gravity base stations are presented as National Geodetic Survey site descriptions.

  6. Stream quality in the San Lorenzo River Basin, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sylvester, Marc A.; Covay, Kenneth J.

    1978-01-01

    Stream quality was studied from November 1973 through June 1975 in the San Lorenzo River basin, Calif., a rapidly developing mountainous area. Dissolved-ion concentrations indicate the basin can be divided into three water-quality areas corresponding to three geologic areas. Pronounced changes in water quality occurred during storms when streamflow, turbidity, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and fecal-coliform bacteria concentrations increased, while dissolved-ion concentrations decreased owing to dilution. Total nitrogen and fecal-coliform concentrations exceeded State objectives in the Zayante and Branciforte Creek drainages probably because of domestic sewage from improperly operating septic-tank systems or the primary-treated sewage effluent discharged into a pit near Scotts Valley. Diel studies did not show appreciable dissolved-oxygen depletion in streams. Greater streamflows and residential development appear responsible for reduced diversity of benthic invertebrates downstream of the residential areas in the basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  8. Hydraulic analysis of Chenango River, Broome County, New York in relation to state highway plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunn, Bernard

    1981-01-01

    Hydraulic analyses of the 50- and 100-year floods in a 3.2 mile reach of the Chenango River in the towns of Fenton and Chenango in New York were made to determine the effects of two alternative bridge designs on flood levels. Neither design would cause more than a 0.1-foot increase in water level of the 50-year flood nor more than a 0.2-foot increase in water level of the 100-year flood above levels that would occur during these floods under present channel conditions. The discharges used in the analyses were 55,200 cubic feet per second for the 50-year flood and 63,000 cubic feet per second for the 100-year flood. Mean flow velocities and water-surface elevations at 17 cross sections are given for both bridge designs and are compared with those that would occur under present conditions. (USGS)

  9. Freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the headwaters of Chipola River, Houston County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, J.T.; McGregor, S.W.; Tarpley, T.A.; Buntin, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Big and Cowarts creeks lie in extreme southeastern Alabama and form the headwaters of Chipola River. Qualitative and quantitative sampling for freshwater mussels in these reaches during 2006 and 2007 revealed an intact fauna, relative to historical reports. A cumulative total of 17 species, including federally protected Elliptio chipolaensis (Chipola Slabshell), Lampsilis subangulata (Shinyrayed Pocketbook), Medionidus penicillatus (Gulf Moccasinshell), and Pleurobema pyriforme (Oval Pigtoe), was encountered. A total of 3382 mussels (density 5.84 per m2) was estimated for one 65-m reach of Big Creek and 9627 mussels (density 8.09 per m2) were estimated to occur in one 170-m reach of Cowarts Creek. Tributaries had depauperate faunas, apparently due to substrate instability.

  10. Climatic variability and flood frequency of the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Robert H.; Betancourt, Julio L.

    1992-01-01

    Past estimates of the 100-year flood for the Santa Cruz River at Tucson, Arizona, range from 572 to 2,780 cubic meters per second. An apparent increase in flood magnitude during the past two decades raises concern that the annual flood series is nonstationary in time. The apparent increase is accompanied by more annual floods occurring in fall and winter and fewer in summer. This greater mixture of storm types that produce annual flood peaks is caused by a higher frequency of meridional flow in the upper-air circulation and increased variance of ocean-atmosphere conditions in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Estimation of flood frequency on the Santa Cruz River is complicated because climate affects the magnitude and frequency of storms that cause floods. Mean discharge does not change significantly, but the variance and skew coefficient of the distribution of annual floods change with time. The 100-year flood during El Niffo-Southern Oscillation conditions is 1,300 cubic meters per second, more than double the value for other years. The increase is mostly caused by an increase in recurvature of dissipating tropical cyclones into the Southwestern United States during El Niffo-Southern Oscillation conditions. Flood frequency based on hydroclimatology was determined by combining populations of floods caused by monsoonal storms, frontal systems, and dissipating tropical cyclones. For 1930-59, annual flood frequency is dominated by monsoonal floods, and the estimated 100-year flood is 323 cubic meters per second. For 1960-86, annual flood frequency at recurrence intervals of greater than 10 years is dominated by floods caused by dissipating tropical cyclones, and the estimated 100-year flood is 1,660 cubic meters per second. For design purposes, 1,660 cubic meters per second might be an appropriate value for the 100-year flood at Tucson, assuming that climatic conditions during 1960-86 are representative of conditions expected in the immediate future.

  11. Morphology and sedimentology of a central Brazos River point bar, Boxley Bend, Brazos County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, W.M.; Mazzullo, J.

    1986-09-01

    A reconnaissance of Brazos River point bars reveals great variety in their morphology and sedimentology, owing to the complex interaction of climate, local hydrography, and local sediment sources. This paper presents the first in a series of studies of point bars of the Brazos River and concentrates on the Boxley Bend point bar near Snook, Texas. The summer morphology of the point bar is complex, consisting of an upper and lower tier separated by a scarp but connected by a central ramp. The surfaces of the lower tier and ramp display numerous large gravel bars and shallow scour pools as well as low-amplitude sand waves, ripples, and current lineations. In cross section, the lower tier and ramp are characterized by (1) trough cross-bedded, medium to fine sand produced by megaripple migration during floods; (2) massive gravel beds, the product of formation and migration of gravel bars during floods; and (3) fine rippled sand and clay drapes formed during falling flood. The surface of the upper tier displays ripple-laminated eolian sand and deflation deposits of mud clasts. In cross section, the upper tier is characterized by thick beds of horizontally stratified fine sand. During the winter, the entire surface of the point bar is covered by large (2 m high) transverse bars separated by deep scour troughs. Transverse bars migrate into the troughs to produce a sequence of fine sand with backflow ripple cross-stratification overlain by thick beds of tabular cross-bedded medium sand. The transverse bars appear to be transitory features with little net effect on sedimentation, because they are removed from the surface of the point bar by summertime.

  12. Geomorphic Characterization of the Middle Fork Saline River: Garland, Perry, and Saline Counties, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pugh, Aaron L.; Garday, Thomas J.; Redman, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    This report was prepared to help address concerns raised by local residents, State, and Federal agencies about the current geomorphic conditions of the Middle Fork Saline River. Over the past 30 years the Middle Fork Saline River Basin has experienced a marked increase in urbanization. The report summarizes the Middle Fork?s current (2003) channel characteristics at nine stream reaches in the upper 91 square miles of the basin. Assessments at each study reach included comparing measured stream geometry dimensions (cross-sectional area, top width, and mean depth) at bankfull stage to regional hydraulic geometry curves for the Ouachita Mountains Physiographic Province of Arkansas and Oklahoma, evaluations of streambed materials and sinuosity, and classification of individual stream reach types. When compared to the Ouachita Mountains? regional hydraulic geometry curves for natural, stable, stream reaches, five of the nine study reaches had slightly smaller crosssectional areas, longer top widths, and shallower depths. Streambed material analysis indicates that the Middle Fork is a bedrock influenced, gravel dominated stream with lesser amounts of sand and cobbles. Slight increases in sinuosity from 1992 to 2002 at seven of the nine study reaches indicate a slight decrease in stream channel slope. Analyses of the Middle Fork?s hydraulic geometry and sinuosity indicate that the Middle Fork is currently overly wide and shallow, but is slowly adjusting towards a deeper, narrower hydraulic geometry. Using the Rosgen system of channel classification, the two upstream study reaches classified as B4c/1 stream types; which were moderately entrenched, riffle dominated channels, with infrequently spaced pools. The downstream seven study reaches classified as C4/1 stream types; which were slightly entrenched, meandering, gravel-dominated, riffle/ pool channels with well developed flood plains. Analyses of stream reach types suggest that the downstream reaches of the Middle Fork

  13. Determination of mass balance and entrainment in the stratified Duwamish River Estuary, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoner, J.D.

    1972-01-01

    During a study of the effects of waste-water input on the stratified Duwamish River estuary, intensive water-velocity and salinity measurements were made in both the lower salt wedge and the upper fresher water layer for tidal-cycle periods. The net movement of water and salt mass past a cross section during a tidal cycle was determined from integration of the measured rates of movement of water and salt past the section. The net volume of water that moved downstream past the section during the cycle agreed with the volume of fresh-water inflow at the head of the estuary within (1) 3.8 and 7.2 percent, respectively, for two studies made during periods of maximum and minimum tidal-prism thickness and identical inflow rates .of 312 cfs (cubic feet per second), and (2) 15 percent for one study made during a period of average tidal-prism thickness and an inflow rate of 1,280 cfs. For the three studies, the difference between salt mass transported upstream and downstream during the cycles ranged from 0.8 to 19 percent of the respective mean salt-mass transport. Water was entrained from the .salt-water wedge into the overlying layer of mixed fresh and salt water at tidal-cycle-average rates of 30 and 69 cfs per million square feet of interface for the inflow rates of 312 cfs, and 99 cfs per million square feet of interface for an inflow rate of 1,280 cfs. At a constant inflow rate, the rate of entrainment of salt-wedge water in the Duwamish River estuary more than doubled for a doubling of tidal-prism thickness. It also doubled for a quadrupling of inflow rate at about constant tidal-prism thickness.

  14. Metal contamination and post-remediation recovery in the Boulder River watershed, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unruh, D.M.; Church, S.E.; Nimick, D.A.; Fey, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    The legacy of acid mine drainage and toxic trace metals left in streams by historical mining is being addressed by many important yet costly remediation efforts. Monitoring of environmental conditions frequently is not performed but is essential to evaluate remediation effectiveness, determine whether clean-up goals have been met, and assess which remediation strategies are most effective. Extensive pre- and post-remediation data for water and sediment quality for the Boulder River watershed in southwestern Montana provide an unusual opportunity to demonstrate the importance of monitoring. The most extensive restoration in the watershed occurred at the Comet mine on High Ore Creek and resulted in the most dramatic improvement in aquatic habitat. Removal of contaminated sediment and tailings, and stream-channel reconstruction reduced Cd and Zn concentrations in water such that fish are now present, and reduced metal concentrations in streambed sediment by a factor of c. 10, the largest improvement in the district. Waste removals at the Buckeye/Enterprise and Bullion mine sites produced limited or no improvement in water and sediment quality, and acidic drainage from mine adits continues to degrade stream aquatic habitat. Recontouring of hillslopes that had funnelled runoff into the workings of the Crystal mine substantially reduced metal concentrations in Uncle Sam Gulch, but did not eliminate all of the acidic adit drainage. Lead isotopic evidence suggests that the Crystal mine rather than the Comet mine is now the largest source of metals in streambed sediment of the Boulder River. The completed removal actions prevent additional contaminants from entering the stream, but it may take many years for erosional processes to diminish the effects of contaminated sediment already in streams. Although significant strides have been made, additional efforts to seal draining adits or treat the adit effluent at the Bullion and Crystal mines would need to be completed to

  15. [Spatiotemporal variation of eco-environmental frangibility based on remote sensing and catastrophe theory: a case study of Kenli County in Yellow River Delta, China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-yan; Zhao, Geng-xing; Jiang, Shu-qian; Wang, Ai-ling; Wang, Jing

    2008-08-01

    Based on remote sensing and the nonlinear theories of entropy and catastrophe, the spatiotemporal variation of eco-environmental frangibility in Kenli County of Yellow River Delta was analyzed through the installation of sampling plots. The methods of analyzing and estimating eco-environmental frangibility were also established. The results indicated that in 1987-2005, the environment of Kenli County tended to deteriorating, and two catastrophes of environmental frangibility occurred, one in 1997, and the other in 2004. The former catastrophe was mainly caused by storm tide and the water shortage from Yellow River, with the main appearance characteristics being habitat change and dominant species substitution, while the latter one was mainly from the water shortage from Yellow River, increase of evaporation-precipitation ratio, a great deal construction of reservoir, and increases of traffic road and population density, with the main appearances of the changes in vegetation type and coverage ratio. The analysis on the spatial variations of the environmental frangibility along the directions of different distances to the Yellow River and to the ocean testified the spatial gradual change pattern of the frangibility. This research was a new attempt, and provided an effective way for the quantitative measurement of environmental frangibility.

  16. Hydrologic and Geomorphologic Assessment of Debris Flow Events for Mount Hood Highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, A.

    2003-04-01

    A hydrologic and geomorphologic assessment was performed for past debris flows events for Mount Hood Highway. This highway is located on the eastern and southern flank of the Mount Hood, a dormant volcano that is part of Cascade Range in Oregon State in western United States. There are at least twelve glaciers or named snowfields located on Mount Hood containing approximately 0.35 cubic kilometers of ice. Various streams crossing this highway have glacial origin and the glacial-melt provides majority of discharge. The highway crossings, bridges or culverts, on these streams have routinely suffered severe damage due to debris flows. This paper presents assessment for two stream drainages, White River and Pollalie Creek. The primary objective of this assessment was to select a design alternative with least total life cycle cost. A range of alternatives, including relocation of the highway, were considered. Glacial outbursts and associated lahar events on Mount Hood can generate peak discharges that are one to two orders of magnitude larger than seasonal peak flow discharge. Additionally, debris flows associated with these events have the potential to permanently alter the channel morphologies of streams that emanate from the upper reaches of the mountain. A number of triggering mechanisms, including glacial, geothermal, and meteorological, have been suggested as the cause of these events; however, a strong correlation between cause and effect has not been identified. Major streams such as White River, Newton Creek, and Clark Creek, whose headwaters are located at glacier termini, can become laden with debris flow material and inflict severe damage to highway structures located downstream. These structures are typically designed to pass a specific calculated peak discharge for rain-on-snow events and are not hardened or sized to withstand the forces of these extreme debris flows. During this assessment it was evident that conventional hydrologic methods, regression

  17. Geologic map of the Hood River Quadrangle, Washington and Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Korosec, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The report is comprised of a 1:100,000 scale geologic map and accompanying text. The text consists of unit descriptions, a table of age dates, a table of major element geochemistry, correlation diagram, and a source of mapping diagram. (ACR)

  18. Ground-water data of selected test holes and wells along the Arkansas River in LeFlore and Haskell Counties, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, H.H.; Hart, D.L.; Knott, R.K.

    1965-01-01

    The data in this report were collected during the period 1958-64 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers, as part of a comprehensive study of the ground-water resources of the alluvium along the Arkansas and Verdigris Rivers between Moffett and Catoosa, Oklahoma (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to make the hydrologic data obtained during the study of ground water in the alluvium along the Arkansas River in Le Flore and Haskell Counties readily available to the public. The data in this report should be useful in predicting geologic and hydrologic conditions when drilling new wells. Table 1 gives information on the sizes, depths, yields, and other characteristics of wells in the area. The table also provides a key to the additional information for each well site given in tables 2 through 6. Table 2 gives logs for the materials penetrated at test holes and wells in the report area; table 3 gives depths to water measured in wells; table 4 includes chemical analyses of water from wells; table 5 gives laboratory determinations of particle-size distribution of earth samples collected from test holes and wells; and table 6 gives coefficients of permeability and other hydrologic properties of earth samples from the selected test holes. Similar data for Sequoyah County, Muskogee County, and Wagoner-Rogers Counties are available in other open-file reports. An interpretive report, 'Hydrology of the alluvium of the Arkansas River, Muskogee, Oklahoma, to Fort Smith, Arkansas,' by Harry H. Tanaka and Jerrald R. Hollowell will be published as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1809-T.

  19. Computer simulation in the design of local exhaust hoods for shielded metal arc welding.

    PubMed

    Tum Suden, K D; Flynn, M R; Goodman, R

    1990-03-01

    Computer simulations were used to examine competing exhaust hood configurations for shielded metal arc welding. The welder's breathing zone concentration appears to be an inverse linear function of the computer-predicted hood capture efficiency. Hood aspect ratio, hood flow, and the welder's position relative to the hood all have a significant effect on the breathing zone concentration. The height of the hood above the welding surface showed no significant effect in reducing breathing zone concentration. Further examination of breathing zone concentration as a function of capture efficiency is needed before reliable design methods can be developed using this parameter.

  20. Geohydrology and saline ground-water discharge to the South Fork Ninnescah River in Pratt and Kingman Counties, south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillespie, Joe B.; Hargadine, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    Saline ground water discharges to the South Fork Ninnescah River in Pratt and Kingman Counties from the adjacent alluvial aquifer. Electromagnetic terrain surveys in this area indicated that the saline ground water is entering the river in intermittent reaches along the channel. The chloride concentration in the river near Murdock exceeds 250 milligrams per liter 75 percent of the time. During base flow in November 1988, stream discharge increased 67 cubic feet per second, and the chloride concentration increased 360 milligrams per liter from Pratt to the Pratt-Kingman County line. The chloride load to the river along this reach was 82 tons per day. The source of saline water probably is dissolution of salt in the Permian rocks, about 600 feet below land surface. Subsequent subsidence and collapse of Permian rocks into salt-dissolution cavities probably has caused fracturing in overlying Permian rocks. Brine moves upward through the Permian rocks and discharges into the alluvial aquifer. The brine discharge to the alluvium is about 0.7 cubic foot per second. In the area of major saline-water discharge to the river, the fluid-potential levels in the Permian rocks are higher than fluid-potential levels in the alluvial aquifer. Several methods for reducing the saline ground-water discharge to the South Fork Ninnescah River have been considered. The most effective of these methods appears to be interception of brine flow in the Permian rocks by pumping of relief wells. Brine could be disposed by injection into deeper formations, by storage in evaporation reservoirs, or by desalinization.

  1. A detailed chronology of the most recent eruption period at Mount Hood, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, Kenneth A.; Pringle, P. T.

    1987-01-01

    The most recent eruptive period of Mount Hood volcano, the Old Maid eruptive period, was characterized by volcano-hydrologic events (hydrologic events initiated by volcanic activity) which resulted in extensive lahar inundation in the White, Sandy, and Zigzag River drainages and produced a lithic pyroclastic flow which traveled at least 9 km down the White River from the vent area at Crater Rock. Interpretations of downstream textural changes in deposits indicate that one lahar reached as far as Tygh Valley (65 km from the vent) before transforming into a lahar runout (hyperconcentrated flow). The runout inundated Tygh Valley and flowed into the Deschutes River, 75 km (flow path) from the volcano. A single lahar traveled more than 30 km down the Sandy River before transforming to a runout. Correlative sands and gravels are found as far as the apex of the Sandy River delta, more than 80 km from the volcano; these suggest that the flow underwent minimal attenuation of stage height throughout the length of Sandy River. Approximate dates ranging from 1760 A.D. to 1810 A.D. for various Old Maid-age events are inferred from dendrochronologic studies of old growth trees. There have been no apparent major topographic changes in the vent area since the end of Old Maid-age activity, enabling the events of the Old Maid eruptive period to be used as a model for future eruptive activity.

  2. 48. EXCAVATING AND DRIVING PILES FOR SHOOFLY BRIDGE, YOLO COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. EXCAVATING AND DRIVING PILES FOR SHOOFLY BRIDGE, YOLO COUNTY SIDE OF RIVER, November 7, 1934 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  3. Mineral resource potential map of the James River Face Wilderness, Bedford and Rockbridge counties, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C. Erwin; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1982-01-01

    The rocks in the James River Face Wilderness are shales and quartzites that overlie a meta-igneous basement. They are folded into a large southwestward-plunging anticline that is cut off on the east and south by an extensive thrust fault that brings old basement rocks over the younger sedimentary rocks. Geochemical studies of stream sediments, soils, and rocks do not reveal any unusually high metal concentrations, but a large resource of metallurgical-grade quartzite and shale suitable for structural clay products and lightweight aggregate is in the wilderness. Antietam (Erwin) Quartzite has been quarried at three sites in the wilderness as raw material for silicon used in the manufacture of ferrosilicon. Other uses included crushed rock for concrete aggregate, road metal, and railroad ballast, and sand for cement and mortar. Potential uses include ganister for silica brick and specialty sands such as filter and furnace sand. Firing tests on samples of shale from the Harpers (Hampton) Formation show that it could be used for the manufacture of brick and as lightweight aggregate. Of marginal economic interest are heavy-mineral layers in the basal Unicoi (Weverton) Formation.

  4. Stream-aquifer interactions in the Straight River area, Becker and Hubbard counties, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stark, J.R.; Armstrong, David S.; Zwilling, Daniel R.

    1994-01-01

    Daily fluctuations of stream temperature are as great as 15 degrees Celsius during the summer, primarily in response to changes in air temperature. Ground-water discharge to the Straight River decreases stream temperature during the summer. Results of simulations from a stream-temperature model indicate that daily changes in stream temperature are strongly influenced by solar radiation, wind speed, stream depth, and ground-water inflow. Results of simulations from ground-water-flow and stream-temperature models developed for the investigation indicate a significant decrease in ground-water flow could result from ground-water withdrawal at rates similar to those measured during 1988. This reduction in discharge to the stream could result in an increase in stream temperature of 0.5 to 1.5 degrees Celsius. Nitrate concentrations in shallow wells screened at the water table, in some areas, are locally greater than the limit set by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. Nitrate concentrations in water from deeper wells and in the stream are low, generally less than 1.0 milligram per liter.

  5. Study of flow patterns in fume hood enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    A three-dimensional model for flow inside a fume hood enclosure was developed and numerical computations were carried out to explore the flow pattern and possible path of contaminant transport under different operating conditions of the hood. Equations for the conservation of mass and momentum were solved for different flow rate and opening conditions in the hood. The face velocity was maintained constant at its rated value of 0.4 m/s. The flow was assumed to enter through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leave the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The {kappa}-{var_epsilon} model was used for the prediction of turbulence. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow patterns around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. In addition, the effect of a person standing in front of the hood on the flow pattern was investigated. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its trailing surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. The computed flow patterns will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air from inside the room.

  6. Magnetotelluric investigations at Mount Hood, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Mozley, E.C.; Goldstein, N.E.; Morrison, H.F.

    1986-10-01

    Magnetotelluric data, with both electric and magnetic field references for noise cancellation, were collected at accessible locations around and as close as possible to the Mount Hood andesite-dacite volcano. The purpose of the study was to identify and map conductive features and to relate them to the thermal regime of the region. Several conductors could be discerned. The shallowest, at a depth of around 500 m below the surface, was identified as a flow of heated water moving away from the summit: the deepest (--50 km) might be a melt zone in the upper mantle. Of particular interest is an elongate conductor that strikes N 10/sup 0/ W and extends from a depth of 12 km down to 22 km. Because the conductor strike is close to the trend of the chain of Cascade volcanoes and because of the high conductive thermal gradients reported for the area, this feature was initially believed to be a zone of partial melt following the volcanic axis. However, because no teleseismic P wave velocity anomaly has been found, the cause of the conductor is more problematic. While the existence of small zones of melt cannot be ruled out, it is possible that the conductor is caused by a large volume of intensely deformed rocks with brine-filled microfractures.

  7. Suspended sediment and bedload in the First Broad River Basin in Cleveland County, North Carolina, 2008-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hazell, William F.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to characterize sediment transport upstream and downstream from a proposed dam on the First Broad River near the town of Lawndale in Cleveland County, North Carolina. Streamflow was measured continuously, and 381 suspended-sediment samples were collected between late March 2008 and September 2009 at two monitoring stations on the First Broad River to determine the suspended-sediment load at each site for the period April 2008-September 2009. In addition, 22 bedload samples were collected at the two sites to describe the relative contribution of bedload to total sediment load during selected events. Instantaneous streamflow, suspended-sediment, and bedload samples were collected at Knob Creek near Lawndale, North Carolina, to describe general suspended-sediment and bedload characteristics at this tributary to the First Broad River. Suspended- and bedload-sediment samples were collected at all three sites during a variety of flow conditions. Streamflow and suspended-sediment measurements were compared with historical data from a long-term (1959-2009) streamflow station located upstream from Lawndale. The mean streamflow at the long-term streamflow station was approximately 60 percent less during the study period than the long-term annual mean streamflow for the site. Suspended-sediment concentrations and continuous records of streamflow were used to estimate suspended-sediment loads and yields at the two monitoring stations on the First Broad River for the period April 2008-September 2009 and for a complete annual cycle (October 2008-September 2009), also known as a water year. Total suspended-sediment loads during water year 2009 were 18,700 and 36,500 tons at the two sites. High-flow events accounted for a large percentage of the total load, suggesting that the bulk of the total suspended-sediment load was transported during these events. Suspended-sediment yields during water year 2009 were 145 and 192 tons per square mile at the two

  8. Evolution of regional stresses based on faulting and folding near the Pit River, Shasta County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, L. J.; Weldon, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of the regional stress state near the Pit River, northeastern California, by analyzing faults and folds preserved in and adjacent to a diatomite mine north of the Pit River near Burney. By measuring the orientation of 250 faults and 140 kinematic indicators on fault planes, we have determined principal stress directions preserved during the past million years. We observe the best exposures of faults in the diatomite mine, a paleolake deposit with an age tightly constrained by 1045 ka volcanic rocks below and the 973 ka Pole Creek basalt above (Muffler et al, 2012). To ensure a regionally representative analysis, we also include faults from the surrounding area, which are sparse but show consistent results. If we analyze all of the high angle faults as a single heterogeneous set, we find a stress state that would produce right-lateral strike-slip faulting on a moderately dipping southeast-striking fault plane. When we break the faults into groups based on orientation and include very low angle faults, we see an evolution of the stress state through time. The maximum principal stress directions (sigma 1) for the groups cluster along a north-south axis, and the lesser principal stresses (sigma 2 and sigma 3) are distributed along an east-west axis. Because moderately-dipping faults have strikes subparallel to regional normal faults and have kinematic indicators that are both down dip and parallel to strike, we infer that normal faulting occurred first and that some normal faults have been reactivated as strike slip faults. Because low angle faults form a distinct conjugate set and cut or deform high angle faults, we infer that they are the youngest. Low angle faults cluster into two groups that dip shallowly to the northwest and southwest. Analysis of the two groups as a conjugate set is consistent with individual analysis of each, and the slip vectors for the two groups cluster around the intersection with the sigma 1-3 plane. This would

  9. Geology and metallization of the White River Area, King and Pierce Counties, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    McCulla, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    Bedrock of the White River area is dominated by Miocene age volcanics of andesite to rhyolite composition, which may be in part coeval with plutonic phases of the nearby 26 - 14 m.y. Tatoosh batholith. These volcanic rocks host two spatially distinct and gold-bearing epithermal deposits of the acid-sulfate type that are structurally, temporally, and genetically related to the formation and resurgent magmatic activity at the margin of an early Miocene caldera (22.6 - 19.1 m.y.). The age of hydrothermal activity is 20.4 +/- 0.1 m.y. based on UAr/TZAr analysis of hypogene alunite from the mineralized zone. Hydrothermal alteration and metallization of both deposits is chemically and mineralogically similar and consists of a central core of pervasive silicification that grades outward into zones of advanced argillic, argillic, and propylitic alteration. The largest of the two target areas is defined by a silica capping. Sulfur isotope analyses of cogenetic alunite-pyrite-enargite demonstrate a (34)S of +28.8 per thousand for the alunite-pyrite mineral pair. This large fractionation corroborates other field and mineralogic evidence for the hypogene origin of the alunite, and provides a geologically reasonable isotopic temperature estimate of 190 C for this epithermal deposit. Fold was introduced in at least 3 distinct episodes of structural-hydrothermal activity. The highest concentration of gold is within a zone measuring 1600 by 300-600 feet, and is localized in parts of the similar capping that contain outcrops of matrix-supported explosion breccias and veins having anomalous concentrations of up to 480 ppb Au, 13.7 ppm Ag, 1900 ppm As, 213 ppm Sb, 7.5 ppm Hg, and 10 ppm Mo.

  10. Hydrology of the Little Androscoggin River Valley aquifer, Oxford County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrissey, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Little Androscoggin River valley aquifer, a 15-square-mile sand and gravel valley-fill aquifer in southwestern Maine, is the source of water for the towns of Norway, Oxford, and South Paris. Estimated inflows to the aquifer during the 1981 water year were 16.4 cubic feet per second from precipitation directly on the aquifer, 11.2 cubic feet per second from till covered uplands adjacent to the aquifer, and 1.4 cubic feet per second from surface-water leakage. Outflows from the aquifer were 26.7 cubic feet per second to surface water and 2.3 cubic feet per second to wells. A finite-difference ground-water flow model was used to simulate conditions observed in the aquifer during 1981. Model conditions observed in the aquifer during 1981. Model simulations indicate that a 50 percent reduction of average 1981 recharge to the aquifer would cause water level declines of up to 20 feet in some areas. Model simulations of increased pumping at a high yield well in the northern part of the aquifer indicate that resulting changes in the water table will not be sufficient to intercept groundwater contaminated by a sludge disposal site. Water in the aquifer is low in dissolved solids (average for 38 samples was 67 mg/L), slightly acidic and soft. Ground-water contamination has occurred near a sludge-disposal site and in the vicinity of a sanitary landfill. Dissolved solids in ground water near the sludge disposal site were as much as ten times greater than average background values for the aquifer. (USGS)

  11. Stream-Sediment Geochemistry in Mining-Impacted Drainages of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River, Custer County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frost, Thomas P.; Box, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    This reconnaissance study was undertaken at the request of the USDA Forest Service, Region 4, to assess the geochemistry, in particular the mercury and selenium contents, of mining-impacted sediments in the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River in Custer County Idaho. The Yankee Fork has been the site of hard-rock and placer mining, primarily for gold and silver, starting in the 1880s. Major dredge placer mining from the 1930s to 1950s in the Yankee Fork disturbed about a 10-kilometer reach. Mercury was commonly used in early hard-rock mining and placer operations for amalgamation and recovery of gold. During the late 1970s, feasibility studies were done on cyanide-heap leach recovery of gold from low-grade ores of the Sunbeam and related deposits. In the mid-1990s a major open-pit bulk-vat leach operation was started at the Grouse Creek Mine. This operation shut down when gold values proved to be lower than expected. Mercury in stream sediments in the Yankee Fork ranges from below 0.02 ppm to 7 ppm, with the highest values associated with old mill locations and lode and placer mines. Selenium ranges from below the detection limit for this study of 0.2 ppm to 4 ppm in Yankee Fork sediment samples. The generally elevated selenium content in the sediment samples reflect the generally high selenium contents in the volcanic rocks that underlie the Yankee Fork and the presence of gold and silver selenides in some of the veins that were exploited in the early phases of mining.

  12. Evaluation of tracer tests completed in 1999 and 2000 on the upper Santa Clara River, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Marisa H.; Mendez, Gregory O.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Reichard, Eric G.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of surface water and hyporheic water along the Santa Clara River in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California, was evaluated by conducting tracer tests and analyzing water-quality data under different flow conditions in October 1999 and May 2000. Tracer and water-quality samples were collected at multiple river and hyporheic sites as well as at the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts Saugus and Valencia Water Reclamation Plants. These water reclamation plants provide the main source of base flow in the river. Rhodamine WT dye was injected into the river to determine river traveltimes and to indicate when Lagrangian water-quality sampling could be performed at each site. Sodium bromide was injected into the river at a constant rate at the water reclamation plants to evaluate the surface-water and shallow ground-water interactions in the hyporheic zone. In the upper reach of the study area, which extends 2.9 river miles downstream from the Saugus Water Reclamation Plant, traveltime was 3.2 hours during May 2000. In the lower reach, which extends 14.1 river miles downstream from the Valencia Water Reclamation Plant, traveltime was 9.6 hours during October 1999 and 7.1 hours during May 2000. The sodium bromide tracer was detected at both hyporheic locations sampled during October 1999, and at two of the three hyporheic locations sampled during May 2000. On the basis of Rhodamine dye tests, flow curves were constructed from the discharge measurements in the Valencia reach. Flow-curve results indicate net gains in flow throughout most, but not all, of the upper parts of the reach and net losses in flow at the lower part of the reach. Lagrangian water-quality sampling provides information on the changes in chemistry as the water flows downstream from the water reclamation plants. Along both reaches there is an increase in sulfate (40-60 mg/L in the Saugus reach and 160 mg/L in the Valencia reach) and a decrease in chloride (about 45 mg/L in the

  13. Focused Weathering Control of Convex Waterfalls Along the Niobrara River in Cherry and Brown Counties, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, L. J.; Pederson, D. T.; Goble, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    More than 200 waterfalls exist along the southern spring branch tributaries that feed an approximately twenty-five mile section of the Niobrara River, east of Valentine, Nebraska. Many of these waterfalls posses a convex shape in the horizontal plane and are buttressed. This morphology is controlled by focused, season-specific weathering along the escarpments adjacent to the waterfall face and a lack of stream erosion on the actual waterfall face. The waterfalls are composed of the Rosebud Formation, a poorly indurated siltstone that should be easily eroded by stream flow. The spring creeks are ineffective at significantly eroding the waterfall face mainly due to their relatively low discharge, three to five cubic feet per second, and low sediment load. The erosive power of the streams is further reduced at the site of the waterfall by the buttressed shape spreading the flow into a thin sheet. The buttressed shape of the waterfall develops in response to stress relief. The only areas of the waterfall face showing stream erosion and lack of diatom cover is where free falling water is impacting the waterfall face. Large, loose talus slopes at the base of the waterfall escarpments further support that the weathering processes operate at a faster rate than stream erosion. Observable groundwater seepage from the escarpments on either side of the waterfalls exposes the faces to season-specific weathering processes. The moisture content of the escarpments varies with exposure to sunlight and changes in air temperature. Cyclic differential expansion and contraction of clays and minerals as well as precipitation and hydration of salts operate on a daily and seasonal basis. These repeated stresses give the escarpments a flaky, shingle like appearance and can cause rapid deterioration of the escarpment. During the winter, the seeping groundwater and waterfall spray form large ice flows on either side of the waterfall face. Freeze-thaw processes operate on a seasonal and

  14. Analysis of heat transfer and contaminant transport in fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the analysis of three-dimensional flow patterns and the associated heat and mass transfer mechanisms in a fume hood enclosure. The flow enters the hood through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leaves the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow pattern around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its training surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. Both temperature and concentration were found to be maximum near the source and gradually decreased as the heated air or gaseous contaminant entrained with incoming air. The local concentration decreased with increase in sash opening area. The results will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air inside the room.

  15. Exploration and production results, Morgan County, eastern Tennessee: subsurface fracturing, oil production, and proposed extension of Clear Creek-Emory River fault

    SciTech Connect

    Egloff, J.

    1986-05-01

    West of the Ridge and Valley province of the southern Appalachians, in eastern Kentucky and Tennessee, the uplifted, less disturbed Paleozoic carbonates are capped by Pennsylvanian sandstones of the Cumberland Plateau. Great faults and escarpments outline overthrust allochthonous and reentrant autochthonous blocks, and the reentrant blocks presently produces oil and gas. Morgan County, Tennessee, an exploration frontier, occupies much of the reentrant block. The Appalachian orogene changes its trend near Morgan County and the adjoining Oak Ridge-Knoxville area, which is centered on the reentrant block. The Jacksboro fault, striking N30/sup 0/W on the south side of the Pine Mountain Overthrust block (northeast Tennessee and Kentucky), is the northern boundary of the autochthonous block and is the analog to the Emory River fault, striking N55/sup 0/W on the southern side of the same block. Where they erode a gorge in the fault trend, the Emory and Obed Rivers and the lower course of Clear Creek mark the distinctive northeastern limit of the Cumberland Overthrust. Early maps and the east-central geologic map of Tennessee indicate the trace of the Cumberland Overthrust extends from the Emory River (and Obed River) gorge generally marking the cross fault, to the Hatfield Mountain faults trending east-west along the outcrop of the thrust fault. Subsurface tests and varied results in oil and gas production indicate the Emory River fault extends northwest along Clear Creek, where its gorge extends approximately N45/sup 0/W, and fracturing trends northwest across the Clear Creek and Douglas Branch oil and gas fields. Another study proposed that Clear Creek follows part of the Cumberland Overthrust faulted boundary.

  16. Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the Duwamish River Estuary, King County, Washington, 1963-67

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Santos, John F.; Stoner, J.D.

    1972-01-01

    This report describes the significant results to 1967 of a comprehensive study that began in 1963 to evaluate what changes take place in an estuary as the loads .of raw and partially treated industrial and municipal wastes are replaced by effluent from a secondary treatment plant. The study area is the Duwamish River estuary, about 18.3 river kilometers long. At mean sea level the estuary has a water-surface area of about 1 square mile and a mean width of 440 feet. At the lowest and highest recorded tides, the volume of the estuary is about 205 and 592 million cubic feet, respectively. The estuary is well stratified (salt-wedge type) at fresh-water inflows greater than 1,000 cfs (cubic feet per second), but when inflow rates are less than 1,000 cfs the lower 5.6 kilometers of the estuary grades into the partly mixed type. The crosschannel salinity distribution is uniform for a given location and depth. Salinity migration is controlled by tides and fresh-water inflow. At fresh-water inflow rates greater than 1,000 cfs, water in the upper 8.4 kilometers of the estuary is always fresh regardless of tide. At inflow rates less than 600 cfs and tide heights greater than 10 feet; some salinity has been detected 16.1 kilometers above the mouth of the estuary. Studies using a fluorescent dye show that virtually no downward mixing into the salt wedge occurs; soluble pollutants introduced at the upper end of the estuary stay in the surface layer (5-15 ft thick). On the basis of dye studies when fresh-water inflow is less than 400 cfs, it is estimated that less than 10 percent of a pollutant will remain in the estuary a minimum of 7 days. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients for the surface layer have been determined to be on the order of 100-400 square feet per second. Four water-quality stations automatically monitor DO (dissolved oxygen), water temperature, pH, and specific conductance; at one station solar radiation also is measured. DO concentration in the surface layer

  17. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL 710 above each grill, broiler, and deep fat fryer. (b) Each grease extraction hood must be equipped with...

  18. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL 710 above each grill, broiler, and deep fat fryer. (b) Each grease extraction hood must be equipped with...

  19. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL 710 above each grill, broiler, and deep fat fryer. (b) Each grease extraction hood must be equipped with...

  20. Development of flood-inundation maps for the West Branch Susquehanna River near the Borough of Jersey Shore, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roland, Mark A.; Hoffman, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Streamflow data, water-surface-elevation profiles derived from a Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System hydraulic model, and geographical information system digital elevation models were used to develop a set of 18 flood-inundation maps for an approximately 5-mile reach of the West Branch Susquehanna River near the Borough of Jersey Shore, Pa. The inundation maps were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Susquehanna River Basin Commission and Lycoming County as part of an ongoing effort by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service to focus on continued improvements to the flood forecasting and warning abilities in the Susquehanna River Basin and to modernize flood-forecasting methodologies. The maps, ranging from 23.0 to 40.0 feet in 1-foot increments, correspond to river stage at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage 01549760 at Jersey Shore. The electronic files used to develop the maps were provided to the National Weather Service for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service website. The maps are displayed on this website, which serves as a web-based floodwarning system, and can be used to identify areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. During times of flooding or predicted flooding, these maps can be used by emergency managers and the public to take proactive steps to protect life and reduce property damage caused by floods.

  1. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-69-87-4781 crossing Wabash River in Huntington County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-69-87-4781 on Interstate 69 crossing Wabash River in Huntington County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Markle in the eastern part of Huntington County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 13.1 feet for the modeled discharge of 10,600 cubic feet per second and approximately 14.6 feet for the modeled discharge of 17,000 cubic feet per second.

  2. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-69-76-4775 crossing Salamonie River in Huntington County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-69-76-4775 on Interstate 69 crossing Salamonie River in Huntington County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Warren in the southeastern part of Huntington County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 13.7 feet for the modeled discharge of 15,800 cubic feet per second and approximately 20.9 feet for the modeled discharge of 26,900 cubic feet per second.

  3. The phylogeny of Little Red Riding Hood.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Jamshid J

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have long been fascinated by the strong continuities evident in the oral traditions associated with different cultures. According to the 'historic-geographic' school, it is possible to classify similar tales into "international types" and trace them back to their original archetypes. However, critics argue that folktale traditions are fundamentally fluid, and that most international types are artificial constructs. Here, these issues are addressed using phylogenetic methods that were originally developed to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among biological species, and which have been recently applied to a range of cultural phenomena. The study focuses on one of the most debated international types in the literature: ATU 333, 'Little Red Riding Hood'. A number of variants of ATU 333 have been recorded in European oral traditions, and it has been suggested that the group may include tales from other regions, including Africa and East Asia. However, in many of these cases, it is difficult to differentiate ATU 333 from another widespread international folktale, ATU 123, 'The Wolf and the Kids'. To shed more light on these relationships, data on 58 folktales were analysed using cladistic, Bayesian and phylogenetic network-based methods. The results demonstrate that, contrary to the claims made by critics of the historic-geographic approach, it is possible to identify ATU 333 and ATU 123 as distinct international types. They further suggest that most of the African tales can be classified as variants of ATU 123, while the East Asian tales probably evolved by blending together elements of both ATU 333 and ATU 123. These findings demonstrate that phylogenetic methods provide a powerful set of tools for testing hypotheses about cross-cultural relationships among folktales, and point towards exciting new directions for research into the transmission and evolution of oral narratives. PMID:24236061

  4. Airborne nanoparticle exposures while using constant-flow, constant-velocity, and air-curtain-isolated fume hoods.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Jung Candace; Huang, Rong Fung; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Tsai et al. (Airborne nanoparticle exposures associated with the manual handling of nanoalumina and nanosilver in fume hoods. J Nanopart Res 2009; 11: 147-61) found that the handling of dry nanoalumina and nanosilver inside laboratory fume hoods can cause a significant release of airborne nanoparticles from the hood. Hood design affects the magnitude of release. With traditionally designed fume hoods, the airflow moves horizontally toward the hood cupboard; the turbulent airflow formed in the worker wake region interacts with the vortex in the constant-flow fume hood and this can cause nanoparticles to be carried out with the circulating airflow. Airborne particle concentrations were measured for three hood designs (constant-flow, constant-velocity, and air-curtain hoods) using manual handling of nanoalumina particles. The hood operator's airborne nanoparticle breathing zone exposure was measured over the size range from 5 nm to 20 mum. Experiments showed that the exposure magnitude for a constant-flow hood had high variability. The results for the constant-velocity hood varied by operating conditions, but were usually very low. The performance of the air-curtain hood, a new design with significantly different airflow pattern from traditional hoods, was consistent under all operating conditions and release was barely detected. Fog tests showed more intense turbulent airflow in traditional hoods and that the downward airflow from the double-layered sash to the suction slot of the air-curtain hood did not cause turbulence seen in other hoods. PMID:19933309

  5. 33 CFR 334.1220 - Hood Canal, Bangor; naval restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hood Canal, Bangor; naval... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1220 Hood Canal, Bangor; naval restricted areas. (a) Hood Canal, Bangor; Naval restricted areas—(1) Area No. 1. That...

  6. 42 CFR 84.176 - Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.176 Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements. Facepieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1136 - Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum... and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1136 Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to provide adequate vision...

  8. 42 CFR 84.176 - Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.176 Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements. Facepieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to...

  9. 42 CFR 84.199 - Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum... DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.199 Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements. Facepieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to provide adequate vision...

  10. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Galley hood and other fire protection equipment. 28.330..., 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.330 Galley hood and other fire protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL...

  11. 42 CFR 84.199 - Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum... DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.199 Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements. Facepieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to provide adequate vision...

  12. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Galley hood and other fire protection equipment. 28.330..., 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.330 Galley hood and other fire protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL...

  13. 42 CFR 84.1136 - Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum... and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1136 Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to provide adequate vision...

  14. 42 CFR 84.136 - Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum... DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.136 Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to provide adequate vision...

  15. Historical streamflows of Double Mountain Fork of Brazos River and water-surface elevations of Lake Alan Henry, Garza County, Texas, water years 1962-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Lubbock, Texas, operates two surface-water stations in Garza County, Tex.: USGS streamflow-gaging station 08079600 Double Mountain Fork Brazos River at Justiceburg, Tex., and 08079700 Lake Alan Henry Reservoir, a water-supply reservoir about 60 miles southeast of Lubbock, Tex., and about 10 miles east of Justiceburg, Tex. The streamflow and water-surface elevation data from the two stations are useful to water-resource managers and planners in support of forecasting and water-resource infrastructure operations and are used in regional hydrologic studies.

  16. 42. At Morby's property, end of Chenoweth Road. Detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. At Morby's property, end of Chenoweth Road. Detail of typical flume and supporting framework. North/northwest 310 degrees. - Broughton Flume, Hood River Junction on Columbia River at Washington/Oregon border, Hood, Skamania County, WA

  17. 43. At Morby's property, end of Chenoweth Road. Detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. At Morby's property, end of Chenoweth Road. Detail of typical flume and supporting framework. North/northwest 310 degrees. - Broughton Flume, Hood River Junction on Columbia River at Washington/Oregon border, Hood, Skamania County, WA

  18. 15. At Morby's property, end of Chenoweth Road. Detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. At Morby's property, end of Chenoweth Road. Detail of typical flume and supporting framework. North/northwest 310 degrees. - Broughton Flume, Hood River Junction on Columbia River at Washington/Oregon border, Hood, Skamania County, WA

  19. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River, Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri, January 2003 through March 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Poulton, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    The Johnson County Blue River Main Wastewater Treatment Facility discharges into the upper Blue River near the border between Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri. During 2005 through 2007 the wastewater treatment facility underwent upgrades to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal. The effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of the upper Blue River were assessed by comparing an upstream site to two sites located downstream from the wastewater treatment facility. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data, and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This evaluation is useful for understanding the potential effects of wastewater effluent on water quality, biological community structure, and ecosystem function. In addition, this information can be used to help achieve National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit requirements after additional studies are conducted. The effects of wastewater effluent on the water-quality conditions of the upper Blue River were most evident during below-normal and normal streamflows (about 75 percent of the time), when wastewater effluent contributed more than 20 percent to total streamflow. The largest difference in water-quality conditions between the upstream and downstream sites was in nutrient concentrations. Total and inorganic nutrient concentrations at the downstream sites during below-normal and normal streamflows were 4 to 15 times larger than at the upstream site, even after upgrades to the wastewater treatment facility were completed. However, total nitrogen concentrations decreased in wastewater effluent and at the downstream site following wastewater treatment facility upgrades. Similar decreases in total phosphorus were not observed, likely because the biological

  20. 3. ENVIRONMENT, FROM SOUTH, SHOWING RIVER ROAD RIDGE CARRYING CASSELMAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ENVIRONMENT, FROM SOUTH, SHOWING RIVER ROAD RIDGE CARRYING CASSELMAN RIVER ROAD OVER CASSELMAN RIVER - River Road Bridge, Crossing Casselman River on Casselman River Road, Grantsville, Garrett County, MD

  1. Data from geothermal test wells near Mount Hood, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robison, J.H.; Forcella, L.S.; Gannett, Marshall W.

    1981-01-01

    This report includes well specifications, drillers ' logs, and temperature logs of geothermal test wells drilled at 7 sites near Mt. Hood, Oreg. The wells were drilled in 1979 and 1980 under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. The project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, was part of an interagency effort to determine the geothermal potential of Mt. Hood. The agencies involved were, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. (USGS)

  2. A strategy for collecting ground-water data and developing a ground-water model of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer, Woodbury and Monona Counties, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchmiller, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    A ground-water-flow model and plan for obtaining supporting data are proposed for a part of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer in Woodbury and Monona Counties, Iowa. The proposed model and the use of the principle of superposition will aid in the interpretation of the relation between ground water and surface water in the study area, particularly the effect of lowered river stages on water levels in the alluvial aquifer. Information on the geometry, hydraulic characteristics, and water levels in the alluvial aquifer needs to be collected for use in the model and for model calibration. A plan to obtain hydrologic and geologic information by use of exploratory test-well drilling is proposed. Also proposed is a monitoring network to obtain information on the spatial and temporal variability of water levels within the study area.

  3. Waste-assimilation capacity of the Arkansas River in Pueblo County, Colorado, as it relates to water-quality guidelines and stream classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Doug; Baldridge, Duaina; Edelmann, Patrick

    1980-01-01

    The waste-assimulation capacity of a 42-mile reach of the Arkansas River in Pueblo County, Colo., was evaluated using a one-dimensional steady-state water-quality model. The model is capable of accurately predicting concentrations of carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand, total ammonia, total nitrate and dissolved oxygen; predicted concentrations of total organic nitrogen and total nitrite are less accurate. Simulation capability for nonionized ammonia was provided by defining its relationship to total ammonia. The model was used to simulate the water-quality effects of 63 combinations of wastewater treatment at the Pueblo Wastewater Treatment Plant and CF and I Steel Corporation. The mixing zone of the effluent from the Pueblo Wastewater Treatment Plant with the Arkansas River was determined to be 2.7 miles in length during the study. (USGS)

  4. Geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Ogallala Formation and White River Group, Belvoir Ranch near Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartos, Timothy T.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Hallberg, Laura L.; Webster, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    The geologic and hydrogeologic characteristics of Tertiary lithostratigraphic units (Ogallala Formation and White River Group) that typically compose or underlie the High Plains aquifer system in southeastern Wyoming were described physically and chemically, and evaluated at a location on the Belvoir Ranch in Laramie County, Wyoming. On the basis of this characterization and evaluation, three Tertiary lithostratigraphic units were identified using physical and chemical characteristics determined during this study and previous studies, and these three units were determined to be correlative with three identified hydrogeologic units composing the groundwater system at the study site—a high-yielding aquifer composed of the entire saturated thickness of the heterogeneous and coarse-grained fluvial sediments assigned to the Ogallala Formation (Ogallala aquifer); an underlying confining unit composed primarily of very fine-grained volcaniclastic sediments and mudrocks assigned to the Brule Formation of the White River Group and some additional underlying sediments that belong to either the Brule or Chadron Formation, or both (Brule confining unit); and an underlying low-yielding aquifer composed primarily of poorly sorted fluvial sediments assigned to the Chadron Formation of the White River Group (Chadron aquifer). Despite widely varying sediment heterogeneity and consolidation, some limited hydraulic connection throughout the full vertical extent of the Ogallala aquifer was indicated but not conclusively proven by interpretation of similar chemical and isotopic characteristics, modern apparent groundwater ages, and similar hydraulic-head responses measured continuously in two Ogallala aquifer monitoring wells installed for this study at two different widely separated (83 feet) depth intervals. Additional work beyond the scope of this study, such as aquifer tests, would be required to conclusively determine hydraulic connection within the Ogallala aquifer. Groundwater

  5. Ground-water resources of the South Platte River Basin in western Adams and southwestern Weld Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Rex O.; Schneider, P.A.; Petri, Lester R.

    1964-01-01

    The area described in this report consists of about 970 square miles in western Adams and southwestern Weld Counties in northeastern Colorado. It includes that part of the South Platte River valley between Denver and Kuner, Colo., all of Beebe Draw, and the lower part of the valley of Box Elder Creek. The stream-valley lowlands are separated by rolling uplands. The climate is semiarid, the normal annual precipitation being about 13 inches; thus, irrigation is essential for stable agricultural development. The area contains about 220,000 acres of irrigated land in the stream valleys. Most of the remaining 400,000 acres of land is used for dry farming or grazing because it lacks irrigation water. Most of the lowlands were brought under irrigation with surface water during the early 1900's, and now nearly all the surface water in the area is appropriated for irrigation within and downstream from the area. Because the natural flow of the streams is sometimes less than the demand for water, ground water is used to supplement the surface-water supply. Wells, drilled chiefly since 1930, supply the supplemental water and in some places are the sole supply for irrigation use. Rocks exposed in the area are of sedimentary origin and range in age from Lato Cretaceous to Recent. Those that are consolidated, called 'bedrock' in this report, consist of the Fox Hills sandstone and the Laramie and Arapahoe formations, all of Late Cretaceous age, and the Denver formation and Dawson arkose of Late Cretaceous and Tertiary age. The surface of the bedrock was shaped by ancestral streams, the valleys of which are reflected by the present surface topography. Dune sand, slope wash, and thin upland deposits of Quaternary age mantle the bedrock in the divide areas, and stream deposits ranging in thickness from 0 to about 125 feet partly fill the ancestral valleys. The valley-fill deposits consist of beds and lenses of clay, silt, sand, gravel, cobbles, and boulders. Abundant supplies of

  6. Surface-water and karst groundwater interactions and streamflow-response simulations of the karst-influenced upper Lost River watershed, Orange County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E. Randall; Cinotto, Peter J.; Ulery, Randy L.; Taylor, Charles J.; McCombs, Gregory K.; Kim, Moon H.; Nelson, Hugh L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs (OCRA), conducted a study of the upper Lost River watershed in Orange County, Indiana, from 2012 to 2013. Streamflow and groundwater data were collected at 10 data-collection sites from at least October 2012 until April 2013, and a preliminary Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER)-TOPMODEL based hydrologic model was created to increase understanding of the complex, karstic hydraulic and hydrologic system present in the upper Lost River watershed, Orange County, Ind. Statistical assessment of the optimized hydrologic-model results were promising and returned correlation coefficients for simulated and measured stream discharge of 0.58 and 0.60 and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency values of 0.56 and 0.39 for USGS streamflow-gaging stations 03373530 (Lost River near Leipsic, Ind.), and 03373560 (Lost River near Prospect, Ind.), respectively. Additional information to refine drainage divides is needed before applying the model to the entire karst region of south-central Indiana. Surface-water and groundwater data were used to tentatively quantify the complex hydrologic processes taking place within the watershed and provide increased understanding for future modeling and management applications. The data indicate that during wet-weather periods and after certain intense storms, the hydraulic capacity of swallow holes and subsurface conduits is overwhelmed with excess water that flows onto the surface in dry-bed relic stream channels and karst paleovalleys. Analysis of discharge data collected at USGS streamflow-gaging station 03373550 (Orangeville Rise, at Orangeville, Ind.), and other ancillary data-collection sites in the watershed, indicate that a bounding condition is likely present, and drainage from the underlying karst conduit system is potentially limited to near 200 cubic feet per second. This

  7. Stratigraphy and nahcolite resources of the saline facies of the Green River Formation, Rio Blanco County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyni, John R.

    1974-01-01

    Based on a study of 10 drill cores, a sequence of oil shale and associated nahcolite, nearly 2,000 feet thick, in the lacustrine Green River Formation (Eocene) in the Piceance Creek basin, Rio Blanco County, Colo., was divided in ascending order into zones 1 to 13, B-groove, Mahogany zone (with lower, middle, and upper parts), and A-groove at the top. The odd-numbered zones and the Mahogany zone are mappable subsurface units of relatively thick oil shale and are distinguished from the even-numbered zones and A- and B-grooves which are thinner units of oil shale of lower grade. Large amounts of nahcolite found in zones 5 to 12 occur in (1) coarse-grained crystalline aggregates scattered through oil shale, (2) laterally continuous units of fine-grained crystals disseminated in oil shale, (3) brown microcrystalline beds, and (4) white coarse-grained beds that grade laterally into halitic rocks toward basin center. The original .upper limit of the nahcolite and halitic rocks is not yet completely known, but the present top is marked by a dissolution surface. Above this surface the rocks, extending from zones 11 or 12 upward into the Mahogany zone, form a water-saturated 'leached zone,' a geohydrologic unit in which large amounts of water-soluble minerals probably mostly nahcolite, and halite, were removed by ground-water dissolution. Rocks in the leached zone, mostly oil shale, are commonly broken and fractured and contain crystal cavities and solution breccias. Several solution breccias can be traced laterally into unleached beds of nahcolite and halite. Although evidence of salines is found in rocks above A-groove, the original saline facies that includes most of the bedded deposits extends from zone 5 upward into A-groove. Potentially ruinable beds of white nahcolite as much as 12 feet thick are found at depths of 1,560 or more feet below the surface. Some thicker beds of high-grade nahcolite are believed to be too close to the dissolution surface for safe room

  8. Exposure and effects of chemical contaminants on tree swallows nesting along the Housatonic River, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, T.W.; Dummer, P.M.; Munney, K.L.

    2003-01-01

    Hatching success of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) was assessed for three years in relation to chemical contamination along the Housatonic River, Berkshire County (MA, USA), in 1998, 1999, and 2000. Nest boxes were erected at five sites along the Housatonic River and its tributaries and at one reference location. Concentrations of total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were some of the highest ever reported in bird eggs. Mean concentrations at sites along the Housatonic River ranged between 32 and 101 I?g/g wet weight. A significant negative relationship was observed between concentrations of total PCBs in clutches and hatching success. A significant negative relationship was also observed between hatching success and the sum of the total dioxins and furans and the associated toxic equivalents (TEQs) for dioxins and furans. In a combined model with PCB TEQs and dioxin/furan TEQs, PCB TEQs were not significantly correlated to hatching success, whereas dioxin/furan TEQs were. Contamination of tree swallows was from local food sources. Accumulation rates of total PCBs in 12-d-old nestlings averaged between 34 and 76 I?g/d at the sites along the main stem of the Housatonic River compared to <1 I?g/d at the reference location.

  9. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Stephen J; Ebersole, Jun A; Dickinson, William C; Ciampaglio, Charles N

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole.

  10. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Stephen J; Ebersole, Jun A; Dickinson, William C; Ciampaglio, Charles N

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole. PMID:26855876

  11. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for the Mississinewa River, Grant County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, William G.; Crawford, Charles G.; Peters, James G.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in the Mississinewa River, Grant County, IN was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The hydrology of the Mississinewa River downstream from Gas City is controlled primarily by two factors; low slopes, typical of the Tipton Till Plain, and a 10-foot dam at river mile 35.9, in Marion. All point-source waste loads affecting the modeled segment of the Mississinewa River are in the four incorporated municipalities of Fairmount, Jonesboro, Gas City, and Marion, in a primarily agricultural area. Model simulations indicate that algal photosynthesis and nitrification are the most significant factors affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration in the Mississinewa River during summer low flows. Natural reaeration without photosynthesis, is not sufficient to maintain an average dissolved-oxygen concentration of at least 5 milligrams per liter in the stream, the State 's water-quality standard. Projected carbonaceous and nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand loads, from the Indiana State Board of Health, for Owens, Illinois, Inc., and the Gas City and Marion wastewater-treatment facility will result in violations of the instream dissolved-oxygen standard. Fairmount and Jonesboro, because of their distance from the Mississinewa, do not significantly affect the water quality of the modeled segment. The model also indicates that, during winter low flows, ammonia toxicity, rather than dissolved oxygen is the limiting water-quality criterion in the Mississinewa River downstream from the Gas City wastewater-treatment facility. (USGS)

  12. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jun A.; Dickinson, William C.; Ciampaglio, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole. PMID:26855876

  13. Evaluation of Water Quality for Two St. Johns River Tributaries Receiving Septic Tank Effluent, Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.

    2004-01-01

    Tributary streamflow to the St. Johns River in Duval County is thought to be affected by septic tank leachate from residential areas adjacent to these tributaries. Water managers and the city of Jacksonville have committed to infrastructure improvements as part of a management plan to address the impairment of tributary water quality. In order to provide data to evaluate the effects of future remedial activities in selected tributaries, major ion and nutrient concentrations, fecal coliform concentrations, detection of wastewater compounds, and tracking of bacterial sources were used to document septic tank influences on the water quality of selected tributaries. The tributaries Fishing Creek and South Big Fishweir Creek were selected because they drain subdivisions identified as high priority locations for septic tank phase-out projects: the Pernecia and Murray Hill B subdivisions, respectively. Population, housing (number of residences), and septic tank densities for the Murray Hill B subdivision are greater than those for the Pernecia subdivision. Water-quality samples collected in the study basins indicate influences from ground water and septic tanks. Estimated concentrations of total nitrogen ranged from 0.33 to 2.86 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and ranged from less than laboratory reporting limit (0.02 mg/L) to 0.64 mg/L for total phosphorus. Major ion concentrations met the State of Florida Class III surface-water standards; total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ecoregion XII nutrient criteria for rivers and streams 49 and 96 percent of the time, respectively. Organic wastewater compounds detected at study sites were categorized as detergents, antioxidants and flame retardants, manufactured polycarbonate resins, industrial solvents, and mosquito repellent. The most commonly detected compound was para-nonylphenol, a breakdown product of detergent. Results of wastewater sampling give evidence that

  14. Surface water-ground water interactions along the lower Dungeness River and vertical hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments, Clallam County, Washington, September 1999-July 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simonds, F. William; Sinclair, Kirk A.

    2002-01-01

    The Dungeness River emerges from the Olympic Mountains and flows generally north toward the Strait of Juan De Fuca, crossing the broad, fertile alluvial fan of the Sequim-Dungeness peninsula in northeastern Clallam County, Washington. Increasing competition for the peninsula's ground-water resources, changing water-use patterns, and recent requirements to maintain minimum in-stream flows to enhance endangered salmon and trout populations have severely strained the peninsula's water resources and necessitated a better understanding of the interaction between surface water and groundwater. Three methods were used to characterize the interchange between surface water and groundwater along the lower 11.8 miles of the Dungeness River corridor between September 1999 and July 2001. In-stream mini-piezometers were used to measure vertical hydraulic gradients between the river and the water-table aquifer at 27 points along the river and helped to define the distribution of gaining and losing stream reaches. Seepage runs were used to quantify the net volume of water exchanged between the river and ground water within each of five river reaches, termed 'seepage reaches.' Continuous water-level and water-temperature monitoring at two off-stream well transects provided data on near-river horizontal hydraulic gradients and temporal patterns of water exchange for a representative gaining stream reach and a representative losing stream reach. Vertical hydraulic gradients in the mini-piezometers generally were negative between river miles 11.8 and 3.6, indicating loss of water from the river to ground water. Gradients decreased in the downstream direction from an average of -0.86 at river mile 10.3 to -0.23 at river mile 3.7. Small positive gradients (+0.01 to +0.02) indicating ground-water discharge occurred in three localized reaches below river mile 3.7. Data from the seepage runs and off-stream transect wells supported and were generally consistent with the mini

  15. 33 CFR 334.1190 - Hood Canal and Dabob Bay, Wash.; naval non-explosive torpedo testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hood Canal and Dabob Bay, Wash... REGULATIONS § 334.1190 Hood Canal and Dabob Bay, Wash.; naval non-explosive torpedo testing area. (a) Hood Canal in vicinity of Bangor—(1) The area. All waters of Hood Canal between latitude 47°46′00″...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1190 - Hood Canal and Dabob Bay, Wash.; naval non-explosive torpedo testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hood Canal and Dabob Bay, Wash... REGULATIONS § 334.1190 Hood Canal and Dabob Bay, Wash.; naval non-explosive torpedo testing area. (a) Hood Canal in vicinity of Bangor—(1) The area. All waters of Hood Canal between latitude 47°46′00″...

  17. Shoreham Railroad Bridge, Former Addison County Railroad (later, Rutland Railroad, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Shoreham Railroad Bridge, Former Addison County Railroad (later, Rutland Railroad, Addison Branch), spanning Lemon Fair River above Richville Pond, west of East Shoreham Road, Shoreham, Addison County, VT

  18. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Wabash River, Huntington County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.; Wilber, William G.; Peters, James G.

    1980-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in the Wabash River in Huntington County, Ind., was used to predict alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditons, summer and winter low flows. The major point-source waste load affecting the Wabash River in Huntington County is the Huntington wastewater-treatment facility. The most significnt factor potentially affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration during summer low flows is nitrification. However, nitrification should not be a limiting factor on the allowable nitrogenous and carbonaceous waste loads for the Huntington wastewater-treatment facility during summer low flows if the ammonia-nitrogen toxicity standard for Indiana streams is met. The disolved-oxygen standard for Indiana stream, an average of 5.0 milligrams per liter, should be met during summer and winter low flows if the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System 's 5-day, carbonaceous biochemical-oxygen demands of a monthly average concentration of 30 milligrams per liter and a maximum weekly average of 45 milligrams per liter are not exceeded. 

  19. Simulation of streamflow and estimation of streamflow constituent loads in the San Antonio River watershed, Bexar County, Texas, 1997-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; McNamara, Kenna C.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey developed watershed models (Hydrological Simulation Program?FORTRAN) to simulate streamflow and estimate streamflow constituent loads from five basins that compose the San Antonio River watershed in Bexar County, Texas. Rainfall and streamflow data collected during 1997?2001 were used to calibrate and test the model. The model was configured so that runoff from various land uses and discharges from other sources (such as wastewater recycling facilities) could be accounted for to indicate sources of streamflow. Simulated streamflow volumes were used with land-use-specific, water-quality data to compute streamflow loads of selected constituents from the various streamflow sources. Model simulations for 1997?2001 indicate that inflow from the upper Medina River (originating outside Bexar County) represents about 22 percent of total streamflow. Recycled wastewater discharges account for about 20 percent and base flow (ground-water inflow to streams) about 18 percent. Storm runoff from various land uses represents about 33 percent. Estimates of sources of streamflow constituent loads indicate recycled wastewater as the largest source of dissolved solids and nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen (about 38 and 66 percent, respectively, of the total loads) during 1997?2001. Stormwater runoff from urban land produced about 49 percent of the 1997?2001 total suspended solids load. Stormwater runoff from residential and commercial land (about 23 percent of the land area) produced about 70 percent of the total lead streamflow load during 1997?2001.

  20. Probability of Elevated Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  1. Probability of Elevated Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  2. "Robin Hood" on Ropes in Texas School Aid Tilt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Texas has had its Robin Hood school financing system in place since 1993, when the legislature adopted the system in response to a state supreme court order to equalize state spending on public schools. Under the arrangement, any district that has taxable property values exceeding $305,000 per student is not allowed to keep all of its property-tax…

  3. Widespread occurrence of polyhalogenated compounds in fat from kitchen hoods.

    PubMed

    Bendig, Paul; Hägele, Florian; Vetter, Walter

    2013-09-01

    Food and contaminated indoor environments are the most relevant sources of human exposure to polyhalogenated chemicals. This study analyzed for the first time fat residues in kitchen hoods for contaminations with polyhalogenated compounds. A wide range of contaminants was detected in all kitchen hoods (n = 15) and most of them could be quantified. Between 0.2 and 18 μg polyhalogenated chemicals/g fat were detected, with chlorinated paraffins being the most relevant contaminant group. Aside from the chlorinated paraffins, each kitchen hood fat sample showed a distinct fingerprint. A wide range of old and current-use brominated flame retardants were also detected in the samples. In addition to these contaminants originating from their use in indoor equipment, residues of organochlorine pesticides and semi-volatile halogenated natural products verified that cooking of food, accompanied with the release of contaminants from the heated food, was another relevant source of contamination. Re-analyses of two samples after 3 months only resulted in small variations in contaminant pattern and concentrations. Therefore, fat from kitchen hoods is proposed as an easily accessible matrix to assess contamination of these hazardous polyhalogenated chemicals. PMID:23877177

  4. Widespread occurrence of polyhalogenated compounds in fat from kitchen hoods.

    PubMed

    Bendig, Paul; Hägele, Florian; Vetter, Walter

    2013-09-01

    Food and contaminated indoor environments are the most relevant sources of human exposure to polyhalogenated chemicals. This study analyzed for the first time fat residues in kitchen hoods for contaminations with polyhalogenated compounds. A wide range of contaminants was detected in all kitchen hoods (n = 15) and most of them could be quantified. Between 0.2 and 18 μg polyhalogenated chemicals/g fat were detected, with chlorinated paraffins being the most relevant contaminant group. Aside from the chlorinated paraffins, each kitchen hood fat sample showed a distinct fingerprint. A wide range of old and current-use brominated flame retardants were also detected in the samples. In addition to these contaminants originating from their use in indoor equipment, residues of organochlorine pesticides and semi-volatile halogenated natural products verified that cooking of food, accompanied with the release of contaminants from the heated food, was another relevant source of contamination. Re-analyses of two samples after 3 months only resulted in small variations in contaminant pattern and concentrations. Therefore, fat from kitchen hoods is proposed as an easily accessible matrix to assess contamination of these hazardous polyhalogenated chemicals.

  5. 76 FR 40322 - Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resort Parking Improvements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... disclose the potential environmental effects of improving the parking at Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resort. The..., cut/fill slopes, storm water swales, snow storage, and an equipment maintenance yard. In addition, the...). An additional 4.5 acres would be cleared for access roads, cut/fill slopes, storm water swales,...

  6. Mt. Hood Community College Institutional Effectiveness (IE) Report Fall 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walleri, R. Dan

    This report examines the indicators of institutional effectiveness for Mount Hood Community College (MHCC) (Oregon). The document reports on five institutional goals: (1) knowledge-based workforce education and services; (2) access for members of the community and development of an environment in which diversity thrives; (3) economic development,…

  7. Hydrology and water quality in the Green River and surrounding agricultural areas near Green River in Emery and Grand Counties, Utah, 2004-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerner, S.J.; Spangler, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Wilberg, D.E.; Naftz, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Water from the Colorado River and its tributaries is used for municipal and industrial purposes by about 27 million people and irrigates nearly 4 million acres of land in the Western United States. Water users in the Upper Colorado River Basin consume water from the Colorado River and its tributaries, reducing the amount of water in the river. In addition, application of water to agricultural land within the basin in excess of crop needs can increase the transport of dissolved solids to the river. As a result, dissolved-solids concentrations in the Colorado River have increased, affecting downstream water users. During 2004-05, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, investigated the occurrence and distribution of dissolved solids in water from the agricultural areas near Green River, Utah, and in the adjacent reach of the Green River, a principle tributary of the Colorado River. The flow-weighted concentration of dissolved solids diverted from the Green River for irrigation during 2004 and 2005 was 357 milligrams per liter and the mean concentration of water collected from seeps and drains where water was returning to the river during low-flow conditions was 4,170 milligrams per liter. The dissolved-solids concentration in water from the shallow part of the ground-water system ranged from 687 to 55,900 milligrams per liter. Measurable amounts of dissolved solids discharging to the Green River are present almost exclusively along the river banks or near the mouths of dry washes that bisect the agricultural areas. The median dissolved-solids load in discharge from the 17 drains and seeps visited during the study was 0.35 ton per day. Seasonal estimates of the dissolved-solids load discharging from the study area ranged from 2,800 tons in the winter to 6,400 tons in the spring. The estimate of dissolved solids discharging from the study area annually is 15,700 tons. Water samples collected from selected sites within

  8. Evaluation of factors affecting the containment performance of traditional and nanomaterial fume hoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Kevin Holden

    This research was conducted to: 1) evaluate different methods for measuring containment effectiveness of a nanomaterial handling enclosure; 2) to evaluate design and operational factors which may impact containment performance for a traditional constant air volume (CAV) and nano fume using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and; 3) to assess the impact on the operator body and arm motion on nanoparticle containment of the CAV and nano fume hoods. The research approach to address these objectives starts with an evaluation of the containment effectiveness of a new nanomaterial handling enclosure using tracer gas, nanoparticle and nanoparticle handling methodologies in a real-world laboratory setting. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well-correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. However, the nanoparticle method was more sensitive than the tracer gas test showing leakage in situations not indicated by the tracer gas tests. These experiments also identified substantial leaks near the sides of the hood sides even when the tracer gas concentration in the manikin breathing zone was not elevated. This result was consistent with new research showing that sampling in the manikin breathing zone may not be adequate to describe containment of fume hood devices. The second phase of this project provides an assessment of the internal flow patterns of a nano fume hood and a traditional CAV chemical fume hood. The impacts of design and operational differences between these hoods are investigated using both experimental measurements and numerical simulations with CFD. An investigation of the airflow patterns inside the hoods showed that large scale recirculation zones develop behind the sash for both hoods. However, the design of the side airfoils of the nano hood resulted in a secondary recirculation pattern along the sides of the hood which impacts interior contaminant dispersion and potential for leakage. The

  9. Relative abundance and distribution of fishes within an established Area of Critical Environmental Concern, of the Amargosa River Canyon and Willow Creek, Inyo and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scoppettone, G. Gary; Hereford, Mark E.; Rissler, Peter H.; Johnson, Danielle M.; Salgado, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The Amargosa River Canyon of San Bernardino and Inyo County, California, has been designated by the Bureau of Land Management as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern, due in part to its unique flora and fauna. As a task of the Area of Critical Environmental Concern implementation plan, a survey of native fishes was conducted from June 21 to August 12, 2010. Geographic Information System tools were used to map sampling locations, which were spaced at 50-meter intervals. Global Positioning Systems were used to locate sampling stations, and stations with adequate water for successful trapping were sampled with baited minnow traps. Amargosa River pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis amargosae) and speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus spp.) were widespread throughout Armargosa River Canyon. Throughout the study area 8,558 pupfish were captured at 194 stations; 3,472 speckled dace were captured at 210 stations; 238 red-swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkia) were captured at 83 stations; and 1,095 western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinus) were captured at 110 stations. Pupfish were most abundant in open water habitat with native riparian vegetation, and they were significantly less abundant where the stream was completely covered by cattails or where saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) dominated the riparian corridor. There was no relationship between stream cover and speckled dace distribution. Non-native western mosquitofish and red-swamp crayfish densities were significantly higher in stream reaches dominated by saltcedar. The continued spread of saltcedar threatens to negatively affect pupfish and potentially reduce speckled dace abundance throughout the Amargosa River Canyon. This study can serve as baseline information for observing native fish populations in the future, as related to potential changes to the Amargosa River Canyon ecosystem.

  10. 11. OVERVIEW FROM WEST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER, LOOKING EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. OVERVIEW FROM WEST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER, LOOKING EAST. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Schuylkill River Viaduct, Spanning Schuylkill River, southeast of Roosevelt Boulevard Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. 17. OVERVIEW FROM WEST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. OVERVIEW FROM WEST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER, LOOKING EAST - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Schuylkill River Viaduct, Spanning Schuylkill River, southeast of Roosevelt Boulevard Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. 9. LOOKING NW FROM EAST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. LOOKING NW FROM EAST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Schuylkill River Viaduct, Spanning Schuylkill River, southeast of Roosevelt Boulevard Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Geohydrology and simulated response to groundwater pumpage in Carson Valley, a river-dominated basin in Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurer, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical model was used to simulate the effect of development of the groundwater reservoir in Carson Valley on Carson River outflow, evapotranspiration, and groundwater levels and storage. The basin-fill groundwater reservoir consists of: (1) confined and unconfined sedimentary deposits of Quaternary age that underlie the valley floor, and (2) sedimentary deposits of Tertiary age that are exposed mainly on the east side of the valley. Water levels indicate the presence of two confined aquifer systems: one < 100 ft deep, and the other, generally deeper than 200 ft. The basin-fill reservoir is surrounded by bedrock that transmits recharge to the basin through weathered and fractured zones near the contact between bedrock and valley fill. Estimates were made of the distribution of hydraulic properties of aquifer materials, and of the components of inflow to and outflow from the basin-fill reservoir. Inflow components consisted of the following approximate quantities, in acre-ft/yr: (1) mainstem Carson River flow, 360,000; (2) direct precipitation, 70,000; (3) runoff from perennial and ephemeral streams, 24,000: and (4) subsurface inflow, 38,000. Approximate estimates of outflow components were, in acre-ft/yr; (1) mainstem Carson River flow, 291,000; (2) potential evapotranspiration, 200,000. Both inflow and outflow totaled about 490,000 acre-ft/yr. These flow volumes show that the hydrologic regimen of the basin is dominated by surface water flow of the Carson River. Steady-state and transient calibration of the model provided an unacceptable fit of observed versus simulated groundwater level fluctuations and storage, and surface water outflow from the valley. These values provide a reasonable balance for the simulated steady-state water budget. Simulations show that surface water flow is the ultimate source of about 75% of pumped water for six scenarios of possible future ground-water development. Model simulations indicate that changes from agricultural to urban

  14. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for East Fork White River, Bartholomew County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, William G.; Peters, James G.; Crawford, Charles G.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in East Fork White River, Bartholomew County, IN, was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The model indicates that benthic-oxygen demand and the headwater concentrations of carbonaceous biochemical-oxygen demand, nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen are the most significant factors affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration of East Fork White River downstream from the Columbus wastewater-treatment facility. The effect of effluent from the facility on the water quality of East Fork White River was minimal. The model also indicates that, with a benthic-oxygen demand of approximately 0.65 gram per square meter per day, the stream has no additional waste-load assimilative capacity during summer low flows. Regardless of the quality of the Columbus wastewater effluent, the minimum 24-hour average dissolved-oxygen concentration of at least 5 milligrams per liter, the State 's water-quality standard for streams, would not be met. Ammonia toxicity is not a limiting water-quality criterion during summer and winter low flows. During winter low flows, the current carbonaceous biochemical-oxygen demand limits for the Columbus wastewater-treatment facility will not result in violations of the in-stream dissolved-oxygen standard. (USGS)

  15. Water-quality data for the Missouri River and Missouri River alluvium near Weldon Spring, St. Charles County, Missouri, 1991--92

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeschulte, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains the water-quality data collected at two cross sections across the Missouri River and from monitoring wells in the Missouri River alluvium near Defiance, Missouri. The sampling results indicate the general water composition from the Missouri River changes with different flow conditions. During low-base flow conditions, the water generally contained about equal quantities of calcium and sodium plus potassium and similar quantities of bicarbonate and sulfate. During high-base flow conditions, water from the river predominantly was a calcium bicarbonate type. During runoff conditions, the water from the river was a calcium bicarbonate type, and sulfate concentrations were larger than during high-base flow conditions but smaller than during low-base flow conditions. The total and dissolved uranium concentrations at both the upstream and downstream cross sections, as well as from the different vertical samples across the river, were similar during each sampling event. However, sodium, sulfate, nitrate, and total and dissolved uranium concentrations varied with different flow conditions. Sodium and sulfate concentrations were larger during low-base flow conditions than during high-base flow or runoff conditions, while nitrate concentrations decreased during low-base flow conditions. Both total and dissolved uranium concentrations were slightly larger during runoff events than during low-base or high-base flow conditions.

  16. Modeling the annual soil erosion rate in the mouth of river Pineios' sub-basin in Thessaly County, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilia, Ioanna; Loupasakis, Constantinos; Tsangaratos, Paraskevas

    2015-04-01

    Erosion is a natural - geomorphological phenomenon, active through geological time that is considered as one of the main agents that forms the earth surface. Soil erosion models estimate the rates of soil erosion and provide useful information and guidance for the development of appropriate intervention and soil conservation practices and strategies. A significant number of soil erosion models can be found in literature; however, the most extensively applied model is the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) established in 1997 by Renard KG, Foster GR, Weesies GA, McCool DK and Yoder DC. RUSLE is an empirically based model that enables the estimation of the average annual rate of soil erosion for an area of interest providing several alternative scenarios involving cropping systems, management methods and erosion control strategies. According to RUSLE model's specifications five major factors (rainfall pattern, soil type, topography, crop system, and management practices) are utilized for estimating the average annual erosion through the following equation: A=RxKxLxSxCxP, PIC where A is the computed spatial average soil loss and temporal average soil loss per unit area (tons ha-1 year-1), R the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor (MJ mm ha-1h-1 year-1), K the soil erodibility factor (tons h MJ-1 mm-1), L the slope - length factor, S the slope steepness factor, C the cover management factor and P the conservation support practice factor. L, S, C and P factors are all dimensionless. The present study aims to utilize a GIS-based RUSLE model in order to estimate the average annual soil loss rate in the sub-basin extending at the mouth of Pineios river in Thessaly County, Greece. The area covers approximate 775.9 km2 with a mean slope angle of 7.8o. The rainfall data of 39 gauge station from 1980 to 2000 where used in order to predict the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor (R). The K-factor was estimated using soil maps available from the European Soil Portal with a

  17. Flow Characteristics and Robustness of an Inclined Quad-vortex Range Hood

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Jia-Kun; HUANG, Rong Fung

    2014-01-01

    A novel design of range hood, which was termed the inclined quad-vortex (IQV) range hood, was examined for its flow and containment leakage characteristics under the influence of a plate sweeping across the hood face. A flow visualization technique was used to unveil the flow behavior. Three characteristic flow modes were observed: convex, straight, and concave modes. A tracer gas detection method using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was employed to measure the containment leakage levels. The results were compared with the test data reported previously in the literature for a conventional range hood and an inclined air curtain (IAC) range hood. The leakage SF6 concentration of the IQV range hood under the influence of the plate sweeping was 0.039 ppm at a suction flow rate of 9.4 m3/min. The leakage concentration of the conventional range hood was 0.768 ppm at a suction flow rate of 15.0 m3/min. For the IAC range hood, the leakage concentration was 0.326 ppm at a suction flow rate of 10.9 m3/min. The IQV range hood presented a significantly lower leakage level at a smaller suction flow rate than the conventional and IAC range hoods due to its aerodynamic design for flow behavior. PMID:24583513

  18. Improving flow and spillage characteristics of range hoods by using an inclined air-curtain technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Nian, You-Cyun; Chen, Jia-Kun; Peng, Kuan-Lin

    2011-03-01

    The current study developed a new type of range hood, which was termed an 'inclined air-curtain range hood', in order to improve the flow and performance of the conventionally used wall-mounted range hood. The flow characteristics and oil mist spillages of air-curtain and conventional range hoods under the influences of both a mannequin presence and a simulated walk-by motion were experimentally examined. The study examined flow patterns by using a laser-light-sheet-assisted smoke-flow visualization technique and diagnosed spillages by using the tracer gas concentration test method. A mannequin presented in front of the conventional hood induced turbulent dispersion of oil mists toward the chest and nose of the mannequin owing to the complex interaction among the suction, wake, and wall effect, while the inclined air-curtain hood presented excellent hood performance by isolating the oil mists from the mannequin with an air curtain and therefore could reduce spillages out into the atmosphere and the mannequin's breathing zone. Both flow visualization and the tracer gas test indicated that the air-curtain hood had excellent 'robustness' over the conventional hood in resisting the influence of walk-by motion. The air-curtain technique could drastically improve the flow characteristics and performance of the range hood by consuming less energy.

  19. Water-quality conditions of the lower Boise River, Ada and Canyon Counties, Idaho, May 1994 through February 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullins, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Agricultural land and water use, wastewater treatment facility discharges, land development, road construction, urban runoff, confined-animal feeding operations, reservoir operations, and river channelization affect the water quality and biotic integrity of the lower Boise River between Lucky Peak Dam and the river's mouth at Parma, Idaho. During May 1994 through February 1997, 4 sites on the Boise River, 12 tributary/drain sites, and 3 wastewater treatment facilities were sampled at various intervals during the irrigation (high-flow) and post-irrigation (low-flow) seasons to determine sources, concentrations, and relative loads of nutrients and suspended sediment. Discharge entering the Boise River from the 12 tributary/drain sites and 3 wastewater treatment facilities was measured to determine the nutrient loads being contributed from each source. Total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and suspended sediment concentrations and loads tended to increase in a downstream direction along the Boise River. Among the 15 sources of discharge to the Boise River, 3 southside tributary/drains and the West Boise wastewater treatment facility contributed the largest loads of total nitrogen; the median daily load was more than 2,000 pounds per day. The West Boise wastewater treatment facility contributed the largest median daily load of total phosphorus (810 pounds per day); Dixie Drain contributed the largest median daily load of suspended sediment (26.4 tons per day). Nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratios at the four Boise River sites indicated that phosphorus could be limiting algal growth at the Diversion Dam site, whereas nitrogen could be limiting algal growth at the Glenwood and Middleton sites during some parts of the year. Algal growth in the Boise River near Parma did not appear to be nutrient limited. Because of the complexity of the plumbing system in the lower Boise River (numerous diversions and inflow points), accurate comparisons between discharge and nutrient loads entering

  20. An investigation of factors affecting the performance of laboratory fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Altemose, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    A `user tracer gas test` was performed on laboratory hoods, with a human subject standing in front of the hood, to assess hood containment ability. The relationship of face velocity and cross draft variables to hood containment ability is investigated. The ability of these variables and other tests, such as smoke challenges or tracer gas tests performed with a manikin at the hood, to predict the results of the user tracer gas test is evaluated. All of the laboratory hoods tested in this study were identical bench top bypass hoods with horizontally sliding sashes. A face velocity traverse, cross draft measurements, a pitot traverse to measure exhaust flow, a smoke test, a manikin tracer gas test, and a user tracer gas test were performed on each hood in several different sash positions. Based on the data collected, face velocity, its distribution and variability, and the magnitude of cross drafts relative to face velocity are important variables in determining hood leakage. `Unblocked` vortices, formed such that no physical barrier exists between the vortex and room air or a person in front of the hood, are identified as important sites of leakage. For the hoods evaluated in this study, unblocked vortices were observed along the beveled side edges. The data support the hypothesis that in the presence of a person standing in front of the hood, leakage is more likely to occur if unblocked vortices are formed than if all vortices are blocked. Evidence suggests that cross drafts are more likely to cause leakage when flowing in a direction that may cause separated flow along a beveled edge of the hood and thereby augment the unblocked vortices along the edge. Results indicate that smoke tests, manikin tracer gas tests, and average face velocity all serve as useful monitoring techniques. Face velocity measurements and smoke tests, which are easy and inexpensive, may provide information which is as valuable as traditional manikin tracer gas tests.

  1. Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from the raft river geothermal area and environs, cassia county, idaho; box elder county, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.; Nehring, N.L.; Crosthwaite, E.G.; Harmon, R.S.; Janik, C.; Borthwick, J.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical and light-stable isotope data are presented for water samples from the Raft River geothermal area and environs. On the basis of chemical character, as defined by a trilinear plot of per cent milliequivalents, and light-stable isotope data, the waters in the geothermal area can be divided into waters that have and have not mixed with cold water. The non-mixed waters have essentially a constant value of light-stable isotopes but show a large variation in chloride content. The variation of chloride composition is not the usual pattern for deep geothermal waters, where it is normally assumed that the deep water has a single chloride composition. Different mixed waters also have hot-water sources of varying chloride composition. Plots of chloride values on cross-sections show that water circulation patterns are confused, with non-mixed waters having different chloride concentrations located in close proximity. Three models can explain the characteristics of the deep geothermal water: (1) in addition to near-surface mixing of cold and hot water, there is deep mixing of two hot waters with the same enthalpy and isotopic composition but differing chloride concentrations to produce the range of chloride concentrations found in the deep geothermal water; (2) there is a single deep hot water, and the range of chloride concentrations is produced by the water passing through a zone of highly soluble materials (most likely in the sedimentary section above the basement) in which waters have different residence times or slightly different circulation paths; (3) the varying chloride concentrations in space have been caused by varying chloride concentrations in the deep feed water through time. Some of this older water has not been flushed from the system by the natural discharge. Although one model may seem more plausible than the others, the available data do not rule out any of them. Data for water samples from the Raft River and Jim Sage Mountains show that water from

  2. Hydrogeology of the Susquehanna River valley-fill aquifer system and adjacent areas in eastern Broome and southeastern Chenango Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer system along a 32-mile reach of the Susquehanna River valley and adjacent areas was evaluated in eastern Broome and southeastern Chenango Counties, New York. The surficial geology, inferred ice-marginal positions, and distribution of stratified-drift aquifers were mapped from existing data. Ice-marginal positions, which represent pauses in the retreat of glacial ice from the region, favored the accumulation of coarse-grained deposits whereas more steady or rapid ice retreat between these positions favored deposition of fine-grained lacustrine deposits with limited coarse-grained deposits at depth. Unconfined aquifers with thick saturated coarse-grained deposits are the most favorable settings for water-resource development, and three several-mile-long sections of valley were identified (mostly in Broome County) as potentially favorable: (1) the southernmost valley section, which extends from the New York–Pennsylvania border to about 1 mile north of South Windsor, (2) the valley section that rounds the west side of the umlaufberg (an isolated bedrock hill within a valley) north of Windsor, and (3) the east–west valley section at the Broome County–Chenango County border from Nineveh to East of Bettsburg (including the lower reach of the Cornell Brook valley). Fine-grained lacustrine deposits form extensive confining units between the unconfined areas, and the water-resource potential of confined aquifers is largely untested. Recharge, or replenishment, of these aquifers is dependent not only on infiltration of precipitation directly on unconfined aquifers, but perhaps more so from precipitation that falls in adjacent upland areas. Surface runoff and shallow groundwater from the valley walls flow downslope and recharge valley aquifers. Tributary streams that drain upland areas lose flow as they enter main valleys on permeable alluvial fans. This infiltrating water also recharges valley aquifers. Current (2012) use of

  3. Calibration and validation of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the Ohio River, Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The quantification of current patterns is an essential component of a Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) application in a riverine environment. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provided a field validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates-2 (RMA-2) hydrodynamic model capable of quantifying the steady-flowpatterns in the Ohio River extending from river mile 590 to 630 for the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) water-quality modeling efforts on that reach. Because of the hydrodynamic complexities induced by McAlpine Locks and Dam (Ohio River mile 607), the model was split into two segments: an upstream reach, which extended from the dam upstream to the upper terminus of the study reach at Ohio River mile 590; and a downstream reach, which extended from the dam downstream to a lower terminus at Ohio River mile 636. The model was calibrated to a low-flow hydraulic survey (approximately 35,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s)) and verified with data collected during a high-flow survey (approximately 390,000 ft3/s). The model calibration and validation process included matching water-surface elevations at 10 locations and velocity profiles at 30 cross sections throughout the study reach. Based on the calibration and validation results, the model is a representative simulation of the Ohio River steady-flow patterns below discharges of approximately 400,000 ft3/s.

  4. Simulation of Transient Ground-Water Flow in the Valley-Fill Aquifers of the Upper Rockaway River Basin, Morris County, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Alison D.

    2002-01-01

    More than 90 percent of the public water supply in the upper Rockaway River Valley in Morris County, New Jersey, is obtained from ground-water withdrawals from the valley-fill aquifers. During 1997, an average of 9.6 million gallons per day of ground water was withdrawn from these aquifers. The aquifer system consists of an unconfined aquifer (upper aquifer) and a locally confined aquifer (lower aquifer), which are composed of sands and gravels. These aquifers are separated by a discontinuous confining unit that consists mostly of silt and clay. Increases in ground-water withdrawals can induce movement of water from streams to wells, increase flow from the upper aquifer to the lower aquifer, and reduce base flow in the Rockaway River downstream. A ground-water-flow model was used to simulate and quantify the effects of current withdrawals on the valley-fill aquifer system under transient monthly conditions. Recharge over the model area varies both spatially and temporally. Part of model calibration consisted of adjusting percentages of monthly precipitation that recharges the valley-fill aquifer system. More recharge occurs during winter and spring than during summer and fall. This seasonal variation affects ground-water discharge to the Rockaway River. Ground-water withdrawals from the valleyfill aquifers also affect ground-water discharge to the Rockaway River. Three scenarios were simulated to observe the effects of ground-water withdrawals on ground-water discharge to the Rockaway River and to determine the extent to which variations in rates of withdrawals correspond to variations in rates of streamflow depletion. Streamflow depletion was estimated by comparing model-computed ground-water discharge for the three scenarios with the modelcomputed ground-water discharge under transient conditions. In scenario 1, all pumpage was removed from the model. In scenarios 2 and 3, 1 million gallons per day of ground-water withdrawals in excess of the current pumpage was

  5. 8. VIEW OF YOLO COUNTY ELEVATION, LOOKING EASTSOUTHEAST TOWARD SACRAMENTO, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF YOLO COUNTY ELEVATION, LOOKING EAST-SOUTHEAST TOWARD SACRAMENTO, ALONG CENTERLINE OF STATE HIGHWAY 275 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  6. 44. PRECONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPH, LOOKING WESTNORTHWEST INTO YOLO COUNTY FROM OPEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. PRE-CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPH, LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST INTO YOLO COUNTY FROM OPEN SWING SPAN OF M STREET BRIDGE, mid-1934 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  7. Ferricrete, manganocrete, and bog iron occurrences with selected sedge bogs and active iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Church, Stanley E.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Wirt, Laurie

    2003-01-01

    During 1996 to 2000, the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a coordinated strategy to (1) study the environmental effects of historical mining on Federal lands, and (2) remediate contaminated sites that have the greatest impact on water quality and ecosystem health. This dataset provides information that contributes to these overall objectives and is part of the USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative. Data presented here represent ferricrete occurrences and selected iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed in San Juan County near Silverton, Colorado. Ferricretes (stratified iron and manganese oxyhydroxide-cemented sedimentary deposits) are one indicator of the geochemical baseline conditions as well as the effect that weathering of mineralized rocks had on water quality in the Animas River watershed prior to mining. Logs and wood fragments preserved in several ferricretes in the upper Animas River watershed, collected primarily along streams, yield radiocarbon ages of modern to 9,580 years B.P. (P.L. Verplanck, D.B. Yager, and S.E. Church, work in progress). The presence of ferricrete deposits along the current stream courses indicates that climate and physiography of the Animas River watershed have been relatively constant throughout the Holocene and that weathering processes have been ongoing for thousands of years prior to historical mining activities. Thus, by knowing where ferricrete is preserved in the watershed today, land-management agencies have an indication of (1) where metal precipitation from weathering of altered rocks has occurred in the past, and (2) where this process is ongoing and may confound remediation efforts. These data are included as two coverages-a ferricrete coverage and a bogs and springs coverage. The coverages are included in ArcInfo shapefile and Arc

  8. Intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Conference Center and Educational Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, K.; Crass, D.C.; Sassaman, K.E.

    1993-02-01

    Documented in this report are the methods and results of an intensive archaeological survey for the proposed University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) Conference Center and Educational Facility on the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS). Archaeological investigations conducted by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) on the 70-acre project area and associated rights-of-way consisted of subsurface testing at two previously recorded sites and the discovery of one previously unrecorded site. The results show that 2 sites contain archaeological remains that may yield significant information about human occupations in the Aiken Plateau and are therefore considered eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. Adverse impacts to these sites can be mitigated through avoidance.

  9. 5. Monighan dragline at work in the Salt River at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Monighan dragline at work in the Salt River at Mormon Flat. Photographer unknown, 1923. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. Additional mineral resources assessment of the Battle Creek, Bruneau River, Deep Creek-Owyhee River, Jarbidge River, Juniper Creek, Little Owyhee River, North Fork Owyhee River, Owyhee River Canyon, South Fork Owyhee River, Upper Deep Creek, and Yatahoney Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Owyhee County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diggles, Michael F.; Berger, Byron R.; Vander Meulen, Dean B.; Minor, Scott A.; Ach, Jay A.; Sawlan, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    From 1984 to 1986, studies were conducted to assess the potential for undiscovered mineral resources in wilderness study areas on the Owyhee Plateau. The results of these studies have been published in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Bulletins. Since that time, low-grade, high-tonnage epithermal hot-spring gold-silver deposits have been recognized in the region north of the wilderness study areas. The recognition that this mineral-deposit model is applicable in the region, coupled with new data that has become available to the U.S. Geological Survey, reinterpretation of existing geochemical data, and known-deposit data suggest that similar deposits may be present elsewhere on the Owyhee Plateau. This report is an additional assessment of the Battle Creek, Bruneau River, Deep Creek-Owyhee River, Jarbidge River, Juniper Creek, Little Owyhee River, North Fork Owyhee River, Owyhee River Canyon, South Fork Owyhee River (ID-016-053), Upper Deep Creek, and Yatahoney Creek Wilderness Study Areas in Idaho Wilderness Study Areas in Idaho in light of those new data.

  11. Hooded mergansers swim in the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A male and two female hooded mergansers swim in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male displays its distinctive fan-shaped, black-bordered crest. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  12. A female hooded merganser swims in the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A female hooded merganser swims solo in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male is distinguished by a fan-shaped, black-bordered crest and striped breast. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  13. A male hooded merganser swims in the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The distinctive fan-shaped, black-bordered crest and striped breast identify this hooded merganser, swimming in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  14. Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater movement, and water budget in the Puyallup River Watershed and vicinity, Pierce and King Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Wendy B.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Savoca, Mark E.; Lane, Ron C.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Marshall, Cameron; Clothier, Burt G.; Knoedler, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    The water-budget area received about 1,428,000 acre-feet or about 52 inches of precipitation per year (January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2012). About 41 percent of precipitation enters the groundwater system as recharge. Seven percent of this recharge is withdrawn from wells and the remainder leaves the groundwater system as discharge to rivers, discharge to springs, or submarine discharge to Puget Sound, or exits the study area through subsurface flow in the Green River valley.

  15. Bathymetric, Velocity, Streamflow, and Dissolved Oxygen Data on the Pee Dee River near Bostick Boat Landing, Florence County, South Carolina, May-August 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Santee Cooper is planning to construct an electricity generating station in southeastern Florence County near the Kingsburg community. As part of this project, a water-intake structure will be constructed on the Pee Dee River near the Bostick Boat Landing, which is located east of the intersection of State secondary roads S-21-57 and S-21-66. Velocity, bathymetric, and dissolved oxygen data are needed to help determine the location for the water-intake structure. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Santee Cooper, collected these data at three different flow regimes during the period of May through August 2007. Data were collected along 15 transects located at 50-foot intervals starting 400 feet upstream from the boat landing and continuing to 300 feet downstream from the boat landing. All data were geographically referenced using a differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS).

  16. Water-surface elevations and channel characteristics for selected reaches of the Rogue River and Elk Creek, Jackson and Josephine Counties, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, D.D.

    1970-01-01

    The central Rogue River valley, because of its mild climate, fertile soil, scenic attractions, and sport-fishery resource, has great potential for future population growth and industrial development. As the population grows and the area develops, zoning becomes necessary to assure the most beneficial use of the land, especially of the flood plains. To establish land-use zones on the flood plains, the area subject to inundation and elevation of floods must be considered. Areas flooded during the December 1964 flood and the approximate limits of the 1861 flood in Jackson and Josephine Counties are shown in two interim reports (Corps of Engineers, 1965); however, there are no published flood-elevation profiles to use as a basis for establishing meaningful land-use-zone boundaries or for delineating inundated areas of other floods.

  17. An unusual Middle Permian flora from the Blaine Formation (Pease River Group: Leonardian-Guadalupian Series) of King County, West Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Hook, R.W.; Nelson, W.J.; Chaney, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts, and the affinities of nearly all taxa are enigmatic. The most common elements are parallel-veined leaves that resemble cordaites but that could be isolated pinnules of a pinnate leaf. Gigantopterid foliage is present but not assignable to any known taxon. A single foliar conifer specimen is too incomplete for assignment. Numerous reproductive organs, however, and an abundance of axes may represent conifers. Conchostracans, palaeoniscoid fish scales, and small heteropolar coprolites also occur in the deposit, which originated as a small, claystone-dominated channel fill in a coastal plain setting.

  18. Public health assessment for U.S. Titanium, Piney River, Nelson County, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS number VAD980705404; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The US Titanium site, a former titanium dioxide manufacturing plant, is located in Nelson County, Virginia, along the northern side of the Piney River. As a result of buried coppers as currently on-site, soils, ground water, and surface water have exhibited highly acidic conditions and naturally-occurring heavy metals have leached into the ground water. Potential human exposure pathways of concern include ingestion and dermal contact with contaminated surface water; ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation of contaminated soil and dusts; and ingestion of contaminated fish. VDH has concluded that the U.S. Titanium site poses an indeterminate public health hazard at this time, since data are not available for all environmental media that humans may be exposed to and there are insufficient health outcome data to indicate that the site has had an adverse effect on human health.

  19. The status of Moapa coriacea and Gila seminuda and status information on other fishes of the Muddy River, Clark County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scoppettone, G.G.; Rissler, P.H.; Nielsen, M.B.; Harvey, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Moapa coriacea is endemic to the headwaters (Warm Springs area) of the Muddy River, Clark County, Nevada. The Warm Springs area was snorkeled and Moapa coriacea and Gila seminuda enumerated in August 1994 after a fire, and in May 1997 after a diversion dam had been removed from the downstream end. Gila seminuda had been reported in greatest abundance downstream from the Warm Springs area and we estimated the population there through mark and recapture from January to March 1995. There was a dramatic reduction in native fishes in the Warm Springs area between 1994 and 1997, coinciding with the invasion of Oreochromis aurea. Downstream from the Warm Springs area Gila seminuda was the most frequently netted species while O. aurea was relatively scarce. The fish population (native and non-native) decreased in a downstream direction; the causative factor(s) have not been identified.

  20. Potential Cascadia Tsunami Deposits From a Tidal Marsh at Hood Canal, Puget Sound, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison-Laney, C.

    2015-12-01

    Two candidate Cascadia tsunami deposits are found in tidal marsh sediments near Lynch Cove, at the head of Hood Canal. The deposits are suggestive of tsunami deposits in their tabular form, distribution in the marsh, sediment type, and microfossil content. The deposits are traceable in channel bank exposures, dug pits, and sediment cores on the outer edges of the marsh, and thin landward to an inland extent of at least 200 m. The deposits are made up of mud to fine sand, and are similar in appearance and grain size to the broad adjacent tidal flat. The deposits also contain tidal flat diatoms, and are notably different from the diatoms in the marsh sediments below and above the deposits. Radiocarbon ages of plant fossils show that the younger deposit (Layer A) postdates A.D. 1680, and may therefore represent the A.D. 1700 Cascadia tsunami. The older deposit (Layer B) has a two sigma age of A.D. 1170-1220, which overlaps in time with coseismic subsidence at the mouth of the Columbia River (subsidence of Soil W, A.D. 1000-1190), and with adjusted age estimates for deep-sea turbidites (turbidite T3, A.D. 960-1180). It is unknown whether Cascadia subduction zone tsunamis have left a geological record in Puget Sound. A recent unpublished simulation by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, of a Cascadia tsunami propagating into Puget Sound predicts maximum water levels of over 4 m for some high water "hot spots" at the heads of narrow waterways. The marsh near Lynch Cove is a simulation "hot spot" with predicted water levels over 3 m. Narrow, wave-amplifying waterways, together with an available sediment supply, and predicted high water levels suggest that Cascadia tsunamis could leave behind a geologic record in Puget Sound, given conditions favorable for deposit preservation. Alternatively, one or both of the deposits may represent tsunamis generated by slides or fault displacement in Hood Canal.

  1. 1. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 18 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 18 DEGREES NORTH. SAME PHOTO AS OR-36-1. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  2. 5. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION DETAIL, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION DETAIL, LOOKING 6 DEGREES NORTH. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  3. 3. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 184 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 184 DEGREES SOUTH. SAME PHOTO AS OR-36-2. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  4. 4. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 224 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 224 DEGREES SOUTHWEST. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  5. 7. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, PERSPECTIVE LOOKING EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, PERSPECTIVE LOOKING EAST. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  6. 6. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION, LOOKING 306 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION, LOOKING 306 DEGREES NORTHWEST. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  7. 2. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 20 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 20 DEGREES NORTH. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  8. Alternative Evaluation for the REDOX (202-S) Plutonium Loadout Hood

    SciTech Connect

    N. R. Kerr

    1999-09-20

    Located in the 200 Areas is the inactive 202-S Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) Facility, which is managed by the Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Surveillance/Maintenance and Transition project. This facility is contaminated from nuclear material processes related to nuclear material separation from Hanford Site facility operations. This alternative evaluation report describes the alternatives and selection criteria based on the necessary protective requirements to maintain the REDOX Plutonium Loadout Hood in a safe and stable condition awaiting a final waste response action.

  9. A review of published quantitative experimental studies on factors affecting laboratory fume hood performance.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kwangseog; Woskie, Susan; DiBerardinis, Louis; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2008-11-01

    This study attempted to identify the important factors that affect the performance of a laboratory fume hood and the relationship between the factors and hood performance under various conditions by analyzing and generalizing the results from other studies that quantitatively investigated fume hood performance. A literature search identified 43 studies that were published from 1966 to 2006. For each of those studies, information on the type of test methods used, the factors investigated, and the findings were recorded and summarized. Among the 43 quantitative experimental studies, 21 comparable studies were selected, and then a meta-analysis of the comparable studies was conducted. The exposure concentration variable from the resulting 617 independent test conditions was dichotomized into acceptable or unacceptable using the control level of 0.1 ppm tracer gas. Regression analysis using Cox proportional hazards models provided hood failure ratios for potential exposure determinants. The variables that were found to be statistically significant were the presence of a mannequin/human subject, the distance between a source and breathing zone, and the height of sash opening. In summary, performance of laboratory fume hoods was affected mainly by the presence of a mannequin/human subject, distance between a source and breathing zone, and height of sash opening. Presence of a mannequin/human subject in front of the hood adversely affects hood performance. Worker exposures to air contaminants can be greatly reduced by increasing the distance between the contaminant source and breathing zone and by reducing the height of sash opening. Many other factors can also affect hood performance. Checking face velocity by itself is unlikely to be sufficient in evaluating hood performance properly. An evaluation of the performance of a laboratory fume hood should be performed with a human subject or a mannequin in front of the hood and should address the effects of the activities

  10. Biomedical laboratory uses VAV fume hoods and heat recovery to save fuel costs

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.L. . Peter F. Loftus Div.)

    1994-03-01

    This article describes a HVAC system utilizing VAV fume hoods and heat recovery equipment to save energy. The topics of the article include building description and system design, planning, IAQ/thermal comfort, innovative design features such as digitally controlled VAV fume hoods, chiller heat recovery for fume hood make-up air reheat, glycol-run-around system for the animal facility, glycol-run-around free cooling/make-up air preheating system, and operations and maintenance.

  11. Flow and containment characteristics of an air-curtain fume hood operated at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Kun; Huang, Rong Fung; Hsin, Pei-Yi; Hsu, Ching Min; Chen, Chun-Wann

    2012-01-01

    The flow and leakage characteristics of the air-curtain fume hood under high temperature operation (between 100°C and 250°C) were studied. Laser-assisted flow visualization technique was used to reveal the hot plume movements in the cabinet and the critical conditions for the hood-top leakage. The sulfur hexafluoride tracer-gas concentration test method was employed to examine the containment spillages from the sash opening and the hood top. It was found that the primary parameters dominating the behavior of the flow field and hood performance are the sash height and the suction velocity as an air-curtain hood is operated at high temperatures. At large sash height and low suction velocity, the air curtain broke down and accompanied with three-dimensional flow in the cabinet. Since the suction velocity was low and the sash opening was large, the makeup air drawn down from the hood top became insufficient to counter act the rising hot plume. Under this situation, containment leakage from the sash opening and the hood top was observed. At small sash opening and high suction velocity, the air curtain presented robust characteristics and the makeup air flow from the hood top was sufficiently large. Therefore the containment leakages from the sash opening and the hood top were not observed. According to the results of experiments, quantitative operation sash height and suction velocity corresponding to the operation temperatures were suggested. PMID:22293724

  12. Flow and containment characteristics of an air-curtain fume hood operated at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Kun; Huang, Rong Fung; Hsin, Pei-Yi; Hsu, Ching Min; Chen, Chun-Wann

    2012-01-01

    The flow and leakage characteristics of the air-curtain fume hood under high temperature operation (between 100°C and 250°C) were studied. Laser-assisted flow visualization technique was used to reveal the hot plume movements in the cabinet and the critical conditions for the hood-top leakage. The sulfur hexafluoride tracer-gas concentration test method was employed to examine the containment spillages from the sash opening and the hood top. It was found that the primary parameters dominating the behavior of the flow field and hood performance are the sash height and the suction velocity as an air-curtain hood is operated at high temperatures. At large sash height and low suction velocity, the air curtain broke down and accompanied with three-dimensional flow in the cabinet. Since the suction velocity was low and the sash opening was large, the makeup air drawn down from the hood top became insufficient to counter act the rising hot plume. Under this situation, containment leakage from the sash opening and the hood top was observed. At small sash opening and high suction velocity, the air curtain presented robust characteristics and the makeup air flow from the hood top was sufficiently large. Therefore the containment leakages from the sash opening and the hood top were not observed. According to the results of experiments, quantitative operation sash height and suction velocity corresponding to the operation temperatures were suggested.

  13. Intensive archaeological survey of the F/H Surface Enhancement Project Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Sassaman, K.E.; Gillam, J.C.

    1993-08-01

    Twelve archaeological sites and four artifact occurrences were located by intensive survey of two tracts of land for the F and H Surface Enhancement Project on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Fieldwork in the 480-acre project area included surface reconnaissance of 3.6 linear kilometers of transects, 140 shovel tests along 4.2 linear kilometers of transects, an additional 162 shovel tests at sites and occurrences, and the excavation of six l {times} 2 m test units. All but one of the sites contained artifacts of the prehistoric era; the twelfth site consists of the remains of a twentieth-century home place. The historic site and six of the prehistoric sites consist of limited and/or disturbed contexts of archaeological deposits that have little research potential and are therefore considered ineligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The remaining five sites have sufficient content and integrity to yield information important to ongoing investigations into upland site use. These sites (38AK146, 38AK535, 38AK539, 38AK541, and 38AK543) are thus deemed eligible for nomination to the NRHP and the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) recommends that they be preserved through avoidance or data recovery.

  14. Groundwater quality and occurrence and distribution of selected constituents in the Aquia and Upper Patapsco aquifers, Naval Air Station Patuxent River, St. Mary's County, Maryland, July 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, Cheryl A.; Campo, Kimberly W.; Baker, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    The Naval Air Station Patuxent River in southern Maryland has continued to expand in the first decade of the 21st century, contributing to rapid population growth in the surrounding area. The increase in population has caused State and County water managers and others to be concerned about the impact of population growth on the quantity and quality of groundwater supplies. The U.S. Geological Survey has been investigating the groundwater resources of the air station since 1998. As part of that ongoing investigation, groundwater was sampled in 2008 in six wells in the Aquia aquifer and two wells in the Upper Patapsco aquifer in the vicinity of Naval Air Station Patuxent River and Webster Outlying Field. Groundwater samples were analyzed for basic chemistry (field parameters, major ions, and nutrients) as well as several water-quality issues of concern including the occurrence of arsenic and tungsten, and saltwater intrusion. The results of the 2008 groundwater-quality sampling indicate that the overall quality of groundwater in the Aquia aquifer has not changed since 1943; data are too limited to determine if groundwater quality has changed in the Upper Patapsco aquifer. At one well in the Aquia aquifer, the arsenic concentration exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standard for drinking water. Arsenic was not detected in samples from the Upper Patapsco aquifer. Tungsten concentrations were detected at low concentrations near the laboratory reporting level in all eight samples. There was no evidence of saltwater intrusion in any of the wells.

  15. Preliminary geologic mapping of Cretaceous and Tertiary formations in the eastern part of the Little Snake River coal field, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haacke, Jon E.; Barclay, C. S. Venable; Hettinger, Robert D.

    2016-09-30

    In the 1970s and 1980s, C.S. Venable Barclay conducted geologic mapping of areas primarily underlain by Cretaceous coals in the eastern part of the Little Snake River coal field (LSR) in Carbon County, southwest Wyoming. With some exceptions, most of the mapping data were never published. Subsequently, after his retirement from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), his field maps and field notebooks were archived in the USGS Field Records. Due to a pending USGS coal assessment of the Little Snake River coal field area and planned geological mapping to be conducted by the Wyoming State Geological Survey, Barclay’s mapping data needed to be published to support these efforts. Subsequently, geologic maps were scanned and georeferenced into a geographic information system, and project and field notes were scanned into Portable Document Format (PDF) files. Data for seventeen 7½-minute quadrangles are presented in this report. This publication is solely intended to compile the mapping data as it was last worked on by Barclay and provides no interpretation or modification of his work.

  16. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for West Fork Blue River, Washington County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, James G.; Wilber, W.G.; Crawford, Charles G.; Girardi, F.P.

    1979-01-01

    A digital computer model calibrated to observe stream conditions was used to evaluate water quality in West Fork Blue River, Washington County, IN. Instream dissolved-oxygen concentration averaged 96.5% of saturation at selected sites on West Fork Blue River during two 24-hour summer surveys. This high dissolved-oxygen concentration reflects small carbonaceous and nitrogenous waste loads; adequate dilution of waste by the stream; and natural reaeration. Nonpoint source waste loads accounted for an average of 53.2% of the total carbonaceous biochemical-oxygen demand and 90.2% of the nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand. Waste-load assimilation was studiedfor critical summer and winter low flows. Natural streamflow for these conditions was zero, so no benefit from dilution was provided. The projected stream reaeration capacity was not sufficient to maintain the minimum daily dissolved-oxygen concentration (5 milligrams per liter) in the stream with current waste-discharge restrictions. During winter low flow, ammonia toxicity, rather than dissolved-oxygen concentration, was the limiting water-quality criterion downstream from the Salem wastewater-treatment facility. (USGS)

  17. Integrated Investigations of Environmental Effects of Historical Mining in the Animas River Watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Stanley E.; Von Guerard, Paul; Finger, Susan E.

    2007-01-01

    This publication comprises a Volume Contents of chapters (listed below) and a CD-ROM of data (contents shown in column at right). The Animas River watershed in southwest Colorado is one of many watersheds in the western United States where historical mining has left a legacy of acid mine drainage and elevated concentrations of potentially toxic trace elements in surface streams. U.S. Geological Survey scientists have completed a major assessment of the environmental effects of historical mining in the Animas River watershed focusing on the area upstream of Silverton, Colo.?the Mineral Creek, Cement Creek, and upper Animas River basins. The study demonstrated how the watershed approach can be used to assess and rank mining-affected sites for possible cleanup. The study was conducted in collaboration with State and Federal land-management agencies and regional stakeholders groups. This book is available for purchase at Information Services, U.S. Geological Survey (1-888-ASK-USGS).

  18. Hydrologic Conditions that Influence Streamflow Losses in a Karst Region of the Upper Peace River, Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.; Lewelling, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    The upper Peace River from Bartow to Fort Meade, Florida, is described as a groundwater recharge area, reflecting a reversal from historical groundwater discharge patterns that existed prior to the 1950s. The upper Peace River channel and floodplain are characterized by extensive karst development, with numerous fractures, crevasses, and sinks that have been eroded in the near-surface and underlying carbonate bedrock. With the reversal in groundwater head gradients, river water is lost to the underlying groundwater system through these karst features. An investigation was conducted to evaluate the hydrologic conditions that influence streamflow losses in the karst region of the upper Peace River. The upper Peace River is located in a basin that has been altered substantially by phosphate mining and increases in groundwater use. These alterations have changed groundwater flow patterns and caused streamflow declines through time. Hydrologic factors that have had the greatest influence on streamflow declines in the upper Peace River include the lowering of the potentiometric surfaces of the intermediate aquifer system and Upper Floridan aquifer beneath the riverbed elevation due to below-average rainfall (droughts), increases in groundwater use, and the presence of numerous karst features in the low-water channel and floodplain that enhance the loss of streamflow. Seepage runs conducted along the upper Peace River, from Bartow to Fort Meade, indicate that the greatest streamflow losses occurred along an approximate 2-mile section of the river beginning about 1 mile south of the Peace River at Bartow gaging station. Along the low-water and floodplain channel of this 2-mile section, there are about 10 prominent karst features that influence streamflow losses. Losses from the individual karst features ranged from 0.22 to 16 cubic feet per second based on measurements made between 2002 and 2007. The largest measured flow loss for all the karst features was about 50 cubic

  19. Clay-mineral segregation by differential flocculation: Jourdan River-St. Louis Bay estuary, Hancock County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, G.

    1988-09-01

    Within the Jourdan River-St. Louis Bay estuarine system, the dominant depositional mechanism of suspended clays is preferential flocculation of kaolinite with increasing salinity. Flocculation and deposition of kaolinite occur mainly within the confines of the Jourdan River, hence the effects of differential gravity settling of mineral species are unlikely. Statistical analyses show that water turbidity and salinity are linearly related to distance from the mouth of the Jourdan River and to each other up to the point where kaolinite is largely removed from the suspended sediments by flocculation. X-ray diffraction data show that maximum flocculation of suspended kaolinite has occurred where the kaolinite/illite ratio (K/I) reaches its minimum. Bottom-sediment mineralogy follows the trend of the suspended sediments with K/I of the bottom sediments increasing as K/I of the suspended sediments decreases.

  20. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  1. 1992 Water-Table Contours of the Mojave River Ground-Water Basin, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Predmore, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    This data set consists of digital water-table contours for the Mojave River Basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Mojave Water Agency, constructed a water-table map of the Mojave River ground-water basin for ground-water levels measured in November 1992. Water-level data were collected from approximately 300 wells to construct the contours. The water-table contours were digitized from the paper map which was published at a scale of 1:125,000. The contour interval ranges from 3,200 to 1,600 feet above sea level.

  2. 2000 Water-Table Contours of the Mojave River and the Morongo Ground-Water Basins, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Predmore, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    This data set consists of digital water-table contours for the Mojave River and the Morongo Ground-Water Basins. The U.S. Geological Survey constructed a water-table map of the Mojave River and the Morongo Ground-Water Basins for ground-water levels measured during the spring of 2000. Water-level data were collected from 498 wells to construct the contours. The water-table contours were digitized from the paper map which was published at a scale of 1:175,512. The contour interval ranges from 3,400 to 1,500 feet above sea level.

  3. 1998 Water-Table Contours of the Mojave River and the Morongo Ground-Water Basins, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Predmore, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    This data set consists of digital water-table contours for the Mojave River and the Morongo Ground-Water Basins. The U.S. Geological Survey constructed a water-table map of the Mojave River and the Morongo Ground-Water Basins for ground-water levels measured during the spring of 1998. Water-level data were collected from 418 wells to construct the contours. The water-table contours were digitized from the paper map which was published at a scale of 1:175,512. The contour interval rangs from 3,400 to 1,500 feet above sea level.

  4. Native American prehistory of the middle Savannah River Valley. A synthesis of archaeological investigations on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Sassaman, K.E.; Brooks, M.J.; Hanson, G.T.; Anderson, D.G.

    1990-12-31

    Archaeological investigations on the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina span 17 years and continue today through a cooperative agreement between DOE and the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA), University of South Carolina. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of SCIAA has been and continues to be the sole archaeological consultant for DOE-SRS. This report documents technical aspects of all prehistoric archaeological research conducted by the SRARP between 1973 and 1987. Further, this report provides interpretative contexts for archaeological resources as a basis for an archaeological resource plan reported elsewhere (SRARP 1989), and as a comprehensive statement of our current understanding of Native American prehistory. 400 refs., 130 figs., 39 tabs.

  5. Hydrogeologic Framework, Groundwater Movement, and Water Budget in Tributary Subbasins and Vicinity, Lower Skagit River Basin, Skagit and Snohomish Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Sumioka, Steven S.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.; Huffman, Raegan L.

    2009-01-01

    A study to characterize the groundwater-flow system in four tributary subbasins and vicinity of the lower Skagit River basin was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey to assist Skagit County and the Washington State Department of Ecology in evaluating the effects of potential groundwater withdrawals and consumptive use on tributary streamflows. This report presents information used to characterize the groundwater and surface-water flow system in the subbasins, and includes descriptions of the geology and hydrogeologic framework of the subbasins; groundwater recharge and discharge; groundwater levels and flow directions; seasonal groundwater-level fluctuations; interactions between aquifers and the surface-water system; and a water budget for the subbasins. The study area covers about 247 mi2 along the Skagit River and its tributary subbasins (East Fork Nookachamps Creek, Nookachamps Creek, Carpenter Creek, and Fisher Creek) in southwestern Skagit County and northwestern Snohomish County, Washington. The geology of the area records a complex history of accretion along the continental margin, mountain building, deposition of terrestrial and marine sediments, igneous intrusion, and the repeated advance and retreat of continental glaciers. A simplified surficial geologic map was developed from previous mapping in the area, and geologic units were grouped into nine hydrogeologic units consisting of aquifers and confining units. A surficial hydrogeologic unit map was constructed and, with lithologic information from 296 drillers'logs, was used to produce unit extent and thickness maps and four hydrogeologic sections. Groundwater in unconsolidated aquifers generally flows towards the northwest and west in the direction of the Skagit River and Puget Sound. This generalized flow pattern is likely complicated by the presence of low-permeability confining units that separate discontinuous bodies of aquifer material and act as local groundwater-flow barriers. Groundwater

  6. Possible changes in ground-water flow to the Pecos River caused by Santa Rosa Lake, Guadalupe County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risser, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    In 1980 Santa Rosa Dam began impounding water on the Pecos River about 7 miles north of Santa Rosa, New Mexico, to provide flood control, sediment control, and storage for irrigation. Santa Rosa Lake has caused changes in the groundwater flow system, which may cause changes in the streamflow of the Pecos River that cannot be detected at the present streamflow gaging stations. Data collected at these stations are used to measure the amount of water available for downstream users. A three-dimensional groundwater flow model for a 950 sq mi area between Anton Chico and Puerto de Luna was used to simulate the effects of Santa Rosa Lake on groundwater flow to a gaining reach of the Pecos River for lake levels of 4,675, 4,715, 4,725, 4,750, 4,776, and 4,797 feet above sea level and durations of impoundment of 30, 90, 182, and 365 days for all levels except 4 ,797 feet. These simulations indicated that streamflow in the Pecos River could increase by as much as 2 cu ft/sec between the dam and Puerto de Luna if the lake level were maintained at 4 ,797 feet for 90 days or 4,776 feet for 1 year. About 90% of this increased streamflow would occur < 0.5 mi downstream from the dam, some of which would be measured at the streamflow gaging station located 0.2 mile downstream from the dam. Simulations also indicated that the lake will affect groundwater flow such that inflow to the study area may be decreased by as much as 1.9 cu ft/sec. This water may leave the Pecos River drainage basin or be diverted back to the Pecos River downstream from the gaging station near Puerto de Luna. In either case, this quantity represents a net loss of water upstream from Puerto de Luna. Most simulations indicated that the decrease in groundwater flow into the study area would be of about the same quantity as the simulated increase in streamflow downstream from the dam. Therefore, the net effect of the lake on the flow of the Pecos River in the study area appears to be negligible. Model simulations

  7. Sediment discharge and channel change in the North Fork Teton River, 1977-78, Fremont and Madison counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Rhea P.

    1979-01-01

    The Teton Dam failure flood of June 5, 1976, severely disrupted the geomorphic character of North Fork Teton River in Idaho. Extensive channel restoration was required to contain expected normal spring flows. Six principal sites were established on the 17-mile reach of the river to study sediment transport and channel change during 1977-78. During April 1 to September 30, 1977, total water discharge at Teton Island bridge was 97,530 acre-feet; 4,360 tons of total sediment were transported. Total water discharge, April 1 to September 30, 1978, was 191,940 acre-feet; 10,680 tons of total sediment were transported. Analyses of data indicated several trends of erosion and deposition. Minimal channel change in the upper 7 miles of the river indicated equilibrium may temporarily exist between hydraulic-flow properties and channel shape. Streambed profiles indicated little change in streambed elevations. Erosional tonnage at mid-study reaches was 4,260 tons. One-half mile downstream, an increase of 4,150 tons of suspended and 1,050 tons of bedload sediment probably was partly derived from upstream bank erosion. An estimated 5,870 tons was deposited within the next subreach downstream. Virtually the entire bedload was redeposited before the last subreach, 4.4 miles downstream measured bedload was 91 tons. Suspended-sediment discharge transported past the last site was 16,470 tons. Lateral erosion and deposition in the lower 10 miles of the river indicate that subreaches now shortened by manmade channel alinements may begin to meander. Future deposition of coarse material at upstream gravel and concrete impoundments may trigger instability in the entire river. (Kosco-USGS)

  8. Numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system in tributary subbasins and vicinity, lower Skagit River basin, Skagit and Snohomish Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Kenneth H.; Savoca, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    A groundwater-flow model was developed to evaluate the effects of potential groundwater withdrawals and consumptive use on streamflows in tributary subbasins of the lower portion of the Skagit River basin. The study area covers about 155 square miles along the Skagit River and its tributary subbasins (East Fork Nookachamps Creek, Nookachamps Creek, Carpenter Creek, Fisher Creek) in southwestern Skagit County and northwestern Snohomish County, Washington. The Skagit River occupies a large, relatively flat alluvial valley that extends across the northern and western margins of the study area, and is bounded to the south and east by upland and mountainous terrain. The alluvial valley and upland are underlain by unconsolidated deposits of glacial and inter- glacial origin. Bedrock underlies the alluvial valley and upland areas, and crops out throughout the mountainous terrain. Nine hydrogeologic units are recognized in the study area and form the basis of the groundwater-flow model. Groundwater flow in tributary subbasins of the lower Skagit River and vicinity was simulated using the groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW-2000. The finite-difference model grid consists of 174 rows, 156 columns, and 15 layers. Each model cell has a horizontal dimension of 500 by 500 feet. The thickness of model layers varies throughout the model area. Groundwater flow was simulated for both steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state condition simulated average recharge, discharge, and water levels for the period, August 2006-September 2008. The transient simulation period, September 2006-September 2008, was divided into 24 monthly stress periods. Initial conditions for the transient model were developed from a 6-year ?lead-in? period that used recorded precipitation and Skagit River levels, and extrapolations of other boundary conditions. During model calibration, variables were adjusted within probable ranges to minimize differences between measured and simulated groundwater

  9. CHARACTERISTICS OF RANGE HOODS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES DATA COLLECTED FROM A REAL ESTATE WEB SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Klug, Victoria; Singer, Brett; Bedrosian, Tod; DCruz, Chris

    2011-09-02

    Venting range hoods are important residential ventilation components that remove pollutants generated by cooking activities and natural gas cooking burners. To address the lack of data on range hood installations in California, we conducted a survey by examining photographs of homes for sale or rent listed on a popular real estate web site. The survey was conducted in November 2010 and April–May 2011. Posted photos of the homes were reviewed to determine if a hood was installed, the type of hood, and two installation details that can impact performance, namely the height above the cooktop and the degree to which the hood covers the cooktop burners. We additionally collected information about the homes, including asking price for purchase or rent, type of building (e.g. detached house, townhouse or apartment), building age, floor area, and cooktop fuel type. Listings were first sampled to focus on homes built since 2005, then randomly sampled to include varied prices and locations around the state. Data were obtained for 1002 homes built between 1865 and 2011 (median year built 1989). Homes for sale varied in asking price from $16,000 to $16,500,000 (median $353,000) and homes for rent varied from $500 to $25,000 (median $2125) per month. Approximately 74% of the sample had natural gas cooktops. In this sample, natural gas cooktops were more prevalent in more expensive homes than in less expensive homes. Across the entire sample, 7.4 % appeared to have no hood installed, 33% had a short hood, 13% had a deep hood and 47% had a microwave over the range. The percentage of these hoods that vent to the outdoors could not be determined. Hood type was related to coverage of the cooktop. For deep hoods, 76% appeared to cover most or all of the cooktop burners. For short hoods, 70% covered about three quarters of the cooktop. And for microwaves the vast majority (96%) covered the back burners but not the front burners. Hood type was also correlated with asking price or

  10. Water-quality trends in the Santa Ana River at MWD Crossing and below Prado Dam, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen A.; Izbicki, John A.; Paybins, Katherine S.

    1998-01-01

    The Santa Ana River, located in an extensively urbanized basin, drains about 2,670 square miles near Los Angeles, California. Almost all flow in the river, about 200,000 acre-feet annually, is diverted to ponds where it infiltrates and recharges underlying aquifers. About 2 million people are dependent on these aquifers for water supply. In recent years, base flow in the river has increased as a result of increased discharge of treated municipal wastewater, and high flows have increased as a result of increase precipitation and urbanization. Trends in water quality were calculated for two sites?at the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) Crossing (an upstream site) and below Prado Dam (a downstream site)?using the computer program ESTREND. Water-quality data for these sites were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1969 to 1995. At MWD Crossing, flow-adjusted downward trends of -1.1 microsiemens per centimeter (iS/cm) per year and -1.6 milligrams per liter (mg/L) per year were calculated for specific conductance and dissolved solids, respectively. In contrast, a flow-adjusted upward trends of 2.2 iS/cm per year for dissolved solids was calculated for the Santa Ana River below Prado Dam. Specific conductance and dissolved solids in the Santa Ana River below Prado Dam had downward unadjusted trends (not adjusted for streamflow) of -8.3 iS/cm per year and -6.0 mg/L per year, respectively. For the Santa Ana River below Prado Dam, downward unadjusted trends were calculated for ammonia (-0.04 mg/L per year) and total organic carbon (0.19 mg/L per year); flow-adjusted upward trends were calculated for nitrite plus nitrate (0.15 mg/L per year), total dissolved nitrogen (0.39 mg/L per year), and orthophosphate (0.03 mg/L per year). Statistically significant unadjusted and flow-adjusted trends were not obtained for organic nitrogen, phosphorus, and dissolved organic carbon. Data for selected trace elements and organic compounds collected between 1970-94 also are

  11. Vigilance and Activity Time-Budget Adjustments of Wintering Hooded Cranes, Grus monacha, in Human-Dominated Foraging Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunlin; Zhou, Lizhi; Xu, Li; Zhao, Niannian; Beauchamp, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Due to loss and degradation of natural wetlands, waterbirds increasingly rely on surrounding human-dominated habitats to obtain food. Quantifying vigilance patterns, investigating the trade-off among various activities, and examining the underlying mechanisms will help us understand how waterbirds adapt to human-caused disturbances. During two successive winters (November-February of 2012–13 and 2013–14), we studied the hooded crane, Grus monacha, in the Shengjin Lake National Nature Reserve (NNR), China, to investigate how the species responds to human disturbances through vigilance and activity time-budget adjustments. Our results showed striking differences in the behavior of the cranes when foraging in the highly disturbed rice paddy fields found in the buffer zone compared with the degraded natural wetlands in the core area of the NNR. Time spent vigilant decreased with flock size and cranes spent more time vigilant in the human-dominated buffer zone. In the rice paddy fields, the birds were more vigilant but also fed more at the expense of locomotion and maintenance activities. Adult cranes spent more time vigilant and foraged less than juveniles. We recommend habitat recovery in natural wetlands and community co-management in the surrounding human-dominated landscape for conservation of the hooded crane and, generally, for the vast numbers of migratory waterbirds wintering in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River floodplain. PMID:25768111

  12. Vigilance and activity time-budget adjustments of wintering hooded cranes, Grus monacha, in human-dominated foraging habitats.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunlin; Zhou, Lizhi; Xu, Li; Zhao, Niannian; Beauchamp, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Due to loss and degradation of natural wetlands, waterbirds increasingly rely on surrounding human-dominated habitats to obtain food. Quantifying vigilance patterns, investigating the trade-off among various activities, and examining the underlying mechanisms will help us understand how waterbirds adapt to human-caused disturbances. During two successive winters (November-February of 2012-13 and 2013-14), we studied the hooded crane, Grus monacha, in the Shengjin Lake National Nature Reserve (NNR), China, to investigate how the species responds to human disturbances through vigilance and activity time-budget adjustments. Our results showed striking differences in the behavior of the cranes when foraging in the highly disturbed rice paddy fields found in the buffer zone compared with the degraded natural wetlands in the core area of the NNR. Time spent vigilant decreased with flock size and cranes spent more time vigilant in the human-dominated buffer zone. In the rice paddy fields, the birds were more vigilant but also fed more at the expense of locomotion and maintenance activities. Adult cranes spent more time vigilant and foraged less than juveniles. We recommend habitat recovery in natural wetlands and community co-management in the surrounding human-dominated landscape for conservation of the hooded crane and, generally, for the vast numbers of migratory waterbirds wintering in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River floodplain.

  13. Vigilance and activity time-budget adjustments of wintering hooded cranes, Grus monacha, in human-dominated foraging habitats.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunlin; Zhou, Lizhi; Xu, Li; Zhao, Niannian; Beauchamp, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Due to loss and degradation of natural wetlands, waterbirds increasingly rely on surrounding human-dominated habitats to obtain food. Quantifying vigilance patterns, investigating the trade-off among various activities, and examining the underlying mechanisms will help us understand how waterbirds adapt to human-caused disturbances. During two successive winters (November-February of 2012-13 and 2013-14), we studied the hooded crane, Grus monacha, in the Shengjin Lake National Nature Reserve (NNR), China, to investigate how the species responds to human disturbances through vigilance and activity time-budget adjustments. Our results showed striking differences in the behavior of the cranes when foraging in the highly disturbed rice paddy fields found in the buffer zone compared with the degraded natural wetlands in the core area of the NNR. Time spent vigilant decreased with flock size and cranes spent more time vigilant in the human-dominated buffer zone. In the rice paddy fields, the birds were more vigilant but also fed more at the expense of locomotion and maintenance activities. Adult cranes spent more time vigilant and foraged less than juveniles. We recommend habitat recovery in natural wetlands and community co-management in the surrounding human-dominated landscape for conservation of the hooded crane and, generally, for the vast numbers of migratory waterbirds wintering in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River floodplain. PMID:25768111

  14. Uranium and diagenesis in evaporitic lacustrine mudstone of the Oligocene White River Group, Dawes County, Nebraska. Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Oligocene White River Group consists of the Chadron and the overlying Brule Formations in northwestern Nebraska. The Chadron Formation consists of alluvial and colluvial vitric mudstone beds, but in addition contains white persistent layers (purplish-white layers) that probably resulted from soil formation on vitric parent material. West of the current study area a basal sandstone facies of the Chadron is host rock for the Crow Butte uranium deposit. The Brule, which consists mostly of pedogenically altered alluvial and fluvial vitric mudstone deposits, contains a uraniferous lacustrine facies northwest of Chadron, Nebraska. Detrital minerals in rocks of the White River Group include quartz, feldspar, volcanic glass, smectite, and illite. Chemical precipitate minerals in the lacustrine facies are calcite, dolomite, and gypsum. Authigenic minerals include calcite, dolomite, gypsum, smectite, opal, chalcedony, together with oxidized uranium minerals.

  15. Technical synthesis of prehistoric archaeological investigations on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Sassaman, K.E.; Brooks, M.J.; Hanson, G.T.; Anderson, D.G.

    1989-12-01

    Archaeological investigations on the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in south Carolina span 16 years and continue today through a cooperative agreement between DOE and the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA), University of South Carolina. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of SCIAA has been and continues to be the sole archaeological consultant for DOE-SRS. This report documents technical aspects of all prehistoric archaeological research conducted by the SRARP between 1973 and 1987. Further, this report provides interpretative contexts for archaeological resources as a basis for an archaeological resource plan reported elsewhere (SRARP 1989), and as a comprehensive statement of our current understanding of Native American prehistory and history.

  16. Woolly erionite from the Reese River zeolite deposit, Lander County, Nevada, and its relationship to other erionites.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gude, A.J.; Sheppard, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Woolly erionite from the Reese River deposit, Nevada, is identical in appearance to that at the type locality, near Durkee, Oregon. Both of these erionites differ in appearance from all other erionite reported in the past 20 yr from diverse rocks throughout the world which are described as prismatic or acicular in habit. The Reese River woolly erionite fills joints in gray to brownish-gray lacustrine mudstone of probably Pliocene age, in a zone about 1m thick beneath a erionite febres gray vitric tuff. Compact masses of long, curly, woolly Z are in the plane of the joint and locally are associated with opal. A chemical analysis of wooly erionite yields a unit-cell composition of: Na1.01K2.84Mg0.3Ca1.69Al8.18Si27.84O72.28.51H2O. -from Authors

  17. Water-quality and biological conditions in the Lower Boise River, Ada and Canyon Counties, Idaho, 1994-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2004-01-01

    The water quality and biotic integrity of the lower Boise River between Lucky Peak Dam and the river's mouth near Parma, Idaho, have been affected by agricultural land and water use, wastewater treatment facility discharge, urbanization, reservoir operations, and river channel alteration. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and cooperators have studied water-quality and biological aspects of the lower Boise River in the past to address water-quality concerns and issues brought forth by the Clean Water Act of 1977. Past and present issues include preservation of beneficial uses of the river for fisheries, recreation, and irrigation; and maintenance of high-quality water for domestic and agricultural uses. Evaluation of the data collected from 1994 to 2002 by the USGS revealed increases in constituent concentrations in the lower Boise in a downstream direction. Median suspended sediment concentrations from Diversion Dam (downstream from Lucky Peak Dam) to Parma increased more than 11 times, nitrogen concentrations increased more than 8 times, phosphorus concentrations increased more than 7 times, and fecal coliform concentrations increased more than 400 times. Chlorophyll-a concentrations, used as an indicator of nutrient input and the potential for nuisance algal growth, also increased in a downstream direction; median concentrations were highest at the Middleton and Parma sites. There were no discernible temporal trends in nutrients, sediment, or bacteria concentrations over the 8-year study. The State of Idaho?s temperature standards to protect coldwater biota and salmonid spawning were exceeded most frequently at Middleton and Parma. Suspended sediment concentrations exceeded criteria proposed by Idaho Department of Environmental Quality most frequently at Parma and at all but three tributaries. Total nitrogen concentrations at Glenwood, Middleton, and Parma exceeded national background levels; median flow-adjusted total nitrogen concentrations at Middleton and

  18. Geology and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Blome, Charles D.; Morris, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    The faulting and fracturing in the study area are part of the Miocene Balcones Fault Zone, which is an extensional system of faults that generally trend southwest to northeast in south-central Texas. An igneous dike, containing aphanitic texture, cuts through the center of the study area near the confluence of Honey Creek and the Guadalupe River. The dike penetrates the Cow Creek Limestone and the lower part of the Hensell Sand, which outcrops at three locations.

  19. Thickness and potential well yield of the stratified deposits in the Croton River Basin, Putnam County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irwin, Don J.

    1988-01-01

    In 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Putnam County, NY Department of Health, reviewed and compiled all available well information and aerial photographs to plot: (1) the locations of the wells and springs currently on file with USGS, and (2) the thickness and potential well yield of the stratified deposits in the county. These deposits consist either of glacial sand and gravel that lie primarily in glacially enlarged valleys, or of recent accumulations of clay, sand, and organic material on flood plains and within local depressions. Plate 1 shows the locations of all wells and springs in the area that are currently on file in USGS 's computerized data base; both bedrock wells and wells that tap till or stratified material are included. Also shown are the locations and depths of the wells, the reported depth to bedrock and yield, and the yield of all springs. Plate 2 shows the thickness of the stratified deposits as determined from logs of wells that were drilled through it; plate 3 shows the amount of water that a stratified deposit may be expected to yield to a new well. These estimates are based on the reported yields of the compiled wells. (Lantz-PTT)

  20. Flow characteristics of an inclined air-curtain range hood in a draft.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The inclined air-curtain technology was applied to build an inclined air-curtain range hood. A draft generator was applied to affect the inclined air-curtain range hood in three directions: lateral (θ=0°), oblique (θ=45°), and front (θ=90°). The three suction flow rates provided by the inclined air-curtain range hood were 10.1, 10.9, and 12.6 m(3)/min. The laser-assisted flow visualization technique and the tracer-gas test method were used to investigate the performance of the range hood under the influence of a draft. The results show that the inclined air-curtain range hood has a strong ability to resist the negative effect of a front draft until the draft velocity is greater than 0.5 m/s. The oblique draft affected the containment ability of the inclined air-curtain range hood when the draft velocity was larger than 0.3 m/s. When the lateral draft effect was applied, the capture efficiency of the inclined air-curtain range hood decreased quickly in the draft velocity from 0.2 m/s to 0.3 m/s. However, the capture efficiencies of the inclined air-curtain range hood under the influence of the front draft were higher than those under the influence of the oblique draft from 0.3 m/s to 0.5 m/s.

  1. 77 FR 26699 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone around vessels involved in a Coast Guard Ready for Operations exercise in Hood Canal, WA...

  2. 78 FR 8027 - Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone around vessels involved in Coast Guard training exercises in Hood Canal, WA. This...

  3. 77 FR 60960 - Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The U.S. Coast Guard is proposing to establish a safety zone around vessels involved in Coast Guard training exercises in Hood...

  4. 77 FR 59083 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise, Hood Canal, Washington AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone around vessels involved in a Coast Guard Ready for Operations exercise in Hood...

  5. 76 FR 70649 - Safety Zone; Department of Defense Exercise, Hood Canal, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Department of Defense Exercise, Hood Canal... temporary safety zone around vessels involved in a Department of Defense exercise in Hood Canal, WA that... public during the exercise. The zone will do so by prohibiting any person or vessel from entering...

  6. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  7. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  9. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  10. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  11. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  12. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  13. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  15. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  16. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  17. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  18. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  19. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  20. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and...

  1. Flow characteristics of an inclined air-curtain range hood in a draft

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Jia-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The inclined air-curtain technology was applied to build an inclined air-curtain range hood. A draft generator was applied to affect the inclined air-curtain range hood in three directions: lateral (θ=0°), oblique (θ=45°), and front (θ=90°). The three suction flow rates provided by the inclined air-curtain range hood were 10.1, 10.9, and 12.6 m3/min. The laser-assisted flow visualization technique and the tracer-gas test method were used to investigate the performance of the range hood under the influence of a draft. The results show that the inclined air-curtain range hood has a strong ability to resist the negative effect of a front draft until the draft velocity is greater than 0.5 m/s. The oblique draft affected the containment ability of the inclined air-curtain range hood when the draft velocity was larger than 0.3 m/s. When the lateral draft effect was applied, the capture efficiency of the inclined air-curtain range hood decreased quickly in the draft velocity from 0.2 m/s to 0.3 m/s. However, the capture efficiencies of the inclined air-curtain range hood under the influence of the front draft were higher than those under the influence of the oblique draft from 0.3 m/s to 0.5 m/s. PMID:25810445

  2. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571.113 Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. S1. Purpose and scope.... Application. This standard applies to passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks, and buses. S3... engine, luggage, storage, or battery compartment. S4. Requirements. S4.1Each hood must be provided with...

  3. "Always the Outlaw": The Potential for Subversion of the Metanarrative in Retellings of Robin Hood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines six recent retellings of Robin Hood and concentrates on the representation of class, religion and gender in the texts. The question is asked: "what values do the texts implicitly or explicitly arm?" The idea that Robin Hood retellings are systematic of a socially and politically conservative ideology is interrogated by…

  4. The Use of Feedback in Lab Energy Conservation: Fume Hoods at MIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesolowski, Daniel; Olivetti, Elsa; Graham, Amanda; Lanou, Steve; Cooper, Peter; Doughty, Jim; Wilk, Rich; Glicksman, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of an Massachusetts Institute of Technology Chemistry Department campaign to reduce energy consumption in chemical fume hoods. Hood use feedback to lab users is a crucial component of this campaign. Design/methodology/approach: Sash position sensor data on variable air volume fume…

  5. Water-quality data for the Russian River Basin, Mendocino and Sonoma Counties, California, 2005-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anders, Robert; Davidek, Karl; Stoeckel, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Field measurements included discharge, barometric pressure, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, temperature, and turbidity. All samples were analyzed for nutrients, major ions, trace metals, total and dissolved organic carbon, organic wastewater compounds, standard bacterial indicators, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Standard bacterial indicators included total coliform, Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens for the period 2005 through 2007, and total and fecal coliform, and enterococci for 2010. In addition, enrichment of enterococci was performed on all surface-water samples collected during summer 2006, for detection of the human-associated enterococcal surface protein in Enterococcus faecium to assess the presence of sewage effluent in the Russian River. Other analyses included organic wastewater compounds of bed sediment samples collected from four Russian River sites during 2005; carbon-13 isotopic values of the dissolved inorganic carbon for surface-water and groundwater samples collected during 2006; human-use pharmaceuticals on Russian River samples collected during 2007 and 2010; and the radiogenic isotopes tritium and carbon-14 for groundwater samples collected during 2008.

  6. Appraisal of the interconnection between the St Johns River and the surficial aquifer, east-central Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, R.M.; Stone, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed deepening of the navigation channel in the St. Johns River to about 46-48 feet below sea level (45 feet below mean low water) may breach up to 11 feet of limestone unit of the lower part of the surficial aquifer along a 25-mile channel. The limestone supplies water to numerous domestic wells along the river in the Jacksonville area. Recent channel improvements to about 39 feet below sea level have already breached the limestone at many locations. Where breaching has not yet occurred, less than 1 to 6 feet of undifferentiated sediments overlie the limestone. These sediments, consisting predominantly of sand, are generally too permeable to form an effective confining layer. Chloride concentrations determined from water in wells tapping the limestone unit range from 8 to 6,600 milligrams per liter. However, chloride concentrations in water from wells located more than 500 feet from the river, were generally less than 30 milligrams per liter. The proposed dredging operation is not expected to alter significantly the present hydrologic system. The current position of the interface most likely represents conditions that will be present after future channel improvements. (USGS)

  7. Reconnaissance of chemical and physical characteristics of selected bottom sediments of the Caloosahatchee River and estuary, tributaries, and contiguous bays, Lee County, Florida, July 20-30, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Mario; Marot, M.E.; Holmes, C.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes a reconnaissance study, conducted July 20-30, 1998, of chemical and physical characteristics of recently deposited bottom sediments in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary. Recently deposited sediments were identified using an isotopic chronometer, Beryllium-7 (7Be), a short-lived radioisotope. Fifty-nine sites were sampled in an area that encompasses the Caloosahatchee River (River) about three miles upstream from the Franklin Lock (S-79), the entire tidally affected length of the river (estuary), and the contiguous water bodies of Matlacha Pass, San Carlos Bay, Estero Bay, Tarpon Bay, and Pine Island Sound in Lee County, Florida. Bottom sediments were sampled for 7Be at 59 sites. From the results of the 7Be analysis, 30 sites were selected for physical and chemical analysis. Sediments were analyzed for particle size, total organic carbon (TOC), trace elements, and toxic organic compounds, using semiquantitative methods for trace elements and organic compounds. The semiquantitative scans of trace elements indicated that cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations, when normalized to aluminum, were above the natural background range at 24 of 30 sites. Particle size and TOC were used to characterize sediment deposition patterns and organic content. Pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (CaPAHs) were determined at 30 sites using immunoassay analysis. The semiquantitative immunoassay analyses of toxic organic compounds indicated that all of the samples contained DDT, cyclodienes as chlordane (pesticides), and CaPAHs. PCBs were not detected. Based on analyses of the 30 sites, sediments at 10 of these sites were analyzed for selected trace elements and toxic organic compounds, including pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs, using quantitative laboratory procedures. No arsenic or cadmium was detected. Zinc was detected at two sites with concentrations greater than the lower limit of the range of

  8. Quantification and Simulation of Metal Loading to the Upper Animas River, Eureka to Silverton, San Juan County, Colorado, September 1997 and August 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paschke, Suzanne S.; Kimball, Briant A.; Runkel, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    the 1998 study. The second affected reach was downstream from Arrastra Gulch, where the increase in zinc load seems related to a series of right-bank inflows with low pH Quantification and Simulation of Metal Loading to the Upper Animas River, Eureka to Silverton, San Juan County, Colorado, September 1997 and August 1998By Suzanne S. Paschke, Briant A. Kimball, and Robert L. Runkeland elevated dissolved zinc concentrations. A third increase in zinc load occurred 6,100 meters downstream from the 1997 injection site and may have been from ground-water discharge with elevated zinc concentrations based on mass-loading graphs and the lack of visible inflow in the reach. A fourth but lesser dissolved zinc load increase occurred downstream from tailings near the Lackawanna Mill. Results of the tracer-injection studies and the effects of potential remediation were analyzed using the one- dimensional stream-transport computer code OTIS. Based on simulation results, instream zinc concentrations downstream from the Kittimack tailings to upstream from Arrastra Gulch would approach 0.16 milligram per liter (the upper limit of acute toxicity for some sensitive aquatic species) if zinc inflow concentrations were reduced by 75 percent in the stream reaches receiving inflow from the Forest Queen mine, the Kittimack tailings, and downstream from Howardsville. However, simulated zinc concentrations downstream from Arrastra Gulch were higher than approximately 0.30 milligram per liter due to numerous visible inflows and assumed ground-water discharge with elevated zinc concentrations in the lower part of the study reach. Remediation of discrete visible inflows seems a viable approach to reducing zinc inflow loads to the upper Animas River. Remediation downstream from Arrastra Gulch is more complicated because ground-water discharge with elevated zinc concentrations seems to contribute to the instream zinc load.

  9. Robin Hood caught in Wonderland: brain SPECT findings.

    PubMed

    Morland, David; Wolff, Valérie; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Marescaux, Christian; Namer, Izzie Jacques

    2013-12-01

    We present the case of a 53-year-old woman presenting several episodes of body image distortions, ground deformation illusions, and problems assessing distance in the orthostatic position corresponding to the Alice in Wonderland syndrome. No symptoms were reported when sitting or lying down. She had uncontrolled hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and a history of head trauma. Her condition had been diagnosed with left internal carotid artery dissection 2 years earlier. Brain SPECT with 99mTc-ECD performed after i.v. injection of the radiotracer in supine and in standing positions showed hypoperfusion in the healthy contralateral frontoparietal operculum (Robin Hood syndrome), deteriorating when standing up. PMID:24152648

  10. Hydrologic data summary for the St. Lucie River Estuary, Martin and St. Lucie Counties, Florida, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrne, Michael J.; Patino, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    A hydrologic analysis was made at three canal sites and four tidal sites along the St. Lucie River Estuary in southeastern Florida from 1998 to 2001. The data included for analysis are stage, 15-minute flow, salinity, water temperature, turbidity, and suspended-solids concentration. During the period of record, the estuary experienced a drought, major storm events, and high-water discharge from Lake Okeechobee. Flow mainly occurred through the South Fork of the St. Lucie River; however, when flow increased through control structures along the C-23 and C-24 Canals, the North Fork was a larger than usual contributor of total freshwater inflow to the estuary. At one tidal site (Steele Point), the majority of flow was southward toward the St. Lucie Inlet; at a second tidal site (Indian River Bridge), the majority of flow was northward into the Indian River Lagoon. Large-volume stormwater discharge events greatly affected the St. Lucie River Estuary. Increased discharge typically was accompanied by salinity decreases that resulted in water becoming and remaining fresh throughout the estuary until the discharge events ended. Salinity in the estuary usually returned to prestorm levels within a few days after the events. Turbidity decreased and salinity began to increase almost immediately when the gates at the control structures closed. Salinity ranged from less than 1 to greater than 35 parts per thousand during the period of record (1998-2001), and typically varied by several parts per thousand during a tidal cycle. Suspended-solids concentrations were observed at one canal site (S-80) and two tidal sites (Speedy Point and Steele Point) during a discharge event in April and May 2000. Results suggest that most deposition of suspended-solids concentration occurs between S-80 and Speedy Point. The turbidity data collected also support this interpretation. The ratio of inorganic to organic suspended-solids concentration observed at S-80, Speedy Point, and Steele Point

  11. Estimates of deep percolation beneath native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River Channel, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Prudic, David E.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Akstin, Katherine C.; Boyd, Robert A.; Henkelman, Katherine K.

    2003-01-01

    The presence and approximate rates of deep percolation beneath areas of native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River channel in the Amargosa Desert of southern Nevada were evaluated using the chloride mass-balance method and inferred downward velocities of chloride and nitrate peaks. Estimates of deep-percolation rates in the Amargosa Desert are needed for the analysis of regional ground-water flow and transport. An understanding of regional flow patterns is important because ground water originating on the Nevada Test Site may pass through the area before discharging from springs at lower elevations in the Amargosa Desert and in Death Valley. Nine boreholes 10 to 16 meters deep were cored nearly continuously using a hollow-stem auger designed for gravelly sediments. Two boreholes were drilled in each of three irrigated fields in the Amargosa-Farms area, two in the Amargosa-River channel, and one in an undisturbed area of native vegetation. Data from previously cored boreholes beneath undisturbed, native vegetation were compared with the new data to further assess deep percolation under current climatic conditions and provide information on spatial variability. The profiles beneath native vegetation were characterized by large amounts of accumulated chloride just below the root zone with almost no further accumulation at greater depths. This pattern is typical of profiles beneath interfluvial areas in arid alluvial basins of the southwestern United States, where salts have been accumulating since the end of the Pleistocene. The profiles beneath irrigated fields and the Amargosa-River channel contained more than twice the volume of water compared to profiles beneath native vegetation, consistent with active deep percolation beneath these sites. Chloride profiles beneath two older fields (cultivated since the 1960?s) as well as the upstream Amargosa-River site were indicative of long-term, quasi-steady deep percolation. Chloride profiles beneath the

  12. A desperate poor country: History and settlement patterning on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Savannah River Archaeological Research Papers 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.; Crass, D.C.

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of this monograph is twofold: first, to example historical trends and settlement patterning through time within the boundaries of the present-day Savannah River Site (SRS), and second, to establish a framework for future investigations of historic period occupation in the study area. Settlement patterns are defined as the distribution of archaeological sites across a landscape. Settlement patterning is a response to widely held cultural needs; therefore, it offers a strategic starting point for the functional interpretation of archaeological cultures. The analysis of settlement patterns if useful because it is practical, it shows the spatial dimension of the man-environment interrelationship that is relative to the technological level of the settlement`s inhabitants, and it can yield concrete clues regarding social organization.

  13. Remote sensing research for agricultural applications. [San Joaquin County, California and Snake River Plain and Twin Falls area, Idaho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N. (Principal Investigator); Wall, S. L.; Beck, L. H.; Degloria, S. D.; Ritter, P. R.; Thomas, R. W.; Travlos, A. J.; Fakhoury, E.

    1984-01-01

    Materials and methods used to characterize selected soil properties and agricultural crops in San Joaquin County, California are described. Results show that: (1) the location and widths of TM bands are suitable for detecting differences in selected soil properties; (2) the number of TM spectral bands allows the quantification of soil spectral curve form and magnitude; and (3) the spatial and geometric quality of TM data allows for the discrimination and quantification of within field variability of soil properties. The design of the LANDSAT based multiple crop acreage estimation experiment for the Idaho Department of Water Resources is described including the use of U.C. Berkeley's Survey Modeling Planning Model. Progress made on Peditor software development on MIDAS, and cooperative computing using local and remote systems is reported as well as development of MIDAS microcomputer systems.

  14. Seepage investigation and selected hydrologic data for the Escalante River drainage basin, Garfield and Kane Counties, Utah, 1909-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilberg, Dale E.; Stolp, Bernard J.

    2005-01-01

    This report contains the results of an October 2001 seepage investigation conducted along a reach of the Escalante River in Utah extending from the U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station near Escalante to the mouth of Stevens Canyon. Discharge was measured at 16 individual sites along 15 consecutive reaches. Total reach length was about 86 miles. A reconnaissance-level sampling of water for tritium and chlorofluorcarbons was also done. In addition, hydrologic and water-quality data previously collected and published by the U.S. Geological Survey for the 2,020-square-mile Escalante River drainage basin was compiled and is presented in 12 tables. These data were collected from 64 surface-water sites and 28 springs from 1909 to 2002. None of the 15 consecutive reaches along the Escalante River had a measured loss or gain that exceeded the measurement error. All discharge measurements taken during the seepage investigation were assigned a qualitative rating of accuracy that ranged from 5 percent to greater than 8 percent of the actual flow. Summing the potential error for each measurement and dividing by the maximum of either the upstream discharge and any tributary inflow, or the downstream discharge, determined the normalized error for a reach. This was compared to the computed loss or gain that also was normalized to the maximum discharge. A loss or gain for a specified reach is considered significant when the loss or gain (normalized percentage difference) is greater than the measurement error (normalized percentage error). The percentage difference and percentage error were normalized to allow comparison between reaches with different amounts of discharge. The plate that accompanies the report is 36' by 40' and can be printed in 16 tiles, 8.5 by 11 inches. An index for the tiles is located on the lower left-hand side of the plate. Using Adobe Acrobat, the plate can be viewed independent of the report; all Acrobat functions are available.

  15. Intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.K.; Sassaman, K.E.

    1993-11-01

    The project area for the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility on the Savannah River Site includes a six-acre tract along Fourmile Branch and 18 mi of trunk line corridors. Archaeological investigations of the six-acre parcel resulted in the discovery of one small prehistoric site designated 38AK465. This cultural resource does not have the potential to add significantly to archaeological knowledge of human occupation in the region. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) therefore recommends that 38AK465 is not eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and further recommends a determination of no effect. Archaeological survey along the trunk line corridors implicated previously recorded sites 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK415, 38AK417, 38AK419, and 38AK436. Past disturbance from construction had severely disturbed 38AK92 and no archaeological evidence of 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 was recovered during survey. Lacking further evidence for the existence of these sites, the SRARP recommends that 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 are not eligible for nomination to the NRHP and thus warrant a determination of no effect. Two of these sites, 38Ak415 and 38AK417, required further investigation to evaluate their archaeological significance. Both of the sites have the potential to yield significant data on the prehistoric period occupation of the Aiken Plateau and the SRARP recommends that they are eligible for nomination to the NRHP. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program recommends that adverse effects to sites 38AK415 and 38AK417 from proposed construction can be mitigated through avoidance.

  16. Channel evolution of the Hatchie River near the U.S. Highway 51 crossing in Lauderdale and Tipton counties, West Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryan, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to describe the channel cross-section evolution near the bridge crossing of the Hatchie River at U.S. Highway 51 in Lauderdale and Tipton Counties, in West Tennessee. The study also included velocity and discharge distributions near the bridge crossing, and definition of streamflow duration and flood frequencies at the bridge site and comparison of these statistics with flows prior to the bridge collapse. Cross-section measurements at the site indicated that the channel was widening at a rate of 0.8 ft/year from 1931 through about 1975. The channel bed was stable at an elevation of about 235 ft. Construction of a south bound bridge in 1974 and 1975 reduced the effective flow width from about 4,000 to about 1,000 ft. Data collected from 1975 to 1981 indicated that the channel bed degraded to an elevation of about 230 ft and the widening rate increased to about 4.5 ft/year. The channel bed returned to approximately the pre-construction elevation of 235 ft as channel width increased. The widening rate decreased to about 1.8 ft/year from 1981 through 1989. Channel-geometry data indicated that recent channel morphology changes along the toe of the right bank have resulted in continued bank undercutting and bank failure. Cross-section geometry and flow-velocity distributions from measurements made from April 6 through 10, 1989, indicate that there is a high-flow meander pattern through this river reach and that the bridges are located at the point where the current strikes the right bank. (USGS)

  17. 2002 Water-Table Contours of the Mojave River and the Morongo Ground-Water Basins, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.A.; Stamos, C.L.; Predmore, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    The Mojave River and Morongo ground-water basins are in the southwestern part of the Mojave Desert in southern California. Ground water from these basins supplies a major part of the water requirements for the region. The continuous population growth in this area has resulted in ever-increasing demands on local ground-water resources. The collection and interpretation of ground-water data helps local water districts, military bases, and private citizens gain a better understanding of the ground-water flow systems, and consequently, water availability. During 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey and other agencies made approximately 2,500 water-level measurements in the Mojave River and Morongo ground-water basins. These data document recent conditions and, when compared with previous data, changes in ground-water levels. A water-level contour map was drawn using data from about 660 wells, providing coverage for most of the basins. Twenty-eight hydrographs show long-term (up to 70 years) water-level conditions throughout the basins, and 9 short-term (1997 to 2002) hydrographs show the effects of recharge and discharge along the Mojave River. In addition, a water-level-change map was compiled to compare 2000 and 2002 water levels throughout the basins. In the Mojave River ground-water basin, about 66 percent of the wells had water-level declines of 0.5 ft or more since 2000 and about 27 percent of the wells had water-level declines greater than 5 ft. The only area that had water-level increases greater than 5 ft that were not attributed to fluctuations in nearby pumpage was in the Harper Lake (dry) area where there has been a significant reduction in pumpage during the last decade. In the Morongo ground-water basin, about 36 percent of the wells had water-level declines of 0.5 ft or more and about 10 percent of the wells had water-level declines greater than 5 ft. Water-level increases greater than 5 ft were measured only in the Warren subbasin, where artificial

  18. Biological assessment of the lower Boise River, October 1995 through January 1998, Ada and Canyon Counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullins, William H.

    1999-01-01

    The lower Boise River, between Lucky Peak Dam and the mouth of the river near Parma, Idaho, is adversely affected by various land- and water-use activities. To assess the biotic integrity of the river and the effects of environmental perturbations on aquatic community structure, and to provide a baseline from which to identify future changes in habitat conditions, biological data were collected from October 1995 through January 1998 and evaluated using protocols developed for the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Aquatic biological communities were sampled according to the following schedule: epilithic periphyton were collected in October 1995, October 1996, and August 1997; benthic macroinvertebrates were collected in October 1995, 1996, and 1997; and fish were collected in December 1996 and August 1997. Qualitative measurements of instream and riparian habitat indicated an overall decrease in instream habitat quality in a downstream direction. Embeddedness was high at all sites but was lower at the Eckert Road site than at the downstream sites near Middleton and Parma. Silt/sand substrate increased from 17 percent at the Eckert Road site to 49 percent near the mouth of the river. The Eckert Road site had a mix of geomorphic channel units (pool/riffle/run), whereas the Middleton and Parma sites were dominated by runs with very little pool or riffle habitat. Epilithic periphyton chlorophyll-a and ashfree dry weight values tended to increase downstream to the Middleton site and decrease from Middleton to the downstream sites near Caldwell and near Parma. Benthic index of biotic integrity (B-IBI) scores for macroinvertebrates collected in 1995, 1996, and 1997 were highest at the Eckert Road site and decreased at sites downstream. IBI scores for fish collected in 1996 were similar at the Glenwood Bridge and Middleton sites (17 and 16, respectively) and were indicative of a low to moderate level of disturbance. In contrast, the IBI score

  19. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow in La Crosse County, Wisconsin, and into nearby pools of the Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.; Saad, David A.; Chapel, Dawn M.

    2003-01-01

    The models provide estimates of the locations and amount of ground-water flow into Pool 8 and the southern portion of Pool 7 of the Mississippi River. Ground-water discharges into all areas of the pools, except along the eastern shore in the vicinity of the city of La Crosse and immediately downgradient from lock and dam 7 and 8. Ground-water flow into the pools is generally greatest around the perimeter with decreasing amounts away from the perimeter. An area of relatively high ground-water discharge extends out towards the center of Pool 7 from the upper reaches of the pool and may

  20. Thermoregulation: incubators, radiant warmers, artificial skins, and body hoods.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, M H

    1991-09-01

    Keeping babies warm whether using incubator or radiant warmers is important in optimizing their chances of survival. Many design changes have occurred in devices for keeping babies warm, while few controlled studies using clinically important end points have been conducted to assess these changes. Radiant warmers produce larger evaporative heat and water losses and slightly higher basal metabolic rate than incubators. The clinical significance of the higher metabolic rate is uncertain. The water losses create an additional problem in managing infants under radiant warmers. The use of hoods made of thin plastic films to raise local humidity and reduce evaporative water loss helps control this problem. In incubators, humidity may be necessary to provide a warm enough environment for the most immature infants. Artificial skins as yet have not supplanted body hoods for this purpose. Both incubators and radiant warmers produce temperature instability when used as skin servocontrolled devices. There are, however, no data currently available to say how much thermal instability can be well tolerated by a baby. Too much thermal instability produces apnea and increased mortality. Air servocontrolling an incubator reduces environmental temperature instability.