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Sample records for horizontal flow regime

  1. A mechanistic determination of horizontal flow regime bound using void wave celerity

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The two-phase flow regime boundaries in a horizontal channel has been investigated by using the behavior of the second order void wave celerities. The average two-fluid model has been constituted with closure relations for horizontally stratified and bubbly flows. A vapor phase turbulent stress model for a smooth interface geometry has been included. It is found that the second order waves (i.e., eigenvalues) propagate in opposite direction with almost the same speed when the liquid phase is stationary. Using the well-posedness limit of the two-phase system, the dispersed-stratified flow regime boundary has been modeled. Two-phase Froude number has been theoretically found to be a convenient parameter in quantifying the flow regime boundary as a function of the void fraction. It is found that interaction between void wave celerities become stronger as the two-phase Froude number is reduced. This result should be interpreted as that gravity and the relative velocity are key parameters in determining flow regime boundaries in a horizontal flow. The influence of the vapor phase turbulent stress found to stabilize the flow stratification. This study clearly shows that the average two-fluid model is very effective for a mechanistic determination of horizontal flow regimes if appropriate closure relations are developed.

  2. Flow Regime Identification of Horizontal Two Phase Refrigerant R-134a Flow Using Neural Networks (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Figure 1. The apparatus for the current work consists of two separate loops , 1) R-134a test loop and 2) Water Cooling loop . A pumped refrigeration loop ...measurements are taken between an L/D of 280 and 300 to ensure that the two phase flow is fully developed. Testing was performed with refrigerant...analysis demonstrates the liquid vapor distributions for each flow regime as seen in Figure 3. Each test point described in this paper is accompanied

  3. Characterization of two-phase flow regimes in horizontal tubes using 81mKr tracer experiments.

    PubMed

    Oriol, Jean; Leclerc, Jean Pierre; Berne, Philippe; Gousseau, Georges; Jallut, Christian; Tochon, Patrice; Clement, Patrice

    2008-10-01

    The diagnosis of heat exchangers on duty with respect to flow mal-distributions needs the development of non-intrusive inlet-outlet experimental techniques in order to perform an online fault diagnosis. Tracer experiments are an example of such techniques. They can be applied to mono-phase heat exchangers but also to multi-phase ones. In this case, the tracer experiments are more difficult to perform. In order to check for the capabilities of tracer experiments to be used for the flow mal-distribution diagnosis in the case of multi-phase heat exchangers, we present here a preliminary study on the simplest possible system: two-phase flows in a horizontal tube. (81m)Kr is used as gas tracer and properly collimated NaI (TI) crystal scintillators as detectors. The specific shape of the tracer response allows two-phase flow regimes to be characterized. Signal analysis allows the estimation of the gas phase real average velocity and consequently of the liquid phase real average velocity as well as of the volumetric void fraction. These results are compared successfully to those obtained with liquid phase tracer experiments previously presented by Oriol et al. 2007. Characterization of the two-phase flow regimes and liquid dispersion in horizontal and vertical tubes using coloured tracer and no intrusive optical detector. Chem. Eng. Sci. 63(1), 24-34, as well as to those given by correlations from literature.

  4. A numerical study of condensation heat transfer for R-134a in annular flow regime inside horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariwibowo, Teguh Hady; Solihah, Fifi Hesty; Harjanto, Bambang

    2017-01-01

    Condensation in a horizontal tube is a phenomenon that occurs in steam power plants, and oil processing. There is some flow regime in the condensation, i.e. annular, bubble, wavy, stratified, and intermittent. Annular flow regime is a regime that happens by 60-70% of the length of a heat exchanger [2]. One important component of the condensation is a heat transfer coefficient. However, the calculation of condensation heat transfer coefficient is a complex thing. This study uses R-134a at saturated temperature 40°C. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is performed by approaching the pseudo two-phase flow. This is intended to obtain the liquid films thickness, eddy viscosity, and shear stress distribution by using the Von Karman universal velocity profiles in liquid films. The results of this study showed that the increase in mass flux and vapor fraction can increase two-phase heat transfer coefficient and two-phase pressure drop. However, the increased vapor fraction followed by a decrease of condensate dimensionless thickness

  5. The effect of primary treatment and flow regime on clogging development in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: An experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, Anna; Corzo, Angélica; Alvarez, Eduardo; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2011-06-01

    The effect of both the type of primary treatment (hydrolitic up-flow sludge blanket (HUSB) reactor and conventional settling) and the flow regime (batch and continuous) on clogging development in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF CWs) was studied. Clogging indicators (such as accumulated solids, hydraulic conductivity and drainable porosity) were determined in an experimental plant with three treatment lines. Correlations were encountered between the solids accumulated and both saturated hydraulic conductivity and drainable porosity reduction over time (74.5% and 89.2% of correlation, respectively). SSF CW implemented with a HUSB reactor accumulated ca. 30% lower sludge (1.9 kg DM/m(2)) than a system with a settler (2.5-2.8 kg DM/m(2)). However, no significant differences were recorded among treatment lines concerning hydraulic parameters (such as hydraulic conductivity or porosity). Root system development contributed to clogging. Accordingly, planted wetlands showed between 30% and 40% and 10% lower hydraulic conductivity and porosity reduction, respectively, than non-planted wetlands.

  6. Experimental Study on the Flow Regimes and Pressure Gradients of Air-Oil-Water Three-Phase Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M.; Shaahid, S. M.; Tunde, Lukman O.; Al-Sarkhi, A.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20°C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed. PMID:24523645

  7. Experimental study on the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flow in horizontal pipes.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M; Shaahid, S M; Tunde, Lukman O; Al-Sarkhi, A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20 °C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed.

  8. Non-invasive classification of gas-liquid two-phase horizontal flow regimes using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and a neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa Abbagoni, Baba; Yeung, Hoi

    2016-08-01

    The identification of flow pattern is a key issue in multiphase flow which is encountered in the petrochemical industry. It is difficult to identify the gas-liquid flow regimes objectively with the gas-liquid two-phase flow. This paper presents the feasibility of a clamp-on instrument for an objective flow regime classification of two-phase flow using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and an artificial neural network, which records and processes the ultrasonic signals reflected from the two-phase flow. Experimental data is obtained on a horizontal test rig with a total pipe length of 21 m and 5.08 cm internal diameter carrying air-water two-phase flow under slug, elongated bubble, stratified-wavy and, stratified flow regimes. Multilayer perceptron neural networks (MLPNNs) are used to develop the classification model. The classifier requires features as an input which is representative of the signals. Ultrasound signal features are extracted by applying both power spectral density (PSD) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) methods to the flow signals. A classification scheme of ‘1-of-C coding method for classification’ was adopted to classify features extracted into one of four flow regime categories. To improve the performance of the flow regime classifier network, a second level neural network was incorporated by using the output of a first level networks feature as an input feature. The addition of the two network models provided a combined neural network model which has achieved a higher accuracy than single neural network models. Classification accuracies are evaluated in the form of both the PSD and DWT features. The success rates of the two models are: (1) using PSD features, the classifier missed 3 datasets out of 24 test datasets of the classification and scored 87.5% accuracy; (2) with the DWT features, the network misclassified only one data point and it was able to classify the flow patterns up to 95.8% accuracy. This approach has demonstrated the

  9. The transition between stratified and annular regimes for horizontal two-phase flow in small diameter tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Galbiati, L.; Andreini, P. )

    1992-03-01

    In this paper a modification to the model of Taitel and Dukler to include the effect of surface tension in transition between stratified and annular regimes is proposed. The predictions of the modified theory given in this paper are compared with empirical boundaries presented in literature. A good agreement has been found.

  10. Horizontal Two Phase Flow Regime Identification: Comparison of Pressure Signature, Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and High Speed Visualization (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    non- iterative algorithms include: linear back projection (LBP), singular value decomposition, and Tikhonov . These algorithms are fast and can be...technique, Newton-Rapshson iterative Tikhonov , and Landweber iteration . These algorithms are slower and must be performed during post processing; they... iterative methods can now be used to solve for permittivity distributions. Pressure signal analysis is another method used for regime identification

  11. Interaction of free and forced convection in horizontal tubes in the transition regime.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental investigation of some new aspects of the combined free and forced convection interacting in the transition regime of a horizontal tube under uniform heat flux conditions. The results obtained include indications that thermally induced secondary flows attenuate the fluctuations in low inlet turbulence flows, while they restabilize the flow as the inlet turbulence is increased.

  12. Liquid-Vapor Flow Regime Transitions for Use in Design of Heat Transfer Loops in Spacecraft - An Investigation of Two-Phase Flow in Zero Gravity Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Horizontal Dukler -Taitel, Vertical Dukler -Taitel, Vertical Weisman and H1orizontal Weisman. None of these models when’ dxtrap- olated to zero-g...COMPARISON OF LAB RESULTS WITH THE FOUR FLOW 37 REGIME MAPS Dukler -Taitel Horizontal Flow Regime Map 37 Weisman Horizontal Flow Regime Map 50 Dukler -Taitel... Dukler -Taitel Horizontal Flow Regime Map 72 The Dukler -Taitel Vertical Flow Regime Map 72 VII. ANALYTICAL WORK 73 VIII.CONCLUSIONS 76 References 77

  13. Environment Flow Assessment with Flow Regime Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Ho, C. C.; Chang, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    To avoid worsen river and estuarine ecosystems cause by overusing water resources, environmental flows conservation is applied to reduce the impact of river environment. Environmental flows refer to water provided within a river, wetland or coastal zone to sustain ecosystems and benefits to human wellbeing. Environment flow assessment is now widely accepted that a naturally variable flow regime, rather than just a minimum low flow. In this study, we propose four methods, experience method, Tenant method, hydraulic method and habitat method to assess the environmental flow of base flow, flush flow and overbank flow with different discharge, frequency and occurrence period. Dahan River has been chosen as a case to demonstrate the assessment mechanism. The alternatives impact analysis of environment and human water used provides a reference for stakeholders when holding an environmental flow consultative meeting.

  14. Two-phase flow regime map predictions under microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Karri, S.B.R.; Mathur, V.K.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the widely used models of Taitel-Dukler and Weisman et al. are extrapolated to microgravity levels to compare predicted flow pattern boundaries for horizontal and vertical flows. Efforts have been made to analyze how the two-phase flow models available in the literature predict flow regime transitions in microgravity. The models of Taitel-Dukler and Weisman et al. have been found to be more suitable for extrapolation to a wide range of system parameters than the other two-phase flow regime maps available in the literature. The original criteria for all cases are used to predict the transition lines, except for the transition to dispersed flow regime in case of the Weisman model for horizontal flow. The constant 0.97 on the righthand side of this correlation should be two times that value, i.e., 1.94, in order to match this transition line in their original paper.

  15. Flow regimes during immiscible displacement

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Mcclure, James; Berrill, Mark A.; ...

    2017-02-01

    Fractional ow of immiscible phases occurs at the pore scale where grain surfaces and phases interfaces obstruct phase mobility. However, the larger scale behavior is described by a saturation-dependent phenomenological relationship called relative permeability. As a consequence, pore-scale parameters, such as phase topology and/ or geometry, and details of the flow regime cannot be directly related to Darcy-scale flow parameters. It is well understood that relative permeability is not a unique relationship of wetting-phase saturation and rather depends on the experimental conditions at which it is measured. Herein we use fast X-ray microcomputed tomography to image pore-scale phase arrangements duringmore » fractional flow and then forward simulate the flow regimes using the lattice-Boltzmann method to better understand the underlying pore-scale flow regimes and their influence on Darcy-scale parameters. We find that relative permeability is highly dependent on capillary number and that the Corey model fits the observed trends. At the pore scale, while phase topologies are continuously changing on the scale of individual pores, the Euler characteristic of the nonwetting phase (NWP) averaged over a sufficiently large field of view can describe the bulk topological characteristics; the Euler characteristic decreases with increasing capillary number resulting in an increase in relative permeability. Lastly, we quantify the fraction of NWP that flows through disconnected ganglion dynamics and demonstrate that this can be a significant fraction of the NWP flux for intermediate wetting-phase saturation. Furthermore, rate dependencies occur in our homogenous sample (without capillary end effect) and the underlying cause is attributed to ganglion flow that can significantly influence phase topology during the fractional flow of immiscible phases.« less

  16. On the Hydraulics of Flowing Horizontal Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, A.; Zhan, H.

    2003-12-01

    A flowing horizontal well is a special type of horizontal well that does not have pumping/injecting facility. The discharge rate of a flowing horizontal well is controlled by the hydraulic gradient between the aquifer and the well and it generally varies with time if the hydraulic head of the aquifer is transient. This type of well has been used in landslide control, mining dewatering, water table control, underground water transportation through a horizontal tunnel, agricultural water drainage, and other applications. Flowing horizontal wells have quite different hydrodynamic characteristics from horizontal wells with fixed pumping or injecting rates because their discharge rates are functions of the aquifer hydraulic heads (Zhan et al, 2001; Zhan and Zlotnik, 2002). Hydraulics of flowing horizontal wells have rarely been studied although the hydraulics of flowing vertical wells have been extensively investigated before. The purpose of this paper is to obtain analytical solutions of groundwater flow to a flowing horizontal-well in a confined aquifer, in a water table aquifer without precipitation, and in a water table aquifer with precipitation. The functions of the flowing horizontal well discharge rates versus time will be obtained under above mentioned different aquifer conditions. The relationships of the aquifer hydraulic heads versus the discharge rates of the well will be investigated. The rate of water table decline due to the dewatering of the well will also be computed, and this solution is particularly useful for landslide control and mining dewatering. The theoretical solutions will be compared with results of experiments that will be conducted in the hydrological laboratory at Texas A&M University. Reference: Zhan, H., Wang, L.V., and Park, E, On the horizontal well pumping tests in the anisotropic confined aquifers, J. hydrol., 252, 37-50, 2001. Zhan, H., and Zlotnik, V. A., Groundwater flow to a horizontal or slanted well in an unconfined aquifer

  17. Phase-locked measurements of gas-liquid horizontal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2014-11-01

    A flow of gas and liquid in a horizontal pipe can be described in terms of various flow regimes, e.g. wavy stratified, annular or slug flow. These flow regimes appear at characteristic gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and feature unique wave phenomena. Wavy stratified flow is populated by low amplitude waves whereas annular flow contains high amplitude and long lived waves, so called disturbance waves, that play a key role in a liquid entrainment into the gas phase (droplets). In a slug flow regime, liquid-continuous regions travel at high speeds through a pipe separated by regions of stratified flow. We use a refractive index matched dynamic shadowgraphy technique using a high-speed camera mounted on a moving robotic linear rail to track the formation and development of features characteristic for the aforementioned flow regimes. We show that the wave dynamics become progressively more complex with increasing liquid and gas Reynolds numbers. Based on the shadowgraphy measurements we present, over a range of conditions: (i) phenomenological observations of the formation, and (ii) statistical data on the downstream velocity distribution of different classes of waves. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  18. Dual permeability flow behavior for modeling horizontal well production in fractured-vuggy carbonate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-Chun; Nie, Ren-Shi; Jia, Yong-Lu

    2012-09-01

    SummaryFractured-vuggy carbonate reservoirs are composed of by matrix, fracture, and vug systems. This paper is the first investigation into the dual permeability flow issue for horizontal well production in a fractured-vuggy carbonate reservoir. Considering dispersed vugs in carbonate reservoirs and treating media directly connected with horizontal wellbore as the matrix and fracture systems, a test analysis model of a horizontal well was created, and triple porosity and dual permeability flow behavior were modeled. Standard log-log type curves were drawn up by numerical simulation and flow behavior characteristics were thoroughly analyzed. Numerical simulations showed that type curves are dominated by external boundary conditions as well as the permeability ratio of the fracture system to the sum of fracture and matrix systems. The parameter κ is only relevant to the dual permeability model, and if κ is one, then the dual permeability model is equivalent to the single permeability model. There are seven main flow regimes with constant rate of horizontal well production and five flow regimes with constant wellbore pressure of horizontal well production; different flow regimes have different flow behavior characteristics. Early radial flow and linear flow regimes are typical characteristics of horizontal well production; duration of early radial flow regime is usually short because formation thickness is generally less than 100 m. Derivative curves are W-shaped, which is a reflection of inter-porosity flows between matrix, fracture, and vug systems. A distorted W-shape, which could be produced in certain situations, such as one involving an erroneously low time of inter-porosity flows, would handicap the recognition of a linear flow regime. A real case application was successfully implemented, and some useful reservoir parameters (e.g., permeability and inter-porosity flow factor) were obtained from well testing interpretation.

  19. Identifying natural flow regimes using fish communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fi-John; Tsai, Wen-Ping; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Chen, Hung-kwai; Herricks, Edwin E.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryModern water resources management has adopted natural flow regimes as reasonable targets for river restoration and conservation. The characterization of a natural flow regime begins with the development of hydrologic statistics from flow records. However, little guidance exists for defining the period of record needed for regime determination. In Taiwan, the Taiwan Eco-hydrological Indicator System (TEIS), a group of hydrologic statistics selected for fisheries relevance, is being used to evaluate ecological flows. The TEIS consists of a group of hydrologic statistics selected to characterize the relationships between flow and the life history of indigenous species. Using the TEIS and biosurvey data for Taiwan, this paper identifies the length of hydrologic record sufficient for natural flow regime characterization. To define the ecological hydrology of fish communities, this study connected hydrologic statistics to fish communities by using methods to define antecedent conditions that influence existing community composition. A moving average method was applied to TEIS statistics to reflect the effects of antecedent flow condition and a point-biserial correlation method was used to relate fisheries collections with TEIS statistics. The resulting fish species-TEIS (FISH-TEIS) hydrologic statistics matrix takes full advantage of historical flows and fisheries data. The analysis indicates that, in the watersheds analyzed, averaging TEIS statistics for the present year and 3 years prior to the sampling date, termed MA(4), is sufficient to develop a natural flow regime. This result suggests that flow regimes based on hydrologic statistics for the period of record can be replaced by regimes developed for sampled fish communities.

  20. Constructing an interdisciplinary flow regime recommendation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally agreed that river rehabilitation most often relies on restoring a more natural flow regime, but credibly defining the desired regime can be problematic. I combined four distinct methods to develop and refine month-by-month and event-based flow recommendations to protect and partially restore the ecological integrity of the Cache la Poudre River through Fort Collins, Colorado. A statistical hydrologic approach was used to summarize the river's natural flow regime and set provisional monthly flow targets at levels that were historically exceeded 75% of the time. These preliminary monthly targets were supplemented using results from three Poudre-specific disciplinary studies. A substrate maintenance flow model was used to better define the high flows needed to flush accumulated sediment from the river's channel and help sustain the riparian zone in this snowmelt-dominated river. A hydraulic/habitat model and a water temperature model were both used to better define the minimum flows necessary to maintain a thriving cool water fishery. The result is a range of recommended monthly flows and daily flow guidance illustrating the advantage of combining a wide range of available disciplinary information, supplemented by judgment based on ecological principles and a general understanding of river ecosystems, in a highly altered, working river. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  1. Experimental measurements of the cavitating flow after horizontal water entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tat Nguyen, Thang; Hai, Duong Ngoc; Quang Thai, Nguyen; Phuong, Truong Thi

    2017-10-01

    Water-entry cavitating flow is of considerable importance in underwater high-speed applications. That is because of the drag-reduction effect that concerns the presence of a cavity around moving objects. Though the study of the flow has long been carried out, little data are documented in literature so far. Besides, currently, in the case of unsteady flow, experimental measurements of some flow parameters such as the cavity pressure still encounter difficulties. Hence continuing research efforts are of important significance. The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally the unsteady cavitating flow after the horizontal water entry of projectiles. An experimental apparatus has been developed. Qualitative and quantitative optical visualizations of the flow have been carried out by using high-speed videography. Digital image processing has been applied to analyzing the recorded flow images. Based on the known correlations between the ellipsoidal super-cavity’s size and the corresponding cavitation number, the cavity pressure has been measured by utilizing the data of image processing. A comparison between the partial- and super-cavitating flow regimes is reported. The received results can be useful for the design of high-speed underwater projectiles.

  2. Horizontal mantle flow controls subduction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ficini, E; Dal Zilio, L; Doglioni, C; Gerya, T V

    2017-08-08

    It is generally accepted that subduction is driven by downgoing-plate negative buoyancy. Yet plate age -the main control on buoyancy- exhibits little correlation with most of the present-day subduction velocities and slab dips. "West"-directed subduction zones are on average steeper (~65°) than "East"-directed (~27°). Also, a "westerly"-directed net rotation of the lithosphere relative to the mantle has been detected in the hotspot reference frame. Thus, the existence of an "easterly"-directed horizontal mantle wind could explain this subduction asymmetry, favouring steepening or lifting of slab dip angles. Here we test this hypothesis using high-resolution two-dimensional numerical thermomechanical models of oceanic plate subduction interacting with a mantle flow. Results show that when subduction polarity is opposite to that of the mantle flow, the descending slab dips subvertically and the hinge retreats, thus leading to the development of a back-arc basin. In contrast, concordance between mantle flow and subduction polarity results in shallow dipping subduction, hinge advance and pronounced topography of the overriding plate, regardless of their age-dependent negative buoyancy. Our results are consistent with seismicity data and tomographic images of subduction zones. Thus, our models may explain why subduction asymmetry is a common feature of convergent margins on Earth.

  3. Fluid flow through a vertical to horizontal 90 elbow bend III three phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Spedding, P.L.; Benard, E.; Crawford, N.M.

    2008-01-15

    Three phase water/oil/air flow was studied around a vertical upward to horizontal 90 elbow bend of R/d = 0.654. The results were more complex than corresponding two phase data. The pressure drop recorded for the two tangent legs sometimes showed significant variations to the straight pipe data. In most cases this variation was caused by differences in the flow regimes between the two systems. The elbow bend tended to constrict the flow presented by the vertical inlet tangent leg while sometimes acting as a wave and droplet generator for the horizontal outlet tangent leg. It could be argued that the inclusion of the elbow bend altered the flow regime map transitional boundaries but it also is possible that insufficient settling length was provided in the apparatus design. The elbow bend pressure drop was best presented as l{sub e}/d the equivalent length to diameter ratio using the actual total pressure drop in the vertical inlet tangent leg. Generally l{sub e}/d values rose with gas rate, but exhibited an increasingly complex relation with f{sub o} the oil to liquid volumetric ratio as liquid rate was increased. A significant maximum in l{sub e}/d was in evidence around the inversion from water dominated to oil dominated flows. Several models are presented to predict the data. (author)

  4. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method developed for the classification of quasi-stationary events into a few planetary flow regimes and for the examination of transitions between these regimes is described. The method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and then to a 500-mbar data set for Northern Hemisphere (NH), for which cluster analysis was carried out in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters were found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, while transient clusters were found in the band-pass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band, three pairs of clusters determined EOFs 1, 2, and 3, respectively; they exhibited well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American pattern, and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data exhibited strong bimodality.

  5. The relationship between void waves and flow regime transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Drew, D.A.; Kalkach-Navarro, S.; Park, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    The results of an extensive experimental and analytical study on the relationship between void waves and flow regime transition are presented, in particular, the bubbly/slug flow regime transition. It is shown that void wave instability signals a flow regime transition.

  6. River Flow Regimes and Effective Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, S.; Sprocati, R.; Frascati, A.; Marani, M.; Schirmer, M.; Botter, G.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of effective discharge is widespread in geomorphology and river engineering and restoration. For example, it is used to design the most stable channel configuration, to estimate sedimentation rate and lifespan of reservoirs and to characterize the hydrologic forcing in models studying long-term evolution of rivers. Accordingly, the effective discharge has been the focus of countless empirical, theoretical and numerical studies, which found it to vary among catchments as a function of climate, landscape and river morphology, type of transport (dissolved, suspended or bedload), and of streamflow variability. The heterogeneity of the effective discharge values observed in different catchments challenges a thorough understanding of its pivotal drivers, and a consistent framework which explains observations carried out in different geographic areas is still lacking. In the present work, the observed diversity is explained in terms of the underlying heterogeneity of river flow regimes, by linking effective discharge to attributes of the sediment rating curve and to streamflow variability, as resulting from climatic and landscape drivers. An analytic expression of the effective ratio (i.e. the ratio between effective discharge and mean streamflow) is provided, which captures observed values of effective discharge for suspended sediment transport in a set of catchments of the continental United States. The framework disentangles hydrologic and landscape controls on effective discharge, and highlights distinct effective ratios of persistent and erratic hydrologic regimes (respectively characterized by low and high flow variability), attributable to intrinsically different streamflow dynamics. Clusters of river catchments characterized by similar streamflow dynamics can be identified. The framework provides an opportunity for first-order estimates of effective discharge in rivers belonging to different areas, based on the type of flow regime.

  7. Flow regimes and parameter dependence in nanochannel flows.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Li, Zhigang

    2009-09-01

    Nanoscale fluid flow systems involve both microscopic and macroscopic parameters, which compete with each another and lead to different flow regimes. In this work, we investigate the interactions of four fundamental parameters, including the fluid-fluid, fluid-wall binding energies, temperature of the system, and driving force, and their effects on the flow motion in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. By illustrating the fluid flux as a function of a dimensionless number, which represents the effective surface effect on the fluid, we show that the fluid motion in nanochannels falls into different regimes, each of which is associated with a distinct mechanism. The mechanisms in different situations reveal the effects of the parameters on the fluid dynamics.

  8. Constraints on flow regimes in wide-aperture fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2004-02-28

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the complex flow processes in individual fractures, aided by flow visualization experiments and conceptual modeling efforts. These advances have led to the recognition of several flow regimes in individual fractures subjected to different initial and boundary conditions. Of these, the most important regimes are film flow, rivulet flow, and sliding of droplets. The existence of such significantly dissimilar flow regimes has been a major hindrance in the development of self-consistent conceptual models of flow for single fractures that encompass all the flow regimes. The objective of this study is to delineate the existence of the different flow regimes in individual fractures. For steady-state flow conditions, we developed physical constraints on the different flow regimes that satisfy minimum energy configurations, which enabled us to segregate the wide range of fracture transmissivity (volumetric flow rate per fracture width) into several flow regimes. These are, in increasing order of flow rate, flow of adsorbed films, flow of sliding drops, rivulet flow, stable film flow, and unstable (turbulent) film flow. The scope of this study is limited to wide-aperture fractures with the flow on the opposing sides of fracture being independent.

  9. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  10. SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2010-08-01

    Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

  11. Online recognition of the multiphase flow regime and study of slug flow in pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liejin, Guo; Bofeng, Bai; Liang, Zhao; Xin, Wang; Hanyang, Gu

    2009-02-01

    Multiphase flow is the phenomenon existing widely in nature, daily life, as well as petroleum and chemical engineering industrial fields. The interface structure among multiphase and their movement are complicated, which distribute random and heterogeneously in the spatial and temporal scales and have multivalue of the flow structure and state[1]. Flow regime is defined as the macro feature about the multiphase interface structure and its distribution, which is an important feature to describe multiphase flow. The energy and mass transport mechanism differ much for each flow regimes. It is necessary to solve the flow regime recognition to get a clear understanding of the physical phenomena and their mechanism of multiphase flow. And the flow regime is one of the main factors affecting the online measurement accuracy of phase fraction, flow rate and other phase parameters. Therefore, it is of great scientific and technological importance to develop new principles and methods of multiphase flow regime online recognition, and of great industrial background. In this paper, the key reasons that the present method cannot be used to solve the industrial multiphase flow pattern recognition are clarified firstly. Then the prerequisite to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime is analyzed, and the recognition rules for partial flow pattern are obtained based on the massive experimental data. The standard templates for every flow regime feature are calculated with self-organization cluster algorithm. The multi-sensor data fusion method is proposed to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime with the pressure and differential pressure signals, which overcomes the severe influence of fluid flow velocity and the oil fraction on the recognition. The online recognition method is tested in the practice, which has less than 10 percent measurement error. The method takes advantages of high confidence, good fault tolerance and less requirement of

  12. Toward a dynamical understanding of planetary-scale flow regimes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Molteni, F.

    1993-06-01

    A strategy for diagnosing and interpreting flow regimes that is firmly rooted in dynamical theory is presented and applied to the study of observed and modeled planetary-scale regimes of the wintertime circulation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  13. A Finite Layer Formulation for Groundwater Flow to Horizontal Wells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Wang, Xudong

    2016-09-01

    A finite layer approach for the general problem of three-dimensional (3D) flow to horizontal wells in multilayered aquifer systems is presented, in which the unconfined flow can be taken into account. The flow is approximated by an integration of the standard finite element method in vertical direction and the analytical techniques in the other spatial directions. Because only the vertical discretization is involved, the horizontal wells can be completely contained in one specific nodal plane without discretization. Moreover, due to the analytical eigenfunctions introduced in the formulation, the weighted residual equations can be decoupled, and the formulas for the global matrices and flow vector corresponding to horizontal wells can be obtained explicitly. Consequently, the bandwidth of the global matrices and computational cost rising from 3D analysis can be significantly reduced. Two comparisons to the existing solutions are made to verify the validity of the formulation, including transient flow to horizontal wells in confined and unconfined aquifers. Furthermore, an additional numerical application to horizontal wells in three-layered systems is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the present method in modeling flow in more complex aquifer systems.

  14. Two-phase flow in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Maeder, P.F.; Michaelides, E.E.; DiPippo, R.

    1981-09-01

    A method is developed in this paper which calculates the two-phase flow friction factor at any state of the fluid in the pipe. The mixing-length theory was employed for the calculation of the Reynolds stresses in turbulent two-phase flow. The friction factors obtained this way are in good agreement with experimental data. It is clear that the choice of the parameter m, or the density distribution, is rather arbitrary. Careful experimentation is required to refine the analysis given in this study, and in particular to provide guidance in the proper selection of the parameter m.

  15. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  16. Horizontal extent of the urban heat dome flow.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yifan; Li, Yuguo; Bejan, Adrian; Wang, Yi; Yang, Xinyan

    2017-09-15

    Urban heat dome flow, which is also referred to as urban heat island circulation, is important for urban ventilation and pollutant transport between adjacent cities when the background wind is weak or absent. A "dome-shaped" profile can form at the upper boundary of the urban heat island circulation. The horizontal extent of the heat dome is an important parameter for estimating the size of the area it influences. This study reviews the existing data on the horizontal extent of the urban heat dome flow, as determined by using either field measurements or numerical simulations. A simple energy balance model is applied to obtain the maximum horizontal extent of a single heat dome over the urban area, which is found to be approximately 1.5 to 3.5 times the diameter of the city's urban area at night. A linearized model is also re-analysed to calculate the horizontal extent of the urban heat dome flow. This analysis supports the results from the energy balance model. During daytime, the horizontal extent of the urban heat dome flow is found to be about 2.0 to 3.3 times the urban area's diameter, as influenced by the convective turbulent plumes in the rural area.

  17. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2×10^{3}regime diagram provided by Yanagisawa et al. [T. Yanagisawa et al., Phys. Rev. E 88, 063020 (2013)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.88.063020]. Three regimes were identified, of which the regime of regular flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra/Q=10, where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  18. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q . We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2 ×103regime diagram provided by Yanagisawa et al. [T. Yanagisawa et al., Phys. Rev. E 88, 063020 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.063020]. Three regimes were identified, of which the regime of regular flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra /Q =10 , where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  19. Design and operation of a horizontal liquid helium flow facility

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sciver, S.W.; Wiesend, J.G. II

    1988-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin horizontal liquid helium flow facility (LHFF) consists of a five meter long 20 cm ID horizontal dewar connected to two end boxes. Several heat exchanger inserts have been built to allow variable temperature operation of 1.6 K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 4.2 K. A centrifugal pump is installed at one end of the facility permitting experiments in forced flow liquid helium up to 100 gm/s. The horizontal design allows experimentation on long straight test sections which may be used either to study fundamental properties of heat and mass transfer in helium or prototype cryogenic components under realistic conditions. A detailed description of the design and operating experience of the LHFF is presented. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Flow patterns of larval fish: undulatory swimming in the intermediate flow regime.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulrike K; van den Boogaart, Jos G M; van Leeuwen, Johan L

    2008-01-01

    Fish larvae, like many adult fish, swim by undulating their body. However, their body size and swimming speeds put them in the intermediate flow regime, where viscous and inertial forces both play an important role in the interaction between fish and water. To study the influence of the relatively high viscous forces compared with adult fish, we mapped the flow around swimming zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae using two-dimensional digital particle image velocimetry (2D-DPIV) in the horizontal and transverse plane of the fish. Fish larvae initiate a swimming bout by bending their body into a C shape. During this initial tail-beat cycle, larvae shed two vortex pairs in the horizontal plane of their wake, one during the preparatory and one during the subsequent propulsive stroke. When they swim ;cyclically' (mean swimming speed does not change significantly between tail beats), fish larvae generate a wide drag wake along their head and anterior body. The flow along the posterior body is dominated by the undulating body movements that cause jet flows into the concave bends of the body wave. Patches of elevated vorticity form around the jets, and travel posteriorly along with the body wave, until they are ultimately shed at the tail near the moment of stroke reversal. Behind the larva, two vortex pairs are formed per tail-beat cycle (the tail beating once left-to-right and then right-to-left) in the horizontal plane of the larval wake. By combining transverse and horizontal cross sections of the wake, we inferred that the wake behind a cyclically swimming zebrafish larva contains two diverging rows of vortex rings to the left and right of the mean path of motion, resembling the wake of steadily swimming adult eels. When the fish larva slows down at the end of a swimming bout, it gradually reduces its tail-beat frequency and amplitude, while the separated boundary layer and drag wake of the anterior body extend posteriorly to envelope the entire larva. This drag wake is

  1. DETECTION OF SUPERSONIC HORIZONTAL FLOWS IN THE SOLAR GRANULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bellot Rubio, L. R.

    2009-07-20

    Hydrodynamic simulations of granular convection predict the existence of supersonic flows covering {approx}3%-4% of the solar surface at any time, but these flows have not been detected unambiguously as yet. Using data from the spectropolarimeter aboard the Hinode satellite, I present direct evidence of fast horizontal plasma motions in quiet-Sun granules. Their visibility increases toward the limb due to more favorable viewing conditions. At the resolution of Hinode, the horizontal flows give rise to asymmetric intensity profiles with very inclined blue wings and even line satellites located blueward of the main absorption feature. Doppler shifts of up to 9 km s{sup -1} are observed at the edges of bright granules, demonstrating that the flows reach supersonic speeds. The strongest velocities occur in patches of 0.''5 or less. They tend to be associated with enhanced continuum intensities, line widths, and equivalent widths, but large values of these parameters do not necessarily imply the existence of supersonic flows. Time series of spectropolarimetric measurements in regions away from the disk center show the transient nature of the strong horizontal motions, which last only for a fraction of the granule lifetime. Supersonic flows are expected to produce shocks at the boundaries between granules and intergranular lanes, and may also play a role in the emergence of small-scale magnetic fields in quiet-Sun internetwork regions.

  2. Liquid-vapor flow regime transitions for use in design of heat transfer loops in spacecraft: An investigation of two-phase flow in zero gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, T. W.

    1985-05-01

    The behavior of viscous (or low velocity) two-phase vapor-liquid flow under zero gravity was simulated in the laboratory by using two immiscible fluids of equal density flowing together in a one inch diameter glass tube. The fluids used were Polypropylene Glycol (PPG) which simulated the liquid phase and water which simulated the vapor phase. Various tests were conducted varying flow rates and entrance conditions. Four existing flow regime models were analyzed, modeled on a computer, and extrapolated to predict zero-gravity conditions. The flow regimes were the Horizontal Dukler-Taitel, Vertical Dukler-Taitel, Vertical Weisman and Horizontal Weisman. None of these models when extrapolated to zero-g conditions agreed well with the lab data, and some of the observed flow regimes were not predicted at all.

  3. Mixed convection in liquid metal flow in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    The work is motivated by design of self-cooled liquid-metal breeder blankets for Tokamak fusion reactors. Thermal convection caused by non-uniform internal heating in a liquid metal flow in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field is analyzed numerically. Axial magnetic field is considered strong enough (the Hartmann number up to 104 corresponding to typical reactor condition) to suppress the streamwise variation of the flow, so a two-dimensional fully developed flow is studied. Duct walls are assumed to be thermally and electrically insulated. The non-uniform internal heat deposited by captured neutrons is fully diverted by the mean flow. Realistically high Grashof (up to 1011) and Reynolds (up to 106) numbers are considered. It is found that the state of the flow is strongly affected by the vertical stable stratification developing in response to the streamwise growth of mean temperature. Two flow regimes are identified: the regime with developed transverse convection at moderate Grashof numbers, and the regime, in which convection is suppressed at high Grashof numbers. Financial support was provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation (Grant CBET 1435269) and by the University of Michigan - Dearborn.

  4. Correlations for laminar mixed convection flows on vertical, inclined, and horizontal flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. S.; Armaly, B. F.; Ramachandran, N.

    1986-11-01

    Local Nusselt numbers for laminar mixed convection flows along isothermal vertical, inclined, and horizontal flat plates are presented for the entire mixed convection regime for a wide range of Prandtl numbers. Simple correlation equations for the local and average mixed convection Nusselt numbers are developed, which are found to agree well with the numerically predicted values and available experimental data for both buoyancy assisting and opposing flow conditions. The threshold values of significant buoyancy effects on forced convection and forced flow effects on free convection, as well as the maximum increase in the local mixed convection Nusselt number from the respective pure convection limits, are also presented for all flow configurations. It is found that the buoyancy or forced flow effect can increase the surface heat transfer rate from pure forced or pure free convection by about 20 percent.

  5. Void fraction correlations in two-phase horizontal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Papathanassiou, G.; Maeder, P.F.; DiPippo, R.; Dickinson, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This study examines some physical mechanisms which impose limits on the possible existence of two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe. With the aid of this analysis and the use of the Martinelli variable, X, a method is developed which determines the range of possible void fractions for a given two-phase flow. This method affords a means of direct comparison among void fraction correlations, as well as between correlation predictions and experimental results. In this respect, four well-known void fraction correlations are compared against each other and with experimental results obtained in the Brown University Two-Phase Flow Research Facility.

  6. Rheological equations in asymptotic regimes of granular flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper assesses the validity of the generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in light of the established constitutive relations in two asymptotic flow regimes, namely, the macroviscous and grain-inertia regimes. A comprehensive review of the literature on constitutive relations in both regimes reveals that except for some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution, the normalized shear stress in both regimes varies only with the grain concentration, C. It is found that Krieger-Dougherty's relative viscosity, ??*(C), is sufficiently coherent among the monotonically nondecreasing functions of C used in describing the variation of the shear stress with C in both regimes. It not only accurately represents the C-dependent relative viscosity of a suspension in the macroviscous regime, but also plays a role of the radial distribution function that describes the statistics of particle collisions in the grain-inertia regime. Use of ??*(C) alone, however, cannot link the two regimes. Another parameter, the shear-rate number, N, is needed in modelling the rheology of neutrally buoyant granular flows in transition between the two asymptotic regimes. The GVF model proves compatible with most established relations in both regimes.

  7. How do horizontal neutral winds create vertical plasma flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliunas, V. M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutral-wind dynamo process produces a configuration of plasma flow that in general (particularly at low magnetic latitudes) includes vertical bulk flow components, even when the neutral winds are assumed to be purely horizontal at all altitudes. Conventionally the plasma flow is described as the E × B drift from the dynamo electric field, the vertical flow component being ascribed to the meridional component of E crossed with the horizontal component of B. This relation between the plasma flow and the electric field, however, merely states a necessary condition for the assumed quasi-steady state; it says nothing about how the quasi-steady state was created, or how either of the two quantities was produced. It has been shown (Buneman, 1992; Vasyliūnas, 2001) that, in a plasma sufficiently dense so that {VA2<flow, not its cause. To create a plasma bulk flow, linear momentum must be added to the plasma, by some force acting on it. In the ionospheric dynamo process, linear momentum is carried by the neutral wind, but it can be transferred to the plasma only by plasma-neutral collisions; with the plasma initially at rest and the neutral wind assumed to flow horizontally everywhere, collisions cannot add vertical linear momentum to the plasma. The Lorentz force J × B, as long as J is described by the conventional ionospheric Ohm's law, simply balances the collisional frictional force (from plasma-neutral velocity difference) and does not add any net momentum to the plasma. In a time-dependent calculation of neutral-wind dynamo evolution (steady neutral wind imposed on an initially stationary plasma), a transient initial current appears, which does not obey the conventional ionospheric Ohm's law but produces an unbalanced J × B force that accelerates the plasma. The vertical component of this force can create the vertical plasma flows that exist in the asymptotic quasi-steady-state configuration. (The low

  8. DIVERGENT HORIZONTAL SUB-SURFACE FLOWS WITHIN ACTIVE REGION 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, S. C.; Hill, F. E-mail: stripathy@nso.edu

    2015-07-20

    We measure the horizontal subsurface flow in a fast emerging active region (AR; NOAA 11158) using the ring-diagram technique and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager high spatial resolution Dopplergrams. This AR had a complex magnetic structure and displayed significant changes in morphology during its disk passage. Over a period of six days from 2011 February 11 to 16, the temporal variation in the magnitude of the total velocity is found to follow the trend of magnetic field strength. We further analyze regions of individual magnetic polarity within AR 11158 and find that the horizontal velocity components in these sub-regions have significant variation with time and depth. The leading and trailing polarity regions move faster than the mixed-polarity region. Furthermore, both zonal and meridional components have opposite signs for trailing and leading polarity regions at all depths showing divergent flows within the AR. We also find a sharp decrease in the magnitude of total horizontal velocity in deeper layers around major flares. It is suggested that the re-organization of magnetic fields during flares, combined with the sunspot rotation, decreases the magnitude of horizontal flows or that the flow kinetic energy has been converted into the energy released by flares. After the decline in flare activity and sunspot rotation, the flows tend to follow the pattern of magnetic activity. We also observe less variation in the velocity components near the surface but these tend to increase with depth, further demonstrating that the deeper layers are more affected by the topology of ARs.

  9. Sub-horizontal channel flow: an exhumation mechanism during the Gondwana collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, Tamer; Stüwe, kurt

    2013-04-01

    The Arabian-Nubian Shield is made up of juvenile crust which was formed due to arc-arc accretion during the East- and West-Gondwana collision (Pan-African event) and the closing of the Mozambique Ocean. Thus the shield is composed of ophiolitic and volcanic material with oceanic affinity. However rocks with continental affinity can be found as high grade metamorphic complexes that were exposed from underneath the arc-related rocks during the late stages of the Pan-African event. Two tectonic models explain the exhumation mechanism of these metamorphic complexes. The first model is exhumation as core complexes in extension setting. This model appears to pertain to the metamorphic complexes of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The second model is exhumation in oblique transpressional regime as it was found - for example - for the Feiran-Solaf complex of Sinai Peninsula. These models are correct with regard to the structural elements in the outer zones of the metamorphic complexes, which formed during the final exhumation mechanism during the later stages of the deformation history (e.g. D3 of the Feiran complex). However the models cannot explain the sub-horizontal lineations that formed during the early deformation phases and are still recorded in the core of the metamorphic complexes (e.g. D1 of the Feiran-Solaf complex). Here we propose sub-horizontal channel flow as a mechanism to exhume the metamorphic complexes and a mechanism that can account for both types of structural elements as part of one exhumation history. We suggest that the rocks flowed horizontally at mid-crustal levels to the NW of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. The front of the channel flows was then exhumed to the Earth surface in a transpression regime. This middle crustal flow will produce extensional tectonic regime in the upper crust (i.e. ?3 is horizontal and oriented in the NW-SE direction). This extensional setting produces low-angle detachments which assisted the middle crustal rocks to be exhumed

  10. River flow regimes and vegetation dynamics along a river transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulatyari, Behnam; Basso, Stefano; Schirmer, Mario; Botter, Gianluca

    2014-11-01

    Ecohydrological processes occurring within fluvial landscapes are strongly affected by natural streamflow variability. In this work the patterns of vegetation biomass in two rivers characterized by contrasting flow regimes were investigated by means of a comprehensive stochastic model which explicitly couples catchment-scale hydroclimatic processes, morphologic attributes of the river transect and in-stream bio-ecological features. The hydrologic forcing is characterized by the probability distribution (pdf) of streamflows and stages resulting from stochastic precipitation dynamics, rainfall-runoff transformation and reach scale morphologic attributes. The model proved able to reproduce the observed pdf of river flows and stages, as well as the pattern of exposure/inundation along the river transect in both regimes. Our results suggest that in persistent regimes characterized by reduced streamflow variability, mean vegetation biomass is chiefly controlled by the pattern of groundwater availability along the transect, leading to a marked transition between aquatic and terrestrial environments. Conversely, erratic regimes ensure wider aquatic-terrestrial zones in which optimal elevation ranges for species with different sensitivity to flooding and access to groundwater are separated. Patterns of mean biomass in erratic regimes were found to be more sensitive to changes in the underlying hydroclimatic conditions, notwithstanding the reduced responsiveness of the corresponding flow regimes. The framework developed highlights the important role played by streamflow regimes in shaping riverine environments, and may eventually contribute to identifying the influence of landscape, climate and morphologic features on in-stream ecological dynamics.

  11. Anthropogenic controls from urban growth on flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía, Alfonso; Rossel, Florian; Gironás, Jorge; Jovanovic, Tijana

    2015-10-01

    Streamflow can be drastically perturbed in urban basins with important implications for stream, floodplain, and riparian ecosystems. Normally, the dynamic influence of urbanization on streamflow is studied via space-for-time substitution. Here we explicitly consider urban growth when determining the flow regime of 14 urban basins. To synthetically represent the flow regime, we employ flow duration curves (FDCs) determined using a stochastic model. The model permits derivation of FDCs that are dependent on few parameters representing climatic, land use, conventional stormwater management, and geomorphological conditions in an urban basin. We use the model, under conditions of urban growth, to assess the influence of urbanization on key model parameters and to determine different indicators of hydrologic alteration. Overall, results indicate consistent changes in the temporal evolution of the perturbed flow regimes, which in this case can largely be explained by the progressive redistribution with urban growth of water from slow subsurface runoff and evapotranspiration to fast urban runoff.

  12. Horizontal flow and capillarity-driven redistribution in porous media.

    PubMed

    Doster, F; Hönig, O; Hilfer, R

    2012-07-01

    A recent macroscopic mixture theory for two-phase immiscible displacement in porous media has introduced percolating and nonpercolating phases. Quasi-analytic solutions are computed and compared to the traditional theory. The solutions illustrate physical insights and effects due to spatiotemporal changes of nonpercolating phases, and they highlight the differences from traditional theory. Two initial and boundary value problems are solved in one spatial dimension. In the first problem a fluid is displaced by another fluid in a horizontal homogeneous porous medium. The displacing fluid is injected with a flow rate that keeps the saturation constant at the injection point. In the second problem a horizontal homogeneous porous medium is considered which is divided into two subdomains with different but constant initial saturations. Capillary forces lead to a redistribution of the fluids. Errors in the literature are reported and corrected.

  13. Early regimes of water capillary flow in slit silica nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, Jens H; Mejía, Andrés; Zambrano, Harvey A

    2015-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the initial stages of spontaneous imbibition of water in slit silica nanochannels surrounded by air. An analysis is performed for the effects of nanoscopic confinement, initial conditions of liquid uptake and air pressurization on the dynamics of capillary filling. The results indicate that the nanoscale imbibition process is divided into three main flow regimes: an initial regime where the capillary force is balanced only by the inertial drag and characterized by a constant velocity and a plug flow profile. In this regime, the meniscus formation process plays a central role in the imbibition rate. Thereafter, a transitional regime takes place, in which, the force balance has significant contributions from both inertia and viscous friction. Subsequently, a regime wherein viscous forces dominate the capillary force balance is attained. Flow velocity profiles identify the passage from an inviscid flow to a developing Poiseuille flow. Gas density profiles ahead of the capillary front indicate a transient accumulation of air on the advancing meniscus. Furthermore, slower capillary filling rates computed for higher air pressures reveal a significant retarding effect of the gas displaced by the advancing meniscus.

  14. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  15. Flow Regimes of the Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, M.; Burgess, D. O.; Mair, D.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2004-05-01

    Flow regimes of the Devon ice cap were investigated using a combination of SAR Interferometry (InSAR) and airborne radio echo sounding (RES). The surface velocity field was mapped by InSAR using ascending ERS 1/2 tandem mode data for the western and southeast sectors of the ice cap and 3-day repeat pass ERS 1 imagery for the north-east sector. Over the terminus of the Belcher glacier (a major calving front), where decorrelation between ERS data occurred, surface velocities were obtained from Radarsat 1 imagery using speckle tracking procedures. Airborne RES at 100MHz was used to map the distribution of ice thickness and bed topography across the ice cap. There is a significant contrast in ice flow dynamics between the east and west sides of the ice cap. West of the main north-south divide ice flow is dominantly by relatively uniform `sheet' flow. East of the divide, several outlet glaciers that extend up to 60km inland from the eastern margin drain the ice cap. Four distinct ice flow regimes were recognized from analysis of the patterns of along-flow co-variation between the ratio of surface velocity to ice thickness (V/H) and the driving stress computed using a surface slope averaging length scale of ten ice thicknesses. These regimes are characterized by (i) a positive relationship between V/H and driving stress, (ii) and (iii) a generally inverse relationship between V/H and driving stress, and (iv) high but variable V/H and low driving stress. For a given driving stress, V/H is generally higher in regime (iii) than in regime (ii). Regime (i) is characteristic of the interior and much of the western half of the ice cap, and also of near stagnant, surge-emplaced ice in the south-east of the ice cap. It is inferred to involve flow primarily by ice deformation. Regimes (ii) and (iii) occur in sections of outlet glaciers where flow stripes are actively formed and where the ice surface topography clearly reflects the presence of topographic obstacles on the glacier

  16. Microgravity Flow Regime Data: Buoyancy and Mixing Apparatus Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Adam; Best, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Zero-g two-phase flow data set qualification and flight experiment design have not been standardized and as a result, agreement among researchers has not been reached regarding what experimental conditions adequately approximate those of microgravity. The effects of buoyancy forces and mixing apparatus on the flow regime transitions are presented in this study. The gravity conditions onboard zero-g aircraft are at best 10-3 g which is used to approximate the 10-5 g conditions of microgravity, thus the buoyancy forces present on zero-g aircraft can become significantly large and unrepresentative of microgravity. When buoyancy forces approach those of surface tension forces, buoyancy induced coalescence occurs. When discussing flow regime transitions, these large buoyancy forces lead to flow regime transitions which otherwise would not occur. The buoyancy attributes of the two-phase flow data sets available in the literature are evaluated to determine which data sets exhibit buoyancy induced transitions. Upon comparison of the representative data sets, the affects of different mixing apparatus can be seen in the superficial velocity flow regime maps.

  17. Viscoinertial regime of immersed granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarsid, L.; Delenne, J.-Y.; Mutabaruka, P.; Monerie, Y.; Perales, F.; Radjai, F.

    2017-07-01

    By means of extensive coupled molecular dynamics-lattice Boltzmann simulations, accounting for grain dynamics and subparticle resolution of the fluid phase, we analyze steady inertial granular flows sheared by a viscous fluid. We show that, for a broad range of system parameters (shear rate, confining stress, fluid viscosity, and relative fluid-grain density), the frictional strength and packing fraction can be described by a modified inertial number incorporating the fluid effect. In a dual viscous description, the effective viscosity diverges as the inverse square of the difference between the packing fraction and its jamming value, as observed in experiments. We also find that the fabric and force anisotropies extracted from the contact network are well described by the modified inertial number, thus providing clear evidence for the role of these key structural parameters in dense suspensions.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial wave generation in turbulent gas-liquid flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bryce; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2014-11-01

    For gas-liquid flows through pipes and channels, a flow regime (referred to as slug flow) may occur when waves form at the interface of a stratified flow and grow until they bridge the pipe diameter trapping large elongated gas bubbles within the liquid. Slug formation is often accompanied by strong nonlinear wave-wave interactions, wave breaking, and gas entrainment. This work numerically investigates the fully nonlinear interfacial evolution of a two-phase density/viscosity stratified flow through a horizontal channel. A Navier-Stokes flow solver coupled with a conservative volume-of-fluid algorithm is use to carry out high resolution three-dimensional simulations of a turbulent gas flowing over laminar (or turbulent) liquid layers. The analysis of such flows over a range of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers permits the characterization of the interfacial stresses and turbulent flow statistics allowing for the development of physics-based models that approximate the coupled interfacial-turbulent interactions and supplement the heuristic models built into existing industrial slug simulators.

  19. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  20. Steady particulate flows in a horizontal rotating cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S.A.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Results of discrete element method (DEM) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments are compared for monodisperse granular materials flowing in a half-filled horizontal rotating cylinder. Because opacity is not a problem for MRI, a long cylinder with an aspect ratio {approximately}7 was used and the flow in a thin transverse slice near the center was studied. The particles were mustard seeds and the ratio of cylinder diameter to particle diameter was approximately 50. The parameters compared were dynamic angle of repose, velocity field in a plane perpendicular to the cylinder axis, and velocity fluctuations at rotation rates up to 30 rpm. The agreement between DEM and MRI was good when the friction coefficient and nonsphericity were adjusted in the simulation for the best fit. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Heat transfer during intermittent/slug flow in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shoham, O.; Dukler, A.E.; Taitel, Y.

    1982-08-01

    Heat transfer characteristics for two-phase gas-liquid slug flow in a horizontal pipe have been measured. The time variation of temperature, heat transfer coefficients, and heat flux is reported for the different zones of slug flow: the mixing region at the nose, the body of the slug, the liquid film, and the gas bubble behind the slug. Substantial differences in heat transfer coefficient exist between the bottom and top of the slug. This results from the fact that each slug is effectively a thermally developing entry region caused by the presence of a hot upper wall just upstream of each slug. A qualitative theory is presented which explains this behavior. 18 refs.

  2. Analysis of horizontal flows in the solar granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Suematsu, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Solar limb observations sometimes reveal the presence of a satellite lobe in the blue wing of the Stokes I profile from pixels belonging to granules. The presence of this satellite lobe has been associated in the past to strong line-of-sight gradients and, as the line-of-sight component is almost parallel to the solar surface, to horizontal granular flows. We aim to increase the knowledge about these horizontal flows studying a spectropolarimetric observation of the north solar pole. We will make use of two state of the art techniques, the spatial deconvolution procedure that increases the quality of the data removing the stray light contamination, and spectropolarimetric inversions that will provide the vertical stratification of the atmospheric physical parameters where the observed spectral lines form. We inverted the Stokes profiles using a two component configuration, obtaining that one component is strongly blueshifted and displays a temperature enhancement at upper photospheric layers while the second component has low redshifted velocities and it is cool at upper layers. In addition, we examined a large number of cases located at different heliocentric angles, finding smaller velocities as we move from the centre to the edge of the granule. Moreover, the height location of the enhancement on the temperature stratification of the blueshifted component also evolves with the spatial location on the granule being positioned on lower heights as we move to the periphery of the granular structure.

  3. Gas phase depletion and flow dynamics in horizontal MOCVD reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Ven, J.; Rutten, G. M. J.; Raaijmakers, M. J.; Giling, L. J.

    1986-08-01

    Growth rates of GaAs in the MOCVD process have been studied as a function of both lateral and axial position in horizontal reactor cells with rectangular cross-sections. A model to describe growth rates in laminar flow systems on the basis of concentration profiles under diffusion controlled conditions has been developed. The derivation of the growth rate equations includes the definition of an entrance length for the concentration profile to developed. In this region, growth rates appear to decrease with the 1/3 power of the axial position. Beyond this region, an exponential decrease is found. For low Rayleigh number conditions, the present experimental results show a very satisfactory agreement with the model without parameter fitting for both rectangular and tapered cells, and with both H 2 and N 2 as carrier gases. Theory also predicts that uniform deposition can be obtained over large areas in the flow direction for tapered cells, which has indeed been achieved experimentally. The influence of top-cooling in the present MOCVD system has been considered in more detail. From the experimental results, conclusions could be drawn concerning the flow characteristics. For low Rayleigh numbers (present study ≲ 700) it follows that growth rate distributions correspond with forced laminar flow characteristics. For relatively high Rayleigh numbers (present work 1700-2800), free convective effects with vortex formation are important. These conclusions are not specific for the present system, but apply to horizontal cold-wall reactors in general. On the basis of the present observations, recommendations for a cell design to obtain large area homogeneous deposition have been formulated. In addition, this work supports the conclusion that the final decomposition of trimethylgallium in the MOCVD process mainly takes place at the hot substrate and susceptor and not in the gas phase.

  4. Experiments on Nucleation in Different Flow Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, R. J.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Morton, C. M.; Robinson, M. B.

    1998-01-01

    can be measured by noncontact optical pyrometry, the mass of the sample is known, and post-processing analysis can be conducted on the sample. The disadvantages are that temperature measurement must have exceptionally high precision, and it is not possible to isolate specific heterogeneous sites as in droplet dispersions. Levitation processing of refractory materials in ultra high vacuum provides an avenue to conduct these kinetic studies on single samples. Two experimental methods have been identified where ultra high vacuum experiments are possible; electrostatic levitation in ground-based experiments and electromagnetic processing in low earth orbit on TEMPUS. Such experiments, reported here, were conducted on zirconium. Liquid zirconium is an excellent solvent and has a high solubility for contaminants contained in the bulk material as well as those contaminants found in the vacuum environment. Oxides, nitrides, and carbides do not exist in the melt, and do not form on the surface of molten zirconium, for the materials and vacuum levels used in this study. Ground-based experiments with electrostatic levitation have shown that the statistical nucleation kinetic experiments are viable and yield results which are consistent with classical nucleation theory. The advantage of low earth orbit experiments is the ability to vary the flow conditions in the liquid prior to nucleation. The put-pose of nucleation experiments in TEMPUS was to examine.

  5. Analytic expression for poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.

    2013-01-15

    The poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime is calculated by improving the l = 1 approximation for the Fokker-Planck collision operator [M. Taguchi, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 1897 (1988)]. The obtained analytic expression for this flow, which can be used for general axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, agrees quite well with the recently calculated numerical results by Parker and Catto [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085011 (2012)] in the full range of aspect ratio.

  6. Study of the Transition Flow Regime using Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA Cooperative Agreement presents a study of the Transition Flow Regime Using Monte Carlo Methods. The topics included in this final report are: 1) New Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) procedures; 2) The DS3W and DS2A Programs; 3) Papers presented; 4) Miscellaneous Applications and Program Modifications; 5) Solution of Transitional Wake Flows at Mach 10; and 6) Turbulence Modeling of Shock-Dominated Fows with a k-Enstrophy Formulation.

  7. Characterization of interfacial waves in horizontal core-annular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sumit; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Singh, Ramesh; Tabor, Rico F.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we characterize interfacial waves in horizontal core annular flow (CAF) of fuel-oil and water. Experimental studies on CAF were performed in an acrylic pipe of 15.5mm internal diameter, and the time evolution of the oil-water interface shape was recorded with a high speed camera for a range of different flow-rates of oil (Qo) and water (Qw). The power spectrum of the interface shape shows a range of notable features. First, there is negligible energy in wavenumbers larger than 2 π / a , where a is the thickness of the annulus. Second, for high Qo /Qw , there is no single dominant wavelength, as the flow in the confined annulus does not allow formation of a preferred mode. Third, for lower Qo /Qw , a dominant mode arises at a wavenumber of 2 π / a . We also observe that the power spectrum of the interface shape depends weakly on Qw, and strongly on Qo, perhaps because the net shear rate in the annulus appears to depend weakly on Qw as well. We also attempt to build a general empirical model for CAF by relating the interfacial stress (calculated via the mean pressure gradient) to the flow rate in the annulus, the annular thickness and the core velocity. Authors are thankful to Orica Mining Services (Australia) for the financial support.

  8. Air-water two-phase flow in a 3-mm horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ing Youn; Chang, Yu-Juei; Wang, Chi-Chung

    2000-01-01

    Two-phase flow pattern and friction characteristics for air-water flow in a 3.17 mm smooth tube are reported in this study. The range of air-water mass flux is between 50 to 700 kg/m2.s and gas quality is between 0.0001 to 0.9. The pressure drop data are analyzed using the concept of the two-phase frictional multipliers and the Martinelli parameter. Experimental data show that the two-phase friction multipliers are strongly related to the flow pattern. Taitel & Dukler flow regime map fails to predict the stratified flow pattern data. Their transition lines between annular-wavy and annular-intermittent give fair agreement with data. A modified correlation from Klimenko and Fyodoros criterion is able to distinguish the annular and stratified data. For two-phase flow in small tubes, the effect of surface tension force should be significantly present as compared to gravitational force. The tested empirical frictional correlations couldn't predict the pressure drop in small tubes for various working fluids. It is suggested to correlate a reliable frictional multiplier for small horizontal tubes from a large database of various working fluids, and to develop the flow pattern dependent models for the prediction of two-phase pressure drop in small tubes. .

  9. A Cahn-Hilliard framework for thin-film flows in the partial-wetting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavan, A. A.; Chen, M.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; McKinley, G. H.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Traditional mathematical descriptions of multiphase flow in porous media rely on a multiphase extension of Darcy's law, and lead to nonlinear second-order (advection-diffusion) partial differential equations for fluid saturations. Here, we study horizontal redistribution of immiscible fluids. The traditional Darcy-flow model predicts that the spreading of a finite amount of liquid in a horizontal porous medium never stops; a prediction that is not substantiated by observation. To help guide the development of new models of multiphase flow in porous media [1], we draw an analogy with the flow of thin films. The flow of thin films over flat surfaces has been the subject of much theoretical, experimental and computational research [2]. Under the lubrication approximation, the classical mathematical model for these flows takes the form of a nonlinear fourth-order PDE, where the fourth-order term models the effect of surface tension [3]. This classical model, however, effectively assumes that the film is perfectly wetting to the substrate and, therefore, does not capture the partial wetting regime. Partial wetting is responsible for stopping the spread of a liquid puddle. Here, we present experiments of (large-volume) liquid spreading over a flat horizontal substrate in the partial wetting regime, and characterize the spreading regimes that we observe. We extend our previous theoretical work of two-phase flow in a capillary tube [4], and develop a macroscopic phase-field model of thin-film flows with partial wetting. Our model naturally accounts for the dynamic contact angle at the contact line, and therefore permits modeling thin-film flows without invoking a precursor film, leading to compactly-supported solutions that reproduce the spreading dynamics and the static equilibrium configuration observed in the experiments. We anticipate that this modeling approach will provide a natural mathematical framework to describe spreading and redistribution of immiscible fluids

  10. Burnett Simulations of Gaseous Flows in Transition Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. X.; Bao, F. B.; Lin, J. Z.

    2011-09-01

    Burnett equations with the slip boundary conditions are used to study the three-dimensional gaseous flow in slip and transition regime. The results were first compared with those of DSMC method and good agreements were achieved. The effects of inlet to outlet pressure ratios and Knudsen numbers on flow characteristics were analyzed. The compressible effect increases the pressure nonlinear distribution while the rarefied effect reduces the nonlinear trend. With the same pressure ratio and cross-section area, the flow rate decreases with the increase of aspect ratio.

  11. Change in the wind flow regime in stratified lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belolipetskii, V. M.; Belolipetskii, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    Wind flows in meromictic saline lakes in which the water column is not mixed to the bottom for at least one year are studied. This leads to the formation of upper and depth layers with small density gradients, between which there is a water layer with a large density gradient. It has been shown that, depending on the density stratification and the wind speed, wind flows (in the vertical plane) of two types are possible: with one or two circulation zones. For a two-layer lake model, a criterion for the change in the wind flow regime is proposed.

  12. Characterization of flow regimes in the post-dryout region

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Ishii, M.

    1988-01-01

    A visual study of film boiling using photographic and high speed motion-picture methods was carried out to determine the flow regime transition criteria in the post-CHF region. An idealized inverted annular flow was obtained by introducing a liquid jet of Freon 113 through a nozzle, precisely centered with respect to the internal diameter of the test section, with an annual gas flow. The respective ranges for liquid and gas exit velocities were 0.05-0.5 and 0.03-8.2 m/s. Nitrogen and helium were used in the study.

  13. Flow regime classification in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, T; De Vuyst, F; Yamaguchi, H

    2008-05-21

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  14. Flow regime classification in air magnetic fluid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, T.; DeVuyst, F.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2008-05-01

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  15. The natural flow regime of Hawaíi streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Y. P.; Strauch, A. M.; Clilverd, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    Freshwater is a critical, but limited natural resource on tropical islands; sustaining agriculture, industry, hydropower, urban development, and domestic water supply. The hydrology of Hawaíi islands is largely influenced by the health of mountain forests, which capture and absorb rain and fog drip, recharging aquifers and sustaining stream flow. Forests in Hawaíi are being degraded through the replacement of native vegetation with introduced species or conversion to another land use. Streams in the tropics frequently experience flash flooding due to extreme rainfall-runoff events and low flows due to seasonal drought. These patterns drive habitat availability for freshwater fauna, as well as sediment and nutrient export to near-shore ecosystems. Flow regimes can be used to characterize the frequency and magnitude of extreme high and low flows and are influenced by watershed climate, geology, land cover and soil composition. We examined the effect of climate extremes on stream flow from Hawaiian forests using historical flow data to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns in surface water resources. By defining flow regimes from forests we can improve our understanding of climate extremes on water resource availability across tropical island landscapes.

  16. Dairy washwater treatment using a horizontal flow biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; de Paor, D; Clifford, E

    2008-01-01

    In Ireland, dairy farmyard washwater commonly comprises farmyard run-off and dairy parlour washings. Land-spreading is the most widely used method for treating this wastewater. However, this method can be labour intensive and can cause, in some cases, the degradation of surface and ground waters, mainly due to nitrogen contamination. In this study, a horizontal flow biofilm reactor (HFBR) with step-feed was constructed and tested in the laboratory, to remove organic carbon and nitrogen from a agricultural strength synthetic washwater (SWW). The HFBR had an average top plan surface area (TPSA) of 0.1002 m(2) and consisted of a stack of 45 polystyrene horizontal sheets--15 sheets embedded with 25 mm deep frustums above 30 sheets with 10 mm deep frustums. The frustums acted as miniature reservoirs. The sheets were alternately offset to allow the wastewater to flow horizontally along each sheet and vertically from sheet to sheet down through the reactor. Biofilms developed on the sheets and treated the wastewater. During the 212-d study, the total hydraulic loading rate based on the TPSA of the sheets was 35 l m(-2) d(-1). SWW was pumped for 10 min each hour, in a step feed arrangement at a rate of 23.33 l m(-2) d(-1) on to the top sheet during Phases 1 and 2, and 11.67 l m(-2) d(-1) onto Sheet 16 during Phase 1 (days 1-92) and onto Sheet 30 during Phase 2 (days 93-212). The substrate loading rate during Phases 1 and 2 was 94.8 g total chemical oxygen demand (COD) m(-2) d(-1) and 10.5 g total nitrogen (TN) m(-2) d(-1), based on the TPSA. At steady state in Phase 2, the unit achieved excellent carbon removal of 99.7% 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) and 96.7% total COD, equivalent to TPSA removal rates of 67.5 g BOD(5)m(-2)d(-1) and 91.7 g COD m(-2) d(-1). The nitrogen removal percentages were 98.3% total ammonium-nitrogen (NH(4)-N(t)) and 72.8% TN, which equated to TPSA removal rates of 4.8 g NH(4)-N(t) m(-2) d(-1) and 7.6g TN m(-2) d(-1). No sloughing of

  17. Particle seeding flow system for horizontal shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Stephen; Garcia, Nicolas J.; Martinez, Adam A.; Orlicz, Gregory C.; Prestridge, Katherine P.

    2012-08-01

    The Extreme Fluids Team in P-23, Physics Division, studies fluid dynamics at high speeds using high resolution diagnostics. The unsteady forces on a particle driven by a shock wave are not well understood, and they are difficult to model. A horizontal shock tube (HST) is being modified to collect data about the behavior of particles accelerated by shocks. The HST has been used previously for studies of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) as well as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), diagnostics that measure density and velocity. The purpose of our project is to design a flow system that will introduce particles into the HST. The requirements for this particle flow system (PFS) are that it be non-intrusive, be able to introduce either solid or liquid particles, have an exhaust capability, not interfere with existing diagnostics, and couple with the existing HST components. In addition, the particles must flow through the tube in a uniform way. We met these design criteria by first drawing the existing shock tube and diagnostics and doing an initial design of the ducts for the PFS. We then estimated the losses through the particle flow system from friction and researched possible fans that could be used to drive the particles. Finally, the most challenging component of the design was the coupling to the HST. If we used large inlets, the shock would lose strength as it passed by the inlet, so we designed a novel coupling inlet and outlet that minimize the losses to the shock wave. Our design was reviewed by the Extreme Fluids Team, and it is now being manufactured and built based upon our technical drawings.

  18. Regimes of flow induced vibration for tandem, tethered cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gary; Stremler, Mark

    2015-11-01

    In the wake of a bluff body, there are a number of dynamic response regimes that exist for a trailing bluff body depending on spacing, structural restoring forces, and the mass-damping parameter m* ζ . For tandem cylinders with low values of m* ζ , two such regimes of motion are Gap Flow Switching and Wake Induced Vibration. In this study, we consider the dynamics of a single degree-of-freedom rigid cylinder in the wake of another in these regimes for a variety of center-to-center cylinder spacings (3-5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4,000-11,000). The system consists of a trailing cylinder constrained to a circular arc around a fixed leading cylinder, which, for small angle displacements, bears a close resemblance to the transversely oscillating cylinders found more commonly in existing literature. From experiments on this system, we compare and contrast the dynamic response within these two regimes. Our results show sustained oscillations in the absence of a structural restoring force in all cases, providing experimental support for the wake stiffness assumption, which is based on the mean lift toward the center line of flow.

  19. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of three-phase slug flows in horizontal pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    One of the most common flow regimes in pipelines is that of slug flow: slug bodies corresponding to alternating blocks of aerated liquid which bridge the pipe, separated by elongated bubbles; the latter ride atop a liquid layer. The slugs travel at velocities that exceed the mixture superficial velocity; this can potentially cause structural damage, particularly at pipe bends and junctions. Two-phase slug flows have received considerable attention in the literature both experimentally and computationally but there has been very little work carried out on three-phase slugging. In the present work, the evolution of oil-water-air three-phase slug flow in a horizontal cylindrical pipe is investigated using two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations. The parameters characterising three-phase slug flow, e.g. slug length, propagation velocity, and slug formation frequency, are determined for various gas and liquid superficial velocities for a given pipe geometry. The results of this work are compared to available experimental data and numerical solutions based on approximate, one-dimensional models relying on the use of empirical correlations. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  20. Estimating the Natural Flow Regime of the Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, T.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Rio Grande is the fifth longest river in North America and is a critical water supply for millions of people in the U. S. and Mexico. It is essential that both governements understand the magnitude of transformation to the river's flow regime as the countries engage in bi-national discussion about restoring parts of the river's native ecosystem. Previous studies have focused on estimating changes in the statistical properties of floods, but no studies have estimated the magnitude of reduction of the total annual flow nor changes to the annual hydrograph. Significant reductions in flow on the Rio Grande date to the onset of increased irrigation development in the mid-1800s, and human disturbances precede gaging records. Since the late 1800s, the total annual stream flow has been reduced by 98%, and the snowmelt flood has been virtually eliminated. We used a systems analysis approach to analyze available mean daily discharge data throughout the watershed to estimate the natural unregulated flow regime of the northern branch of the Rio Grande upstream from the Rio Conchos. We specifically estimated what would have been the natural hydrograph of the northern branch if there were no diversions of water for irrigation or municipal water supply in each year between 1958 and 2008, based on evaluation of 34 gaging station records. In each year, we reconstructed hydrographs for successive pairs of gages using estimated unaltered flows as upstream inputs, routed flow as if existing impoundments did not exist, and we made corrections for irrigation diversions; we also evaluated historical flood records. We show that the total natural annual flow for the northern branch was more than 50 times greater than the actual measured flow for this 50-year period. The magnitude of the existing diversions has eliminated the ecological cues in which the native ecosystem evolved. This reduction of flow has shifted the river into fine sediment surplus and initiated widespread channel

  1. compartment transfer rates in horizontal flow constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Uli; Oswald, Sascha; Thullner, Martin; Grathwohl, Peter

    2010-05-01

    A conceptual computer model has been constructed to simulate the compartment transfer rates in horizontal flow constructed wetlands. The model accounts for flow and transport in the variably saturated porous medium as well as biogeochemical change reactions. The most concentrated contaminants such as BTEX, MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons and dissolved as well as mineral phase electron acceptors are considered. Also of major interest are reduced species with high oxygen demand such as ammonium. The influence of marsh plants on microbial activity, gas transport, water balance and contaminant fate in general is matter of current investigation. The constructed wetlands consist of a coarse sand or fine gravel porous medium. Marsh plants were introduced after installation, however, a number of control basins are operated unplanted. Water levels and through flow rates are adjusted to optimize the remediation efficiency. The system is likely to be neither reaction nor mixing limited, thus both, values of dispersivity and degradation kinetics may be crucial for remediation efficiency. Biogeochemical modelling is able to delineate in detail (i) the zonation of processes, (ii) temporal variation (breakthrough curves) and (iii) mass balance information. The contributions of biodegradation and volatilisation and the influence of plants (compartment transfer) can generally best be evaluated by the component's mass balance. More efficient mixing is expected in the wetlands with open water body which leads to both, more biodegradation and volatilisation. An important task is to quantify the role of plants and root systems for contaminant attenuation in constructed wetlands. The long term goal of investigation is to allow for predictions for the design of large scale compartment transfer wetlands that may be applied to remediate the site as a whole.

  2. Numerical Analysis of Granular Flows in a Silo Bed on Flow Regime Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xingtuan; Gui, Nan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jiang, Shengyao

    2015-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a gravity-driven dense granular flow in a granular bed with a contracted drainage orifice are studied by using discrete element method and quantitative analysis. Three values of discharging rates, ranging from fast to slow dense flows, are investigated. Time variations and derivatives of mean forces and velocities, as well as their respective correlations, are analyzed to quantitatively depict the characteristics of granular flow as well as flow regime categorization. The auto-correlation functions, as well as their Fourier spectrums, are utilized to characterize the differences between the mechanisms of slow and fast granular flows. Finally, it is suggested that the flow regimes of slow and fast flows can be characterized by the kinetic and kinematic flow properties of particles. PMID:25793996

  3. Modelling Air and Water Two-Phase Annular Flow in a Small Horizontal Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Yao, Yufeng; Arini, Antonino; McIiwain, Stuart; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been carried out to study air and water two-phase flow in a small horizontal pipe of an inner diameter of 8.8mm, in order to investigate unsteady flow pattern transition behaviours and underlying physical mechanisms. The surface liquid film thickness distributions, determined by either wavy or full annular flow regime, are shown in reasonable good agreement with available experimental data. It was demonstrated that CFD simulation was able to predict wavy flow structures accurately using two-phase flow sub-models embedded in ANSYS-Fluent solver of Eulerian-Eulerian framework, together with a user defined function subroutine ANWAVER-UDF. The flow transient behaviours from bubbly to annular flow patterns and the liquid film distributions revealed the presence of gas/liquid interferences between air and water film interface. An increase of upper wall liquid film thickness along the pipe was observed for both wavy annular and full annular scenarios. It was found that the liquid wavy front can be further broken down to form the water moisture with liquid droplets penetrating upwards. There are discrepancies between CFD predictions and experimental data on the liquid film thickness determined at the bottom and the upper wall surfaces, and the obtained modelling information can be used to assist further 3D user defined function subroutine development, especially when CFD simulation becomes much more expense to model full 3D two-phase flow transient performance from a wavy annular to a fully developed annular type.

  4. Evaluation of unclogging aspects in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Suymara Toledo; de Matos, Antonio Teixeira; Baptestini, Gheila Corrêa Ferres; Borges, Alisson Carraro

    2016-10-01

    In horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSF-CWs), the main operational problem is clogging of the porous medium. In this study, the unclogging of HSSF-CWs was evaluated, at rest, by adding a nitrogen-based nutrient solution to the influent. For this, six HSSF-CWs were used, consisting of two uncultivated (CW-C), two cultivated with Tifton 85-grass (Cynodon spp.) (CW-T) and two cultivated with alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) (CW-A), which were fully clogged after being used for the treatment of swine wastewater. The results indicated that passage of the nutrient solution for 55 days through the bed of the HSSF-CWs resulted in reductions of 11 and 33%, respectively, in the total volatile solids (TVS) concentration of fine clogging material in the CW-T and CW-A. With regard to the TVS content of the coarse clogging material, the reduction was even greater, being 33% for CW-T and 62% for CW-A. Measurements of K0 made along the beds (thirds 1, 2 and 3) before and after passage of the nutrient solution in the CWs indicated respective increases of 7, 13 and 0.1% in CW-C; 21, 11 and 7% in CW-T; and 52%, 6% and -6% (decrease) in CW-A. Runoff of the nutrient solution decreased gradually over time, presenting at the beginning of the experiment 26, 35 and 150 cm, and at the end (after 55 days of application) 0, 0 and 50 cm in the flow direction of the CW-C and CW-T and CW-A, respectively.

  5. Predicting regime shifts in flow of the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gangopadhyay, Subhrendu; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of continued global warming on water resources are a concern for water managers and stake holders. In the western United States, where the combined climatic demand and consumptive use of water is equal to or greater than the natural supply of water for some locations, there is growing concern regarding the sustainability of future water supplies. In addition to the adverse effects of warming on water supply, another issue for water managers is accounting for, and managing, the effects of natural climatic variability, particularly persistently dry and wet periods. Analyses of paleo-reconstructions of Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) flow demonstrate that severe sustained droughts, and persistent pluvial periods, are a recurring characteristic of hydroclimate in the Colorado River basin. Shifts between persistently dry and wet regimes (e.g., decadal to multi-decadal variability (D2M)) have important implications for water supply and water management. In this study paleo-reconstructions of UCRB flow are used to compute the risks of shifts between persistently wet and dry regimes given the length of time in a specific regime. Results indicate that low frequency variability of hydro-climatic conditions and the statistics that describe this low frequency variability can be useful to water managers by providing information about the risk of shifting from one hydrologic regime to another. To manage water resources in the future water managers will have to understand the joint hydrologic effects of natural climate variability and global warming. These joint effects may produce future hydrologic conditions that are unprecedented in both the instrumental and paleoclimatic records.

  6. Effects of tidal operation on pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland treating sulfate rich wastewater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbing; Vymazal, Jan; Kuschk, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Three different flow regimes were carried out in a pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland-treating sulfate rich wastewater contaminated with monochlorobenzene (MCB) and perchloroethene (PCE). The three regimes were continuous flow, 7-day cycle discontinuous flow, and 2.5-day cycle discontinuous flow. The results show that intensifying the tidal regime (2.5-day cycle) significantly enhanced MCB removal before 2 m from the inlet and increasing PCE removal efficiency at 0.5 m. The PCE dechlorination process was promoted with tidal operation, especially under the 2.5-day cycle regime, with significant increases of cis-1,2- dichloroethenes (DCEs), vinyl chloride (VC), and ethene, but trans-1,2-DCE was significantly decreased after tidal operation. Due to the high sulfate concentration in the influent, sulfide was observed in pore water up to 20 and 23 mg L(-1) under continuous flow and 7-day cycle regime, respectively. However, sulfide concentrations decreased to less than 4 mg L(-1) under intensified tidal operation (2.5-day cycle). The increase of oxygen concentration in pore water through intensified tidal operation resulted in better MCB removal performance and the successful inhibition of sulfate reduction. In conclusion, intensifying tidal operation is an effective approach for the treatment of chlorinated hydrocarbons and inhibiting sulfide accumulation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

  7. Observations on preferential flow and horizontal transport of nitrogen fertilizer in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkison, D.H.; Blevins, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    A study site underlain by a claypan soil was instrumented to examine the transport of fertilizer nitrogen (N) under corn (Zea mays L.) cultivation. The study was designed to examine N transport within the unsaturated zone and in interflow (the saturated flow of water on top of the claypan). A 15N- labeled fertilizer (labeled N), bromide (Br), and chloride (Cl) were used as field tracers. Rapid or prolonged infiltration events allowed water and dissolved solutes to perch on the claypan for brief periods. However, a well- developed network of preferential flow paths quickly diverted water and solutes through the claypan and into the underlying glacial till aquifer. Excess fertilizer N in the unsaturated zone supplied a continuous, but declining input of N to ground water for a period of 15 mo after a single fertilizer application. Calculated solute velocities through the claypan matrix (6.4 x 10-6 cm s-1) were similar to horizontal transport rates along the claypan (3.5 to 7.3 x 10-6 cm s-1) but much slower than infiltration rates determined for preferential flow paths (1.67 x 10-3 cm s-1). These flow paths accounted for 35% of the transport. A seasonally variable, dual mode of transport (matrix and preferential flow) prevented the claypan from being an effective barrier to vertical transport. Simulations of selected field observations, conducted using the variably saturated two- dimensional flow and transport model, VS2DT, confirmed the presence of a dual flow regime in the claypan.

  8. Space-charge-limited flow in quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Lay Kee

    2005-10-01

    Space-charge-limited (SCL) flow has been an area of active research in the development of non-neutral plasma physics, high current diodes, high power microwave sources, vacuum microelectronics and sheath physics. According to the classical Child-Langmuir (CL) law for the planar diodes, the current density scales as 3/2's power of gap voltage and to the inverse squared power of gap spacing. In the past decade, there have been renewed interests in extending the classical CL law to multi-dimensional models both numerically and analytically. The study of SCL flow in quantum regime has also attracted considerable interests in the past 3 years [1-3]. With the recent advances in nanotechnology, electron beam with very high current density may be transported in a nano-scale gap with a relatively low gap voltage. In this new operating regime, where the electron wavelength is comparable or larger than the gap spacing, the quantum effects become important. In this talk, the quantum theory of CL law will be introduced to reveal that the classical CL law is enhanced by a large factor due to electron tunneling and exchange-correlation effects, and there is a new quantum scaling for the current density, which is proportional to the 1/2's power of gap voltage, and to the inverse fourth-power of gap spacing [1-2]. Quasi-2D and 3D models with finite emission area will be shown [3]. We will also show that the classical properties of the SCL flow such as bipolar flow, beam-loaded capacitance, transit time and noise will require a complete revision in the quantum regime. The implications of the emission law of Fowler-Nordheim in the presence of intense space charge over the nanometer scale will be discussed.[1] L. K. Ang, T. J. T. Kwan, and Y. Y. Lau, ``New Scaling of Child-Langmuir Law in the Quantum Regime,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 208303 (2003). [2] L. K. Ang, Y. Y. Lau, and T. J. T. Kwan, ``Simple Derivation of Quantum Scaling in Child-Langmuir law,'' IEEE Trans Plasma Sci. 32, 410

  9. Observed changes in flow regimes in the Mekong River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongnan; Long, Di; Zhao, Jianshi; Lu, Hui; Hong, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Human activities, such as dam construction, significantly altered the flow regimes in the Mekong River, particularly after the completion of two large dams, namely Xiaowan and Nuozhadu in 2010 and 2014, respectively. Streamflow data from 1960 to 2014 obtained from five stations located along the Mekong mainstream are divided into three periods, i.e., the pre-impact period (1960-1991), the transition period (1992-2009), and the post-impact period (2010-2014). The flow regimes were investigated using eco-flow metrics and indicators of hydrologic alteration (IHA). The results show that the construction and initial filling of the upstream dams reduced the annual streamflow in the upstream Chiang Saen gauging station, whereas no clear effect was observed in the downstream Stung Treng station. The operation of dams reduces the streamflow in wet seasons and increases the streamflow in dry seasons, resulting in a unique seasonal variation in the streamflow based on eco-flow metrics in the Chiang Saen gauging station, observed from 2010 to 2014. In addition, the maximum flow values decreased significantly in the Chiang Saen gauging station during the year corresponding to the completion of the upstream dams. The construction and operation of dams clearly have significant impacts on low pulse duration. It is observed that climate change dictated the changes in the annual streamflow during the transition period 1992-2009 (82.28%), whereas human activities contributed more in the post-impact period 2010-2014 (61.88%). The results of this study could provide a reference for reservoir operation in the upstream regions considering both ecological and economic benefits of such operations, as well as maximize the interests of stakeholders in this region.

  10. Linking principles of soil formation and flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Henry

    2010-10-01

    SummaryPreferential flow (PF) is a fundamentally important soil hydrologic process that controls a variety of soil physical, chemical, and biological functions. However, the lack of theory in this field and the existence of conceptual and technological bottlenecks continue to hinder the advancement of PF modeling and prediction. This paper explores three theoretical perspectives on the relationships between pedogenesis and flow regimes in field soils. First, we examine non-equilibrium thermodynamics as applied to open dissipative field soils with continuous energy inputs and mass exchanges with the surrounding environment. The dual-partitioning of pedogenesis (dissipating and organizing processes) is consistent with the theory of dissipative structure, which explains the genesis and evolution of soil architecture (structure + matrix) and organized heterogeneity found in various soils. Such organized heterogeneity leads to widespread potential for PF occurrence. Second, we investigate constructal theory to explain the tendency for dual-flow regimes in soils - one with high resistivity (Darcy flow) and the other with low resistivity (PF) - together, they form PF configuration that provides the least global flow resistance. This theory is applied to explain some general characteristics of weathering processes and related flow regime changes, which are supported by limited chronologic data from the literature on subsoil's saturated hydraulic conductivity decrease after a soil reaches a certain age. Third, the theory of evolving networks sheds light on a variety of PF networks observed in field soils, which increase the effectiveness of energy and mass transfer in the subsurface. This is because networks are a part of the organization resulting from the minimum energy dissipation principle and far-from-equilibrium thermodynamics. All the three theories discussed support the notion that the potential for PF occurrence in field soils is likely universal. However

  11. Horizontal compressive stress regime on the northern Cascadia margin inferred from borehole breakouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M.; Malinverno, A.; Wang, K.; Goldberg, D.; Guerin, G.

    2016-09-01

    During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311 five boreholes were drilled across the accretionary prism of the northern Cascadia subduction zone. Logging-while-drilling borehole images are utilized to determine breakout orientations to define maximum horizontal compressive stress orientations. Additionally, wireline logging data at two of these sites and from Site 889 of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 146 are used to define breakouts from differences in the aperture of caliper arms. At most sites, the maximum horizontal compressive stress SHmax is margin-normal, consistent with plate convergence. Deviations from this trend reflect local structural perturbations. Our results do not constrain stress magnitudes. If the margin-normal compressional stress is greater than the vertical stress, the margin-normal SHmax direction we observe may reflect current locking of a velocity-weakening shallow megathrust and thus potential for trench-breaching, tsunamigenic rupture in a future megathrust earthquake.

  12. Intermittent Flow Regimes in Unsaturated Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzehei, T. A.; Or, D.

    2001-12-01

    Flow regimes in unsaturated fractured rocks are significantly influenced by interplay between gravitational and capillary forces and by abrupt changes in media pore space properties. These interactions give rise to complex flow mechanisms that are not amenable to representation by standard continuum theories. Even when the flux of water into the fracture is uniform, actual flow of liquid occurs through preferential pathways. We developed a model for interactions between a uniform flux and local variations in fracture aperture, leading to fragmentation of the liquid into discrete elements (bridges) and subsequent initiation of avalanches. Liquid bridges form and grow in local asperities along the preferential pathways, with subsequent breakup of the bridges at a critical bridge size. The detached bridge has a potential of sweeping other bridges along the pathway downhill from the initiation point, creating an avalanche of growing mass. Consequently, the outflow at the end of the fracture occurs as a series of discrete discharge events. The size and interval of the discharge events depend on the flux of liquid into the fracture and the fracture geometry on the pathway (e.g., number of apertures and aperture sizes). Such complex flow structure was observed in other studies involving gravity-driven unsaturated flow.

  13. Trends in seasonal river flow regimes in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannaford, J.; Buys, G.

    2012-12-01

    SummaryA wide range of hydrological trend studies have been published for the UK, but there has not previously been a UK-wide assessment of changes in seasonal river flow regimes in a large number of catchments reflecting the diversity of UK rivers. This represents a gap in research, as climate change impacts are likely to vary regionally and seasonally, and seasonal river flows form the basis of many climate change impact assessments. This study attempts to fill this gap, by analysing trends over the 1969-2008 period in a network of 89 catchments from across the UK. Many UK catchments are heavily disturbed by human influences, so this study primarily focuses on catchments with near-natural flow regimes, to enable climate-driven trends to be distinguished from direct anthropogenic disturbances such as river regulation and abstractions. Trends are characterised for four standard seasons (December-February, March-May, June-August, September-November), for seven flow quantiles. Particular emphasis is placed on examining spatial patterns in observed trend magnitude for median, high and low flows. A set of eight catchments with long records (starting in the 1930s or earlier) are used to assess the representativeness of recent trends in a long-term context, via a moving window trend analysis. The results of this study suggest a much more complex pattern of regional and seasonal variation than revealed in previous work. Some findings resonate with observed rainfall changes, and also with potential future climate change - e.g. increased runoff and high flows in winter and autumn, and decreased flows in spring. The latter is a result which is sensitive to study period, and is not observed in longer records. In summer, there is no compelling evidence for a decrease in overall runoff or low flows, which is contrary to trajectories of most future projections. Overall, the results do not suggest immediate concern for current water resource management on the basis of observed

  14. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-11-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ``isolated`` bubbles, ``coalesced`` bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined.

  15. Measurement of interfacial structures in horizontal air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, J. D.; Worosz, T.; Dodds, M. R.; Kim, S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to predict multi-dimensional phenomena in nuclear reactor systems, methods relying on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are essential. However, to be applicable in assessing thermal-hydraulic safety, these codes must be able to accurately predict the development of two-phase flows. Therefore, before practical application these codes must be assessed using experimental databases that capture multi-dimensional phenomena. While a large database exists that can be employed to assess predictions in vertical flows, the available database for horizontal flows is significantly lacking. Therefore, the current work seeks to develop an additional database in air-water horizontal bubbly flow through a 38.1 mm ID test section with a total development length of approximately 250 diameters. The experimental conditions are chosen to cover a wide range of the bubbly flow regime based upon flow visualization using a high-speed video camera. A database of local time-averaged void fraction, bubble velocity, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter are acquired throughout the pipe cross-section using a four-sensor conductivity probe. To investigate the evolution of the flow, measurements are made at axial locations of 44, 116, and 244 diameters downstream of the inlet. In the current work, only measurements obtained at L/D = 244 are presented. It is found that increasing the liquid superficial velocity tends to reduce both the bubble size and the degree of bubble packing near the upper wall. However, it is observed that the position of the maximum void fraction value remains nearly constant and is located approximately one bubble diameter away from the upper wall. It is also found that the bubble velocity exhibits a power law behavior resembling a single phase liquid turbulent velocity profile. Moreover, the local bubble velocity tends to decrease as the local void fraction increases. Conversely, increasing the gas superficial velocity is found to

  16. Molecular dynamics of fluid flows in the Knudsen regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2000-03-01

    Novel technological applications often involve fluid flows in the Knudsen regime in which the mean free path is comparable to the system size. The boundary conditions at the wall-fluid interface are studied. The wall is modelled by atoms tethered to a lattice that interact by Lennard-Jones forces with the fluid atoms. Monoatomic and polymeric Lennard-Jones fluids are considered and Couette and gravity-driven flows are studied. The scenarios of behavior envisioned by J. C. Maxwell are found not to be valid in general. For instance, there are novel effects related to a non-zero residence time of the fluid molecules in the wall vicinity. In the limiting case of strongly attractive fluid-wall interactions, the velocity distribution of the outcoming atoms is indeed thermal. However, when the attractive tail in the fluid-wall interactions is weak, there are significant deviations from Maxwell's hypothesis. Striking many body effects are found as one interpolates between the dilute gas and the dense fluid regime. The molecular nature of the viscous and thermal slip phenomena are elucidated.

  17. Wind-Driven Ecological Flow Regimes Downstream from Hydropower Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, J.; Characklis, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    challenge, the following study was designed to investigate the potential for wind power integration to alter riparian flow regimes below hydroelectric dams. A hydrological model of a three-dam cascade in the Roanoke River basin (Virginia, USA) is interfaced with a simulated electricity market (i.e. a unit commitment problem) representing the Dominion Zone of PJM Interconnection. Incorporating forecasts of electricity demand, hydro capacity and wind availability, a mixed-integer optimization program minimizes the system cost of meeting hourly demand and reserve requirements by means of a diverse generation portfolio (e.g. nuclear, fossil, hydro, and biomass). A secondary 'balancing' energy market is executed if real-time wind generation is less than the day-ahead forecast, calling upon reserved generation resources to meet the supply shortfall. Hydropower release schedules are determined across a range of wind development scenarios (varying wind's fraction of total installed generating capacity, as well as its geographical source region). Flow regimes for each wind development scenario are compared against both historical and simulated flows under current operations (negligible wind power), as well as simulated natural flows (dam removal), in terms of ecologically relevant flow metrics. Results quantify the ability of wind power development to alter within-week stream flows downstream from hydropower dams.

  18. Flow regime map and deposition rate uniformity in vertical rotating-disk OMVPE reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biber, Catharina R.; Wang, Christine A.; Motakef, Shahryar

    1992-10-01

    A quantitative map of flow regimes has been developed for rotating-disk organometallic vapor epitaxy reactors. Scaling laws and flow visualization experiments over a wide range of reactor geometries and processing conditions were used to generate analytical relationships for boundaries separating the plug-flow regime from the bouyancy- and rotation-induced-flow regimes. For the growth of epitaxial layers with a high degree of uniformity and interface abruptness, the plug-flow regime is preferred. The locus of maximum deposition rate uniformity within the plug-flow regime was found by numerical simulation studies. Operation at high rotation rates close to the boundary between the plug-flow and rotation-induced-flow regimes provides for nearly uniform deposition rates.

  19. Flow regime change in an Endorheic basin in Southern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worku, F. F.; Werner, M.; Wright, N.; van der Zaag, P.; Demissie, S.

    2014-01-01

    Endorheic basins, often found in semi-arid and arid climates, are particularly sensitive to changes in climatological fluxes such as precipitation, evaporation and runoff, resulting in variability of river flows as well as of water levels in end-point lakes that are often present. In this paper we apply the Indicators of Hydrological Alteration (IHA) to characterise change to the natural flow regime of the Omo-Ghibe basin in Southern Ethiopia. This endorheic basin is considered relatively pristine, with the basin being the main source of flow to Lake Turkana, the end-point lake in the East-African rift valley. The water level in Lake Turkana shows significant fluctuation, but an increasing trend can be observed over the past 20 yr. The reasons are currently not well understood. Of the five groups of metrics in the IHA, only those related to magnitude were found to show significant trends, with the main trend being the increase of flow during the dry season. This trend was not reflected in climatological drivers such as rainfall, evaporation, and temperature (which shows an increasing trend), but rather is attributed to the substantial changes in Land Use and Land Cover (LULC) in the basin. The impact on the basin hydrology is apparent mainly in the more humid part of the basin. The significant shift from forest and woodland to grassland and cropland results in a decrease of actual evaporation and subsequent increase in (dry season) runoff. The long term trend of the increasing levels in lake Turkana are related to these trends in dry season flows, while shorter term fluctuations of the lake levels are attributed primarily to anomalies in consecutive wet and dry season rainfall.

  20. Flow regime change in an endorheic basin in southern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worku, F. F.; Werner, M.; Wright, N.; van der Zaag, P.; Demissie, S. S.

    2014-09-01

    Endorheic basins, often found in semi-arid and arid climates, are particularly sensitive to variation in fluxes such as precipitation, evaporation and runoff, resulting in variability of river flows as well as of water levels in end-point lakes that are often present. In this paper we apply the indicators of hydrological alteration (IHA) to characterise change to the natural flow regime of the Omo-Ghibe Basin in southern Ethiopia. Little water resource infrastructure has been developed in the basin to date, and it is considered pristine. The basin is endorheic and is the main source of flow to Lake Turkana in the East African Rift Valley. The water level in Lake Turkana shows significant fluctuation, but increase of its level can be observed over the past 20 years. The reasons are currently not well understood. Of the five groups of hydrological characteristics in the IHA (magnitude, timing, duration, frequency and variability), only those related to magnitude were found to show significant trends, with the main trend being the increase of flow during the dry season. This trend was not reflected in climatological drivers such as rainfall, evaporation and temperature (which shows a positive trend), but rather is attributed to the substantial changes in land use and land cover in the basin. The change in the basin hydrology is apparent mainly in the more humid part of the basin. The significant shift from forest and woodland to grassland and cropland results in a decrease of actual evaporation and subsequent increase in (dry season) runoff. The long-term trend of the increasing levels in Lake Turkana are related to these trends in dry season flows, while shorter-term fluctuations of the lake levels are attributed primarily to anomalies in consecutive wet and dry season rainfall.

  1. Controls of wellbore flow regimes on pump effluent composition.

    PubMed

    Martin-Hayden, James M; Plummer, Mitchell; Britt, Sanford L

    2014-01-01

    Where well water and formation water are compositionally different or heterogeneous, pump effluent composition will vary due to partial mixing and transport induced by pumping. Investigating influences of purging and sampling methodology on composition variability requires quantification of wellbore flow regimes and mixing. As a basis for this quantification, analytical models simulating Poiseuille flow were developed to calculate flow paths and travel times. Finite element modeling was used to incorporate influences of mixing. Parabolic velocity distributions within the screened interval accelerate with cumulative inflow approaching the pump intake while an annulus of inflowing formation water contracts uniformly to displace an axial cylinder of pre-pumping well water as pumping proceeds. Increased dispersive mixing forms a more diffuse formation water annulus and the contribution of formation water to pump effluent increases more rapidly. Models incorporating viscous flow and diffusion scale mixing show that initially pump effluent is predominantly pre-pumping well water and compositions vary most rapidly. After two screen volumes of pumping, 94% of pump effluent is inflowing formation water. Where the composition of formation water and pre-pumping well water are likely to be similar, pump effluent compositions will not vary significantly and may be collected during early purging or with passive sampling. However, where these compositions are expected to be considerably different or heterogeneous, compositions would be most variable during early pumping, that is, when samples are collected during low-flow sampling. Purging of two screen volumes would be required to stabilize the content and collect a sample consisting of 94% formation water.

  2. Controls of Wellbore Flow Regimes on Pump Effluent Composition

    SciTech Connect

    James Martin-Hayden; plummer; Sanford Britt

    2014-01-01

    Where well water and formation water are compositionally different or heterogeneous, pump effluent composition will vary due to partial mixing and transport induced by pumping. Investigating influences of purging and sampling methodology on composition variability requires quantification of wellbore flow regimes and mixing. As a basis for this quantification, analytical models simulating Poiseuille flow were developed to calculate flow paths and travel times. Finite element modeling was used to incorporate influences of mixing. Parabolic velocity distributions within the screened interval accelerate with cumulative inflow approaching the pump intake while an annulus of inflowing formation water contracts uniformly to displace an axial cylinder of pre-pumping well water as pumping proceeds. Increased dispersive mixing forms a more diffuse formation water annulus and the contribution of formation water to pump effluent increases more rapidly. Models incorporating viscous flow and diffusion scale mixing show that initially pump effluent is predominantly pre-pumping well water and compositions vary most rapidly. After two screen volumes of pumping, 94% of pump effluent is inflowing formation water. Where the composition of formation water and pre-pumping well water are likely to be similar, pump effluent compositions will not vary significantly and may be collected during early purging or with passive sampling. However, where these compositions are expected to be considerably different or heterogeneous, compositions would be most variable during early pumping, that is, when samples are collected during low-flow sampling. Purging of two screen volumes would be required to stabilize the content and collect a sample consisting of 94% formation water.

  3. A hydrometeorological forecasting approach for basins with complex flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkadoulas, Akis; Mantesi, Konstantina; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koussis, Antonis; Mazi, Aikaterini; Katsanos, Demetris; Koukouvinos, Antonis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    The combined use of weather forecasting models and hydrological models in flood risk estimations is an established technique, with several successful applications worldwide. However, most known hydrometeorological forecasting systems have been established in large rivers with perpetual flow. Experience from small- and medium-scale basins, which are often affected by flash floods, is very limited. In this work we investigate the perspectives of hydrometeorological forecasting, by emphasizing two issues: (a) which modelling approach can credibly represent the complex dynamics of basins with highly variable runoff (intermittent or ephemeral); and (b) which transformation of point-precipitation forecasts provides the most reliable estimations of spatially aggregated data, to be used as inputs to semi-distributed hydrological models. Using as case studies the Sarantapotamos river basin, in Eastern Greece (145 km2), and the Nedontas river basin, in SW Peloponnese (120 km2), we demonstrate the advantages of continuous simulation through the HYDROGEIOS model. This employs conjunctive modelling of surface and groundwater flows and their interactions (percolation, infiltration, underground losses), which are key processes in river basins characterized by significantly variability of runoff. The model was calibrated against hourly flow data at two and three hydrometric stations, respectively, for a 3-year period (2011-2014). Next we attempted to reproduce the most intense flood events of that period, by substituting observed rainfall by forecast scenarios. In this respect, we used consecutive point forecasts of a 6-hour lead time, provided by the numerical weather prediction model WRF (Advanced Research version), dynamically downscaled from the ~1° forecast of GSF-NCEP/NOAA successively first to ~18 km, then to ~6 km and ultimately at the horizontal grid resolution of 2x2 km2. We examined alternative spatial integration approaches, using as reference the rainfall stations

  4. Aeration efficiency over stepped cascades: better predictions from flow regimes.

    PubMed

    Khdhiri, Hatem; Potier, Olivier; Leclerc, Jean-Pierre

    2014-05-15

    Stepped cascades are recognized as high potential air-water gas exchangers. In natural rivers, these structures enhance oxygen transfer to water by creating turbulence at interface with increasing air entrainment in water and air-water surface exchange. Stepped cascades could be really useful to improve the natural self-purification process by providing oxygen to aerobic micro-organisms. The aeration performance of these structures depends on several operating and geometrical parameters. In the literature, several empirical correlations for aeration efficiency prediction on stepped cascades exist. Most of these correlations are only applicable for operating and geometrical parameters in the range of which they have been developed. In this paper, 398 experimental sets of data (from our experiments and collected from literature) were used to develop a correlation for aeration prediction over stepped cascades derived from dimensional analysis and parameterized for each individual flow regime in order to consider change in flow regime effect on oxygen transfer. This new correlation allowed calculating the whole set of data obtained for cascades with steps heights between 0.05 m and 0.254 m, cascade total height between 0.25 m and 2.5 m, for discharges per unit of width ranging from 0.28 10(-3) m(2)/s to 600 10(-3) m(2)/s and for cascade steps number between 3 and 25. In these ranges of parameters, standard deviation for aeration efficiency estimation was found to be less than 17%. Finally, advices were proposed to help and improve the structure design in order to improve aeration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A solution algorithm for fluid-particle flows across all flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bo; Fox, Rodney O.

    2017-09-01

    Many fluid-particle flows occurring in nature and in technological applications exhibit large variations in the local particle volume fraction. For example, in circulating fluidized beds there are regions where the particles are close-packed as well as very dilute regions where particle-particle collisions are rare. Thus, in order to simulate such fluid-particle systems, it is necessary to design a flow solver that can accurately treat all flow regimes occurring simultaneously in the same flow domain. In this work, a solution algorithm is proposed for this purpose. The algorithm is based on splitting the free-transport flux solver dynamically and locally in the flow. In close-packed to moderately dense regions, a hydrodynamic solver is employed, while in dilute to very dilute regions a kinetic-based finite-volume solver is used in conjunction with quadrature-based moment methods. To illustrate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed solution algorithm, it is implemented in OpenFOAM for particle velocity moments up to second order, and applied to simulate gravity-driven, gas-particle flows exhibiting cluster-induced turbulence. By varying the average particle volume fraction in the flow domain, it is demonstrated that the flow solver can handle seamlessly all flow regimes present in fluid-particle flows.

  6. A solution algorithm for fluid–particle flows across all flow regimes

    DOE PAGES

    Kong, Bo; Fox, Rodney O.

    2017-05-12

    Many fluid–particle flows occurring in nature and in technological applications exhibit large variations in the local particle volume fraction. For example, in circulating fluidized beds there are regions where the particles are closepacked as well as very dilute regions where particle–particle collisions are rare. Thus, in order to simulate such fluid–particle systems, it is necessary to design a flow solver that can accurately treat all flow regimes occurring simultaneously in the same flow domain. In this work, a solution algorithm is proposed for this purpose. The algorithm is based on splitting the free-transport flux solver dynamically and locally in themore » flow. In close-packed to moderately dense regions, a hydrodynamic solver is employed, while in dilute to very dilute regions a kinetic-based finite-volume solver is used in conjunction with quadrature-based moment methods. To illustrate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed solution algorithm, it is implemented in OpenFOAM for particle velocity moments up to second order, and applied to simulate gravity-driven, gas–particle flows exhibiting cluster-induced turbulence. By varying the average particle volume fraction in the flow domain, it is demonstrated that the flow solver can handle seamlessly all flow regimes present in fluid–particle flows.« less

  7. Flow visualization study of post critical heat flux region for inverted bubbly, slug and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Denten, J.G.; Ishii, M.

    1988-11-01

    A visual study of film boiling using still photographic and high- speed motion picture methods was carried out in order to analyze the post-CHF hydrodynamics for steady-state inlet pre-CHF two-phase flow regimes. Pre-CHF two-phase flow regimes were established by introducing Freon 113 liquid and nitrogen gas into a jet core injection nozzle. An idealized, post-CHF two-phase core initial flow geometry (cylindrical multiphase jet core surrounded by a coaxial annulus of gas) was established at the nozzle exit by introducing nitrogen gas into the annular gap between the jet nozzle two-phase effluent and the heated test section inlet. For the present study three basic post-CHF flow regimes have been observed: the rough wavy regime (inverted annular flow preliminary break down), the agitated regime (transition between inverted annular and dispersed droplet flow), and the dispersed ligament/droplet regime. For pre-CHF bubbly flow in the jet nozzle, the post-CHF flow (beginning from jet nozzle exit/heated test section inlet) consists of the rough wavy regime, followed by the agitated and then the dispersed ligament/droplet regime. In the same way, for pre-CHF slug flow in the jet core, the post-CHF flow is comprised of the agitated regime at the nozzle exit, followed by the dispersed regime. Pre-CHF annular jet core flow results in a small, depleted post-CHF agitated flow regime at the nozzle exit, immediately followed by the dispersed ligament/droplet regime. Observed post dryout hydrodynamic behavior is reported, with particular attention given to the transition flow pattern between inverted annular and dispersed droplet flow. 43 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Fluid flow regimes and nonlinear flow characteristics in deformable rock fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Nemcik, Jan

    2013-01-01

    SummaryThe presence of fracture roughness, isolated contact areas and the occurrence of nonlinear flow complicate the fracture flow process. To experimentally investigate the fluid flow regimes through deformable rock fractures, water flow tests through both mated and non-mated sandstone fractures were conducted in triaxial cell under changing confining stress from 1.0 MPa to 3.5 MPa. For the first time Forchheimer's nonlinear factor b describing flow in non-mated fractures under variable confining stress has been quantified. The results show that linear Darcy's law holds for water flow through mated fracture samples due to high flow resistance caused by the small aperture and high tortuosity of the flow pathway, while nonlinear flow occurs for non-mated fracture due to enlarged aperture. Regression analyses of experimental data show that both Forchheimer equation and Izbash's law provide an excellent description for this nonlinear fracture flow process. Further, the nonlinear flow data indicate that for smaller true transmissivity, the appreciable nonlinear effect occurs at lower volumetric flow rates. The experimental data of both mated and non-mated fracture flow show that the confining stress does not change the linear and nonlinear flow patterns, however, it has a significant effect on flow characteristics. For mated fracture flow, the slope of pressure gradient versus flow rate becomes steeper and the transmissivity decreases hyperbolically with increase of confining stress, while for non-mated fracture flow, the rate of increase of the nonlinear coefficient b used in Forchheimer equation steadily diminishes with the increase of confining stress. Based on Forchheimer equation and taking 10% of the nonlinear effect as the critical state to distinguish between linear and nonlinear flow, the critical Reynolds number was successfully estimated by using a nonlinear effect coefficient E. This method appears effective to determine critical Reynolds numbers for

  9. Flow Visualization Study of a 1/48-Scale AFTI/F111 Model to Investigate Horizontal Tail Flow Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    During flight testing of the AFTI/F111 aircraft, horizontal tail buffet was observed. Flutter analysis ruled out any aeroelastic instability, so a water-tunnel flow visualization study was conducted to investigate possible flow disturbances on the horizontal tail which might cause buffet. For this study, a 1/48-scale model was used. Four different wing cambers and one horizontal tail setting were tested between 0 and 20 deg angle of attack. These wing cambers corresponded to the following leading training edge deflections: 0/2, 10/10, 10/2, and 0/10. Flow visualization results in the form of still photographs are presented for each of the four wing cambers between 8 and 12 deg angle of attack. In general, the horizontal tail experiences flow disturbances which become more pronounced with angle of attack or wing trailing-edge deflection.

  10. Horizontal multiphase flow correlations for large diameter pipes and high flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ne`aim, S.A.; Aggour, M.A.; Al-Yousef, H.Y.

    1995-10-01

    The most widely used horizontal multiphase flow correlations have been tested against field measurements in order to determine the best correlation(s) for Saudi Arabian field conditions. A total of 450 field data points covering pipe sizes from 6 in. to 10 in., oil flow rates form 2200 to 25600 STB/D, water cut up to 60% and GOR up to 984 SCF/STB were used in this study. The standard Beggs and Brill correlation provided the best prediction considering all data combined. However, Dukler Case II correlation provided better prediction for the 6 in. pipes; and Beggs and Brill correlation was the best for the 8 in. and 10 in. pipes.

  11. Flow regime and deposition pattern of evaporating binary mixture droplet suspended with particles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2016-02-01

    The flow regimes and the deposition pattern have been investigated by changing the ethanol concentration in a water-based binary mixture droplet suspended with alumina nanoparticles. To visualize the flow patterns, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been applied in the binary liquid droplet containing the fluorescent microspheres. Three distinct flow regimes have been revealed in the evaporation. In Regime I, the vortices and chaotic flows are found to carry the particles to the liquid-vapor interface and to promote the formation of particle aggregation. The aggregates move inwards in Regime II as induced by the Marangoni flow along the droplet free surface. Regime III is dominated by the drying of the left water and the capillary flow driving particles radially outward is observed. The relative weightings of Regimes I and II, which are enhanced with an increasing load of ethanol, determine the motion of the nanoparticles and the formation of the final drying pattern.

  12. Flow regimes and mechanistic modeling of critical heat flux under subcooled flow boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, Jean-Marie

    Thermal performance of heat flux controlled boiling heat exchangers are usually limited by the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) above which the heat transfer degrades quickly, possibly leading to heater overheating and destruction. In an effort to better understand the phenomena, a literature review of CHF experimental visualizations under subcooled flow boiling conditions was performed and systematically analyzed. Three major types of CHF flow regimes were identified (bubbly, vapor clot and slug flow regime) and a CHF flow regime map was developed, based on a dimensional analysis of the phenomena and available data. It was found that for similar geometric characteristics and pressure, a Weber number (We)/thermodynamic quality (x) map can be used to predict the CHF flow regime. Based on the experimental observations and the review of the available CHF mechanistic models under subcooled flow boiling conditions, hypothetical CHF mechanisms were selected for each CHF flow regime, all based on a concept of wall dry spot overheating, rewetting prevention and subsequent dry spot spreading. It is postulated that a high local wall superheat occurs locally in a dry area of the heated wall, due to a cyclical event inherent to the considered CHF two-phase flow regime, preventing rewetting (Leidenfrost effect). The selected modeling concept has the potential to span the CHF conditions from highly subcooled bubbly flow to early stage of annular flow. A numerical model using a two-dimensional transient thermal analysis of the heater undergoing nucleation was developed to mechanistically predict CHF in the case of a bubbly flow regime. In this type of CHF two-phase flow regime, the high local wall superheat occurs underneath a nucleating bubble at the time of bubble departure. The model simulates the spatial and temporal heater temperature variations during nucleation at the wall, accounting for the stochastic nature of the boiling phenomena. The model has also the potential to evaluate

  13. Rheology of cohesive granular materials across multiple dense-flow regimes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yile; Chialvo, Sebastian; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the dense-flow rheology of cohesive granular materials through discrete element simulations of homogeneous, simple shear flows of frictional, cohesive, spherical particles. Dense shear flows of noncohesive granular materials exhibit three regimes: quasistatic, inertial, and intermediate, which persist for cohesive materials as well. It is found that cohesion results in bifurcation of the inertial regime into two regimes: (a) a new rate-independent regime and (b) an inertial regime. Transition from rate-independent cohesive regime to inertial regime occurs when the kinetic energy supplied by shearing is sufficient to overcome the cohesive energy. Simulations reveal that inhomogeneous shear band forms in the vicinity of this transition, which is more pronounced at lower particle volume fractions. We propose a rheological model for cohesive systems that captures the simulation results across all four regimes.

  14. Hot-wire calibration in subsonic/transonic flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Ash, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    A different approach for calibrating hot-wires, which simplifies the calibration procedure and reduces the tunnel run-time by an order of magnitude was sought. In general, it is accepted that the directly measurable quantities in any flow are velocity, density, and total temperature. Very few facilities have the capability of varying the total temperature over an adequate range. However, if the overheat temperature parameter, a(sub w), is used to calibrate the hot-wire then the directly measurable quantity, voltage, will be a function of the flow variables and the overheat parameter i.e., E = f(u,p,a(sub w), T(sub w)) where a(sub w) will contain the needed total temperature information. In this report, various methods of evaluating sensitivities with different dependent and independent variables to calibrate a 3-Wire hot-wire probe using a constant temperature anemometer (CTA) in subsonic/transonic flow regimes is presented. The advantage of using a(sub w) as the independent variable instead of total temperature, t(sub o), or overheat temperature parameter, tau, is that while running a calibration test it is not necessary to know the recovery factor, the coefficients in a wire resistance to temperature relationship for a given probe. It was deduced that the method employing the relationship E = f (u,p,a(sub w)) should result in the most accurate calibration of hot wire probes. Any other method would require additional measurements. Also this method will allow calibration and determination of accurate temperature fluctuation information even in atmospheric wind tunnels where there is no ability to obtain any temperature sensitivity information at present. This technique greatly simplifies the calibration process for hot-wires, provides the required calibration information needed in obtaining temperature fluctuations, and reduces both the tunnel run-time and the test matrix required to calibrate hotwires. Some of the results using the above techniques are presented

  15. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  16. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-12-31

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  17. Numerical modeling of flow focusing: Quantitative characterization of the flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamet, V.; Namy, P.; Dedulle, J.-M.

    2017-09-01

    Among droplet generation technologies, the flow focusing technique is a major process due to its control, stability, and reproducibility. In this process, one fluid (the continuous phase) interacts with another one (the dispersed phase) to create small droplets. Experimental assays in the literature on gas-liquid flow focusing have shown that different jet regimes can be obtained depending on the operating conditions. However, the underlying physical phenomena remain unclear, especially mechanical interactions between the fluids and the oscillation phenomenon of the liquid. In this paper, based on published studies, a numerical diphasic model has been developed to take into consideration the mechanical interaction between phases, using the Cahn-Hilliard method to monitor the interface. Depending on the liquid/gas inputs and the geometrical parameters, various regimes can be obtained, from a steady state regime to an unsteady one with liquid oscillation. In the dispersed phase, the model enables us to compute the evolution of fluid flow, both in space (size of the recirculation zone) and in time (period of oscillation). The transition between unsteady and stationary regimes is assessed in relation to liquid and gas dimensionless numbers, showing the existence of critical thresholds. This model successfully highlights, qualitatively and quantitatively, the influence of the geometry of the nozzle, in particular, its inner diameter.

  18. Horizontal flow stratification modifications for RELAP5/MOD3

    SciTech Connect

    Riemke, R.A.

    1989-02-01

    The report documents the modifications to the horizontal stratification model in RELAP5/MOD3. Background information, model description and solution method, coding changes, and assessment of these changes are described in the report. The use of the phasic velocity difference in the Taitel-Dukler criterion along with a mass flux criterion improved the void fraction data comparison for the TPTF tests. Modifications and error corrections to the void gradient term improved the code's capability to calculate the correct velocities. 15 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Passive scalar scaling regimes in a rapidly decorrelating turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Peter Roland

    This thesis is concerned with some issues pertaining to the small scale structure of a passive scalar field advected by a turbulent flow, and driven by external stochastic pumping and/or interaction with a background passive scalar gradient. We analyze and apply two previously developed simplified mathematical models: the Simple Shear Model of Andrew Majda and Marco Avellaneda, and the Rapid Decorrelation in Time (RDT) Model of Robert Kraichnan. The fundamental representation of the passive scalar statistics in these models is presented from a consideration of Lagrangian tracer trajectories. This permits an easy extension of the Simple Shear Model to incorporate driving, and an alternative derivation of the governing mathematical equations in the RDT Model. Using a Simple Shear Poisson Blob Model of Majda and Avellaneda, we provide an example in which the correlation time of the velocity field becomes very small, but the passive scalar statistics do not converge to those of the RDT model. The RDT Model therefore only describes passive scalar advection for a velocity field with short correlation time in a certain sense. We next apply the RDT Model to investigate scaling regimes in the spectral density of a random passive scalar field advected by a turbulent flow. First, we rigorously derive three scaling regimes, and test some physical theories against these exact results. We find most predictions to succeed, but indicate an apparent gap in the reasoning behind the inertial-diffusive theory of Carl Gibson. Next, motivated by a recent experimental controversy, we consider whether, in the RDT Model, anisotropies in the external pumping could disrupt the k-1 viscous- convective scaling law at high Schmidt number. We find that the k-1 law persists. Finally, we test two asymptotic procedures, the Intermediate Asymptotic (IA) approach as described by G. I. Barenblatt and the Renormalization Group (RG) method of Lin-Yuan Chen et al. on an exactly solvable ODE arising in

  20. Zonal flow regimes in rotating anelastic spherical shells (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.; Aurnou, J. M.; Heimpel, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    The surface zonal winds observed in the giant planets form a complex jet pattern with alternating prograde and retrograde direction. While the main equatorial band is prograde on the gas giants, both ice giants have a pronounced retrograde equatorial jet. The depth of these jets is however poorly known and highly debated. Theoretical scenarios range from "shallow models", that assume that these zonal flows are restricted to the outer stably stratified layer; to "deep models" that hypothesise that the surface winds are the signature of deep-seated convection. Most of the numerical models supporting the latter idea employed the Boussinesq approximation where compressibility effects are ignored. While this approximation is suitable for modelling the liquid iron core of terrestrial planets, this becomes questionable in the gas giants interiors, where density increases by several orders of magnitude. To tackle this problem, several numerical models using the "anelastic approximation" have been recently developed to study the compressibility effects while filtering out the fast acoustic waves. Here, we consider such anelastic models of rapidly-rotating spherical shells to explore the properties of the zonal winds in different regimes where either rotation or buoyancy dominates the force balance. We conduct several parameter studies to quantify the dependence of zonal flows on the background density stratification and the driving of convection. We find that the direction of the equatorial wind is controlled by the ratio of buoyancy and Coriolis force. The prograde equatorial band maintained by Reynolds stresses is found in the rotation-dominated regime. At low Ekman numbers, several alternating jets form at high latitude in a similar way to some previous Boussinesq calculations. In cases where buoyancy dominates Coriolis force, the angular momentum per unit mass is homogenised and the equatorial band is retrograde, reminiscent to those observed in the ice giants

  1. Predicted Variations in Flow Patterns in a Horizontal CVD Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    1999-01-01

    Expressions in terms of common reactor operating parameters were derived for the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, Gr/Re, the ratio of the Grashof to the square of 2 the Reynolds number, Gr/Re(exp 2), and the Rayleigh number, Ra. Values for these numbers were computed for an example horizontal CVD reactor and compared to numerical simulations to gauge their effectiveness as predictors of the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in the reactor. Comparisons were made for both argon and hydrogen carrier gases over the pressure range 2- 101 kPa. Reasonable agreement was achieved in most cases when using Gr/Re to predict the presence of transverse rolls and Ra to predict the presence of longitudinal rolls. The ratio Gr/Re(exp 2) did not yield useful predictions regarding the presence of transverse rolls. This comparison showed that the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, as well as the Rayleigh number, can be used to predict the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in a horizontal CVD reactor for a given set of reactor conditions. These predictions are approximate, and care must be exercised when making predictions near transition regions.

  2. Reservoir management to balance ecosystem and human needs: Incorporating the paradigm of the ecological flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, Jian-Ping; Eheart, J. Wayland

    2006-03-01

    The history of environmental flow analysis shows a shift from an emphasis on a flat line minimum flow requirement to the development of a holistic, regime-based, approach to flow management. The ecological flow regime determines environmental flow by embracing the multitude of species within an ecosystem rather than emphasizing a single species. Moreover, this paradigm recognizes that flow magnitude, duration, frequency, timing, and predictability must be incorporated into any flow management strategy. In this study, the ecological flow regime paradigm is used to establish such comprehensive and complex management targets for operating a reservoir to satisfy a downstream aquatic ecosystem. The new paradigm incorporates the intermediate disturbance hypothesis, which holds that ecosystems are healthier under disturbances that are neither too small nor too large. The nondominated sorting genetic algorithm is used to find the Pareto set of operating rules that provides decision makers with the optimal trade-off between human needs and ecological flow regime maintenance.

  3. Flooding characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in a horizontal U bend pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, T.; Hosokawa, S.; Fujii, Y.

    1995-09-01

    For next-generation nuclear reactors, hybrid safety systems which consist of active and passive safety systems have been planned. Steam generators with horizontal U bend pipelines will be used as one of the passive safety systems. It is required to clarify flow characteristics, especially the onset of flooding, in the horizontal U bend pipelines in order to examine their safety. Flooding in vertical pipes has been studied extensively. However, there is little study on flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines. It is supposed that the onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines is different from that in vertical pipes. On the other hand, liquid is generated due to condensation of steam in pipes of the horizontal steam generators at the loss of coolant accident because the steam generators will be used as a condenser of a cooling system of steam from the reactor. It is necessary to simulate this situation by the supply of water at the middle of horizontal pipe. In the present paper, experiments were carried out using a horizontal U bend pipeline with a liquid supply section in the midway of pipeline. The onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipeline was measured. Effects of the length of horizontal pipe and the radius of U bend on the onset of flooding were discussed.

  4. Natural flow regimes of the Ozark-Ouachita Interior Highlands region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leasure, D. R.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; Longing, S. D.

    2016-01-01

    Natural flow regimes represent the hydrologic conditions to which native aquatic organisms are best adapted. We completed a regional river classification and quantitative descriptions of each natural flow regime for the Ozark–Ouachita Interior Highlands region of Arkansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. On the basis of daily flow records from 64 reference streams, seven natural flow regimes were identified with mixture model cluster analysis: Groundwater Stable, Groundwater, Groundwater Flashy, Perennial Runoff, Runoff Flashy, Intermittent Runoff and Intermittent Flashy. Sets of flow metrics were selected that best quantified nine ecologically important components of these natural flow regimes. An uncertainty analysis was performed to avoid selecting metrics strongly affected by measurement uncertainty that can result from short periods of record. Measurement uncertainties (bias, precision and accuracy) were assessed for 170 commonly used flow metrics. The ranges of variability expected for select flow metrics under natural conditions were quantified for each flow regime to provide a reference for future assessments of hydrologic alteration. A random forest model was used to predict the natural flow regimes of all stream segments in the study area based on climate and catchment characteristics, and a map was produced. The geographic distribution of flow regimes suggested distinct ecohydrological regions that may be useful for conservation planning. This project provides a hydrologic foundation for future examination of flow–ecology relationships in the region. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  6. Investigation of single-substance horizontal two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, D.A.; Maeder, P.F.

    1984-03-01

    Despite the abundance of work in the field of two-phase flow, it seems as though a consensus has not been reached on some of the fundamental points. Although exceptions exist, adequate physical interpretation of the flow seems to be hindered either by complexity of analysis or, in the opposite extreme, the trend toward limited-range analysis and correlations. The dissertation presents the derivation of basic conservation equations for the phases. The combined equations are used to examine the phenomenon of slip and its practical limitations, the Fanno line for single-substance flow and the effect of slip on choking. Equations for critical mass flux in the presence of slip are derived. The Mach, Reynolds and Froude numbers based on conditions at flashing are introduced as the characteristic parameters, and the importance of compressibility in single-substance two-phase flow is discussed. Experimental measurements of pressure change and void fraction for flow in the highly compressible range (.5 < Ma < 1) are presented. The working fluid is Refrigerant R-114, at room temperature, in a test section of diameter 5 cm and length 8 m. The effect of the Froude and Mach numbers is examined. The experimental facility is operated intermittently with running times of approximately two minutes and is instrumented for rapid measurements using a computer data acquisition and control system. A description of the facility and procedure is provided.

  7. A kinematic investigation of the influence of anvil air flow over convective nephsystems on high-level horizontal flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogun, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    The interactions between horizontal ambient flow and divergent wind fields, such as those that obtain atop cumulonimbus complexes, were investigated (theoretically) kinematically. The following were observed from the results of the analyses. First, for a particular divergent field, the relative mass flux over the area of the nephsystem decreased as the strength of the horizontal flow increased. Secondly, while in some of the cases analyzed the interaction between the two flows only resulted in the fanning out of streamlines and a slight redistribution in the wind speed, in many cases backflows and a total reorganization of the wind field occurred. Backflows have a blocking effect on the horizontal flow. Some of the computed patterns were compared with upper level cloud vectors (from geostationary satellite photographs). The comparison indicated that the computed resultant wind field could be used to explain some features of such satellite-derived wind fields.

  8. Measurement and prediction of two-phase flow patterns for new refrigerants inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kattan, N.; Favrat, D.; Thome, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Two-phase flow pattern data were obtained with 12-mm-bore sight glasses for five refrigerants: R-123, R-134a, R-502, R-402A, and R-404A. The existing flow pattern maps of Taitel and Dukler (1976) and Hashizume (1983) poorly represented the data, while, with the exception of mist flows, the VDI map identified the flow patterns successfully. Methods used in horizontal flow boiling correlations to determine the threshold between all wet wall and partially wet wall flows were shown to be unreliable.

  9. A genetic algorithm-based optimization model for pool boiling heat transfer on horizontal rod heaters at isolated bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi Fazel, S. Ali

    2017-03-01

    A new optimized model which can predict the heat transfer in the nucleate boiling at isolated bubble regime is proposed for pool boiling on a horizontal rod heater. This model is developed based on the results of direct observations of the physical boiling phenomena. Boiling heat flux, wall temperature, bubble departing diameter, bubble generation frequency and bubble nucleation site density have been experimentally measured. Water and ethanol have been used as two different boiling fluids. Heating surface was made by several metals and various degrees of roughness. The mentioned model considers various mechanisms such as latent heat transfer due to micro-layer evaporation, transient conduction due to thermal boundary layer reformation, natural convection, heat transfer due to the sliding bubbles and bubble super-heating. The fractional contributions of individual mentioned heat transfer mechanisms have been calculated by genetic algorithm. The results show that at wall temperature difference more that about 3 K, bubble sliding transient conduction, non-sliding transient conduction, micro-layer evaporation, natural convection, radial forced convection and bubble super-heating have higher to lower fractional contributions respectively. The performance of the new optimized model has been verified by comparison of the existing experimental data.

  10. A genetic algorithm-based optimization model for pool boiling heat transfer on horizontal rod heaters at isolated bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi Fazel, S. Ali

    2017-09-01

    A new optimized model which can predict the heat transfer in the nucleate boiling at isolated bubble regime is proposed for pool boiling on a horizontal rod heater. This model is developed based on the results of direct observations of the physical boiling phenomena. Boiling heat flux, wall temperature, bubble departing diameter, bubble generation frequency and bubble nucleation site density have been experimentally measured. Water and ethanol have been used as two different boiling fluids. Heating surface was made by several metals and various degrees of roughness. The mentioned model considers various mechanisms such as latent heat transfer due to micro-layer evaporation, transient conduction due to thermal boundary layer reformation, natural convection, heat transfer due to the sliding bubbles and bubble super-heating. The fractional contributions of individual mentioned heat transfer mechanisms have been calculated by genetic algorithm. The results show that at wall temperature difference more that about 3 K, bubble sliding transient conduction, non-sliding transient conduction, micro-layer evaporation, natural convection, radial forced convection and bubble super-heating have higher to lower fractional contributions respectively. The performance of the new optimized model has been verified by comparison of the existing experimental data.

  11. Methodology Development of a Gas-Liquid Dynamic Flow Regime Transition Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doup, Benjamin Casey

    Current reactor safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5, TRACE, and CATHARE, use flow regime maps or flow regime transition criteria that were developed for static fully-developed two-phase flows to choose interfacial transfer models that are necessary to solve the two-fluid model. The flow regime is therefore difficult to identify near the flow regime transitions, in developing two-phase flows, and in transient two-phase flows. Interfacial area transport equations were developed to more accurately predict the dynamic nature of two-phase flows. However, other model coefficients are still flow regime dependent. Therefore, an accurate prediction of the flow regime is still important. In the current work, the methodology for the development of a dynamic flow regime transition model that uses the void fraction and interfacial area concentration obtained by solving three-field the two-fluid model and two-group interfacial area transport equation is investigated. To develop this model, detailed local experimental data are obtained, the two-group interfacial area transport equations are revised, and a dynamic flow regime transition model is evaluated using a computational fluid dynamics model. Local experimental data is acquired for 63 different flow conditions in bubbly, cap-bubbly, slug, and churn-turbulent flow regimes. The measured parameters are the group-1 and group-2 bubble number frequency, void fraction, interfacial area concentration, and interfacial bubble velocities. The measurements are benchmarked by comparing the prediction of the superficial gas velocities, determined using the local measurements with those determined from volumetric flow rate measurements and the agreement is generally within +/-20%. The repeatability four-sensor probe construction process is within +/-10%. The repeatability of the measurement process is within +/-7%. The symmetry of the test section is examined and the average agreement is within +/-5.3% at z/D = 10 and +/-3.4% at z/D = 32

  12. Environmental Flows: Evaluating Long-Term Baselines for Hydrological Regime Change in the Southern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, A. M.; Morrison, A. M.; Menzie, C.

    2016-12-01

    The wide variety of ecosystem services associated with running fresh waters are dependent on an assortment of flow conditions including timing and duration of seasonal floods as well as intermittent flows, such as storm peaks. Modern methods of assessing environmental flows consider hydrological regime change by comparing actual or simulated baseline flow conditions against putatively altered regime flows. These calculated flow changes are used as inputs to models of ecosystem responses such as for fish populations, inundated habitat area, or nutrient supplies. However, common and recommended tools and software used to make flow comparisons between putative regimes lack robust mechanisms for evaluating the significance of hydrological regime change in the context of long-term (multiple decades, centuries, or greater) trends, such as climatic conditions, or the facility to determine the existence and causes of regime changes when no obvious discontinuity exists, such as the construction of a dam. As such, environmental flow decisions based on short (recent) baseline records or baseline records assumed to represent stable hydrological conditions may lead to inefficient water use and ecosystem services distribution. Here we examine long-term patterns in discharge, the frequency and severity of regional droughts, and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation to better understand the occurrence and causes of hydrological regime change in rivers in the Southern United States. For each river we ask: 1) Has hydrological regime change occurred? 2) To what degree is observed regime change associated with regional climatic drivers? 3) How might environmental flows suggested by current methods (e.g. the USGS Hydroecological Integrity Assessment or the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration software) compare with flows derived by additional consideration of long-term drivers of hydrological change? We discuss the different temporal scales through which climate can influence a

  13. Scale-Dependence of Natural Variability of Flow Regimes in a Forested Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, S. E.; Creed, I. F.

    2005-12-01

    The natural flow paradigm states that rivers should be managed to preserve their natural flow regimes. Maintaining natural variability in the flow regime is critical for conserving the structure and function of riverine ecosystems. This research seeks to determine relations between natural variability in the flow regime and basin scale. A distributed hydrologic model was used to characterize the natural flow regime of basins from first to fifth order within tributaries of the Batchawana River in the Algoma Highlands of central Ontario using the Range of Variability Approach (RVA). A thirty-year simulated flow record was used to calculate natural variability in the flow regime, defined as the S80 ((90th percentile - 10th percentile) / median). A scale-dependence in the S80 of these flows, and particularly low-flow parameters, was observed. Basins less than a threshold between ca. 400 and 600 ha had a large range in S80, while basins greater than 600 ha had a smaller range that converged towards a constant with increasing area. This represents the potential for a representative elementary area (REA) to exist with regard to interannual variability of some flow parameters. Below the REA, the mean of the ln (/To tan B) distribution was significantly related to the S80 mean summer flow and 90-day minimum flow (p<0.001). This research demonstrates the scale-dependence of natural variability of flows, important for establishing reference conditions against which impacts of disturbance on flows throughout a drainage basin may be measured.

  14. On the definition of dominant force regimes for flow boiling heat transfer by using single mini-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Soumei; Sawada, Kenichiro; Kubota, Chisato; Kawanami, Osamu; Asano, Hitoshi; Inoue, Koichi; Ohta, Haruhiko

    Recent increase in the size of space platforms requires the management of larger amount of waste heat under high heat flux conditions and the transportation of it along a long distance to the radiator. Flow boiling applied to the thermal management system in space attracts much attention as promising means to realize high-performance heat transfer and transport because of large latent heat of vaporization. In microgravity two-phase flow phenomena are quite different from those under 1-g condition because buoyancy effects are significantly reduced and surface tension becomes dominant. By the similar reason, flow boiling characteristics in mini channels are not the same as those in channels of normal sizes. In the present stage, however, the boundary between the regimes of body force dominated and of surface tension dominated is not clear. The design of space thermal devices, operated under the conditions where no effect of gravity is expected, will improve the reliability of their ground tests, provided that the boundaries of dominant force regimes are clarified quantitatively in advance. In flow boiling in mini channels or in parallel channels, back flow could be occurred because of rapid growth of bubbles in a confined space, resulting flow rate fluctuation. Flow boiling heat transfer characteristics in mini channels can be changed considerably by the existence of inlet flow rate fluctuation. It is important to pay attention to experimental accuracy and to use a single circular mini-tube to compare heat transfer characteristics with those of normal size tubes. In the present paper, effects of tube orientations, i.e. vertical upward flow, vertical downward flow and horizontal flow, on flow boiling heat transfer characteristics is investigated for FC72 flowing in single mini-tubes with inner diameters of 0.13 and 0.51 mm to establish a reliable dominant force regime map. If the regime map is described by using dimensionless groups of Bond, Weber and Froude numbers

  15. Comparison of vertical and horizontal flow planted and unplanted subsurface flow wetlands treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pandey, M K; Jenssen, P D; Krogstad, T; Jonasson, Sven

    2013-01-01

    In the search for design criteria for constructed wetlands (CWs) in Nepal a semi-scale experimental setup including horizontal flow (HF) and vertical flow (VF) CWs was developed. This paper compares the performance of HF and VF wetlands, and planted with unplanted beds. The experimental setup consists of two units of HF and VF beds of size 6 m × 2 m × 0.6 m and 6 m × 2 m × 0.8 m (length × width × depth) respectively. For both HF and VF systems, one unit was planted with Phragmites karka (local reed) and one was not planted. The systems were fed with wastewater drawn from the grit chamber of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. The media consisted of river gravel. In the first phase of the experiment the hydraulic loading rate (HLR) was varied in steps; 0.2, 0.08, 0.04 m(3)/m(2)/d and the percent removal increase with decrease in HLR for all beds and parameters except for total phosphorus. In the second phase the loading rate of 0.04 m(3)/m(2)/d was run for 7 months. In both parts of the experiment the planted beds performed better than the unplanted beds and the VF better than the HF beds. To meet Nepalese discharge standards HF beds are sufficient, but to meet stricter requirements a combination of HF and VF beds are recommended.

  16. Counter-current flow in a vertical to horizontal tube with obstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Tye, P.; Matuszkiewicz, A.; Teyssedou, A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents experimental results on counter-current flow and flooding in an elbow between a vertical and a horizontal run. The experimental technique used allowed not only the flooding limit to be determined, but also the entire partial delivery region to be studied as well. The influence that various size orifices placed in the horizontal run have on both the delivered liquid flow rates and on the flooding limits is also examined. It is observed that both the flooding limits and the delivered liquid flow rates decrease with decreasing orifice size. Further, it is also observed that the mechanisms that govern the partial delivery of the liquid are significantly different when an orifice is present in the horizontal leg as compared to the case when no orifice is present.

  17. Laboratory and numerical evaluation of borehole methods for subsurface horizontal flow characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Pedler, William H. (Radon Abatement Systems, Inc., Golden, CO); Jepsen, Richard Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM)

    2003-08-01

    The requirement to accurately measure subsurface groundwater flow at contaminated sites, as part of a time and cost effective remediation program, has spawned a variety of flow evaluation technologies. Validation of the accuracy and knowledge regarding the limitations of these technologies are critical for data quality and application confidence. Leading the way in the effort to validate and better understand these methodologies, the US Army Environmental Center has funded a multi-year program to compare and evaluate all viable horizontal flow measurement technologies. This multi-year program has included a field comparison phase, an application of selected methods as part of an integrated site characterization program phase, and most recently, a laboratory and numerical simulator phase. As part of this most recent phase, numerical modeling predictions and laboratory measurements were made in a simulated fracture borehole set-up within a controlled flow simulator. The scanning colloidal borescope flowmeter (SCBFM) and advanced hydrophysical logging (NxHpL{trademark}) tool were used to measure velocities and flow rate in a simulated fractured borehole in the flow simulator. Particle tracking and mass flux measurements were observed and recorded under a range of flow conditions in the simulator. Numerical models were developed to aid in the design of the flow simulator and predict the flow conditions inside the borehole. Results demonstrated that the flow simulator allowed for predictable, easily controlled, and stable flow rates both inside and outside the well. The measurement tools agreed well with each other over a wide range of flow conditions. The model results demonstrate that the Scanning Colloidal Borescope did not interfere with the flow in the borehole in any of the tests. The model is capable of predicting flow conditions and agreed well with the measurements and observations in the flow simulator and borehole. Both laboratory and model results showed a

  18. LHe Flow Regime/Pressure Drop for D0 Solenoid at Steady State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-03-03

    This paper describes in a note taking format what was learned from several sources on two phase liquid helium flow regimes and pressure drops as applied to the D-Zero solenoid upgrade project. Calculations to estimate the steady state conditions for the D-Zero solenoid at 5, 10 and 15 g/s are also presented. For the lower flow rates a stratified type regime can be expected with a pressure drop less than 0.5 psi. For the higher flow rate a more homogeneous flow regime can be expected with a pressure drop between 0.4 to 1.5 psi.

  19. Flow and habitat effects on juvenile fish abundance in natural and altered flow regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Mary C.; Bowen, Z.H.; Bovee, K.D.; Irwin, E.R.

    2001-01-01

    Conserving biological resources native to large river systems increasingly depends on how flow-regulated segments of these rivers are managed. Improving management will require a better understanding of linkages between river biota and temporal variability of flow and instream habitat. However, few studies have quantified responses of native fish populations to multiyear (>2 yr) patterns of hydrologic or habitat variability in flow-regulated systems. To provide these data, we quantified young-of-year (YOY) fish abundance during four years in relation to hydrologic and habitat variability in two segments of the Tallapoosa River in the southeastern United States. One segment had an unregulated flow regime, whereas the other was flow-regulated by a peak-load generating hydropower dam. We sampled fishes annually and explored how continuously recorded flow data and physical habitat simulation models (PHABSIM) for spring (April-June) and summer (July-August) preceding each sample explained fish abundances. Patterns of YOY abundance in relation to habitat availability (median area) and habitat persistence (longest period with habitat area continuously above the long-term median area) differed between unregulated and flow-regulated sites. At the unregulated site, YOY abundances were most frequently correlated with availability of shallow-slow habitat in summer (10 species) and persistence of shallow-slow and shallow-fast habitat in spring (nine species). Additionally, abundances were negatively correlated with 1-h maximum flow in summer (five species). At the flow-regulated site, YOY abundances were more frequently correlated with persistence of shallow-water habitats (four species in spring; six species in summer) than with habitat availability or magnitude of flow extremes. The associations of YOY with habitat persistence at the flow-regulated site corresponded to the effects of flow regulation on habitat patterns. Flow regulation reduced median flows during spring and

  20. Aerothermodynamics of compressible flow past a flat plate in the slip-flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Yang; Dai, Yi; Li, Genong; Hu, Yitao; Lai, Ming-Chia

    2015-11-01

    Compressible flow past a flat plate in the slip-flow regime features a very simple geometry and flow field, but it retains the most relevant and interesting physics in high-speed rarefied gas dynamics. In the slip-flow regime, the aerothermodynamic issues, especially the recovery factors and the convection heat transfer correlation, are the focus of this presentation. We first present the detailed similarity equations, especially the transformed Maxwell's slip and jump boundary conditions, and the equations for the Chapman-Rubesin parameter as well as how we incorporate the variable gas properties and the constitutive scaling model for the Knudsen layer in the similarity equations. The similarity solutions are compared with results published by E. R. van Driest [NACA Technical Note 2597, 1952]. We point out that van Driest's solutions were computed by using no-slip and no-jump boundary conditions. The recovery factor and Nusselt number of the plate are shown as functions of the Reynolds number and the Mach number. Finally, the similarity solutions are also compared with simulations of a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model solving the full Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations with slip and jump boundary conditions.

  1. Relations between morphology of granular pyroclastic flow deposits and flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, G.; Thomas, N.

    2003-04-01

    The basal part of some small dense pyroclastic flows behaves often like a granular flow. The deposits then produced exhibit a particular morphology: lobes with parallel lateral levées and a low central channel [1,2]. We study experimentally this morphology and show that it is linked to the dynamics of the flow. The flows are created in the laboratory by the release of glass microbeads on a rough, wide inclined plane. A tongue of gravity driven granular material flows down the slope. Depending on the flux imposed by the source and on the inclination of the plane, several flow regimes were observed. For low inclinations of the plane and low fluxes, an intermittent regime exists: the final deposit is rounded shaped and does not display levees. For high inclinations of the plane and high fluxes, a roll-waves regime is observed: the final morphology of the deposit is either flat or no deposit exists. For a given range of inclinations and fluxes, a stationary frictional regime is observed: a finger shaped flow rapidly reaches a steady state with a constant velocity, height and width. The deposit left displays the levées/channel morphology whose quantitative characteristics depend on the slope, flux and type of particles. This morphology can be interpreted in terms of the thickness (hstop) of particles which remains on a slope after a flow passed [3,4]. For a given size of particles and a given flux, hstop decreases exponentially with increasing slopes. For low inclinations (below a critical angle θ1), it tends towards infinity. Then, we observe a rounded deposit typical of the intermittent regime. For high inclinations (above a critical angle θ2), hstop tends towards zero. Then, no deposit is observed (roll-wave regime). For angles between θ1 and θ2, the deposit produced in the stationary regime displays levées. Working with particles having a wide size distribution induces segregation: large particles compose the front and the levées, small particles the central

  2. Horizontal Flows in the Photosphere and Subphotosphere of Two Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei; Schuck, P. W.

    2012-01-01

    We compare horizontal flow fields in the photosphere and in the subphotosphere (a layer 0.5 megameters below the photosphere) in two solar active regions: AR11084 and AR11158. AR11084 is a mature, simple active region without significant flaring activity, and AR11158 is a multipolar, complex active region with magnetic flux emerging during the period studied. Flows in the photosphere are derived by applying the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms (DAVE4VM) on HMI-observed vector magnetic fields, and the subphotospheric flows are inferred by time-distance helioseismology using HMI-observed Dopplergrams. Similar flow patterns are found for both layers for AR11084: inward flows in the sunspot umbra and outward flows surrounding the sunspot. The boundary between the inward and outward flows, which is slightly different in the photosphere and the subphotosphere, is within the sunspot penumbra. The area having inward flows in the subphotosphere is larger than that in the photosphere. For AR11158, flows in these two layers show great similarities in some areas and significant differences in other areas. Both layers exhibit consistent outward flows in the areas surrounding sunspots. On the other hand, most well-documented flux-emergence-related flow features seen in the photosphere do not have counterparts in the subphotosphere. This implies that the horizontal flows caused by flux emergence do not extend deeply into the subsurface.

  3. The performance of hybrid journal bearings in the superlaminar flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, D.; Rowe, W. B.

    1992-10-01

    Previous work conducted on hybrid journal bearings has shown that a combination of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic lubrication principles leads to good load support over a wide range of speed, including zero speed. Above the transition speed, particularly with large bearing diameters or low-viscosity lubricants, the mode of flow within the fluid film degenerates from that of pure laminar flow, through a transitional or vortex flow regime, to fully developed turbulent flow. This work presents a theoretical investigation of slot entry hybrid journal bearings operating in the superlaminar flow regimes. In particular, the work considers the effects of superlaminar flow on the optimization of slot entry hybrid journal bearings.

  4. Flow Regime Transition in Inner Grooved Minichannel Cold Plates for Cooling Hybrid Electric Power Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    3. Hydroblok pressure-fit 6-pass serpentine cold plate (9)..................................................5 Figure 4. Two-phase flow regimes and...however, may be to integrate the enhanced tubes in a pressure-fit serpentine brazed cold plate. An example of this cold plate design is shown in...figure 3. Figure 3. Hydroblok pressure-fit 6-pass serpentine cold plate (9). 2.1 Two-phase Flow Regimes In two-phase flow, the vapor and liquid

  5. System-focused environmental flow regime prescription, monitoring and adaptive management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, David; Lexartza Artza, Irantzu

    2016-04-01

    The definition of appropriate environmental flow regimes through hydropower schemes and water storage reservoirs is key part of mitigation. Insufficient (magnitude and variability) environmental flows can result in much environmental harm with negative impacts being encountered by morphological, ecological and societal systems. Conventionally, environmental flow regimes have been determined by using generic protocols and guidance such as the Tennant method of environmental flow estimation. It is generally accepted that such approaches to minimum environmental flow definition, although being a useful starting point, are not universally applicable across catchment typologies and climatic regions. Such approaches will not always produce conditions that would be associated with 'Good Ecological Status' under the Water framework Directive (or equivalent). Other similar approaches to minimum environmental flow estimation are used that are specific to geographies, yet still the associated guidance rarely thoroughly covers appropriate definition for healthy holistic systems across the flow regime. This paper draws on experience of system-focused environmental flow regime determination in the UK and the Georgian Caucasus Mountains, which allowed for a critical analysis of more conventional methods to be undertaken. The paper describes a recommended approach for determining appropriate environmental flow regimes based on analysis of the impacted geomorphological, ecological and societal systems in a way which is sensitive to the local holistic environment and associated complexities and interactions. The paper suggests that a strong understanding of the local geomorphology in key in predicting how flows will manifest habitat differently across the flow regime, and be spatially dynamic. Additionally, an understanding of the geomorphological system allows the flow of course and fine sediment to be factored into the initial suggested environmental flow regime. It is suggested

  6. Two-phase Flow Regime Identification Combining Conductivity Probe Signals and Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Leonor; Juliá, José Enrique; Chiva, Sergio; Paranjape, Sidharth; Ishii, Mamoru

    2007-06-01

    Important aspects of the hydrodynamics and thus, the correct identification of the flow regime could enhance safety and overall performance in multiphase flow systems. Several works on flow regime identification have been carried out in the past. Most of them consist, in a first stage, on measuring certain flow parameters that can be used as good flow regime indicators and, then, developing a flow regime map using these indicators. In this work, a vertical two-phase flow loop facility was used, whereby local conductivity signals were recorded and utilized for the development of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based method for the flow regime classification. The experimental database consists of a total number of 125 test cases covering a wide range of situations in the loop working area. Each experiment flow regime was identified by visual inspection, and classified into bubbly (B), cap-bubbly (CB), slug (S), churn turbulent (CT) or annular (A). The bubble chord length cumulative probability function (CPDF), calculated from the measured conductivity signals was selected as flow regime indicator. Different ANN configurations were designed, trained and optimized. The ANN types and the statistical parameters of the CPFD used as inputs were two of the four parameters varied in the ANN optimization process. The temporal length in the conductivity signal used to calculate the CPDF, was also modified during this study. The range of variation of the temporal signal was from 1 to 60 seconds. Together with this temporal variation, the number of training patterns (increasing with decreasing CPDF processing times or not) was also modified. The modification of all these variables allowed the identification of the ANN configuration that better fit the requirements of the specific study of flow regime classification.

  7. Large-scale horizontal flows in the solar photosphere. III. Effects on filament destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudier, T.; Švanda, M.; Meunier, N.; Keil, S.; Rieutord, M.; Malherbe, J. M.; Rondi, S.; Molodij, G.; Bommier, V.; Schmieder, B.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:We study the influence of large-scale photospheric motions on the destabilization of an eruptive filament, observed on October 6, 7, and 8, 2004, as part of an international observing campaign (JOP 178). Methods: Large-scale horizontal flows were investigated from a series of MDI full-disc Dopplergrams and magnetograms. From the Dopplergrams, we tracked supergranular flow patterns using the local correlation tracking (LCT) technique. We used both LCT and manual tracking of isolated magnetic elements to obtain horizontal velocities from magnetograms. Results: We find that the measured flow fields obtained by the different methods are well-correlated on large scales. The topology of the flow field changed significantly during the filament eruptive phase, suggesting a possible coupling between the surface flow field and the coronal magnetic field. We measured an increase in the shear below the point where the eruption starts and a decrease in shear after the eruption. We find a pattern in the large-scale horizontal flows at the solar surface that interact with differential rotation. Conclusions: We conclude that there is probably a link between changes in surface flow and the disappearance of the eruptive filament.

  8. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  9. Study of the stratified-slug flow transition in a horizontal pipe containing a rod bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, V.S.; Kowalski, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental measurements related to the stratified-slug flow transition in a horizontal pipe containing a 7-rod bundle are described. The experiments were carried out in air-water and Freon gas-water flows with liquid-to-gas density ratios in the range 46 to 392. The results are compared with the predictions of a modified form of the Taitel-Dukler theory. The predictions are also compared with other published experimental data on the stratified-slug flow transition in air-water and steam-water flows in pipes containing 37-rod bundles. Reasonable agreement is obtained in all cases. This work has particular application to the study of heat transfer in the horizontal fuel channels of a CANDU nuclear reactor under certain postulated fault conditions.

  10. Surface tension- and buoyancy-driven flows across horizontally propagating chemical fronts.

    PubMed

    Tiani, R; De Wit, A; Rongy, L

    2017-07-20

    Chemical reactions can interplay with hydrodynamic flows to generate various complex phenomena. Because of their relevance in many research areas, chemically-induced hydrodynamic flows have attracted increasing attention in the last decades. In this context, we propose to give a review of the past and recent theoretical and experimental works which have considered the interaction of such flows with chemical fronts, i.e. reactive interfaces, formed between miscible solutions. We focus in particular on the influence of surface tension- (Marangoni) and buoyancy-driven flows on the dynamics of chemical fronts propagating horizontally in the gravity field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A chaotic system of two-phase flow in a small, horizontal, rectangular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    Various measurement tools that are used in chaos theory were applied to analyze two-phase pressure signals with the objective of identifying and interpreting flow pattern transitions for two-phase flows in a small, horizontal rectangular channel. These measurement tools included power spectral density function, autocorrelation function, pseudo-phase-plane trajectory, Lyapunov exponents, and fractal dimensions. It was demonstrated that the randomlike pressure fluctuations characteristic of two-phase flow in small rectangular channels are chaotic. As such, they are governed by a high-order deterministic system. The correlation dimension is potentially a new approach for identifying certain two-phase flow patterns and transitions.

  12. Horizontal Flow of Semantic and Phonological Information in Chinese Spoken Sentence Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jin-Chen; Yang, Yu-Fang

    2008-01-01

    A variant of the picture--word interference paradigm was used in three experiments to investigate the horizontal information flow of semantic and phonological information between nouns in spoken Mandarin Chinese sentences. Experiment 1 demonstrated that there is a semantic interference effect when the word in the second phrase (N3) and the first…

  13. Horizontal Flow of Semantic and Phonological Information in Chinese Spoken Sentence Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jin-Chen; Yang, Yu-Fang

    2008-01-01

    A variant of the picture--word interference paradigm was used in three experiments to investigate the horizontal information flow of semantic and phonological information between nouns in spoken Mandarin Chinese sentences. Experiment 1 demonstrated that there is a semantic interference effect when the word in the second phrase (N3) and the first…

  14. Two Phase Flow Modeling: Summary of Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop Correlations in Reduced and Partial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rame, E.; Kizito, J.; Kassemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art predictions for two-phase flows relevant to Advanced Life Support. We strive to pick out the most used and accepted models for pressure drop and flow regime predictions. The main focus is to identify gaps in predictive capabilities in partial gravity for Lunar and Martian applications. Following a summary of flow regimes and pressure drop correlations for terrestrial and zero gravity, we analyze the fully developed annular gas-liquid flow in a straight cylindrical tube. This flow is amenable to analytical closed form solutions for the flow field and heat transfer. These solutions, valid for partial gravity as well, may be used as baselines and guides to compare experimental measurements. The flow regimes likely to be encountered in the water recovery equipment currently under consideration for space applications are provided in an appendix.

  15. Gas-liquid annular flow under microgravity conditions: Linear stability as a tool for flow regime identification

    SciTech Connect

    Best, F.R.; Carron, I.

    1994-12-31

    A single parameter has been developed that predicts the highly nonlinear state of a microgravity flow with a confidence of up to 95% in differentiating slug flow from other regimes for different fluids of radically different properties such as air/water and Freon-11, -12, and -114. The authors have also shown that by taking the best data available based on current knowledge, it was possible to predict the flow regime in experiments with an accuracy of at least 85%, whether the flow was slug or bubbly, slug/annular and annular flow.

  16. Optimal ranking regime analysis of TreeFlow dendrohydrological reconstructions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Optimal Ranking Regime (ORR) method was used to identify 6-100 year time windows containing significant ranking sequences in 55 western U.S. streamflow reconstructions, and reconstructions of the level of the Great Salt Lake and San Francisco Bay salinity during 1500-2007. The method’s ability t...

  17. Liquid-Vapor Flow Regime Transitions for Spacecraft Heat Transfer Loops

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    heavenly bodies, in spite of their astonishing distances, than in the investigations of the movement of flowing water before our very eyes" Galileo ... Galilei 1564-1642 Motivation to Study MicroQravity Flow Reuimes The study of microgravity vapor-liquid flow regimes is motivated by the benefits of heat

  18. Analysis of Different Approaches to Modeling of the Nozzle Flows in the Near Continuum Regime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-21

    the Near Continuum Regime (Postprint) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) E.V. Titov & D.A. Levin (Pennsylvania State...of Nozzle Flows in the Near Continuum Regime E.V. Titov ∗ and D.A. Levin† Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 N.E. Gimelshein‡ and

  19. Flow patterns in a rotating horizontal cylinder partially filled with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Victor; Polezhaev, Denis

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of an annular layer of low-viscosity liquid inside a rapidly rotating horizontal cylinder is experimentally studied. Under gravity, the liquid performs forced azimuthal oscillations in the cavity frame. We examined the stability of the two-dimensional azimuthal flow and discovered two novel types of axisymmetric liquid flows. First, a large-scale axially symmetric flow is excited near the end walls. The inertial modes generated in the corner regions are proven to be responsible for such a flow. Second, a small-scale flow in the form of the Taylor-Gortler vortices appears due to the centrifugal instability of the oscillatory liquid flow. The spatial period of the vortices is in qualitative agreement with the data obtained in the experimental and numerical studies of cellular flow in librating containers.

  20. A Comparison of Critical Regimes in Collapsible Tube, Pipe, Open Channel and Gas-Dynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, C. P.

    2003-11-01

    Though of considerable interest to clinical scientists, collapsible tubes are only recently receiving due interest by fluid physicists. The subject of critical phenomena in collapsible tube flow appears not to have been examined critically. For example, it has been proposed in the past that shock waves in physiological tubes are abnormal. We propose a classification of flow through collapsible tubes recognising that compressibility in gas-dynamic and pipe flow (cf.waterhammer) corresponds to distensibility in collapsible tube flow. Thus, opening and closing waves of collapsible tube flow (predistension regime) is subcritical flow and the post-distension regime, supercritical. Physiological tubes are often hyperelastic and contractile and often, when distension is very significant, a hypercritical regime corresponding to hypersonic gas-dynamic flow is admissible. Such a hypercritical regime would allow storage of energy and muscle contraction in the wall of the tube and hence continuance of propulsion in the essentially intermittent flow that is seen in collapsible tubes. Such a mechanism appears to be in operation in the human aorta, bowel and urethra. The present work offers a comparison of critical regimes in various fluid flow situations including collapsible tubes, that is in harmony with known phenomena seen in nature.

  1. Flow regime transitions in a bubble column with a paraffin wax as the liquid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Petrovic, D.; Daly, J.G.

    1987-06-01

    Gas hold-up measurements were made in a 0.051-m-diameter by 3.05-m-long glass bubble column with a molten paraffin wax as the liquid medium. For temperatures between 230 and 280/sup 0/C, there is a range of gas velocities where two modes of operation are possible, and they are referred to as the foamy and the turbulent bubbling flow regimes. The start-up velocity determines which flow regime are obtained. Transitions between these two flow regimes occur and are influenced by the temperature (i.e., the liquid viscosity) and the gas distributor design. Lower temperatures and/or perforated plate distributors with larger holes favor the existence of the turbulent bubbling flow regime.

  2. Venus' nighttime horizontal plasma flow, 'magnetic congestion', and ionospheric hole production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Mayr, H. G.; Curtis, S. A.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A simple rectilinear, two-dimensional MHD model is used to investigate the effects of field-aligned plasma loss and cooling on a dense plasma convecting across a weak magnetic field, in order to illumine the Venus nighttime phenomena of horizontal plasma flow, magnetic congestion and ionospheric hole production. By parameterizing field-aligned variations and explicitly solving for cross magnetic field variations, it is shown that the abrupt horizontal enhancements of the vertical magnetic field, as well as sudden decreases of the plasma density to very low values (which are characteristic of ionospheric holes), can be produced in the presence of field-aligned losses.

  3. Venus' nighttime horizontal plasma flow, 'magnetic congestion', and ionospheric hole production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Mayr, H. G.; Curtis, S. A.; Taylor, H. A.

    1983-04-01

    A simple rectilinear, two-dimensional MHD model is used to investigate the effects of field-aligned plasma loss and cooling on a dense plasma convecting across a weak magnetic field, in order to illumine the Venus nighttime phenomena of horizontal plasma flow, magnetic congestion and ionospheric hole production. By parameterizing field-aligned variations and explicitly solving for cross magnetic field variations, it is shown that the abrupt horizontal enhancements of the vertical magnetic field, as well as sudden decreases of the plasma density to very low values (which are characteristic of ionospheric holes), can be produced in the presence of field-aligned losses.

  4. Salix response to different flow regimes in controlled experiments: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, Lorenzo; Signarbieux, Constant; Buttler, Alexandre; Perona, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Dams and water management for hydropower production, agriculture and other human activities alter the natural flow regime of rivers. The new river hydrograph components depend on the type of impoundment and the policy of regulation but such a different flow regime will likely affect the riparian environment. The main challenge in order to define sustainable flow releases is to quantify hydrological effects in terms of geomorphology and ecosystem response. A considerable lack of knowledge still affects the link hydrology-ecology and inadequate flow rules (e.g., minimal or residual flows) are consequently still widespread: further research in this direction is urgently required. We present an experiment, which aims to investigate the effects of different water stage regimes on riparian vegetation (salix Viminalis cuttings) development in a temperate region (Switzerland). This work describes the installation setup, together with the first results concerning the first of the two scheduled seasons of campaign. Sixty Salix cuttings were planted in non-cohesive sandy-gravel sediment within 1 meter tall plastic pots installed outside in the EPFL campus. After grouping them in three batteries, the water level within them has been varying following three river regimes simulated by adjusting the water level within the pots by means of an automatic hydraulic system. The three water level regimes reproduce a natural flow regime, a minimum residual flow policy, which only conserves peaks during flooding conditions, and an artificial regime conserving only low frequencies (e.g., seasonality) of the natural dynamic. The natural flow regime of the first battery has been applied for two months to the entire system; the three regimes above said started in June 2012. This triggered a plant response transitory regime, which we monitored by measuring plant growth, soil and atmospheric variables. Particularly, measures concern with branches development leaves photosynthesis and

  5. Possible flow regimes of adiabatic one-dimensional compressible fluid flow with friction in convergent and divergent ducts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shouman, A. R.; Garcia, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical solution for the compressible one-dimensional flow in convergent and divergent ducts with friction is obtained. It is found that a nondimensional parameter, N, can be formed using the friction factor, duct half-angle and the ratio of specific heats of the gas. Seven flow regimes are describable with the solution, based on certain bounds on the magnitude of N. The regimes are discussed and corollary data are presented graphically.

  6. Well logging interpretation of production profile in horizontal oil-water two phase flow pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Jin, Ning-De; Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zheng, Xi-Ke

    2012-03-01

    Due to the complicated distribution of local velocity and local phase hold up along the radial direction of pipe in horizontal oil-water two phase flow, it is difficult to measure the total flow rate and phase volume fraction. In this study, we carried out dynamic experiment in horizontal oil-water two phases flow simulation well by using combination measurement system including turbine flowmeter with petal type concentrating diverter, conductance sensor and flowpassing capacitance sensor. According to the response resolution ability of the conductance and capacitance sensor in different range of total flow rate and water-cut, we use drift flux model and statistical model to predict the partial phase flow rate, respectively. The results indicate that the variable coefficient drift flux model can self-adaptively tone the model parameter according to the oil-water two phase flow characteristic, and the prediction result of partial phase flow rate of oil-water two phase flow is of high accuracy.

  7. Correlation Equation for Predicting the Single-Collector Contact Efficiency of Colloids in a Horizontal Flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xie, Xiaohu; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-07-07

    The single-collector contact efficiency (η0) for physicochemical colloid filtration under horizontal flow in saturated porous media was calculated using trajectory analysis in three dimensions. Past studies have developed correlation equations for colloids with densities close to that of water, such as bacteria and latex particles. A new correlation equation was developed for predicting η0 based on a large number of trajectory simulations to account for higher-density particles representative of metal colloids. The correlation equation was developed by assuming Brownian diffusion, interception, and gravitational sedimentation contributed to η0 in an additive manner. Numerical simulations for colloid trajectory analysis used for calculating η0 were based on horizontal flow around a collector under the action of van der Waals attractive forces, gravity, and hydrodynamic forces as well as Brownian motion. The derived correlation equation shows excellent agreement with existing correlation equations for particles with density close to that of water. However, the correlation equation presented in this study shows that η0 of high-density colloids, such as metal particles, transported under horizontal flow deviates from that predicted by existing correlations for colloids larger than 4 μm and under low approach velocities. Simulations of trajectory paths show that a significantly reduced contact of high-density colloids larger than 4 μm in size with a collector is due to gravity forces causing trajectory paths to deviate away from the underside of collectors. The new correlation equation is suitable for predicting the single collector efficiency of large particles (several hundred nanometers to several micrometers) and with a large amount of density transport in the horizontal flow mode but is unsuitable for particles with a quite small size (several to tens of nanometers) and for the particle with a large amount of density flow in the vertical flow mode. The

  8. A model for fluid flow during saturated boiling on a horizontal cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kheyrandish, K.; Dalton, C.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    A model has been developed to represent the vapor removal pattern in the vicinity of a cylinder during nucleate flow boiling across a horizontal cylinder. The model is based on a potential flow representation of the liquid and vapor regions and an estimate of the losses that should occur in the flow. Correlation of the losses shows a weak dependence on the Weber number and a slightly stronger dependence on the saturated liquid-to-vapor density ratio. The vapor jet thickness, which is crucial to the prediction of the burnout heat flux, and the shape of the vapor film are predicted. Both are verified by qualitative experimental observations.

  9. A model for fluid flow during saturated boiling on a horizontal cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kheyrandish, K.; Dalton, C.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    A model has been developed to represent the vapor removal pattern in the vicinity of a cylinder during nucleate flow boiling across a horizontal cylinder. The model is based on a potential flow representation of the liquid and vapor regions and an estimate of the losses that should occur in the flow. Correlation of the losses shows a weak dependence on the Weber number and a slightly stronger dependence on the saturated liquid-to-vapor density ratio. The vapor jet thickness, which is crucial to the prediction of the burnout heat flux, and the shape of the vapor film are predicted. Both are verified by qualitative experimental observations.

  10. Observational evidence of preferred flow regimes in the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, R. B.; Fairlie, T. D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Ten years of stratospheric geopotential height data are analyzed in an attempt to determine whether there are preferred flow regimes in the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere. The data are taken from Stratospheric Sounding Units on board NOAA satellites. The probability density estimate of the amplitude of the wavenumber 1 10-mb height is found to be bimodal. The density distribution is composed of a dominant large-amplitude mode and a less frequent low-amplitude mode. When the wavenumber 1 10-mb height data are projected onto the phase plane defined by the 10-mb zonal-mean winds and wavenumber 1 100-mb heights, three preferred regimes are evident. The small-amplitude mode separates into a strong zonal wind-weak wave regime and a weak zonal wind-weak wave regime. The large-amplitude mode is an intermediate zonal wind-strong wave regime. Transitions between the large-amplitude regime and the weak zonal wind-weak wave regime are found to be associated with major stratospheric warmings. The clustering of the stratospheric data into the preferred flow regimes is interpreted in light of the bifurcation properties of the Holton and Mass model. The interannual variability of the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere is interpreted in terms of the relative frequency of the observed preferred regimes.

  11. Observational evidence of preferred flow regimes in the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.B. ); Duncan, T.; Fairlie, A. )

    1993-07-01

    Ten years of stratospheric geopotential height data are analyzed in an attempt to determine whether there are preferred flow regimes in the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere. The data are taken from Stratospheric Sounding Units on board NOAA satellites. The probability density estimate of the amplitude of the wavenumber 1 10-mb height is found to be bimodal. The density distribution is composed of a dominant large-amplitude mode and a less frequent low-amplitude mode. When the wavenumber 1 10-mb height data are projected onto the phase plane defined by the 10-mb zonal-mean winds and wavenumber 1 100-mb heights, three preferred regimes are evident. The small-amplitude mode separates into a strong zonal wind-weak wave regime and a weak zonal wind-weak wave regime. The large-amplitude mode is an intermediate zonal wind-strong wave regime. Transitions between the large-amplitude regime and the weak zonal wind-weak wave regime are found to be associated with major stratospheric warmings. The clustering of the stratospheric data into the preferred flow regimes is interpreted in light of the bifurcation properties of the Holton and Mass model. The interannual variability of the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere is interpreted in terms of the relative frequency of the observed preferred regimes. 26 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Observational evidence of preferred flow regimes in the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, R. B.; Fairlie, T. D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Ten years of stratospheric geopotential height data are analyzed in an attempt to determine whether there are preferred flow regimes in the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere. The data are taken from Stratospheric Sounding Units on board NOAA satellites. The probability density estimate of the amplitude of the wavenumber 1 10-mb height is found to be bimodal. The density distribution is composed of a dominant large-amplitude mode and a less frequent low-amplitude mode. When the wavenumber 1 10-mb height data are projected onto the phase plane defined by the 10-mb zonal-mean winds and wavenumber 1 100-mb heights, three preferred regimes are evident. The small-amplitude mode separates into a strong zonal wind-weak wave regime and a weak zonal wind-weak wave regime. The large-amplitude mode is an intermediate zonal wind-strong wave regime. Transitions between the large-amplitude regime and the weak zonal wind-weak wave regime are found to be associated with major stratospheric warmings. The clustering of the stratospheric data into the preferred flow regimes is interpreted in light of the bifurcation properties of the Holton and Mass model. The interannual variability of the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere is interpreted in terms of the relative frequency of the observed preferred regimes.

  13. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; McFarland, E. R.; Chima, R. V.; Capece, V. R.; Hayden, J.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center linear cascade on the intermittent flow on the suction surface of an airfoil section from the tip region of a modern low aspect ratio fan blade. Experimental results revealed that, at a large incidence angle, a range of transonic inlet Mach numbers exist where the leading-edge shock-wave pattern was unstable. Flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers indicated large local jumps in the pressure in the leading edge area, which generates large intermittent loading on the blade leading edge. These measurements suggest that for an inlet Mach number between 0.9 and 1.0 the flow is bi-stable, randomly switching between subsonic and supersonic flows. Hence, it appears that the change in overall flow conditions in the transonic region is based on the frequency of switching between two stable flow states rather than on the continuous increase of the flow velocity. To date, this flow behavior has only been observed in a linear transonic cascade. Further research is necessary to confirm this phenomenon occurs in actual transonic fans and is not the byproduct of an endwall restricted linear cascade.

  14. Instability of a thin film flowing on a rotating horizontal or inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Dávalos-Orozco, L A; Busse, F H

    2002-02-01

    In this paper the instability of a thin fluid film flowing under the effects of gravity, Coriolis, and centrifugal forces is investigated. It is supposed that the film flows far from the axis of rotation on a plane which may be horizontal or inclined with respect to the horizontal. In the former case, the flow is only driven by the centrifugal force while in the latter case, the flow is driven by the components of centrifugal force and gravity along the plane. This case may also be considered as the flow down a rotating cone but far from the apex. The stabilizing influence of rotation on the film flow increases with the rotation rate. Up to a certain critical rate of rotation, the film flowing down the rotating inclined plane (or cone) is more stable than the flow on the horizontal rotating plane while above this rate of rotation the situation is reversed. The instability above the critical rate is associated with a finite wave number in contrast to the vanishing wave number of the instability below the critical rate. The possibility of Ekman layer instabilities is also investigated. An equation describing the nonlinear evolution of surface waves is also obtained. Moreover, this equation is simplified for the case in which the amplitudes are very small. An equation including dissipation as well as dispersion is derived whose solutions may possess solitary waves, as in the case of similar equations considered in the literature. These solutions are likely to correspond to the solitary spiral waves observed in experiments.

  15. Structures in the Oscillatory regime of RLDCC flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchapakesan, Nagangudy

    2015-11-01

    Rotating lid driven cubical cavity flow (RLDCC flow) is studied with a view to test structure eduction algorithms. OpenFoam software was used to simulate the RLDCC flow at Reynolds numbers higher than the critical Reynolds number for this geometry. Vortex bubble and other characteristic structures were observed in these simulations. The vector fields of the simulations were further analyzed with LCS and other methodologies to educe the structures. The structures were compared with level sets of different dynamical variables. The ability of these algorithms to present a coherent representation of the time evolution and unsteady dynamics of the bubble and other structures is evaluated. Funded by AR&DB India.

  16. A study of oil-water flow patterns in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Trallero, J.L.; Intevep, S.A.; Sarica, C.; Brill, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    Oil-water flow pattern transitions in horizontal pipes have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. A new state-of-the-art, oil-water test facility was designed, constructed and operated. A transparent test section (5.013-cm inside diameter x 15.54-m long) can be inclined at any angle, to study both upward and downward flow simultaneously. Mineral oil and water were the working fluids ({mu}{sub o}/{mu}{sub w} = 29.6, {rho}{sub o}/{rho}{sub w} = 0.85 and {sigma} = 36 dynes/cm @ 25.6{degrees}C). Only horizontal flow tests were conducted. A new classification for oil-water flow patterns based on published and acquired data is proposed. Six flow patterns were identified and classified into two categories: Segregated flow and Dispersed flow. Stratified flow and stratified flow with some mixing at the interface (ST & MI) are segregated flow patterns. The dispersed flow can be either water dominated or oil dominated. A dispersion of oil in water over a water layer and an emulsion of oil in water are water dominated flow patterns. An emulsion of water in oil and a dual dispersion are oil dominant flow patterns. Conductance probe data and high speed photographs were found to be adequate flow pattern identification tools while wall pressure fluctuations are not. Pressure drop decreases when the transition to dispersed flow is crossed. Slippage is only relevant for segregated flow patterns. The oil-water flow pattern transitions for light oils are predicted using the two-fluid model and a balance between gravity and turbulent fluctuations normal to the axial flow direction. Linear and non-linear analyses reveal that the stratified/non-stratified transition must be addressed with the complete two-fluid model. Stratified flow is predicted by the viscous Kelvin-Helmholtz analysis while inviscid Kelvin-Helmholtz theory predicted the ST & MI flow pattern. Both the viscous Kelvin-Helmholtz analysis and structural stability criterion are satisfied simultaneously.

  17. Numerical simulation of two-phase flow in horizontal interconnected subchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Shourki, M.; Carver, M.B.; Tahir, A.

    1985-11-01

    Different subchannel computer codes have been successfully used for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of coolant flow in vertical fuel channels. None of these methods, however, is suitable for two-phase flow in horizontal fuel channels, such as those of the CANDU nuclear reactors, due to the lack of appropriate constitutive relationships that can correctly account for the gravity separation effects. A transverse vapor drift model that accounts for the combined effect of gravity separation and turbulent diffusion has been incorporated into the existing subchannel computer code SAGA. Although the basic structure of the code remains similar to SAGA III, some modifications in both the mathematical formulation and numerical solution have been incorporated. These modifications resulted in significant improvements in the code's ability to model horizontal two-phase subchannel flow. The new version of the code was tested and found to be capable of simulating the complex exchange phenomenon between adjacent horizontal subchannels caused by the interaction of turbulent diffusion, pressure gradient, and gravity-induced cross flows. The code predictions were compared with experimental data obtained from two different sources and showed good agreement.

  18. Intermittent flow regimes near the convection threshold in ferromagnetic nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Krauzina, Marina T; Bozhko, Alexandra A; Putin, Gennady F; Suslov, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    The onset and decay of convection in a spherical cavity filled with ferromagnetic nanofluid and heated from below are investigated experimentally. It is found that, unlike in a single-component Newtonian fluid where stationary convection sets in as a result of supercritical bifurcation and where convection intensity increases continuously with the degree of supercriticality, convection in a multicomponent ferromagnetic nanofluid starts abruptly and has an oscillatory nature. The hysteresis is observed in the transition between conduction and convection states. In moderately supercritical regimes, the arising fluid motion observed at a fixed temperature difference intermittently transitions from quasiharmonic to essentially irregular oscillations that are followed by periods of a quasistationary convection. The observed oscillations are shown to result from the precession of the axis of a convection vortex in the equatorial plane. When the vertical temperature difference exceeds the convection onset value by a factor of 2.5, the initially oscillatory convection settles to a steady-state regime with no intermittent behavior detected afterward. The performed wavelet and Fourier analyses of thermocouple readings indicate the presence of various oscillatory modes with characteristic periods ranging from one hour to several days.

  19. Impurity flows and plateau-regime poloidal density variation in a tokamak pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Landreman, M.; Fueloep, T.; Guszejnov, D.

    2011-09-15

    In the pedestal of a tokamak, the sharp radial gradients of density and temperature can give rise to poloidal variation in the density of impurities. At the same time, the flow of the impurity species is modified relative to the conventional neoclassical result. In this paper, these changes to the density and flow of a collisional impurity species are calculated for the case when the main ions are in the plateau regime. In this regime, it is found that the impurity density can be higher at either the inboard or outboard side. This finding differs from earlier results for banana- or Pfirsch-Schlueter-regime main ions, in which case the impurity density is always higher at the inboard side in the absence of rotation. Finally, the modifications to the impurity flow are also given for the other regimes of main-ion collisionality.

  20. Impact of Climate Change and Human Intervention on River Flow Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajendra; Mittal, Neha; Mishra, Ashok

    2017-04-01

    Climate change and human interventions like dam construction bring freshwater ecosystem under stress by changing flow regime. It is important to analyse their impact at a regional scale along with changes in the extremes of temperature and precipitation which further modify the flow regime components such as magnitude, timing, frequency, duration, and rate of change of flow. In this study, the Kangsabati river is chosen to analyse the hydrological alterations in its flow regime caused by dam, climate change and their combined impact using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) program based on the Range of Variability Approach (RVA). Results show that flow variability is significantly reduced due to dam construction with high flows getting absorbed and pre-monsoon low flows being augmented by the reservoir. Climate change alone reduces the high peaks whereas a combination of dam and climate change significantly reduces variability by affecting both high and low flows, thereby further disrupting the functioning of riverine ecosystems. Analysis shows that in the Kangsabati basin, influence of dam is greater than that of the climate change, thereby emphasising the significance of direct human intervention. Keywords: Climate change, human impact, flow regime, Kangsabati river, SWAT, IHA, RVA.

  1. Using regional flow classes as references to analyse flow regime anomalies across a set of regulated Canadian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Fraser; Lapointe, Michel; Bourque, Guillaume; Boisclair, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that a river's natural flow regime is a key determinant of ecological integrity and that dam regulated-flow releases can be detrimental to biotic communities and even affect river ecosystem structure (e.g. Poff and Zimmerman, 2010). Regional flow classes, groups of rivers that share similar natural flow regimes (called ‘river types' by Poff and Zimmerman (2010)) and to which regional fish communities are ‘adapted', have been proposed as units of analysis to identify significant damming related flow alteration (e.g. Poff, 1996; Poff and Zimmerman, 2010; McManamay et al., 2012a). Specifically, the natural range of flow behaviour within regional classes can be used to identify clearly anomalous flow features in rivers regulated by dams. Through ordination analysis on 70 ecologically important flow indices, we isolated five distinctive regional groupings of natural flow regimes among the 96 unregulated rivers located in study regions of South Eastern and South Western Canada, selected based on watershed characteristics as possible references for the 13 hydro-regulated, NSERC-HydroNet study rivers in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. The distinguishing characteristics of natural flow regimes within each flow class are explored through visualization in principal component space. The 16 regulated HydroNet sites were assigned to appropriate regional flow classes through discriminant function analysis based on shared geographic location and watershed characteristics. Anomalous flow features in the regulated rivers are then characterized by type and strength, based on identification of flow indices that are significantly different from observed natural variability in the relevant regional class. The magnitude distributions and the main axes of variability in index anomalies are analysed, across regions and regulation types (storage, peaking and run-of-the-river (RoR)). We also discuss the potential biological

  2. Multi-metric calibration of hydrological model to capture overall flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Shao, Quanxi; Zhang, Shifeng; Zhai, Xiaoyan; She, Dunxian

    2016-08-01

    Flow regimes (e.g., magnitude, frequency, variation, duration, timing and rating of change) play a critical role in water supply and flood control, environmental processes, as well as biodiversity and life history patterns in the aquatic ecosystem. The traditional flow magnitude-oriented calibration of hydrological model was usually inadequate to well capture all the characteristics of observed flow regimes. In this study, we simulated multiple flow regime metrics simultaneously by coupling a distributed hydrological model with an equally weighted multi-objective optimization algorithm. Two headwater watersheds in the arid Hexi Corridor were selected for the case study. Sixteen metrics were selected as optimization objectives, which could represent the major characteristics of flow regimes. Model performance was compared with that of the single objective calibration. Results showed that most metrics were better simulated by the multi-objective approach than those of the single objective calibration, especially the low and high flow magnitudes, frequency and variation, duration, maximum flow timing and rating. However, the model performance of middle flow magnitude was not significantly improved because this metric was usually well captured by single objective calibration. The timing of minimum flow was poorly predicted by both the multi-metric and single calibrations due to the uncertainties in model structure and input data. The sensitive parameter values of the hydrological model changed remarkably and the simulated hydrological processes by the multi-metric calibration became more reliable, because more flow characteristics were considered. The study is expected to provide more detailed flow information by hydrological simulation for the integrated water resources management, and to improve the simulation performances of overall flow regimes.

  3. Removing heavy metals from Isfahan composting leachate by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Bakhshoodeh, Reza; Alavi, Nadali; Soltani Mohammadi, Amir; Ghanavati, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Composting facility leachate usually contains high concentrations of pollutants including heavy metals that are seriously harmful to the environment and public health. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate heavy metals removal from Isfahan composting facility (ICF) leachate by a horizontal flow constructed wetland (HFCWs) system. Two horizontal systems were constructed, one planted with vetiver and the other without plant as a control. They both operated at a flow rate of 24 L/day with a 5-day hydraulic retention time (HRT). The average removal efficiencies for Cr (53 %), Cd (40 %), Ni (35 %), Pb (30 %), Zn (35 %), and Cu (40 %) in vetiver constructed wetland were significantly higher than those of the control (P < 0.05). Accumulations of heavy metals in roots were higher than shoots. Cd and Zn showed the highest and the lowest bioconcentration factor (BCF), respectively. Vetiver tolerates the extreme condition in leachate including high total dissolved solids.

  4. Enhanced Heat Flow in the Hydrodynamic Collisionless Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Meppelink, R.; Rooij, R. van; Vogels, J. M.; Straten, P. van der

    2009-08-28

    We study the heat conduction of a cold, thermal cloud in a highly asymmetric trap. The cloud is axially hydrodynamic, but due to the asymmetric trap radially collisionless. By locally heating the cloud we excite a thermal dipole mode and measure its oscillation frequency and damping rate. We find an unexpectedly large heat conduction compared to the homogeneous case. The enhanced heat conduction in this regime is partially caused by atoms with a high angular momentum spiraling in trajectories around the core of the cloud. Since atoms in these trajectories are almost collisionless they strongly contribute to the heat transfer. We observe a second, oscillating hydrodynamic mode, which we identify as a standing wave sound mode.

  5. Pattern formation in the flow between two horizontal coaxial cylinders with a partially filled gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Hegseth, John J.; Andereck, C. David; Wesfreid, Jose E.

    1988-11-01

    Flow between two horizontal coaxial cylinders with a partially filled gap is subject to several types of centrifugal instabilities which lead to the formation of a variety of spatial patterns. An experimental investigation has shown that there are five distinct branches of primary instabilities occurring in the system and that four codimension-2 points are easily reached. Theoretical predictions are in qualitative agreement with the observations.

  6. A Risk-Based Ecohydrological Approach to Assessing Environmental Flow Regimes.

    PubMed

    Mcgregor, Glenn B; Marshall, Jonathan C; Lobegeiger, Jaye S; Holloway, Dean; Menke, Norbert; Coysh, Julie

    2017-03-27

    For several decades there has been recognition that water resource development alters river flow regimes and impacts ecosystem values. Determining strategies to protect or restore flow regimes to achieve ecological outcomes is a focus of water policy and legislation in many parts of the world. However, consideration of existing environmental flow assessment approaches for application in Queensland identified deficiencies precluding their adoption. Firstly, in managing flows and using ecosystem condition as an indicator of effectiveness, many approaches ignore the fact that river ecosystems are subjected to threatening processes other than flow regime alteration. Secondly, many focus on providing flows for responses without considering how often they are necessary to sustain ecological values in the long-term. Finally, few consider requirements at spatial-scales relevant to the desired outcomes, with frequent focus on individual places rather than the regions supporting sustainability. Consequently, we developed a risk-based ecohydrological approach that identifies ecosystem values linked to desired ecological outcomes, is sensitive to flow alteration and uses indicators of broader ecosystem requirements. Monitoring and research is undertaken to quantify flow-dependencies and ecological modelling is used to quantify flow-related ecological responses over an historical flow period. The relative risk from different flow management scenarios can be evaluated at relevant spatial-scales. This overcomes the deficiencies identified above and provides a robust and useful foundation upon which to build the information needed to support water planning decisions. Application of the risk assessment approach is illustrated here by two case studies.

  7. Scale-dependence of natural variability of flow regimes in a forested landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, S. E.; Creed, I. F.; Tague, C. L.; Beall, F. D.; Buttle, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The ecological integrity of riverine ecosystems is dependent upon the natural flow regime of the river system. Maintaining natural variability in the flow regime is critical for conserving the structure and function of riverine ecosystems. This research seeks to determine relations between natural variability in the flow regime and basin scale. A distributed hydrologic model was used to characterize the natural flow regime of basins from first to fifth order within tributaries of the Batchawana River in the Algoma Highlands of central Ontario using the range of variability approach (RVA). A 30-year simulated flow record was used to calculate natural variability in the flow regime, defined by the S80 [(90th percentile - 10th percentile)/median]. Flow variability under wetter conditions was similar across all basins, regardless of scale. Conversely, flow variability under drier conditions was scale-dependent, with smaller basins (<600 ha) showing a large range in variability and larger basins (>600 ha) showing a smaller range in variability that converged toward a constant with increasing area. The effect of basin area on flow variability suggested the existence of a representative elementary area (REA). Within the REA, morphometric sources of natural variability were determined through multivariate regression analyses. A combination of indices describing the near-stream riparian area within a basin, median basin residence time, and basin curvature was significantly related to flow variability under drier conditions. These findings present a potential management template for establishing reference conditions against which impacts of disturbance on flows throughout a regional drainage basin may be measured.

  8. Comprehensive assessment of dam impacts on flow regimes with consideration of interannual variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Shao, Quanxi; Zhao, Tongtiegang

    2017-09-01

    Assessing the impact of human intervention on flow regimes is important in policy making and resource management. Previous impact assessments of dam regulation on flow regimes have focused on long-term average patterns, but interannual variations, which are important characteristics to be considered, have been ignored. In this study, the entire signatures of hydrograph variations of Miyun Reservoir in northern China were described by forty flow regime metrics that incorporate magnitude, variability and frequency, duration, timing, and rate of change for flow events based on a long-term synchronous observation series of inflow and outflow. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to reduce the multidimensionality of the metrics and time and to determine impact patterns and their interannual shifts. Statistically significant driving factors of impact pattern variations were identified. We found that dam regulation resulted in four main impact classes on the flow regimes and that the regulated capacity was interannually attenuated from 1973 to 2010. The impact patterns alternated between the highly regulated class with extremely decreasing flow magnitude, slight variability, and extreme intermittency and the slightly regulated class with extremely increasing flow magnitude, slight variability, and extreme intermittency from 1973 to 1987 and then stabilized in the latter class from 1988 to 2001. After 2001, the pattern gradually changed from the moderately regulated class with moderately decreasing flow magnitude, extreme variability, and extreme intermittency to the slightly regulated class with slightly decreasing flow magnitude, slight variability, and no intermittency. Decreasing precipitation and increasing drought were the primary drivers for the interannual variations of the impact patterns, and inflow variability was the most significant factor affecting the patterns, followed by flow event frequency and duration, magnitude, and timing. This

  9. Modeling of particle removal in the first coarse media of direct horizontal-flow roughing filtration.

    PubMed

    Ahn, H W; Park, N S; Kim, S; Park, S Y; Wang, C K

    2007-03-01

    Horizontal-Flow Roughing Filtration (HRF) is an alternative pretreatment method e.g. prior to Slow Sand Filtration (SSF). However, some of its limitations are that the effluent quality drops drastically at higher turbidity (>200NTU) and at higher filtration rate (>1 m h(-1)). To overcome these drawbacks, we suggested Direct Horizontal-Flow Roughing Filtration (DHRF), which is a modified system of Horizontal-Flow Roughing Filtration (HRF) by addition of a low dose of coagulant prior to filtration. To optimize the DHRF configuration, a conceptual and mathematical model for the coarse compartment has been developed in analogy with multi-plate settler. Data from simple column settling test can be used in the model to predict the filter performance. Furthermore, the model developed herein has been validated by successive experiments. The conventional column settling test has been found to be handy and useful to predict the performance of DHRF for different raw water characteristics (e.g. coagulated or uncoagulated water, different amounts of organic matter, etc.) and different initial process conditions (e.g. coagulant dose, mixing time and intensity, etc.). An optimum filter design for the coarse compartment (grain size 20 mm) has been found to be of 3m h(-1) filtration rate with filter length of 4-4.5 m.

  10. Can multiple flow boiling regimes be reduced into a single one in microchannels?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fanghao; Dai, Xianming; Peles, Yoav; Cheng, Ping; Li, Chen

    2013-07-01

    We report that multiple and transitional flow boiling regimes in microchannels can be reduced into a single annular flow from the onset of nucleate boiling to the critical heat flux condition. Hydrophilic silicon nanowires directly grown on inner walls of microchannels were tailored to create boiling surfaces with optimal submicron pores surrounded by nanogaps through controlling the height and density of silicon nanowires using the nanocarpet effect. A single two-phase regime can be realized by controlling the flow structure in two aspects: reducing bubble size and transforming the dominant surface tension force from the cross-sectional plane to the inner-wall plane.

  11. Velocity and temperature profiles in near-critical nitrogen flowing past a horizontal flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Boundary layer velocity and temperature profiles were measured for nitrogen near its thermodynamic critical point flowing past a horizontal flat plate. The results were compared measurements made for vertically upward flow. The boundary layer temperatures ranged from below to above the thermodynamic critical temperature. For wall temperatures below the thermodynamic critical temperature there was little variation between the velocity and temperature profiles in three orientations. In all three orientations the point of crossing into the critical temperature region is marked by a significant flattening of the velocity and temperature profiles and also a decrease in heat transfer coefficient.

  12. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  13. Nitrogen removal in a combined system: vertical vegetated bed over horizontal flow sand bed.

    PubMed

    Kantawanichkul, S; Neamkam, P; Shutes, R B

    2001-01-01

    Pig farm wastewater creates various problems in many areas throughout Thailand. Constructed wetland systems are an appropriate, low cost treatment option for tropical countries such as Thailand. In this study, a combined system (a vertical flow bed planted with Cyperus flabelliformis over a horizontal flow sand bed without plants) was used to treat settled pig farm wastewater. This system is suitable for using in farms where land is limited. The average COD and nitrogen loading rate of the vegetated vertical flow bed were 105 g/m2 x d and 11 g/m2 x d respectively. The wastewater was fed intermittently at intervals of 4 hours with a hydraulic loading rate of 3.7 cm/d. The recirculation of the effluent increased total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency from 71% to 85%. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) removal efficiencies were 95% and 98%. Nitrification was significant in vertical flow Cyperus bed, and the concentration of nitrate increased by a factor of 140. The horizontal flow sand bed enhanced COD removal and nitrate reduction was 60%. Plant uptake of nitrogen was 1.1 g N/m2 x d or dry biomass production was 2.8 kg/m2 over 100 days.

  14. An experimental and numerical investigation of thin film flow in an axially rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Keary; Schultz, William; Perlin, Marc

    2003-11-01

    Two dimensional film flow in an axially rotating horizontal cylinder is studied both experimentally and numerically. The physical setup is a 610 cm long glass tube with inside radius of 1.634 cm. This tube is filled partially with four different fluids: treated water and 1, 20, and 500 cSt silicone oils (dimethylpolysiloxane). The free surface profile is captured via video imaging and laser sheet illumination of the dye laden fluid. Transition to rimming flow (snap through") during rotational acceleration as well as from rimming flow during deceleration is recorded. A long working distance microscope observes the depth of the thin film region as it reenters the "puddle" during non-rimming flow. A lubrication analysis numerical study includes centrifugal force in addition to pressure gradients in the direction of the polar angle [1]. Surface profiles generated from the experiments are compared with this simulation as well as other numerical and analytical studies. 1. Liu, Z. 2001 "Film flow within an axially rotating horizontal cylinder and contact lines on an oscillating plate," Ph.D. dissertation, University of Michigan.

  15. Restoring native fish assemblages to a regulated California stream using the natural flow regime concept.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, Joseph D; Moyle, Peter B; Crain, Patrick K

    2012-07-01

    We examined the response of fishes to establishment of a new flow regime in lower Putah Creek, a regulated stream in California, U.S.A. The new flow regime was designed to mimic the seasonal timing of natural increases and decreases in stream flow. We monitored fish assemblages annually at six sample sites distributed over approximately 30 km of stream for eight years before and nine years after the new flow regime was implemented. Our purpose was to determine whether more natural stream flow patterns would reestablish native fishes and reduce the abundances of alien (nonnative) fishes. At the onset of our study, native fishes were constrained to habitat immediately (<1 km) below the diversion dam, and alien species were numerically dominant at all downstream sample sites. Following implementation of the new flow regime, native fishes regained dominance across more than 20 km of lower Putah Creek. We propose that the expansion of native fishes was facilitated by creation of favorable spawning and rearing conditions (e.g., elevated springtime flows), cooler water temperatures, maintenance of lotic (flowing) conditions over the length of the creek, and displacement of alien species by naturally occurring high-discharge events. Importantly, restoration of native fishes was achieved by manipulating stream flows at biologically important times of the year and only required a small increase in the total volume of water delivered downstream (i.e., water that was not diverted for other uses) during most water years. Our results validate that natural flow regimes can be used to effectively manipulate and manage fish assemblages in regulated rivers.

  16. Flow regimes of adiabatic gas-liquid two-phase under rolling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chaoxing; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Licheng; Xing, Dianchuan; Wang, Yang; Tian, Daogui

    2013-07-01

    Characteristics of adiabatic air/water two-phase flow regimes under vertical and rolling motion conditions were investigated experimentally. Test sections are two rectangular ducts with the gaps of 1.41 and 10 mm, respectively, and a circular tube with 25 mm diameter. Flow regimes were recorded by a high speed CCD-camera and were identified by examining the video images. The experimental results indicate that the characteristics of flow patterns in 10 mm wide rectangular duct under vertical condition are very similar to those in circular tube, but different from the 1.41 mm wide rectangular duct. Channel size has a significant influence on flow pattern transition, boundary of which in rectangular channels tends asymptotically towards that in the circular tube with increasing the width of narrow side. Flow patterns in rolling channels are similar to each other, nevertheless, the effect of rolling motion on flow pattern transition are significantly various. Due to the remarkable influences of the friction shear stress and surface tension in the narrow gap duct, detailed flow pattern maps of which under vertical and rolling conditions are indistinguishable. While for the circular tube with 25 mm diameter, the transition from bubbly to slug flow occurs at a higher superficial liquid velocity and the churn flow covers more area on the flow regime map as the rolling period decreases.

  17. Impact of flow regime on pressure drop increase and biomass accumulation and morphology in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Vrouwenvelder, J S; Buiter, J; Riviere, M; van der Meer, W G J; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kruithof, J C

    2010-02-01

    Biomass accumulation and pressure drop development have been studied in membrane fouling simulators at different flow regimes. At linear flow velocities as applied in practice in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, voluminous and filamentous biofilm structures developed in the feed spacer channel, causing a significant increase in feed channel pressure drop. Elevated shear by both single phase flow (water) and two phase flow (water with air sparging: bubble flow) caused biofilm filaments and a pressure drop increase. The amount of accumulated biomass was independent of the applied shear, depending on the substrate loading rate (product of substrate concentration and linear flow velocity) only. The biofilm streamers oscillated in the passing water. Bubble flow resulted in a more compact and less filamentous biofilm structure than single phase flow, causing a much lower pressure drop increase. The biofilm grown under low shear conditions was more easy to remove during water flushing compared to a biofilm grown under high shear. To control biofouling, biofilm structure may be adjusted using biofilm morphology engineering combined with biomass removal from membrane elements by periodic reverse flushing using modified feed spacers. Potential long and short term consequences of flow regimes on biofilm development are discussed. Flow regimes manipulate biofilm morphology affecting membrane performance, enabling new approaches to control biofouling. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Triple-decker: Interfacing atomistic-mesoscopic-continuum flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2009-03-01

    Multiscale flow phenomena in microfluidic and biomedical applications require the use of heterogeneous modeling approaches. In this paper we present a hybrid method based on coupling the Molecular Dynamics (MD) method, the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method, and the incompressible Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. MD, DPD, and NS are formulated in separate subdomains and are coupled via an overlapping region by communicating state information at the subdomain boundaries. Imposition of boundary conditions in the MD and DPD systems involves particle insertion and deletion, specular wall reflection and body force terms. The latter includes a boundary pressure force in order to minimize near-boundary density fluctuations, and an adaptive shear force which enforces the tangential velocity component of boundary conditions. The triple-decker algorithm is verified for prototype flows, including simple and multi-layer fluids (Couette, Poiseuille, and lid-driven cavity), using highly accurate reference solutions. A zero-thickness interface is also possible if it is aligned with the flow streamlines.

  19. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients under the influence of SDS surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Duangprasert, Tanabordee; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2008-01-15

    Two-phase gas/liquid flows in vertical pipes have been systematically investigated. Water and SDS surfactant solutions at various concentrations were used as the working fluids. In particular, we focus our work on the influence of surfactant addition on the flow regimes, the corresponding pressure gradients, and the bubble sizes and velocity. Adding the surfactant lowers the air critical Reynolds numbers for the bubble-slug flow and the slug flow transitions. The pressure gradients of SDS solutions are lower than those of pure water especially in the slug flow and the slug-churn flow regimes, implying turbulent drag reduction. At low Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the surfactant solution are lower than those of pure water due to the increase in viscosity. With increasing and at high Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the SDS solution become greater than those of pure water which is attributed to the effect of surface tension. (author)

  20. Regulation of snow-fed rivers affects flow regimes more than climate change.

    PubMed

    Arheimer, B; Donnelly, C; Lindström, G

    2017-07-05

    River flow is mainly controlled by climate, physiography and regulations, but their relative importance over large landmasses is poorly understood. Here we show from computational modelling that hydropower regulation is a key driver of flow regime change in snow-dominated regions and is more important than future climate changes. This implies that climate adaptation needs to include regulation schemes. The natural river regime in snowy regions has low flow when snow is stored and a pronounced peak flow when snow is melting. Global warming and hydropower regulation change this temporal pattern similarly, causing less difference in river flow between seasons. We conclude that in snow-fed rivers globally, the future climate change impact on flow regime is minor compared to regulation downstream of large reservoirs, and of similar magnitude over large landmasses. Our study not only highlights the impact of hydropower production but also that river regulation could be turned into a measure for climate adaptation to maintain biodiversity on floodplains under climate change.Global warming and hydropower regulations are major threats to future fresh-water availability and biodiversity. Here, the authors show that their impact on flow regime over a large landmass result in similar changes, but hydropower is more critical locally and may have potential for climate adaptation in floodplains.

  1. Numerical design of a Knudsen pump with curved channels operating in the slip flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontidis, Vlasios; Chen, Jie; Baldas, Lucien; Colin, Stéphane

    2014-08-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed for modeling 2D thermal creep flows with Fluent®. Complete first order velocity slip, including thermal creep and walls curvature effects, as well as temperature jump, boundary conditions, are implemented via C routines. After validation on benchmark flows, the technique is used for designing a Knudsen pump with curved microchannels and it is demonstrated that this micropump can be efficient in the slip flow regime.

  2. Linking river flow regimes to riparian plant guilds: a community-wide modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Lytle, David A; Merritt, David M; Tonkin, Jonathan D; Olden, Julian D; Reynolds, Lindsay V

    2017-03-06

    Modeling riparian plant dynamics along rivers is complicated by the fact that plants have different edaphic and hydrologic requirements at different life-stages. With intensifying human demands for water and continued human alteration of rivers, there is a growing need for predicting responses of vegetation to flow alteration, including responses related to climate change and river flow management. We developed a coupled structured population model that coombines stage-specific responses of plant guilds with specific attributes of river hydrologic regime. The model uses information on the vital rates of guilds as they relate to different hydrologic conditions (flood, drought, and baseflow), but deliberately omits biotic interactions from the structure ("interaction neutral"). Our intent was to: 1) consolidate key vital rates concerning plant population dynamics and to incorporate these data into a quantitative framework, 2) determine whether complex plant stand dynamics, including biotic interactions, can be predicted from basic vital rates and river hydrology, and 3) project how altered flow regimes might affect riparian communities. We illustrated the approach using five flow-response guilds that encompass much of the river floodplain community: hydroriparian tree, xeroriparian shrub, hydroriparian shrub, mesoriparian meadow, and desert shrub. We also developed novel network-based tools for predicting community-wide effects of climate-driven shifts and deliberately altered flow regimes. The model recovered known patterns of hydroriparian tree vs. xeroriparian shrub dominance, including the relative proportion of these two guilds as a function of river flow modification. By simulating flow alteration scenarios ranging from increased drought to shifts in flood timing, the model predicted that mature hydroriparian forest should be most abundant near the observed natural flow regime. Multiguild sensitivity analysis identified substantial network connectivity (many

  3. Economic interpretation of environmental flow regime downstream diverted river reaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, Lorenzo; Perona, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Water demand for hydropower production is increasing together with the consciousness of the importance of riparian ecosystems and biodiversity. Some Cantons in Switzerland and other alpine regions in Austria and in Sud Tirol (Italy) started replacing the inadequate concept of Minimum Flow Requirement (MFR) with a dynamic one, by releasing a fix percentage of the total inflow (e.g. 25 %) to the environment. In the same direction Perona et al. (in revision) mathematically formulated a method particularly suitable for small hydropower plants, handling the environment as a non-traditional water use, which competes with exploitators. This model uses the Principle of Equal Marginal Utility (PEMU) as optimal water allocation rule for generating like-natural flow releases while maximizing the aggregate economic benefit of all uses (Gorla and Perona, in revision). In this paper we show how redistribution policies can be interpreted in terms of PEMU, particularly we focus at traditional water repartition rules, such as the MFR, but also to dynamic ones like proportional redistribution. For the first case we show both ecological and economical arguments suggesting its inappropriateness; in the second case we highlight explicit points of strength and weakness, and suggest ways of improvement. For example the flow release allocation rule can be changed from inflow-independent ones (e.g., proportional redistribution), to inflow-dependent ones (e.g., non-proportional). The latters, having fewer constraints, can generally lead to better both ecological and economical performances. A class of simple functions, based on the PEMU, is then proposed as a suitable solution in run-of-river or small hydropower plants. Each water repartition policy underlies an ecosystem monetization. We explicit the value of the ecosystem health underlying each policy by means of the PEMU under a few assumptions, and discuss how the theoretic efficient redistribution law obtained by our approach is

  4. Experimental investigation of two-phase flow patterns in minichannels at horizontal orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saljoshi, P. S.; Autee, A. T.

    2017-09-01

    Two-phase flow is the simplest case of multiphase flow in which two phases are present for a pure component. The mini channel is considered as diameter below 3.0-0.2 mm and conventional channel is considered diameter above 3.0 mm. An experiment was conducted to study the adiabatic two-phase flow patterns in the circular test section with inner diameter of 1.1, 1.63, 2.0, 2.43 and 3.0 mm for horizontal orientation using air and water as a fluid. Different types of flow patterns found in the experiment. The parameters that affect most of these patterns and their transitions are channel size, phase superficial velocities (air and liquid) and surface tension. The superficial velocity of liquid and gas ranges from 0.01 to 66.70 and 0.01 to 3 m/s respectively. Two-phase flow pattern photos were recorded using a high speed CMOS camera. In this experiment different flow patterns were identified for different tube diameters that confirm the diameter effect on flow patterns in two-phase flows. Stratified flow was not observed for tube diameters less than 3.0 mm. Similarly, wavy-annular flow pattern was not observed in 1.6 and 1.0 mm diameter tubes due to the surface-tension effect and decrease in tube diameter. Buoyancy effects were clearly visible in 2.43 and 3.0 mm diameter tubes flow pattern. It has also observed that as the test-section diameter decreases the transition lines shift towards the higher gas and liquid velocity. However, the result of flow pattern lines in the present study has good agreement with the some of the existing flow patterns maps.

  5. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governing equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.

  6. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; ...

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governingmore » equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.« less

  7. Rheology of binary granular mixtures in the dense flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Anurag; Khakhar, D. V.

    2011-11-01

    We study the rheology of granular mixtures in a steady, fully developed, gravity-driven flow on an inclined plane, by means of discrete element method (DEM) simulations. Results are presented for a single component system and binary mixtures with particles of different size and density. Inclination angles, composition, size ratios and density ratios are varied to obtain different segregated configurations at equilibrium. Steady state profiles of the mean velocity, volume fractions, shear stress, shear rate, inertial number and apparent viscosity across the depth of the flowing layer are reported for the different cases. The viscosity varies with height and is found to depend on the local bulk density and composition, which, in turn, depend on the size ratio, the mass ratio and the degree of segregation. For a single component system, a viscoplastic rheological model [P. Jop et al., Nature 441, 727 (2006)] describes the data quite well. We propose a modification of the model for the case of mixtures. The mixture model predicts the viscosity for both well-mixed and segregated granular mixtures differing in size, density or both, using the same model parameters as obtained for the single component system. The predictions of a model for the volume fraction of the mixtures also agree well with simulation results.

  8. DETECTION OF THE HORIZONTAL DIVERGENT FLOW PRIOR TO THE SOLAR FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Hayashi, K.

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that solar active regions including sunspots are formed by the emerging magnetic flux from the deep convection zone. In previous numerical simulations, we found that the horizontal divergent flow (HDF) occurs before the flux emergence at the photospheric height. This paper reports the HDF detection prior to the flux emergence of NOAA AR 11081, which is located away from the disk center. We use SDO/HMI data to study the temporal changes of the Doppler and magnetic patterns from those of the reference quiet Sun. As a result, the HDF appearance is found to come before the flux emergence by about 100 minutes. Also, the horizontal speed of the HDF during this time gap is estimated to be 0.6-1.5 km s{sup -1}, up to 2.3 km s{sup -1}. The HDF is caused by the plasma escaping horizontally from the rising magnetic flux. And the interval between the HDF and the flux emergence may reflect the latency during which the magnetic flux beneath the solar surface is waiting for the instability onset to the further emergence. Moreover, SMART H{alpha} images show that the chromospheric plages appear about 14 minutes later, located cospatial with the photospheric pores. This indicates that the plages are caused by plasma flowing down along the magnetic fields that connect the pores at their footpoints. One important result of observing the HDF may be the possibility of predicting the sunspot appearances that occur in several hours.

  9. Lateral Mixing Mechanisms in Vertical and Horizontal Interconnected Subchannel Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gencay, Sarman; Teyssedou, Alberto; Tye, Peter

    2002-05-15

    A lateral mixing model based on equal volume exchange between two laterally interconnected subchannels is presented. The following mixing mechanisms are taken into account in this model: (a) diversion cross flow, caused by the lateral pressure difference between adjacent subchannels; (b) turbulent void diffusion, which is governed by the lateral void fraction difference between the subchannels; (c) void drift, responsible for the tendency of the vapor phase to drift toward unobstructed regions; and (d) buoyancy drift, which takes into account the effect of gravity in horizontal flows. Experimental two-phase air-water data obtained using two test sections having different geometries and orientations are used to determine the diffusion coefficients required by the mixing model. Under the absence of diversion crossflow, i.e., negligible lateral pressure difference between the subchannels, it is observed that the diffusion coefficient increases with increasing average void fraction in the subchannels. Moreover, for vertical flows turbulent void diffusion seems to be considerably affected by the geometry of the subchannels. For horizontal flows under nonsymmetric inlet void fraction conditions, even though the interconnected subchannels have the same geometry, different turbulent void diffusion and void drift coefficients are required to satisfy the conditions of hydrodynamic equilibrium. In the present study this condition is achieved by introducing a new void drift coefficient expressed as a correction term applied to the turbulent void drift term.

  10. Effect of Drag Reducing Polymers on Stratified and Stratified/Annular Flow in a Horizontal Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernica, Patricia; Fleck, Brian; Heidrick, Ted

    2006-11-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the effects of a drag reducing additive (DRA) on two phase flow in horizontal stratified and stratified/annular flow patterns. Experiments were conducted in an air-water flow in a transparent rectangular channel of cross-section 25.4 mm x 50.8 mm and 2.5 m in length. Pressure drop measurements, wave characteristics and observations of entrainment with and without DRA are presented. A non-contact measurement technique using laser induced fluorescence and high speed videography was used to measure span-wise liquid wave heights and to characterize the air-water interface. Pressure drop was measured at the centerline of the duct over a one meter distance. The onset of entrainment was observed visually. Effects of DRA were observed even at a low concentration of 5ppm. This concentration yielded pressure drop reductions of 10-15% which correlate with previous experiments done in horizontal pipelines. Observations also show dampening of roll waves and the suppression of atomization. Al-Sarkhi, A., Hanratty, T.J., Int J. Multiphase Flow, 27, 1151 (2001)

  11. Resolution of thermal striping issue downstream of a horizontal pipe elbow in stratified pipe flow. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.; Kasza, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    A thermally stratified pipe flow produced by a thermal transient when passing through a horizontal elbow as a result of secondary flow gives rise to large thermal fluctuations on the inner curvature wall of the downstream piping. These fluctuations were measured in a specially instrumented horizontal pipe and elbow system on a test set-up using water in the Mixing Components Technology Facility (MCTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This study is part of a larger program which is studying the influence of thermal buoyancy on general reactor component performance. This paper discusses the influence of pipe flow generated thermal oscillations on the thermal stresses induced in the pipe walls. The instrumentation was concentrated around the exit plane of the 90/sup 0/ sweep elbow, since prior tests had indicated that the largest thermal fluctuations would occur within about one hydraulic diameter downstream of the elbow exit. The thermocouples were located along the inner curvature of the piping and measured the near surface fluid temperature. The test matrix involved thermal downramps under turbulent flow conditions.

  12. A Framework to Assess the Cumulative Hydrological Impacts of Dams on flow Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this study we proposed a framework to assess the cumulative impact of dams on hydrological regime, and the impacts of the Three Gorges Dam on flow regime in Yangtze River were investigated with the framework. We reconstructed the unregulated flow series to compare with the regulated flow series in the same period. Eco-surplus and eco-deficit and the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration parameters were used to examine the hydrological regime change. Among IHA parameters, Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Principal Components Analysis identified the representative indicators of hydrological alterations. Eco-surplus and eco-deficit showed that the reservoir also changed the seasonal regime of the flows in autumn and winter. Annual extreme flows and October flows changes lead to negative ecological implications downstream from the Three Gorges Dam. Ecological operation for the Three Gorges Dam is necessary to mitigate the negative effects on the river ecosystem in the middle reach of Yangtze River. The framework proposed here could be a robust method to assess the cumulative impacts of reservoir operation.

  13. Characterization of Horizontal Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow Using Markov Model-Based Complex Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Dan; Jin, Ning-De; Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2013-05-01

    Horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow widely exists in many physical systems and chemical engineering processes. Compared with vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow, investigations on dynamic behavior underlying horizontal gas-liquid flows are quite limited. Complex network provides a powerful framework for time series analysis of complex dynamical systems. We use a network generation method based on Markov transition probability to infer directed weighted complex networks from signals measured from horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow experiment and find that the networks corresponding to different flow patterns exhibit different network structure. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of horizontal gas-liquid flows, we construct a number of complex networks under different flow conditions, and explore the network indices for each constructed network. In addition, we investigate the sample entropy of different flow patterns. Our results suggest that the network statistic can well represent the complexity in the transition among different flow patterns and further allows characterizing the interface fluctuation behavior in horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow.

  14. Simulation of Flow Regimes to Reduce Habitat for T. tubifex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Whirling disease has had a significant impact on trout fisheries of the American west by reducing the numbers and quality of rainbow trout in infected streams. A critical factor in the life cycle of the whirling disease parasite is the fine sediment that provides the optimum habitat for Tubifex tubifex, an oligochaete worm that acts as an intermediate host for the disease. This report presents a model for the simulation of flushing flows required to remove undesirable fines and sand from a pool. Undesirable fines may also need to be flushed from runs, the surface layer, and backwater areas. Well-defined links of specific particle sizes to oligochaete worm abundance is needed to justify the use of flushing flows to move sediment. An analytical method for estimating the streamflows needed to remove the fine sediment is demonstrated herein. The overall steps to follow in removing fines from a stream are: Step 1. Determine size of the sediment that is the habitat for oligochaete worms. Step 2. Determine location of the sediment that is the habitat for oligochaete worms. Step 3. Determine streamflows needed to flush (remove) the sediment that is the habitat for oligochaete worms. The case study approach is used to present the method and to demonstrate its application. The case is derived from the sediment and oligochaete worm habitat of Willow Creek, a tributary of the Upper Colorado River located in Grand County, Colo. Willow Creek Reservoir (an element of the Colorado-Big Thompson Project) controls the streamflows of the creek and is just above the study site.

  15. The effects of regional groundwater flow in the thermal regime of a basin

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leslie; Chapman, David S.

    1982-09-01

    Numerical solutions of the equations of fluid flow and heat transport are used to quantify the effects of groundwater flow on the subsurface thermal regime. Simulations are carried out for a vertical section through a basin with a distance of 40 km separating the regional topographic high and low. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conditions under which advective effects significantly perturb the thermal field. The transition from conduction-dominated to advection-dominated thermal regimes is sharp and depends primarily on the topographic configuration of the water table, the magnitude and spatial distribution of permeability, hydraulic anisotropy and depth of active flow. Deviations of surface heat flow from the background heat flux are a measurable effect of groundwater flow and depend on the same factors. Our results show that from zero to almost one hundred per cent of the section may have surface heat flow significantly different from background heat flow, depending upon the nature of the hydrogeologic environment. A limited spatial variability in a distributed set of heat flow measurements and/or linear temperature-depth profiles does not ensure that surface heat flow measurements are not disturbed. The results of our simulations suggest that knowledge of the complete environment of a site, including the water table configuration and subsurface flow system, combined with more closely spaced heat flow measurements may be necessary to unravel the true background heat flux in active flow regions.

  16. Flow regime analysis for fluid injection into a confined aquifer: implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Zheng, Z.; Celia, M. A.; Stone, H.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide injection into a confined saline aquifer may be modeled as an axisymmetric two-phase flow problem. Assuming the two fluids segregate in the vertical direction due to strong buoyancy, and neglecting capillary pressure and miscibility, the lubrication approximation leads to a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors in the system are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of the displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ , the gravity number, which represents the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. Four different analytical solutions can be derived as the asymptotic approximations, representing specific values of the parameter pairs. The four solutions correspond to: (1) Γ << 1, M <1; (2) Γ << 1, M =1; (3) Γ << 1, M >1; and (4) Γ >> 1, any M values. The first two of these solutions are new, while the third corresponds to the solution of Nordbotten and Celia (2006) for confined injections and the fourth corresponds to the solution of (Lyle et al., 2005) for gravity currents in an unconfined aquifer. Overall, the various axisymmetric flows can be summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime (Fig. 1). Data from a number of CO2 injection sites around the world can be used to compute the two dimensionless groups Γ and M associated with each injection. When plotted on the regime diagram, these values show the flow behavior for each injection and how the values vary from site to site. For all the CO2 injections, M is always larger than 1, while Γ can range from 0.01 up to 100. The pairs of (Γ, M) with lower Γ values correspond to solution (3), while the ones with higher Γ values can move up to the intermediate regime and the flow regime for solution (4). The higher values of Γ correspond to pilot-scale injections with low

  17. Flow regime patterns and their controlling factors in the Ebro basin (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano, M. Dolores; Marchamalo, Miguel; García de Jalón, Diego; González del Tánago, Marta

    2010-05-01

    SummaryNatural intra-annual flow fluctuations vary between rivers, being a determining factor for aquatic insects, fish and riparian communities which are adapted to the habitat conditions and different flows throughout the seasons. Moreover, restoration of seasonal flow patterns plays an important role in achieving good ecological status of rivers, through the preservation and/or recovery of components and processes of natural river ecosystems. In this work we: (a) classify fluvial segments in the Ebro basin (North-Eastern Spain) according to the intra-annual variability of flows under natural conditions using statistical cluster analysis of monthly mean flow data; (b) characterise the resulting flow typologies according to several ecologically important hydrological variables; (c) analyse the relationships between flow regimes of fluvial segments and physical variables from their catchments; and finally (d) predict the most probable natural flow regime using logistic models based on the most determinant physical characteristics. Fifteen natural flow typologies were described in the Ebro basin, which were characterised in terms of flow fluctuation through the year as well as timing, flow ratio and duration of the maximum and minimum flows. Precipitation, biogeography and geology of catchments showed the highest correlations with flow regimes. Basin size, mean elevation and slope were also correlated. The logistic model we developed had a prediction success of 72% in the Ebro basin. The definition of the natural hydrological conditions (to which the biological communities are tailored), even when flow data are not available, is an important support in the management of river ecosystems. It is especially suitable for setting goals in aquatic ecosystem conservation or restoration projects.

  18. On the effects of centrifugal forces in air-water two-phase flow regime transitions in an adiabatic helical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eric Paul

    Two-phase flow in helical conduits is important in many industries where reaction between components, heat transfer, and mass transport are utilized as processes. The helical design is chosen for the effects of secondary flow patterns that reduce axial dispersion, increased heat transfer, and also their compact design. The first is a result of the secondary flow, which continually transports fluid from the near wall region to the bulk of the flow. In single-phase chemical reactor design this secondary flow increases radial mixing and reduces axial dispersion. In heat exchanger design it increases laminar heat transfer while extending the Reynolds number range of laminar flow. A literature review of the work on helical pipe flow shows that the vast majority of the work is on toroidal single-phase flow, and analyses of two-phase flow are sparse. This dissertation addresses this void by presenting an analytical model of the stratified and annular flow regime transitions in helical conduits, by consideration of the governing equations and mechanisms for transition in the toroidal geometry including the major impact of pitch. Studies have taken a similar approach for straight inclined horizontal and vertical geometries, but none have been found which resolve two-phase flow in the curved geometry of a helix. The main issue in resolving the flow in this geometry is that of determining appropriate inter-phase momentum transfer, and the appropriate friction correlations for wall interaction. These issues are resolved to yield a novel attempt at modeling helical two-phase flow. Pitch is considered negligible in introduction of torsion, while the dominating influence of the centrifugal force is retained. The formulation of the governing equations are taken from a general vector form that is readily extended to a true helix that includes torsion. The predictive capability of the current model is compared to the data and observations of the two-phase helical flow studies

  19. Laboratory Validation of Passive Flow Focusing of Horizontal Wells for in Situ Groundwater Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMarco, A.; Crimi, M.; Holsen, T.; Bellona, C.; Kumarage, P.; Divine, C.; O'Fallon, T.

    2014-12-01

    A new concept for in situgroundwater remediation was recently developed where drilled horizontal wells filled with granular treatment media are installed in the direction of groundwater flow. Due to the differences in hydraulic conductivity (K) of the media in the well and the surrounding aquifer, groundwater is "focused" into the well and treated (Figure 1). Initial computer simulations demonstrate that the horizontal well will have a substantial capture zone making this a viable and appealing remediation strategy. In this work, a laboratory scale model was constructed to validate the computer simulations and determine the expected capture zone of a horizontal well under a range of hydraulic conductivity differentials. We have built a physical model to replicate a horizontal well in a confined aquifer. The model is constructed inside a 55-gallon drum packed with sand and water is pumped into the bottom of the drum and flows upward through the system. Within the aquifer, we installed a 1" screened well packed with lime-soda beads. To define the capture zone, we placed manometers in the aquifer. Finally, a constant head is applied to the system (Figure 2 and 3). Initial tests have shown that the 1" well with a hydraulic conductivity 65 times greater than the surrounding aquifer (kwell= 1.3 cm/sec vs. kaquifer= 0.02cm/sec) will capture a significant percentage (over 80% in some configurations) of the water applied to the system. A tracer test has shown that the water velocity in the well is substantially higher than the aquifer. Manometer readings confirm the flowfield effects of the well and these data are being used to calibrate numerical models. The presentation will focus on the observed behavior of the physical model under varying applied head and hydraulic conductivities and discuss the potential design implications for full-scale application.

  20. Identification of flow regimes around two staggered square cylinders by a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboueian, J.; Sohankar, A.

    2017-02-01

    The flow over two square cylinders in staggered arrangement is simulated numerically at a fixed Reynolds number (Re =150 ) for different gap spacing between cylinders from 0.1 to 6 times a cylinder side to understand the flow structures. The non-inclined square cylinders are located on a line with a staggered angle of 45° the oncoming velocity vector. All numerical simulations are carried out with a finite-volume code based on a collocated grid arrangement. The effects of vortex shedding on the various features of the flow field are numerically visualized using different flow contours such as λ 2 criterion, vorticity, pressure and magnitudes of velocity to distinguish the distinctive flow patterns. By changing the gap spacing between cylinders, five different flow regimes are identified and classified as single body, periodic gap flow, aperiodic, modulated periodic and synchronized vortex shedding regimes. This study revealed that the observed multiple frequencies in global forces of the downstream cylinder in the modulated periodic regime are more properly associated with differences in vortex shedding frequencies of individual cylinders than individual shear layers reported in some previous works; particularly, both shear layers from the downstream cylinder often shed vortices at the same multiple frequencies. The maximum Strouhal number for the upstream cylinder is also identified at {G}^{*}=1 for aperiodic flow pattern. Furthermore, for most cases studied, the downstream cylinder experiences larger drag force than the upstream cylinder.

  1. Prediction of gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jinho; Platt, Jonathan A.

    1993-01-01

    An attempt is made to predict gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in a pipe in a microgravity environment through scaling analysis based on dominant physical mechanisms. Simple inlet geometry is adopted in the analysis to see the effect of inlet configuration on flow regime transitions. Comparison of the prediction with the existing experimental data shows good agreement, though more work is required to better define some physical parameters. The analysis clarifies much of the physics involved in this problem and can be applied to other configurations.

  2. Scaling of two-phase flow regimes in a rod bundle with Freon

    SciTech Connect

    Symolon, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    A fundamental requirement of Freon modeling is that the same void fraction and spatial phase distribution will exist in the Freon model as in the steam/water system being simulated. It is shown that this requirement is satisfied by comparing flow regime transitions observed in high-pressure steam/water with transitions observed in the half-scale Freon four-rod test. It is also demonstrated through predictions of a two-fluid model for a one-half geometric scale factor that within each flow regime, a similar slip ratio (vapor-to-liquid-velocity ratio) exists for the Freon and water systems.

  3. Analysis of Different Approaches to Modeling of Nozzle Flows in the Near Continuum Regime (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-07

    of Nozzle Flows in the Near Continuum Regime (Preprint) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) E.V. Titov , Rakesh Kumar...Different Approaches to Modeling of Nozzle Flows in the Near Continuum Regime E. V. Titov , Rakesh Kumar, D. A. Levin∗ and N. E. Gimelshein, S. F...Axisymmetric Geometries, Journal of Computational Physics, Vol. 162, 2000, pp. 429-466. 13. Titov , E.V., and Levin, D.A., Extension of the DSMC method to

  4. Altered stream-flow regimes and invasive plant species: The Tamarix case

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromberg, J.C.; Lite, S.J.; Marler, R.; Paradzick, C.; Shafroth, P.B.; Shorrock, D.; White, J.M.; White, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that anthropogenic alteration of stream-flow regimes is a key driver of compositional shifts from native to introduced riparian plant species. Location: The arid south-western United States; 24 river reaches in the Gila and Lower Colorado drainage basins of Arizona. Methods: We compared the abundance of three dominant woody riparian taxa (native Populus fremontii and Salix gooddingii, and introduced Tamarix) between river reaches that varied in stream-flow permanence (perennial vs. intermittent), presence or absence of an upstream flow-regulating dam, and presence or absence of municipal effluent as a stream water source. Results: Populus and Salix were the dominant pioneer trees along the reaches with perennial flow and a natural flood regime. In contrast, Tamarix had high abundance (patch area and basal area) along reaches with intermittent stream flows (caused by natural and cultural factors), as well as those with dam-regulated flows. Main conclusions: Stream-flow regimes are strong determinants of riparian vegetation structure, and hydrological alterations can drive dominance shifts to introduced species that have an adaptive suite of traits. Deep alluvial groundwater on intermittent rivers favours the deep-rooted, stress-adapted Tamarix over the shallower-rooted and more competitive Populus and Salix. On flow-regulated rivers, shifts in flood timing favour the reproductively opportunistic Tamarix over Populus and Salix, both of which have narrow germination windows. The prevailing hydrological conditions thus favour a new dominant pioneer species in the riparian corridors of the American Southwest. These results reaffirm the importance of reinstating stream-flow regimes (inclusive of groundwater flows) for re-establishing the native pioneer trees as the dominant forest type. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Analysis of basic flow regimes in a human airway model by stereo-scanning PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soodt, Thomas; Pott, Desirée; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    The detailed understanding of the human lung flow is of high relevance for the optimization of mechanical ventilation. Therefore, the spatial and temporal development of the flow field in a realistic human lung model is investigated for several oscillatory flow regimes using stereo-scanning particle-image velocimetry (PIV). The flow in the right primary bronchus is always measured for a complete sinusoidal ventilation cycle. Three Reynolds and Womersley number sets describing viscous ( Re = 10; α = 1.5), unsteady ( Re = 40; α = 5), and convective ( Re = 150; α = 1.5) regimes are defined to cover various dominating fluid mechanical effects. In addition, multi-plane PIV measurements are performed to analyze steady laminar ( Re = 150) and turbulent ( Re = 2,650) flow at inspiration and expiration. The steady results show that the maximum velocity is shifted to the outer wall at inspiration and toward the inner wall of the bronchial bend at expiration. At inhalation, a U-shaped high-speed velocity profile develops only inside the left primary bronchus, whereas both primary bronchi contain one vortex pair. During expiration, the vortex pairs from each main bronchus merge into a two-vortex-pair system inside the trachea. From the oscillatory findings, it is evident that an undersupply for the right upper lobe is noticed at low ventilatory frequencies, whereas high-frequency flow leads to a more homogeneous ventilation. The analysis of the temporal development of the absolute velocity in the center plane shows a variable phase lag. Unlike the flow in the unsteady regime, the flow of the viscous flow domain ( α = 1.5) is in phase with the applied pressure gradient. Additionally, a premature outflow of the upper right lung lobe can be observed in the unsteady flow regime.

  6. Experimental observations of pressure oscillations and flow regimes in an analogue volcanic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, S.J.; Chouet, B.A.; Phillips, J.C.; Dawson, P.; Ryan, G.A.; Hurst, E.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-liquid flows, designed to be analogous to those in volcanic conduits, are generated in the laboratory using organic gas-gum rosin mixtures expanding in a vertically mounted tube. The expanding fluid shows a range of both flow and pressure oscillation behaviors. Weakly supersaturated source liquids produce a low Reynolds number flow with foam expanding from the top surface of a liquid that exhibits zero fluid velocity at the tube wall; i.e., the conventional "no-slip" boundary condition. Pressure oscillations, often with strong long-period characteristics and consistent with longitudinal and radial resonant oscillation modes, are detected in these fluids. Strongly supersaturated source liquids generate more energetic flows that display a number of flow regimes. These regimes include a static liquid source, viscous flow, detached flow (comprising gas-pockets-at-wall and foam-in-gas annular flow, therefore demonstrating strong radial heterogeneity), and a fully turbulent transonic fragmented or mist flow. Each of these flow regimes displays characteristic pressure oscillations that can be related to resonance of flow features or wall impact phenomena. The pressure oscillations are produced by the degassing processes without the need of elastic coupling to the confining medium or flow restrictors and valvelike features. The oscillatory behavior of the experimental flows is compared to seismoacoustic data from a range of volcanoes where resonant oscillation of the fluid within the conduit is also often invoked as controlling the observed oscillation frequencies. On the basis of the experimental data we postulate on the nature of seismic signals that may be measured during large-scale explosive activity. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Dynamic model for horizontal two-phase flow predicting low head flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Saarinen, M. . Nuclear Engineering Lab.)

    1994-10-01

    The countercurrent flow of gas and water in a short horizontal pipe is studied numerically with a two-phase flow model. It is observed that the onset of flooding cannot be predicted at low liquid flow rates using conventional one-dimensional equations. The conventional equations yield the same underestimated results as the Taitel-Dukler criterion. Utilizing physical reasoning, improved equations have been derived. The basic idea is that the distribution of the phase velocities should not be treated as uniform in the cross-sectional area occupied by phases but transverse dependencies for the velocities should be allowed. By comparing measurement data and calculated results, it is shown that flooding transition can be predicted accurately with these equations.

  8. An investigation of flow regimes affecting the Mexico City region

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    The Mexico City region is well-known to the meteorological community for its overwhelming air pollution problem. Several factors contribute to this predicament, namely, the 20 million people and vast amount of industry within the city. The unique geographical setting of the basin encompassing Mexico City also plays an important role. This basin covers approximately 5000 km{sup 2} of the Mexican Plateau at an average elevation of 2250 m above sea level (asl) and is surrounded on three sides by mountains averaging over 3500 m asl, with peaks over 5000 m asl. Only to the north is their a significant opening in the mountainous terrain. Mexico City sprawls over 1000 km{sup 2} in the southwestern portion of the basin. In recent years, several major research programs have been undertaken to investigate the air quality problem within Mexico City. One of these, the Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative (MARI), conducted in 1990--1993, was a cooperative study between researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mexican Petroleum Institute. As part of this study, a field campaign was initiated in February 1991 during which numerous surface, upper air, aircraft, and LIDAR measurements were taken. Much of the work to date has focused upon defining and simulating the local meteorological conditions that are important for understanding the complex photochemistry occurring within the confines of the city. It seems reasonable to postulate, however, that flow systems originating outside of the Mexico City basin will influence conditions within the city much of the time.

  9. General slip regime permeability model for gas flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Jiang, Peixue; Xu, Ruina; Ouyang, Xiaolong

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical effective gas permeability model was developed for rarefied gas flow in porous media, which holds over the entire slip regime with the permeability derived as a function of the Knudsen number. This general slip regime model (GSR model) is derived from the pore-scale Navier-Stokes equations subject to the first-order wall slip boundary condition using the volume-averaging method. The local closure problem for the volume-averaged equations is studied analytically and numerically using a periodic sphere array geometry. The GSR model includes a rational fraction function of the Knudsen number which leads to a limit effective permeability as the Knudsen number increases. The mechanism for this behavior is the viscous fluid inner friction caused by converging-diverging flow channels in porous media. A linearization of the GSR model leads to the Klinkenberg equation for slightly rarefied gas flows. Finite element simulations show that the Klinkenberg model overestimates the effective permeability by as much as 33% when a flow approaches the transition regime. The GSR model reduces to the unified permeability model [F. Civan, "Effective correlation of apparent gas permeability in tight porous media," Transp. Porous Media 82, 375 (2010)] for the flow in the slip regime and clarifies the physical significance of the empirical parameter b in the unified model.

  10. Hotspot Liquid Microfluidic Cooling: Comparing The Efficiency between Horizontal Flow and Vertical Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yuki; Ryoson, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Koji; Honjo, Keiji; Ohba, Takayuki; Mita, Yoshio

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a novel cooling method for a local high-temperature block in an integrated circuit, which is called a “hotspot”. The method is to cool the chip in out-of-plane (3-D) direction to overcome efficiency limit of traditional horizontal (2-D) cooling. Our result indicates that high-temperature (over 180 °C) circuit block such as a phase-locked-loop (PLL), which is a performance limiting block in a modern CPU, can more efficiently be cooled by the vertical (3-D) cooling scheme.

  11. Revisiting Maxwell’s accommodation coefficient: A study of nitrogen flow in a silica microtube across all flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Wenwen McKenzie, David R.

    2014-12-15

    Gas flows have been studied quantitatively for more than a hundred years and have relevance in modern fields such as the control of gas inputs to processes, the measurement of leak rates and the separation of gaseous species. Cha and McCoy have derived a convenient formula for the flow of an ideal gas applicable across a wide range of Knudsen numbers (Kn) that approaches the Navier–Stokes equations at small Kn and the Smoluchowski extension of the Knudsen flow equation at large Kn. Smoluchowski’s result relies on the Maxwell definition of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient α, recently challenged by Arya et al. We measure the flow rate of nitrogen gas in a smooth walled silica tube across a wide range of Knudsen numbers from 0.0048 to 12.4583. We find that the nitrogen flow obeys the Cha and McCoy equation with a large value of α, unlike carbon nanotubes which show flows consistent with a small value of α. Silica capillaries are therefore not atomically smooth. The flow at small Kn has α=0.91 and at large Kn has α close to one, consistent with the redefinition of accommodation coefficient by Arya et al., which also resolves a problem in the literature where there are many observations of α of less than one at small Kn and many equal to one at large Kn. Silica capillaries are an excellent choice for an accurate flow control system. - Highlights: • First experimental study on flow rate across all flow regimes in a well-defined microtube. • Extend Cha and McCoy theory for molecular flow regime. • Demonstrate the Maxwell accommodation coefficient is different in the slip and molecular flow regimes.

  12. Mixed convection between horizontal plates and consequences for chemical vapor deposition flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    To simulate the fluid dynamics of VD systems, mixed convection between horizontal plates (AR = width/height = 10) heated from below was studied by laser Doppler anemometry in a range 1368 < Ra < 8300 and 15 < R3 < 170. The entrance effects were characterized by two lengths: one for the onset of bouyancy-driven instability, and one for the full development of longitudinal convection rolls. Explicit expressions for both entrance lengths are given in terms of Ra and Re. In addition, unsteady longitudinal convection rolls were observed. These are discussed in terms of the admixture of transverse convection rolls and/or contributions from upstream turbulence. For the fully developed region it is shown analytically that the transverse velocities of the longitudinal convection rolls, v and w, are independent of the forced flow and are identical to those of the two-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection rolls. These fundamental results serve as a base for the discussion of horizontal CVD flows. The entrance and sidewall effects are found to have pronounced influences on the flow patterns observed in CVD (AR = 2) reactors.

  13. Kinetic modelling of nitrogen and organics removal in vertical and horizontal flow wetlands.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Tanveer; Sun, Guangzhi

    2011-05-01

    This paper provides a comparative evaluation of the kinetic models that were developed to describe the biodegradation of nitrogen and organics removal in wetland systems. Reaction kinetics that were considered in the model development included first order kinetics, Monod and multiple Monod kinetics; these kinetics were combined with continuous-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) or plug flow pattern to produce equations to link inlet and outlet concentrations of each key pollutants across a single wetland. Using three statistical parameters, a critical evaluation of five potential models was made for vertical and horizontal flow wetlands. The results recommended the models that were developed based on Monod models, for predicting the removal of nitrogen and organics in a vertical and horizontal flow wetland system. No clear correlation was observed between influent BOD/COD values and kinetic coefficients of BOD(5) in VF and HF wetlands, illustrating that the removal of biodegradable organics was insensitive to the nature of organic matter. Higher effluent COD/TN values coincided with greater denitrification kinetic coefficients, signifying the dependency of denitrification on the availability of COD in VF wetland systems. In contrast, the trend was opposite in HF wetlands, indicating that availability of NO(3)-N was the main limiting step for nitrogen removal. Overall, the results suggested the possible application of the developed alternative predictive models, for understanding the complex biodegradation routes of nitrogen and organics removal in VF and HF wetland systems.

  14. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients: Effect of viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Da Hlaing, Nan; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of liquid viscosity on the flow regimes and the corresponding pressure gradients along the vertical two-phase flow was investigated. Experiment was carried out in a vertical transparent tube of 0.019 m in diameter and 3 m in length and the pressure gradients were measured by a U-tube manometer. Water and a 50 vol.% glycerol solution were used as the working fluids whose kinematic viscosities were 0.85 x 10{sup -6} and 4.0 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In our air-liquid annular two-phase flow, the liquid film of various thicknesses flowed adjacent to the wall and the gas phase flowed at the center of the tube. The superficial air velocity, j{sub air}, was varied between 0.0021 and 58.7 m/s and the superficial liquid velocity, j{sub liquid}, was varied between 0 and 0.1053 m/s. In the bubble, the slug and the slug-churn flow regimes, the pressure gradients decreased with increasing Reynolds number. But in the annular and the mist flow regimes, pressure gradients increased with increasing Reynolds number. Finally, the experimentally measured pressure gradient values were compared and are in good agreement with the theoretical values. (author)

  15. Theoretical and pragmatic modeling of governing equations for two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M.; Ajuha, S.; Sengpiel, W.

    1994-12-31

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy derived for a two-phase flow by volume-averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration; bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities makes the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modeling of these terms is discussed.

  16. Theoretical and pragmatic modelling of governing equations for a two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M.; Sengpiel, W.

    1992-12-01

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy, derived for a two-phase flow by volume averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration, bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities make the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modelling of these terms is discussed. 3 figs., 15 refs.

  17. Theoretical and pragmatic modelling of governing equations for a two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M. . Materials and Components Technology Div.); Sengpiel, W. . Inst. fuer Reaktorsicherheit)

    1992-01-01

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy, derived for a two-phase flow by volume averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration, bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities make the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modelling of these terms is discussed. 3 figs., 15 refs.

  18. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a horizontal circular cylinder in a Jeffrey fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zokri, S. M.; Arifin, N. S.; Mohamed, M. K. A.; Salleh, M. Z.; Kasim, A. R. M.; Mohammad, N. F.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the mixed convection boundary layer flow and heat transfer of Jeffrey fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder with viscous dissipation effect and constant heat flux is discussed. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless forms using the appropriate non-similar transformation. Numerical solutions are obtained by using the Keller-box method, which is proven well-tested, flexible, implicit and unconditionally stable. The numerical results for the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are attained for various values of mixed convection parameter.

  19. Modeling flow into horizontal wells in a Dupuit-Forchheimer model.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, Henk; Kuzin, Sergey; Kelson, Vic; Abrams, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal wells or radial collector wells are used in shallow aquifers to enhance water withdrawal rates. Groundwater flow patterns near these wells are three-dimensional (3D), but difficult to represent in a 3D numerical model because of the high degree of grid refinement needed. However, for the purpose of designing water withdrawal systems, it is sufficient to obtain the correct production rate of these wells for a given drawdown. We developed a Cauchy boundary condition along a horizontal well in a Dupuit-Forchheimer model. Such a steady-state 2D model is not only useful for predicting groundwater withdrawal rates but also for capture zone delineation in the context of source water protection. A comparison of our Dupuit-Forchheimer model for a radial collector well with a 3D model yields a nearly exact production rate. Particular attention is given to horizontal wells that extend underneath a river. A comparison of our approach with a 3D solution for this case yields satisfactory results, at least for moderate-to-large river bottom resistances.

  20. The path to COVIS: A review of acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, Karen G.; Silver, Deborah; Xu, Guangyu; Light, Russ; Jackson, Darrell; Jones, Christopher; Ozer, Sedat; Liu, Li

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow regimes started with the incidental recognition of a plume on a routine sonar scan for obstacles in the path of the human-occupied submersible ALVIN. Developments in sonar engineering, acoustic data processing and scientific visualization have been combined to develop technology which can effectively capture the behavior of focused and diffuse hydrothermal discharge. This paper traces the development of these acoustic imaging techniques for hydrothermal flow regimes from their conception through to the development of the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). COVIS has monitored such flow eight times a day for several years. Successful acoustic techniques for estimating plume entrainment, bending, vertical rise, volume flux, and heat flux are presented as is the state-of-the-art in diffuse flow detection.

  1. EFFECT OF HORIZONTALLY INHOMOGENEOUS HEATING ON FLOW AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE CHROMOSPHERE OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P.; Vasyliūnas, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar chromosphere is heated by damped Alfvén waves propagating upward from the photosphere at a rate that depends on magnetic field strength, producing enhanced heating at low altitudes in the extended weak-field regions (where the additional heating accounts for the radiative losses) between the boundaries of the chromospheric network as well as enhanced heating per particle at higher altitudes in strong magnetic field regions of the network. The resulting inhomogeneous radiation and temperature distribution produces bulk flows, which in turn affect the configuration of the magnetic field. The basic flow pattern is circulation on the spatial scale of a supergranule, with upward flow in the strong-field region; this is a mirror image in the upper chromosphere of photospheric/subphotospheric convection widely associated with the formation of the strong network field. There are significant differences between the neutral and the ionized components of the weakly ionized medium: neutral flow streamlines can form closed cells, whereas plasma is largely constrained to flow along the magnetic field. Stresses associated with this differential flow may explain why the canopy/funnel structures of the network magnetic field have a greater horizontal extent and are relatively more homogeneous at high altitudes than is expected from simple current-free models.

  2. HORIZONTAL FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGIONS FROM RING-DIAGRAM AND LOCAL CORRELATION TRACKING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, S. C.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.; Ravindra, B.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous high-cadence and high spatial resolution Dopplergrams allow us to study subsurface dynamics that may be further extended to explore precursors of visible solar activity on the surface. Since the p-mode power is absorbed in the regions of high magnetic field, the inferences in these regions are often presumed to have large uncertainties. In this paper, using the Dopplergrams from space-borne Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, we compare horizontal flows in a shear layer below the surface and the photospheric layer in and around active regions. The photospheric flows are calculated using the local correlation tracking (LCT) method, while the ring-diagram technique of helioseismology is used to infer flows in the subphotospheric shear layer. We find a strong positive correlation between flows from both methods near the surface. This implies that despite the absorption of acoustic power in the regions of strong magnetic field, the flows inferred from the helioseismology are comparable to those from the surface measurements. However, the magnitudes are significantly different; the flows from the LCT method are smaller by a factor of 2 than the helioseismic measurements. Also, the median difference between the direction of corresponding vectors is 49°.

  3. Effects of flow regime and pesticides on periphytic communities: evolution and role of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Aurélie; Montuelle, Bernard; Bouchez, Agnès

    2011-04-01

    The effects of chemical and physical factors on periphyton structure, diversity and functioning were investigated in an outdoor mesocosm experiment. Stream biofilms were subjected to a pesticide mix (diuron and azoxystrobin) under two different hydraulic regimes. The hydraulic regimes differed by spatial variations of flow conditions (turbulent with high variations vs. laminar with low variations). The effects of the hydraulic regime and pesticides were assessed at the level of the periphytic communities. We focused on the change in the biodiversity of these communities under the two hydraulic regimes, and on the role of these biodiversity changes in case of pesticide contamination. Changes in structural (biomass, cell density), diversity (community composition assessed by PCR-DGGE and microscopic analysis) and functional (bacterial and algal production, sensitivity to the herbicide) parameters were monitored throughout a 2-month experiment. The results showed that exposure to pesticides affected the phytobenthic community targeted by the herbicide, impacting on both its growth dynamics and its primary production. Conversely, the impact of the flow regime was greater than that of pesticides on the non-target bacterial community with higher bacterial density and production in laminar mesocosms (uniform regime). An interaction between flow and pollution effects was also observed. Communities that developed in turbulent mesocosms (heterogeneous regime) were more diversified, as a result of increased microhabitat heterogeneity due to high spatial variations. However, this higher biodiversity did not increase the ability of these biofilms to tolerate pesticides, as expected. On the contrary, the sensitivity of these communities to pesticide contamination was, in fact, increased. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Natural flow regimes, nonnative fishes, and native fish persistence in arid-land river systems.

    PubMed

    Propst, David L; Gido, Keith B; Stefferud, Jerome A

    2008-07-01

    Escalating demands for water have led to substantial modifications of river systems in arid regions, which coupled with the widespread invasion of nonnative organisms, have increased the vulnerability of native aquatic species to extirpation. Whereas a number of studies have evaluated the role of modified flow regimes and nonnative species on native aquatic assemblages, few have been conducted where the compounding effects of modified flow regimes and established nonnatives do not confound interpretations, particularly at spatial and temporal scales that are relevant to conservation of species at a range-wide level. By evaluating a 19-year data set across six sites in the relatively unaltered upper Gila River basin, New Mexico, USA, we tested how natural flow regimes and presence of nonnative species affected long-term stability of native fish assemblages. Overall, we found that native fish density was greatest during a wet period at the beginning of our study and declined during a dry period near the end of the study. Nonnative fishes, particularly predators, generally responded in opposite directions to these climatic cycles. Our data suggested that chronic presence of nonnative fishes, coupled with naturally low flows reduced abundance of individual species and compromised persistence of native fish assemblages. We also found that a natural flow regime alone was unlikely to ensure persistence of native fish assemblages. Rather, active management that maintains natural flow regimes while concurrently suppressing or excluding nonnative fishes from remaining native fish strongholds is critical to conservation of native fish assemblages in a system, such as the upper Gila River drainage, with comparatively little anthropogenic modification.

  5. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2015-12-15

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis [“Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface,” Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A{sup 2}), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A{sup 2}) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A{sup 2}) and thus particle dispersion on O(A{sup 4}). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  6. Accuracy of flowmeters measuring horizontal groundwater flow in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E.R.; Mandell, Wayne A.; Ursic, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Borehole flowmeters that measure horizontal flow velocity and direction of groundwater flow are being increasingly applied to a wide variety of environmental problems. This study was carried out to evaluate the measurement accuracy of several types of flowmeters in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator. Flowmeter response to hydraulic gradient, aquifer properties, and well-screen construction was measured during 2003 and 2005 at the U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The flowmeters tested included a commercially available heat-pulse flowmeter, an acoustic Doppler flowmeter, a scanning colloidal borescope flowmeter, and a fluid-conductivity logging system. Results of the study indicated that at least one flowmeter was capable of measuring borehole flow velocity and direction in most simulated conditions. The mean error in direction measurements ranged from 15.1 degrees to 23.5 degrees and the directional accuracy of all tested flowmeters improved with increasing hydraulic gradient. The range of Darcy velocities examined in this study ranged 4.3 to 155 ft/d. For many plots comparing the simulated and measured Darcy velocity, the squared correlation coefficient (r2) exceeded 0.92. The accuracy of velocity measurements varied with well construction and velocity magnitude. The use of horizontal flowmeters in environmental studies appears promising but applications may require more than one type of flowmeter to span the range of conditions encountered in the field. Interpreting flowmeter data from field settings may be complicated by geologic heterogeneity, preferential flow, vertical flow, constricted screen openings, and nonoptimal screen orientation.

  7. Effects of dams on river flow regime based on IHA/RVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Q.; Liang, S.

    2015-05-01

    The river hydrologic regime is a driving force of the river ecosystem. Operation of dams and sluices has significant impacts on rivers' hydrological situation. Taking the example of the Shaying River, the Jieshou hydrologic section was selected to study the influence of the sluice and all its upstream dams on the hydrologic regime. Using 55 years of measured daily flows at Jieshou hydrologic station, the hydrological date were divided into two series as pre- and post-impact periods. Based on the IHA, the range of variability in 33 flow parameters was calculated, and the hydrologic alteration associated with dams and sluices operation was quantified. Using the RVA method, hydrologic alteration at the stream gauge site was assessed to demonstrate the influence of dams on the hydrological condition. The results showed that dams have a strong influence on the regime; the river eco-hydrological targets calculated in this study can afford some support for water resources and ecosystem management of Shaying River.

  8. Influence of flow velocity on the removal of faecal coliforms in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Lohay, W S; Lyimo, T J; Njau, K N

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of flow velocity on the removal of faecal coliforms (FC) in constructed wetlands (CWs), removal rate constants of FC (k(FC)) were studied at various flow velocities (u). Membrane filtration technique was used during analysis. Values of k(FC) were determined using Reed's equation of pathogen removal; the results were compared with the plug flow equation. According to Reed's equation, k(FC) values ranged from 1.6 day⁻¹ at a velocity of 4 m/day to 34.5 day⁻¹ at a velocity of 42.9 m/day. The removal rates correlated positively with flow velocity (r = 0.84, p < 0.05). On assuming a plug flow equation, removal rates constants ranged from 0.77 to 11.69 day⁻¹; a more positive correlation (r = 0.93, p < 0.05) was observed. Optimum removal rate constants were observed for the velocity ranging 36 to 43 m/day. Generally, the increase of flow velocity improved FC removal rate constants: implying that pathogen removals are influenced by diffusion of the microorganisms into the biofilms on CW media. The velocity dependent approach together with the plug flow equation is therefore proposed for incorporation in the design of CW in a tropical climate where temperature variations are minor.

  9. Validating alternative methodologies to estimate the regime of temporary rivers when flow data are unavailable.

    PubMed

    Gallart, F; Llorens, P; Latron, J; Cid, N; Rieradevall, M; Prat, N

    2016-09-15

    Hydrological data for assessing the regime of temporary rivers are often non-existent or scarce. The scarcity of flow data makes impossible to characterize the hydrological regime of temporary streams and, in consequence, to select the correct periods and methods to determine their ecological status. This is why the TREHS software is being developed, in the framework of the LIFE Trivers project. It will help managers to implement adequately the European Water Framework Directive in this kind of water body. TREHS, using the methodology described in Gallart et al. (2012), defines six transient 'aquatic states', based on hydrological conditions representing different mesohabitats, for a given reach at a particular moment. Because of its qualitative nature, this approach allows using alternative methodologies to assess the regime of temporary rivers when there are no observed flow data. These methods, based on interviews and high-resolution aerial photographs, were tested for estimating the aquatic regime of temporary rivers. All the gauging stations (13) belonging to the Catalan Internal Catchments (NE Spain) with recurrent zero-flow periods were selected to validate this methodology. On the one hand, non-structured interviews were conducted with inhabitants of villages near the gauging stations. On the other hand, the historical series of available orthophotographs were examined. Flow records measured at the gauging stations were used to validate the alternative methods. Flow permanence in the reaches was estimated reasonably by the interviews and adequately by aerial photographs, when compared with the values estimated using daily flows. The degree of seasonality was assessed only roughly by the interviews. The recurrence of disconnected pools was not detected by flow records but was estimated with some divergences by the two methods. The combination of the two alternative methods allows substituting or complementing flow records, to be updated in the future through

  10. Potential impacts to freshwater ecosystems caused by flow regime alteration under changing climate conditions in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, J.-P.

    2008-11-01

    Observed increases in the Earth's surface temperature bring with them associated changes in precipitation and atmospheric moisture that consequentially alter river flow regimes. This paper uses the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration approach to examine climate-induced flow regime changes that can potentially affect freshwater ecosystems. Analyses of the annual extreme water conditions at 23 gauging stations throughout Taiwan reveal large alterations in recent years; extreme flood and drought events were more frequent in the period after 1991 than from 1961 1990, and the frequency and duration of the flood and drought events also show high fluctuation. Climate change forecasts suggest that such flow regime alterations are going to continue into the foreseeable future. Aquatic organisms not only feel the effects of anthropogenic damage to river systems, but they also face on-going threats of thermal and flow regime alterations associated with climate change. This paper calls attention to the issue, so that water resources managers can take precautionary measures that reduce the cumulative effects from anthropogenic influence and changing climate conditions.

  11. Flow regime alterations under changing climate in two river basins: Implications for freshwater ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibson, C.A.; Meyer, J.L.; Poff, N.L.; Hay, L.E.; Georgakakos, A.

    2005-01-01

    We examined impacts of future climate scenarios on flow regimes and how predicted changes might affect river ecosystems. We examined two case studies: Cle Elum River, Washington, and Chattahoochee-Apalachicola River Basin, Georgia and Florida. These rivers had available downscaled global circulation model (GCM) data and allowed us to analyse the effects of future climate scenarios on rivers with (1) different hydrographs, (2) high future water demands, and (3) a river-floodplain system. We compared observed flow regimes to those predicted under future climate scenarios to describe the extent and type of changes predicted to occur. Daily stream flow under future climate scenarios was created by either statistically downscaling GCMs (Cle Elum) or creating a regression model between climatological parameters predicted from GCMs and stream flow (Chattahoochee-Apalachicola). Flow regimes were examined for changes from current conditions with respect to ecologically relevant features including the magnitude and timing of minimum and maximum flows. The Cle Elum's hydrograph under future climate scenarios showed a dramatic shift in the timing of peak flows and lower low flow of a longer duration. These changes could mean higher summer water temperatures, lower summer dissolved oxygen, and reduced survival of larval fishes. The Chattahoochee-Apalachicola basin is heavily impacted by dams and water withdrawals for human consumption; therefore, we made comparisons between pre-large dam conditions, current conditions, current conditions with future demand, and future climate scenarios with future demand to separate climate change effects and other anthropogenic impacts. Dam construction, future climate, and future demand decreased the flow variability of the river. In addition, minimum flows were lower under future climate scenarios. These changes could decrease the connectivity of the channel and the floodplain, decrease habitat availability, and potentially lower the ability

  12. Flow of a thin liquid film coating a horizontal stationary cylinder.

    PubMed

    Cachile, M; Aguirre, M A; Lenschen, M; Calvo, A

    2013-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the flow of liquid films around a stationary horizontal cylinder is reported. The film presents two different behaviors: The flow is stable in the upper zone (up to ∼150° with the vertical) and Rayleigh-Taylor-like instabilities appear in the lower zone. For the stable region, film thickness evolution could be described by numerically integrating an evolution equation obtained using a lubrication approximation. For the unstable region, a linear stability analysis allows us to determine the maximum growth wavelength for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Approximate analytical solutions were obtained for generatrices at an angle with the vertical θ=0 (stable region) and θ=π (where the instability appears).

  13. Laminar forced convection from a rotating horizontal cylinder in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Prabul; Venugopal, G.; Jaleel, H. Abdul; Rajkumar, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    The influence of non-dimensional rotational velocity, flow Reynolds number and Prandtl number of the fluid on laminar forced convection from a rotating horizontal cylinder subject to constant heat flux boundary condition is numerically investigated. The numerical simulations have been conducted using commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics package CFX available in ANSYS Workbench 14. Results are presented for the non-dimensional rotational velocity α ranging from 0 to 4, flow Reynolds number from 25 to 40 and Prandtl number of the fluid from 0.7 to 5.4. The rotational effects results in reduction in heat transfer compared to heat transfer from stationary heated cylinder due to thickening of boundary layer as consequence of the rotation of the cylinder. Heat transfer rate increases with increase in Prandtl number of the fluid.

  14. Flow boiling heat transfer characteristics of methane in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Gong, M. Q.; Chen, G. F.; Sun, Z. H.; Wu, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Forced two-phase flow boiling heat transfer coefficients of methane through a smooth horizontal tube with an inner diameter of 6 mm were measured. Experimental investigations were carried out at a particular set of test variables with the pressure range from 0.3 MPa to 0.6 MPa, heat flux range from 5 kW/m2 to 63 kW/m2, mass flux from 110 kg/m2-s to 275 kg/m2-s, and the vapor quality from 0 to 0.25. The influences of different experimental parameters on the flow boiling heat transfer coefficient were discussed. The data were also compared against ten heat transfer coefficient predictive methods. The correlations suggested by Kew-Conwell and Lazarek-Black both show good agreements with a mean absolute relative deviation less than 10%, and over 95% points within an error bandwidth of ±30.0%.

  15. Intensified nitrate and phosphorus removal in an electrolysis -integrated horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y; Xie, Y W; Zhang, Q; Wang, A L; Yu, Y X; Yang, L Y

    2017-01-01

    A novel electrolysis-integrated horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland system (E-HFCWs) was developed for intensified removal of nitrogen and phosphorus contaminated water. The dynamics of nitrogen and phosphorus removal and that of main water qualities of inflow and outflow were also evaluated. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) greatly enhanced nitrate removal when the electrolysis current intensity was stabilized at 0.07 mA/cm(2). When the HRT ranged from 2 h to 12 h, the removal rate of nitrate increased from 20% to 84%. Phosphorus (P) removal was also greatly enhanced-exceeding 90% when the HRT was longer than 4 h in the electrolysis-integrated HFCWs. This improved P removal is due to the in-situ formation of ferric ions by anodizing of sacrificial iron anodes, causing chemical precipitation, physical adsorption and flocculation of phosphorus. Thus, electrolysis plays an important role in nitrate and phosphorus removal. The diversity and communities of bacteria in the biofilm of substrate was established by the analysis of 16S rDNA gene sequences, and the biofilm was abundant with Comamonadaceae and Xanthomonadaceae bacteria in E-HFCWs. Test results illustrated that the electrolysis integrated with horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland is a feasible and effective technology for intensified nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Numerical analysis of the flow field in a sloshing tank with a horizontal perforated plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Heng; Liu, Yong; Li, Huajun; Fu, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Liquid sloshing is a type of free surface flow inside a partially filled water tank. Sloshing exerts a significant effect on the safety of liquid transport systems; in particular, it may cause large hydrodynamic loads when the frequency of the tank motion is close to the natural frequency of the tank. Perforated plates have recently been used to suppress the violent movement of liquids in a sloshing tank at resonant conditions. In this study, a numerical model based on OpenFOAM (Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation), an open source computed fluid dynamic code, is used to investigate resonant sloshing in a swaying tank with a submerged horizontal perforated plate. The numerical results of the free surface elevations are first verified using experimental data, and then the flow characteristics around the perforated plate and the fluid velocity distribution in the entire tank are examined using numerical examples. The results clearly show differences in sloshing motions under first-order and third-order resonant frequencies. This study provides a better understanding of the energy dissipation mechanism of a horizontal perforated plate in a swaying tank.

  17. Dairy farm wastewater treatment using horizontal subsurface flow wetlands with Typha domingensis and different substrates.

    PubMed

    Schierano, María Celeste; Maine, María Alejandra; Panigatti, María Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of different substrates in the performance of a horizontal flow constructed wetland employed in dairy farm wastewater treatment. Typha domingensis was chosen for this study due to its high productivity and efficiency in nutrient removal. Fifteen microcosm-scale reactors simulating horizontal flow constructed wetlands were disposed in a greenhouse in triplicate. Five substrates (river gravel, gravel, LECA, river gravel + zeolite and gravel + zeolite) were evaluated. Real effluent with previous treatment was used. Dairy farm effluents favoured T. domingensis growth, probably due to their high nutrient concentrations. The treatments with the different substrates studied were efficient in the treatment of the dairy farm effluent obtaining ammonium ([Formula: see text]) and total phosphorus (TP) removals between 88-99% and 86-99%, respectively. Removal efficiencies were significantly higher in treatments using LECA and combined substrate (gravel + zeolite). After treatment, the quality of the final effluent was significantly improved. Outlet effluent complied with regulations and could be discharged into the environment.

  18. Flow switchability of motions in a horizontal impact pair with dry friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Fu, Xilin

    2017-03-01

    Using the flow switchability theory of the discontinuous dynamical systems, the present paper is to develop mechanical complexity in a periodic-excited horizontal impact pair with dry friction. The impact pair studied models the motions of a single bolted connection which is vibrated in the plane perpendicular to the bolt axis. According to motion character, the phase space can be partitioned into several domains and boundaries, in which a continuous dynamical system is defined in each domain, and it possesses dynamical properties different from its adjacent subsystem, the boundaries have different properties and can fall into two kinds - displacement boundaries and velocity boundaries. In this paper, using G-functions defined on separation boundaries to study flow switching on corresponding boundaries, the analytical switching conditions on each boundary are developed: the sufficient and necessary conditions of occurrence and disappearance of sliding-stick motion and side-stick motion are obtained, the sufficient and necessary conditions of grazing motion appearing on velocity boundaries are also obtained, and the analytical conditions of appearance for grazing motion on displacement boundaries are preliminarily discussed. Thus it can be seen that dynamical behaviors of the horizontal impact pair with or without dry friction are essentially different, in particular flow switchability on displacement boundaries depend on whether the conditions of passable flows on velocity boundaries are satisfied. The numerical simulations are given to demonstrate the analytical results of two stick motions and grazing motions in such pair. More details of the motions for the object reaching the intersection point of displacement boundary and velocity boundary need to be considered further in the future.

  19. Reservoir simulation with MUFITS code: Extension for double porosity reservoirs and flows in horizontal wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    Numerical modelling of multiphase flows in porous medium is necessary in many applications concerning subsurface utilization. An incomplete list of those applications includes oil and gas fields exploration, underground carbon dioxide storage and geothermal energy production. The numerical simulations are conducted using complicated computer programs called reservoir simulators. A robust simulator should include a wide range of modelling options covering various exploration techniques, rock and fluid properties, and geological settings. In this work we present a recent development of new options in MUFITS code [1]. The first option concerns modelling of multiphase flows in double-porosity double-permeability reservoirs. We describe internal representation of reservoir models in MUFITS, which are constructed as a 3D graph of grid blocks, pipe segments, interfaces, etc. In case of double porosity reservoir, two linked nodes of the graph correspond to a grid cell. We simulate the 6th SPE comparative problem [2] and a five-spot geothermal production problem to validate the option. The second option concerns modelling of flows in porous medium coupled with flows in horizontal wells that are represented in the 3D graph as a sequence of pipe segments linked with pipe junctions. The well completions link the pipe segments with reservoir. The hydraulics in the wellbore, i.e. the frictional pressure drop, is calculated in accordance with Haaland's formula. We validate the option against the 7th SPE comparative problem [3]. We acknowledge financial support by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No RFBR-15-31-20585). References [1] Afanasyev, A. MUFITS Reservoir Simulation Software (www.mufits.imec.msu.ru). [2] Firoozabadi A. et al. Sixth SPE Comparative Solution Project: Dual-Porosity Simulators // J. Petrol. Tech. 1990. V.42. N.6. P.710-715. [3] Nghiem L., et al. Seventh SPE Comparative Solution Project: Modelling of Horizontal Wells in Reservoir Simulation

  20. Relationship between first-order decay coefficients in ponds, for plug flow, CSTR and dispersed flow regimes.

    PubMed

    von, Sperling M

    2002-01-01

    Adequate consideration of the hydraulic regime of a pond is essential in the analysis of BOD and coliform removal, and considerable divergence exists in the literature when reporting removal coefficients. This paper aims at integrating the existing approaches, by quantifying the relationship between the first-order removal coefficients K from the three main hydraulic regimes (CSTR, plug flow and dispersed flow) adopted in the design and performance evaluation of ponds. Based on theoretical considerations and statistical regression analyses, the relationship between the K values is investigated, quantified and modelled. Two tables are presented and two equations are proposed, which allow conversion of K values obtained for dispersed flow to (a) K for CSTR and (b) K for plug flow, based on the hydraulic detention time t and the dispersion number d. These coefficients, when applied in the CSTR or plug-flow equations, will give approximately the same prediction of the effluent concentration as that obtained when using the dispersed-flow model with its proper coefficient. With this approach designers can apply, and researchers can report, K values for the two idealised flow patterns (CSTR and plug flow).

  1. Prediction of the multicellular flow regime of natural convection in fenestration glazing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Goss, W.P.; Curcija, D.

    1997-12-31

    In this work, gas-filled tall rectangular cavities, typically found in insulating glazing units (IGUs) of fenestration systems, with constant temperatures at the side walls and zero heat flux at the top and bottom, were investigated. Critical Rayleigh numbers, Ra{sub c}, at which multicellular flow begins to form were determined for aspect ratios from 10.7 to 80. Using a general-purpose fluid flow and heat transfer finite-element analysis computer program (FDI 1993), numerical calculations were performed over the range of aspect ratios, A, from 10 to 80 with Rayleigh numbers, Ra, varying within the laminar flow regime. The calculations revealed that for aspect ratios between 10.7 and 30, the multicellular flow pattern dies out before the flow enters the turbulent flow regime. In addition, the lowest aspect ratio at which multicellular flow patterns existed was 10.7, which is lower than the lowest limit (A = 12) published by other researchers. The resulting critical Rayleigh numbers are plotted on a graph as a function of the aspect ratio and the Rayleigh numbers. The overall heat transfer results in terms of the average, or integrated, Nusselt numbers, Nu, are compared with available numerical and experimental data on multicellular flow in rectangular cavities, and good agreement was found. Also, streamline contour plots and temperature profiles are plotted for selected cases.

  2. Assessment of the natural flow regime in a Mediterranean river impacted from irrigated agriculture.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, Konstantinos; Panagopoulos, Yiannis; Psomas, Alexandros; Mimikou, Maria

    2016-12-15

    Over the last few decades, the natural flow regime of most rivers has been significantly altered influencing the ecological integrity and functioning of river ecosystems. Especially in the Mediterranean region, irrigated agriculture is considered one of the most important drivers of hydro-morphological modifications in river systems. In this study we employ the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) methodology for the Pinios River and its tributaries, located in a Mediterranean catchment in central Greece, with the purpose to assess the natural flow regime under a simulated no-agriculture scenario and compare with the current situation. The work is based on the use of the SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool) model for the simulation of long time series of daily stream flows, which were analyzed under the actual conditions (baseline), and the hypothetical scenario. The key characteristics of the flow regime projected under each model run were assessed through the implementation of the IHA methodology that utilizes a number of indicators to characterize the intra- and inter-annual variability in the hydrologic conditions. The results of this study revealed that without agricultural activities in the catchment, annual and monthly flows would increase, with significant alterations in the flow characteristics of the winter months, and much smaller in summer. However, the analysis showed that the frequency of droughts and low flow summer events would be smaller. The article provides a comprehensive and easy-to-implement methodology that can facilitate the impact assessment of agricultural human activities on river flow variability under the typical Mediterranean conditions, allowing experimentation on setting river flow thresholds required for a good ecological status within the context of the European Water Framework Directive.

  3. Effect of intermolecular potential on compressible Couette flow in slip and transitional regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Andrew B.; Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of intermolecular potentials on compressible, planar flow in slip and transitional regimes is investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Two intermolecular interaction models, the variable hard sphere (VHS) and the Lennard-Jones (LJ) models, are first compared for subsonic and supersonic Couette flows of argon at temperatures of 40, 273, and 1,000 K, and then for Couette flows in the transitional regime ranging from Knudsen numbers (Kn) of 0.0051 to 1. The binary scattering model for elastic scattering using the Lennard-Jones (LJ) intermolecular potential proposed recently [A. Venkattraman and A. Alexeenko, "Binary scattering model for Lennard-Jones potential: Transport coefficients and collision integrals for non-equilibrium gas flow simulations," Phys. Fluids 24, 027101 (2012)] is shown to accurately reproduce both the theoretical collision frequency in an equilibrium gas as well as the theoretical viscosity variation with temperature. The use of a repulsive-attractive instead of a purely repulsive potential is found to be most important in the continuum and slip regimes as well as in flows with large temperature variations. Differences in shear stress of up to 28% between the VHS and LJ models is observed at Kn=0.0051 and is attributed to differences in collision frequencies, ultimately affecting velocity gradients at the wall. For Kn=1 where the Knudsen layer expands the entire domain, the effect of the larger collision frequency in the LJ model relative to VHS diminishes, and a 7% difference in shear stress is observed.

  4. Upper flow-regime structures in a Pleistocene carbonate ramp (Favignana, Italy): diagnostic criteria and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slootman, Arnoud; Cartigny, Matthieu; de Boer, Poppe; Moscariello, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    This work presents key diagnostic criteria for the recognition of upper flow-regime sedimentary structures in clastic cool-water carbonate accumulations, illustrated by the excellent exposures of the Pleistocene carbonate ramp succession of Favignana Island (Italy). Cool-water carbonate sedimentation has dominated Mediterranean shelves since the Early Pliocene. Of the various types of marine limestones, cool-water carbonates behave most similar to siliciclastics. They typically develop ramp morphologies with skeletal sand and gravel, consisting of the remains of heterozoan organisms. Resedimentation of this loose carbonate debris during high-energy events such as storms and, more rarely, tsunamis is the norm. Off-ramp supercritical sediment density flows are important contributors to basinward sediment transport as evidenced by the prevalence of backset-stratification bounded by composite erosion surfaces, locally defining spoon-shaped scours-fills, in beds exceeding several metres in thickness. Sedimentary structures created by upper flow-regime bedforms like antidunes, chute-and-pools and cyclic steps as seen on Favignana Island, which form in association with in-phase waves and hydraulic jumps, are not commonly mentioned in carbonate ramp depositional models. For each of the bedforms we present diagnostic criteria to explain otherwise enigmatic sedimentary structures. Thick beds deposited by supercritical sediment density flows have major implications for the distribution of porosity and permeability in carbonate sandstone bodies, especially where they host hydrocarbon and/or water accumulations. The correct identification of upper flow-regime sedimentary structures in carbonate ramp accumulations is therefore important.

  5. Mathematical modelling of Liquid -Liquid extraction in the slug flow regime in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramji, Sundari; Bhagavatula, Dinesh; Rakesh, Arjun; Pushpavanam, S.

    2016-11-01

    Mixing in the slug flow regime in microchannels is enhanced by the presence of internal circulations induced by shear due to wall. This helps improve mass transfer in this flow regime. We exploit the low Re characteristic of the flow and seek a numerical solution to understand the structure of the vortex patterns formed in the two phases in the slug flow regime. We study liquid-liquid extraction in the system to determine the improvement in mass transfer. The system was analyzed for two cases when there is (i) no film surrounding the slug (ii) a thin film surrounding the slug. The 2D governing equations for fluid flow are solved using two approaches: a) a stream function formulation based on finite differences b) primitive variable formulation with the Chebyshev collocation method. The effect of viscosity ratio, slug length and film thickness on the vortex structure were studied. While secondary vortices were induced in the less viscous phase in the case where the thin film is absent, they are always generated in the slug irrespective of the viscosity ratio in the case where the film is present. The species balance equation was then solved numerically using two approaches: a) an Alternating Direction Explicit method and b) the Locally One Dimensional splitting technique. The effect of varying Peclet number from 0 to 104 on the solute transfer from the slug to the continuous phase was studied. The extraction performance is analyzed in terms of extraction efficiency and mass transfer coefficient.

  6. Characterizing effects of hydropower plants on sub-daily flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano, María Dolores; Sordo-Ward, Álvaro; Alonso, Carlos; Nilsson, Christer

    2017-07-01

    A characterization of short-term changes in river flow is essential for understanding the ecological effects of hydropower plants, which operate by turning the turbines on or off to generate electricity following variations in the market demand (i.e., hydropeaking). The goal of our study was to develop an approach for characterizing the effects of hydropower plant operations on within-day flow regimes across multiple dams and rivers. For this aim we first defined ecologically meaningful metrics that provide a full representation of the flow regime at short time scales from free-flowing rivers and rivers exposed to hydropeaking. We then defined metrics that enable quantification of the deviation of the altered short-term flow regime variables from those of the unaltered state. The approach was successfully tested in two rivers in northern Sweden, one free-flowing and another regulated by cascades of hydropower plants, which were additionally classified based on their impact on short-term flows in sites of similar management. The largest differences between study sites corresponded to metrics describing sub-daily flow magnitudes such as amplitude (i.e., difference between the highest and the lowest hourly flows) and rates (i.e., rise and fall rates of hourly flows). They were closely followed by frequency-related metrics accounting for the numbers of within-day hourly flow patterns (i.e., rises, falls and periods of stability of hourly flows). In comparison, between-site differences for the duration-related metrics were smallest. In general, hydropeaking resulted in higher within-day flow amplitudes and rates and more but shorter periods of a similar hourly flow patterns per day. The impacted flow feature and the characteristics of the impact (i.e., intensity and whether the impact increases or decreases whatever is being described by the metric) varied with season. Our approach is useful for catchment management planning, defining environmental flow targets

  7. Zero-G experiments in two-phase fluids flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; King, C. D.; Littles, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The two-phase flows studied were liquid and gas mixtures in a straight flow channel of circular cross-section. Boundaries between flow regimes have been defined for normogravity on coordinates of gas quality and total mass velocity; and, when combined with boundary expressions having a Froude number term, an analytical model was derived predicting boundary shifts with changes in gravity level. Experiments with air and water were performed, first in the normogravity environment of a ground laboratory and then in 'zero gravity' aboard a KC-135 aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. Data reduction confirmed regime boundary shifts in the direction predicted, although the magnitude was a little less than predicted. Pressure drop measurements showed significant increases for the low gravity condition.

  8. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacks, Daniel H.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Arias, Paul G.; Im, Hong G.

    2016-12-01

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H2-air flames with an equivalence ratio ϕ =0.7 . It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P ,Q , and R ) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  9. Effects of flow regime on stream turbidity and suspended solids after wildfire, Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Writer, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Wildfires occur frequently in the Colorado Front Range and can alter the hydrological response of watersheds, yet little information exists on the impact of flow regime and storm events on post-wildfire water quality. The flow regime in the region is characterized by base-flow conditions during much of the year and increased runoff during spring snowmelt and summer convective storms. The impact of snowmelt and storm events on stream discharge and water quality was evaluated for about a year after a wildfire near Boulder, Colorado, USA. During spring snowmelt and low-intensity storms, differences in discharge and turbidity at sites upstream and downstream from the burned areas were minimal. However, high-intensity convective storms resulted in dramatic increases in discharge and turbidity at sites downstream from the burned area. This study highlights the importance of using high-frequency sampling to assess accurately wildfire impacts on water quality downstream.

  10. Zero-G experiments in two-phase fluids flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; King, C. D.; Littles, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The two-phase flows studied were liquid and gas mixtures in a straight flow channel of circular cross-section. Boundaries between flow regimes have been defined for normogravity on coordinates of gas quality and total mass velocity; and, when combined with boundary expressions having a Froude number term, an analytical model was derived predicting boundary shifts with changes in gravity level. Experiments with air and water were performed, first in the normogravity environment of a ground laboratory and then in 'zero gravity' aboard a KC-135 aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. Data reduction confirmed regime boundary shifts in the direction predicted, although the magnitude was a little less than predicted. Pressure drop measurements showed significant increases for the low gravity condition.

  11. A positron emission particle tracking investigation of the flow regimes in tumbling mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, I.; Pathmathas, T.

    2017-01-01

    Using positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) data we recover key granular rheology ingredients (velocity, shear rate, volume concentration, bed depth) for developing, testing and calibrating granular flow models. In this regard, 5 mm glass beads were rotated within a 476 mm diameter mill fitted with angled lifter bars along the inner azimuthal walls and operated in batch mode across a range of drum rotation speeds that span cascading and cataracting Froude regimes. After averaging the PEPT outputs into representative volume elements, subsequent continuum analysis of the flowing layer revealed a rich coexistence of flow regimes: a quasi-static layer dominated by frictional interactions, a dense, liquid-like layer that is stressed by frictional and collisional interactions, and an inertial layer that interacts mainly through collisions. Combining the inertial number with an empirically formulated dilatancy law and the measured granular rheological ingredients then facilitated the recovery of the total depth-dependent pressure of the free surface layer.

  12. Design configurations affecting flow pattern and solids accumulation in horizontal free water and subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, A; Sidrach-Cardona, R; Sánchez, J C; Carretero, J; Garfi, M; Bécares, E

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different horizontal constructed wetland (CW) design parameters on solids distribution, loss of hydraulic conductivity over time and hydraulic behaviour, in order to assess clogging processes in wetlands. For this purpose, an experimental plant with eight CWs was built at mesocosm scale. Each CW presented a different design characteristic, and the most common CW configurations were all represented: free water surface flow (FWS) with different effluent pipe locations, FWS with floating macrophytes and subsurface flow (SSF), and the presence of plants and specific species (Typha angustifolia and Phragmites australis) was also considered. The loss of the hydraulic conductivity of gravel was greatly influenced by the presence of plants and organic load (representing a loss of 20% and c.a. 10% in planted wetlands and an overloaded system, respectively). Cattail seems to have a greater effect on the development of clogging since its below-ground biomass weighed twice as much as that of common reed. Hydraulic behaviour was greatly influenced by the presence of a gravel matrix and the outlet pipe position. In strict SSF CW, the water was forced to cross the gravel and tended to flow diagonally from the top inlet to the bottom outlet (where the inlet and outlet pipes were located). However, when FWS was considered, water preferentially flowed above the gravel, thus losing half the effective volume of the system. Only the presence of plants seemed to help the water flow partially within the gravel matrix.

  13. Characterising temporary streams' regimes using qualitative "aquatic states" instead of quantitative flow measures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, F.; Prat, N.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of the biological communities found in stream reaches is currently used for the assessment of the quality of stream waters. Nevertheless, in temporary streams, these communities are largely varying in time, strongly depending on the occurrence of the sets of aquatic mesohabitats determined by the hydrological conditions (hereafter called Aquatic States). Particularly, the interruption of the flow in a stream, or even its total desiccation, plays a determinant role in their ecological communities so much so that temporary streams should be considered a distinct class of ecosystems instead of simply hydrologically challenged permanent streams. Within the EU MIRAGE project (grant FP7 n° 211732), two complementary tools have been developed to analyse and characterise the regime of temporary streams: the Aquatic States Frequency Graph (ASFG) that shows the monthly frequency of occurrence of the diverse Aquatic States throughout the year, and the Temporary Stream Regime Plot (TSRP) that maps the value of two metrics that describe respectively the relative number of months with flow per year (Mf) and the seasonal predictability of the zero-flow periods (Sd6). The ASFG allows a rapid appraisal of the stream regime relevant for the development of the aquatic life and is useful for anticipating the sampling calendars but is somewhat dependent of the subjective criteria of the observer. On the contrary, the TSRP manages much less information but allows the comparison and classification of the regimes and is based on the more objective criterion of the presence-absence of flow. In the case of lack of observations, rainfall-runoff models may be used to develop these analyses, although a threshold value for zero flow must be assessed as models usually do not simulate the absence of flow.

  14. Flow characteristics of two immiscible liquid layers subjected to a horizontal temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo; Nishio, Masahiro; Okamoto, Koji; Madarame, Haruki

    2002-10-01

    Marangoni convection, driven by an interfacial instability due to a surface tension gradient, presents a significant problem in crystal growth in normal microgravity environments. It is important to suppress and control the convection phenomenon for better material processing, especially in crystal growth by the liquid encapsulated Czochralski or liquid encapsulated floating zone techniques, in which the melt is encapsulated in an immiscible medium. Marangoni convection can occur on the liquid-liquid interface and on the gas-liquid free surface. Buoyancy driven convection can also affect and complicate the flow. In the study we report here, experiments were carried out with two liquid layers, silicone oil and fluorinert, in an open and enclosed rectangular cavity. The flow in the cavity was subjected to a horizontal temperature gradient. The interactive flow near the liquid-liquid interface was measured by the particle image velocimetry technique. The measured flow field is in agreement with numerical predictions. Free surface fluctuations with several dominant frequencies were also measured.

  15. Visualization and flow boiling heat transfer of hydrocarbons in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhuqiang; Bi, Qincheng; Guo, Yong; Liu, Zhaohui; Yan, Jianguo

    2013-07-01

    Visualizations of a specific hydrocarbon fuel in a horizontal tube with 2.0 mm inside diameter were investigated. The experiments were conducted at mass velocity of 213.4, 426.5 and 640.2 kg/ (m2ṡs), diabatic lengths of 140, 240 and 420 mm under the pressure from 2.0-2.7 MPa. In the sub-pressure conditions, bubbly, intermittent, stratified-wave, churn and annular flow patterns were observed. The frictional pressure drops were also measured to distinguish the patterns. The development of flow patterns and frictional pressure drop were positively related to the mass velocity and the heat flux. However, the diabatic length of the tube takes an important part in the process. The residence time of the fluid does not only affect the transition of the patterns but influence the composition of the fuel manifested by the fuel color and carbon deposit. The special observational phenomenon was obtained for the supercritical pressure fluid. The flow in the tube became fuzzier and pressure drop changed sharply near the pseudocritical point. The flow boiling heat transfer characteristics of the hydrocarbons were also discussed respectively. The curve of critical heat flux about onset of nucleate boiling was plotted with different mass velocities and diabatic tube lengths. And heat transfer characteristics of supercritical fuel were proved to be better than that in subcritical conditions.

  16. Centrifugal scaling of isothermal gas-liquid flows in horizontal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraets, Jacques Joseph Marie

    1986-05-01

    To test the similarity criteria of two-phase gas-liquid flows, arising from the governing equations and boundary conditions, the flow of air and a water-glycerine mixture in a 50 mm diameter horizontal tube is compared with a two-phase flow of helium and water in a 5 mm diameter tube rotating around a parallel vertical axis (the effective gravity is 113 g0). Results emphasize that in general only dimensionless correlations provide meaningful predictions. The homogeneous Dukler case 1 (1964b) correlation, which contains no two-phase information, provides the best fit (the standard deviation is 21%) with the measured pressure drops. For predicting flow pattern the most promising approach is that of Taitel and Dukler (1976). Examples of scaling down large diameter, high pressure pipelines are presented. With a scale factor of 1/30 equality of the Froude number, the gas-liquid density ratio, and either the Reynolds number or the Weber number can be realized. Compressibility and gas viscosity are not properly scaled.

  17. Experiments and simulations of oil-water flows in horizontal pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Hernandes, Roberto; Wright, Stuart; Xie, Zhihua; Markides, Christos; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    The extraction of detailed information (e.g. velocity and turbulent data) in the flow of two immiscible liquid phases in horizontal pipes is of great importance for the fundamental understanding of the in situ hydrodynamics (and transport properties) of these flows, and the validation and improvement of advanced multiphase flow models. This detailed flow information can be obtained by the application of advanced laser-based diagnostic techniques, such as Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), however, the difference in the refractive index between the most relevant test fluids (oil, water) prevents the extraction of accurate information simultaneously in both phases, especially when the phases begin to develop interfacial instabilities, droplets and dispersions. In this work, a simultaneous, combined two-line technique is employed to obtain spatiotemporally resolved information in a 32 mm ID quartz pipe in terms of liquid phase distributions, velocity profiles and turbulence measurements. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations carried out using the Fluidity code based on control-volume, finite-elements, and adaptive, unstructured meshing. Funding from BP (for R-IH), Cameron (for SW), and the EPSRC UK through the MEMPHIS programme (Grant Number EP/K0039761/1) is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme for steady state solutions in all flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yajun; Zhong, Chengwen; Xu, Kun

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS) for non-equilibrium steady state flow computation. The UGKS is a direct modeling method for flow simulation in all regimes with the updates of both macroscopic flow variables and microscopic gas distribution function. By solving the macroscopic equations implicitly, a predicted equilibrium state can be obtained first through iterations. With the newly predicted equilibrium state, the evolution equation of the gas distribution function and the corresponding collision term can be discretized in a fully implicit way for fast convergence through iterations as well. The lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) factorization method is implemented to solve both macroscopic and microscopic equations, which improves the efficiency of the scheme. Since the UGKS is a direct modeling method and its physical solution depends on the mesh resolution and the local time step, a physical time step needs to be fixed before using an implicit iterative technique with a pseudo-time marching step. Therefore, the physical time step in the current implicit scheme is determined by the same way as that in the explicit UGKS for capturing the physical solution in all flow regimes, but the convergence to a steady state speeds up through the adoption of a numerical time step with large CFL number. Many numerical test cases in different flow regimes from low speed to hypersonic ones, such as the Couette flow, cavity flow, and the flow passing over a cylinder, are computed to validate the current implicit method. The overall efficiency of the implicit UGKS can be improved by one or two orders of magnitude in comparison with the explicit one.

  19. Evaluating the Effects of Horizontal Spatial Discretization on Interflow in the Soil Zone Using the Richards and Groundwater Flow Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, W.; Niswonger, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    In many mountainous regions, a large proportion of streamflow originates as shallow subsurface storm flow (interflow) within the shallow soils of hillslopes. Infiltration can accumulate to form perched groundwater within the upper few meters of the soil horizon that drains to streams through both macropores and soil-matrix. Richards Equation has become a commonly used governing equation for simulating interflow in regional-scale models. Recent research has shown that optimal vertical discretization for Richards Equation near land surface and the water table is much smaller than the discretization typically used in basin-scale hydrologic models, yet little is known about optimal horizontal discretization or potential effects of horizontal discretization on interflow solutions. Most of the work related to the effects of discretization on the solution of Richards Equation has focused on the vertical infiltration problem. This study evaluates horizontal spatial discretization effects on interflow predictions using 1) a modified version of GSFLOW and 2) VS2DT. The modified GSFLOW couples Smith-Parlange 1-D infiltration equations with 3-D unconfined groundwater flow equation, whereas VS2DT uses Richards Equation to represent infiltration and variably saturated flow. Interflow solutions and breakthrough at the stream were compared using a model domain similar to Vauclin and others (1979) with horizontal grid resolutions ranging from 0.05-5m and vertical resolutions ranging between 0.05-1m, with horizontal flow path lengths of 25m to the stream. Variable horizontal spatial resolutions affected VS2DT interflow solutions (RMSE up to 0.12) and interflow breakthrough at the stream, whereas GSFLOW solutions were well correlated (RMSE <0.052). Interflow breakthrough was delayed by up to 10 days with increasing resolution in VS2DT, whereas GSFLOW breakthrough was consistently the same day. Results indicate that the solution of Richards Equation for soil-zone interflow is much

  20. Turbulent flow regime in coiled tubes: local heat-transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzoli, F.; Cattani, L.; Mocerino, A.; Rainieri, S.

    2017-08-01

    Wall curvature represents a widely adopted technique for enhancing heat transfer: the fluid flowing inside a coiled pipe experiences the centrifugal force and this phenomenon induces local maxima in the velocity distribution that locally increase the temperature gradients at the wall by enhancing the heat transfer both in the laminar and in the turbulent flow regime. Consequently, the distribution of the velocity field over the cross-section of the tube is strongly uneven thus leading to significant variations along the circumferential angular coordinate of the convective heat-transfer coefficient at the wall internal surface: in particular, it shows higher values at the outer bend side of the coil than at the inner bend side. The aim of the present work is to estimate experimentally the local convective heat-transfer coefficient at the fluid wall interface in coiled tubes when turbulent flow regime occurs. In particular, the temperature distribution maps on the external coil wall are employed as input data of the inverse heat conduction problem in the wall and a solution approach based on the Tikhonov regularisation is implemented. The results, obtained with water as working fluid, are focused on the fully developed region in the turbulent flow regime in the Reynolds number range of 5000 to 12,000. For the sake of completeness, the overall efficiency of the coiled tubes under test is assessed under a first-law performance evaluation criterion.

  1. Orbiter Aerodynamic Acceleration Flight Measurements in the Rarefied-Flow Transition Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    Acceleration data taken from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) during reentry on STS-62 have been analyzed using calibration factors taken on orbit. This is the first Orbiter mission which collected OARE data during the Orbiter reentry phase. The data examined include the flight regime from orbital altitudes down to about 90 km which covers the free-molecule-flow regime and the upper altitude fringes of the rarefied-flow transition into the hypersonic continuum. Ancillary flight data on Orbiter position, orientation, velocity, and rotation rates have been used in models to transform the measured accelerations to the Orbiter center-of-gravity, from which aerodynamic accelerations along the Orbiter body axes have been calculated. Residual offsets introduced in the measurements by unmodeled Orbiter forces are identified and discussed. Direct comparisons are made between the OARE flight data and an independent micro-gravity accelerometer experiment, the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), which also obtained flight data on reentry during the mission down to about 95 km. The resulting OARE aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's body axis, aid the normal to axial acceleration ratio in the free-molecule-flow and transition-flow regimes are presented and compared with numerical simulations from three direct simulation Monte Carlo codes.

  2. Numerical and Experimental Studies of the Natural Convection Flow Within a Horizontal Cylinder Subjected to a Uniformly Cold Wall Boundary Condition. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Poly. Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Numberical solutions are obtained for the quasi-compressible Navier-Stokes equations governing the time dependent natural convection flow within a horizontal cylinder. The early time flow development and wall heat transfer is obtained after imposing a uniformly cold wall boundary condition on the cylinder. Solutions are also obtained for the case of a time varying cold wall boundary condition. Windware explicit differ-encing is used for the numerical solutions. The viscous truncation error associated with this scheme is controlled so that first order accuracy is maintained in time and space. The results encompass a range of Grashof numbers from 8.34 times 10,000 to 7 times 10 to the 7th power which is within the laminar flow regime for gravitationally driven fluid flows. Experiments within a small scale instrumented horizontal cylinder revealed the time development of the temperature distribution across the boundary layer and also the decay of wall heat transfer with time.

  3. Impacts of water resources development on flow regimes in the Brazos River.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Adrian L; Lopes, Vicente L

    2009-10-01

    The Brazos River, the second largest basin in Texas, represents one of the most highly developed river systems in the state. Thirty-nine reservoirs with capacities greater than 5,000 acre-feet are currently in operation in the basin. Impacts on stream ecosystems are evidenced by changes in flow regimes and resulting changes in fish assemblages over the past 50 years. These changes have been widely attributed to human impacts, through the construction of dams, diversion of water supplies for agricultural and municipal uses, and land use change. However, streamflow regimes result from a complex mix of drivers that include climate, topography, land cover, land use practices, reservoir management practices, dam releases, and water consumption patterns, making determination of anthropogenic impacts problematic. This study quantifies changes in flow regime and probable historical drivers including precipitation, dam construction, population growth, and changing water demand in the Brazos River basin over the past 100 years. Results indicate that the climate of the basin has been relatively stable over the study period, while large-scale changes in human population densities and intense water resources development are correlated with impacts on flow regimes, decreasing the frequency and magnitude of high flow events and stabilizing low flows. These changes have resulted in an increase of habitat generalist fish species, a decrease of native obligate riverine fishes, and an overall homogenization of species assemblages. The results of this study indicate the importance of combining ecological data with an assessment of social drivers for a greater understanding of the dynamics of river basin systems.

  4. Thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Schubert, Gerald; Eichelberger, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes, due to temperature-dependent viscosity and dissipation, was investigated using finite element calculations of magma flow in dikelike channels with length-to-width ratios of 1000:1 or more. Solutions of the steady state equations governing magma flow are obtained for a variety of conditions ranging from idealized plane-parallel models to cases involving nonparallel geometry and two-phase flows. The implications of the numerical simulations for the dynamics of flow in a dike-reservoir system and the consequences of dike entrance conditions on magmatic storage are discussed. Consideration is also given to an unmixing/self-lubrication mechanism which may be important for the lubrication of silicic magmas rising to the earth's surface in mixed magma ascent scenarios, which naturally segregates magma mixtures of two components with differing viscosities to minimize the driving pressure gradient.

  5. Hydrological classification of natural flow regimes to support environmental flow assessments in intensively regulated Mediterranean rivers, Segura River Basin (Spain).

    PubMed

    Belmar, Oscar; Velasco, Josefa; Martinez-Capel, Francisco

    2011-05-01

    Hydrological classification constitutes the first step of a new holistic framework for developing regional environmental flow criteria: the "Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA)". The aim of this study was to develop a classification for 390 stream sections of the Segura River Basin based on 73 hydrological indices that characterize their natural flow regimes. The hydrological indices were calculated with 25 years of natural monthly flows (1980/81-2005/06) derived from a rainfall-runoff model developed by the Spanish Ministry of Environment and Public Works. These indices included, at a monthly or annual basis, measures of duration of droughts and central tendency and dispersion of flow magnitude (average, low and high flow conditions). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated high redundancy among most hydrological indices, as well as two gradients: flow magnitude for mainstream rivers and temporal variability for tributary streams. A classification with eight flow-regime classes was chosen as the most easily interpretable in the Segura River Basin, which was supported by ANOSIM analyses. These classes can be simplified in 4 broader groups, with different seasonal discharge pattern: large rivers, perennial stable streams, perennial seasonal streams and intermittent and ephemeral streams. They showed a high degree of spatial cohesion, following a gradient associated with climatic aridity from NW to SE, and were well defined in terms of the fundamental variables in Mediterranean streams: magnitude and temporal variability of flows. Therefore, this classification is a fundamental tool to support water management and planning in the Segura River Basin. Future research will allow us to study the flow alteration-ecological response relationship for each river type, and set the basis to design scientifically credible environmental flows following the ELOHA framework.

  6. Flow regimes and long-term water exchange of the Himmerfjärden estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engqvist, Anders; Stenström, Petter

    2009-06-01

    A numerical model of processes determining the water exchange encountered in Baltic coastal archipelagos is calibrated and validated against salinity and temperature field data spanning two decades with approximately bi-weekly resolution assessed in the Himmerfjärden estuary. This area is resolved into 17 basins interconnected by 38 individual straits of varying geometrical properties using GIS-based methods. All formulations of the strait exchange flows are free from parameters that need calibration and permit computations of the flow through a strait contraction with or without a coincident sill under a flow classification scheme, of which the first one (a) consists of two groups of multiple layers including aspirated layers from levels beneath the sill crest. The other regimes are as follows. (b) Pure barotropic flow; (c) rotationally controlled flow and (d) plug-flow, which serves as resort solution for flow situations that cannot be solved with (a) and also for computation of the barotropic part of the total flow. For long canals where friction effects act to reduce the flow, a fifth exchange regime is used. The vertical mixing formulation is based on energy balances between supplied wind energy and its work against buoyancy forces. The values of semi-empirical parameters involved in the mixing scheme have been established by calibration against measured data of the first decade period. A statistical evaluation is performed comparing the model results with the measurements of the second decade. It is found that the accuracy of the model is yet limited by the poor temporal resolution in the boundary and the thermal forcing. The overall accuracy of this approach is found to be comparable to earlier model studies in the same area. Since the exchange flows are now based on first principles and are applied to four times more basins, it seems that this more articulated model approach can confidently be applied to more complex archipelago areas.

  7. Using Historic Models of Cn2 to predict r0 and regimes affected by atmospheric turbulence for horizontal, slant and topological paths

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J K; Carrano, C J

    2006-06-20

    Image data collected near the ground, in the boundary layer, or from low altitude planes must contend with the detrimental effects of atmospheric turbulence on the image quality. So it is useful to predict operating regimes (wavelength, height of target, height of detector, total path distance, day vs. night viewing, etc.) where atmospheric turbulence is expected to play a significant role in image degradation. In these regimes, image enhancement techniques such as speckle processing, deconvolution and Wiener filtering methods can be utilized to recover near instrument-limited resolution in degraded images. We conducted a literature survey of various boundary layer and lower troposphere models for the structure coefficient of the index of refraction (C{sub n}{sup 2}). Using these models, we constructed a spreadsheet tool to estimate the Fried parameter (r{sub 0}) for different scenarios, including slant and horizontal path trajectories. We also created a tool for scenarios where the height along the path crudely accounted for the topology of the path. This would be of particular interest in mountain-based viewing platforms surveying ground targets. The tools that we developed utilized Visual Basic{reg_sign} programming in an Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheet environment for accessibility and ease of use. In this paper, we will discuss the C{sub n}{sup 2} profile models used, describe the tools developed and compare the results obtained for the Fried parameter with those estimated from experimental data.

  8. Bacterial transformation and biodegradation processes simulation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands using CWM1-RETRASO.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Esther; Saaltink, Maarten W; Poch, Manel; García, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The performance and reliability of the CWM1-RETRASO model for simulating processes in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSF CWs) and the relative contribution of different microbial reactions to organic matter (COD) removal in a HSSF CW treating urban wastewater were evaluated. Various different approaches with diverse influent configurations were simulated. According to the simulations, anaerobic processes were more widespread in the simulated wetland and contributed to a higher COD removal rate [72-79%] than anoxic [0-1%] and aerobic reactions [20-27%] did. In all the cases tested, the reaction that most contributed to COD removal was methanogenesis [58-73%]. All results provided by the model were in consonance with literature and experimental field observations, suggesting a good performance and reliability of CWM1-RETRASO. According to the good simulation predictions, CWM1-RETRASO is the first mechanistic model able to successfully simulate the processes described by the CWM1 model in HSSF CWs.

  9. Oscillatory modes in the flow between two horizontal corotating cylinders with a partially filled gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, I.; Normand, C.; Peerhossaini, H.; Wesfreid, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    The linear stability of viscous flow between two rotating coaxial horizontal cylinders with a partially filled gap is investigated. It is shown that, for a range of values of the rotation ratio μ, the stability diagram for stationary modes consists of two separate curves connected by an oscillatory branch. For 0.26<μ<0.61 the critical point is on the oscillatory branch. Therefore it can be expected that, at onset, the instability will set in as an oscillatory mode. We have established the existence of codimension-2 points for two particular values of the rotation ratio μ=0.26 and 0.61, where the onset of instability for stationary as well as oscillatory modes occurs for the same value of the Taylor number.

  10. Analytical solutions for flow of horizontal well in compressible, three-dimensional unconsolidated formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Chen, Jun; Li, Long-Xin; Zhou, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    A novel mathematical model for single-phase fluid flow from unconsolidated formations to a horizontal well with the consideration of stress-sensitive permeability is presented. The model assumes the formation permeability is an exponential function of the pore pressure. Using a perturbation technique, the model is solved for either constant pressure or constant flux or infinite lateral boundary conditions with closed top and bottom boundaries. Through Laplace transformation, finite Fourier transformation and numerical inversion methods, the solutions are obtained and the pressure response curves are analyzed. The agreement between the analytical solutions in this paper and the numerical results from commercial software (Saphir) is excellent, which manifests the accuracy of the results derived in this paper.

  11. Free-convection flow past a horizontal surface in a nanofluid with suction/injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Nurul Shahirah Mohd; Arifin, Norihan Md; Bachok, Norfifah; Nazar, Roslinda

    2017-08-01

    The present work deals with the steady free-convection boundary-layer flow past a horizontal permeable surface embedded in a porous medium filled with a nanofluid. The similarity transformation was applied to the governing equations to transform into a system of ordinary differential equations, which are then solved numerically using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order (RKF45) method. Three types of nanoparticles which are titania (TiO2), alumina (Al2O3), and copper (Cu) in the based fluid of water are considered to investigate the effect of the nanoparticle volume fraction parameter, υ. Results are presented and discussed for the local Nusselt number, the surface velocity, the temperature profiles, and the velocity profile. It is found that the imposition of suction/injection has an impact on the velocity profiles and temperature profiles.

  12. Horizontal annular flow modelling using a compositional based interface capturing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhizhua; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Progress on a consistent approach for interface-capturing in which each component represents a different phase/fluid is described. The aim is to develop a general multi-phase modelling approach based on fully-unstructured meshes that can exploit the latest mesh adaptivity methods, and in which each fluid phase may have a number of components. The method is compared against experimental results for a collapsing water column test case and a convergence study is performed. A number of numerical test cases are undertaken to demonstrate the method's ability to model arbitrary numbers of phases with arbitrary equations of state. The method is then used to simulate horizontal annular flows. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  13. Model-based design of horizontal subsurface flow constructed treatment wetlands: a review.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Diederik P L; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; De Pauw, Niels

    2004-03-01

    The increasing application of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment coupled with increasingly strict water quality standards is an ever growing incentive for the development of better process design tools. This paper reviews design models for horizontal subsurface flow constructed treatment wetlands, ranging from simple rules of thumb and regression equations, to the well-known first-order k-C* models, Monod-type equations and more complex dynamic, compartmental models. Especially highlighted in this review are the model constraints and parameter uncertainty. A case study has been used to demonstrate the model output variability and to unravel whether or not more complex but also less manageable models offer a significant advantage to the designer.

  14. Numerical study of the laminar natural convection flow around an array of two horizontal isothermal cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Chouikh, R.; Guizani, A.; Maalej, M.; Belghith, A.

    1999-04-01

    The amount of work accomplished in the area of natural convection heat transfer in interacting flow fields around an array of cylinders has increased in the last years. There is a growing demand for a better understanding of this phenomenon in areas like heat exchangers, electronic devices, solar heating and storing technology among others. Here, natural convection heat transfer from an array of heated cylinders has received attention in recent years. However, most of the previous investigations has been experimental and has been restricted to the influence of geometrical parameters on the overall heat transfer. The present work is devoted to the numerical study of laminar natural convection flow from an array of two horizontal isothermal cylinders. This work, that enters within the framework of general study dealing with an array of several cylinders, states the problem in Cartesian coordinates system, involves the use of a control-volume method and solves the full vorticity transport equation together with the stream function and energy equations. The modifications of the average Nusselt number evolution compared with the single cylinder are explained in terms of velocity and temperature fields of the flow around the cylinders. Results are obtained for variety of combinations of spacing and numbers of Rayleigh.

  15. A mathematical framework for forcing turbulence applied to horizontally homogeneous stratified flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. J.; de Bruyn Kops, S. M.

    2011-06-01

    It is often desirable to study turbulent flows at steady state even if the flow has no inherent source of turbulence kinetic energy. Doing so requires a forcing schema, and various methods applicable to laboratory experiments or numerical simulations have been studied extensively for turbulence that is isotropic and homogeneous in three dimensions. A review of existing schemata for simulations is used to form a framework for more general forcing methods. In this framework, the problem of developing a forcing method is abstracted into the two problems of (1) prescribing the spectrum of the input power and (2) specifying a force that has the desired characteristics and that adds energy to the flow with the correct spectrum. The framework is used to construct three forcing methods for simulating horizontally homogeneous and isotropic, vertically stratified turbulence. They are implemented in a pseudo-spectral large-eddy simulations and their characteristics are analyzed. The framework is then used to characterize existing laboratory experiments. While no exact analogy can be drawn between forcing in esoteric pseudo-spectral simulations and forcing in physical experiments, there are many similarities. It is suggested that the forcing framework can be applied to predict and systematically test the effects of configuration choices made in the design of simulations and laboratory experiments.

  16. Flow adjustment inside large finite-size wind farms approaching the infinite wind farm regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Due to the increasing number and the growing size of wind farms, the distance among them continues to decrease. Thus, it is necessary to understand how these large finite-size wind farms and their wakes could interfere the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and adjacent wind farms. Fully-developed flow inside wind farms has been extensively studied through numerical simulations of infinite wind farms. The transportation of momentum and energy is only vertical and the advection of them is neglected in these infinite wind farms. However, less attention has been paid to examine the length of wind farms required to reach such asymptotic regime and the ABL dynamics in the leading and trailing edges of the large finite-size wind farms. Large eddy simulations are performed in this study to investigate the flow adjustment inside large finite-size wind farms in conventionally-neutral boundary layer with the effect of Coriolis force and free-atmosphere stratification from 1 to 5 K/km. For the large finite-size wind farms considered in the present work, when the potential temperature lapse rate is 5 K/km, the wind farms exceed the height of the ABL by two orders of magnitude for the incoming flow inside the farms to approach the fully-developed regime. An entrance fetch of approximately 40 times of the ABL height is also required for such flow adjustment. At the fully-developed flow regime of the large finite-size wind farms, the flow characteristics match those of infinite wind farms even though they have different adjustment length scales. The role of advection at the entrance and exit regions of the large finite-size wind farms is also examined. The interaction between the internal boundary layer developed above the large finite-size wind farms and the ABL under different potential temperature lapse rates are compared. It is shown that the potential temperature lapse rate plays a role in whether the flow inside the large finite-size wind farms adjusts to the fully

  17. Flow Regime Based Climatologies of Lightning Probabilities for Spaceports and Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Sharp, David; Spratt, Scott; Lafosse, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to provide forecasters with a tool to indicate the warm season climatological probability of one or more lightning strikes within a circle at a site within a specified time interval. This paper described the AMU work conducted in developing flow regime based climatologies of lightning probabilities for the SLF and seven airports in the NWS MLB CWA in east-central Florida. The paper also described the GUI developed by the AMU that is used to display the data for the operational forecasters. There were challenges working with gridded lightning data as well as the code that accompanied the gridded data. The AMU modified the provided code to be able to produce the climatologies of lightning probabilities based on eight flow regimes for 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-n mi circles centered on eight sites in 1-, 3-, and 6-hour increments.

  18. Optimal conditions for chlorothalonil and dissolved organic carbon in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Rìos-Montes, Karina A; Casas-Zapata, Juan C; Briones-Gallardo, Roberto; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2017-01-13

    The most efficient system of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCW) for removing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the presence of chlorothalonil pesticide (CLT) present in synthetic domestic wastewater was determined using the macrophyte Phragmites australis. Two concentrations of CLT (85 and 385 μg L(-1)) and one concentration of glucose (20 mg L(-1)) were evaluated in four pilot scale horizontal surface flow constructed wetlands coupled with two sizes of silica gravel, igneous gravel, fine chalky gravel (3.18-6.35 mm), coarse gravel (12.70-25.40 mm) and two water surface heights (20 and 40 cm). For a month, wetlands were acclimated with domestic wastewater. Some groups of bacteria were also identified in the biofilm attached to the gravel. In each treatment periodic samplings were conducted in the influent and effluent. Chlorothalonil was quantified by gas chromatography (GC-ECD m), DOC by an organic carbon analyzer and bacterial groups using conventional microbiology in accordance with Standard Methods. The largest removals of DOC (85.82%-85.31%) were found when using fine gravel (3.18-6.35 mm) and the lower layer of water (20 cm). The bacterial groups quantified in the biofilm were total heterotrophic, revivable heterotrophic, Pseudomonas and total coliforms. The results of this study indicate that fine grain gravel (3.18-6.35 mm) and both water levels (20 to 40 cm) can be used in the removal of organic matter and for the treatment of agricultural effluents contaminated with organo-chloride pesticides like CLT in HSSFCW.

  19. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images. II. Flow fields in the final stages of sunspot decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Deng, N.; Liu, C.; Shimizu, T.; Wang, H.; Denker, C.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Generation and dissipation of magnetic fields is a fundamental physical process on the Sun. In comparison to flux emergence and the initial stages of sunspot formation, the demise of sunspots still lacks a comprehensive description. Aims: The evolution of sunspots is most commonly discussed in terms of their intensity and magnetic field. Here, we present additional information about the three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of sunspots towards the end of their existence. Methods: We present a subset of multi-wavelengths observations obtained with the Japanese Hinode mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain during the time period 2010 November 18-23. Horizontal proper motions were derived from G-band and Ca ii H images, whereas line-of-sight velocities were extracted from VTT echelle Hα λ656.28 nm spectra and Fe i λ630.25 nm spectral data of the Hinode/Spectro-Polarimeter, which also provided three-dimensional magnetic field information. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO provided continuum images and line-of-sight magnetograms, in addition to the high-resolution observations for the entire disk passage of the active region. Results: We perform a quantitative study of photospheric and chromospheric flow fields in and around decaying sunspots. In one of the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 11126, we observe moat flow and moving magnetic features (MMFs), even after its penumbra had decayed. We also detect a superpenumbral structure around this pore. We find that MMFs follow well-defined, radial paths from the spot all the way to the border of a supergranular cell surrounding the spot. In contrast, flux emergence near the other sunspot prevents the establishment of similar well ordered flow patterns, which could be discerned around a tiny pore of merely 2 Mm diameter. After the disappearance of the sunspots/pores, a coherent patch of abnormal

  20. Study on the two-phase critical flow through a small bottom break in a pressurized horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Moon-Sun

    2008-06-01

    Two-phase critical flow rates through a small bottom break of a pressurized horizontal pipe are calculated by using an improved critical flow model with a well-known quality prediction model. This phenomenon has many difficulties in predicting the two-phase critical flow rate at the break points mainly due to the inaccuracies of the critical flow model as well as the quality prediction model. In this study, the critical flow model is improved as a first step that is based on a new sound speed criterion derived from the hyperbolic two-fluid model for non-equilibrium flow and this model is applied to a system analysis code. Following to a conceptual problem of the vertically upward flow with quality variation, the small bottom break of a pressurized horizontal pipe is simulated and discussed in some detail. From the test results without any adjustment like empirical discharge coefficient, the assessment results on the critical flow test through a small bottom break in a horizontal pipe show that just improving the critical flow model can remarkably reduce the relative error.

  1. Experimental response of Salix cuttings to different flow regimes due to human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, Lorenzo; Signarbieux, Constant; Turberg, Pascal; Buttler, Alexandre; Perona, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Hydropower production and other human activities change the natural flow regime of rivers, in turn impacting the riparian environment. The main challenge in order to define eco-sustainable flows is to quantify the effects in terms of geomorphology and ecosystem adaptation. We present 2-years controlled experiments to investigate riparian vegetation (Salix Viminalis) response to forced water table changing dynamics, from one water regime to another, in a temperate region (Switzerland). Three synthetic flow regimes have been simulated and applied to three batteries of Salix cuttings growing outdoor within plastic pots, each about 1 meter tall. In 2012 one treatment simulated a minimal flow policy for small run-of-river hydropower plants, which drastically impacts the low and the medium-low components of the hydrograph, but not the extremes. In 2013 we confirmed and completed some of 2012 results, by reproducing typical hydropeaking effects due to dam management and focusing on daily water table variations and offsets. For both the seasons, after an initial period where all pots undergone the same oscillations in order to uniform the plants initial conditions, the experiment started, and the water dynamic was changed. Cuttings transitory response dynamics has been quantified by continuous sap flow and water potential measurements, and by regularly collecting growth parameters, as well as leaves photosynthesis, fluorescence, and pictures of each plant. At the end of the experiment, all cuttings were carefully removed and the both above and below ground biomass analyzed in detail. Particularly, the 3D root structure was obtained by High Resolution Computer Tomography. Our analyses revealed a clear dependence between roots distribution and water regime reflecting the need for adaptation, in agreement with field observations of Pasquale et al. (2012). In particular, an initial strong difference in terms of stress and growth performances was then followed by a later

  2. Experimental estimation of the local heat-transfer coefficient in coiled tubes in turbulent flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzoli, F.; Cattani, L.; Mocerino, A.; Rainieri, S.

    2016-09-01

    Wall curvature is a popular heat transfer enhancement technique since it gives origin to the centrifugal force in the fluid: this phenomenon promotes local maxima in the velocity distribution that locally increase the temperature gradients at the wall by enhancing the heat transfer both in the laminar and in the turbulent flow regime. This geometry produces an asymmetrical distribution of the velocity field over the cross-section of the tube which lead to a significant variation in the convective heat-transfer coefficient along the circumferential angular coordinate: it presents higher values at the outer bend side of the wall surface than at the inner bend side. Although the irregular distribution of the heat transfer coefficient may be critical in some industrial applications, most of the authors did not investigate this aspect, mainly due to the practical difficulty of measuring heat flux on internal wall surface of a pipe. In the present investigation the local convective heat-transfer coefficient is experimentally estimated at the fluid-wall interface in coiled tubes when turbulent flow regime occurs; in particular, temperature distribution maps on the external coil wall are employed as input data of the inverse heat conduction problem in the wall and a solution approach based on the Tikhonov regularisation is implemented. The results, obtained with water as working fluid, are focused on the fully developed region in the turbulent flow regime in the Reynolds number range of 5000 to 12000.

  3. Validating alternative methodologies to estimate the hydrological regime of temporary streams when flow data are unavailable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Cid, Núria; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic life in temporary streams is strongly conditioned by the temporal variability of the hydrological conditions that control the occurrence and connectivity of diverse mesohabitats. In this context, the software TREHS (Temporary Rivers' Ecological and Hydrological Status) has been developed, in the framework of the LIFE Trivers project, to help managers for adequately implement the Water Framework Directive in this type of water bodies. TREHS, using the methodology described in Gallart et al (2012), defines six temporal 'aquatic states', based on the hydrological conditions representing different mesohabitats, for a given reach at a particular moment. Nevertheless, hydrological data for assessing the regime of temporary streams are often non-existent or scarce. The scarcity of flow data makes frequently impossible the characterization of temporary streams hydrological regimes and, as a consequence, the selection of the correct periods and methods to determine their ecological status. Because of its qualitative nature, the TREHS approach allows the use of alternative methodologies to assess the regime of temporary streams in the lack of observed flow data. However, to adapt the TREHS to this qualitative data both the temporal scheme (from monthly to seasonal) as well as the number of aquatic states (from 6 to 3) have been modified. Two alternatives complementary methodologies were tested within the TREHS framework to assess the regime of temporary streams: interviews and aerial photographs. All the gauging stations (13) belonging to the Catalan Internal Catchments (NE, Spain) with recurrent zero flows periods were selected to validate both methodologies. On one hand, non-structured interviews were carried out to inhabitants of villages and small towns near the gauging stations. Flow permanence metrics for input into TREHS were drawn from the notes taken during the interviews. On the other hand, the historical series of available aerial photographs (typically 10

  4. Transition to turbulence in a plane plume above a horizontal heat source: Measurement of flow properties and flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shunichi; Yosinobu, Hirowo

    1988-04-01

    Flow properties and flow visualization are measured during the process of transition to turbulence in a natural convection plume above a horizontal line heat source. Streamwise variations of time-mean vertical velocity and temperature on the center plane of the plume suggest the beginning and the end of the transition. Smoke photographs show that a pair of vortices are formed at a certain distance from the source as a result of growth of an anti-symmetric disturbance and break down a short distance downstream. The experimentally obtained profiles of mean temperature show that no similarity holds among them all through the process observed, but that there seems to be a similarity in the final stage, when the scaling law for turbulent profiles is adopted. However, this similarity profile is quite different from those given previously by other investigators, whose turbulent plumes were established without passing through such a gradual process of transition as was observed in the present experiment. Our flow visualization, on the other hand, supports the validity of our profile. Hence, there remains the question of whether our similarity profile is self-preserved in a fully-developed turbulent state or whether it will conform to others further downstream.

  5. Emulsification in turbulent flow 1. Mean and maximum drop diameters in inertial and viscous regimes.

    PubMed

    Vankova, Nina; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai D; Ivanov, Ivan B; Vulchev, Vassil D; Danner, Thomas

    2007-08-15

    Systematic experimental study of the effects of several factors on the mean and maximum drop sizes during emulsification in turbulent flow is performed. These factors include: (1) rate of energy dissipation, epsilon; (2) interfacial tension, sigma; (3) viscosity of the oil phase, eta(D); (4) viscosity of the aqueous phase, eta(C); and (5) oil volume fraction, Phi. The emulsions are prepared by using the so-called "narrow-gap homogenizer" working in turbulent regime of emulsification. The experiments are performed at high surfactant concentration to avoid the effect of drop-drop coalescence. For emulsions prepared in the inertial turbulent regime, the mean and the maximum drop sizes increase with the increase of eta(D) and sigma, and with the decrease of epsilon. In contrast, Phi and eta(C) affect only slightly the mean and the maximum drop sizes in this regime of emulsification. These results are described very well by a theoretical expression proposed by Davies [Chem. Eng. Sci. 40 (1985) 839], which accounts for the effects of the drop capillary pressure and the viscous dissipation inside the breaking drops. The polydispersity of the emulsions prepared in the inertial regime of emulsification does not depend significantly on sigma and epsilon. However, the emulsion polydispersity increases significantly with the increase of oil viscosity, eta(D). The experiments showed also that the inertial turbulent regime is inappropriate for emulsification of oils with viscosity above ca. 500 mPa s, if drops of micrometer size are to be obtained. The transition from inertial to viscous turbulent regime of emulsification was accomplished by a moderate increase of the viscosity of the aqueous phase (above 5 mPa s in the studied systems) and/or by increase of the oil volume fraction, Phi>0.6. Remarkably, emulsions with drops of micrometer size are easily formed in the viscous turbulent regime of emulsification, even for oils with viscosity as high as 10,000 mPa s. In this regime

  6. CFD simulations of the flow control performance applied for inlet of low drag high-bypass turbofan engine at cross flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursakov, I. A.; Kazhan, E. V.; Lysenkov, A. V.; Savelyev, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Paper describes the optimization procedure for low cruise drag inlet of high-bypass ratio turbofan engine (HBRE). The critical cross-flow velocity when the flow separation on the lee side of the inlet channel occurs is determined. The effciency of different flow control devices used to improve the flow parameters at inlet section cross flow regime is analyzed. Boundary layer suction, bypass slot and vortex generators are considered. It is shown that flow control devices enlarge the stability range of inlet performance at cross flow regimes.

  7. Flow regime mapping of vertical two-phase downflow in a ribbed annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-12-01

    Two-phase flow regimes have been mapped for vertical, cocurrent downflow in a narrow annulus which is partially segmented by the presence of longitudinal ribs. This geometry and flow condition has application to the analysis of a Large-Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LB-LOCA) in the production K-Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The ribbed annular geometry, particularly the presence of non-sealing ribs, gives rise to some unique phenomenological features. The flow behavior is influenced by the partial segmentation of the annulus into four quadrants or subchannels. A random element is induced by the natural bowing of the slender tubes; the width of the azimuthal flow path between two subchannels at a given axial location is indeterminate, and can take on any value between zero and the maximum clearance of 7.6 {times} l0{sup {minus}4} m. When the rib gap is zero at a given location, it is at a maximum 180P away at the same axial location. The range of rib gaps is spanned in a single test section, as it would be also in a reactor assembly. As a result of these effects, flow regime maps obtained by other researchers for downflow in annuli are not accurate for defining flow regimes in a ribbed annulus. Flow regime transitions similar to those noted by, e.g., Bamea, were observed; the locations of these transitions were displaced with respect to the transition equations derived by Bamea. Experimental bubble rise velocity measurements were also obtained in the same test section. The bubble rise velocities were much higher than expected from the theory developed for slug bubbles in tubes, unribbed annuli, and rectangular channels. An elliptical-cap bubble rises faster than a slug bubble of the same area. Large, slug-shaped bubbles injected into the test section were observed to reduce in size as they rose, due to interaction with a longitudinal rib. They thereby adopted a shape more like an elliptical-cap bubble, hence rising faster than the original slug bubble.

  8. Flow regime mapping of vertical two-phase downflow in a ribbed annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    Two-phase flow regimes have been mapped for vertical, cocurrent downflow in a narrow annulus which is partially segmented by the presence of longitudinal ribs. This geometry and flow condition has application to the analysis of a Large-Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LB-LOCA) in the production K-Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The ribbed annular geometry, particularly the presence of non-sealing ribs, gives rise to some unique phenomenological features. The flow behavior is influenced by the partial segmentation of the annulus into four quadrants or subchannels. A random element is induced by the natural bowing of the slender tubes; the width of the azimuthal flow path between two subchannels at a given axial location is indeterminate, and can take on any value between zero and the maximum clearance of 7.6 [times] l0[sup [minus]4] m. When the rib gap is zero at a given location, it is at a maximum 180P away at the same axial location. The range of rib gaps is spanned in a single test section, as it would be also in a reactor assembly. As a result of these effects, flow regime maps obtained by other researchers for downflow in annuli are not accurate for defining flow regimes in a ribbed annulus. Flow regime transitions similar to those noted by, e.g., Bamea, were observed; the locations of these transitions were displaced with respect to the transition equations derived by Bamea. Experimental bubble rise velocity measurements were also obtained in the same test section. The bubble rise velocities were much higher than expected from the theory developed for slug bubbles in tubes, unribbed annuli, and rectangular channels. An elliptical-cap bubble rises faster than a slug bubble of the same area. Large, slug-shaped bubbles injected into the test section were observed to reduce in size as they rose, due to interaction with a longitudinal rib. They thereby adopted a shape more like an elliptical-cap bubble, hence rising faster than the original slug bubble.

  9. Flow Regime Study in a High Density Circulating Fluidized Bed Riser with an Abrupt Exit

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Shadle, L.J.; Yue, P.C.; Monazam, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    Flow regime study was conducted in a 0.3 m diameter, 15.5 m height circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser with an abrupt exit at the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. Local particle velocities were measured at various radial positions and riser heights using an optical fiber probe. On-line measurement of solid circulating rate was continuously recorded by the Spiral. Glass beads of mean diameter 61 μm and particle density of 2,500 kg/m3 were used as bed material. The CFB riser was operated at various superficial gas velocities ranging from 3 to 7.6 m/s and solid mass flux from 20 to 550 kg/m2-s. At a constant riser gas velocity, transition from fast fluidization to dense suspension upflow (DSU) regime started at the bottom of the riser with increasing solid flux. Except at comparatively low riser gas velocity and solid flux, the apparent solid holdup at the top exit region was higher than the middle section of the riser. The solid fraction at this top region could be much higher than 7% under high riser gas velocity and solid mass flux. The local particle velocity showed downward flow near the wall at the top of the riser due to its abrupt exit. This abrupt geometry reflected the solids and, therefore, caused solid particles traveling downward along the wall. However, at location below, but near, the top of the riser the local particle velocities were observed flowing upward at the wall. Therefore, DSU was identified in the upper region of the riser with an abrupt exit while the fully developed region, lower in the riser, was still exhibiting core-annular flow structure. Our data were compared with the flow regime boundaries proposed by Kim et al. [1] for distinguishing the dilute pneumatic transport, fast fluidization, and DSU.

  10. Forest Harvesting Impacts on Attributes of the Flow Regime in Snowmelt Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, K.; Alila, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have revealed how forest cover removal can alter the frequency and magnitude of annual peak flows. However, to fully understand the impacts of land cover changes on stream channels, it is necessary to examine how multiple attributes of the flow regime are affected. Changes in the frequency and duration of peaks over threshold (PoT) discharge for sediment mobilization has the potential to alter the dynamics of bedload mobility and channel form in alluvial gravel-bed streams. A meta-analysis investigation of changes in the duration and number of PoT in four snowmelt catchments of western North America contributes towards a comprehensive understanding of the influence of harvesting on the snowmelt flow regime. Analysis results reveal that harvesting causes the duration and number of PoT of snowmelt peak flows to increase and that these increases are generally greater for larger flood quantiles. Such a response indicates that, following harvesting, the hydrograph in all four catchments has become more responsive during the freshet period. In addition harvesting has resulted in increases in the total volume (i.e. duration) of flood peaks so that discharge remains elevated above specific thresholds for longer periods of time. The meta-analysis results suggest that physical basin characteristics including percentage of alpine area, slope aspect, and gradient, elevation and watershed size all play a role in catchment scale response to harvesting-related increases in flood duration and PoT. In snow environments alterations to the flow regime due to forest removal are likely to persist for many decades until sufficient forest regeneration restores stand level processes of snow accumulation and snowmelt.

  11. The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weihang; Kong, Lingfu; Li, Lei; Liu, Xingbin; Xie, Ronghua; Li, Jun; Tang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow is widespread in petroleum industry processes. The study of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes and the liquid holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow are of great importance for the optimization of the oil production process. This paper presents a novel sensor, i.e., a mini-conductance probe (MCP) for measuring pure-water phase conductivity of oil-water segregated flow in horizontal pipes. The MCP solves the difficult problem of obtaining the pure-water correction for water holdup measurements by using a ring-shaped conductivity water-cut meter (RSCWCM). Firstly, using the finite element method (FEM), the spatial sensitivity field of the MCP is investigated and the optimized MCP geometry structure is determined in terms of the characteristic parameters. Then, the responses of the MCP for the oil-water segregated flow are calculated, and it is found that the MCP has better stability and sensitivity to the variation of water-layer thickness in the condition of high water holdup and low flow velocity. Finally, the static experiments for the oil-water segregated flow were carried out and a novel calibration method for pure-water phase conductivity measurements was presented. The validity of the pure-water phase conductivity measurement with segregated flow in horizontal pipes was verified by experimental results. PMID:27563907

  12. Quantifying downstream impacts of impoundment on flow regime and channel planform, lower Trinity River, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Slattery, Michael C.; Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2005-07-01

    As human population worldwide has grown, so has interest in harnessing and manipulating the flow of water for the benefit of humans. The Trinity River of eastern Texas is one such watershed greatly impacted by engineering and urbanization. Draining the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, just under 30 reservoirs are in operation in the basin, regulating flow while containing public supplies, supporting recreation, and providing flood control. Lake Livingston is the lowest, as well as largest, reservoir in the basin, a mere 95 km above the Trinity's outlet near Galveston Bay. This study seeks to describe and quantify channel activity and flow regime, identifying effects of the 1968 closure of Livingston dam. Using historic daily and peak discharge data from USGS gauging stations, flow duration curves are constructed, identifying pre- and post-dam flow conditions. A digital historic photo archive was also constructed using six sets of aerial photographs spanning from 1938 to 1995, and three measures of channel activity applied using a GIS. Results show no changes in high flow conditions following impoundment, while low flows are elevated. However, the entire post-dam period is characterized by significantly higher rainfall, which may be obscuring the full impact of flow regulation. Channel activity rates do not indicate a more stabilized planform following dam closure; rather they suggest that the Trinity River is adjusting itself to the stress of Livingston dam in a slow, gradual process that may not be apparent in a modern time scale.

  13. DSMC computations of hypersonic flow separation and re-attachment in the transition to continuum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Ram; Gai, Sudhir L.; O'Byrne, Sean; Brown, Melrose

    2016-11-01

    The flow over a `tick' shaped configuration is performed using two Direct Simulation Monte Carlo codes: the DS2V code of Bird and the code from Sandia National Laboratory, called SPARTA. The configuration creates a flow field, where the flow is expanded initially but then is affected by the adverse pressure gradient induced by a compression surface. The flow field is challenging in the sense that the full flow domain is comprised of localized areas spanning continuum and transitional regimes. The present work focuses on the capability of SPARTA to model such flow conditions and also towards a comparative evaluation with results from DS2V. An extensive grid adaptation study is performed using both the codes on a model with a sharp leading edge and the converged results are then compared. The computational predictions are evaluated in terms of surface parameters such as heat flux, shear stress, pressure and velocity slip. SPARTA consistently predicts higher values for these surface properties. The skin friction predictions of both the codes don't give any indication of separation but the velocity slip plots indicate an incipient separation behavior at the corner. The differences in the results are attributed towards the flow resolution at the leading edge that dictates the downstream flow characteristics.

  14. Stability analysis of the rimming flow inside a uniformly heated rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, Tara Chand; Tiwari, Naveen

    2017-03-01

    The stability analysis is presented for a thin viscous liquid film flowing inside a uniformly heated horizontal cylinder that is rotating about its axis. The free surface evolution equation for the liquid-gas interface is obtained by simplifying the Navier-Stokes and energy equations within the lubrication approximation. Various dimensionless numbers are obtained that quantify the effect of gravity, viscous drag, inertia, surface tension, and thermocapillary stress. The film thickness evolution equation is solved numerically to obtain two-dimensional, steady state solutions neglecting axial variations. A liquid pool forms at the bottom of the cylinder when gravity dominates other forces. This liquid pool is shifted in the direction of rotation when inertia or viscous drag is increased. Small axial perturbations are then imposed to the steady solutions to study their stability behavior. It is found that the inertia and capillary pressure destabilize whereas the gravity and thermocapillary stress stabilize the rimming flow. The influence of Marangoni number is reported by computing the stable and unstable parametric regions. Thicker films are shown to be more susceptible to become unstable.

  15. Functional architecture of an optic flow-responsive area that drives horizontal eye movements in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Fumi; Hablitzel, Bastian; Dal Maschio, Marco; Driever, Wolfgang; Baier, Herwig; Arrenberg, Aristides B

    2014-03-19

    Animals respond to whole-field visual motion with compensatory eye and body movements in order to stabilize both their gaze and position with respect to their surroundings. In zebrafish, rotational stimuli need to be distinguished from translational stimuli to drive the optokinetic and the optomotor responses, respectively. Here, we systematically characterize the neural circuits responsible for these operations using a combination of optogenetic manipulation and in vivo calcium imaging during optic flow stimulation. By recording the activity of thousands of neurons within the area pretectalis (APT), we find four bilateral pairs of clusters that process horizontal whole-field motion and functionally classify eleven prominent neuron types with highly selective response profiles. APT neurons are prevalently direction selective, either monocularly or binocularly driven, and hierarchically organized to distinguish between rotational and translational optic flow. Our data predict a wiring diagram of a neural circuit tailored to drive behavior that compensates for self-motion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Treatment of 1, 2-dichlorobenzene in wastewater by using horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands].

    PubMed

    Ding, Cheng; Yang, Tang-Yi; Yu, Qian; Li, Zhao-Xia; Yang, Chun-Sheng

    2011-09-01

    Pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCW) planted with Phragmites australis were constructed to treat in 1,2-dichlorobenzene (o-DCB) wastewater. Different soil substrates of loam (W-L), fine sand (W-F) and coarse sand (W-C) were used in the three SFCW and a loam wetland with no reeds W-Z was taken as control. Results showed that the optimal hydraulic retention time (HRT) and pollutants surface loading rate(ALR)were 5 d and 150 mg x (m2 x d)(-1). Removal efficiencies for o-DCB of W-L, W-F, W-C and W-Z were 81.2%, 71.1%, 72.4% and 65.2%, respectively. The performance of systems achieved in mid-August and declined from October, with order of W-L > W-C > W-Z > W-F. Spatial concentration dynamics of o-DCB and dissolved oxygen (DO) were also investigated in W-L and W-Z, which indicated that DO was an important role to removal of o-DCB. The residual quantity of o-DCB in wetland substrate decreased along the flow direction and increased with the depth of substrate layers, the mean residual in the root, stem and leaf of reeds were 30.28, 14.85 and 6.18 microg x g(-1).

  17. Study of the horizontal and vertical dispersion at the atmospheric flow at the Alc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, L.; Roballo, S.; Fisch, G.; Avelar, A.; Girardi, R.; Gielow, R.

    2009-04-01

    The Alcântara Launching Center (ALC) region is situated in the north coast of the Maranhão state and it was simulated in a wind tunnel with an open circuit at Institute Technologic of Aeronautics (ITA). The ALC topography possesses typical characteristics of smooth surface (ocean) close to a roughness surface (continent). The local coast has a relative topographical variation (coastal cliffs) with inclination and 50 m height, being the top a plain area. A mock-up model has been constructed to be inserted at the wind tunnel for the measurements. The Integration Mobile Tower (IMT) is placed at 150 m from the coastal cliff. Consequently the rockets can suffer the influence from intense turbulence resultant of the modification of the wind profile of the proceeding from the ocean as ascending vertically from thr IMT. It was used the Particle Image Velocimetrýs (PIV) technique for the analysis of the vertical dispersion in the central lane from the ocean until the IMT and the hot wire anemometry technique for the horizontal dispersion. The analysis of the vertical dispersion was carried through locating the PIV transversally to the model that simulates the ALC. The vorticity generated above of the coastal cliff has the same intensity of the vorticity generated at the IMT (-2000 s-1) being these the zones of higher turbulence. With regard to the horizontal flow one noticed that the low levels (below 10 m) presented the great speed fluctuations close the coastal cliff. In the high levels (above 10 m), this fluctuations diminished. The high values of turbulent intensities after the step, in the low levels, due to recirculation characterized for low values of speeds average and hight speed fluctuations also was verified in the vertical dispersion.

  18. Exact regularized point particle method for multiphase flows in the two-way coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, P.; Picano, F.; Sardina, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    Particulate flows have been largely studied under the simplifying assumptions of one-way coupling regime where the disperse phase do not react-back on the carrier fluid. In the context of turbulent flows, many non trivial phenomena such as small scales particles clustering or preferential spatial accumulation have been explained and understood. A more complete view of multiphase flows can be gained calling into play two-way coupling effects, i.e. by accounting for the inter-phase momentum exchange between the carrier and the suspended phase, certainly relevant at increasing mass loading. In such regime, partially investigated in the past by the so-called Particle In Cell (PIC) method, much is still to be learned about the dynamics of the disperse phase and the ensuing alteration of the carrier flow. In this paper we present a new methodology rigorously designed to capture the inter-phase momentum exchange for particles smaller than the smallest hydrodynamical scale, e.g. the Kolmogorov scale in a turbulent flow. In fact, the momentum coupling mechanism exploits the unsteady Stokes flow around a small rigid sphere where the transient disturbance produced by each particle is evaluated in a closed form. The particles are described as lumped, point masses which would lead to the appearance of singularities. A rigorous regularization procedure is conceived to extract the physically relevant interactions between particles and fluid which avoids any "ah hoc" assumption. The approach is suited for high efficiency implementation on massively parallel machines since the transient disturbance produced by the particles is strongly localized in space around the actual particle position. As will be shown, hundred thousands particles can therefore be handled at an affordable computational cost as demonstrated by a preliminary application to a particle laden turbulent shear flow.

  19. A probabilistic approach to quantifying spatial patterns of flow regimes and network-scale connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbin, Silvia; Alessi Celegon, Elisa; Fanton, Pietro; Botter, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    The temporal variability of river flow regime is a key feature structuring and controlling fluvial ecological communities and ecosystem processes. In particular, streamflow variability induced by climate/landscape heterogeneities or other anthropogenic factors significantly affects the connectivity between streams with notable implication for river fragmentation. Hydrologic connectivity is a fundamental property that guarantees species persistence and ecosystem integrity in riverine systems. In riverine landscapes, most ecological transitions are flow-dependent and the structure of flow regimes may affect ecological functions of endemic biota (i.e., fish spawning or grazing of invertebrate species). Therefore, minimum flow thresholds must be guaranteed to support specific ecosystem services, like fish migration, aquatic biodiversity and habitat suitability. In this contribution, we present a probabilistic approach aiming at a spatially-explicit, quantitative assessment of hydrologic connectivity at the network-scale as derived from river flow variability. Dynamics of daily streamflows are estimated based on catchment-scale climatic and morphological features, integrating a stochastic, physically based approach that accounts for the stochasticity of rainfall with a water balance model and a geomorphic recession flow model. The non-exceedance probability of ecologically meaningful flow thresholds is used to evaluate the fragmentation of individual stream reaches, and the ensuing network-scale connectivity metrics. A multi-dimensional Poisson Process for the stochastic generation of rainfall is used to evaluate the impact of climate signature on reach-scale and catchment-scale connectivity. The analysis shows that streamflow patterns and network-scale connectivity are influenced by the topology of the river network and the spatial variability of climatic properties (rainfall, evapotranspiration). The framework offers a robust basis for the prediction of the impact of

  20. Can stormwater control measures restore altered urban flow regimes at the catchment scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Congying; Fletcher, Tim D.; Duncan, Hugh P.; Burns, Matthew J.

    2017-06-01

    Over the last 20-30 years, there has been an evolution in urban stormwater management towards the use of stormwater control measures (SCMs) at or near the source of the runoff. These approaches aim to protect or restore natural elements of the flow regime. However, evidence of the success of such approaches is to date limited. We reviewed attempts to both model and monitor the catchment-scale hydrological consequences of SCMs. While many catchment-scale studies on the hydrologic effects of SCMs are based on computer simulation, these modeling approaches are limited by many uncertainties. The few existing monitoring studies provide early indications of the potential of SCMs to deliver more natural flow regimes, but many questions remain. There is an urgent need for properly monitored studies that aim to assess the hydrologic effects of SCMs at the catchment scale. In future monitoring studies, these hydrologic effects need to be characterized using appropriate flow metrics at a range of scales (from site scale to catchment scale), and changes to flow metrics by SCMs need to be assessed using robust statistical methods. Such studies will give confidence to stormwater and river managers of the feasibility and benefits of ;low impact; approaches to stormwater management.

  1. Granular-flow rheology: Role of shear-rate number in transition regime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the rationale behind the semiempirical formulation of a generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in the light of the Reiner-Rivlin constitutive theory and the viscoplastic theory, thereby identifying the parameters that control the rheology of granular flow. The shear-rate number (N) proves to be among the most significant parameters identified from the GVF model. As N ??? 0 and N ??? ???, the GVF model can reduce asymptotically to the theoretical stress versus shear-rate relations in the macroviscous and graininertia regimes, respectively, where the grain concentration (C) also plays a major role in the rheology of granular flow. Using available data obtained from the rotating-cylinder experiments of neutrally buoyant solid spheres dispersing in an interstitial fluid, the shear stress for granular flow in transition between the two regimes proves dependent on N and C in addition to some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution. The insufficiency of data on rotating-cylinder experiments cannot presently allow the GVF model to predict how a granular flow may behave in the entire range of N; however, the analyzed data provide an insight on the interrelation among the relevant dimensionless parameters.

  2. Numerical investigation of multiple stationary and time-periodic flow regimes in vertical rotating disc CVD reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gakis, G. P.; Koronaki, E. D.; Boudouvis, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    The vertical rotating disc CVD reactor problem is revisited with a computational framework that allows systematic parameter continuation along branches of flow regimes over various operating parameter values. The commercial CFD code Fluent is used, enhanced with a home-made module and by appropriate initialization, a P-ω diagram is mapped out. In addition to the well known result where boyancy-induced and rotation-induced regimes exist for low and high rotation rates respectively along with a favorable for film uniformity plug flow regime in between, interesting new flow regimes are computed: Stable time-periodic buoyancy induced flows are found as well as stationary ones. Periodic buoyancy induced flows co-exist with stationary plug flow regimes over a range of ω for pressures higher than 200 Torr. A regime of stationary flows where the effect of buoyancy and rotation is combined is computed at pressures higher than 350 Torr and it shown to co-exist with typical rotation induced flows.

  3. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhihui; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Junlin; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-12-09

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body.

  4. Fibrous filter efficiency and pressure drop in the viscous-inertial transition flow regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Andres L.; Brockmann, John E.; Dellinger, Jennifer Gwynne; Lucero, Daniel A.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Servantes, Brandon Lee

    2011-10-01

    Fibrous filter pressure drop and aerosol collection efficiency were measured at low air pressures (0.2 to 0.8 atm) and high face velocities (5 to 20 meters per second) to give fiber Reynolds numbers in the viscous-inertial transition flow regime (1 to 16). In this regime, contemporary filtration theory based on Kuwabara's viscous flow through an ensemble of fibers under-predicts single fiber impaction by several orders of magnitude. Streamline curvature increases substantially as inertial forces become dominant. Dimensionless pressure drop measurements followed the viscous-inertial theory of Robinson and Franklin rather than Darcy's linear pressure-velocity relationship (1972). Sodium chloride and iron nano-agglomerate test aerosols were used to evaluate the effects of particle density and shape factor. Total filter efficiency collapsed when plotted against the particle Stokes and fiber Reynolds numbers. Efficiencies were then fitted with an impactor type equation where the cutpoint Stokes number and a steepness parameter described data well in the sharply increasing portion of the curve (20% to 80% efficiency). The cutpoint Stokes number was a linearly decreasing function of fiber Reynolds number. Single fiber efficiencies were calculated from total filter efficiencies and compared to contemporary viscous flow impaction theory (Stechkina et al. 1969), and numerical simulations from the literature. Existing theories under-predicted measured single fiber efficiencies although the assumption of uniform flow conditions for each successive layer of fibers is questionable; the common exponential relationship between single fiber efficiency and total filter efficiency may not be appropriate in this regime.

  5. Integrating Acoustic Imaging of Flow Regimes With Bathymetry: A Case Study, Main Endeavor Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    A unified view of the seafloor and the hydrothermal flow regimes (plumes and diffuse flow) is constructed for three major vent clusters in the Main Endeavour Field (e.g., Grotto, S&M, and Salut) of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Main Endeavour Field is one of RIDGE 2000's Integrated Study Sites. A variety of visualization techniques are used to reconstruct the plumes (3D) and the diffuse flow field (2D) based on our acoustic imaging data set (July 2000 cruise). Plumes are identified as volumes of high backscatter intensity (indicating high particulate content or sharp density contrasts due to temperature variations) that remained high intensity when successive acoustic pings were subtracted (indicating that the acoustic targets producing the backscatter were in motion). Areas of diffuse flow are detected using our acoustic scintillation technique (AST). For the Grotto vent region (where a new Doppler technique was used to estimate vertical velocities in the plume), we estimate the areal partitioning between black smoker and diffuse flow in terms of volume fluxes. The volumetric and areal regions, where plume and diffuse flow were imaged, are registered over the bathymetry and compared to geologic maps of each region. The resulting images provide a unified view of the seafloor by integrating hydrothermal flow with geology.

  6. Vertical Subsurface Flow Mixing and Horizontal Anisotropy in Coarse Fluvial Aquifers: Structural Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggenberger, P.; Huber, E.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed descriptions of the subsurface heterogeneities in coarse fluvial aquifer gravel often lack in concepts to distinguish between the essence and the noise of a permeability structure and the ability to extrapolate site specific hydraulic information at the tens to several hundred meters scale. At this scale the heterogeneity strongly influences the anisotropies of the flow field and the mixing processes in groundwater. However, in many hydrogeological models the complexity of natural systems is oversimplified. Understanding the link between the dynamics of the surface processes of braided-river systems and the resulting subsurface sedimentary structures is the key to characterizing the complexity of horizontal and vertical mixing processes in groundwater. From the different depositional elements of coarse braided-river systems, the largest permeability contrasts can be observed in the scour-fills. Other elements (e.g. different types of gravel sheets) show much smaller variabilities and could be considered as a kind of matrix. Field experiments on the river Tagliamento (Northeast Italy) based on morphological observation and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys, as well as outcrop analyses of gravel pit exposures (Switzerland) allowed us to define the shape, sizes, spatial distribution and preservation potential of scour-fills. In vertical sections (e.g. 2D GPR data, vertical outcrop), the spatial density of remnant erosional bounding surfaces of scours is an indicator for the dynamics of the braided-river system (lateral mobility of the active floodplain, rate of sediment net deposition and spatial distribution of the confluence scours). In case of combined low aggradation rate and low lateral mobility the deposits may be dominated by a complex overprinting of scour-fills. The delineation of the erosional bounding surfaces, that are coherent over the survey area, is based on the identification of angular discontinuities of the reflectors. Fence diagrams

  7. Application of chaos theory in identification of two-phase flow patterns and transitions in a small, horizontal, rectangular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1996-02-01

    Various measurement tools of chaos theory were applied to analyze two-phase pressure signals with the objective to identify and interpret flow pattern transitions for two-phase flows in a small, horizontal rectangular channel. These measurement tools included power spectral density function, autocorrelation function, pseudo-phase-plane trajectory, Lyapunov exponents, and fractal dimensions. It was demonstrated that the randomlike pressure fluctuations characteristic of two-phase flow in small rectangular channels are chaotic in nature. As such, they are governed by a high-order deterministic system. The correlation dimension is potentially a new approach for identification of certain two-phase flow patterns and transitions.

  8. Modeling Food Delivery Dynamics For Juvenile Salmonids Under Variable Flow Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L.; Utz, R.; Anderson, K.; Nisbet, R.

    2010-12-01

    Traditional approaches for assessing instream flow needs for salmonids have typically focused on the importance of physical habitat in determining fish habitat selection. This somewhat simplistic approach does not account for differences in food delivery rates to salmonids that arise due to spatial variability in river morphology, hydraulics and temporal variations in the flow regime. Explicitly linking how changes in the flow regime influences food delivery dynamics is an important step in advancing process-based bioenergetic models that seek to predict growth rates of salmonids across various life-stages. Here we investigate how food delivery rates for juvenile salmonids vary both spatially and with flow magnitude in a meandering reach of the Merced River, CA. We utilize a two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic model and discrete particle tracking algorithm to simulate invertebrate drift transport rates at baseflow and a near-bankfull discharge. Modeling results indicate that at baseflow, the maximum drift density occurs in the channel thalweg, while drift densities decrease towards the channel margins due to the process of organisms settling out of the drift. During high-flow events, typical of spring dam-releases, the invertebrate drift transport pathway follows a similar trajectory along the high velocity core and the drift concentrations are greatest in the channel centerline, though the zone of invertebrate transport occupies a greater fraction of the channel width. Based on invertebrate supply rates alone, feeding juvenile salmonids would be expected to be distributed down the channel centerline where the maximum predicted food delivery rates are located in this reach. However, flow velocities in these channel sections are beyond maximum sustainable swimming speeds for most juvenile salmonids. Our preliminary findings suggest that a lack of low velocity refuge may prevent juvenile salmonids from deriving energy from the areas with maximum drift density in this

  9. A Modeling Approach for Evaluating the Coupled Riparian Vegetation-Geomorphic Response to Altered Flow Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Wilcox, A. C.; Merritt, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The ecogeomorphic response of riparian ecosystems to a change in hydrologic properties is difficult to predict because of the interactions and feedbacks among plants, water, and sediment. Most riparian models of community dynamics assume a static channel, yet geomorphic processes strongly control the establishment and survival of riparian vegetation. Using a combination of approaches that includes empirical relationships and hydrodynamic models, we model the coupled vegetation-topographic response of three cross-sections on the Yampa and Green Rivers in Dinosaur National Monument, to a shift in the flow regime. The locations represent the variable geomorphology and vegetation composition of these canyon-bound rivers. We account for the inundation and hydraulic properties of vegetation plots surveyed over three years within International River Interface Cooperative (iRIC) Fastmech, equipped with a vegetation module that accounts for flexible stems and plant reconfiguration. The presence of functional groupings of plants, or those plants that respond similarly to environmental factors such as water availability and disturbance are determined from flow response curves developed for the Yampa River. Using field measurements of vegetation morphology, distance from the channel centerline, and dominant particle size and modeled inundation properties we develop an empirical relationship between these variables and topographic change. We evaluate vegetation and channel form changes over decadal timescales, allowing for the integration of processes over time. From our analyses, we identify thresholds in the flow regime that alter the distribution of plants and reduce geomorphic complexity, predominately through side-channel and backwater infilling. Simplification of some processes (e.g., empirically-derived sedimentation) and detailed treatment of others (e.g., plant-flow interactions) allows us to model the coupled dynamics of riparian ecosystems and evaluate the impact of

  10. An open source tool to analyse heat waves using flow analogues and weather regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radanovics, Sabine; Jézéquel, Aglaé; Alvarez-Castro, Carmen; Yiou, Pascal; Hempelmann, Nils; Ehbrecht, Carsten; Nangini, Cathy; Vautard, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Studies on the relation of atmospheric circulation patterns and heat waves using flow analogues or weather regimes often miss an assessment of the uncertainties related to internal climate variability and the analysis method itself because of the limited length of the data sets used. However, considering this type of uncertainty is important when interpreting changes found in a transient climate using this type of methods. We used several hundreds of years long preindustrial control runs of CMIP5 climate models to address this issue in a constant model climate. Several heat waves over central Europe as simulated by the climate model were selected and then reconstructed using circulation analogues, that is by searching for days with similar pressure fields in the simulation and recombining the temperatures of these similar days to form uchronic events. The variance of these uchronic events is supposed to vary with the rarity of the original event. We therefore present the relationship between the variance of the uchronic events and the distance between the original event and its analogues. Further we present the variation of the distances due to internal climate variability. Weather regimes are typical atmospheric circulation patterns obtained for example using a cluster analysis. Each day is then assigned to a cluster, the weather regime. The frequency of the weather regimes is supposed to be constant in a constant climate, but variations of these frequencies can occur due to internal climate variability. We therefore show these variations for the weather regimes associated with the heat waves. The web processing service (WPS) flyingpigeon is an open source WPS featuring processes for studying weather extremes and climate change impacts. Flyingpigeon is part of the open source project birdhouse, a collection of WPSs following the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standard and available on github. The WPS allowed to first select the data sets needed from the ESGF

  11. Quantifying alteration of river flow regime by large reservoirs in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, Thomas; Sauquet, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Reservoirs may highly modify river flow regime. Knowing the alterations is of importance to better understand the biological and physical patterns along the river network. However data are not necessary available to carry out an analysis of modifications at a national scale, e.g. due to industrial interests or to lack of measurements. The objective of this study is to quantify the changes in a set of hydrological indices due to large reservoirs in France combining different data sources. The analysis is based on a comparison between influenced discharges (observed discharges) and natural discharges available from: (i) gauging stations available upstream the dam, (ii) regionalization procedures (Sauquet et al., 2008; Sauquet et Catalogne, 2011; Cipriani et al., 2012), or (iii) historical data free from human influence close to the dam location. The impact of large reservoirs is assessed considering different facets of the river flow regime, including flood quantiles, low flow characteristics, quantiles from the flow duration curve and the twelve mean monthly discharges. The departures from the indice representative of natural conditions quantify the effect of the reservoir management on the river flow regime. The analysis is based on 62 study cases. Results show large spread in terms of impact depending on the purposes of the reservoirs and the season of interest. Results also point out inconsistencies in data (water balance between outflow and inflow, downstream of the dam is not warranted) due to uncertainties in mean monthly discharges and to the imperfect knowledge of inflows and outflows. Lastly, we suggest a typology of hydrological alterations based on the purposes of the reservoirs. Cipriani T., Toilliez T., Sauquet E. (2012). Estimating 10 year return period peak flows and flood durations at ungauged locations in France. La Houille Blanche, 4-5: 5-13, doi : 10.1051/lhb/2012024. Sauquet E., Catalogne C. (2011). Comparison of catchment grouping methods for

  12. Calibration of Mineralization Degree for Dynamic Pure-water Measurement in Horizontal Oil-water Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Weihang; Li, Lei; Kong, Lingfu; Liu, Xingbin

    2016-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity measurement in the process of calculating water content of oil-water two-phase flow of production profile logging in horizontal wells, a six-group local-conductance probe (SGLCP) is proposed to measure dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow. The structures of conductance sensors which include the SGLCP and ring-shaped conductance probe (RSCP) are analyzed by using the finite-element method (FEM). In the process of simulation, the electric field distribution generated by the SGLCP and RSCP are investigated, and the responses of the measuring electrodes are calculated under the different values of the water resistivity. The static experiments of the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow are carried out. Results of simulation and experiments demonstrate a nice linearity between the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees. The SGLCP has also a good adaptability to stratified flow, stratified flow with mixing at the interface and dispersion of oil in water and water flow. The validity and feasibility of pure-water electrical conductivity measurement with the designed SGLCP under different mineralization degrees are verified by experimental results.

  13. The flow regimes and the pressure-flow relationship in the canine urethra.

    PubMed

    Lecamwasam, H S; Sullivan, M P; Yalla, S V; Cravalho, E G

    1999-01-01

    Classical fluid dynamics predicts that the pressure difference Deltap between any two points along a fully developed, viscous flow stream is linearly proportional to the flow rate Q (the Poiseuille relation). However, the passive urethral resistance relationship (PURR) widely used in modern urodynamics describes the pressure difference Deltap between two points along the urethra as linearly proportional to the flow rate squared (Q(2)). It is our hypothesis that this functional dependence may have its origins in the developing flow field within the urethra. That is, rather than being fully developed hydrodynamically, urethral flow is more likely representative of flow within the entry length of a rigid conduit. In our study, we used a canine model of the lower urinary tract to investigate the possibility of entrance effects. Although the most rigorous model of urethral fluid mechanics would include the elastic properties of the urethra into its configuration, the solutions from such a model would be unnecessarily complex and not readily lend themselves to the analysis of clinical data. Therefore, we chose to model the canine urethra at each instant in time as a rigid tube, and characterized its instantaneous flow using viscous flow theory for a rigid tube. All urodynamic analyses were performed on a surgically exposed urinary tract. Solid state pressure transducers were used to measure the intravesical and distal urethral pressures, whereas an ultrasonic flowmeter was used to obtain a simultaneous measure of the urinary flow rate. Detrusor contractions were induced using bilateral electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerves. Varying degrees of outlet obstruction were created using an inflatable sphincter cuff secured around the bladder outlet. The experimental data were evaluated using the well-known laminar entry length model of Atkinson and Goldstein. The peak Reynolds numbers under nonobstructed R(p)(e non-obs) and obstructed R(p)(e obs) outlet conditions ranged

  14. Identifying hydrological regime and eco-flow threshold of small and medium flood of the Xiaoqing River in Jinan city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Sheng-Le

    2017-06-01

    It was known that hydrological regime was the main influencing factor of river ecosystem, but the regime of different flow rates of urban rivers was poorly understood. We collected daily inflows at the Huangtai station of the Xiaoqing River from 1960 to 2014 and divided the data into three periods. Then we calculated hydrological parameters by the method of EFCs (Environmental Flow Components) and analyzed the tendency and change rates of each component respectively in the three periods. Combined with the ecological significance of environmental flow components, we identified the small and medium flood had the greatest impact on the river regime and ecosystem. And then we used the hydraulic parameters in the good ecosystem period as control conditions, to calculate the ecological threshold of the flow component under the current situation. This study could provide technical support for restoring and improving hydrological regime and ecological environment of the Xiaoqing River in Jinan city.

  15. Predicting ecological flow regime at ungaged sites: A comparison of methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Jennifer C.; Knight, Rodney R.; Wolfe, William J.; Gain, W. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Nineteen ecologically relevant streamflow characteristics were estimated using published rainfall–runoff and regional regression models for six sites with observed daily streamflow records in Kentucky. The regional regression model produced median estimates closer to the observed median for all but two characteristics. The variability of predictions from both models was generally less than the observed variability. The variability of the predictions from the rainfall–runoff model was greater than that from the regional regression model for all but three characteristics. Eight characteristics predicted by the rainfall–runoff model display positive or negative bias across all six sites; biases are not as pronounced for the regional regression model. Results suggest that a rainfall–runoff model calibrated on a single characteristic is less likely to perform well as a predictor of a range of other characteristics (flow regime) when compared with a regional regression model calibrated individually on multiple characteristics used to represent the flow regime. Poor model performance may misrepresent hydrologic conditions, potentially distorting the perceived risk of ecological degradation. Without prior selection of streamflow characteristics, targeted calibration, and error quantification, the widespread application of general hydrologic models to ecological flow studies is problematic. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Microbubble generation in a co-flow device operated in a new regime.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; van Hoeve, Wim; Lohse, Detlef; Gordillo, José M

    2011-06-21

    A new regime of operation of PDMS-based flow-focusing microfluidic devices is presented. We show that monodisperse microbubbles with diameters below one-tenth of the channel width (here w = 50 μm) can be produced in low viscosity liquids thanks to a strong pressure gradient in the entrance region of the channel. In this new regime bubbles are generated at the tip of a long and stable gas ligament whose diameter, which can be varied by tuning appropriately the gas and liquid flow rates, is substantially smaller than the channel width. Through this procedure the volume of the bubbles formed at the tip of the gas ligament can be varied by more than two orders of magnitude. The experimental results for the bubble diameter d(b) as function of the control parameters are accounted for by a scaling theory, which predicts d(b)/w ∝ (μ(g)/μ(l))(1/12)(Q(g)/Q(l))(5/12), where μ(g) and μ(l) indicate, respectively, the gas and liquid viscosities and Q(g) and Q(l) are the gas and liquid flow rates. As a particularly important application of our results we produce monodisperse bubbles with the appropriate diameter for therapeutic applications (d(b) ≃ 5 μm) and a production rate exceeding 10(5) Hz.

  17. Conduit and diffuse type groundwater flow regimes in young volcanic terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, B.G. )

    1993-04-01

    The Big Butte Springs Watershed Geohydrologic Study (Medford Water Commission and Rogue River National Forest, Medford, OR, 1990) compares the movement of the groundwater supplying these major domestic springs to karstic terrain groundwater flow regimes. The similarity of groundwater velocities and the characteristics of responses to precipitation events in young volcanic groundwater systems warrants the use of conduit-like (and diffuse-like) for volcanic terrain to clearly differentiate from the karstic hydrogeologic terms turbulent solution conduit flow and diffuse darcian flow''. The conduit-like systems in young volcanic terrain includes both the clinkery, rubbly interflow zones and the high hydraulic conductivity (K) basal zones. The basal zones are interpreted to originate as follows: (1) thin lava flows onto rivers/streams yielding through-going continuous groundwater passages by steam explosion and thermal shock, and (2) lava flows cover high K river gravel sequences. The (volcanic) diffuse component originates from fracture systems, minor interflow zones or from streams which were tributary to the pre-lava flow main river system. The presentation will highlight comparisons of data from karstic and volcanic terrain and include descriptions of several world-wide high velocity and high K volcanic groundwater systems.

  18. On the coupled unsaturated-saturated flow process induced by vertical, horizontal, and slant wells in unconfined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiuyu; Zhan, Hongbin; Zhang, You-Kuan; Liu, Jin

    2017-03-01

    Conventional models of pumping tests in unconfined aquifers often neglect the unsaturated flow process. This study concerns the coupled unsaturated-saturated flow process induced by vertical, horizontal, and slant wells positioned in an unconfined aquifer. A mathematical model is established with special consideration of the coupled unsaturated-saturated flow process and the well orientation. Groundwater flow in the saturated zone is described by a three-dimensional governing equation and a linearized three-dimensional Richards' equation in the unsaturated zone. A solution in the Laplace domain is derived by the Laplace-finite-Fourier-transform and the method of separation of variables, and the semi-analytical solutions are obtained using a numerical inverse Laplace method. The solution is verified by a finite-element numerical model. It is found that the effects of the unsaturated zone on the drawdown of a pumping test exist at any angle of inclination of the pumping well, and this impact is more significant in the case of a horizontal well. The effects of the unsaturated zone on the drawdown are independent of the length of the horizontal well screen. The vertical well leads to the largest water volume drained from the unsaturated zone (W) during the early pumping time, and the effects of the well orientation on W values become insignificant at the later time. The screen length of the horizontal well does not affect W for the whole pumping period. The proposed solutions are useful for the parameter identification of pumping tests with a general well orientation (vertical, horizontal, and slant) in unconfined aquifers affected from above by the unsaturated flow process.

  19. Characterizing Sub-Daily Flow Regimes: Implications of Hydrologic Resolution on Ecohydrology Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; McManamay, Ryan A.; O'Connor, B.

    2014-05-26

    Natural variability in flow is a primary factor controlling geomorphic and ecological processes in riverine ecosystems. Within the hydropower industry, there is growing pressure from environmental groups and natural resource managers to change reservoir releases from daily peaking to run-of-river operations on the basis of the assumption that downstream biological communities will improve under a more natural flow regime. In this paper, we discuss the importance of assessing sub-daily flows for understanding the physical and ecological dynamics within river systems. We present a variety of metrics for characterizing sub-daily flow variation and use these metrics to evaluate general trends among streams affected by peaking hydroelectric projects, run-of-river projects and streams that are largely unaffected by flow altering activities. Univariate and multivariate techniques were used to assess similarity among different stream types on the basis of these sub-daily metrics. For comparison, similar analyses were performed using analogous metrics calculated with mean daily flow values. Our results confirm that sub-daily flow metrics reveal variation among and within streams that are not captured by daily flow statistics. Using sub-daily flow statistics, we were able to quantify the degree of difference between unaltered and peaking streams and the amount of similarity between unaltered and run-of-river streams. The sub-daily statistics were largely uncorrelated with daily statistics of similar scope. Furthermore, on short temporal scales, sub-daily statistics reveal the relatively constant nature of unaltered streamreaches and the highly variable nature of hydropower-affected streams, whereas daily statistics show just the opposite over longer temporal scales.

  20. Characterizing Sub-Daily Flow Regimes: Implications of Hydrologic Resolution on Ecohydrology Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; McManamay, Ryan A.; O'Connor, B.

    2014-05-26

    Natural variability in flow is a primary factor controlling geomorphic and ecological processes in riverine ecosystems. Within the hydropower industry, there is growing pressure from environmental groups and natural resource managers to change reservoir releases from daily peaking to run-of-river operations on the basis of the assumption that downstream biological communities will improve under a more natural flow regime. In this paper, we discuss the importance of assessing sub-daily flows for understanding the physical and ecological dynamics within river systems. We present a variety of metrics for characterizing sub-daily flow variation and use these metrics to evaluate general trends amongmore » streams affected by peaking hydroelectric projects, run-of-river projects and streams that are largely unaffected by flow altering activities. Univariate and multivariate techniques were used to assess similarity among different stream types on the basis of these sub-daily metrics. For comparison, similar analyses were performed using analogous metrics calculated with mean daily flow values. Our results confirm that sub-daily flow metrics reveal variation among and within streams that are not captured by daily flow statistics. Using sub-daily flow statistics, we were able to quantify the degree of difference between unaltered and peaking streams and the amount of similarity between unaltered and run-of-river streams. The sub-daily statistics were largely uncorrelated with daily statistics of similar scope. Furthermore, on short temporal scales, sub-daily statistics reveal the relatively constant nature of unaltered streamreaches and the highly variable nature of hydropower-affected streams, whereas daily statistics show just the opposite over longer temporal scales.« less

  1. Characterization of interfacial waves and pressure drop in horizontal oil-water core-annular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sumit; Tabor, Rico F.; Singh, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Amitabh

    2017-08-01

    We study the transportation of highly viscous furnace-oil in a horizontal pipe as core-annular flow (CAF) using experiments. Pressure drop and high-speed images of the fully developed CAF are recorded for a wide range of flow rate combinations. The height profiles (with respect to the centerline of the pipe) of the upper and lower interfaces of the core are obtained using a high-speed camera and image analysis. Time series of the interface height are used to calculate the average holdup of the oil phase, speed of the interface, and the power spectra of the interface profile. We find that the ratio of the effective velocity of the annular fluid to the core velocity, α , shows a large scatter. Using the average value of this ratio (α =0.74 ) yields a good estimate of the measured holdup for the whole range of flow rate ratios, mainly due to the low sensitivity of the holdup ratio to the velocity ratio. Dimensional analysis implies that, if the thickness of the annular fluid is much smaller than the pipe radius, then, for the given range of parameters in our experiments, the non-dimensional interface shape, as well as the non-dimensional wall shear stress, can depend only on the shear Reynolds number and the velocity ratio. Our experimental data show that, for both lower and upper interfaces, the normalized power spectrum of the interface height has a strong dependence on the shear Reynolds number. Specifically, for low shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with large wavelengths dominate, while, for large shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with small wavelengths dominate. Normalized variance of the interface height is higher at lower shear Reynolds numbers and tends to a constant with increasing shear Reynolds number. Surprisingly, our experimental data also show that the effective wall shear stress is, to a large extent, proportional to the square of the core velocity. Using the implied scalings for the holdup ratio and wall shear stress, we can derive

  2. The numerical modelling of falling film thickness flow on horizontal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, I. A.; Sadikin, A.; Isa, N. Mat

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a computational modelling of water falling film flowing over horizontal tubes. The objective of this study is to use numerical predictions for comparing the film thickness along circumferential direction of tube on 2-D CFD models. The results are then validated with a theoretical result in previous literatures. A comprehensive design of 2-D models have been developed according to the real application and actual configuration of the falling film evaporator as well as previous experimental parameters. A computational modelling of the water falling film is presented with the aid of Ansys Fluent software. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique is adapted in this analysis since its capabilities of determining the film thickness on tubes surface is highly reliable. The numerical analysis is carried out under influence of ambient pressures at temperature of 27 °C. Three types of CFD numerical models were analyzed in this simulation with inter tube spacing of 30 mm, 20 mm and 10 mm respectively. The use of a numerical simulation tool on water falling film has resulted in a detailed investigation of film thickness. Based on the numerical simulated results, it is found that the average values of water film thickness for each model are 0.53 mm, 0.58 mm, and 0.63 mm.

  3. Effects of intermittent loading on nitrogen removal in horizontal subsurface flow wetlands.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Margaret G; Yelderman, Joe C; Potterton, Tina; Doyle, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    Removal of CBOD(5) and nitrogen from septic tank effluent was evaluated in four horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) wetlands. An intermittently loaded cell was compared to a continuously loaded control cell, with both treatments receiving the same weekly volume. The intermittent cell was rapidly drained and "rested" for 24-hr, then refilled in steps, twice weekly. Two media with different particle sizes but similar porosities were also compared. The two media, light weight expanded shale and gravel, were both continuously loaded. As hypothesized, the wetland cell that was intermittently loaded had higher dissolved oxygen, greater ammonia removal, and greater nitrate production than the continuously loaded cells. Areal NH(3)-N removal for the intermittently loaded cell was 0.90 g m(-2) d(-1) compared to 0.47 g m(-2) d(-1) for the control. Ammonia removal was also higher in continuously loaded gravel cells than in cells with expanded shale. Ammonia-N removal was an order of magnitude lower in a similar SSF wetland that had been in operation for 3 years. However, CBOD(5), total suspended solids, and total nitrogen did not vary substantially among the treatments.

  4. Performance of experimental horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands fed with dissolved or particulate organic matter.

    PubMed

    Caselles-Osorio, Aracelly; García, Joan

    2006-11-01

    In this study, the effect of the influent type of organic matter (dissolved or particulate) on the efficiency of two experimental horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF CWs) was investigated. The SSF CWs' surface area was 0.54 m(2) and the water depth was 0.3m. They were monitored for a period of 9 months. One of the SSF CWs was fed with dissolved organic matter (glucose, assumed to be readily biodegradable), and the other with particulate organic matter (starch, assumed to be slowly biodegradable). The removal efficiency of the systems was tested at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) in the presence or absence of sulphate. The removal efficiency of the COD was not different in the two systems, reaching eliminations of around 85% in the presence of sulphates and around 95% in their absence. Ammonia N removal was low in the two SSF CWs; the system fed with glucose generally had statistically significant higher removal (45%) than the one fed with starch (40%). Ammonia N removal was more affected by the HRT than by the presence or absence of sulphates. Hydraulic conductivity measurements showed that it was lower near the inlet of the SFF CW fed with glucose, probably connected to the fact that there was a more substantial development of the biofilm. The results of this study suggest that SSF CWs are not sensitive to the type of organic matter in the influents, whether it is readily (like glucose) or slowly (like starch) biodegradable, for the removal of COD.

  5. Determination and removal of antibiotics in secondary effluent using a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhui; Ning, Ke; Zhang, Wenwen; Guo, Yuanjie; Chen, Jun; Liang, Chen

    2013-04-01

    Increased attention is currently being directed towards the potential negative effects of antibiotics and other PPCPs discharged into the aquatic environment via municipal WWTP secondary effluents. A number of analytical methods, such as high performance liquid chromatography technologies, including a high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence method (HPLC-FLD), high performance liquid chromatography-UV detection method (HPLC-UV) and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method (HPLC-MS), have been suggested as determination technologies for antibiotic residues in water. In this study, we implement a HPLC-MS/MS combined method to detect and analyze antibiotics in WWTP secondary effluent and apply a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (CW) as an advanced wastewater treatment for removing antibiotics in the WWTP secondary effluent. The results show that there were 2 macrolides, 2 quinolones and 5 sulfas in WWTP secondary effluent among all the 22 antibiotics considered. After the CW advanced treatment, the concentration removal efficiencies and removal loads of 9 antibiotics were 53-100% and 0.004-0.7307 μg m(-2) per day, respectively.

  6. Removal of total suspended solids from wastewater in constructed horizontal flow subsurface wetlands.

    PubMed

    Manios, T; Stentiford, E I; Millner, P

    2003-06-01

    Subsurface horizontal flow experimental wetlands (reed beds), were designed and built based on a combination of two design methodologies, that of the WRc and Severn Trent Water plc (1996) and that of the USA, EPA (1988). Four different growing media were used with a combination of top soil, gravel, river sand, and mature sewage sludge compost, to determine the best substrate for total suspended solids (TSS) removal. Eight units were constructed, two for each growing media. One bed for each pair was planted with Typha latifolia plants commonly known as cattails. Primary treated domestic wastewater, was continuously fed to the beds for more than six months. All eight beds performed very well. The best performance was achieved by the gravel reed beds with an almost constant removal rate above 95% and an average effluent concentration of less than 10 mg/L. Soil based beds containing top soil and sand, managed to reach values of removal around 90%. The wetlands containing compost in their substrate, produced an effluent with average concentration of less than 30 mg/L and a percentage removal between 80% and 90%. As expected, there was no significant difference in the performance of planted and unplanted wetlands.

  7. Sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin removal using a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor.

    PubMed

    Chatila, Sami; Amparo, Maura R; Carvalho, Lucas S; Penteado, Eduardo D; Tomita, Inês N; Santos-Neto, Álvaro J; Lima Gomes, Paulo C F; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotics sulfamethoxazole (SMTX) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) are commonly used in human and veterinary medicine, which explains their occurrence in wastewater. Anaerobic reactors are low-cost, simple and suitable technology to wastewater treatment, but there is a lack of studies related to the removal efficiency of antibiotics. To overcome this knowledge gap, the objective of this study was to evaluate the removal kinetics of SMTX and CIP using a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor. Two different concentrations were evaluated, for SMTX 20 and 40 μg L(-1); for CIP 2.0 and 5.0 μg L(-1). The affluent and effluent analysis was carried out in liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with the sample preparation procedure using an off-line solid-phase extraction. This method was developed, validated and successfully applied for monitoring the affluent and effluent samples. The removal efficiency found for both antibiotics at the two concentrations studied was 97%. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) exhibited kinetic constants that were different from that observed for the antibiotics, indicating the absence of co-metabolism. Also, though the antibiotic concentration was increased, there was no inhibitory effect in the removal of COD and antibiotics.

  8. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) dechlorination in horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB) reactors.

    PubMed

    Damianovic, M H R Z; Moraes, E M; Zaiat, M; Foresti, E

    2009-10-01

    This study verifies the potential applicability of horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB) reactors to pentachlorophenol (PCP) dechlorination. Two bench-scale HAIB reactors (R1 and R2) were filled with cubic polyurethane foam matrices containing immobilized anaerobic sludge. The reactors were then continuously fed with synthetic wastewater consisting of PCP, glucose, acetic acid, and formic acid as co-substrates for PCP anaerobic degradation. Before being immobilized in polyurethane foam matrices, the biomass was exposed to wastewater containing PCP in reactors fed at a semi-continuous rate of 2.0 microg PCP g(-1) VS. The applied PCP loading rate was increased from 0.05 to 2.59 mg PCP l(-1)day(-1) for R1, and from 0.06 to 4.15 mg PCP l(-1)day(-1) for R2. The organic loading rates (OLR) were 1.1 and 1.7 kg COD m(-3)day(-1) at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 24h for R1 and 18 h for R2. Under such conditions, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of up to 98% were achieved in the HAIB reactors. Both reactors exhibited the ability to remove 97% of the loaded PCP. Dichlorophenol (DCP) was the primary chlorophenol detected in the effluent. The adsorption of PCP and metabolites formed during PCP degradation in the packed bed was negligible for PCP removal efficiency.

  9. Sub-grid drag models for horizontal cylinder arrays immersed in gas-particle multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2013-09-08

    Immersed cylindrical tube arrays often are used as heat exchangers in gas-particle fluidized beds. In multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of large fluidized beds, explicit resolution of small cylinders is computationally infeasible. Instead, the cylinder array may be viewed as an effective porous medium in coarse-grid simulations. The cylinders' influence on the suspension as a whole, manifested as an effective drag force, and on the relative motion between gas and particles, manifested as a correction to the gas-particle drag, must be modeled via suitable sub-grid constitutive relationships. In this work, highly resolved unit-cell simulations of flow around an array of horizontal cylinders, arranged in a staggered configuration, are filtered to construct sub-grid, or `filtered', drag models, which can be implemented in coarse-grid simulations. The force on the suspension exerted by the cylinders is comprised of, as expected, a buoyancy contribution, and a kinetic component analogous to fluid drag on a single cylinder. Furthermore, the introduction of tubes also is found to enhance segregation at the scale of the cylinder size, which, in turn, leads to a reduction in the filtered gas-particle drag.

  10. Experimental mixed convection from a large, vertical plate in a horizontal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebers, D. L.; Moffat, R. J.; Schwind, R. G.

    Mixed-convection heat transfer coefficients have been measured on a 3M x 3M vertical plate, parallel to a horizontal wind. Measurements were made at 105 locations on the plate, at each of 36 combinations of plate temperature and wind speed. The plate temperature was varied between 40 and 600 C, with wind speeds from 0 to 6 M/s. The region of mixed-convection effects on the average heat transfer from the plate lies between Gr/Re-squared values of 0.7 and 10.0. Outside that region, the average heat transfer coefficient can be calculated using correlations for pure forced or pure free convection. Boundary layer flow-angle measurements (not presented here) showed mixed convection effects on the hydrodynamics for all Gr/Re-squared values tested except pure free convection. Increasing the plate temperature at constant velocity caused transition to move upstream and reduced the slope of the heat transfer coefficient variation with x-distance in the turbulent region.

  11. Alternative filter media for phosphorous removal in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Vohla, Christina; Põldvere, Elar; Noorvee, Alar; Kuusemets, Valdo; Mander, Ulo

    2005-01-01

    During the study period from 1997 to 2002 the purification efficiency of phosphorus in the horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) constructed wetland (CW) in Kodijärve, has been quite high (63-95%). However, slowly increasing trend in outlet P concentrations and decreasing annual P removal rate are obviously the indicators that show possible saturation processes in filter media. To search for potential filter media with high phosphorus sorption capacity, sorption characteristics and particle size distribution of several local sands, gravels, glauconite-sandstone, LWA, and calcareous waste products from oil-shale industry were investigated. The average P sorption capacity for best materials (crashed ash block, oil, shale fly ash and the sediment from oil shale ash plateau) was higher than 96% and estimated design capacity was around 4-5 g P kg(-1). According to results, sediment from oil shale ash plateau was considered as perspective filter media for P retention. In Summer 2002 experimental sedimentation filter, filled with the sediment from oil shale ash plateau, was installed in the outlet from the Kodijärve HSSF CW. According to preliminary results the average P removal in the sedimentation filter was 52%.

  12. Influence of chlorothalonil on the removal of organic matter in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Casas-Zapata, Juan C; Ríos, Karina; Florville-Alejandre, Tomás R; Morató, Jordi; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of chlorothalonil (CLT) on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCW) planted with Phragmites australis. Physicochemical parameters of influent and effluent water samples, microbial population counting methods and statistical analysis were used to evaluate the influence of CLT on organic matter removal efficiency. The experiments were conducted on four planted replicate wetlands (HSSFCW-Pa) and one unplanted control wetland (HSSFCW-NPa). The wetlands exhibited high average organic matter removal efficiencies (HSSFCW-Pa: 80.6% DOC, 98.0% COD; HSSFCW-NPa: 93.2% DOC, 98.4% COD). The addition of CLT did not influence organic removal parameters. In all cases CLT concentrations in the effluent occurred in concentrations lower than the detection limit of the analytical method. Microbial population counts from HSSFCW-Pa showed significant correlations among different microbial groups and with different physicochemical variables. The apparent independence of organic matter removal and CLT inputs, along with the CLT depletion observed in effluent samples demonstrated that HSSFCW are a viable technology for the treatment of agricultural effluents contaminated with organo-chloride pesticides like CLT.

  13. Use of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands to treat reverse osmosis concentrate of rolling wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingcheng; Zhao, Gang; Huang, Xiangfeng; Guo, Haobo; Liu, Wei

    2017-03-04

    According to the characteristics of the reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) generated from iron and steel company, we used three sets of parallel horizontal subsurface flow (HSF) constructed wetlands (CWs) with different plants and substrate layouts to treat the high-salinity wastewater. The plant growth and removal efficiencies under saline condition were evaluated. The evaluation was based entirely on routinely collected water quality data and the physical and chemical characteristics of the plants (Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia, Iris wilsonii, and Scirpus planiculmis). The principal parameters of concern in the effluent were chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP). The results showed that the CWs were able to remove COD, TN, and TP from ROC. S. planiculmis was not suitable for the treatment of high-saline wastewater. The sequence of metals accumulated in CW plants was K>Ca>Na>Mg>Zn>Cu. More than 70% of metals were accumulated in the aboveground of P. australis. The CW filled with gravel and manganese ore and planted with P. australis and T. latifolia had the best performance of pollutant removal, with average removal of 49.96%, 39.45%, and 72.01% for COD, TN, and TP, respectively. The effluent water quality met the regulation in China. These results suggested that HSF CW planted with P. australis and T. latifolia can be applied for ROC pollutants removal.

  14. Statistical analysis of the horizontal divergent flow in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, Shin; Hayashi, Keiji; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-10-10

    Solar active regions (ARs) are thought to be formed by magnetic fields from the convection zone. Our flux emergence simulations revealed that a strong horizontal divergent flow (HDF) of unmagnetized plasma appears at the photosphere before the flux begins to emerge. In our earlier study, we analyzed HMI data for a single AR and confirmed presence of this precursor plasma flow in the actual Sun. In this paper, as an extension of our earlier study, we conducted a statistical analysis of the HDFs to further investigate their characteristics and better determine the properties. From SDO/HMI data, we picked up 23 flux emergence events over a period of 14 months, the total flux of which ranges from 10{sup 20} to 10{sup 22} Mx. Out of 23 selected events, 6 clear HDFs were detected by the method we developed in our earlier study, and 7 HDFs detected by visual inspection were added to this statistic analysis. We found that the duration of the HDF is on average 61 minutes and the maximum HDF speed is on average 3.1 km s{sup –1}. We also estimated the rising speed of the subsurface magnetic flux to be 0.6-1.4 km s{sup –1}. These values are highly consistent with our previous one-event analysis as well as our simulation results. The observation results lead us to the conclusion that the HDF is a rather common feature in the earliest phase of AR emergence. Moreover, our HDF analysis has the capability of determining the subsurface properties of emerging fields that cannot be directly measured.

  15. Statistical Analysis of the Horizontal Divergent Flow in Emerging Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Shin; Hayashi, Keiji; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-10-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are thought to be formed by magnetic fields from the convection zone. Our flux emergence simulations revealed that a strong horizontal divergent flow (HDF) of unmagnetized plasma appears at the photosphere before the flux begins to emerge. In our earlier study, we analyzed HMI data for a single AR and confirmed presence of this precursor plasma flow in the actual Sun. In this paper, as an extension of our earlier study, we conducted a statistical analysis of the HDFs to further investigate their characteristics and better determine the properties. From SDO/HMI data, we picked up 23 flux emergence events over a period of 14 months, the total flux of which ranges from 1020 to 1022 Mx. Out of 23 selected events, 6 clear HDFs were detected by the method we developed in our earlier study, and 7 HDFs detected by visual inspection were added to this statistic analysis. We found that the duration of the HDF is on average 61 minutes and the maximum HDF speed is on average 3.1 km s-1. We also estimated the rising speed of the subsurface magnetic flux to be 0.6-1.4 km s-1. These values are highly consistent with our previous one-event analysis as well as our simulation results. The observation results lead us to the conclusion that the HDF is a rather common feature in the earliest phase of AR emergence. Moreover, our HDF analysis has the capability of determining the subsurface properties of emerging fields that cannot be directly measured.

  16. Nitrogen dynamics and removal in a horizontal flow biofilm reactor for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Clifford, E; Nielsen, M; Sørensen, K; Rodgers, M

    2010-07-01

    A horizontal flow biofilm reactor (HFBR) designed for the treatment of synthetic wastewater (SWW) was studied to examine the spatial distribution and dynamics of nitrogen transformation processes. Detailed analyses of bulk water and biomass samples, giving substrate and proportions of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidising bacteria (NOB) gradients in the HFBR, were carried out using chemical analyses, sensor rate measurements and molecular techniques. Based on these results, proposals for the design of HFBR systems are presented. The HFBR comprised a stack of 60 polystyrene sheets with 10-mm deep frustums. SWW was intermittently dosed at two points, Sheets 1 and 38, in a 2 to 1 volume ratio respectively. Removals of 85.7% COD, 97.4% 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) and 61.7% TN were recorded during the study. In the nitrification zones of the HFBR, which were separated by a step-feed zone, little variation in nitrification activity was found, despite decreasing in situ ammonia concentrations. The results further indicate significant simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) activity in the nitrifying zones of the HFBR. Sensor measurements showed a linear increase in potential nitrification rates at temperatures between 7 and 16 degrees C, and similar rates of nitrification were measured at concentrations between 1 and 20mg NH(4)-N/l. These results can be used to optimise HFBR reactor design. The HFBR technology could provide an alternative, low maintenance, economically efficient system for carbon and nitrogen removal for low flow wastewater discharges. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of flow pattern transitions for horizontal liquid-liquid pipe flows by using multi-scale distribution entropy in coupled 3D phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Zong, Yan-Bo; Wang, Hong-Mei; Yan, Cong; Gao, Zhong-Ke; Jin, Ning-De

    2017-03-01

    Horizontal oil-water two-phase flows often exist in many industrial processes. Uncovering the dynamic mechanism of the flow pattern transition is of great significance for modeling the flow parameters. In this study we propose a method called multi-scale distribution entropy (MSDE) in a coupled 3D phase space, and use it to characterize the flow pattern transitions in horizontal oil-water two-phase flows. Firstly, the proposed MSDE is validated with Lorenz system and ARFIMA processes. Interestingly, it is found that the MSDE is dramatically associated with the cross-correlations of the coupled time series. Then, through conducting the experiment of horizontal oil-water two-phase flows, the upstream and downstream flow information is collected using a conductance cross-correlation velocity probe. The coupled cross-correlated signals are investigated using the MSDE method, and the results indicate that the MSDE is an effective tool uncovering the complex dynamic behaviors of flow pattern transitions.

  18. Gas holdup and flow regime transition in spider-sparger bubble column: effect of liquid phase properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besagni, G.; Inzoli, F.; De Guido, G.; Pellegrini, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of the liquid velocity and the liquid phase properties on the gas holdup and the flow regime transition in a large-diameter and large-scale counter-current two-phase bubble column. In particular, we compared and analysed the experimental data obtained in our previous experimental studies. The bubble column is 5.3 m in height, has an inner diameter of 0.24 m, it was operated with gas superficial velocities in the range of 0.004–0.20 m/s and, in the counter-current mode, the liquid was recirculated up to a superficial velocity of -0.09 m/s. Air was used as the dispersed phase and various fluids (tap water, aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ethanol and monoethylene glycol) were employed as liquid phases. The experimental dataset consist in gas holdup measurements and was used to investigate the global fluid dynamics and the flow regime transition between the homogeneous flow regime and the transition flow regime. We found that the liquid velocity and the liquid phase properties significantly affect the gas holdup and the flow regime transition. In this respect, a possible relationship (based on the lift force) between the flow regime transition and the gas holdup was proposed.

  19. Laminar boundary layer flow of saturated vapor and its condensate over a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrnaios, D. N.; Pelekasis, N. A.; Tsamopoulos, J. A.

    2002-06-01

    The steady two-dimensional laminar flow of a stream of saturated vapor flowing over a tube that is kept at a uniform temperature, below the saturation temperature, is examined. Owing to the temperature difference between the vapor stream and the solid surface a film of condensate is generated that flows along the surface due to shear, pressure-drop, and gravity. In the limit as the boundary layer and film thickness remain smaller than the radius of curvature of the surface a simplified lubrication-type formulation describes the temperature and flow fields in the film, whereas the usual boundary layer formulation is applied in the vapor boundary layer. The case of flow past a horizontal cylinder of radius R is investigated numerically with the oncoming stream aligned with gravity. The parameters that control momentum and heat transfer in this problem are the viscosity ratio, μcs/μss, the density ratio, ρcs/ρss, the Prandtl number, Pr=cpcsμcs/kcs, the Froude number, Fr=U∞2/(gπR), and finally the thickness ratio between the condensate and the vapor boundary layer, ɛ, which is also a measure of the temperature difference between the vapor stream and the tube wall. Then, the Nusselt number and the skin friction coefficient, averaged over the upper half of the cylinder, are calculated for a wide parameter range. When Fr is very small and ɛ relatively large the flow remains attached until the trailing stagnation point of the cylinder. As the effect of adverse pressure drop becomes more pronounced (Fr increases or ɛ decreases) it is shown that the solution exhibits two different types of singularity in the rear part of the cylinder. The first one is a typical Goldstein singularity because it appears at the tube wall and it is associated with vanishing skin friction (wall shear) and rapidly increasing film thickness. The second one takes place near the interface between the vapor stream and the film of condensate in a region where very small velocities prevail in

  20. Velocity asymmetry of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in the creep and flow regimes.

    PubMed

    Vaňatka, M; Rojas-Sánchez, J-C; Vogel, J; Bonfim, M; Belmeguenai, M; Roussigné, Y; Stashkevich, A; Thiaville, A; Pizzini, S

    2015-08-19

    We have carried out measurements of domain wall dynamics in a Pt/Co/GdOx(t) wedge sample with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. When driven by an easy-axis field Hz in the presence of an in-plane field Hx, the domain wall propagation is different along [Formula: see text]x, as expected for samples presenting Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DMI) interaction. In the creep regime, the sign and the value of the domain wall velocity asymmetry changes along the wedge. We show that in our samples the domain wall speed versus Hx curves in the creep regime cannot be explained simply in terms of the variation of the domain wall energy with Hx, as suggested by previous works. For this reason the strength and the sign of the DMI cannot be extracted from these measurements. To obtain reliable information on the DMI strength using magnetic field-induced domain wall dynamics, measurements have been performed with high fields, bringing the DW close to the flow regime of propagation. In this case we find large values of the DMI, consistent in magnitude and sign with those obtained from Brillouin light scattering measurements.

  1. Assessment of future variability in extreme precipitation and the potential effects on the wadi flow regime.

    PubMed

    Gunawardhana, Luminda Niroshana; Al-Rawas, Ghazi A; Kazama, So; Al-Najar, Khalid A

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate how the magnitude and occurrence of extreme precipitation events are affected by climate change and to predict the subsequent impacts on the wadi flow regime in the Al-Khod catchment area, Muscat, Oman. The tank model, a lumped-parameter rainfall-runoff model, was used to simulate the wadi flow. Precipitation extremes and their potential future changes were predicted using six-member ensembles of general circulation models (GCMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Yearly maxima of the daily precipitation and wadi flow for varying return periods were compared for observed and projected data by fitting the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution function. Flow duration curves (FDC) were developed and compared for the observed and projected wadi flows. The results indicate that extreme precipitation events consistently increase by the middle of the twenty-first century for all return periods (49-52%), but changes may become more profound by the end of the twenty-first century (81-101%). Consequently, the relative change in extreme wadi flow is greater than twofolds for all of the return periods in the late twenty-first century compared to the relative changes that occur in the mid-century period. Precipitation analysis further suggests that greater than 50% of the precipitation may be associated with extreme events in the future. The FDC analysis reveals that changes in low-to-moderate flows (Q60-Q90) may not be statistically significant, whereas increases in high flows (Q5) are statistically robust (20 and 25% for the mid- and late-century periods, respectively).

  2. The shock-vortex interaction patterns affected by vortex flow regime and vortex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Barik, Hrushikesh; Chang, Se-Myong

    2009-08-01

    We have used a third-order essentially non-oscillatory method to obtain numerical shadowgraphs for investigation of shock-vortex interaction patterns. To search different interaction patterns, we have tested two vortex models (the composite vortex model and the Taylor vortex model) and as many as 47 parametric data sets. By shock-vortex interaction, the impinging shock is deformed to a S-shape with leading and lagging parts of the shock. The vortex flow is locally accelerated by the leading shock and locally decelerated by the lagging shock, having a severely elongated vortex core with two vertices. When the leading shock escapes the vortex, implosion effect creates a high pressure in the vertex area where the flow had been most expanded. This compressed region spreads in time with two frontal waves, an induced expansion wave and an induced compression wave. They are subsonic waves when the shock-vortex interaction is weak but become supersonic waves for strong interactions. Under a intermediate interaction, however, an induced shock wave is first developed where flow speed is supersonic but is dissipated where the incoming flow is subsonic. We have identified three different interaction patterns that depend on the vortex flow regime characterized by the shock-vortex interaction.

  3. Flow regime effects on mature Populus fremontii (Fremont cottonwood) productivity on two contrasting dryland river floodplains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    I compared riparian cottonwood (Populus fremontii) productivity-discharge relationships in a relictual stand along the highly regulated Green River and in a naturally functioning stand along the unregulated Yampa River in semiarid northwest Colorado. I used multiple regression to model flow effects on annual basal area increment (BAI) from 1982 to 2011, after removing any autocorrelation present. Each BAI series was developed from 20 trees whose mean size (67 cm diameter at breast height [DBH]) was equivalent in the two stands. BAI was larger in the Yampa River stand except in 2 y when defoliating leaf beetles were present there. I found no evidence for a Yampa flood-magnitude threshold above which BAI declined. Flow variables explained ∼45% of residual BAI variability, with most explained by current-year maximum 90-d discharge (QM90) in the Yampa River stand and by a measure of the year-to-year change in QM90 in the Green River stand. The latter reflects a management-imposed ceiling on flood magnitude—Flaming Gorge Dam power plant capacity—infrequently exceeded during the study period. BAI in the relictual stand began to trend upward in 1992 when flows started to mimic a natural flow regime. Mature Fremont cottonwoods appear to be ecologically resilient. Their productivity along regulated rivers might be optimized using multiyear environmental flow designs.

  4. River adjustments under varying flow and sediment sypply regimes. The role of hydrograh shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer-Boix, C.; Elgueta, M. A.; Hassan, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    This research aims to explore how sediment supply conditions and hydrograph shape influence bed surface evolution, vertical and downstream sediment sorting, and sediment transport in gravel bed streams. While a significant body of research has been focused on channel evolution under constant flow regimes, few studies have focused on the impacts of flow variations in channel adjustments. Particularly, we are interested in examining the impact of the sediment supply regime and hydrograph magnitude and duration on channel adjustments and sediment transport rates. To this end, we conducted a set of experiments in a 0.8 m-wide, 5 m-long tilting flume. Flow discharge during the runs was increased and decreased at steps of certain duration allowing us to vary the steepness of rising and falling limbs of hydrographs. The influence of hydrograph shape (symmetrical and asymmetrical) on river morphodynamics was tested. Flow rates during the experiments ranged from 30 l/s to 70 l/s. Some of the experiments were conducted under no feed conditions while others were carried out with sediment supply, which ranged from 10 kg/h to 80 kg/h. The feed texture in these latter runs was identical to that of the original mixture (Dmin = 0.5 mm, Dmax = 64 mm, Dg = 5.65 mm and σg = 3.05). Initial bed slope and surface configuration were obtained after varying times of conditioning under constant flow and no feed. Finally, we conducted equilibrium experiments under constant flow and sediment supply that were used as reference. All these sets of experiments benefited from a very detailed and extensive data monitoring which allowed us to provide a unique description or river adjustments under varying flow conditions. Data acquisition included: 1) bed surface images covering the entire flume, 2) bed scans at 2 mm resolution of the whole flume and 3) real-time measurements of bedload transport (rate and texture) at the outlet of the flume. This set up allows us to obtain fractional particle

  5. Unsteady Flow of Radiating and Chemically Reacting MHD Micropolar Fluid in Slip-Flow Regime with Heat Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Dahab, S. M.; Mohamed, R. A.

    2013-11-01

    An analytical study of the problem of unsteady free convection with thermal radiation and heat generation on MHD micropolar fluid flow through a porous medium bounded by a semi-infinite vertical plate in a slip-flow regime has been presented. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to describe the radiation heat flux in the energy equation. The homogeneous chemical reaction of first order is accounted for in the mass diffusion equation. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicular on the porous surface absorbing micropolar fluid with a suction velocity varying with time. A perturbation technique is applied to obtain the expressions for the velocity, microrotation, temperature, and concentration distributions. Expressions for the skin-friction, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are also obtained. The results are discussed graphically for different values of the parameters entered into the equations of the problem.

  6. Integrated model for the natural flow regime in the Cerro Prieto hydrothermal system, B. C. , Mexico, based upon petrological and isotope geochemical criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; Hoagland, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of cuttings and core at Cerro Prieto have now been extended to more than 50 boreholes. The aims of this petrological and isotopic work are to determine the shape of the reservoir, its physical properties, and its temperature distribution and flow regime before the steam field was produced. A map showing the first occurrence of hydrothermal epidote shows a dome-shaped top to the steam-producing zone. The hottest of the mapped mineral zones - the biotite vermiculite zone - shows a dome displaced to the northeast relative to the epidote zone. Patterns of mineral zones observed in wells are consistent with patterns of oxygen isotopic ratios in calcite and quartz. Using both criteria all of the boreholes so far studied were classified as belonging to one of four different regimes. These are: (a) the thermal plume of upward flowing water close to boiling, marked by a regular sequence of prograde mineral zones and large isotopic shifts; (b) the discharge system where fluid leaks to the surface, as indicated by the occurrence of only a few low temperature mineral zones, which extend over large depth intervals with little isotope exchange; (c) the horizontal flow zone, in which boreholes penetrate reversals of both mineral zones and isotope shifts with increasing depth; and (d) the recharge zone where cold water is descending. Plotting these four types of boreholes on a map reveals a simple, consistent, pattern. This is interpreted to have been produced by a thermal plume dipping at 45/sup 0/ to the northeast.

  7. The shrinking instability of toroidal liquid droplets in the Stokes flow regime.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenwei; Bowick, Mark J

    2011-03-01

    We analyze the stability and dynamics of toroidal liquid droplets. In addition to the Rayleigh instabilities akin to those of a cylindrical droplet there is a shrinking instability that is unique to the topology of the torus and dominates in the limit that the aspect ratio is near one (fat tori). We first find an analytic expression for the pressure distribution inside the droplet. We then determine the velocity field in the bulk fluid, in the Stokes flow regime, by solving the biharmonic equation for the stream function. The flow pattern in the external fluid is analyzed qualitatively by exploiting symmetries. This elucidates the detailed nature of the shrinking mode and the swelling of the cross-section following from incompressibility. Finally the shrinking rate of fat toroidal droplets is derived by energy conservation.

  8. Limestone and Zeolite as Alternative Media in Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands: Laboratory-Scale Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizama, K.; Jaque, I.; Ayala, J.

    2016-12-01

    Arsenic is well known for its chronic toxicity. Millions of people around the world are currently at risk, drinking water with As concentrations above 10 ppb, the WHO drinking water guideline. Although different treatment options exist, they are often limited by elevated costs and maintenance requirements. Constructed wetlands are a natural water treatment system, capable to remove metals and metalloids -including As- via different physical, chemical and biological processes. The use of alternative supporting media to enhance As removal in subsurface flow wetlands has been recommended, but not sufficiently studied. Limestone and zeolite have been identified as effective supporting media in subsurface flow wetlands aiming As removal. However, there are still key aspects to be addressed, such as the implications of using these media, the speciation in the solid phase, the role of vegetation, etc. This study investigated the performance of limestone and zeolite in three types of experiments: batch, column and as main supporting media in a bench scale horizontal subsurface flow wetland system. Synthetic water resembling a contaminated river in Chile (As concentration=3 mg/L, Fe concentration= 100 mg/L, pH=2) was used in all experiments. In the batch experiments, the As concentration, the mass of media and the contact time were varied. The column system consisted of three limestone columns and three zeolite columns, operated under a hydraulic loading of 20 mm/d. The wetland system consisted of twelve PVC cells: six filled with zeolite and six with limestone. Phragmites australis were planted in three cells of each media type, as control cells. From the batch experiments, maximum As sorption capacities as indicated by Langmuir model were 1.3 mg/g for limestone and 0.17 mg/g for zeolite, at 18 h contact time and 6.3 g/L medium concentration. EDS and XPS analyses revealed that As and Fe were retained in zeolite at the end of the batch experiments. Zeolite and limestone

  9. Rheology of dense granular materials: steady, uniform flow and the avalanche regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajchenbach, Jean

    2005-06-01

    In the first part we present experimental results concerning the flow of a densely packed grain collection down a two-dimensional inclined channel. For the range of inclinations corresponding to a steady, uniform regime and to nonsliding conditions at the bottom, we obtain quasi-linear profiles of velocity, that are in contradiction with the predictions of the kinetic theory. We attribute this discrepancy to the inadequacy of the binary collision picture in the case of dense packings. We also show that the various velocity profiles obtained for different flow rates and slopes merge onto a single master curve, according to the following law: v_{X}/\\sqrt {gd} \\propto [\\sin (\\theta-\\theta_{\\mathrm {c}}) /\\cos \\theta_{\\mathrm {c}}]^{1 / 2 }y/d (d being the grain diameter, θ the channel inclination angle and θc the maximal angle of repose), provided that the regime is steady and uniform. Arguing that continuous paths of transient contacts are effective for transporting momentum and energy through the bulk, and that the associated dissipation time is very short compared to the time associated with shearing, we succeed in explaining this scaling behaviour and the paradoxical nonzero shear rate in the vicinity of the free surface. We also show that for dense particulate flows, the dissipation is mainly due to frictional sliding. In the second part, we emphasize some remarkable features exhibited by dry grain avalanches in laboratory experiments. According to the slope angle, the rear front propagates either upwards or downwards, with velocity approximately equal to the depth averaged velocity of the avalanche. As a counterpart, in both regimes, the velocity magnitude of the head front remains of the order of twice the depth averaged avalanche velocity. We suggest simple elementary mechanisms capable of accounting for these observations. We propose then an analytical modelling aimed at describing the combined processes governing the avalanche expansion. The two

  10. Mapping the fluid flow and shear near the core surface using the radial and horizontal components of the magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Andrew; Bloxham, Jeremy

    1991-01-01

    The problem of calculating the temporal evolution of both the radial and horizontal poloidal components of a field, given an initial field and the flow and shear, is first considered. Attention is then given to the inverse problem of determining the flow and shear, given an initial field and its temporal evolution. The nonuniqueness inherent in such inversions is discussed, and it is shown that part of the nonuniqueness in the shear is closely related to that in the flow derived from just the radial induction equation.

  11. Effects of Urbanization on the Flow Regimes of Semi-Arid Southern California Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, R. J.; Bledsoe, B. P.; Stein, E. D.

    2010-12-01

    Stream channel erosion and associated habitat degradation are pervasive in streams draining urban areas in the southwestern US. The prevalence of these impacts results from the inherent sensitivity of streams in semi-arid climates to changes in flow and sediment regimes, and past inattention to management of geomorphically effective flows. Addressing this issue is difficult due to the lack of data linking ranges of flow (from small to large runoff events) to geomorphic channel response. Forty-three U. S. Geological Survey gages with record lengths greater than ~15 yrs and watershed areas less than ~250 square kilometers were used to empirically model the effects of urbanization on streams in southern California. The watersheds spanned a gradient of urban development and ranged from 0 to 23% total impervious area in 2001. With little flow control at the subdivision scale to date, most impervious area in the region is relatively well-connected to surface-drainage networks. Consequently, total impervious area was an effective surrogate for urbanization, and emerged as a significant (p < 0.05) predictor of instantaneous peak-flow rates at the 1.5- and 2-yr recurrence intervals, with decreasing significance and influence at higher return periods. For example, peak factors for a watershed with 20% imperviousness were ~10, 6, and 2 for the 1.5-, 2-, and 5-yr flows, respectively, with no discernable influence at flows greater than the 10-yr event. Most importantly with respect to geomorphic response, urbanization extent was a significant predictor of duration density functions, which integrate the magnitude and duration of mean daily discharges. This approach expands on previous scaling procedures to produce histogram-style cumulative flow duration graphs for ungaged sites based on urbanization extent and other watershed descriptors. Urbanization resulted in proportionally-longer durations of all geomorphically-effective flows, with a more pronounced effect on the

  12. Effects of hydrologic infrastructure on flow regimes of California's Central Valley rivers: Implications for fish populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Larry R.; Bauer, Marissa L.

    2010-01-01

    Alteration of natural flow regimes is generally acknowledged to have negative effects on native biota; however, methods for defining ecologically appropriate flow regimes in managed river systems are only beginning to be developed. Understanding how past and present water management has affected rivers is an important part of developing such tools. In this paper, we evaluate how existing hydrologic infrastructure and management affect streamflow characteristics of rivers in the Central Valley, California and discuss those characteristics in the context of habitat requirements of native and alien fishes. We evaluated the effects of water management by comparing observed discharges with estimated discharges assuming no water management ("full natural runoff"). Rivers in the Sacramento River drainage were characterized by reduced winter–spring discharges and augmented discharges in other months. Rivers in the San Joaquin River drainage were characterized by reduced discharges in all months but particularly in winter and spring. Two largely unaltered streams had hydrographs similar to those based on full natural runoff of the regulated rivers. The reduced discharges in the San Joaquin River drainage streams are favourable for spawning of many alien species, which is consistent with observed patterns of fish distribution and abundance in the Central Valley. However, other factors, such as water temperature, are also important to the relative success of native and alien resident fishes. As water management changes in response to climate change and societal demands, interdisciplinary programs of research and monitoring will be essential for anticipating effects on fishes and to avoid unanticipated ecological outcomes.

  13. Dynamic regimes of buoyancy-affected two-phase flow in unconsolidated porous media.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, M; Khalili, A

    2006-03-01

    The invasion and subsequent flow of a nonwetting fluid (NWF) in a three-dimensional, unconsolidated porous medium saturated with a wetting fluid of higher density and viscosity have been studied experimentally using a light-transmission technique. Distinct dynamic regimes have been found for different relative magnitudes of viscous, capillary, and gravity forces. It is shown that the ratio of viscous and hydrostatic pressure gradients can be used as a relevant dimensionless number K for the characterization of the different flow regimes. For low values of K, the invasion is characterized by the migration and fragmentation of isolated clusters of the NWF resulting from the prevalence of gravity and capillary forces. At high values of K, the dominance of viscous and gravity forces leads to an anisotropic fingerlike invasion. When the invasion stops after the breakthrough of the NWF at the open upper boundary, the invasion structure retracts under the influence of gravity and transforms into stable vertical channels. It is shown that the stability of these channels is the result of a balance between hydrostatic and viscous pressure gradients.

  14. Dynamic regimes of buoyancy-affected two-phase flow in unconsolidated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöhr, M.; Khalili, A.

    2006-03-01

    The invasion and subsequent flow of a nonwetting fluid (NWF) in a three-dimensional, unconsolidated porous medium saturated with a wetting fluid of higher density and viscosity have been studied experimentally using a light-transmission technique. Distinct dynamic regimes have been found for different relative magnitudes of viscous, capillary, and gravity forces. It is shown that the ratio of viscous and hydrostatic pressure gradients can be used as a relevant dimensionless number K for the characterization of the different flow regimes. For low values of K , the invasion is characterized by the migration and fragmentation of isolated clusters of the NWF resulting from the prevalence of gravity and capillary forces. At high values of K , the dominance of viscous and gravity forces leads to an anisotropic fingerlike invasion. When the invasion stops after the breakthrough of the NWF at the open upper boundary, the invasion structure retracts under the influence of gravity and transforms into stable vertical channels. It is shown that the stability of these channels is the result of a balance between hydrostatic and viscous pressure gradients.

  15. Measurement of Size-dependent Dynamic Shape Factors of Quartz Particles in Two Flow Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Jennifer M.; Bell, David M.; Imre, D.; Kleiber, Paul; Grassian, Vicki H.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-08-02

    Understanding and modeling the behavior of quartz dust particles, commonly found in the atmosphere, requires knowledge of many relevant particles properties, including particle shape. This study uses a single particle mass spectrometer, a differential mobility analyzer, and an aerosol particle mass analyzer to measure quartz aerosol particles mobility, aerodynamic, and volume equivalent diameters, mass, composition, effective density, and dynamic shape factor as a function of particle size, in both the free molecular and transition flow regimes. The results clearly demonstrate that dynamic shape factors can vary significantly as a function of particle size. For the quartz samples studied here, the dynamic shape factors increase with size, indicating that larger particles are significantly more aspherical than smaller particles. In addition, dynamic shape factors measured in the free-molecular (χv) and transition (χt) flow regimes can be significantly different, and these differences vary with the size of the quartz particles. For quartz, χv of small (d < 200 nm) particles is 1.25, while χv of larger particles (d ~ 440 nm) is 1.6, with a continuously increasing trend with particle size. In contrast χt, of small particles starts at 1.1 increasing slowly to 1.34 for 550 nm diameter particles. The multidimensional particle characterization approach used here goes beyond determination of average properties for each size, to provide additional information about how the particle dynamic shape factor may vary even for particles with the same mass and volume equivalent diameter.

  16. Effective discharge for sediment transport: the sorting role of river flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Stefano; Sprocati, Riccardo; Frascati, Alessandro; Marani, Marco; Schirmer, Mario; Botter, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    The effective discharge is a key concept in geomorphology, river engineering and restoration. It is used to design the most stable channel configuration, to estimate sedimentation rate and lifespan of reservoirs and to characterize the hydrologic forcing in models studying long-term evolution of rivers. Previous empirical, theoretical and numerical studies found the effective discharge to be affected by climate, landscape and river morphology, type of transport (dissolved, suspended or bedload), and by streamflow variability. However, the heterogeneity of values observed for the effective discharge challenges a clear understanding of its pivotal drivers, and a consistent framework which explains observations carried out in different catchments and geographic areas is still lacking. This work relates the observed diversity of effective discharge values to the underlying heterogeneity of river flow regimes. The effective ratio (i.e. the ratio between effective discharge and mean streamflow) is derived as a function of the empirical exponent of the sediment rating curve and the streamflow variability, resulting from climatic and landscape drivers. The proposed analytic expression helps to disentangle hydrologic and landscape controls on the effective discharge, and highlights distinct effective ratios of persistent and erratic hydrologic regimes (respectively characterized by low and high flow variability), attributable to intrinsically different streamflow dynamics. The framework captures observed values of effective discharge for suspended sediment transport in a set of catchments of the continental United States, and may allow for first-order estimates of effective discharge in rivers belonging to different climatic regions.

  17. Invasive riparian vegetation response to flow regimes and flood pulses in a braided river floodplain.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Brian S; Pithie, Callum; Edmondson, Laura

    2013-08-15

    This study evaluated flow regimes and flood pulse characteristics, and their influences on invasive riparian vegetation, in a free-flowing braided river in the Southern Alps, South Island, New Zealand. A 46-year gauged flow record was used to evaluate 67 flow metrics for the Ahuriri River, and five sets of colour aerial photographs over 20 years (1991-2011) were analysed to quantify temporal and spatial changes in vegetation (crack willow, Russell lupin, and grassland). The correlation between flow metrics and vegetation class cover for each aerial photo interval was analysed, and multiple regression models were developed. Significant changes in different invasive vegetation classes were found, including cover, number and sizes of patches, and distances from patches to primary channels. In addition to infrequent large floods, specific characteristics of small floods, high flows, low/baseflows, and extreme low flows had influences on different vegetation classes. Key metrics that appear to drive changes in cover and provide a useful multiple regression model include the largest flood peak, frequency of floods, and the time since the last flood for each air photo interval. Up to 25% of invasive vegetation cover was removed and bare substrate increased after the largest flood on record (approximately 50-year flood), and the amount of vegetation cover is highly variable over time and space. Within approximately six years, however, the proportion of vegetation recovered to pre-flood levels. The study reach appears to demonstrate the "shifting-mosaic steady state" conceptual model of riverine floodplains, where the total proportion of substrate, vegetation and water remain relatively constant over long time periods.

  18. Understanding multiple ecological responses to anthropogenic disturbance: rivers and potential flow regime change.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Catherine; Stewart-Koster, Ben; Sheldon, Fran; Burford, Michele A

    2012-01-01

    Human-induced alteration of the natural flow regime is a major threat to freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity. The effects of hydrological alteration on the structural and functional attributes of riverine communities are expected to be multiple and complex, and they may not be described easily by a single model. Based on existing knowledge of key hydrological and ecological attributes, we explored potential effects of a flow-regulation scenario on macroinvertebrate assemblage composition and diversity in two river systems in Australia's relatively undeveloped wet-dry tropics. We used a single Bayesian belief network (BBN) to model potential changes in multiple assemblage attributes within each river type during dry and wet seasons given two flow scenarios: the current, near-natural flow condition, and flow regulation. We then used multidimensional scaling (MDS) ordination to visually summarize and compare the most probable attributes of assemblages and their environment under the different scenarios. The flow-regulation scenario provided less certainty in the ecological responses of one river type during the dry season, which reduced the ability to make predictions from the BBN outputs directly. However, visualizing the BBN results in an ordination highlighted similarities and differences between the scenarios that may have been otherwise difficult to ascertain. In particular, the MDS showed that flow regulation would reduce the seasonal differentiation in hydrology and assemblage characteristics that is expected under the current low level of development. Our approach may have wider application in understanding ecosystem responses to different river management practices and should be transferred easily to other ecosystems or biotic assemblages to provide researchers, managers, and decision makers an enhanced understanding of ecological responses to potential anthropogenic disturbance.

  19. Biological mechanisms associated with triazophos (TAP) removal by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSFCW).

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Feng, Yuqin; Dai, Yanran; Cui, Naxin; Anderson, Bruce; Cheng, Shuiping

    2016-05-15

    Triazophos (TAP) is a widely used pesticide that is easily accumulated in the environment due to its relatively high stability: this accumulation from agricultural runoff results in potential hazards to aquatic ecosystems. Constructed wetlands are generally considered to be an effective technology for treating TAP polluted surface water. However, knowledge about the biological mechanisms of TAP removal is still lacking. This study investigates the responses of a wetland plant (Canna indica), substrate enzymes and microbial communities in bench-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (HSCWs) loaded with different TAP concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5 and 5 mg · L(-1)). The results indicate that TAP stimulated the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) in the roots of C. indica. The highest TAP concentrations significantly inhibited photosynthetic activities, as shown by a reduced effective quantum yield of PS II (ΦPS II) and lower electron transport rates (ETR). However, interestingly, the lower TAP loadings exhibited some favorable effects on these two variables, suggesting that C. indica is a suitable species for use in wetlands designed for treatment of low TAP concentrations. Urease and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in the wetland substrate were activated by TAP. Two-way ANOVA demonstrated that urease activity was influenced by both the TAP concentrations and season, while acidphosphatase (ACP) only responded to seasonal variations. Analysis of high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed seasonal variations in the microbial community structure of the wetland substrate at the phylum and family levels. In addition, urease activity had a greater correlation with the relative abundance of some functional microbial groups, such as the Bacillaceae family, and the ALP and ACP may be influenced by the plant more than substrate microbial communities.

  20. Palladium Catalysis in Horizontal-Flow Treatment Wells: Field-Scale Design and Laboratory Study

    SciTech Connect

    Munakata, N; Cunningham, J A; Reinhard, M; Ruiz, R; Lebron, C

    2002-03-01

    This paper discusses the field-scale design and associated laboratory experiments for a new groundwater remediation system that combines palladium-catalyzed hydrodehalogenation with the use of dual horizontal-flow treatment wells (HFTWs). Palladium (Pd) catalysts can treat a wide range of halogenated compounds, often completely and rapidly dehalogenating them. The HFTW system recirculates water within the treatment zone and provides the opportunity for multiple treatment passes, thereby enhancing contaminant removal. The combined Pd/HFTW system is scheduled to go on line in mid-2002 at Edwards Air Force Base in southeastern California, with groundwater contaminated with 0.5 to 1.5 mg/L of trichloroethylene (TCE). Laboratory work, performed in conjunction with the field-scale design, provided reaction rates for field-scale design and information on long-term catalyst behavior. The apparent first-order reaction rate constant for TCE was 0.43/min, corresponding to a half-life of 1.6 min. Over the long term (1 to 2 months), the reaction rate decreased, indicating catalyst deactivation. The data show three distinct deactivation rates: a slow rate of 0.03/day over approximately the first month, followed by faster deactivation at 0.16 to 0.19/day. The final, fastest deactivation (0.55/day) was attributed to an artifact of the laboratory setup, which caused unnaturally high sulfide concentrations through bacterial reduction of sulfate to sulfide, a known catalyst poison. Sodium hypochlorite recovered the catalyst activity, and is expected to maintain activity in the field with periodic pulses to regenerate the catalyst and control growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  1. Timescales of stream bed stabilization due to altered flow and sediment regimes below dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salant, N.; Renshaw, C.; Magilligan, F.

    2005-12-01

    Altered flow and sediment transport regimes due to impoundment can result in significant channel bed composition changes which exacerbate the geomorphic and ecological effects of flow regulation. Using long-term discharge and cross-sectional data in combination with a two-fraction sediment transport model, we assess changes in the downstream bed of two flow-regulated rivers with equivalent dam-induced changes in flow but opposite changes in sediment flux. Supply limitation has led to incision and armoring in one case while supply excess has led to aggradation and embeddedness in the other. Under limited sediment supply, bed elevation variability decreases soon after impoundment, while excess sediment supply results in a decades-long gradual decrease in both bed elevation variability and depth of incision. Although the balance of sediment supply and transport differs between dam managements styles, both the immediate and more gradual changes can be explained within the framework of a two-fraction sediment transport model. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering bed composition on sediment transport predictions and the development of management strategies for ecosystem maintenance.

  2. Modeling the Evolution of Riparian Woodlands Facing Climate Change in Three European Rivers with Contrasting Flow Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Rivaes, Rui P.; Rodríguez-González, Patricia M.; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Pinheiro, António N.; Politti, Emilio; Egger, Gregory; García-Arias, Alicia; Francés, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Global circulation models forecasts indicate a future temperature and rainfall pattern modification worldwide. Such phenomena will become particularly evident in Europe where climate modifications could be more severe than the average change at the global level. As such, river flow regimes are expected to change, with resultant impacts on aquatic and riparian ecosystems. Riparian woodlands are among the most endangered ecosystems on earth and provide vital services to interconnected ecosystems and human societies. However, they have not been the object of many studies designed to spatially and temporally quantify how these ecosystems will react to climate change-induced flow regimes. Our goal was to assess the effects of climate-changed flow regimes on the existing riparian vegetation of three different European flow regimes. Cases studies were selected in the light of the most common watershed alimentation modes occurring across European regions, with the objective of appraising expected alterations in the riparian elements of fluvial systems due to climate change. Riparian vegetation modeling was performed using the CASiMiR-vegetation model, which bases its computation on the fluvial disturbance of the riparian patch mosaic. Modeling results show that riparian woodlands may undergo not only at least moderate changes for all flow regimes, but also some dramatic adjustments in specific areas of particular vegetation development stages. There are circumstances in which complete annihilation is feasible. Pluvial flow regimes, like the ones in southern European rivers, are those likely to experience more pronounced changes. Furthermore, regardless of the flow regime, younger and more water-dependent individuals are expected to be the most affected by climate change. PMID:25330151

  3. Modeling the evolution of riparian woodlands facing climate change in three European rivers with contrasting flow regimes.

    PubMed

    Rivaes, Rui P; Rodríguez-González, Patricia M; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Pinheiro, António N; Politti, Emilio; Egger, Gregory; García-Arias, Alicia; Francés, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Global circulation models forecasts indicate a future temperature and rainfall pattern modification worldwide. Such phenomena will become particularly evident in Europe where climate modifications could be more severe than the average change at the global level. As such, river flow regimes are expected to change, with resultant impacts on aquatic and riparian ecosystems. Riparian woodlands are among the most endangered ecosystems on earth and provide vital services to interconnected ecosystems and human societies. However, they have not been the object of many studies designed to spatially and temporally quantify how these ecosystems will react to climate change-induced flow regimes. Our goal was to assess the effects of climate-changed flow regimes on the existing riparian vegetation of three different European flow regimes. Cases studies were selected in the light of the most common watershed alimentation modes occurring across European regions, with the objective of appraising expected alterations in the riparian elements of fluvial systems due to climate change. Riparian vegetation modeling was performed using the CASiMiR-vegetation model, which bases its computation on the fluvial disturbance of the riparian patch mosaic. Modeling results show that riparian woodlands may undergo not only at least moderate changes for all flow regimes, but also some dramatic adjustments in specific areas of particular vegetation development stages. There are circumstances in which complete annihilation is feasible. Pluvial flow regimes, like the ones in southern European rivers, are those likely to experience more pronounced changes. Furthermore, regardless of the flow regime, younger and more water-dependent individuals are expected to be the most affected by climate change.

  4. Flow regime, temperature, and biotic interactions drive differential declines of trout species under climate change

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Seth J.; Isaak, Daniel J.; Luce, Charles H.; Neville, Helen M.; Fausch, Kurt D.; Dunham, Jason B.; Dauwalter, Daniel C.; Young, Michael K.; Elsner, Marketa M.; Rieman, Bruce E.; Hamlet, Alan F.; Williams, Jack E.

    2011-01-01

    Broad-scale studies of climate change effects on freshwater species have focused mainly on temperature, ignoring critical drivers such as flow regime and biotic interactions. We use downscaled outputs from general circulation models coupled with a hydrologic model to forecast the effects of altered flows and increased temperatures on four interacting species of trout across the interior western United States (1.01 million km2), based on empirical statistical models built from fish surveys at 9,890 sites. Projections under the 2080s A1B emissions scenario forecast a mean 47% decline in total suitable habitat for all trout, a group of fishes of major socioeconomic and ecological significance. We project that native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii, already excluded from much of its potential range by nonnative species, will lose a further 58% of habitat due to an increase in temperatures beyond the species’ physiological optima and continued negative biotic interactions. Habitat for nonnative brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta is predicted to decline by 77% and 48%, respectively, driven by increases in temperature and winter flood frequency caused by warmer, rainier winters. Habitat for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is projected to decline the least (35%) because negative temperature effects are partly offset by flow regime shifts that benefit the species. These results illustrate how drivers other than temperature influence species response to climate change. Despite some uncertainty, large declines in trout habitat are likely, but our findings point to opportunities for strategic targeting of mitigation efforts to appropriate stressors and locations. PMID:21844354

  5. Flow regime, temperature, and biotic interactions drive differential declines of trout species under climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wenger, S.J.; Isaak, D.J.; Luce, C.H.; Neville, H.M.; Fausch, K.D.; Dunham, J.B.; Dauwalter, D.C.; Young, M.K.; Elsner, M.M.; Rieman, B.E.; Hamlet, A.F.; Williams, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Broad-scale studies of climate change effects on freshwater species have focused mainly on temperature, ignoring critical drivers such as flow regime and biotic interactions. We use downscaled outputs from general circulation models coupled with a hydrologic model to forecast the effects of altered flows and increased temperatures on four interacting species of trout across the interior western United States (1.01 million km2), based on empirical statistical models built from fish surveys at 9,890 sites. Projections under the 2080s A1B emissions scenario forecast a mean 47% decline in total suitable habitat for all trout, a group of fishes of major socioeconomic and ecological significance. We project that native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii, already excluded from much of its potential range by nonnative species, will lose a further 58% of habitat due to an increase in temperatures beyond the species' physiological optima and continued negative biotic interactions. Habitat for nonnative brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta is predicted to decline by 77% and 48%, respectively, driven by increases in temperature and winter flood frequency caused by warmer, rainier winters. Habitat for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is projected to decline the least (35%) because negative temperature effects are partly offset by flow regime shifts that benefit the species. These results illustrate how drivers other than temperature influence species response to climate change. Despite some uncertainty, large declines in trout habitat are likely, but our findings point to opportunities for strategic targeting of mitigation efforts to appropriate stressors and locations.

  6. Monitoring strategies of stream phosphorus under contrasting climate-driven flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyenola, G.; Meerhoff, M.; Teixeira-de Mello, F.; González-Bergonzoni, I.; Graeber, D.; Fosalba, C.; Vidal, N.; Mazzeo, N.; Ovesen, N. B.; Jeppesen, E.; Kronvang, B.

    2015-10-01

    Climate and hydrology are relevant control factors determining the timing and amount of nutrient losses from land to downstream aquatic systems, in particular of phosphorus (P) from agricultural lands. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the differences in P export patterns and the performance of alternative monitoring strategies in streams under contrasting climate-driven flow regimes. We compared a set of paired streams draining lowland micro-catchments under temperate climate and stable discharge conditions (Denmark) and under sub-tropical climate and flashy conditions (Uruguay). We applied two alternative nutrient sampling programs (high-frequency composite sampling and low-frequency instantaneous-grab sampling) and estimated the contribution derived from point and diffuse sources fitting a source apportionment model. We expected to detect a pattern of higher total and particulate phosphorus export from diffuse sources in streams in Uruguay streams, mostly as a consequence of higher variability in flow regime (higher flashiness). Contrarily, we found a higher contribution of dissolved P in flashy streams. We did not find a notably poorer performance of the low-frequency sampling program to estimate P exports in flashy streams compared to the less variable streams. We also found signs of interaction between climate/hydrology and land use intensity, in particular in the presence of point sources of P, leading to a bias towards underestimation of P in hydrologically stable streams and overestimation of P in flashy streams. Based on our findings, we suggest that the evaluation and use of more accurate monitoring methods, such as automatized flow-proportional water samplers and automatized bankside analyzers, should be prioritized whenever logistically possible. However, it seems particularly relevant in currently flashy systems and also in systems where climate change predictions suggest an increase in stream flashiness.

  7. Flow regime, temperature, and biotic interactions drive differential declines of trout species under climate change.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Seth J; Isaak, Daniel J; Luce, Charles H; Neville, Helen M; Fausch, Kurt D; Dunham, Jason B; Dauwalter, Daniel C; Young, Michael K; Elsner, Marketa M; Rieman, Bruce E; Hamlet, Alan F; Williams, Jack E

    2011-08-23

    Broad-scale studies of climate change effects on freshwater species have focused mainly on temperature, ignoring critical drivers such as flow regime and biotic interactions. We use downscaled outputs from general circulation models coupled with a hydrologic model to forecast the effects of altered flows and increased temperatures on four interacting species of trout across the interior western United States (1.01 million km(2)), based on empirical statistical models built from fish surveys at 9,890 sites. Projections under the 2080s A1B emissions scenario forecast a mean 47% decline in total suitable habitat for all trout, a group of fishes of major socioeconomic and ecological significance. We project that native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii, already excluded from much of its potential range by nonnative species, will lose a further 58% of habitat due to an increase in temperatures beyond the species' physiological optima and continued negative biotic interactions. Habitat for nonnative brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta is predicted to decline by 77% and 48%, respectively, driven by increases in temperature and winter flood frequency caused by warmer, rainier winters. Habitat for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is projected to decline the least (35%) because negative temperature effects are partly offset by flow regime shifts that benefit the species. These results illustrate how drivers other than temperature influence species response to climate change. Despite some uncertainty, large declines in trout habitat are likely, but our findings point to opportunities for strategic targeting of mitigation efforts to appropriate stressors and locations.

  8. Flow regime, temperature, and biotic interactions drive differential declines of trout species under climate change [includes Supporting Information

    Treesearch

    Seth J. Wenger; Daniel J. Isaak; Charlie Luce; Helen M. Neville; Kurt D. Fausch; Jason B. Dunham; Daniel C. Dauwalter; Michael K. Young; Marketa M. Elsner; Bruce E. Rieman; Alan F. Hamlet; Jack E. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Broad-scale studies of climate change effects on freshwater species have focused mainly on temperature, ignoring critical drivers such as flow regime and biotic interactions. We use downscaled outputs from general circulation models coupled with a hydrologic model to forecast the effects of altered flows and increased temperatures on four interacting species of trout...

  9. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V, Oliver C

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities.

  10. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model

    PubMed Central

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V., Oliver C.

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities. PMID:26207997

  11. Slug front gas entrainment in gas-liquid two-phase horizontal flow using hi-speed slug-tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2013-11-01

    A gas-liquid flow regime where liquid-continuous regions travel at high speeds (i.e. slugs) through a pipe separated by regions of stratified flow (i.e. elongated bubbles) is referred to as a ``slug flow.'' This regime is characterised by the turbulent entrainment of gas into the slug front body. We use a high-speed camera mounted on a moving robotic linear rail to track the formation of naturally occurring slugs over 150 pipe diameters. We show that the dynamics of the slugs become progressively more complex with increasing liquid and gas Reynolds numbers. Based on the slug-tracking visualization we present, over a range of conditions: (i) phenomenological observations of the formation and development of slugs, and (ii) statistical data on the slug velocity and gas entrainment rate into the slug body. EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  12. Stagnation point flow and heat transfer behavior of Cu-water nanofluid towards horizontal and exponentially stretching/shrinking cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we analyzed the stagnation point flow and heat transfer behavior of Cu-water nanofluid towards horizontal and exponentially permeable stretching/shrinking cylinders in presence of suction/injection, heat source and shape of nanoparticles. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed to nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. The influence of non-dimensional governing parameters on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics are discussed and presented through graphs and tables. The study indicates that the solutions for the horizontal and exponential cylinders are non-unique and shape of nanoparticles also influences the rate of heat transfer. Comparisons of the present results with existed studies are presented. Present study has an excellent agreement with the existed studies under some special conditions.

  13. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of graphene oxide nanofluids in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunna, Maheshwar Rao

    This thesis presents a fundamental study conducted on heat transfer and decrease in flow through a straight copper tube of a graphene oxide (GO) nanofluid developed in-house. The GO particles were synthesized using the modified Hummers method. The physicochemical properties of the fabricated GO were characterized using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and UV-Vis spectrophotometry, and the particle size distribution was investigated using dynamic light scattering. GO nanofluids of 0.01 wt. % and 0.1 wt. % were prepared by dispersing GO sheets in de-ionized water. Thermo-physical properties of GO nanofluids were also measured at different temperatures. An experimental setup was developed to find the heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of nanofluids in the test section. A flexible heater was used to provide the constant heat flux condition at the wall of the tube for all the experiments. In this study, the experimental investigations of flow regime, flowrates, pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics were performed by considering three different heat flux conditions (7.38 kW/m2, 9.08 kW/m2, and 12.55 kW/m2) at three different set points of variable frequency drive (VFD), 15, 20, and 25, connected to the pump. Due to the increase in viscosity, there was a decrease in flowrate and Reynolds number from 0.01 wt. % to 0.1 wt. % of GO nanofluids at constant pump frequency. Experimental data obtained for water was validated with available data from the literature, and the correlations were formulated for the Nusselt number and Reynolds number by considering the multiple regression analysis. Convective heat transfer coefficient and dimensionless wall temperature for water and GO nanofluids were investigated. A rise in dimensionless wall temperature with the increase of velocity and particle concentration was observed. The convective heat transfer coefficient for GO 0.01 wt. % was higher when compared to GO 0.1 wt

  14. Porous anodes with helical flow pathways in bioelectrochemical systems: The effects of fluid dynamics and operating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Rae; Boghani, Hitesh C.; Amini, Negar; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-François; Michie, Iain; Dinsdale, Richard M.; Guwy, Alan J.; Guo, Zheng Xiao; Premier, Giuliano C.

    2012-09-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) and/or microbial fuel cell (MFC) mass transport and associated over-potential limitations are affected by flow regimes, which may simultaneously increase the power and pollution treatment capacities. Two electrodes with helical flow channels were compared in the same tubular MFC reactor. 1). A machined monolithic microporous conductive carbon (MMCC). 2). A layered carbon veil with spoked ABS former (LVSF); both presented helical flow channel. Anode performances were compared when subject to temperature, substrate concentration and flow rate variations. The MMCC maximum power increased from 2.9 ± 0.3 to 7.6 ± 0.7 mW with influent acetate concentration, from 1 to 10 mM (with 2 mL min-1), but decreased power to 5.5 ± 0.5 mW at 40 mM, implicated localized pH/buffering. Flow rate (0.1 to 7.5 mL min-1) effects were relatively small but an increase was evident from batch to continuous operation at 0.1 mL min-1. The LVSF configuration showed improved performance in power as the flow rate increased, indicating that flow pattern affects BES performance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling showed less uniform flow with the LVSF. Thus flow regime driven mass transfer improves the power output in continuously fed system operation. These results indicate that electrode configuration, flow regime and operating condition need consideration to optimize the bioelectrochemical reaction.

  15. Theory for modeling the equatorial evening ionosphere and the origin of the shear in the horizontal plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Haerendel, G.; Eccles, J.V.; Cakir, S. )

    1992-02-01

    Companion papers in this series present (1) the role of equatorial E region postsunset ionosphere, (2) the origin of horizontal plasma shear flow in the postsunset equatorial ionosphere (this paper), (3) the Colored Bubbles experiments results, and (4) computer simulations of artificial initiation of plasma density depletions (bubbles) in the equatorial ionosphere. Within this paper, equations describing the time evolution of the equatorial ionosphere are developed using flux tube integrated and flux tube weighted quantities which model the chemistry, dynamics, and electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere. The resulting two-dimensional set of equations can be used to investigate equatorial ionosphere. The resulting two-dimensional set of equations can be used to investigate equatorial electric fields neglecting small-scale phenomena ({lambda} < 1 km). An immediate result derived from the integrated current equations is an equation describing the physics of the shear in the horizontal flow of the equatorial plasma during the evening hours. The profile of the horizontal flow has three important contributing terms relating to the neutral wind dynamo, Hall conduction, and the equatorial electrojet current divergence. Using a one-dimensional model of the velocity shear equation and the integrated ionosphere transport equations, a time history of the development of the shear feature during postsunset hours is presented. The one-dimensional model results are compared to the velocity shear measurements from the Colored Bubbles experiments.

  16. Investigation on Effect of Gravity Level on Bubble Distribution and Liquid Turbulence Modification for Horizontal Channel Bubbly Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, M. J.; Wei, J. J.; Yu, B.

    2017-08-01

    Bubbly flows in the horizontal channel or pipe are often seen in industrial engineering fields, so it is very necessary to fully understand hydrodynamics of horizontal bubbly flows so as to improve industrial efficiency and to design an efficient bubbly system. In this paper, in order to fully understand mechanisms of phase distribution and liquid-phase turbulence modulation in the horizontal channel bubbly flow, the influence of gravity level on both of them were investigated in detail with the developed Euler-Lagrange two-way coupling method. For the present investigation, the buoyance on bubbles in both sides of the channel always points to the corresponding wall in order to study the liquid-phase turbulence modulation by bubbles under the symmetric physical condition. The present investigation shows that the gravity level has the important influence on the wall-normal distribution of bubbles and the liquid-phase turbulence modulation; the higher the gravity level is, the more bubbles can overcome the wall-normal resistance to accumulate near the wall, and the more obvious the liquid-phase turbulence modulation is. It is also discovered that interphase forces on the bubbles are various along the wall-normal direction, which leads to the fact that the bubble located in different wall-normal places has a different wall-normal velocity.

  17. Can water sensitive urban design systems help to preserve natural channel-forming flow regimes in an urbanised catchment?

    PubMed

    Wella-Hewage, Chathurika Subhashini; Alankarage Hewa, Guna; Pezzaniti, David

    2016-01-01

    Increased stormwater runoff and pollutant loads due to catchment urbanisation bring inevitable impacts on the physical and ecological conditions of environmentally sensitive urban streams. Water sensitive urban design (WSUD) has been recognised as a possible means to minimise these negative impacts. This paper reports on a study that investigated the ability of infiltration-based WSUD systems to replicate the predevelopment channel-forming flow (CFF) regime in urban catchments. Catchment models were developed for the 'pre-urban', 'urban' and 'managed' conditions of a case study catchment and the hydrological effect on CFF regime was investigated using a number of flow indices. The results clearly show that changes to flow regime are apparent under urban catchment conditions and are even more severe under highly urbanised conditions. The use of WSUD systems was found to result in the replication of predevelopment flow regimes, particularly at low levels of urbanisation. Under highly urbanised conditions (of managed catchments) overcontrol of the CFF indices was observed as indicated by flow statistics below their pre-urban values. The overall results suggest that WSUD systems are highly effective in replicating the predevelopment CFF regime in urban streams and could be used as a means to protect environmentally sensitive urban streams.

  18. Intermediate regime and a phase diagram of red blood cell dynamics in a linear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levant, Michael; Steinberg, Victor

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the in vitro dynamics of a single rabbit red blood cell (RBC) in a planar linear flow as a function of a shear stress σ and the dynamic viscosity of outer fluid ηo. A linear flow is a generalization of previous studies dynamics of soft objects including RBC in shear flow and is realized in the experiment in a microfluidic four-roll mill device. We verify that the RBC stable orientation dynamics is found in the experiment being the in-shear-plane orientation and the RBC dynamics is characterized by observed three RBC dynamical states, namely tumbling (TU), intermediate (INT), and swinging (SW) [or tank-treading (TT)] on a single RBC. The main results of these studies are the following. (i) We completely characterize the RBC dynamical states and reconstruct their phase diagram in the case of the RBC in-shear-plane orientation in a planar linear flow and find it in a good agreement with that obtained in early experiments in a shear flow for human RBCs. (ii) The value of the critical shear stress σc of the TU-TT(SW) transition surprisingly coincides with that found in early experiments in spite of a significant difference in the degree of RBC shape deformations in both the SW and INT states. (iii) We describe the INT regime, which is stationary, characterized by strong RBC shape deformations and observed in a wide range of the shear stresses. We argue that our observations cast doubts on the main claim of the recent numerical simulations that the only RBC spheroidal stress-free shape is capable to explain the early experimental data. Finally, we suggest that the amplitude dependence of both θ and the shape deformation parameter D on σ can be used as the quantitative criterion to determine the RBC stress-free shape.

  19. Intermediate regime and a phase diagram of red blood cell dynamics in a linear flow.

    PubMed

    Levant, Michael; Steinberg, Victor

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the in vitro dynamics of a single rabbit red blood cell (RBC) in a planar linear flow as a function of a shear stress σ and the dynamic viscosity of outer fluid η_{o}. A linear flow is a generalization of previous studies dynamics of soft objects including RBC in shear flow and is realized in the experiment in a microfluidic four-roll mill device. We verify that the RBC stable orientation dynamics is found in the experiment being the in-shear-plane orientation and the RBC dynamics is characterized by observed three RBC dynamical states, namely tumbling (TU), intermediate (INT), and swinging (SW) [or tank-treading (TT)] on a single RBC. The main results of these studies are the following. (i) We completely characterize the RBC dynamical states and reconstruct their phase diagram in the case of the RBC in-shear-plane orientation in a planar linear flow and find it in a good agreement with that obtained in early experiments in a shear flow for human RBCs. (ii) The value of the critical shear stress σ_{c} of the TU-TT(SW) transition surprisingly coincides with that found in early experiments in spite of a significant difference in the degree of RBC shape deformations in both the SW and INT states. (iii) We describe the INT regime, which is stationary, characterized by strong RBC shape deformations and observed in a wide range of the shear stresses. We argue that our observations cast doubts on the main claim of the recent numerical simulations that the only RBC spheroidal stress-free shape is capable to explain the early experimental data. Finally, we suggest that the amplitude dependence of both θ and the shape deformation parameter D on σ can be used as the quantitative criterion to determine the RBC stress-free shape.

  20. Scaling of two-phase flow regimes in a rod bundle with freon

    SciTech Connect

    Symolon, P.D.

    1990-07-01

    Fluid to fluid modeling of the thermal-hydraulics of steam/water systems using Freon has been the subject of research for the past 25 years. However, there is as yet no universally accepted set of scaling laws to define the geometry and velocity scaling requirements of an equivalent Freon test of the full scale steam/water system being simulated. This paper describes a scaling concept where the Weber and Froud numbers of the Freon model are matched to that of the prototype being simulated, thus creating a comparable balance among inertia, surface tension and buoyancy forces. In this test it was demonstrated that similar flow regime transitions are observed in a half scale Freon simulation of a full scale steam/water test run at Dynatech. It is also shown using a two fluid analytical model and existing correlations for friction and interfacial momentum exchange from the open literature, that a half scale simulation leads to nearly the same slip ratio as for full scale steam/water, while the slip ratio for a full scale Freon simulation is too high. A comparison of the predicted flow distribution in the 4-rod bundle is made using the COBRA-IV code for a full scale simulation using Freon, a half scale simulation using Freon and full scale test with water. The COBRA results demonstrated that a half scale test section model using Freon yields a subchannel flow distribution similar to the steam/water case, while a full scale Freon simulation results in a distorted subchannel flow distribution. It is concluded that the appropriate geometric scale factor for Freon simulation of two-phase steam/water flow in tube bundles is one-half for a broad range of thermal-hydraulic conditions. 24 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Ecohydrological modeling and environmental flow regime in the Formoso River, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Hugo A S; Silva, Demetrius D; Dergam, Jorge A; Elesbon, Abrahão A A

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed at determining the environmental flow regime in a 1 km stretch of the Formoso River, MG, using River2D model. To carry out the ecohydrological modeling, the following information was used: bathymetry, physical and hydraulic features, and the Habitat Suitability Index for species of the Hypostomus auroguttatus. In the River2D, the Weighted Usable Areas were determined from the average long-term streamflows with percentage from 10% to 100%. Those streamflows were simulated for the later construction of optimization matrices that maximize the habitat area throughout the year. For H. auroguttatus Juvenile, higher values of Weighted Usable Area were associated with the percentage of 60% and 70% of the average long-term streamflows in October and September, respectively. For H. auroguttatus Adult, the highest value of Weighted Usable Area was associated with the percentage of 100% of the average long-term streamflow in September. The environmental flows found for this stretch of the Formoso River varied over the year. The lowest environmental flow was observed in December (2.85 m3 s-1), while the highest was observed in May (4.13 m3 s-1). This paper shows the importance of ecohydrological studies in forming a basis for water resources management actions.

  2. Flow regimes of micrometric ripples in a capillary channel in micro gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlen, Alain; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam; Thomas, Peter

    Since the advent of nanotechnology microfluidic devices have become common in science and engineering. Examples are equipment for drug delivery, systems for the analysis of chemical substances or devices for the manipulation, transport or separation of suspended droplets, microparticles, cells, or macro-molecules in fluids. In these contexts observations of new patternformation phenomena in microfluidic two-phase flows is always of great interest. Here the oscillatory motion of a fluid carrying micron-sized particles inside a capillary tube is investigated experimentally in standard gravity condition. It is found that initially uniformly distributed particles can segregate and accumulate to form regularly spaced micron-sized particle clusters. The wavelength of the micro clusters is compared to data for macro-scale sand-ripple patterns and found to obey the same universal scaling as these. A physical and dimensional analysis is performed that confirms the universality of the experimentally observed scaling. From these theory, the effect of a low gravity can therefore be discussed on the basis of this universal scaling. The basis of the theory is the dominant importance of the interfacial velocity between the liquid and the grains layer. Of course this is only possible if the global flow variations in space are slow compared with the wave lengths observed. This allows a discussion about the flow regimes that can be present in space can therefore be forecasted and a few applications for bioscience or material sciences can be considered.

  3. Laboratory modeling of flow regimes in a draft tube of Francis hydro-turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtork, Sergey; Litvinov, Ivan; Mitryakov, Andrey; Hanjalic, Kemal

    The paper reports on some results of the experimental study of flow and pressure pulsations in a laboratory model of the draft tube (DT) of Francis-99 hydro-turbine over a broad range of operating regimes. Velocity distributions at the model inlet varied within 866 modes of the turbine load conditions, including those with maximum coherent pressure pulsations on the model walls. The contact and non-contact methods were used to measure pressure pulsations on the model walls using acoustic sensors and to measure the averaged velocity distribution with a laser Doppler anemometer "LAD-06i". Analysis of the results have showed that in the model cone there are flow modes with forming of precessing vortex cores, accompanied by a sharp increase in the amplitude of coherent pressure pulsations on the wall and the velocity field rearrangement. It is shown that the vortex core starts forming with an increase in the integral parameter of swirl up to S>0.5. A novelty of the work is the combination of the rapid prototyping (3-d printing) of the inflow swirl generators and computerized measurement techniques that makes it possible to acquire rapidly a large amount of experimental data for a variety of designs and operating conditions. The results can provide insight into the effect of various design and operating parameters on the flow physics, as well as serve for verification of the numerical simulations.

  4. Climate change impact assessment on flow regime by incorporating spatial correlation and scenario uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallam, P.; Qin, X. S.

    2017-07-01

    Flooding risk is increasing in many parts of the world and may worsen under climate change conditions. The accuracy of predicting flooding risk relies on reasonable projection of meteorological data (especially rainfall) at the local scale. The current statistical downscaling approaches face the difficulty of projecting multi-site climate information for future conditions while conserving spatial information. This study presents a combined Long Ashton Research Station Weather Generator (LARS-WG) stochastic weather generator and multi-site rainfall simulator RainSim (CLWRS) approach to investigate flow regimes under future conditions in the Kootenay Watershed, Canada. To understand the uncertainty effect stemming from different scenarios, the climate output is fed into a hydrologic model. The results showed different variation trends of annual peak flows (in 2080-2099) based on different climate change scenarios and demonstrated that the hydrological impact would be driven by the interaction between snowmelt and peak flows. The proposed CLWRS approach is useful where there is a need for projection of potential climate change scenarios.

  5. A stochastic model of cell aggregation under planar flow in the dilute regime.

    PubMed

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François; Kabouya, Nadjiba; Mefti, Nacim

    2010-01-19

    Models of the adhesion of a population of cells in a plane flow are developed, considering the dilute regime. Cells considered as rigid punctual entities are virtually injected at regular times within a plane channel limited by two fixed planes. The pressure profile is supposed to be triangular (constant gradient), in accordance with the assumptions of a Poiseuille flow. The cell adherence to the channel wall is governed by the balance of forces, accounting for gravity, non-specific physical interactions, such as electrostatic effects (repulsive) and Van der Waals forces (attractive), specific adhesive forces representing the ligand-receptor interactions, and friction between cells and the fluid in the vicinity of the endothelium wall. The spatial distribution of the adhesion molecules along the wall is supposed to be a random event, accounted for by a stochastic spatial variability of the dipolar moments of those molecules, according to a Gaussian process. Experimental trends reported for the rate of aggregation of L-selectin mediated leukocytes under shear flow are in qualitative accordance with the evolution versus time of adhering cells obtained by the present simulations. The effect of the maximal injection pressure on those kinetics is assessed.

  6. Self-similar turbulent boundary layer with imposed pressure gradient. Four flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Vigdorovich, I. I.

    2014-11-15

    Self-similar flows of an incompressible fluid in a turbulent boundary layer, when the free-stream velocity is a power function (with the exponent m) of the longitudinal coordinate, have been studied. It has been shown that there are four different self-similar flow regimes corresponding to four individual similarity parameters one of which is the known Clauser parameter and the three other parameters have been established for the first time. At adverse pressure gradient, when the exponent m lies in a certain range depending on Reynolds number, the problem has two solutions with different values of the boundary-layer thickness and skin friction; consequently, hysteresis in a pre-separation flow is possible. Separation occurs not at the minimal value of m that corresponds to the strongest adverse pressure gradient, but at m = −0.216 −0.4 Re{sub p}{sup −1/3} + O(Re{sub p}{sup −2/3}), where Re{sub p} is the Reynolds number based on longitudinal pressure gradient. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Influence of Flow Regime on the Food web of a Dryland River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, S. E.; Balcombe, S. R.; Fellows, C. S.; McKenzie-Smith, F. J.

    2005-05-01

    Australian dryland rivers are among the most variable and unpredictable in the world in terms of their flow regimes. Although renowned for their spectacular floods over vast floodplains, rivers exist for much of the time as discrete waterholes, which are important refugia for aquatic biota. During these dry spells, aquatic food webs in waterholes are clearly supported by algal production, despite the high natural turbidity and significant terrestrial carbon inputs. However, the relative importance of pelagic and benthic sources is less clear. Although fish rarely have stable isotope signatures consistent with a phytoplankton diet, gut contents analysis suggests that zooplankton can be a significant component of diets. Planktonic sources of carbon appear to be important during and immediately after flood events, where aquatic production on inundated floodplains provides an immense food resource. As waterholes become isolated post-flood, we predict that benthic sources of production become increasingly important as algae develop along the relatively stable shoreline. More frequent flow pulses connect waterholes and enhance their physical persistence, but may disrupt the formation of these productive algal mats. We propose that the relative importance of benthic and pelagic algal production to dryland river food webs varies in response to recent flow history.

  8. Mass Flow Rate Measurements in a MicroChannel: from Hydrodynamic to Free Molecular Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graur, I. A.; Perrier, P.; Ghozlani, W.; Méolans, J. G.

    2008-12-01

    Mass flow rate measurements in a single silicon micro channel were carried out for various gases in isothermal steady flows. The results obtained, from hydrodynamic to near free molecular regime by using a powerful experimental platform, allowed us to deduce interesting information, notably about the reflection/accommodation process at the wall. In the 0-0.3 Knudsen range, a continuum approximated analytic approach was derived from NS equations, associated to first or second order slip boundary conditions. Identifying the experimental mass flow rate curves to the theoretical ones the TMAC of various gases were extracted. Over all the Knudsen range [0-50] the experimental results were compared with theoretical values calculated from kinetic approaches: using variable TMAC values as fitting parameter, the theoretical curves were fitted to the experimental ones. Whatever the Knudsen range and the theoretical approach, the TMAC values are found decreasing when the molecular weights of the gas considered increase (as long as the different gases are compared using the same approach). Moreover, the values of the various accommodation coefficients are rather close one to other but sufficiently smaller than unity to conclude that the full accommodation modelling is not satisfactory to describe the gas/wall interaction.

  9. Assessment of MELCOR condensation models with the presence of noncondensable gas in natural convection flow regime

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Dhongik S; Jo, HangJin; Corradini, Michael L

    2017-04-01

    Condensation of steam vapor is an important mode of energy removal from the reactor containment. The presence of noncondensable gas complicates the process and makes it difficult to model. MELCOR, one of the more widely used system codes for containment analyses, uses the heat and mass transfer analogy to model condensation heat transfer. To investigate previously reported nodalization-dependence in natural convection flow regime, MELCOR condensation model as well as other models are studied. The nodalization-dependence issue is resolved by using physical length from the actual geometry rather than node size of each control volume as the characteristic length scale formore » MELCOR containment analyses. At the transition to turbulent natural convection regime, the McAdams correlation for convective heat transfer produces a better prediction compared to the original MELCOR model. The McAdams correlation is implemented in MELCOR and the prediction is validated against a set of experiments on a scaled AP600 containment. The MELCOR with our implemented model produces improved predictions. For steam molar fractions in the gas mixture greater than about 0.58, the predictions are within the uncertainty margin of the measurements. The simulation results still underestimate the heat transfer from the gas-steam mixture, implying that conservative predictions are provided.« less

  10. Assessing the flow regime in a contaminated fractured and karstic dolostone aquifer supplying municipal water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Jérôme; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2011-04-01

    SummaryThe Silurian dolostone bedrock in Ontario, Canada, is a broad 400 km long swath northward from Niagara Falls through the Bruce Peninsula that represents an important water source for municipal, industrial, and agricultural uses. Where the Quaternary overburden is thin or absent, karst is common. This study concerns an urban area where the dolostone aquifer is 100 m thick beneath up to 50 m thick Quaternary deposits and where karst features identified by borehole information are common. Hydraulic tests show moderate to large bulk rock hydraulic conductivity and rock core tests indicate much smaller matrix hydraulic conductivity than the bulk rock values. Therefore, the aquifer is essentially a dual permeability, fully saturated system in which conduits occur within a network of ubiquitous extensive, horizontally- and vertically-interconnected fractures. Karst features are concentrated in a thin zone at the top-of-rock, likely representing former epikarst, and also in a thicker zone in the middle of the aquifer. Some pumping test results and large yields of some municipal wells are consistent with conduit occurrences. However, atmospheric tritium, distributed-source contamination (Cl -, NO3-), and a point-source pesticide plume (metolachlor) show detailed concentration distributions lacking influence of flow in conduits. Detailed hydraulic head profiles also show no influence of conduit flow. This study shows that when designing monitoring networks for groundwater quality and source water protection in similar contexts, locating conduits is not necessary because contaminant distributions are governed by the combined influences of the rock matrix, fractures and conduits, the hydraulic boundary conditions, and the interconnected fracture network with only minimal conduit effects. Prior to glaciations, an integrated karstic aquifer could develop with flow controlled by conduits; however, this original, converging flow system became non-functional when the

  11. Permafrost, heat flow, and the geothermal regime at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.; Marshall, B.V.; Moses, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Temperature measurements through permafrost in the oil field at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, combined with laboratory measurements of the thermal conductivity of drill cutting permit an evaluation of in situ thermal properties and an understanding of the general factors that control the geothermal regime. A sharp contrast in temperatire gradient at c600m represents a contrast in thermal conductivity caused by the downward change from interstitial ice to interstitial water at the base of permafrost under near steady state conditions. These results yield a heat flow of c1.3HFU, which is similar to other values on the Alaskan Arctic Coast: the anomalously deep permafrost is a result of the anomalously high conductivity of the siliceous ice-rich sediments. With confirmation of the permafrost configuration by offshore drilling, heat conduction models can yield reliable new information on the chronology of arctic shoreline. -from Authors

  12. Modeling the relations between flow regime components, species traits, and spawning success of fishes in warmwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craven, S.W.; Peterson, J.T.; Freeman, Mary C.; Kwak, T.J.; Irwin, E.

    2010-01-01

    Modifications to stream hydrologic regimes can have a profound influence on the dynamics of their fish populations. Using hierarchical linear models, we examined the relations between flow regime and young-of-year fish density using fish sampling and discharge data from three different warmwater streams in Illinois, Alabama, and Georgia. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the relative support for models describing hypothesized influences of five flow regime components representing: short-term high and low flows; short-term flow stability; and long-term mean flows and flow stability on fish reproductive success during fish spawning and rearing periods. We also evaluated the influence of ten fish species traits on fish reproductive success. Species traits included spawning duration, reproductive strategy, egg incubation rate, swimming locomotion morphology, general habitat preference, and food habits. Model selection results indicated that young-of-year fish density was positively related to short-term high flows during the spawning period and negatively related to flow variability during the rearing period. However, the effect of the flow regime components varied substantially among species, but was related to species traits. The effect of short-term high flows on the reproductive success was lower for species that broadcast their eggs during spawning. Species with cruiser swimming locomotion morphologies (e.g., Micropterus) also were more vulnerable to variable flows during the rearing period. Our models provide insight into the conditions and timing of flows that influence the reproductive success of warmwater stream fishes and may guide decisions related to stream regulation and management. ?? 2010 US Government.

  13. Modeling the relations between flow regime components, species traits, and spawning success of fishes in warmwater streams.

    PubMed

    Craven, Scott W; Peterson, James T; Freeman, Mary C; Kwak, Thomas J; Irwin, Elise

    2010-08-01

    Modifications to stream hydrologic regimes can have a profound influence on the dynamics of their fish populations. Using hierarchical linear models, we examined the relations between flow regime and young-of-year fish density using fish sampling and discharge data from three different warmwater streams in Illinois, Alabama, and Georgia. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the relative support for models describing hypothesized influences of five flow regime components representing: short-term high and low flows; short-term flow stability; and long-term mean flows and flow stability on fish reproductive success during fish spawning and rearing periods. We also evaluated the influence of ten fish species traits on fish reproductive success. Species traits included spawning duration, reproductive strategy, egg incubation rate, swimming locomotion morphology, general habitat preference, and food habits. Model selection results indicated that young-of-year fish density was positively related to short-term high flows during the spawning period and negatively related to flow variability during the rearing period. However, the effect of the flow regime components varied substantially among species, but was related to species traits. The effect of short-term high flows on the reproductive success was lower for species that broadcast their eggs during spawning. Species with cruiser swimming locomotion morphologies (e.g., Micropterus) also were more vulnerable to variable flows during the rearing period. Our models provide insight into the conditions and timing of flows that influence the reproductive success of warmwater stream fishes and may guide decisions related to stream regulation and management.

  14. Modeling the Relations Between Flow Regime Components, Species Traits, and Spawning Success of Fishes in Warmwater Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Scott W.; Peterson, James T.; Freeman, Mary C.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Irwin, Elise

    2010-08-01

    Modifications to stream hydrologic regimes can have a profound influence on the dynamics of their fish populations. Using hierarchical linear models, we examined the relations between flow regime and young-of-year fish density using fish sampling and discharge data from three different warmwater streams in Illinois, Alabama, and Georgia. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the relative support for models describing hypothesized influences of five flow regime components representing: short-term high and low flows; short-term flow stability; and long-term mean flows and flow stability on fish reproductive success during fish spawning and rearing periods. We also evaluated the influence of ten fish species traits on fish reproductive success. Species traits included spawning duration, reproductive strategy, egg incubation rate, swimming locomotion morphology, general habitat preference, and food habits. Model selection results indicated that young-of-year fish density was positively related to short-term high flows during the spawning period and negatively related to flow variability during the rearing period. However, the effect of the flow regime components varied substantially among species, but was related to species traits. The effect of short-term high flows on the reproductive success was lower for species that broadcast their eggs during spawning. Species with cruiser swimming locomotion morphologies (e.g., Micropterus) also were more vulnerable to variable flows during the rearing period. Our models provide insight into the conditions and timing of flows that influence the reproductive success of warmwater stream fishes and may guide decisions related to stream regulation and management.

  15. Suspended particulate composition: evolution along a river linear and influence of regime flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Meur, Mathieu; Montargès-Pelletier, Emmanuelle; Bauer, Allan; Gley, Renaud; Migot, Sylvie; Mansuy-Huault, Laurence; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Villièras, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Suspended Particulate Matters are recognized to play a crucial role in the transport and fate of chemicals like trace metal elements. The affinity of trace metals with natural SPM is influenced by (i) the nature of metal (ii) physical-chemical conditions of the water column (iii) SPM physical characteristics (grain size, surface area) (iiii) SPM chemical characteristics (elemental composition, mineralogy, organic composition). Some authors observed that the SPM composition was the predominant factor controlling the affinity of trace metals with natural SPM. One purpose of this work is to follow the physical and chemical characteristics of SPM along the river linear in order to better understand the affinity between SPM and heavy metals. One other purpose is to study the influence of regime flow on SPM physical and chemical composition in order to detect any variation of SPM composition with regime flow. SPM were sampled along Moselle river (North East of France) following an urbanization gradient. Two tributaries were also sampled, the Madon river which drains an agricultural catchment and the Fensch stream which flows through an ancient steel-making basin. SPM were sampled several times during high flow and low flow. Particulate matter was extracted on field using continuous flow field centrifuge. Frozen-dried samples were then characterized in terms of size distribution, elemental composition (ICP - AES, ICP - MS), mineralogy (XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM), surface properties (gas adsorption techniques) and organic composition (Py-GC-MS and GC-MS). Grain size distribution evidenced the presence of coarser particles during high flow but no difference in the grain size distribution could be evidenced between the different stations. The grain size distribution of collected SPM appeared globally identical, although the increase of conductivity due to the junction of Meurthe river . In terms of composition, major element contents in SPM are characterized by the predominance of

  16. Residence times and alluvial architecture of a sediment superslug in response to different flow regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, John A.

    2017-01-01

    A superslug was deposited in a basin in the Colorado Front Range Mountains as a consequence of an extreme flood following a wildfire disturbance in 1996. The subsequent evolution of this superslug was measured by repeat topographic surveys (31 surveys from 1996 through 2014) of 18 cross sections approximately uniformly spaced over 1500 m immediately above the basin outlet. These surveys allowed the identification within the superslug of chronostratigraphic units deposited and eroded by different geomorphic processes in response to different flow regimes.Over the time period of the study, the superslug went through aggradation, incision, and stabilization phases that were controlled by a shift in geomorphic processes from generally short-duration, episodic, large-magnitude floods that deposited new chronostratigraphic units to long-duration processes that eroded units. These phases were not contemporaneous at each channel cross section, which resulted in a complex response that preserved different chronostratigraphic units at each channel cross section having, in general, two dominant types of alluvial architecture—laminar and fragmented. Age and transit-time distributions for these two alluvial architectures evolved with time since the extreme flood. Because of the complex shape of the distributions they were best modeled by two-parameter Weibull functions. The Weibull scale parameter approximated the median age of the distributions, and the Weibull shape parameter generally had a linear relation that increased with time since the extreme flood. Additional results indicated that deposition of new chronostratigraphic units can be represented by a power-law frequency distribution, and that the erosion of units decreases with depth of burial to a limiting depth. These relations can be used to model other situations with different flow regimes where vertical aggradation and incision are dominant processes, to predict the residence time of possible contaminated

  17. Residence times and alluvial architecture of a sediment superslug in response to different flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, John A.

    2017-10-01

    A superslug was deposited in a basin in the Colorado Front Range Mountains as a consequence of an extreme flood following a wildfire disturbance in 1996. The subsequent evolution of this superslug was measured by repeat topographic surveys (31 surveys from 1996 through 2014) of 18 cross sections approximately uniformly spaced over 1500 m immediately above the basin outlet. These surveys allowed the identification within the superslug of chronostratigraphic units deposited and eroded by different geomorphic processes in response to different flow regimes. Over the time period of the study, the superslug went through aggradation, incision, and stabilization phases that were controlled by a shift in geomorphic processes from generally short-duration, episodic, large-magnitude floods that deposited new chronostratigraphic units to long-duration processes that eroded units. These phases were not contemporaneous at each channel cross section, which resulted in a complex response that preserved different chronostratigraphic units at each channel cross section having, in general, two dominant types of alluvial architecture-laminar and fragmented. Age and transit-time distributions for these two alluvial architectures evolved with time since the extreme flood. Because of the complex shape of the distributions they were best modeled by two-parameter Weibull functions. The Weibull scale parameter approximated the median age of the distributions, and the Weibull shape parameter generally had a linear relation that increased with time since the extreme flood. Additional results indicated that deposition of new chronostratigraphic units can be represented by a power-law frequency distribution, and that the erosion of units decreases with depth of burial to a limiting depth. These relations can be used to model other situations with different flow regimes where vertical aggradation and incision are dominant processes, to predict the residence time of possible contaminated

  18. Production of microbubbles from axisymmetric flow focusing in the jetting regime for moderate Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Vega, E J; Acero, A J; Montanero, J M; Herrada, M A; Gañán-Calvo, A M

    2014-06-01

    We analyze both experimentally and numerically the formation of microbubbles in the jetting regime reached when a moderately viscous liquid stream focuses a gaseous meniscus inside a converging micronozzle. If the total (stagnation) pressure of the injected gas current is fixed upstream, then there are certain conditions on which a quasisteady gas meniscus forms. The meniscus tip is sharpened by the liquid stream down to the gas molecular scale. On the other side, monodisperse collections of microbubbles can be steadily produced in the jetting regime if the feeding capillary is appropriately located inside the nozzle. In this case, the microbubble size depends on the feeding capillary position. The numerical simulations for an imposed gas flow rate show that a recirculation cell appears in the gaseous meniscus for low enough values of that parameter. The experiments allow one to conclude that the bubble pinch-off comprises two phases: (i) a stretching motion of the precursor jet where the neck radius versus the time before the pinch essentially follows a potential law, and (ii) a final stage where a very thin and slender gaseous thread forms and eventually breaks apart into a number of micron-sized bubbles. Because of the difference between the free surface and core velocities, the gaseous jet breakage differs substantially from that of liquid capillary jets and gives rise to bubbles with diameters much larger than those expected from the Rayleigh-type capillary instability. The dependency of the bubble diameter upon the flow-rate ratio agrees with the scaling law derived by A. M. Gañán-Calvo [Phys. Rev. E 69, 027301 (2004)], although a slight influence of the Reynolds number can be observed in our experiments.

  19. Evapotranspiration from subsurface horizontal flow wetlands planted with Phragmites australis in sub-tropical Australia.

    PubMed

    Headley, T R; Davison, L; Huett, D O; Müller, R

    2012-02-01

    The balance between evapotranspiration (ET) loss and rainfall ingress in treatment wetlands (TWs) can affect their suitability for certain applications. The aim of this paper was to investigate the water balance and seasonal dynamics in ET of subsurface horizontal flow (HF) TWs in a sub-tropical climate. Monthly water balances were compiled for four pilot-scale HF TWs receiving horticultural runoff over a two year period (Sep. 1999-Aug. 2001) on the sub-tropical east-coast of Australia. The mean annual wetland ET rate increased from 7.0 mm/day in the first year to 10.6 mm/day in the second, in response to the development of the reed (Phragmites australis) population. Consequently, the annual crop coefficients (ratio of wetland ET to pan evaporation) increased from 1.9 in the first year to 2.6 in the second. The mean monthly ET rates were generally greater and more variable than the Class-A pan evaporation rates, indicating that transpiration is an important contributor to ET in HF TWs. Evapotranspiration rates were generally highest in the summer and autumn months, and corresponded with the times of peak standing biomass of P. australis. It is likely that ET from the relatively small 1 m wide by 4 m long HF TWs was enhanced by advection through so-called "clothesline" and "oasis" effects, which contributed to the high crop coefficients. For the second year, when the reed population was well established, the annual net loss to the atmosphere (taking into account rainfall inputs) accounted for 6.1-9.6 % of the influent hydraulic load, which is considered negligible. However, the net loss is likely to be higher in arid regions with lower rainfall. The Water Use Efficiency (WUE) of the wetlands in the second year of operation was 1.3 g of above-ground biomass produced per kilogram of water consumed, which is low compared to agricultural crops. It is proposed that system level WUE provides a useful metric for selecting wetland plant species and TW design alternatives to

  20. Optimization of a horizontal-flow biofilm reactor for the removal of methane at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Clifford, E; Kennelly, C; Walsh, R; Gerrity, S; Reilly, E O; Collins, G

    2012-10-01

    Three pilot-scale, horizontal-flow biofilm reactors (HFBRs 1-3) were used to treat methane (CH4)-contaminated air to assess the potential of this technology to manage emissions from agricultural activities, waste and wastewater treatment facilities, and landfills. The study was conducted over two phases (Phase 1, lasting 90 days and Phase 2, lasting 45 days). The reactors were operated at 10 degrees C (typical of ambient air and wastewater temperatures in northern Europe), and were simultaneously dosed with CH4-contaminated air and a synthetic wastewater (SWW). The influent loading rates to the reactors were 8.6 g CH4/m3/hr (4.3 g CH4/m2 TPSA/hr; where TPSA is top plan surface area). Despite the low operating temperatures, an overall average removal of 4.63 g CH4/m3/day was observed during Phase 2. The maximum removal efficiency (RE) for the trial was 88%. Potential (maximum) rates of methane oxidation were measured and indicated that biofilm samples taken from various regions in the HFBRs had mostly equal CH4 removal potential. In situ activity rates were dependent on which part of the reactor samples were obtained. The results indicate the potential of the HFBR, a simple and robust technology, to biologically treat CH4 emissions. The results of this study indicate that the HFBR technology could be effectively applied to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment plants and agricultural facilities at lower temperatures common to northern Europe. This could reduce the carbon footprint of waste treatment and agricultural livestock facilities. Activity tests indicate that methanotrophic communities can be supported at these temperatures. Furthermore, these data can lead to improved reactor design and optimization by allowing conditions to be engineered to allow for improved removal rates, particularly at lower temperatures. The technology is simple to construct and operate, and with some optimization of the liquid phase to improve mass

  1. An evaluation of borehole flowmeters used to measure horizontal ground-water flow in limestones of Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, John T.; Mandell, Wayne A.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Bayless, E. Randall; Hanson, Randall T.; Kearl, Peter M.; Kerfoot, William B.; Newhouse, Mark W.; Pedler, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Three borehole flowmeters and hydrophysical logging were used to measure ground-water flow in carbonate bedrock at sites in southeastern Indiana and on the westcentral border of Kentucky and Tennessee. The three flowmeters make point measurements of the direction and magnitude of horizontal flow, and hydrophysical logging measures the magnitude of horizontal flowover an interval. The directional flowmeters evaluated include a horizontal heat-pulse flowmeter, an acoustic Doppler velocimeter, and a colloidal borescope flowmeter. Each method was used to measure flow in selected zones where previous geophysical logging had indicated water-producing beds, bedding planes, or other permeable features that made conditions favorable for horizontal-flow measurements. Background geophysical logging indicated that ground-water production from the Indiana test wells was characterized by inflow from a single, 20-foot-thick limestone bed. The Kentucky/Tennessee test wells produced water from one or more bedding planes where geophysical logs indicated the bedding planes had been enlarged by dissolution. Two of the three test wells at the latter site contained measurable vertical flow between two or more bedding planes under ambient hydraulic head conditions. Field measurements and data analyses for each flow-measurement technique were completed by a developer of the technology or by a contractor with extensive experience in the application of that specific technology. Comparison of the horizontal-flow measurements indicated that the three point-measurement techniques rarely measured the same velocities and flow directions at the same measurement stations. Repeat measurements at selected depth stations also failed to consistently reproduce either flow direction, flow magnitude, or both. At a few test stations, two of the techniques provided similar flow magnitude or direction but usually not both. Some of this variability may be attributed to naturally occurring changes in

  2. Two-phase magnetoconvection flow of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in a horizontal composite porous annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Zaheer; Hasnain, Jafar

    A numerical study is performed to examine the two-phase magnetoconvection and heat transfer phenomena of Fe3O4 -kerosene nanofluid flow in a horizontal composite porous annulus with an external magnetic field. The annulus is filled with immiscible fluids flowing between two concentric cylinders. The governing equations of the flow problem are obtained using Darcy-Brinkman model. Heat transfer is analyzed in the presence of viscous and Darcian dissipation terms. The shooting method is used as a tool to solve the obtained non-linear ordinary differential equations for the velocity and temperature profiles. The velocity and temperature distributions are analyzed and discussed under the influence of involved flow parameters with the aid of graphs. It is found that both velocity and temperature of fluid are decreased with ferroparticle volume fraction. In addition to that, it is also presented that the existence of magnetic field decreases the benefit of ferrofluids in heat transfer progression.

  3. Investigations on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher geometry in the hypersonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saile, D.; Gülhan, A.; Henckels, A.; Glatzer, C.; Statnikov, V.; Meinke, M.

    2013-06-01

    The turbulent wake flow of generic rocket configurations is investigated experimentally and numerically at a freestream Mach number of 6.0 and a unit Reynolds number of 10·106 m-1. The flow condition is based on the trajectory of Ariane V-like launcher at an altitude of 50 km, which is used as the baseline to address the overarching tasks of wake flows in the hypersonic regime like fluid-structural coupling, reverse hot jets and base heating. Experimental results using pressure transducers and the high-speed Schlieren measurement technique are shown to gain insight into the local pressure fluctuations on the base and the oscillations of the recompression shock. This experimental configuration features a wedgeprofiled strut orthogonally mounted to the main body. Additionally, the influence of cylindrical dummy nozzles attached to the base of the rocket is investigated, which is the link to the numerical investigations. Here, the axisymmetric model possesses a cylindrical sting support of the same diameter as the dummy nozzles. The sting support allows investigations for an undisturbed wake flow. A time-accurate zonal Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach is applied to identify shocks, expansion waves, and the highly unsteady recompression region numerically. Subsequently, experimental and numerical results in the strut-averted region are compared with regard to the wall pressure and recompression shock frequency spectra. For the compared configurations, experimental pressure spectra exhibit dominant Strouhal numbers at about SrD = 0.03 and 0.27, and the recompression shock oscillates at 0.2. In general, the pressure and recompression shock fluctuations numerically calculated agree reasonably with the experimental results. The experiments with a blunt base reveal base-pressure spectra with dominant Strouhal numbers at 0.08 at the center position and 0.145, 0.21-0.22, and 0.31-0.33 at the outskirts of the base.

  4. The Impact of Surface Friction on Boundary Layer Separation for Different Mountain Flow Regimes: An Analysis Based on Large-Eddy-Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachsperger, Johannes; Serafin, Stefano; Grubišić, Vanda

    2014-05-01

    expected; rather we find those in moderately non-linear flows. A possible explanation for that is that for flows in the strongest non-linear regime, the BLS is associated with low-level mountain-wave breaking which leads to the formation of a lee wave train underneath a self-induced critical level and an attendant train of smaller rotors underneath the lee wave crests. It appears also that the trapped flow over this train of rotors excites an upward propagating gravity wave (similar to a terrain generated internal gravity wave) which partially passes through the critical level and changes the structure of the larger-scale flow above. The sensitivity tests for the strength of surface friction show that with increasing surface drag the rotor interior structure changes from a single coherent horizontal vortex to a more complex interior filled with sub-vortices that impact the overall shape of the rotor.

  5. A graphical approach to characterize sub-daily flow regimes and evaluate its alterations due to hydropeaking.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Carlos; Román, Alfonso; Bejarano, Maria Dolores; Garcia de Jalon, Diego; Carolli, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Most flow regime characterizations focus on long time scale flow patterns, which are not precise enough to capture key components of short-term flow fluctuations. Recent proposed methods describing sub-daily flow fluctuations are focused on limited components of the flow regime being unable to fully represent it, or on the identification of peaking events based on subjectively defined thresholds, being unsuitable for evaluations of short-term flow regime alterations through comparisons between regulated and free-flowing rivers. This study aims to launch an innovative approach based on the visual display of quantitative information to address the challenge of the short-term hydrologic characterization and evaluation of alteration resulting from hydropeaking. We propose a graphical method to represent a discrete set of ecologically relevant indices that characterize and evaluate the alteration of sub-daily flow regimes. The frequency of occurrence of classified values of a descriptive hydrological variable is represented in a map-like graph where longitude, latitude and altitude represent the Julian day, the value of the variable and the frequency of occurrence, respectively. Subsequently, we tested the method on several rivers, both free-flowing and subjected to hydropower production. The advantages of our approach compared to other analytical methods are: (i) it displays a great amount of information without oversimplification; (ii) it takes into account changes in the intensity, timing and frequency of the sub-daily flows, without needing a priori defined thresholds to identify hydropeaking events; and (iii) it supports the Water Framework Directive goal. Specifically, results from applications of our graphical method agree with Sauterleute and Charmasson (2014) analytical method.

  6. Migration of a droplet in a cylindrical tube in the creeping flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Binita; Biswas, Gautam; Dalal, Amaresh; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2017-03-01

    The migration of a neutrally buoyant droplet in a tube containing another immiscible liquid is investigated numerically in the creeping flow regime. A fully developed velocity profile is imposed at the inlet of the tube. The interface between the two immiscible fluids is captured using a coupled level-set and volume-of-fluid approach. The deformation and breakup dynamics of the droplet are investigated in terms of three dimensionless parameters, namely, the ratio between the radius of the undeformed droplet and the radius of the capillary tube, the viscosity ratio between the dispersed and the continuous phases, and the capillary number that measures the relative importance of the viscous force over the surface tension force. It has been observed that the droplet, while traversing through the tube, either approaches a steady bulletlike shape or develops a prominent reentrant cavity at its rear. Depending on the initial droplet size, there exists a critical capillary number for every flow configuration beyond which the drop fails to maintain a steady shape and breaks into fragments. The deformation and breakup phenomena depend primarily on the droplet size, the viscosity ratio, and the capillary number. Special attention has been given to the case where the drop diameter is comparable with the tube diameter. A thorough computational study has been conducted to find the critical capillary number for a range of droplets of varied sizes suspended in systems having different viscosity ratios.

  7. Hydrothermal flow regime and magmatic heat source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Williams, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    This detailed three-dimensional model of the natural flow regime of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, before steam production began, is based on patterns of hydrothermal mineral zones and light stable isotopic ratios observed in rock samples from more than 50 deep wells, together with temperature gradients, wireline logs and other data. At the level so far penetrated by drilling, this hydrothermal system was heated by a thermal plume of water close to boiling, inclined at 45/sup 0/, rising from the northeast and discharging to the west. To the east a zone of cold water recharge overlies the inclined thermal plume. Fission track annealing studies show the reservoir reached 170/sup 0/C only 10/sup 4/ years ago. Oxygen isotope exchange data indicate that a 12 km/sup 3/ volume of rock subsequently reacted with three times its volume of water hotter than 200/sup 0/C. Averaged over the duration of the heating event this would require a flow velocity through a typical cross-section of the reservoir of about 6 m/year. The heat in storage in that part of the reservoir hotter than 200/sup 0/C and shallower than 3 km depth is equivalent to that which would be released by the cooling of about 1 or 2 km/sup 3/ of basalt or gabbro magma.

  8. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Stratified Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Horizontal Circular Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Faccini, J.L.H.; Sampaio, P.A.B. de

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports numerical and experimental investigation of stratified gas-liquid two-phase flow in horizontal circular pipes. The Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes equations (RANS) with the k-{omega} model for a fully developed stratified gas-liquid two-phase flow are solved by using the finite element method. A smooth and horizontal interface surface is assumed without considering the interfacial waves. The continuity of the shear stress across the interface is enforced with the continuity of the velocity being automatically satisfied by the variational formulation. For each given interface position and longitudinal pressure gradient, an inner iteration loop runs to solve the nonlinear equations. The Newton-Raphson scheme is used to solve the transcendental equations by an outer iteration to determine the interface position and pressure gradient for a given pair of volumetric flow rates. The interface position in a 51.2 mm ID circular pipe was measured experimentally by the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The numerical results were also compared with experimental results in a 21 mm ID circular pipe reported by Masala [1]. The good agreement between the numerical and experimental results indicates that the k-{omega} model can be applied for the numerical simulation of stratified gas-liquid two-phase flow. (authors)

  9. How kelp produce blade shapes suited to different flow regimes: A new wrinkle.

    PubMed

    Koehl, M A R; Silk, W K; Liang, H; Mahadevan, L

    2008-12-01

    Many species of macroalgae have flat, strap-like blades in habitats exposed to rapidly flowing water, but have wide, ruffled "undulate" blades at protected sites. We used the giant bull kelp, Nereocystis luetkeana, to investigate how these ecomorphological differences are produced. The undulate blades of N. luetkeana from sites with low flow remain spread out and flutter erratically in moving water, thereby not only enhancing interception of light, but also increasing drag. In contrast, strap-like blades of kelp from habitats with rapid flow collapse into streamlined bundles and flutter at low amplitude in flowing water, thus reducing both drag and interception of light. Transplant experiments in the field revealed that shape of the blade in N. luetkeana is a plastic trait. Laboratory experiments in which growing blades from different sites were subjected to tensile forces that mimicked the hydrodynamic drag experienced by blades in different flow regimes showed that change in shape is induced by mechanical stress. During growth experiments in the field and laboratory, we mapped the spatial distribution of growth in both undulate and strap-like blades to determine how these different morphologies were produced. The highest growth rates occur near the proximal ends of N. luetkeana blades of both morphologies, but the rates of transverse growth of narrow, strap-like blades are lower than those of wide, undulate blades. If rates of longitudinal growth at the edges of a blade exceed the rate of longitudinal growth along the midline of the blade, ruffles along the edges of the blade are produced by elastic buckling. In contrast, flat blades are produced when rates of longitudinal growth are similar across the width of a blade. Because ruffles are the result of elastic buckling, a compliant undulate N. luetkeana blade can easily be pushed into different configurations (e.g., the wavelengths of the ruffles along the edges of the blade can change, and the whole blade can

  10. Modeling the transition between upper plane bed regime and sheet flow without an active layer formulation. Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, E.; Hernandez Moreira, R. R.; Blom, A.

    2015-12-01

    A perusal of the literature on bedload transport revealed that, notwithstanding the large number of studies on bedform morphology performed in the past decades, the upper plane bed regime has not been thoroughly investigated and the distinction between the upper plane bed and sheet flow transport regimes is still poorly defined. Previous experimental work demonstrated that the upper plane bed regime is characterized by long wavelength and small amplitude bedforms that migrate downstream. These bedforms, however, were not observed in experiments on sheet flow transport suggesting that the upper plane bed and the sheet flow are two different regimes. We thus designed and performed experiments in a sediment feed flume in the hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of South Carolina at Columbia to study the transition from upper plane bed to sheet flow regime. Periodic measurements of water surface and bed elevation, bedform geometry and thicknesses of the bedload layer were performed by eyes, and with cameras, movies and a system of six ultrasonic probes that record the variations of bed elevation at a point over time. We used the time series of bed elevations to determine the probability functions of bed elevation. These probability functions are implemented in a continuous model of river morphodynamics, i.e. a model that does not use the active layer approximation to describe the sediment fluxes between the bedload and the deposit and that should thus be able to capture the details of the vertical and streamwise variation of the deposit grain size distribution. This model is validated against the experimental results for the case of uniform material. We then use the validated model in the attempt to study if and how the spatial distribution of grain sizes in the deposit changes from upper plane bed regime to sheet flow and if these results are influenced by the imposed rates of base level rise.

  11. Basal ice flow regime influenced by glacial lake formation in Rhonegletscher, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, D.; Tsutaki, S.; Sugiyama, S.

    2010-12-01

    After the retreat of glacier terminus over a bedrock bump, a glacial lake has formed in front of Rhonegletscher, Switzerland. It is suspected that ice flow regime is now significantly influenced by the lake water. To investigate the impact of lake formation on glacier dynamics, we carried out surface and borehole observations in the terminus region of Rhonegletscher. In 2008 and 2009 summer seasons, we drilled more than 20 boreholes to measure borehole deformation by repeated inclinometry. Ice surface speed was measured by surveying stakes installed nearby the boreholes. We used a borehole televiewer to measure basal sliding speed by tracking stones and markers at the bottom of the boreholes. We also measured basal sediment layer thickness by hammering a penetrometer at the bottom of the boreholes. Our measurements showed clear decrease in the ice deformation rate near the lake (Fig. 1). Ice deformation accounted for 60-80% in the upper part of our study site (e.g. boreholes 1 and 5), whereas it is less than 10% near the lake (e.g. boreholes 7, 10 and 11). This result suggests that the basal ice flow near the lake is enhanced by the lake water. According to the basal sliding speed measurement in borehole 2, sliding accounted for less than 10% of basal flow speed from 2 to 31 August 2009. Deformation of a subglacial sediment layer is thus important in this region. The penetrometer measurement confirmed that the study site is underlain by a subglacial sediment layer whose thickness was in a range of 0-70 m. Fig.1 Terminus of Rhonegletscher and proglacial lakes indicated by the shaded areas. The columns show ice surface and deformation speeds measured at each borehole site from 9 July to 5 September in 2009. Ice deformation speed was negligibly small at boreholes 7, 10, and 11. Surface contour spacing is 20 m.

  12. Expansion of bubbles under a pulsatile flow regime in decompressed ovine blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Ran; Marmur, Abraham

    2016-02-01

    After decompression of ovine large blood vessels, bubbles nucleate and expand at active hydrophobic spots on their luminal aspect. These bubbles will be in the path of the blood flow within the vessel, which might replenish the supply of gas-supersaturated plasma in their vicinity and thus, in contrast with our previous estimations, enhance their growth. We used the data from our previous study on the effect of pulsatile flow in ovine blood vessels stretched on microscope slides and photographed after decompression from hyperbaric exposure. We measured the diameter of 46 bubbles in 4 samples taken from 3 blood vessels (pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, and aorta) in which both a "multi-bubble active spot" (MBAS)--which produces several bubbles at a time, and at least one "single-bubble active spot" (SBAS)--which produces a single bubble at a time, were seen together. The linear expansion rate for diameter in SBAS ranged from 0.077 to 0.498 mm/min and in MBAS from 0.001 to 0.332 mm/min. There was a trend toward a reduced expansion rate for bubbles in MBAS compared with SBAS. The expansion rate for bubbles in an MBAS when it was surrounded by others was very low. Bubble growth is related to gas tension, and under a flow regime, bubbles expand from a diameter of 0.1 to 1mm in 2-24 min at a gas supersaturation of 620 kPa and lower. There are two phases of bubble development. The slow and disperse initiation of active spots (from nanobubbles to gas micronuclei) continues for more than 1h, whereas the fast increase in size (2-24 min) is governed by diffusion. Bubble-based decompression models should not artificially reduce diffusion constants, but rather take both phases of bubble development into consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigating the flow and stress regime at the front of a tidewater outlet glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercenier, Rémy; Luethi, Martin; Vieli, Andreas; Rohner, Christoph; Small, David

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic changes in ocean-terminating glaciers are responsible for approximately half of the current high rate of mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet. The related calving process, which occurs when the stresses at the calving front exceed the fracture toughness of ice, is still not well understood and poorly represented in current generation ice-sheet models, but is a crucial requisite to understand and model dynamics and future mass loss of the ice sheet. Here, we use a two-dimensional finite-element model to compute the stress and flow fields near the front of a tidewater outlet glacier. First, we perform a sensitivity analysis for an idealized glacier exploring the effects of variable calving front slope, water depth and basal sliding. We then apply the model to two flowlines of Eqip Sermia, an ocean terminating outlet glacier in West Greenland. Detailed velocity and geometry measurements obtained from terrestrial radar interferometry serve as constraints to the model. These flowline geometries and velocities strongly differ. One flowline ends with a ˜ 50 meter vertical cliff, close to floatation, while the other has a 150-200 meter high grounded front with a ˜ 45° slope and for which extrusion flow is observed. These different geometry settings lead to substantial difference in stress and flow regimes. This stress analysis improves our understanding of how and where the ice is susceptible to failure and crevasse formation for different idealized as well as real conditions. In further work, we aim to use this information as a constraint to investigate the short-term and long-term processes related to outlet glacier calving.

  14. Changes in long-term flow regimes in Mekong River and their implications in riverine ecosystems and reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongnan, L.; Long, D.; Zhao, J.; Lu, H.; Hong, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Human activities, such as dam construction, significantly alter the flow regimes in Mekong River, especially after the completion of two large dams, namely, Xiaowan and Nuozadu, in 2010 and 2014, respectively. Streamflow data from 1960 to 2014 obtained from six stations located along the Mekong mainstream are divided into three periods, i.e., the pre-impact period (1960-1991), the transition period (1992-2009), and the impacted period (2010-2014). The flow regimes are investigated using eco-low metrics and the indicators of hydrologic alteration (IHA). Principal component analysis is applied to select key indices from IHA. Results show that damming the upstream area reduced the annual streamflow in upstream Chiang Saen gauging station, whereas no clear effect was observed in downstream Stung Treng station. Operation of dams reduces the streamflow in wet seasons and increases the streamflow in dry seasons, leading to unique seasonal variation in streamflow in terms of eco-flow metrics in Chiang Saen gauging station from 2010 to 2014. In addition, no notable change has been observed in the date of occurrence of extreme flows. In upstream Chiang Saen gauging station, the maximum flow values decreased significantly in the year corresponding to the completion of the Manwan, Dachaoshan, and Jinghong Dams. The construction and operation of dams clearly exerted significant impacts on low pulse duration. The 90-day maximum flow, high and low pulse duration, number of fluctuations, and date of the occurrence of maximum flow are selected to reflect flow regimes in Mekong River. On one hand, changes in flow regimes influence the riverine ecosystems; on the other hand, these changes are beneficial in downstream irrigation, flood management, and navigation. The results of this study provide reference for reservoir operation in upstream regions, taking into consideration both the ecological and economic benefits of such operation, as well as for maximizing the interests of

  15. Prediction of strong and weak ignition regimes in turbulent reacting flows with temperature fluctuations: A direct numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Pinaki; Valorani, Mauro; Im, Hong; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    The present work investigates the auto-ignition characteristics of compositionally homogeneous reactant mixtures in the presence of thermal non-uniformities and turbulent velocity fluctuations. An auto-ignition regime diagram is briefly discussed, that provides the framework for predicting the expected ignition behavior based on the thermo-chemical properties of the reactant mixture and flow/scalar field conditions. The regime diagram classifies the ignition regimes mainly into three categories: weak (deflagration dominant), reaction-controlled strong and mixing-controlled strong (volumetric ignition/spontaneous propagation dominant) regimes. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of auto-ignition in a lean thermally-stratified syngas/air turbulent mixture at high-pressure, low-temperature conditions are performed to assess the validity of the regime diagram. Various parametric cases are considered corresponding to different locations on the regime diagram, by varying the characteristic turbulent Damköhler and Reynolds numbers. Detailed analysis of the reaction front propagation and heat release indicates that the observed ignition behaviors agree very well with the corresponding predictions by the regime diagram. U.S. DOE NETL award number DE-FE0007465; King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).

  16. The effect of neutrally buoyant finite-size particles on channel flows in the laminar-turbulent transition regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Vincent; Abbas, Micheline; Masbernat, Olivier; Climent, Eric

    2013-12-01

    The presence of finite-size particles in a channel flow close to the laminar-turbulent transition is simulated with the Force Coupling Method which allows two-way coupling with the flow dynamics. Spherical particles with channel height-to-particle diameter ratio of 16 are initially randomly seeded in a fluctuating flow above the critical Reynolds number corresponding to single phase flow relaminarization. When steady-state is reached, the particle volume fraction is homogeneously distributed in the channel cross-section (ϕ ≅ 5%) except in the near-wall region where it is larger due to inertia-driven migration. Turbulence statistics (intensity of velocity fluctuations, small-scale vortical structures, wall shear stress) calculated in the fully coupled two-phase flow simulations are compared to single-phase flow data in the transition regime. It is observed that particles increase the transverse r.m.s. flow velocity fluctuations and they break down the flow coherent structures into smaller, more numerous and sustained eddies, preventing the flow to relaminarize at the single-phase critical Reynolds number. When the Reynolds number is further decreased and the suspension flow becomes laminar, the wall friction coefficient recovers the evolution of the laminar single-phase law provided that the suspension viscosity is used in the Reynolds number definition. The residual velocity fluctuations in the suspension correspond to a regime of particulate shear-induced agitation.

  17. On the accuracy of the simplified Bernoulli trials collision algorithm in treating flows at nano scale and hypersonic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roohi, Ehsan; Stefanov, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    This paper reviews the accuracy of the Simplified Bernoulli Trial (SBT) algorithm and its variants, i.e., SBT-TAS (SBT on transient adaptive subcells) and ISBT (intelligence SBT) in the simulation of a wide spectrum of rarefied flow problems, including collision frequency ratio evaluation in the equilibrium condition, comparison of the Sonine-polynomial coefficients prediction in the Fourier flow with the theoretical prediction of the Chapman-Enskog expansion, accurate wall heat flux solution for the Fourier flow in the early slip regime, and hypersonic flows over cylinder and biconic geometries. We summarize advantages and requirements that utilization of the SBT collision families brings to a typical DSMC solver.

  18. Optimizing environmental flows for multiple reaches affected by a multipurpose reservoir system in Taiwan: Restoring natural flow regimes at multiple temporal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    For reservoirs that are operated for multiple purposes such as water supply, flood control, and power generation, any attempts to incorporate environmental flow targets in the reservoir operation rules need to take into account both the human and ecosystem demands. To date, however, none of the reservoir operation schemes that consider environmental flow requirements includes subdaily flow regimes and is able to optimize for multiple reaches. Here, we address the temporal and spatial issues associated with the optimal environmental flow and operation strategies for a multipurpose reservoir system in Taiwan. We propose an environmental flow proportion strategy and three-period release approach, and multireach operation scenarios that simultaneously optimize reservoir performances and environmental flow objectives at subdaily to interannual timescales for a maximum of three connected reaches. Our results imply that taking into account the environmental flow objectives does not necessarily degrade the overall reservoir performance due to the positive effect on flood control, which in turn would compensate for the adverse effects on domestic water supply and hydropower generation. The three-period release approach benefits mainly the subdaily flow regime, while the environmental flow proportion strategy benefits primarily the daily flow regime. Spatially, a mutual exclusion is observed between the reaches above and below a diversion weir, a fact that revises the conventional perception that restoring the flow regimes of a downstream reach would automatically restore those of upstream reaches. An overall evaluation reveals that the three-reach scenario outperforms the two-reach scenarios, which then outperform the one-reach scenarios. The one- or two-reach scenario that incorporates the midstream reach may be taken as an alternative because such scenario would benefit the upstream or downstream reach in addition to the midstream reach.

  19. Horizontal density-gradient effects on simulation of flow and transport in the Potomac Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, Robert A.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional, depth-integrated, hydrodynamic/transport model of the Potomac Estuary between Indian Head and Morgantown, Md., has been extended to include treatment of baroclinic forcing due to horizontal density gradients. The finite-difference model numerically integrates equations of mass and momentum conservation in conjunction with a transport equation for heat, salt, and constituent fluxes. Lateral and longitudinal density gradients are determined from salinity distributions computed from the convection-diffusion equation and an equation of state that expresses density as a function of temperature and salinity; thus, the hydrodynamic and transport computations are directly coupled. Horizontal density variations are shown to contribute significantly to momentum fluxes determined in the hydrodynamic computation. These fluxes lead to enchanced tidal pumping, and consequently greater dispersion, as is evidenced by numerical simulations. Density gradient effects on tidal propagation and transport behavior are discussed and demonstrated.

  20. Effect of placements (horizontal with vertical) on gas-solid flow and particle impact erosion in gate valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhe; Zhu, Linhang; Cui, Baoling; Li, Yi; Ruan, Xiaodong

    2014-12-01

    Gate valve has various placements in the practical usages. Due to the effect of gravity, particle trajectories and erosions are distinct between placements. Thus in this study, gas-solid flow properties and erosion in gate valve for horizontal placement and vertical placement are discussed and compared by using Euler-Lagrange simulation method. The structure of a gate valve and a simplified structure are investigated. The simulation procedure is validated in our published paper by comparing with the experiment data of a pipe and an elbow. The results show that for all investigated open degrees and Stokes numbers (St), there are little difference of gas flow properties and flow coefficients between two placements. It is also found that the trajectories of particles for two placements are mostly identical when St « 1, making the erosion independent of placement. With the increase of St, the distinction of trajectories between placements becomes more obvious, leading to an increasing difference of the erosion distributions. Besides, the total erosion ratio of surface T for horizontal placement is two orders of magnitudes larger than that for vertical placement when the particle diameter is 250μm.

  1. Composting plant leachate treatment by a pilot-scale, three-stage, horizontal flow constructed wetland in central Iran.

    PubMed

    Bakhshoodeh, Reza; Alavi, Nadali; Paydary, Pooya

    2017-09-02

    Handling and treatment of composting leachate is difficult and poses major burdens on composting facilities. The main goal of this study was to evaluate usage of a three-stage, constructed wetland to treat leachate produced in Isfahan composting facility. A pilot-scale, three-stage, subsurface, horizontal flow constructed wetland, planted with vetiver with a flow rate of 24 L/day and a 15-day hydraulic retention time, was used. Removal of organic matter, ammonia, nitrate, total nitrogen, suspended solids, and several heavy metals from Isfahan composting facility leachate was monitored over a 3-month period. Constructed wetland system was capable of efficiently removing BOD5 (87.3%), COD (74.5%), ammonia (91.5%), nitrate (87.9%), total nitrogen (87.8%), total suspended solids (85.5%), and heavy metals (ranging from 70 to 90%) from the composting leachate. High contaminant removal efficiencies were achieved, but effluent still failed to meet Iranian standards for treated wastewater. This study shows that although a three-stage horizontal flow constructed wetland planted with vetiver cannot be used alone to treat Isfahan composting facility leachate, but it has the potential to be used as a leachate pre-treatment step, along with another complementary method.

  2. Effect of long range order on sheared liquid crystalline materials: flow regimes, transitions, and rheological phase diagrams

    PubMed

    Tsuji; Rey

    2000-12-01

    A generalized theory that includes short-range elasticity, long-range elasticity, and flow effects is used to simulate and characterize the shear flow of liquid crystalline materials as a function of the Deborah (De) and Ericksen (Er) numbers in the presence of fixed planar director boundary conditions; the results are also interpreted as a function of the ratio R between short-range and long-range elasticity. The results are effectively summarized into rheological phase diagrams spanned by De and Er, and also by R and Er, where the stability region of four distinct flow regimes are indicated. The four regimes for planar (two-dimensional orientation) shear flow are (1) the elastic-driven steady state, (2) the composite tumbling-wagging periodic state, (3) the wagging periodic state, and (4) the viscous-driven steady state. The coexistence of the four regimes at a quacritical point is shown to be due to the emergence of a defect structure. The origin, the significant steady and dynamical features, and the transitions between these regimes are thoroughly characterized and analyzed. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons between the present complete model predictions and those obtained from the classical theories of nematodynamics (Leslie-Ericksen and Doi theories) are presented and the main physical mechanisms that drive the observed deviations between the predictions of these models are identified. The presented results fill the previously existing gap between the classical Leslie-Ericksen theory and the Doi theory, and present a unified description of nematodynamics.

  3. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase IV: Central Florida Flow Regime Based Climatologies of Lightning Probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2009-01-01

    The threat of lightning is a daily concern during the warm season in Florida. Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. Previously, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) calculated the gridded lightning climatologies based on seven flow regimes over Florida for 1-, 3- and 6-hr intervals in 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-NM diameter range rings around the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and eight other airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) county warning area (CWA). In this update to the work, the AMU recalculated the lightning climatologies for using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The AMU included all data regardless of flow regime as one of the stratifications, added monthly stratifications, added three years of data to the period of record and used modified flow regimes based work from the AMU's Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool, Phase II. The AMU made changes so the 5- and 10-NM radius range rings are consistent with the aviation forecast requirements at NWS MLB, while the 20- and 30-NM radius range rings at the SLF assist the Spaceflight Meteorology Group in making forecasts for weather Flight Rule violations during Shuttle landings. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface with the new data.

  4. Pattern transitions of oil-water two-phase flow with low water content in rectangular horizontal pipes probed by terahertz spectrum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Wu, Shi-Xiang; Zhao, Kun; Wang, Wei; Zhan, Hong-Lei; Jiang, Chen; Xiao, Li-Zhi; Chen, Shao-Hua

    2015-11-30

    The flow-pattern transition has been a challenging problem in two-phase flow system. We propose the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to investigate the behavior underlying oil-water flow in rectangular horizontal pipes. The low water content (0.03-2.3%) in oil-water flow can be measured accurately and reliably from the relationship between THz peak amplitude and water volume fraction. In addition, we obtain the flow pattern transition boundaries in terms of flow rates. The critical flow rate Qc of the flow pattern transitions decreases from 0.32 m3 h to 0.18 m3 h when the corresponding water content increases from 0.03% to 2.3%. These properties render THz-TDS particularly powerful technology for investigating a horizontal oil-water two-phase flow system.

  5. Experimental study on the flow patterns and the two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal impacting T-Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; Malandrone, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper analyzes the experimental results concerning the flow patterns and pressure drops in two-phase flow through a horizontal impacting T-junction, whose outlet pipes are aligned and perpendicular to the inlet pipe. The test section consists of plexiglass pipes with inner diameter of 10 mm. A mixture of water and air at ambient temperature and pressures up to 2.4 bar flows through the T-junction, with different splitting of flow rates in the two outlet branches; superficial velocities of air and water in the inlet pipe have been varied up to a maximum of 35 m/s and 3.5 m/s respectively. The flow patterns occurring in the inlet and branch pipes are compared with the predictions of the Baker and Taitel - Dukler maps. The pressure drops along the branches have been measured relatively to different splitting of the flow rate through the two branches and the pressure loss coefficients in the junction have been evaluated. Friction pressure drops have allowed us to evaluate two-phase friction multipliers, which have then been compared to the predictions of Lockhart-Martinelli, and Friedel correlations. Local pressure drops have been extrapolated at the junction centre and analyzed; the two-phase multiplier has been evaluated and compared with the predictions of Chisholm correlation; the value of the empirical coefficient that minimizes the discrepancy has also been evaluated.

  6. Predicting the natural flow regime: Models for assessing hydrological alteration in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlisle, D.M.; Falcone, J.; Wolock, D.M.; Meador, M.R.; Norris, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the extent to which natural streamflow characteristics have been altered is an important consideration for ecological assessments of streams. Assessing hydrologic condition requires that we quantify the attributes of the flow regime that would be expected in the absence of anthropogenic modifications. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether selected streamflow characteristics could be predicted at regional and national scales using geospatial data. Long-term, gaged river basins distributed throughout the contiguous US that had streamflow characteristics representing least disturbed or near pristine conditions were identified. Thirteen metrics of the magnitude, frequency, duration, timing and rate of change of streamflow were calculated using a 20-50 year period of record for each site. We used random forests (RF), a robust statistical modelling approach, to develop models that predicted the value for each streamflow metric using natural watershed characteristics. We compared the performance (i.e. bias and precision) of national- and regional-scale predictive models to that of models based on landscape classifications, including major river basins, ecoregions and hydrologic landscape regions (HLR). For all hydrologic metrics, landscape stratification models produced estimates that were less biased and more precise than a null model that accounted for no natural variability. Predictive models at the national and regional scale performed equally well, and substantially improved predictions of all hydrologic metrics relative to landscape stratification models. Prediction error rates ranged from 15 to 40%, but were 25% for most metrics. We selected three gaged, non-reference sites to illustrate how predictive models could be used to assess hydrologic condition. These examples show how the models accurately estimate predisturbance conditions and are sensitive to changes in streamflow variability associated with long-term land-use change. We also

  7. Flow development and structural loading on dual step cylinders in laminar shedding regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, J.; Morton, C.; Yarusevych, S.

    2015-06-01

    The flow development over a dual step cylinder is investigated numerically at a Reynolds number (ReD) of 150 for a range of aspect ratios, 0.2 ≤ L/D ≤ 5, and diameter ratios, 1.1 ≤ D/d ≤ 4. The results reveal the following four distinct types of wake topology downstream of the larger diameter cylinder: (i) shedding of hairpin vortices, (ii) transient asymmetric shedding, (iii) primarily spanwise shedding, and (iv) no vortex shedding. Dominant vortex interactions are reconstructed for each regime. These interactions, involving half-loop vortex connections, vortex merging, and direct vortex connections are shown to occur periodically as the large and small cylinder structures undergo vortex dislocations. Topological schematics are introduced to relate the characteristic frequencies to the periodic vortex interactions. The observed types of wake topology are shown to produce distinctly different mean and fluctuating forces on the dual step cylinder. For lower aspect and diamete