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Sample records for hormonal anabolic compounds

  1. Growth hormone secretion and clearance rates in growing beef steers implanted with estrogenic anabolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, R; Kitts, W D

    1984-01-01

    The effect of estrogenic anabolic compounds on the kinetic parameters of metabolism of growth hormone (GH) was studied in growing beef steers. Twenty-four beef steers were randomly placed into four groups and assigned to one of the following four treatment groups: zeranol, diethylstilbestrol (DES), Synovex-S and an unimplanted control. GH metabolism was studied from eight steers on day 20 following the implantation of anabolic compounds. The animals were rapidly injected with a solution of bGH (NIH-GH-B18) and the disappearance of injected GH from the plasma was monitored up to 120 min following the injection. The plasma GH disappearance curve displayed an initial rapid phase lasting 5 min and a slow disappearance phase lasting 42 min; the fractional turnover rate from the two compartments were 0.167 and 0.017 min-1, respectively. The average volume of distribution of GH in steers was 6% of the body weight. Mean values of metabolic clearance and secretion rates of GH in steers were 21 liters/h and 252 micrograms/h or 74.5 ml/kg/h and 0.91 microgram/kg/h, respectively. Steers implanted with anabolic compounds gained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) than the controls. Plasma basal GH concentration appeared to be higher in all the implanted than in the control steers. The secretion rate of GH was increased (P less than 0.05) in steers implanted with anabolic compounds when compared to control steers. The secretion rate (microgram/kg/h) was about 96% (P less than 0.05), 107% (P less than 0.05) and 81% (P less than 0.05) higher in steers implanted with DES, zeranol and Synovex-S, respectively, than in the control steers. All the compounds studied were equally effective in increasing the secretion of GH on day 20 following their implantation. Metabolic clearance rate of GH was not affected by anabolic compound implantation in steers. There was, however, a slight reduction in metabolic clearance rate due to DES and a slight elevation due to zeranol and Synovex-S when

  2. Anabolic steroids and growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Haupt, H A

    1993-01-01

    Athletes are generally well educated regarding substances that they may use as ergogenic aids. This includes anabolic steroids and growth hormone. Fortunately, the abuse of growth hormone is limited by its cost and the fact that anabolic steroids are simply more enticing to the athlete. There are, however, significant potential adverse effects regarding its use that can be best understood by studying known growth hormone excess, as demonstrated in the acromegalic syndrome. Many athletes are unfamiliar with this syndrome and education of the potential consequences of growth hormone excess is important in counseling athletes considering its use. While athletes contemplating the use of anabolic steroids may correctly perceive their risks for significant physiologic effects to be small if they use the steroids for brief periods of time, many of these same athletes are unaware of the potential for habituation to the use of anabolic steroids. The result may be incessant use of steroids by an athlete who previously considered only short-term use. As we see athletes taking anabolic steroids for more prolonged periods, we are likely to see more severe medical consequences. Those who eventually do discontinue the steroids are dismayed to find that the improvements made with the steroids generally disappear and they have little to show for hours or even years of intense training beyond the psychological scars inherent with steroid use. Counseling of these athletes should focus on the potential adverse psychological consequences of anabolic steroid use and the significant risk for habituation.

  3. [Dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA(S)]: anabolic hormone?].

    PubMed

    Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Maggio, Marcello

    2010-09-01

    The role of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphated form (DHEAS) as anabolic hormones is still debated in the literature. In this review we describe the fundamental steps of DHEA physiological secretion and its peripheral metabolism. Moreover we will list all the observational and intervention studies conducted in humans. Many observational studies have tested the relationship between low DHEA levels and age-related changes in skeletal muscle and bone, while intervention studies underline the positive and significant effects of DHEA treatment on several parameters of body composition. Surprisingly, observational studies are not consistent with different effects in men and women. There is recent evidence of a significant role of DHEA in frailty syndrome and as predictor of mortality. However a more complete approach of the problem suggests the opportunity to not focus only on one single hormonal derangement but to analyze the parallel dysregulation of anabolic hormones including sex steroids, GH-IGF-1 system and other catabolic hormones.

  4. Parathyroid hormone 1-34 and skeletal anabolic action

    PubMed Central

    Sanghani, A.; Coathup, M.; Briggs, T.; Bostrom, M.; Blunn, G.

    2017-01-01

    Intermittently administered parathyroid hormone (PTH 1-34) has been shown to promote bone formation in both human and animal studies. The hormone and its analogues stimulate both bone formation and resorption, and as such at low doses are now in clinical use for the treatment of severe osteoporosis. By varying the duration of exposure, parathyroid hormone can modulate genes leading to increased bone formation within a so-called ‘anabolic window’. The osteogenic mechanisms involved are multiple, affecting the stimulation of osteoprogenitor cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes and the stem cell niche, and ultimately leading to increased osteoblast activation, reduced osteoblast apoptosis, upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling, increased stem cell mobilisation, and mediation of the RANKL/OPG pathway. Ongoing investigation into their effect on bone formation through ‘coupled’ and ‘uncoupled’ mechanisms further underlines the impact of intermittent PTH on both cortical and cancellous bone. Given the principally catabolic actions of continuous PTH, this article reviews the skeletal actions of intermittent PTH 1-34 and the mechanisms underlying its effect. Cite this article: L. Osagie-Clouard, A. Sanghani, M. Coathup, T. Briggs, M. Bostrom, G. Blunn. Parathyroid hormone 1-34 and skeletal anabolic action: The use of parathyroid hormone in bone formation. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:14–21. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0085.R1. PMID:28062525

  5. Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    Anabolic steroids are man-made substances related to male sex hormones. Doctors use anabolic steroids to treat some hormone problems in men, delayed ... from some diseases. Bodybuilders and athletes often use anabolic steroids to build muscles and improve athletic performance. Using ...

  6. Hormone Treatment and Muscle Anabolism during Aging: Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, E. Lichar; Durham, William J.; Urban, Randall J.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual decline in circulating testosterone concentrations and decreased musculature in men. While testosterone administration is often considered when symptoms of hypogonadism are presented, the long-term effects of androgen use on muscle physiology are not yet fully understood. The definition of hypogonadism in men remains obscure but is generally indicated by total testosterone concentrations less than a threshold value of 300-500 ng/dL. Androgen replacement therapy is generally safe in men and women with low endogenous testosterone concentrations. The development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide additional options in treatment of hypogonadism while lowering the potential of side effects often associated with long-term androgen use. Androgen administration, either alone or in combination with other treatments, can be successful in improving muscle mass by increasing protein anabolism and reducing protein catabolism in men and women. Further research is necessary to optimize the anabolic and anticatabolic properties of androgens for treatment and prevention of muscle loss in men and women. PMID:20452103

  7. Doping with growth hormone/IGF-1, anabolic steroids or erythropoietin: is there a cancer risk?

    PubMed

    Tentori, Lucio; Graziani, Grazia

    2007-05-01

    Anabolic steroid and peptide hormones or growth factors are utilized to increase the performance of athletes of professional or amateur sports. Despite their well-documented adverse effects, the use of some of these agents has significantly grown and has been extended also to non-athletes with the aim to improve appearance or to counteract ageing. Pre-clinical studies and epidemiological observations in patients with an excess of hormone production or in patients chronically treated with hormones/growth factors for various pathologies have warned about the potential risk of cancer development and progression which may be also associated to the use of certain doping agents. Anabolic steroids have been described to provoke liver tumours; growth hormone or high levels of its mediator insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) have been associated with colon, breast, and prostate cancers. Actually, IGF-1 promotes cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis either by triggering other growth factors or by interacting with pathways which have an established role in carcinogenesis and cancer promotion. More recently, the finding that erythropoietin (Epo) may promote angiogenesis and inhibit apoptosis or modulate chemo- or radiosensitivity in cancer cells expressing the Epo receptor, raised the concern that the use of recombinant Epo to increase tissue oxygenation might favour tumour survival and aggressiveness. Cancer risk associated to doping might be higher than that of patients using hormones/growth factors as replacement therapy, since enormous doses are taken by the athletes often for a long period of time. Moreover, these substances are often used in combination with other licit or illicit drugs and this renders almost unpredictable all the possible adverse effects including cancer. Anyway, athletes should be made aware that long-term treatment with doping agents might increase the risk of developing cancer.

  8. Growth and anabolic hormones, leptin, and neuromuscular performance in moderately trained prepubescent athletes and untrained boys.

    PubMed

    Tsolakis, Charilaos; Vagenas, George; Dessypris, Athanasios

    2003-02-01

    We investigated hormonal regulators of growth and development, leptin levels, body composition, neuromuscular performance, and the associations among them in trained prepubertal athletes (experimental group [EG]) and an untrained control group (CG). Informed consent was obtained from the children and their parents. Their maturation stage was evaluated according to Tanner's criteria. There were no differences between EG and CG in physical characteristics, body mass index (BMI), lean body mass, testosterone (T), sex hormone-binding globulin, free androgen index, growth hormone (GH), hand grip strength, and jumping performance. Leptin levels and percent fat of the EG were significantly lower than those of the CG (p < 0.05-0.005). Leptin levels were significantly correlated to body fat and BMI for both the EG and the CG (r = 0.51-0.79). There is little evidence that leptin has a positive effect on growth and anabolic factors. Sex hormone-binding globulin and GH may explain the variation of leptin in athletes with low T (R(2) = 0.43) and in CG (R(2) = 0.35), respectively. Leptin seems to be a permissive factor for the onset of puberty, and the training background needs an optimal biological maturation to produce significant differences in muscle and power performance.

  9. Reductions in circulating anabolic hormones induced by sustained sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Everson, Carol A; Crowley, William R

    2004-06-01

    The main systemic disorders resulting from prolonged sleep deprivation in laboratory animals are a negative energy balance, low circulating thyroid hormones, and host defense impairments. Low thyroid hormones previously have been found caused by altered regulation at the level of the hypothalamus with possible pituitary involvement. The present studies investigated the effects of sleep deprivation on other major anabolic hormonal systems. Plasma growth hormone (GH) concentrations and major secretory bursts were characterized. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) was evaluated as an integrative marker of peripheral GH effector activity. Prolactin (PRL) was assessed by basal concentrations and by stimulating the pituitary with exogenous thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Leptin was studied for its linkage to metabolic signs of sleep loss and its correspondence to altered neuroendocrine regulation in other disease states. Last, plasma corticosterone was measured to investigate the degree of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation. Sleep deprivation was produced by the disk-over-water method, a well-established means of selective deprivation of sleep and noninterference with normal waking behaviors. Hormone concentrations were determined in sham comparisons and at intervals during baseline and experimental periods lasting at least 15 days in partially and totally sleep-deprived rats. The results indicate that high-amplitude pulses of GH were nearly abolished and that concentrations of GH, IGF-I, PRL, and leptin all were suppressed by sleep deprivation. Corticosterone concentration was relatively unaffected. Features of these results, such as low GH and low IGF-I, indicate failed negative feedback and point to hypothalamic mechanisms as containing the foci responsible for peripheral signs.

  10. Combined Treatment with Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Analog and Anabolic Steroid Hormone Increased Pubertal Height Gain and Adult Height in Boys with Early Puberty for Height.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Naiki, Yasuhiro; Horikawa, Reiko

    2012-04-01

    Twenty-one boys with a height of 135 cm or less at onset of puberty were treated with a combination of GnRH analog and anabolic steroid hormone, and their pubertal height gain and adult height were compared with those of untreated 29 boys who enter puberty below 135 cm. The mean age at the start of treatment with a GnRH analog, leuprorelin acetate depot (Leuplin(®)) was 12.3 yr, a mean of 1.3 yr after the onset of puberty, and GnRH analog was administered every 3 to 5 wk thereafter for a mean duration of 4.1 yr. The anabolic steroid hormone was started approximately 1 yr after initiation of treatment with the GnRH analog. The mean pubertal height gain from onset of puberty till adult height was significantly greater in the combination treatment group (33.9 cm) than in the untreated group (26.4 cm) (p<0.0001). The mean adult height was significantly greater in the combination treatment group (164.3 cm) than in the untreated group (156.9 cm) (p<0.0001). The percentage of subjects with an adult height of 160 cm or taller was 90.5% (19/21) in the combination treatment group, and it was 13.8% (4/29) in the untreated group (p<0.0001). Since growth of the penis and pubic hair is promoted by the anabolic steroid hormone, no psychosocial problems arose because of delayed puberty. No clinically significant adverse events appeared. Combined treatment with GnRH analog and anabolic steroid hormone significantly increased height gain during puberty and adult height in boys who entered puberty with a short stature, since the period until epiphyseal closure was extended due to deceleration of the bone age maturation by administration of the GnRH analog and the growth rate at this time was maintained by the anabolic steroid hormone.

  11. Skeletal unloading induces selective resistance to the anabolic actions of growth hormone on bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Autry, C. P.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S.; Patterson-Buckendahl, P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of skeletal weight bearing or physical unloading of bone in the growing animal inhibits bone formation and induces a bone mineral deficit. To determine whether the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading in the growing animal is a consequence of diminished sensitivity to growth hormone (GH) we studied the effects of skeletal unloading in young hypophysectomized rats treated with GH (0, 50, 500 micrograms/100 g body weight/day). Skeletal unloading reduced serum osteocalcin, impaired uptake of 3H-proline into bone, decreased proximal tibial mass, and diminished periosteal bone formation at the tibiofibular junction. When compared with animals receiving excipient alone, GH administration increased bone mass in all animals. The responses in serum osteocalcin, uptake of 3H-proline and 45Ca into the proximal tibia, and proximal tibial mass in non-weight bearing animals were equal to those in weight bearing animals. The responses in trabecular bone volume in the proximal tibia and bone formation at the tibiofibular junction to GH, however, were reduced significantly by skeletal unloading. Bone unloading prevented completely the increase in metaphyseal trabecular bone normally induced by GH and severely dampened the stimulatory effect (158% vs. 313%, p < 0.002) of GH on periosteal bone formation. These results suggest that while GH can stimulate the overall accumulation of bone mineral in both weight bearing and non-weight bearing animals, skeletal unloading selectively impairs the response of trabecular bone and periosteal bone formation to the anabolic actions of GH.

  12. Anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Mottram, D R; George, A J

    2000-03-01

    Anabolic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone modified to enhance the anabolic rather than the androgenic actions of the hormone. The anabolic effects are considered to be those promoting protein synthesis, muscle growth and crythopoiesis. There are numerous side-effects to anabolic steroids, including hypertension and atherosclerosis, blood clotting, jaundice, hepatic carcinoma, tendon damage, psychiatric and behavioural effects and, in males, reduced fertility and gynaccomastia. Anabolic steroids were added to the International Olympic Committee's list of banned substances in 1975. The majority of 'evidence' concerning the efficacy of anabolic steroids as performance enhancing agents is anecdotal. In the main, experimental investigations have been poorly designed scientifically, clinically and statistically. The percentage of positive test results from IOC accredited laboratories has remained consistently low. However, athletes take their steroids during training and out-of-competition testing is not conducted in all countries, although international co-operation is now under consideration. Despite the lack of conclusive evidence, steroids users will continue to hold the view that their effects are efficacious and they are therefore unlikely to be persuaded to curtail their use.

  13. Role of paraoxonase-1 in bone anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone in hyperlipidemic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinxiu; Cheng, Henry; Atti, Elisa; Shih, Diana M.; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Anabolic effects of PTH were tested in hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing PON1. ► Expression of antioxidant regulatory genes was induced in PON1 overexpression. ► Bone resorptive activity was reduced in PON1 overexpressing hyperlipidemic mice. ► PON1 restored responsiveness to intermittent PTH in bones of hyperlipidemic mice. -- Abstract: Hyperlipidemia blunts anabolic effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cortical bone, and the responsiveness to PTH are restored in part by oral administration of the antioxidant ApoA-I mimetic peptide, D-4F. To evaluate the mechanism of this rescue, hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing the high-density lipoprotein-associated antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg}) were generated, and daily PTH injections were administered to Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} and to littermate Ldlr{sup −/−} mice. Expression of bone regulatory genes was determined by realtime RT-qPCR, and cortical bone parameters of the femoral bones by micro-computed tomographic analyses. PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTH receptor (PTH1R), activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in femoral cortical bone, as well as significantly greater cortical bone mineral content, thickness, and area in femoral diaphyses compared with untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice. In contrast, in control mice (Ldlr{sup −/−}) without PON1 overexpression, PTH treatment did not induce these markers. Calvarial bone of PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice also had significantly greater expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes as well as BMP-2-target and Wnt-target genes. Untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTHR1 than untreated Ldlr{sup −/−} mice, whereas sclerostin expression was reduced. In femoral cortical bones, expression levels of transcription factors, Fox

  14. [Effect of anabolic preparation fenobolin on blood, reproductive system and hormone levels in blood serum of fractionally irradiated male rats].

    PubMed

    Vereshchako, G G; Gorokh, G A; Fedosenko, O L; Gun'kova, N V; Iakushev, D L; Konoplia, E F

    2011-01-01

    Influence of anabolic drug (phenobolin) injection at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg on some indexes of blood, reproductive system, the level of thyroid hormones, corticosterone and testosterone in blood serum of the male rats exposed to a fractional irradiation at the total dose of 2.0 Gy have been studied. A significant decrease in the quantity of leucocytes and lymphocytes after a fractional irradiation without and with phenobolin introduction was determined. Introduction of anabolic drug resulted in a significant drop of relative mass of testes and, particularly, epididymes, and also in a sharp decrease of the number of mature germ cells isolated from epididymes. A combined action of phenobolin and fractional irradiation (2.0 Gy) led to a significant reduction (3-5 times) in the quantity of mature germ cells in an epididymis. In some cases phenobolin influenced the level of testosterone in blood serum of the intact and irradiated animals. The anabolic steroid drug affects negatively the state of reproductive system of male rats.

  15. Mixed lactate and caffeine compound increases satellite cell activity and anabolic signals for muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yoshimi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Yokokawa, Takumi; Hirotsu, Keisuke; Shimazu, Mariko; Uchida, Kenji; Tomi, Hironori; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2015-03-15

    We examined whether a mixed lactate and caffeine compound (LC) could effectively elicit proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells or activate anabolic signals in skeletal muscles. We cultured C2C12 cells with either lactate or LC for 6 h. We found that lactate significantly increased myogenin and follistatin protein levels and phosphorylation of P70S6K while decreasing the levels of myostatin relative to the control. LC significantly increased protein levels of Pax7, MyoD, and Ki67 in addition to myogenin, relative to control. LC also significantly increased follistatin expression relative to control and stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and P70S6K. In an in vivo study, male F344/DuCrlCrlj rats were assigned to control (Sed, n = 10), exercise (Ex, n = 12), and LC supplementation (LCEx, n = 13) groups. LC was orally administered daily. The LCEx and Ex groups were exercised on a treadmill, running for 30 min at low intensity every other day for 4 wk. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in the mass of the gastrocnemius (GA) and tibialis anterior (TA) relative to both the Sed and Ex groups. Furthermore, the LCEx group showed a significant increase in the total DNA content of TA compared with the Sed group. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in myogenin and follistatin expression of GA relative to the Ex group. These results suggest that administration of LC can effectively increase muscle mass concomitant with elevated numbers of myonuclei, even with low-intensity exercise training, via activated satellite cells and anabolic signals.

  16. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A modulates the anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone in mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Kari B; Conover, Cheryl A

    2015-12-01

    Intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a potent anabolic therapy for bone, and several studies have implicated local insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling in mediating this effect. The IGF system is complex and includes ligands and receptors, as well as IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and IGFBP proteases. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a metalloprotease expressed by osteoblasts in vitro that has been shown to enhance local IGF action through cleavage of inhibitory IGFBP-4. This study was set up to test two specific hypotheses: 1) Intermittent PTH treatment increases the expression of IGF-I, IGFBP-4 and PAPP-A in bone in vivo, thereby increasing local IGF activity. 2) In the absence of PAPP-A, local IGF activity and the anabolic effects of PTH on bone are reduced. Wild-type (WT) and PAPP-A knock-out (KO) mice were treated with 80 μg/kg human PTH 1-34 or vehicle by subcutaneous injection five days per week for six weeks. IGF-I, IGFBP-4 and PAPP-A mRNA expression in bone were significantly increased in response to PTH treatment. PTH treatment of WT mice, but not PAPP-A KO mice, significantly increased expression of an IGF-responsive gene. Bone mineral density (BMD), as measured by DEXA, was significantly decreased in femurs of PAPP-A KO compared to WT mice with PTH treatment. Volumetric BMD, as measured by pQCT, was significantly decreased in femoral midshaft (primarily cortical bone), but not metaphysis (primarily trabecular bone), of PAPP-A KO compared to WT mice with PTH treatment. These data suggest that stimulation of PAPP-A expression by intermittent PTH treatment contributes to PTH bone anabolism in mice.

  17. Are Osteoclasts Needed for the Bone Anabolic Response to Parathyroid Hormone?

    PubMed Central

    Pierroz, Dominique D.; Bonnet, Nicolas; Baldock, Paul A.; Ominsky, Michael S.; Stolina, Marina; Kostenuik, Paul J.; Ferrari, Serge L.

    2010-01-01

    PTH stimulates osteoblastic cells to form new bone and to produce osteoblast-osteoclast coupling factors such as RANKL. Whether osteoclasts or their activity are needed for PTH anabolism remains uncertain. We treated ovariectomized huRANKL knock-in mice with a human RANKL inhibitor denosumab (DMAb), alendronate (Aln), or vehicle for 4 weeks, followed by co-treatment with intermittent PTH for 4 weeks. Loss of bone mass and microarchitecture was prevented by Aln and further significantly improved by DMAb. PTH improved bone mass, microstructure, and strength, and was additive to Aln but not to DMAb. Aln inhibited biochemical and histomorphometrical indices of bone turnover, -i.e. osteocalcin and bone formation rate (BFR) on cancellous bone surfaces-, and Dmab inhibited them further. However Aln increased whereas Dmab suppressed osteoclast number and surfaces. PTH significantly increased osteocalcin and bone formation indices, in the absence or presence of either antiresorptive, although BFR remained lower in presence of Dmab. To further evaluate PTH effects in the complete absence of osteoclasts, high dose PTH was administered to RANK−/− mice. PTH increased osteocalcin similarly in RANK−/− and WT mice. It also increased BMD in RANK−/− mice, although less than in WT. These results further indicate that osteoclasts are not strictly required for PTH anabolism, which presumably still occurs via stimulation of modeling-based bone formation. However the magnitude of PTH anabolic effects on the skeleton, in particular its additive effects with antiresorptives, depends on the extent of the remodeling space, as determined by the number and activity of osteoclasts on bone surfaces. PMID:20558734

  18. Resorption Controls Bone Anabolism Driven by Parathyroid Hormone (PTH) Receptor Signaling in Osteocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Yumie; Lee, Eun-Young; Lezcano, Virginia; Ronda, Ana C.; Condon, Keith W.; Allen, Matthew R.; Plotkin, Lilian I.; Bellido, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of remodeling-based bone formation coupled to osteoclast activity versus modeling-based bone formation that occurs independently of resorption, to the anabolic effect of PTH remains unclear. We addressed this question using transgenic mice with activated PTH receptor signaling in osteocytes that exhibit increased bone mass and remodeling, recognized skeletal effects of PTH elevation. Direct inhibition of bone formation was accomplished genetically by overexpressing the Wnt antagonist Sost/sclerostin; and resorption-dependent bone formation was inhibited pharmacologically with the bisphosphonate alendronate. We found that bone formation induced by osteocytic PTH receptor signaling on the periosteal surface depends on Wnt signaling but not on resorption. In contrast, bone formation on the endocortical surface results from a combination of Wnt-driven increased osteoblast number and resorption-dependent osteoblast activity. Moreover, elevated osteoclasts and intracortical/calvarial porosity is exacerbated by overexpressing Sost and reversed by blocking resorption. Furthermore, increased cancellous bone is abolished by Wnt inhibition but further increased by blocking resorption. Thus, resorption induced by PTH receptor signaling in osteocytes is critical for full anabolism in cortical bone, but tempers bone gain in cancellous bone. Dissecting underlying mechanisms of PTH receptor signaling would allow targeting actions in different bone compartments, enhancing the therapeutic potential of the pathway. PMID:23963454

  19. Insulin-like growth factor I is required for the anabolic actions of parathyroid hormone on mouse bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, Daniel D.; Sakata, Takeshi; Leary, Colin; Elalieh, Hashem; Ginzinger, David; Rosen, Clifford J.; Beamer, Wesley; Majumdar, Sharmila; Halloran, Bernard P.

    2002-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a potent anabolic agent for bone, but the mechanism(s) by which it works remains imperfectly understood. Previous studies have indicated that PTH stimulates insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I production, but it remains uncertain whether IGF-I mediates some or all of the skeletal actions of PTH. To address this question, we examined the skeletal response to PTH in IGF-I-deficient (knockout [k/o]) mice. These mice and their normal littermates (NLMs) were given daily injections of PTH (80 microg/kg) or vehicle for 2 weeks after which their tibias were examined for fat-free weight (FFW), bone mineral content, bone structure, and bone formation rate (BFR), and their femurs were assessed for mRNA levels of osteoblast differentiation markers. In wild-type mice, PTH increased FFW, periosteal BFR, and cortical thickness (C.Th) of the proximal tibia while reducing trabecular bone volume (BV); these responses were not seen in the k/o mice. The k/o mice had normal mRNA levels of the PTH receptor and increased mRNA levels of the IGF-I receptor but markedly reduced basal mRNA levels of the osteoblast markers. Surprisingly, these mRNAs in the k/o bones increased several-fold more in response to PTH than the mRNAs in the bones from their wild-type littermates. These results indicate that IGF-I is required for the anabolic actions of PTH on bone formation, but the defect lies distal to the initial response of the osteoblast to PTH.

  20. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids - New anabolic compounds improving protein metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous animal studies demonstrated that chronic feeding of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) that modifies muscle membrane fatty acid composition promotes protein anabolism by blunting the age-associated deterioration in insulin sensitivity. The current study assessed, as a pr...

  1. Investigations into the feasibility of routine ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of equine hair samples for detecting the misuse of anabolic steroids, anabolic steroid esters and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bobby P; Viljanto, Marjaana; Bright, Jane; Pearce, Clive; Maynard, Steve

    2013-07-17

    The detection of the abuse of anabolic steroids in equine sport is complicated by the endogenous nature of some of the abused steroids, such as testosterone and nandrolone. These steroids are commonly administered as intramuscular injections of esterified forms of the steroid, which prolongs their effects and improves bioavailability over oral dosing. The successful detection of an intact anabolic steroid ester therefore provides unequivocal proof of an illegal administration, as esterified forms are not found endogenously. Detection of intact anabolic steroid esters is possible in plasma samples but not, to date, in the traditional doping control matrix of urine. The analysis of equine mane hair for the detection of anabolic steroid esters has the potential to greatly extend the time period over which detection of abuse can be monitored. Equine mane hair samples were incubated in 0.1M phosphate buffer (pH 9.5) before anabolic steroids (testosterone, nandrolone, boldenone, trenbolone and stanozolol), anabolic steroid esters (esters of testosterone, nandrolone, boldenone and trenbolone) and associated compounds (fluticasone propionate and esters of hydroxyprogesterone) were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with a mix of hexane and ethyl acetate (7:3, v:v). Further sample clean up by solid phase extraction was followed by derivatisation with methoxylamine HCL and analysis by UHPLC-MS/MS. Initial method development was performed on a representative suite of four testosterone esters (propionate, phenylpropionate, isocaproate and decanoate) and the method was later extended to include a further 18 compounds. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by the analysis of mane hair samples collected following the intramuscular administration of 500 mg of Durateston(®) (mixed testosterone esters) to a Thoroughbred mare (560 kg). The method was subsequently used to successfully detect boldenone undecylenate and stanozolol in hair samples collected following

  2. Anabolic-androgenic steroids and related substances.

    PubMed

    Yesalis, Charles E; Bahrke, Michael S

    2002-08-01

    Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone, and anabolic-androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone. Anabolic steroids are used to enhance athletic performance and appearance. Adverse effects include those on the liver, serum lipids, psyche/behavior, and the reproductive system. Androstenedione is an anabolic-androgenic steroid used to increase blood testosterone levels for the purposes of increasing strength, lean body mass, and sexual performance. However, there is no research indicating androstenedione or its related compounds, significantly increases strength and/or lean body mass by increasing testosterone levels. The long-term health effects of prolonged androstenedione supplementation are unknown. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a weak androgen also used to elevate testosterone levels. DHEA is also advertised as an antiobesity and antiaging supplement capable of improving libido, vitality, and immunity levels. However, research demonstrates that DHEA supplementation does not increase serum testosterone concentrations or increase strength in men, and it may have virilizing effects on women.

  3. Treatment of idiopathic short stature: effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs, aromatase inhibitors and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Leo

    2011-01-01

    Modulation of sex steroid action on the growth plate can, at least theoretically, increase adult height in children and adolescents with idiopathic short stature. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog therapy during adolescence has been shown effective in a placebo-controlled study, but to obtain clinically significant increases in adult height, the treatment duration must be lengthy (several years). Furthermore, such treatment seems to compromise bone health and, because of the resulting delay in pubertal development, likely has psychosocial consequences. Therefore, GnRH analogs are no longer recommended to augment height in adolescents with short stature and normally timed puberty. Aromatase inhibitors are probably more effective than GnRH analogs in promoting increased adult height in children with short stature and, unlike GnRH analogs, do not delay pubertal development in males. However, due to a dearth of safety data with aromatase inhibitors for the treatment of short stature, their use outside a research setting is currently not recommended. Positive effects of anabolic steroids on adult height have not been documented.

  4. 17β-trenbolone, an anabolic-androgenic steroid as well as an environmental hormone, contributes to neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fucui; Liu, Daicheng

    2015-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to neurodegenerative disorders. In a large number of neurodegenerative diseases (for example, Alzheimer's disease (AD)), patients do not carry the mutant genes. Other risk factors, for example the environmental factors, should be evaluated. 17β-trenbolone is a kind of environmental hormone as well as an anabolic-androgenic steroid. 17β-trenbolone is used as a growth promoter for livestock in the USA. Also, a large portion of recreational exercisers inject 17β-trenbolone in large doses and for very long time to increase muscle and strength. 17β-trenbolone is stable in the environment after being excreted. In the present study, 17β-trenbolone was administered to adult and pregnant rats and the primary hippocampal neurons. 17β-trenbolone's distribution and its effects on serum hormone levels and Aβ42 accumulation in vivo and its effects on AD related parameters in vitro were assessed. 17β-trenbolone accumulated in adult rat brain, especially in the hippocampus, and in the fetus brain. It altered Aβ42 accumulation. 17β-trenbolone induced apoptosis of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro and resisted neuroprotective function of testosterone. Presenilin-1 protein expression was down-regulated while β-amyloid peptide 42 (Aβ42) production and caspase-3 activities were increased. Both androgen and estrogen receptors mediated the processes. 17β-trenbolone played critical roles in neurodegeneration. Exercisers who inject large doses of trenbolone and common people who are exposed to 17β-trenbolone by various ways are all influenced chronically and continually. Identification of such environmental risk factors will help us take early prevention measure to slow down the onset of neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Interactions of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Kopera, H

    1993-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions, or interference between drugs and other treatments, depend on many factors and are therefore difficult to predict. However, a number are clearly established in the case of anabolic-androgenic steroids. The beneficial interactions between anabolic steroids and radiotherapy or cytostatic drugs respectively are of therapeutic value. Adjuvant treatment with anabolic compounds in patients undergoing radiation and/or cytostatic therapy is beneficial because it can prevent or reduce depression of erythropoiesis, granulopoiesis and thrombopoiesis. It also diminishes protein catabolism, supports recovery, improves the general condition of the patient and minimizes radiation sickness. Potentially adverse interactions with anabolic steroids must be expected in the case of oral anticoagulants and antidiabetic drugs, since sensitivity to each of the latter is increased. This makes it particularly advisable to monitor patients receiving either oral anticoagulants or antidiabetic treatment concurrently with anabolic drugs.

  6. Skeletal response of male mice to anabolic hormone therapy in the absence of the Igfals gene.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Oran D; Sun, Hui; Wu, Yingjie; Courtland, Hayden-William; Williams, Garry A; Cardoso, Luis; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Yakar, Shoshana

    2014-03-01

    IGF-I is a critical regulator of skeletal acquisition, which acts in endocrine and autocrine/paracrine modes. In serum, IGF-I is carried by the IGF-binding proteins in binary complexes. Further stabilization of these complexes is achieved by binding to the acid labile subunit (ALS) in a ternary complex (of IGF-I-IGF-binding protein 3/5-ALS). Ablation of the Igfals gene in humans (ALS deficiency) and mice (ALS knockout [ALSKO]) leads to markedly decreased serum IGF-I levels, growth retardation, and impaired skeletal acquisition. To investigate whether hormonal replacement therapy would improve the skeletal phenotype in cases of Igfals gene ablation, we treated male ALSKO mice with GH, IGF-I, or a combination of both. Treatments were administered to animals between 4 and 16 weeks of age or from 8 to 16 weeks of age. Although all treatment groups showed an increase (20%) in serum IGF-I levels, there was no increase in body weight, weight gain, or bone length in either age group. Despite the blunted linear growth in response to hormone therapy, ALSKO mice treated with GH showed radial bone growth, which contributed to bone strength tested by 4-point bending. We found that ALSKO mice treated with GH showed increased total cross-sectional area, cortical bone area, and cortical thickness by microtomography. Dynamic histomorphometry showed that although GH and double treatment groups resulted in trends towards increased bone formation parameters, these did not reach significance. However, bone resorption parameters were significantly increased in all treatment groups. ALSKO mice treated between 4 and 16 weeks of age showed minor differences in bone traits compared with vehicle-treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with GH and IGF-I do not work synergistically to rescue the stunted growth found in mice lacking the Igfals gene. Although GH alone appears to increase bone parameters slightly, it does not affect body weight or linear growth.

  7. Resistance exercise-induced increases in putative anabolic hormones do not enhance muscle protein synthesis or intracellular signalling in young men

    PubMed Central

    West, Daniel W D; Kujbida, Gregory W; Moore, Daniel R; Atherton, Philip; Burd, Nicholas A; Padzik, Jan P; De Lisio, Michael; Tang, Jason E; Parise, Gianni; Rennie, Michael J; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether exercise-induced elevations in systemic concentration of testosterone, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) enhanced post-exercise myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and phosphorylation of signalling proteins important in regulating mRNA translation. Eight young men (20 ± 1.1 years, BMI = 26 ± 3.5 kg m−2) completed two exercise protocols designed to maintain basal hormone concentrations (low hormone, LH) or elicit increases in endogenous hormones (high hormone, HH). In the LH protocol, participants performed a bout of unilateral resistance exercise with the elbow flexors. The HH protocol consisted of the same elbow flexor exercise with the contralateral arm followed immediately by high-volume leg resistance exercise. Participants consumed 25 g of protein after arm exercise to maximize MPS. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken as appropriate. There were no changes in serum testosterone, GH or IGF-1 after the LH protocol, whereas there were marked elevations after HH (testosterone, P < 0.001; GH, P < 0.001; IGF-1, P < 0.05). Exercise stimulated a rise in MPS in the biceps brachii (rest = 0.040 ± 0.007, LH = 0.071 ± 0.008, HH = 0.064 ± 0.014% h−1; P < 0.05) with no effect of elevated hormones (P= 0.72). Phosphorylation of the 70 kDa S6 protein kinase (p70S6K) also increased post-exercise (P < 0.05) with no differences between conditions. We conclude that the transient increases in endogenous purportedly anabolic hormones do not enhance fed-state anabolic signalling or MPS following resistance exercise. Local mechanisms are likely to be of predominant importance for the post-exercise increase in MPS. PMID:19736298

  8. Elevations in ostensibly anabolic hormones with resistance exercise enhance neither training-induced muscle hypertrophy nor strength of the elbow flexors

    PubMed Central

    West, Daniel W. D.; Burd, Nicholas A.; Tang, Jason E.; Moore, Daniel R.; Staples, Aaron W.; Holwerda, Andrew M.; Baker, Steven K.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether resistance exercise-induced elevations in endogenous hormones enhance muscle strength and hypertrophy with training. Twelve healthy young men (21.8 ± 1.2 yr, body mass index = 23.1 ± 0.6 kg/m2) trained their elbow flexors independently for 15 wk on separate days and under different hormonal milieu. In one training condition, participants performed isolated arm curl exercise designed to maintain basal hormone concentrations (low hormone, LH); in the other training condition, participants performed identical arm exercise to the LH condition followed immediately by a high volume of leg resistance exercise to elicit a large increase in endogenous hormones (high hormone, HH). There was no elevation in serum growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), or testosterone after the LH protocol but significant (P < 0.001) elevations in these hormones immediately and 15 and 30 min after the HH protocol. The hormone responses elicited by each respective exercise protocol late in the training period were similar to the response elicited early in the training period, indicating that a divergent postexercise hormone response was maintained over the training period. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) increased by 12% in LH and 10% in HH (P < 0.001) with no difference between conditions (condition × training interaction, P = 0.25). Similarly, type I (P < 0.01) and type II (P < 0.001) muscle fiber CSA increased with training with no effect of hormone elevation in the HH condition. Strength increased in both arms, but the increase was not different between the LH and HH conditions. We conclude that exposure of loaded muscle to acute exercise-induced elevations in endogenous anabolic hormones enhances neither muscle hypertrophy nor strength with resistance training in young men. PMID:19910330

  9. Anabolic therapy with growth hormone accelerates protein gain in surgical patients requiring nutritional rehabilitation.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, T A; Morrissey, T B; Gatzen, C; Benfell, K; Nattakom, T V; Scheltinga, M R; LeBoff, M S; Ziegler, T R; Wilmore, D W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the effects of exogenous growth hormone (GH) on protein accretion and the composition of weight gain in a group of stable, nutritionally compromised postoperative patients receiving standard hypercaloric nutritional therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A significant loss of body protein impairs normal physiologic functions and is associated with increased postoperative complications and prolonged hospitalization. Previous studies have demonstrated that standard methods of nutritional support enhance the deposition of fat and extracellular water but are ineffective in repleting body protein. METHODS: Fourteen patients requiring long-term nutritional support for severe gastrointestinal dysfunction received standard nutritional therapy (STD) providing approximately 50 kcal/kg/day and 2 g of protein/kg/day during an initial 7-day equilibrium period. The patients then continued on STD (n = 4) or, in addition, received GH 0.14 mg/kg/day (n = 10). On day 7 of the equilibrium period and again after 3 weeks of treatment, the components of body weight were determined; these included body fat, mineral content, lean (nonfat and nonmineral-containing tissue) mass, total body water, extracellular water (ECW), and body protein. Daily and cumulative nutrient balance and substrate oxidation studies determined the distribution, efficiency, and utilization of calories for protein, fat, and carbohydrate deposition. RESULTS: The GH-treated patients gained minimal body fat but had significantly more lean mass (4.311 +/- 0.6 kg vs. 1.988 +/- 0.2 kg, p < or = 0.03) and more protein (1.417 +/- 0.3 kg vs. 0.086 +/- 0.1 kg, p < or = 0.03) than did the STD-treated patients. The increase in lean mass was not associated with an inappropriate expansion of ECW. In contrast, patients receiving STD therapy tended to deposit a greater proportion of body weight as ECW and significantly more fat than did GH-treated patients (1.004 +/- 0.3 kg vs. 0.129 +/- 0.2 kg, p < 0

  10. [The reaction of hormones of hypophysis-thyroid gland's endocrinal axis on vibration pathology and on condition of it's correction with liquid oxygen and anabolic steroids].

    PubMed

    Abzianidze, E N

    2007-06-01

    The experiment was held on white male rats. After the tests had been finished, by means of immunofermental method the concentration of thyroid (T3 and T4) and thyrotrophic (TSH) hormones were defined in the blood of animals in condition of vibropathology and it's correction with liquid oxygen and retabolil. The research showed, that the level of TSH, T3 and T4 decreased in condition of vibropathology and it's correction with anabolic steroid compare with control groups. But against of background liquid oxygen's injection the level of TSH increased, but the concentration of T3 and T4 were reduced compare with control group, though they were increased compare with the rest groups of experimental animals. As a result of the search, it was established, that the impact of vibration on the organism of male rats causes important changes in the hypophysis-thyroid gland's endocrinal axis, particularly it takes place the hypofunction of thyroid gland. And it's worth to mention that the correction of vibropathology with liquid oxygen cause positive influence and changes in the organism. There is a positively expressed normalization of thyroid and thyrotrophic hormones' concentration, but the correction of vibropathology with anabolic steroid has not been a successful one.

  11. Anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cynthia M

    2002-01-01

    The term "anabolic steroids" refers to testosterone derivatives that are used either clinically or by athletes for their anabolic properties. However, scientists have questioned the anabolic effects of testosterone and its derivatives in normal men for decades. Most scientists concluded that anabolic steroids do not increase muscle size or strength in people with normal gonadal function and have discounted positive results as unduly influenced by positive expectations of athletes, inferior experimental design, or poor data analysis. There has been a tremendous disconnect between the conviction of athletes that these drugs are effective and the conviction of scientists that they aren't. In part, this disconnect results from the completely different dose regimens used by scientists to document the correction of deficiency states and by athletes striving to optimize athletic performance. Recently, careful scientific study of suprapharmacologic doses in clinical settings - including aging, human immunodeficiency virus, and other disease states - supports the efficacy of these regimens. However, the mechanism by which these doses act remains unclear. "Anabolism" is defined as any state in which nitrogen is differentially retained in lean body mass, either through stimulation of protein synthesis and/or decreased breakdown of protein anywhere in the body. Testosterone, the main gonadal steroid in males, has marked anabolic effects in addition to its effects on reproduction that are easily observed in developing boys and when hypogonadal men receive testosterone as replacement therapy. However, its efficacy in normal men, as during its use in athletes or in clinical situations in which men are eugonadal, has been debated. A growing literature suggests that use of suprapharmacologic doses can, indeed, be anabolic in certain situations; however, the clear identification of these situations and the mechanism by which anabolic effects occur are unclear. Furthermore, the

  12. Loss of Gsα in the Postnatal Skeleton Leads to Low Bone Mass and a Blunted Response to Anabolic Parathyroid Hormone Therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Partha; Aarnisalo, Piia; Chubb, Rhiannon; Poulton, Ingrid J.; Guo, Jun; Nachtrab, Gregory; Kimura, Takaharu; Swami, Srilatha; Saeed, Hamid; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.; Schipani, Ernestina; Sims, Natalie A.; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Wu, Joy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an important regulator of osteoblast function and is the only anabolic therapy currently approved for treatment of osteoporosis. The PTH receptor (PTH1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that signals via multiple G proteins including Gsα. Mice expressing a constitutively active mutant PTH1R exhibited a dramatic increase in trabecular bone that was dependent upon expression of Gsα in the osteoblast lineage. Postnatal removal of Gsα in the osteoblast lineage (P-GsαOsxKO mice) yielded markedly reduced trabecular and cortical bone mass. Treatment with anabolic PTH(1–34) (80 μg/kg/day) for 4 weeks failed to increase trabecular bone volume or cortical thickness in male and female P-GsαOsxKO mice. Surprisingly, in both male and female mice, PTH administration significantly increased osteoblast numbers and bone formation rate in both control and P-GsαOsxKO mice. In mice that express a mutated PTH1R that activates adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A (PKA) via Gsα but not phospholipase C via Gq/11 (D/D mice), PTH significantly enhanced bone formation, indicating that phospholipase C activation is not required for increased bone turnover in response to PTH. Therefore, although the anabolic effect of intermittent PTH treatment on trabecular bone volume is blunted by deletion of Gsα in osteoblasts, PTH can stimulate osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Together these findings suggest that alternative signaling pathways beyond Gsα and Gq/11 act downstream of PTH on osteoblast differentiation. PMID:26598522

  13. [Heterologous expression of functionally active human cytochrome P-450s. Cytochrome P-450IIIA4 catalyzes the biotransformation of the anabolic steroid hormone methandrostenolone].

    PubMed

    Krynetskiĭ, E Iu; Kovaleva, I E; Luzikov, V N

    1994-02-01

    The expression of the cytochrome P450IIIA4 gene in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast using the shuttle vector pYeDP1-8/2 has been carried out. The microsomal fraction isolated from the transformed yeast cells was used for biotransformation of the anabolic steroid hormone-methandrostenolone (MA). The microsomal oxidation products were analyzed by HPLC and two-dimensional TLC. It was shown that microsomes of the yeasts expressing human cytochrome P450IIIA4 catalyze the MA conversion into its 6 beta-hydroxy derivative. An identical product is formed via a reaction catalyzed by human liver microsomes. The use of the heterological system of cytochrome P450IIIA4 expression has made it possible to establish its role in MA metabolism. The experimental system simulates the first phase of the drug biotransformation in liver cells.

  14. The Relationships between Anabolic Hormones and Body Composition in Middle-Aged and Elderly Men with Prediabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Rabijewski, Michał; Papierska, Lucyna; Piątkiewicz, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The influence of anabolic hormones and body composition in men with prediabetes (PD) is unknown. In a cross-sectional study we investigated the relationships between total testosterone (TT), calculated free testosterone (cFT), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and body composition assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method in 84 patients with PD (40–80 years) and 56 men in control group. Patients with PD had lower TT, cFT, and DHEAS levels but similar IGF-1 levels in both groups. Patients with PD presented the higher total and abdominal fat as well as the lower total and abdominal lean than control (p < 0.02, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, and p < 0.02, resp.). We observed negative relationship between TT and total fat (p = 0.014) and positive with abdominal lean mass (p = 0.034), while cFT was negatively associated with abdominal (p = 0.02), trunk (p = 0.024), and leg fat (p = 0.037) and positively associated with total (p = 0.022) and trunk lean (p = 0.024). DHEAS were negatively associated with total fat (p = 0.045), and IGF-1 were positively associated with abdominal (p = 0.003) and leg lean (p = 0.015). In conclusion, the lowered anabolic hormones are involved in body composition rearrangement in men with PD. Further studies are needed to establish whether the androgen replacement therapy would be beneficial in men with PD. PMID:27274996

  15. Black bear parathyroid hormone has greater anabolic effects on trabecular bone in dystrophin-deficient mice than in wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sarah K; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Sanders, Jennifer L; Condon, Keith W; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Donahue, Seth W

    2012-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease that has deleterious consequences in muscle and bone, leading to decreased mobility, progressive osteoporosis, and premature death. Patients with DMD experience a higher-than-average fracture rate, particularly in the proximal and distal femur and proximal tibia. The dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse is a model of DMD that demonstrates muscle degeneration and fibrosis and osteoporosis. Parathyroid hormone, an effective anabolic agent for post-menopausal and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, has not been explored for DMD. Black bear parathyroid hormone (bbPTH) has been implicated in the maintenance of bone properties during extended periods of disuse (hibernation). We cloned bbPTH and found 9 amino acid residue differences from human PTH. Apoptosis was mitigated and cAMP was activated by bbPTH in osteoblast cultures. We administered 28nmol/kg of bbPTH 1-84 to 4-week old male mdx and wild type mice via daily (5×/week) subcutaneous injection for 6 weeks. Vehicle-treated mdx mice had 44% lower trabecular bone volume fraction than wild type mice. No changes were found in femoral cortical bone geometry or mechanical properties with bbPTH treatment in wild type mice, and only medio-lateral moment of inertia changed with bbPTH treatment in mdx femurs. However, μCT analyses of the trabecular regions of the distal femur and proximal tibia showed marked increases in bone volume fraction with bbPTH treatment, with a greater anabolic response (7-fold increase) in mdx mice than wild type mice (2-fold increase). Trabecular number increased in mdx long bone, but not wild type bone. Additionally, greater osteoblast area and decreased osteoclast area were observed with bbPTH treatment in mdx mice. The heightened response to PTH in mdx bone compared to wild type suggests a link between dystrophin deficiency, altered calcium signaling, and bone. These findings support further investigation of PTH as an anabolic

  16. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  17. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  18. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  19. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  20. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  1. Basal Bone Phenotype and Increased Anabolic Responses to Intermittent Parathyroid Hormone in Healthy Male COX-2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Manshan; Choudhary, Shilpa; Voznesensky, Olga; Gao, Qi; Adams, Douglas; Diaz-Doran, Vilmaris; Wu, Qian; Goltzman, David; Raisz, Lawrence G.; Pilbeam, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) knockout (KO) mice in inbred strains can have renal dysfunction with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPTH), making direct effects of COX-2 KO on bone difficult to assess. COX-2 KO mice in an outbred CD-1 background did not have renal dysfunction but still had two-fold elevated PTH compared to wild type (WT) mice. Compared to WT mice, KO mice had increased serum markers of bone turnover, decreased femoral bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical bone thickness, but no differences in trabecular bone volume by μCT or dynamic histomorphometry. Because PTH is a potent inducer of COX-2 and prostaglandin (PG) production, we examined effects of COX-2 KO on bone responses after three weeks of intermittent PTH. Intermittent PTH increased femoral BMD and cortical bone area more in KO mice than in WT mice and increased trabecular bone volume in the distal femur in both WT and KO mice. Although not statistically significant, PTH-stimulated increases in trabecular bone tended to be greater in KO mice than in WT mice. PTH increased serum markers of bone formation and resorption more in KO than in WT mice but increased the ratio of osteoblastic surface to osteoclastic surface only in KO mice. PTH also increased femoral mineral apposition rates and bone formation rates in KO mice more than in WT mice. Acute mRNA responses to PTH of genes that might mediate some anabolic and catabolic effects of PTH tended to be greater in KO than WT mice. We conclude that (1) the basal bone phenotype in male COX-2 KO mice might reflect HPTH, COX-2 deficiency or both, and (2) increased responses to intermittent PTH in COX-2 KO mice, despite the presence of chronic HPTH, suggest that absence of COX-2 increased sensitivity to PTH. It is possible that manipulation of endogenous PGs could have important clinical implications for anabolic therapy with PTH. PMID:20471507

  2. The anabolic action of intermittent parathyroid hormone on cortical bone depends partly on its ability to induce nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gohin, S; Carriero, A; Chenu, C; Pitsillides, A A; Arnett, T R; Marenzana, M

    2016-03-01

    There is strong evidence that vasodilatory nitric oxide (NO) donors have anabolic effects on bone in humans. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), the only osteoanabolic drug currently approved, is also a vasodilator. We investigated whether the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME might alter the effect of PTH on bone by blocking its vasodilatory effect. BALB/c mice received 28 daily injections of PTH[1-34] (80 µg/kg/day) or L-NAME (30 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination. Hindlimb blood perfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging. Bone architecture, turnover and mechanical properties in the femur were analysed respectively by micro-CT, histomorphometry and three-point bending. PTH increased hindlimb blood flow by >30% within 10 min of injection (P < 0.001). Co-treatment with L-NAME blocked the action of PTH on blood flow, whereas L-NAME alone had no effect. PTH treatment increased femoral cortical bone volume and formation rate by 20% and 110%, respectively (P < 0.001). PTH had no effect on trabecular bone volume in the femoral metaphysis although trabecular thickness and number were increased and decreased by 25%, respectively. Co-treatment with L-NAME restricted the PTH-stimulated increase in cortical bone formation but had no clear-cut effects in trabecular bone. Co-treatment with L-NAME did not affect the mechanical strength in femurs induced by iPTH. These results suggest that NO-mediated vasorelaxation plays partly a role in the anabolic action of PTH on cortical bone.

  3. Nmp4/CIZ suppresses the response of bone to anabolic parathyroid hormone by regulating both osteoblasts and osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Childress, Paul; Philip, Binu K.; Robling, Alexander G.; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Kacena, Melissa A.; Bivi, Nicoletta; Plotkin, Lilian I.; Heller, Aaron; Bidwell, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    How parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases bone mass is unclear but understanding this phenomenon is significant to the improvement of osteoporosis therapy. Nmp4/CIZ is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling transcriptional repressor that suppresses PTH-induced osteoblast gene expression and hormone-stimulated gains in murine femoral trabecular bone. To further characterize Nmp4/CIZ suppression of hormone-mediated bone growth we treated 10 wk-old Nmp4-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice with intermittent human PTH (1-34) at 30μg/kg/day or vehicle, 7 days/wk, for 2, 3, or 7 wks. Null mice treated with hormone (7 wks) gained more vertebral and tibial cancellous bone than WT animals paralleling the exaggerated response in the femur. Interestingly, Nmp4/CIZ suppression of this hormone-stimulated bone formation was not apparent during the first 2 wks of treatment. Consistent with the null mice enhanced PTH-stimulated addition of trabecular bone these animals exhibited an augmented hormone-induced increase in serum osteocalcin 3 wks into treatment. Unexpectedly the Nmp4-KO mice displayed an osteoclast phenotype. Serum C-terminal telopeptides, a marker for bone resorption, was elevated in the null mice, irrespective of treatment. Nmp4-KO bone marrow cultures produced more osteoclasts, which exhibited an elevated resorbing activity, compared to WT cultures. The expression of several genes critical to the development of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts were elevated in Nmp4-KO mice at 2 wks but not 3 wks of hormone exposure. We propose that Nmp4/CIZ dampens PTH-induced improvement of trabecular bone throughout the skeleton by transiently suppressing hormone-stimulated increases in the expression of proteins key to the required enhanced activity/number of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:21607813

  4. A single injection of the anabolic bone agent, parathyroid hormone-collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD), results in sustained increases in bone mineral density for up to 12 months in normal female mice.

    PubMed

    Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Suda, Hirofumi; Miyata, Shigeru; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the most effective osteoporosis treatment, but it is only effective if administered by daily injections. We fused PTH(1-33) to a collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) to extend its activity, and have shown an anabolic bone effect with monthly dosing. We tested the duration of action of this compound with different routes of administration. Normal young C57BL/6J mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of PTH-CBD (320 μg/kg). PTH-CBD treated mice showed a 22.2 % increase in bone mineral density (BMD) at 6 months and 12.8 % increase at 12 months. When administered by subcutaneous injection, PTH-CBD again caused increases in BMD, 15.2 % at 6 months and 14.3 % at 12 months. Radiolabeled PTH-CBD was concentrated in bone and skin after either route of administration. We further investigated skin effects of PTH-CBD, and histological analysis revealed an apparent increase in anagen VI hair follicles. A single dose of PTH-CBD caused sustained increases in BMD by >10 % for 1 year in normal mice, regardless of the route of administration, thus showing promise as a potential osteoporosis therapy.

  5. Weight loss and low body cell mass in males with lung cancer: relationship with systemic inflammation, acute-phase response, resting energy expenditure, and catabolic and anabolic hormones.

    PubMed

    Simons, J P; Schols, A M; Buurman, W A; Wouters, E F

    1999-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate, in human lung cancer, the relationship between weight loss and the existence of a low body cell mass (BCM) on the one hand, and the putative presence of systemic inflammation, an increased acute-phase response, anorexia, hypermetabolism and changes in circulating levels of several anabolic and catabolic hormones on the other. In 20 male lung cancer patients, pre-stratified by weight loss of >/=10% (n=10) or of <10% (n=10), the following measurements were performed: BCM (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry/bromide dilution), circulating levels of sTNF-R55 and sTNF-R75 (soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors of molecular masses 55 and 75 kDa respectively), interleukin-6, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, albumin, appetite (scale of 0-10), resting energy expenditure (by indirect calorimetry) and circulating levels of catabolic (cortisol) and anabolic [testosterone, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)] hormones. Compared with the patients with a weight loss of <10%, those with a weight loss of >/=10% were characterized by higher levels of sTNF-R55 (trend towards significance; P=0.06), and lower levels of albumin (27.4 compared with 34.4 mmol/l; P=0.02), testosterone (13.2 compared with 21.5 nmol/l; P=0.01) and IGF-I (119 compared with 184 ng/ml; P=0.004). In the patient group as a whole, the percentage weight loss was significantly correlated with sTNF-R55 (r=0.59, P=0.02), albumin (r=-0.63, P=0.006) and IGF-I (r=-0.50, P=0.02) levels. Height-adjusted BCM was significantly correlated with sTNF-R55 (r=-0.57, P=0.03), sTNF-R75 (r=-0.50, P=0. 04), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (r=-0.50, P=0.04), albumin (r=0.56, P=0.02) and resting energy expenditure/BCM (r=-0.54, P=0. 03), and there was a trend towards a correlation with IGF-I concentration (r=0.44, P=0.06). We conclude that, in human lung cancer, weight loss and the presence of a low BCM are associated with systemic inflammation, an increased acute

  6. Miscellaneous uses of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Kopera, H

    1993-01-01

    The original list of indications for anabolic-androgenic steroids has been reduced to those discussed in this publication so far and to mammary carcinoma, deficiency states and growth disorders. In disseminated endocrine-responsive mammary carcinoma in the female, anabolic drugs have a proven palliative effect in some 20 to 40% of patients, arresting tumour growth for up to 12 months and improving the patient's general condition. In high doses they can cause a disturbing increase in libido. Patients with deficiency states can, irrespective of the cause, benefit from adjunctive anabolic steroid treatment, provided their food supply is adequate. Positive effects are exerted by the anabolic agents' protein anabolic and anticatabolic actions, by psychic stimulation of the patient and by enhancement of recovery. Current trials strongly indicate that oral anabolic drugs administered alone or in combination with growth hormone or thyroid preparations are of therapeutic value in growth disorders such as constitutional delay of growth and puberty, hypopituitary dwarfism, chronic renal diseases and in Turner's syndrome.

  7. T cells, osteoblasts, and osteocytes: interacting lineages key for the bone anabolic and catabolic activities of parathyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Osteoimmunology is field of research dedicated to the study of the interactions between the immune system and bone. Among the cells of the immune system that regulate bone turnover and the responsiveness of bone cells to calciothropic hormones are bone marrow T lymphocytes. T cells secrete osteoclastogenic cytokines such as RANKL and TNF-α, as well as factors that stimulate bone formation, one of which is Wnt10b. In addition, T cells regulate the differentiation and life span of stromal cells and their responsiveness to parathyroid hormone (PTH) via costimulatory molecules expressed on their surface. The conditioning effect of T cells on stromal cells (SCs) is inherited by the osteoblastic and osteocytic progeny of SCs. As a result, osteoblastic cells of T cell–deficient mice have functional characteristics different from corresponding cells of T cell–replete mice. These differences include the ratio of RANKL/OPG produced in response to continuous PTH treatment, and the osteoblastogenic response to intermittent PTH treatment. This article reviews the evidence indicating that the effects of parathyroid hormone are mediated not only by osteoblasts and osteocytes but also by T cells. PMID:26662934

  8. Anabolic steroid boosts weight.

    PubMed

    1996-09-01

    A randomized study of nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin) showed that the anabolic steroid can increase weight in people with HIV infections. The group receiving nandrolone experienced a greater increase both in fat-free mass and body cell mass (although the latter measure did not reach statistical significance) than those on placebo. Deca-Durabolin had little to do with two occurrences of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in the study group, but until further studies are completed, caution is advised when using this steroid in patients with KS. A new study comparing nandrolone to growth hormone in patients with wasting is slated to begin in the next 3 or 4 months.

  9. T cells, osteoblasts, and osteocytes: interacting lineages key for the bone anabolic and catabolic activities of parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Osteoimmunology is a field of research dedicated to the study of the interactions between the immune system and bone. Among the cells of the immune system that regulate bone turnover and the responsiveness of bone cells to calciothropic hormones are bone marrow T lymphocytes. T cells secrete osteoclastogenic cytokines such as RANKL and TNF-α, as well as factors that stimulate bone formation, one of which is Wnt10b. In addition, T cells regulate the differentiation and life span of stromal cells (SCs) and their responsiveness to parathyroid hormone (PTH) via costimulatory molecules expressed on their surface. The conditioning effect of T cells on SCs is inherited by the osteoblastic and osteocytic progeny of SCs. As a result, osteoblastic cells of T cell-deficient mice have functional characteristics different from corresponding cells of T cell-replete mice. These differences include the ratio of RANKL/OPG produced in response to continuous PTH treatment, and the osteoblastogenic response to intermittent PTH treatment. This article reviews the evidence indicating that the effects of PTH are mediated not only by osteoblasts and osteocytes but also by T cells.

  10. Emerging anabolic treatments in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mosekilde, Leif; Tørring, Ove; Rejnmark, Lars

    2011-04-01

    Anabolic treatment that remodels bone tissue and restores bone biomechanical competence is essential in the treatment of osteoporosis. In addition, long term antiresorptive therapy may have limitations because of the reduced renewal of bone tissue. The only pure anabolic drugs available at present are intact PTH (1-84) (Preotact®) and the truncated PTH (1-34) (Teriparatide, Forteo®) while strontium ranelate may possess antiresorptive as well as anabolic properties. The marketed antiresorptive and anabolic antiosteoporotic drugs have limitations in their use due to adverse effects or to the occurrence of rare but severe late complications. Furthermore, indications may be restricted by co-existing diseases or treatment duration may be limited. However, new anabolic drugs are being developed mimicking the effect of PTH, or targeting the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) or the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway. The PTH mimetics are truncated or altered PTH fragments, parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTHrP) and calcilytics stimulating endogenous PTH secretion. Calcimimetics (e.g. strontium) and calcilytics (e.g. lithium) may also affect bone cells directly through the CaSR. The Wnt pathway that stimulates osteoblastic proliferation, differentiation and function may be activated by neutralizing antibodies to secreted inhibitors of Wnt signalling (e.g. Sclerostin or Dickkopf) or by small molecules (e.g. lithium) that inhibits the glycogen synthase kinase 3β mediated degradation of β-catenin. Finally, blocking of activin A by soluble receptor fusion proteins has been shown to increase bone mass by a dual anabolic-antiresorptive action. The present paper summarises the physiological background and the present evidence for these effects.

  11. Anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Brower, K J

    1993-03-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids are controlled substances that are taken illicitly to enhance physical appearance and performance. In addition to the desired somatic effects, reasonably good evidence suggests that AASs are capable of influencing mood and behavior. A myriad of adverse effects have been reported. Although many of these effects appear to reverse with cessation of use, fatalities due to suicides, homicides, liver disease, heart attacks, and cancer have been reported infrequently among illicit users. Although studies are needed to quantify more precisely the long-term consequences and risks of using AASs, patterns of illicit use are particularly troublesome. The use of extremely high doses, needles, counterfeit and veterinary drugs, and multiple steroidal and nonsteroidal drugs simultaneously may further enhance the risks of using AASs. The clinician should suspect AAS use in high-risk individuals who manifest any of the possible consequences described in this article. Laboratory tests can be valuable for detection of use and assessment of consequences. Treatment approaches may borrow from proven techniques employed with other substance abusers, but should also address the special value that physical attributes and body image have for the AAS user.

  12. Simultaneous determination of anabolic steroids and synthetic hormones in meat by freezing-lipid filtration, solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jungju; Kim, Hye-Young; Chung, Bong Chul; Hong, Jongki

    2005-03-04

    Estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, zeranol and diethylstilbestrol including estradiol metabolites were determined simultaneously in meat. Extraction of growth hormones was carried out by ultasonication using a methanol-water mixture. The growth hormones in the meat extract can be effectively separated from lipids by freezing-lipid filtration, followed by C8-solid phase extraction (SPE). During freezing-lipid filtration, about 90% of lipids are removed without any significant loss of growth hormones. For further clean-up, silica- and aminopropyl-SPE were used. To enhance detection sensitivity, the growth hormones are derivatized with trimethylsilyl reagents. Quantitation using isotope-labelled internal standards was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode. The method detection limits were 0.1-0.4 microg/kg for all growth hormones. Overall recoveries of synthetic and natural growth hormones were 68-106% with coefficients of variation of 5-16% for the complete procedure.

  13. [Anabolic/catabolic imbalance in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Cittadini, Antonio; Bossone, Eduardo; Marra, Alberto Maria; Arcopinto, Michele; Bobbio, Emanuele; Longobardi, Salvatore; Cevara, Carmine; Di Michele, Sara; Saccà, Luigi

    2010-06-01

    A metabolic imbalance between anabolic drive and catabolic forces is commonly observed in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, with the latter prevailing over anabolic hormones. Moreover, anabolic deficiencies are independent markers of poor prognosis. This finding represents a solid background for the implementation of therapeutic trials based on replacement therapy. The somatotropic axis (GH/IGF-1) is the most powerful anabolic axis of the body and its decline is related with a poor outcome and a worse clinical status. Growth hormone (GH) administration may enter the therapeutic arena as adjunctive treatment in patients affected by CHF and GH/IGF-1 deficiency. The T.O.S.CA. project aims at investigating the relationship between CHF and hormonal deficiency.

  14. Compounded bioidentical hormone therapy: identifying use trends and knowledge gaps among US women

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Santoro, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Two surveys (Harris and Rose surveys) were conducted to quantify the use of compounded hormone therapy (CHT; or bioidentical hormone therapy) among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women in the United States, to assess women's knowledge of CHT versus Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved hormone therapy, and to gather information on menopausal experience. Methods: The Harris survey was administered to 801 women aged 45 to 60 years who had experienced at least one menopausal symptom. The Rose survey was administered to 2,044 women aged 40 years or older who were ever users of hormone therapy. Women were queried about menopausal symptoms, hormone therapy use, and knowledge of CHT. Findings from the Rose survey were extrapolated using US Census Bureau data and prescription claims for FDA-approved hormone therapy to estimate the prevalence of CHT use. Results: According to extrapolations using Rose data, up to 2.5 million US women aged 40 years or older may use CHT annually, accounting for 28% to 68% of hormone therapy prescriptions. Harris data showed that 86% of women surveyed were unaware that CHT products are not FDA-approved. The Rose survey asked a subset of 1,771 women whether their hormone therapy had been personalized based on hormone levels; 21% (378) answered “yes” whereas 27% (476) did not know. In both surveys, most hormone therapy users stated that their physician had recommended the treatment. Conclusions: We estimate that 1 million to 2.5 million US women aged 40 years or older use CHT. The data suggest that many women are unaware that compounded hormones have not been evaluated or approved by the FDA. Providers have an educational opportunity to ensure that women considering hormone therapy understand the risks and benefits of inadequately regulated CHT. PMID:25692877

  15. Pathological changes in anabolic androgenic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-07-01

    Several classes of recreational and prescription drugs have additional effects on the heart and vasculature, which may significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality in chronic users. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart possibly due to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The role these hormones may play in their occurrence of sudden cardiac death is also investigated. 98 medico-legal cases including 6 anabolic androgenic steroid users were retrospectively reviewed. Autopsies, histology, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry and toxicology were performed in all cases. Pathological changes consisted of various degrees of interstitial and perivascular fibrosis as well as fibroadipous metaplasia and perineural fibrosis within the myocardium of the left ventricle. Within the limits of the small number of investigated cases, our results appear to confirm former observations on this topic and suggest anabolic androgenic steroid's potential causative role in the pathogenesis of sudden cardiac deaths in chronic users.

  16. Sports-related issues and biochemistry of natural and synthetic anabolic substances.

    PubMed

    Parr, Maria K; Flenker, Ulrich; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-03-01

    Testosterone is the principal male sex hormone. As with all natural steroids, it is biosynthesized from cholesterol. Phase I metabolism employs some very specific enzymes and pathways. Phase II metabolism and excretion follow more general patterns. The effects of testosterone are twofold: anabolic and androgenic. Because of its anabolic effects, testosterone is frequently abused in sports. Because of its endogenous nature, testosterone doping is difficult to detect. The standard procedure is based on the evaluation of the urinary steroid profile. Conspicuous samples then are submitted to compound-specific (13)C/(12)C analysis. Synthetic and endogenous steroids differ in this measure. Numerous xenobiotic compounds have been derived from testosterone. The modifications typically aim at a reduction of the androgenic properties while maintaining the anabolic potential. Most of these compounds have been withdrawn from the legal market. However, they are found to be illicitly added to otherwise inefficient nutritional supplements. These products represent a major problem to doping control. Recently, clinical trials with selective androgen receptor modulators have been started.

  17. Alternatives to animal experimentation for hormonal compounds research.

    PubMed

    Penza, M; Jeremic, M; Montani, C; Unkila, M; Caimi, L; Mazzoleni, G; Di Lorenzo, Diego

    2009-09-01

    Alternatives to animal testing and the identification of reliable methods that may decrease the need for animals are currently the subject of intense investigation worldwide. Alternative testing procedures are particularly important for synthetic and natural chemicals that exert their biological actions through binding nuclear receptors, called nuclear receptors-interacting compounds (NR-ICs), for which research is increasingly emphasizing the limits of several models in the accurate estimation of the physiological consequences of exposure to these compounds. In particular, estrogen receptor interacting compounds (ER-ICs) have a great impact on human health from the therapeutic, nutritional, and toxicological point of view due to the highly permissive nature of the estrogen receptors towards a large number of natural and synthetic compounds. Similar to in vitro systems, recently generated animal models (e.g., animal models generated for the study of estrogen receptor ligands) may fulfill the 3R principles: refine, reduce, and replace. If used correctly, NR-regulated models, such as reporter mice, xenopus, or zebrafish, and models obtained by somatic gene transfer in reporter systems, combined with imaging technologies, may contribute to strongly decreasing the overall number of animals required for NR-IC testing and research. With these models, flexible and highly standardized parameters and reporter marker quantification can be obtained. Here, we highlight the need for the substitution of currently used testing models with more appropriate ones that can reproduce the features and reactivity of specific mammalian target tissue/organs. We consider the promotion of this advancement a research priority bearing scientific, economic, social, and ethical relevance.

  18. Are osteoclasts needed for the bone anabolic response to parathyroid hormone? A study of intermittent parathyroid hormone with denosumab or alendronate in knock-in mice expressing humanized RANKL.

    PubMed

    Pierroz, Dominique D; Bonnet, Nicolas; Baldock, Paul A; Ominsky, Michael S; Stolina, Marina; Kostenuik, Paul J; Ferrari, Serge L

    2010-09-03

    PTH stimulates osteoblastic cells to form new bone and to produce osteoblast-osteoclast coupling factors such as RANKL. Whether osteoclasts or their activity are needed for PTH anabolism remains uncertain. We treated ovariectomized huRANKL knock-in mice with a human RANKL inhibitor denosumab (DMAb), alendronate (Aln), or vehicle for 4 weeks, followed by co-treatment with intermittent PTH for 4 weeks. Loss of bone mass and microarchitecture was prevented by Aln and further significantly improved by DMAb. PTH improved bone mass, microstructure, and strength, and was additive to Aln but not to DMAb. Aln inhibited biochemical and histomorphometrical indices of bone turnover,--i.e. osteocalcin and bone formation rate (BFR) on cancellous bone surfaces-, and Dmab inhibited them further. However Aln increased whereas Dmab suppressed osteoclast number and surfaces. PTH significantly increased osteocalcin and bone formation indices, in the absence or presence of either antiresorptive, although BFR remained lower in presence of Dmab. To further evaluate PTH effects in the complete absence of osteoclasts, high dose PTH was administered to RANK(-/-) mice. PTH increased osteocalcin similarly in RANK(-/-) and WT mice. It also increased BMD in RANK(-/-) mice, although less than in WT. These results further indicate that osteoclasts are not strictly required for PTH anabolism, which presumably still occurs via stimulation of modeling-based bone formation. However the magnitude of PTH anabolic effects on the skeleton, in particular its additive effects with antiresorptives, depends on the extent of the remodeling space, as determined by the number and activity of osteoclasts on bone surfaces.

  19. Research of stimulants and anabolic steroids in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Baume, N; Mahler, N; Kamber, M; Mangin, P; Saugy, M

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the composition of 103 dietary supplements bought on the internet. The supplements were dispatched in four different categories according to their announced contents [creatine, prohormones, "mental enhancers" and branched chain amino acids (BCAA)]. All the supplements were screened for the presence of stimulants and main anabolic steroids parent compounds. At the same time, the research was focused on the precursors and metabolites of testosterone and nandrolone. The study pointed out three products containing an anabolic steroid, metandienone, in a very high amount. The ingestion of such products induced a high quantity of metandienone metabolites in urines that would be considered as a positive antidoping test. The results have also shown that one creatine product and three "mental enhancers" contained traces of hormones or prohormones not claimed on the labels and 14 prohormone products contained substances other than those indicated by the manufacturer. The oral intake of the creatine product revealed the presence of the two main nandrolone metabolites (19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone) in urine.

  20. Selling androgenic anabolic steroids by the pound: identification and analysis of popular websites on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Cordaro, F G; Lombardo, S; Cosentino, M

    2011-12-01

    Internet websites offering androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) were identified and available products were examined. Keywords for the website search were: "anabolic steroids," "anabolic steroids buy," "anabolic steroid purchase." The first 10 websites offering AAS in the first 10 pages of results were considered. At least two AAS-containing products per website were selected. Thirty AAS-selling websites were identified, mainly located in the United States (46.7%) and Europe (30%). Most websites sold other anabolic/ergogenic products (clenbuterol, 76.7%; GH/IGF, 60.0%; thyroid hormones, 46.7%; erythropoietin, 30.0%; insulin, 20.0%) or products for AAS-related adverse effects (mainly: estrogen antagonists, 63.3%; products for erectile dysfunction, 56.7%; 5α-reductase inhibitors, 33.3%; anti-acne products, 33.3%). AAS were sold as medicines (69.6%) or as dietary supplements (30.4%). AAS in medicines were mainly: nandronole (20.4%), methandrostenolone (18.4%), and testosterone (12.2%). Dietary supplements contained mainly DHEA and included several fake compounds. Manufacturers were declared for 97.9% of medicines and 66.7% of dietary supplements; however, several manufacturers were not found on the Internet. Described benefits were usually few adverse effects and no estrogenicity. Toxicity was seldom reported and presented as mild. Recommended doses were two-fourfold higher than current medical recommendations. In conclusion, misleading information and deceiving practices were common findings on AAS-selling websites, indicating their deleterious potential for public health.

  1. Ecdysteroids: A novel class of anabolic agents?

    PubMed Central

    Botrè, F; Naß, A; Hengevoss, J; Diel, P; Wolber, G

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of dietary supplements with ecdysteroids are marketed as “natural anabolic agents”. Results of recent studies suggested that their anabolic effect is mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) binding. Within this study the anabolic potency of ecdysterone was compared to well characterized anabolic substances. Effects on the fiber sizes of the soleus muscle in rats as well the diameter of C2C12 derived myotubes were used as biological readouts. Ecdysterone exhibited a strong hypertrophic effect on the fiber size of rat soleus muscle that was found even stronger compared to the test compounds metandienone (dianabol), estradienedione (trenbolox), and SARM S 1, all administered in the same dose (5 mg/kg body weight, for 21 days). In C2C12 myotubes ecdysterone (1 µM) induced a significant increase of the diameter comparable to dihydrotestosterone (1 µM) and IGF 1 (1.3 nM). Molecular docking experiments supported the ERβ mediated action of ecdysterone. To clarify its status in sports, ecdysterone should be considered to be included in the class “S1.2 Other Anabolic Agents” of the list of prohibited substances of the World Anti-Doping Agency. PMID:26060342

  2. Sexual functioning of male anabolic steroid abusers.

    PubMed

    Moss, H B; Panzak, G L; Tarter, R E

    1993-02-01

    The effects of anabolic steroid use on male sexual behavior were assessed using a structured clinical interview administered to male body builders currently using steroids, and to two comparison groups (body builders with a past but not current history of steroid use, and a group of "natural" body builders who had never used steroids). Current anabolic steroid users had a significantly higher coital and orgasmic frequency than did comparison athletes. They also reported a significantly higher incidence of erectile difficulties during the past month. Beliefs concerning the sexually stimulating effects of steroids did not correlate with the frequencies of specific sexual behaviors. The data support the contention that anabolic steroids, as androgenic compounds, enhance sexual desire.

  3. Jasmonate Hormone: Regulating Synthesis of Reduced Carbon Compounds in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Browse, John

    2016-05-13

    Our original interest in understanding the role of jasmonate (JA) in regulating the final stages of stamen and pollen development led to our discovery of the JAZ repressors, and the molecular mechanism of JA action is now a second important focus of our research. The specific goals for this grant period are to: 1. Investigate the generation and clearance of the hormone with emphasis on the regulation of the OPR3 enzyme and the hydrolysis of JA-Ile. 2. Use dominant-negative and overexpression constructs to explore the role of the MYC5 transcription factor in initiating and regulating JA responses. 3. Investigate specific JAZ protein interactions that will help us to recognize and understand the extended network of processes, such as sulfur nutrition, that interface with JA signaling. The COI1 F-Box protein is a JA-Ile coreceptor and coi1 mutant plants lack JA responses. We have tested the possibility that sites of JA action can be probed by using tissue-specific promoters to drive expression of a COI1-YFP fusion protein in coi1 mutant plants deficient in stamen and pollen function. When we expressed COI1 behind a filament-specific promoter (from the DAD1 gene), filament elongation was restored but not anther dehiscence or pollen function. Three tapetum specific promoters, all failed to restore any of these three functions but, unexpectedly, a promoter active in the stomium and epidermal cells, restored both pollen function and anther dehiscence. Most importantly, our results demonstrate the power of promoter::COI1-YFP constructs in revealing the primary sites of JA-regulated gene expression that control developmental and other responses in neighboring tissues. We now plan to use this new tool to test current hypotheses about JA action in other organs of the plant. The MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 proteins are the primary transcription factors initiating defense and root growth responses to JA signaling. However, transgenic plants overexpressing these proteins do not show

  4. Mind Over Matter: Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matter Teaching Guide and Series / Anabolic Steroids Print Mind Over Matter: Anabolic Steroids Order Free Publication in: ... how drugs affect the brain and nervous system. Mind Over Matter is produced by the National Institute ...

  5. Impact of Four Weeks of a Multi-Ingredient Performance Supplement on Muscular Strength, Body Composition, and Anabolic Hormones in Resistance-Trained Young Men.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, Vince C; Allman, Brittany R; Kinsey, Amber W; Moffatt, Robert J; Hickner, Robert C; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Although multi-ingredient performance supplements (MIPS) have increased in popularity because of their array of ergogenic ingredients, their efficacy and safety remain in question. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of supplementation with T+ (SUP; Onnit Labs, Austin, TX, USA), an MIPS containing long jack root, beta-alanine, and branched-chain amino acids, and other proprietary blends, on strength, body composition, and hormones in young resistance-trained men. Subjects were randomized to consume either T+ (SUP; n = 14; age, 21 ± 3 years; body fat, 18.3 ± 4.7%) or an isocaloric placebo (PL; n = 13; age, 21 ± 3 years; body fat, 21.5 ± 6.2%) for 4 weeks. Both groups underwent a progressive, 4-week high-intensity resistance training protocol. Before and after the training protocol, mood state, body composition, blood hormones (also collected at midpoint), and maximal strength were measured. SUP had significantly greater increases in bench press (SUP, 102 ± 16 kg to 108 ± 16 kg vs. PL, 96 ± 22 kg to 101 ± 22 kg; p < 0.001) and total weight lifted (SUP, 379 ± 59 kg to 413 ± 60 kg vs. PL, 376 ± 70 kg to 400 ± 75 kg; p < 0.001) compared with PL. Additionally, deadlift strength relative to total body mass (calculated as weight lifted/body mass; kg:kg) (2.08 ± 0.18 to 2.23 ± 0.16; p = 0.036) and lean mass (2.55 ± 0.19 to 2.72 ± 0.16; p = 0.021) increased significantly in SUP but not PL (2.02 ± 0.30 to 2.15 ± 0.36 and 2.56 ± 0.31 to 2.70 ± 0.36, respectively). No other significant differences were detected between groups for the remaining variables. Supplementing with SUP enhanced resistance training adaptations independent of hormonal status, and thus SUP use may warrant inclusion into peri-workout nutrition regimens. This study was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT01971723).

  6. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey H.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Barber, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (Kom, L kg-1) for 17β-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17α-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17β-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  7. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, J.H.; Ryan, J.N.; Barber, L.B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (K om, L kg-1) for 17??-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17??-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg -1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17??-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  8. Compounded non-FDA–approved menopausal hormone therapy prescriptions have increased: results of a pharmacy survey

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Constantine, Ginger D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: From a survey of compounding pharmacists, specific questions regarding compounded menopausal hormone therapy were used to estimate compounded hormone therapy (CHT) prescribing in the United States. Methods: A national online survey was conducted by Rose Research—a market research company consisting of 12,250 US pharmacists from independent community pharmacies (ICPs) and compounding pharmacies (CPs). Pharmacists who completed the survey and met the prespecified criteria were eligible. Data from the survey were extrapolated to estimate overall CHT prescription volume and annual costs of CHT prescriptions for the United States based upon industry data from the National Community Pharmacists Association and IBISWorld. Results: Surveys were completed by 483 pharmacies, including 365 ICPs and 118 CPs. On the basis of the survey responses and extrapolated industry data, an estimated 26 to 33 million CHT prescriptions were filled annually, with total sales estimated at $1.3 to $1.6 billion. CPs (vs ICPs) accounted for a higher proportion of CHT prescriptions. More than half of the ICPs (52%) and CPs (75%) expected continued compounding business growth, with most predicting 5% to 25% growth within 2 years, despite the potential effect of restrictive legislation regarding compounding. Conclusions: On the basis of extrapolated data from numbers of prescriptions reported by pharmacists participating in the survey, the volume of CHT seems to approach that of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved menopausal hormone therapy, and growth in the CHT market is expected. Thus, physicians should educate themselves and the women consulting them about the differences between the FDA-approved and the less-tested CHT formulations. More research on the efficacy, safety, and consistency of non-FDA–approved CHT is needed. PMID:26645819

  9. Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids and related substances in sport and exercise.

    PubMed

    Bahrke, Michael S; Yesalis, Charles E

    2004-12-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone, which is the primary male sex hormone. Anabolic androgenic steroids are used to enhance athletic performance and appearance. Adverse effects include those on the liver, serum lipids, psyche/behavior and reproductive system. Androstenedione is an anabolic androgenic steroid used to increase blood testosterone levels for the purposes of increasing strength, lean body mass and sexual performance. However, there is no research indicating that androstenedione, or its related compounds, significantly increases strength and/or lean body mass in humans by increasing testosterone levels. The long-term health effects of prolonged androstenedione supplementation are unknown. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a weak androgen also used to elevate testosterone levels, and is advertised as an anti-obesity and anti-aging supplement capable of improving libido, vitality and immunity levels. However, research demonstrates that DHEA supplementation does not increase serum testosterone concentrations or increase strength in men, and may acutely increase testosterone levels in women, thus producing a virilizing effect.

  10. Anabolic Steroids (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... typically spend a large amount of time and money obtaining the drugs, another sign they could be addicted. When they ... get more information? Drug Facts NIDA: Commonly Abused Drugs Chart DrugFacts: ... Report Series: Anabolic Steroid Abuse Statistics and Trends ...

  11. Pharmacology of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Kicman, A T

    2008-06-01

    Athletes and bodybuilders have recognized for several decades that the use of anabolic steroids can promote muscle growth and strength but it is only relatively recently that these agents are being revisited for clinical purposes. Anabolic steroids are being considered for the treatment of cachexia associated with chronic disease states, and to address loss of muscle mass in the elderly, but nevertheless their efficacy still needs to be demonstrated in terms of improved physical function and quality of life. In sport, these agents are performance enhancers, this being particularly apparent in women, although there is a high risk of virilization despite the favourable myotrophic-androgenic dissociation that many xenobiotic steroids confer. Modulation of androgen receptor expression appears to be key to partial dissociation, with consideration of both intracellular steroid metabolism and the topology of the bound androgen receptor interacting with co-activators. An anticatabolic effect, by interfering with glucocorticoid receptor expression, remains an attractive hypothesis. Behavioural changes by non-genomic and genomic pathways probably help motivate training. Anabolic steroids continue to be the most common adverse finding in sport and, although apparently rare, designer steroids have been synthesized in an attempt to circumvent the dope test. Doping with anabolic steroids can result in damage to health, as recorded meticulously in the former German Democratic Republic. Even so, it is important not to exaggerate the medical risks associated with their administration for sporting or bodybuilding purposes but to emphasize to users that an attitude of personal invulnerability to their adverse effects is certainly misguided.

  12. Anabolic effect of plant brassinosteroid

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Debora; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Shapses, Sue; Raskin, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are plant-derived polyhydroxylated derivatives of 5a-cholestane, structurally similar to cholesterol-derived animal steroid hormones and insect ecdysteroids, with no known function in mammals. 28-Homobrassinolide (HB), a steroidal lactone with potent plant growth-promoting property, stimulated protein synthesis and inhibited protein degradation in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells (EC50 4 μM) mediated in part by PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Oral administration of HB (20 or 60 mg/kg/d for 24 d) to healthy rats fed normal diet (protein content 23.9%) increased food intake, body weight gain, lean body mass, and gastrocnemius muscle mass as compared with vehicle-treated controls. The effect of HB administration increased slightly in animals fed a high-protein diet (protein content 39.4%). Both oral (up to 60 mg/kg) and subcutaneous (up to 4 mg/kg) administration of HB showed low androgenic activity when tested in the Hershberger assay. Moreover, HB showed no direct binding to the androgen receptor in vitro. HB treatment was also associated with an improved physical fitness of untrained healthy rats, as evident from a 6.7% increase in lower extremity strength, measured by grip test. In the gastrocnemius muscle of castrated animals, HB treatment significantly increased the number of type IIa and IIb fibers and the cross-sectional area of type I and type IIa fibers. These findings suggest that oral application of HB triggers selective anabolic response with minimal or no androgenic side-effects and begin to elucidate the putative cellular targets for plant brassinosteroids in mammals.—Esposito, D., Komarnytsky, S., Shapses, S., Raskin, I. Anabolic effect of plant brassinosteroid. PMID:21746867

  13. Influence of anabolic combinations of an androgen plus an estrogen on biochemical pathways in bovine uterine endometrium and ovary.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Riedmaier, I; Reiter, M; Tichopad, A; Groot, M J; Stolker, A A M; Pfaffl, M W; Nielen, M F W; Meyer, H H D

    2011-07-01

    The application of anabolic steroids in food producing animals is forbidden in the EU since 1988, but the abuse of such drugs is a potential problem. The existing test systems are based on known compounds and can be eluded by newly emerging substances. The examination of physiological effects of anabolic hormones on different tissues to indirectly detect misuse might overcome this problem. Two studies were conducted with post-pubertal 24-months old Nguni heifers and pre-pubertal female 2-4 weeks old Holstein Friesian calves, respectively. The animals of the accordant treatment groups were administered combinations of estrogenic and androgenic compounds. The measurement of the gene expression pattern was undertaken with RT-qPCR. Target genes of different functional groups (receptors, angiogenesis, steroid synthesis, proliferation, apoptosis, nutrient metabolism and others) have been quantified. Several biochemical pathways were shown to be influenced by anabolic treatment. Both studies identified significant regulations in steroid and growth factor receptors (AR, ERβ, LHR, FSHR, Flt-1, PR, IGF-1R, Alk-6), angiogenic and tissue remodeling factors (VEGFs, FGFs, BMPs, ANGPT-2, MMPs, TIMP-2, CTSB), steroid synthesis (S5A1, HSD17, CYP19A1), proliferation (TNFα, IGF-1, IGFBPs, p53, c-fos; CEBPD, c-kit), apoptosis (CASP3, FasL, p53) and others (C7, INHA, STAR). Several genes were regulated to opposite directions in post-pubertal compared to pre-pubertal animals. PCA for Nguni heifers demonstrated a distinct separation between the control and the treatment group. In conclusion, anabolics modify hormone sensitivity and steroid synthesis, and they induce proliferative effects in the whole reproductive tract (uterus and ovary) as well as anti-angiogenic effects in the ovary. However, the extent will depend on the developmental stage of the animals.

  14. Influence of the dosing frequency of parathyroid hormone-(1-38) on its anabolic effect in bone and on the balance of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium.

    PubMed

    Riond, J L; Goliat-von Fischer, I; Küffer, B; Toromanoff, A; Forrer, R

    1998-06-01

    The effect of the frequency of administration of synthetic human parathyroid hormone fragment 1-38 [hPTH-(1-38)] on bone formation and on the balance of calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium was investigated in 32 9-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats, using a randomly complete block design. Rats received subcutaneously during 14 days either the vehicle solution once a day or 50 micrograms hPTH-(1-38)/kg BW once a day at 8:00 a.m., twice a day at 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or three times a day at 8:00 a.m., 0:30 p.m., and 5:00 p.m. The balance study was performed during the last 48 h of the hPTH-(1-38) treatment schedule after which femora, tibiae, and lumbar vertebrae were removed for the determination of the dry weight, volume, and contents of Ca, P, Mg, hydroxyproline, and DNA. PTH treatment was associated with a significant increase of the apparent intestinal absorption of Ca, P, and Mg. Mean urinary Ca excretion augmented with the increase of the frequency of dosing. Urinary Ca excretion correlated negatively with the Ca apparent intestinal absorption and with the Ca content of the tibiae in the 2 groups with the highest frequency of dosing. The mean Ca, P, and Mg balances, the mean contents of bone Ca, P, and Mg and the mean bone dry weights were significantly increased with PTH treatment. In contrast to the mean volume of tibiae which was not affected by the PTH administration, the mean volume of the fifth lumbar vertebrae increased with the treatment. With the 2 times and 3 times daily treatments, mean hydroxyproline concentrations in the femora were significantly higher than the control values. An increase of the mean hydroxyproline content of the third lumbar vertebrae was evidenced with the 1 time and 2 times daily treatment, but the mean of the highest frequency of dosing was not different from that of the control group. The DNA content of femoral and of the fourth lumbar vertebrae significantly decreased with the frequency of dosing.

  15. Anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism--towards a unified hypothesis of anabolic steroid action.

    PubMed

    Tan, R S; Scally, M C

    2009-06-01

    Anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH) is the functional incompetence of the testes with subnormal or impaired production of testosterone and/or spermatozoa due to administration of androgens or anabolic steroids. Anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS), both prescription and nonprescription, use is a cause of ASIH. Current AAS use includes prescribing for wasting associated conditions. Nonprescription AAS use is also believed to lead to AAS dependency or addiction. Together these two uses account for more than four million males taking AAS in one form or another for a limited duration. While both of these uses deal with the effects of AAS administration they do not account for the period after AAS cessation. The signs and symptoms of ASIH directly impact the observation of an increase in muscle mass and muscle strength from AAS administration and also reflect what is believed to demonstrate AAS dependency. More significantly, AAS prescribing after cessation adds the comorbid condition of hypogonadism to their already existing chronic illness. ASIH is critical towards any future planned use of AAS or similar compound to effect positive changes in muscle mass and muscle strength as well as an understanding for what has been termed anabolic steroid dependency. The further understanding and treatments that mitigate or prevent ASIH could contribute to androgen therapies for wasting associated diseases and stopping nonprescription AAS use. This paper proposes a unified hypothesis that the net effects for anabolic steroid administration must necessarily include the period after their cessation or ASIH.

  16. Project Right Way: An Anabolic Steroid Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June

    There is increasing concern by medical experts in this country about the use of anabolic steroids by teenagers. Over one million Americans are believed to be currently using or have used the synthetic hormones in the past. While drug testing and a reduction in the supply of the drugs appear to be reducing the number of adult users, use by…

  17. Consequences of use of anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Marcel J; Blake, Kathleen; Griffith, Jill; Yates, Andrew; Copley, LaRae M

    2007-08-01

    Whether providing anticipatory guidance to the young adolescent patient, conducting a preparticipation examination on a young athlete, or treating a sick user of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs), the primary care physician must be familiar with the adverse consequences of the use of these compounds. This article reviews the endocrine, cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatic, and miscellaneous effects of AASs, highlighting effects reported in children and adolescents, and relying on consequences in adults when pediatric data is unavailable.

  18. Pharmacology of anabolic steroids

    PubMed Central

    Kicman, A T

    2008-01-01

    Athletes and bodybuilders have recognized for several decades that the use of anabolic steroids can promote muscle growth and strength but it is only relatively recently that these agents are being revisited for clinical purposes. Anabolic steroids are being considered for the treatment of cachexia associated with chronic disease states, and to address loss of muscle mass in the elderly, but nevertheless their efficacy still needs to be demonstrated in terms of improved physical function and quality of life. In sport, these agents are performance enhancers, this being particularly apparent in women, although there is a high risk of virilization despite the favourable myotrophic–androgenic dissociation that many xenobiotic steroids confer. Modulation of androgen receptor expression appears to be key to partial dissociation, with consideration of both intracellular steroid metabolism and the topology of the bound androgen receptor interacting with co-activators. An anticatabolic effect, by interfering with glucocorticoid receptor expression, remains an attractive hypothesis. Behavioural changes by non-genomic and genomic pathways probably help motivate training. Anabolic steroids continue to be the most common adverse finding in sport and, although apparently rare, designer steroids have been synthesized in an attempt to circumvent the dope test. Doping with anabolic steroids can result in damage to health, as recorded meticulously in the former German Democratic Republic. Even so, it is important not to exaggerate the medical risks associated with their administration for sporting or bodybuilding purposes but to emphasize to users that an attitude of personal invulnerability to their adverse effects is certainly misguided. PMID:18500378

  19. The effects of six weeks of supplementation with multi-ingredient performance supplements and resistance training on anabolic hormones, body composition, strength, and power in resistance-trained men

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance training (RT) enhances muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy while increasing strength and power. Some multi-ingredient performance supplements (MIPS) have been shown to augment the physiological improvements associated with RT. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of specific pre- and post-workout MIPS on anabolic hormones, body composition, muscle strength, and power in resistance-trained men participating in a periodized RT program. Methods Twenty-four ( mean ± SE; 24.0 ± 0.9 years; 180.5 ± 5.8 cm; 83.7 ± 0.5 kg) resistance-trained men completed 6 wks of periodized RT (3x/wk). Participants were assigned to one of two groups based upon maximal voluntary contraction of the quadriceps (Biodex) to lean mass (LM) ratio. Group 1 (n = 13; MIPS) consumed one serving of NO-Shotgun® (whey protein, casein protein, branched-chain amino acids, creatine, beta alanine, and caffeine) before each workout and one serving of NO-Synthesize® (whey protein, casein protein, branched-chain amino acids, creatine, and beta alanine; Vital Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Davie, FL) immediately after each workout and on non-RT days. Group 2 (n = 11; Placebo; PLA) consumed a flavor-matched isocaloric maltodextrin placebo. Serum insulin-like growth factor 1, human growth hormone, testosterone, body composition (DXA), circumferences, 1-repetition maximal strength (1RM) of the upper (chest press) and lower body (leg press), and anaerobic power (Wingate test) were assessed before and after the intervention. Statistical analysis included a 2 × 2 (group x time) ANOVA with repeated measures. Tukey LSD post hoc tests were used to examine pairwise differences. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results There was a main time effect (p = 0.035) for testosterone to increase, but no differences between groups were observed. There were no differences in the other blood hormones. Group x time interactions were observed for LM

  20. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect many different processes, including Growth and development Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the ...

  1. Flaxseed bioactive compounds change milk, hormonal and biochemical parameters of dams and offspring during lactation.

    PubMed

    Troina, A A; Figueiredo, M S; Passos, M C F; Reis, A M; Oliveira, E; Lisboa, P C; Moura, E G

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated maternal intake of SDG (secoisolariciresinol diglucoside), a compound from flaxseed, and flaxseed oil+SDG on biochemical and hormonal parameters of dams and male and female offspring during lactation. Dams were fed a standard diet (C); diet added 40 mg of SDG/100g diet (SDG) or diet added 40 mg of SDG/100g diet and 7% of flaxseed oil (OLSDG). SDG and OLSDG dams showed hyperprolactinemia. The OLSDG milk had lower lactose and protein, while the SDG milk had lower protein on the 14th day of lactation. At 14 days, OLSDG male and female pups showed lower body mass, SDG and OLSDG male pups had hypoprolactinemia and lower body fat mass, but higher visceral fat mass (VFM) and hypertriglyceridemia. At 21 days, male SDG and OLSDG presented hypotriglyceridemia. At 14 days, SDG and OLSDG female offspring showed higher serum 17-β estradiol (E2); OLSDG presented hypercholesterolemia and SDG presented hypertriglyceridemia. At 21 days, SDG and OLSDG female pups showed hypotriglyceridemia and OLSDG shower lower E2. Both maternal treatments changes maternal metabolism as well as hormonal and biochemical parameters of the offspring, which are gender-dependent. Maternal hyperprolactinemia may act as an imprint factor responsible for the hormonal and metabolic changes observed in the pups.

  2. New Insights into the Role of Anabolic Interventions in Dialysis Patients with Protein Energy Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Ikizler, T. Alp

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Patients on maintenance dialysis commonly develop protein-energy wasting (PEW), which is associated with poor survival. There have been several advances in anabolic interventions aimed at improving PEW in these patients in recent years. Recent findings Oral or parenteral nutritional supplementation, especially if administered during dialysis, improves net protein anabolism in chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients. These beneficial effects have been extended to long-term benefits in recent clinical trials. Resistance exercise, alone or combined with intradialytic oral nutrition supplementation also improves net protein balance in the acute setting although recent studies indicated a limited beneficial effect of long-term exercise alone on muscle protein accretion in CHD patients. Anabolic agents such as growth hormone and androgens have been shown to exert significant benefits on visceral protein stores, muscle mass and strength. Ghrelin, a hormone with combined orexigenic and anti-inflammatory effects, is a potential new nutritional intervention in maintenance dialysis patients. Summary Existing anabolic therapeutic strategies have proven to be effective in improving PEW in maintenance dialysis patients. Combined anabolic interventions and several new and established anabolic hormones represent as further promising nutritional interventions. Large-scale randomized controlled trials examining the effects of anabolic interventions on mortality and morbidity are still lacking. PMID:19713839

  3. Anabolic Steroid Use: Federal Efforts to Prevent and Reduce Anabolic Steroid Abuse among Teenagers. Report to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives. GAO-08-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Government Accountability Office, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The abuse of anabolic steroids by teenagers--that is, their use without a prescription--is a health concern. Anabolic steroids are synthetic forms of the hormone testosterone that can be taken orally, injected, or rubbed on the skin. Although a 2006 survey funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) found that less than 3 percent of 12th…

  4. [Abuse of anabolic steroids and its impact on thyroid function].

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Rodrigo S; Rosenthal, Doris; Carvalho, Denise P de

    2007-12-01

    The use of anabolic steroids to increase physical performance and for aesthetic ends has reached alarming indices in the last three decades. Besides the desired actions, several collateral effects have been described in the literature, such as the development of some types of cancer, ginecomasty, peliosis hepatis, renal insufficiency, virilization, amongst others. The most proeminent effect on human thyroid function is the reduction of thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), with consequent reductions of total serum T3 and T4, depending however on the susceptibility of the drug to aromatization and subsequent transformation into estrogen. In rats, anabolic steroids also act in the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones and seem to exert an important proliferative effect on thyroid cells. Thus, the aim of the present paper is to review data on the effect of supraphysiological doses of anabolic steroids on thyroid function, showing the danger that indiscriminate use of these drugs can cause to health.

  5. Test methods: anabolics.

    PubMed

    Saugy, M; Cardis, C; Robinson, N; Schweizer, C

    2000-03-01

    In the International Olympic Committee (IOC) accredited laboratories, specific methods have been developed to detect anabolic steroids in athletes' urine. The technique of choice to achieve this is gas-chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In order to improve the efficiency of anti-doping programmes, the laboratories have defined new analytical strategies. The final sensitivity of the analytical procedure can be improved by choosing new technologies for use in detection, such as tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) or high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). A better sample preparation using immuno-affinity chromatography (IAC) is also a good tool for improving sensitivity. These techniques are suitable for the detection of synthetic anabolic steroids whose structure is not found naturally in the human body. The more and more evident use, on a large scale, of substances chemically similar to the endogenous steroids obliges both the laboratory and the sports authorities to use the steroid profile of the athlete in comparison with reference ranges from a population or with intraindividual reference values.

  6. Anabolic Steroids...What's the Hype?...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Gregory L.; Wagner, Lauris L.

    This pamphlet uses a question-and-answer format to examine the use and abuse of anabolic steroids. It begins by explaining that all steroids are not anabolic steroids and that anabolic steroids are those used specifically to build muscles quickly. Medical uses of anabolic steroids are reviewed; how people get steroids, how they take them, and…

  7. Estrogenic compounds decrease growth hormone receptor abundance and alter osmoregulation in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lerner, Darren T.; Sheridan, Mark A.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Atlantic salmon smolts to estrogenic compounds is shown to compromise several aspects of smolt development. We sought to determine the underlying endocrine mechanisms of estrogen impacts on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis. Smolts in freshwater (FW) were either injected 3 times over 10 days with 2 μg g−1 17β-estradiol (E2) or 150 μg g−1 4-nonylphenol (NP). Seawater (SW)-acclimated fish received intraperitoneal implants of 30 μg g−1 E2 over two weeks. Treatment with these estrogenic compounds increased hepatosomatic index and total plasma calcium. E2 and NP reduced maximum growth hormone binding by 30–60% in hepatic and branchial membranes in FW and SW, but did not alter the dissociation constant. E2 and NP treatment decreased plasma levels of IGF-I levels in both FW and SW. In FW E2 and NP decreased plasma GH whereas in SW plasma GH increased after E2 treatment. Compared to controls, plasma chloride concentrations of E2-treated fish were decreased 5.5 mM in FW and increased 10.5 mM in SW. There was no effect of NP or E2 on gill sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase) activity in FW smolts, whereas E2 treatment in SW reduced gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity and altered the number and size of ionocytes. Our data indicate that E2 downregulates the GH/IGF-I-axis and SW tolerance which may be part of its normal function for reproduction and movement into FW. We conclude that the mechanism of endocrine disruption of smolt development by NP is in part through alteration of the GH/IGF-I axis via reduced GH receptor abundance.

  8. Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: Knowledge about, Attitude toward, and Extent of Use by High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonker, R. J.; And Others

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AS) are pharmacologic derivatives of the hormone testosterone. They have therapeutic merit when used under a physician's prescription to treat certain hormonal imbalances and some forms of anemia; however, when taken in high doses they have a number of virilizing, feminizing, toxic, and psychological effects. This…

  9. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and organic wastewater compounds in Pennsylvania waters, 2006-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reif, Andrew G.; Crawford, J. Kent; Loper, Connie A.; Proctor, Arianne; Manning, Rhonda; Titler, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Concern over the presence of contaminants of emerging concern, such as pharmaceutical compounds, hormones, and organic wastewater compounds (OWCs), in waters of the United States and elsewhere is growing. Laboratory techniques developed within the last decade or new techniques currently under development within the U.S. Geological Survey now allow these compounds to be measured at concentrations in nanograms per liter. These new laboratory techniques were used in a reconnaissance study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, to determine the occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern in streams, streambed sediment, and groundwater of Pennsylvania. Compounds analyzed for in the study are pharmaceuticals (human and veterinary drugs), hormones (natural and synthetic), and OWCs (detergents, fragrances, pesticides, industrial compounds, disinfectants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fire retardants and plasticizers). Reconnaissance sampling was conducted from 2006 to 2009 to identify contaminants of emerging concern in (1) groundwater from wells used to supply livestock, (2) streamwater upstream and downstream from animal feeding operations, (3) streamwater upstream from and streamwater and streambed sediment downstream from municipal wastewater effluent discharges, (4) streamwater from sites within 5 miles of drinking-water intakes, and (5) streamwater and streambed sediment where fish health assessments were conducted. Of the 44 pharmaceutical compounds analyzed in groundwater samples collected in 2006 from six wells used to supply livestock, only cotinine (a nicotine metabolite) and the antibiotics tylosin and sulfamethoxazole were detected. The maximum concentration of any contaminant of emerging concern was 24 nanograms per liter (ng/L) for cotinine, and was detected in a groundwater sample from a Lebanon County, Pa., well. Seven pharmaceutical compounds including acetaminophen

  10. Cardiac effects of anabolic steroids

    PubMed Central

    Payne, J R; Kotwinski, P J; Montgomery, H E

    2004-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse in athletes has been associated with a wide range of adverse conditions, including hypogonadism, testicular atrophy, impaired spermatogenesis, gynaecomastia, and psychiatric disturbance. But what effect does steroid abuse have on the cardiovascular system? PMID:15084526

  11. Prescribing of FDA-approved and compounded hormone therapy differs by specialty

    PubMed Central

    Constantine, Ginger D.; Archer, David F.; Graham, Shelli; Bernick, Brian A.; Mirkin, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of general practitioners (GPs), obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), and wellness physicians (WPs) of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for both compounded (CHT) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved products, using a survey of US physicians. Methods: Nine thousand one US physicians were invited to participate in a survey to report on their HT-prescribing patterns. Physicians were eligible if they prescribed HT for at least six patients per month. Results: The survey was completed by 440 eligible physicians (893 responded of 9,001 invited) including 171 GPs, 170 OB/GYNs, and 84 WPs. Physicians prescribed HT for 15% to 30% of their female patients, with WPs numerically most likely to prescribe HT. Menopausal symptoms were the leading reason for HT prescriptions among all specialties. WPs seemed more likely to prescribe HT for general/cardiovascular health (28%), and for shorter durations, than other specialties. WPs prescribed proportionally more compounded (vs FDA-approved) estrogens/progestogens than GPs or OB/GYNs, but OB/GYNs seemed to prescribe more compounded dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone (prescribed alone) than did others. OB/GYNs seemed least likely to consider CHT being more safe or effective than FDA-approved HT. Symptom relief was the main determinant of efficacy for all specialties; WPs also used blood (61%) or saliva testing (25%) for dose adjustment. Conclusions: Although all physician specialties surveyed prescribed HT, differences in prescribing CHT versus FDA-approved formulations by medical specialty/practice seemed to exist. Of those surveyed, OB/GYNs and GPs prescribed proportionally more FDA-approved HT, whereas WPs, similarly, prescribed more CHT. More discussion is needed concerning physicians’ decisions to prescribe CHT versus FDA-approved formulations. PMID:27648594

  12. Mathematical Model of Bone Remodeling Captures the Antiresorptive and Anabolic Actions of Various Therapies.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S; Mehta, Khamir; Cabal, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular pathways regulating the bone remodeling process should help in the development of new antiresorptive regulators and anabolic regulators, that is, regulators of bone resorption and of bone formation. Understanding the mechanisms by which parathyroid hormone (PTH) influences bone formation and how it switches from anabolic to catabolic action is important for treating osteoporosis (Poole and Reeve in Curr Opin Pharmacol 5:612-617, 2005). In this paper we describe a mathematical model of bone remodeling that incorporates, extends, and integrates several models of particular aspects of this biochemical system (Cabal et al. in J Bone Miner Res 28(8):1830-1836, 2013; Lemaire et al. in J Theor Biol 229:293-309, 2004; Peterson and Riggs in Bone 46:49-63, 2010; Raposo et al. in J Clin Endocrinol Metab 87(9):4330-4340, 2002; Ross et al. in J Disc Cont Dyn Sys Series B 17(6):2185-2200, 2012). We plan to use this model as a bone homeostasis platform to develop anabolic and antiresorptive compounds. The model will allow us to test hypotheses about the dynamics of compounds and to test the potential benefits of combination therapies. At the core of the model is the idealized account of osteoclast and osteoblast signaling given by Lemaire et al. (J Theor Biol 229:293-309, 2004). We have relaxed some of their assumptions about the roles of osteoprotegerin, transforming growth factor [Formula: see text], and receptor activator of nuclear factor [Formula: see text]B ligand; we have devised more detailed models of the interactions of these species. We have incorporated a model of the effect of calcium sensing receptor antagonists on remodeling (Cabal et al. in J Bone Miner Res 28(8):1830-1836, 2013). We have also incorporated a basic model of the effects of vitamin D on calcium homeostasis. We have included a simple model of the mechanism proposed by Bellido et al. (2003), Ross et al. (J Disc Cont Dyn Sys Series B 17(6):2185-2200, 2012), of the

  13. The concept of multiple hormonal dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Marcello; Cattabiani, Chiara; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Ceda, Gianpaolo

    2010-01-01

    Aging process is accompanied by hormonal changes characterized by an imbalance between catabolic hormones that remain stable and anabolic hormones (testosterone, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), that decrease with age. Despite the multiple hormonal dysregulation occurring with age, the prevalent line of research in the last decades has tried to explain many age-related phenomena as consequence of one single hormonal derangement with disappointing results. In this review we will list the relationship between hormonal anabolic deficiency and frailty and mortality in older population, providing evidence to the notion that multiple hormonal dysregulation rather than change in single anabolic hormone is a powerful marker of poor health status and mortality.

  14. Use of compounded bioidentical hormone therapy in menopausal women: an opinion statement of the Women's Health Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    McBane, Sarah E; Borgelt, Laura M; Barnes, Kylie N; Westberg, Sarah M; Lodise, Nicole M; Stassinos, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Menopausal symptoms affect a significant portion of women. Traditional treatment with manufactured hormone therapy can alleviate these symptoms, but many women and their health care providers are concerned about the risks, such as venous thromboembolism and certain types of cancer, demonstrated with manufactured hormone therapy. Compounded bioidentical hormone therapy has been proposed and is often used as a solution for these concerns. Despite this use, no data are currently available to support the claims that compounded bioidentical hormone therapy is a safer or more efficacious option compared with manufactured hormone therapy. A common misperception is that all manufactured products consist of synthetic hormones and all compounded medications consist of natural hormones; however, in fact, significant overlap exists. Several key stakeholder organizations have issued statements expressing concern about the lack of evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of compounded bioidentical hormone therapy, in addition to concerns regarding prescribing patterns. The Women's Health Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy recommends against the consistent use of compounded bioidentical hormones as a safer option compared with manufactured therapy and supports the statements of other key organizations, acknowledging the need for more robust clinical studies to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of compounded bioidentical products compared with manufactured products.

  15. Identification of plant compounds that disrupt the insect juvenile hormone receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seok-Hee; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Fang, Ying; An, Saes-Byeol; Park, Doo-Sang; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Soo-Young; Kim, Seonghyun; Kim, Namjung; Raikhel, Alexander S; Je, Yeon Ho; Shin, Sang Woon

    2015-02-10

    Insects impact human health through vector-borne diseases and cause major economic losses by damaging crops and stored agricultural products. Insect-specific growth regulators represent attractive control agents because of their safety to the environment and humans. We identified plant compounds that serve as juvenile hormone antagonists (PJHANs). Using the yeast two-hybrid system transformed with the mosquito JH receptor as a reporter system, we demonstrate that PJHANs affect the JH receptor, methoprene-tolerant (Met), by disrupting its complex with CYCLE or FISC, formation of which is required for mediating JH action. We isolated five diterpene secondary metabolites with JH antagonist activity from two plants: Lindera erythrocarpa and Solidago serotina. They are effective in causing mortality of mosquito larvae at relatively low LD50 values. Topical application of two diterpenes caused reduction in the expression of Met target genes and retardation of follicle development in mosquito ovaries. Hence, the newly discovered PJHANs may lead to development of a new class of safe and effective pesticides.

  16. Identification of plant compounds that disrupt the insect juvenile hormone receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seok-Hee; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Fang, Ying; An, Saes-Byeol; Park, Doo-Sang; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Soo-Young; Kim, Seonghyun; Kim, Namjung; Raikhel, Alexander S.; Je, Yeon Ho; Shin, Sang Woon

    2015-01-01

    Insects impact human health through vector-borne diseases and cause major economic losses by damaging crops and stored agricultural products. Insect-specific growth regulators represent attractive control agents because of their safety to the environment and humans. We identified plant compounds that serve as juvenile hormone antagonists (PJHANs). Using the yeast two-hybrid system transformed with the mosquito JH receptor as a reporter system, we demonstrate that PJHANs affect the JH receptor, methoprene-tolerant (Met), by disrupting its complex with CYCLE or FISC, formation of which is required for mediating JH action. We isolated five diterpene secondary metabolites with JH antagonist activity from two plants: Lindera erythrocarpa and Solidago serotina. They are effective in causing mortality of mosquito larvae at relatively low LD50 values. Topical application of two diterpenes caused reduction in the expression of Met target genes and retardation of follicle development in mosquito ovaries. Hence, the newly discovered PJHANs may lead to development of a new class of safe and effective pesticides. PMID:25624480

  17. Investigation of anabolic steroids in two taste aversion paradigms.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, R; Rosellini, R A; Svare, B

    1993-02-01

    The aversive effects of estradiol have been studied in two different taste aversion paradigms. A similar investigation was undertaken for the anabolic-androgenic steroids, nandralone and testosterone cypionate, using Rockland-Swiss mice. Experiments 1 and 2 used the brief exposure of a novel saccharin solution as the conditioned stimulus for taste aversion learning, and showed that anabolic steroids (1 mg) do not induce taste aversions. Instead, these hormones induced a small non-contingent increase in saccharin preference. Experiment 3 showed that daily nandralone administration (1 mg/day) had a greater anabolic effect than the same dose of testosterone cypionate. Experiment 4 paired the continuous exposure to a novel diet with daily nandralone injections, and showed that steroid treatment increased intake of the novel diet. When the novel diet was subsequently presented with the familiar diet in a two-choice preference test, there was no indication that an aversion was conditioned to the novel target diet. On the contrary, nandralone treatment significantly increased the preference for the novel diet. These experiments show that anabolic-androgenic steroids do not have aversive effects in mice, and that they may have positive consequences.

  18. Anabolic Steroid Reversal of Denervation Atrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    10-1-0932 TITLE: Anabolic Steroid Reversal of Denervation Atrophy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Jonathan E. Isaacs...certainly “denervation atrophy” plays a significant role. Anabolic steroids , which have been shown to cause hypertrophy of muscle fibers, increase net...of satellite cells to muscle fibers. In conclusion, there did not seem to be a functional benefit for anabolic steroid treatment following

  19. Effects of stress hormones on the production of volatile sulfur compounds by periodontopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Calil, Caroline Morini; Oliveira, Gisele Mattos; Cogo, Karina; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Marcondes, Fernanda Klein; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of stress hormones on the etiologic agents of halitosis. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effects of adrenaline (ADR), noradrenaline (NA) and cortisol (CORT) on bacteria that produce volatile sulfur compounds (VSC), the major gases responsible for bad breath. Cultures of Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), Porphyromonas endodontalis (Pe), Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) were exposed to 50 µM ADR, NA and CORT or equivalent volumes of sterile water as controls for 12 and 24 h. Growth was evaluated based on absorbance at 660 nm. Portable gas chromatography was used to measure VSC concentrations. Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn post-hoc test were used to compare the groups. For Fn, ADR, NA and CORT significantly reduced bacterial growth after 12 h and 24 h (p<0.05). All the substances tested increased hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production (p<0.05). For Pe, all the substances tested reduced bacterial development after 24 h (p<0.05), and NA significantly increased the H2S concentration after 12 h (p<0.05). In the Pg and Pi cultures, no effects on bacterial growth were observed (p>0.05). In the Pi cultures, ADR, NA and CORT increased H2S (p<0.05). Catecholamines and cortisol can interfere with growth and H2S production of sub-gingival species in vitro. This process appears to be complex and supports the association between stress and the production of VSC.

  20. Endocrine aspects of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Wu, F C

    1997-07-01

    Understanding of the mechanism of androgen action has been enhanced by advances in knowledge on the molecular basis of activation of the androgen receptor and the importance of tissue conversion of circulating testosterone to dihydrotestosterone and estradiol. New evidence supports the view that supraphysiological doses of anabolic steroids do have a definite, positive effect on muscle size and muscle strength. However, the nature of the anabolic action of androgens on muscle is currently unclear and may involve mechanisms independent of the androgen receptor. The dose-response relationships of anabolic actions vs the potentially serious risk to health of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) use are still unresolved. Most of the adverse effects of AAS are reversible but some are permanent, particularly in women and children. The reported incidence of acute life-threatening events associated with AAS abuse is low, but the actual risk may be underrecognized or underreported; the exact incidence is unknown. The long-term consequences and disease risks of AAS to the sports competitor remain to be properly evaluated.

  1. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Pickar, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. Methods: US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [FDCA]) through 2014, including chronologies, Congressional testimony, FDA guidelines and enforcements, and reports. The FDCA and DQSA were reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched for articles on compounded drugs, including CBHT. Results: Congress explicitly granted the FDA limited oversight of compounded drugs in a 1997 amendment to the FDCA, but the FDA has encountered obstacles in exercising that authority. After 64 patient deaths and 750 adversely affected patients from the 2012 meningitis outbreak due to contaminated compounded steroid injections, Congress passed the DQSA, authorizing the FDA to create a voluntary registration for facilities that manufacture and distribute sterile compounded drugs in bulk and reinforcing FDCA regulations for traditional compounding. Given history and current environment, concerns remain about CBHT product regulation and their lack of safety and efficacy data. Conclusions: The DQSA and its reinforcement of §503A of the FDCA solidifies FDA authority to enforce FDCA provisions against compounders of CBHT. The new law may improve compliance and accreditation by the compounding industry; support state and FDA oversight; and prevent the distribution of misbranded, adulterated, or inconsistently compounded medications, and false and misleading claims, thus reducing public health risk. PMID:26418479

  2. Anabolic treatment with GH, IGF-I, or anabolic steroids in patients with HIV-associated wasting.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Kathleen; Schambelan, Morris

    2002-09-01

    Wasting, and particularly loss of metabolically active lean tissue, contributes to increased mortality, accelerated disease progression, and impairment of strength and functional status in patients with HIV infection. A variety of protein anabolic agents, including growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, testosterone, nandrolone decanoate, oxandrolone, and oxymetholone, have been studied in patients with HIV-associated wasting. Overall, these studies have demonstrated that treatment with protein anabolic agents can increase lean body mass (LBM) and in some cases provide functional benefits and improvements in quality of life. Further research is needed to determine whether such treatment prolongs survival or reduces the overall health care burden of HIV infection. The advances in identification of successful treatments for HIV-associated wasting can provide a model for using these therapies in other catabolic states, including end-stage renal disease, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiac cachexia.

  3. Atrial fibrillation and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M L; Martinez, C M; Gallagher, E J

    1999-01-01

    A young male bodybuilder, consuming large doses of anabolic steroids (AS), presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with symptomatic rapid atrial fibrillation (AF). Echocardiogram revealed significant septal hypokinesis, and posterior and septal wall thickness at the upper limit of normal for highly trained athletes. The atrial fibrillation had not recurred at 10 weeks after discontinuation of AS use. Consumption of these agents in athletes has been associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and sudden death.

  4. Anabolic steroids are fool's gold.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A J

    1981-10-01

    Since increases in muscle strength are proportional to increases in the cross-sectional diameter of the muscles being trained, the body must convert greater than normal amounts of amino acids available to it to increase size in athletes in training. When androgens became available in the 1930's they were used primarily to restore positive nitrogen balance in victims of starvation. Anabolic steroids, which were developed to avoid unwanted effects of androgens, were first given to weight lifters, but football players and weight throwers were soon using them. From 1965 to 1977, 25 clinical studies were published dealing with the administration of an anabolic-androgenic steroid to adult human males for evaluating changes in strength and, in 10 of these studies, in maximum oxygen consumption. In 12 of these studies, improvements were claimed from the use of these steroids; in the other 13 no improvements were observed. Other studies have shown that in healthy adult males these steroids reduce testosterone and gonadotrophin output, which reduces spermatogenesis. Alterations of normal liver function have been found in up to 80% of persons treated with C17-alkylated testosterone derivatives. Peliosis hepatitis, with liver failure and death, and fatal liver cancer have also been reported in adults so treated. Reliable methods for detecting anabolic steroids in the urine are now used in certain international competitions. Testing, announced bans, and disqualifications have not been effective in controlling the use of the drugs. The best hope for doing so lies in continuing education of athletes and their supervisors.

  5. Hyperplastic changes and receptor status in the breast tissue of bodybuilders under anabolic-androgenic steroid stimulation.

    PubMed

    Salazar, E L; Torres, J A; Avila, A; Andrade, A

    2000-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are misused by athletes to improve their physical performance. AAS with similar groups and configuration indicate that testosterone is the base of this ability to stimulate anabolic activity. The effect of these compounds on the breast tissue of males that consume them is a confirmation of its metabolic pathway. To confirm its hormonal effects, the status of estradiol and progesterone receptors (ER, PgR) status was determined in cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions (HRc, HRn) of 8 premalignant breast tissues from 8 bodybuilders (aged 21 to 45 years) under AAS stimulation. The control group included 5 males with benign disorders of the breast, but not due to AAS administration. The concentrations of ERc and ERn were significantly higher (p < .05) in males under AAS stimulation than in males without these. The concentrations of PgRc and PgRn do not differ between these two groups (p > .05) The benign breast disease is remarkably similar in female and male patients, suggesting a common origin. In the same way, the measurement of both HRc and HRn is necessary to accurately report receptor concentration.

  6. Modulation of follistatin and myostatin propeptide by anabolic steroids and gender.

    PubMed

    Mosler, S; Geisler, S; Hengevoss, J; Schiffer, T; Piechotta, M; Adler, M; Diel, P

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the impact of training, anabolic steroids and endogenous hormones on myostatin-interacting proteins in order to identify manipulations of myostatin signalling. To identify whether analysis of the myostatin interacting proteins follistatin and myostatin propeptide is suitable to detect the abuse of anabolic steroids, their serum concentrations were monitored in untrained males, bodybuilders using anabolic steroids and natural bodybuilders. In addition, we analysed follistatin and myostatin propeptide serum proteins in females during menstrual cycle. Our results showed increased follistatin concentrations in response to anabolic steroids. Furthermore, variations of sex steroid levels during the menstrual cycle had no impact on the expression of follistatin and myostatin propetide. In addition, we identified gender differences in the basal expression of the investigated proteins. In general, follistatin and myostatin propeptide concentrations were relatively stable within the same individual both in males and females. In conclusion, the current findings provide an insight into gender differences in myostatin-interacting proteins and their regulation in response to anabolic steroids and endogenous hormones. Therefore our data provide new aspects for the development of doping prevention strategies.

  7. Anabolic steroids: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Haupt, H A; Rovere, G D

    1984-01-01

    The use of anabolic steroids by athletes is controversial. On the one hand, many athletes believe that steroids improve athletic performance and thus provide an advantage to those who use them. On the other hand, the medical and scientific communities believe that inadequate scientific data exist to support the claim that anabolic steroids can improve athletic performance while overwhelming scientific data demonstrate their deleterious effects. Therefore, a large information and credibility gap concerning anabolic steroids exists between the athletes and the medical and scientific communities. We believe that this gap can be closed if both groups are better informed about anabolic steroids. We provide a detailed review of the literature on anabolic steroids that provides to the reader the information needed to make an informed decision on the relative risks and benefits of anabolic steroids to the athlete.

  8. HPLC-ICP/MS Analysis of Thyroid Hormone and Related Iodinated Compounds in Tissues and Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantifying thyroid hormone (TH) and the synthetic precursors and metabolic products of TH is important for developing models of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis as well as for understanding the effects of xenobiotics on HPT axis function. In this study, the developm...

  9. [Use and abuse of androgens and anabolic steroids].

    PubMed

    Alén, M

    1993-01-01

    At therapeutic dosages, androgen and anabolic steroids enhance neither muscle strength nor competitive performance. Endogenous androgen secretion is inhibited, and the net effect is negligible. The dosages taken by athletes and body-builders are 10-50 fold greater than the therapeutic dosages, and give rise to hyperandrogenic conditions. Although this improves endurance, strength and muscle development, at the same time a manifest hormone disturbance is developed with a variety of consequences. Abusers, who as a rule inject illicit preparations themselves, are also at risk of hepatitis and HIV.

  10. Tracing thyroid hormone-disrupting compounds: database compilation and structure-activity evaluation for an effect-directed analysis of sediment.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jana M; Andersson, Patrik L; Zhang, Jin; Simon, Eszter; Leonards, Pim E G; Hamers, Timo; Lamoree, Marja H

    2015-07-01

    A variety of anthropogenic compounds has been found to be capable of disrupting the endocrine systems of organisms, in laboratory studies as well as in wildlife. The most widely described endpoint is estrogenicity, but other hormonal disturbances, e.g., thyroid hormone disruption, are gaining more and more attention. Here, we present a review and chemical characterization, using principal component analysis, of organic compounds that have been tested for their capacity to bind competitively to the thyroid hormone transport protein transthyretin (TTR). The database contains 250 individual compounds and technical mixtures, of which 144 compounds are defined as TTR binders. Almost one third of these compounds (n = 52) were even more potent than the natural hormone thyroxine (T4). The database was used as a tool to assist in the identification of thyroid hormone-disrupting compounds (THDCs) in an effect-directed analysis (EDA) study of a sediment sample. Two compounds could be confirmed to contribute to the detected TTR-binding potency in the sediment sample, i.e., triclosan and nonylphenol technical mixture. They constituted less than 1% of the TTR-binding potency of the unfractionated extract. The low rate of explained activity may be attributed to the challenges related to identification of unknown contaminants in combination with the limited knowledge about THDCs in general. This study demonstrates the need for databases containing compound-specific toxicological properties. In the framework of EDA, such a database could be used to assist in the identification and confirmation of causative compounds focusing on thyroid hormone disruption.

  11. Regional variability in bed-sediment concentrations of wastewater compounds, hormones and PAHs for portions of coastal New York and New Jersey impacted by hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Patrick; Gibson, Cathy A; Fisher, Shawn C.; Fisher, Irene; Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Foreman, William T.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Focazio, Michael J.; Jones, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Bed sediment samples from 79 coastal New York and New Jersey, USA sites were analyzed for 75 compounds including wastewater associated contaminants, PAHs, and other organic compounds to assess the post-Hurricane Sandy distribution of organic contaminants among six regions. These results provide the first assessment of wastewater compounds, hormones, and PAHs in bed sediment for this region. Concentrations of most wastewater contaminants and PAHs were highest in the most developed region (Upper Harbor/Newark Bay, UHNB) and reflected the wastewater inputs to this area. Although the lack of pre-Hurricane Sandy data for most of these compounds make it impossible to assess the effect of the storm on wastewater contaminant concentrations, PAH concentrations in the UHNB region reflect pre-Hurricane Sandy conditions in this region. Lower hormone concentrations than predicted by the total organic carbon relation occurred in UHNB samples, suggesting that hormones are being degraded in the UHNB region.

  12. Regional variability in bed-sediment concentrations of wastewater compounds, hormones and PAHs for portions of coastal New York and New Jersey impacted by hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick J; Gibson, Catherine A; Fisher, Shawn C; Fisher, Irene J; Reilly, Timothy J; Smalling, Kelly L; Romanok, Kristin M; Foreman, William T; ReVello, Rhiannon C; Focazio, Michael J; Jones, Daniel K

    2016-06-30

    Bed sediment samples from 79 coastal New York and New Jersey, USA sites were analyzed for 75 compounds including wastewater associated contaminants, PAHs, and other organic compounds to assess the post-Hurricane Sandy distribution of organic contaminants among six regions. These results provide the first assessment of wastewater compounds, hormones, and PAHs in bed sediment for this region. Concentrations of most wastewater contaminants and PAHs were highest in the most developed region (Upper Harbor/Newark Bay, UHNB) and reflected the wastewater inputs to this area. Although the lack of pre-Hurricane Sandy data for most of these compounds make it impossible to assess the effect of the storm on wastewater contaminant concentrations, PAH concentrations in the UHNB region reflect pre-Hurricane Sandy conditions in this region. Lower hormone concentrations than predicted by the total organic carbon relation occurred in UHNB samples, suggesting that hormones are being degraded in the UHNB region.

  13. The effects of dietary boron compounds in supplemented diet on hormonal activity and some biochemical parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucukkurt, Ismail; Akbel, Erten; Karabag, Funda; Ince, Sinan

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the effects of dietary boric acid or borax, as a boron (B) source, on hormonal status (leptin, insulin, triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine) and some biochemical parameter levels as glucose, carnitine, nonesterified fatty acids, and betahydroxybutyric acid in rats. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into three equal groups: the animals in the first group (control) were fed with a standard rodent diet containing 6.4 mg B/kg, and the animals in the experimental group were fed with a standard rodent diet added with boric acid and borax (100 mg B/kg) throughout the experimental period of 28 days. The B compounds especially borax decreased leptin, insulin, and glucose levels, whereas increased T3 and carnitine levels in plasma. In addition, body weight of rats was found to be low in the boric acid group at the end of 4 weeks. Consequently, our results demonstrate that B supplementation (100 mg/kg) in diet decreases body weight, leptin, and insulin, whereas increases T3 levels in plasma, so enhances the metabolic activity of rats. Between the B compounds used in this study, it was found that borax had a greater effect on hormonal status than boric acid.

  14. Illicit Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Hudson, James I.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2009-01-01

    The anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are a family of hormones that includes testosterone and its derivatives. These substances have been used by elite athletes since the 1950s, but they did not become widespread drugs of abuse in the general population until the 1980s. Thus, knowledge of the medical and behavioral effects of illicit AAS use is still evolving. Surveys suggest that many millions of boys and men, primarily in Western countries, have abused AAS to enhance athletic performance or personal appearance. AAS use among girls and women is much less common. Taken in supraphysiologic doses, AAS show various long-term adverse medical effects, especially cardiovascular toxicity. Behavioral effects of AAS include hypomanic or manic symptoms, sometimes accompanied by aggression or violence, which usually occur while taking AAS, and depressive symptoms occurring during AAS withdrawal. However, these symptoms are idiosyncratic and afflict only a minority of illicit users; the mechanism of these idiosyncratic responses remains unclear. AAS users may also ingest a range of other illicit drugs, including both “body-image” drugs to enhance physical appearance or performance, and classical drugs of abuse. In particular, AAS users appear particularly prone to opioid use. There may well be a biological basis for this association, since both human and animal data suggest that AAS and opioids may share similar brain mechanisms. Finally, AAS may cause a dependence syndrome in a substantial minority of users. AAS dependence may pose a growing public health problem in future years, but remains little studied. PMID:19769977

  15. Anabolic-androgenic steroids and the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Rogol, A D; Yesalis, C E

    1992-03-01

    This article has reviewed some of the hormonal and behavioral maturation that occurs during adolescence, which are characterized by remarkable physical changes and behavioral vulnerability. Risk taking of many varieties is common and drugs (including anabolic-androgenic steroids) form a part of the prevailing culture in many places. These steroids probably are not severe health hazards when taken intermittently and in low to moderate doses. The 17-alkylated derivatives are clearly the more likely to cause hepatotoxicity. Thus, the scare tactics formerly used (severe constitutional side effects) are doomed to failure. The tenuous link between these drugs and objective behavioral and addictive effects must be strengthened before health strategies based on this issue can be validated. Clearly, the lack of scientific information has impeded, if not precluded, the formulation of an effective health education strategy. The most potent deterrent to the use of steroid drugs by athletes must be the moral issue of fair play and maintaining a "level playing field." We strongly support directed research in these areas and hope that the credibility of the scientific community can be regained after its faulted "stop steroid use" campaigns based on the lack of steroid efficacy in bringing about desired results or on their dire consequences have been replaced with credible evidence to refute their use on these and other grounds.

  16. How sex hormones promote skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Velders, Martina; Diel, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration efficiency declines with age for both men and women. This decline impacts on functional capabilities in the elderly and limits their ability to engage in regular physical activity and to maintain independence. Aging is associated with a decline in sex hormone production. Therefore, elucidating the effects of sex hormone substitution on skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration after injury or disuse is highly relevant for the aging population, where sarcopenia affects more than 30 % of individuals over 60 years of age. While the anabolic effects of androgens are well known, the effects of estrogens on skeletal muscle anabolism have only been uncovered in recent times. Hence, the purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic insight into the regulation of skeletal muscle regenerative processes by both androgens and estrogens. Animal studies using estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists and receptor subtype selective agonists have revealed that estrogens act through both genomic and non-genomic pathways to reduce leukocyte invasion and increase satellite cell numbers in regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. Although animal studies have been more conclusive than human studies in establishing a role for sex hormones in the attenuation of muscle damage, data from a number of recent well controlled human studies is presented to support the notion that hormonal therapies and exercise induce added positive effects on functional measures and lean tissue mass. Based on the fact that aging human skeletal muscle retains the ability to adapt to exercise with enhanced satellite cell activation, combining sex hormone therapies with exercise may induce additive effects on satellite cell accretion. There is evidence to suggest that there is a 'window of opportunity' after the onset of a hypogonadal state such as menopause, to initiate a hormonal therapy in order to achieve maximal benefits for skeletal muscle health. Novel receptor subtype selective

  17. Anabolic steroid accelerated multicompartment syndrome following trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bahia, H; Platt, A; Hart, N; Baguley, P

    2000-01-01

    The case is reported of a 23 year old male body builder who was involved in a road traffic accident after taking anabolic steroids. The resulting trauma caused a severe life threatening acute multicompartment syndrome resulting in the need for urgent multiple fasciotomies. Key Words: anabolic steroids; body builder; trauma; multicompartment syndrome PMID:10953907

  18. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens.

  19. PTH Promotes Bone Anabolism by Stimulating Aerobic Glycolysis via IGF Signaling.

    PubMed

    Esen, Emel; Lee, Seung-Yon; Wice, Burton M; Long, Fanxin

    2015-11-01

    Teriparatide, a recombinant peptide corresponding to amino acids 1-34 of human parathyroid hormone (PTH), has been an effective bone anabolic drug for over a decade. However, the mechanism whereby PTH stimulates bone formation remains incompletely understood. Here we report that in cultures of osteoblast-lineage cells, PTH stimulates glucose consumption and lactate production in the presence of oxygen, a hallmark of aerobic glycolysis, also known as Warburg effect. Experiments with radioactively labeled glucose demonstrate that PTH suppresses glucose entry into the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle). Mechanistically, the increase in aerobic glycolysis is secondary to insulin-like growth factor (Igf) signaling induced by PTH, whereas the metabolic effect of Igf is dependent on activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2). Importantly, pharmacological perturbation of glycolysis suppresses the bone anabolic effect of intermittent PTH in the mouse. Thus, stimulation of aerobic glycolysis via Igf signaling contributes to bone anabolism in response to PTH.

  20. [Regulation of bone mineralization by parathyroid hormone].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masaru; Tamura, Tatsuya

    2004-06-01

    In randomized clinical trials, parathyroid hormone (PTH) showed potent anabolic effects on the lumbar spine and decreased the risk of incident vertebral fractures dramatically. Although the anabolic effect of PTH on cortical bone in the femoral neck is still unclear, it should be demonstrated in further clinical studies. Concurrent or sequential therapies of PTH and anti-resorptive agents will be one of the major issues of treatment for osteoporosis in the future.

  1. Steroidal hormones and other endocrine active compounds in shallow groundwater in nonagricultural areas of Minnesota—Study design, methods, and data, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, Melinda L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, completed a study on the occurrence of steroidal hormones and other endocrine active compounds in shallow groundwater in nonagricultural areas of Minnesota during 2009–10. This report describes the study design and methods, and presents the data collected on steroidal hormones and other related compounds. Environmental and quality-control samples were collected from 40 wells as part of this study. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory for 16 steroidal hormones and 4 other related compounds, of which all but 2 compounds are endocrine active compounds. Most of the water samples did not contain detectable concentrations of any of the 20 compounds analyzed. Water samples from three wells had detectable concentrations of one or more compounds. Bisphenol A was detected in samples from three wells, and trans-diethylstilbestrol was detected in one of the samples in which bisphenol A also was detected.

  2. Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2002-10-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are mainly used to treat androgen deficiency syndromes and, more recently, catabolic states such as AIDS-associated wasting. There is no evidence in the reviewed literature that AAS abuse or dependence develops from the therapeutic use of AAS. Conversely, 165 instances of AAS dependence have been reported among weightlifters and bodybuilders who, as part of their weight training regimens, chronically administered supraphysiologic doses, often including combinations of injected and oral AAS as well as other drugs of abuse. A new model is proposed in which both the "myoactive" and psychoactive effects of AAS contribute to the development of AAS dependence. The adverse consequences of AAS are reviewed, as well as their assessment by means of a history and physical, mental status examination, and laboratory testing. When patients with AAS use disorders are compared with patients with other substance use disorders, both similarities and differences become apparent and have implications for treatment.

  3. [New physiological and pharmacological aspects of the growth hormone (I). The effects in adults].

    PubMed

    Díez, J J; Gómez-Pan, A

    1993-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH), a well-known anabolizing agent, not only plays a physiological role in childhood by promoting longitudinal growth, but also it remains to be secreted during adult life. Many aspects on physiological and pharmacological actions of this hormone in adulthood have been clarified in the last years. GH induces the biosynthesis of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a peptidic compound that acts as a mediator of indirect actions of GH. In GH deficient adults, exogenous GH administration produces a decrease in adipose mass which is accompanied by an increase in lean body mass, mainly due to an enlargement of muscle cell mass. Sodium and water retention has been also described. An augmentation in muscle strength, basal metabolic rate and nitrogen retention by action of GH are expressions of the potential anabolizing effects of this hormone in adult life. Glucose tolerance is decreased by GH, and this effect is accompanied by a decrease in peripheral utilization of glucose and an increase in insulin secretion. GH behaves as a lipolytic hormone and gives rise to an increase in resistance to the lipogenetic action of insulin. GH treatment increases plasma levels of bone Gla protein and other marker of osteoblastic activity, what suggests a physiological role of GH in bone turnover regulation. Many other organic functions are also affected by GH administration.

  4. Spatial working memory is preserved in rats treated with anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Smith, S T; Stackman, R W; Clark, A S

    1996-10-21

    The effects of anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) compounds on spatial working memory were evaluated in male rats. Thirty days of administration of a high dose of three individual AAS compounds (17 alpha-methyltestosterone, methandrostenolone, or testosterone cypionate) had no effects on spatial memory or motivation as tested on a delayed non-match-to-sample radial arm maze task. Administration of these AAS compounds at doses within the human abuse range does not impair spatial working memory in rats.

  5. The anabolic steroid methandienone targets the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis and myostatin signaling in a rat training model.

    PubMed

    Mosler, Stephanie; Pankratz, Carlos; Seyfried, Alexis; Piechotta, Marion; Diel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the biological activity of myostatin (MSTN), a negative regulator of muscle growth, is affected by training but also anabolic steroids. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the frequently abused anabolic steroid methandienone (Md) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis and androgen-sensitive tissues in intact rats performing a treadmill training to simulate the situation of abusing athletes. The anabolic effects were correlated with the expression of members of the MSTN signaling cascade. Md treatment resulted in a significant stimulation of anabolic activity of the levator ani muscle, which was further increased by training, while prostate and seminal vesicle weights decreased in conformance with hormone concentrations of LH and testosterone. In gastrocnemius muscle, mRNA expression of genes of the MSTN signaling cascade (MSTN, Smad7 and MyoD) was reduced by training but not after Md treatment, in soleus muscle MSTN and its inhibitors, follistatin (FLST) and Smad-7 were only affected after training in combination with Md treatment. In summary, our data demonstrate that Md treatment of intact rats results in anabolic effects which are enhanced in combination with physical activity. Interestingly, the anabolic activity on the levator ani was increased in combination with training, although the levator ani muscle was not specifically stimulated by our training protocol. In the m. gastrocnemius and soleus, the anabolic effects correlate with changes in the expression patterns of genes involved in MSTN signaling. Our data provide evidence that the decrease in the weight of androgen-sensitive sexual glands, observed after Md treatment, is caused by a suppression of endogenous testosterone synthesis. These observations provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between anabolic steroids, training and MSTN signaling during skeletal muscle adaptation.

  6. Prolonged intrahepatic cholestasis and renal failure secondary to anabolic androgenic steroid-enriched dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prashant V; Feng, Zhen-Zhou; Gordon, Stuart C

    2009-08-01

    The illegal enrichment of anabolic androgenic steroids in over-the-counter dietary supplements is well documented, but the health consequences have not been widely recognized. Three recent reports document cholestatic jaundice and nephropathy due to these compounds. We present 3 additional cases of anabolic androgenic steroid-enriched dietary supplement-induced hepatotoxicity and 1 case of renal failure, and we review the literature and the relevant features of this growing health concern. Recognition of this entity could obviate the need for invasive diagnostic testing and hospitalization and facilitate diagnosis and appropriate counseling.

  7. Anabolic-androgenic steroid and adrenal steroid effects on hippocampal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Clark, A S; Mitre, M C; Brinck-Johnsen, T

    1995-05-08

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic androgen-like compounds which are taken in high doses by athletes with the intention of enhancing muscular appearance, strength and/or athletic performance. Recent research indicates that high doses of AAS may influence the functions of the hippocampus. This evidence led us to explore the extent to which chronic AAS treatments influence spatial memory and the integrity of the hippocampus in the rat. Gonadally intact adult male Long-Evans rats were treated with either the AAS methandrostenolone, a steroid 'cocktail' (TNB; testosterone cypionate, boldenone undecylenate and nandrolone decanoate), or the oil vehicle daily for 12 weeks. A group of male rats treated with corticosterone (CORT; 10 mg/day) was also examined. Spatial memory was assessed in the Morris water maze after 10 weeks of hormone treatment. At 12 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, blood collected and the brain sectioned to assess hippocampal cell number. There were no impairments in the acquisition or retention of the Morris water maze in any hormone treatment group. Although serum testosterone levels were elevated in rats treated with TNB relative to the oil controls, neither the TNB or methandrostenolone treatments produced changes in hippocampal cell number. Serum CORT levels were significantly elevated in the rats treated with CORT and cell loss (15%) was detectable in the CA3b subfield in this group of animals. These results indicate that the AAS administered in the present study were not detrimental to hippocampal spatial memory or cell survival and that, while chronic CORT may produce mild hippocampal cell loss, this loss is not accompanied by deficits on a spatial memory task.

  8. Chronic Drought Decreases Anabolic and Catabolic BVOC Emissions of Quercus pubescens in a Mediterranean Forest

    PubMed Central

    Saunier, Amélie; Ormeño, Elena; Wortham, Henri; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Lecareux, Caroline; Boissard, Christophe; Fernandez, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted by plants can originate from both anabolism (metabolite production through anabolic processes) and catabolism (metabolite degradation by oxidative reactions). Drought can favor leaf oxidation by increasing the oxidative pressure in plant cells. Thus, under the precipitation decline predicted for the Mediterranean region, it can be expected both strong oxidation of anabolic BVOC within leaves and, as a result, enhanced catabolic BVOC emissions. Using an experimental rain exclusion device in a natural forest, we compared the seasonal course of the emissions of the main anabolic BVOC released by Q. pubescens (isoprene and methanol) and their catabolic products (MACR+MVK+ISOPOOH and formaldehyde, respectively) after 3 years of precipitation restriction (−30% of rain). Thus, we assume that this repetitive amplified drought promoted a chronic drought. BVOC emissions were monitored, on-line, with a PTR-ToF-MS. Amplified drought decreased all BVOC emissions rates in spring and summer by around 40–50 %, especially through stomatal closure, with no effect in autumn. Moreover, ratios between catabolic and anabolic BVOC remained unchanged with amplified drought, suggesting a relative stable oxidative pressure in Q. pubescens under the water stress applied. Moreover, these results suggest a quite good resilience of this species under the most severe climate change scenario in the Mediterranean region. PMID:28228762

  9. Chronic Drought Decreases Anabolic and Catabolic BVOC Emissions of Quercus pubescens in a Mediterranean Forest.

    PubMed

    Saunier, Amélie; Ormeño, Elena; Wortham, Henri; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Lecareux, Caroline; Boissard, Christophe; Fernandez, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted by plants can originate from both anabolism (metabolite production through anabolic processes) and catabolism (metabolite degradation by oxidative reactions). Drought can favor leaf oxidation by increasing the oxidative pressure in plant cells. Thus, under the precipitation decline predicted for the Mediterranean region, it can be expected both strong oxidation of anabolic BVOC within leaves and, as a result, enhanced catabolic BVOC emissions. Using an experimental rain exclusion device in a natural forest, we compared the seasonal course of the emissions of the main anabolic BVOC released by Q. pubescens (isoprene and methanol) and their catabolic products (MACR+MVK+ISOPOOH and formaldehyde, respectively) after 3 years of precipitation restriction (-30% of rain). Thus, we assume that this repetitive amplified drought promoted a chronic drought. BVOC emissions were monitored, on-line, with a PTR-ToF-MS. Amplified drought decreased all BVOC emissions rates in spring and summer by around 40-50 %, especially through stomatal closure, with no effect in autumn. Moreover, ratios between catabolic and anabolic BVOC remained unchanged with amplified drought, suggesting a relative stable oxidative pressure in Q. pubescens under the water stress applied. Moreover, these results suggest a quite good resilience of this species under the most severe climate change scenario in the Mediterranean region.

  10. Direct determination of anabolic steroids in pig urine by a new SPME-GC-MS method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Duan, Hongbin; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Xi; Liu, Wei; Chen, Guonan

    2009-05-15

    A new solid phase microextraction (SPME) method coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for rapid determination of four anabolic steroids such as 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-androstane-17-one (HA), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), androstenedione (AD) and methyltestosterone (MT) in pig urine. SPME was used to extract the four anabolic compounds directly without derivatization. The optimum SPME sampling conditions were based on the home-made carbowax-divinylbenzene (CW-DVB) fiber coating during extraction at 40 degrees C for 50 min with 0.18 g/mL NaCl solution and 750 rpm stirring speed. The linear ranges of the proposed method were in the range of 8-640 pg/mL for HA and DHT and 16-510 pg/mL for AD and MT, respectively. The detection limits (S/N=3) were from 2 to 8 pg/mL for the four anabolic steroids. This SPME method provided very high enrichment factors for the four anabolic steroids, which were 1063-fold and 965-fold for HA and DHT at the concentration of 8 pg/mL and 207-fold and 451-fold for AD and MT at the concentration of 16 pg/mL, respectively. The recoveries ranged from 71.3 to 121%, and the RSDs were lower than 12.9%. The method was sensitive and reliable for determination of trace anabolic steroids in biological samples.

  11. Effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hartgens, Fred; Kuipers, Harm

    2004-01-01

    Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone. They can exert strong effects on the human body that may be beneficial for athletic performance. A review of the literature revealed that most laboratory studies did not investigate the actual doses of AAS currently abused in the field. Therefore, those studies may not reflect the actual (adverse) effects of steroids. The available scientific literature describes that short-term administration of these drugs by athletes can increase strength and bodyweight. Strength gains of about 5-20% of the initial strength and increments of 2-5 kg bodyweight, that may be attributed to an increase of the lean body mass, have been observed. A reduction of fat mass does not seem to occur. Although AAS administration may affect erythropoiesis and blood haemoglobin concentrations, no effect on endurance performance was observed. Little data about the effects of AAS on metabolic responses during exercise training and recovery are available and, therefore, do not allow firm conclusions. The main untoward effects of short- and long-term AAS abuse that male athletes most often self-report are an increase in sexual drive, the occurrence of acne vulgaris, increased body hair and increment of aggressive behaviour. AAS administration will disturb the regular endogenous production of testosterone and gonadotrophins that may persist for months after drug withdrawal. Cardiovascular risk factors may undergo deleterious alterations, including elevation of blood pressure and depression of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-, HDL2- and HDL3-cholesterol levels. In echocardiographic studies in male athletes, AAS did not seem to affect cardiac structure and function, although in animal studies these drugs have been observed to exert hazardous effects on heart structure and function. In studies of athletes, AAS were not found to damage the liver. Psyche and behaviour seem to be strongly affected by AAS

  12. Hormonal growth promoting agents in food producing animals.

    PubMed

    Stephany, Rainer W

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the use of hormonal doping agents in sports to enhance the performance of athletes, in the livestock industry hormonal growth promoters ("anabolics") are used to increase the production of muscle meat. This leads to international disputes about the safety of meat originating from animals treated with such anabolics.As a consequence of the total ban in the EU of all hormonal active growth promoters ("hormones") in livestock production, in contrast to their legal use [e.g. of five such hormones (17beta-estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, trenbolone and zeranol) as small solid ear implants and two hormones as feed additives for feedlot heifers (melengestrol acetate) and for swine (ractopamine) in the USA], the regulatory controls also differ sharply between the EU and the USA.In the EU the treatment of slaughter animals is the regulatory offence that has to be controlled in inspection programs. In the USA testing for compliance of a regulatory maximum residue level in the edible product (muscle, fat, liver or kidney) is the purpose of the inspection program (if any).The EU inspection programs focus on sample materials that are more suitable for testing for banned substances, especially if the animals are still on the farm, such as urine and feces or hair. In the case of slaughtered animals, the more favored sample materials are bile, blood, eyes and sometimes liver. Only in rare occasions is muscle meat sampled. This happens only in the case of import controls or in monitoring programs of meat sampled in butcher shops or supermarkets.As a result, data on hormone concentrations in muscle meat samples from the EU market are very rare and are obtained in most cases from small programs on an ad hoc basis. EU data for natural hormones in meat are even rarer because of the absence of "legal natural levels" for these hormones in compliance testing. With the exception of samples from the application sites - in the EU the site of injection of liquid hormone

  13. Short Anabolic Peptides for Bone Growth.

    PubMed

    Amso, Zaid; Cornish, Jillian; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Loss of bone occurs in the age-related skeletal disorder, osteoporosis, leading to bone fragility and increased incidence of fractures, which are associated with enormous costs and substantial morbidity and mortality. Recent data indicate that osteoporotic fractures are more common than other diseases, which usually attract public attention (e.g., heart attack and breast cancer). The prevention and treatment of this skeletal disorder are therefore of paramount importance. Majority of osteoporosis medications restore skeletal balance by reducing osteoclastic activity, thereby reducing bone resorption. These agents, however, do not regenerate damaged bone tissue, leaving limited options for patients once bone loss has occurred. Recently, attention has turned to bone-anabolic agents. Such agents have the ability to increase bone mass and strength, potentially reversing structural damage. To date, only one bone-anabolic drug is available in the market. The discovery of more novel, cost-effective bone anabolic agents is therefore a priority to treat those suffering from this disabling condition. Short peptides offer an important alternative for the development of novel bone-anabolic agents given their high target binding specificity, which translates into potent activity with limited side effects. This review summarizes attempts in the identification of bone-anabolic peptides, and their development for promoting bone growth.

  14. Anabolic steroids and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Angell, Peter; Chester, Neil; Green, Danny; Somauroo, John; Whyte, Greg; George, Keith

    2012-02-01

    Recent reports from needle exchange programmes and other public health initiatives have suggested growing use of anabolic steroids (AS) in the UK and other countries. Data indicate that AS use is not confined to body-builders or high-level sportsmen. Use has spread to professionals working in emergency services, casual fitness enthusiasts and subelite sportsmen and women. Although the precise health consequences of AS use is largely undefined, AS use represents a growing public health concern. Data regarding the consequences of AS use on cardiovascular health are limited to case studies and a modest number of small cohort studies. Numerous case studies have linked AS use with a variety of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events or endpoints, including myocardial infarction, stroke and death. Large-scale epidemiological studies to support these links are absent. Consequently, the impact of AS use upon known CVD risk factors has been studied in relatively small, case-series studies. Data relating AS use to elevated blood pressure, altered lipid profiles and ECG abnormalities have been reported, but are often limited in scope, and other studies have often produced equivocal outcomes. The use of AS has been linked to the appearance of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy as well as endothelial dysfunction but the data again remains controversial. The mechanisms responsible for the negative effect of AS on cardiovascular health are poorly understood, especially in humans. Possibilities include direct effects on myocytes and endothelial cells, reduced intracellular Ca2+ levels, increased release of apoptogenic factors, as well as increased collagen crosslinks between myocytes. New data relating AS use to cardiovascular health risks are emerging, as novel technologies are developed (especially in non-invasive imaging) that can assess physiological structure and function. Continued efforts to fully document the cardiovascular health consequences of AS use is important to

  15. Doping in sport and exercise: anabolic, ergogenic, health and clinical issues.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen R; Goebel, Catrin; Burke, Louise M; Greaves, Ronda F

    2016-03-01

    The use of doping agents is evident within competitive sport in senior and junior age groups, where they are taken by non-elite as well as elite participants. They are also taken in non-sporting contexts by individuals seeking to 'improve' their physique through an increase in muscle and/or decrease in fat mass. While attaining accurate data on the prevalence of their use has limitations, studies suggest the illicit use of doping agents by athletes and non-athletes may be 1-5% in the population and greater than 50% in some groups; with the prevalence being higher in males. There is conclusive evidence that some doping agents are anabolic and ergogenic. There is also evidence that the use of doping agents such as anabolic androgenic steroids, growth hormone and other anabolic agents, erythropoietin and stimulants conveys considerable health risks that include, but are not limited to: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, mental health issues, virilisation in females and the suppression of naturally produced androgens in males. This review will outline the anabolic, ergogenic and health impacts of selected doping agents and methods that may be used in both the sporting and physique development contexts. It also provides a brief tabulated overview of the history of doping and how doping agents may impact upon the analyses of clinical samples.

  16. Metabolic Response to Injury and Role of Anabolic Hormones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    article is prohibited. substrate cycle exists when opposing, nonequilibirum reactions catalyzed by different enzymes are operating simultaneously, with at...least one of the reactions invol- ving the hydrolysis of ATP. Thus, a substrate cycle both liberates heat and increases energy expenditure without any...beneficial effect. In severe burns, the total rates of triglyceride –fatty acid and glycolytic–gluconeogenic cycling without effective product were 450

  17. Anabolic steroids: implications for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Duncan, D J; Shaw, E B

    1985-12-01

    Anabolic steroids are being used by athletes in a wide variety of sports in efforts to enhance their athletic performances. Steroid abuse is complex to evaluate due to the highly emotional subject matter and the limitations in researching anabolic steroids. This article has been written to heighten the practitioner's awareness of the problem of "sports doping" with anabolic steroids. It will provide practical information on possible consequences of steroid use and outline essential information to obtain through the history, physical exam and laboratory studies. Intervention strategies based on the three levels of prevention are described. With awareness of the problem of sports doping and knowledge of how to deal with it in primary care, the nurse practitioner can enhance the health care provided to aspiring athletes, athletes and retired athletes.

  18. Review of Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Use

    SciTech Connect

    T. Borges; G. Eisele; C. Byrd

    2001-07-31

    An area that has been overlooked within personnel security evaluations is employee use of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). Current drug testing within the federal government does not include testing for anabolic steroids, and the difficulties to implement such testing protocols-not to mention the cost involved-make AAS testing highly improbable. The basis of this report is to bring to the forefront the damage that anabolic steroids can cause from both a physical and a psychological standpoint. Most individuals who use AASs do so to increase their muscle mass because they wish to gain some type of competitive edge during athletic competition or they wish to enhance their physical features for self-satisfaction and self-esteem (i.e., body building). Security officers are one group of men who often take high doses of anabolic steroids, according to the Second Report of the Senate Standing Committee (1990). The negative psychological characteristics for AAS use is extensive and includes prominent hostility, aggressiveness, irritability, euphoria, grandiose beliefs, hyperactivity, reckless behavior, increased sexual appetite, unpredictability, poor impulse control, mood fluctuations, and insomnia. The drug may invoke a sense of power and invincibility (Leckman and Scahill, 1990). Depressive symptoms, such as anhedonia, fatigue, impaired concentration, decreased libido, and even suicidality (Pope and Katz, 1992) have been noted with steroid withdrawal. It appears that long-term users of AAS experience similar characteristics as other substance abusers (i.e., craving, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms).

  19. Anabolic androgenic steroid-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sella, Gianluigi; Bellanti, Giancarlo; Margheri, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse, aimed at increasing muscle mass, has been growing in recent years. We describe a case of a 25-year-old bodybuilder who, after taking nandrolone and stanozolol, presented with Takotsubo syndrome. The angiography showed a normal coronary anatomy with the absence of stenosis. The left ventricular function was completely normalised after 1 week. PMID:25804946

  20. Preventing Anabolic Steroid Use: Guidelines and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June; Rauhe, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Information about anabolic steroids should be included in the school health curriculum as early as possible. The paper presents suggestions for planning education programs and offers a variety of activities and strategies appropriate for many age groups, including case studies, story completion, posters, demonstrations, projects, creative writing,…

  1. Androgenic anabolic steroids also impair right ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Oflaz, Huseyin; Umman, Berrin; Bugra, Zehra

    2009-05-01

    Chronic anabolic steroid use suppresses left ventricular functions. However, there is no information regarding the chronic effects of anabolic steroids on right ventricular function which also plays a key role in global cardiac function. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of androgenic anabolic steroids usage among athletes on remodeling the right part of the heart. Androgenic-anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders had smaller diastolic velocities of both ventricles than drug-free bodybuilders and sedentary counterparts. This study shows that androgenic anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders exhibited depressed diastolic functions of both ventricles.

  2. Biochemistry and physiology of anabolic androgenic steroids doping.

    PubMed

    Lippi, G; Franchini, M; Banfi, G

    2011-05-01

    Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AASs) are chemical and pharmacological derivatives of the male hormone testosterone which are widely used for increasing burst and sprinting activities in sports. Although AASs are thought to be transversal to the plurality of sports disciplines, they are principally misused by bodybuilders, weightlifters, shot, hammer, discus or javelin throwers, rugby and American football players as well as by swimmers and runners. AAS exert a kaleidoscope of effects on human biology, principally through the 5-α-reductase-mediated conversion into dihydrotestosterone, the aromatase-mediated conversion into female sex hormones, a competitive antagonism to the glucocorticoid receptors, the potential stimulation of erythropoietin secretion as well as psychoactive effects on the brain. The influence of AASs on physical performance is still undefined, since the large number of studies published so far have described discordant and often contradictory outcomes. Nevertheless, animal and human investigations support the hypothesis that the administration of AASs might increase lean body mass, muscle mass, and maximal voluntary strength especially in men, so that they would represent an appealing form of doping for increasing power capacity, sustaining intensive training periods and, last but not least, as a cosmetic muscle makeover. The aim of this article is to review the biochemistry, physiology and the ergogenic effects of AASs.

  3. Bone anabolic effects of S-40503, a novel nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM), in rat models of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Keigo; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Nejishima, Hiroaki; Ichikawa, Kiyonoshin; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Miyakawa, Motonori; Amano, Seiji; Sumita, Yuji; Oguro, Nao

    2003-11-01

    A novel nonsteroidal androgen receptor (AR) binder, S-40503, was successfully generated in order to develop selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). We evaluated the binding specificity for nuclear receptors (NRs) and osteoanabolic activities of S-40503 in comparison with a natural nonaromatizable steroid, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The compound preferentially bound to AR with nanomolar affinity among NRs. When S-40503 was administrated into orchiectomized (ORX) rats for 4 weeks, bone mineral density (BMD) of femur and muscle weight of levator ani were increased as markedly as DHT, but prostate weight was not elevated over the normal at any doses tested. In contrast, DHT administration caused about 1.5-fold increase in prostate weight. The reduced virilizing activity was clearly evident from the result that 4-week treatment of normal rats with S-40503 showed no enlargement of prostate. To confirm the bone anabolic effect, S-40503 was given to ovariectomized (OVX) rats for 2 months. The compound significantly increased the BMD and biomechanical strength of femoral cortical bone, whereas estrogen, anti-bone resorptive hormone, did not. The increase in periosteal mineral apposition rate (MAR) of the femur revealed direct bone formation activity of S-40503. It was unlikely that the osteoanabolic effect of the compound was attribute to the enhancement of muscle mass, because immobilized ORX rats treated with S-40503 showed a marked increase in BMD of tibial cortical bone without any actions on the surrounding muscle tissue. Collectively, our novel compound served as a prototype for SARMs, which had unique tissue selectivity with high potency for bone formation and lower impact upon sex accessory tissues.

  4. Growth Hormone and Craniofacial Tissues. An update

    PubMed Central

    Litsas, George

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone is an important regulator of bone homeostasis. In childhood, it determines the longitudinal bone growth, skeletal maturation, and acquisition of bone mass. In adulthood, it is necessary to maintain bone mass throughout life. Although an association between craniofacial and somatic development has been clearly established, craniofacial growth involves complex interactions of genes, hormones and environment. Moreover, as an anabolic hormone seems to have an important role in the regulation of bone remodeling, muscle enhancement and tooth development. In this paper the influence of growth hormone on oral tissues is reviewed. PMID:25674165

  5. Cross-reactivity of steroid hormone immunoassays: clinical significance and two-dimensional molecular similarity prediction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunoassays are widely used in clinical laboratories for measurement of plasma/serum concentrations of steroid hormones such as cortisol and testosterone. Immunoassays can be performed on a variety of standard clinical chemistry analyzers, thus allowing even small clinical laboratories to do analysis on-site. One limitation of steroid hormone immunoassays is interference caused by compounds with structural similarity to the target steroid of the assay. Interfering molecules include structurally related endogenous compounds and their metabolites as well as drugs such as anabolic steroids and synthetic glucocorticoids. Methods Cross-reactivity of a structurally diverse set of compounds were determined for the Roche Diagnostics Elecsys assays for cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate, estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone. These data were compared and contrasted to package insert data and published cross-reactivity studies for other marketed steroid hormone immunoassays. Cross-reactivity was computationally predicted using the technique of two-dimensional molecular similarity. Results The Roche Elecsys Cortisol and Testosterone II assays showed a wider range of cross-reactivity than the DHEA sulfate, Estradiol II, and Progesterone II assays. 6-Methylprednisolone and prednisolone showed high cross-reactivity for the cortisol assay, with high likelihood of clinically significant effect for patients administered these drugs. In addition, 21-deoxycortisol likely produces clinically relevant cross-reactivity for cortisol in patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, while 11-deoxycortisol may produce clinically relevant cross-reactivity in 11β-hydroxylase deficiency or following metyrapone challenge. Several anabolic steroids may produce clinically significant false positives on the testosterone assay, although interpretation is limited by sparse pharmacokinetic data for some of these drugs. Norethindrone therapy may impact immunoassay measurement

  6. Multiple hormonal dysregulation as determinant of low physical performance and mobility in older persons.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; De Vita, Francesca; Basaria, Shehzad; Lippi, Giuseppe; Butto, Valeria; Luci, Michele; Cattabiani, Chiara; Ceresini, Graziano; Verzicco, Ignazio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Mobility-disability is a common condition in older individuals. Many factors, including the age-related hormonal dysregulation, may concur to the development of disability in the elderly. In fact, during the aging process it is observed an imbalance between anabolic hormones that decrease (testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), estradiol, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and Vitamin D) and catabolic hormones (cortisol, thyroid hormones) that increase. We start this review focusing on the mechanisms by which anabolic and catabolic hormones may affect physical performance and mobility. To address the role of the hormonal dysregulation to mobility-disability, we start to discuss the contribution of the single hormonal derangement. The studies used in this review were selected according to the period of time of publication, ranging from 2002 to 2013, and the age of the participants (≥65 years). We devoted particular attention to the effects of anabolic hormones (DHEAS, testosterone, estradiol, Vitamin D and IGF-1) on both skeletal muscle mass and strength, as well as other objective indicators of physical performance. We also analyzed the reasons beyond the inconclusive data coming from RCTs using sex hormones, thyroid hormones, and vitamin D (dosage, duration of treatment, baseline hormonal values and reached hormonal levels). We finally hypothesized that the parallel decline of anabolic hormones has a higher impact than a single hormonal derangement on adverse mobility outcomes in older population. Given the multifactorial origin of low mobility, we underlined the need of future synergistic optional treatments (micronutrients and exercise) to improve the effectiveness of hormonal treatment and to safely ameliorate the anabolic hormonal status and mobility in older individuals.

  7. Multiple Hormonal Dysregulation as Determinant of Low Physical Performance and Mobility in Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; De Vita, Francesca; Basaria, Shehzad; Lippi, Giuseppe; Buttò, Valeria; Luci, Michele; Cattabiani, Chiara; Ceresini, Graziano; Verzicco, Ignazio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Mobility-disability is a common condition in older individuals. Many factors, including the age-related hormonal dysregulation, may concur to the development of disability in the elderly. In fact, during the aging process it is observed an imbalance between anabolic hormones that decrease (testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), estradiol, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and Vitamin D) and catabolic hormones (cortisol, thyroid hormones) that increase. We start this review focusing on the mechanisms by which anabolic and catabolic hormones may affect physical performance and mobility. To address the role of the hormonal dysregulation to mobility-disability, we start to discuss the contribution of the single hormonal derangement. The studies used in this review were selected according to the period of time of publication, ranging from 2002 to 2013, and the age of the participants (≥65 years). We devoted particular attention to the effects of anabolic hormones (DHEAS, testosterone, estradiol, Vitamin D and IGF-1) on both skeletal muscle mass and strength, as well as other objective indicators of physical performance. We also analyzed the reasons beyond the inconclusive data coming from RCTs using sex hormones, thyroid hormones, and vitamin D (dosage, duration of treatment, baseline hormonal values and reached hormonal levels). We finally hypothesized that the parallel decline of anabolic hormones has a higher impact than a single hormonal derangement on adverse mobility outcomes in older population. Given the multifactorial origin of low mobility, we underlined the need of future synergistic optional treatments (micronutrients and exercise) to improve the effectiveness of hormonal treatment and to safely ameliorate the anabolic hormonal status and mobility in older individuals. PMID:24050169

  8. When color fails: illicit blue tablets containing anabolic androgen steroids.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Donata; Castagna, Franca; Maietti, Sergio; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2013-09-01

    The necessity of specific, confirmatory tests in the identification of seized illicit products was highlighted by the analysis of eighteen heart shaped, blue tablets confiscated by Police at a street control in the North East of Italy. The tablets responded as amphetamines to a preliminary color test (Marquis); a subsequent, confirmatory assay by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of two anabolic androgen steroids (AAS), methandienone and methyltestosterone, in concentration of 1.7 and 1.5mg respectively per tablet; no trace of amphetamine-like or nitrogen containing compounds was found. The observed orange coloration was due to the reaction of concentrated sulphuric acid, contained in the Marquis reagent, with the Δ(4) C-3 keto group of steroids. The two AAS, banned under the world antidoping code, are not considered as psychoactive drugs of abuse in most countries, although their trafficking may entangle severe public health concerns.

  9. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy(a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a doctor’s instructions). ... that bioidentical hormones, whether prepared by a compounding pharmacy or pharmaceutical company, are safer to use than ...

  10. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy (a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a doctor’s instructions). ... that bioidentical hormones, whether prepared by a compounding pharmacy or pharmaceutical company, are safer to use than ...

  11. Standardization of hormone determinations.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2013-12-01

    Standardization of hormone determinations is important because it simplifies interpretation of results and facilitates the use of common reference values for different assays. Progress in standardization has been achieved through the introduction of more homogeneous hormone standards for peptide and protein hormones. However, many automated methods for determinations of steroid hormones do not provide satisfactory result. Isotope dilution-mass spectrometry (ID-MS) has been used to establish reference methods for steroid hormone determinations and is now increasingly used for routine determinations of steroids and other low molecular weight compounds. Reference methods for protein hormones based on MS are being developed and these promise to improve standardization.

  12. Anabolic steroids abuse and male infertility.

    PubMed

    El Osta, Rabih; Almont, Thierry; Diligent, Catherine; Hubert, Nicolas; Eschwège, Pascal; Hubert, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, testosterone and its synthetic derivatives have been used with anabolic and androgenic purposes. These substances were first restricted to professional bodybuilders, but become more and more popular among recreational athletes. Up to date, 3,000,000 anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users have been reported in the United States with an increasing prevalence, making AAS consumption a major public health growing concern. Infertility is defined by the WHO as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse and a male factor is present in up to 50 % of all infertile couples. Several conditions may be related to male infertility. Substance abuse, including AAS, is commonly associated to transient or persistent impairment on male reproductive function, through different pathways. Herein, a brief overview on AAS is offered. Steroids biochemistry, patterns of use, physiological and clinical issues are enlightened. A further review about fertility outcomes among male AAS abusers is also presented, including the classic reports on transient anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH), and the more recent experimental reports on structural and genetic sperm damage.

  13. Anabolic and androgenic activities of Bulbine natalensis stem in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Yakubu, Musa T; Afolayan, Anthony J

    2010-05-01

    Aqueous extract of Bulbine natalensis Baker (Asphodelaceae) stem at 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight was investigated for anabolic and androgenic effects in male Wistar rats. Sixty male rats were grouped into four (A-D) consisting of 15 each. Group A (control) was orally treated with 0.5 mL of distilled water for 14 days while groups B, C and D were treated like the control except they received 0.5 mL containing 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of the extract respectively. All the doses of the extract increased (P <0.05) the testicular-body weight ratio as well as alkaline phosphatase activity, glycogen, sialic acid, protein, and cholesterol content of the testes except the single administration of 100 mg/kg body weight which compared well (P>0.05) with the controls for glycogen and cholesterol. The testicular and serum testosterone concentration were increased except in the 100 mg/kg body weight where the effect on the tissue and serum hormone did not manifest until after the first and seven daily doses respectively. Testicular acid phosphatase activity, serum follicle stimulating and luteinizing hormone concentrations also increased at all the doses except in the 100 mg/kg body weight where the effect on the enzyme and the hormone did not manifest until after seven days. The increases were most pronounced in the 50 mg/kg body weight extract treated animals. The results indicate anabolic and androgenic activities of Bulbine natalensis stem in male rat testes with the 50 mg/kg body weight of the extract exhibiting the highest anabolizing and androgenic activities. These activities further support the folkloric use of the plant most especially at 50 mg/kg body weight in the management of male sexual dysfunction in South Africa.

  14. Weight-of-evidence analysis of human exposures to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds and associations with thyroid hormone levels during early development.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Julie E; Kerper, Laura E; Boyce, Catherine Petito; Prueitt, Robyn L; Rhomberg, Lorenz R

    2010-10-01

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the proper development of brain function and cell growth. Several epidemiological studies have been conducted to assess potential associations between pre- and post-natal exposure to dioxins or dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and the levels of circulating thyroid hormones during early development. Dioxins and DLCs include chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, chlorinated dibenzofurans, and mono- and non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). We identified a total of 23 relevant epidemiological studies (21 cohort studies and 1 case-control study) that measured exposures to various types of dioxins and DLCs as well as markers of thyroid function, such as thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), total thyroxine (T4), free T4, total triiodothyroxine (T3), free T3, and thyroid-binding globulin concentrations in cord blood or circulation. While some of the studies reported associations between concentrations of dioxins and/or DLCs and some biomarkers of thyroid function, the majority of the observed associations were not statistically significant. Moreover, there were no clear and consistent effects across studies for any of the hormone levels examined, and while a number of studies showed a statistically significant association with exposure for a given marker of thyroid function, other studies showed either no change or changes in the opposite direction for the same thyroid function marker. Similarly, when the results were analyzed considering developmental stage, there generally were no clear and consistent effects at any age from birth through 12 years of age. The absence of a clear correlation between background exposures to dioxins and DLCs and thyroid function biomarkers during development is not consistent with the hypothesis that background exposures to these chemicals cause effects on thyroid function during development.

  15. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  16. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  17. [Effect of anabolic steroid on immune response].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, H; Kobayashi, M; Konosu, H; Kurioka, H; Naito, K; Sonoyama, T; Nishimoto, T; Hashimoto, I

    1984-03-01

    Using lymphocyte, monocyte and eosinophil counts of the peripheral blood, PHA-blastoid transformation, immunoglobulin and beta 2-microglobulin, the influence of anabolic steroid on the immune reactivity of the host was dissected by administration of Deca-Durabolin ( nandrolone decanoate) to both tumor-bearing host and tumor-free host after operation for alimentary tract. The number of peripheral lymphocytes and monocytes, the PHA-blastoid transformation of peripheral lymphocytes and the IgG level were increased, and the beta 2-microglobulin level showed the tendency of decrease after the administration of Deca-Durabolin.

  18. [Rhabdomyolysis in a bodybuilder using anabolic steroids].

    PubMed

    Hageloch, W; Appell, H J; Weicker, H

    1988-09-01

    The clinical course and the laboratory findings of a massive rhabdomyolysis in a male bodybuilder is presented. Particularly spectacular are the light- and electron-microscopical pictures of the histological findings. The acute renal failure as the most important and major life-threatening complication of the rhabdomyolysis is considered and the successful therapeutic procedure is described. The probability of a causal relation between anabolic steroids and rhabdomyolysis is discussed as well as the resulting consequences for the care of athletes in sports medicine.

  19. Acute myocardial infarction in a young man using anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Wysoczanski, Mariusz; Rachko, Maurice; Bergmann, Steven R

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids are used worldwide to help athletes gain muscle mass and strength. Their use and abuse is associated with numerous side effects, including acute myocardial infarction (MI). We report a case of MI in a young 31-year-old bodybuilder. Because of the serious cardiovascular complications of anabolic steroids, physicians should be aware of their abuse and consequences.

  20. Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, Akitoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Nagasako, Naoyuki; Asahi, Ryoji

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Cu-based chalcogenides such as Cu3SbSe4, Cu2Se, and Cu2SnSe3 have attracted much attention because of their high thermoelectric performance and their common feature of very low thermal conductivity. However, for practical use, materials without toxic elements such as selenium are preferable. In this paper, we report Se-free Cu3SbS4 thermoelectric material and improvement of its figure of merit ( ZT) by chemical substitutions. Substitutions of 3 at.% Ag for Cu and 2 at.% Ge for Sb lead to significant reductions in the thermal conductivity by 37% and 22%, respectively. These substitutions do not sacrifice the power factor, thus resulting in enhancement of the ZT value. The sensitivity of the thermal conductivity to chemical substitutions in these compounds is discussed in terms of the calculated phonon dispersion and previously proposed models for Cu-based chalcogenides. To improve the power factor, we optimize the hole carrier concentration by substitution of Ge for Sb, achieving a power factor of 16 μW/cm K2 at 573 K, which is better than the best reported for Se-based Cu3SbSe4 compounds.

  1. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  2. Chemometric and chemoinformatic analyses of anabolic and androgenic activities of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone analogues.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ginarte, Yoanna María; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Noheda-Marin, Pedro; Garcia de la Vega, Jose Manuel; Montero-Cabrera, Luis Alberto; Ruiz García, José Alberto; Caldera-Luzardo, José A; Alvarado, Ysaias J

    2008-06-15

    activities and high values of eta produce unfavorable effects. The found MDs can also be efficiently used in similarity studies based on cluster analysis. Our model for the anabolic/androgenic ratio (expressed by weight of levator ani muscle, LA, and seminal vesicle, SV, in mice) predicts that the 2-aminomethylene-17alpha-methyl-17beta-hydroxy-5alpha-androstan-3-one (43) compound is the most potent anabolic steroid, and the 17alpha-methyl-2beta,17beta-dihydroxy-5alpha-androstane (31) compound is the least potent one of this series. The approach described in this report is an alternative for the discovery and optimization of leading anabolic compounds among steroids and analogues. It also gives an important role to electron exchange terms of molecular interactions to this kind of steroid activity.

  3. Residue profiles of organohalogen compounds in human serum from e-waste recycling sites in North Vietnam: Association with thyroid hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Akifumi; Nomiyama, Kei; Minh Tue, Nguyen; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Hung Viet, Pham; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrated the contamination levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs), hydroxylated PBDEs (OH-PBDEs), and bromophenols (BPhs), and their relationships with thyroid hormones (THs), in the serum of human donors from an e-waste recycling site and a rural site in Hung Yen province, Vietnam. Occupationally related exposure was indicated by significantly higher residue levels of PCBs, OH-PCBs, PBDEs, and BPhs in the serum of donors from the e-waste recycling site (median: 420, 160, 290, and 300pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively) than those in the serum of donors from the rural site (median: 290, 82, 230, and 200pgg(-)(1) wet wt, respectively). On the other hand, levels of OH-/MeO-PBDEs were significantly higher in serum of donors from the reference site (median: 160 and 20pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively) than in those from the e-waste recycling site (median: 43 and 0.52pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively). In addition, we implemented stepwise generalized linear models to assess the association between the levels of TH and PCBs, PBDEs, and their related compounds. In females, we found positive associations of PCBs and OH-PCB concentrations with total thyroxine, free thyroxine, total triiodothyronine, and free triiodothyronine, and a negative association with thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations.

  4. The effects of compounded bioidentical transdermal hormone therapy on hemostatic, inflammatory, immune factors; cardiovascular biomarkers; quality-of-life measures; and health outcomes in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kenna; Neuenschwander, Pierre F; Kurdowska, Anna K

    2013-01-01

    Menopause impacts 25 million women world wide each year, and the World Health Organization estimates 1.2 billion women will be postmenopausal by 2030. Menopause has been associated with symptoms of hot flashes, night sweats, dysphoric mood, sleep disturbance, and conditions of cardiovascular disease, depression, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, depression, dementia, and frailty. Conventional hormone replacement therapy results in increased thrombotic events, and an increased risk of breast cancer and dementia as evidenced in large prospective clinical trials including Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study I and the Women's Health Initiative. A possible mechanism for these adverse events is the unfavorable net effects of conjugated equine estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate on the hemostatic balance and inflammatory and immune factors. Physiologic sex steroid therapy with transdermal delivery for peri/postmenopausal women may offer a different risk/benefit profile, yet long-term studies of this treatment model are lacking. The objective of this study was to examine the long-term effects of compounded bioidentical transdermal sex steroid therapy including estriol, estradiol, progesterone, DHEA, and testosterone on cardiovascular biomarkers, hemostatic, inflammatory, immune signaling factors; quality-of-life measures; and health outcomes in peri/postmenopausal women within the context of a hormone restoration model of care. A prospective, cohort, closed-label study received approval from the Human Subjects Committee. Recruitment from outpatient clinics at an academic medical center and the community at large resulted in three hundred women giving signed consent. Seventy-five women who met strict inclusion/exclusion criteria were enrolled. Baseline hormone evaluation was performed along with baseline experimental measures. Following this, women received compounded transdermal bioidentical hormone therapy of BiEst (80%Estriol/20%Estradiol), and

  5. Update on clinical trials of growth factors and anabolic steroids in cachexia and wasting.

    PubMed

    Gullett, Norleena P; Hebbar, Gautam; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2010-04-01

    This article and others that focused on the clinical features, mechanisms, and epidemiology of skeletal muscle loss and wasting in chronic diseases, which include chronic kidney disease, cancer, and AIDS, were presented at a symposium entitled "Cachexia and Wasting: Recent Breakthroughs in Understanding and Opportunities for Intervention," held at Experimental Biology 2009. The clinical and anabolic efficacy of specific growth factors and anabolic steroids (eg, growth hormone, testosterone, megestrol acetate) in malnutrition and other catabolic states has been the subject of considerable research during the past several decades. Research on the effects of these agents in cachexia or wasting conditions, characterized by progressive loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, focused on patients with AIDS in the early 1990s, when the devastating effects of the loss of body weight, lean body mass, and adipose tissue were recognized as contributors to these patients' mortality. These same agents have also been studied as methods to attenuate the catabolic responses observed in cancer-induced cachexia and in wasting induced by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, renal failure, and other conditions. This article provides an updated review of recent clinical trials that specifically examined the potential therapeutic roles of growth hormone, testosterone, oxandrolone, and megestrol acetate and emerging data on the orexigenic peptide ghrelin, in human cachexia and wasting.

  6. The anabolic effects of insulin on type II collagen synthesis of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bembenek, M.E.; Liberti, J.P.

    1984-08-15

    The anabolic effects of insulin on collagen production of freshly isolated Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes were investigated. The specific radioactivity of newly synthesized collagen was not increased by insulin, indicating that the hormone has no effect on the specific radioactivity of the aminoacyl tRNA pool. Results of further studies obtained from collagen degradation experiments demonstrated that insulin did not alter the rate of (3H)collagen degradation. Together, these results clearly indicate that insulin stimulates collagen biosynthesis. Polyacrylamide gel analysis of the newly synthesized collagen of both control and insulin-stimulated cells revealed a large-molecular-weight component which migrated with authentic alpha 1(II) collagen and was collagenase-sensitive. Additional studies showed that, although insulin increased the processing and secretion of collagen, the hormone did not cause a shift in the distribution of the extracellular and intracellular collagen pools. Finally, results of studies conducted with the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D, indicated that the anabolic effects of insulin on collagen and non-collagen proteins were mediated at a post-transcriptional site.

  7. Restoration of anabolic deficit and muscle glycogen consumption in competitive orienteering.

    PubMed

    Johansson, C; Tsai, L; Hultman, E; Tegelman, R; Pousette, A

    1990-06-01

    Consumption and restoration of muscle glycogen and changes in anabolic and catabolic steroid hormones were analyzed in five male elite orienteers during and after an orienteering competition. The magnitude of glycogen consumption and pronounced increase in serum-cortisol during the orienteering race reflect the great muscular output demands during forest running. The free testosterone/cortisol ratio was normalized to the initial level within four hours post-exercise. Synchronously, only 25% of the muscle glycogen loss was restored. Within 24 hours post-exercise all runners showed normalized levels of testosterone, cortisol and free testosterone/cortisol ratio. The glycogen content was also restored except in one of the runners. We conclude that daily orienteering competitions per se do not seem to create risks for developing a state of hormonal imbalance or significant decrease in glycogen when the carbohydrate supply is appropriate.

  8. The gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-like molecule in prosobranch Patella caerulea: potential biomarker of endocrine-disrupting compounds in marine environments.

    PubMed

    De Lisa, Emilia; Carella, Francesca; De Vico, Gionata; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2013-02-01

    It has been reported that endocrine disrupter compounds (EDCs) interfere with the endocrine system, mimicking the action of sex steroid hormones in different species of mollusks. Prosobranchs are frequently used as a reliable bioindicator to evaluate EDC exposure. In this article, we evaluate the effects of the xenoestrogen 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) in the prosobranch gastropod Patella caerulea, which exhibits protandrous hermaphroditism as its reproductive strategy. We isolated a partial sequence of a GnRH-like molecule from the gonads of Patella caerulea. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous to that reported for the Lottia gigantea GnRH. Patella caerulea GnRH (pGnRH) mRNA expression is widespread in both male and female germ lines during gametogenesis. We suggest pGnRH as a novel biomarker for the early assessment of presence of EDCs and monitoring short and long-term impacts on Patella caerulea community structure.

  9. Modulation of steroidogenic gene expression and hormone production of H295R cells by pharmaceuticals and other environmentally active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gracia, Tannia Hilscherova, Klara; Jones, Paul D.; Newsted, John L.; Higley, Eric B.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hecker, Markus; Murphy, Margaret B.; Yu, Richard M.K.; Lam, Paul K.S.; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P.

    2007-12-01

    The H295R cell bioassay was used to evaluate the potential endocrine disrupting effects of 18 of the most commonly used pharmaceuticals in the United States. Exposures for 48 h with single pharmaceuticals and binary mixtures were conducted; the expression of five steroidogenic genes, 3{beta}HSD2, CYP11{beta}1, CYP11{beta}2, CYP17 and CYP19, was quantified by Q-RT-PCR. Production of the steroid hormones estradiol (E2), testosterone (T) and progesterone (P) was also evaluated. Antibiotics were shown to modulate gene expression and hormone production. Amoxicillin up-regulated the expression of CYP11{beta}2 and CYP19 by more than 2-fold and induced estradiol production up to almost 3-fold. Erythromycin significantly increased CYP11{beta}2 expression and the production of P and E2 by 3.5- and 2.4-fold, respectively, while production of T was significantly decreased. The {beta}-blocker salbutamol caused the greatest induction of CYP17, more than 13-fold, and significantly decreased E2 production. The binary mixture of cyproterone and salbutamol significantly down-regulated expression of CYP19, while a mixture of ethynylestradiol and trenbolone, increased E2 production 3.7-fold. Estradiol production was significantly affected by changes in concentrations of trenbolone, cyproterone, and ethynylestradiol. Exposures with individual pharmaceuticals showed the possible secondary effects that drugs may exert on steroid production. Results from binary mixture exposures suggested the possible type of interactions that may occur between drugs and the joint effects product of such interactions. Dose-response results indicated that although two chemicals may share a common mechanism of action the concentration effects observed may be significantly different.

  10. Changes in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol levels induced by intracerebroventricular injection of histamine and its related compounds in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, S; Kamei, C; Yoshida, T; Tasaka, K

    1993-08-01

    Changes in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels induced by intracerebroventricular injection of histamine (H(i)) were studied in dogs. Intracerebroventricular administration of Hi at doses of 5 and 10 micrograms/kg caused a significant increase in plasma ACTH, while more rapid and more marked increase in plasma cortisol was noticed after Hi injection at doses of 2-10 micrograms/kg. Similar results were obtained when 2-methylhistamine was injected; remarkable increases in both plasma ACTH and cortisol levels were observed at doses of 25 and 50 micrograms/kg. However, no such effect was elicited by 4-methylhistamine even at a dose of 50 micrograms/kg. The rate of plasma cortisol increase induced by either Hi or 2-methylhistamine was significantly faster than that of plasma ACTH. Simultaneous application of pyrilamine (intracerebroventricularly) with H(i) resulted in the significant inhibition of H(i)-induced hormone secretions, but in similar administration neither ACTH nor cortisol were affected by cimetidine. In hypophysectomized dogs, a significant increase in plasma cortisol level was also observed after H(i) injection at a dose of 5 micrograms/kg. Intravenous infusion of hexamethonium continued before and after H(i) injection failed to inhibit the increase in plasma ACTH and cortisol levels induced by H(i). From these findings, it can be concluded that intracerebroventricular injection of H(i) caused an increase in plasma ACTH and cortisol levels via H1-receptor, and it is suggested that to some extent, the cortisol release elicited by H(i) is certainly produced without participation of ACTH.

  11. Mechanical signals as anabolic agents in bone.

    PubMed

    Ozcivici, Engin; Luu, Yen Kim; Adler, Ben; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Janet; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clinton T

    2010-01-01

    Aging and a sedentary lifestyle conspire to reduce bone quantity and quality, decrease muscle mass and strength, and undermine postural stability, culminating in an elevated risk of skeletal fracture. Concurrently, a marked reduction in the available bone-marrow-derived population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) jeopardizes the regenerative potential that is critical to recovery from musculoskeletal injury and disease. A potential way to combat the deterioration involves harnessing the sensitivity of bone to mechanical signals, which is crucial in defining, maintaining and recovering bone mass. To effectively utilize mechanical signals in the clinic as a non-drug-based intervention for osteoporosis, it is essential to identify the components of the mechanical challenge that are critical to the anabolic process. Large, intense challenges to the skeleton are generally presumed to be the most osteogenic, but brief exposure to mechanical signals of high frequency and extremely low intensity, several orders of magnitude below those that arise during strenuous activity, have been shown to provide a significant anabolic stimulus to bone. Along with positively influencing osteoblast and osteocyte activity, these low-magnitude mechanical signals bias MSC differentiation towards osteoblastogenesis and away from adipogenesis. Mechanical targeting of the bone marrow stem-cell pool might, therefore, represent a novel, drug-free means of slowing the age-related decline of the musculoskeletal system.

  12. Mechanical signals as anabolic agents in bone

    PubMed Central

    Ozcivici, Engin; Luu, Yen Kim; Adler, Ben; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Janet; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clinton T.

    2013-01-01

    Aging and a sedentary lifestyle conspire to reduce bone quantity and quality, decrease muscle mass and strength, and undermine postural stability, culminating in an elevated risk of skeletal fracture. Concurrently, a marked reduction in the available bone-marrow-derived population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) jeopardizes the regenerative potential that is critical to recovery from musculoskeletal injury and disease. A potential way to combat the deterioration involves harnessing the sensitivity of bone to mechanical signals, which is crucial in defining, maintaining and recovering bone mass. To effectively utilize mechanical signals in the clinic as a non-drug-based intervention for osteoporosis, it is essential to identify the components of the mechanical challenge that are critical to the anabolic process. Large, intense challenges to the skeleton are generally presumed to be the most osteogenic, but brief exposure to mechanical signals of high frequency and extremely low intensity, several orders of magnitude below those that arise during strenuous activity, have been shown to provide a significant anabolic stimulus to bone. Along with positively influencing osteoblast and osteocyte activity, these low-magnitude mechanical signals bias MSC differentiation towards osteoblastogenesis and away from adipogenesis. Mechanical targeting of the bone marrow stem-cell pool might, therefore, represent a novel, drug-free means of slowing the age-related decline of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:20046206

  13. Evolution and Function of the NR1I Nuclear Hormone Receptor Subfamily (VDR, PXR, and CAR) with Respect to Metabolism of Xenobiotics and Endogenous Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Reschly, E.J.; Krasowski, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    The NR1I subfamily of nuclear hormone receptors includes the 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D3 receptor (VDR; NR1I1), pregnane X receptor (PXR; NR1I2), and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3). PXR and VDR are found in diverse vertebrates from fish to mammals while CAR is restricted to mammals. Current evidence suggests that the CAR gene arose from a duplication of an ancestral PXR gene, and that PXR and VDR arose from duplication of an ancestral gene, represented now by a single gene in the invertebrate Ciona intestinalis. Aside from the high-affinity effects of 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D3 on VDRs, the NR1I subfamily members are functionally united by the ability to bind potentially toxic endogenous compounds with low affinity and initiate changes in gene expression that lead to enhanced metabolism and elimination (e.g., induction of cytochrome P450 3A4 expression in humans). The detoxification role of VDR seems limited to sensing high concentrations of certain toxic bile salts, such as lithocholic acid, whereas PXR and CAR have the ability to recognize structurally diverse compounds. PXR and CAR show the highest degree of cross-species variation in the ligand-binding domain of the entire vertebrate nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, suggesting adaptation to species-specific ligands. This review examines the insights that phylogenetic and experimental studies provide into the function of VDR, PXR, and CAR, and how the functions of these receptors have expanded to evolutionary advantage in humans and other animals. PMID:16724925

  14. The current preference for the immuno-analytical ELISA method for quantitation of steroid hormones (endocrine disruptor compounds) in wastewater in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Manickum, Thavrin; John, Wilson

    2015-07-01

    requirements for steroid hormone quantitation. Further optimization of the sensitivity of the chemical-analytical LC-tandem mass spectrometry methods, especially for wastewater screening, in South Africa is required. Risk assessment studies showed that it was not practical to propose standards or allowable limits for the steroid estrogens E1, E2, EE2, and E3; the use of predicted-no-effect concentration values of the steroid estrogens appears to be appropriate for use in their risk assessment in relation to aquatic organisms. For raw water sources, drinking water, raw and treated wastewater, the use of bioassays, with trigger values, is a useful screening tool option to decide whether further examination of specific endocrine activity may be warranted, or whether concentrations of such activity are of low priority, with respect to health concerns in the human population. The achievement of improved quantitation limits for immuno-analytical methods, like ELISA, used for compound quantitation, and standardization of the method for measuring E2 equivalents (EEQs) used for biological activity (endocrine: e.g., estrogenic) are some areas for future EDC research.

  15. Effect-directed analysis to explore the polar bear exposome: identification of thyroid hormone disrupting compounds in plasma.

    PubMed

    Simon, Eszter; van Velzen, Martin; Brandsma, Sicco H; Lie, Elisabeth; Løken, Katharina; de Boer, Jacob; Bytingsvik, Jenny; Jenssen, Bjørn M; Aars, Jon; Hamers, Timo; Lamoree, Marja H

    2013-08-06

    Compounds with transthyretin (TTR)-binding potency in the blood plasma of polar bear cubs were identified with effect-directed analysis (EDA). This approach contributes to the understanding of the thyroid disrupting exposome of polar bears. The selection of these samples for in-depth EDA was based on the difference between the observed TTR-binding potency on the one hand and the calculated potency (based on known concentrations of TTR-binding compounds and their relative potencies) on the other. A library-based identification was applied to the liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-ToF-MS) data by screening for matches between compound lists and the LC-ToF-MS data regarding accurate mass and isotope pattern. Then, isotope cluster analysis (ICA) was applied to the LC-ToF-MS data allowing specific screening for halogen isotope patterns. The presence of linear and branched nonylphenol (NP) was observed for the first time in polar bears. Furthermore, the presence of one di- and two monohydroxylated octachlorinated biphenyls (octaCBs) was revealed in the extracts. Linear and branched NP, 4'-OH-CB201 and 4,4'-OH-CB202 could be successfully confirmed with respect to their retention time in the analytical system. In addition, branched NP, mono- and dihydroxylated-octaCBs showed TTR-binding potencies and could explain another 32 ± 2% of the total measured activities in the extracts.

  16. Analysis of anabolic steroids in hair: time courses in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Xiang, Ping; Yan, Hui; Shen, Baohua; Wang, Mengye

    2009-09-01

    Sensitive, specific, and reproducible methods for the quantitative determination of eight anabolic steroids in guinea pig hair have been developed using LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS. Methyltestosterone, stanozolol, methandienone, nandrolone, trenbolone, boldenone, methenolone and DHEA were administered intraperitoneally in guinea pigs. After the first injection, black hair segments were collected on shaved areas of skin. The analysis of these segments revealed the distribution of anabolic steroids in the guinea pig hair. The major components in hair are the parent anabolic steroids. The time courses of the concentrations of the steroids in hair (except methenolone, which does not deposit in hair) demonstrated that the peak concentrations were reached on days 2-4, except stanozolol, which peaked on day 10 after administration. The concentrations in hair appeared to be related to the physicochemical properties of the drug compound and to the dosage. These studies on the distribution of drugs in the hair shaft and on the time course of their concentration changes provide information relevant to the optimal time and method of collecting hair samples. Such studies also provide basic data that will be useful in the application of hair analysis in the control of doping and in the interpretation of results.

  17. Integration of ligand and structure-based virtual screening for identification of leading anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ginarte, Yoanna María; Montero-Cabrera, Luis Alberto; García-de la Vega, José Manuel; Bencomo-Martínez, Alberto; Pupo, Amaury; Agramonte-Delgado, Alina; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Ruiz-García, José Alberto; Mikosch, Hans

    2013-11-01

    Parallel ligand- and structure-based virtual screenings of 269 steroids with anabolic activity evaluated in vivo were performed. The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model expressed by selected descriptors as the octanol-water partition coefficient, the molar volume and the quantum mechanical calculated charge values on atoms C1, C2, C5, C9, C10, C14 and C17 of the steroid skeleton, expresses structural features of anabolic steroids (AS) contributing to the transport and steroid-receptor interaction. On the other hand, computational simulations of a candidate ligand binding to a receptor study (a "docking" procedure) predict the association of these AS with the human androgen receptor (AR). Fourteen compounds were identified as lead; the most potent was the 7α-methylestr-4-en-3, 17-dione. It was concluded that a good anabolic activity requires hydrogen bonding interactions between both Arg752 and Gln711 residues in the cycles A with O3 atom of the steroid and either Asn705 and Thr877 residues in the cycles D of steroid with O17 atom.

  18. Prevalence of Anabolic Steroid Use Among Illinois High School Students

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Leslye D.; Gaa, Gregory L.; Griffith, Edwin H.; Cahill, Bernard R.

    1994-01-01

    This study was conducted to quantify anabolic steroid use in Illinois, investigate student knowledge and perception of anabolic steroid use, and identify characteristics of the anabolic steroid user. We surveyed 3047 freshman and senior high school students from 38 high schools, randomly selected from three school enrollment sizes and five geographic locations, using a six-page anonymous questionnaire. Anabolic steroid use was reported by 58 (1.9%) of the participants, 44 of 1477 (3%) males and 14 of 1562 (0.9%) females. Thirty-four of 1679 (2%) freshman and 24 of 1366 (1.8%) seniors reported use. Anabolic steroids were used in all possible school enrollment sizes and geographic locations (matrix cells). Four (7%) of the users reported starting at age 10 or younger. A teacher/coach was reported as a primary source by 8 (14%) of the users, as well as identified by 11 (19%) of the users as the individual they knew using anabolic steroids. It appears that anabolic steroids are being introduced to students in elementary and junior high schools, and that teachers/coaches are actively involved in their use. PMID:16558283

  19. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  20. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  1. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  2. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  3. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  4. Anabolic actions of Notch on mature bone

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Ping, Yilin; Ma, Meng; Zhang, Demao; Liu, Connie; Zaidi, Samir; Gao, Song; Ji, Yaoting; Lou, Feng; Yu, Fanyuan; Lu, Ping; Stachnik, Agnes; Bai, Mingru; Wei, Chengguo; Zhang, Liaoran; Wang, Ke; Chen, Rong; New, Maria I.; Rowe, David W.; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Zaidi, Mone

    2016-01-01

    Notch controls skeletogenesis, but its role in the remodeling of adult bone remains conflicting. In mature mice, the skeleton can become osteopenic or osteosclerotic depending on the time point at which Notch is activated or inactivated. Using adult EGFP reporter mice, we find that Notch expression is localized to osteocytes embedded within bone matrix. Conditional activation of Notch signaling in osteocytes triggers profound bone formation, mainly due to increased mineralization, which rescues both age-associated and ovariectomy-induced bone loss and promotes bone healing following osteotomy. In parallel, mice rendered haploinsufficient in γ-secretase presenilin-1 (Psen1), which inhibits downstream Notch activation, display almost-absent terminal osteoblast differentiation. Consistent with this finding, pharmacologic or genetic disruption of Notch or its ligand Jagged1 inhibits mineralization. We suggest that stimulation of Notch signaling in osteocytes initiates a profound, therapeutically relevant, anabolic response. PMID:27036007

  5. Anabolic androgenic steroid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bond, Peter; Llewellyn, William; Van Mol, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused for decades by both professional and amateur athletes in order to improve physical performance or muscle mass. AAS abuse can cause adverse effects, among which are hepatotoxic effects. These effects include cholestatic icterus and possibly peliosis hepatis and hepatocellular carcinoma or adenoma. In particular, 17α-alkylated AAS appear to be hepatotoxic, whereas nonalkylated AAS appear not to be. The 17α-alkyl substitution retards hepatic metabolism of the AAS rendering it orally bioavailable. The mechanism responsible for the hepatotoxicity induced by 17α-alkylated AAS remains poorly understood. However, oxidative stress has been repeatedly shown to be associated with it. In this manuscript we present a hypothesis which describes a potential mechanism responsible for AAS-induced hepatotoxicity, based on several observations from the literature which suggest oxidative stress being a causal factor.

  6. [Control measures for anabolic androgenic steroid medicines].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Mourelle, Raquel; Carracedo-Martínez, Eduardo; Ces Gens, Eugenio; Cadórniga Valiño, Luis; Álvaro Esteban, Pilar; Pose Reino, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) can cause serious adverse effects when used without a therapeutic purpose. This article aims to show that the AAS are susceptible to being sold on the black market. We also aim to describe how certain limitations on the health inspection services of the Galician health service to pursue these illegal actions prompted a regulatory initiative demanding that additional actions be granted to community pharmacies when dispensing AAS. Four pharmacy inspections detected the diversion of a total of 3118 packages of AAS, which led to the opening of four disciplinary proceedings. In two of these, specialized police forces were called in as there was sufficient evidence of possible diversion to gymnasiums, resulting in a police operation called Operation Fitness.

  7. Anabolic androgenic steroids abuse and liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Neri, M; Bello, S; Bonsignore, A; Cantatore, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Fineschi, V

    2011-05-01

    In the athletes the wide use of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) cause series damage in various organs, in particular, analyzing the liver, elevation on the levels of liver enzymes, cholestatic jaundice, liver tumors, both benign and malignant, and peliosis hepatis are described. A prolonged AAS administration provokes an increase in the activities of liver lysosomal hydrolases and a decrease in some components of the microsomal drug-metabolizing system and in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes without modifying classical serum indicators of hepatic function. Liver is a key organ actively involved in numerous metabolic and detoxifying functions. As a consequence, it is continuously exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous oxidants that are by-products of many biochemical pathways and, in fact, it has been demonstrated that intracellular oxidant production is more active in liver than in tissues, like the increase of inflammatory cytokines, apoptosis and the inhibitors of apoptosis NF- κB and Heat Shock Proteins.

  8. [Research progresses of anabolic steroids analysis in doping control].

    PubMed

    Long, Yuanyuan; Wang, Dingzhong; Li, Ke'an; Liu, Feng

    2008-07-01

    Anabolic steroids, a kind of physiological active substance, are widely abused to improve athletic performance in human sports. They have been forbidden in sports by the International Olympic Committee since 1983. Since then, many researchers have been focusing their attentions on the establishment of reliable detection methods. In this paper, we review the research progresses of different analytical methods for anabolic steroids since 2002, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, immunoassay, electrochemistry analysis and mass spectrometry. The developing prospect of anabolic steroids analysis is also discussed.

  9. Hepatocellular carcinoma associated with recreational anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Gorayski, P; Thompson, C H; Subhash, H S; Thomas, A C

    2008-01-01

    A 35-year-old male bodybuilder was found to have a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) arising in a pre-existing hepatic adenoma following recreational anabolic steroid use. Given the widespread use of recreational anabolic steroids, another potentially life-threatening complication is highlighted in addition to the more commonly recognised hepatic adenoma. Malignant transformation to HCC from a pre-existing hepatic adenoma confirmed by immunohistochemical study has previously not been reported in athletes taking anabolic steroids. Further studies using screening programmes to identify high-risk individuals are recommended.

  10. Impact of anabolic androgenic steroids on adolescent males.

    PubMed

    Lumia, Augustus R; McGinnis, Marilyn Y

    2010-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) use increased dramatically among adolescent males. This review focuses on studies using animal models of AAS exposure during adolescence which is a hormonally sensitive developmental period. AAS exposure during this critical period has wide-ranging consequences, including increased dendritic spine density, altered brain serotonin levels and escalated aggression in response to physical provocation. Human data suggest that AAS induces indiscriminate and unprovoked aggression often described as "'roid rage". However, animal studies indicate that the behavioral impact of AAS is modulated by experiential and social contingencies, a perceived provocation, and the chemical composition of the AAS. The AAS, testosterone increases aggression in juvenile and adult male rats when physically provoked. In contrast, stanzolol, inhibits aggression in both juvenile and adult male rats, even when physically provoked. Nandrolone has minimal effects on aggression, unless preceded by attack training. Exposure to AAS during adolescence may have a host of unintended bio-behavioral consequences. Yet, the perception of harmlessness surrounds AAS use. The perception of harmlessness is promoted by the availability of AAS especially through internet pharmacies. The perception of acceptability is reflected in current cultural ethics that no longer condemn cheating to obtain personal achievement or success. A prevailing conviction is that although AAS are illegal they are not really bad. Reduction of the availability of AAS to adolescents requires ardent legislative and legal intervention. The problem of acceptability can be addressed by educating adolescents about the short-term and long-term effects of AAS on brain and behavior, to increase awareness of the potential consequences of AAS use that apply directly to them.

  11. Adverse health effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Opperhuizen, Antoon; Hartgens, Fred

    2010-06-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic drugs derived from testosterone. Illegally, these drugs are regularly self-administered by body builders and power lifters to enhance their sportive performance. Adverse side effects of AAS include sexual dysfunction, alterations of the cardiovascular system, psyche and behavior, and liver toxicity. However, severe side effects appear only following prolonged use of AAS at high dose and their occurrence is limited. Occasionally, AAS abuse may be linked to certain social and psychological traits of the user, like low self-esteem, low self-confidence, suffered hostility, childhood conduct disorder, and tendency to high-risk behavior. The overwhelming stereotype about AAS is that these compounds cause aggressive behavior in males. However, the underlying personality traits of a specific subgroup of the AAS abusers, who show aggression and hostility, may be relevant, as well. Use of AAS in combination with alcohol largely increases the risk of violence and aggression. The dependence liability of AAS is very low, and withdrawal effects are relatively mild. Based on the scores for acute and chronic adverse health effects, the prevalence of use, social harm and criminality, AAS were ranked among 19 illicit drugs as a group of drugs with a relatively low harm.

  12. Screening for anabolic steroids in urine of forensic cases using fully automated solid phase extraction and LC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Andersen, David W; Linnet, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    A screening method for 18 frequently measured exogenous anabolic steroids and the testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratio in forensic cases has been developed and validated. The method involves a fully automated sample preparation including enzyme treatment, addition of internal standards and solid phase extraction followed by analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) using electrospray ionization with adduct formation for two compounds. Urine samples from 580 forensic cases were analyzed to determine the T/E ratio and occurrence of exogenous anabolic steroids. Extraction recoveries ranged from 77 to 95%, matrix effects from 48 to 78%, overall process efficiencies from 40 to 54% and the lower limit of identification ranged from 2 to 40 ng/mL. In the 580 urine samples analyzed from routine forensic cases, 17 (2.9%) were found positive for one or more anabolic steroids. Only seven different steroids including testosterone were found in the material, suggesting that only a small number of common steroids are likely to occur in a forensic context. The steroids were often in high concentrations (>100 ng/mL), and a combination of steroids and/or other drugs of abuse were seen in the majority of cases. The method presented serves as a fast and automated screening procedure, proving the suitability of LC-MS-MS for analyzing anabolic steroids.

  13. High throughput identification and quantification of anabolic steroid esters by atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry for efficient screening of drug preparations.

    PubMed

    Doué, Mickael; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Gicquiau, Audrey; Pouponneau, Karinne; Monteau, Fabrice; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2014-06-17

    Recent developments in ambient mass spectrometry (AMS), such as atmospheric solids analysis probe (ASAP) mass spectrometry, open a whole new range of possibilities to screen for drug preparations. In this study, the potential of ASAP for the rapid identification and quantification of anabolic steroid esters has been evaluated. These compounds are known to be used both in human and in food producing animals to enhance performances and to improve the rate of growth, respectively. Using a triple quadrupole (QqQ) MS instrument, mechanism of ionization and fragmentation in both positive and negative mode were studied for a range of 21 selected steroid esters (based on testosterone, estradiol, nandrolone, and boldenone) which highlighted common neutral mass loss of 96.1, thus allowing rapid screening in minutes to reveal steroid ester presence with minimal sample preparation. Ester identification is further achieved through an efficient 2 min workflow on a QqQ MS instrument. Moreover, the use of isotope labeled internal standards permitted the quantification of the corresponding steroid esters in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode, for the first time in ASAP. This approach was successfully applied for characterization of oily commercial preparations. These results open new perspectives in hormone (and drug) rapid analysis by ASAP-MS in the near future.

  14. Multiple arterial thromboses associated with anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Neil Arthur; Abbas, Jonathan Raihan; Simms, Malcolm Harold

    2014-03-01

    The use of supraphysiological doses of anabolic androgenic steroids can have serious side effects. This article reports the case of a young man who suffered potentially life-threatening arterial thromboses following the use of these drugs.

  15. Analysis of anabolic steroids in the horse: development of a generic ELISA for the screening of 17alpha-alkyl anabolic steroid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, Natasha L; Sortais, Benoît; Smart, Corrine G; McKinney, Andrew R; Ridley, Damon D; Stenhouse, Allen M; Suann, Craig J; Munn, Kellie J; Sillence, Martin N; McLeod, Malcolm D

    2005-08-01

    Due to the potential for misuse of a wide range of anabolic steroids in horse racing, a screening test to detect multiple compounds, via a common class of metabolites, would be a valuable forensic tool. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to detect 17alpha-alkyl anabolic steroid metabolites in equine urine. 16beta-Hydroxymestanolone (16beta,17beta-dihydroxy-17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androstan-3-one) was synthesised in six steps from commercially available epiandrosterone (3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-androstan-17-one). Polyclonal antibodies were raised in sheep, employing mestanolone (17beta-hydroxy-17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androstan-3-one) or 16beta-hydroxymestanolone conjugated to human serum albumin, via a 3-carboxymethyloxime linker, as antigens. Antibody cross-reactivities were determined by assessing the ability of a library of 54 representative steroids to competitively bind the antibodies. Antibodies raised against 16beta-hydroxymestanolone showed excellent cross-reactivities for all of the 16beta,17beta-dihydroxy-17alpha-methyl steroids analysed and an ELISA has been developed to detect these steroid metabolites. Using this 16beta-hydroxymestanolone assay, urine samples from horses administered with stanozolol (17alpha-methyl-pyrazolo[4',3':2,3]-5alpha-androstan-17beta-ol), were analysed raw, following beta-glucuronidase hydrolysis, and following solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedures. The suppressed absorbances observed were consistent with detection of the metabolite 16beta-hydroxystanozolol. Positive screening results were confirmed by comparison with standard LCMS analyses. Antibodies raised against mestanolone were also used to develop an ELISA and this was used to detect metabolites retaining the parent D-ring structure following methandriol (17alpha-methylandrost-5-ene-3beta,17beta-diol) administration. The ELISA methods developed have application as primary screening tools for detection of new and known anabolic steroid metabolites.

  16. Detection of anabolic steroid abuse using a yeast transactivation system.

    PubMed

    Zierau, Oliver; Lehmann, Sylvi; Vollmer, Günter; Schänzer, Willhelm; Diel, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    The classical analytical method for detection of anabolic steroid abuse is gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, even molecules with a chemical structure typical for this class of substances, are sometimes not identified in routine screening by GC/MS when their precise chemical structure is still unknown. A supplementary approach to identify anabolic steroid abuse could be a structure-independent identification of anabolic steroids based on their biological activity. To test the suitability of such a system, we have analyzed the yeast androgen receptor (AR) reporter gene system to identify anabolic steroids in human urine samples. Analysis of different anabolic steroids dissolved in buffer demonstrated that the yeast reporter gene system is able to detect a variety of different anabolic steroids and their metabolites with high specificity, including the so-called 'designer steroid' tetrahydrogestrinone. In contrast, other non-androgenic steroids, like glucocordicoids, progestins, mineralocordicoids and estrogens had a low potency to stimulate transactivation. To test whether the system would also allow the detection of androgens in urine, experiments with spiked urine samples were performed. The androgen reporter gene in yeast responds very sensitive to 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), even at high urine concentrations. To examine whether the test system would also be able to detect anabolic steroids in the urine of anabolic steroid abusers, anonymous urine samples previously characterized by GCMS were analyzed with the reporter gene assay. Even when the concentration of the anabolic metabolites was comparatively low in some positive samples it was possible to identify the majority of positive samples by their biological activity. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the yeast reporter gene system detects anabolic steroids and corresponding metabolites with high sensitivity even in urine of anabolic steroid abusing athletes

  17. Medical Issues Associated with Anabolic Steroid Use: Are They Exaggerated?

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Jay R.; Ratamess, Nicholas A.

    2006-01-01

    For the past 50 years anabolic steroids have been at the forefront of the controversy surrounding performance enhancing drugs. For almost half of this time no attempt was made by sports governing bodies to control its use, and only recently have all of the major sports governing bodies in North America agreed to ban from competition and punish athletes who test positive for anabolic steroids. These punitive measures were developed with the primary concern for promotion of fair play and eliminating potential health risks associated with androgenic-anabolic steroids. Yet, controversy exists whether these testing programs deter anabolic steroid use. Although the scope of this paper does not focus on the effectiveness of testing, or the issue of fair play, it is of interest to understand why many athletes underestimate the health risks associated from these drugs. What creates further curiosity is the seemingly well-publicized health hazards that the medical community has depicted concerning anabolic steroidabuse. Is there something that the athletes know, or are they simply naïve regarding the dangers? The focus of this review is to provide a brief history of anabolic steroid use in North America, the prevalence of its use in both athletic and recreational populations and its efficacy. Primary discussion will focus on health issues associated with anabolic steroid use with an examination of the contrasting views held between the medical community and the athletes that are using these ergogenic drugs. Existing data suggest that in certain circumstances the medical risk associated with anabolic steroid use may have been somewhat exaggerated, possibly to dissuade use in athletes. Key Points For many years the scientific and medical communities depicted a lack of efficacy and serious adverse effects from anabolic steroid use. Clinical case studies continue to link anabolic steroid administration with myocardial infarct, suicide, and cancer, evidence to support a cause

  18. Medical issues associated with anabolic steroid use: are they exaggerated?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Ratamess, Nicholas A

    2006-01-01

    For the past 50 years anabolic steroids have been at the forefront of the controversy surrounding performance enhancing drugs. For almost half of this time no attempt was made by sports governing bodies to control its use, and only recently have all of the major sports governing bodies in North America agreed to ban from competition and punish athletes who test positive for anabolic steroids. These punitive measures were developed with the primary concern for promotion of fair play and eliminating potential health risks associated with androgenic-anabolic steroids. Yet, controversy exists whether these testing programs deter anabolic steroid use. Although the scope of this paper does not focus on the effectiveness of testing, or the issue of fair play, it is of interest to understand why many athletes underestimate the health risks associated from these drugs. What creates further curiosity is the seemingly well-publicized health hazards that the medical community has depicted concerning anabolic steroidabuse. Is there something that the athletes know, or are they simply naïve regarding the dangers? The focus of this review is to provide a brief history of anabolic steroid use in North America, the prevalence of its use in both athletic and recreational populations and its efficacy. Primary discussion will focus on health issues associated with anabolic steroid use with an examination of the contrasting views held between the medical community and the athletes that are using these ergogenic drugs. Existing data suggest that in certain circumstances the medical risk associated with anabolic steroid use may have been somewhat exaggerated, possibly to dissuade use in athletes. Key PointsFor many years the scientific and medical communities depicted a lack of efficacy and serious adverse effects from anabolic steroid use.Clinical case studies continue to link anabolic steroid administration with myocardial infarct, suicide, and cancer, evidence to support a cause and

  19. Prolonged Hypogonadism in Males Following Withdrawal from Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: an Underrecognized Problem

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Hudson, James I.; DeLuca, James; Isaacs, Stephanie; Baggish, Aaron; Weiner, Rory; Bhasin, Shalender; Pope, Harrison G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the frequency and severity of hypogonadal symptoms in male long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) misusers who have discontinued AAS use. Design Cross-sectional, naturalistic. Setting Outpatient facility. Participants Twenty-four male former long-term AAS users and 36 non-AAS-using weightlifters, recruited by advertisement in Massachusetts, USA. Five of the former users were currently receiving treatment with physiologic testosterone replacement, leaving 19 untreated users for the numerical comparisons below. Measurements The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, questions regarding history of AAS use, physical examination, serum hormone determinations, and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Findings Compared with the 36 non-AAS-using weightlifters, the 19 untreated former AAS users displayed significantly smaller testicular volumes (estimated difference [95% confidence interval (CI)]: 2.3 [0.1, 4.5] ml; p = 0.042) and lower serum testosterone levels (estimated difference: 131 [25, 227] dL; p = 0.009), with five users showing testosterone levels below 200 ng/dL despite abstinence from AAS for 3–26 months. Untreated former users also displayed significantly lower scores on the IIEF Sexual Desire subscale (estimated difference: 2.4 [1.3, 3.5] points on a 10-point scale; p < 0.001). In the overall group of 24 treated plus untreated former users, 7 (29%) had experienced major depressive episodes during AAS withdrawal; 4 of these had not experienced major depressive episodes at any other time. Two men (8%) had failed to regain normal libidinal or erectile function despite adequate replacement testosterone treatment. Conclusions Among long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid misusers, anabolic-androgenic steroid-withdrawal hypogonadism appears to be common, frequently prolonged, and associated with substantial morbidity. PMID:25598171

  20. [Anabolic steroids: damages, effect on performance, and on metabolism (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Keul, J; Deus, B; Kindermann, W

    1976-03-19

    10 normal persons (age: x=22 years) and 15 weight lifters (age: x=27 years) were studied before and three months after taking Nandrolone danoate (ND). Strength exercises, hear rate during ergometer work, physical working capacity and certain biochemical variables were measured in the experimental group, as well as in a controll group of 7 weight lifters. Six weight lifters in the experimental group who had been taking ND for at least 3 years were also studied to determine whether there were any deleterious effects on their health. In addition, 75 athletes who had been taking anabolic steroids were investigated to determine the possible effects. It was found that: 1. In spite of an 7% increase in performance, the maximal heart rate was not higher when the subjects took ND. During submaximal work loads the heart rate (p less than 0.025) and the blood lactate level (p less than 0.05) were lower. During physical work, there was essentially no effect of ND on glucose or total lipids in serum. 2. The results from the three-months study, from the weight lifters taking ND for 3 years, as well as from 26 of the 57 athletes who had been taking ND showed no evidence of a deleterious effect of ND (based on 26 biochemical measurements). It would appear, therefore, that the general suggestion of a detrimental effect of anabolic hormones is not justified. 3. Damages or functional disturbances were found in 31 athletes and 3 weight lifters of the experimental group after oral application of anabolic alkyl-steroids. After a period of time without alkyl-steroid administration, all investigated biochemical parameters returned to normal levels; thus it appears that the aforementioned pathological findings are reversible changes in liver function.

  1. Multidetection Of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Using Immunoarrays and Pattern Recognition Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, D.; Salvador, J. P.; Tort, N.; Centi, F.; Marco, M. P.; Marco, S.

    2009-05-01

    A first step towards the multidetection of anabolic androgenic steroids by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) has been performed in this study. This proposal combines an array of classical ELISA assays with different selectivities and multivariate data analysis techniques. Data has been analyzed by principal component analysis in conjunction with a k-nearest line classifier has been used. This proposal allows to detect simultaneously four different compounds in the range of concentration from 10-1.5 to 103 mM with a total rate of 90.6% of correct detection.

  2. Dying to be big: a review of anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, H M; Wright, D; Littlepage, B N

    1992-01-01

    Anabolic steroids use is commonly perceived to be the domain of the higher echelons of competitive athletes. However, a great deal of anabolic steroid use occurs in private gymnasia (non-local authority) among non-competitive recreational athletes. Our study has attempted to give an insight into the prevalence of the use of these drugs, the hazards associated with it, and the public health responses which we have adopted. PMID:1490220

  3. Protein Anabolic Resistance in Cancer: Does it really exist?

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Mariëlle P. K. J.; van der Meij, Barbara S.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Preventing unintentional weight and muscle loss is of crucial importance to maintain the condition and well-being of patients with cancer, improve treatment response and tolerance, and prolong survival. Anabolic resistance might explain why some cancer patients do not respond to nutritional intervention but does recent evidence actually support this? We will discuss recent literature that cast doubt on attenuated anabolic potential in cancer. Recent findings Although anabolic resistance was observed in the past, more recent studies have shown that advanced cancer patients have an anabolic potential after intake of high-quality proteins. Furthermore a consistent linear relationship is observed in cancer between (essential) amino acid availability from the diet and net protein gain. The studied cancer patients however were often characterized by a normal or obese body weight, following the trend in the general population, and mild systemic inflammation. Factors like recent chemotherapy, surgery or cachexia do not seem to attenuate the anabolic potential to feeding. Summary Cancer patients have a normal anabolic potential which relates to the amount of essential amino acids in the meal. It remains to be determined if this is also the case in weak cancer patients with a short life expectancy and high systemic inflammation. PMID:26560520

  4. Exposure to anabolic-androgenic steroids shortens life span of male mice.

    PubMed

    Bronson, F H; Matherne, C M

    1997-05-01

    Adult male laboratory mice were exposed for 6 months to a combination of four anabolic-androgenic steroids of the kinds and at the relative levels to which human athletes and body builders expose themselves. The four steroids included testosterone, two 17-alkylated steroids, and an ester, and they were given at doses that totaled either 5 or 20 times normal androgenic maintenance levels for mice. By the time the survivors were 20 months old (1 yr after the termination of steroid exposure), 52% of the mice given the high dose of steroids had died compared with 35% of the mice given the low dose and only 12% of the control mice given no exogenous hormones (P < 0.001). Autopsy of the steroid-treated mice typically revealed tumors in the liver or kidney, other kinds of damage to these two organs, broadly invase lymphosarcomas, or heart damage, and usually more than one of these conditions. It can be concluded that the life span of male mice is decreased dramatically by exposing them for 6 months to the kinds and relative levels of anabolic steroids used by many athletes and body builders.

  5. Anabolic steroids, acute myocardial infarction and polycythemia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stergiopoulos, Kathleen; Brennan, Joseph J; Mathews, Robin; Setaro, John F; Kort, Smadar

    2008-01-01

    The association between testosterone-replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk remains unclear with most reports suggesting a neutral or possibly beneficial effect of the hormone in men and women. However, several cardiovascular complications including hypertension, cardiomyopathy, stroke, pulmonary embolism, fatal and nonfatal arrhythmias, and myocardial infarction have been reported with supraphysiologic doses of anabolic steroids. We report a case of an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient with traditional cardiac risk factors using supraphysiologic doses of supplemental, intramuscular testosterone. In addition, this patient also had polycythemia, likely secondary to high-dose testosterone. The patient underwent successful percutaneous intervention of the right coronary artery. Phlebotomy was used to treat the polycythemia acutely. We suggest that the chronic and recent "stacked" use of intramuscular testosterone as well as the resultant polycythemia and likely increased plasma viscosity may have been contributing factors to this cardiovascular event, in addition to traditional coronary risk factors. Physicians and patients should be aware of the clinical consequences of anabolic steroid abuse.

  6. Determination of anabolic agents in dietary supplements by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Odoardi, Sara; Castrignanò, Erika; Martello, Simona; Chiarotti, Marcello; Strano-Rossi, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive method for the identification and quantification of anabolic steroids and clenbuterol at trace levels in dietary supplements by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) in atmospheric pressure ionisation (APCI) mode using a single-stage Orbitrap analyser operating at a resolution power of 100 000 full width at half maximum (FWHM) was developed and validated. A total of 1 g of dietary supplement was added with testosterone-d3 as internal standard, dissolved in methanol, evaporated to dryness, diluted in sodium hydroxide solution and extracted with a mixture of pentane/ethyl ether 9:1. The extract was directly injected into the LC-HRMS system. The method was fully validated. Limits of detection (LODs) obtained for anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) varied from 1 to 25 ng g(-1) and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 50 ng g(-1) for all analytes. The calibration was linear for all compounds in the range from the LOQ to 2000 ng g(-1), with correlation coefficients always higher than 0.99. Accuracy (intended as %E) and repeatability (%CV) were always lower than 15%. Good values of matrix effect and recovery were achieved. The ease of the sample preparation together with a fast run time of only 16 min permitted rapid identification of the analytes. The method was applied to the analysis of 30 dietary supplements in order to check for the presence of anabolic agents not labelled as being present in these supplements. Many AASs were often detected in the same sample: indeed, androstenedione was detected in nine supplements, 5-androsten-3β-ol-17-one (DHEA) in 12, methandienone in three, stanozolol in one, testosterone in seven and testosterone esters in four of them. A retrospective analysis of suspected compounds not included at the beginning of the method development was also possible by means of the full acquisition spectra obtained with the HRMS technique.

  7. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in anabolic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Maior, A S; Carvalho, A R; Marques-Neto, S R; Menezes, P; Soares, P P; Nascimento, J H M

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) abuse may induce cardiac autonomic dysfunction in recreational trained subjects. Twenty-two men were volunteered for the study. The AAS group (n = 11) utilized AAS at mean dosage of 410 ± 78.6 mg/week. All of them were submitted to submaximal exercise testing using an Astrand-Rhyming protocol. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and respired gas analysis were monitored at rest, during, and post-effort. Mean values of VO2 , VCO2 , and VE were higher in AAS group only at rest. The heart rate variability variables were calculated from ECG using MATLAB-based algorithms. At rest, AAS group showed lower values of the standard deviation of R-R intervals, the proportion of adjacent R-R intervals differing by more than 50 ms (pNN50), the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), and the total, the low-frequency (LF) and the high-frequency (HF) spectral power, as compared to Control group. After submaximal exercise testing, pNN50, RMSSD, and HF were lower, and the LF/HF ratio was higher in AAS group when compared to control group. Thus, the use of supraphysiological doses of AAS seems to induce dysfunction in tonic cardiac autonomic regulation in recreational trained subjects.

  8. Determination of steroid hormones and related compounds in filtered and unfiltered water by solid-phase extraction, derivatization, and gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Lindley, Chris E.; Losche, Scott A.; Barber, Larry B.

    2012-01-01

    A new analytical method has been developed and implemented at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory that determines a suite of 20 steroid hormones and related compounds in filtered water (using laboratory schedule 2434) and in unfiltered water (using laboratory schedule 4434). This report documents the procedures and initial performance data for the method and provides guidance on application of the method and considerations of data quality in relation to data interpretation. The analytical method determines 6 natural and 3 synthetic estrogen compounds, 6 natural androgens, 1 natural and 1 synthetic progestin compound, and 2 sterols: cholesterol and 3--coprostanol. These two sterols have limited biological activity but typically are abundant in wastewater effluents and serve as useful tracers. Bisphenol A, an industrial chemical used primarily to produce polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins and that has been shown to have estrogenic activity, also is determined by the method. A technique referred to as isotope-dilution quantification is used to improve quantitative accuracy by accounting for sample-specific procedural losses in the determined analyte concentration. Briefly, deuterium- or carbon-13-labeled isotope-dilution standards (IDSs), all of which are direct or chemically similar isotopic analogs of the method analytes, are added to all environmental and quality-control and quality-assurance samples before extraction. Method analytes and IDS compounds are isolated from filtered or unfiltered water by solid-phase extraction onto an octadecylsilyl disk, overlain with a graded glass-fiber filter to facilitate extraction of unfiltered sample matrices. The disks are eluted with methanol, and the extract is evaporated to dryness, reconstituted in solvent, passed through a Florisil solid-phase extraction column to remove polar organic interferences, and again evaporated to dryness in a reaction vial. The method compounds are reacted with

  9. Training increases anabolic response and reduces inflammatory response to a single practice in elite male adolescent volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Nemet, Dan; Portal, Shawn; Zadik, Zvi; Pilz-Burstein, Rutie; Adler-Portal, Dana; Meckel, Yoav; Eliakim, Alon

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effect of training on hormonal and inflammatory response to a single volleyball practice in elite adolescent players. Fourteen male, elite, national team-level, Israeli volleyball players (age, 16.3±1.1 years, Tanner stage 4-5) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after a typical 60-min volleyball practice, before and after 7 weeks of training during the initial phases of the volleyball season. Hormonal measurements included the anabolic hormones growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, and testosterone; the catabolic hormone cortisol; the pro-inflammatory markers interleukin (IL) 6, and the anti-inflammatory marker IL-1 receptor antagonist. Training led to a significant improvement of both anaerobic and aerobic properties. Before the training intervention, the typical volleyball practice was associated with a significant increase of GH and testosterone and also with a significant increase of IL-6. Training resulted in a significantly greater GH response (ΔGH, 2.5±2.4 vs. 4.7±3.0 ng/mL, before and after training, respectively; p<0.02) and reduced IL-6 response (ΔIL-6, 2.0±1.6 vs. 0.6±0.7 pg/mL, before and after training, respectively; p<0.01) to the same relative intensity volleyball practice. The results suggest that, along with the improvement of anaerobic and aerobic characteristics, training leads to a greater anabolic and reduced inflammatory response to exercise.

  10. Androgenic anabolic steroid use among male adolescents in Falkenberg.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, S

    1995-01-01

    Recent reports show that androgenic anabolic steroids are used by many teenagers, not as a deliberate attempt to give them strength, better athletic performance, etc., but to improve their looks. The so-called macho cult among young boys tempts them into using androgenic anabolic steroids to give them bigger muscles and a more powerful appearance. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of androgenic anabolic steroid use among teenagers in a small town and to create a platform for future work with the aim of decreasing the misuse of these drugs. In Falkenberg, a town in the county of Halland in the west of Sweden, the pupils at two high schools were investigated by means of an anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire. A total of 1383 students (688 males and 695 females) aged 14-19 years participated in the study, giving a participation rate of 96%. The number of answers completed was 99%. The use of androgenic anabolic steroids is a reality among male teenagers in Falkenberg, with 5.8% of them using the drugs. Among 15- to 16-year-old boys misuse of these drugs is as high as 10%, and of these 50% (5.0% of total) also inject ampoules of the drugs. This prevalence is alarming since the adverse effects of androgenic anabolic steroids are more serious in teenagers. Serious action must be taken to inform teenagers of the consequences of misusing drugs.

  11. Anabolic and androgenic activities of 19-nor-testosterone steroids: QSAR study using quantum and physicochemical molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ginarte, Yoanna María; Montero-Cabrera, Luis Alberto; de la Vega, José Manuel García; Noheda-Marín, Pedro; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Ruíz-García, José Alberto

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study of 19-nor-testosterone steroids family was performed using quantum and physicochemical molecular descriptors. The quantum-chemical descriptors were calculated using semiempirical calculations. The descriptor values were statistically correlated using multi-linear regression analysis. The QSAR study indicated that the electronic properties of these derivatives have significant relationship with observed biological activities. The found QSAR equations explain that the energy difference between the LUMO and HOMO, the total dipole moment, the chemical potential and the value of the net charge of different carbon atoms in the steroid nucleus showed key interaction of these steroids with their anabolic-androgenic receptor binding site. The calculated values predict that the 17α-cyclopropyl-17β, 3β-hydroxy-4-estrene compound presents the highest anabolic-androgenic ratio (AAR) and the 7α-methyl-17β-acetoxy-estr-4-en-3-one compound the lowest AAR. This study might be helpful in the future successful identification of "real" or "virtual" anabolic-androgenic steroids.

  12. Targeted overexpression of Dkk1 in osteoblasts reduces bone mass but does not impair the anabolic response to intermittent PTH treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang-Qing; Wu, Jian-Jun; Troiano, Nancy; Insogna, Karl

    2011-03-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a potent anabolic agent, but the cellular mechanisms by which it increases bone mass are not fully understood. Dickkopf 1 (Dkk1) is an endogenous inhibitor of Wnt signaling and suppresses bone formation in vivo. We sought to determine if Dkk1 and anabolic PTH treatment interact in regulating bone mass. PTH treatment of primary murine osteoblasts for 24 h reduced Dkk1 expression by 90% as quantified by real-time PCR, whereas PTH treatment in vivo reduced Dkk1 expression by 30% when given as a single daily subcutaneous dose. To directly determine whether Dkk1 modulates the anabolic response of PTH in vivo, we engineered transgenic (TG) mice expressing murine Dkk1 under the control of the 2.3-kb rat collagen alpha-1 promoter. TG mice had significantly reduced bone mass, which was accompanied by reduced histomorphometric parameters of bone formation (reduced OV/TV, ObS/OS, and NOb/TAR). Treatment of TG mice and wild-type (WT) littermates with 95 ng/g body weight of human (1-34) PTH daily for 34 days resulted in comparable increases in bone mass at all skeletal sites. Histomorphometric analyses indicated that PTH treatment increased the numbers of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts in WT mice but only increased the numbers of osteoblasts in TG mice. We conclude that overexpression of Dkk1 does not attenuate the anabolic response to PTH in vivo.

  13. Current status and bioanalytical challenges in the detection of unknown anabolic androgenic steroids in doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Oscar J; De Brabanter, Nik; Fabregat, Andreu; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen

    2013-11-01

    Androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) are prohibited in sports due to their anabolic effects. Doping control laboratories usually face the screening of AAS misuse by target methods based on MS detection. Although these methods allow for the sensitive and specific detection of targeted compounds and metabolites, the rest remain undetectable. This fact opens a door for cheaters, since different AAS can be synthesized in order to evade doping control tests. This situation was evidenced in 2003 with the discovery of the designer steroid tetrahydrogestrinone. One decade after this discovery, the detection of unknown AAS still remains one of the main analytical challenges in the doping control field. In this manuscript, the current situation in the detection of unknown AAS is reviewed. Although important steps have been made in order to minimize this analytical problem and different analytical strategies have been proposed, there are still some drawbacks related to each approach.

  14. On the Free Energy That Drove Primordial Anabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A key problem in understanding the origin of life is to explain the mechanism(s) that led to the spontaneous assembly of molecular building blocks that ultimately resulted in the appearance of macromolecular structures as they are known in modern biochemistry today. An indispensable thermodynamic prerequisite for such a primordial anabolism is the mechanistic coupling to processes that supplied the free energy required. Here I review different sources of free energy and discuss the potential of each form having been involved in the very first anabolic reactions that were fundamental to increase molecular complexity and thus were essential for life. PMID:19468343

  15. Hepatic lesions in patients treated with synthetic anabolic steriods.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, E C; Evans, D J

    1976-07-01

    Hepatic abnormalities are described in three patients who received synthetic anabolic steroids. A child with Franconi's anaemia was treated for four years and at necropsy the liver showed generalized hyperplasia, hyperplastic nodules, and a benign hepatoma. Two adults received only three months' therapy with synthetic androgens; in one there was generalized hepatic hyperplasia and in the other widespread nodular hyperplasia. It is suggested that anabolic steroids may induce tumours through intermediate hyperplastic lesions, a sequence similar to that seen during tumour induction by carcinogens in experimental animals.

  16. Hepatic lesions in patients treated with synthetic anabolic steriods.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, E C; Evans, D J

    1976-01-01

    Hepatic abnormalities are described in three patients who received synthetic anabolic steroids. A child with Franconi's anaemia was treated for four years and at necropsy the liver showed generalized hyperplasia, hyperplastic nodules, and a benign hepatoma. Two adults received only three months' therapy with synthetic androgens; in one there was generalized hepatic hyperplasia and in the other widespread nodular hyperplasia. It is suggested that anabolic steroids may induce tumours through intermediate hyperplastic lesions, a sequence similar to that seen during tumour induction by carcinogens in experimental animals. Images PMID:185239

  17. Anabolic steroids: what should the emergency physician know?

    PubMed

    Brown, James T

    2005-08-01

    Anabolic steroids have not currently made their way into the daily practice of emergency physicians. The patients that use and abuse them have. In addition, those patients that are suffering from the consequences of illnesses that have excess levels of androgens are commonly evaluated in the emergency department. Clinicians should familiarize themselves with the practices of anabolic steroid users, so they can provide more beneficial council to their patients. As research continues, the emergency physician may find uses for androgens within the emergency department.

  18. Manifestation of severe coronary heart disease after anabolic drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Mewis, C; Spyridopoulos, I; Kühlkamp, V; Seipel, L

    1996-02-01

    Anabolic steroids are frequently abused, thus increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease, despite the known unfavorable influence on lipid profiles. We report on a young bodybuilder who presented with ventricular tachycardia as the first manifestation of severe underlying coronary heart disease. Coronary angiogram revealed severe stenotic lesions in the right coronary artery and the left descending coronary artery, and hypokinetic regions corresponded to posterolateral and anterior myocardial infarctions. This young patient had a history without any coronary risk factors, but with a 2-year abuse of the anabolic steroid stanazolol. No report published so far has shown possible atherogenic consequences of long-term abuse of stanazolol.

  19. [Myocardial infarction and anabolic steroid use. A case report].

    PubMed

    Godon, P; Bonnefoy, E; Guérard, S; Munet, M; Velon, S; Brion, R; Touboul, P

    2000-07-01

    The potential cardiotoxicity of anabolic steroids is not well known. The authors report the case of a young man who was a top class body builder and who developed severe ischaemic cardiomyopathy presenting with an inferior wall myocardial infarction. The clinical history revealed prolonged and intensive usage of two types of anabolic steroids to be the only risk factor. This cardiotoxicity may be related to several physiopathological mechanisms: accelerated atherogenesis by lipid changes, increased platelet aggregation, coronary spasm or a direct toxic effect on the myocytes. The apparent scarcity of the reported clinical details in the literature is probably an underestimation of the consequences of this usage.

  20. Bleeding oesophageal varices associated with anabolic steroid use in an athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Winwood, P. J.; Robertson, D. A.; Wright, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old bodybuilder who had been taking anabolic steroids for 18 months presented with bleeding oesophageal varices. Serious liver disease secondary to anabolic steroids including peliosis hepatis, nodular hyperplasia and malignant change is well recognized. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first case of bleeding oesophageal varices associated with the use of anabolic steroids. PMID:2099434

  1. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  2. Knowledge about Anabolic Steroids of Rhode Island Adolescents: Implications for Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June

    Although anabolic steroids are associated with short term behavior and long term health problems, few schools address this issue. Adolescents were surveyed to determine their general knowledge of anabolic steroids, attitudes related to fair play, and interest in limiting anabolic steroid use. Data from 322 boys and 331 girls in grades 7-12 were…

  3. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  4. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  5. The Effect of Anabolic Steroid Education on Knowledge and Attitudes of At-Risk Preadolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenhaile, Jay; Choi, Hee-Sook; Proctor, Theron B.; Work, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the effect of anabolic steroid education on preadolescents' knowledge of and attitudes toward anabolic steroids with 35 male athletes. Information on psychological and physiological aspects of anabolic steroid use, weight training techniques, nutrition, social decision making, and self-esteem training were provided. Participants…

  6. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  7. Confirmation and 3D profiling of anabolic steroid esters in injection sites using imaging desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Rijke, Eva; Hooijerink, Dick; Sterk, Saskia S; Nielen, Michel W F

    2013-01-01

    In this study, desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) was applied for the confirmation and three-dimensional profiling of anabolic steroid esters in an injection site of bovine muscle. The spatial resolution of the DESI-MS(n) was demonstrated by scanning hormone esters and marker ink lines drawn at various distances on a microscopic slide at set distances, using an x-scanner with manual y and z adjustment. Tissue slices of bovine muscle injected with a hormone cocktail were analysed. All anabolic steroid esters could be directly detected in the sample and confirmed on the basis of identification points awarded for selected MS/MS transitions according to the performance criteria given in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Moreover, the injection site could be mapped by two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging MS, showing a horizontal and vertical distribution through the muscle tissue. This DESI approach offers potential for analysis of injection sites of steroid esters from illegally treated animals; moreover, direct analysis by ambient imaging DESI-MS still allows conventional extraction and analysis of the whole tissue for further confirmatory or contra-analysis afterwards.

  8. Investigation of the composition of anabolic tablets using near infrared spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Rebiere, Hervé; Ghyselinck, Céline; Lempereur, Laurent; Brenier, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The use of performance enhancing drugs is a widespread phenomenon in professional and leisure sports. A spectroscopic study was carried out on anabolic tablets labelled as 5 mg methandienone tablets provided by police departments. The analytical approach was based on a two-step methodology: a fast analysis of tablets using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to assess sample homogeneity based on their global composition, followed by Raman chemical imaging of one sample per NIR profile to obtain information on sample formulation. NIR spectroscopy assisted by a principal components analysis (PCA) enabled fast discrimination of different profiles based on the excipient formulation. Raman hyperspectral imaging and multivariate curve resolution - alternating least square (MCR-ALS) provided chemical images of the distribution of the active substance and excipients within tablets and facilitated identification of the active compounds. The combination of NIR spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging highlighted dose-to-dose variations and succeeded in the discrimination of four different formulations out of eight similar samples of anabolic tablets. Some samples contained either methandienone or methyltestosterone whereas one sample did not contain an active substance. Other ingredients were sucrose, lactose, starch or talc. Both techniques were fast and non-destructive and therefore can be carried out as exploratory methods prior to destructive screening methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Anabolic steroids detected in bodybuilding dietary supplements - a significant risk to public health.

    PubMed

    Abbate, V; Kicman, A T; Evans-Brown, M; McVeigh, J; Cowan, D A; Wilson, C; Coles, S J; Walker, C J

    2015-07-01

    Twenty-four products suspected of containing anabolic steroids and sold in fitness equipment shops in the United Kingdom (UK) were analyzed for their qualitative and semi-quantitative content using full scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), accurate mass liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), high pressure liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), UV-Vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, X-ray crystallography enabled the identification of one of the compounds, where reference standard was not available. Of the 24 products tested, 23 contained steroids including known anabolic agents; 16 of these contained steroids that were different to those indicated on the packaging and one product contained no steroid at all. Overall, 13 different steroids were identified; 12 of these are controlled in the UK under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. Several of the products contained steroids that may be considered to have considerable pharmacological activity, based on their chemical structures and the amounts present. This could unwittingly expose users to a significant risk to their health, which is of particular concern for naïve users.

  10. Use of dried blood spots in doping control analysis of anabolic steroid esters.

    PubMed

    Tretzel, Laura; Thomas, Andreas; Geyer, Hans; Gmeiner, Günter; Forsdahl, Guro; Pop, Valentin; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-08-05

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling, a technique for whole blood sampling on a piece of filter paper, has more than 50-years tradition, particularly in the diagnostic analysis of metabolic disorders in neonatal screening. Due to the minimal invasiveness, straightforwardness, robustness against manipulation and fastness DBS sampling recommends itself as an advantageous technique in doping control analysis. The present approach highlights the development of a screening assay for the analysis of eight anabolic steroid esters (nandrolone phenylpropionate, trenbolone enanthate, testosterone acetate, testosterone cypionate, testosterone isocaproate, testosterone phenylpropionate, testosterone decanoate and testosterone undecanoate) and nandrolone in DBS. The detection of the intact esters allows an unequivocal proof of the administration of conjugates of exogenous testosterone and its derivatives. Precise, specific and linear conditions were obtained by means of liquid chromatography high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry. Sensitivity in the low ppb range was accomplished by the preparation of the methyloxime derivatives of the target compounds. Labeled internal standards (d3-nandrolone, d3-nandrolone caproate and d3-nandrolone undecanoate) were applied to compensate for the broad range in chain length of the esters. The assay presented here outlines the application of DBS for the analysis of anabolic steroid esters in doping controls for the first time providing great potential to simplify the proof of exogenous administration of testosterone.

  11. The incidence of anabolic steroid use among competitive bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Tricker, R; O'Neill, M R; Cook, D

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of anabolic steroid use among competitive male and female bodybuilders in Kansas and Missouri. A profile was established for users and non-users of anabolic steroids. The results of this study indicated that more than half of the male bodybuilders (54%) were using steroids on a regular basis compared to 10 percent of the female competitors. The types of steroid used were investigated and revealed that on average, four different types of anabolic steroid were used during the year, with individual use ranging from one to fifteen different types; including Dianabol, Deca Durabolin, Anavar, Testosterone, Androl 50, Winstrol, Primobolan, Equipoise, Finaject, Parabolin, HCG, Primacetate, Enanthate, Halotestin, and Maxibolin, in order of the most to least frequently used. The female bodybuilders reported that they had used an average of two different steroids including Deca Durabolin, Anavar, Testosterone, Dianabol, Equipoise, and Winstrol. The principal reason bodybuilders used steroids was related to their perception that these drugs were an important factor in winning competitions. Another important motivating factor for use was consistent with reports that significant gains in strength could be achieved by including anabolic steroids as part of the training regimen in spite of the reported adverse side-effects.

  12. "Anabolic" effects of methandienone in men undergoing athletic training.

    PubMed

    Hervey, G R; Hutchinson, I; Knibbs, A V; Burkinshaw, L; Jones, P R; Norgan, N G; Levell, M J

    1976-10-02

    After failure to confirm an anabolic action of testosterone and its derivatives in rats, methandienone ('Dianabol', an "anabolic steroid" used by athletes) has been given to 11 athletic men during a course of weight-training, in a double-blind, crossover experiment. The dose of methandienone was 100 mg/day for 6 wk. Body weight and composition, muscular strength and performance, and indices of endocrine function were studied. Compared with the placebo period, on methandienone the subjects gained weight (mean 3-3 kg +/- 0-6 kg) and accumulated a disproportionately large amount of potassium (420+/-68 mmol); the increase in weight was confined to the lean part of the body, and the muscles increased in size. Strength and performance improved over each training period, but not significantly differently on drug and placebo. On the drug, plasma-cortisol concentration and urinary cortisol excretion increased, and plasma-testosterone decreased. Although the weight and body-composition changes may demonstrate an anabolic action of methandienone in man, they may alternatively have been caused by an increase in intracellular fluid, and the question of anabolic action therefore remains open.

  13. Bolus vs. continuous feeding to optimize anabolism in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonates with feeding difficulties can be fed by orogastric tube, using either continuous or bolus delivery. This review reports on recent findings that bolus is advantageous compared to continuous feeding in supporting optimal protein anabolism. Whether bolus or continuous feeding is more beneficia...

  14. Psychological and Behavioral Effects of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrke, Michael S.

    This review of the literature on the psychological and behavioral effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AS) first looks at aspects of the history and prevalence of AS use in competitive sports. Research suggests that one-quarter to one-half million adolescents in the United States have used, or are currently using AS. Some effects of androgens…

  15. Hypercholesterolemia in Male Power Lifters Using Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of serum cholesterol concentrations in male power lifters who used anabolic-androgenic steroids for eight weeks, three years, or eight years indicated that mean serum cholesterol levels increased with drug use, but decreased promptly to near pre-steroid levels after steroid use ended. (Author/CB)

  16. Anabolic Steroid Use: Indications of Habituation among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yesalis, Charles E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Identified characteristics of adolescent male anabolic steroid (AS) user and addictive potential. Found AS user population different from nonuser in self-perceptions of health and strength, interest in controlling AS use, and perception of peer AS use. Found subgroups with significantly different attitudes and/or behaviors. Suggests prevention…

  17. Psychological Predictors of Anabolic Steroid Use: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwerin, Michael J.; Corcoran, Kevin J.; LaFleur, Bonnie J.; Fisher, Leslee; Patterson, David; Olrich, Tracy

    1997-01-01

    Examined social physique anxiety, upper body esteem, social anxiety, and body dissatisfaction as possible predictors of anabolic steroid (AS) use. Results based on 185 AS-using bodybuilders and various control groups indicated that the upper body strength subscale of two measures, along with age, were significant predictors of AS use. (RJM)

  18. The Incidence of Anabolic Steroid Use among Competitive Bodybuilders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tricker, Ray; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigated incidence of anabolic steroid use among 380 competitive male and female bodybuilders in Kansas and Missouri. Results indicated more than half (54 percent) of the male bodybuilders were using steroids on a regular basis compared to 10 percent of the female competitors. Found main reason for use of steroids was desire to win. (Author/TE)

  19. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  20. Development of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis after Anabolic Steroid Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Herlitz, Leal C.; Markowitz, Glen S.; Farris, Alton B.; Schwimmer, Joshua A.; Stokes, Michael B.; Kunis, Cheryl; Colvin, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse adversely affects the endocrine system, blood lipids, and the liver, but renal injury has not been described. We identified an association of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and proteinuria in a cohort of 10 bodybuilders (six white and four Hispanic; mean body mass index 34.7) after long-term abuse of anabolic steroids. The clinical presentation included proteinuria (mean 10.1 g/d; range 1.3 to 26.3 g/d) and renal insufficiency (mean serum creatinine 3.0 mg/dl; range 1.3 to 7.8 mg/dl); three (30%) patients presented with nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed FSGS in nine patients, four of whom also had glomerulomegaly, and glomerulomegaly alone in one patient. Three biopsies revealed collapsing lesions of FSGS, four had perihilar lesions, and seven showed ≥40% tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Among eight patients with mean follow-up of 2.2 yr, one progressed to ESRD, the other seven received renin-angiotensin system blockade, and one also received corticosteroids. All seven patients discontinued anabolic steroids, leading to weight loss, stabilization or improvement in serum creatinine, and a reduction in proteinuria. One patient resumed anabolic steroid abuse and suffered relapse of proteinuria and renal insufficiency. We hypothesize that secondary FSGS results from a combination of postadaptive glomerular changes driven by increased lean body mass and potential direct nephrotoxic effects of anabolic steroids. Because of the expected rise in serum creatinine as a result of increased muscle mass in bodybuilders, this complication is likely underrecognized. PMID:19917783

  1. Development of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis after anabolic steroid abuse.

    PubMed

    Herlitz, Leal C; Markowitz, Glen S; Farris, Alton B; Schwimmer, Joshua A; Stokes, Michael B; Kunis, Cheryl; Colvin, Robert B; D'Agati, Vivette D

    2010-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse adversely affects the endocrine system, blood lipids, and the liver, but renal injury has not been described. We identified an association of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and proteinuria in a cohort of 10 bodybuilders (six white and four Hispanic; mean body mass index 34.7) after long-term abuse of anabolic steroids. The clinical presentation included proteinuria (mean 10.1 g/d; range 1.3 to 26.3 g/d) and renal insufficiency (mean serum creatinine 3.0 mg/dl; range 1.3 to 7.8 mg/dl); three (30%) patients presented with nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed FSGS in nine patients, four of whom also had glomerulomegaly, and glomerulomegaly alone in one patient. Three biopsies revealed collapsing lesions of FSGS, four had perihilar lesions, and seven showed > or =40% tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Among eight patients with mean follow-up of 2.2 yr, one progressed to ESRD, the other seven received renin-angiotensin system blockade, and one also received corticosteroids. All seven patients discontinued anabolic steroids, leading to weight loss, stabilization or improvement in serum creatinine, and a reduction in proteinuria. One patient resumed anabolic steroid abuse and suffered relapse of proteinuria and renal insufficiency. We hypothesize that secondary FSGS results from a combination of postadaptive glomerular changes driven by increased lean body mass and potential direct nephrotoxic effects of anabolic steroids. Because of the expected rise in serum creatinine as a result of increased muscle mass in bodybuilders, this complication is likely underrecognized.

  2. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 484: Performance enhancing anabolic steroid abuse in women.

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    Anabolic steroids are composed of testosterone and other substances related to testosterone that promote growth of skeletal muscle, increase hemoglobin concentration, and mediate secondary sexual characteristics. These substances have been in use since the 1930s to promote muscle growth, improve athletic performance, and enhance cosmetic appearance. Although anabolic steroids are controlled substances, only to be prescribed by a physician, it is currently possible to obtain anabolic steroids illegally without a prescription. There are significant negative physical and psychologic effects of anabolic steroid use, which in women can cause significant cosmetic and reproductive changes. Anabolic steroid use can be addictive and, therefore, difficult to stop. Treatment for anabolic steroid abuse generally involves education, counseling, and management of withdrawal symptoms. Health care providers are encouraged to address the use of these substances, encourage cessation, and refer patients to substance abuse treatment centers to prevent the long-term irreversible consequences of anabolic steroid use.

  3. Action of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: involvement of novel arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, G D; Capdevila, J; Chacos, N; Manna, S; Falck, J R

    1983-01-01

    Anterior pituitary cells were incubated in the presence of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and one of three inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism:indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase system; nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an antioxidant that inhibits lipoxygenase; and icosatetraynoic acid, an acetylenic analogue of arachidonic acid that blocks all known pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism. Indomethacin was ineffective in blocking luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was only marginally capable of inhibiting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Icosatetraynoic acid at 10 microM completely inhibited stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Addition of several epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites to cells in vitro resulted in secretion of luteinizing hormone equal to or greater than that induced by 10 nM luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. The half-maximal effective dose for these compounds was approximately 50 nM. The 5,6-epoxyicosatrienoic acid was the most potent of the compounds tested. These studies suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone release is closely coupled with the production of oxidized arachidonic acid metabolites. Moreover, one or more of the epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites might be a component of the cascade of reactions initiated by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone that ultimately results in secretion of luteinizing hormone. PMID:6344087

  4. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... estrogen , a hormone that helps control the menstrual cycle . Changing estrogen levels can bring on symptoms such ... two hormones—estrogen and progesterone —control your menstrual cycle. These hormones are made by the ovaries . Estrogen ...

  5. Morphometric analysis of cortical bone upon the exposure to sustained delivery of anabolic promoting agents using adult male rats as a model.

    PubMed

    Tramontana, J; Benghuzzi, H; Tucci, M; Tsao, A; Hughes, J

    2001-01-01

    Several investigations have documented that the use of anabolic agents could promote osteogenesis and enhance bone ingrowth in traumatized bone. Previously, anabolic steroids have been shown to increase the mineralization of bone. However, their clinical use has been limited because of the unwanted virilizing activity. The previous studies used systemic administration of anabolic steroids, which subjects other tissues within the body to high concentrations of hormones. In addition, different anabolic/androgenic steroids have varying affinities to different cell types within tissues. The specific objectives of this study were (i) to histopathologically evaluate the structural changes associated with sustained delivery of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and androstendione (AED) using adult male rats as a model, and (ii) to morphometrically evaluate the cortical areas and length upon the exposure of the aforementioned hormones for 90 days. A total of 23 adult rats were randomly divided into five groups (group I = control, group II = sham, group III = AED, Group IV = T and group V = DHT treated). At the end of the treatments the animals were euthanized and the x-rays, blood, and bones were analyzed using standard laboratory protocols. Data obtained from this investigation revealed the following: (A) all treated femurs appeared healthy with no traumatic responses observed in comparison to control animals, (B) measurements of the inner perimeter of the bone on the endosteal side showed significant reduction in the androgen treated animals. This suggesting that the androgens caused increases in the cortical bone. The differences seen in the amount of reduction was in the following ease: T > DHT > AED. C) quantitative measurements of the cortical length showed slight increases in the cortical lengths in the androgen treated rats in comparison to the control.

  6. Betaine supplementation enhances anabolic endocrine and Akt signaling in response to acute bouts of exercise.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Jenna M; Lee, Elaine C; Bailey, Brooke L; Saenz, Catherine; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Craig, Stuart A S; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to examine the effect of betaine supplementation on selected circulating hormonal measures and Akt muscle signaling proteins after an acute exercise session. Twelve trained men (age 19.7 ± 1.23 years) underwent 2 weeks of supplementation with either betaine (B) (1.25 g BID) or placebo (P). Following a 2-week washout period, subjects underwent supplementation with the other treatment (B or P). Before and after each 2-week period, subjects performed an acute exercise session (AES). Circulating GH, IGF-1, cortisol, and insulin were measured. Vastus lateralis samples were analyzed for signaling proteins (Akt, p70 S6k, AMPK). B (vs. P) supplementation approached a significant increase in GH (mean ± SD (Area under the curve, AUC), B: 40.72 ± 6.14, P: 38.28 ± 5.54, p = 0.060) and significantly increased IGF-1 (mean ± SD (AUC), B: 106.19 ± 13.45, P: 95.10 ± 14.23, p = 0.010), but significantly decreased cortisol (mean ± SD (AUC), B: 1,079.18 ± 110.02, P: 1,228.53 ± 130.32, p = 0.007). There was no difference in insulin (AUC). B increased resting Total muscle Akt (p = 0.003). B potentiated phosphorylation (relative to P) of Akt (Ser(473)) and p70 S6 k (Thr(389)) (p = 0.016 and p = 0.005, respectively). Phosphorylation of AMPK (Thr(172)) decreased during both treatments (both p = 0.001). Betaine (vs. placebo) supplementation enhanced both the anabolic endocrine profile and the corresponding anabolic signaling environment, suggesting increased protein synthesis.

  7. Urinary detection of conjugated and unconjugated anabolic steroids by dilute-and-shoot liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tudela, Eva; Deventer, Koen; Geldof, Lore; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are an important class of doping agents. The metabolism of these substances is generally very extensive and includes phase-I and phase-II pathways. In this work, a comprehensive detection of these metabolites is described using a 2-fold dilution of urine and subsequent analysis by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The method was applied to study 32 different metabolites, excreted free or conjugated (glucuronide or sulfate), which permit the detection of misuse of at least 21 anabolic steroids. The method has been fully validated for 21 target compounds (8 glucuronide, 1 sulfate and 12 free steroids) and 18 out of 21 compounds had detection limits in the range of 1-10 ng mL(-1) in urine. For the conjugated compounds, for which no reference standards are available, metabolites were synthesized in vitro or excretion studies were investigated. The detection limits for these compounds ranged between 0.5 and 18 ng mL(-1) in urine. The simple and straightforward methodology complements the traditional methods based on hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

  8. Changes in Hormonal Concentrations after Different Heavy-Resistance Exercise Protocols in Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    routine used by sistance training, but none of them was a competitive athletes primarily training for strength (e.g., competitive lifter. None was...1yot9 ausadth1iuiay tabolic and anabolic steriod hormones in muscular exercise. In: H.uHtm, W. F.. E. W. JENNE. F. REPPIN. K. KIETZMANN. M. B. Exercise

  9. IGF-1 and insulin as growth hormones.

    PubMed

    Laron, Zvi

    2004-01-01

    IGF-1 generated in the liver is the anabolic effector and linear growth promoting hormone of the pituitary growth hormone (GH). This is evidenced by dwarfism in states of congenital IGF-1 deficiency, Igf1 gene mutation/deletions or knockouts, and in Laron syndrome (LS), due to GH receptor gene mutations/deletions or IGF-1 receptor blocking. In a positive way, daily IGF-1 administration to stunted patients with LS or hGH gene deletion accelerates linear growth velocity. IGF-1 acts on the proliferative cells of the epiphyseal cartilage. IGF-1 also induces organ and tissue growth; its absence causing organomicria. Insulin shares a common ancestry with IGF-1 and with 45% amino acid homology, as well as very close relationships in the structure of its receptors and post-receptor cascade, also acts as a growth hormone. It has protein anabolic activity and stimulates IGF-1 synthesis. Pancreas agenesis causes short babies, and obese children with hyperinsulinism, with or without pituitary GH, have an accelerated growth rate and skeletal maturation; so do babies with macrosomia. Whether the insulin growth effect is direct, or mediated by IGF-1 or leptin is controversial.

  10. Multivariate optimization of a derivatisation procedure for the simultaneous determination of nine anabolic steroids by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hadef, Y; Kaloustian, J; Portugal, H; Nicolay, A

    2008-05-09

    The medical commission of the International Olympic Committee forbids the use of anabolic androgenic steroids to improve sporting performances. Nine anabolic steroids (androsterone (A), nandrolone, estradiol, testosterone propionate, nandrolone-17 propionate, dydrogesterone, testosterone, epitestosterone, boldenone) and alpha-cholestane as internal standard were studied by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The derivatisation reagent employed for the derivatisation of anabolic steroids was a mixture of N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MSTFA), ammonium iodide and 2-mercaptoethanol (1000:2:6, v/w/v). Trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives were obtained. Anabolic steroids can be derivatised into one or two forms, mainly for androsterone into A-monoTMS and A-diTMS. The aim of this study was to research the optimization conditions of the derivatisation process (maximum yield of silylation reaction) of each anabolic steroid into only one form. A two-level factorial Doelhert design was used to determine the influence of different parameters and their interactions on each compound, thanks to response surface methodology. The parameters to be optimized were the reaction time and the temperature. The interaction "temperature-reaction time" is significant and has a positive effect on the improvement of the effectiveness of the derivatisation. Considering the large amount of information, often not convergent, a global desirability function was applied for multi-responses optimization. Thus, the optimized temperature and the reaction time of silylation were 85 degrees C and 24 min, respectively. Several GC/MS analytical parameters were also studied: linearity (regression coefficient upper than 0.99 for each compound, sensibility (range of concentration 0.05-0.30 microg/ml). Confirmatory experiments were applied to check the predicted values and to validate the model. The confirmatory assay responses are relatively close to the responses predicted

  11. Sample preparation for the determination of steroids (corticoids and anabolics) in feed using LC.

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Valencia, Roberto; Ceballos-Magaña, Silvia G; Gonzalo-Lumbreras, Raquel; Santos-Montes, Ana; Izquierdo-Hornillos, Roberto C

    2008-07-01

    An improved sample preparation procedure for the determination of 17 steroids (corticoids (CC) and androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS)), used potentially as growth promoters, in feed samples has been developed. This procedure is based on two reported LC-UV methods. The improved procedure includes a leaching process using ACN, saponification, and SPE using polymeric cartridges. The proposed method was validated according to the EU criteria established for quantitative screening methods in PFS. The extraction efficiencies, decision limits (CCalpha) and detection capabilities (CCbeta), for these compounds were in the ranges of 82-100%, 19-40, and 24-53 microg/kg, respectively. The repeatability and the within-laboratory reproducibility at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 CCbeta levels were smaller than 10%. Accuracy was in the 97-101% range. The robustness was evaluated using the Youden robustness test. This method was applied to the analysis of steroids in different kinds of FS with satisfactory results.

  12. Combined effects of androgen anabolic steroids and physical activity on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Hengevoss, Jonas; Piechotta, Marion; Müller, Dennis; Hanft, Fabian; Parr, Maria Kristina; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Diel, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Analysing effects of pharmaceutical substances and training on feedback mechanisms of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be helpful to quantify the benefit of strategies preventing loss of muscle mass, and in the fight against doping. In this study we analysed combined effects of anabolic steroids and training on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Therefore intact male Wistar rats were dose-dependently treated with metandienone, estradienedione and the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S-1. In serum cortisol, testosterone, 17β-estradiol (E2), prolactin, inhibin B, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and thyroxine (T4) concentrations were determined. Six human volunteers were single treated with 1-androstenedione. In addition abusing and clean body builders were analysed. Serum concentrations of inhibin B, IGF-1, cortisol, prolactin, T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), testosterone and LH were determined. In rats, administration of metandienone, estradienedione and S-1 resulted in an increase of muscle fiber diameter. Metandienone and estradienedione but not S-1 administration significantly decreases LH and inhibin B serum concentration. Administration of estradienedione resulted in an increase of E2 and S-1 in an increase of cortisol. Single administration of 1-androstenedione in humans decreased cortisol and inhibin B serum concentrations. LH was not affected. In abusing body builders a significantly decrease of LH, TSH and inhibin B and an increase of prolactin, IGF-1 and T4 was detected. In clean body builders only T4 and TSH were affected.

  13. Determination of anabolic steroids in human urine by automated in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keita; Yagi, Katsuharu; Ishizaki, Atsushi; Kataoka, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-05

    A simple, rapid and sensitive method was developed for determining the presence of seven anabolic steroids (boldenone, nandrolone, testosterone, methyltestosterone, epiandrosterone, androsterone, and atnozolol) in human urine. Glucuronide-conjugates of these compounds were hydrolyzed with beta-glucuronidase. The anabolic steroids were analyzed by on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The steroids were separated within 14 min by high performance liquid chromatography using a Chromolith RP-18e column and 5 mM ammonium formate/methanol (35/65, v/v) as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Electrospray ionization conditions in the positive ion mode were optimized for the MS detection of these compounds. The optimum in-tube SPME conditions were 20 draw/eject cycles with a sample size of 40 microL using a Supel-Q PLOT capillary column for the extraction. The extracted compounds could be desorbed readily from the capillary column by flow of the mobile phase, and no carryover was observed. Using the in-tube SPME LC-MS with SIM mode detection, good linearity of the calibration curve (r>0.995) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-20 ng/mL, except for stanozolol. The detection limits (S/N=3) of anabolic steroids were in the range 9-182 pg/mL and the proposed method showed 20-33-fold higher sensitivity than the direct injection method. The within-day and between-day precisions were below 4.0% and 7.3% (n=5), respectively. This method was applied successfully to the analysis of urine samples without the interference peaks. The recovery rates of anabolic steroids spiked into urine samples were above 85%. This method is useful to analyze the urinary levels of these compounds in anti-doping tests.

  14. The Metabolomic Signature of Malignant Glioma Reflects Accelerated Anabolic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Kensicki, Elizabeth; Bloom, Gregory; Prabhu, Antony; Sarcar, Bhaswati; Kahali, Soumen; Eschrich, Steven; Qu, Xiaotao; Forsyth, Peter; Gillies, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made toward understanding glioblastoma biology through large-scale genetic and protein expression analyses, little is known about the underlying metabolic alterations promoting their aggressive phenotype. We conducted global metabolomic profiling on patient-derived glioma specimens and identified specific metabolic programs differentiating low- and high-grade tumors, with the metabolic signature of glioblastoma reflecting accelerated anabolic metabolism. When coupled with transcriptional profiles, we identified the metabolic phenotype of the mesenchymal subtype to consist of accumulation of the glycolytic intermediate phosphoenolpyruvate and decreased pyruvate kinase activity. Unbiased hierarchical clustering of metabolomic profiles identified three subclasses, which we term energetic, anabolic, and phospholipid catabolism with prognostic relevance. These studies represent the first global metabolomic profiling of glioma, offering a previously undescribed window into their metabolic heterogeneity, and provide the requisite framework for strategies designed to target metabolism in this rapidly fatal malignancy. PMID:23026133

  15. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and abuse of anabolic steroids

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is characterized by mucocutaneous tenderness and typical hemorrhagic erosions, erythema and epidermal detachment presenting as blisters and areas of denuded skin. SJS is often observed after drug use as well as after bacterial or viral infections. Several drugs are at high risk of inducing SJS, but there are no cases in the English literature regarding anabolic steroid use triggering SJS. In our paper, we describe a case in which use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) was associated with SJS. The patient participated in competitive body-building and regularly took variable doses of AAS. Initial symptoms (headache, weakness, pharyngodynia, and fever) were ignored. After a week he presented to the Emergency Department with a burning sensation on the mouth, lips, and eyes. Painful, erythematous, maculopapular, and vesicular lesions appeared all over the body, including on the genitals. During hospitalization, he also developed a cardiac complication. The patient had not taken any drugs except AAS. PMID:28280713

  16. ANABOLIC-ANDROGENIC STEROID DEPENDENCE? INSIGHTS FROM ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, with negative health consequences. As a result, in 1991 testosterone and related AAS were declared controlled substances. However, the relative abuse and dependence liability of AAS have not been fully characterized. In humans, it is difficult to separate the direct psychoactive effects of AAS from reinforcement due to their systemic anabolic effects. However, using conditioned place preference and self-administration, studies in animals have demonstrated that AAS are reinforcing in a context where athletic performance is irrelevant. Furthermore, AAS share brain sites of action and neurotransmitter systems in common with other drugs of abuse. In particular, recent evidence links AAS with opioids. In humans, AAS abuse is associated with prescription opioid use. In animals, AAS overdose produces symptoms resembling opioid overdose, and AAS modify the activity of the endogenous opioid system. PMID:18275992

  17. Anabolic steroid abuse causing recurrent hepatic adenomas and hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicole M; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chung, Raymond T

    2008-07-28

    Anabolic steroid abuse is common among athletes and is associated with a number of medical complications. We describe a case of a 27-year-old male bodybuilder with multiple hepatic adenomas induced by anabolic steroids. He initially presented with tumor hemorrhage and was treated with left lateral hepatic segmentectomy. Regression of the remaining tumors was observed with cessation of steroid use. However, 3 years and a half after his initial hepatic segmentectomy, he presented with recurrent tumor enlargement and intraperitoneal hemorrhage in the setting of steroid abuse relapse. Given his limited hepatic reserve, he was conservatively managed with embolization of the right accessory hepatic artery. This is the first reported case of hepatic adenoma re-growth with recidivistic steroid abuse, complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. While athletes and bodybuilders are often aware of the legal and social ramifications of steroid abuse, they should continue to be counseled about its serious medical risks.

  18. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes. A constant threat.

    PubMed

    Maravelias, C; Dona, A; Stefanidou, M; Spiliopoulou, C

    2005-09-15

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are used as ergogenic aids by athletes and non-athletes to enhance performance by augmenting muscular development and strength. AAS administration is often associated with various adverse effects that are generally dose related. High and multi-doses of AAS used for athletic enhancement can lead to serious and irreversible organ damage. Among the most common adverse effects of AAS are some degree of reduced fertility and gynecomastia in males and masculinization in women and children. Other adverse effects include hypertension and atherosclerosis, blood clotting, jaundice, hepatic neoplasms and carcinoma, tendon damage, psychiatric and behavioral disorders. More specifically, this article reviews the reproductive, hepatic, cardiovascular, hematological, cerebrovascular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, renal, immunologic and psychologic effects. Drug-prevention counseling to athletes is highlighted and the use of anabolic steroids is must be avoided, emphasizing that sports goals may be met within the framework of honest competition, free of doping substances.

  19. Anabolic-androgenic steroid dependence? Insights from animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I

    2008-10-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, with negative health consequences. As a result, in 1991 testosterone and related AAS were declared controlled substances. However, the relative abuse and dependence liability of AAS have not been fully characterized. In humans, it is difficult to separate the direct psychoactive effects of AAS from reinforcement due to their systemic anabolic effects. However, using conditioned place preference and self-administration, studies in animals have demonstrated that AAS are reinforcing in a context where athletic performance is irrelevant. Furthermore, AAS share brain sites of action and neurotransmitter systems in common with other drugs of abuse. In particular, recent evidence links AAS with opioids. In humans, AAS abuse is associated with prescription opioid use. In animals, AAS overdose produces symptoms resembling opioid overdose, and AAS modify the activity of the endogenous opioid system.

  20. Sensitive and robust method for anabolic agents in human urine by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, Miguel A; Garrostas, Lorena; Pozo, Oscar J; Ventura, Rosa; Velasco, Benjamín; Segura, Jordi; Marcos, Josep

    2012-05-15

    A rapid, sensitive and robust gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of seven anabolic agents in human urine. The selection of analytes includes the main metabolites of all anabolics with higher sensitivity requirements. After optimizing the fragmentation conditions for each compound, a validation procedure for qualitative analysis was performed. The selectivity of the method showed that no interfering peaks were observed at the retention time of the compound. Adequate intermediate precision, below 14%, was observed for all of the compounds at the lower concentration tested. The concentrations assayed were in accordance with the performance limits required by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Unlike a previously published GC/QqQ method, detection of 17α-methyl-5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol (the main metabolites of methyltestosterone) at 2 ng/mL was accomplished under routine conditions. The qualitative method was applied to the analysis of 1367 samples in the span of 2 weeks, as part of the doping control of the XVI Pan American Games which took place in Mexico (14th-30th October, 2011). The high sensitivity was maintained during the analysis of all analytical batches, proving for the first time the excellent ruggedness of GC/QqQ methods.

  1. Anabolic androgenic steroids in delayed diagnosis of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Suneet K.; Sharma, Archana; Rai, Deependra K.; Thawani, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    This is the first case report depicting masking of symptoms of intestinal tuberculosis by anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) causing delay in diagnosis which lead to a major surgery. Negative tuberculosis skin test (TST) probably due to immunomodulating effects of AAS also contributed to the delay. Patient also had early dependence on AAS and rapid growth of scrotal sebaceous cysts, findings of which have not yet been reported. PMID:23326112

  2. Androgenic, anabolic, estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects of desogestrel and lynestrenol: effects on serum proteins and vaginal cytology.

    PubMed

    Cullberg, G

    1984-07-01

    Eight healthy (apart from pelvic endometriosis) women were given daily doses of 0.125, 0.250 and 0.500 mg of desogestrel or 5 mg of lynestrenol orally in a randomized order. Duration of each treatment was 6 weeks. Serum was analyzed for sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), ceruloplasmin, cortisol binding globulin (CBG), thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) and prealbumin using an electroimmunoassay. Serum 17 beta-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) were analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Vaginal cytology was studied using the maturation value (MV). E2 levels were depressed by desogestrel and lynestrenol apart from values in two women after 0.125 mg desogestrel. T concentration was suppressed by desogestrel but not by lynestrenol. SHBG concentration and MV were dose-dependently suppressed indicating an antiestrogenic or possibly androgenic effect of desogestrel and lynestrenol. No androgenic or anabolic effects of desogestrel were however seen, e.g. suppression of TBG content or increase in prealbumin levels. For lynestrenol, however, a small but significant increase in prealbumin concentration indicated a weak androgenic/anabolic effect. No estrogenic effects were seen, e.g. increases in ceruloplasmin, CBG levels or in elevations of MV. A depressed SHBG production ability in the hepatocytes during treatment with 19-nortestosterone derivatives is postulated, possibly due to competitive receptor binding.

  3. Anabolic androgens affect the competitive interactions in cell migration and adhesion between normal mouse urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hung, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Chawnshang; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-09-26

    The urothelium is constantly rebuilt by normal urothelial cells to regenerate damaged tissues caused by stimuli in urine. However, the urothelial carcinoma cells expand the territory by aberrant growth of tumor cells, which migrate and occupy the damaged tissues to spread outside and disrupt the normal cells and organized tissues and form a tumor. Therefore, the interaction between normal urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells affect the initiation and progression of urothelial tumors if normal urothelial cells fail to migrate and adhere to the damages sites to regenerate the tissues. Here, comparing normal murine urothelial cells with murine urothelial carcinoma cells (MBT-2), we found that normal cells had less migration ability than carcinoma cells. And in our co-culture system we found that carcinoma cells had propensity migrating toward normal urothelial cells and carcinoma cells had more advantages to adhere than normal cells. To reverse this condition, we used anabolic androgen, dihyrotestosterone (DHT) to treat normal cells and found that DHT treatment increased the migration ability of normal urothelial cells toward carcinoma cells and the adhesion capacity in competition with carcinoma cells. This study provides the base of a novel therapeutic approach by using anabolic hormone-enforced normal urothelial cells to regenerate the damage urothelium and defend against the occupancy of carcinoma cells to thwart cancer development and recurrence.

  4. The thyroid hormone mimetic compound KB2115 lowers plasma LDL cholesterol and stimulates bile acid synthesis without cardiac effects in humans.

    PubMed

    Berkenstam, Anders; Kristensen, Jens; Mellström, Karin; Carlsson, Bo; Malm, Johan; Rehnmark, Stefan; Garg, Neeraj; Andersson, Carl Magnus; Rudling, Mats; Sjöberg, Folke; Angelin, Bo; Baxter, John D

    2008-01-15

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a major problem despite the availability of drugs that influence major risk factors. New treatments are needed, and there is growing interest in therapies that may have multiple actions. Thyroid hormone modulates several cardiovascular risk factors and delays atherosclerosis progression in humans. However, use of thyroid hormone is limited by side effects, especially in the heart. To overcome this limitation, pharmacologically selective thyromimetics that mimic metabolic effects of thyroid hormone and bypass side effects are under development. In animal models, such thyromimetics have been shown to stimulate cholesterol elimination through LDL and HDL pathways and decrease body weight without eliciting side effects. We report here studies on a selective thyromimetic [KB2115; (3-[[3,5-dibromo-4-[4-hydroxy-3-(1-methylethyl)-phenoxy]-phenyl]-amino]-3-oxopropanoic acid)] in humans. In moderately overweight and hypercholesterolemic subjects KB2115 was found to be safe and well tolerated and elicited up to a 40% lowering of total and LDL cholesterol after 14 days of treatment. Bile acid synthesis was stimulated without evidence of increased cholesterol production, indicating that KB2115 induced net cholesterol excretion. KB2115 did not provoke detectable effects on the heart, suggesting that the pharmacological selectivity observed in animal models translates to humans. Thus, selective thyromimetics deserve further study as agents to treat dyslipidemia and other risk factors for atherosclerosis.

  5. Feasibility of capillary liquid chromatography/microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry in analyzing anabolic steroids in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Ahonen, Linda L; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2010-04-15

    We examined the feasibility of capillary liquid chromatography/microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry (capLC/microAPPI-MS/MS) for the analysis of anabolic steroids in human urine. The urine samples were pretreated by enzymatic hydrolysis (with beta-glucuronidase from Helix pomatia), and the compounds were liquid-liquid extracted with diethyl ether. After separation the compounds were vaporized by microchip APPI, photoionized by a 10 eV krypton discharge lamp, and detected by selected reaction monitoring. The capLC/microAPPI-MS/MS method showed good sensitivity with detection limits at the level of 1.0 ng mL(-1), good linearity with correlation coefficients between 0.9954 and 0.9990, and good repeatability with relative standard deviations below 10%. These results demonstrate that microchip APPI combined with capLC/MS/MS provides a new potential method for analyzing non-polar and neutral compounds in biological samples.

  6. Pulmonary embolism associated with protein C deficiency and abuse of anabolic-androgen steroids.

    PubMed

    Alhadad, Alaa; Acosta, Stefan; Sarabi, Latif; Kölbel, Tilo

    2010-04-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old male athlete with protein C deficiency who developed proximal deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism while abusing anabolic-androgenic steroids. Anabolic-androgenic steroids have been reported to have anticoagulatory and profibrinolytic effects in patients with protein C deficiency. Despite these antithrombotic effects, the patient developed repeated venous thromboembolism during treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin. The net effect of anabolic-androgenic steroids on the haemostatic system may change from antithrombotic to prothrombotic in male abusers of anabolic steroids with protein C deficiency.

  7. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    PubMed

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  8. A jaundiced bodybuilder Cholestatic hepatitis as side effect of injectable anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Boks, Marije N; Tiebosch, Anton T; van der Waaij, Laurens A

    2016-12-12

    The use of anabolic steroids is prevalent in recreational athletes. This case report describes a young amateur bodybuilder who was referred to our outpatient clinic with jaundice and loss of appetite due to cholestatic hepatitis. Additional tests including a liver biopsy made it likely that the hepatitis was caused by the injectable anabolic steroid trenbolone enanthate. Cholestatic hepatitis may not be limited to the use of oral anabolic-androgenic steroids, as is widely assumed. Therefore, and because of other side effects, the recreational use of all forms of anabolic steroids should be discouraged.

  9. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L.; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT-7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory. PMID:23792034

  10. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT--7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory.

  11. Detecting growth hormone misuse in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Richard I. G.

    2013-01-01

    Athletes have been misusing growth hormone (GH) for its anabolic and metabolic effects since the early 1980s, at least a decade before endocrinologists began to treat adults with GH deficiency. Although there is an ongoing debate about whether GH is performance enhancing, recent studies suggest that GH improves strength and sprint capacity, particularly when combined with anabolic steroids. The detection of GH misuse is challenging because it is an endogenous hormone. Two approaches have been developed to detect GH misuse; the first is based on the measurement of pituitary GH isoforms and the ratio of 22-kDa isoform to total GH. The second is based on the measurement of insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (P-III-NP) which increase in a dose-dependent manner in response to GH administration. Both methodologies have been approved by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and have led to the detection of a number of athletes misusing GH. PMID:24251151

  12. Urinary Concentrations of Steroids in Bulls under Anabolic Treatment by Revalor-XS® Implant

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Roberto; Barrucci, Federica; Lega, Francesca; Angeletti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Despite the European ban of using anabolics in food-producing animals, growth promoters might still be illegally used in the European Union. To control the food chain and guarantee consumers' health, there is a need of highly sensitive analytical methods for the identification of marker residues of such treatments. In the present study, a group of bulls (n = 16) received trenbolone acetate (200 mg) and estradiol (40 mg) by a commercial ear implant during a time range of 71 days, and a second group (n = 16) was kept for control. The aim of the research was to measure the residual urinary concentrations of the administered drugs (β-trenbolone and β-estradiol), their main metabolites (α-trenbolone and α-estradiol), and possible alterations of the urinary profile of other endogenous hormones metabolically related. The analytical method was based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed average urinary concentrations of α-trenbolone and α-estradiol during treatment in the range of (0.81 ÷ 2.1) ng mL−1 and (0.96 ÷ 4.4) ng mL−1, respectively, whereas β-trenbolone and β-estradiol exhibit urinary concentrations lower than 0.22 ng mL−1 in both cases. Data obtained from the urinary profiles of endogenous steroids indicate that they could be useful to indirectly detect the ongoing treatment. PMID:27840769

  13. Altered gonadal steroidogenesis in critical illness: is treatment with anabolic steroids indicated?

    PubMed

    Spratt, D I

    2001-12-01

    The physiology of the reproductive system changes dramatically with the onset of major illness. The serum testosterone concentrations fall to pre-pubertal levels secondary to a decreased secretion of gonadotropins and a decreased Leydig cell response to luteinizing hormone. At the same time, the serum oestrogen concentration rises as the result of an increased rate of peripheral aromatization. The clinical consequences of these marked changes are not yet well understood. One line of evidence argues for the administration of anabolic steroids (derivatives of testosterone) to critically ill patients to improve their catabolic state. Another line of evidence in animal models suggests that testosterone may suppress the immune system and myocardial function in critical illness. No clinical trials of oestrogen administration to critically ill patients have been reported, although two animal studies suggest that oestrogen may have a positive effect on survival. This chapter reviews changes in the physiology of the reproductive system in major illness as well as current evidence regarding the clinical effects of androgens and oestrogens in critical illness and their potential therapeutic roles.

  14. What can allostasis tell us about anabolic-androgenic steroid addiction?

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Yehuda, Rachel; Alfano, Lauren

    2011-08-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) are synthetic hormones used by individuals who want to look better or perform better in athletics and at the gym. Their use raises an interesting paradox in which drug use is associated with a number of health benefits, but also the possibility of negative health consequences. Existing models of AAS addiction follow the traditional framework of drug abuse and dependence, which suggest that harmful use occurs as a result of the drug's ability to hijack the motivation-reward system. However, AASs, unlike typical drugs of abuse, are not used for acute intoxication effects or euphoria. Rather, AASs are used to affect the body through changes to the musculoskeletal system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis as opposed to stimulating the reward system. We offer an allostatic model of AAS addiction to resolve this inconsistency between traditional drug addiction and AAS addiction. This allostatic framework provides a way to (a) incorporate exercise into AAS misuse, (b) identify where AAS use transitions from recreational use into a drug problem, and (c) describe individual differences in vulnerability or resilience to AASs. Implications for this model of AAS addiction are discussed.

  15. Effects of anabolic androgenic steroids and social subjugation on behavior and neurochemistry in male rats.

    PubMed

    Frahm, Krystle A; Lumia, Augustus R; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Strong, Randy; Roberts, James L; McGinnis, Marilyn Y

    2011-01-01

    Early abuse and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) both increase aggression. We assessed the behavioral and neurochemical consequences of AAS, alone or in combination with social subjugation (SS), an animal model of child abuse. On P26, gonadally intact male rats began SS consisting of daily pairings with an adult male for 2 weeks followed by daily injections of the AAS, testosterone on P40. As adults, males were tested for sexual and aggressive behaviors towards females in various hormonal conditions and inter-male aggression in a neutral setting using home or opponent bedding. Neurotransmitter levels were assessed using HPLC. Results showed that AAS males displayed significantly more mounts toward sexually receptive, vaginally obstructed females (OBS) and displayed significantly more threats towards ovariectomized females. SS males mounted OBS females significantly less and were not aggressive toward females. The role of olfactory cues in a neutral setting did not affect aggression regardless of treatment. AAS significantly increased brainstem DOPAC and NE. SS decreased 5HIAA, DA, DOPAC, and NE in brainstem. 5HIAA was significantly increased in the prefrontal cortex of all experimental groups. We conclude that AAS and SS differentially affect behavior towards females as well as neurotransmitter levels.

  16. Hormonal regulators of muscle and metabolism in aging (HORMA): Design and conduct of a complex, double-masked, multicenter trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Older persons often lose muscle mass, strength, and physical function. This report describes the challenges of conducting a complex clinical investigation assessing the effects of anabolic hormones on body composition, physical function, and metabolism during aging. METHODS: HORMA is a m...

  17. Dissolved Organic Matter Assisted Transport of Hormones Through An Agricultural Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jann, S.; Totsche, K. U.; Koegel-Knabner, I.; Schiffer, B.; Meyer, H. H. D.

    In the last years the disrupting activity of steroidal sex hormones like estrogens has been discussed for various ecosystems and even for human fertility. Once released into the environment, steroids pose a severe risk to fauna and man. After excretion of the relevant compounds or their metabolites by the target animals, the transition of biologically active substances via dung or manure onto soils and into the groundwa- ter cannot be excluded. Yet there is only little knowledge on the stability, degradation and transport pathways of steroids in soils. Just as little is known about the fate of anabolic steroids which are licensed as growth promotants for farm animals in many meat-exporting countries outside the EU (e.g. USA, Australia). We therefore studied the transport of Trenbolone-17 and Melengestrolacetate (MGA) with col- umn experiments employing aggregated agricultural field soil materials (Luvisol E and Bt horizons). The columns (14.6 cm in height, 4.7 cm in diameter) were perco- lated from bottom to top using a peristaltic pump. The mean volumetric flow rate was kept constant throughout the experiments at 20 ml h-1. Chloride was used as nonreac- tive tracer. The flow regime is controlled by two flow regions reflecting the dual mode pore size distribution of the aggregated soil material. Our results show that although the very high KOC values U Trenbolone: 24311 within the E-horizon; 21622 within the Bt-horizon and MGA: 16708 within the E-horizon; 59459 within the Bt horizon - we observe a quick breakthrough of low concentrations of the hormones simultaneous with the non-reactive tracer chloride. This points to the fact that within aggregated field soil, the risk for deep seepage of low concentrations of hormones is high.

  18. Bilateral deltoid myositis ossificans in a weightlifter using anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Schultzel, Mark M; Johnson, Michael H; Rosenthal, Howard G

    2014-09-01

    A 40-year-old male weightlifter presented with a 6-month history of a painless mass in the right deltoid. He had no history of trauma to the shoulder other than an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair a few weeks earlier. Physical examination showed a firm, nontender mass located longitudinally and coinciding with the deltoid, measuring 12×14×4 cm. There was no limitation in range of motion or functioning. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans suggested a lobulated, heterogeneous mass with multiple areas of calcification that raised suspicion for soft tissue sarcoma vs myositis ossificans. Marginal resection of the soft tissue mass was performed, and pathologic studies confirmed the diagnosis of xanthogranulomatous myositis ossificans with dystrophic calcifications and central cystic degeneration. At 2-week follow-up, the patient had improved range of motion and pain, but he noted a second soft tissue mass in the left deltoid. The MRI and CT scans showed a 10.5×16×3.4-cm linear, lobulated lesion with multiple calcifications, similar in appearance to the contralateral deltoid. The patient admitted to frequently injecting anabolic steroids into his deltoids. Because the patient was asymptomatic on the left side and the MRI appearance of the left deltoid mass was similar to that of the myositis ossificans seen on the right side, the patient opted for nonsurgical treatment. This is a rare case of myositis ossificans occurring bilaterally in the deltoids after repeated injections of anabolic steroids. There is currently no known association between anabolic steroids and myositis ossificans. This condition often mimics malignant neoplasms, illustrating the necessity of resection for diagnostic confirmation.

  19. Hormones as doping in sports.

    PubMed

    Duntas, Leonidas H; Popovic, Vera

    2013-04-01

    Though we may still sing today, as did Pindar in his eighth Olympian Victory Ode, "… of no contest greater than Olympia, Mother of Games, gold-wreathed Olympia…", we must sadly admit that today, besides blatant over-commercialization, there is no more ominous threat to the Olympic games than doping. Drug-use methods are steadily becoming more sophisticated and ever harder to detect, increasingly demanding the use of complex analytical procedures of biotechnology and molecular medicine. Special emphasis is thus given to anabolic androgenic steroids, recombinant growth hormone and erythropoietin as well as to gene doping, the newly developed mode of hormones abuse which, for its detection, necessitates high-tech methodology but also multidisciplinary individual measures incorporating educational and psychological methods. In this Olympic year, the present review offers an update on the current technologically advanced endocrine methods of doping while outlining the latest procedures applied-including both the successes and pitfalls of proteomics and metabolomics-to detect doping while contributing to combating this scourge.

  20. OVERVIEW OF EXPOSURE TO DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS AND PCBS ON DEVELOPMENTAL, IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE, AND HORMONE-RELATED EFFECTS IN MAMMALS, INCLUDING HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to TCDD and related compounds leads to a plethora of effects in multiple species, tissues and stages of development. The response spectrum ranges from simple biochemical alterations to overtly toxic responses, including lethality. Many of the effects of TCDD and relate...

  1. Anabolic androgenic steroids, an easily forgotten cause of polycythaemia and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Low, M S Y; Vilcassim, S; Fedele, P; Grigoriadis, G

    2016-04-01

    Excessive anabolic androgenic steroids (both exogenous and endogenous) are known causes of polycythaemia and ischaemic cardiovascular events. Despite this, they are commonly forgotten in the workup of patients. We report a case of exogenous anabolic androgenic steroid-induced polycythaemia and stroke and explore possible pitfalls for clinicians.

  2. 76 FR 72355 - Classification of Two Steroids, Prostanozol and Methasterone, as Schedule III Anabolic Steroids...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... corticosteroids, treatment of delayed puberty in boys, treatment of metastatic breast cancer in women, and... stunted growth due to premature closure of the growth plates in long bones. In adolescent boys, anabolic steroid abuse can cause precocious sexual development. In both girls and women, anabolic steroid...

  3. Anabolic Steroids: A Threat to Body and Mind. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report, based on findings of recent studies on the use of anabolic steroids in the United States, was written to educate the public about these drugs and the dangers of misusing them. It notes that the nonmedical use of anabolic/androgenic steroids among adolescents and young adults is of growing concern, with possibly as many as half a…

  4. Systemic lupus erythematosus with membranous glomerulonephritis and transverse myelitis associated with anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Radis, C D; Callis, K P

    1997-10-01

    This report describes a 29-year-old bodybuilder taking anabolic steroids who presented with urinary retention, arthralgias, and peripheral edema, subsequently developed acute lower-extremity paralysis, and was diagnosed as having transverse myelitis and membranous glomerulonephritis secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The association of anabolic steroid use and hyperprolactinemia, and their possible link to the development of SLE, are reviewed.

  5. Quo vadis plant hormone analysis?

    PubMed

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Novák, Ondřej; Floková, Kristýna; Tarkowski, Petr; Turečková, Veronika; Grúz, Jiří; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav

    2014-07-01

    Plant hormones act as chemical messengers in the regulation of myriads of physiological processes that occur in plants. To date, nine groups of plant hormones have been identified and more will probably be discovered. Furthermore, members of each group may participate in the regulation of physiological responses in planta both alone and in concert with members of either the same group or other groups. The ideal way to study biochemical processes involving these signalling molecules is 'hormone profiling', i.e. quantification of not only the hormones themselves, but also their biosynthetic precursors and metabolites in plant tissues. However, this is highly challenging since trace amounts of all of these substances are present in highly complex plant matrices. Here, we review advances, current trends and future perspectives in the analysis of all currently known plant hormones and the associated problems of extracting them from plant tissues and separating them from the numerous potentially interfering compounds.

  6. Modelling the anabolic response of bone using a cell population model.

    PubMed

    Buenzli, Pascal R; Pivonka, Peter; Gardiner, Bruce S; Smith, David W

    2012-08-21

    To maintain bone mass during bone remodelling, coupling is required between bone resorption and bone formation. This coordination is achieved by a network of autocrine and paracrine signalling molecules between cells of the osteoclastic lineage and cells of the osteoblastic lineage. Mathematical modelling of signalling between cells of both lineages can assist in the interpretation of experimental data, clarify signalling interactions and help develop a deeper understanding of complex bone diseases. Several mathematical models of bone cell interactions have been developed, some including RANK-RANKL-OPG signalling between cells and systemic parathyroid hormone PTH. However, to our knowledge these models do not currently include key aspects of some more recent biological evidence for anabolic responses. In this paper, we further develop a mathematical model of bone cell interactions by Pivonka et al. (2008) to include the proliferation of precursor osteoblasts into the model. This inclusion is important to be able to account for Wnt signalling, believed to play an important role in the anabolic responses of bone. We show that an increased rate of differentiation to precursor cells or an increased rate of proliferation of precursor osteoblasts themselves both result in increased bone mass. However, modelling these different processes separately enables the new model to represent recent experimental discoveries such as the role of Wnt signalling in bone biology and the recruitment of osteoblast progenitor cells by transforming growth factor β. Finally, we illustrate the power of the new model's capabilities by applying the model to prostate cancer metastasis to bone. In the bone microenvironment, prostate cancer cells are believed to release some of the same signalling molecules used to coordinate bone remodelling (i.e.,Wnt and PTHrP), enabling the cancer cells to disrupt normal signalling and coordination between bone cells. This disruption can lead to either bone

  7. Spatiotemporal variations in estrogenicity, hormones, and endocrine-disrupting compounds in influents and effluents of selected wastewater-treatment plants and receiving streams in New York, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Ernst, Anne G.; Gray, James L.; Hemming, Jocelyn D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in wastewater effluents have been linked to changes in sex ratios, intersex (in males), behavioral modifications, and developmental abnormalities in aquatic organisms. Yet efforts to identify and regulate specific EDCs in complex mixtures are problematic because little is known about the estrogen activity (estrogenicity) levels of many common and emerging contaminants. The potential effects of EDCs on the water quality and health of biota in streams of the New York City water supply is especially worrisome because more than 150 wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) are permitted to discharge effluents into surface waters and groundwaters of watersheds that provide potable water to more than 9 million people. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), and New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) began a pilot study to increase the understanding of estrogenicity and EDCs in effluents and receiving streams mainly in southeastern New York. The primary goals of this study were to document and assess the spatial and temporal variability of estrogenicity levels; the effectiveness of various treatment-plant types to remove estrogenicity; the concentrations of hormones, EDCs, and pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs); and the relations between estrogenicity and concentrations of hormones, EDCs, and PPCPs. The levels of estrogenicity and selected hormones, non-hormone EDCs, and PPCPs were characterized in samples collected seasonally in effluents from 7 WWTPs, once or twice in effluents from 34 WWTPs, and once in influents to 6 WWTPs. Estrogenicity was quantified, as estradiol equivalents, using both the biological e-screen assay and a chemical model. Results generally show that (1) estrogenicity levels in effluents varied spatially and seasonally, (2) a wide range of known and unknown EDCs

  8. Anabolic and Antiresorptive Modulation of Bone Homeostasis by the Epigenetic Modulator Sulforaphane, a Naturally Occurring Isothiocyanate*

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Roman; Maurizi, Antonio; Roschger, Paul; Sturmlechner, Ines; Khani, Farzaneh; Spitzer, Silvia; Rumpler, Monika; Zwerina, Jochen; Karlic, Heidrun; Dudakovic, Amel; Klaushofer, Klaus; Teti, Anna; Rucci, Nadia; Varga, Franz; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2016-01-01

    Bone degenerative pathologies like osteoporosis may be initiated by age-related shifts in anabolic and catabolic responses that control bone homeostasis. Here we show that sulforaphane (SFN), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate, promotes osteoblast differentiation by epigenetic mechanisms. SFN enhances active DNA demethylation via Tet1 and Tet2 and promotes preosteoblast differentiation by enhancing extracellular matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblastic markers (Runx2, Col1a1, Bglap2, Sp7, Atf4, and Alpl). SFN decreases the expression of the osteoclast activator receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in osteocytes and mouse calvarial explants and preferentially induces apoptosis in preosteoclastic cells via up-regulation of the Tet1/Fas/Caspase 8 and Caspase 3/7 pathway. These mechanistic effects correlate with higher bone volume (∼20%) in both normal and ovariectomized mice treated with SFN for 5 weeks compared with untreated mice as determined by microcomputed tomography. This effect is due to a higher trabecular number in these mice. Importantly, no shifts in mineral density distribution are observed upon SFN treatment as measured by quantitative backscattered electron imaging. Our data indicate that the food-derived compound SFN epigenetically stimulates osteoblast activity and diminishes osteoclast bone resorption, shifting the balance of bone homeostasis and favoring bone acquisition and/or mitigation of bone resorption in vivo. Thus, SFN is a member of a new class of epigenetic compounds that could be considered for novel strategies to counteract osteoporosis. PMID:26757819

  9. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria G.; Tucci, Paolo; Bove, Maria; Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming androgen anabolic steroids (AAS). These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, their off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combinations of different steroids and doses generally higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. The frequency of side effects is higher among AAS abusers, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because data collection is very difficult due to the subjects' reticence and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in the reward process, leading to increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The goal of this article is to review the literature on steroid abuse and changes to the reward system in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26379484

  10. Hormone replacement therapy and physical function in healthy older men. Time to talk hormones?

    PubMed

    Giannoulis, Manthos G; Martin, Finbarr C; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Umpleby, A Margot; Sonksen, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Improving physical function and mobility in a continuously expanding elderly population emerges as a high priority of medicine today. Muscle mass, strength/power, and maximal exercise capacity are major determinants of physical function, and all decline with aging. This contributes to the incidence of frailty and disability observed in older men. Furthermore, it facilitates the accumulation of body fat and development of insulin resistance. Muscle adaptation to exercise is strongly influenced by anabolic endocrine hormones and local load-sensitive autocrine/paracrine growth factors. GH, IGF-I, and testosterone (T) are directly involved in muscle adaptation to exercise because they promote muscle protein synthesis, whereas T and locally expressed IGF-I have been reported to activate muscle stem cells. Although exercise programs improve physical function, in the long-term most older men fail to comply. The GH/IGF-I axis and T levels decline markedly with aging, whereas accumulating evidence supports their indispensable role in maintaining physical function integrity. Several studies have reported that the administration of T improves lean body mass and maximal voluntary strength in healthy older men. On the other hand, most studies have shown that administration of GH alone failed to improve muscle strength despite amelioration of the detrimental somatic changes of aging. Both GH and T are anabolic agents that promote muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy but work through separate mechanisms, and the combined administration of GH and T, albeit in only a few studies, has resulted in greater efficacy than either hormone alone. Although it is clear that this combined approach is effective, this review concludes that further studies are needed to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of combined hormone replacement therapy in older men before the medical rationale of prescribing hormone replacement therapy for combating the sarcopenia of aging can be established.

  11. Determination of the prevalence of anabolic steroids, stimulants, and selected drugs subject to doping controls among elite sport students using analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Sauer, Michael; Geyer, Hans; Sigmund, Gerd; Mareck, Ute; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-08-01

    Drug abuse by adolescents has been investigated in various surveys that reported correlations between age, gender, and activity. However, none of these studies included chemical analyses to help substantiate the statements of participants. In the present study, the urine specimens of 964 students (439 females, 525 males; mean age 22.1 years, s = 1.7), who applied to study sports sciences at university, were assessed for anabolic steroids, stimulants, and selected drugs prohibited in sports. In total, 11.2% of the urine specimens provided contained drugs covered by doping controls. The most frequently detected compound was the major metabolite of tetrahydrocannabinol (9.8%) followed by various stimulants related to amphetamine and cocaine (1.0%). Indications of anabolic steroid use were found in 0.4% of urine samples but originated from contraceptives containing norethisterone. The present study provided unambiguous data on the status quo of drug (ab)use by adolescents hoping for a career related to elite sport or sports sciences. No use of anabolic steroids was detected. However, evidence for stimulants and tetrahydrocannabinol administration was obtained, although not reported by any participant, which highlights the issue of under-reporting in surveys based solely on questionnaires.

  12. Vasopressin differentially modulates aggression and anxiety in adolescent hamsters administered anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Thomas R; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2016-11-01

    Adolescent Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with anabolic/androgenic steroids display increased offensive aggression and decreased anxiety correlated with an increase in vasopressin afferent development, synthesis, and neural signaling within the anterior hypothalamus. Upon withdrawal from anabolic/androgenic steroids, this neurobehavioral relationship shifts as hamsters display decreased offensive aggression and increased anxiety correlated with a decrease in anterior hypothalamic vasopressin. This study investigated the hypothesis that alterations in anterior hypothalamic vasopressin neural signaling modulate behavioral shifting between adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced offensive aggression and anxiety. To test this, adolescent male hamsters were administered anabolic/androgenic steroids and tested for offensive aggression or anxiety following direct pharmacological manipulation of vasopressin V1A receptor signaling within the anterior hypothalamus. Blockade of anterior hypothalamic vasopressin V1A receptor signaling suppressed offensive aggression and enhanced general and social anxiety in hamsters administered anabolic/androgenic steroids during adolescence, effectively reversing the pattern of behavioral response pattern normally observed during the adolescent exposure period. Conversely, activation of anterior hypothalamic vasopressin V1A receptor signaling enhanced offensive aggression in hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids during adolescence. Together, these findings suggest that the state of vasopressin neural development and signaling in the anterior hypothalamus plays an important role in behavioral shifting between aggression and anxiety following adolescent exposure to anabolic/androgenic steroids.

  13. Synchronous deficits in cumulative muscle protein synthesis and ribosomal biogenesis underlie age‐related anabolic resistance to exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Matthew S.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Mitchell, William K.; Lund, Jonathan N.; Phillips, Bethan E.; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Smith, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Key points Resistance exercise training (RET) is one of the most effective strategies for preventing declines in skeletal muscle mass and strength with age.Hypertrophic responses to RET with age are diminished compared to younger individuals.In response to 6 weeks RET, we found blunted hypertrophic responses with age are underpinned by chronic deficits in long‐term muscle protein synthesis.We show this is likely to be the result of multifactorial deficits in anabolic hormones and blunted translational efficiency and capacity.These results provide great insight into age‐related exercise adaptations and provide a platform on which to devise appropriate nutritional and exercise interventions on a longer term basis. Abstract Ageing is associated with impaired hypertrophic responses to resistance exercise training (RET). Here we investigated the aetiology of ‘anabolic resistance’ in older humans. Twenty healthy male individuals, 10 younger (Y; 23 ± 1 years) and 10 older (O; 69 ± 3 years), performed 6 weeks unilateral RET (6 × 8 repetitions, 75% of one repetition maximum (1‐RM), 3 times per week). After baseline bilateral vastus lateralis (VL) muscle biopsies, subjects consumed 150 ml D2O (70 atom%; thereafter 50 ml week−1), further bilateral VL muscle biopsies were taken at 3 and 6 weeks to quantify muscle protein synthesis (MPS) via gas chromatography–pyrolysis–isotope ratio mass spectrometry. After RET, 1‐RM increased in Y (+35 ± 4%) and O (+25 ± 3%; P < 0.01), while MVC increased in Y (+21 ± 5%; P < 0.01) but not O (+6 ± 3%; not significant (NS)). In comparison to Y, O displayed blunted RET‐induced increases in muscle thickness (at 3 and 6 weeks, respectively, Y: +8 ± 1% and +11 ± 2%, P < 0.01; O: +2.6 ± 1% and +3.5 ± 2%, NS). While ‘basal’ longer term MPS was identical between Y and O (∼1.35 ± 0.1% day−1), MPS increased in response to RET only in Y (3 weeks, Y: 1.61 ± 0.1%

  14. Dioxin-like and perfluorinated compounds in pigs in an Indian open waste dumping site: toxicokinetics and effects on hepatic cytochrome P450 and blood plasma hormones.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Michio X; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Tao, Lin; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Iwata, Hisato

    2010-07-01

    Dioxins and related compounds (DRCs) and perfluorinated compounds were measured in the livers of pigs (Sus scrofa) collected from an open waste dumping site in South India. Hepatic concentrations of DRCs and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS; up to 200 ng/g wet wt) were significantly higher in male and female pigs, respectively, collected from the dumping site than in those from a reference site. Results suggest that dumping sites are a source of DRCs and PFOS. Hepatic concentrations of DRCs in piglets were higher than in mothers, especially for the congeners with molecular weights in the range of 360 to 400, implying congener-specific maternal transfer of DRCs in swine. Concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and some non-ortho dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the liver of pigs were higher than those in the adipose fat and muscle of the same specimens. In addition, the liver-to-adipose concentration ratios for each congener had a significant positive correlation with the levels of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A-like protein, suggesting congener-specific and CYP1A-dependent hepatic sequestration of DRCs in the swine. Total hepatic 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs; 8.9-350 pg/g fat wt) had a significant positive correlation with CYP1A-like protein expression (r=0.56, p=0.012), suggesting the induction of CYP1A by DRCs. However, the total TEQs had a significant negative correlation with CYP4A-like protein (r=-0.49, p=0.029), suggesting repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha)-mediated signaling pathway by DRCs. Decreases in plasma total thyroxine (T4), free T4, and immunoglobulin (Ig) G were also found in pigs from the dumping site compared with those from the reference site. This study provides insight into the toxicological impacts of DRCs and perfluorinated compounds in wild animals from open waste dumping sites.

  15. In silico investigations of potential anabolic treatments in multiple myeloma-induced bone disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Lin, Bo

    2013-07-01

    No anabolic drugs are currently approved to treat multiple myeloma (MM)-induced bone disease and the anti-MM agent bortezomib exhibits the anabolic effects in the clinic. In this study, we focus on investigating potential anabolic treatments of MM-induced bone disease using our previously proposed MM-bone model, with the goal for clarifying the underlying molecular/cellular mechanisms. Firstly, a variety of virtual drug treatments are explored by the parametric study to clarify the anabolic-related molecular/cellular mechanisms. The real drug (i.e., bortezomib) treatments are further examined by developing an integrated model with bortezomib to validate the clarified anabolic-related molecular/cellular mechanisms. The simulated responses to the bortezomib treatments that are validated by the clinical data are consistent with the simulated responses to the virtual drug treatments. Our study clarifies that the anabolic effects in the treatment of MM-induced bone disease are associated with promoting the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and inhibiting the apoptosis of active osteoblasts, while promoting the differentiation of osteoblast precursors is instead suggested to be associated with the anti-catabolic effects. Compared with the individual anabolic therapies, the anabolic therapies that promote the differentiation of BMSC in combination with the anti-MM/anti-catabolic therapies are found to induce a greater increase in the bone volume, while the anabolic therapies that inhibit the apoptosis of active osteoblasts in combination with the anti-MM/anti-catabolic therapies induce a lower increase in the bone volume. The simulations also suggest that the direct inhibition of bortezomib on the osteoclast activity is probably a redundant mechanism.

  16. Hormonal control of aging in rodents: The somatotropic axis

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Borg, Holly M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing body of literature focusing on the somatotropic axis and regulation of aging and longevity. Many of these reports derive data from multiple endocrine mutants, those that exhibit both elevated growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) or deficiencies in one or both of these hormones. In general, both spontaneous and genetically engineered GH and IGF-1 deficiencies have lead to small body size, delayed development of sexual maturation and age-related pathology, and life span extension. In contrast, characteristics of high circulating GH included larger body sizes, early puberty and reproductive senescence, increased cancer incidence and reduced life span when compared to wild-type animals with normal plasma hormone concentrations. This information, along with that found in multiple other species, implicates this anabolic pathway as the major regulator of longevity in animals. PMID:18674587

  17. Anabolic-androgenic steroid use among Brazilian bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Fabiana Ranielle de Siqueira; Brito, Aline de Freitas; Oliveira, Caio Victor Coutinho de; Vieira, Thaiza Isidro; Gouveia, Rachel Linka Beniz

    2014-07-01

    This cross-sectional, quantitative, exploratory study investigated the prevalence and profile of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users amongst a convenience sample of 510 bodybuilders from 52 gyms, in João Pessoa, Brazil, with a structured questionnaire containing selected questions about socioeconomic and training variables on the use of AAS. Data were analyzed using frequency and chi-square tests. AAS prevalence use was 20.6%; mostly young men (98.1%), of a low education level (46.7%), who trained for more than 4 years (49.5%). The use of AAS was related to the use of dietary supplements. About 81% of consumed AAS consisted of Deca-Durabolin, Winstrol, and Sustanon. Study's limitations are noted.

  18. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Robert D.; Elliot, Diane L.; Goldberg, Linn; Kanayama, Gen; Leone, James E.; Pavlovich, Mike; Pope, Harrison G.

    2012-01-01

    This NATA position statement was developed by the NATA Research & Education Foundation. Objective This manuscript summarizes the best available scholarly evidence related to anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) as a reference for health care professionals, including athletic trainers, educators, and interested others. Background Health care professionals associated with sports or exercise should understand and be prepared to educate others about AAS. These synthetic, testosterone-based derivatives are widely abused by athletes and nonathletes to gain athletic performance advantages, develop their physiques, and improve their body image. Although AAS can be ergogenic, their abuse may lead to numerous negative health effects. Recommendations Abusers of AAS often rely on questionable information sources. Sports medicine professionals can therefore serve an important role by providing accurate, reliable information. The recommendations provide health care professionals with a current and accurate synopsis of the AAS-related research. PMID:23068595

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of Chondrocyte Catabolism and Anabolism in Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeonkyeong; Kang, Donghyun; Cho, Yongsik; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent forms of joint disorder, associated with a tremendous socioeconomic burden worldwide. Various non-genetic and lifestyle-related factors such as aging and obesity have been recognized as major risk factors for OA, underscoring the potential role for epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of the disease. OA-associated epigenetic aberrations have been noted at the level of DNA methylation and histone modification in chondrocytes. These epigenetic regulations are implicated in driving an imbalance between the expression of catabolic and anabolic factors, leading eventually to osteoarthritic cartilage destruction. Cellular senescence and metabolic abnormalities driven by OA-associated risk factors appear to accompany epigenetic drifts in chondrocytes. Notably, molecular events associated with metabolic disorders influence epigenetic regulation in chondrocytes, supporting the notion that OA is a metabolic disease. Here, we review accumulating evidence supporting a role for epigenetics in the regulation of cartilage homeostasis and OA pathogenesis.

  20. Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2009-12-01

    The nonmedical use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) appeals to athletes across several sports, particularly those whose activity makes muscle size and strength advantageous, and in individuals (usually men) with body dysmorphic disorder. Patterns of nonmedical use, including supratherapeutic doses of illicitly obtained drugs, increase the risk for adverse psychiatric and other medical consequences. Although AAS users may be more likely to consult physicians for nonpsychiatric medical consequences than changes in their mental status, it is argued that the motivation for persistent use despite adverse consequences is sustained in large part by psychological variables. Therefore, all physicians who treat nonmedical AAS users will benefit from an understanding of these psychological variables, including the potential for AAS to cause dependence. This article aims to aid such understanding, and guidelines are suggested for assessment and treatment of nonmedical AAS users.

  1. Myeloid regeneration after whole body irradiation, autologous bone marrow transplantation, and treatment with an anabolic steroid.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, C M; Ambrus, J L

    1975-01-01

    Stumptail monkeys (Macaca speciosa) received lethal whole body radiation. Autologous bone marrow injection resulted in survival of the majority of the animals. Treatment with Deca-Durabolin, an anabolic steroid, caused more rapid recovery of colony-forming cell numbers in the bone marrow than in control animals. Both the Deca-Durabolin-treated and control groups were given autologous bone marrow transplantation. Anabolic steroid effect on transplanted bone marrow colonyforming cells may explain the increased rate of leukopoietic regeneration in anabolic steroid-treated animals as compared to controls.

  2. Anabolic Steroid Abuse among Teenage Girls: An Illusory Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Boynes, Matthew; Hudson, James I.; Field, Alison E.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent media reports have portrayed an alarming increase in apparent anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use among American teenage girls; Congress even held hearings on the subject in June 2005. We questioned whether AAS use among teenage girls was as widespread as claimed. Methods We reviewed four large national surveys and many smaller surveys examining the prevalence of AAS use among teenage girls. Virtually all of these surveys used anonymous questionnaires. We asked particularly whether the language of survey questions might generate false-positive responses among girls who misinterpreted the term “steroid.” We also reviewed data from other countries, together with results from the only recent study (to our knowledge) in which investigators personally interviewed female AAS users. Results The surveys produced remarkably disparate findings, with the lifetime prevalence of AAS use estimated as high as 7.3% among ninth-grade girls in one study, but only 0.1% among teenage girls in several others. Upon examining the surveys reporting an elevated prevalence, it appeared that most used questions that failed to distinguish between anabolic steroids, corticosteroids, and over-the-counter supplements that respondents might confuse with “steroids.” Other features in the phrasing of certain questions also seemed likely to further bias results in favor of false-positive responses. Conclusions Many anonymous surveys, using imprecise questions, appear to have greatly overestimated the lifetime prevalence of AAS use among teenage girls; the true lifetime prevalence may well be as low as 0.1%. Future studies can test this impression by using a carefully phrased question regarding AAS use. PMID:17127018

  3. Hepatic neoplasms associated with contraceptive and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Ishak, K G

    1979-01-01

    This paper evaluates the differences between HCA (hepatocellular adenoma) and FNH (focal nodular hyperplasia) and the association of HCA and FNH with OC (oral contraceptives). FNH occurs at least twice as frequent in females as in males. A study conducted by the author revealed that only 20% of patients with FNH had symptoms and signs related to their neoplasms; in the rest, FNH was accidentally discovered during surgery for diseases of the gallbladder or at necropsy. The highly characteristic gross appearance of FNH is discribed in detail. The etiologic relationship between FNH and OC was cited in the light of frequent findings of FNH in infants and children, and of suggestions by other authors that FNH could be a direct result on OC therapy or that contraceptive steroids or conjugated estrogens accelerate the growth of FNH, a very slow growing neoplasm. Simple excision is the treatment of choice for FNH; in some cases, hepatic artery ligation is indicated. In the case of HCA, statistics show that the incidence of HCA has been increasing since 1960. Majority of patients with HCA have normal tests of hepatic function. Radiographic studies and hepatic scans may reveal HCA, but the best diagnostic method so far is angiography. Although gross appearance of HCA is variable, the features are clearly distinguishable from that of FNH. Other topics discussed include the occasional occurence of nodular regenerative hyperplasia in patients on OC or anabolic steroids (AS), and malignant liver tumors in patients using OC or AS. Further research should be done to clarify the etiologic relationship between androgenic-anabolic steroids and hepatocellular tumors and tumorlike lesions.

  4. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  5. The Availability and Acquisition of Illicit Anabolic Androgenic Steroids and Testosterone Preparations on the Internet.

    PubMed

    McBride, J Abram; Carson, Culley C; Coward, Matt

    2016-05-11

    The lifetime prevalence of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) use in the United States is over 1%. Recent reports have suggested AAS can easily be obtained over the Internet without a prescription, but this has been poorly studied. This study focused on determining the availability and ease of purchase for AAS, testosterone, and other non-AAS therapies on the Internet from the perspective of a typical consumer. A Google search was performed and the top-ranking sites offering AAS for sale were individually evaluated for selection of AAS offered, the purchasing process, and additional consumer information to support AAS use. The current results revealed that 87% of sites offered commonly used forms of AAS, injectable testosterone, and non-AAS hormone therapies. Seventy-five percent offered at least one postcycle recovery agent and 62% offered at least one erectile dysfunction medication. No site required a prescription for purchase of any substance, 75% accepted common forms of payment including credit card, and all sites were supplied by unregulated international pharmacies providing shipment to home addresses with disclaimers that consumers are liable to local laws. Seventy-five percent of sites provided specific cycle and stacking recommendations, 62% provided postcycle recovery information, but only one site offered information on non-AAS alternatives. In conclusion, AAS, injectable testosterone, and other non-AAS therapies are readily available and remarkably easy to purchase on the Internet without a prescription. It is of paramount importance that clinicians are aware of this considerable public health problem given the detrimental physiologic effects including infertility and sexual dysfunction.

  6. A naturally occurring naringenin derivative exerts potent bone anabolic effects by mimicking oestrogen action on osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Swarnkar, Gaurav; Sharan, Kunal; Siddiqui, Jawed A; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Khan, Kainat; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Gupta, Varsha; Rawat, Preeti; Maurya, Rakesh; Dwivedi, Anil K; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Naringenin and its derivatives have been assessed in bone health for their oestrogen-‘like’ effects but low bioavailability impedes clinical potential. This study was aimed at finding a potent form of naringenin with osteogenic action. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Osteoblast cultures were harvested from mouse calvaria to study differentiation by naringenin, isosakuranetin, poncirin, phloretin and naringenin-6-C-glucoside (NCG). Balb/cByJ ovariectomized (OVx) mice without or with osteopenia were given naringenin, NCG, 17β-oestradiol (E2) or parathyroid hormone (PTH). Efficacy was evaluated by bone microarchitecture using microcomputed tomography and determination of new bone formation by fluorescent labelling of bone. Plasma levels of NCG and naringenin were determined by HPLC. KEY RESULTS NCG stimulated osteoblast differentiation more potently than naringenin, while isosakuranetin, poncirin or phloretin had no effect. NCG had better oral bioavailability than naringenin. NCG increased the mRNA levels of oestrogen receptors (ERs) and bone morphogenetic protein (an ER responsive gene) in vivo, more than naringenin. In OVx mice, NCG treatment in a preventive protocol increased bone formation rate (BFR) and improved trabecular microarchitecture more than naringenin or E2. In osteopenic mice, NCG but not naringenin, in a therapeutic protocol, increased BFR and improved trabecular microarchitecture, comparable with effects of PTH treatment. Stimulatory effects of NCG on osteoblasts were abolished by an ER antagonist. NCG transactivated ERβ but not ERα. NCG exhibited no uterine oestrogenicity unlike naringenin. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS NCG is a potent derivative of naringenin that has bone anabolic action through the activation of osteoblast ERs and exhibited substantial oral bioavailability. PMID:21864313

  7. Anabolic androgenic steroids differentially affect social behaviors in adolescent and adult male Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Salas-Ramirez, Kaliris Y; Montalto, Pamela R; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2008-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone used by over half a million adolescents in the United States for their tissue-building potency and performance-enhancing effects. AAS also affect behavior, including reports of heightened aggression and changes in sexual libido. The expression of sexual and aggressive behaviors is a function of complex interactions among hormones, social context, and the brain, which is extensively remodeled during adolescence. Thus, AAS may have different consequences on behavior during adolescence and adulthood. Using a rodent model, these studies directly compared the effects of AAS on the expression of male sexual and aggressive behaviors in adolescents and adults. Male Syrian hamsters were injected daily for 14 days with either vehicle or an AAS cocktail containing testosterone cypionate (2 mg/kg), nandrolone decanoate (2 mg/kg), and boldenone undecylenate (1 mg/kg), either during adolescence (27-41 days of age) or in adulthood (63-77 days of age). The day after the last injection, males were tested for either sexual behavior with a receptive female or agonistic behavior with a male intruder. Adolescent males treated with AAS showed significant increases in sexual and aggressive behaviors relative to vehicle-treated adolescents. In contrast, AAS-treated adults showed significantly lower levels of sexual behavior compared with vehicle-treated adults and did not show heightened aggression. Thus, adolescents, but not adults, displayed significantly higher behavioral responses to AAS, suggesting that the still-developing adolescent brain is more vulnerable than the adult brain to the adverse consequences of AAS on the nervous system and behavior.

  8. Interactions between opioids and anabolic androgenic steroids: implications for the development of addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Fred; Hallberg, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades, research on doping agents, such as anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), has revealed that these compounds are often used in combination with other drugs of abuse. It seems that misuse of AAS probably involves more than a desire to enhance appearance or sports performance and studies have revealed that steroids are commonly connected with alcohol, opioids, tobacco, and psychotropic drugs. We have observed that AAS may interact with the endogenous opioids, excitatory amino acids, and dopaminergic pathways involved in the brain reward system. Furthermore, our studies provide evidence that AAS may induce an imbalance in these signal systems leading to an increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. In fact, studies performed in various clinics have shown that individuals taking AAS are likely to get addicted to opioids like heroin. This chapter reviews current knowledge on interactions between AAS and endogenous as well as exogenous opioids based not only on research in our laboratory but also on research carried out by several other clinical and preclinical investigators.

  9. Immunologic Intervention in HIV Infection: Anti-Polymerase Responses and Hormonal Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    cluster of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in adults without predisposing illnesses. N. Engl. J. Med. 324:246- 250. 20. Laurence J, Siegal FP, Schattner E... first model for investigation of control of HIV infection in B cells. This work also has implications for the pathogenesis of B cell lymphomas in AIDS...together with its anabolic properties, is of great interest in HIV disease. We have discovered that not only is growth hormone a potent T cell stimulant

  10. Detection and quantification of 12 anabolic steroids and analogs in human whole blood and 20 in hair using LC-HRMS/MS: application to real cases.

    PubMed

    Fabresse, Nicolas; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Etting, Isabelle; Alvarez, Jean-Claude

    2017-02-24

    We developed and validated a method to detect and quantify 12 anabolic steroids in blood (androstenedione, dihydrotestosterone, boldenone, epitestosterone, mesterolone, methandienone, nandrolone, stanozolol, norandrostenedione, tamoxifene, testosterone, trenbolone) and eight more in hair samples (nandrolone phenylpropionate, nandrolone decanoate, testosterone propionate, testosterone benzoate, testosterone cypionate, testosterone decanoate, testosterone phenylpropionate, testosterone undecanoate) using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. This method used a benchtop Orbitrap mass spectrometer operating with an APCI probe under positive ionization mode. Analysis was realized in full scan experiment with a nominal resolving power of 140,000. After addition of the internal standard (testosterone-D3) and incubation in phosphate buffer pH = 5 for hair, 200 μL of blood and 30 mg of hair samples were extracted with heptane. LOQ and LOD were determined at 5 and 1 ng mL(-1) in whole blood and 10 to 100 pg mg(-1) and 2 to 20 pg mg(-1) in hair according to the compounds, respectively. The method was linear in the 5-1000 ng mL(-1) range in whole blood and between 10 or 100 pg mg(-1) and 1000 pg mg(-1) in hair with correlation coefficients >0.99, and intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision were <14.8% for all compounds except for some esters in hairs (<19.9%) probably due to an important matrix effect for these compounds. This sensitive and specific method to detect anabolic steroids has been successfully applied to two real cases, for which various anabolic steroids in whole blood, urine, and hair were identified and quantified.

  11. Development and validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of circulating antibodies raised against growth hormone as a consequence of rbST treatment in cows.

    PubMed

    Rochereau-Roulet, Sandrine; Gaudin, Isabelle; Chéreau, Sylvain; Prévost, Stéphanie; André-Fontaine, Geneviève; Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2011-08-26

    The recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbST) is used to increase lactating performances of dairy cows. Administration of rbST is banned in the European Union; nevertheless, its use is probable. Until now, efficient analytical strategies to detect such practice are based on the direct detection by mass spectrometry of the presence of rbST in biological fluids, which suits for confirmatory purposes. Current screening strategies do not offer satisfactory performances; therefore, alternative screening strategies are required. The aim of the present work is to develop and validate an ELISA to measure the production of specific antibodies upon rbST in bovine sera. In this immunoassay, rbST is absorbed onto microtiter plate. After specific purification of the antibodies in serum, samples are analysed and the presence of antibodies anti-rbST is detected by Protein G peroxidase conjugate and 2-2'-azino di-ethyl benz-thiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS). The mean reproducibility of the OD (λ=405 nm) measurement was calculated with a CV of 13%. The intra- and inter-assay CVs ranged from 0.79% to 7.91% and from 2.69% to 20% respectively. The test presents cross-reaction with other growth hormones such as the recombinant equine (reST) and porcine (pST) (100% and 80% respectively). The specificity of the test toward rbST anabolic treatment was confirmed through the analysis of sera samples collected on animals administered with other anabolic compounds (steroids). The performances of the present anti-rbST ELISA proves its efficiency as a new screening tool to highlight illegal administration of rbST in cattle up to at least 3 weeks after treatment.

  12. Use of anabolic-androgenic steroids among body builders--frequency and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Lindström, M; Nilsson, A L; Katzman, P L; Janzon, L; Dymling, J F

    1990-06-01

    A total of 138 male body builders who regularly attended a gym participated anonymously in a study of the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in relation to side-effects, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI; kg m-2), training frequency, social background, occupation, knowledge and attitudes to steroid use. Fifty-three of the 138 body builders had used anabolic-androgenic steroids for a median duration of 2 years. Steroid use was linked to a higher BMI and more frequent training. Seventy-five per cent (n = 18) of those attending body building for competition, and 24% (n = 11) of those attending to improve their sense of well-being, used anabolic-androgenic steroids. Of all body builders, 94% considered anabolic-androgenic steroids to be dangerous. Of the users, 81% experienced side-effects, but 74% still intended to continue steroid medication.

  13. Altered Serum Lipoprotein Profiles in Male and Female Power Lifters Ingesting Anabolic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Serum lipoprotein profiles were measured in nine male and three female weightlifters who were taking anabolic steroids. The profiles suggest that steriod users may face an increased risk of coronary artery disease. (Author/MT)

  14. Acute hereditary coproporphyria induced by the androgenic/anabolic steroid methandrostenolone (Dianabol).

    PubMed

    Lane, P R; Massey, K L; Worobetz, L J; Jutras, M N; Hull, P R

    1994-02-01

    Acute attacks of porphyria can be induced by certain drugs. We report a case of acute coproporphyria induced by methandrostenolone. This is the first report of acute porphyria induced by an androgenic, anabolic steroid.

  15. Anabolic Steroids: Metabolism, Doping and Detection in Human and Equestrian Sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kicman, A. T.; Houghton, E.; Gower, D. B.

    This chapter highlights the important aspects of detection of doping with synthetic anabolic steroids and discusses some of the problems with, and solutions to, the detection of misuse of the naturally occurring ones.

  16. The Use and Abuse of Anabolic Steroids: A Discussion for Health and Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John A.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    This article reviews research on anabolic steroids, indicating that athletes are mistaken in believing that taking them will improve their physical performance. Dangerous side-effects are also discussed. (JA)

  17. [Effect of an anabolic steroid on the cellular immunity and postoperative evaluation of uterine cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Ooshika, Y; Umesaki, N; Sako, H; Kawabata, M; Sugana, T

    1984-10-01

    The effects of an anabolic steroid on the immune activity and clinical condition of patients with cancer of the uterine cervix were studied. The effects of the steroid on tumor growth were also studied in animals. The results obtained demonstrated that the anabolic steroid (1) enhanced the activity of macrophages and cell-mediated immune activity, (2) reduced the incidence of post-operative infection, (3) reduced pose-operative loss of weight of patients due to the intrinsic anabolic activity of the steroid, and (4) did not exert any influence on tumor growth. Judging from these results, administration of the anabolic steroid would appear to be effective for the improvement of the general condition of cancer patients following surgery or in terminal cases.

  18. Improved ultrasonic-based sample treatment for the screening of anabolic steroids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Galesio, M; Rial-Otero, R; Simal-Gándara, J; de la Torre, X; Botrè, F; Capelo-Martínez, J L

    2010-08-30

    A rapid sample treatment procedure for the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) determination of anabolic steroids in human urine has been developed. The new procedure makes use of ultrasonic energy to reduce reaction times and increase the overall sensitivity. The following variables affecting the performance of the ultrasonic treatment were optimised: (i) time, (ii) device, (iii) frequency, and (iv) temperature. It was found that, under an ultrasonic field, the hydrolysis of conjugated steroids with beta-glucuronidase from Escherichia coli K12 was possible with a treatment time of 10 min. The accuracy and precision of the ultrasonic method were found to be in agreement with those achieved with the conventional thermal conductivity procedure (Student's t-test; p = 0.05, n = 10). After the enzymatic hydrolysis, the derivatisation of the target compounds with trimethylsilyl (TMS) reagent, methyl-N-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MSTFA)/NH(4)I/dithioerythritol (DTE) (1000:2:4, v/w/w), was also accelerated using ultrasonic energy. In order to test the applicability of the use of ultrasonic energy in the acceleration of the derivatisation reaction with TMS, the classic method of thermal conductivity was applied for comparative purposes to a pool of 35 androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) and/or their metabolites. The results demonstrated that after 3 min of sonication in a Sonoreactor device (50% amplitude), 19 of the 35 compounds studied showed similar reaction yield to those obtained with the classic procedure requiring 30 min (Student's t-test; p = 0.05, n = 5); 13 increased to higher silylation yields; and for the steroids 1-testosterone, danazol and etiocholanolone-D5, the same results were obtained using a sonication time of 5 min.The overall applicability of the ultrasonic-based sample treatment method is shown by the analysis of five urine samples. The results are similar to those achieved by the routine procedure. The new method is fast, robust, and

  19. Supraphysiological doses of performance enhancing anabolic-androgenic steroids exert direct toxic effects on neuron-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Basile, John R.; Binmadi, Nada O.; Zhou, Hua; Yang, Ying-Hua; Paoli, Antonio; Proia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are lipophilic hormones often taken in excessive quantities by athletes and bodybuilders to enhance performance and increase muscle mass. AAS exert well known toxic effects on specific cell and tissue types and organ systems. The attention that androgen abuse has received lately should be used as an opportunity to educate both athletes and the general population regarding their adverse effects. Among numerous commercially available steroid hormones, very few have been specifically tested for direct neurotoxicity. We evaluated the effects of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone on sympathetic-like neuron cells. Vitality and apoptotic effects were analyzed, and immunofluorescence staining and western blot performed. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone are toxic to the neuron-like differentiated pheochromocytoma cell line PC12, as confirmed by toxicity on neurite networks responding to nerve growth factor and the modulation of the survival and apoptosis-related proteins ERK, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and heat-shock protein 90. We observe, in contrast to some previous reports but in accordance with others, expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in neuron-like cells, which when inhibited mitigated the toxic effects of AAS tested, suggesting that the AR could be binding these steroid hormones to induce genomic effects. We also note elevated transcription of neuritin in treated cells, a neurotropic factor likely expressed in an attempt to resist neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that supraphysiological exposure to the AAS methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone exert neurotoxic effects by an increase in the activity of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and alterations in neurite networks. PMID:23675320

  20. Supraphysiological doses of performance enhancing anabolic-androgenic steroids exert direct toxic effects on neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Basile, John R; Binmadi, Nada O; Zhou, Hua; Yang, Ying-Hua; Paoli, Antonio; Proia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are lipophilic hormones often taken in excessive quantities by athletes and bodybuilders to enhance performance and increase muscle mass. AAS exert well known toxic effects on specific cell and tissue types and organ systems. The attention that androgen abuse has received lately should be used as an opportunity to educate both athletes and the general population regarding their adverse effects. Among numerous commercially available steroid hormones, very few have been specifically tested for direct neurotoxicity. We evaluated the effects of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone on sympathetic-like neuron cells. Vitality and apoptotic effects were analyzed, and immunofluorescence staining and western blot performed. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone are toxic to the neuron-like differentiated pheochromocytoma cell line PC12, as confirmed by toxicity on neurite networks responding to nerve growth factor and the modulation of the survival and apoptosis-related proteins ERK, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and heat-shock protein 90. We observe, in contrast to some previous reports but in accordance with others, expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in neuron-like cells, which when inhibited mitigated the toxic effects of AAS tested, suggesting that the AR could be binding these steroid hormones to induce genomic effects. We also note elevated transcription of neuritin in treated cells, a neurotropic factor likely expressed in an attempt to resist neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that supraphysiological exposure to the AAS methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone exert neurotoxic effects by an increase in the activity of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and alterations in neurite networks.

  1. Compulsive weight lifting and anabolic drug abuse among women rape victims.

    PubMed

    Gruber, A J; Pope, H G

    1999-01-01

    In the course of a study of 75 female weight lifters, we encountered 10 (13%) who reported that they were raped as teenagers or adults. Nine of these women began or greatly increased their weight lifting activities after the assault to be better able to defend themselves against men. Seven began abusing anabolic steroids and/or clenbuterol to gain muscle mass. Compulsive weight lifting and anabolic substance abuse may represent another form of response to the trauma of sexual assault.

  2. Prevalence of Use of Anabolic Steroids by Bodybuilders Using Three Methods in a City of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaee, Mohammad Reza; Pakravan, Faezeh; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of substance use among bodybuilding athletes has been poorly studied in Iran. This study was conducted to examine the prevalence of drug use, especially anabolic steroids, among bodybuilding athletes. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in the first half of 2013 among body building athletes referring to gyms located in Kerman, Iran. Five gyms were selected randomly and 380 athletes were invited to complete a self-administered anonymous questionnaire, consecutively. The questionnaire included two parts; baseline characteristics and substance related questions. The prevalence of anabolic steroids was estimated based on three methods; self-report, projective question, and crosswise model. Findings We enrolled 298 male athletes in the final analysis. Mean ± SD age of subjects was 25.9 ± 8.4. The most frequent recent (past 30 days) drug use was waterpipe smoking (45%). The second most frequently used drug was alcohol (26.5%, recent use). Based on self-reports, the prevalence of lifetime anabolic steroid use was calculated to be 24.5%. The corresponding figure based on crosswise method was obtained to be 56.8%. Participants believed that a median of 40% of athletes had used anabolic steroids in their lifetime. The prevalence of anabolic steroid was higher in single and less educated individuals (P < 0.05). The main reason for using anabolic steroids was to increase muscle size. Conclusion The prevalence of drug use, especially tobacco, alcohol, and anabolic steroids, was high among bodybuilding athletes. We could not rely on self-reports to examine anabolic steroid use. PMID:24494162

  3. Cardiotoxic effects of cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Welder, A A; Melchert, R B

    1993-04-01

    Cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse have become major drug problems in the United States. Cocaine has been designated as "the drug of greatest national health concern" while as many as 1 million Americans have used or are currently using anabolic-androgenic steroids to promote athletic performance and/or improve physical appearance. Unfavorable cardiovascular events have been linked to both cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse in healthy, physically active individuals. Deaths of several United States athletes in 1986 focused attention on the life-threatening cardiovascular consequences of cocaine abuse. Reports of myocardial injury with anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse are anecdotal. Nevertheless, case reports have illustrated the alarming cardiotoxic potential of these steroids in athletes. Anabolic-androgenic steroids were correlated to myocardial infarction in weight lifters and cardiomyopathy in a former professional football player. From the total emergency room episodes where cocaine was mentioned in 1990, approximately 66% of these episodes occurred in young individuals 18-29 years of age. Over 500,000 of the individuals currently taking anabolic-androgenic steroids for nonmedical purposes are high-school children. Because cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids are used improperly, more focus needs to be paid to the toxic mechanisms of their adverse effects. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss mechanisms whereby exercise and/or exercise training may alter the cardiovascular responses to these drugs. Furthermore, we would like to illustrate that contrary to the popular belief, acute and chronic abuse of cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids have a negative impact on exercise performance.

  4. Parathyroid hormone and bone healing.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, M; Jørgensen, N R; Schwarz, P

    2010-07-01

    Fracture healing is a complex process, and a significant number of fractures are complicated by impaired healing and non-union. Impaired healing is prevalent in certain risk groups, such as the elderly, osteoporotics, people with malnutrition, and women after menopause. Currently, no pharmacological treatments are available. There is therefore an unmet need for medications that can stimulate bone healing. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the first bone anabolic drug approved for the treatment of osteoporosis, and intriguingly a number of animal studies suggest that PTH could be beneficial in the treatment of fractures and could thus be a potentially new treatment option for induction of fracture healing in humans. Furthermore, fractures in animals with experimental conditions of impaired healing such as aging, estrogen withdrawal, and malnutrition can heal in an expedited manner after PTH treatment. Interestingly, fractures occurring at both cancellous and cortical sites can be treated successfully, indicating that both osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic fractures can be the target of PTH-induced healing. Finally, the data suggest that PTH partly prevents the delay in fracture healing caused by aging. Recently, the first randomized, controlled clinical trial investigating the effect of PTH on fracture healing was published, indicating a possible clinical benefit of PTH treatment in inducing fracture healing. The aim of this article is therefore to review the evidence for the potential of PTH in bone healing, including the underlying mechanisms for this, and to provide recommendations for the clinical testing and use of PTH in the treatment of impaired fracture healing in humans.

  5. Neurotoxic properties of the anabolic androgenic steroids nandrolone and methandrostenolone in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Pistarà, V; Corsaro, A; Tomasello, Flora; Giuffrida, Maria Laura; Sortino, Maria Angela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Copani, Agata

    2011-04-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse is associated with multiple neurobehavioral disturbances. The sites of action and the neurobiological sequels of AAS abuse are unclear at present. We investigated whether two different AASs, nandrolone and methandrostenolone, could affect neuronal survival in culture. The endogenous androgenic steroid testosterone was used for comparison. Both testosterone and nandrolone were neurotoxic at micromolar concentrations, and their effects were prevented by blockade of androgen receptors (ARs) with flutamide. Neuronal toxicity developed only over a 48-hr exposure to the steroids. The cell-impermeable analogues testosterone-BSA and nandrolone-BSA, which preferentially target membrane-associated ARs, were also neurotoxic in a time-dependent and flutamide-sensitive manner. Testosterone-BSA and nandrolone-BSA were more potent than their parent compounds, suggesting that membrane-associated ARs were the relevant sites for the neurotoxic actions of the steroids. Unlike testosterone and nandrolone, toxicity by methandrostenolone and methandrostenolone-BSA was insensitive to flutamide, but it was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU-486. Methandrostenolone-BSA was more potent than the parent compound, suggesting that its toxicity relied on the preferential activation of putative membrane-associated GRs. Consistently with the evidence that membrane-associated GRs can mediate rapid effects, a brief challenge with methandrostenolone-BSA was able to promote neuronal toxicity. Activation of putative membrane steroid receptors by nontoxic (nanomolar) concentrations of either nandrolone-BSA or methandrostenolone-BSA became sufficient to increase neuronal susceptibility to the apoptotic stimulus provided by β-amyloid (the main culprit of AD). We speculate that AAS abuse might facilitate the onset or progression of neurodegenerative diseases not usually linked to drug abuse.

  6. Insulin is protein-anabolic in chronic renal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Victoria S; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Crowley, Jan R; Fangman, Jerry; Flanigan, Michael

    2003-09-01

    To examine the protein anabolic actions of insulin in chronic renal failure, the authors measured four sets of whole body leucine fluxes during insulin alone and insulin with amino acid infusion in nine uremic patients before hemodialysis (B-HD). Seven were restudied 8 wk after initiation of maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Six normal subjects served as control (N). All values ( micro mol/kg/h, mean +/- SEM) are presented in the sequence of B-HD, HD, and N, and only P < 0.05 are listed. During Flux 1 (baseline), D (leucine release from body protein degradation) were 114 +/- 7, 126 +/- 4, and 116 +/- 6, respectively. C (leucine oxidation rates) were 18 +/- 2, 17 +/- 2, and 21 +/- 3, respectively. S (leucine disappearance into body protein [index of protein synthesis]) were 96 +/- 6, 107 +/- 4, and 94 +/- 4, respectively, and balances (net leucine flux into protein [values were negative during fasting]) were -18 +/- 2, -17 +/- 2, and -21 +/- 3, respectively. During Flux 2 (low-dose insulin infusion), D were 89 +/- 3, 98 +/- 6, and 94 +/- 5, respectively; C were 12 +/- 1, 11 +/- 2, and 18 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.02); S were 77 +/- 4, 87 +/- 5, and 76 +/- 5, respectively, and balances were -12 +/- 1, -11 +/- 2, and -18 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.02). During Flux 3 (high-dose insulin infusion): D were 77 +/- 3, 82 +/- 7, and 84 +/- 5, respectively; C were 9 +/- 1, 8 +/- 1, and 14 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.005); S were 68 +/- 4, 74 +/- 6, and 70 +/- 5, respectively, and balances were -9 +/- 1, -8 +/- 1, and -14 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.005). In Flux 4 (insulin infused with amino acids): D were 73 +/- 3, 107 +/- 18, and 85 +/- 7, respectively; C were 35 +/- 4, 29 +/- 5, and 39 +/- 3, respectively; S were 105 +/- 5, 145 +/- 15, and 113 +/- 6, respectively (P = 0.02), and balances were 32 +/- 4, 38 +/- 5, and 27 +/- 3, respectively. These data show that B-HD and HD patients were as sensitive as normal subjects to the protein anabolic actions of insulin. Insulin alone

  7. [Growth hormone and IGF-1 as doping agents in competitive sport].

    PubMed

    Jóźków, Paweł; Medraś, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are often used by athletes as doping agents. It is estimated that up to 25% of sportsmen using anabolic-androgenic steroids also take GH. Available data do not confirm the influence of GH or IGF-1 preparations on physical performance improvement. However, there is some evidences for many adverse effects in athletes using this form of doping. Blood tests to detect growth hormone abuse are available since several years. Surprisingly, no one has been proven to use illegal doping agents influencing GH/IGF-1 axis.

  8. Sex steroids and growth hormone interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; de Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; Guerra, Borja; Díaz, Mario; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    GH and sex hormones are critical regulators of body growth and composition, somatic development, intermediate metabolism, and sexual dimorphism. Deficiencies in GH- or sex hormone-dependent signaling and the influence of sex hormones on GH biology may have a dramatic impact on liver physiology during somatic development and in adulthood. Effects of sex hormones on the liver may be direct, through hepatic receptors, or indirect by modulating endocrine, metabolic, and gender-differentiated functions of GH. Sex hormones can modulate GH actions by acting centrally, regulating pituitary GH secretion, and peripherally, by modulating GH signaling pathways. The endocrine and/or metabolic consequences of long-term exposure to sex hormone-related compounds and their influence on the GH-liver axis are largely unknown. A better understanding of these interactions in physiological and pathological states will contribute to preserve health and to improve clinical management of patients with growth, developmental, and metabolic disorders.

  9. The effect of anabolic steroids on mandibular growth.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Alexander; Pancherz, Hans

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of nandrolone (Deca-Durabolin, AKZO Nobel, Cambridge, United Kingdom) on mandibular growth in juvenile and adult rats with radiographic cephalometry and immunoradiology. Juvenile (n = 16) and adult (n = 16) inbred female Wistar-Kyoto rats were compared. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups with 8 experimental (E) and 8 control (C) animals in each subgroup. Lateral headfilms taken before and after the 70-day study period were analyzed. Body weight and blood serum IGF-I levels were monitored weekly. The results showed marked mandibular growth changes in both the juvenile and the adult E rats. Body weight increase was larger in the E than in the C animals. The IGF-I blood serum levels were similar in the juvenile E and C rats but higher in the adult E animals than in the adult C animals. It was found that the anabolic steroid (Deca-Durabolin) had a significant effect on mandibular growth in both juvenile and adult rats.

  10. Testing for anabolic steroids in hair from two bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Kintz, P; Cirimele, V; Sachs, H; Jeanneau, T; Ludes, B

    1999-05-17

    Two male bodybuilders were recently arrested by the French customs in Strasbourg (France) in possession of 2050 tablets and 251 ampoules of various anabolic steroids. It was claimed that the steroids were for personal use and not for trafficing as suggested by the police. Urine and hair specimens were collected from both suspects to clarify the claims. Nandrolone, stanozolol, testosterone and their corresponding metabolites were identified in the urine of both subjects. After decontamination, the hair was hydrolyzed by sodium hydroxide in presence of deuterated internal standards. After extraction with ethyl acetate and silylation, the drugs were identified by GC-MS in the electron impact mode. Hair from both males were positive for nandrolone (196 and 260 pg/mg), testosterone (46 and 71 pg/mg) and stanozolol (135 and 156 pg/mg), clearly indicating steroids abuse. Although not yet recognized by the International Olympic Committee, hair analysis may be a useful adjunct to conventional drug testing in urine from athletes.

  11. Sudden or unnatural deaths involving anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Torok, Michelle; Duflou, Johan

    2014-07-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) are frequently misused. To determine causes of death, characteristics, toxicology, and pathology of AAS positive cases, all cases (n = 24) presenting to the New South Wales Department of Forensic Medicine (1995-2012) were retrieved. All were male, and the mean age was 31.7 years. Deaths were mainly due to accidental drug toxicity (62.5%), then suicide (16.7%) and homicide (12.5%). Abnormal testosterone/epitestosterone ratios were reported in 62.5%, followed by metabolites of nandrolone (58.3%), stanozolol (33.3%), and methandienone (20.8%). In 23 of 24 cases, substances other than steroids were detected, most commonly psychostimulants (66.7%). In nearly half, testicular atrophy was noted, as was testicular fibrosis and arrested spermatogenesis. Left ventricular hypertrophy was noted in 30.4%, and moderate to severe narrowing of the coronary arteries in 26.1%. To summarize, the typical case was a male polydrug user aged in their thirties, with death due to drug toxicity. Extensive cardiovascular disease was particularly notable.

  12. [Doping--anabolic steroid abuse--careless homicide].

    PubMed

    Schneider, V; Klug, E

    1996-06-01

    Proceeding from a case requiring an expert's opinion (competitive athlete from the GDR), the question of damage to the health after the abuse of anabolic preparations is being discussed once again. In this connection, however, it is not only necessary to look at the cases that have come to light in the competitive sports sector (doping) but also at cases involving the body-building movement. Damages to the liver, in particular liver tumors, are described, among others. But vascular diseases are also described. Auto-aggression and aggression toward others can, however, also entail a forensic/psychiatric report, and, finally, the forensic-medicine expert can be challenged when manipulations of the urine specimens to be examined are involved (DNA analyses). From the legal point of view, doping cases will constantly pose the question of whether the athletes concerned knew what they were being "treated" with. Quite apart from forensic questions, however, it will also be necessary to discuss the overall complex from the point of view of medical ethics. Every time a case becomes known, damage is done once again to the idea that sports are supposed to bring nations together and promote peace.

  13. Risk factors for anabolic-androgenic steroid use in men.

    PubMed

    Brower, K J; Blow, F C; Hill, E M

    1994-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic steroids to enhance athletic performance and physical appearance can cause numerous psychiatric and other adverse effects. In order to prevent steroid use and its negative consequences, knowledge of risk factors is needed. We conducted an anonymous survey of 404 male weight lifters from community gymnasiums who completed a 20-min, self-administered questionnaire. The sample for this study included all 35 men who were thinking about using steroids ("high-risk" nonusers), 50 randomly selected nonusers who were not thinking about using steroids ("low-risk" nonusers) and all 49 steroid users. The three groups differed in age, training characteristics, other performance-enhancers tried, body image, acquaintance with steroid users, and perception of negative consequences. When groups were compared along a continuum from low risk to high risk and from high risk to actual use, we found increasing amounts of competitive bodybuilding, performance-enhancers tried, and steroid-using acquaintances. Groups did not differ in their use of addictive substances. Nearly three-fourths of the high-risk group felt "not big enough," compared to 21% of the low-risk group and 38% of the steroid users (p < .001). These data suggest that steroids do work to increase satisfaction with body size, and that dissatisfaction with body size may contribute to the risk of using steroids.

  14. Brain connectivity aberrations in anabolic-androgenic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Westlye, Lars T; Kaufmann, Tobias; Alnæs, Dag; Hullstein, Ingunn R; Bjørnebekk, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Sustained anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use has adverse behavioral consequences, including aggression, violence and impulsivity. Candidate mechanisms include disruptions of brain networks with high concentrations of androgen receptors and critically involved in emotional and cognitive regulation. Here, we tested the effects of AAS on resting-state functional brain connectivity in the largest sample of AAS-users to date. We collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 151 males engaged in heavy resistance strength training. 50 users tested positive for AAS based on the testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E) ratio and doping substances in urine. 16 previous users and 59 controls tested negative. We estimated brain network nodes and their time-series using ICA and dual regression and defined connectivity matrices as the between-node partial correlations. In line with the emotional and behavioral consequences of AAS, current users exhibited reduced functional connectivity between key nodes involved in emotional and cognitive regulation, in particular reduced connectivity between the amygdala and default-mode network (DMN) and between the dorsal attention network (DAN) and a frontal node encompassing the superior and inferior frontal gyri (SFG/IFG) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), with further reductions as a function of dependency, lifetime exposure, and cycle state (on/off).

  15. Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use Among California Community College Student-Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of anabolic- androgenic steroid use among a sample of community college student-athletes; also, to compare various aspects of users and nonusers, as well as to describe usage patterns. Design and Setting: A survey following random stratified cluster sampling techniques was administered to 10 California community colleges. Subjects: A group of 1,185 male and female student- athletes. Measurements: An anonymous 27-item, valid, and reliable questionnaire was administered surveying anabolic-androgenic steroid use and usage patterns. Results: Of all student-athletes sampled, 3.3% were anabolic -androgenic steroid users. Gender-specific incidence rates were 4.2% for males and 1.2% for females. Anabolic- androgenic steroid users tended to be older males, usually in their second year of college. The users were more often minorities. Users believed that they were knowledgeable about anabolic-androgenic steroids, and that the rates of usage were higher than reported. Their sources of steroid information were often lifting partners and fellow athletes. Use of these drugs was most often in cycles (mean of 6.7 weeks) and was frequently done using multiple anabolic-androgenic steroids at a time. The average number of cycles completed was 2.9. A wide variety of steroids were used by the student-athletes, of which most were obtained from illegal sources. Conclusions: Anabolic-androgenic steroid use among Califonia community college student-athletes were similar to other previous research studies involving high school and university student-athletes. PMID:16558405

  16. Thyroid hormones in fetal growth and prepartum maturation.

    PubMed

    Forhead, A J; Fowden, A L

    2014-06-01

    The thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), are essential for normal growth and development of the fetus. Their bioavailability in utero depends on development of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid gland axis and the abundance of thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases that influence tissue levels of bioactive hormone. Fetal T4 and T3 concentrations are also affected by gestational age, nutritional and endocrine conditions in utero, and placental permeability to maternal thyroid hormones, which varies among species with placental morphology. Thyroid hormones are required for the general accretion of fetal mass and to trigger discrete developmental events in the fetal brain and somatic tissues from early in gestation. They also promote terminal differentiation of fetal tissues closer to term and are important in mediating the prepartum maturational effects of the glucocorticoids that ensure neonatal viability. Thyroid hormones act directly through anabolic effects on fetal metabolism and the stimulation of fetal oxygen consumption. They also act indirectly by controlling the bioavailability and effectiveness of other hormones and growth factors that influence fetal development such as the catecholamines and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). By regulating tissue accretion and differentiation near term, fetal thyroid hormones ensure activation of physiological processes essential for survival at birth such as pulmonary gas exchange, thermogenesis, hepatic glucogenesis, and cardiac adaptations. This review examines the developmental control of fetal T4 and T3 bioavailability and discusses the role of these hormones in fetal growth and development with particular emphasis on maturation of somatic tissues critical for survival immediately at birth.

  17. The potential use of complex derivatization procedures in comprehensive HPLC-MS/MS detection of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Pavel A; Appolonova, Svetlana A; Rodchenkov, Grigory M

    2010-10-01

    The use of two separate derivatization procedures with the formation of oxime (hydroxyl ammonium pretreatment) and picolinoyl (mixed anhydride method) derivates of anabolic steroids following HPLC-MS/MS analysis was proposed. The main product ions of obtained derivatives for 21 anabolic steroids were evaluated and fragmentation pathways were compared.The analysis of MS/MS spectra for underivatized steroids versus oxime or picolinoyl derivatives showed that in case of analytes containing conjugated double bonds in sterane core all of the observed MS/MS spectra contained abundant product ions of diagnostic value. The implementation of derivatization procedures to such compounds is useful for upgrading sensitivity or selectivity of the evaluated method. On the other hand, MS/MS spectra of underivatized and oxime analytes without conjugated double bonds in sterane core produce spectra with large amounts of low abundant product ions. Picolinoyl derivatives formation leads to highly specific spectra with product ions of diagnostic value coupled with sensitive and selective analysis at the same time. The intra- and inter-group comparison analysis revealed that fragmentation pathways for underivatized steroids and correspondent oxime derivatives are similar.The obtained oxime and picolinoyl derivatives provided 10-15 times higher ESI response in the HPLC-ESI-MS-selected reaction monitoring (SRM) when compared to those of underivatized molecules in positive HPLC-ESI-MS mode.Due to the laborious sample preparation we suggest to use the performed strategy for confirmation analysis purposes, metabolic studies or while the identification of new steroids or steroid-like substances.

  18. Follicle-stimulating hormone increases bone mass in female mice.

    PubMed

    Allan, Charles M; Kalak, Robert; Dunstan, Colin R; McTavish, Kirsten J; Zhou, Hong; Handelsman, David J; Seibel, Markus J

    2010-12-28

    Elevated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) activity is proposed to directly cause bone loss independent of estradiol deficiency in aging women. Using transgenic female mice expressing human FSH (TgFSH), we now reveal that TgFSH dose-dependently increased bone mass, markedly elevating tibial and vertebral trabecular bone volume. Furthermore, TgFSH stimulated a striking accrual of bone mass in hypogonadal mice lacking endogenous FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH) function, showing that FSH-induced bone mass occurred independently of background LH or estradiol levels. Higher TgFSH levels increased osteoblast surfaces in trabecular bone and stimulated de novo bone formation, filling marrow spaces with woven rather than lamellar bone, reflective of a strong anabolic stimulus. Trabecular bone volume correlated positively with ovarian-derived serum inhibin A or testosterone levels in TgFSH mice, and ovariectomy abolished TgFSH-induced bone formation, proving that FSH effects on bone require an ovary-dependent pathway. No detectable FSH receptor mRNA in mouse bone or cultured osteoblasts or osteoclasts indicated that FSH did not directly stimulate bone. Therefore, contrary to proposed FSH-induced bone loss, our findings demonstrate that FSH has dose-dependent anabolic effects on bone via an ovary-dependent mechanism, which is independent of LH activity, and does not involve direct FSH actions on bone cells.

  19. AAS, growth hormone, and insulin abuse: psychological and neuroendocrine effects

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael R; Evans, Peter; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2008-01-01

    The nontherapeutic use of prescription medicines by individuals involved in sport is increasing. Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are the most widely abused drug. Much of our knowledge of the psychological and physiological effects of human growth hormone (hGH) and insulin has been learned from deficiency states. As a consequence of the Internet revolution, previously unobtainable and expensive designer drugs, particularly recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and insulin, have become freely available at ridiculously discounted prices from countries such as China and are being abused. These drugs have various physiological and psychological effects and medical personnel must become aware that such prescription medicine abuse appears to be used not only for performance and cosmetic reasons, but as a consequence of psychological pre-morbidity. PMID:18827854

  20. Measurement of androgen and estrogen receptors in breast tissue from subjects with anabolic steroid-dependent gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Calzada, L; Torres-Calleja, J; Martinez, J M; Pedrón, N

    2001-08-17

    In order to assess the relationship between anabolic steroid administration and gynecomastia, we studied the effects produced by administering nandrolone decanoate and a mixture of propionate, phenilpropionate, isocaproate and testosterone decanoate to bodybuilders during a six month period. The following significant changes occurred: a 53% reduction in serum testosterone; LH and FSH levels were suppressed to 77% and 87%, respectively, in comparison to control values; and although 45% of the subjects showed an increase in serum estradiol levels, no statistically significant differences were found compared with control estradiol levels. With regard to estradiol and androgen receptors, 85% of gynecomastia tissue contained estradiol or androgen receptors, while 40% contained both. The mean values of estradiol and androgen receptors in the cytosol were 65 +/- 10 and 52 +/- 5 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Nuclear androgen and estradiol receptor levels were 33 +/- 7 and 67.5 +/- 9 fmol/mg protein, respectively. The presence of hormone receptors in gynecomastia receptive cells provides support for the hypothesis that gynecomastia is steroid-dependent.

  1. Identification of Anabolic Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators with Reduced Activities in Reproductive Tissues and Sebaceous Glands

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Azriel; Harada, Shun-Ichi; Kimmel, Donald B.; Bai, Chang; Chen, Fang; Rutledge, Su Jane; Vogel, Robert L.; Scafonas, Angela; Gentile, Michael A.; Nantermet, Pascale V.; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Pennypacker, Brenda; Masarachia, Patricia; Sahoo, Soumya P.; Kim, Yuntae; Meissner, Robert S.; Hartman, George D.; Duggan, Mark E.; Rodan, Gideon A.; Towler, Dwight A.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Androgen replacement therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of frailty; however, androgens pose risks for unwanted effects including virilization and hypertrophy of reproductive organs. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) retain the anabolic properties of androgens in bone and muscle while having reduced effects in other tissues. We describe two structurally similar 4-aza-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands, Cl-4AS-1, a full agonist, and TFM-4AS-1, which is a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 is a potent AR ligand (IC50, 38 nm) that partially activates an AR-dependent MMTV promoter (55% of maximal response) while antagonizing the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction within AR that is required for full receptor activation. Microarray analyses of MDA-MB-453 cells show that whereas Cl-4AS-1 behaves like 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), TFM-4AS-1 acts as a gene-selective agonist, inducing some genes as effectively as DHT and others to a lesser extent or not at all. This gene-selective agonism manifests as tissue-selectivity: in ovariectomized rats, Cl-4AS-1 mimics DHT while TFM-4AS-1 promotes the accrual of bone and muscle mass while having reduced effects on reproductive organs and sebaceous glands. Moreover, TFM-4AS-1 does not promote prostate growth and antagonizes DHT in seminal vesicles. To confirm that the biochemical properties of TFM-4AS-1 confer tissue selectivity, we identified a structurally unrelated compound, FTBU-1, with partial agonist activity coupled with antagonism of the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction and found that it also behaves as a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 and FTBU-1 represent two new classes of SARMs and will allow for comparative studies aimed at understanding the biophysical and physiological basis of tissue-selective effects of nuclear receptor ligands. PMID:19846549

  2. Immunological and structural relatedness of catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferases and the anabolic enzymes of enterobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Falmagne, P; Portetelle, D; Stalon, V

    1985-01-01

    Purified catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase of Pseudomonas putida and anabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase (argF product) of Escherichia coli K-12 were used to prepare antisera. The two specific antisera gave heterologous cross-reactions of various intensities with bacterial catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferases formed by Pseudomonas and representative organisms of other bacterial genera. The immunological cross-reactivity observed only between the catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferases and the anabolic enzymes of enterobacteria suggests that these proteins share some structural similarities. Indeed, the amino acid composition of the anabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase of E. coli K-12 (argF and argI products) closely resembles the amino acid compositions of the catabolic enzymes of Pseudomonas putida, Aeromonas formicans, Streptococcus faecalis, and Bacillus licheniformis. Comparison of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the E. coli anabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase with that of the A. formicans and Pseudomonas putida catabolic enzymes shows, respectively, 45 and 28% identity between the compared positions; the A. formicans sequence reveals 53% identity with the Pseudomonas putida sequence. These results favor the conclusion that anabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferases of enterobacteria and catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferases derive from a common ancestral gene. PMID:3968036

  3. [Cardiovascular side effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids].

    PubMed

    Kindermann, Wilfried

    2006-09-01

    The intake of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) leads to an increase in skeletal muscle mass and is prohibited as a doping measure in sport. AAS abuse is not limited to competitive athletes. It is also prevalent in subjects who do body building or resistance training for cosmetic reasons only. Out of the numerous and partly serious side effects, the cardiovascular ones are presented here. An increase in left ventricular muscle mass is well documented, and some researchers have even reported concentric hypertrophy. By contrast, resistance training without AAS intake does not lead to increased ventricular wall thickness. AAS do not affect the systolic function of the left ventricle, whereas diastolic function might be impaired. Different ultrastructural myocardial alterations have been documented in animal studies. In addition, AAS can induce arterial hypertension. Blood clotting and fibrinolysis are negatively affected, and several case studies of thrombi exist in young strength athletes. Changes in the concentration of blood lipoproteins, particularly a reduction in vessel-protective HDL cholesterol, can lead to early atherosclerosis. Many case reports exist about cardiac deaths in seemingly healthy subjects-most often body builders and other strength athletes. In fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarctions patent coronary arteries were proven frequently. Besides the prothrombotic effects of AAS, an impaired endothelial function and vasospasms are discussed hypothetically as pathomechanisms. Also, cardiomyopathies can occur due to AAS abuse. On the basis of the described possible cardiovascular side effects, it can be concluded that in cases of sudden cardiac deaths in young athletes, a misuse of AS should be excluded.

  4. Detecting the administration of endogenous anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Ayotte, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The detection of the administration of an androgen such as testosterone that could be present normally in human bodily fluids is based upon the methodical evaluation of key parameters of the urinary profile of steroids, precisely measured by GC/MS. Over the years, the markers of utilization were identified, the reference ranges of diagnostic metabolites and ratios were established in volunteers and in populations of athletes, and their stability in individual subjects was studied. The direct confirmation comes from the measurement of delta (13)C values reflecting their synthetic origin, ruling out a potential physiological anomaly. Several factors may alter the individual GC/MS steroid profile besides the administration of a testosterone-related steroid, the nonexhaustive list ranging from the microbial degradation of the specimen, the utilization of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase or other anabolic steroids, masking agents such as probenecid, to inebriating alcohol drinking. The limitation of the testing strategy comes from the potentially elevated rate of false negatives, since only the values exceeding those of the reference populations are picked up by the GC/MS screening analyses performed by the laboratories on blind samples, excluding individual particularities and subtle doping. Since the ranges of normal values are often described from samples collected in Western countries, extrapolating data to all athletes appears inefficient. Furthermore, with short half-life and topical formulations, the alterations of the steroid profile are less pronounced and disappear rapidly. GC/C/IRMS analyses are too delicate and fastidious to be considered for screening routine samples. An approach based upon the individual athlete's steroid profiling is necessary to pick up variations that would trigger further IRMS analysis and investigations.

  5. Deciding about hormone therapy

    MedlinePlus

    HRT - deciding; Estrogen replacement therapy - deciding; ERT- deciding; Hormone replacement therapy - deciding; Menopause - deciding; HT - deciding; Menopausal hormone therapy - deciding; MHT - deciding

  6. The Role of the Multiple Hormonal Dysregulation in the Onset of “Anemia of Aging”: Focus on Testosterone, IGF-1, and Thyroid Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Marcello; De Vita, Francesca; Fisichella, Alberto; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Ceresini, Graziano; Cappola, Anne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a multifactorial condition whose prevalence increases in both sexes after the fifth decade of life. It is a highly represented phenomenon in older adults and in one-third of cases is “unexplained.” Ageing process is also characterized by a “multiple hormonal dysregulation” with disruption in gonadal, adrenal, and somatotropic axes. Experimental studies suggest that anabolic hormones such as testosterone, IGF-1, and thyroid hormones are able to increase erythroid mass, erythropoietin synthesis, and iron bioavailability, underlining a potential role of multiple hormonal changes in the anemia of aging. Epidemiological data more consistently support an association between lower testosterone and anemia in adult-older individuals. Low IGF-1 has been especially associated with anemia in the pediatric population and in a wide range of disorders. There is also evidence of an association between thyroid hormones and abnormalities in hematological parameters under overt thyroid and euthyroid conditions, with limited data on subclinical statuses. Although RCTs have shown beneficial effects, stronger for testosterone and the GH-IGF-1 axis and less evident for thyroid hormones, in improving different hematological parameters, there is no clear evidence for the usefulness of hormonal treatment in improving anemia in older subjects. Thus, more clinical and research efforts are needed to investigate the hormonal contribution to anemia in the older individuals. PMID:26779261

  7. Mechanisms of anabolic androgenic steroid inhibition of mammalian ɛ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brian L; Whiting, Paul J; Henderson, Leslie P

    2006-01-01

    GABAergic transmission regulates the activity of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the preoptic area/hypothalamus that control the onset of puberty and the expression of reproductive behaviours. One of the hallmarks of illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is disruption of behaviours under neuroendocrine control. GnRH neurons are among a limited population of cells that express high levels of the ɛ-subunit of the GABAA receptor. To better understand the actions of AAS on neuroendocrine mechanisms, we have characterized modulation of GABAA receptor-mediated currents in mouse native GnRH neurons and in heterologous cells expressing recombinant α2β3ɛ-receptors. GnRH neurons exhibited robust currents in response to millimolar concentrations of GABA and a picrotoxin (PTX)-sensitive, bicuculline-insensitive current that probably arises from spontaneous openings of GABAA receptors. The AAS 17α-methyltestosterone (17α-MeT) inhibited spontaneous and GABA-evoked currents in GnRH neurons. For recombinant α2β3ɛ-receptors, 17α-MeT inhibited phasic and tonic GABA-elicited responses, accelerated desensitization and slowed paired pulse response recovery. Single channel analysis indicated that GABA-evoked events could be described by three open dwell components and that 17α-MeT enhanced residence in the intermediate dwell state. This AAS also inhibited a PTX-sensitive, spontaneous current (open probability, ∼0.15–0.2) in a concentration-dependent fashion (IC50 ≈ 9 μm). Kinetic modelling indicated that the inhibition induced by 17α-MeT occurs by an allosteric block in which the AAS interacts preferentially with a closed state and promotes accumulation in that state. Finally, studies with a G302S mutant ɛ-subunit suggest that this residue within the transmembrane domain TM2 plays a role in mediating AAS binding and modulation. In sum, our results indicate that inclusion of the ɛ-subunit significantly alters the profile of AAS

  8. Physically active men show better semen parameters and hormone values than sedentary men.

    PubMed

    Vaamonde, Diana; Da Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo Edir; García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Barrera, Natalibeth; Vaamonde-Lemos, Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Physical exercise promotes many health benefits. The present study was undertaken to assess possible semen and hormone differences among physically active (PA) subjects and sedentary subjects (SE). The analyzed qualitative sperm parameters were: volume, sperm count, motility, and morphology; where needed, additional testing was performed. The measured hormones were: follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone (T), cortisol (C), and the ratio between T and C (T/C). Maximum oxygen consumption was also assessed to check for differences in fitness level. Statistically significant differences were found for several semen parameters such as total progressive motility (PA: 60.94 ± 5.03; SE: 56.07 ± 4.55) and morphology (PA: 15.54 ± 1.38, SE: 14.40 ± 1.15). The seminological values observed were supported by differences in hormones, with FSH, LH, and T being higher in PA than in SE (5.68 ± 2.51 vs. 3.14 ± 1.84; 5.95 ± 1.11 vs. 5.08 ± 0.98; 7.68 ± 0.77 vs. 6.49 ± 0.80, respectively). Likewise, the T/C ratio, index of anabolic versus catabolic status, was also higher in PA (0.46 ± 0.11 vs. 0.32 ± 0.07), which further supports the possibility of an improved hormonal environment. The present study shows that there are differences in semen and hormone values of physically active subjects and sedentary subjects. Physically active subjects seem to have a more anabolic hormonal environment and a healthier semen production.

  9. Anabolic Vitamin D Analogs as Countermeasures to Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wei; Duncan, Randall L.; Karin, Norman J.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrated for the first time that vitamin D3 influences the effect of PTH on bone cell calcium ion levels. This is a rapid effect, taking place within seconds/minutes. This may prove to be a critical contribution to our understanding of bone physiology in that these two hormones are among the most potent regulators of bone calcium content and of systemic calcium homeostasis. Together with the data gathered from the study of astronauts exposed to microgravity for extended periods, these observations suggest the interaction of vitamin D3 and PTH as a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of bone loss disorders such as osteoporosis and disuse atrophy. Chronic exposure of cultured osteoblasts to vitamin D, altered the number of voltage-sensitive Ca(+2) channels expressed. Estrogen treatment yielded a similar result, suggesting that there is overlap in the mechanism by which these hormones elicit long-term effects on bone cell calcium homeostasis.

  10. Clenbuterol and anabolic steroids: a previously unreported cause of myocardial infarction with normal coronary arteriograms.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D R; Dobbs, T; Krull, B; Plumb, V J

    1998-08-01

    During the last 10 years, several cases of myocardial infarction associated with anabolic steroid use have been reported. Postulated mechanisms to explain this association have included changes in lipid levels, the fibrinolytic system, and platelet aggregation. Clenbuterol is a beta 2-agonist with anabolic properties that has not been seen previously with myocardial infarction. We report a case of myocardial infarction in an otherwise healthy 26-year-old body-builder who recently used clenbuterol and anabolic steroids. In this case, synergistic effects of the two agents seem likely to have played a role in the infarct. The normal coronary arteriograms before any anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapy strongly suggest coronary spasm as the mechanism of the infarct.

  11. Anabolic steroid-induced cardiomyopathy underlying acute liver failure in a young bodybuilder

    PubMed Central

    Bispo, Miguel; Valente, Ana; Maldonado, Rosário; Palma, Rui; Glória, Helena; Nóbrega, João; Alexandrino, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure may lead to subclinical circulatory disturbances and remain an unrecognized cause of ischemic liver injury. We present the case of a previously healthy 40-year-old bodybuilder, referred to our Intensive-Care Unit of Hepatology for treatment of severe acute liver failure, with the suspicion of toxic hepatitis associated with anabolic steroid abuse. Despite the absence of symptoms and signs of congestive heart failure at admission, an anabolic steroid-induced dilated cardiomyopathy with a large thrombus in both ventricles was found to be the underlying cause of the liver injury. Treatment for the initially unrecognized heart failure rapidly restored liver function to normal. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of severe acute liver failure due to an unrecognized anabolic steroid-induced cardiomyopathy. Awareness of this unique presentation will allow for prompt treatment of this potentially fatal cause of liver failure. PMID:19533818

  12. Doping control analysis of anabolic steroids in equine urine by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, April S Y; Leung, Gary N W; Leung, David K K; Wan, Terence S M

    2016-09-08

    Anabolic steroids are banned substances in equine sports. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been the traditional technique for doping control analysis of anabolic steroids in biological samples. Although liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has become an important technique in doping control, the detection of saturated hydroxysteroids by LC-MS remains a problem due to their low ionization efficiency under electrospray. The recent development in fast-scanning gas-chromatography-triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) has provided a better alternative with a significant reduction in chemical noise by means of selective reaction monitoring. Herein, we present a sensitive and selective method for the screening of over 50 anabolic steroids in equine urine using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Imitation of phase I oxidative metabolism of anabolic steroids by titanium dioxide photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ruokolainen, Miina; Valkonen, Minna; Sikanen, Tiina; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2014-12-18

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysis for oxidation of anabolic steroids and for imitation of their phase I metabolism. The photocatalytic reaction products of five anabolic steroids were compared to their phase I in vitro metabolites produced by human liver microsomes (HLM). The same main reaction types - hydroxylation, dehydrogenation and combination of these two - were observed both in TiO2 photocatalysis and in microsomal incubations. Several isomers of each product type were formed in both systems. Based on the same mass, retention time and similarity of the product ion spectra, many of the products observed in HLM reactions were also formed in TiO2 photocatalytic reactions. However, products characteristic to only either one of the systems were also formed. In conclusion, TiO2 photocatalysis is a rapid, simple and inexpensive method for imitation of phase I metabolism of anabolic steroids and production of metabolite standards.

  14. Hormones and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hampl, Richard; Bičíková, Marie; Sosvorová, Lucie

    2015-03-01

    Hormones exert many actions in the brain, and brain cells are also hormonally active. To reach their targets in brain structures, hormones must overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a unique device selecting desired/undesired molecules to reach or leave the brain, and it is composed of endothelial cells forming the brain vasculature. These cells differ from other endothelial cells in their almost impermeable tight junctions and in possessing several membrane structures such as receptors, transporters, and metabolically active molecules, ensuring their selection function. The main ways how compounds pass through the BBB are briefly outlined in this review. The main part concerns the transport of major classes of hormones: steroids, including neurosteroids, thyroid hormones, insulin, and other peptide hormones regulating energy homeostasis, growth hormone, and also various cytokines. Peptide transporters mediating the saturable transport of individual classes of hormones are reviewed. The last paragraph provides examples of how hormones affect the permeability and function of the BBB either at the level of tight junctions or by various transporters.

  15. The influence of photoperiod on body weight gain, body composition, nutrient intake and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Tucker, H A; Petitclerc, D; Zinn, S A

    1984-12-01

    Increasing daily light exposure from 8 to 16 h increases average daily body weight gains of sheep and Holstein cattle but reduces gains of white-tailed doe fawns. Some of these effects on average daily gain in sheep are the result of increased gut fill and pelt weight. Increasing daily exposure to light increases feed intake when sheep or cattle are fed ad libitum. However, increased feed intake is not a prerequisite for the anabolic effects of long duration exposures to light because increased growth occurs in the animals given 16 h light:8 h dark (16L:8D) even when feed intake is restricted. The anabolic effects of increased duration photoperiods in sheep are independent of the gonads, whereas in cattle they are dependent on the gonads. Consistent increases in average daily gains of cattle in response to longer duration photoperiods have not always been achieved. The lack of consistency may be associated with sexual maturity or rate of fattening of the animal. For example, the stimulatory effects of 16L:8D photoperiods on live weight gain are not readily manifested in immature prepubertal heifers, but occur primarily during the peripubertal period. Short days are conducive to deposition of fat, which may account for the stimulatory effects of short days on live weight gain of white-tailed doe fawns and excessively fattened Holsteins. In contrast, long duration photoperiods stimulate protein accretion in cattle. The hormonal signals that mediate the anabolic effects of increasing exposure to light are not associated with change in insulin, thyroxine or growth hormone concentrations in the blood. Glucocorticoid concentrations in serum decrease with longer duration photoperiods which is consistent with an anabolic effect. Increasing daily light exposure to 16 h/d hastens the increase in concentrations of progesterone and testosterone in sera of peripubertal heifers and prepubertal bulls, respectively. Thus, change in secretion of reproductive hormones in the

  16. [The evaluation of changes in concentration of ghrelin, somatotropin, insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, leptin and thyroid hormones in mother and umbilical blood in case of physiologic pregnancy with normosomia and macrosomia of fetus].

    PubMed

    Shul'ga, A S; Butenko, E V; Aleksandrova, A A; Gutnikova, L V; Rymashevskiĭ, A A; Shestopalov, A V; Shkurat, T P

    2013-02-01

    The sample of women with physiologic pregnancy consisting of 40 females with fetus normosomia and 8 females with fetus macrosomia were examined. The examination covered the evaluation of changes in concentration of ghrelin, somatotropin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin, leptin and thyroid hormones in mother and umbilical blood. In females with fetus macrosomia the changes in concentration of hormones regulating trophism, energy balance and anabolic processes in organisms of mother and fetus were detected

  17. Effects of copper on bone component in the femoral tissues of rats: anabolic effect of zinc is weakened by copper.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying Ling; Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2005-12-01

    The effects of copper on biochemical components in the femoral-diaphyseal (cortical bone) and -metaphyseal (trabecullar bone) tissues of rats in vivo and in vitro were investigated. Rats were orally administered copper sulfate (50, 100, or 200 microg Cu/100 g body weight) once daily for 7 d. Calcium content in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues was significantly decreased with the administration of copper (200 microg/100 g), while alkaline phosphatase activity in these tissues was not significantly changed by copper administration. The diaphyseal DNA content was significantly decreased with the administration of copper (50, 100, or 200 microg/100 g). Moreover, the femoral-diaphyseal and -metaphyseal tissues were cultured for 48 h in serum-free medium containing either vehicle or copper (10(-7) - 10(-4) M). Culture with copper (10(-7) - 10(-4) M) caused a significant decrease in alkaline phosphatase activity in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues, while calcium and DNA contents in these tissues were not significantly changed. Culture with parathyroid hormone [PTH (1-34); 10(-7) M], a bone-resorbing factor, caused a significant decrease in calcium content in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues. This decrease was completely inhibited in the presence of copper (10(-6) or 10(-5) M). Culture with zinc sulfate (10(-4) M) caused a significant increase in calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues. The effects of zinc (10(-4) M) in increasing femoral calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity were not seen in the presence of cycloheximide (10(-6) M), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, suggesting that the effects of zinc are involved in newly synthesized protein components. The effects of zinc in increasing calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues were significantly weakened in the presence of copper (10(-4) M). The inhibitory effects of copper were further

  18. Invasive fungal sinusitis in a healthy athlete due to long-term anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Kim, Irene A; Thompson, Christopher F; Kedeshian, Paul A; Palma-Diaz, Fernando; Suh, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis is a potentially fatal infection that affects immunocompromised patients. Prognosis is generally poor despite aggressive medical and surgical treatments. We present the first reported case of invasive fungal sinusitis in a healthy 18-year-old male athlete who was taking anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS). The effects of excessive AAS use on the immune system are not fully understood, but there may be consequences at supraphysiological concentrations. This case demonstrates potential immunomodulatory effects of anabolic steroids and highlights a previously unknown cause of invasive fungal sinusitis.

  19. Fatal Liver Cyst Rupture Due to Anabolic Steroid Use: A Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Hansma, Patrick; Diaz, Francisco J; Njiwaji, Chantel

    2016-03-01

    Liver cysts are commonly found incidentally from imaging scans or at autopsy. These benign neoplasms vary in size and represent a heterogeneous group of disorders, for which the demographics, risk factors, apparent inciting event, clinical presentation, and outcome are varied. Complications that can develop from a liver cyst include development of spontaneous hemorrhage, infection, and/or obstruction. Although the etiology of liver cysts varies, fatal rupture of a hemorrhagic liver cyst due to anabolic steroid use is a rare occurrence. In fact, there are few reported cases in journal literature. We report a case of a fatal liver cyst rupture with resultant hemoperitoneum in the presence of anabolic steroid (stanozolol) use.

  20. [Hormonal dysnatremia].

    PubMed

    Karaca, P; Desailloud, R

    2013-10-01

    Because of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) disorder on production or function we can observe dysnatremia. In the absence of production by posterior pituitary, central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurs with hypernatremia. There are hereditary autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X- linked forms. When ADH is secreted but there is an alteration on his receptor AVPR2, it is a nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in acquired or hereditary form. We can make difference on AVP levels and/or on desmopressine response which is negative in nephrogenic forms. Hyponatremia occurs when there is an excess of ADH production: it is a euvolemic hypoosmolar hyponatremia. The most frequent etiology is SIADH (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH), a diagnostic of exclusion which is made after eliminating corticotropin deficiency and hypothyroidism. In case of brain injury the differential diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome has to be discussed, because its treatment is perfusion of isotonic saline whereas in SIADH, the treatment consists in administration of hypertonic saline if hyponatremia is acute and/or severe. If not, fluid restriction demeclocycline or vaptans (antagonists of V2 receptors) can be used in some European countries. Four types of SIADH exist; 10 % of cases represent not SIADH but SIAD (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis) due to a constitutive activation of vasopressin receptor that produces water excess. c 2013 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROID ABUSE: MULTIPLE MECHANISMS OF REGULATION OF GABAERGIC SYNAPSES IN NEUROENDOCRINE CONTROL REGIONS OF THE RODENT FOREBRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Oberlander, Joseph G.; Porter, Donna M.; Penatti, Carlos A. A.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2011-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone originally developed for clinical purposes, but now predominantly taken at suprapharmacological levels as drugs of abuse. To date, nearly 100 different AAS compounds that vary in metabolic fate and physiological effects have been designed and synthesised. While administered for their ability to enhance muscle mass and performance, untoward side effects of AAS use include changes in reproductive and sexual behaviours. Specifically, AAS, depending on the type of compound administered, can delay or advance pubertal onset, lead to irregular oestrous cyclicity, diminished male and female sexual behaviours, and accelerate reproductive senescence. Numerous brains regions and neurotransmitter signalling systems are involved in the generation of these behaviours, and are potential targets for both chronic and acute actions of the AAS. However critical to all of these behaviours is neurotransmission mediated by GABAA receptors within a nexus of interconnected forebrain regions that includes the medial preoptic area (mPOA), the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Here we review how exposure to AAS alters GABAergic transmission and neural activity within these forebrain regions, taking advantage of in vitro systems and both wild-type and genetically altered mouse strains, in order to better understand how these synthetic steroids affect the neural systems that underlie the regulation of reproduction and the expression of sexual behaviours. PMID:21554430

  2. Anabolic steroid use: patterns of use and detection of doping.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michael R; Davies, Bruce; Grace, Fergal M; Kicman, Andrew; Baker, Julien S

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) were the first identified doping agents that have ergogenic effects and are being used to increase muscle mass and strength in adult males. Consequently, athletes are still using them to increase physical performance and bodybuilders are using them to improve size and cosmetic appearance. The prevalence of AAS use has risen dramatically over the last two decades and filtered into all aspects of society. Support for AAS users has increased, but not by the medical profession, who will not accept that AAS use dependency is a psychiatric condition. The adverse effects and potential dangers of AAS use have been well documented. AAS are used in sport by individuals who have acquired knowledge of the half-lives of specific drugs and the dosages and cycles required to avoid detection. Conversely, they are used by bodybuilders in extreme dosages with the intention of gaining muscle mass and size, with little or no regard for the consequences. Polypharmacy by self-prescription is prevalent in this sector. Most recently, AAS use has filtered through to 'recreational street drug' users and is the largest growth of drugs in this subdivision. They are taken to counteract the anorexic and cachectic effects of the illegal psychotropic street drugs. Screening procedures for AAS in World Anti-Doping Agency accredited laboratories are comprehensive and sensitive and are based mainly on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, although liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry is becoming increasingly more valuable. The use of carbon isotope mass spectrometry is also of increasing importance in the detection of natural androgen administration, particularly to detect testosterone administration. There is a degree of contentiousness in the scenario of AAS drug use, both within and outside sport. AAS and associated doping agents are not illegal per se. Possession is not an offence, despite contravening sporting regulations and moral codes. Until AAS are

  3. Comparative effectiveness of somatotropin and anabolic steroids in feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Preston, R L; Bartle, S J; Kasser, T R; Day, J W; Veenhuizen, J J; Baile, C A

    1995-04-01

    Crossbred steers (n = 252, BW = 379 +/- 28 kg) were allotted to 42 pens in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments: control or steroid implant (STR; estradiol benzoate+progesterone [three lighter blocks reimplanted on d 84] and trenbolone acetate [reimplanted on d 63]), and either 0, 80, or 160 mg/wk of recombinant bovine somatotropin (bST). Steers were adapted to the finishing diet (12% roughage equivalent, 13% CP) before the start of the experiment and fed for 84 or 119 d. Blood samples were taken on d 0, 14, 28, 56, and 84 for plasma urea N (PUN), serum somatotropin (ST), plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and plasma amino acid assay. Few interactions were noted (P > .1). Gain was increased by both treatments: 1.30 vs 1.66 kg/d for control vs. STR (P < .001) and 1.44, 1.49, and 1.51 kg/d (linear, P = .07) for 0, 80, and 160 mg of bST/wk, respectively. Gain efficiency was also improved: 169 vs 205 g/kg (P < .001) and 177, 189, and 195 g/kg (linear, P < .001), respectively. Average PUN was decreased (P < .001) 29% by STR and decreased 17 and 29% by 80 and 160 mg of bST/wk, respectively (linear, P < .001). Somatotropin decreased mean serum ST compared with controls; STR increased ST 36% compared with controls. Average plasma IGF-I was increased (P < .001) 12% by STR and 13 and 19% (linear, P < .001) by 80 and 160 mg of bST/wk, respectively. Both STR and bST influenced (P < .05) plasma amino acid profiles. Indicators of carcass fatness were decreased linearly (P < .05) by bST; STR implant tended to decrease carcass fatness and increase longissimus muscle area, which was related to carcass weight. The anabolic effects of STR and bST were found to be additive and possibly independent in feedlot steers.

  4. Steroid binding sites in liver membranes: interplay between glucocorticoids, sex steroids, and pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, L; Flores-Morales, A; Chirino-Godoy, R; Díaz-Chico, J C; Díaz-Chico, B N

    2008-04-01

    Steroid hormones activate target cells through specific receptors that discriminate among ligands based upon recognition of distinct structural features. For most known steroids, membrane and nuclear receptors co-exist in many target cells. However, while the structure of the nuclear receptors and their function as transcriptional activators of specific target genes is generally well understood, the identity of the membrane receptors remains elusive. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we are beginning to characterize receptors for glucocorticoids and anabolic-androgenic steroids in male rat liver membranes. Male rat liver endoplasmic reticulum contains two steroid binding sites which are functionally related and associated with a 90-134 kDa oligomeric protein: (1) the low-affinity glucocorticoid binding site (LAGS), composed at least in part of two peptides (37 and 53 kDa) that bind glucocorticoids and (2) the stanozolol binding protein (STBP), composed at least in part of three peptides (22, 31, and 55 kDa) that bind the synthetic androgen stanozolol. These steroid binding proteins have many properties different from those of classical nuclear receptors, with the salient differences being a failure to recognize "classical" ligands for nuclear receptors together with marked differences in biochemical properties and physiological regulation. The mechanism of interaction of glucocorticoids with the LAGS can be clearly distinguished from that with STBP. Moreover, STBP shows an extremely narrow pharmacological profile, being selective for ST and its analog, danazol, among more than 100 steroids and non-steroidal compounds that were assayed, including those that are able to displace glucocorticoids from the LAGS. The level of LAGS activity undergoes dramatic variations following changes from the physiological serum levels of thyroid hormones, glucocorticoids, GH, vitamin A, and E2. However, neither thyroid hormones nor GH have a critical role on STBP

  5. Hormone therapy in acne.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli

    2013-01-01

    Underlying hormone imbalances may render acne unresponsive to conventional therapy. Relevant investigations followed by initiation of hormonal therapy in combination with regular anti-acne therapy may be necessary if signs of hyperandrogenism are present. In addition to other factors, androgen-stimulated sebum production plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acne in women. Sebum production is also regulated by other hormones, including estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, glucocorticoids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and melanocortins. Hormonal therapy may also be beneficial in female acne patients with normal serum androgen levels. An understanding of the sebaceous gland and the hormonal influences in the pathogenesis of acne would be essential for optimizing hormonal therapy. Sebocytes form the sebaceous gland. Human sebocytes express a multitude of receptors, including receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters and the receptors for steroid and thyroid hormones. Various hormones and mediators acting through the sebocyte receptors play a role in the orchestration of pathogenetic lesions of acne. Thus, the goal of hormonal treatment is a reduction in sebum production. This review shall focus on hormonal influences in the elicitation of acne via the sebocyte receptors, pathways of cutaneous androgen metabolism, various clinical scenarios and syndromes associated with acne, and the available therapeutic armamentarium of hormones and drugs having hormone-like actions in the treatment of acne.

  6. Qualitative description of the prevalence and use of anabolic androgenic steroids by United States powerlifters.

    PubMed

    Curry, L A; Wagman, D F

    1999-02-01

    Powerlifters have been suspected to be a population wherein use of anabolic androgenic steroids is prevalent (Yesalis, Herrick, & Buckley, 1988). To access commentary from these athletes on issues related to these drugs and the effectiveness of doping controls, a survey was developed. From 28 U.S. Powerlifting Team members who competed internationally since 1988, 26 were contacted by mail, and 15 questionnaires were returned. The questionnaire solicited yes/no responses and qualitative descriptions about current and previous use of anabolic androgenic steroids in powerlifting. Analysis indicated that ten U.S. Powerlifting Team members admitted to using these drugs, and five athletes admitted to beating the International Olympic Committee's doping control procedures. Reported use of anabolic androgenic steroids by these athletes was consistent with data presented by Yesalis, et al. and illustrated continued discrepancy between admitted use of these drugs prior to or during national and international events and the lack of reported positive test data. Discussion focused on the value of this study to elicit in an athlete's own words commentary specific to the use of anabolic androgenic steroids and the need for more effective doping controls.

  7. The development of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis secondary to anabolic steroid abuse.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Patrick; Ali, Galil; Chan, Anthony

    2011-12-02

    The authors present the case of a patient who presented to the nephrology department of a district general hospital with end-stage renal failure. He presented with malignant hypertension and symptoms and signs of uraemia. He also gave a history of prior abuse of anabolic steroids over a number of years. Renal biopsy was performed and the findings were in keeping with a diagnosis of advanced focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The patient went on to require renal replacement therapy within weeks of presentation. The authors suggest that anabolic steroid abuse is a direct cause of FSGS. People with raised body mass index are known to be at increased risk of developing this condition, due to increased haemodynamic stress on the glomeruli, with subsequent development of sclerosis. However, the authors believe that anabolic steroid abuse may be an independent risk factor, and that anabolic steroids have a direct nephrotoxic effect that leads to a more advanced initial presentation with rapid decline in renal function.

  8. Multi-organ damage induced by anabolic steroid supplements: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Samaha, Ali A; Nasser-Eddine, Walid; Shatila, Elizabeth; Haddad, John J; Wazne, Jaafar; Eid, Ali H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The use of anabolic supplements and other related drugs for body building and to enhance athletic performance is nowadays widespread and acutely pervasive all around the world. This alarming increase in the use of anabolic and amino acid supplements has been linked to a diverse array of pathologies. As previously reported, the abuse of androgenic steroids is not without severe physiological, psychiatric and physical costs. The case we report here describes multi-organ damage resulting from the abuse and uncontrolled use of anabolic steroid supplements, mainly testosterone. Case presentation A 24-year-old white man presented with abdominal pain concomitant with nausea and vomiting. Laboratory analysis revealed hypercalcemia, elevated liver enzymes and high levels of amylase, lipase and creatine protein kinase. Conclusion Amino acid as well as anabolic supplements may lead to abnormal functioning of many organs, which could be fatal in some instances. This mandates worldwide and concerted efforts to educate the public, especially the youth, about the dangers of these increasingly abused drugs. PMID:18976461

  9. Use of anabolic-androgenic steroids masking the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculous pleural effusions are not always easy to diagnose but the presence of a lymphocyte-rich exudate associated with an increased adenosine deaminase level and a positive skin test result are highly sensitive diagnostic signs. Case presentation We report a case of pleural tuberculosis in a 31-year-old white male patient from Caracas, Venezuela who was negative for human immunodeficiency virus and presented 2 weeks after injecting the anabolic-androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate, in whom all the tests for tuberculosis were initially negative; an eosinophilic pleural effusion with a low adenosine deaminase level, a negative tuberculin skin test and negative for acid-fast bacilli staining and culture of the pleural fluid. After excluding other causes of eosinophilic pleural effusion malignant pleural effusion was suspected. The patient did not return until 4 months later. The second thoracentesis obtained a pleural fluid suggestive for tuberculosis, with a predominance of lymphocytes, an elevated adenosine deaminase level (51 U/l) and a positive tuberculin skin test. Culture of pleural fragments confirmed pleural tuberculosis. Conclusion This case suggests that the use of an anabolic-androgenic steroid masks the definitive diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis by changing the key diagnostic parameters of the pleural fluid, a finding not previously reported. Available evidence of the effects of anabolic steroids on the immune system also suggests that patients using anabolic-androgenic steroids might be susceptible to developing tuberculosis in either reactivating a latent infection or facilitating development of the disease after a recent infection. PMID:19175931

  10. Anabolic Androgenic Steroids: Use and Perceived Use in Nonathlete College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berning, Joseph M.; Adams, Kent J.; Debeliso, Mark; Stamford, Bryant A.; Newman, Ian M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated the use and perceived use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) among nonathlete college students. Participants: The authors surveyed a sample of 485 nonathlete college students at a major metropolitan university. Methods: They administered a survey on use and perceived use of AAS to the students. Results:…

  11. Anabolic agents: recent strategies for their detection and protection from inadvertent doping

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    According to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List, anabolic agents consist of exogenous anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), endogenous AAS and other anabolic agents such as clenbuterol and selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Currently employed strategies for their improved detection include the prolongation of the detection windows for exogenous AAS, non-targeted and indirect analytical approaches for the detection of modified steroids (designer steroids), the athlete’s biological passport and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the detection of the misuse of endogenous AAS, as well as preventive doping research for the detection of SARMs. The recent use of these strategies led to 4–80-fold increases of adverse analytical findings for exogenous AAS, to the detection of the misuse of new designer steroids, to adverse analytical findings of different endogenous AAS and to the first adverse analytical findings of SARMs. The strategies of the antidoping research are not only focused on the development of methods to catch the cheating athlete but also to protect the clean athlete from inadvertent doping. Within the past few years several sources of inadvertent doping with anabolic agents have been identified. Among these are nutritional supplements adulterated with AAS, meat products contaminated with clenbuterol, mycotoxin (zearalenone) contamination leading to zeranol findings, and natural products containing endogenous AAS. The protection strategy consists of further investigations in case of reasonable suspicion of inadvertent doping, publication of the results, education of athletes and development of methods to differentiate between intentional and unintentional doping. PMID:24632537

  12. Anabolic Steroid Abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The use of anabolic steroids is on the increase among athletes as well as other segments of the population. Data from the "Monitoring the Future" study showed a significant increase from 1998 to 1999 in steroid abuse among middle school students. During the same year, there was a decline in the percentage of 12th graders who believed…

  13. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. 1308.25 Section 1308.25 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...(41)(B)(i) of the Act (21 U.S.C. 802(41)(B)(i)), may apply to the Office of Diversion Control,...

  14. Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Use in Teens: Prevalence, Demographics, and Perception of Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorang, Melissa; Callahan, Bryan; Cummins, Kevin M.; Achar, Suraj; Brown, Sandra A.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple risks are associated with early use of anabolic androgenic steroids, yet public understanding is limited and teen use not uncommon. The present study surveyed 4,231 high school students to understand prevalence of use, association with athletics and other substance use and expectations of drug effects. While overall rates of steroid use…

  15. Drug Insight: testosterone and selective androgen receptor modulators as anabolic therapies for chronic illness and aging

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Shalender; Calof, Olga M; Storer, Thomas W; Lee, Martin L; Mazer, Norman A; Jasuja, Ravi; Montori, Victor M; Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Several regulatory concerns have hindered development of androgens as anabolic therapies, despite unequivocal evidence that testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass and strength in men; it induces hypertrophy of type I and II muscle fibers, and increases myonuclear and satellite cell number. Androgens promote differentiation of mesenchymal multipotent cells into the myogenic lineage and inhibit their adipogenic differentiation, by facilitating association of androgen receptors with β-catenin and activating T-cell factor 4. Meta-analyses indicate that testosterone supplementation increases fat-free mass and muscle strength in HIV-positive men with weight loss, glucocorticoid-treated men, and older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels. The effects of testosterone on physical function and outcomes important to patients have not, however, been studied. In older men, increased hematocrit and increased risk of prostate biopsy and detection of prostate events are the most frequent, testosterone-related adverse events. Concerns about long-term risks have restrained enthusiasm for testosterone use as anabolic therapy. Selective androgen-receptor modulators that are preferentially anabolic and that spare the prostate hold promise as anabolic therapies. We need more studies to determine whether testosterone or selective androgen-receptor modulators can induce meaningful improvements in physical function and patient-important outcomes in patients with physical dysfunction associated with chronic illness or aging. PMID:16932274

  16. Effects of Anabolic Steroids on Lipoprotein Profiles of Female Weight Lifters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffatt, Robert J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effects of resistance exercise and anabolic steroids on lipoprotein profiles of female weightlifters. The study found that women who participate in resistance training have better lipoprotein profiles than their sedentary counterparts, but these changes do not offset the deleterious effects of steroid use. (SM)

  17. Determinants of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Risk Perceptions in Youth Populations: A Multivariate Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Bryan E.

    2009-01-01

    Grounded conceptually in social cognitive theory, this research examines how personal, behavioral, and environmental factors are associated with risk perceptions of anabolic-androgenic steroids. Ordinal logistic regression and logit log-linear models applied to data gathered from high-school seniors (N = 2,160) in the 2005 Monitoring the Future…

  18. Examining Athletes' Attitudes toward Using Anabolic Steroids and Their Knowledge of the Possible Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anshel, Mark H.; Russell, Kenneth G.

    1997-01-01

    Examined the relationships between athletes' (N=291) knowledge about the long-term effects of anabolic steroids and their attitudes toward this type of drug. Results show low correlation between greater knowledge and attitudes about the use of steroids in sports, suggesting that drug education programs regarding steroids may have limited value.…

  19. Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: Prevalence, Knowledge, and Attitudes in Junior and Senior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luetkemeier, Maurie J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reports a survey of junior and senior high school students that investigated the prevalence of anabolic-androgenic steroid use and examined gender, sports participation, and illicit drug use. Results indicated the prevalence of steroid use was 3.3%. Steroid use was greater for males, users of other drugs, and strength trainers. (SM)

  20. Self-Treatment of Gynecomastia in Bodybuilders Who Use Anabolic Steroids. Case Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedl, Karl E.; Yesalis, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Presents four case reports of bodybuilders whose self-administered anabolic steroid programs resulted in gynecomastia, and discusses treatment strategies advocated by some bodybuilders. The actual recommended treatment is complete cessation of drugs. By dispelling unfounded treatment methods, physicians might help discourage such drug use. (SM)

  1. Psychomotor and Motor Speed in Power Athletes Self-Administering Testosterone and Anabolic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Era, Pertti; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Self-administered testosterone and anabolic steroids resulted in insignificant improvement in psychomotor and motor speed tests of power athletes. This study is part of a larger study on the effects of such drugs on endocrinology, metabolism and neuromuscular functions. Methodolgy and results are discussed. (Author/JL)

  2. Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use Among 1,010 College Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Harrison G., Jr.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Two percent of 1,010 male college students responding to a questionnaire about anabolic-androgenic steroid use reported using steroids; most of the users were competitive athletes, although some used steroids to improve their physical appearance. Users were not distinguished from non-users in terms of academic achievement or use of other illicit…

  3. Anabolic agents: recent strategies for their detection and protection from inadvertent doping.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-05-01

    According to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List, anabolic agents consist of exogenous anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), endogenous AAS and other anabolic agents such as clenbuterol and selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Currently employed strategies for their improved detection include the prolongation of the detection windows for exogenous AAS, non-targeted and indirect analytical approaches for the detection of modified steroids (designer steroids), the athlete's biological passport and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the detection of the misuse of endogenous AAS, as well as preventive doping research for the detection of SARMs. The recent use of these strategies led to 4-80-fold increases of adverse analytical findings for exogenous AAS, to the detection of the misuse of new designer steroids, to adverse analytical findings of different endogenous AAS and to the first adverse analytical findings of SARMs. The strategies of the antidoping research are not only focused on the development of methods to catch the cheating athlete but also to protect the clean athlete from inadvertent doping. Within the past few years several sources of inadvertent doping with anabolic agents have been identified. Among these are nutritional supplements adulterated with AAS, meat products contaminated with clenbuterol, mycotoxin (zearalenone) contamination leading to zeranol findings, and natural products containing endogenous AAS. The protection strategy consists of further investigations in case of reasonable suspicion of inadvertent doping, publication of the results, education of athletes and development of methods to differentiate between intentional and unintentional doping.

  4. Commentary: Synthetic Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: A Plea for Controlled Substance Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, William N.

    1987-01-01

    The widespread abuse of synthetic anabolic-androgenic steriods, their habit-forming properties, and their other adverse effects are good reasons for reclassification of steriods as controlled substances under federal law, a step which may combat their abuse. (Author/CB)

  5. The effect of anabolic steroids on the gastrointestinal system, kidneys, and adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Modlinski, Ryan; Fields, Karl B

    2006-04-01

    Over the past several decades we have seen an increase in the prevalence of anabolic steroid use by athletes. Because use of anabolic steroids is illicit, much of our knowledge of their side effects is derived from case reports, retrospective studies, or comparisons with studies in other similar patient groups. It has been shown that high-dose anabolic steroids have an effect on lowering high-density lipoprotein, increasing low-density lipoprotein, and increasing the atherogenic-promoting apolipoprotein A. Steroid abuse can also be hepatotoxic, promoting disturbances such as biliary stasis, peliosis hepatis, and even hepatomas, which are all usually reversible upon discontinuation. Suppression of the hypothalamic adrenal axis can also lead to profound adrenal changes that are also reversible with time. Although rare, renal side effects have also been documented, leading to acute renal failure and even Wilms' tumors in isolated cases. Much of our knowledge of these potentially severe but usually limited side effects is confounded by use of combinations of different steroid preparations and by the concomitant use with other substances. Physicians must target their efforts at counseling adolescents and other athletes about the potential harms of androgenic anabolic steroids and the legal options to improve strength and performance.

  6. Evidence for physical and psychological dependence on anabolic androgenic steroids in eight weight lifters.

    PubMed

    Brower, K J; Eliopulos, G A; Blow, F C; Catlin, D H; Beresford, T P

    1990-04-01

    All eight users of anabolic androgenic steroids in a pilot survey of weight lifters reported withdrawal symptoms and continued steroid use despite adverse consequences. Psychiatric (especially, depressive) symptoms were prominent in dependent users, underscoring the importance of diagnosing steroid dependence in clinical practice.

  7. The hypoandrogenic-anabolic deficiency state: endocrine and metabolic shifts in men.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Paul G

    2008-11-01

    In recent years there has been increased interest in and awareness of the consequences of the male hypogonadal state which frequently occurs as one component of the androgen deficiency complex. This is important as it allows for abnormal energy partitioning which adversely alters anabolism and the maintenance of cellular and tissue biological integrity. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that over time all forms of diminished androgen availability, in males, leads to adverse metabolic shifts that direct energy control mechanisms towards a progressive dysfunctional anabolic state. It is now apparent that whenever hypotestosteronemia is detected other components of the androgen-anabolic deficiency complex should be evaluated. This relationship can best be viewed as the hypoandrogenic-anabolic deficiency triad: decreased gonadal, adrenal and somatotropic biosynthetic activity which requires separate evaluation of each axis. These combined deficits may provide part of the explanation for the inconsistent reports regarding the benefits of androgen and other replacement treatments. Furthermore, it suggests that these deficiencies may require simultaneous repair in order to achieve better metabolic response profiles.

  8. New active series of growth hormone secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Guerlavais, Vincent; Boeglin, Damien; Mousseaux, Delphine; Oiry, Catherine; Heitz, Annie; Deghenghi, Romano; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio; Ghé, Corrado; Catapano, Filomena; Muccioli, Giampiero; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean

    2003-03-27

    New growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) analogues were synthesized and evaluated for growth hormone releasing activity. This series derived from EP-51389 is based on a gem-diamino structure. Compounds that exhibited higher in vivo GH-releasing potency than hexarelin in rat (subcutaneous administration) were then tested per os in beagle dogs and for their binding affinity to human pituitary GHS receptors and to hGHS-R 1a. Compound 7 (JMV 1843, H-Aib-(d)-Trp-(d)-gTrp-formyl) showed high potency in these tests and was selected for clinical studies.(1)

  9. Role of Thyroid Hormones in Skeletal Development and Bone Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, J. H. Duncan

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton is an exquisitely sensitive and archetypal T3-target tissue that demonstrates the critical role for thyroid hormones during development, linear growth, and adult bone turnover and maintenance. Thyrotoxicosis is an established cause of secondary osteoporosis, and abnormal thyroid hormone signaling has recently been identified as a novel risk factor for osteoarthritis. Skeletal phenotypes in genetically modified mice have faithfully reproduced genetic disorders in humans, revealing the complex physiological relationship between centrally regulated thyroid status and the peripheral actions of thyroid hormones. Studies in mutant mice also established the paradigm that T3 exerts anabolic actions during growth and catabolic effects on adult bone. Thus, the skeleton represents an ideal physiological system in which to characterize thyroid hormone transport, metabolism, and action during development and adulthood and in response to injury. Future analysis of T3 action in individual skeletal cell lineages will provide new insights into cell-specific molecular mechanisms and may ultimately identify novel therapeutic targets for chronic degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the current state of the art. PMID:26862888

  10. Changes in anabolic and catabolic activity among women taking part in an alternative labour market programme.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Hugo; Bergström, Anna; Theorell, Töres

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-two female participants in a mobilising labour market programme offering temporary, alternative employment in Sweden were followed longitudinally for one year, including a six month post participation follow-up period. It can be hypothesised that an important aspect of the physiological effects of unemployment is a change in the balance between anabolic and catabolic activities in the body and that re-employment should lead to a shift towards anabolism. An earlier study of a smaller subset of the data, however, including both men and women, showed increased prolactin and decreased dehydroepiadrosterone sulphate (DHEA-s) levels, contrary to the initial hypothesis. In the present analysis, intended to elucidate these results, psychophysiological data were summarised in two indices, one connected with anabolism (made up of testosterone and DHEA-s) and one with catabolism (prolactin, gamma-glutamyl transferase, aspartate amino transferase, alpha levuline amino transferase, and body mass index). In addition, self-rated anxiety, depression, hopelessness and personal control were analysed. The results indicate that the effect of 'better' activities within the programme was a temporary increase in anabolism, possibly indicating lower stress levels, and the effect of 'worse' activities, on the one hand, a temporary decrease in the catabolic index, probably reflecting repressed alcohol consumption, and, on the other hand, impaired anabolism. There was also a general but transient decrease in depressiveness measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The results seem to imply that it is difficult to achieve lasting effects through a relatively short participation in a mobilising programme.

  11. Different patterns of metabolism determine the relative anabolic activity of 19-norandrogens.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, K; Kumar, N; Monder, C; Bardin, C W

    1995-06-01

    Testosterone, the principal androgen secreted by Leydig cells, exerts a wide range of actions including growth of the male reproductive tract (androgenic effects) and growth of non-reproductive tissues such as muscle, kidney, liver, and salivary gland (anabolic effects). As androgenic steroids were discovered some were found to have relatively more anabolic than androgenic activity. The results reviewed in this report suggest that these differences result, in part, from the differential metabolism of the steroids in individual tissues and the varied activities of the individual metabolites. In the accessory sex organs (e.g. the prostate) testosterone is 5 alpha-reduced to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) which, due to its higher affinity for androgen receptors (AR), amplifies the action of testosterone. In contrast, when 19-nortestosterone (NT) is 5 alpha-reduced, its affinity for AR decreases, resulting in a decrease in its androgenic potency. However, their anabolic potency remains unchanged since significant 5 alpha-reduction of the steroids does not occur in the muscle. 7 alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) does not get 5 alpha-reduced due to steric hindrance from the 7 alpha-methyl group. Therefore, the androgenic potency of MENT is not amplified as happens with testosterone. These metabolic differences are responsible for the increased anabolic activity of NT and MENT compared to testosterone. Part of the biological effects of testosterone are mediated by its aromatization to estrogens. The fact that MENT is also aromatized to 7 alpha-methyl estradiol, a potent estrogen, in vitro by human placental and rat ovarian aromatase suggests that some of the anabolic actions of MENT may be mediated by this estrogen.

  12. Adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroids: Aggression and anxiety during exposure predict behavioral responding during withdrawal in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Ricci, Lesley A; Morrison, Thomas R; Melloni, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In the U.S. and worldwide anabolic/androgenic steroid use remains high in the adolescent population. This is concerning given that anabolic/androgenic steroid use is associated with a higher incidence of aggressive behavior during exposure and anxiety during withdrawal. This study uses pubertal Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) to investigate the hypothesis that an inverse behavioral relationship exists between anabolic/androgenic steroid-induced aggression and anxiety across adolescent exposure and withdrawal. In the first experiment, we examined aggression and anxiety during adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure and withdrawal. Adolescent anabolic/androgenic steroid administration produced significant increases in aggression and decreases in anxiety during the exposure period followed by significant decreases in aggression and increases in anxiety during anabolic/androgenic steroid withdrawal. In a second experiment, anabolic/androgenic steroid exposed animals were separated into groups based on their aggressive response during the exposure period and then tested for anxiety during exposure and then for both aggression and anxiety during withdrawal. Data were analyzed using a within-subjects repeated measures predictive analysis. Linear regression analysis revealed that the difference in aggressive responding between the anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure and withdrawal periods was a significant predictor of differences in anxiety for both days of testing. Moreover, the combined data suggest that the decrease in aggressive behavior from exposure to withdrawal predicts an increase in anxiety-like responding within these same animals during this time span. Together these findings indicate that early anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure has potent aggression- and anxiety-eliciting effects and that these behavioral changes occur alongside a predictive relationship that exists between these two behaviors over time.

  13. Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) and serine biosynthetic pathway genes are co-ordinately increased during anabolic agent-induced skeletal muscle growth

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. M.; Williams, H.; Ryan, K. J. P.; Wilson, T. L.; Daniel, Z. C. T. R.; Mareko, M. H. D.; Emes, R. D.; Harris, D. W.; Jones, S.; Wattis, J. A. D.; Dryden, I. L.; Hodgman, T. C.; Brameld, J. M.; Parr, T.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify novel molecular mechanisms for muscle growth during administration of anabolic agents. Growing pigs (Duroc/(Landrace/Large-White)) were administered Ractopamine (a beta-adrenergic agonist; BA; 20 ppm in feed) or Reporcin (recombinant growth hormone; GH; 10 mg/48 hours injected) and compared to a control cohort (feed only; no injections) over a 27-day time course (1, 3, 7, 13 or 27-days). Longissimus Dorsi muscle gene expression was analyzed using Agilent porcine transcriptome microarrays and clusters of genes displaying similar expression profiles were identified using a modified maSigPro clustering algorithm. Anabolic agents increased carcass (p = 0.002) and muscle weights (Vastus Lateralis: p < 0.001; Semitendinosus: p = 0.075). Skeletal muscle mRNA expression of serine/one-carbon/glycine biosynthesis pathway genes (Phgdh, Psat1 and Psph) and the gluconeogenic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-M (Pck2/PEPCK-M), increased during treatment with BA, and to a lesser extent GH (p < 0.001, treatment x time interaction). Treatment with BA, but not GH, caused a 2-fold increase in phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) protein expression at days 3 (p < 0.05) and 7 (p < 0.01), and a 2-fold increase in PEPCK-M protein expression at day 7 (p < 0.01). BA treated pigs exhibit a profound increase in expression of PHGDH and PEPCK-M in skeletal muscle, implicating a role for biosynthetic metabolic pathways in muscle growth. PMID:27350173

  14. High resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry in comparison with tandem mass spectrometry for confirmation of anabolic steroids in meat.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecke, Lynn; Van Meulebroek, Lieven; De Clercq, Nathalie; Vanden Bussche, Julie

    2013-03-12

    A prominent trend which has been observed in recent years in the analysis of veterinary drugs and growth-promoting agents is the shift from target-oriented procedures, mainly based on liquid chromatography coupled to triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QqQ-MS), towards accurate mass full scan MS (such as time of flight (ToF) and Fourier Transform (FT) Orbitrap MS). In this study the applicability of high resolution single-stage-Orbitrap-MS for confirmatory analysis of growth-promoting agents in meat was compared to that of a QqQ-MS. Validation according to CD 2002/657/EC demonstrated that steroid analysis based on Orbitrap MS, operating at a resolution of 50,000 FWHM, is indeed capable to compete with QqQ-MS in terms of selectivity/specificity, while providing excellent linearity (for most compounds >0.99) but somewhat inferior sensitivity. Indeed, CCαs reached from 0.04-0.88μgkg(-1) for the 34 anabolic steroids upon MS/MS detection, while upon Orbitrap MS detection a range of 0.07-2.50μgkg(-1) was observed. Using QqQ-MS adequate precision was obtained since relative standard deviations, associated with the repeatability and intra-laboratory reproducibility, were below 20%. In the case of Orbitrap MS, for some compounds (i.e. some estrogens) this threshold was exceeded and thus poor precision was observed, which is possibly caused by the lack in sensitivity. Overall, it may be concluded that Orbitrap-MS offers an adequate performance in terms of linearity and precision but lacks in sensitivity for some of the compounds.

  15. Anabolic Effect of Insulin Therapy on the Bone: Osteoprotegerin and Osteocalcin Up-Regulation in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Bortolin, Raul Hernandes; Freire Neto, Francisco Paulo; Arcaro, Carlos Alberto; Bezerra, João Felipe; da Silva, Flávio Santos; Ururahy, Marcela Abbott Galvão; Souza, Karla Simone da Costa; Lima, Valeria Morgiana Gualberto Duarte Moreira; Luchessi, André Ducati; Lima, Francisco Pignataro; Lia Fook, Marcus Vinicius; da Silva, Bartolomeu Jorge; Almeida, Maria das Graças; Abreu, Bento João; de Rezende, Luciana Augusto; de Rezende, Adriana Augusto

    2017-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with several skeletal alterations, particularly in conditions of poor glycaemic control. Insulin therapy is the major conservative treatment for T1DM; however, the effects of this hormone on bone markers of T1DM rats are limited, and the regulatory mechanisms remain elusive. Therefore, the evaluation of molecular and non-molecular parameters in a chronic animal model of T1DM-induced bone loss, treated with and without insulin, may help in elucidating the insulin mechanisms. Male Wistar rats were assigned into three groups: control, T1DM (T1DM rats induced with streptozotocin [STZ] at 40 mg/kg intravenously) and T1DM plus insulin therapy (T1DMI). After 8 weeks, we evaluated the serum biochemical, tibia histomorphometric and biomechanical parameters, as well as the gene expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin (OC) of femur mRNA. Compared with T1DM, the T1DMI group showed less bone loss, which was revealed by the increased trabecular width (TbWi, p < 0.001) and trabecular bone area (BAr, p < 0.01), reduced trabecular separation (TbSp, p < 0.01) and increased Young's modulus (p < 0.05). Moreover, molecular analyses indicated that the expression of OPG and OC was up-regulated (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, the up-regulation of OPG and OC in the T1DMI group supports an anabolic effect of insulin, which was demonstrated by the maintenance of bone architecture and flexibility. These results suggest that insulin therapy may prevent T1DM-induced bone loss via the effects on the bone formation.

  16. Determination of seven free anabolic steroid residues in eggs by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenling; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Jiahui; Yu, Jingxian; He, Limin; Shen, Xianguang

    2013-03-01

    A cheap, reliable and practical high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method was developed for the simultaneous determination of seven anabolic steroids in eggs, including trenbolone, boldenone, nandrolone, stanozolol, methandienone, testosterone and methyl testosterone. The analytes were extracted from the egg samples using methanol. The extracts were subjected to the removal of fat by freezing-lipid filtration and then further purified by liquid-liquid extraction using tert-butyl methyl ether. The analytes were separated on a Luna C18 column by a gradient elution program with 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile. This method was validated over 1.00-100 ng/g for all steroids of interest. The correlation coefficients (r) for each calibration curve are higher than 0.99 within the experimental concentration range. The decision limits of the steroids in eggs ranged from 0.20 to 0.44 ng/g, and the detection capabilities were below 1.03 ng/g. The average recoveries were between 66.3 and 82.8% in eggs at three spiked levels of 1.00, 1.50 and 2.00 ng/g for each analyte. The between-day and within-day relative standard deviations were in the range of 2.4-11%. High matrix suppression effects were observed for all compounds of interest.

  17. Screening for exogenous androgen anabolic steroids in human hair by liquid chromatography/orbitrap-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strano-Rossi, Sabina; Castrignanò, Erika; Anzillotti, Luca; Odoardi, Sara; De-Giorgio, Fabio; Bermejo, Ana; Pascali, Vincenzo L

    2013-09-02

    A method for the screening of various anabolic steroids and their esters in human hair, based on liquid-chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry using an Exactive benchtop Orbitrap mass spectrometer, has been set up and validated. This method involved methanolic incubation of 30 mg of hair and analysis of the relevant extract in HPLC using a C18 column. The mass detector, with nominal resolving power of 100,000, operated in full scan mode in APCI under positive ionization mode. Analytes were identified by exact mass, correspondence of isotopic cluster and retention times. The limits of detection obtained varied from 10 to 50 pg mg(-1), and limits of quantitation were 0.5 ng mg(-1) for all compounds. The method was linear for all analytes in the ranges from the LOQ to 6 ng mg(-1), giving correlation coefficients >0.99 for all analytes. Also accuracy (intended as %E) and repeatability (%CV) were always lower than 15%. Specificity was assessed by analysing ten blank samples and fifteen samples from polidrug abusers. This method was applied to a real-life case, resulting in the identification of testosterone undecanoate in the hair of a suspect. The analyte identity was confirmed by the analysis of its in-source fragmentation and comparison to a certified standard. Thanks to the scan acquisition, this method also enables retrospective re-analysis of the acquired datafile in case a further analyte needs to be screened.

  18. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb babies ...

  19. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... to hormones! Download our Free App! Understand the endocrine system and its related conditions with our 3D Patient ...

  20. Growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dosage of the medicine. Serious side effects of growth hormone treatment are rare. Common side effects include: Headache Fluid ... years. The rate of growth then slowly decreases. Growth hormone therapy does not work for all children. Left untreated, ...

  1. Hormones and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Hormones and Obesity Fact Sheet Hormones and Obesity March, 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Caroline Apovian, MD Judith Korner, MD, PhD What is obesity? Obesity is a chronic (long-term) medical problem ...

  2. [Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes].

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes are a group of genetic conditions characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones. Three syndromes, in which resistance to hormone action is respectively due to mutations in the gene encoding for thyroid hormone receptor TRβ, impaired T4 and T3 transport, and impaired conversion of T4 to T3 mediated by deiodinases. An updated review of each of these forms of resistance is provided, and their pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical approaches are discussed.

  3. Growth Hormone-Insulin-Like Growth Factor Axis, Thyroid Axis, Prolactin, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Anthony C; Davis, Hope C; Lane, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    This chapter addresses what is known about the endocrine system components growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis, thyroid axis, and prolactin relative to exercise and exercise training. Each one of these hormone axes contributes to the maintenance of homeostasis in the body through impact on a multitude of physiological systems. The homeostatic disruption of exercise causes differing responses in each hormone axis. GH levels increase with sufficient stimulation, and IGFs are released in response to GH from the anterior pituitary providing multiple roles including anabolic properties. Changes in the thyroid hormones T3 and T4 vary greatly with exercise, from increases/decreases to no change in levels across different exercise types, intensities and durations. These ambiguous findings could be due to numerous confounding factors (e.g. nutrition status) within the research. Prolactin increases proportionally to the intensity of the exercise. The magnitude may be augmented with extended durations; conflicting findings have been reported with resistance training. While the responses to exercise vary, it appears there may be overall adaptive and regenerative impacts on the body into recovery by these hormones through immune and tissue inflammatory responses/mediations. Nonetheless, well-designed exercise research studies are still needed on each of these hormones, especially thyroid hormones and prolactin.

  4. [Growth hormone treatment update].

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Short stature in children is a common cause for referral to pediatric endocrinologists, corresponding most times to normal variants of growth. Initially growth hormone therapy was circumscribed to children presenting growth hormone deficiency. Since the production of recombinant human hormone its use had spread to other pathologies.

  5. Thyroid hormone, brain development, and the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Zoeller, Thomas R; Dowling, Amy L S; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Iannacone, Eric A; Gauger, Kelly J; Bansal, Ruby

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for normal brain development. Therefore, it is a genuine concern that thyroid function can be altered by a very large number of chemicals routinely found in the environment and in samples of human and wildlife tissues. These chemicals range from natural to manufactured compounds. They can produce thyroid dysfunction when they are absent from the diet, as in the case of iodine, or when they are present in the diet, as in the case of thionamides. Recent clinical evidence strongly suggests that brain development is much more sensitive to thyroid hormone excess or deficit than previously believed. In addition, recent experimental research provides new insight into the developmental processes affected by thyroid hormone. Based on the authors' research focusing on the ability of polychlorinated biphenyls to alter the expression of thyroid hormone-responsive genes in the developing brain, this review provides background information supporting a new way of approaching risk analysis of thyroid disruptors. PMID:12060829

  6. Strigolactones: a new hormone with a past.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; McCourt, Peter

    2009-10-01

    The recent discovery of an endogenous hormonal activity for strigolactones in shoot branching was surprising since these molecules were thought to mostly play roles as signaling molecules between organisms. Even in the context of plant hormones, strigolactones appear to be different in that their role in plant development is quite restricted. This most probably reflects early days and new hormonal functions will most probably be found for these compounds in the future. In this respect, the exogenous role of strigolactones in parasitic plant seed germination may hint to functions of this compound in seed development. However, showing new roles for strigolactones in the seed or any other aspect of plant development for that matter will require developing assays in model genetic systems such as Arabidopsis and rice where we can take full advantage of the experimental tools that are available.

  7. Comparison between triple quadrupole, time of flight and hybrid quadrupole time of flight analysers coupled to liquid chromatography for the detection of anabolic steroids in doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Oscar J; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen; Elbardissy, Hisham; Grimalt, Susana; Sancho, Juan V; Hernandez, Felix; Ventura, Rosa; Delbeke, Frans T

    2011-01-17

    Triple quadrupole (QqQ), time of flight (TOF) and quadrupole-time of flight (QTOF) analysers have been compared for the detection of anabolic steroids in human urine. Ten anabolic steroids were selected as model compounds based on their ionization and the presence of endogenous interferences. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses were evaluated. QqQ allowed for the detection of all analytes at the minimum required performance limit (MRPL) established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (between 2 and 10 ng mL(-1) in urine). TOF and QTOF approaches were not sensitive enough to detect some of the analytes (3'-hydroxy-stanozolol or the metabolites of boldenone and formebolone) at the established MRPL. Although a suitable accuracy was obtained, the precision was unsatisfactory (RSD typically higher than 20%) for quantitative purposes irrespective of the analyser used. The methods were applied to 30 real samples declared positives either for the misuse of boldenone, stanozolol and/or methandienone. Most of the compounds were detected by every technique, however QqQ was necessary for the detection of some metabolites in a few samples. Finally, the possibility to detect non-target steroids has been explored by the use of TOF and QTOF. The use of this approach revealed that the presence of boldenone and its metabolite in one sample was due to the intake of androsta-1,4,6-triene-3,17-dione. Additionally, the intake of methandienone was confirmed by the post-target detection of a long-term metabolite.

  8. Hidden Danger of Irrational Abusing Illegal Androgenic-anabolic Steroids in Recreational Athletes Age Under 35 in Bosnia & Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Solakovic, Sid; Totic, Dragan; Vukas, Haris; Djedovic, Muhamed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Androgenic-anabolic steroids are rarely used by sportsmen who want to improve physical performance in competition sport. Despite that they are well aware of the side effects of anabolic steroids, many young athletes in Bosnia and Herzegovina without competition motivation come in temptation, trying to achieve better muscle proportion and physical performance unknowing consequence of side effects and what is hiding behind. Risk factors such as increasing of lipid levels and arterial hypertension are major factors which have important role in the Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and are responsible for occurrence of cardiovascular disease even causing a sudden death in young athletes. Objective: The aim of the study was to estimate the frequency of misusing of androgenic anabolic steroid drugs in young recreational sportsmen without competition motivation. This study will try to estimate vascular and lipid status, analyzing the side effects of steroids in young recreational athletes under the age of 35, in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods: The study included 70 individuals in period of 2010 till 2015 on recreational exercising program; 35 individuals misusing androgenic anabolic steroids during the period of 5 years were compared with 35 individuals which do not use androgenic anabolic steroids. Non-invasive methods were used in all individual (clinical examination and vascular ultrasound examination of vein system). The routine of training units in both groups was approximately two hours 4-6 times per week. Results: Final analysis has reveal that in androgenic anabolic steroids group in 18 individuals or 55.7% arterial hypertension with hyperlipidemia was more represented, compared with the group without using anabolic steroids, represented by 2 individuals or 5.7% and it was statistically considered significant by using p value less than 0.05. (p<0.05). Statistically dominant population using anabolic steroids drugs are males (100%) or 35 individuals

  9. Intramuscular anabolic signaling and endocrine response following high volume and high intensity resistance exercise protocols in trained men

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; Boone, Carleigh H; Beyer, Kyle S; Baker, Kayla M; Wells, Adam J; Mangine, Gerald T; Robinson, Edward H; Church, David D; Oliveira, Leonardo P; Willoughby, Darryn S; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise paradigms are often divided into high volume (HV) or high intensity (HI) protocols, however, it is unknown whether these protocols differentially stimulate mTORC1 signaling. The purpose of this study was to examine mTORC1 signaling in conjunction with circulating hormone concentrations following a typical HV and HI lower-body resistance exercise protocol. Ten resistance-trained men (24.7 ± 3.4 years; 90.1 ± 11.3 kg; 176.0 ± 4.9 cm) performed each resistance exercise protocol in a random, counterbalanced order. Blood samples were obtained at baseline (BL), immediately (IP), 30 min (30P), 1 h (1H), 2 h (2H), and 5 h (5H) postexercise. Fine needle muscle biopsies were completed at BL, 1H, and 5H. Electromyography of the vastus lateralis was also recorded during each protocol. HV and HI produced a similar magnitude of muscle activation across sets. Myoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations were significantly greater following HI compared to HV (P = 0.01–0.02), whereas the lactate response was significantly higher following HV compared to HI (P = 0.003). The growth hormone, cortisol, and insulin responses were significantly greater following HV compared to HI (P = 0.0001–0.04). No significant differences between protocols were observed for the IGF-1 or testosterone response. Intramuscular anabolic signaling analysis revealed a significantly greater (P = 0.03) phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor at 1H following HV compared to HI. Phosphorylation status of all other signaling proteins including mTOR, p70S6k, and RPS6 were not significantly different between trials. Despite significant differences in markers of muscle damage and the endocrine response following HV and HI, both protocols appeared to elicit similar mTORC1 activation in resistance-trained men. PMID:26197935

  10. Effects of Anabolic Steroids on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yongzhong

    2014-01-01

    Background Anabolic steroids are known to improve body composition and muscle strength in healthy people. However, whether anabolic steroids improve the physical condition and function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains undetermined. A meta-analysis was conducted to review the current evidence regarding the effects of anabolic steroids on COPD patients. Methods A comprehensive literature search of PubMed and EMBASE was performed to identify randomised controlled trials that examine the effects of anabolic steroids on COPD patients. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine differences between anabolic steroid administration and control conditions. Results Eight eligible studies involving 273 COPD patients were identified in this meta-analysis. Significant improvements were found in body weight (0.956 kg), fat-free mass (1.606 kg), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score (−6.336) and symptom score (−12.148). The apparent improvements in maximal inspiratory pressure (2.740 cmH2O) and maximal expiratory pressure (12.679 cmH2O) were not significant. The effects on handgrip strength, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), predicted FEV1 percent, PaO2, PaCO2 and six-min walk distance were negative, with WMDs of −0.245 kg, −0.096 L/sec, −1.996% of predicted, −1.648 cmHg, −0.039 cmHg and −16.102 meters, respectively. Conclusions Limited evidence available from the published literature suggests that the benefit of anabolic steroids on COPD patients cannot be denied. However, further studies are needed to identify the specific benefits and adverse effects of anabolic steroids on COPD patients and to determine the optimal populations and regimes of anabolic steroids in COPD patients. PMID:24427297

  11. Determination of anabolic-androgenic steroid adulterants in counterfeit drugs by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Cho, So-Hyun; Park, Hyoung Joon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Do, Jung-Ah; Heo, Seok; Jo, Jeong Hwa; Cho, Sooyeul

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) have been illegally used in counterfeit drugs to improve the performance of athletes. In addition, AASs have been used for cosmetic purpose by non-athletes. To determine the presence of 26 AASs, an analysis method using ultra-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was developed and validated. The validated method was applied to 19 counterfeit drugs collected from the Internet and off-line markets during 2014. Nearly 50% (9/19) of the samples contained one of these 26 AASs. In addition, the concentration ranges of the AASs ranged from 0.09 to 119,228.57 mg/kg in the suspected samples. The determined AASs primarily consisted of testosterone and testosterone 17-propionate (26%) followed by boldenone (21%). These results indicate the adulteration of over-the-counter counterfeit drugs, and the continuous monitoring of counterfeit drugs or dubious dietary supplements containing anabolic steroids is warranted.

  12. The Buzz About Anabolic Androgenic Steroids: Electrophysiological Effects in Excitable Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Oberlander, Joseph G.; Penatti, Carlos A. A.; Porter, Donna M.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2012-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) comprise a large and growing class of synthetic androgens used clinically to promote tissue-building in individuals suffering from genetic disorders, injuries and diseases. Despite these beneficial therapeutic applications, the predominant use of AAS is illicit: these steroids are self-administered to promote athletic performance and body image. Hand in hand with the desired anabolic actions of the AAS are untoward effects on the brain and behavior. While the signaling routes by which the AAS impose both beneficial and harmful actions may be quite diverse, key endpoints are likely to include ligand-gated and voltage-dependent ion channels that govern the activity of electrically excitable tissues. Here we review the known effects of AAS on molecular targets that play critical roles in controlling electrical activity, with a specific focus on the effects of AAS on neurotransmission mediated by GABAA receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:22576754

  13. Exercise-induced cardioprotection is impaired by anabolic steroid treatment through a redox-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Elen A; Fortunato, Rodrigo S; Carvalho, Denise P; Nascimento, José Hamilton M; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2013-11-01

    High doses of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) impair the cardioprotective effects of exercise against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) insult, possibly through cellular redox imbalance. Here, the effect of nandrolone decanoate (DECA) treatment on heart redox metabolism was investigated during I/R in sedentary and exercised rats. DECA treatment significantly reduced superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase activities in exercised rats after heart reperfusion. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were not affected by DECA in both sedentary and trained rats, regardless the I/R period. DECA also induced myocardial oxidative stress, as evidenced by the reduced levels of total reduced thiols after heart reperfusion in exercised rats treated with the anabolic steroid. These results indicate that cardiotoxic effects of supraphysiological doses of AAS involve reduced heart antioxidant capacity.

  14. Wernicke's encephalopathy and anabolic steroid drug abuse. Is there any possible relation?

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulos, P; Katsanoulas, C; Timplalexi, G; Lathyris, D; Vasiliagkou, S; Antoniadou, E

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a reversible, neurologic disorder due to thiamine deficiency which is mainly related to chronic alcohol abuse. We report a case of a young male patient, who was bodybuilder and anabolic drug user, in whom encephalopathy was diagnosed after a short medical course in the ICU after a major upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Mallory-Weiss syndrome) and hypovolemic shock. His clinical condition was typical for Wernicke's encephalopathy and although neuroimaging tests were not indicative, the patient received thiamine supplement therapy, which resulted in rapid clinical improvement. The diagnosis was based only on clinical sings and anabolic drug abuse was considered as a possible predisposing factor for the manifestation of the syndrome. PMID:23935320

  15. Side effects of anabolic androgenic steroids: pathological findings and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Andreas; Thieme, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Side effects of anabolic steroids with relevance in forensic medicine are mainly due to life-threatening health risks with potential fatal outcome and cases of uncertain limitations of criminal liability after steroid administration. Both problems are typically associated with long-term abuse and excessive overdose of anabolic steroids. Side effects may be due to direct genomic or nongenomic activities (myotrophic, hepatotoxic), can result from down-regulation of endogenous biosynthesis (antiandrogenic) or be indirect consequence of steroid biotransformation (estrogenic).Logically, there are no systematic clinical studies available and the number of causally determined fatalities is fairly limited. The following compilation reviews typical abundant observations in cases where nonnatural deaths (mostly liver failure and sudden cardiac death) were concurrent with steroid abuse. Moreover, frequent associations between structural characteristics and typical side effects are summarized.

  16. Multiple Intussusceptions Associated with Polycythemia in an Anabolic Steroid Abuser, A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Y; Shah, N; Thomas, A B; Gupta, A

    2015-01-01

    Intussusceptions are generally associated with mechanical lead points or localized inflammation that function as foci for intestinal telescoping. We present the case of a patient whose abuse of anabolic steroids resulted in the development of multiple simultaneous intussusceptions. Our patient had no additional identifiable risk factors for intussusception. Consistent with previous reports, corticosteroid induced polycythemia and its consequent hyperviscosity led to intravascular sludging and mesenteric ischemia with associated bowel wall thickening. The localized intestinal induration then served as mechanical foci for intussusception. Due to the illicit nature of anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse, the physiologic effects of supraphysiologic doses are sparsely reported and poorly understood. The scope of AAS abuse and its consequences are likely under-reported and under-recognized within the medical community. Our case presented a unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenge with which we aim to increasing awareness and clinical suspicion for AAS among healthcare personnel.

  17. Development of genetically engineered bacteria for production of selected aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Thomas E.; Watkins, Carolyn S.; Bulmer, Deborah K.; Johnson, Bruce F.; Amaratunga, Mohan

    2001-01-01

    The cloning and expression of genes in the common aromatic pathway of E. coli are described. A compound for which chorismate, the final product of the common aromatic pathway, is an anabolic intermediate can be produced by cloning and expressing selected genes of the common aromatic pathway and the genes coding for enzymes necessary to convert chorismate to the selected compound. Plasmids carrying selected genes of the common aromatic pathway are also described.

  18. Testosterone and other anabolic steroids as cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, J; Christiana, J; Frishman, W H

    1999-05-01

    There has been much interest in the effect of sex hormones on cardiovascular risk factors and as a therapeutic modality in both men and women. In this article, testosterone is considered as a possible therapy for cardiovascular disease. It has been shown that the level of serum testosterone decreases in men as they age. Healthy men with low testosterone levels have increased cardiovascular risk factors, including high fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and apo A-I lipoprotein. Injections of testosterone to raise the levels to midnormal range have been shown to decrease total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, while increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Testosterone affects the clotting system by increasing thromboxane A (2) receptor activity and platelet aggregability. Testosterone has also been shown to augment the fibrinolytic system and antithrombin III activity. In men, testosterone has been shown to have antianginal effects, and endogenous levels have an inverse relationship to systolic blood pressure. Testosterone can be given in oral, injectable, pellet, and transdermal patch forms. There may be a role in administering testosterone to return men to normal physiologic range who have low serum levels. This treatment increases the risk of prostatic cancer, benign prostatism, erythrocytosis, and edema. No long-term studies of the effects of long-term testosterone replacement have been undertaken, so it is difficult to recommend this treatment as yet, but it is being considered as a therapy for augmenting skeletal muscle strength in patients with congestive heart failure.

  19. Effect of anabolic steroids on overloaded and overloaded suspended skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsika, R W; Herrick, R E; Baldwin, K M

    1987-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether anabolic steroids act synergistically with functional overload in terms of increasing muscle weight and subcellular protein content of normal overloaded and suspended overloaded rodent plantaris muscle. Female rats were randomly assigned to six groups (7 rats/group) for 6 wk: 1) normal control (NC), 2) overload (OV), 3) overload steroid (OV-S), 4) normal suspended (N-SUS), 5) overload suspended (OV-SUS), and 6) overload suspended steroid (OV-SUS-S). Rats receiving anabolic steroid were administered 0.3 mg nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin) per day. Relative to control values, overload induced 1) sparing of muscle weight of the OV-SUS group as well as larger absolute and normalized (mg muscle/g body wt) muscle weight of the OV group (P less than 0.05), 2) greater protein content (mg/muscle, P less than 0.05), and 3) an increased relative expression of slow myosin in both the OV and OV-SUS groups (P less than 0.05). Although anabolic steroid treatment of overload animals (OV-S) did not alter further the pattern of response of any parameter analyzed for the OV group, it did induce larger absolute and normalized muscle weight (P less than 0.05) as well as a greater protein content (mg/muscle, P less than 0.05) of the OV-SUS-S group compared with control values. However, anabolic steroid treatment did not alter the pattern of isomyosin expression observed in the overload (OV-S vs. OV) or overload suspended (OV-SUS-S vs. OV-SUS) groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. The effect of anabolic steroids on lean body mass: the dose response curve.

    PubMed

    Forbes, G B

    1985-06-01

    Data from human subjects given various amounts of anabolic steroids show that the resultant increment in lean body mass (LBM) has the features of a typical dose response curve. Low doses produce a very modest effect, while large doses result in a progressive augmentation of the LBM. Endogenous testosterone production during male adolescence is accompanied by a sex differential in LBM that is comparable to the LBM increment generated by exogenous steroids given to adults.

  1. Severe Cholestasis and Bile Acid Nephropathy From Anabolic Steroids Successfully Treated With Plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Avegail; Nustas, Rosemary; Nguyen, Hoang-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Severe cholestasis with anabolic androgenic steroids is well-known to cause acute liver injury. Treatment is usually supportive after withdrawal of the offending agent. Acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently occurs in acute liver injury and may complicate management and prognosis. We highlight the use of plasmapheresis resulting in rapid improvement in cholestatic jaundice with resolution of AKI. Plasmapheresis should be considered in special cases in which there is progressive clinical decline despite supportive care. PMID:26958570

  2. Assessment of bone quality in osteoporosis treatment with bone anabolic agents: Really something new?

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo; Caudarella, Renata; Camisasca, Marzia; Cabrini, Daniela Maria; Merli, Ilaria; Messina, Carmelo; Piodi, Luca Petruccio

    2016-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic pathologic condition, particularly of the elderly, in which a reduction of bone mineral density (BMD) weakens bone, leading to the so-called fragility fractures, most often of spine and femur. The gold standard exam for the quantitative measurement of BMD is the dual X-ray photon absorptiometry (DXA), a radiological method. However, a relevant number of fragility fractures occurs in the range of normal BMD values, meaning that also qualitative aspects of bone play a role, namely bone architecture and bone geometry. Bone structure is investigated by microCT and histomorphometry, which necessitate an invasive approach with a biopsy, usually taken at the iliac crest, not the typical site of fragility fractures. New tools, trabecular bone score (TBS) and hip structural analysis (HSA), obtained during DXA, can supply informations about bone structure of spine and femur, respectively, in a not invasive way. Therapy of osteoporosis is based on two types of drugs leading to an increase of BMD: antiresorptive and anabolic treatments. The antiresorptive drugs inhibit the osteoclasts, whereas teriparatide and, in part, strontium ranelate ameliorate bone structure. The present review deals with the relation between the anabolic drugs for osteoporosis and the cited new tools which investigate bone architecture and geometry, in order to clarify if they represent a real advantage in monitoring efficacy of osteoporosis' treatment. Data from the studies show that increases of TBS and HSA values after anabolic therapy are small and very close to their least significant change at the end of the usual period of treatment. Therefore, it is questionable if TBS and HSA are really helpful in monitoring bone quality and in defining reduction of individual fragility fracture risk during osteoporosis treatment with bone anabolic agents.

  3. Mycobacterium fortuitum skin infection as a complication of anabolic steroids: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Pai, R; Parampalli, U; Hettiarachchi, G; Ahmed, I

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rare cause of recurrent skin abscesses in an immunocompetent person. We report the case of a 37-year-old man presenting with multiple recurrent non-healing skin abscesses. Culture of the abscess wall yielded growth of M fortuitum. In our case, we highlight the association of anabolic steroids with non-tuberculous mycobacterial skin abscesses that fail to resolve despite repeated drainage.

  4. Clinical review 138: Anabolic-androgenic steroid therapy in the treatment of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Basaria, S; Wahlstrom, J T; Dobs, A S

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the preclinical and clinical literature relevant to the efficacy and safety of anabolic androgen steroid therapy for palliative treatment of severe weight loss associated with chronic diseases. Data sources were published literature identified from the Medline database from January 1966 to December 2000, bibliographic references, and textbooks. Reports from preclinical and clinical trials were selected. Study designs and results were extracted from trial reports. Statistical evaluation or meta-analysis of combined results was not attempted. Androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) are widely prescribed for the treatment of male hypogonadism; however, they may play a significant role in the treatment of other conditions as well, such as cachexia associated with human immunodeficiency virus, cancer, burns, renal and hepatic failure, and anemia associated with leukemia or kidney failure. A review of the anabolic effects of androgens and their efficacy in the treatment of these conditions is provided. In addition, the numerous and sometimes serious side effects that have been known to occur with androgen use are reviewed. Although the threat of various side effects is present, AAS therapy appears to have a favorable anabolic effect on patients with chronic diseases and muscle catabolism. We recommend that AAS can be used for the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome wasting and in severely catabolic patients with severe burns. Preliminary data in renal failure-associated wasting are also positive. Advantages and disadvantages should be weighed carefully when comparing AAS therapy to other weight-gaining measures. Although a conservative approach to the use of AAS in patients with chronic diseases is still recommended, the utility of AAS therapy in the attenuation of severe weight loss associated with disease states such as cancer, postoperative recovery, and wasting due to pulmonary and hepatic disease should be

  5. Changes in the miRNA profile under the influence of anabolic steroids in bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christiane; Riedmaier, Irmgard; Reiter, Martina; Tichopad, Ales; Pfaffl, Michael W; Meyer, Heinrich H D

    2011-03-21

    miRNAs are regulatory RNA molecules. The analytical interest rose over the past 10 years especially in clinical diagnostics as miRNAs show specific expression patterns in several human diseases like diabetes or cancer. Therefore, it is expected that miRNA profiles might be used as biomarkers in early diagnosis. The idea of establishing biomarkers is also present in veterinary drug analysis, e.g. in the surveillance of illegal use of anabolics. Transcriptomics is a promising approach in the detection of anabolics misuse. However, miRNA expression patterns have shown their superiority over mRNA patterns in clinical diagnostics. Thus, the influence of anabolic steroids on miRNA expression in bovine liver should be investigated and an expression pattern should be validated, which might be used as a treatment biomarker. An animal experiment was conducted with 18 heifers equally allocated to a control and a treatment group, which was implanted with TBA plus E2. Liver samples were screened for miRNA expression using PCR arrays. Expression of 11 prominent miRNAs was validated via single assay qPCR. Herein, the following expression pattern could be found with an up-regulation of miR-29c and miR-103 and a down-regulation of miR-34a, miR-181c, miR-20a and miR-15a (p<0.05 each). Using principal components analysis (PCA), the control group could clearly be distinguished from the treatment group, when integrating gene expression results from both miRNA and mRNA. So, the combination of different transcribed targets (mRNA plus miRNA) might be a promising approach to find a valid expression pattern to be used for anabolic treatment screening.

  6. Nutritional state modulates growth hormone-stimulated lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Bergan, Heather E; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Sheridan, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates several processes in vertebrates, including two metabolically disparate processes: promotion of growth, an anabolic action, and mobilization of stored lipid, a catabolic action. In this study, we used hepatocytes isolated from continuously fed and long-term (4weeks) fasted rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as a model to investigate the mechanistic basis of the anabolic and catabolic actions of GH. Our hypothesis was that nutritional state modulates the lipolytic responsiveness of cells by adjusting the signal transduction pathways to which GH links. GH stimulated lipolysis as measured by increased glycerol release in both a time- and concentration-related manner from cells of fasted fish but not from cells of fed fish. Expression of mRNAs that encode the lipolytic enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), HSL1 and HSL2, also was stimulated by GH in cells from fasted fish and not in cells from fed fish. Activation of the signaling pathways that mediate GH action also was studied. In cells from fed fish, GH activated the JAK-STAT, PI3K-Akt, and ERK pathways, whereas in cells from fasted fish, GH activated the PLC/PKC and ERK pathways. In hepatocytes from fasted fish, blockade of PLC/PKC and of the ERK pathway inhibited GH-stimulated lipolysis and GH-stimulated HSL mRNA expression, whereas blockade of JAK-STAT or of the PI3K-Akt pathway had no effect on lipolysis or HSL expression stimulated by GH. These results indicate that during fasting GH activates the PLC/PKC and ERK pathways resulting in lipolysis but during periods of feeding GH activates a different complement of signal elements that do not promote lipolysis. These findings suggest that the responsiveness of cells to GH depends on the signal pathways to which GH links and helps resolve the growth-promoting and lipid catabolic actions of GH.

  7. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated syndrome of inappropriate secretion of anti-diuretic hormone.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jordan; Shields, Jenna; Passero, Vida

    2016-10-01

    Hyponatremia is a common complication among cancer patients. Certain antineoplastic agents have been associated with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of anti-diuretic hormone-induced hyponatremia. The most common agents associated with secretion of anti-diuretic hormone are vinca alkaloids, platinum compounds, and alkylating agents. We report a case of secretion of anti-diuretic hormone associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  8. In vivo MRI evaluation of anabolic steroid precursor growth effects in a guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haiying; Vasselli, Joseph R; Tong, Christopher; Heymsfield, Steven B; Wu, Ed X

    2009-08-01

    Anabolic steroids are widely used to increase skeletal muscle (SM) mass and improve physical performance. Some dietary supplements also include potent steroid precursors or active steroid analogs such as nandrolone. Our previous study reported the anabolic steroid effects on SM in a castrated guinea pig model with SM measured using a highly quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol. The aim of the current study was to apply this animal model and in vivo MRI protocol to evaluate the growth effects of four widely used over-the-counter testosterone and nandrolone precursors: 4-androstene-3 17-dione (androstenedione), 4-androstene-3beta 17beta-diol (4-androsdiol), 19-nor-4-androstene-3beta-17beta-diol (bolandiol) and 19-nor-4-androstene-3 17-dione (19-norandrostenedione). The results showed that providing precursor to castrated male guinea pigs led to plasma steroid levels sufficient to maintain normal SM growth. The anabolic growth effects of these specific precursors on individual and total muscle volumes, sexual organs, and total adipose tissue over a 10-week treatment period, in comparison with those in the respective positive control testosterone and nandrolone groups, were documented quantitatively by MRI.

  9. Hypoxia Potentiates Anabolic Effects of Exogenous Hyaluronic Acid in Rat Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Ichimaru, Shohei; Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Shimomura, Seiji; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used clinically to treat osteoarthritis (OA), but its pharmacological effects under hypoxic conditions remain unclear. Articular chondrocytes in patients with OA are exposed to a hypoxic environment. This study investigated whether hypoxia could potentiate the anabolic effects of exogenous HA in rat articular cartilage and whether these mechanisms involved HA receptors. HA under hypoxic conditions significantly enhanced the expression of extracellular matrix genes and proteins in explant culture, as shown by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays. Staining with Safranin-O and immunohistochemical staining with antibody to type II collagen were also enhanced in pellet culture. The expression of CD44 was increased by hypoxia and significantly suppressed by transfection with siRNAs targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (siHIF-1α). These findings indicate that hypoxia potentiates the anabolic effects of exogenous HA by a mechanism in which HIF-1α positively regulates the expression of CD44, enhancing the binding affinity for exogenous HA. The anabolic effects of exogenous HA may increase as OA progresses. PMID:27347945

  10. Creb coactivators direct anabolic responses and enhance performance of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Nelson E; Kelly, Kimberly A; Hawkins, Richard; Bramah-Lawani, Mariam; Amelio, Antonio L; Nwachukwu, Jerome C; Nettles, Kendall W; Conkright, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    During the stress response to intense exercise, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) induces rapid catabolism of energy reserves through the release of catecholamines and subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Paradoxically, chronic administration of sympathomimetic drugs (β-agonists) leads to anabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle, suggesting that sympathetic outflow also regulates myofiber remodeling. Here, we show that β-agonists or catecholamines released during intense exercise induce Creb-mediated transcriptional programs through activation of its obligate coactivators Crtc2 and Crtc3. In contrast to the catabolic activity normally associated with SNS function, activation of the Crtc/Creb transcriptional complex by conditional overexpression of Crtc2 in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice fostered an anabolic state of energy and protein balance. Crtc2-overexpressing mice have increased myofiber cross-sectional area, greater intramuscular triglycerides and glycogen content. Moreover, maximal exercise capacity was enhanced after induction of Crtc2 expression in transgenic mice. Collectively these findings demonstrate that the SNS-adrenergic signaling cascade coordinates a transient catabolic stress response during high-intensity exercise, which is followed by transcriptional reprogramming that directs anabolic changes for recovery and that augments subsequent exercise performance. PMID:24674967

  11. Dkk1 haploinsufficiency requires expression of Bmp2 for bone anabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Intini, Giuseppe; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-06-01

    Bone fractures remain a serious health burden and prevention and enhanced healing of fractures have been obtained by augmenting either BMP or Wnt signaling. However, whether BMP and Wnt signaling are both required or are self-sufficient for anabolic and fracture healing activities has never been fully elucidated. Mice haploinsufficient for Dkk1 (Dkk1(+/-)) exhibit a high bone mass phenotype due to an up-regulation of canonical Wnt signaling while mice lacking Bmp2 expression in the limbs (Bmp2(c/c);Prx1::cre) succumb to spontaneous fracture and are unable to initiate fracture healing; combined, these mice offer an opportunity to examine the requirement for activated BMP signaling on the anabolic and fracture healing activity of Wnts. When Dkk1(+/-) mice were crossed with Bmp2(c/c);Prx1::cre mice, the offspring bearing both genetic alterations were unable to increase bone mass and heal fractures, indicating that increased canonical Wnt signaling is unable to exploit its activity in absence of Bmp2. Thus, our data suggest that BMP signaling is required for Wnt-mediated anabolic activity and that therapies aimed at preventing fractures and fostering fracture repair may need to target both pathways for maximal efficacy.

  12. Hypercortisolemia alters muscle protein anabolism following ingestion of essential amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Creson, Daniel L.; Sanford, Arthur P.; Wolf, Steven E.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Ferrando, Arny A.

    2003-01-01

    Debilitating injury is accompanied by hypercortisolemia, muscle wasting, and disruption of the normal anabolic response to food. We sought to determine whether acute hypercortisolemia alters muscle protein metabolism following ingestion of a potent anabolic stimulus: essential amino acids (EAA). A 27-h infusion (80 microg. kg(-1). h(-1)) of hydrocortisone sodium succinate mimicked cortisol (C) levels accompanying severe injury (>30 microg/dl), (C + AA; n = 6). The control group (AA) received intravenous saline (n = 6). Femoral arteriovenous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained during a primed (2.0 micromol/kg) constant infusion (0.05 micromol. kg(-1). min(-1)) of l-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine before and after ingestion of 15 g of EAA. Hypercortisolemia [36.5 +/- 2.1 (C + AA) vs. 9.0 +/- 1.0 microg/dl (AA)] increased postabsorptive arterial, venous, and muscle intracellular phenylalanine concentrations. Hypercortisolemia also increased postabsorptive and post-EAA insulin concentrations. Net protein balance was blunted (40% lower) following EAA ingestion but remained positive for a greater period of time (60 vs. 180 min) in the C + AA group. Thus, although differences in protein metabolism were evident, EAA ingestion improved muscle protein anabolism during acute hypercortisolemia and may help minimize muscle loss following debilitating injury.

  13. [Ingestion of anabolic steroids and ischaemic stroke. A clinical case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    García-Esperón, Carlos; Hervás-García, José Vicente; Jiménez-González, Marta; Pérez de la Ossa-Herrero, Natalia; Gomis-Cortina, Meritxell; Dorado-Bouix, Laura; López-Cancio Martinez, Elena; Castaño-Duque, Carlos H; Millán-Torné, Mónica; Dávalos, Antonio

    2013-03-16

    INTRODUCTION. Anabolic-androgenic steroids are synthetic substances derived from testosterone that are employed for their trophic effect on muscle tissue, among other uses. Their consumption can give trigger a series of adverse side effects on the body, including the suppression of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis as well as liver, psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders. The most common effects are altered fat profiles and blood pressure values, cardiac remodelling, arrhythmias or myocardial infarcts. CASE REPORT. We report the case of a young male, with a background of anabolic-androgenic steroids abuse, who visited because of an acute neurological focus in the right hemisphere related with an ischaemic stroke. The aetiological study, including cardiac monitoring, echocardiograph and imaging studies (magnetic resonance and arteriography) and lab findings (thrombophilia, serology, autoimmunity, tumour markers) showed no alterations. CONCLUSIONS. The association between consumption of anabolic-androgenic steroids and cardiovascular pathologies is known, but its relation with cerebrovascular disease has not received so much attention from researchers.

  14. Hair analysis of anabolic steroids in connection with doping control-results from horse samples.

    PubMed

    Anielski, P

    2008-07-01

    Doping control of anabolic substances is normally carried out with urine samples taken from athletes and horses. Investigation of alternative specimens, e.g. hair samples, is restricted to special cases, but can also be worthwhile, in addition to urine analysis. Moreover, hair material is preferred in cases of limited availability or complicated collection of urine samples, e.g. from horses. In this work, possible ways of interpretation of analytical results in hair samples are discussed and illustrated by practical experiences. The results demonstrate the applicability of hair analysis to detect anabolic steroids and also to obtain further information about previous abuse. Moreover, the process of incorporation of steroids into hairs is described and the consequences on interpretation are discussed, e.g. on the retrospective estimation of the application date. The chosen examples deal with the detection of the anabolic agent testosterone propionate. Hair samples of an application study, as well as a control sample taken from a racing horse, were referred to. Hair material was investigated by a screening procedure including testosterone, nandrolone and several esters (testosterone propionate, phenylpropionate, decanoate, undecanoate, cypionate; nandrolone decanoate, dodecanoate and phenylpropionate; limits of detection (LODs) between 0.1 and 5.0 pg/mg). Confirmation of testosterone propionate (LOD 0.1 pg/mg) was carried out by an optimised sample preparation. Trimethylsilyl (TMS) and tert-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives were detected by gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS).

  15. PYOMYOSITIS IN ATHLETES AFTER THE USE OF ANABOLIC STEROIDS - CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Nivaldo Souza Cardozo; Gaspar, Eric Figueirido; Siqueira, Karina Levy; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report on the management of five cases of pyomyositis in athletes after the use of anabolic steroids. Method: Over the past 10 years, five cases of athletes who developed pyomyositis after using anabolic steroids were attended at the Sports Trauma Center (CETE), EPM-UNIFESP. Results: All the patients were diagnosed clinically and through laboratory and imaging tests. Surgical treatment was carried out (with collection of material for culturing) and antibiotic therapy was administered. In four cases, the injection sites were in the upper limbs and in one case, in the gluteus muscles bilaterally as well as in the upper limbs. In all five cases, occurrences of leukocytosis and neutrophilia were observed in the hemogram. After debridement, the germs of normal skin (S. aureus and S. viridans) were found in cultures on the secretions. Demarcation of the abscess and examination of the muscle plane in which the abscess was located were performed using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. All the patients responded to broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Two cases required more than one surgical procedure because of the appearance of more than one abscess site with different evolution times. Conclusion: The use of anabolic steroids by some athletes may have grave consequences. Rapid, energetic and multidisciplinary intervention is necessary in such cases in order to avoid undesirable results. The right treatment healed the athletes completely, and they returned to their sports at the same level. PMID:27026995

  16. The roles of parathyroid hormone in bone remodeling: prospects for novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, G; Di Somma, C; Rubino, M; Faggiano, A; Vuolo, L; Guerra, E; Contaldi, P; Savastano, S; Colao, A

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this review is to focus on the roles of PTH in bone remodeling. PTH plays a central role in regulating calcium-phosphate metabolism and its production increases in response to low serum calcium levels. A continue hypersecretion of PTH, as occurs in primary hyperparathyroidism, leads to bone resorption. On the other hand, there is clear evidence of the anabolic properties of PTH.When administered at a low dose and intermittently, this hormone seems to be able to exert positive effects on bone volume and microarchitecture. The effects of PTH are mediated by PTH/PTH-related protein receptor, a G protein that can activate the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PK)A and calcium-dependent PKC; the activation of PKA account for most of the PTH anabolic action. The anabolic actions of PTH involve direct effects on osteoblasts and indirect effects mediated by activation of skeletal growth factors (IGF-I) and inhibition of growth factor antagonists, such as sclerostin. PTH enhances the number and the activation of osteoblast through 4 pathways: increasing osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, decreasing osteoblast apoptosis and reducing the negative effects of peroxisome proliferator activator (PPAR)γ receptor on osteoblast differentiation. Moreover PTH enhances the Wnt-β catenin pathway, that is central to osteogenesis and bone formation, inhibiting sclerostin. Finally, PTH induces the synthesis of IGF-I and, due to its prodifferentiating and pro-survival effects on osteoblasts, this could be a key mediator of PTH effect on osteoblasts. In conclusion, the intermittent administration of PTH has a pleiotropic anabolic effect on bone; further studies about mechanisms of action of PTH could be a starting point to new osteoporosis treatments.

  17. Blood lactate and hormonal responses to prototype flywheel ergometer workouts.

    PubMed

    Caruso, John F; Coday, Michael A; Monda, Julie K; Ramey, Elizabeth S; Hastings, Lori P; Vingren, Jakob L; Potter, William T; Kraemer, William J; Wickel, Eric E

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare blood lactate and hormonal responses with flywheel ergometer (FERG) leg presses for preliminary assessment of workouts best suited for future in-flight resistance exercise. Comprised of 10 repetition sets, the workouts entailed 3 sets of concentric and eccentric (CE3) actions, or concentric-only actions done for 3 (CO3) or 6 (CO6) sets. Methods employed included assessment of blood lactate concentrations ([BLa-]) before and 5 minutes postexercise. Venous blood was also collected before and at 1 and 30 minutes postexercise to assess growth hormone, testosterone, cortisol concentrations ([GH], [T], [C]) and [T/C] ratios. [BLa-] were compared with 2 (time) x 3 (workout) analysis of variance. Hormones were assessed with 2 (gender) x 3 (time) x 3 (workout) analysis of covariances. Results showed [BLa-] had a time effect. Growth hormone concentration showed gender x workout, gender x time, and workout x time interactions, whereas [T] had a 3-way interaction. [C] had gender, time, and workout effects. [T/C] yielded a gender x time interaction. It was concluded that, because CO6 and CE3 yielded similar anabolic hormonal data but the latter had a lower [C] 30 minutes postexercise, CE3 served as the best workout. Although the FERG was originally designed for microgravity, the effort put forth by current subjects was like that for workouts aimed at greater athletic performance and conditioning. Practical applications suggest that eccentric actions should be used for FERG workouts geared toward muscle mass and strength improvement.

  18. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    PubMed

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life.

  19. Assessment of two complementary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry metabolomics strategies for the screening of anabolic steroid treatment in calves.

    PubMed

    Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Weigel, Stefan; Lommen, Arjen; Chereau, Sylvain; Rambaud, Lauriane; Essers, Martien; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Nielen, Michel W F; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2011-08-26

    Anabolic steroids are banned in food producing livestock in Europe. Efficient methods based on mass spectrometry detection have been developed to ensure the control of such veterinary drug residues. Nevertheless, the use of "cocktails" composed of mixtures of low amounts of several substances as well as the synthesis of new compounds of unknown structure prevent efficient prevention. New analytical tools able to detect such abuse are today mandatory. In this context, metabolomics may represent new emerging strategies for investigating the global physiological effects associated to a family of substances and therefore, to suspect the administration of steroids. The purpose of the present study was to set up, assess and compare two complementary mass spectrometry-based metabolomic strategies as new tools to screen for steroid abuse in cattle and demonstrate the feasibility of such approaches. The protocols were developed in two European laboratories in charge of residues analysis in the field of food safety. Apart from sample preparation, the global process was different in both laboratories from LC-HRMS fingerprinting to multivariate data analysis through data processing and involved both LC-Orbitrap-XCMS and UPLC-ToF-MS-MetAlign strategies. The reproducibility of both sample preparation and MS measurements were assessed in order to guarantee that any differences in the acquired fingerprints were not caused by analytical variability but reflect metabolome modifications upon steroids administration. The protocols were then applied to urine samples collected on a large group of animals consisting of 12 control calves and 12 calves administrated with a mixture of 17β-estradiol 3-benzoate and 17β-nandrolone laureate esters according to a protocol reflecting likely illegal practices. The modifications in urine profiles as indicators of steroid administration have been evaluated in this context and proved the suitability of the approach for discriminating anabolic

  20. Hormone Abuse Prevention and What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... high school students in the United States used anabolic steroid pills or shots without a prescription. Young people ... and sports-training centers, and on the Internet. Anabolic steroids have been found in over-the-counter supplements, ...

  1. Inhibitors of sex hormones: development of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Frost, P; Gomez, E C

    1972-01-01

    Inhibitors of sex hormones and the development of experimental models are discussed. Compounds that inhibit the action of androgens and estrogens are defined, and the possible mechanisms of action presented are: 1) inhibition of hormone synthesis; 2) inhibition of uptake of hormone into target tissues; 3) inhibition of the retention of hormone in target tissues; 4) inhibition of the binding of hormone to nonenzyme macromolecules; and 5) inhibition of the metabolism of a hormone to a more active form. Effects of antiandrogen on skin such as hirsutism, sebum production, and acne are briefly covered. Methods of study included inhibition of in vitro metabolism of testosterone by human foreskin and the use of the hamster flank organ for the bioassay of antiandrogens.

  2. Hormones and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blackstein, Martin Elliot

    1984-01-01

    Hormonal therapy is the first systemic therapy to have been used successfully in the treatment of cancer. Developments in steroid hormone receptor assays in the last decade have resulted in the first predictable assays for cancer therapy. The role of hormones, in both the development and treatment of breast, prostate and uterine cancer, is reviewed. Because hormonal therapy is generally a less toxic palliative treatment than other treatments (e.g., chemotherapy and radiation), it has been used for malignancies such as malignant melanoma, hypernephroma, and carcinoid. PMID:21278945

  3. Relationships between structure, ionization profile and sensitivity of exogenous anabolic steroids under electrospray ionization and analysis in human urine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cha, Eunju; Kim, Sohee; Kim, Hee Won; Lee, Kang Mi; Kim, Ho Jun; Kwon, Oh-Seung; Lee, Jaeick

    2016-04-01

    The relationships between the ionization profile, sensitivity, and structures of 64 exogenous anabolic steroids (groups I-IV) was investigated under electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions. The target analytes were ionized as [M + H](+) or [M + H-nH2 O](+) in the positive mode, and these ions were used as precursor ions for selected reaction monitoring analysis. The collision energy and Q3 ions were optimized based on the sensitivity and selectivity. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.05-20 ng/mL for the 64 steroids. The LODs for 38 compounds, 14 compounds and 12 compounds were in the range of 0.05-1, 2-5 and 10-20 ng/mL, respectively. Steroids including the conjugated keto-functional group at C3 showed good proton affinity and stability, and generated the [M + H](+) ion as the most abundant precursor ion. In addition, the LODs of steroids using the [M + H](+) ion as the precursor ion were mostly distributed at low concentrations. In contrast, steroids containing conjugated/unconjugated hydroxyl functional groups at C3 generated [M + H - H2 O](+) or [M + H - 2H2 O](+) ions, and these steroids showed relatively high LODs owing to poor stability and multiple ion formation. An LC-MS/MS method based on the present ionization profile was developed and validated for the determination of 78 steroids (groups I-V) in human urine.

  4. Liquid chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography as alternative techniques to gas chromatography for the rapid screening of anabolic agents in urine.

    PubMed

    Desfontaine, Vincent; Nováková, Lucie; Ponzetto, Federico; Nicoli, Raul; Saugy, Martial; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-06-17

    This work describes the development of two methods involving supported liquid extraction (SLE) sample treatment followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography or ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS and UHPSFC-MS/MS) for the screening of 43 anabolic agents in human urine. After evaluating different stationary phases, a polar-embedded C18 and a diol columns were selected for UHPLC-MS/MS and UHPSFC-MS/MS, respectively. Sample preparation, mobile phases and MS conditions were also finely tuned to achieve highest selectivity, chromatographic resolution and sensitivity. Then, the performance of these two methods was compared to the reference routine procedure for steroid analyses in anti-doping laboratories, which combines liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). For this purpose, urine samples spiked with the compounds of interest at five different concentrations were analyzed using the three analytical platforms. The retention and selectivity of the three techniques were very different, ensuring a good complementarity. However, the two new methods displayed numerous advantages. The overall procedure was much faster thanks to high throughput SLE sample treatment using 48-well plates and faster chromatographic analysis. Moreover, the highest sensitivity was attained using UHPLC-MS/MS with 98% of the doping agents detected at the lowest concentration level (0.1ng/mL), against 76% for UHPSFC-MS/MS and only 14% for GC-MS/MS. Finally, the weakest matrix effects were obtained with UHPSFC-MS/MS with 76% of the analytes displaying relative matrix effect between -20 and 20%, while the GC-MS/MS reference method displayed very strong matrix effects (over 100%) for all of the anabolic agents.

  5. The effects of parathyroid hormone peptides on the peripheral skeleton of postmenopausal women. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Louis M; Aspray, Terry J; McCloskey, Eugene V

    2017-03-09

    Given current developments in anabolic therapy for bone, we wished to document the effects of the only currently available anabolic therapy, parathyroid hormone (PTH) peptides, on the peripheral skeleton of postmenopausal women. We undertook a systematic review of English articles using MEDLINE, Scopus and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (final update 28th March 2016). Additional studies were identified through searches of bibliographies. Studies included those comparing PTH peptides with placebo, with anti-osteoporotic treatments and in combination therapies. Participants had to be postmenopausal women and outcomes included areal or volumetric bone mineral density (BMD) and measurements of bone microarchitecture at peripheral sites, such as the forearm and tibia. Data were extracted independently and reviewed by EVM and LMM. Data on study design were also collected for methodological risk of bias assessment. The heterogeneity between studies, regarding the drug dose and duration, and the site measured, prevented grouped meta-analysis. There were no significant differences in areal BMD between PTH peptides and placebo at peripheral skeletal sites at 12months. A decrease in aBMD occurred with PTH(1-34) (larger dose) and PTH(1-84) treatment at 18months follow-up in comparison to the placebo arms. Anti-resorptives seemed to attenuate losses of aBMD at peripheral sites when compared to PTH peptides monotherapy, likely mediated by lower cortical porosity. Finally, PTH peptides combined with bisphosphonates or denosumab attenuated peripheral BMD losses in comparison to PTH peptide monotherapy, with evidence of increased BMD at ultradistal peripheral sites when PTH(1-34) was combined with denosumab or hormone replacement therapy. This summary should act as a reference point for the comparison of new anabolic therapies, specifically in comparison to PTH(1-34).

  6. Effect of multiple oral doses of androgenic anabolic steroids on endurance performance and serum indices of physical stress in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Baume, Norbert; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; Sottas, Pierre-Edouard; Bagutti, Carlo; Cauderay, Michel; Mangin, Patrice; Saugy, Martial

    2006-11-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are doping agents that are mostly used for improvement of strength and muscle hypertrophy. In some sports, athletes reported that the intake of AAS is associated with a better recovery, a higher training load capacity and therefore an increase in physical and mental performances. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, the effect of multiple doses of AAS on different physiological parameters that could indirectly relate the physical state of athletes during a hard endurance training program. In a double blind settings, three groups (n = 9, 8 and 8) were orally administered placebo, testosterone undecanoate or 19-norandrostenedione, 12 times during 1 month. Serum biomarkers (creatine kinase, ASAT and urea), serum hormone profiles (testosterone, cortisol and LH) and urinary catecholamines (noradrenalin, adrenalin and dopamine) were evaluated during the treatment. Running performance was assessed before and after the intervention phase by means of a standardized treadmill test. None of the measured biochemical variables showed significant impact of AAS on physical stress level. Data from exercise testing on submaximal and maximal level did not reveal any performance differences between the three groups or their response to the treatment. In the present study, no effect of multiple oral doses of AAS on endurance performance or bioserum recovery markers was found.

  7. Hepatocellular adenomas associated with anabolic androgenic steroid abuse in bodybuilders: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Socas, L; Zumbado, M; Pérez-Luzardo, O; Ramos, A; Pérez, C; Hernández, J R; Boada, L D

    2005-05-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are used illicitly at high doses by bodybuilders. The misuse of these drugs is associated with serious adverse effects to the liver, including cellular adenomas and adenocarcinomas. We report two very different cases of adult male bodybuilders who developed hepatocellular adenomas following AAS abuse. The first patient was asymptomatic but had two large liver lesions which were detected by ultrasound studies after routine medical examination. The second patient was admitted to our hospital with acute renal failure and ultrasound (US) studies showed mild hepatomegaly with several very close hyperecogenic nodules in liver, concordant with adenomas at first diagnosis. In both cases the patients have evolved favourably and the tumours have shown a tendency to regress after the withdrawal of AAS. The cases presented here are rare but may well be suggestive of the natural course of AAS induced hepatocellular adenomas. In conclusion, sportsmen taking AAS should be considered as a group at risk of developing hepatic sex hormone related tumours. Consequently, they should be carefully and periodically monitored with US studies. In any case, despite the size of the tumours detected in these two cases, the possibility of spontaneous tumour regression must also be taken in account.

  8. Direct analysis of anabolic steroids in urine using Leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption-dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Nonami, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-08-11

    Rapid detection of trace level anabolic steroids in urine is highly desirable to monitor the consumption of performance enhancing anabolic steroids by athletes. The present article describes a novel strategy for identifying the trace anabolic steroids in urine using Leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption (LPTD) coupled to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ionization mass spectrometry. Using this method the steroid molecules are enriched within a liquid droplet during the thermal desorption process and desorbed all-together at the last moment of droplet evaporation in a short time domain. The desorbed molecules were ionized using a dielectric barrier discharge ion-source in front of the mass spectrometer inlet at open atmosphere. This process facilitates the sensitivity enhancement with several orders of magnitude compared to the thermal desorption at a lower temperature. The limits of detection (LODs) of various steroid molecules were found to be in the range of 0.05-0.1 ng mL(-1) for standard solutions and around two orders of magnitude higher for synthetic urine samples. The detection limits of urinary anabolic steroids could be lowered by using a simple and rapid dichloromethane extraction technique. The analytical figures of merit of this technique were evaluated at open atmosphere using suitable internal standards. The technique is simple and rapid for high sensitivity and high throughput screening of anabolic steroids in urine.

  9. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004000.htm Aging changes in hormone production To use the sharing ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ...

  10. Effect of anabolic implants on adrenal cortisol synthesis in feedlot beef cattle implanted early or late in the finishing phase.

    PubMed

    Gifford, C A; Branham, K A; Ellison, J O; Gómez, B I; Lemley, C O; Hart, C G; Krehbiel, C R; Bernhard, B C; Maxwell, C L; Goad, C L; Hallford, D M; Hernandez Gifford, J A

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of anabolic steroids to increase growth rate in beef cattle impacts adrenal glucocorticoid production. The mechanism by which combination androgen and estrogen implants reduce cortisol biosynthesis in heifers is not clear. The objective of this study was to identify whether pituitary or adrenal gene expression and liver enzyme activity may contribute to altered serum cortisol concentrations in heifers receiving a combination implant. On d 0 of a 122-d finishing phase, 187 predominantly Angus heifers (361 kg) approximately 14 months old were randomly assigned to one of three implant groups: (1) non-implanted control, (2) implanted at the beginning of the finishing phase (d 0; early implant) with a combination implant (200mg TBA+20mg E2; Revalor 200®), and (3) implanted during the late stage of the finishing phase (d 56; late implant) with Revalor 200®. At d 56, body weight (BW) was greater (P<0.0001) for the early implanted heifers (456 ± 1.9 kg) compared to 437 and 435 (± 1.8) kg for control and late implanted heifers, respectively. Final BW (d 122) was similar between both implanted groups and heavier than non-implanted controls (P<0.0001). Serum cortisol was similar among groups at d 0 (P=0.86) however, by d 28 heifers receiving the combination implant had reduced (P<0.05) serum cortisol concentrations (31.2 ng/mL) compared to controls (49.4 ng/mL) and late (48.2 ng/mL) groups. On d 84 cortisol was similar (P=0.75) among implanted heifers and was less (P<0.01) than non-implanted heifers. Expression of pituitary and adrenal genes involved in glucocorticoid synthesis was evaluated at d 28/29 or 84/85; however, despite decreased serum cortisol in implanted heifers, no change in mRNA expression was demonstrated. Liver CYP3A enzyme activity at d 28/29 was decreased 59% in early implanted heifers compared to control heifers (P=0.01). Additionally, at d 84/85 AKR1C activity was greatest (P=0.01) in control heifers compared to both implanted groups. Data

  11. Anabolic potential of bone mineral in human periosteal fibroblasts using steroid markers of healing.

    PubMed

    Suchak, A; Soory, M

    2013-05-01

    A deproteinized natural cancellous bone mineral (B) was studied in a cell culture model for its anabolic potential using two radiolabelled steroid substrates, 14C-testosterone (14C-T) and 14C-4-androstenedione (14C-4-A) independently; in the presence or absence of the anti-androgen finasteride (F) and minocycline (M). Culture medium was assayed for the biologically active metabolite 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) a marker of regenerative potential and wound healing. Confluent monolayer cultures of human periosteal fibroblasts were incubated in Eagle's minimum essential medium with each of the substrates 14C-T and 14C-4-A. Incubations were performed with previously established optimal concentrations of B5 (milligrams/ml), M25 (μg/ml) and F5 (μg/ml) alone and in combination (n=6) for 24h. The eluent was solvent extracted with ethyl acetate (2 ml x 2) and subjected to TLC in a benzene/acetone solvent system (4:1 v/v) for separation of metabolites; they were quantified using a radioisotope scanner. The yield of DHT was increased over controls in response to B and M with both substrates 14C-T and 14C-4-A by 1.7, 1.8-fold and 1.7, 1.6-fold respectively (n=6; p<0.001; one way ANOVA). Combined incubations of B and M resulted in similar yields. F inhibited DHT yields with both radiolabelled substrates by 2-3-fold (n=6; p<0.001) which was overcome by a combined incubation of F+B to values similar to those of controls (p<0.01). Documented pro-anabolic effects of minocycline were applicable as a standard for confirmation of responses to B. Significant increases in yields of DHT in response to B and M with both substrates indicate their anabolic potential in periosteal fibroblasts with implications for wound healing.

  12. Diverse Roles of Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 in Mammalian Aging: Progress and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Csiszar, Anna; de Cabo, Raphael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Because the initial reports demonstrating that circulating growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 decrease with age in laboratory animals and humans, there have been numerous studies related to the importance of these hormones for healthy aging. Nevertheless, the role of these potent anabolic hormones in the genesis of the aging phenotype remains controversial. In this chapter, we review the studies demonstrating the beneficial and deleterious effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 deficiency and explore their effects on specific tissues and pathology as well as their potentially unique effects early during development. Based on this review, we conclude that the perceived contradictory roles of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in the genesis of the aging phenotype should not be interpreted as a controversy on whether growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-1 increases or decreases life span but rather as an opportunity to explore the complex roles of these hormones during specific stages of the life span. PMID:22522510

  13. Diverse roles of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in mammalian aging: progress and controversies.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; deCabo, Raphael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    Because the initial reports demonstrating that circulating growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 decrease with age in laboratory animals and humans, there have been numerous studies related to the importance of these hormones for healthy aging. Nevertheless, the role of these potent anabolic hormones in the genesis of the aging phenotype remains controversial. In this chapter, we review the studies demonstrating the beneficial and deleterious effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 deficiency and explore their effects on specific tissues and pathology as well as their potentially unique effects early during development. Based on this review, we conclude that the perceived contradictory roles of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in the genesis of the aging phenotype should not be interpreted as a controversy on whether growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-1 increases or decreases life span but rather as an opportunity to explore the complex roles of these hormones during specific stages of the life span.

  14. Beneficial effects of an anabolic steroid during cytotoxic chemotherapy for metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Spiers, A S; DeVita, S F; Allar, M J; Richards, S; Sedransk, N

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the effects of concurrent administration of an anabolic steroid upon hematopoiesis and metabolism in patients with cancer who were receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy, a randomized trial was conducted. Thirty-three evaluable patients received intensive multiple-agent chemotherapy: 17 received in addition nandrolone decanoate ("Deca-Durabolin"), 200 mg intramuscularly each week. The nandrolone-treated patients showed significantly better maintenance of hemoglobin concentrations and body weight, and a highly significant reduction in number of blood transfusions. Improved survival in the androgen-treated patients did not achieve significance. There were no differences in neutrophil or platelet counts or in tolerance of cytotoxic drugs. Toxicity from nandrolone therapy was minimal.

  15. Anabolic Androgenic Steroid (AAS) related deaths: autoptic, histopathological and toxicological findings.

    PubMed

    Frati, Paola; Busardò, Francesco P; Cipolloni, Luigi; Dominicis, Enrico De; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) represent a large group of synthetic derivatives of testosterone, produced to maximize anabolic effects and minimize the androgenic ones. AAS can be administered orally, parenterally by intramuscular injection and transdermally. Androgens act by binding to the nuclear androgen receptor (AR) in the cytoplasm and then translocate into the nucleus. This binding results in sequential conformational changes of the receptor affecting the interaction between receptor and protein, and receptor and DNA. Skeletal muscle can be considered as the main target tissue for the anabolic effects of AAS, which are mediated by ARs which after exposure to AASs are up-regulated and their number increases with body building. Therefore, AASs determine an increase in muscle size as a consequence of a dose-dependent hypertrophy resulting in an increase of the cross-sectional areas of both type I and type II muscle fibers and myonuclear domains. Moreover, it has been reported that AASs can increase tolerance to exercise by making the muscles more capable to overload therefore shielding them from muscle fiber damage and improving the level of protein synthesis during recovery. Despite some therapeutic use of AASs, there is also wide abuse among athletes especially bodybuilders in order to improve their performances and to increase muscle growth and lean body mass, taking into account the significant anabolic effects of these drugs. The prolonged misuse and abuse of AASs can determine several adverse effects, some of which may be even fatal especially on the cardiovascular system because they may increase the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), myocardial infarction, altered serum lipoproteins, and cardiac hypertrophy. The aim of this review is to focus on deaths related to AAS abuse, trying to evaluate the autoptic, histopathological and toxicological findings in order to investigate the pathophysiological mechanism that underlines this type of death, which

  16. Collapsing glomerulopathy following anabolic steroid use in a 16-year-old boy with IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Matthai, S. M.; Basu, G.; Varughese, S.; Pulimood, A. B.; Veerasamy, T.; Korula, A.

    2015-01-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is a proliferative podocytopathy, increasingly recognized in a variety of disease conditions. We report a case of CG in a 16-year-old boy with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) who presented with acute kidney injury, marked proteinuria and hypertension following a short period of anabolic steroid use. Although CG has been associated with long-term anabolic steroid use among body builders, there is no data on the effect of anabolic steroid use in persons with underlying renal disease like IgAN. We postulate that development of CG in our patient could be temporally linked to intake of body-building steroids along with a predisposing background renal disease of IgAN. PMID:25838648

  17. Position stand on androgen and human growth hormone use.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Bhasin, Shalender; Storer, Thomas; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Haff, G Gregory; Willoughby, Darryn S; Rogol, Alan D

    2009-08-01

    Hoffman, JR, Kraemer, WJ, Bhasin, S, Storer, T, Ratamess, NA, Haff, GG, Willoughby, DS, and Rogol, AD. Position stand on Androgen and human growth hormone use. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S1-S59, 2009-Perceived yet often misunderstood demands of a sport, overt benefits of anabolic drugs, and the inability to be offered any effective alternatives has fueled anabolic drug abuse despite any consequences. Motivational interactions with many situational demands including the desire for improved body image, sport performance, physical function, and body size influence and fuel such negative decisions. Positive countermeasures to deter the abuse of anabolic drugs are complex and yet unclear. Furthermore, anabolic drugs work and the optimized training and nutritional programs needed to cut into the magnitude of improvement mediated by drug abuse require more work, dedication, and preparation on the part of both athletes and coaches alike. Few shortcuts are available to the athlete who desires to train naturally. Historically, the NSCA has placed an emphasis on education to help athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals become more knowledgeable, highly skilled, and technically trained in their approach to exercise program design and implementation. Optimizing nutritional strategies are a vital interface to help cope with exercise and sport demands (). In addition, research-based supplements will also have to be acknowledged as a strategic set of tools (e.g., protein supplements before and after resistance exercise workout) that can be used in conjunction with optimized nutrition to allow more effective adaptation and recovery from exercise. Resistance exercise is the most effective anabolic form of exercise, and over the past 20 years, the research base for resistance exercise has just started to develop to a significant volume of work to help in the decision-making process in program design (). The interface with nutritional strategies has been less

  18. The effects of catabolic and anabolic steroids on amino acid incorporation by skeletal-muscle ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Gillian; White, A. M.; Worthington, Judy

    1968-01-01

    1. A method is described for the routine isolation of ribosomes from small quantities of skeletal muscle that have been homogenized with the Ultra-Turrax tissue disintegrator. 2. Ribosomes prepared by this method from rats receiving triamcinolone acetonide or rabbits receiving cortisone acetate show a marked fall in their ability to incorporate amino acids when compared with ribosomes from control animals. 3. This fall in activity can be partially prevented in rats by pretreating the animals with an anabolic steroid, steroid 36644-Ba. 4. Testosterone (5mg./kg.) administered to rabbits in conjunction with cortisone acetate is not effective in maintaining ribosomal activity. However, steroid 36644-Ba at one-tenth of an equiandrogenic dose (0·05mg./kg.) is extremely effective. 5. The results with ribosomes isolated from rabbits support the concept that steroid 36644-Ba and possibly all anabolic steroids have an ability to counteract the catabolic action of corticosteroids that is greater than their androgenic activity would suggest. PMID:5673936

  19. Effectiveness of Anabolic Steroid Preventative Intervention among Gym Users: Applying Theory of Planned Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian, Farzad; Allahverdipour, Hamid; Moeini, Babak; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been associated with adverse physical and psychiatric effects and it is known as rising problem among youth people. This study was conducted to evaluate anabolic steroids preventative intervention efficiency among gym users in Iran and theory of planned behaviour was applied as theoretical framework. Methods: Overall, 120 male gym users participated in this study as intervention and control group. This was a longitudinal randomized pretest - posttest series control group design panel study to implement a behaviour modification based intervention to prevent AAS use. Cross -tabulation and t-test by using SPSS statistical package, version 13 was used for the statistical analysis. Results: It was found significant improvements in average response for knowledge about side effects of AAS (P<0.001), attitude toward, and intention not to use AAS. Additionally after intervention, the rate of AAS and supplements use was decreased among intervention group. Conclusion: Comprehensive implementation against AAS abuse among gym users and ado­lescences would be effective to improve adolescents’ healthy behaviors and intend them not to use AAS. PMID:24688897

  20. The Diagnosis and Manifestations of Liver Injury Secondary to Off-Label Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Use

    PubMed Central

    Cabb, Elena; Baltar, Shanna; Powers, David Wes; Mohan, Karthik; Martinez, Antonio; Pitts, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) presents as a broad spectrum of adverse drug reactions which can range from a mild elevation in liver enzymes to fulminant liver failure. The primary goal is to identify DILI early when the patient's liver enzymes are elevated and to discontinue the offending agent as soon as possible to prevent further injury. Herbal, dietary supplements and anabolic steroids represent a significant component of the drugs thought to cause DILI in the United States. Unlike all other drugs known to cause DILI, these drugs fall into a category of injury that is neither intrinsic nor idiosyncratic due to overlapping characteristics between the two. Here, we present a case of the off-label use of androgenic anabolic steroids inducing liver injury. A combination of clinical, laboratory, and histologic workup eventually led to the diagnosis of DILI. This can be a diagnostic challenge for practitioners. The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) published guidelines to aid the clinician in diagnosing DILI. Proving that an episode of liver injury is caused by a drug is difficult in many cases as it requires the exclusion of alternative etiologies. Some of the variables include temporal association, clinical-biochemical features, type of injury (hepatocellular and/or cholestatic), extrahepatic features, and the likelihood that a given agent is the culprit based on its known manifestations with prior cases. This case illustrates the utility of the diagnostic tools used for DILI as recommended by the ACG, along with a supplemental histopathologic diagnosis. PMID:27721739

  1. Oxidative stress and myocardial dysfunction in young rabbits after short term anabolic steroids administration.

    PubMed

    Germanakis, Ioannis; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Fragkiadaki, Persefoni; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Champsas, Maria Christakis; Stagos, Demetrios; Rentoukas, Elias; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2013-11-01

    The present study focuses on the short term effects of repeated low level administration of turinabol and methanabol on cardiac function in young rabbits (4 months-old). The experimental scheme consisted of two oral administration periods, lasting 1 month each, interrupted by 1-month wash-out period. Serial echocardiographic evaluation at the end of all three experimental periods was performed in all animals. Oxidative stress markers have also been monitored at the end of each administration period. Treated animals originally showed significantly increased myocardial mass and systolic cardiac output, which normalized at the end of the wash out period. Re-administration led to increased cardiac output, at the cost though of a progressive myocardial mass reduction. A dose-dependent trend towards impaired longitudinal systolic, diastolic and global myocardial function was also observed. The adverse effects were more pronounced in the methanabol group. For both anabolic steroids studied, the low dose had no significant effects on oxidative stress markers monitored, while the high dose created a hostile oxidative environment. In conclusion, anabolic administration has been found to create a possible deleterious long term effect on the growth of the immature heart and should be strongly discouraged especially in young human subjects.

  2. The androgenic anabolic steroid tetrahydrogestrinone produces dioxin-like effects via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyo Youl; Kim, Sun-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2012-10-01

    For a long time, athletes have used androgenic anabolic steroids (AASs) in an inappropriate and veiled manner with the aim of improving exercise performance or for cosmetic purposes. Abuse of AASs triggers adverse effects such as hepatocarcinogenesis, heart attacks, and aggressive behavior. However, AAS-induced toxicity is not completely understood at the molecular level. In the present study, we showed, by performing a dioxin response element (DRE)-luciferase reporter gene assay, that tetrahydrogestrinone (THG), a popular and potent androgen receptor agonist, has dioxin-like effects. In addition, we showed that THG increased cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1) mRNA and protein levels, and enzyme activity. The gene encoding CYP1A1 is involved in phase 1 xenobiotic metabolism and a target gene of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Using the AhR antagonist CH-223191, we also examined whether the effects of THG on DRE activation depended on AhR. Our results suggest that synthetic anabolic steroids may have dioxin-like side effects that can disturb endocrine systems and may cause other side effects including cancer through AhR.

  3. Anabolic androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate reduces hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Jonas; Kindlundh, Anna M S; Nyberg, Fred; Bergström, Lena; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2003-10-03

    Supratherapeutical doses of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) have dramatic effects on metabolism in humans, and also inhibit feeding and reduce the rate of body weight gain in rats. In order to test the hypothesis that the AAS metabolic syndrome is accompanied by alterations in the central melanocortin system, we evaluated body weight, food intake and hypothalamic agouti-related protein (AgRP) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels following administration of different doses of the anabolic androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate. In order to distinguish changes induced by the steroid treatment per se from those resulting from the reduced food intake and growth rate, we also compared the effect of nandrolone decanoate on AgRP and POMC mRNA expression with both normally fed, and food restricted control groups. We here report that administration of nandrolone specifically reduces arcuate nucleus POMC mRNA levels while not affecting the expression level of AgRP. The effect on POMC expression was not observed in the food restricted controls, excluding the possibility that the observed effect was a mere response to the reduced food intake and body weight. These results raise the possibility that some of the metabolic and behavioural consequences of AAS abuse may be the result of alterations in the melanocortin system.

  4. Effects of anabolic agents on protein breakdown in L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, F J; Francis, G L

    1983-01-01

    1. Protein degradation in rat L6 myoblasts is inhibited by high concentrations of insulin as well as by foetal bovine serum and bovine colostrum, mixtures rich in growth-factor activity. 2. Growth factors achieve maximal effects within 2 h after addition to the cell cultures, but these diminish with time. Indeed, during incubations greater than 12 h, foetal calf serum actually stimulates protein breakdown. The changed response, however, is not due to the depletion of growth factors from serum. 3. Protein breakdown is stimulated by dexamethasone by a process that takes several hours to be expressed, but is more pronounced over a 4 h measurement period than over 18h. The glucocorticoid response is prevented by insulin or by cycloheximide. 4. Anabolic agents such as trenbolone, diethylstilboestrol and testosterone do not alter rates of intracellular protein breakdown and do not interfere with the glucocorticoid-induced catabolic response. 5. The results are consistent with anabolic steroids and related agents acting indirectly on muscle, perhaps via altering concentrations of growth factors of the somatomedin type. PMID:6342615

  5. New approaches to male non-hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Nya-Ngatchou, Jean-Jacques; Amory, John K

    2013-03-01

    A non-hormonal male contraceptive is a contraceptive that does not involve the administration of hormones or hormone blockers. This review will focus on the use of lonidamine derivatives and inhibitors of retinoic acid biosynthesis and function as approaches to male non-hormonal contraception. Two current lonidamine derivatives, adjudin and H2-gamendazole, are in development as male contraceptives. These potent anti-spermatogenic compounds impair the integrity of the apical ectoplasmic specialization, resulting in premature spermiation and infertility. Another approach to male contraceptive development is the inhibition of retinoic acid in the testes, as retinoic acid signaling is necessary for spermatogenesis. The administration of the retinoic acid receptor antagonist BMS-189453 reversibly inhibits spermatogenesis in mice. Similarly, oral dosing of WIN 18,446, which inhibits testicular retinoic acid biosynthesis, effectively contracepts rabbits. Hopefully, one of these approaches to non-hormonal male contraception will prove to be safe and effective in future clinical trials.

  6. Menopause and Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the participating organizations that have assisted in its reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  7. Vaginal bleeding - hormonal

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. DUB is more common in teenagers or in women who are approaching menopause. DUB is unpredictable. The bleeding may be very heavy or light and can occur often or randomly.

  8. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin) Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken) Alternative Names GH test Images Growth hormone stimulation test - series References Ali O. Hyperpituitarism, tall stature, and overgrowth ...

  9. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Murat

    2016-01-05

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  10. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases. PMID:28117293

  11. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  12. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  13. Sex hormonal regulation and hormesis in aging and longevity: role of vitagenes.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, V; Scapagnini, G; Davinelli, S; Koverech, G; Koverech, A; De Pasquale, C; Salinaro, A Trovato; Scuto, M; Calabrese, E J; Genazzani, A R

    2014-12-01

    Aging process is accompanied by hormonal changes characterized by an imbalance between catabolic hormones, such as cortisol and thyroid hormones which remain stable and hormones with anabolic effects (testosterone, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), that decrease with age. Deficiencies in multiple anabolic hormones have been shown to predict health status and longevity in older persons.Unlike female menopause, which is accompanied by an abrupt and permanent cessation of ovarian function (both folliculogenesis and estradiol production), male aging does not result in either cessation of testosterone production nor infertility. Although the circulating serum testosterone concentration does decline with aging, in most men this decrease is small, resulting in levels that are generally within the normal range. Hormone therapy (HT) trials have caused both apprehension and confusion about the overall risks and benefits associated with HT treatment. Stress-response hormesis from a molecular genetic perspective corresponds to the induction by stressors of an adaptive, defensive response, particularly through alteration of gene expression. Increased longevity can be associated with greater resistance to a range of stressors. During aging, a gradual decline in potency of the heat shock response occur and this may prevent repair of protein damage. Conversely, thermal stress or pharmacological agents capable of inducing stress responses, by promoting increased expression of heat-shock proteins, confer protection against denaturation of proteins and restoration of proteome function. If induction of stress resistance increases life span and hormesis induces stress resistance, hormesis most likely result in increased life span. Hormesis describes an adaptive response to continuous cellular stresses, representing a phenomenon where exposure to a mild stressor confers resistance to subsequent, otherwise harmful, conditions of increased

  14. A novel approach to the quantitative detection of anabolic steroids in bovine muscle tissue by means of a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry instrument.

    PubMed

    Bussche, Julie Vanden; Decloedt, Anneleen; Van Meulebroek, Lieven; De Clercq, Nathalie; Lock, Stephen; Stahl-Zeng, Jianru; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2014-09-19

    In recent years, the analysis of veterinary drugs and growth-promoting agents has shifted from target-oriented procedures, mainly based on liquid chromatography coupled to triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QqQ-MS), towards accurate mass full scan MS (such as Time-of-Flight (ToF) and Fourier Transform (FT)-MS). In this study, the performance of a hybrid analysis instrument (i.e. UHPLC-QuadrupoleTime-of-Flight-MS (QqToF-MS)), able to exploit both full scan HR and MS/MS capabilities within a single analytical platform, was evaluated for confirmatory analysis of anabolic steroids (gestagens, estrogens including stilbenes and androgens) in meat. The validation data was compared to previously obtained results (CD 2002/657/EC) for QqQ-MS and single stage Orbitrap-MS. Additionally, a fractional factorial design was used to shorten and optimize the sample extraction. Validation according to CD 2002/657/EC demonstrated that steroid analysis using QqToF has a higher competing value towards QqQ-MS in terms of selectivity/specificity, compared to single stage Orbitrap-MS. While providing excellent linearity, based on lack-of-fit calculations (F-test, α=0.05 for all steroids except 17β-ethinylestradiol: α=0.01), the sensitivity of QqToF-MS proved for 61.8% and 85.3% of the compounds more sensitive compared to QqQ-MS and Orbitrap-MS, respectively. Indeed, the CCα values, obtained upon ToF-MS/MS detection, ranged from 0.02 to 1.74μgkg(-1) for the 34 anabolic steroids, while for QqQ-MS and Orbitrap-MS values ranged from 0.04 to 0.88μgkg(-1) and from 0.07 to 2.50μgkg(-1), respectively. Using QqToF-MS and QqQ-MS, adequate precision was obtained as relative standard deviations for repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility, were below 20%. In case of Orbitrap-MS, some compounds (i.e. some estrogens) displayed poor precision, which was possibly caused by some lack of sensitivity at lower concentrations and the absence of MRM-like experiments. Overall, it can be

  15. POSSIBLE MECHANISMS OF THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION IN MICE BY BDE 47, A MAJOR POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHER CONGENER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Polybromindated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of polyhalogenated aromatic compounds commercially used as fire retardants in consumer products. These compounds have been shown to decrease thyroid hormone concentrations in rodents after acute exposures. Based on t...

  16. Former Abusers of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Exhibit Decreased Testosterone Levels and Hypogonadal Symptoms Years after Cessation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Selmer, Christian; Østergren, Peter Busch; Pedersen, Karen Boje; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Faber, Jens; Juul, Anders; Kistorp, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Aims Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers. Methods This study had a cross-sectional case-control design and involved 37 current AAS abusers, 33 former AAS abusers (mean (95%CI) elapsed duration since AAS cessation: 2.5 (1.7; 3.7) years) and 30 healthy control participants. All participants were aged 18–50 years and were involved in recreational strength training. Reproductive hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)) were measured using morning blood samples. Symptoms of hypogonadism (depressive symptoms, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction) were recorded systematically. Results Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower median (25th –75th percentiles) total and free testosterone levels than control participants (total testosterone: 14.4 (11.9–17.7) nmol/l vs. 18.8 (16.6–22.0) nmol/l) (P < 0.01). Overall, 27.2% (13.3; 45.5) of former AAS abusers exhibited plasma total testosterone levels below the lower reference limit (12.1 nmol/l) whereas no control participants exhibited testosterone below this limit (P < 0.01). Gonadotropins were significantly suppressed, and inhibin B and AMH were significantly decreased in current AAS abusers compared with former AAS abusers and control participants (P < 0.01). The group of former AAS abusers had higher proportions of participants with depressive symptoms ((24.2%) (11.1; 42.2)), erectile dysfunction ((27.3%) (13.3; 45.6)) and decreased libido ((40.1%) (23.2; 57.0)) than the other two groups (trend analyses: P < 0.05). Conclusions Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower plasma testosterone levels and higher frequencies of symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism than healthy control participants years after AAS cessation

  17. Hormonal therapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Fernand

    2010-01-01

    , especially in the presence of increased AR levels, it becomes important to discover more potent and purely antagonistic blockers of AR. The data obtained with compounds under development are promising. While waiting for this (these) new anti-androgen(s), combined treatment with castration and a pure anti-androgen (bicalutamide, flutamide or nilutamide) is the only available and the best scientifically based means of treating prostate cancer by hormone therapy at any stage of the disease with the optimal chance of success and even cure in localized disease.

  18. Renewal of the air-water interface as a critical system parameter of protein stability: aggregation of the human growth hormone and its prevention by surface-active compounds.

    PubMed

    Wiesbauer, Johanna; Prassl, Ruth; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2013-12-10

    Soluble proteins are often highly unstable under mixing conditions that involve dynamic contacting between the main liquid phase and a gas phase. The recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) was recently shown to undergo aggregation into micrometer-sized solid particles composed of non-native (mis- or unfolded) protein, once its solutions were stirred or shaken to generate a continuously renewed air-water interface. To gain deepened understanding and improved quantification of the air-water interface effect on rhGH stability, we analyzed the protein's aggregation rate (r(agg)) at controlled specific air-water surface areas (a(G/L)) established by stirring or bubble aeration. We show that in spite of comparable time-averaged values for a(G/L) (≈ 100 m(2)/m(3)), aeration gave a 40-fold higher r(agg) than stirring. The enhanced r(agg) under aeration was ascribed to faster macroscopic regeneration of free a(G/L) during aeration as compared to stirring. We also show that r(agg) was independent of the rhGH concentration in the range 0.67 - 6.7 mg/mL, and that it increased linearly dependent on the available a(G/L). The nonionic surfactant Pluronic F-68, added in 1.6-fold molar excess over rhGH present, resulted in complete suppression of r(agg). Foam formation was not a factor influencing r(agg). Using analysis by circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that in the presence of Pluronic F-68 under both stirring and aeration, the soluble protein retained its original fold, featuring native-like relative composition of secondary structural elements. We further provide evidence that the efficacy of Pluronic F-68 resulted from direct, probably hydrophobic protein-surfactant interactions that prevented rhGH from becoming attached to the air-water interface. Surface-induced aggregation of rhGH is suggested to involve desorption of non-native protein from the air-water interface as the key limiting step. Proteins or protein aggregates released

  19. Direct interactions of androgenic/anabolic steroids with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain: implications for the psychological and physiological manifestations of androgenic/anabolic steroid abuse.

    PubMed

    Masonis, A E; McCarthy, M P

    1996-08-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a mitochondrial protein involved in regulating steroid synthesis and transport. We report here the effects of androgenic/anabolic steroids (AAS) on the binding of the PBR-specific ligand [3H] PK11195 to male rat brain cortical synaptoneurosomes. Two synthetic AAS, stanozolol and 17beta-testosterone cypionate (17beta-cyp), significantly inhibited 1 nM [3H] PK11195 binding at concentrations greater than 5 and 25 microM, respectively. Stanozolol was the most effective inhibitor, reducing [3H] PK11195 binding by up to 75%, compared to only 40% inhibition by 17beta-cyp, at 50 microM AAS concentration. Two other AAS, 17alpha-methyltestosterone and nortestosterone decanoate, were incapable of inhibiting [3H] PK11195 binding at concentrations up to 50 microM. On the basis of Scatchard/Rosenthal analysis, [3H] PK11195 binds to two classes of binding sites, and the inhibition of [3H] PK11195 binding by stanozolol appears to be allosteric, primarily reducing binding to the higher affinity [3H] PK11195 binding site. These results, in combination with earlier studies indicating the direct effects of AAS on the function of additional central nervous system receptor complexes, suggest that the behavioral and psychological effects of AAS result from the interactions of AAS with multiple regulatory systems in the brain.

  20. Variability and dilemmas in harm reduction for anabolic steroid users in the UK: a multi-area interview study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The UK continues to experience a rise in the number of anabolic steroid-using clients attending harm reduction services such as needle and syringe programmes. Methods The present study uses interviews conducted with harm reduction service providers as well as illicit users of anabolic steroids from different areas of England and Wales to explore harm reduction for this group of drug users, focussing on needle distribution policies and harm reduction interventions developed specifically for this population of drug users. Results The article addresses the complexity of harm reduction service delivery, highlighting different models of needle distribution, such as peer-led distribution networks, as well as interventions available in steroid clinics, including liver function testing of anabolic steroid users. Aside from providing insights into the function of interventions available to steroid users, along with principles adopted by service providers, the study found significant tensions and dilemmas in policy implementation due to differing perspectives between service providers and service users relating to practices, risks and effective interventions. Conclusion The overarching finding of the study was the tremendous variability across harm reduction delivery sites in terms of available measures and mode of operation. Further research into the effectiveness of different policies directed towards people who use anabolic steroids is critical to the development of harm reduction. PMID:24986546

  1. N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen as a biomarker of anabolic response to recombinant human GH and testosterone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Biomarkers that predict musculoskeletal response to anabolic therapies should expedite drug development. During collagen synthesis in soft lean tissue, N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (P3NP) is released into circulation. We investigated P3NP as a biomarker of lean body mass (L...

  2. Adolescent Self-Perceptions and Attitudes toward School as Determinants of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Risk Estimates and Normative Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Bryan E.

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in symbolic interactionism and drawing on data gathered in the 2007 Monitoring the Future Study (n = 2,201), this research examines how self-esteem and perceived intelligence, as well as attitudes and behaviors related to school environments, associate with perceptions of anabolic-androgenic steroids. With perceived risk and…

  3. Anabolic Steroid Misuse among Minors. Report to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia. House Document No. 58.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Health Professions Dept., Richmond.

    This document comprises the final report of the Virginia Department of Health Professions' Task Force on anabolic steroid misuse among minors. As such, it summarizes the activities of the department and of the boards within the department, the Offices of the Secretary of Health and Education, and other organizations including the Virginia High…

  4. Adult Brtl/+ Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Demonstrates Anabolic Response to Sclerostin Antibody Treatment with Increased Bone Mass and Strength

    PubMed Central

    Sinder, Benjamin P.; White, Logan E.; Salemi, Joseph D.; Ominsky, Michael S.; Caird, Michelle S.; Marini, Joan C.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable collagen-related bone dysplasia, characterized by brittle bones with increased fracture risk. Although OI fracture risk is greatest before puberty, adults with OI remain at risk of fracture. Anti-resorptive bisphosphonates are commonly used to treat adult OI, but have shown mixed efficacy. New treatments which consistently improve bone mass throughout the skeleton may improve patient outcomes. Neutralizing antibodies to sclerostin (Scl-Ab) are a novel anabolic therapy that have shown efficacy in preclinical studies by stimulating bone formation via the canonical wnt signaling pathway. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Scl-Ab in an adult 6 mo old Brtl/+ model of OI that harbors a typical heterozygous OI-causing Gly>Cys substitution on Col1a1. Methods 6mo old WT and Brtl/+ mice were treated with Scl-Ab (25mg/kg, 2x/week) or Veh for 5 weeks. OCN and TRACP5b serum assays, dynamic histomorphometry, microCT and mechanical testing were performed. Results Adult Brtl/+ mice demonstrated a strong anabolic response to Scl-Ab with increased serum osteocalcin and bone formation rate. This anabolic response led to improved trabecular and cortical bone mass in the femur. Mechanical testing revealed Scl-Ab increased Brtl/+ femoral stiffness and strength. Conclusion Scl-Ab was successfully anabolic in an adult Brtl/+ model of OI. PMID:24803333

  5. In vivo pharmacological evaluation of a lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Shayli Varasteh; Varamini, Pegah; Steyn, Frederik; Toth, Istvan

    2015-11-10

    In the current study, the efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile of lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) was examined following oral administration in male rats. A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry technique was developed and applied for measuring the concentration of lactose[Q(1)][w(6)]LHRH (compound 1) in rat plasma in order to allow measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters. LH release was evaluated using a sandwich ELISA. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax = 0.11 μg/ml) was reached at 2h (Tmax) following oral administration of the compound at 10mg/kg. The half-life was determined to be 2.6h. The absolute bioavailability of the orally administered compound was found to be 14%, which was a remarkable improvement compared to zero-to-low oral bioavailability of the native peptide. Compound 1 was effective in stimulating LH release at 20mg/kg after oral administration. The method was validated at a linear range of 0.01-20.0 μg/ml and a correlation coefficient of r(2) ≥ 0.999. The accuracy and precision values showed the reliability and reproducibility of the method for evaluation of the pharmacokinetic parameters. These findings showed that the lactose derivative of LHRH has a therapeutic potential to be further developed as an orally active therapeutics for the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases.

  6. Are the cardiac effects of anabolic steroid abuse in strength athletes reversible?

    PubMed Central

    Urhausen, A; Albers, T; Kindermann, W

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the reversibility of adverse cardiovascular effects after chronic abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) in athletes. Methods: Doppler echocardiography and cycle ergometry including measurements of blood pressure at rest and during exercise were undertaken in 32 bodybuilders or powerlifters, including 15 athletes who had not been taking AAS for at least 12 months (ex-users) and 17 currently abusing AAS (users), as well as in 15 anabolic-free weightlifters. Results: Systolic blood pressure was higher in users (mean (SD) 140 (10) mm Hg) than in ex-users (130 (5) mm Hg) (p < 0.05) or weightlifters (125 (10) mm Hg; p < 0.001). Left ventricular muscle mass related to fat-free body mass and the ratio of mean left ventricular wall thickness to internal diameter were not significantly higher in users (3.32 (0.48) g/kg and 42.1 (4.4)%) than in ex-users (3.16 (0.53) g/kg and 40.3 (3.8)%), but were lower in weightlifters (2.43 (0.26) g/kg and 36.5 (4.0)%; p < 0.001). Left ventricular wall thickness related to fat-free body mass was also lower in weightlifters, but did not differ between users and ex-users. Left ventricular wall thickness was correlated with a point score estimating AAS abuse in users (r  =  0.49, p < 0.05). In all groups, systolic left ventricular function was within the normal range. The maximum late transmitral Doppler flow velocity (Amax) was higher in users (61 (12) cm/s) and ex-users (60 (12) cm/s) than in weightlifters (50 (9) cm/s; p < 0.05 and p  =  0.054). Conclusions: Several years after discontinuation of anabolic steroid abuse, strength athletes still show a slight concentric left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison with AAS-free strength athletes. PMID:15084541

  7. Hormones and endocrine disruptors in human seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Hampl, R; Kubatova, J; Heracek, J; Sobotka, V; Starka, L

    2013-07-01

    Seminal plasma represents a unique environment for maturation, nutrition, and protection of male germ cells from damaging agents. It contains an array of organic as well as inorganic chemicals, encompassing a number of biologically and immunologically active compounds, including hormones. Seminal plasma contains also various pollutants transferred from outer environment known as endocrine disruptors. They interfere with hormones at the receptor level, act as inhibitors of their biosynthesis, and affect hormone regulation.In this minireview, the main groups of hormones detected in seminal plasma are summarized. Seminal gonadal steroids were investigated mostly with aim to use them as biomarkers of impaired spermatogenesis (sperm count, motility, morphology). Concentrations of hormones in the seminal plasma often differ considerably from the blood plasma levels in dependence on their origin. In some instances (dihydrotestosterone, estradiol), their informative value is higher than determination in blood.Out of peptide hormones detected in seminal plasma, peptides of transforming growth factor beta family, especially antimullerian hormone, and oligopeptides related to thyrotropin releasing hormone have the high informative value, while assessment of seminal gonadotropins and prolactin does not bring advantage over determination in blood.Though there is a large body of information about the endocrine disruptors' impact on male reproduction, especially with their potential role in decline of male reproductive functions within the last decades, there are only scarce reports on their presence in seminal plasma. Herein, the main groups of endocrine disruptors found in seminal plasma are reviewed, and the use of their determination for investigation of fertility disorders is discussed.

  8. Exposure to media predicts use of dietary supplements and anabolic-androgenic steroids among Flemish adolescent boys.

    PubMed

    Frison, Eline; Vandenbosch, Laura; Eggermont, Steven

    2013-10-01

    This study examined whether different types of media affect the use of dietary proteins and amino acid supplements, and intent to use anabolic-androgenic steroids. A random sample of 618 boys aged 11-18 years from eight schools in the Flemish part of Belgium completed standardized questionnaires as part of the Media and Adolescent Health Study. The survey measured exposure to sports media, appearance-focused media, fitness media, use of dietary supplements, and intent to use anabolic-androgenic steroids. Data were analyzed using logistic regressions and are presented as adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI); 8.6 % indicated to have used dietary proteins, 3.9 % indicated to have used amino acid supplements, and 11.8 % would consider using anabolic-androgenic steroids. After adjusting for fitness activity, exposure to fitness media was associated with the use of dietary proteins (OR = 7.24, CI = 2.25-23.28) and amino acid supplements (5.16, 1.21-21.92; 44.30, 8.25-238). Intent to use anabolic-androgenic steroids was associated with exposure to fitness media (2.38, 1.08-5.26; 8.07, 2.55-25.53) and appearance-focused media (6.02, 1.40-25.82; 8.94, 1.78-44.98). Sports media did not correlate with the use of dietary supplements and intent to use anabolic-androgenic steroids. Specific types of media are strong predictors of the use of supplements in adolescent boys. This provides an opportunity for intervention and prevention through the selection of fitness media as a communication channel. Health practitioners should also be aware that the contemporary body culture exerts pressure not only on girls but also on boys.

  9. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  10. Hormonal control of euryhalinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takei, Yoshio; McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  11. Thyroid hormone transporter defects.

    PubMed

    Grüters, Annette

    2007-01-01

    In in vitro experiments, active transport of thyroid hormones had been repeatedly demonstrated. The membrane transporters for thyroid hormones which have been identified include the organic anion transporting polypeptide, heterodimeric amino acid transporters and the monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) which are the focus of this chapter. The gene encoding MCT8 which was identified as a specific thyroid hormone transporter is located on chromosome Xq13.2. The expression pattern of MCT8 indicates that MCT8 plays an important role in the development of the central nervous system by transporting thyroid hormone into neurons as its main target cells. Mutational analysis of the MCT8 gene revealed mutations or deletions in the MCT8 gene in unrelated male patients with severe psychomotor retardation and biochemical findings consistent with thyroid hormone resistance. Indeed, thyroid function tests in patients with MCT8 mutations demonstrated marked elevations of serum T3 (in the thyrotoxic range), a significant decrease in serum T4 or fT4 and normal to elevated TSH levels.

  12. Male hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K

    2006-06-01

    Efforts are underway to develop additional forms of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development involves the administration of exogenous testosterone (T). When administered to a man, T functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis. After 2-3 months of treatment, low levels of these gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in a majority of men. Hormonal contraception with exogenous T has proven to be free from serious adverse effects and is well tolerated by men. In addition, sperm counts uniformly normalize when the exogenous T is discontinued. Thus, male hormonal is safe, effective and reversible; however, spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some diminished potential for fertility persists. Because of this recent studies have combined T with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing antagonists to further suppress pituitary gonadotropins and optimize contraceptive efficacy. Current combinations of T and progestogens completely suppress spermatogenesis without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable T, which can be administered every 8 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  13. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based metabolomic to screen for anabolic practices in cattle: identification of 5α-androst-2-en-17-one as new biomarker of 4-androstenedione misuse.

    PubMed

    Anizan, Sebastien; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Duval, Thibault; Monteau, Fabrice; Cesbron, Nora; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The use of anabolic steroids as growth promoters for meat-producing animals is banned within the European Union. However, screening for the illegal use of natural steroid hormones still represents a difficult challenge because of the high interindividual and physiological variability of the endogenous concentration levels in animals. In this context, the development of untargeted profiling approaches for identifying new relevant biomarkers of exposure and/or effect has been emerging for a couple of years. The present study deals with an untargeted metabolomics approach on the basis of GC-MS aiming to reveal potential biomarkers signing a fraudulent administration of 4-androstenedione (AED), an anabolic androgenic steroid chosen as template. After a sample preparation based on microextraction by packed sorbent, urinary profiles of the free and deglucurono-conjugates urinary metabolites were acquired by GC-MS in the full-scan acquisition mode. Data processing and chemometric procedures highlighted 125 ions, allowing discrimination between samples collected before and after an administration of 4-AED. After a first evaluation of the signal robustness using additional and independent non-compliant samples, 17 steroid-like metabolites were pointed out as relevant candidate biomarkers. All these metabolites were then monitored using a targeted GC-MS/MS method for an additional assessment of their capacity to be used as biomarkers. Finally, two steroids, namely 5α-androstane-3β,17α-diol and 5α-androst-2-en-17-one, were concluded to be compatible with such a definition and which could be finally usable for screening purpose of AED abuse in cattle.

  14. Growth hormone, IGF-I and insulin and their abuse in sport

    PubMed Central

    Holt, R I G; Sönksen, P H

    2008-01-01

    There is widespread anecdotal evidence that growth hormone (GH) is used by athletes for its anabolic and lipolytic properties. Although there is little evidence that GH improves performance in young healthy adults, randomized controlled studies carried out so far are inadequately designed to demonstrate this, not least because GH is often abused in combination with anabolic steroids and insulin. Some of the anabolic actions of GH are mediated through the generation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and it is believed that this is also being abused. Athletes are exposing themselves to potential harm by self-administering large doses of GH, IGF-I and insulin. The effects of excess GH are exemplified by acromegaly. IGF-I may mediate and cause some of these changes, but in addition, IGF-I may lead to profound hypoglycaemia, as indeed can insulin. Although GH is on the World Anti-doping Agency list of banned substances, the detection of abuse with GH is challenging. Two approaches have been developed to detect GH abuse. The first is based on an assessment of the effect of exogenous recombinant human GH on pituitary GH isoforms and the second is based on the measurement of markers of GH action. As a result, GH abuse can be detected with reasonable sensitivity and specificity. Testing for IGF-I and insulin is in its infancy, but the measurement of markers of GH action may also detect IGF-I usage, while urine mass spectroscopy has begun to identify the use of insulin analogues. PMID:18376417

  15. Self-Reported Use of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids by Elite Power Lifters.

    PubMed

    Yesalis, C E; Herrick, R T; Buckley, W E; Friedl, K E; Brannon, D; Wright, J E

    1988-12-01

    In brief: Sixty-one athletes competed in the 1987 National Championship of the US Powerlifting Federation; all were surveyed to obtain information on anabolic-androgenic steroids regarding attitudes, patterns of use, and health effects. Of the 45 who responded to the survey, 15 admitted having used steroids. In a follow-up telephone interview of 20 of the competitors, 11 reported previous steroid use. The reason given most often for using steroids was improved athletic performance; the most common side effects reported were heightened libido, acne, and increased body hair. The small number of admitted users suggests that underreporting took place; this level of use probably represents the lower bound of steroid use among power lifters.

  16. Delayed diagnosis of a cerebrovascular accident associated with anabolic steroid use

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Isabelle; Reeve, Nina; Doherty, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of atherosclerotic stroke in a 46-year-old recreational bodybuilder with a 20 year history of anabolic-adrenergic steroid (AAS) abuse. Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) occurred during his third week of hospital admission for an acute abdomen and on day 8, postemergency laparotomy. CVA presented with collapse, generalised seizures, reduced Glasgow Coma Score and severe hypertension. He was subsequently admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), where initial investigations did not illustrate an underlying diagnosis. By day 4 in ICU, there had been no significant clinical improvement and radiological investigations were repeated, identifying a left frontal lobe infarct in the middle cerebral artery territory. The authors propose CVA was secondary to AAS. After a prolonged and complicated period of rehabilitation, he has been discharged home; he requires carers due to dyspraxia and is mobilising independently. PMID:22693186

  17. Supplemental dietary leucine and the skeletal muscle anabolic response to essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; McClung, James P

    2011-09-01

    Skeletal muscle protein synthesis (MPS) is regulated by a number of dietary factors, to include essential amino acids (EAAs). Leucine, a branched-chain amino acid, has been identified as a stimulator of MPS in many cell culture and animal studies. However, whether supplemental leucine exerts a unique stimulatory effect, as compared to other EAAs, on muscle anabolism in humans has not been clearly demonstrated. A recent study found no improvement in resting MPS in adults who consumed a 10 g EAA supplement providing added leucine (3.5 g leucine) when compared to a control 10 g EAA supplement (1.8 g leucine). These findings suggest that added leucine is unnecessary for the stimulation of MPS when sufficient EAAs are provided; however, the study of supplemental leucine during conditions such as endurance exercise, caloric deprivation, and ageing may be warranted.

  18. Anabolic steroids in athelics: crossover double-blind trial on weightlifters.

    PubMed Central

    Freed, D L; Banks, A J; Longson, D; Burley, D M

    1975-01-01

    Thirteen experienced male weightlifters taking high-protein diets and regular exercise took part in a double-blind crossover trial of methandienone 10 or 25 mg/day to seeif the drug improved athletic performance. Their improvemments were significantly greater on methandienone than on placebo; their body weights rose (though this seemed to be associated with water retention); and systolic blood pressure rose significantly. Methandienone caused many side effects, and three men had to withdraw because of them. All side effects disappeared after the drug was stopped. Anabolic steroids are effective only when given combination with exercise and high-protein diet.We deprecate their use in athletics but can suggest no way of stopping it. PMID:125133

  19. Plasticity in anterior hypothalamic vasopressin correlates with aggression during anabolic-androgenic steroid withdrawal in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Jill M; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2006-02-01

    In hamsters, adolescent anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) exposure facilitates offensive aggression, in part by altering the development and activity of anterior hypothalamic arginine vasopressin (AH-AVP). This study assessed whether these effects were lasting by examining aggression and AH-AVP during AAS withdrawal. Adolescent hamsters administered AAS were tested as adults for aggression at 1, 4, 11, 18, or 25 days of withdrawal, sacrificed the following day, and examined for AH-AVP afferent innervation using immunohistochemistry. Through Day 12 of withdrawal, aggression and AVP were significantly higher in AAS-treated hamsters than in controls. These differences were no longer observable by Day 19 of withdrawal, at which point the behavior and neurobiology of AAS-treated hamsters reverted to that observed in controls. These data indicate that adolescent AAS exposure has short-term, reversible effects on both aggression and AH-AVP, correlating AH-AVP with the aggressive/nonaggressive behavioral phenotype during AAS withdrawal.

  20. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase activity results in dependency on pyruvate carboxylation for cellular anabolism.

    PubMed

    Lussey-Lepoutre, Charlotte; Hollinshead, Kate E R; Ludwig, Christian; Menara, Mélanie; Morin, Aurélie; Castro-Vega, Luis-Jaime; Parker, Seth J; Janin, Maxime; Martinelli, Cosimo; Ottolenghi, Chris; Metallo, Christian; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Favier, Judith; Tennant, Daniel A

    2015-11-02

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway responsible for supplying reducing potential for oxidative phosphorylation and anabolic substrates for cell growth, repair and proliferation. As such it thought to be essential for cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis. However, since the initial report of an inactivating mutation in the TCA cycle enzyme complex, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in paraganglioma (PGL), it has become clear that some cells and tissues are not only able to survive with a truncated TCA cycle, but that they are also able of supporting proliferative phenotype observed in tumours. Here, we show that loss of SDH activity leads to changes in the metabolism of non-essential amino acids. In particular, we demonstrate that pyruvate carboxylase is essential to re-supply the depleted pool of aspartate in SDH-deficient cells. Our results demonstrate that the loss of SDH reduces the metabolic plasticity of cells, suggesting vulnerabilities that can be targeted therapeutically.