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Sample records for hormone deficient children

  1. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  2. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... many reasons for slow growth and below-average height in children. At times, slow growth is normal ... same age Signs of GHD • Slowed growth in height in infants, children, or adolescents (teenagers) • A young- ...

  3. Multiple hormone deficiencies in children with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Oerter, K E; Kamp, G A; Munson, P J; Nienhuis, A W; Cassorla, F G; Manasco, P K

    1993-02-01

    Patients with thalassemia major require multiple blood transfusions leading to hemochromatosis. These patients often have pubertal delay and growth failure, the etiology of which has not been fully elucidated. We performed an extensive endocrine evaluation which included measurements of spontaneous and stimulated levels of gonadotropins, GH, thyroid hormone, and adrenal hormones in 17 patients between the ages of 12 and 18 yr with hemochromatosis receiving desferoxamine therapy. All of the 17 patients had at least one endocrine abnormality, and 12 had more than one abnormality. Abnormalities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were the most common. Six patients had clinical evidence of delayed puberty with spontaneous and stimulated gonadotropin and sex steroid levels appropriate for their delayed pubertal stage. All 14 children in puberty LH pulsatility index below the mean for pubertal stage compared to normal children. Six of the 14 had LH pulsatility index more than 2 SD below the mean for pubertal stage. This may be an indicator of abnormal pituitary function. Six patients failed either the provocative GH tests (peak GH < 7 micrograms/L) or had a mean spontaneous GH less than 1 microgram/L. The 4 patients who failed provocative tests had growth velocities more than 2 SD below the mean for bone age. Three patients had evidence of primary hypothyroidism. We conclude that all patients with hemochromatosis need periodic careful endocrine evaluations because the incidence of endocrine dysfunction is substantial and they may benefit from hormonal therapy.

  4. Growth hormone treatment in non-growth hormone-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Luisanna; Ibba, Anastasia; Guzzetti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Until 1985 growth hormone (GH) was obtained from pituitary extracts, and was available in limited amounts only to treat severe growth hormone deficiency (GHD). With the availability of unlimited quantities of GH obtained from recombinant DNA technology, researchers started to explore new modalities to treat GHD children, as well as to treat a number of other non-GHD conditions. Although with some differences between different countries, GH treatment is indicated in children with Turner syndrome, chronic renal insufficiency, Prader-Willi syndrome, deletions/mutations of the SHOX gene, as well as in short children born small for gestational age and with idiopathic short stature. Available data from controlled trials indicate that GH treatment increases adult height in patients with Turner syndrome, in patients with chronic renal insufficiency, and in short children born small for gestational age. Patients with SHOX deficiency seem to respond to treatment similarly to Turner syndrome. GH treatment in children with idiopathic short stature produces a modest mean increase in adult height but the response in the individual patient is unpredictable. Uncontrolled studies indicate that GH treatment may be beneficial also in children with Noonan syndrome. In patients with Prader-Willi syndrome GH treatment normalizes growth and improves body composition and cognitive function. In any indication the response to GH seems correlated to the dose and the duration of treatment. GH treatment is generally safe with no major adverse effects being recorded in any condition. PMID:24926456

  5. Growth hormone treatment in non-growth hormone-deficient children.

    PubMed

    Loche, Sandro; Carta, Luisanna; Ibba, Anastasia; Guzzetti, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    Until 1985 growth hormone (GH) was obtained from pituitary extracts, and was available in limited amounts only to treat severe growth hormone deficiency (GHD). With the availability of unlimited quantities of GH obtained from recombinant DNA technology, researchers started to explore new modalities to treat GHD children, as well as to treat a number of other non-GHD conditions. Although with some differences between different countries, GH treatment is indicated in children with Turner syndrome, chronic renal insufficiency, Prader-Willi syndrome, deletions/mutations of the SHOX gene, as well as in short children born small for gestational age and with idiopathic short stature. Available data from controlled trials indicate that GH treatment increases adult height in patients with Turner syndrome, in patients with chronic renal insufficiency, and in short children born small for gestational age. Patients with SHOX deficiency seem to respond to treatment similarly to Turner syndrome. GH treatment in children with idiopathic short stature produces a modest mean increase in adult height but the response in the individual patient is unpredictable. Uncontrolled studies indicate that GH treatment may be beneficial also in children with Noonan syndrome. In patients with Prader-Willi syndrome GH treatment normalizes growth and improves body composition and cognitive function. In any indication the response to GH seems correlated to the dose and the duration of treatment. GH treatment is generally safe with no major adverse effects being recorded in any condition. PMID:24926456

  6. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  7. Burden of Growth Hormone Deficiency and Excess in Children.

    PubMed

    Fideleff, Hugo L; Boquete, Hugo R; Suárez, Martha G; Azaretzky, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal growth results from multifactorial and complex processes that take place in the context of different genetic traits and environmental influences. Thus, in view of the difficulties in comprehension of the physiological mechanisms involved in the achievement of normal height, our ability to make a definitive diagnosis of GH impairment still remains limited. There is a myriad of controversial aspects in relation to GH deficiency, mainly related to diagnostic controversies and advances in molecular biology. This might explain the diversity in therapeutic responses and may also serve as a rationale for new "nonclassical" treatment indications for GH. It is necessary to acquire more effective tools to reach an adequate evaluation, particularly while considering the long-term implications of a correct diagnosis, the cost, and safety of treatments. On the other hand, overgrowth constitutes a heterogeneous group of different pathophysiological situations including excessive somatic and visceral growth. There are overlaps in clinical and molecular features among overgrowth syndromes, which constitute the real burden for an accurate diagnosis. In conclusion, both GH deficiency and overgrowth are a great dilemma, still not completely solved. In this chapter, we review the most burdensome aspects related to short stature, GH deficiency, and excess in children, avoiding any details about well-known issues that have been extensively discussed in the literature. PMID:26940390

  8. Educating children and families about growth hormone deficiency and its management: part 1.

    PubMed

    Collin, Jacqueline; Whitehead, Amanda; Walker, Jenny

    2016-02-01

    The management of growth hormone deficiency is long term. Children may be diagnosed at pre-school age meaning relationships with the paediatric endocrine team may last more than 15 years. The education role of the paediatric endocrine nurse specialist is essential in working in partnership with families over a long period of time. Children and young people have changing needs for information to help them understand their condition and growth hormone deficiency treatment as they grow up. Developing positive working relationships with parents, children and young people enables their developmental needs and the context in which they live their lives to be central to any educational planning for them. Addressing developmental needs when providing information on growth hormone deficiency to children and young people reinforces the need for education to be an ongoing process and not a one-off event. This is part one of a two-part article. The second part will be published in the March issue of Nursing Children and Young People and it focuses on educating children, young people and their parents about the condition, and includes case studies.

  9. Outcome of growth hormone therapy in children with growth hormone deficiency showing an inadequate response to growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Saenger, P; Pescovitz, O H; Bercu, B B; Murray, F T; Landy, H; Brentzel, J; O'Dea, L; Hanson, B; Howard, C; Reiter, E O

    2001-06-01

    Saizen (recombinant growth hormone [GH]), 0.2 mg/(kg x wk), was given in an open-label fashion for an average of 51 mo to 27 children with presumed idiopathic GH deficiency who had withdrawn from a trial of Geref (recombinant GH-releasing hormone [GHRH] 1-29) because of inadequate height velocity (HV) (25 children), the onset of puberty (1 child), or injection site reactions (1 child). Measurements were made every 3-12 mo of a number of auxologic variables, including HV, height standard deviation score, and bone age. The children in the study showed excellent responses to Saizen. Moreover, first-year growth during Saizen therapy was inversely correlated with the GH response to provocative GHRH testing carried out 6 and 12 mo after the initiation of Geref treatment. These findings indicate that GH is effective in accelerating growth in GH-deficient children who do not show or maintain a satisfactory response to treatment with GHRH. In addition, they suggest that the initial response to GH therapy used in this way can be predicted by means of provoc-ative testing.

  10. Modified Clonidine Testing for Growth Hormone Stimulation Reveals α2-Adrenoreceptor Sub Sensitivity in Children with Idiopathic Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Willaschek, Christian; Meint, Sebastian; Rager, Klaus; Buchhorn, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The association between short stature and increased risk of ischemic heart disease has been subject to studies for decades. The recent discussion of cardiovascular risk during growth hormone therapy has given new importance to this question. We have hypothesized that the autonomic system is a crucial element relating to this subject. Methods Heart rate variability calculated from 24-hour electrocardiogram data is providing insight into the regulatory state of the autonomous nervous system and is an approved surrogate parameter for estimating cardiovascular risk. We have calculated heart rate variability during clonidine testing for growth hormone stimulation of 56 children. As clonidine is a well-known effector of the autonomous system, stimulating vagal tone and decreasing sympathetic activity, we compared the autonomous reactions of children with constitutional growth delay (CGD), growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and former small for gestational age (SGA). Results During clonidine testing children with CGD showed the expected α2-adrenoreceptor mediated autonomous response of vagal stimulation for several hours. This vagal reaction was significantly reduced in the SGA group and nearly non- existent in the GHD group. Discussion Children with GHD show a reduced autonomous response to clonidine indicating α2-adrenoreceptor sub sensitivity. This can be found prior to the start of growth hormone treatment. Since reduction of HRV is an approved surrogate parameter, increased cardiovascular risk has to be assumed for patients with GHD. In the SGA group a similar but less severe reduction of the autonomous response to clonidine was found. These findings may enrich the interpretation of the data on growth hormone therapy, which are being collected by the SAGhE study group. PMID:26361394

  11. Educating children and families about growth hormone deficiency and its management: part 2.

    PubMed

    Collin, Jacqueline; Whitehead, Amanda; Walker, Jenny

    2016-03-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a long-term condition, therefore creating ongoing partnerships with families is a fundamental part of the role of a paediatric endocrine nurse specialist (PENS). Teaching children, young people and their families about GHD and exploring what it means to them and how they can manage their ongoing treatment is central to building positive relationships. Educating children about the management of their growth hormone treatment (GHT) is an ongoing process and professionals must respond to the changing needs for that information children may have as they grow and develop. Long-term relationships with families are strengthened by recognising and respecting the developing expertise of families as they gain confidence and competence to manage GHT. This article is the second of two parts. Part one was published in the February issue of Nursing Children and Young People and covered an overview of growth hormone, causes and clinical presentation of GHD, development and availability of GHT and the role of the PENS in building partnerships with parents. The focus of this article is the education role of the PENS and the importance of providing information that is appropriate to the child or young person's developmental age.

  12. The effects of growth hormone deficiency and growth hormone replacement therapy on intellectual ability, personality and adjustment in children.

    PubMed

    Puga González, B; Ferrández Longás, A; Oyarzábal, M; Nosas, R

    2010-06-01

    Traditionally, it has been assumed that intellectual development in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is distributed between ranges of a normal population based on the observation that it does not differ substantially from that of children of the same age. Nevertheless, few studies have investigated this assumption. This Spanish Collaborative study was prospectively planned with two main purposes: to study a possible influence of GHD on intelligence quotient (IQ), personality traits and adaptative capacity and to study the evolution of these parameters during substitution therapy with growth hormone (GH). Although the overall intellectual ability of children with GHD is comparable to that of a normal reference population, some areas such the motor-component scale (evaluated by McCarthy test) and performance IQ (evaluated by WISC-R) were below the mean at the beginning of the study, showing significant improvement during therapy. Emotional adjustment (normal at study start) also improved significantly during treatment. Females showed better adjustment capacity before and during GH therapy. Longer studies with an increased number of cases are needed to confirm these effects of GHD and its treatment in children.

  13. Aetiology of growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Herber, S M; Kay, R

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed in an attempt to identify perinatal risk factors for the development of growth hormone deficiency. More of the affected children were boys, and their birth weights were significantly lower than those of the national average; there were also considerably more preterm and post-term deliveries among boys. PMID:3632025

  14. Impact of mild thyroid hormone deficiency in pregnancy on cognitive function in children: lessons from the Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Ghassabian, Akhgar; Henrichs, Jens; Tiemeier, Henning

    2014-03-01

    Animal models and epidemiological studies suggest that mild maternal thyroid hormone deficiency in early gestation has adverse consequences on the cognitive abilities of the children. However, methodological problems, lack of a consistent definition for mild thyroid hormone deficiency, and short follow-up of the children reduce the confidence in the conclusion of existing studies. In this review, we summarize the main findings of a series of studies performed in Generation R, a population-based birth cohort in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. In this iodine sufficient region, we aimed to investigate the relation between mild maternal thyroid hormone deficiency in early gestation and children's verbal and nonverbal cognitive function and executive function. We discuss the main findings of these studies, present recommendations for clinicians and formulate suggestions for future research. PMID:24629863

  15. Baseline Body Composition in Prepubertal Short Stature Children with Severe and Moderate Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Klesiewicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare body composition parameters in short children with severe versus moderate and no growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Design and Method. 61 children (40 boys) were studied. Height SDS, BMI Z-score, waist/height ratio (W/HtR), and body composition parameters (BIA) as fat tissue (FAT%), fat-free mass (FFM%), predicted muscle mass (PMM%), and total body water (TBW%) were evaluated. GH secretion in the overnight profile and two stimulation tests and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) level were measured. Results. Overall, in 16 (26%) moderate (7.0 > peak GH < 10 ng/mL) and in 11 (18%) severe (GH ≤ 7.0 ng/mL) GHD was diagnosed. In children with sGHD BMI Z-score, W/HtR and FAT% were significantly higher, while FFM%, PMM%, and TBW% were significantly lower versus mGHD and versus noGHD subgroups. No significant differences between mGHD and noGHD were found. There were no differences in height SDS and IGF-1 SDS between evaluated subgroups. Night GH peak level correlated significantly with FAT%, FFM%, PMM%, and TBW%, (p < 0.05) in the entire group. Conclusions. Only sGHD is associated with significant impairment of body composition. Body composition analysis may be a useful tool in distinguishing between its severe and moderate form of GHD.

  16. Baseline Body Composition in Prepubertal Short Stature Children with Severe and Moderate Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Klesiewicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare body composition parameters in short children with severe versus moderate and no growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Design and Method. 61 children (40 boys) were studied. Height SDS, BMI Z-score, waist/height ratio (W/HtR), and body composition parameters (BIA) as fat tissue (FAT%), fat-free mass (FFM%), predicted muscle mass (PMM%), and total body water (TBW%) were evaluated. GH secretion in the overnight profile and two stimulation tests and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) level were measured. Results. Overall, in 16 (26%) moderate (7.0 > peak GH < 10 ng/mL) and in 11 (18%) severe (GH ≤ 7.0 ng/mL) GHD was diagnosed. In children with sGHD BMI Z-score, W/HtR and FAT% were significantly higher, while FFM%, PMM%, and TBW% were significantly lower versus mGHD and versus noGHD subgroups. No significant differences between mGHD and noGHD were found. There were no differences in height SDS and IGF-1 SDS between evaluated subgroups. Night GH peak level correlated significantly with FAT%, FFM%, PMM%, and TBW%, (p < 0.05) in the entire group. Conclusions. Only sGHD is associated with significant impairment of body composition. Body composition analysis may be a useful tool in distinguishing between its severe and moderate form of GHD. PMID:27656208

  17. Baseline Body Composition in Prepubertal Short Stature Children with Severe and Moderate Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Matusik, Pawel; Klesiewicz, Marta; Klos, Karolina; Stasiulewicz, Martyna; Barylak, Aleksandra; Nazarkiewicz, Patrycja; Malecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare body composition parameters in short children with severe versus moderate and no growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Design and Method. 61 children (40 boys) were studied. Height SDS, BMI Z-score, waist/height ratio (W/HtR), and body composition parameters (BIA) as fat tissue (FAT%), fat-free mass (FFM%), predicted muscle mass (PMM%), and total body water (TBW%) were evaluated. GH secretion in the overnight profile and two stimulation tests and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) level were measured. Results. Overall, in 16 (26%) moderate (7.0 > peak GH < 10 ng/mL) and in 11 (18%) severe (GH ≤ 7.0 ng/mL) GHD was diagnosed. In children with sGHD BMI Z-score, W/HtR and FAT% were significantly higher, while FFM%, PMM%, and TBW% were significantly lower versus mGHD and versus noGHD subgroups. No significant differences between mGHD and noGHD were found. There were no differences in height SDS and IGF-1 SDS between evaluated subgroups. Night GH peak level correlated significantly with FAT%, FFM%, PMM%, and TBW%, (p < 0.05) in the entire group. Conclusions. Only sGHD is associated with significant impairment of body composition. Body composition analysis may be a useful tool in distinguishing between its severe and moderate form of GHD. PMID:27656208

  18. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a PEGylated recombinant human growth hormone and daily recombinant human growth hormone in growth hormone-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ling; Chen, Zhi-hang; Liu, Dong; Cheng, Yuan-guo; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy in children generally requires daily subcutaneous (sc) injections, which may be inconvenient for patients. Jintrolong® is a PEGylated rhGH with the purpose of weekly sc injections. The aim of the current study was to examine the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability of multiple sc doses of Jintrolong® vs daily doses of rhGH. Design and methods Twelve children with growth hormone deficiency participated in this single-center, open-label, crossover Phase I trial. All subjects received daily sc injections of rhGH at 0.0286 mg/kg/d for 7 days, followed by a 4-week washout period and six weekly doses of Jintrolong® at 0.2 mg/kg/w. Results In comparison with rhGH, sc injection of Jintrolong® produced a noticeably higher Cmax, significantly longer half-life (t1/2), and slower plasma clearance, signifying a profile suitable for long-term treatment. The ratio of the area under the concentration vs time curve (AUC) after the seventh and first injections (AUC(0–∞)7th/AUC(0–∞)1st) of rhGH was 1.02, while the AUC(0–∞)6th/AUC(0–∞)1st of Jintrolong ® was 1.03, indicating no accumulation of circulating growth hormone. There was no significant difference in the change in insulin-like growth factor-1 expression produced by 7 days of sc rhGH and weekly Jintrolong® injections. There were no severe adverse events during the trial. Conclusion The elimination rate of Jintrolong® was slower than that of sc rhGH. No progressive serum accumulation of Jintrolong® was found. The changes in insulin-like growth factor-1 expression produced by rhGH and Jintrolong® were comparable, indicating similar pharmacodynamics. Our results demonstrate that Jintrolong® is suitable for long-term growth hormone treatment in children with growth hormone deficiency. PMID:26719670

  19. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  20. Growth hormone deficiency: an update.

    PubMed

    Audí, L; Fernández-Cancio, M; Camats, N; Carrascosa, A

    2013-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) in humans manifests differently according to the individual developmental stage (early after birth, during childhood, at puberty or in adulthood), the cause or mechanism (genetic, acquired or idiopathic), deficiency intensity and whether it is the only pituitary-affected hormone or is combined with that of other pituitary hormones or forms part of a complex syndrome. Growing knowledge of the genetic basis of GH deficiency continues to provide us with useful information to further characterise mutation types and mechanisms for previously described and new candidate genes. Despite these advances, a high proportion of GH deficiencies with no recognisable acquired basis continue to be labelled as idiopathic, although less frequently when they are congenital and/or familial. The clinical and biochemical diagnoses continue to be a conundrum despite efforts to harmonise biochemical assays for GH and IGF-1 analysis, probably because the diagnosis based on the so-called GH secretion stimulation tests will prove to be of limited usefulness for predicting therapy indications.

  1. Effect of Growth Hormone Deficiency on Brain Structure, Motor Function and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Emma A.; O'Reilly, Michelle A.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Seunarine, Kiran K.; Chong, Wui K.; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone less than 6.7 [micro]g/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone greater than 10 [micro]g/l)…

  2. Effects of growth hormone therapeutic supplementation on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in children with growth hormone deficiency: focus on proliferation and differentiation capabilities.

    PubMed

    Kawa, M P; Stecewicz, I; Piecyk, K; Pius-Sadowska, E; Paczkowska, E; Rogińska, D; Sobuś, A; Łuczkowska, K; Gawrych, E; Petriczko, E; Walczak, M; Machaliński, B

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the direct effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy (GH-RT) on hematopoiesis in children with GH deficiency (GHD) with the special emphasis on proliferation and cell cycle regulation. Peripheral blood (PB) was collected from sixty control individuals and forty GHD children before GH-RT and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-RT to measure hematological parameters and isolate CD34(+)-enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Selected parameters of PB were analyzed by hematological analyzer. Moreover, collected HPCs were used to analyze GH receptor (GHR) and IGF1 expression, clonogenicity, and cell cycle activity. Finally, global gene expression profile of collected HPCs was analyzed using genome-wide RNA microarrays. GHD resulted in a decrease in several hematological parameters related to RBCs and significantly diminished clonogenicity of erythroid progenies. In contrast, GH-RT stimulated increases in clonogenic growth of erythroid lineage and RBC counts as well as significant up-regulation of cell cycle-propagating genes, including MAP2K1, cyclins D1/E1, PCNA, and IGF1. Likewise, GH-RT significantly modified GHR expression in isolated HPCs and augmented systemic IGF1 levels. Global gene expression analysis revealed significantly higher expression of genes associated with cell cycle, proliferation, and differentiation in HPCs from GH-treated subjects. (i) GH-RT significantly augments cell cycle progression in HPCs and increases clonogenicity of erythroid progenitors; (ii) GHR expression in HPCs is modulated by GH status; (iii) molecular mechanisms by which GH influences hematopoiesis might provide a basis for designing therapeutic interventions for hematological complications related to GHD.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... People with combined pituitary hormone deficiency may have hypothyroidism, which is underactivity of the butterfly-shaped thyroid gland in the lower neck. Hypothyroidism can cause many symptoms, including weight gain and ...

  4. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  5. Idiopathic Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    GH secretion is controlled by hypothalamic as well as intrapituitary and peripheral signals, all of which converge upon the somatotroph, resulting in integrated GH synthesis and secretion. Enabling an accurate diagnosis of idiopathic adult GH deficiency (IAGHD) is challenged by the pulsatility of GH secretion, provocative test result variability, and suboptimal GH assay standardization. The spectrum between attenuated GH secretion associated with the normal aging process and with obesity and truly well-defined IAGHD is not distinct and may mislead the diagnosis. Adult-onset GHD is mainly caused by an acquired pituitary deficiency, commonly including prior head/neck irradiation, or an expanding pituitary mass causing functional somatotroph compression. To what extent rare cryptic causes account for those patients seemingly classified as IAGHD is unclear. About 15% of patients with adult GHD and receiving GH replacement in open-label surveillance studies are reported as being due to an idiopathic cause. These patients may also reflect a pool of subjects with an as yet to be determined occult defect, or those with unclear or incomplete medical histories (including forgotten past sports head injury or motor vehicle accident). Therefore, submaximal diagnostic evaluation likely leads to an inadvertent diagnosis of IAGHD. In these latter cases, adherence to rigorous biochemical diagnostic criteria and etiology exclusion may result in reclassification of a subset of these patients to a distinct known acquired etiology, or as GH-replete. Accordingly, rigorously verified IAGHD likely comprises less than 10% of adult GHD patients, an already rare disorder. Regardless of etiology, patients with adult GHD, including those with IAGHD, exhibit a well-defined clinical phenotype including increased fat mass, loss of lean muscle mass, decreased bone mass, and enhanced cardiac morbidity. Definition of unique efficacy and dosing parameters for GH replacement and resultant therapeutic

  6. The "multiple hormone deficiency" theory of aging: is human senescence caused mainly by multiple hormone deficiencies?

    PubMed

    Hertoghe, T

    2005-12-01

    In the human body, the productions, levels and cell receptors of most hormones progressively decline with age, gradually putting the body into various states of endocrine deficiency. The circadian cycles of these hormones also change, sometimes profoundly, with time. In aging individuals, the well-balanced endocrine system can fall into a chaotic condition with losses, phase-advancements, phase delays, unpredictable irregularities of nycthemeral hormone cycles, in particular in very old or sick individuals. The desynchronization makes hormone activities peak at the wrong times and become inefficient, and in certain cases health threatening. The occurrence of multiple hormone deficits and spilling through desynchronization may constitute the major causes of human senescence, and they are treatable causes. Several arguments can be put forward to support the view that senescence is mainly a multiple hormone deficiency syndrome: First, many if not most of the signs, symptoms and diseases (including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, dementia) of senescence are similar to physical consequences of hormone deficiencies and may be caused by hormone deficiencies. Second, most of the presumed causes of senescence such as excessive free radical formation, glycation, cross-linking of proteins, imbalanced apoptosis system, accumulation of waste products, failure of repair systems, deficient immune system, may be caused or favored by hormone deficiencies. Even genetic causes such as limits to cell proliferation (such as the Hayflick limit of cell division), poor gene polymorphisms, premature telomere shortening and activation of possible genetic "dead programs" may have links with hormone deficiencies, being either the consequence, the cause, or the major favoring factor of hormone deficiencies. Third, well-dosed and -balanced hormone supplements may slow down or stop the progression of signs, symptoms, or diseases of senescence and may often

  7. [Growth hormone in children and adolescents: facts and fiction].

    PubMed

    Burckhardt, Marie-Anne; Zumsteg, Urs

    2013-06-19

    Growth Hormone therapy has been used therapeutically for over 50 years. Until recently, growth hormone therapy has been restricted for children and adolescents with proven hypothalamic-pituitary short stature. Today some other causes - but not all - can be treated with growth hormone. To the well-established indications belong apart from proven growth hormone deficiency, children with Turner Syndrome and with Prader Willi Syndrome, children born small for gestational age without catch-up growth and children with chronic kidney disease and with some haematological and oncological diseases. Careful and accurate diagnosis is essential. Growth hormone therapy is rare in everyday practice and requires close cooperation with a pediatric endocrinologist.

  8. Usability and Tolerability of the Norditropin NordiFlex® Injection Device in Children Never Previously Treated With Growth Hormone

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-23

    Growth Hormone Disorder; Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children; Genetic Disorder; Turner Syndrome; Foetal Growth Problem; Small for Gestational Age; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Insufficiency; Delivery Systems

  9. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    PubMed

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  10. Effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure, motor function and cognition.

    PubMed

    Webb, Emma A; O'Reilly, Michelle A; Clayden, Jonathan D; Seunarine, Kiran K; Chong, Wui K; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A; Dattani, Mehul T

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone <6.7 µg/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone >10 µg/l) underwent cognitive assessment, diffusion tensor imaging and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging prior to commencing growth hormone treatment. Total brain, corpus callosal, hippocampal, thalamic and basal ganglia volumes were determined using Freesurfer. Fractional anisotropy (a marker of white matter structural integrity) images were aligned and tract-based spatial statistics performed. Fifteen children (mean 8.8 years of age) with isolated growth hormone deficiency [peak growth hormone <6.7 µg/l (mean 3.5 µg/l)] and 14 controls (mean 8.4 years of age) with idiopathic short stature [peak growth hormone >10 µg/l (mean 15 µg/l) and normal growth rate] were recruited. Compared with controls, children with isolated growth hormone deficiency had lower Full-Scale IQ (P < 0.01), Verbal Comprehension Index (P < 0.01), Processing Speed Index (P < 0.05) and Movement-Assessment Battery for Children (P < 0.008) scores. Verbal Comprehension Index scores correlated significantly with insulin-like growth factor-1 (P < 0.03) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (P < 0.02) standard deviation scores in isolated growth hormone deficiency. The splenium of the corpus callosum, left globus pallidum, thalamus and hippocampus (P < 0.01) were significantly smaller; and corticospinal tract (bilaterally; P < 0.045, P < 0.05) and corpus callosum (P < 0.05) fractional anisotropy were significantly lower in the isolated growth hormone deficiency group. Basal ganglia volumes and bilateral corticospinal tract fractional anisotropy correlated significantly with Movement-Assessment Battery for Children scores, and

  11. Growth hormone deficiency in treated acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Marzullo, Paolo; Doga, Mauro; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Giustina, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) of the adult is characterized by reduced quality of life (QoL) and physical fitness, skeletal fragility, and increased weight and cardiovascular risk. Hypopituitarism may develop in patients after definitive treatment of acromegaly, but an exact prevalence of GHD in this population is still uncertain owing to limited awareness and the scarce and conflicting data available on this topic. Because acromegaly and GHD may yield adverse consequences on similar target systems, the final outcomes of some complications of acromegaly may be further affected by the occurrence of GHD. However, it is still largely unknown whether patients with post-acromegaly GHD may benefit from GH replacement. We review the diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of GHD in adult patients treated for acromegaly.

  12. Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Birrell, G; Lampe, A; Richmond, S; Bruce, S N; Gécz, J; Lower, K; Wright, M; Cheetham, T D

    2003-12-01

    We describe two brothers with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and the 22A-->T (Lys8X) PHF6 mutation, who presented with the symptoms and signs of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. Biochemical investigations and radiology confirmed growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as well as gonadotrophin deficiency. They were also found to have optic nerve hypoplasia. This family suggests that the BFL gene product may play an important role in midline neuro-development including the hypothalamo-pituitary axis.

  13. Exceptional Association Between Klinefelter Syndrome and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doubi, Sana; Amrani, Zoubida; Ouahabi, Hanan El; Boujraf, Saïd; Ajdi, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is characterized in adults by the combination of a tall stature, small testes, gynecomastia, and azoospermia. This case is described in a North African population of the Mediterranean region of North Africa. We report the case of a male 16 years old, of Arab ethnic origin, and diagnosed with this syndrome, who had a small height in relation to a growth hormone (GH) deficiency and a history of absence seizures (generalized myoclonic epilepsy). The patient's size was <−2.8 standard deviation (SD) with weight <−3 SD. GH deficiency was isolated and confirmed by two dynamic tests (insulin — hypoglycemia tolerance test and clonidine) with normal hypothalamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). GH supplementation using recombinant GH was advocated, while gonadotropin treatment was deferred. Small size in children or adolescents should not eliminate the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome — on the contrary, the presence of any associated sign (brain maturation, delay in puberty, aggressiveness) should encourage one to request a karyotype for the diagnosis and appropriate care of any case of KS that can be associated with GH deficiency, or which is in a variant form (isochromosome Xq, 49,XXXXY). PMID:27330737

  14. Hormonal deficiencies during and after Puumala hantavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, S; Jaatinen, P; Miettinen, M; Salmi, J; Ala-Houhala, I; Huhtala, H; Hurme, M; Pörsti, I; Vaheri, A; Mustonen, J

    2010-06-01

    Previous reports have described panhypopituitarism associated with severe cases of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), but the prevalence of hormonal deficiencies after nephropathia epidemica (NE), a milder form of HFRS, has not been studied. This study was conducted in order to determine the prevalence of hormonal defects in patients with acute NE and during long-term follow-up. Fifty-four patients with serologically confirmed acute NE were examined by serum hormonal measurements during the acute NE, after 3 months, and after 1 to 10 (median 5) years. Thirty out of 54 (56%) patients had abnormalities of the gonadal and/or thyroid axis during the acute NE. After a median follow-up of 5 years, 9 (17%) patients were diagnosed with a chronic, overt hormonal deficit: hypopituitarism was found in five patients and primary hypothyroidism in five patients. In addition, chronic subclinical testicular failure was found in five men. High creatinine levels and inflammatory markers during NE were associated with the acute central hormone deficiencies, but not with the chronic deficiencies. Hormonal defects are common during acute NE and, surprisingly, many patients develop chronic hormonal deficiencies after NE. The occurrence of long-term hormonal defects cannot be predicted by the severity of acute NE. PMID:20397036

  15. IODIDE DEFICIENCY, THYROID HORMONES, AND NEURODEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Severe iodide insufficiency during early development is associated with cognitive deficits. Environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under conditio...

  16. Leptin deficiency in maltreated children

    PubMed Central

    Danese, A; Dove, R; Belsky, D W; Henchy, J; Williams, B; Ambler, A; Arseneault, L

    2014-01-01

    Consistent with findings from experimental research in nonhuman primates exposed to early-life stress, children exposed to maltreatment are at high risk of detrimental physical health conditions, such as obesity and systemic inflammation. Because leptin is a key molecule involved in the regulation of both energy balance and immunity, we investigated abnormalities in leptin physiology among maltreated children. We measured leptin, body mass index and C-reactive protein in 170 12-year-old children members of the Environmental-Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, for whom we had prospectively-collected information on maltreatment exposure. We found that maltreated children exhibited blunted elevation in leptin levels in relation to increasing levels of physiological stimuli, adiposity and inflammation, compared with a group of non-maltreated children matched for gender, zygosity and socioeconomic status. These findings were also independent of key potential artifacts and confounders, such as time of day at sample collection, history of food insecurity, pubertal maturation and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, using birth weight as a proxy measure for leptin, we found that physiological abnormalities were presumably not present at birth in children who went on to be maltreated but only emerged over the course of childhood, after maltreatment exposure. Leptin deficiency may contribute to onset, persistence and progression of physical health problems in maltreated children. PMID:25247591

  17. Leptin deficiency in maltreated children.

    PubMed

    Danese, A; Dove, R; Belsky, D W; Henchy, J; Williams, B; Ambler, A; Arseneault, L

    2014-01-01

    Consistent with findings from experimental research in nonhuman primates exposed to early-life stress, children exposed to maltreatment are at high risk of detrimental physical health conditions, such as obesity and systemic inflammation. Because leptin is a key molecule involved in the regulation of both energy balance and immunity, we investigated abnormalities in leptin physiology among maltreated children. We measured leptin, body mass index and C-reactive protein in 170 12-year-old children members of the Environmental-Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, for whom we had prospectively-collected information on maltreatment exposure. We found that maltreated children exhibited blunted elevation in leptin levels in relation to increasing levels of physiological stimuli, adiposity and inflammation, compared with a group of non-maltreated children matched for gender, zygosity and socioeconomic status. These findings were also independent of key potential artifacts and confounders, such as time of day at sample collection, history of food insecurity, pubertal maturation and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, using birth weight as a proxy measure for leptin, we found that physiological abnormalities were presumably not present at birth in children who went on to be maltreated but only emerged over the course of childhood, after maltreatment exposure. Leptin deficiency may contribute to onset, persistence and progression of physical health problems in maltreated children. PMID:25247591

  18. Growth and hormonal status of children treated for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Shalet, S M

    1982-01-01

    The adult survivors of the treatment of brain tumours in childhood are often short. Several adverse factors contribute to the impaired growth of these children including growth hormone (GH) deficiency, impaired spinal growth following spinal irradiation, chemotherapy, poor nutritional intake and recurrent tumour. The GH deficiency is due to radiation-induced damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. GH is always the first pituitary hormone to be affected by such radiation damage but panhypopituitarism may occur if the radiation dose is sufficiently great. Preliminary results suggest that GH therapy will improve the growth rate of children with radiation-induced GH deficiency. Additional endocrine complications, which may occur following spinal irradiation, include thyroid dysfunction and ovarian failure due to direct radiation damage to the thyroid and the ovary.

  19. Clinical use of glycine intravenous load for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Florea, I; Popa, M; Simionescu, L; Dinulescu, E; Juvină, E

    1976-05-01

    Intravenous glycine injection (250 mg/kg of body weight) resulted in growth hormone release in normal children but not in those with growth hormone deficiency diagnosed by insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. In the latter significantly higher peak concentrations of serum alpha-amino nitrogen were also found. False negative responses to glycine (no GH release) were observed in two patients of short stature but normal pituitary function. In them the peak levels of serum alpha-amino nitrogen were lower than in those with hypopituitarism. We propose the clinical use of glycine as an inexpensive and innocuous procedure for the detection of GH deficiency in children. A post-glycine GH peak greater than 10-0 mu/l seems to be a good index of an intact GH reserve.

  20. Mexico City normal weight children exposed to high concentrations of ambient PM2.5 show high blood leptin and endothelin-1, vitamin D deficiency, and food reward hormone dysregulation versus low pollution controls. Relevance for obesity and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Rodríguez-Díaz, Joel; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Chao, Chih-kai; Thompson, Charles; Mukherjee, Partha S; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Perry, George

    2015-07-01

    Millions of Mexico, US and across the world children are overweight and obese. Exposure to fossil-fuel combustion sources increases the risk for obesity and diabetes, while long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) above US EPA standards is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mexico City Metropolitan Area children are chronically exposed to PM2.5 and O3 concentrations above the standards and exhibit systemic, brain and intrathecal inflammation, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We investigated adipokines, food reward hormones, endothelial dysfunction, vitamin D and apolipoprotein E (APOE) relationships in 80 healthy, normal weight 11.1±3.2 year olds matched by age, gender, BMI and SES, low (n: 26) versus high (n:54) PM2.5 exposures. Mexico City children had higher leptin and endothelin-1 (p<0.01 and p<0.000), and decreases in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP 1), ghrelin, and glucagon (<0.02) versus controls. BMI and leptin relationships were significantly different in low versus high PM2.5 exposed children. Mexico City APOE 4 versus 3 children had higher glucose (p=0.009). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D<30 ng/mL was documented in 87% of Mexico City children. Leptin is strongly positively associated to PM 2.5 cumulative exposures. Residing in a high PM2.5 and O3 environment is associated with 12h fasting hyperleptinemia, altered appetite-regulating peptides, vitamin D deficiency, and increases in ET-1 in clinically healthy children. These changes could signal the future trajectory of urban children towards the development of insulin resistance, obesity, type II diabetes, premature cardiovascular disease, addiction-like behavior, cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Increased efforts should be made to decrease pediatric PM2.5 exposures, to deliver health interventions prior to the development of obesity and to identify and mitigate environmental factors influencing obesity and Alzheimer

  1. Mexico City normal weight children exposed to high concentrations of ambient PM2.5 show high blood leptin and endothelin-1, vitamin D deficiency, and food reward hormone dysregulation versus low pollution controls. Relevance for obesity and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Rodríguez-Díaz, Joel; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Chao, Chih-kai; Thompson, Charles; Mukherjee, Partha S; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Perry, George

    2015-07-01

    Millions of Mexico, US and across the world children are overweight and obese. Exposure to fossil-fuel combustion sources increases the risk for obesity and diabetes, while long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) above US EPA standards is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mexico City Metropolitan Area children are chronically exposed to PM2.5 and O3 concentrations above the standards and exhibit systemic, brain and intrathecal inflammation, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We investigated adipokines, food reward hormones, endothelial dysfunction, vitamin D and apolipoprotein E (APOE) relationships in 80 healthy, normal weight 11.1±3.2 year olds matched by age, gender, BMI and SES, low (n: 26) versus high (n:54) PM2.5 exposures. Mexico City children had higher leptin and endothelin-1 (p<0.01 and p<0.000), and decreases in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP 1), ghrelin, and glucagon (<0.02) versus controls. BMI and leptin relationships were significantly different in low versus high PM2.5 exposed children. Mexico City APOE 4 versus 3 children had higher glucose (p=0.009). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D<30 ng/mL was documented in 87% of Mexico City children. Leptin is strongly positively associated to PM 2.5 cumulative exposures. Residing in a high PM2.5 and O3 environment is associated with 12h fasting hyperleptinemia, altered appetite-regulating peptides, vitamin D deficiency, and increases in ET-1 in clinically healthy children. These changes could signal the future trajectory of urban children towards the development of insulin resistance, obesity, type II diabetes, premature cardiovascular disease, addiction-like behavior, cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Increased efforts should be made to decrease pediatric PM2.5 exposures, to deliver health interventions prior to the development of obesity and to identify and mitigate environmental factors influencing obesity and Alzheimer

  2. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and small for gestational age (SGA): genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Jancevska, A; Gucev, Z S; Tasic, V; Pop-Jordanova, N

    2009-12-01

    Short stature associated with GH deficiency has been estimated to occur in about 1 in 4000 to 1 in 10,000 in various studies. In the last decade new genetic defects have been described in all the levels of the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH)-GH-IGF (insulin-like growth factor) axis. Genetic defects in the GHRH and in various parts of the Insulin-like growth factor system have been demonstrated. Genetic defects causing isolated GH deficiency (GHD), as well as multiple pituitary hormonal deficiencies have been analysed in detail. Signalling molecules and transcription factors leading to the development of the pituitary gland have been discovered and their function recognized. In animal models and in humans the importance of the transcription factors HESX1, PROP1, POU1F1, LHX3, LHX4, TBX19, SOX2 and SOX3 has been extensively studied. Genetic alterations of those transcription factors dictate the highly variable phenotype: from isolated hypopituitarism to multiple pituitary hormonal deficiencies with or without malformations (e.g. septo-optic dysplasia or holoprosencephaly). Small for gestational age (SGA) children are increasingly recognized to be a heterogeneous group in which new mechanisms of growth retardation and metabolic disturbances have been proposed. Since SGA is considered to be the main reason for the short stature in 10% of short adults this is a large group with a great potential for novel insights into mechanisms of growth and metabolic disturbances. A group of signalling proteins are involved in prenatal (SGA) growth retardation: IRS-1, PDK1, AKT1, and S6K1. In addition, an attractive modern theory supposes that a disturbed mother-placenta-foetus relation results in the activation of the so-called "thrifty phenotype" of which the IGF system is a vital part. The mechanisms assure short-term postnatal survival in conditions of deficient nutritional supply. However, as a consequence, the abundant postnatal nutritional supply and the "thrifty

  3. Homoarginine (hArg) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in short stature children without and with growth hormone deficiency: hArg and ADMA are involved differently in growth in the childhood.

    PubMed

    Langen, Jennifer; Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Beckmann, Bibiana; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Carmann, Christina; Hörster, Irina; Lilienthal, Eggert; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Lücke, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Adult subjects with growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) are known to have reduced life expectancy due to increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. In adults, these events are associated with elevated circulating concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) which is an endogenous inhibitor of L-arginine (Arg)-derived nitric oxide (NO). Low circulating concentrations of homoarginine (hArg) emerged as a cardiovascular risk factor. In adults, hArg seems to antagonize ADMA. In the present work, we tested the hypothesis that children with short stature without or with GHD have altered Arg/NO pathway as compared to children with normal growth. We studied 66 short stature children (38 boys, 28 girls) aged 3.5-17.3 years, who underwent the routine L-Arginine Test to diagnose presence of GHD. GHD was confirmed in 47 children (GHD group; 30 boys, 17 girls) and was absent in the remaining 19 children (non-GHD group; 8 boys, 11 girls). In addition, we investigated 24 healthy age- and gender-matched children (10 boys, 14 girls) with normal growth. In EDTA plasma samples of all children, we determined by mass spectrometry-based methods the concentrations of Arg, hArg and ADMA, and calculated the Arg/ADMA and hArg/ADMA molar ratios. With respect to these biochemical parameters, we did not find statistically significant differences between the GHD and non-GHD groups. Comparing short with normal stature children, we found small differences regarding plasma hArg concentrations [mean ± SD; median (25th-75th percentile)]: 2.06 ± 0.52 µM; 2.12 (1.74-2.36) µM vs. 1.7 ± 0.5 µM; 1.6 (1.4-1.8) µM, P < 0.001. Compared to normal stature children, short stature children had considerably higher plasma concentrations of ADMA [0.77 ± 0.15 µM; 0.77 (0.66-0.85) µM vs. 0.57 ± 0.09 µM; 0.58 (0.50-0.63) µM, P < 0.001], but not of Arg [83.3 ± 19.2 µM; 82.2 (71.9-90.3) µM vs. 86.5 ± 17.8 µM; 84.8 (77.2-94.8) µM, P = 0.336], or the hArg/ADMA ratio [2.74 ± 0.76; 2

  4. Growth hormone modulation of arginine-induced glucagon release: studies of isolated growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Seino, Y; Taminato, T; Goto, Y; Inoue, Y; Kadowaki, S; Hattori, M; Mori, K; Kato, Y; Matsukura, S; Imura, H

    1978-12-01

    Plasma glucagon and insulin responses to L-arginine were compared in normal controls and patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly. Patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency were characterized by high plasma glucagon response and low plasma insulin response, whereas acromegalic patients showed exaggerated plasma glucagon response and almost normal insulin response. These results suggest that growth hormone is probably required for optimum function of the islets, and since hyperglucagonaemia was observed in both growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly, metabolic disturbances stemming from the respective primary diseases may affect glucagon secretion.

  5. [Children with body length deficiency at birth and at risk of growth deficiency since childhood].

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Every year a several percent of newborns is affected with deficient body size, in some of these cases can be identified growth disorders, for examples Turner's Syndrome, Noonan Syndrome, idiopathic growth hormone deficiency. Clinical records of such newborns, aimed at monitoring their growth, do not exist so far. Screening for body size deficiencies requires only that the measurements of body length and mass be appropriately performed and this would be much less costly than screenings for congenital metabolic diseases. These recommendations are supported by the fact that in recent decades the risk of growth disorders and/or short stature (body height below -2 SDS upon full skeletal maturity) of children with deficient body size at birth is 5- to 7-fold higher than in those with normal body size relative the time of delivery. Moreover, in the former newborns the risk of behavioural/psychosocial disorders, hypertension, CHD, Type 2 diabetes and several other hormonal disorders were shown to be also higher than in the "normal"-born ones. The number of the so afflicted individuals and costs of potential therapies evidence the indispensability of a widespread detection of deficient body size at birth and a subsequent growth monitoring consisting of measuring body length/height 4 times in the course of the first year of life and twice a year thereafter.

  6. Maternal iron deficiency alters circulating thyroid hormone levels in developing neonatal rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency and iron deficiency (FeD) during fetal and neonatal life are both similarly deleterious to mammalian development suggesting a possible linkage between iron and thyroid hormone insufficiencies. Recent published data from our laboratory demonstrate a r...

  7. Elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase during growth hormone treatment in patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Momoi, T; Yamanaka, C; Tanaka, R; Yoshida, A; Okumura, M; Yamakura, S; Takasaki, Y; Sasaki, H; Kawai, M

    1995-11-01

    Serum creatinine phosphokinase (s-CPK) increased to more than 500 U/l in 5 out of 21 patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency during the 2 years of treatment with biosynthetic GH. In three of these five patients, s-CPK had elevated gradually after the start of GH treatment and remained high in one patient except in the period when GH injection was interrupted, and gradually decreased in the other two patients during treatment. These three patients had complete GH deficiency associated with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency due to pituitary stalk transection. One of the remaining two patients had Noonan syndrome and his s-CPK levels before therapy were relatively high. The fifth patient was a baseball athlete and the elevation of s-CPK seemed to be attributable to the strenuous exercise. Conclusion. s-CPK increases significantly in a certain group of patients with GH deficiency during GH replacement therapy. Measurement of s-CPK is to be included in the follow up laboratory tests at least in the 1st treatment year to evaluate the potential hazardous effects of GH on muscle.

  8. Infantile Growth Hormone Deficiency and X- Linked Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Stephanie T.; Chi, Carolyn H.; Haymond, Morey W.; Jeha, George S.

    2015-01-01

    Context X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) is a rare but important cause of primary adrenal insufficiency and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. AHC is caused by mutations within the NROB1 gene that codes for the DAX-1 protein, an orphan nuclear receptor essential for the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Affected individuals typically present in early infancy with adrenal insufficiency and growth is usually normal once medical therapy is instituted. Here we report the first case of growth hormone deficiency in an infant with AHC and a novel NROB1 missense mutation. Case A two-week old infant presented with salt-losing adrenal crises and a normal newborn screen. Tests of adrenal function confirmed adrenal hypoplasia congenita and molecular evaluation revealed a novel missense NROB1 mutation. Replacement steroid therapy was promptly initiated, but he subsequently developed growth failure despite optimal nutritional and medical steroid therapy. Further biochemical analyses confirmed isolated idiopathic growth hormone deficiency. Conclusions Growth failure in adequately treated infants with adrenal hypoplasia congenita is rare and the role of DAX-1 in the development of pituitary somatotropes is not known. There is variable genotype-phenotype correlation in X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita but novel NROB1 missense mutations could offer insight into the function of the various DAX-1 ligand-binding domains. PMID:27110597

  9. Color Vision Deficiencies in Children. United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Presented are prevalence data on color vision deficiencies (color blindness) in noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States, as estimated from the Health Examination Survey findings on a representative sample of over 7,400 children. Described are the two color vision tests used in the survey, the Ishihara Test for Color…

  10. Nutritional deficiencies in children on restricted diets.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Midge; Danner, Elaine

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric nutritional deficiencies are associated not only with poverty and developing countries, but also in children in the developed world who adhere to restricted diets. At times, these diets are medically necessary, such as the gluten-free diet for management of celiac disease or exclusion diets in children with food allergies. At other times, the diets are self-selected by children with behavioral disorders, or parent-selected because of nutrition misinformation, cultural preferences, alternative nutrition therapies, or misconceptions regarding food tolerance. Health care providers must be vigilant in monitoring both growth and feeding patterns to identify inappropriate dietary changes that may result in nutritional deficiencies.

  11. Growth hormone deficiency in 18q deletion syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ghidoni, P.D.; Cody, J.; Danney, J.

    1994-09-01

    The 18q- syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal deletion syndromes. Clinical characteristics are variable but may include: hypotonia, cleft palate, mental retardation and hearing impairment. Growth failure (GF) (<3% weight/height) is present in 80% of affected individuals. We evaluated growth hormone (GH) sufficiency in 15 patients with 18q- syndrome. Of these 15 patients, 10 have growth failure (<3% weight/height); of the remaining 5, 3 had normal growth parameters and 2 had growth along the 5%. Twelve patients failed to produce adequate GH following standard stimulation testing. Of these 12 patients with inadequate GH production, 2 had normal growth (above 3%). Of the 15, only 1 has normal GH production and normal growth parameters. Bone age was obtained on 1 patient with both GH deficiency and GF, and revealed significant delays. GH levels in response to GH releasing factor were normal in 3 out of 4 patients. MRI studies of GH-deficient patients indicated normal midline structures. Myelination in the few studied GH-deficient patients appeared delayed. The gene for myelin basic protein (MBP) is known to be located on the terminal portion of the long arm of chromosome 18. Neither the gene for GH, GH releasing factor nor GH releasing factor receptor is on chromosome 18. These genes are located on chromosomes 17, chromosome 20 and chromosome 7, respectively. Findings to date suggest that GH deficiency is common in individuals with 18q- syndrome. The etiology of this finding is unknown. We postulate that a gene(s) on chromosome 18q is involved in GH expression.

  12. Association of Turner Syndrome and Growth Hormone Deficiency: A Review.

    PubMed

    Marques, Jorge Sales; Aires, Sónia

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is an important cause of short stature in girls. Patients with TS most often do not have growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Testing GH secretion is not indicated despite the presence of short stature. In the last 20 years only three cases were reported with this association in Pubmed. We describe a case of an 11 year old girl with short stature and karyotype confirmed TS: 45,X(16)46,X,i(X)(ql0)(13). Because her growth velocity was low (-3 SD), we evaluated the GH response with stimulating tests and the results were under the normal range. These findings were compatible with GHD. It is important to check for GHD in patients with TS whenever the growth velocity is low for age and sex.

  13. Rasch Measurement in the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adult Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Luis; Roset, Montse; Badia, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Tested the metric properties of a Spanish version of the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA) questionnaire through Rasch analysis with a sample of 356 adult patients in Spain. Results suggest that the Spanish AGHDA could be a useful complement of the clinical evaluation of growth hormone deficiency patients at group and…

  14. Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency – Benefits, Side Effects, and Risks of Growth Hormone Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Mary L.; Merriam, George R.; Kargi, Atil Y.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of growth hormone (GH) in adults results in a syndrome characterized by decreased muscle mass and exercise capacity, increased visceral fat, impaired quality of life, unfavorable alterations in lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk, decrease in bone mass and integrity, and increased mortality. When dosed appropriately, GH replacement therapy (GHRT) is well tolerated, with a low incidence of side effects, and improves most of the alterations observed in GH deficiency (GHD); beneficial effects on mortality, cardiovascular events, and fracture rates, however, remain to be conclusively demonstrated. The potential of GH to act as a mitogen has resulted in concern over the possibility of increased de novo tumors or recurrence of pre-existing malignancies in individuals treated with GH. Though studies of adults who received GHRT in childhood have produced conflicting reports in this regard, long-term surveillance of adult GHRT has not demonstrated increased cancer risk or mortality. PMID:23761782

  15. Clinical and humanistic aspects of growth hormone deficiency and growth-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Rogol, Alan D

    2011-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) therapy has evolved rapidly since the introduction of recombinant human GH (rhGH). The increase in the availability and safety of GH therapy has also increased the number of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indications for use in both children and adults. FDA indications in children include GH deficiency (GHD), Turner syndrome, idiopathic short stature, small for gestational age with failure to attain normal growth percentiles, Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), chronic renal insufficiency, Noonan syndrome, and short stature due to short stature homeobox gene haploinsufficiency. Children and adolescents with GHD have demonstrated the greatest response to GHD therapy. The primary objective of rhGH therapy in children is to increase height velocity; however, the therapy also has benefits related to improved body composition, especially in children with conditions like PWS. Treatment of adult GHD primarily targets improvements in body composition, quality of life, and surrogate markers for cardiovascular disease. The safety reports of rhGH in children are generally good, but there have been a small number of cases of raised intracranial pressure, scoliosis, and muscle and joint discomfort. In adults, many side effects can be managed with dose titration at the initiation of treatment and dose reduction if side effects occur. PMID:22590765

  16. Facial morphometry of Ecuadorian patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency/Laron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, G B; Rosenbloom, A L; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Campbell, E A; Ullrich, F; Patil, K; Frias, J L

    1994-01-01

    Facial morphometry using computerised image analysis was performed on patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron syndrome) from an inbred population of southern Ecuador. Morphometrics were compared for 49 patients, 70 unaffected relatives, and 14 unrelated persons. Patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency showed significant decreases in measures of vertical facial growth as compared to unaffected relatives and unrelated persons with short stature from other causes. This report validates and quantifies the clinical impression of foreshortened facies in growth hormone receptor deficiency. Images PMID:7815422

  17. [Benefits and risks of growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Cordido, Fernando

    2014-10-21

    Adult growth hormone (GH) deficiency is a well-recognized clinical syndrome with adverse health consequences. Many of these may improve after replacement therapy with recombinant GH. This treatment induces an increase in lean body mass and a decrease in fat mass. In long-term studies, bone mineral density increases and muscle strength improves. Health-related quality of life tends to increase after treatment with GH. Lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk also improve with therapy. Nevertheless, GH replacement therapy is not without risk. According to some studies, GH increases blood glucose, body mass index and waist circumference and may promote long-term development of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Risk of neoplasia does not appear to be increased in adults treated with GH, but there are some high-risk subgroups. Methodological shortcomings and difficulties inherent to long-term studies prevent definitive conclusions about the relationship between GH and survival. Therefore, research in this field should remain active.

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Sustained-Release Recombinant Human Growth Hormone in Korean Adults with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngsook; Hong, Jae Won; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Sung-Woon; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jin Hwa; Kim, Byung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The administration of recombinant human growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency has been known to improve metabolic impairment and quality of life. Patients, however, have to tolerate daily injections of growth hormone. The efficacy, safety, and compliance of weekly administered sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone (SR-rhGH, Declage™) supplement in patients with growth hormone deficiency were evaluated. Materials and Methods This trial is 12-week prospective, single-arm, open-label trial. Men and women aged ≥20 years with diagnosed growth hormone deficiency (caused by pituitary tumor, trauma and other pituitary diseases) were eligible for this study. Each subject was given 2 mg (6 IU) of SR-rhGH once a week, subcutaneously for 12 weeks. Efficacy and safety at baseline and within 30 days after the 12th injection were assessed and compared. Score of Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA score) for quality of life and serum IGF-1 level. Results The IGF-1 level of 108.67±74.03 ng/mL was increased to 129.01±68.37 ng/mL (p=0.0111) and the AGHDA QoL score was decreased from 9.80±6.51 to 7.55±5.76 (p<0.0001) at week 12 compared with those at baseline. Adverse events included pain, swelling, erythema, and warmth sensation at the administration site, but many adverse events gradually disappeared during the investigation. Conclusion Weekly administered SR-rhGH for 12 weeks effectively increased IGF-1 level and improved the quality of life in patients with GH deficiency without serious adverse events. PMID:24954335

  19. The cardiovascular system in growth hormone excess and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, G; Di Somma, C; Grasso, L F S; Savanelli, M C; Colao, A; Pivonello, R

    2012-12-01

    The clinical conditions associated with GH excess and GH deficiency (GHD) are known to be associated with an increased risk for the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, suggesting that either an excess or a deficiency in GH and/or IGF-I is deleterious for cardiovascular system. In patients with acromegaly, chronic GH and IGF-I excess commonly causes a specific cardiomyopathy characterized by a concentric cardiac hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction and, in later stages, with systolic dysfunction ending in heart failure if GH/IGF-I excess is not controlled. Abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and anomalies of cardiac valves can also occur. Moreover, the increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance, as well as dyslipidemia, confer an increased risk for vascular atherosclerosis. Successful control of the disease is accompanied by a decrease of the cardiac mass and improvement of cardiac function and an improvement in cardiovascular risk factors. In patients with hypopituitarism, GHD has been considered the under- lying factor of the increased mortality when appropriate standard replacement of the pituitary hormones deficiencies is given. Either childhood-onset or adulthood-onset GHD are characterized by a cluster of abnormalities associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, including altered body composition, unfavorable lipid profile, insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction and vascular atherosclerosis, a decrease in cardiac mass together with an impairment of systolic function mainly after exercise. Treatment with recombinant GH in patients with GHD is followed by an improvement of the cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in cardiac mass together with an improvement in cardiac performance. In conclusion, acromegaly and GHD are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the control of GH/IGF-I secretion reverses cardiovascular

  20. Lead Toxicity and Iron Deficiency in Utah Migrant Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliffe, Stephen D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Determines the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, aged 9-72 months. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen percent of all children tested, and 30 percent of those aged 9-23 months, were iron deficient. Hematocrit determination is an insensitive screen for iron deficiency.…

  1. Growth Hormone Response after Administration of L-dopa, Clonidine, and Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Seigfried M.

    1993-01-01

    This study of eight growth-retarded children with Down's syndrome (aged 1 to 6.5 years) found that administration of growth hormone was more effective than either L-dopa or clonidine. Results suggest that children with Down's syndrome have both anatomical and biochemical hypothalamic derangements resulting in decreased growth hormone secretion and…

  2. Immune deficiencies following cancer treatment in children.

    PubMed

    Kantar, Mehmet; Cetingül, Nazan; Kansoy, Savaş; Kütükçüler, Necil; Aksu, Güzide

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine serum immunoglobulins, IgG subclasses, lymphocyte subsets, and serum protective antitoxin levels of tetanus and diphtheria, and to investigate specific antibody response to tetanus and diphtheria vaccines in children with cancer who have been treated for leukemias and solid tumors. Forty patients with different types of childhood malignancies were enrolled in this study and their lymphocyte subsets, serum Ig A, M, G and IgG subclass concentrations were determined at completion of chemotherapy and 6 months later. We measured serum diphtheria (D) and tetanus (T) antitoxin levels and investigated specific antibody responses against DT vaccines at 6 months. Only the leukemic children had low CD19+ cells at completion of chemotherapy and 6 months later. The patients with solid tumors had reduced CD4+ cells, but increased natural killer cells at completion of chemotherapy. Serum IgA and IgM levels were decreased in leukemic patients after chemotherapy. There were no IgG subclass deficiency. Forty-two per cent of the patients did not have protective serum T antitoxins. All patients produced high levels of DT antibodies by vaccination. Immune system changes recover by 6 months after cancer therapy in children. Children with solid tumors, as well as leukemias, should be followed-up in terms of immune deficiencies. A repeat dose of tetanus toxoid should be recommended at 6 months.

  3. Growth hormone deficiency and premature thelarche in a female infant with kabuki makeup syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, K; Lemli, L; Craen, M; de Zegher, F

    1995-01-01

    We report on a girl with the kabuki makeup syndrome, including short stature, premature thelarche and partial growth hormone deficiency of hypothalamic origin, without stalk interruption. Treatment with recombinant human growth hormone resulted in an increase of annualized growth velocity from 3.6 to 11.2 cm. The kabuki makeup syndrome may be associated with hypothalamopituitary dysfunction.

  4. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. ... performed on infants and children to identify human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency as a cause of growth retardation. ...

  5. Vitamin d deficiency in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Helou, Marieka; Ning, Yi; Yang, Shibing; Irvine, Patricia; Bachmann, Lorin M; Godder, Kamar; Massey, Gita

    2014-04-01

    A limited number of small studies have examined the vitamin D status of pediatric oncology patients, and the results indicate an increased prevalence of hypovitaminosis. We conducted a cross-sectional study with the primary aim of describing the vitamin D status of our pediatric cancer patients and any associations with demographic characteristics. Our secondary aim was to compare this prevalence to that of a healthy population. We collected data on children seen in our clinic and determined the overall prevalence of hypovitaminosis. We then compared this prevalence to that of healthy populations described in the literature. The prevalence of hypovitaminosis in our study population was 72%. Forty-three percent of our patients were considered deficient with 8% being severely deficient. Our analysis revealed a significant association between the outcome and age in that patients 6 years and above were more likely to have hypovitaminosis after adjustment for other characteristics (AOR = 3.23; 95% CI, 1.11-9.40). When compared with a healthy pediatric population, our patients had a significantly higher prevalence of hypovitaminosis (P-value = 0.003). Vitamin D deficiency is very common in children with cancer, representing a subpopulation of high-risk patients that could benefit most from early detection and supplementation.

  6. [Growth hormone treatment update].

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Short stature in children is a common cause for referral to pediatric endocrinologists, corresponding most times to normal variants of growth. Initially growth hormone therapy was circumscribed to children presenting growth hormone deficiency. Since the production of recombinant human hormone its use had spread to other pathologies.

  7. Use of growth hormone in children.

    PubMed

    Hindmarsh, Peter C; Dattani, Mehul T

    2006-05-01

    The introduction of recombinant DNA-derived human growth hormone (rhGH) in the mid-1980s allowed studies to be undertaken in a number of growth disorders other than the classic indication--growth-hormone deficiency (GHD). In patients with GHD, optimizing the dose and frequency of rhGH administration, and early instigation of therapy, has led to near-normalization of final height. The use of rhGH in the treatment of Turner syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, intrauterine growth restriction, and chronic renal failure demonstrated the efficacy of therapy, although the increase in final height (5-7 cm) is less than that achieved in GHD. Cost-benefit implications need to be considered in the next phases of evaluating the role of rhGH therapy in these indications. To date, rhGH has only received approval for the management of idiopathic short stature in the US; as with the other wider growth indications, the lack of formal randomized, controlled trials hampers the full evaluation of efficacy, and a cautious approach should, therefore, be adopted for this particular indication. rhGH has a good safety record, although there are current concerns about the possible long-term increased risk of colonic and lymphatic malignancy, which will require monitoring through national cancer registries. PMID:16932297

  8. Lead toxicity and iron deficiency in Utah migrant children.

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, S D; Lee, J; Lutz, L J; Woolley, F R; Baxter, S; Civish, F; Johnson, M

    1989-01-01

    We determined the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, ages 9-72 months, during the summer of 1985. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen per cent of those tested and 30 per cent of the children ages 9-23 months were iron deficient. Hematocrit determinations accurately predicted iron deficiency in only 35 per cent of the children confirmed to have this disorder via erythrocyte protoporphyrin screening. PMID:2650572

  9. Immune deficiencies in children: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, S; Lissauer, S; Welch, S; Hackett, S

    2013-12-01

    Primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are disorders of the immune system that result in increased susceptibility to infectious disease, autoimmunity and malignancy. They are challenging to paediatricians as they can present anytime from birth to adolescence with a wide variety of signs and symptoms. It is important to diagnose PIDs promptly, especially more severe forms to prevent significant morbidity and mortality. However, significant challenges exist in deciding which children to investigate and when. We aim to give a basic understanding of the human immune system, the different presentations in a child that should alert a paediatrician about the possibility of PID and the possible underlying diagnosis. Additionally, we have developed a framework for a stepwise approach to investigating these children.

  10. Immune deficiencies in children: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, S; Lissauer, S; Welch, S; Hackett, S

    2013-10-01

    Primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are disorders of the immune system that result in increased susceptibility to infectious disease, autoimmunity and malignancy. They are challenging to paediatricians as they can present anytime from birth to adolescence with a wide variety of signs and symptoms. It is important to diagnose PIDs promptly, especially more severe forms to prevent significant morbidity and mortality. However, significant challenges exist in deciding which children to investigate and when. We aim to give a basic understanding of the human immune system, the different presentations in a child that should alert a paediatrician about the possibility of PID and the possible underlying diagnosis. Additionally, we have developed a framework for a stepwise approach to investigating these children.

  11. Absence of serum growth hormone binding protein in patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron dwarfism)

    SciTech Connect

    Daughaday, W.H.; Trivedi, B.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been recognized that human serum contains a protein that specifically binds human growth hormone (hGH). This protein has the same restricted specificity for hGH as the membrane-bound GH receptor. To determine whether the GH-binding protein is a derivative of, or otherwise related to, the GH receptor, the authors have examined the serum of three patients with Laron-type dwarfism, a condition in which GH refractoriness has been attributed to a defect in the GH receptor. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hGH incubated with serum has been measured after gel filtration of the serum through an Ultrogel AcA 44 minicolumn. Results are expressed as percent of specifically bound /sup 125/I-hGH and as specific binding relative to that of a reference serum after correction is made for endogenous GH. The mean +/- SEM of specific binding of sera from eight normal adults (26-46 years of age) was 21.6 +/- 0.45%, and the relative specific binding was 101.1 +/- 8.6%. Sera from 11 normal children had lower specific binding of 12.5 +/- 1.95% and relative specific binding of 56.6 +/- 9.1%. Sera from three children with Laron-type dwarfism lacked any demonstrable GH binding, whereas sera from 10 other children with other types of nonpituitary short stature had normal relative specific binding. They suggest that the serum GH-binding protein is a soluble derivative of the GH receptor. Measurement of the serum GH-binding protein may permit recognition of other abnormalities of the GH receptor.

  12. Chromatic VEP in children with congenital colour vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tekavčič Pompe, Manca; Stirn Kranjc, Branka; Brecelj, Jelka

    2010-09-01

    Visual evoked potentials to chromatic stimulus (cVEP) are believed to selectively test the parvocellular visual pathway which is responsible for processing information about colour. The aim was to evaluate cVEP in children with red-green congenital colour vision deficiency. VEP responses of 15 colour deficient children were compared to 31 children with normal colour vision. An isoluminant red-green stimulus composed of horizontal gratings was presented in an onset-offset manner. The shape of the waveform was studied, as well as the latency and amplitude of positive (P) and negative (N) waves. cVEP response did not change much with increased age in colour deficient children, whereas normative data showed changes from a predominantly positive to a negative response with increased age. A P wave was present in 87% of colour deficient children (and in 100% of children with normal colour vision), whereas the N wave was absent in a great majority of colour deficient children and was present in 80% of children with normal colour vision. Therefore, the amplitude of the whole response (N-P) decreased linearly with age in colour deficient children, whereas in children with normal colour vision it increased linearly. P wave latency shortened with increased age in both groups. cVEP responses differ in children with congenital colour vision deficiency compared to children with normal colour vision.

  13. [Vitamin deficiencies in breastfed children due to maternal dietary deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kollée, L A A

    2006-03-01

    Dietary deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation may result in health problems in exclusively breastfed infants. Vitamin-B12 deficiency in these infants results in irritability, anorexia and failure to thrive during the first 4-8 months of life. Severe and permanent neurodevelopmental disturbances may occur. The most at risk for vitamin-B12 deficiency are breast-fed infants ofveganist and vegetarian mothers. Mothers who cover their skin prevent exposure to the sun and may consequently be at risk for vitamin-D deficiency, as well as putting their offspring at risk. In prenatal and perinatal care, it is important to take the maternal dietary history in order to be able to prevent or treat these disorders. Guidelines for obstetrical and neonatal care should include the topic of vitamin deficiency.

  14. Defective minor spliceosome mRNA processing results in isolated familial growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Argente, Jesús; Flores, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Arumí, Armand; Verma, Bhupendra; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Cuscó, Ivon; Oghabian, Ali; Chowen, Julie A; Frilander, Mikko J; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis of a significant number of cases of isolated growth hormone deficiency remains unknown. We describe three sisters affected with severe isolated growth hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia caused by biallelic mutations in the RNPC3 gene, which codes for a minor spliceosome protein required for U11/U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) formation and splicing of U12-type introns. We found anomalies in U11/U12 di-snRNP formation and in splicing of multiple U12-type introns in patient cells. Defective transcripts include preprohormone convertases SPCS2 and SPCS3 and actin-related ARPC5L genes, which are candidates for the somatotroph-restricted dysfunction. The reported novel mechanism for familial growth hormone deficiency demonstrates that general mRNA processing defects of the minor spliceosome can lead to very narrow tissue-specific consequences. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy ' Genetic Disease; Metabolism PMID:24480542

  15. Lower limb deficient children in The Netherlands: epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Rijnders, L J; Boonstra, A M; Groothoff, J W; Cornel, M C; Eisma, W H

    2000-04-01

    Information on the characteristics of children with limb deficiencies and amputations in The Netherlands is largely lacking. The present study aimed to collect data about the prevalence of congenital deficiencies, the ratio of congenital to acquired limb deficiencies, types of lower leg deficiency or amputation and male/female ratios. Data were obtained from a regional birth defects registry for the northern part of The Netherlands (EUROCAT-NNL) and from a national survey. Inclusion criteria for the selection of the EUROCAT data were: children/foetuses with lower leg deficiencies born in 1981-1986. Inclusion criteria for the survey data were: children aged 1-18 years with congenital deficiencies or acquired amputations of the leg, excluding toe deficiencies/amputations. Both the regional birth defects registry and the national survey only yielded small numbers of children, which limits the validity of the authors' findings. The Eurocat data show a prevalence of lower leg deficiencies at birth of 2.07/10,000. Fifty-five (55) children/foetuses were included in the present study. The male/female ratio was 1:1. Of the live-born children, 30% also had defects of the upper limbs, while 38% had bilateral lower limb deficiencies. The national survey included 89 children, of whom 73% had congenital deficiencies, while the others had undergone amputations: of which 37% were due to malignancies, 29% to traumata, 13% to infections and 21% to other pathology. The male/female ratio was 7:3 for the children with congenital deficiencies versus 6:4 for the children with acquired amputations. In the group of congenital deficiencies, fibula deficiency was most frequently seen (36%), while in the group with acquired amputations trans-femoral amputation, knee disarticulation and trans-tibial amputation were seen with equal frequency (21%). In 40% of the children with congenital deficiency and in 8% of the children with acquired amputations the arm was also affected. Both legs were

  16. Lateral preferences in children with intellectual deficiency of idiopathic origin.

    PubMed

    Leconte, Pascale; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate lateral preferences in a population of children with intellectual deficiency of idiopathic origin, compared with those of typically developing (TD) children. Two groups of children with mild or moderate intellectual deficiency were observed. Handedness (using a 10-item test and Bishop's card-reaching task), eyedness and footedness were studied. The younger group consisted of sixteen 10- to 11-year olds; the older group comprised fourteen 12- to 14-year olds. A control group of fifteen TD children was matched for age with the younger group of intellectually deficient (ID) children. The results show that the occurrence of left-handedness is not higher in children with ID of unknown origin than in age-matched TD children. However, we observed a marginally reduced tendency toward right-handedness in ID than in TD children: more mixed-handers among ID than TD children; test-retest consistency of hand preference significantly lower in the 10- to 11-year-old ID children than in the age-matched TD children; greater tendency of ID children to use their nonpreferred left hand when the card was presented to the left, as compared with TD children. Left-eyedness and crossed hand-eye preference were also more frequent in ID than in age-matched TD children. No age-related difference in laterality was found in ID children. These results partially support other studies indicating that less rightward asymmetry is associated with intellectual deficiency in children.

  17. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  18. Parathyroid hormone secretory pattern, circulating activity, and effect on bone turnover in adult growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A M; Hopkins, M T; Fraser, W D; Ooi, C G; Durham, B H; Vora, J P

    2003-02-01

    Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is associated with osteoporosis. Reports have associated parathyroid hormone (PTH) circadian rhythm abnormalities with osteoporosis. Furthermore, there is evidence of relative PTH insensitivity in AGHD patients. Factors regulating PTH circadian rhythm are not fully understood. There is evidence that serum phosphate is a likely determinant of PTH rhythm. The aim of this study was to investigate PTH circadian rhythm and its circulating activity and association with bone turnover in untreated AGHD patients compared to healthy individuals. We sampled peripheral venous blood at 30-min and urine at 3-h intervals during the day over a 24-h period from 1400 h in 14 untreated AGHD patients (7 M, 7 W; mean age, 49.5 +/- 10.7 years) and 14 age (48.6 +/- 11.4 years; P = NS) and gender-matched controls. Cosinor analysis was performed to analyze rhythm parameters. Cross-correlational analysis was used to determine the relationship between variables. Serum PTH (1-84), phosphate, total calcium, urea, creatinine, albumin, type I collagen C-telopeptides (CT(x)), a bone resorption marker, and procollagen type I amino-terminal propeptide (PINP), a bone formation marker, were measured on all samples. Nephrogenous cyclic adenosine monophosphate (NcAMP), which reflects the renal activity of PTH, was calculated from plasma and urinary cAMP. Urinary calcium and phosphate were measured on all urine samples. Significant circadian rhythms were observed for serum PTH, phosphate, CT(x), and PINP in AGHD and healthy subjects (P < 0.001). No significant rhythm was observed for serum-adjusted calcium. PTH MESOR (rhythm-adjusted mean) was significantly higher (P < 0.05), whereas the MESOR values for phosphate, CT(x) (P < 0.05), and PINP (P < 0.001) were lower in AGHD patients than in controls. AGHD patients had significantly lower 24-h NcAMP (P < 0.001) and higher urinary calcium excretion (P < 0.05). Maximum cross-correlation between PTH and phosphate (r = 0

  19. Multiglandular Hormone Deficiency in a Patient with Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Then, Cornelia; Ritzel, Katrin; Seibold, Christa; Mann, Johannes F. E.; Reincke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) is a rare but potentially fatal disorder characterized by a loss of fluid and proteins into the interstitial space leading to intravascular hypovolemia up to the point of hypovolemic shock. We report the case of a 64-year-old man with SCLS and multiple hormone abnormalities (primary hypothyroidism, hypoadrenalism, and hypogonadism), deficiency of hormone binding globulins, and hypogammaglobulinemia. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulins, theophylline, and terbutaline. Strikingly, with the dissolution of peripheral edema, hormone levels improved. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of SCLS associated with polyglandular abnormalities. PMID:25685157

  20. Essential fatty acid deficiency in malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Holman, R T; Johnson, S B; Mercuri, O; Itarte, H J; Rodrigo, M A; De Tomas, M E

    1981-08-01

    Fatty acid patterns of major classes of lipids of serum were measured in forty Argentine children ages 2 to 24 months admitted to the hospital with chronic malnutrition. A normal control group of 48 children from the same population was also examined. Serum lipids were extracted and separated into phospholipids, cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and free fatty acids. These were converted to methyl esters which were analyzed by gas chromatography. In chronic malnutrition, the fatty acid patterns of phospholipids and cholesteryl esters indicated changes characteristic of essential fatty acid deficiency of moderate degree. The total omega 6 acids were found to be highly significantly diminished from normal, and the ratio of 20:3 omega 9/20:4 omega 6 was highly significantly increased. Decreased proportions of omega 6 metabolites suggested impaired desaturase activity, and elevated ratios of 22:4 omega 6/20:4 omega 6 and 20:2 omega 6/18:2 omega 6 suggested increased chain elongation in chronic malnutrition.

  1. Anaemia and iron deficiency disease in children.

    PubMed

    Olivares, M; Walter, T; Hertrampf, E; Pizarro, F

    1999-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the single most common nutritional disorder world-wide and the main cause of anaemia in infancy, childhood and pregnancy. It is prevalent in most of the developing world and it is probably the only nutritional deficiency of consideration in industrialised countries. In the developing world the prevalence of iron deficiency is high, and is due mainly to a low intake of bioavailable iron. However, in this setting, iron deficiency often co-exists with other conditions such as, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, folate deficiency, and infection. In tropical regions, parasitic infestation and haemoglobinopathies are also a common cause of anaemia. In the developed world iron deficiency is mainly a single nutritional problem. The conditions previously mentioned might contribute to the development of iron deficiency or they present difficulties in the laboratory diagnosis of iron deficiency.

  2. Iron Deficiency in Preschool Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilgic, Ayhan; Gurkan, Kagan; Turkoglu, Serhat; Akca, Omer Faruk; Kilic, Birim Gunay; Uslu, Runa

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) causes negative outcomes on psychomotor and behavioral development of infants and young children. Children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are under risk for ID and this condition may increase the severity of psychomotor and behavioral problems, some of which already inherently exist in these children. In the present…

  3. Vitamin D deficiency in refugee children from conflict zones.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Mohamud; Wang, Shu; Pal, Abhijit; MacIntyre, C Raina; Wood, Nicholas; Gunesekera, Hasantha

    2011-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common in newly resettled refugee children and is associated with significant morbidity including rickets. To determine risk factors and burden of vitamin D deficiency in newly resettled refugee children in Australia. A descriptive epidemiological study and survey on refugee children attending an outpatient general health clinic at the Children's Hospital Westmead, Sydney. 215 patients were examined (age range 0-17 years), (76%) majority were from Africa. Mean serum 25OHD level was 46 nmol/L (SD = 24) (sufficiency range 50-150 nmol/L). 40% had mild deficiency (26-50 nmol/L), 19% moderate deficiency (13-25 nmol/L) and 2% were severely deficient (<13 nmol/L). Deficiency was most common in East African (72%) and Middle Eastern (66%) refugees, children in early puberty (89%) and those living in Australia >6 months (71%). Deficient children were more likely to have had movement restrictions and longer time in hiding in their country of refuge (OR 3:1[CI 0.9-9.7], P = .062).

  4. Positive correlation of thyroid hormones and serum copper in children with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Blasig, Sarah; Kühnen, Peter; Schuette, Andrea; Blankenstein, Oliver; Mittag, Jens; Schomburg, Lutz

    2016-09-01

    Thyroid hormones are of central relevance for growth and development. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Recent studies in humans and mice have demonstrated that serum levels of selenium (Se) and copper (Cu) are positively affected by thyroid hormones. Given the importance of these trace elements for many biochemical processes, we tested whether this interaction is found in children at risk for hypothyroidism, potentially providing a novel factor contributing to the disturbed development observed in congenital hypothyroidism (CH). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 84 children diagnosed with CH displaying a wide range of thyroid hormone concentrations. Serum Se and Cu concentrations were measured by total reflection X-ray fluorescence. Data for thyrotropin (TSH) were available in all, thyroxine (T4) and free thyroxine (fT4) in the majority and triiodothyronine (T3) in 29 of the children. Spearman rank analyzes were performed. Cu and thyroid hormones showed a strong positive correlation (Cu/T4, rho=0.5241, P=0.0003; Cu/T3, rho=0.6003, P=0.0006). Unlike in adults, no associations were found between Se and any of the thyroid hormones. Our data highlight that serum Cu and thyroid hormones are strongly associated already in early postnatal life. Severely hypothyroid children are thus at risk of developing a Cu deficiency if not adequately nourished or supplemented. This finding needs to be verified in larger groups of children in order not to miss an easily-avoidable risk factor for poor development. PMID:27267969

  5. Iodine Deficiency in School Children in Aligarh District, India.

    PubMed

    Aslami, Ahmad Nadeem; Ansari, Mohammed A; Khalique, N; Kapil, Umesh

    2016-08-01

    We carried out this study to assess iodine deficiency disorders among school children of 6-12 years age group in Aligarh district of India. The prevalence of goiter was 5.2%. Median Urinary Iodine Excretion level was 150 ug/L; 22.5% of students had biochemical iodine deficiency. 50.4% households were consuming adequately iodized salt. PMID:27567653

  6. Perinatal Iron and Copper Deficiencies Alter Neonatal Rat Circulating and Brain Thyroid Hormone Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Thomas W.; Prohaska, Joseph R.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Anderson, Grant W.

    2010-01-01

    Copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and iodine/thyroid hormone (TH) deficiencies lead to similar defects in late brain development, suggesting that these micronutrient deficiencies share a common mechanism contributing to the observed derangements. Previous studies in rodents (postweanling and adult) and humans (adolescent and adult) indicate that Cu and Fe deficiencies affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, leading to altered TH status. Importantly, however, relationships between Fe and Cu deficiencies and thyroidal status have not been assessed in the most vulnerable population, the developing fetus/neonate. We hypothesized that Cu and Fe deficiencies reduce circulating and brain TH levels during development, contributing to the defects in brain development associated with these deficiencies. To test this hypothesis, pregnant rat dams were rendered Cu deficient (CuD), FeD, or TH deficient from early gestation through weaning. Serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), and brain T3 levels, were subsequently measured in postnatal d 12 (P12) pups. Cu deficiency reduced serum total T3 by 48%, serum total T4 by 21%, and whole-brain T3 by 10% at P12. Fe deficiency reduced serum total T3 by 43%, serum total T4 by 67%, and whole-brain T3 by 25% at P12. Brain mRNA analysis revealed that expression of several TH-responsive genes were altered in CuD or FeD neonates, suggesting that reduced TH concentrations were sensed by the FeD and CuD neonatal brain. These results indicate that at least some of the brain defects associated with neonatal Fe and Cu deficiencies are mediated through reductions in circulating and brain TH levels. PMID:20573724

  7. Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone or Thyrotropin Deficiency Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Three Cases with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Cho-Ok; Kim, Yu Ji; Kim, Ji Hye

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical features and long-term outcomes of isolated pituitary hormone deficiencies after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such deficiencies typically present at time intervals after TBI, especially after mild injuries such as concussions, which makes their diagnosis difficult without careful history taking. It is necessary to improve diagnosis and prevent life threatening or morbid conditions such as those that may occur in deficiencies of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (as known as thyrotropin, TSH), the two most important pituitary hormones in hypopituitarism treatment. Here, we report two cases of isolated ACTH deficiency and one case of isolated TSH deficiency. These patients presented at different time points after concussion and underwent long-term follow-ups. PMID:27169080

  8. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow’s milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  9. Effect of copper deficiency on the content and secretion of pancreatic islet hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Bhathena, S.J.; Voyles, N.R.; Timmers, K.I.; Fields, M.; Kennedy, B.W.; Recant, L.

    1986-03-01

    Experimental copper (Cu) deficiency in rats is characterized by glucose intolerance and hyperlipemia. Its severity is increased by dietary fructose (F) as compared to starch (S). Since islet hormones are intimately involved in carbohydrate metabolism the authors studied the effects of Cu deficiency on their content and secretion. Rats were fed Cu deficient (CuD) (0.6 ..mu..g Cu/g) or Cu supplemented (6.0 ..mu..g Cu/g) diets with either 62% F or S for 7 weeks after weaning. Feeding CuD diets decreased plasma insulin (I) (P < 0.001) but not plasma glucagon (G). F feeding compared to S magnified the effects of Cu deficiency. Total pancreatic content of I in CuD rats was increased threefold (P < 0.001). Total somatostatin content increased significantly only in the pancreas of CuD rats fed F. Although total G content was not altered in CuD rats, when G was expressed per g protein or g wet weight, significant increases were found in CuD rats fed F. Thus, of the islet hormones, the major effect of Cu deficiency was on I. When pancreata were perfused in vitro with high glucose, pancreas from CuD rats had reduced insulin response. Thus, cellular functions dependent on Cu are involved in maintaining the ability of the islets of Langerhans to secrete I in a normal fashion.

  10. Iron deficiency in young Bradford children from different ethnic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, P

    1986-01-01

    Haematological parameters and iron state were studied in children admitted to hospital consecutively during a six month period. A total of 147 of 598 children (24.6%) were anaemic, with haemoglobin values below the third centile of the reference range, and 131 of 400 children (32.8%) were iron deficient, with serum ferritin concentrations less than 10 micrograms/l. Both findings were more common in children from the Asian ethnic minority. The "routine" full blood count is a useful tool for the presumptive identification of iron deficiency in childhood. Iron deficiency is deleterious to the health of young children. In view of its extent and degree--not exclusively among the Asian ethnic minority--a community based preventive programme on the lines of the Stop Rickets Campaign is recommended. PMID:3080103

  11. Long-term outcome of growth hormone therapy in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lanes, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has been available for more than 4 decades for the treatment of GH deficiency. Initially, GH was extracted from the pituitary glands of human cadavers, but its use was discontinued following the transmission of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob virus. After the development of recombinant GH (somatropin) in 1985, an 'unlimited' commercial source of GH has been available, allowing for the treatment of a large number of short GH-deficient and -sufficient children. Refinements in both the dosage and the frequency of administration of GH have allowed GH-deficient children to reach nearly normal final heights, although mostly they are still below their target heights. Decreased bone mineral densities and increased concentrations of fasting and postprandial lipids, coagulation factors, and several independent cardiovascular risk factors have been reported in GH-deficient children and adolescents and appear to improve with GH administration. The short-term administration of GH to mostly non-GH-deficient short children with Turner syndrome, chronic renal insufficiency (CRI), intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), and idiopathic short stature (ISS) has resulted in increased growth velocities. In addition, the final height of patients with Turner syndrome and CRI appears to improve with the long-term administration of GH. Final height data are still lacking in adolescents with IUGR, but height standard deviation score and final height predictions appear to improve with therapy. Based on the incomplete and inconclusive available data, one must conclude that GH treatment of children with ISS cannot be advised. The use of GH at replacement doses in children with GH deficiency has resulted in rare and generally reversible adverse effects. The long-term administration of pharmacologic GH doses to short, mostly non-GH-deficient children must, however, still be viewed with caution, as long-term complications cannot as yet be fully evaluated. GH therapy must be

  12. Hypothalamic hamartoma associated with central precocious puberty and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rousseau-Nepton, Isabelle; Kaduri, Sagi; Garfield, Natasha; Krishnamoorthy, Preetha

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are tumors generally associated with isolated central precocious puberty (CPP). To our knowledge, we report a unique case of a girl with HH associated with CPP and growth hormone deficiency. This case highlights the complex interaction between HHs and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. It also emphasizes the value of close follow-up of growth velocity in these patients even after treatment of the CPP.

  13. [Growth hormone administered to non-growth hormone deficient, small girls: echographic aspect of the gonads and uterus].

    PubMed

    Colle, M; Broussin, B

    1993-09-01

    The effect of growth hormone (GH) treatment on prepubertal gonads is controversial especially with regard to the risk of precocious puberty. Ultrasound assessment of ovarian volume, follicle size, and uterine growth was performed in 20 premenarcheal girls (8.0 +/- 2.6 years) receiving growth hormone (GH) for short stature (-2.8 +/- 0.4 SD) not related to growth hormone deficiency or Turner syndrome. Mean GH dosage was 1.0 +/- 0.4 IU/kg/week and mean duration of treatment at evaluation was 16.3 +/- 8.9 months. All patients underwent real time ultrasonography of the pelvic organs and ten subjects also had color Doppler studies of the ovarian and uterine arteries. Ultrasound findings were similar to those reported in normal prepubertal girls. Mean uterine length (29.1 +/- 7.5 mm) and volume (1.23 +/- 0.86 ml) were correlated with age but not with dosage or duration of GH treatment. Ovarian volumes was within the normal age-specific range in all patients except a 7.9 year old girl with substantially enlarged ovaries (4.7 ml) but no evidence or precocious puberty. Ovarian follicles were found in five girls; they measured less than 9 mm in diameter in every case except one (13 mm follicle in an 11-year-old). Blood flow in the ovarian arteries was seen on 5 of the 10 color Doppler studies and was not correlated with dosage or duration of GH treatment. Administration of GH to non-GH-deficient girls did not substantially affect the internal genital organs. It remains uncertain whether the single case of ovarian enlargement seen was related to GH treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Elevation deficiency in children with recessive RDH12-related retinopathy.

    PubMed

    AlBakri, Amani; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Khan, Arif O

    2015-12-01

    Children with retinal dystrophies often have nonspecific strabismus, but vertical incomitant deviations are uncommon. We report 4 children from 3 consanguineous families with bilateral elevation deficiency in the context of retinal dystrophy. All were found to harbor recessive mutations in retinal dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12). PMID:26691045

  15. Exaggerated thyroid stimulating hormone secretion in children exposed to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Boyarskaya, O Y; Kopilova, O V

    2008-02-01

    We present results of a long-term study of the morpho-functional state of the thyroid gland and of the functional capacities of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal system, as shown by thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation, in different groups of children who suffered from the Chernobyl accident. It was shown that the thyroid gland of the children who were evacuated from the 30-km zone was damaged most severely due to the influence of radioactive iodine (131I). Living on radionuclide-polluted territories in conditions of iodine deficiency has been an additional contributory factor in the development of thyroid gland diseases. Latent functional deficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal system can be one of the reasons leading to oncopathology of the thyroid gland.

  16. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in children with cholestasis in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Bahram; Najafi, Mehri; Farahmand, Fateme; Motamed, Farzaneh; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadi, Jamshid; Eshagh Roze, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in children with cholestatic liver diseases. Forty eight children with established cholestatic liver disease who referred to gastrointestinal clinic of Children Medical Center (Tehran, Iran) between April 2010 and March 2011 were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Laboratory analysis including calcium, phosphate, albumin, total and direct bilirubin, aminotransferases, alkalinephosphatase (ALP), prothrombin time (PT), parathyroid hormone (PTH), total protein determined by routine laboratory techniques. Mean age of participants was 299.1 ± 676.8 days (range 2-3600 days) whereas twenty one were female (43.8%) and 27 (56.3%) were male. Twenty two (45.8%) had evidences of rickets in X-ray evaluation. Three children with rickets and two with normal X-ray had vitamin D deficiency while ten in rickets group and 16 in normal group had vitamin D insufficiency. The main underlying diseases were anatomical biliary atresia in cases with rickets and idiopathic in other group. Rickets and vitamin D deficiency should be considered in chronic cholestatic children.

  17. Dose-Response Analysis of Developmental Iodide Deficiency: Reductions in Thyroid Hormones and Impaired Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis and severe iodide deficiency (ID) during early development is associated with neurological impairments. Several environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under cond...

  18. Rickets and Vitamin D Deficiency in Alaska Native Children

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Rosalyn; Lescher, Rachel; Gessner, Bradford D.; Benson, Matthew; Bulkow, Lisa; Rosenfeld, John; Thomas, Timothy; Holman, Robert C.; Haberling, Dana; Bruce, Michael; Bartholomew, Michael; Tiesinga, James

    2015-01-01

    Background Rickets and vitamin D deficiency appeared to increase in Alaskan children, starting in the 1990s. We evaluated the epidemiology of rickets and vitamin D deficiency in Alaska Native (AN) children in 2001-2010. Methods We analyzed 2001-2010 visits with rickets or vitamin D deficiency diagnosis for AN and American Indian children and the general U.S. population aged <10 years. We conducted a case-control study of AN rickets/vitamin D deficient cases and age- and region-matched controls. Results AN children annual rickets-associated hospitalization rate (2.23/100,000 children/year) was higher than general U.S. rate (1.23; 95% CI 1.08-1.39). Rickets incidence increased with latitude. Rickets/vitamin D deficiency cases were more likely to have malnutrition (OR 38.1; 95% CI 4.9-294), had similar breastfeeding prevalence, and were less likely to have received vitamin D supplementation (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.1-0.87), than controls. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of latitude, malnutrition and lack of vitamin D supplementation as risk factors for rickets. PMID:25741788

  19. Hyperhomocysteinemia and B-vitamin deficiencies in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Ueland, Per Magne; Monsen, Anne Lise Bjørke

    2003-11-01

    Measurement of total homocysteine (tHcy) in healthy and diseased children has documented the utility of this marker in pediatric research and diagnostics. This article focuses on novel data obtained in infants, children and adolescents, with emphasis on cobalamin status in infants. In children, determinants of plasma tHcy are similar to those established in adults, and include age, gender, nutrition, B-vitamin status, and some drugs interfering with B-vitamin function. In infants (age < 1 year), tHcy is moderately elevated and related to serum cobalamin, whereas in older children and throughout childhood, plasma tHcy is low (about 60% of adult levels), and folate status becomes a strong tHcy determinant. As in adults, hyperhomocysteinemia in childhood is a risk factor for stroke, and folate-responsive hyperhomocysteinemia has been detected in children with renal failure. tHcy seems to be a sensitive indicator of folate deficiency in children on a poor diet, in HIV-infected children, and in children treated with anti-folate drugs. In children at increased risk of cobalamin deficiency, which includes children born to vegetarian mothers or children in developing countries on a poor diet, tHcy and methylmalonic acid are responsive indicators of a deficiency state. In newborns and infants born to mothers with an adequate nutrition, there are consistent observations of low cobalamin, elevated tHcy and methylmalonic acid, and reduction of both metabolites by cobalamin supplementation. These data have raised the question whether cobalamin deficiency may be widespread and undetected in babies born to non-vegetarian women on a Westernized diet.

  20. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in hospitalized young children.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Feyzullah; Yildirmak, Yildiz; Kutluk, Gunsel; Erdem, Ela

    2007-01-01

    The authors sought to determine prevalence, social, economic, and dietary patterns of young children (n = 20) identified as having vitamin B12 deficiency anemia after admission to their hospital in the last 3 years. The diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency was based on symptoms and clinical findings, findings on peripheral blood films and bone marrow aspirates, and serum levels of vitamin B12. The children had been exclusively breast-fed without any animal food supplementation. Serum vitamin B12 levels were also measured in the sera of mothers and found to be low. The authors concluded that vitamin B12 deficiency might be an important health problem among children of mothers who do not consume animal foods adequately.

  1. Thyroid function and stress hormones in children with stress hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Taj-Aldini, Reza; Karamizadeh, Zohre; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Karimi, Mehran; Omrani, Gholam Hossein

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the prevalence of stress hyperglycemia and to investigate how thyroid and stress hormones alter during stress hyperglycemia in children admitted to pediatric emergency wards. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in children, less than 19 years old, who were admitted to pediatric emergency wards of Nemazee and Dastgheib Hospitals, Shiraz, Southern Iran. Those patients taking steroids, beta-agonists or intravenously administered glucose before venipuncture, and patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or thyroid diseases were excluded. Children with blood glucose ≥ 150 mg/dL during admission were regarded as cases. The controls were age- and- sex- matched, euglycemic children. Stress hormones including cortisol, insulin, growth hormone, and prolactin were measured, and thyroid function was tested with a radioimmunoassay (RIA) method in all cases and controls. The results showed that among 1,054 screened children, 39 cases (3.7 %) had stress hyperglycemia and 89 controls were included in the study. The occurrence of hyperglycemia was independent of sex, but it occurred mostly in children under 6 years old. Hyperglycemia occurred more frequently in patients with a positive family history of DM (odds ratio = 3.2, 95 % CI = 1.3-7.9, and P = 0.009). There were no significant differences between cases and controls regarding any hormones except higher cortisol, and lower total T3 and T4 in cases compared with controls. Neither of cases developed diabetes in the 24-month follow-up period. These findings led us to the conclusion that stress hyperglycemia is occasionally seen in critically ill patients. Among the stress hormones measured, only cortisol increased during hyperglycemia. It seems that hyperglycemia is not an important risk factor for future diabetes.

  2. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium metabolism in patients with human growth hormone deficiency or acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Aihara, K; Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Kihara, M; Ohta, M; Sakoda, K; Uozumi, T; Usui, T

    1985-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate trace metal metabolism in patients with known abnormalities of human growth hormone (hGH). The mean concentration of zinc in plasma and urine decreased in patients with hGH deficiency after hGH injection, whereas, after adenomectomy, in patients with acromegaly, zinc increased in plasma, remained the same in erythrocytes, and decreased in urine. There was a negative correlation between plasma zinc and serum hGH levels and a positive correlation between urinary zinc excretion and serum hGH levels in acromegaly. In hGH deficiency, the copper content remained unchanged in plasma and erythrocytes and rose in urine after treatment; however, in acromegaly, the copper content increased in plasma and remained unchanged in erythrocytes and urine after surgery. The mean concentration of erythrocyte manganese did not change significantly after treatment in patients with hGH deficiency or acromegaly, but the pre-hGH treatment level of erythrocyte manganese in hGH deficiency was lower than in the controls. Plasma selenium concentrations were decreased in hGH deficiency and increased in acromegaly patients after therapy. These results suggest that hGH affects the metabolism of zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium.

  3. Management of hydrocephalus in children with plasminogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Weinzierl, M R; Collmann, H; Korinth, M C; Gilsbach, J M; Rohde, V

    2007-04-01

    Congenital plasminogen deficiency is an infrequent disorder, which usually becomes symptomatic as ligneous conjunctivitis. However, pseudomembranous lesions in the mucosa of the pharynx, tracheobronchial tree, and the peritoneum may likewise occur. An accompanying hydrocephalus is extremely rare; only 16 cases have been reported to date. The reports indicate that hydrocephalus, even if treated by ventriculoperitoneal (VP) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting, worsens the prognosis substantially. Thus, VP CSF shunting does not seem to be the optimal therapy for hydrocephalic children with plasminogen deficiency. We add two cases to the literature, and, on the base of our experience, we propose a management strategy for the hydrocephalus. We report the case history of two children with plasminogen deficiency and associated hydrocephalus. Both children initially were treated with VP shunts and had a very similar clinical course with multiple shunt malfunctions due to nonabsorption by the peritoneum. In the first child, the attempt to treat the hydrocephalus with a ventriculoatrial (VA) shunt failed due to catheter thrombosis. Finally, a ventriculocholecystic shunt was placed in both children, which worked well. In patients with plasminogem deficiency and associated hydrocephalus, special care must be taken in the management of hydrocephalus. The absorptive capacity of the peritoneum is reduced by pseudomembrane formation, which results in VP shunt malfunction. The plasminogen deficiency results in early thrombus formation if atrial catheters are used. Therefore, the authors believe that ventriculocholecystic shunting should be considered early on in the course of the disease.

  4. The impact of exercise on thyroid hormone metabolism in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kanaka-Gantenbein, C

    2005-09-01

    Thyroid hormones are important regulators of energy metabolism and may influence energy processes during physical exercise. There are controversial results concerning thyroid hormone metabolism during strenuous exercise in adult athletes and only scant data concerning the impact of strenuous exercise on thyroid hormone metabolism in children and adolescents. Although some studies demonstrate a transient change in thyroid hormones during intense physical performance, most studies agree that these changes are of minor impact, practically reflecting the relative negative energy balance during strenuous exercise. This state of hypometabolism during intense physical performance has also been confirmed in highly trained female young athletes, who may be also characterized by reproductive axis dysfunction, manifested either as luteal-phase deficiency or amenorrhea, alongside the typical constellation of low T3, insulin and leptin levels. More importantly, strenuous exercise during childhood or adolescence is mostly accompanied by a delay of skeletal maturation, and height and may have a long-lasting negative effect on growth and acquisition of maximum bone mass. In conclusion, although thyroid hormones are only transiently or insignificantly changed during strenuous exercise, adequate caloric intake should be guaranteed in highly performing young athletes in order to counteract the relative negative energy balance and prevent alterations in endocrine-metabolic profile. Moreover, when growth and pubertal progression in very young athletes are significantly impaired, a reduction in the intensity of the physical exercise should be advocated in order to guarantee better final height and adequate acquisition of bone mass.

  5. Zinc deficiency (ZD) without starvation affects thyroid hormone metabolism of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaski, H.C.; Smith, S.M.; Hall, C.B.; Bucher, D.R. )

    1991-03-15

    Young rats fed diets severely deficient in Zn exhibit impaired growth and endocrine function. These hormone effects may be confounded by cyclical feeding and starvation. To examine the effects of zinc deficiency (ZD) with and without starvation, 40 male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a semipurified diet containing all essential nutrients and 30 ppm Zn until they weighed 150 g, then were matched by weight into four groups and were fed one of the following diets for 28d: ad lib control Zn diet, marginal ZD diet, severe ZD diet, and C diet pair-fed (PF) in amounts consumed by matched ZD1 rat. Food intake was depressed in ZD1; body weights were reduced in ZD1 and PF. There was no difference in either food intake or weight gain between C and ZD6. ZD reduced liver and femur Zn concentrations. Plasma thyroxine (T{sub 4}) concentration was greater in ZD6 then ZD1 or PF, but less than C; triodothyronine concentration was less in PF than C, but similar to ZD1 and ZD6. Hepatic T{sub 4}-5{prime}-deiodinase activity was greater in ZD6 than ZD1 or PF, but less than C. These findings indicate that altered thyroid hormone metabolism of severe ZD is related to Zn intake and starvation, whereas ZD uncomplicated by starvation affects peripheral deiodination of T{sub 4}, and suggests altered rates of thyroid hormone synthesis or degradation.

  6. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Emanuel R.; Egger, Andrea; Allemann, Sabin; Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age/gender/waist-matched control subjects (CS) were studied. VO2max was assessed on a treadmill and insulin sensitivity determined by a two-step hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) fat were quantified by MR-imaging. IHCL and IMCL were measured before and after a 2 h exercise at 50–60% of VO2max using MR-spectroscopy (∆IMCL, ∆IHCL). Identical investigations were performed after 6 months of GHRT. VO2max was similar in GHD and CS and significantly increased after GHRT; GHRT significantly decreased SAT and VAT. 2 h-exercise resulted in a decrease in IMCL (significant in CS and GHRT) and a significant increase in IHCL in CS and GHD pre and post GHRT. GHRT didn’t significantly impact on ∆IMCL and ∆IHCL. We conclude that aerobic exercise affects ectopic lipids in patients and controls. GHRT increases exercise capacity without influencing ectopic lipids. PMID:26792091

  7. Deficiency of antidiuretic hormone: a rare cause of massive polyuria after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyung Mi; Sohn, Young Soo; Hwang, Young Ju; Choi, Bong Seok; Cho, Min Hyun

    2016-04-01

    A 15-year-old boy, who was diagnosed with Alport syndrome and end-stage renal disease, received a renal transplant from a living-related donor. On postoperative day 1, his daily urine output was 10,000 mL despite normal graft function. His laboratory findings including urine, serum osmolality, and antidiuretic hormone levels showed signs similar to central diabetes insipidus, so he was administered desmopressin acetate nasal spray. After administering the desmopressin, urine specific gravity and osmolality increased abruptly, and daily urine output declined to the normal range. The desmopressin acetate was tapered gradually and discontinued 3 months later. Graft function was good, and urine output was maintained within the normal range without desmopressin 20 months after the transplantation. We present a case of a massive polyuria due to transient deficiency of antidiuretic hormone with the necessity of desmopressin therapy immediately after kidney transplantation in a pediatric patient. PMID:27186232

  8. Rathke's cleft cyst as a cause of growth hormone deficiency and micropenis.

    PubMed

    Setian, N; Aguiar, C H; Galvão, J A; Crivellaro, C E; Dichtchekenian, V; Damiani, D

    1999-05-01

    Rathke's cleft cyst has rarely been reported in pediatric patients, and such cysts are usually found by chance, in 2-33% of routine necropsies, as they have not interfered with pituitary function. In general, they are intrasellar with a single layer of ciliated cuboidal or columnar epithelium containing mucoid material. The age range in which symptomatic Rathke's cleft cysts occur is between 30 and 60 years. This paper reports an 8.1-year-old boy presenting with growth hormone deficiency and micropenis attributable to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), implying altered pituitary function since intrauterine life. At this age (before puberty) the diagnosis of HH can be made by means of the LHRH agonist stimulation test, since conventional LHRH is not able to discriminate HH from a normal prepubertal child. To our knowledge, this is the first case of micropenis caused by Rathke's cleft cyst interfering with gonadotropin and growth hormone secretion since intrauterine life.

  9. Low dose oral iodized oil for control of iodine deficiency in children.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, M; Adou, P; Torresani, T; Zeder, C; Hurrell, R

    2000-08-01

    In areas where iodized salt is not available, oral iodized oil is often used to correct I deficiency despite a lack of consensus on the optimal dose or duration of effect, particularly in children, a main target group. Annual doses ranging from 400 to 1000 mg have been advocated for school-age children. Because lower doses of iodized oil have been shown to be effective in treating I deficiency in adults, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a low dose of oral iodized oil in goitrous I-deficient children. Goitrous children (n 104, mean age 8.4 years, range 6-12 years, 47% female) received 0.4 ml oral iodized poppyseed-oil containing 200 mg I. Baseline measurements included I in spot urines (UI), serum thyroxine (T4), whole blood thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid-gland volume using ultrasound. At 1, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 50 weeks post-intervention, UI, TSH and T4 were measured. At 10, 15, 30 and 50 weeks, thyroid-gland volume was remeasured. At 30 and 50 weeks the mean percentage change in thyroid volume from baseline was -35% and -41% respectively. The goitre rate fell to 38% at 30 weeks and 17% at 50 weeks. No child showed signs of I-induced hypo- or hyperthyroidism. UI remained significantly increased above baseline for the entire year (P < 0.001); the median UI at 50 weeks was 97 micrograms/l, at the World Health Organization cut-off value (100 micrograms/l) for I-deficiency disorders risk. In this group of goitrous children, an oral dose of 200 mg I as Lipiodol (Guerbert, Roissy CdG Cedex, France) was safe and effective for treating goitre and maintaining normal I status for at least 1 year.

  10. NFKB2 mutation in common variable immunodeficiency and isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chuan; Wang, Fen; Tong, Anli; Zhang, Xiao-Qian; Song, Hong-Mei; Liu, Zheng-Yin; Lyu, Wei; Liu, Yue-Hua; Xia, Wei-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) with central adrenal insufficiency is a recently defined clinical syndrome caused by mutations in the nuclear factor kappa-B subunit 2 (NFKB2) gene. We present the first case of NFKB2 mutation in Asian population. Methods and Results An 18-year-old Chinese female with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency was admitted due to adrenal crisis and pneumonia. She had a history of recurrent respiratory infections since childhood and ectodermal abnormalities were noted during physical examination. Immunologic tests revealed panhypogammaglobulinemia and deficient natural killer (NK)-cell function. DNA sequencing of NFKB2 identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.2563 A>T, p.855: Lys>∗) in the patient but not her parents. Conclusion Clinicians should be alert to comorbidities of adrenal insufficiency and ectodermal dysplasia in CVID patients as these might suggest a rare hereditary syndrome caused by NFKB2 mutation. PMID:27749582

  11. A novel heterozygous SOX2 mutation causing congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Macchiaroli, Annamaria; Kelberman, Daniel; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Drury, Suzanne; Islam, Lily; Giangiobbe, Sara; Ironi, Gabriele; Lench, Nicholas; Sowden, Jane C; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario; Cavallo, Luciano; Gasperi, Maurizio; Faienza, Maria Felicia

    2014-01-25

    Heterozygous de novo mutations in SOX2 have been reported in approximately 10-20% of patients with unilateral or bilateral anophthalmia or microphthalmia. An additional phenotype of hypopituitarism, with anterior pituitary hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, has been reported in patients carrying SOX2 alterations. We report a novel heterozygous mutation in the SOX2 gene in a male affected with congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation we describe is a cytosine deletion in position 905 (c905delC) which causes frameshift and an aberrant C-terminal domain. Our report highlights the fact that subjects affected with eye anomalies and harboring SOX2 mutations are at high risk for gonadotropin deficiency, which has important implications for their clinical management.

  12. The Influence of Alcohol Consumption in Conjunction with Sex Hormone Deficiency on Ca/P Ratio in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Karina Bortolin; Marchini, Adriana Mathias Pereira da Silva; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Rode, Sigmar de Mello; Marchini, Leonardo; da Rocha, Rosilene Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of sex hormones and excessive alcohol consumption are factors that have been related to alterations in the pattern of bone mineralization and osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible alterations in the calcium/phosphorus (Ca/P) ratio in the femur of rats subjected to sex hormone deficiency and/or alcohol consumption. Methods. Female and male Wistar rats (n = 108) were divided into ovariectomized (Ovx), orchiectomized (Orx), or sham-operated groups and subdivided according to diet: alcoholic diet (20% alcohol solution), isocaloric diet, and ad libitum diet. The diets were administered for 8 weeks. The Ca/P ratio in the femur was analyzed by energy dispersive micro-X-ray spectrometer (μEDX). Results. Consumption of alcohol reduced the Ca/P ratio in both females and males. The isocaloric diet reduced the Ca/P ratio in females. In groups with the ad libitum diet, the deficiency of sex hormones did not change the Ca/P ratio in females or males. However, the combination of sex hormone deficiency and alcoholic diet presented the lowest values for the Ca/P ratio in both females and males. Conclusions. There was a reduced Ca/P ratio in the femur of rats that consumed alcohol, which was exacerbated when combined with a deficiency of sex hormones. PMID:27073396

  13. Microarchitecture, but not bone mechanical properties, is rescued with growth hormone treatment in a mouse model of growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Erika; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Morck, Douglas W; Boyd, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency is related to an increased fracture risk although it is not clear if this is due to compromised bone quality or a small bone size. We investigated the relationship between bone macrostructure, microarchitecture and mechanical properties in a GH-deficient (GHD) mouse model undergoing GH treatment commencing at an early (prepubertal) or late (postpubertal) time point. Microcomputed tomography images of the femur and L4 vertebra were obtained to quantify macrostructure and vertebral trabecular microarchitecture, and mechanical properties were determined using finite element analyses. In the GHD animals, bone macrostructure was 25 to 43% smaller as compared to the GH-sufficient (GHS) controls (P < 0.001). GHD animals had 20% and 19% reductions in bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), respectively. Whole bone mechanical properties of the GHD mice were lower at the femur and vertebra (67% and 45% resp.) than the GHS controls (P < 0.001). Both early and late GH treatment partially recovered the bone macrostructure (15 to 32 % smaller than GHS controls) and the whole bone mechanical properties (24 to 43% larger than GHD animals) although there remained a sustained 27-52% net deficit compared to normal mice (P < 0.05). Importantly, early treatment with GH led to a recovery of BV/TV and Tb.Th with a concomitant improvement of trabecular mechanical properties. Therefore, the results suggest that GH treatment should start early, and that measurements of microarchitecture should be considered in the management of GHD. PMID:22505889

  14. [Effects of the iodine deficiency on intellectual variables among children].

    PubMed

    Muela Martínez, José Antonio; García León, Ana; Torres Barahona, Rosario; Santiago Fernández, Piedad; Sóriguer Escofet, Federico

    2008-05-01

    An association between severe iodine deficiency and poor mental development has been found in many studies. We examined the relationship between moderate or mild iodine deficiency and intellectual capacity in order to determine whether problems common to severe iodine deficiency (including mental retardation) also emerge in a more subtle form. We also wished to know whether the classic methodology (comparing iodine-deficient zones with nondeficient zones) is the most adequate, and propose to combine this grouping by zones with urinary iodine presented by individuals in each zone. We measured IQ, manipulative and verbal capacity, attention, visual motor ability and disruptive behaviour, variables that have barely been studied in this kind of investigations. The sample comprised 760 schoolchildren from the province of Jaén (southern Spain). Our results show that children with low levels of iodine intake and with urinary iodine concentration lower than 100 microg/litre had a lower IQ and displayed more disruptive behaviour than children with high levels of the criteria. The other variables were not associated with iodine deficiency. PMID:18413091

  15. The epidemiology of iodine-deficiency disorders in relation to goitrogenic factors and thyroid-stimulating-hormone regulation.

    PubMed

    Thilly, C H; Swennen, B; Bourdoux, P; Ntambue, K; Moreno-Reyes, R; Gillies, J; Vanderpas, J B

    1993-02-01

    In children aged 5-7 y from goiter-endemic areas in Ubangi, Zaire, and Ntcheu, Malawi, mean serum thyroxin (T4) concentrations were 53 +/- 49 vs 81 +/- 33 nmol/L (P < 0.05), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) values were 24.3 +/- 9.6 vs 4.5 +/- 3.3 mU/L respectively (P < 0.01); mean urinary iodine concentrations were 0.14 +/- 0.02 vs 0.09 +/- 0.02 mumol/L, and mean thiocyanate concentrations were 0.33 +/- 0.05 vs 0.17 +/- 0.05 nmol/L, respectively (P < 0.05). Mean serum selenium concentrations were 0.343 +/- 0.176 mumol/L in Ubangi and 0.437 +/- 0.178 mumol/L in Ntcheu (P < 0.05). In two groups of 11 adolescent girls from Ubangi, the mean values for excretion of urinary iodine were 1.31 +/- 0.14 and 0.58 +/- 0.17 mumol/L (P < 0.05) after a meal of cassava or a control meal of rice, respectively. In euthyroid subjects from Ubangi, mean serum TSH for a given serum T4 was approximately twice as high for children aged < 15 y than for those aged 16-25 y. The high frequency of myxedematous cretins observed in Ubangi very probably result from both severe iodine and selenium deficiency together with thiocyanate overload. PMID:8427202

  16. The Thyroid Hormone Analog DITPA Ameliorates Metabolic Parameters of Male Mice With Mct8 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Ye, Honggang; Weiss, Roy E; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Refetoff, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), cause mental retardation in humans associated with a specific thyroid hormone phenotype manifesting high serum T3 and low T4 and rT3 levels. Moreover, these patients have failure to thrive, and physiological changes compatible with thyrotoxicosis. Recent studies in Mct8-deficient (Mct8KO) mice revealed that the high serum T3 causes increased energy expenditure. The TH analog, diiodothyropropionic acid (DITPA), enters cells independently of Mct8 transport and shows thyromimetic action but with a lower metabolic activity than TH. In this study DITPA was given daily ip to adult Mct8KO mice to determine its effect on thyroid tests in serum and metabolism (total energy expenditure, respiratory exchange rate, and food and water intake). In addition, we measured the expression of TH-responsive genes in the brain, liver, and muscles to assess the thyromimetic effects of DITPA. Administration of 0.3 mg DITPA per 100 g body weight to Mct8KO mice brought serum T3 levels and the metabolic parameters studied to levels observed in untreated Wt animals. Analysis of TH target genes revealed amelioration of the thyrotoxic state in liver, somewhat in the soleus, but there was no amelioration of the brain hypothyroidism. In conclusion, at the dose used, DITPA mainly ameliorated the hypermetabolism of Mct8KO mice. This thyroid hormone analog is suitable for the treatment of the hypermetabolism in patients with MCT8 deficiency, as suggested in limited preliminary human trials. PMID:26322373

  17. Perceptual-motor deficiency in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Fulkerson, S C; Freeman, W M

    1980-02-01

    15 autistic children were matched with normals on the Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-motor Integration. The two groups were subsequently compared on ability to (1) increase geometric figure-copying performance using additional information provided during subsequent trials, (2) make figure-ground resolutions, (3) perform a fine motor integration task, and (4) cope with background interference while responding on the Developmental Test of Visual-motor Integration. The primary deficit observed in the autistic subjects appeared to be defective monitoring of the motor response.

  18. Physical fatty acid deficiency signs in children with ADHD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sinn, N

    2007-08-01

    Fatty acid deficiency symptoms (FADS) of dry hair and skin, frequent thirst and urination have been observed to be higher in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Two studies investigated FADS in 7-12-year-old children; Study 1 in a general population (N=347) and Study 2 in children with ADHD symptoms (N=104). Correlations between FADS and ADHD-related symptoms were found at baseline in Study 1 but not Study 2. FADS did not improve after supplementation with omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) versus placebo after 15 weeks in Study 2, and were not related to improvements in ADHD symptoms in the PUFA groups. However, FADS did improve in all groups, possibly attributable to the linoleic acid present in both the PUFA and placebo (palm oil) supplements. FADS are not a reliable selection criterion for children with ADHD who might benefit from omega-3 PUFA supplementation.

  19. Thyroid hormones and bone development.

    PubMed

    Combs, C E; Nicholls, J J; Duncan Bassett, J H; Williams, G R

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical determinants of postnatal skeletal development. Thyroid hormone deficiency or excess in children results in severe abnormalities of linear growth and bone maturation. These clinical observations have been recapitulated in mutant mice and these models have facilitated studies of the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action in the developing skeleton. In this review, we consider in detail the direct and indirect effects of thyroid hormone on bone and the molecular mechanisms involved.

  20. Reappraisal of bovril as a source of arginine in the arginine stimulation test for growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Loh, H H; Norlela, S; Nor Azmi, K

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this case study is to report the use of oral Bovril (a food supplement which contains arginine) as an alternative test for growth hormone stimulation test. We performed oral Bovril test in 3 patients -- one with suspected growth hormone deficiency in whom insulin tolerance test could not be performed (subject A), one sex-matched control (subject B), and one with confirmed growth hormone deficiency (subject C). 14g/m(2) of oral Bovril was mixed with 150ml of warm water and was given to all three subjects. Blood for growth hormone was taken at baseline, and every 30 minutes till 150 minutes after ingestion of oral Bovril. The ingestion of oral Bovril showed a positive response in subjects A and B, with highest growth hormone levels of 28.4mIU/L and 42.0mIU/L respectively at 150 minutes. Subject C had suppressed growth hormone throughout the test. Oral Bovril is readily available and is a safe alternative for standard growth hormone stimulation test. PMID:26248787

  1. [Anaemia in adopted children, not always iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Veneman, N G P; Waalkens, H J; Tamminga, R Y J

    2006-06-24

    Anaemia was diagnosed in four adopted children during a standard screening examination 1-4 weeks after arrival. Further investigation revealed a number of causes which could then be specifically treated. The children were a girl aged 14 months from China with iron-deficiency anaemia, a boy aged 16 months from Nigeria with sickle cell anaemia, a girl aged 5 from Haiti who had alpha-thalassaemia, and a boy aged 7 from Brazil with spherocytosis. Iron deficiency is the most common cause of anaemia in childhood. However, in adopted children from sub-tropical areas other causes of anaemia like haemoglobinopathies or erythrocyte membrane defects should be borne in mind, particularly as a history of disease and family history are often lacking. Additional investigations may be necessary. An incorrect diagnosis of iron deficiency may result in ongoing and unjustified iron supplementation leading to harmful iron accumulation in thalassaemia and a delay in the correct treatment in sickle cell anemia or spherocytosis which could carry considerable risk.

  2. Familial X-linked mental retardation and isolated growth hormone deficiency: Clinical and molecular findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Smits, A.P.T.; Helm, B. van den

    1996-07-12

    We report on several members of a family with varying degrees of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), and infantile behavior but without other consistent phenotypic abnormalities. Male patients continued to grow until well into their twenties and reached a height ranging from 135 to 159 cm. Except one, all female carriers were mentally normal; their adult height ranged from 159 to 168 cm. By linkage studies we have assigned the underlying genetic defect to the Xq24-q27.3 region, with a maximum lod score of Z = 3.26 at {theta} = 0.0 for the DXS294 locus. The XLMR-IGHD phenotype in these patients may be due to pleiotropic effects of a single gene or it may represent a contiguous gene syndrome. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Comorbid Medical Conditions in Friedreich Ataxia: Association With Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shinnick, Julianna E; Schadt, Kimberly; Strawser, Cassandra; Wilcox, Nicholas; Perlman, Susan L; Wilmot, George R; Gomez, Christopher M; Mathews, Katherine D; Yoon, Grace; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Hoyle, Chad; Subramony, S H; Yiu, Eppie M; Delatycki, Martin B; Brocht, Alicia F; Farmer, Jennifer M; Lynch, David R

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a progressive degenerative disease with neurologic and cardiac involvement. This study characterizes comorbid medical conditions in a large cohort of patients with Friedreich ataxia. Patient diagnoses were collected in a large natural history study of 641 subjects. Prevalence of diagnoses in the cohort with Friedreich ataxia was compared with prevalence in the population without Friedreich ataxia. Ten patients (1.6%) had inflammatory bowel disease, 3.5 times more common in this cohort of individuals with Friedreich ataxia than in the general population. Four subjects were growth hormone deficient, reflecting a prevalence in Friedreich ataxia that is 28 times greater than the general population. The present study identifies specific diagnoses not traditionally associated with Friedreich ataxia that are found at higher frequency in this disease. These associations could represent coincidence, shared genetic background, or potentially interactive disease mechanisms with Friedreich ataxia.

  4. Detection of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults with Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Griesbach, Grace S.; Ashley, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study examined the prevalence of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) during the post-acute phase of recovery and whether GHD was associated with increased disability, decreased independence, and depression. A secondary objective was to determine the accuracy of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels in predicting GHD in patients with TBI. Anterior pituitary function was assessed in 235 adult patients with TBI through evaluation of fasting morning hormone levels. GH levels were assessed through provocative testing, specifically the glucagon stimulation test. GHD was diagnosed in a significant number of patients, with 45% falling into the severe GHD (≤3 μg/L) category. IGF-1 levels were not predictive of GHD. Patients with GHD were more disabled and less independent compared with those patients who were not GHD. Those patients with more severe GHD also showed decreased levels of cortisol and testosterone. Symptoms of depression were also more prevalent in this group. In addition, patients with severe GHD had delayed admission to post-acute rehabilitation. This study confirms the high prevalence of GHD in patients with TBI and the necessity to monitor clinical symptoms and perform provocative testing to definitively diagnose GHD. PMID:26414093

  5. Precocious metamorphosis in the juvenile hormone-deficient mutant of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Daimon, Takaaki; Kozaki, Toshinori; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kobayashi, Isao; Furuta, Kenjiro; Namiki, Toshiki; Uchino, Keiro; Banno, Yutaka; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Mita, Kazuei; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Itoyama, Kyo; Shimada, Toru; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are intricately governed by two hormones, ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones (JHs). JHs prevent precocious metamorphosis and allow the larva to undergo multiple rounds of molting until it attains the proper size for metamorphosis. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, several "moltinism" mutations have been identified that exhibit variations in the number of larval molts; however, none of them have been characterized molecularly. Here we report the identification and characterization of the gene responsible for the dimolting (mod) mutant that undergoes precocious metamorphosis with fewer larval-larval molts. We show that the mod mutation results in complete loss of JHs in the larval hemolymph and that the mutant phenotype can be rescued by topical application of a JH analog. We performed positional cloning of mod and found a null mutation in the cytochrome P450 gene CYP15C1 in the mod allele. We also demonstrated that CYP15C1 is specifically expressed in the corpus allatum, an endocrine organ that synthesizes and secretes JHs. Furthermore, a biochemical experiment showed that CYP15C1 epoxidizes farnesoic acid to JH acid in a highly stereospecific manner. Precocious metamorphosis of mod larvae was rescued when the wild-type allele of CYP15C1 was expressed in transgenic mod larvae using the GAL4/UAS system. Our data therefore reveal that CYP15C1 is the gene responsible for the mod mutation and is essential for JH biosynthesis. Remarkably, precocious larval-pupal transition in mod larvae does not occur in the first or second instar, suggesting that authentic epoxidized JHs are not essential in very young larvae of B. mori. Our identification of a JH-deficient mutant in this model insect will lead to a greater understanding of the molecular basis of the hormonal control of development and metamorphosis.

  6. Iron Deficiency Is Common During Remission in Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Wikholm, Emma; Malmborg, Petter; Forssberg, Maria; Hederos, Carl-Axel; Wikström, Sverre

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study prevalence of iron deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) during remission. In addition, there was an observational evaluation of hematological response to oral iron. A population-based retrospective study including 90 Swedish children (median 13 years) with IBD was performed. Patient records covered in median 25 months. Iron deficiency was present in 70/77 children (91%) in which iron status could be assessed. In clinical and biochemical remission, iron deficiency was found in 57/67 (85%) of children, and 23 (34%) of them had iron deficiency anemia. Thirty-six iron-deficient children were prescribed oral iron supplementation and 32 (89%) improved hemoglobin levels over 6 months. In conclusion, iron deficiency is common during clinical remission in children with IBD, even in cohorts with low prevalence of anemia. Therefore, regular biochemical screening for iron deficiency is warranted during all stages of disease, irrespective of symptoms and inflammatory blood markers.

  7. GPR101 Mutations are not a Frequent Cause of Congenital Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Castinetti, F; Daly, A F; Stratakis, C A; Caberg, J-H; Castermans, E; Trivellin, G; Rostomyan, L; Saveanu, A; Jullien, N; Reynaud, R; Barlier, A; Bours, V; Brue, T; Beckers, A

    2016-06-01

    Patients with Xq26.3 microduplication present with X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome, an early-childhood form of gigantism due to marked growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion from mixed GH-PRL adenomas and hyperplasia. The microduplication includes GPR101, which is upregulated in patients' tumor tissue. The GPR101 gene codes for an orphan G protein coupled receptor that is normally highly expressed in the hypothalamus. Our aim was to determine whether GPR101 loss of function mutations or deletions could be involved in patients with congenital isolated GH deficiency (GHD). Taking advantage of the cohort of patients from the GENHYPOPIT network, we studied 41 patients with unexplained isolated GHD. All patients had Sanger sequencing of the GPR101 gene and array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) to look for deletions. Functional studies (cell culture with GH secretion measurements, cAMP response) were performed. One novel GPR101 variant, c.589 G>T (p.V197L), was seen in the heterozygous state in a patient with isolated GHD. In silico analysis suggested that this variant could be deleterious. Functional studies did not show any significant difference in comparison with wild type for GH secretion and cAMP response. No truncating, frameshift, or small insertion-deletion (indel) GPR101 mutations were seen in the 41 patients. No deletion or other copy number variation at chromosome Xq26.3 was found on aCGH. We found a novel GPR101 variant of unknown significance, in a patient with isolated GH deficiency. Our study did not identify GPR101 abnormalities as a frequent cause of GH deficiency. PMID:26797872

  8. Deficiency of prohormone convertase dPC2 (AMONTILLADO) results in impaired production of bioactive neuropeptide hormones in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Christian; Herbert, Henrik; Kahnt, Jörg; Bender, Michael; Rhea, Jeanne M

    2011-08-01

    Peptide hormones synthesized by secretory neurons in the CNS are important regulators of physiology, behavior, and development. Like other neuropeptides, they are synthesized from larger precursor molecules by a specific set of enzymes. Using a combination of neurogenetics, immunostainings, and direct mass spectrometric profiling, we show that the presence of Drosophila prohormone convertase 2 encoded by the gene amontillado (amon) is a prerequisite for the proper processing of neuropeptide hormones from the major neurohemal organs of the CNS. A loss of amon correlates with a loss of neuropeptide hormone signals from the larval ring gland and perisympathetic organs. Neuropeptide hormone signals were still detectable in the adult corpora cardiaca of older amon-deficient flies which were amon heat-shock-rescued until eclosion. A semiquantification by direct peptide profiling using stable isotopic standards showed, however, that their neuropeptide hormone levels are strongly reduced. Targeted expression of GFP under the control of amon regulatory regions revealed a co-localization with the investigated peptide hormones in secretory neurons of the brain and ventral nerve cord. The lack of AMON activity resulted in a deficiency of L3 larva to enter the wandering phase. In conclusion, our findings provide the first direct evidence that AMON is a key enzyme in the production of neuropeptides in the fruitfly. PMID:21138435

  9. Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Banu; Winters, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a circulating glycoprotein that transports testosterone and other steroids in the blood. Interest in SHBG has escalated in recent years because of its inverse association with obesity and insulin resistance, and because many studies have linked lower circulating levels of SHBG to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, and early puberty. The purpose of this review is to summarize molecular, clinical, endocrine, and epidemiological findings to illustrate how measurement of plasma SHBG may be useful in clinical medicine in children. PMID:26761949

  10. An Overlapping Syndrome of Allergy and Immune Deficiency in Children

    PubMed Central

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent airway inflammations in children are an important clinical problem in pediatric practice. An essential challenge is differentiation between allergic background and immune deficiency, which is a difficult task taking into consideration individual predisposition to atopy, immune system maturation in the early childhood, as well as exposition to environmental allergens and microbial antigens. In this paper relationship between selected elements of innate and adaptive immunity, such as pattern-recognition receptors, complement components, dendritic cells, as well as immunoglobulins, and regulatory T lymph cells has been discussed. Particular attention has been paid to these mechanisms of the immune response which, depending on settings and timing of activation, predispose to allergy or contribute to tolerogenic phenotype. In the context of multifactorial conditioning of the innate and adaptive immunity governing the ultimate response and associations between allergy and immune deficiencies, these phenomena should be considered as pathogenetically not precluding, but as an overlapping syndrome. PMID:21918651

  11. Expression of the iron hormone hepcidin distinguishes different types of anemia in African children.

    PubMed

    Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Atkinson, Sarah H; Armitage, Andrew E; Khandwala, Shivani; Veenemans, Jacobien; Cox, Sharon E; Eddowes, Lucy A; Hayes, Theodore; Doherty, Conor P; Demir, Ayse Y; Tijhaar, Edwin; Verhoef, Hans; Prentice, Andrew M; Drakesmith, Hal

    2014-05-01

    Childhood anemia is a major global health problem resulting from multiple causes. Iron supplementation addresses iron deficiency anemia but is undesirable for other types of anemia and may exacerbate infections. The peptide hormone hepcidin governs iron absorption; hepcidin transcription is mediated by iron, inflammation, and erythropoietic signals. However, the behavior of hepcidin in populations where anemia is prevalent is not well established. We show that hepcidin measurements in 1313 African children from The Gambia and Tanzania (samples taken in 2001 and 2008, respectively) could be used to identify iron deficiency anemia. A retrospective secondary analysis of published data from 25 Gambian children with either postmalarial or nonmalarial anemia demonstrated that hepcidin measurements identified individuals who incorporated >20% oral iron into their erythrocytes. Modeling showed that this sensitivity of hepcidin expression at the population level could potentially enable simple groupings of individuals with anemia into iron-responsive and non-iron-responsive subtypes and hence could guide iron supplementation for those who would most benefit.

  12. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  13. Growth hormone receptor polymorphism and growth hormone therapy response in children: a Bayesian meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Renehan, Andrew G; Solomon, Mattea; Zwahlen, Marcel; Morjaria, Reena; Whatmore, Andrew; Audí, Laura; Binder, Gerhard; Blum, Werner; Bougnères, Pierre; Santos, Christine Dos; Carrascosa, Antonio; Hokken-Koelega, Anita; Jorge, Alexander; Mullis, Primus E; Tauber, Maïthé; Patel, Leena; Clayton, Peter E

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy is used in the long-term treatment of children with growth disorders, but there is considerable treatment response variability. The exon 3-deleted growth hormone receptor polymorphism (GHR(d3)) may account for some of this variability. The authors performed a systematic review (to April 2011), including investigator-only data, to quantify the effects of the GHR(fl-d3) and GHR(d3-d3) genotypes on rhGH therapy response and used a recently established Bayesian inheritance model-free approach to meta-analyze the data. The primary outcome was the 1-year change-in-height standard-deviation score for the 2 genotypes. Eighteen data sets from 12 studies (1,527 children) were included. After several prior assumptions were tested, the most appropriate inheritance model was codominant (posterior probability = 0.93). Compared with noncarriers, carriers had median differences in 1-year change-in-height standard-deviation score of 0.09 (95% credible interval (CrI): 0.01, 0.17) for GHR(fl-d3) and of 0.14 (95% CrI: 0.02, 0.26) for GHR(d3-d3). However, the between-study standard deviation of 0.18 (95% CrI: 0.10, 0.33) was considerable. The authors tested by meta-regression for potential modifiers and found no substantial influence. They conclude that 1) the GHR(d3) polymorphism inheritance is codominant, contrasting with previous reports; 2) GHR(d3) genotypes account for modest increases in rhGH effects in children; and 3) considerable unexplained variability in responsiveness remains.

  14. Deficient cognitive control fuels children's exuberant false allegations.

    PubMed

    Poole, Debra Ann; Dickinson, Jason J; Brubacher, Sonja P; Liberty, Allison E; Kaake, Amanda M

    2014-02-01

    In eyewitness studies as in actual investigations, a minority of children generate numerous false (and sometimes incredulous) allegations. To explore the characteristics of these children, we reinterviewed and administered a battery of tasks to 61 children (ages 4-9 years) who had previously participated in an eyewitness study where a man broke a "germ rule" twice when he tried to touch them. Performance on utilization, response conflict (Luria tapping), and theory of mind tasks predicted the number of false reports of touching (with age and time since the event controlled) and correctly classified 90.16% of the children as typical witnesses or exuberant (more than 3) false reporters. Results of a factor analysis pointed to a common process underlying performance on these tasks that accounted for 49% of the variability in false reports. Relations between task performance and testimony confirmed that the mechanisms underlying occasional intrusions are different from those that drive persistent confabulation and that deficient cognitive control fuels young children's exuberant false reports. PMID:24157217

  15. Deficient motor timing in children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Debrabant, Julie; Plasschaert, Ellen; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Vingerhoets, Guy; Legius, Eric; Janssens, Sandra; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2014-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common single-gene disorders affecting fine and visual-motor skills. This case-control study investigated motor timing as a possible related performance deficit in children with NF1. A visual-motor reaction time (VRT) test was administered in 20 NF1 children (mean age 9 years 7 months) and 20 age- and gender-matched typically developing (TD) children. Copying and tracing performance were evaluated using the Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration (Beery VMI). Children with NF1 responded with an increased reaction time (RT) to temporally predictive stimuli compared to TD children, whereas RT at unpredictive stimuli did not differ between groups. Motor timing indexed by the RT decrease at predictive stimuli significantly associated with the Beery VMI copy and tracing outcomes. Deficient motor timing as an actual symptom may add to further research on the pathogenesis of NF1-associated motor impairment and the development of more effective treatment. PMID:25145806

  16. Nitric oxide may mediate the hemodynamic effects of recombinant growth hormone in patients with acquired growth hormone deficiency. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Böger, R H; Skamira, C; Bode-Böger, S M; Brabant, G; von zur Muhlen, A; Frolich, J C

    1996-01-01

    We studied the effects of recombinant growth hormone on systemic nitric oxide (NO) formation and hemodynamics in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in adult patients with acquired growth hormone deficiency. 30 patients were randomly allocated to either recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH; 2.0 IU/d) or placebo for 12 mo. In the subsequent 12 mo, the study was continued with both groups of patients receiving r-hGH. In months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 of each year, urine and plasma samples were collected for the determination of urinary nitrate and cyclic GMP as indices of systemic NO production, and of plasma IGF-1 levels. Cardiac output was measured in months 1, 12, and 24 by echocardiography. r-hGH induced a fourfold increase in plasma IGF-1 concentrations within the first month of treatment. Urinary nitrate and cyclic GMP excretion rates were low at baseline in growth hormone-deficient patients (nitrate, 96.8+/-7.4 micromol/mmol creatinine; cyclic GMP, 63.6+/-7.1 nmol/mmol creatinine) as compared with healthy controls (nitrate, 167.3+/-7.5 micromol/mmol creatinine; cyclic GMP, 155.2+/-6.9 nmol/mmol creatinine). These indices of NO production were significantly increased by r-hGH, within the first 12 mo in the GH group, and within the second 12 mo in the placebo group. While systolic and diastolic blood pressure were not significantly altered by r-hGH, cardiac output significantly increased by 30-40%, and total peripheral resistance decreased by approximately 30% in both groups when they were assigned to r-hGH treatment. In the second study year, when both groups were given r-hGH, there were no significant differences in plasma IGF-1, urinary nitrate, or cyclic GMP excretion, or hemodynamic parameters between both groups. In conclusion, systemic NO formation is decreased in untreated growth hormone-deficient patients. Treatment with recombinant human growth hormone normalizes urinary nitrate and cyclic GMP excretion, possibly via IGF-1 stimulation of endothelial

  17. Effects of thyroid hormone deficiency on electrocardiogram findings of congenitally hypothyroid neonates.

    PubMed

    Asami, T; Suzuki, H; Yazaki, S; Sato, S; Uchiyama, M

    2001-08-01

    and log (TSH). From these results we conclude that the deficiency of thyroid hormones does not affect ECG findings of congenitally hypothyroid neonates. This may be consistent with the unexpectedly mild signs and symptoms of screen-detected hypothyroid neonates. PMID:11525269

  18. Diagnosis and management of trimethylaminuria (FMO3 deficiency) in children.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, R A; Bain, M D; Michelakakis, H; Zschocke, J; Iles, R A

    2006-02-01

    Persistent trimethylaminuria in children is caused by autosomal recessively inherited impairment of hepatic trimethylamine (TMA) oxidation due to deficiency of flavin monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) secondary to mutations in the FMO3 gene. Trimethylaminuria or 'fish odour syndrome' is due to excessive excretion into body fluids and breath of TMA derived from the enterobacterial metabolism of dietary precursors. The disorder is present from birth but becomes apparent as foods containing high amounts of choline or of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) from marine (sea or saltwater) fish are introduced into the diet. In our experience, trimethylaminuria (FMO3 deficiency) in children is rare. We have compared the dynamics and diagnostic efficacy of choline loading with marine fish meals in six children with trimethylaminuria. Loading with a marine fish meal provides a simple and acceptable method for confirmation of diagnosis of suspected trimethylaminuria in children, with the effects being cleared more quickly than with a choline load test. However, oral loading with choline bitartrate allows estimation of residual oxidative capacity in vivo and is a useful adjunct to molecular studies. Patients homozygous for the 'common' P153L mutation in the FMO3 gene showed virtual complete lack of residual TMA N-oxidative capacity, consistent with a nonfunctional or absent FMO3 enzyme, whereas a patient with the M82T mutation showed some residual oxidative capacity. A patient compound heterozygous for two novel mutations, G193E and R483T, showed considerable residual N-oxidative capacity. A further patient, heterozygous for two novel sequence variations in the FMO3 gene, consistently showed malodour and elevated urinary TMA/TMAO ratios under basal conditions but a negative response to both choline and marine fish meal loading. Comparison of the effects of administration of antibiotics (metronidazole, amoxicillin, neomycin) on gut bacterial production of trimethylamine from choline showed they

  19. Genetic analyses of bone morphogenetic protein 2, 4 and 7 in congenital combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The complex process of development of the pituitary gland is regulated by a number of signalling molecules and transcription factors. Mutations in these factors have been identified in rare cases of congenital hypopituitarism but for most subjects with combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) genetic causes are unknown. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) affect induction and growth of the pituitary primordium and thus represent plausible candidates for mutational screening of patients with CPHD. Methods We sequenced BMP2, 4 and 7 in 19 subjects with CPHD. For validation purposes, novel genetic variants were genotyped in 1046 healthy subjects. Additionally, potential functional relevance for most promising variants has been assessed by phylogenetic analyses and prediction of effects on protein structure. Results Sequencing revealed two novel variants and confirmed 30 previously known polymorphisms and mutations in BMP2, 4 and 7. Although phylogenetic analyses indicated that these variants map within strongly conserved gene regions, there was no direct support for their impact on protein structure when applying predictive bioinformatics tools. Conclusions A mutation in the BMP4 coding region resulting in an amino acid exchange (p.Arg300Pro) appeared most interesting among the identified variants. Further functional analyses are required to ultimately map the relevance of these novel variants in CPHD. PMID:24289245

  20. Dose dependency of time of onset of radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, P.E.; Shalet, S.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was assessed on 133 occasions in 82 survivors of childhood malignant disease. All had received cranial irradiation with a dose range to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of 27 to 47.5 Gy (estimated by a schedule of 16 fractions over 3 weeks) and had been tested on one or more occasions between 0.2 and 18.9 years after treatment. Results of one third of the GH tests were defined as normal (GH peak response, greater than 15 mU/L) within the first 5 years, in comparison with 16% after 5 years. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that dose (p = 0.007) and time from irradiation (p = 0.03), but not age at therapy, had a significant influence on peak GH responses. The late incidence of GH deficiency was similar over the whole dose range (4 of 26 GH test results normal for less than 30 Gy and 4 of 25 normal for greater than or equal to 30 Gy after 5 years), but the speed of onset over the first years was dependent on dose. We conclude that the requirement for GH replacement therapy and the timing of its introduction will be influenced by the dose of irradiation received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  1. Evaluation of Iodine Deficiency in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kanık Yüksek, Saliha; Aycan, Zehra; Öner, Özgür

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of iodine deficiency (ID) and its effects on mental function in children referred to the Dr. Sami Ulus Maternity and Children’s Training and Research Hospital with a prospective diagnosis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: The study was conducted on 89 children referred in the period from September 2009 to June 2010 with a diagnosis of ADHD. A questionnaire was given to all parents. Conners’ rating scales were applied to the parents (CPRS) and teachers (CTRS), and revised Wechsler intelligence scale for children (WISC-R) to the children. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine, thyroglobulin, anti-thyroid peroxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, and urinary iodine levels were measured in all children. Results: Median age was 9.41±1.95 years, and 83.1% of subjects were male. The mean urinary iodine level of the children was 92.56±22.25 μg/L. ID was detected in 71.9% of subjects and all were mild ID. There was no significant relationship between urinary iodine levels with WISC-R subtest scores and CPRS. However, a significant association was found between urinary iodine levels and hyperactivity section of CTRS (p<0.05). Likewise, a significant relationship was found between learning disorder/mental retardation diagnosis and freedom subtest of WISC-R (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study highlights the effects of ID on comprehension, perception, attention, and learning. However, the results need to be supported by new randomized controlled trials. PMID:26758811

  2. Profile of follitropin alpha/lutropin alpha combination for the stimulation of follicular development in women with severe luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Leonardo; Selman, Helmy

    2016-01-01

    A severe gonadotropin deficiency together with chronic estradiol deficiency leading to amenorrhea characterizes patients suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Administration of both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to these patients has been shown to be essential in achieving successful stimulation of follicular development, ovulation, and rescue of fertility. In recent years, the availability of both recombinant FSH (rFSH) and recombinant LH (rLH) has provided a new therapeutic option for the stimulation of follicular growth in hypopituitary–hypogonadotropic women (World Health Organization Group I). In this article, we review the data reported in the literature to highlight the role and the efficacy of using recombinant gonadotropins, rFSH and rLH, in the treatment of women with severe LH/FSH deficiency. Although the studies on this issue are limited and the experiences available in the literature are few due to the small number of such patients, it is clearly evident that the recombinant gonadotropins rFSH and rLH are efficient in treating patients affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The results observed in the studies reported in this review suggest that recombinant gonadotropins are able to induce proper follicular growth, oocyte maturation, and eventually pregnancy in this group of women. Moreover, the clinical use of recombinant gonadotropins in this type of patients has given more insight into some endocrinological aspects of ovarian function that have not yet been fully understood. PMID:27307766

  3. Isolated growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in childhood and adolescence: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Webb, Emma Alice; Le Tissier, Paul; Dattani, Mehul T

    2014-06-01

    The diagnosis of GH deficiency (GHD) in childhood is a multistep process involving clinical history, examination with detailed auxology, biochemical testing, and pituitary imaging, with an increasing contribution from genetics in patients with congenital GHD. Our increasing understanding of the factors involved in the development of somatotropes and the dynamic function of the somatotrope network may explain, at least in part, the development and progression of childhood GHD in different age groups. With respect to the genetic etiology of isolated GHD (IGHD), mutations in known genes such as those encoding GH (GH1), GHRH receptor (GHRHR), or transcription factors involved in pituitary development, are identified in a relatively small percentage of patients suggesting the involvement of other, yet unidentified, factors. Genome-wide association studies point toward an increasing number of genes involved in the control of growth, but their role in the etiology of IGHD remains unknown. Despite the many years of research in the area of GHD, there are still controversies on the etiology, diagnosis, and management of IGHD in children. Recent data suggest that childhood IGHD may have a wider impact on the health and neurodevelopment of children, but it is yet unknown to what extent treatment with recombinant human GH can reverse this effect. Finally, the safety of recombinant human GH is currently the subject of much debate and research, and it is clear that long-term controlled studies are needed to clarify the consequences of childhood IGHD and the long-term safety of its treatment.

  4. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  5. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) deficiencies affect expression of lipolytic activities in mouse adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Morak, Maria; Schmidinger, Hannes; Riesenhuber, Gernot; Rechberger, Gerald N; Kollroser, Manfred; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Kronenberg, Florian; Hermetter, Albin

    2012-12-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are key enzymes involved in intracellular degradation of triacylglycerols. It was the aim of this study to elucidate how the deficiency in one of these proteins affects the residual lipolytic proteome in adipose tissue. For this purpose, we compared the lipase patterns of brown and white adipose tissue from ATGL (-/-) and HSL (-/-) mice using differential activity-based gel electrophoresis. This method is based on activity-recognition probes possessing the same substrate analogous structure but carrying different fluorophores for specific detection of the enzyme patterns of two different tissues in one electrophoresis gel. We found that ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue had a profound effect on the expression levels of other lipolytic and esterolytic enzymes in this tissue, whereas HSL-deficiency hardly showed any effect in brown adipose tissue. Neither ATGL- nor HSL-deficiency greatly influenced the lipase patterns in white adipose tissue. Enzyme activities of mouse tissues on acylglycerol substrates were analyzed as well, showing that ATGL-and HSL-deficiencies can be compensated for at least in part by other enzymes. The proteins that responded to ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue were overexpressed and their activities on acylglycerols were analyzed. Among these enzymes, Es1, Es10, and Es31-like represent lipase candidates as they catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain acylglycerols.

  6. Beyond Stimulus Deprivation: Iron Deficiency and Cognitive Deficits in Postinstitutionalized Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doom, Jenalee R.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Kroupina, Maria G.; Frenn, Kristin; Fuglestad, Anita J.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Children adopted from institutions have been studied as models of the impact of stimulus deprivation on cognitive development (Nelson, Bos, Gunnar, & Sonuga-Barke, 2011), but these children may also suffer from micronutrient deficiencies (Fuglestad et al., 2008). The contributions of iron deficiency (ID) and duration of deprivation on…

  7. Neurologic impairment in children associated with maternal dietary deficiency of cobalamin--Georgia, 2001.

    PubMed

    2003-01-31

    During 2001, neurologic impairment resulting from cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency was diagnosed in two children in Georgia. The children were breastfed by mothers who followed vegetarian diets. This report summarizes the two cases and provides guidance for health-care providers on identifying and preventing cobalamin deficiency among breastfed infants of vegetarian mothers.

  8. Growth hormone deficiency in monozygotic twins with autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib.

    PubMed

    Sano, Shinichiro; Iwata, Hiromi; Matsubara, Keiko; Fukami, Maki; Kagami, Masayo; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is associated with compromised signal transductions via PTH receptor (PTH-R) and other G-protein-coupled receptors including GHRH-R. To date, while GH deficiency (GHD) has been reported in multiple patients with PHP-Ia caused by mutations on the maternally expressed GNAS coding regions and in two patients with sporadic form of PHP-Ib accompanied by broad methylation defects of maternally derived GNAS differentially methylated regions (DMRs), it has not been identified in a patient with an autosomal dominant form of PHP-Ib (AD-PHP-Ib) accompanied by an STX16 microdeletion and an isolated loss of methylation (LOM) at exon A/B-DMR. We studied 5 4/12-year-old monozygotic twins with short stature (both -3.4 SD) and GHD (peak GH values, <6.0 μg/L after arginine and clonidine stimulations). Molecular studies revealed maternally derived STX16 microdeletions and isolated LOMs at exon A/B-DMR in the twins, confirming the diagnosis of AD-PHP-Ib. GNAS mutation was not identified, and neither mutation nor copy number variation was detected in GH1, POU1F1, PROP1, GHRHR, LHX3, LHX4, and HESX1 in the twins. The results, in conjunction with the previous finding that GNAS shows maternal expression in the pituitary, suggest that GHD of the twins is primarily ascribed to compromised GHRH-R signaling caused by AD-PTH-Ib. Thus, resistance to multiple hormones including GHRH should be considered in AD-PHP-Ib.

  9. Severe growth hormone deficiency is rare in surgically-cured acromegalics.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Shingo; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Hirano, Hirofumi; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Kubo, Fumikatsu; Yunoue, Shunji; Bohara, Manoj; Kinoshita, Yasuyuki; Tominaga, Atsushi; Arimura, Hiroshi; Arita, Kazunori

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in surgically-cured acromegalics has been reported to negatively affect their metabolic condition and quality of life (QOL). The incidence of GHD, its causes, and its effects on their physio-psychological condition remain to be examined in detail. We performed a retrospective study to investigate GH secretory function in surgically-cured acromegalics, prognostic factors of GHD, and its impact on QOL. The study population consisted of 72 acromegalics who were determined to be surgically cured according to the Cortina consensus criteria. We recorded the incidence of impaired GH secretory function based on the peak GH level during postoperative insulin tolerance test (ITT) which lowered their nadir blood sugar to under 50 mg/dL. Their QOL was evaluated by SF-36. In surgically-cured acromegalics, the incidence of severe GHD (peak GH during ITT ≦ 3.0 μg/L) was 12.5 % (9/72). The preoperative tumor size was significantly larger in patients with severe GHD than without severe GHD (21.9 ± 9.0 vs. 15.5 ± 7.1 mm, p = 0.017). The peak GH levels during postoperative ITT were statistically correlated with the physical but not the mental component summary of the SF-36 score. The incidence of GHD was 12.5 % in our surgically-cured acromegalics. As some QOL aspects are positively related with peak GH levels during postoperative ITT, efforts should be made to preserve pituitary function in acromegalic patients undergoing adenomectomy.

  10. Crohn's disease and growth deficiency in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, Marco; Guariso, Graziella

    2014-10-01

    Nutritional concerns, linear growth deficiency, and delayed puberty are currently detected in up to 85% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) diagnosed at childhood. To provide advice on how to assess and manage nutritional concerns in these patients, a Medline search was conducted using "pediatric inflammatory bowel disease", "pediatric Crohn's disease", "linear growth", "pubertal growth", "bone health", and "vitamin D" as key words. Clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses published between 2008 and 2013 were selected to produce this narrative review. Studies referring to earlier periods were also considered if the data was relevant to our review. Although current treatment strategies for CD that include anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy have been shown to improve patients' growth rate, linear growth deficiencies are still common. In pediatric CD patients, prolonged diagnostic delay, high initial activity index, and stricturing/penetrating type of behavior may cause growth deficiencies (in weight and height) and delayed puberty, with several studies reporting that these patients may not reach an optimal bone mass. Glucocorticoids and inflammation inhibit bone formation, though their impact on skeletal modeling remains unclear. Long-term control of active inflammation and an adequate intake of nutrients are both fundamental in promoting normal puberty. Recent evidence suggests that recombinant growth factor therapy is effective in improving short-term linear growth in selected patients, but is of limited benefit for ameliorating mucosal disease and reducing clinical disease activity. The authors conclude that an intense initial treatment (taking a "top-down" approach, with the early introduction of immunomodulatory treatment) may be justified to induce and maintain remission so that the growth of children with CD can catch up, ideally before puberty. Exclusive enteral nutrition has a key role in inducing remission and improving patients

  11. Crohn's disease and growth deficiency in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gasparetto, Marco; Guariso, Graziella

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional concerns, linear growth deficiency, and delayed puberty are currently detected in up to 85% of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) diagnosed at childhood. To provide advice on how to assess and manage nutritional concerns in these patients, a Medline search was conducted using “pediatric inflammatory bowel disease”, “pediatric Crohn’s disease”, “linear growth”, “pubertal growth”, “bone health”, and “vitamin D” as key words. Clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses published between 2008 and 2013 were selected to produce this narrative review. Studies referring to earlier periods were also considered if the data was relevant to our review. Although current treatment strategies for CD that include anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy have been shown to improve patients’ growth rate, linear growth deficiencies are still common. In pediatric CD patients, prolonged diagnostic delay, high initial activity index, and stricturing/penetrating type of behavior may cause growth deficiencies (in weight and height) and delayed puberty, with several studies reporting that these patients may not reach an optimal bone mass. Glucocorticoids and inflammation inhibit bone formation, though their impact on skeletal modeling remains unclear. Long-term control of active inflammation and an adequate intake of nutrients are both fundamental in promoting normal puberty. Recent evidence suggests that recombinant growth factor therapy is effective in improving short-term linear growth in selected patients, but is of limited benefit for ameliorating mucosal disease and reducing clinical disease activity. The authors conclude that an intense initial treatment (taking a “top-down” approach, with the early introduction of immunomodulatory treatment) may be justified to induce and maintain remission so that the growth of children with CD can catch up, ideally before puberty. Exclusive enteral nutrition has a key role in inducing

  12. Three cases of congenital growth hormone deficiency with micropenis and hypospadias: what does growth hormone have to do with it?

    PubMed

    Urzola, A; Leger, J; Czernichow, P

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports 3 cases of congenital GH deficiency with male pseudohermaphroditism. All 3 showed a normal male karyotype, hypospadias of different degrees, and, for 2 of them, micropenis. No müllerian structure was individualized since pelvic ultrasound and genitography were normal. Patient 1 was born with multiple anomalies and patient 3 showed partial agenesia of the corpus callosum. Only 1 patient showed complete anterior pituitary deficiency. Gonadotropin defects were not investigated. We postulate that GH might play a role in early testosterone stimulation, and thus in male sexual differentiation.

  13. Psychosocial stimulation benefits development in nonanemic children but not in anemic, iron-deficient children.

    PubMed

    Tofail, Fahmida; Hamadani, Jena D; Mehrin, Fardina; Ridout, Deborah A; Huda, Syed N; Grantham-McGregor, Sally M

    2013-06-01

    Young children with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) usually have poor development, but there is limited information on their response to psychosocial intervention. We aimed to compare the effects of psychosocial stimulation on the development of children with IDA and children who were neither anemic nor iron deficient (NANI). NANI (n = 209) and IDA (n = 225) children, aged 6-24 mo, from 30 Bangladeshi villages were enrolled in the study. The villages were then randomized to stimulation or control, and all children with IDA received 30 mg iron daily for 6 mo. Stimulation comprised 9 mo weekly play sessions at home. We assessed children's development at baseline and after 9 mo by using the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI) and the Mental Development Index (MDI) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II, and rated their behavior during the test. When we controlled for socioeconomic background, the IDA and NANI groups did not differ in their Bayley scores and behavior at baseline. After 9 mo, the IDA group had improved in iron status compared with baseline but had lower PDI scores and were less responsive to the examiner than the NANI group. Random-effects multilevel regressions of the final Bayley scores of the IDA and NANI groups showed that stimulation improved children's MDI [B ± SE = 5.7 ± 1.9 (95% CI: 2.0, 9.4), P = 0.003], and the interaction between iron status and stimulation showed a suggestive trend (P = 0.10), indicating that children with IDA and NANI responded differently to stimulation, with the NANI group improving more than the IDA group. In addition to iron treatment, children with IDA may require more intense or longer interventions than NANI children. PMID:23616511

  14. Clonidine-stimulated growth hormone concentrations (cut-off values) measured by immunochemiluminescent assay (ICMA) in children and adolescents with short stature

    PubMed Central

    de Fátima Borges, Maria; Teixeira, Flávia Carolina Cândida; Feltrin, Aline Karin; Ribeiro, Karina Alvarenga; Nascentes, Gabriel Antonio Nogueira; Resende, Elisabete Aparecida Mantovani Rodrigues; Ferreira, Beatriz Pires; Silva, Adriana Paula; Palhares, Heloísa Marcelina Cunha

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish cut-off values for growth hormone concentrations using clonidine as a secretagogue and an immunochemiluminescent assay as the method of measurement and to analyze the response time as well as the influence of gender, nutritional status and pubertal stage. METHODS: A total of 225 tests were performed in 3 patient groups, categorized as group 1 (normal), group 2 (idiopathic short stature) and group 3 (growth hormone deficiency). Among the 199 disease-free individuals, 138 were prepubertal, and 61 were pubertal. Clonidine (0.1 mg/m2) was orally administered, and the growth hormone level was measured by immunochemiluminescent assay. The growth hormone peak and the difference between the growth hormone peak and the baseline level were then analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test and Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's post hoc test. Cut-off values were determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve. RESULTS: Group 1 and group 2 had no difference in growth hormone peak, gender, body mass index standard deviation score, or pubertal stage. Group 3 exhibited a significantly lower growth hormone peak than the other groups did. The receiver operating characteristic curve demonstrated that growth hormone concentrations ≥ 3.0 ng/mL defined responsiveness to clonidine. In total, 3.02% of individuals in group 1 and group 2 were considered false positive, i.e., these children lacked growth hormone deficiency and had a peak below 3.0 ng/mL. CONCLUSION: Clonidine-stimulated growth hormone concentrations ≥3 ng/mL, as measured by immunochemiluminescent assay, suggest responsiveness to the stimulus regardless of gender, body mass index standard deviation score or pubertal stage. PMID:27166774

  15. Anophthalmia, hearing loss, abnormal pituitary development and response to growth hormone therapy in three children with microdeletions of 14q22q23

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microdeletions of 14q22q23 have been associated with eye abnormalities and pituitary defects. Other phenotypic features in deletion carriers including hearing loss and response to growth hormone therapy are less well recognized. We studied genotype and phenotype of three newly identified children with 14q22q23 deletions, two girls and one boy with bilateral anophthalmia, and compared them with previously published deletion patients and individuals with intragenic defects in genes residing in the region. Results The three deletions were de novo and ranged in size between 5.8 and 8.9 Mb. All three children lacked one copy of the OTX2 gene and in one of them the deletion involved also the BMP4 gene. All three patients presented partial conductive hearing loss which tended to improve with age. Analysis of endocrine and growth phenotypes showed undetectable anterior pituitary, growth hormone deficiency and progressive growth retardation in all three patients. Growth hormone therapy led to partial catch-up growth in two of the three patients but just prevented further height loss in the third. Conclusions The pituitary hypoplasia, growth hormone deficiency and growth retardation associated with 14q22q23 microdeletions are very remarkable, and the latter appears to have an atypical response to growth hormone therapy in some of the cases. PMID:24581273

  16. Evaluation of impact of steroid replacement treatment on bone health in children with 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Delvecchio, M; Soldano, L; Lonero, A; Ventura, A; Giordano, P; Cavallo, L; Grano, M; Brunetti, G; Faienza, M F

    2015-04-01

    There are conflicting data regarding the potential impact of chronic glucocorticoid (GC) therapy on the bone mineral density of patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Previous studies performed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry reported conflicting results. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of chronic GC replacement treatment in children with classical and non classical CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) by quantitative ultrasonometry (QUS), an easy, cheap, and radiation-free technique. The study population consisted of nineteen 21-OHD patients (nine males) on lifelong GC treatment. Anthropometric, hormonal, and treatment data were recorded for each patient, and bone quality was assessed by QUS measurements. QUS findings (amplitude-dependent speed of sound and bone transmission time) were normal in 21-OHD patients and did not correlate with duration of treatment, daily, total, and yearly hydrocortisone dose. Furthermore, no significant correlation was found between QUS findings and 17α-hydroxy progesterone, Δ4-androstenedione, and testosterone levels. In conclusion, our results provide reassurance that currently used replacement doses of GC do not have a major impact on bone in patients with CAH. QUS seems to be a reliable tool for screening of bone health in children with 21-OHD.

  17. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1-deficiency enhances hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission: an in vivo microdialysis study in mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Peñalva, R G; Flachskamm, C; Zimmermann, S; Wurst, W; Holsboer, F; Reul, J M H M; Linthorst, A C E

    2002-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone plays an important role in the coordination of various responses to stress. Previous research has implicated both corticotropin-releasing hormone and the serotonergic system as causative factors in the development and course of stress-related psychiatric disorders such as major depression. To delineate the role of the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRH-R1) in the interactions between corticotropin-releasing hormone and serotonergic neurotransmission, in vivo microdialysis was performed in CRH-R1-deficient mice under basal (home cage) and stress (forced swimming) conditions. Hippocampal dialysates were used to measure extracellular levels of serotonin and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and free corticosterone levels to monitor the status of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Moreover, behavioural activity was assessed by visual observation and a scoring paradigm. Both wild-type and heterozygous mutant mice showed a clear diurnal rhythm in free corticosterone. Free corticosterone concentrations were, however, lower in heterozygous mutant mice than in wild-type animals and undetectable in homozygous CRH-R1-deficient mice. Homozygous CRH-R1-deficient mice showed enhanced hippocampal levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid but not of serotonin during the light and the dark phase of the diurnal cycle, which may point to an enhanced synthesis of serotonin in the raphe-hippocampal system. Moreover, the mutation resulted in higher behavioural activity in the home cage during the light but not during the dark period. Forced swimming caused a rise in hippocampal serotonin followed by a further increase after the end of the stress paradigm in all genotypes. Homozygous and heterozygous mutant mice showed, however, a significantly amplified serotonin response to the forced swimming as compared to wild-type control animals. We conclude that CRH-R1-deficiency results in reduced hypothalamic

  18. Fetal and neonatal iron deficiency exacerbates mild thyroid hormone insufficiency effects on male thyroid hormone levels and brain thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Thomas W; Prohaska, Joseph R; Georgieff, Michael K; Anderson, Grant W

    2014-03-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression.

  19. Fetal and Neonatal Iron Deficiency Exacerbates Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Effects on Male Thyroid Hormone Levels and Brain Thyroid Hormone-Responsive Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Thomas W.; Prohaska, Joseph R.; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression. PMID:24424046

  20. Food fortification for addressing iron deficiency in Filipino children: benefits and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Detzel, Patrick; Wieser, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most widespread nutritional disorders in both developing and industrialized countries, making it a global public health concern. Anemia, mainly due to iron deficiency, affects one third of the world's population and is concentrated in women and children below 5 years of age. Iron deficiency anemia has a profound impact on human health and productivity, and the effects of iron deficiency are especially pronounced in the first 1,000 days of life. This critical window of time sets the stage for an individual's future physiological and cognitive health, underscoring the importance of addressing iron deficiency in infants and young children. This review focuses on the use of fortified foods as a cost-effective tool for addressing iron deficiency in infants and young children in the Philippines.

  1. [Prevalence of anemia, iron and folate deficiency in children 7 years smaller. Costa Rica, 1996].

    PubMed

    Cunningham, L; Blanco, A; Rodríguez, S; Ascencio, M

    2001-03-01

    In 1996, were studied in Costa Rica 961 children with ages between one and six years, with representation for metropolitan, urban and rural zones of the country. The classification approaches applied were emitted by the Pan-American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. The preschooler population presented in the national environment a prevalence of anemia of 26.3% (children from 1 to 4 years with hemoglobin < 11.0 g/dL and those from 5 to 6 years old with hemoglobin < 12.0 g/dL). The prevalence of Iron depletion (Ferritin < 12 ng/mL) and iron deficiency (Ferritin < 24 ng/mL) were 24.4% and 53.8%, respectively. The folate deficiency (< 6.0 ng/mL) was 11.4%. The iron deficiency was higher in children smaller than 4 years, being the maximum deficiency in the 1 year-old (75%). More than 40% of the preschool children presented sub-clinical deficiency of iron; of them, 10% showed severe deficiency of iron without presence of anemia. The children from the rural area presented the highest prevalence of anemia and iron depletion, while the metropolitan area met more frequency with iron deficiency. The nutritional anemias still constitute a moderate problem of public health in Costa Rica. The main cause is iron deficiency, associated in small proportion with folate deficiency and other factors associated with the erythropoiesis.

  2. 'A disease that makes criminals': encephalitis lethargica (EL) in children, mental deficiency, and the 1927 Mental Deficiency Act.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Violeta

    2015-03-01

    Encephalitis lethargica (EL) was an epidemic that spread throughout Europe and North America during the 1920s. Although it could affect both children and adults alike, there were a strange series of chronic symptoms that exclusively affected its younger victims: behavioural disorders which could include criminal propensities. In Britain, which had passed the Mental Deficiency Act in 1913, the concept of mental deficiency was well understood when EL appeared. However, EL defied some of the basic precepts of mental deficiency to such an extent that amendments were made to the Mental Deficiency Act in 1927. I examine how clinicians approached the sequelae of EL in children during the 1920s, and how their work and the social problem that these children posed eventually led to changes in the legal definition of mental deficiency. EL serves as an example of how diseases are not only framed by the society they emerge in, but can also help to frame and change existing concepts within that same society. PMID:25683195

  3. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S.

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  4. Effects of Growth Hormone (GH) Therapy Withdrawal on Glucose Metabolism in Not Confirmed GH Deficient Adolescents at Final Height

    PubMed Central

    Prodam, Flavia; Savastio, Silvia; Genoni, Giulia; Babu, Deepak; Giordano, Mara; Ricotti, Roberta; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Bona, Gianni; Bellone, Simonetta

    2014-01-01

    Context, objective Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, in particular after treatment in children and adults with pre-existing metabolic risk factors. Our aims were. i) to evaluate the effect on glucose metabolism of rhGH treatment and withdrawal in not confirmed GHD adolescents at the achievement of adult height; ii) to investigate the impact of GH receptor gene genomic deletion of exon 3 (d3GHR). Design, setting We performed a longitudinal study (1 year) in a tertiary care center. Methods 23 GHD adolescent were followed in the last year of rhGH treatment (T0), 6 (T6) and 12 (T12) months after rhGH withdrawal with fasting and post-OGTT evaluations. 40 healthy adolescents were used as controls. HOMA-IR, HOMA%β, insulinogenic (INS) and disposition (DI) indexes were calculated. GHR genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR. Results In the group as a whole, fasting insulin (p<0.05), HOMA-IR (p<0.05), insulin and glucose levels during OGTT (p<0.01) progressively decreased from T0 to T12 becoming similar to controls. During rhGH, a compensatory insulin secretion with a stable DI was recorded, and, then, HOMAβ and INS decreased at T6 and T12 (p<0.05). By evaluating the GHR genotype, nDel GHD showed a decrease from T0 to T12 in HOMA-IR, HOMAβ, INS (p<0.05) and DI. Del GHD showed a gradual increase in DI (p<0.05) and INS with a stable HOMA-IR and higher HDL-cholesterol (p<0.01). Conclusions In not confirmed GHD adolescents the fasting deterioration in glucose homeostasis during rhGH is efficaciously coupled with a compensatory insulin secretion and activity at OGTT. The presence of at least one d3GHR allele is associated with lower glucose levels and higher HOMA-β and DI after rhGH withdrawal. Screening for the d3GHR in the pediatric age may help physicians to follow and phenotype GHD patients also by a metabolic point of view. PMID:24498035

  5. Regulation of testicular insulin-like growth factor-I in pubertal growth hormone-deficient male rats.

    PubMed

    Spiteri-Grech, J; Bartlett, J M; Nieschlag, E

    1991-11-01

    GH plays a major role in pubertal growth, effects mainly mediated by stimulation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) production by the liver. However, the role of GH in the regulation of pubertal onset, spermatogenesis and fertility is still under debate. GH and FSH have, in addition, been implicated in the regulation of IGF-I production by Sertoli cells in a number of studies, although conflicting results have been reported. The interpretation of studies using GH-deficient mutant mice has been complicated by the presence of additional defects in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of these animals. We have therefore used GH-deficient mutant male rats with no other documented hormonal deficiencies to study the effect of GH administration on somatic and testicular development, circulating and testicular IGF-I concentrations and testicular histology. Body weights in GH-deficient rats substituted with GH were not significantly different from untreated or GH-treated normal rats and were significantly higher than body weights in untreated dwarf rats. Similarly, circulating IGF-I concentrations in GH-treated GH-deficient rats were not significantly different from those in untreated or GH-treated normal rats but were significantly higher than circulating IGF-I concentrations in untreated dwarf rats. No differences in testicular IGF-I concentrations were observed in any of the groups studied. Testicular weights remained low in both untreated and GH-treated GH-deficient animals compared with control animals but spermatogenesis was qualitatively and quantitatively normal in all groups at the end of the observation period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Growth hormone therapy in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cayir, Atilla; Kosan, Celalettin

    2015-02-01

    Growth is impaired in a chronic renal failure. Anemia, acidosis, reduced intake of calories and protein, decreased synthesis of vitamin D and increased parathyroid hormone levels, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy and changes in growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor and the gonadotropin-gonadal axis are implicated in this study. Growth is adversely affected by immunosuppressives and corticosteroids after kidney transplantation. Treating metabolic disorders using the recombinant human growth hormone is an effective option for patients with inadequate growth rates. PMID:25745347

  7. Neurocognitive outcomes of children secondary to mild iodine deficiency in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Iodine deficiency is the most important preventable cause of brain damage worldwide. During pregnancy, severe iodine deficiency causes endemic cretinism, whereas mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency impairs neurocognitive function of the offspring. Numerous reports demonstrate the impact of iodine supplementation on prevention of cretinism, and recent studies evaluate the effects of iodine prophylaxis on neurocognitive development in children of women with mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. Iodine prophylaxis is generally well tolerated without side effects for the pregnant women and the offspring. In France, the iodine status was recently considered as satisfactory in children and adult population, but regional studies conducted during the last two decades have shown that healthy women are mild-to-moderately iodine deficient during pregnancy. According to recent World Heath Organization guidelines, systematic iodine prophylaxis is recommended in women planning a pregnancy, during gestation and lactation in order to prevent maternal, neonatal and infantile consequences of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. PMID:25934357

  8. Neurocognitive outcomes of children secondary to mild iodine deficiency in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Iodine deficiency is the most important preventable cause of brain damage worldwide. During pregnancy, severe iodine deficiency causes endemic cretinism, whereas mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency impairs neurocognitive function of the offspring. Numerous reports demonstrate the impact of iodine supplementation on prevention of cretinism, and recent studies evaluate the effects of iodine prophylaxis on neurocognitive development in children of women with mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. Iodine prophylaxis is generally well tolerated without side effects for the pregnant women and the offspring. In France, the iodine status was recently considered as satisfactory in children and adult population, but regional studies conducted during the last two decades have shown that healthy women are mild-to-moderately iodine deficient during pregnancy. According to recent World Heath Organization guidelines, systematic iodine prophylaxis is recommended in women planning a pregnancy, during gestation and lactation in order to prevent maternal, neonatal and infantile consequences of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency.

  9. Spino-Cerebellar Degeneration, Hormonal Disorder, Hypogonadism, Deaf Mutism and Mental Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvester, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    Post mortem examinations were done on two adult siblings (one female and one male) who had been clinically described as suffering from mental handicap, deaf mutism, ataxia, hypogonadism, and hormonal disorders. (DB)

  10. EFFECT OF GROWTH HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN WOMEN WITH GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY WHO HAVE A HISTORY OF ACROMEGALY VERSUS OTHER DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Valassi, Elena; Brick, Danielle J.; Johnson, Jessica C.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the response in quality of life (QoL) to growth hormone (GH) replacement in women with GH deficiency (GHD) and a history of acromegaly with that in women with GHD of other causes. Methods Fifty-five women with GHD were studied: 17 with prior acromegaly and 38 with other causes of GHD. We compared two 6-month, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of GH therapy in women with hypopituitarism conducted with use of the same design—one in women with a history of acromegaly and one in women with no prior acromegaly. QoL was assessed with the following questionnaires: the QoL-Assessment of Growth Hormone deficiency in Adults (AGHDA), the Symptom Questionnaire, and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results The 2 groups had comparable mean pretreatment age, body mass index, and QoL scores and comparable mean GH dose at 6 months (0.61 ± 0.30 versus 0.67 ± 0.27 mg daily). After 6 months of GH replacement therapy, women with GHD and prior acromegaly demonstrated a greater improvement in AGHDA score, four SF-36 subscales (Role Limitations due to Physical Health, Energy or Fatigue, Emotional Well-Being, and Social Functioning), and the Somatic Symptoms subscale of the Symptom Questionnaire than did women with GHD of other causes. Poorer pretreatment QoL was associated with a greater improvement in QoL after administration of GH. Conclusion In this study, GH replacement therapy improved QoL in women with GHD and a history of acromegaly but not in women with GHD due to other hypothalamic and pituitary disorders. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term risks versus benefits of GH replacement in patients who develop GHD after definitive treatment for acromegaly. PMID:22440981

  11. Hormonal profile and reproductive performance in lactation deficient (OFA hr/hr) and normal (Sprague-Dawley) female rats.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Susana R; Penissi, Alicia B; Deis, Ricardo P; Jahn, Graciela A

    2007-04-01

    Lactation deficiency may have important consequences on infant health, particularly in populations of low socioeconomic status. The OFA hr/hr (OFA) strain of rats, derived from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, has deficient lactation and is a good model of lactation failure. We examined the reproductive performance and hormonal profiles in OFA and SD strains to determine the cause(s) of the lactation failure of the OFA strain. We measured hormonal (PRL, GH, gonadotropins, oxytocin, and progesterone) levels by RIA in cycling, pregnant, and lactating rats and in response to suckling. Dopaminergic metabolism was assessed by determination of mediobasal hypothalamic dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) concentrations by HPLC and tyrosine hydroxylase expression by immunocytochemistry and western blot. OFA rats have normal fertility but 50% of the litters die of malnutrition on early lactation; only 6% of the mothers show normal lactation. The OFA rats showed lower circulating PRL during lactation, increased hypothalamic dopamine and DOPAC, and impaired milk ejection with decreased PRL and oxytocin response to suckling. Before parturition, PRL release and lactogenesis were normal, but dopaminergic metabolism was altered, suggesting activation of the dopaminergic system in OFA but not in SD rats. The number of arcuate and periventricular neurons expressing tyrosine hydroxylase was higher in SD rats, but hypothalamic expression of TH was higher in OFA rats at the end of pregnancy and early lactation. These results suggest that the OFA rats have impaired PRL release linked with an augmented dopaminergic tone which could be partially responsible for the lactational failure.

  12. Growth Hormone Deficiency after Treatment of Acromegaly: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study of Growth Hormone Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Karen K.; Wexler, Tamara; Fazeli, Pouneh; Gunnell, Lindsay; Graham, Gwenda J.; Beauregard, Catherine; Hemphill, Linda; Nachtigall, Lisa; Loeffler, Jay; Swearingen, Brooke; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Context: The effects of GH replacement therapy in patients who develop GH deficiency (GHD) after cure of acromegaly have not been established in a placebo-controlled study. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether GH replacement improves body composition, cardiovascular risk markers and quality of life in patients with GHD and prior acromegaly. Design: This was a 6-month, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Setting: The study was conducted at a clinical translational science center. Study Participants: Participants included 30 subjects with prior acromegaly and current GHD. Intervention: Interventions included GH or placebo. Main Outcome Measures: Body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and cross-sectional computed tomography at L4), cardiovascular risk markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), total, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fibrinogen, and carotid intimal-medial thickness), and quality of life were measured. Results: The mean GH dose at 6 months was 0.58 ± 0.26 mg/d. Total fat mass, visceral adipose tissue (−15.3 ± 18.6 vs. 1.3 ± 12.5%, P = 0.01), and total abdominal fat decreased, and fat-free mass increased, in the GH vs. placebo group. Mean hsCRP levels decreased, but there was no GH effect on other cardiovascular risk markers. There was no change in glycosylated hemoglobin or homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index. Quality of life improved with GH. Side effects were minimal. Conclusions: This is the first randomized, placebo-controlled study of the effects of GH replacement therapy on body composition and cardiovascular end points in patients who have developed GH deficiency after treatment for acromegaly, a disease complicated by metabolic and body composition alterations and increased cardiovascular risk. GH replacement decreased visceral adipose tissue, increased fat-free mass, decreased hsCRP, and improved quality of life in patients with GHD after

  13. Combinatorial effects of malaria season, iron deficiency, and inflammation determine plasma hepcidin concentration in African children

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Andrew E.; Khandwala, Shivani; Mwangi, Tabitha W.; Uyoga, Sophie; Bejon, Philip A.; Williams, Thomas N.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Drakesmith, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Hepcidin is the master regulatory hormone that governs iron homeostasis and has a role in innate immunity. Although hepcidin has been studied extensively in model systems, there is less information on hepcidin regulation in global health contexts where iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and high infectious burdens (including malaria) all coexist but fluctuate over time. We evaluated iron status, hepcidin levels, and determinants of hepcidin in 2 populations of rural children aged ≤8 years, in the Gambia and Kenya (total n = 848), at the start and end of a malaria season. Regression analyses and structural equation modeling demonstrated, for both populations, similar combinatorial effects of upregulating stimuli (iron stores and to a lesser extent inflammation) and downregulating stimuli (erythropoietic drive) on hepcidin levels. However, malaria season was also a significant factor and was associated with an altered balance of these opposing factors. Consistent with these changes, hepcidin levels were reduced whereas the prevalence of ID was increased at the end of the malaria season. More prevalent ID and lower hepcidin likely reflect an enhanced requirement for iron and an ability to efficiently absorb it at the end of the malaria season. These results, therefore, have implications for ID and malaria control programs. PMID:24596418

  14. Postnatal growth hormone deficiency in growing rats causes marked decline in the activity of spinal cord acetylcholinesterase but not butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Koohestani, Faezeh; Brown, Chester M; Meisami, Esmail

    2012-11-01

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) deficiency on the developmental changes in the abundance and activity of cholinesterase enzymes were studied in the developing spinal cord (SC) of postnatal rats by measuring the specific activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a marker for cholinergic neurons and their synaptic compartments, and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), a marker for glial cells and neurovascular cells. Specific activities of these two enzymes were measured in SC tissue of 21- and 90 day-old (P21, weaning age; P90, young adulthood) GH deficient spontaneous dwarf (SpDwf) mutant rats which lack anterior pituitary and circulating plasma GH, and were compared with SC tissue of normal age-matched control animals. Assays were carried out for AChE and BuChE activity in the presence of their specific chemical inhibitors, BW284C51 and iso-OMPA, respectively. Results revealed that mean AChE activity was markedly and significantly reduced [28% at P21, 49% at P90, (p<0.01)] in the SC of GH deficient rats compared to age-matched controls. GH deficiency had a higher and more significant effect on AChE activity of the older (P90) rats than the younger ones (P21) ones. In contrast, BuChE activity in SC showed no significant changes in GH deficient rats at either of the two ages studied. Results imply that, in the absence of pituitary GH, the postnatal proliferation of cholinergic synapses in the rat SC, a CNS structure, where AChE activity is abundant, is markedly reduced during both the pre- and postweaning periods; more so in the postweaning than preweaning ages. In contrast, the absence of any effects on BuChE activity implies that GH does not affect the development of non-neuronal elements, e.g., glia, as much as the neuronal and synaptic compartments of the developing rat SC. PMID:22922167

  15. Postnatal growth hormone deficiency in growing rats causes marked decline in the activity of spinal cord acetylcholinesterase but not butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Koohestani, Faezeh; Brown, Chester M; Meisami, Esmail

    2012-11-01

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) deficiency on the developmental changes in the abundance and activity of cholinesterase enzymes were studied in the developing spinal cord (SC) of postnatal rats by measuring the specific activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a marker for cholinergic neurons and their synaptic compartments, and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), a marker for glial cells and neurovascular cells. Specific activities of these two enzymes were measured in SC tissue of 21- and 90 day-old (P21, weaning age; P90, young adulthood) GH deficient spontaneous dwarf (SpDwf) mutant rats which lack anterior pituitary and circulating plasma GH, and were compared with SC tissue of normal age-matched control animals. Assays were carried out for AChE and BuChE activity in the presence of their specific chemical inhibitors, BW284C51 and iso-OMPA, respectively. Results revealed that mean AChE activity was markedly and significantly reduced [28% at P21, 49% at P90, (p<0.01)] in the SC of GH deficient rats compared to age-matched controls. GH deficiency had a higher and more significant effect on AChE activity of the older (P90) rats than the younger ones (P21) ones. In contrast, BuChE activity in SC showed no significant changes in GH deficient rats at either of the two ages studied. Results imply that, in the absence of pituitary GH, the postnatal proliferation of cholinergic synapses in the rat SC, a CNS structure, where AChE activity is abundant, is markedly reduced during both the pre- and postweaning periods; more so in the postweaning than preweaning ages. In contrast, the absence of any effects on BuChE activity implies that GH does not affect the development of non-neuronal elements, e.g., glia, as much as the neuronal and synaptic compartments of the developing rat SC.

  16. Effects of parathyroid hormone on puppies during development of Ca and vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wong, K M; Klein, L; Hollis, B

    1985-12-01

    The acute effects of parathyroid extract (PTE) were studied repeatedly in young dogs (prelabeled with 45Ca and [3H]tetracycline) during the development of calcium (Ca) and vitamin D deficiency. Blood Ca and radioactivity changes were monitored sequentially after subcutaneous PTE, injected seven times over 63 days. In control dogs, all sequential responses to acute PTE challenges were constant in both magnitude of increase and time at which maximum response occurred over the entire experiment. Under chronic Ca and D deficiency, plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in experimental dogs decreased continuously to very low levels at 63 days, whereas 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D initially increased to a maximum at 32 days and thereafter decreased. In response to an acute challenge of PTE, dogs on the deficient diet for 3 and 10 days showed a greater response of blood Ca and 45Ca than the controls but subsequently showed a smaller response than controls after 49 and 63 days on the deficient diet. Compared with control dogs, the time of maximal response of blood Ca and 45Ca to PTE occurred much earlier in dogs that were on the deficient diet for 35-63 days. The blood [3H]tetracycline response (index of bone resorption) to exogenous PTE in the deficient dogs, however, was constant and similar to that of the control dogs during the entire period. The data suggest that the bone resorption response to PTE was normal in Ca- and D-deficient puppies with hypocalcemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Hormone-sensitive lipase deficiency suppresses insulin secretion from pancreatic islets of Lep{sup ob/ob} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, Motohiro; Yahagi, Naoya; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Masaki; Ohta, Keisuke; Takanashi, Mikio; Kumagai, Masayoshi; Takase, Satoru; Nishi, Makiko; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Izumida, Yoshihiko; Kubota, Midori; Ohashi, Ken; Iizuka, Yoko; Yagyu, Hiroaki; Gotoda, Takanari; Nagai, Ryozo; Shimano, Hitoshi; Yamada, Nobuhiro; and others

    2009-09-25

    It has long been a matter of debate whether the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)-mediated lipolysis in pancreatic {beta}-cells can affect insulin secretion through the alteration of lipotoxicity. We generated mice lacking both leptin and HSL (Lep{sup ob/ob}/HSL{sup -/-}) and explored the role of HSL in pancreatic {beta}-cells in the setting of obesity. Lep{sup ob/ob}/HSL{sup -/-} developed elevated blood glucose levels and reduced plasma insulin levels compared with Lep{sup ob/ob}/HSL{sup +/+} in a fed state, while the deficiency of HSL did not affect glucose homeostasis in Lep{sup +/+} background. The deficiency of HSL exacerbated the accumulation of triglycerides in Lep{sup ob/ob} islets, leading to reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The deficiency of HSL also diminished the islet mass in Lep{sup ob/ob} mice due to decreased cell proliferation. In conclusion, HSL affects insulin secretary capacity especially in the setting of obesity.

  18. The Role of Food Fortification in Addressing Iron Deficiency in Infants and Young Children.

    PubMed

    Spieldenner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency, one of the most widespread nutritional disorders, affects millions of people in emerging economies and, increasingly, in industrialized countries. Due to the high iron requirements during growth and development, infants and young children are among those most severely affected by iron deficiency. Iron deficiency that occurs during the critical phases of early life development has long-lasting health consequences that are reflected in increased risk of disease, reduced economic productivity and premature death, underscoring the importance of infants and young children as a key target group for addressing iron deficiency. This chapter focuses on the use of fortified foods as a cost-effective mechanism to address iron deficiency in this particularly vulnerable subpopulation. Nutritional policies that include food fortification need to be implemented within the context of effective public-private partnerships in order to address the fundamental mechanisms of accessibility, affordability and availability of nutritious food items for those in the lowest socio-economic strata. PMID:27198518

  19. Prevalence and correlates of vitamin K deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jan K; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Szaflarska-Poplawska, Anna; Klincewicz, Beata; Adamczak, Daria; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Plawski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Although vitamin K deficiency has been implicated in adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its prevalence in pediatric IBD remains unknown. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 63 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 48 with ulcerative colitis (UC) to assess the prevalence of vitamin K deficiency and to search for potential correlation between vitamin K status and pediatric IBD activity. Vitamin K status was assessed using protein induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II; ELISA). Prevalence of vitamin K deficiency was 54.0% in CD and 43.7% in UC. Vitamin K deficiency was more common in patients with higher CD activity, in CD patients with higher mass Z-scores, and less common among children with CD treated with infliximab. Relation of vitamin K deficiency to pediatric IBD clinical course and treatment demand further research. PMID:24759680

  20. Prevalence and correlates of vitamin K deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jan K; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Szaflarska-Poplawska, Anna; Klincewicz, Beata; Adamczak, Daria; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Plawski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-04-24

    Although vitamin K deficiency has been implicated in adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its prevalence in pediatric IBD remains unknown. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 63 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 48 with ulcerative colitis (UC) to assess the prevalence of vitamin K deficiency and to search for potential correlation between vitamin K status and pediatric IBD activity. Vitamin K status was assessed using protein induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II; ELISA). Prevalence of vitamin K deficiency was 54.0% in CD and 43.7% in UC. Vitamin K deficiency was more common in patients with higher CD activity, in CD patients with higher mass Z-scores, and less common among children with CD treated with infliximab. Relation of vitamin K deficiency to pediatric IBD clinical course and treatment demand further research.

  1. Induction of chronic growth hormone deficiency by anti-GH serum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Smith, A. T.; Ellis, S.; Evans, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The observations reported indicate that the growth rate of neonatal rats can be specifically inhibited for at least 78 days following the administration of antisera against growth hormone (GH) for only four days after birth. The inhibition can be correlated with a marked deficit of tibial growth promoting activity in the pituitary but not with the plasma concentrations of immuno-reactive GH.

  2. Non-invasive screening of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in children using a dipstick immunocapture assay.

    PubMed

    Rodinová, M; Trefilová, E; Honzík, T; Tesařová, M; Zeman, J; Hansíková, H

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CIV) deficiency is among the most common childhood mitochondrial disorders. The diagnosis of this deficiency is complex, and muscle biopsy is used as the gold standard of diagnosis. Our aim was to minimize the patient burden and to test the use of a dipstick immunocapture assay (DIA) to determine the amount of CIV in non-invasively obtained buccal epithelial cells. Buccal smears were obtained from five children with Leigh syndrome including three children exhibiting a previously confirmed CIV deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts and two children who were clinical suspects for CIV deficiency; the smear samples were analysed using CI and CIV human protein quantity dipstick assay kits. Samples from five children of similar age and five adults were used as controls. Analysis of the controls demonstrated that only samples of buccal cells that were frozen for a maximum of 4 h after collection provide accurate results. All three patients with confirmed CIV deficiency due to mutations in the SURF1 gene exhibited significantly lower amounts of CIV than the similarly aged controls; significantly lower amounts were also observed in two new patients, for whom later molecular analysis also confirmed pathologic mutations in the SURF1 gene. We conclude that DIA is a simple, fast and sensitive method for the determination of CIV in buccal cells and is suitable for the screening of CIV deficiency in non-invasively obtained material from children who are suspected of having mitochondrial disease. PMID:25629267

  3. Benefits and harms of iron supplementation in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

    PubMed

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Due to high iron requirements, young children are at risk for iron deficiency anemia. Iron supplements are therefore often recommended, especially since iron deficiency anemia in children is associated with poor neurodevelopment. However, in contrast to most other nutrients, excess iron cannot be excreted by the human body and it has recently been suggested that excessive iron supplementation of young children may have adverse effects on growth, risk of infections, and even on cognitive development. Recent studies support that iron supplements are beneficial in iron-deficient children but there is a risk of adverse effects in those who are iron replete. In populations with a low prevalence of iron deficiency, general supplementation should therefore be avoided. Iron-fortified foods can still be generally recommended since they seem to be safer than medicinal iron supplements, but the level of iron fortification should be limited. General iron supplementation is recommended in areas with a high prevalence of iron deficiency, with the exception of malarious areas where a cautious supplementation approach needs to be adopted, based either on screening or a combination of iron supplements and infection control measures. More studies are urgently needed to better determine the risks and benefits of iron supplementation and iron-fortified foods given to iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

  4. Can Maori Children Really Be Positioned as "Deficient" Learners for Reading English?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Fleur

    2009-01-01

    Maori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. Since British colonial settlement in the early 1800s, Maori children have been predominantly educated in an English-speaking system dominated by colonial governance. In this institution, Maori children have been constructed as deficient learners, primarily in relation to a colonial curriculum taught…

  5. Mathematics Deficiencies in Children with Very Low Birth Weight or Very Preterm Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, H. Gerry; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Anderson, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Children with very low birth weight (VLBW, less than 1500 g) or very preterm birth (VPTB, less than 32 weeks gestational age or GA) have more mathematics disabilities or deficiencies (MD) and higher rates of mathematics learning disabilities (MLD) than normal birth weight term-born children (NBW, greater than 2500 g and greater than 36 weeks GA).…

  6. Plasma Amino Acids Profiles in Children with Autism: Potential Risk of Nutritional Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Georgianne L.; Hyman, Susan L.; Mooney, Robert A.; Kirby, Russell S.

    2003-01-01

    The plasma amino acid profiles of 10 children with autism on gluten and casein restricted diets and 26 on unrestricted diets were reviewed. There was a trend for the children on restricted diets to have an increased prevalence of essential amino acid deficiencies and lower plasma levels of essential acids. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  7. Fetal and Neonatal Iron Deficiency Reduces Thyroid Hormone-Responsive Gene mRNA Levels in the Neonatal Rat Hippocampus and Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Thomas W.; Anderson, Jeremy A.; Fretham, Stephanie J.; Prohaska, Joseph R.; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and thyroid hormone (TH) deficiencies produce similar defects in late brain development including hypomyelination of axons and impaired synapse formation and function, suggesting that these micronutrient deficiencies share a common mechanism contributing to these derangements. We previously demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Cu and Fe deficiencies lower circulating TH concentrations in neonatal rats. Fe deficiency also reduces whole-brain T3 content, suggesting impaired TH action in the developing Fe-deficient brain. We hypothesized that fetal/neonatal Cu and Fe deficiencies will produce mild or moderate TH deficiencies and will impair TH-responsive gene expression in the neonatal cerebral cortex and hippocampus. To test this hypothesis, we rendered pregnant Sprague Dawley rats Cu-, Fe-, or TH-deficient from early gestation through postnatal d 10 (P10). Mild and moderate TH deficiencies were induced by 1 and 3 ppm propylthiouracil treatment, respectively. Cu deficiency did not significantly alter serum or tissue TH concentrations or TH-responsive brain mRNA expression. Fe deficiency significantly lowered P10 serum total T3 (45%), serum total T4 (52%), whole brain T3 (14%), and hippocampal T3 (18%) concentrations, producing a mild TH deficiency similar to 1 ppm propylthiouracil treatment. Fe deficiency lowered Pvalb, Enpp6, and Mbp mRNA levels in the P10 hippocampus. Fe deficiency also altered Hairless, Dbm, and Dio2 mRNA levels in the P10 cerebral cortex. These results suggest that some of the brain defects associated with Fe deficiency may be mediated through altered thyroidal status and the concomitant alterations in TH-responsive gene transcription. PMID:23054056

  8. Multiple endocrinopathies (growth hormone deficiency, autoimmune hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus) in Kearns-Sayre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berio, A; Piazzi, A

    2013-01-01

    Kearns-Sayre syndrome is characterized by onset before 20 years, chronic progressive external opthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinal degeneration, and ataxia (and/or hearth block, and/or high protein content in the cerebrospinal fluid) in the presence of mtDNA rearrangements. Multiple endocrine dysfunction associated with this syndrome was rarely reported. In this paper, the Authors report on a female patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome with large heteroplasmic mtDNA deletion, absence of cytochrome c oxidase in many muscle fibers, partial GH deficiency, hypothyroidism and subsequently insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Anti-thyroid peroxidase and antithyreoglobulin antibodies were present in high titer in serum while anti-islet cell antibodies were absent. The patient developed thyroiditis with Hashimoto encephalopathy. The presence of GH deficiency, autoimmune thyroiditis with hypothyroidism and IDDM distinguishes this case from others and confirms the association of Kearns-Sayre syndrome with multiple endocrine dysfunction. Hashimoto encephalopathy and anti-thyroideal antibodies suggest that in this patient, predisposed by a genetic factor (a mitochondrial deletion) anti-thyroideal antibodies may have contributed to the hypothyroidism and, by interfering with cerebral mitochondrial function, may have caused the encephalopathy. GH deficiency and IDDM can be attributed to oxidative phosphorylation deficiency but the autoimmunity may also have played a role in the production of glandular insufficiencies. It seems important to search for endocrine autoimmunity in every case of KSS. PMID:23947115

  9. Response to long-term growth hormone therapy in patients affected by RASopathies and growth hormone deficiency: Patterns of growth, puberty and final height data.

    PubMed

    Tamburrino, Federica; Gibertoni, Dino; Rossi, Cesare; Scarano, Emanuela; Perri, Annamaria; Montanari, Francesca; Fantini, Maria Pia; Pession, Andrea; Tartaglia, Marco; Mazzanti, Laura

    2015-11-01

    RASopathies are developmental disorders caused by heterozygous germline mutations in genes encoding proteins in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Reduced growth is a common feature. Several studies generated data on growth, final height (FH), and height velocity (HV) after growth hormone (GH) treatment in patients with these disorders, particularly in Noonan syndrome, the most common RASopathy. These studies, however, refer to heterogeneous cohorts in terms of molecular information, GH status, age at start and length of therapy, and GH dosage. This work reports growth data in 88 patients affected by RASopathies with molecularly confirmed diagnosis, together with statistics on body proportions, pubertal pattern, and FH in 33, including 16 treated with GH therapy for proven GH deficiency. Thirty-three patients showed GH deficiency after pharmacological tests, and were GH-treated for an average period of 6.8 ± 4.8 years. Before starting therapy, HV was -2.6 ± 1.3 SDS, and mean basal IGF1 levels were -2.0 ± 1.1 SDS. Long-term GH therapy, starting early during childhood, resulted in a positive height response compared with untreated patients (1.3 SDS in terms of height-gain), normalizing FH for Ranke standards but not for general population and Target Height. Pubertal timing negatively affected pubertal growth spurt and FH, with IGF1 standardized score increased from -2.43 to -0.27 SDS. During GH treatment, no significant change in bone age velocity, body proportions, or cardiovascular function was observed.

  10. How much, and by what mechanisms, does growth hormone replacement improve the quality of life in GH-deficient adults?

    PubMed

    Chrisoulidou, A; Kousta, E; Beshyah, S A; Robinson, S; Johnston, D G

    1998-07-01

    The majority of studies (but not all) have demonstrated that adults with hypopituitarism of both childhood and adult onset have a diminished quality of life (QOL) in comparison with the normal population. Reductions in physical and mental energy, dissatisfaction with body image and poor memory have been reported most consistently. A specific role for growth hormone (GH) deficiency, as opposed to multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, has been observed for the memory deficit, which extends to both short- and long-term memory. Comparisons with normal siblings have confirmed the reduced QOL, although differences have been small. There is less consensus for a reduction in QOL when hypopituitary subjects are compared with patients with other chronic diseases, with studies supporting (in comparison with diabetics) and refuting (in comparison with patients following mastoid surgery) the reduction in QOL. GH replacement in adults has improved QOL, particularly in the domains of energy level and self-esteem, and memory has improved. The social impact of these changes may be considerable, with patients requiring fewer days' sick leave. A major placebo effect is present, however, and neutral results as well as positive have been reported in placebo-controlled trials. Where a positive effect has been observed, it has been more likely to occur in patients with a low QOL at the outset. It is otherwise impossible to predict at the outset those who will benefit from GH replacement. GH treatment has effects on body composition, exercise capacity, muscle strength, total body water and intermediary metabolism which would be expected to improve QOL. Replacement therapy also has side-effects, and it is the variable balance of the positive and negative effects, coupled with the difficulties of measuring QOL, which have led to the disparate results in the literature. There is probably also a true inter-individual variation, although the mechanisms of this are currently unknown.

  11. Iron deficiency associated with higher blood lead in children living in contaminated environments.

    PubMed Central

    Bradman, A; Eskenazi, B; Sutton, P; Athanasoulis, M; Goldman, L R

    2001-01-01

    The evidence that iron deficiency increases lead child exposure is based primarily on animal data and limited human studies, and some of this evidence is contradictory. No studies of iron status and blood lead levels in children have accounted for environmental lead contamination and, therefore, the source of their exposure. Thus, no studies have directly determined whether iron deficiency modifies the relationship of environmental lead and blood lead. In this study, we compared blood lead levels of iron-deficient and iron-replete children living in low, medium, or highly contaminated environments. Measurements of lead in paint, soil, dust, and blood, age of housing, and iron status were collected from 319 children ages 1-5. We developed two lead exposure factors to summarize the correlated exposure variables: Factor 1 summarized all environmental measures, and Factor 2 was weighted for lead loading of house dust. The geometric mean blood lead level was 4.9 microg/dL; 14% exceeded 10 microg/dL. Many of the children were iron deficient (24% with ferritin < 12 ng/dL). Seventeen percent of soil leads exceeded 500 microg/g, and 23% and 63% of interior and exterior paint samples exceeded 5,000 microg/g. The unadjusted geometric mean blood lead level for iron-deficient children was higher by 1 microg/dL; this difference was greater (1.8 microg/dL) after excluding Asians. Blood lead levels were higher for iron-deficient children for each tertile of exposure as estimated by Factors 1 and 2 for non-Asian children. Elevated blood lead among iron-deficient children persisted after adjusting for potential confounders by multivariate regression; the largest difference in blood lead levels between iron-deficient and -replete children, approximately 3 microg/dL, was among those living in the most contaminated environments. Asian children had a paradoxical association of sufficient iron status and higher blood lead level, which warrants further investigation. Improving iron status

  12. Hormone replacement therapy in children: The use of growth hormone and IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Pfäffle, Roland

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been available since 1985. This article gives an overview, what has been achieved over the past 30 years in respect to optimization of rhGH treatment for the individual child with GH deficiency and what are the safety issues concerned with this treatment. In the last twenty years significant scientific progress has been made in the diagnosis of GH deficiency, the genetic disorders that are associated with pituitary GH deficiency and the genetics that influence growth in general. On the other hand rhGH is not only used in states of GH deficiency but also various conditions without a proven GH deficiency by classical standards. Clinical studies that investigated both the genetics of growth and the individual responses to rhGH therapy in these patient populations were able to refine our concept about the physiology of normal growth. In most patients under rhGH treatment there is a considerable short-term effect, however the overall gain in growth obtained by a long-term treatment until final height still remains a matter of debate in some of the conditions treated. Also first studies on the long-term safety risks of rhGH treatment have raised the question whether this treatment is similarly safe for all the patient groups eligible for such a treatment. Therefore even in the face of a longstanding safety record of this drug replacement therapy the discussion about the right cost and risk to benefit ratio is continuing. Consequently there is still a need for carefully conducted long-term studies that use modern anthropometric, genetic, and laboratory techniques in order to provide the necessary information for clinicians to select the patients that will benefit best from this valuable treatment without any long term risk.

  13. Hormone replacement therapy in children: The use of growth hormone and IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Pfäffle, Roland

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been available since 1985. This article gives an overview, what has been achieved over the past 30 years in respect to optimization of rhGH treatment for the individual child with GH deficiency and what are the safety issues concerned with this treatment. In the last twenty years significant scientific progress has been made in the diagnosis of GH deficiency, the genetic disorders that are associated with pituitary GH deficiency and the genetics that influence growth in general. On the other hand rhGH is not only used in states of GH deficiency but also various conditions without a proven GH deficiency by classical standards. Clinical studies that investigated both the genetics of growth and the individual responses to rhGH therapy in these patient populations were able to refine our concept about the physiology of normal growth. In most patients under rhGH treatment there is a considerable short-term effect, however the overall gain in growth obtained by a long-term treatment until final height still remains a matter of debate in some of the conditions treated. Also first studies on the long-term safety risks of rhGH treatment have raised the question whether this treatment is similarly safe for all the patient groups eligible for such a treatment. Therefore even in the face of a longstanding safety record of this drug replacement therapy the discussion about the right cost and risk to benefit ratio is continuing. Consequently there is still a need for carefully conducted long-term studies that use modern anthropometric, genetic, and laboratory techniques in order to provide the necessary information for clinicians to select the patients that will benefit best from this valuable treatment without any long term risk. PMID:26051295

  14. Sulphur limitation and early sulphur deficiency responses in poplar: significance of gene expression, metabolites, and plant hormones

    PubMed Central

    Honsel, Anne; Kojima, Mikiko; Haas, Richard; Frank, Wolfgang; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Herschbach, Cornelia; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    The influence of sulphur (S) depletion on the expression of genes related to S metabolism, and on metabolite and plant hormone contents was analysed in young and mature leaves, fine roots, xylem sap, and phloem exudates of poplar (Populus tremula×Populus alba) with special focus on early consequences. S depletion was applied by a gradual decrease of sulphate availability. The observed changes were correlated with sulphate contents. Based on the decrease in sulphate contents, two phases of S depletion could be distinguished that were denominated as ‘S limitation’ and ‘early S deficiency’. S limitation was characterized by improved sulphate uptake (enhanced root-specific sulphate transporter PtaSULTR1;2 expression) and reduction capacities (enhanced adenosine 5′-phosphosulphate (APS) reductase expression) and by enhanced remobilization of sulphate from the vacuole (enhanced putative vacuolar sulphate transporter PtaSULTR4;2 expression). During early S deficiency, whole plant distribution of S was impacted, as indicated by increasing expression of the phloem-localized sulphate transporter PtaSULTR1;1 and by decreasing glutathione contents in fine roots, young leaves, mature leaves, and phloem exudates. Furthermore, at ‘early S deficiency’, expression of microRNA395 (miR395), which targets transcripts of PtaATPS3/4 (ATP sulphurylase) for cleavage, increased. Changes in plant hormone contents were observed at ‘early S deficiency’ only. Thus, S depletion affects S and plant hormone metabolism of poplar during ‘S limitation’ and ‘early S deficiency’ in a time series of events. Despite these consequences, the impact of S depletion on growth of poplar plants appears to be less severe than in Brassicaceae such as Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica sp. PMID:22162873

  15. Suppression of urinary and plasma follicle-stimulating hormone by exogenous estrogens in prepubertal and pubertal children.

    PubMed

    Kelch, R P; Kaplan, S L; Ghumbach, M M

    1973-05-01

    Clomiphene citrate, an "anti-estrogen" with mild estrogenic properties, inhibits rather than stimulates gonadotropin excretion in prepubertal and early pubertal children. These and other data suggest that the sensitivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary "gonadostat" decreases at the onset of puberty. To test this hypothesis further, the daily excretion of urinary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was determined in 19 children (5 "short normals" and 14 with isolated human growth hormone (HGH) deficiency) who were given ethinyl estradiol (EE) 1.4-14.7 mug/m(2) per day (2-10 mug/day) for 4 to 7 days. In addition, plasma and urinary gonadotropins and plasma estrogens were serially determined in two prepubertal females(with isolated HGH deficiency) given two injections (24 h apart) of estradiol benzoate, 10 mug/kg. FSH and LH concentrations in plasma and kaolin-acetone urinary concentrates and plasma 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) and estrone (E(1)) were measured by radioimmunoassays. 2-3 mug/m(2) per day of EE significantly suppressed urinary FSH (and LH when detected in the control period) in two out of six prepubertal children, while all doses >5 mug/m(2) per day suppressed urinary gonadotropins to undetectable levels in eight prepubertal subjects. In early to midpubertal subjects. 2-10 mug/m(2) per day of EE produced a slight suppression of urinary FSH, but failed to suppress to undetectable levels. Two subjects in late puberty (stage 4) did not suppress their urinary FSH while on 7 and 8.3 mug/m(2) per day. In both subjects treated with estradiol benzoate, plasma FSH promptly decreased after the first injection. Urinary FSH was suppressed to <0.1 IU/day on day 2 and urinary and plasma gonadotropins remained suppressed for the duration of the study (3 days). Plasma E(2) and E(1) rose from prepubertal values to peak concentrations of 150 to 250 pg/ml (E(2)), and 50 and 100 pg/ml (E(1)) at approximately 36 h. We conclude that the hypothalamic

  16. A comparison of fasting plasma insulin and growth hormone concentrations in marasmic, kwashiorkor, marasmic-kwashiorkor and underweight children.

    PubMed

    Robinson, H; Picou, D

    1977-05-01

    Fasting plasma insulin and growth hormone concentrations were measured in 24 marasmic, 11 kwashiorkor, 16 marasmic-kwashiorkor, and 4 underweight children. Hormone measurements were made by a special modification of the Hales and Randle double antibody immunoassay with increased sensitivity in the concentration range 0-25 micronU/ml. Fasting plasma insulin was low in marasmus, kwashiorkor, and marasmic-kwashiorkor children, and increased to normal levels after recovery. Fasting plasma growth hormone was elevated in all groups during malnutrition and was significantly decreased to normal levels after recovery. There were no significant differences in plasma insulin or growth hormone levels between the different clinical types of severe protein energy malnutrition. These hormonal changes in severe protein energy malnutrition are of complex and not fully understood etiology. However, recovered children appear to have a hormonal pattern similar to that described in normal control infants and children.

  17. A novel loss-of-function mutation in OTX2 in a patient with anophthalmia and isolated growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi-Hoffnung, Liat; Lebenthal, Yael; Wyatt, Alexander W; Ragge, Nicola K; Dateki, Sumito; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2010-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the gene encoding transcription factor OTX2 were recently shown to be responsible for ocular as well as pituitary abnormalities. Here, we describe a patient with unilateral anophthalmia and short stature. Endocrine evaluation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis revealed isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) with small anterior pituitary gland, invisible stalk, ectopic posterior lobe, and right anophthalmia on brain magnetic resonance imaging. DNA was analyzed for mutations in the HESX1, SOX2, and OTX2 genes. Molecular analysis yielded a novel heterozygous OTX2 mutation (c.270A>T, p.R90S) within the homeodomain. Functional analysis revealed that the mutation inhibited both the DNA binding and transactivation activities of the protein. This novel loss-of-function mutation is associated with anophthalmia and IGHD in a patient of Sephardic Jewish descent. We recommend that patients with GH deficiency and ocular malformation in whom genetic analysis for classic transcription factor genes (PROP1, POU1F1, HESX1, and LHX4) failed to identify alterations should be checked for the presence of mutations in the OTX2 gene.

  18. Iodine Deficiency Induces a Thyroid Stimulating Hormone-Independent Early Phase of Microvascular Reshaping in the Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Anne-Catherine; Poncin, Sylvie; Caetano, Bertrand; Sonveaux, Pierre; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Feron, Olivier; Colin, Ides M.; Soncin, Fabrice

    2008-01-01

    Expansion of the thyroid microvasculature is the earliest event during goiter formation, always occurring before thyrocyte proliferation; however, the precise mechanisms governing this physiological angiogenesis are not well understood. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry to measure gene expression and laser Doppler to measure blood flow in an animal model of goitrogenesis, we show that thyroid angiogenesis occurred into two successive phases. The first phase lasted a week and involved vascular activation; this process was thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-independent and was directly triggered by expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by thyrocytes as soon as the intracellular iodine content decreased. This early reaction was followed by an increase in thyroid blood flow and endothelial cell proliferation, both of which were mediated by VEGF and inhibited by VEGF-blocking antibodies. The second, angiogenic, phase was TSH-dependent and was activated as TSH levels increased. This phase involved substantial up-regulation of the major proangiogenic factors VEGF-A, fibroblast growth factor-2, angiopoietin 1, and NG2 as well as their receptors Flk-1/VEGFR2, Flt-1/VEGFR1, and Tie-2. In conclusion, goiter-associated angiogenesis promotes thyroid adaptation to iodine deficiency. Specifically, as soon as the iodine supply is limited, thyrocytes produce proangiogenic signals that elicit early TSH-independent microvascular activation; if iodine deficiency persists, TSH plasma levels increase, triggering the second angiogenic phase that supports thyrocyte proliferation. PMID:18276786

  19. Growth Hormone: Use and Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... than children of the same age), such as chronic kidney disease, Turner syndrome, and Prader-Willi syndrome In adults, GH is used to treat • Growth hormone deficiency • Muscle wasting (loss of muscle tissue) from HIV • Short bowel ...

  20. Development of antibodies against growth hormone (GH) during rhGH therapy in a girl with idiopathic GH deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Meazza, Cristina; Schaab, Michael; Pagani, Sara; Calcaterra, Valeria; Bozzola, Elena; Kratzsch, Juergen; Bozzola, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    A 12.5-year-old Italian girl was referred to our institute for progressive growth failure from the age of 6 years, with a height of 128.2 cm (-3.37 SDS) and a bone age of 9 years. Endocrinological evaluation revealed a partial growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and GH therapy was started at a dosage of 0.25 mg/kg/week. During the first 3 years, she showed an increase in growth rate and experienced pubertal development onset. Then a poor growth rate (2 cm/year=0.43 SDS) was observed, notwithstanding an increase in GH dosage (0.35 mg/kg/week) and good compliance. We found a positive anti-GH antibody titre (1:1850, cutoff 1/100), confirmed 6 months later (1:2035); the antibodies had low binding capacity (0.63 μg/mL) and were only partially capable of inhibiting the GH effect. However, GH treatment was discontinued, and after 3 months the antibody titre decreased (1:950). In conclusion, we suggest evaluation of anti-GH antibodies in GH-treated idiopathic GHD children in whom growth response decreases after some years of therapy.

  1. The testicular form of hormone-sensitive lipase HSLtes confers rescue of male infertility in HSL-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Erdtmann, Virginie; Tavernier, Geneviève; Contreras, Juan Antonio; Mairal, Aline; Rieu, Cécile; Touzalin, Anne-Marie; Holm, Cecilia; Jégou, Bernard; Langin, Dominique

    2004-10-01

    Inactivation of the hormone-sensitive lipase gene (HSL) confers male sterility with a major defect in spermatogenesis. Several forms of HSL are expressed in testis. HSLtes mRNA and protein are found in early and elongated spermatids, respectively. The other forms are expressed in diploid germ cells and interstitial cells of the testis. To determine whether the absence of the testis-specific form of HSL, HSLtes, was responsible for the infertility in HSL-null mice, we generated transgenic mice expressing HSLtes under the control of its own promoter. The transgenic animals were crossed with HSL-null mice to produce mice deficient in HSL in nongonadal tissues but expressing HSLtes in haploid germ cells. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity was almost completely blunted in HSL-deficient testis. Mice with one allele of the transgene showed an increase in enzymatic activity and a small elevation in the production of spermatozoa. The few fertile hemizygous male mice produced litters of very small to small size. The presence of the two alleles led to a doubling in cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity, which represented 25% of the wild type values associated with a qualitatively normal spermatogenesis and a partial restoration of sperm reserves. The fertility of these mice was totally restored with normal litter sizes. In line with the importance of the esterase activity, HSLtes transgene expression reversed the cholesteryl ester accumulation observed in HSL-null mice. Therefore, expression of HSLtes and cognate cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity leads to a rescue of the infertility observed in HSL-deficient male mice. PMID:15292223

  2. The testicular form of hormone-sensitive lipase HSLtes confers rescue of male infertility in HSL-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Erdtmann, Virginie; Tavernier, Geneviève; Contreras, Juan Antonio; Mairal, Aline; Rieu, Cécile; Touzalin, Anne-Marie; Holm, Cecilia; Jégou, Bernard; Langin, Dominique

    2004-10-01

    Inactivation of the hormone-sensitive lipase gene (HSL) confers male sterility with a major defect in spermatogenesis. Several forms of HSL are expressed in testis. HSLtes mRNA and protein are found in early and elongated spermatids, respectively. The other forms are expressed in diploid germ cells and interstitial cells of the testis. To determine whether the absence of the testis-specific form of HSL, HSLtes, was responsible for the infertility in HSL-null mice, we generated transgenic mice expressing HSLtes under the control of its own promoter. The transgenic animals were crossed with HSL-null mice to produce mice deficient in HSL in nongonadal tissues but expressing HSLtes in haploid germ cells. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity was almost completely blunted in HSL-deficient testis. Mice with one allele of the transgene showed an increase in enzymatic activity and a small elevation in the production of spermatozoa. The few fertile hemizygous male mice produced litters of very small to small size. The presence of the two alleles led to a doubling in cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity, which represented 25% of the wild type values associated with a qualitatively normal spermatogenesis and a partial restoration of sperm reserves. The fertility of these mice was totally restored with normal litter sizes. In line with the importance of the esterase activity, HSLtes transgene expression reversed the cholesteryl ester accumulation observed in HSL-null mice. Therefore, expression of HSLtes and cognate cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity leads to a rescue of the infertility observed in HSL-deficient male mice.

  3. Beyond stimulus deprivation: iron deficiency and cognitive deficits in postinstitutionalized children.

    PubMed

    Doom, Jenalee R; Gunnar, Megan R; Georgieff, Michael K; Kroupina, Maria G; Frenn, Kristin; Fuglestad, Anita J; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2014-01-01

    Children adopted from institutions have been studied as models of the impact of stimulus deprivation on cognitive development (Nelson, Bos, Gunnar, & Sonuga-Barke, 2011), but these children may also suffer from micronutrient deficiencies (Fuglestad et al., 2008). The contributions of iron deficiency (ID) and duration of deprivation on cognitive functioning in children adopted from institutions between 17 and 36 months of age were examined. ID was assessed in 55 children soon after adoption, and cognitive functioning was evaluated 11-14.6 months postadoption when the children averaged 37.4 months old (SD = 4.9). ID at adoption and longer duration of institutional care independently predicted lower IQ scores and executive function (EF) performance. IQ did not mediate the association between ID and EF.

  4. Beyond Stimulus Deprivation: Iron Deficiency and Cognitive Deficits in Post-Institutionalized Children

    PubMed Central

    Doom, Jenalee R.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Kroupina, Maria G.; Frenn, Kristin; Fuglestad, Anita J.

    2014-01-01

    Children adopted from institutions have been studied as models of the impact of stimulus deprivation on cognitive development (Nelson et al., 2011), but these children may also suffer from micronutrient deficiencies (Fuglestad et al., 2008). The contributions of iron deficiency (ID) and duration of deprivation on cognitive functioning in children adopted from institutions between 17 and 36 months of age were examined. ID was assessed in 55 children soon after adoption, and cognitive functioning was evaluated 11–14.6 months post-adoption when the children averaged 37.4 months old (SD = 4.9). ID at adoption and longer duration of institutional care independently predicted lower IQ scores and executive function (EF) performance. IQ did not mediate the association between ID and EF. PMID:24597672

  5. Is growth hormone bad for your heart? Cardiovascular impact of GH deficiency and of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, G; Colao, A; Marzullo, P; Ferone, D; Longobardi, S; Esposito, V; Merola, B

    1997-10-01

    At present, there is growing evidence implicating GH and/or IGF-I in the intricate cascade of events connected with the regulation of heart development and hypertrophy. Moreover, GH excess and/or deficiency have been shown to include in their advanced clinical manifestations almost always an impaired cardiac function, which may reduce life expectancy. This finding is related both to a primitive impairment of heart structure and function and to metabolic changes such as hyperlipidemia, increase of body fat and premature atherosclerosis. Patients with childhood or adulthood-onset GH deficiency have a reduced left ventricular mass and ejection fraction and the indexes of left ventricular systolic function remain markedly depressed during exercise. Conversely, in acromegaly the cardiac enlargement, which is disproportionate to the increase in size of other internal body organs, has been a rather uniform finding. The severity of the acromegalic cardiomyopathy was reported to be correlated better with the disease duration than with circulating GH and/or IGF-I levels. Myocardial hypertrophy with interstitial fibrosis, lymphomononuclear infiltration and areas of monocyte necrosis often results in concentric hypertrophy of both ventricles. The treatment of GH deficiency and excess improved cardiac function. Interestingly, based on the evidence that GH increases cardiac mass, recombinant GH was administered to patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. It increased the myocardial mass and reduced the size of the left ventricular chamber, resulting in improvement of hemodynamics, myocardial energy metabolism and clinical status. These promising results open new perspectives for the use of GH in heart failure.

  6. Blood and hair lead in children with different extents of iron deficiency in Karachi

    SciTech Connect

    Ataur Rahman, Muhammad; Rahman, Bushra; Saeed Ahmad, Muhammad; Blann, Andrew; Ahmed, Nessar

    2012-10-15

    Childhood iron deficiency has a high incidence in Pakistan. Some but not all studies have shown that dietary iron deficiency may cause increased absorption of lead as both compete for the same transporters in the small intestine. Therefore, children in Pakistan, residing in heavily polluted cities like Karachi may be prone to lead poisoning. This hypothesis was tested by investigating blood and hair lead concentrations in children from Karachi who were divided into four groups of iron status; normal, borderline iron deficiency, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia. A prospective observational study was conducted where 269 children were categorized into four groups of iron status using the World Health Organization criteria and one based on soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood iron status was determined using a full blood count, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood lead was determined by graphite atomic absorption spectroscopy, whereas hair lead was assessed using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in children with iron deficiency anaemia (mean [95% confidence intervals] were 24.9 [22.6-27.2] {mu}g/dL) compared to those with normal iron status (19.1 [16.8-21.4] {mu}g/dL) using WHO criteria. In contrast, hair lead content was not significantly different in children of different iron status. Our findings reinforce the importance of not only reducing environmental lead pollution but also the development of national health strategies to reduce childhood iron deficiency in Pakistan.

  7. Vitamin B12 deficiency in children: a treatable cause of neurodevelopmental delay.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rahul; Singh, Archana; Mittal, Medha; Talukdar, Bibek

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency in children can rarely cause neurologic manifestations. In this series, 14 pediatric cases (median age 11 months) have been described in whom association of vitamin B12 deficiency with developmental delay or regression was observed. Severe to profound delay was present in 8 (57%) patients. All the patients were exclusively or predominantly breast-fed and 10 of 12 mothers had low serum vitamin B12 levels. Three to 6 months after treatment, a mean gain of development quotient of 38.8 points was seen in 7 follow-ups. In settings with a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, this association should be actively searched for.

  8. [Iron-deficiency anemia in children. A old problem not yet resolved].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mayans, Jaime A; Ortiz-López, Carolina; García-Campos, Margarita; Cervantes-Bustamante, Roberto; Mata-Rivera, Norberto; Zárate-Mondragón, Flora; Mason-Cordero, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is still a health problem worldwide. Iron supplementation of some foods such as milk formulas and cereals apparently has not been the solution due to bioavailability of iron. In Mexico, there is high prevalence of anemia in children to date, mainly those under 2 years of age and predominantly in the Southern part of the country. Probably the main causes are iron-deficiency anemia in pregnant women, recurrent infections, such as gastroenteritis and parasites, and the most important one undoubtedly, deficient iron intake.

  9. Micronutrient Deficiencies and Plasmodium vivax Malaria among Children in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Benzecry, Silvana Gomes; Alexandre, Márcia Almeida; Vítor-Silva, Sheila; Salinas, Jorge Luis; de Melo, Gisely Cardoso; Marinho, Helyde Albuquerque; Paes, Ângela Tavares; de Siqueira, André Machado; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Leite, Heitor Pons

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a growing body of evidence linking micronutrient deficiencies and malaria incidence arising mostly from P. falciparum endemic areas. We assessed the impact of micronutrient deficiencies on malaria incidence and vice versa in the Brazilian state of Amazonas. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated children <10 years old living in rural communities in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, from May 2010 to May 2011. All children were assessed for sociodemographic, anthropometric and laboratory parameters, including vitamin A, beta-carotene, zinc and iron serum levels at the beginning of the study (May 2010) and one year later (May 2011). Children were followed in between using passive surveillance for detection of symptomatic malaria. Those living in the study area at the completion of the observation period were reassessed for micronutrient levels. Univariate Cox-proportional Hazards models were used to assess whether micronutrient deficiencies had an impact on time to first P. vivax malaria episode. We included 95 children median age 4.8 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 2.3–6.6), mostly males (60.0%) and with high maternal illiteracy (72.6%). Vitamin A deficiencies were found in 36% of children, beta-carotene deficiency in 63%, zinc deficiency in 61% and iron deficiency in 51%. Most children (80%) had at least one intestinal parasite. During follow-up, 16 cases of vivax malaria were diagnosed amongst 13 individuals. Micronutrient deficiencies were not associated with increased malaria incidence: vitamin A deficiency [Hazard ratio (HR): 1.51; P-value: 0.45]; beta-carotene [HR: 0.47; P-value: 0.19]; zinc [HR: 1.41; P-value: 0.57] and iron [HR: 2.31; P-value: 0.16]). Upon reevaluation, children with al least one episode of malaria did not present significant changes in micronutrient levels. Conclusion Micronutrient serum levels were not associated with a higher malaria incidence nor the malaria episode influenced micronutrient levels. Future studies

  10. Dysgraphia in Children: Lasting Psychomotor Deficiency or Transient Developmental Delay?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C. M.; Van Galen, Gerard P.

    1997-01-01

    Used writing tasks recorded on a computer-monitored XY tablet to differentiate between normal variations in psychomotor development and dysgraphia in 16 young children. Found that control of spatial accuracy, not allograph retrieval or size control, discriminated dysgraphic children from others. Poor writers were less accurate than proficient…

  11. The Incidence of and Factors Associated with Vitamin D Deficiency in Newly Diagnosed Children with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Genc, Dildar Bahar; Vural, Sema; Yagar, Gulperi

    2016-07-01

    This retrospective chart review study aimed to assess vitamin D status and identify risk factors associated with vitamin D deficiency and bone parameters in children with cancer at admission. The data of 86 (50 males and 36 females) patients between April 2013 and June 2015 were analyzed. Calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 25(OH)D, age, gender, diagnostic category, body mass index, duration of complaints, and season of blood sampling were recorded. Median age was 7.17 years (range 0.31-17.40) in 29 hematological malignancy and 57 solid tumor patients. According to cut-off level of 20 ng/ml, 63% of children with cancer had vitamin D deficiency at diagnosis with a median 25(OH)D of 16.75 ng/ml. The mean vitamin D value of children >10 years was significantly low in comparison to that observed in younger children [11.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) = = 8.85-14.81 ng/ml vs. 19.81, 95% CI = = 17.02-22.60 ng/ml]. Vitamin D measurement between November and May was a risk factor for vitamin D deficiency (P < 0.05). The frequency of hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia was not different between two groups of vitamin D. Further longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether monitoring vitamin D status and supplementation in children with cancer might prevent future complications related to vitamin D deficiency. PMID:27270075

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among children attending the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, IZ; Mainasara, AS; Erhabor, Osaro; Omojuyigbe, ST; Dallatu, MK; Bilbis, LS; Adias, TC

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human enzyme deficiencies in the world. It is particularly common in populations living in malaria-endemic areas, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. This present study was conducted with the aim of determining the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children visiting the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital for pediatric-related care. The study included 118 children, made up of 77 (65.3%) males and 41 (34.7%) females aged ≤5 years with mean age of 3.26 ± 1.90 years. Randox G6PD quantitative in vitro test screening was used for the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency. Of the 118 children tested, 17 (14.4%) were G6PD-deficient. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency was concentrated predominantly among male children (22.1%). Male sex was significantly correlated with G6PD deficiency among the children studied (r = 7.85, P = 0.01). The highest prevalence occurred among children in the 2- to 5-year age-group. Of the 17 G6PD-deficient children, twelve (70.2%) were moderately deficient, while five (29.4%) were severely deficient. Blood film from G6PD-deficient children indicated the following morphological changes; Heinz bodies, schistocytes, target cells, nucleated red cells, spherocytes, and polychromasia. This present study has shown a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children residing in Sokoto in the northwestern geopolitical zone of Nigeria. The study indicated a male sex bias in the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among the children studied. There is a need for the routine screening of children for G6PD deficiency in our environment, to allow for evidence-based management of these children and to ensure the avoidance of food, drugs, and infective agents that can potentially predispose these children to oxidative stress as well as diseases that deplete micronutrients that protect against oxidative stress. There is need to build capacity in our

  13. Extent of vitamin A deficiency among preschool children and women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    West, Keith P

    2002-09-01

    Knowledge of the extent of vitamin A (VA) deficiency (D) is critical for identifying high-risk populations and mobilizing resources for prevention. Yet, all estimates are necessarily imperfect, often based on assumptions in the absence of data. In 1995, the World Health Organization estimated 254 million children to be VA-deficient and 2.8 million to have xerophthalmia. Subsequently, estimates were changed to 75-140 million and 3.3 million, respectively. Although both sets are consistent with a problem of enormous magnitude, the discrepancies also created uncertainty. The present analysis indicates there are approximately 127 million and 4.4 million preschool children with VAD (serum retinol < 0.70 micro mol/L or displaying abnormal impression cytology) and xerophthalmia, respectively. More than 7.2 million pregnant women in the developing world are VA-deficient (serum or breast-milk vitamin A concentrations < 0.70 micro mol/L), and another 13.5 million have low VA status (0.70-1.05 micro mol/L); >6 million women develop night blindness (XN) during pregnancy annually. Roughly 45% of VA-deficient and xerophthalmic children and pregnant women with low-to-deficient VA status live in South and Southeast Asia. These regions harbor >60% of all cases of maternal XN, three fourths of whom seem to live in India. Africa accounts for 25-35% of the global cases of child and maternal VAD; about 10% of all deficient persons live in the eastern Mediterranean region, 5-15% live in the Western Pacific and approximately 5% live in the Region of the Americas. VA prophylaxis seems to be preventing the number of deficient preschool children from increasing while probably reducing rates of blindness and mortality. Greater effort is needed to assess and prevent VAD and its disorders, particularly among pregnant and lactating women. PMID:12221262

  14. Serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels in children with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mengjie; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Rong, Liping; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Lizhi; Qiu, Zeting; Mo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is an immunopathologic diagnosis based on a renal biopsy, it is characterized by deposits of IgA-containing immune complexes in the mesangium. Adults with IgAN have a galactose-deficient IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposition. There are few studies on the glycosylation of serum IgA1 in children with IgAN. To measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in pediatric patients with IgAN, 72 biopsy-proven IgAN children were divided into 3 groups based on the clinical features: isolated hematuria group (24 patients), hematuria and proteinuria group (22 patients), and nephritic syndrome group (26 patients). They were also divided into 3 groups according to pathologic grading: grade I + II group (25 patients), grade III group (33 patients) and grade IV + V group (14 patients). 30 healthy children were recruited as a control group. We used vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in all groups and controls. Serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in children with IgAN were higher than controls (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 among the different clinical and pathologic grading groups. The values of the area under the curve for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels were 0.976 (95% CI, 0.953-1.000). The cutoff point for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels was 0.125, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 83.3%, with a positive predictive value of 92.6% and a negative predictive value of 73.5% (P < 0.01). Children with IgAN presented serum galactose-deficient IgA1, which has shown no relationship with the clinical manifestations and pathologic grading of the disease. Detection of serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels by vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has a certain clinical value in diagnosis of children with IgAN.

  15. Roles of the lactogens and somatogens in perinatal and postnatal metabolism and growth: studies of a novel mouse model combining lactogen resistance and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, Donald; Oden, Jon; Kelly, Paul A; Mohan, Subburaman; Alliouachene, Samira; Pende, Mario; Wentz, Sabrina; Kerr, Jennifer; Freemark, Michael

    2005-01-01

    To delineate the roles of the lactogens and GH in the control of perinatal and postnatal growth, fat deposition, insulin production, and insulin action, we generated a novel mouse model that combines resistance to all lactogenic hormones with a severe deficiency of pituitary GH. The model was created by breeding PRL receptor (PRLR)-deficient (knockout) males with GH-deficient (little) females. In contrast to mice with isolated GH or PRLR deficiencies, double-mutant (lactogen-resistant and GH-deficient) mice on d 7 of life had growth failure and hypoglycemia. These findings suggest that lactogens and GH act in concert to facilitate weight gain and glucose homeostasis during the perinatal period. Plasma insulin and IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations were decreased in both GH-deficient and double-mutant neonates but were normal in PRLR-deficient mice. Body weights of the double mutants were reduced markedly during the first 3-4 months of age, and adults had striking reductions in femur length, plasma IGF-I and IGF binding protein-3 concentrations, and femoral bone mineral density. By age 6-12 months, however, the double-mutant mice developed obesity, hyperleptinemia, fasting hyperglycemia, relative hypoinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance; males were affected to a greater degree than females. The combination of perinatal growth failure and late-onset obesity and insulin resistance suggests that the lactogen-resistant/GH-deficient mouse may serve as a model for the development of the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Deficient auditory processing in children with Asperger Syndrome, as indexed by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira; Ceponiene, Rita; Kielinen, Marko; Suominen, Kalervo; Jäntti, Ville; Linna, Sirkka Liisa; Moilanen, Irma; Näätänen, Risto

    2003-03-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is characterized by normal language development but deficient understanding and use of the intonation and prosody of speech. While individuals with AS report difficulties in auditory perception, there are no studies addressing auditory processing at the sensory level. In this study, event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded for syllables and tones in children with AS and in their control counterparts. Children with AS displayed abnormalities in transient sound-feature encoding, as indexed by the obligatory ERPs, and in sound discrimination, as indexed by the mismatch negativity. These deficits were more severe for the tone stimuli than for the syllables. These results indicate that auditory sensory processing is deficient in children with AS, and that these deficits might be implicated in the perceptual problems encountered by children with AS.

  17. Exclusion of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone gene mutations in familial isolated GH deficiency by linkage and single strand conformation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Francke, U.; Phillips, J.A. III

    1994-03-01

    The molecular basis and the locus responsible for most familial cases of isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) are still unknown. The GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene has been evaluated as a possible candidate in 23 unrelated families with IGHD, 14 of whom were classified as having autosomal recessive IGHD type IB and 9 of whom had autosomal dominant IGHD type II. Three highly polymorphic microsatellites (dinucleotide repeats), mapped close to GHRH on chromosome 20 by previous linkage studies, were analyzed as markers for the GHRH locus. All available family members were genotyped for D20S44 [no recombination with GHRH at a LOD (logarithm of the odds) score of 3.6]. Noninformative families were also genotyped for D20S45 and/or D20S54 (located at {approximately} 1 and 3 centiMorgan of genetic distance from GHRH, respectively). Twenty families were informative for linkage analysis with 1 or more of these markers. They found at least 1 obligate recombinant with discordance between phenotype and genotype in 19 of the 23 families (83%). There is only a very small chance (1-3% or less) that the discordances observed are due to recombination between the GHRH locus and the marker tested. Concordant segregation was seen in only 1 type IB family (4%). When probands from this and the 3 noninformative families were screened for sequence variants in the 5 exons of the GHRH gene by single strand conformation analysis, no abnormal patterns were observed. They conclude that mutations responsible for IGHD are not within or near the structural gene for GHRH on chromosome 20 in the 23 families studied. As linkage to the GH-1 gene has also been previously excluded in 65% of these families, mutations in a locus or loci unlinked to GH-1 and GHRH must be responsible for the majority of these IGHD families. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Health consequences of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Umesh

    2007-12-01

    Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are one of the biggest worldwide public health problem of today. Their effect is hidden and profoundly affects the quality of human life. Iodine deficiency occurs when the soil is poor in iodine, causing a low concentration in food products and insufficient iodine intake in the population. When iodine requirements are not met, the thyroid may no longer be able to synthesize sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone. The resulting low-level of thyroid hormones in the blood is the principal factor responsible for the series of functional and developmental abnormalities, collectively referred to as IDD. Iodine deficiency is a significant cause of mental developmental problems in children, including implications on reproductive functions and lowering of IQ levels in school-aged children. The consequence of iodine deficiency during pregnancy is impaired synthesis of thyroid hormones by the mother and the foetus. An insufficient supply of thyroid hormones to the developing brain may result in mental retardation. Brain damage and irreversible mental retardation are the most important disorders induced by iodine deficiency. Daily consumption of salt fortified with iodine is a proven effective strategy for prevention of IDD. PMID:21748117

  19. Plasma thyrotropin-releasing hormone concentrations in the rat. Effect of thyroid excess and deficiency and cold exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, C H; Utiger, R D

    1975-01-01

    To investigate the physiology of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) secretion from hypothalamus and brain, a method for measurement of peripheral plasma TRH concentrations in rats was developed. Blood was collected in heparin and dimercaptopropanol containing [3H]TRH to determine recovery. The plasma was extracted with methanol and the redissolved dried methanol extracts applied to anti-TRH Sepharose columns. These columns bound greater than 80% of 125I-TRH applied and had a capacity in excess of 20 ng TRH. TRH was eluted from the anti-TRH Sepharose with acetic acid and quantitated by radioimmunoassay of the lyophilized acetic acid eluate. Mean recovery of unlabeled TRH was 44.7+/-6.1% (SD) and mean recovery of [3H]TRH was 44.0+/-4.0%. Mean plasma TRH concentrations, corrected for recovery, in plasma pools from eight groups of normal male rats (four to seven pools/experiment, five to seven rats/pool) ranged from 7 to 30 pg/ml (mean, 16). In experiments in which rats were given 5, 10, 15, 0r 50 mug thyroxine daily for 1 wk or in thyroidectomized rats, mean plasma TRH concentrations did not differ significantly from those of control animals sacrificed at the same time. In each experiment, four to seven plasma pools, each from five to seven rats, were processed from both control and experimental groups. No changes in plasma TRH concentrations were found in rats exposed to cold (4degreeC) for 30, 60, and 90-180 min. Signigicant increases in plasma thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations were found in all cold-exposed animals. These results provide no evidence that thyroid hormone excess of deficiency affects TRH secretion. If TRH secretion is responsible for cold-induced increases in plasma TSH concentrations, the increase in TRH secretion is of insufficient magnitude to alter periperal plasma TRH concentrations. PMID:811690

  20. Deficiency of the calcium-sensing receptor in the kidney causes parathyroid hormone-independent hypocalciuria.

    PubMed

    Toka, Hakan R; Al-Romaih, Khaldoun; Koshy, Jacob M; DiBartolo, Salvatore; Kos, Claudine H; Quinn, Stephen J; Curhan, Gary C; Mount, David B; Brown, Edward M; Pollak, Martin R

    2012-11-01

    Rare loss-of-function mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor (Casr) gene lead to decreased urinary calcium excretion in the context of parathyroid hormone (PTH)-dependent hypercalcemia, but the role of Casr in the kidney is unknown. Using animals expressing Cre recombinase driven by the Six2 promoter, we generated mice that appeared grossly normal but had undetectable levels of Casr mRNA and protein in the kidney. Baseline serum calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and PTH levels were similar to control mice. When challenged with dietary calcium supplementation, however, these mice had significantly lower urinary calcium excretion than controls (urinary calcium to creatinine, 0.31±0.03 versus 0.63±0.14; P=0.001). Western blot analysis on whole-kidney lysates suggested an approximately four-fold increase in activated Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC2). In addition, experimental animals exhibited significant downregulation of Claudin14, a negative regulator of paracellular cation permeability in the thick ascending limb, and small but significant upregulation of Claudin16, a positive regulator of paracellular cation permeability. Taken together, these data suggest that renal Casr regulates calcium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb, independent of any change in PTH, by increasing the lumen-positive driving force for paracellular Ca(2+) transport.

  1. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration.

    PubMed

    Rouver, Wender Nascimento; Delgado, Nathalie Tristão Banhos; Menezes, Jussara Bezerra; Santos, Roger Lyrio; Moyses, Margareth Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium-dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM), castrated (CAST), castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group) or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group) of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin (BK) was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO), L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT). We observed significant endothelium-dependent, BK-induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP. PMID:26322637

  2. Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, David

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children.

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 Deficiency Does Not Impair the Osteoanabolic Action of Parathyroid Hormone on Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yangli; Yi, Lingxian; Weng, Tujun; Huang, Junlan; Luo, Fengtao; Jiang, Wanling; Xian, Cory J; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: PTH stimulates bone formation in Fgfr3 knockout mice through promotion of proliferation and differentiation in osteoblasts. Introduction: Previous studies showed that endogenous fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is required for parathyroid hormone (PTH)-stimulated bone anabolic effects, however, the exact mechanisms by which PTH stimulate bone formation and the function of FGF receptors in mediating these actions are not fully defined. FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) has been characterized as an important regulator of bone metabolism and is confirmed to cross-talk with PTH/PTHrP signal in cartilage and bone development. Methods: Fgfr3 knockout and wild-type mice at 2-month-old and 4-month-old were intraperitoneally injected with PTH intermittently for 4 weeks and then the skeletal responses to PTH were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and bone histomorphometry. Results: Intermittent PTH treatment improved bone mineral density (BMD) and femoral mechanical properties in both Fgfr3-/- and wild-type mice. Histomorphometric analysis showed that bone formation and bone resorption were increased in both genotypes following PTH treatment. PTH treatment increased trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) in WT and Fgfr3-deficient mice. The anabolic response in Fgfr3-deficient and wild-type bone is characterized by an increase of both bone formation and resorption-related genes following PTH treatment. In addition, we found that Fgfr3 null osteoblasts (compared to wild-type controls) maintained normal abilities to response to PTH-stimulated increase of proliferation, differentiation, expression of osteoblastic marker genes (Cbfa1, Osteopontin and Osteocalcin), and phosphorylation of Erk1/2. Conclusions: Bone anabolic effects of PTH were not impaired by the absence of FGFR3, suggesting that the FGFR3 signaling may not be required for osteoanabolic effects of PTH activities. PMID:27489502

  4. Expression of human hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in postmeiotic germ cells confers normal fertility to HSL-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu Pei; Chung, Shari; Soni, Krishnakant; Bourdages, Hugo; Hermo, Louis; Trasler, Jacquetta; Mitchell, Grant A

    2004-12-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, Lipe, E.C.3.1.1.3) is a multifunctional fatty acyl esterase that is essential for male fertility and spermatogenesis and that also plays important roles in the function of adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, and adrenal cortical cells. Gene-targeted HSL-deficient (HSL-/-) male mice are infertile, have a 2-fold reduction in testicular mass, a 2-fold elevation of the ratio of esterified to free cholesterol in testis, and unique morphological abnormalities in round and elongating spermatids. Postmeiotic germ cells in the testis express a specific HSL isoform. We created transgenic mice expressing a normal human testicular HSL cDNA from the mouse protamine-1 promoter, which mediates expression specifically in postmeiotic germ cells. Testicular cholesteryl esterase activity was undetectable in HSL-/- mice, but in HSL-/- males expressing the testicular transgene, activity was 2-fold greater than normal. HSL transgene mRNA became detectable in testes between 19 and 25 days of age, coinciding with the first wave of postmeiotic transcription in round spermatids. In contrast to nontransgenic HSL-/- mice, HSL-/- males expressing the testicular transgene were normal with respect to fertility, testicular mass, testicular esterified/free cholesterol ratio, and testicular histology. Their cauda epididymides contained abundant, normal-appearing spermatozoa. We conclude that human testicular HSL is functional in mouse testis and that the mechanism of infertility in HSL-deficient males is cell autonomous and resides in postmeiotic germ cells, because HSL expression in these cells is in itself sufficient to restore normal fertility.

  5. Prevalence of Iron deficiency anemia in children with liver cirrhosis: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zareifar, Soheila; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Rahanjam, Najmeh; Farahmand Far, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among the many complications reported for cirrhosis, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has attracted much attention. This type of anemia, in contrast to other types of anemia, is easy to treat prophylactically, but if left untreated can lead to a poor quality of life. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemoglobin and serum iron levels among patients with liver cirrhosis for the early diagnosis of IDA and to avoid unnecessary testing and iron supplementation. Subjects and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 88 children diagnosed with cirrhosis were included, and the values of hemoglobin, serum iron levels and relationship between serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), prothrombine time (PT), international normalization ratio (INR), total and direct bilirubin and hepatic enzymes were estimated using paired t test, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Forty-six (52.3%) of 88 children were girls and 42 (47.7%) were boys. Forty-eight (54.5%) patients had anemia and 8 (9%) had iron deficiency anemia (5 boys, 5.6%, and 3 girls, 3.4%). No relationships were observed between iron deficiency anemia and the patient’s age or gender, whereas there was a relationship between iron deficiency and severity and duration of the disease, although the correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The high frequency of iron deficiency anemia in children with cirrhosis (9%) suggests that timely screening should be used for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26261697

  6. Prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in children aged 6-9 years in Wukro, northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed Central

    Kassaye, T.; Receveur, O.; Johns, T.; Becklake, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in children aged 6-9 years in northern Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out and the data were analysed for 824 (61.5%) of 1339 eligible children for whom there was complete information on biochemical vitamin A status, dietary vitamin A intake, ocular examination for xerophthalmia, and anthropometry. FINDINGS: The prevalence of xerophthalmia was 5.8%; serum retinol levels were below 0.35 mumol/l and between 0.35 and 0.70 mumol/l in 8.4% and 51.1% of the children respectively. The liver vitamin A reserve (modified relative dose response ratio > or = 0.06) was low in 41.0% of the children. CONCLUSION: The high prevalence of severe vitamin A deficiency in children aged 6-9 years indicates the need to reevaluate the practice of targeting vitamin A supplementation programmes on children under 6 years of age in areas where vitamin A deficiency is endemic. PMID:11417037

  7. Nutritional Deficiencies and Food Insecurity Among HIV-infected Children in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Modlin, Chelsea E.; Naburi, Helga; Hendricks, Kristy M.; Lyatuu, Goodluck; Kimaro, Josphine; Adams, Lisa V.; Palumbo, Paul E.; von Reyn, C. Fordham

    2014-01-01

    Background: Poor nutrition has been associated with impaired immunity and accelerated disease progression in HIV-infected children. The aim of this study was to quantify the levels of nutrient intake in HIV-infected children and compare these to standard recommendations. Methods: We surveyed HIV-infected Tanzanian children enrolled in a pediatric care program that provided routine nutritional counseling and vitamin supplementation. We obtained anthropometric measurements and determined 24-hour macronutrient and micronutrient intakes and food insecurity. Values were compared to recommended nutrient intakes based on age and gender. Results: We interviewed 48 pairs of children and their caregiver(s). The age of the child ranged from 2-14 years; median age 6 and 60% female. The median weight-for-height z-score for children ≤ 5 years was 0.69 and BMI-for-age z-scores for children >5 was -0.84. Macronutrient evaluation showed that 29 (60%) children were deficient in dietary intake of energy; deficiency was more common in older children (p=0.004). Micronutrient evaluation shows that over half of study subjects were deficient in dietary intake of vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, folate, vitamin B12, and calcium. Food insecurity was reported by 20 (58%) caregivers. Conclusions and Public Health Implications: The diets of many HIV-infected children at a specialized treatment center in Tanzania do not meet recommended levels of macro-and micro-nutrients. Food insecurity was a contributory factor. Enhanced dietary counseling and provision of macro- and micro-nutrient supplements will be necessary to achieve optimal nutrition for most HIV-infected children in resource-poor regions.

  8. Factors Influencing the One- and Two-Year Growth Response in Children Treated with Growth Hormone: Analysis from an Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Judith; Lee, Peter A.; Gut, Robert; Germak, John

    2010-01-01

    To assess gender-, pubertal-, age-related differences in change from baseline height standard deviation score (ΔHSDS), data from 5,797 growth hormone (GH) naïve pediatric patients (<18 years) with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD), Turner syndrome (TS), small for gestational age (SGA), Noonan syndrome (NS), and idiopathic short stature (ISS) were obtained from the ANSWER (American Norditropin Studies: Web-enabled Research) Program registry. For patients with SGA, ΔHSDS at year 1 was significantly greater for males versus females (P = .016), but no other gender differences were observed. For patients with GHD, ΔHSDS was greater in prepubertal than in pubertal patients. Younger patients for both genders (<11 years for boys; <10 years for girls) showed a greater ΔHSDS (P < .05 for GHD, MPHD, and ISS). Overall, positive ΔHSDSs were observed in all patients, with greater growth responses in younger prepubertal children, emphasizing the importance of starting GH treatment early. PMID:20981140

  9. Suitability of School Textbooks for 5 to 7 Year Old Children with Colour Vision Deficiencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrents, Aurora; Bofill, Francesc; Cardona, Genis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to determine, through colorimetric analysis, whether school textbooks for children aged 5 to 7 years contained tasks requiring normal colour vision discrimination for their resolution. In addition, the performance of a group of observers with diverse colour vision deficiencies was evaluated while…

  10. Modification by Social Reinforcement of Deficient Social Behavior of Disadvantaged Kindergarten Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Sally A.; And Others

    Positive social reinforcement (teacher attention) was used to modify the deficient social behavior of two disadvantaged Negro kindergarten children. Subjects were a girl who showed a very high amount of isolate behavior, and a boy who usually played alone, or with girls to the exclusion of boys. Data were collected for one month during half hour…

  11. Peptide T bolus normalizes the growth hormone secretion pattern in two children with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Barbey-Morel, Charlotte; McDonnell, Kevin; Pert, Candace B; Adams, MerriBeth; Farrand, Dean; Ruff, Michael R; Lumpkin, Michael D

    2002-12-01

    In humans, HIV infection reduces growth hormone (GH) secretion contributing to AIDS wasting. In rats, the HIV envelope protein gp120 alone blocks GH secretion both in vitro and in vivo through GH-releasing hormone receptors. Peptide T, a modified octapeptide derived from gp120, normalizes GH secretion. We now report that an intravenous bolus of peptide T normalizes nocturnal GH secretion in two out of three children with AIDS. These results, coupled with the lack of toxicity of this experimental AIDS therapeutic, justify clinical trials for AIDS wasting and pediatric AIDS. A clinical and basic science update on peptide T appears in Current HIV Research. PMID:12535709

  12. Is red meat required for the prevention of iron deficiency among children and adolescents?

    PubMed

    Savva, Savvas C; Kafatos, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency remains the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide despite the fact that global prevention is a high priority. Recent guidelines suggest intake of red meat both in infants and toddlers to prevent iron deficiency. However frequent consumption of red and processed meat may be associated with an increased risk for cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Evidence also suggests that even in vegetarian diets or diets with little consumption of white or red meat, iron status may not be adversely affected. The Eastern Orthodox Christian Church dietary recommendations which is a type of periodic vegetarian diet, has proved beneficial for the prevention of iron deficiency and avoidance of excess iron intake. This paper aims to provide examples of meals for children and adolescents that may be sufficient to meet age specific iron requirements without consumption of red meat beyond the recommended consumption which is once or twice per month.

  13. Compound Deficiencies in Multiple Fibroblast Growth Factor Signalling Components Differentially Impact the Murine Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone System

    PubMed Central

    Chung, W. C. J.; Matthews, T. A.; Tata, B. K.; Tsai, P.-S.

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones control the onset and maintenance of fertility. Aberrant development of the GnRH system underlies infertility in Kallmann syndrome [KS; idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and anosmia]. Some KS patients harbour mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (Fgfr1) and Fgf8 genes. The biological significance of these two genes in GnRH neuronal development was corroborated by the observation that GnRH neurones were severely reduced in newborn transgenic mice deficient in either gene. In the present study, we hypothesised that the compound deficiency of Fgf8 and its cognate receptors, Fgfr1 and Fgfr3, may lead to more deleterious effects on the GnRH system, thereby resulting in a more severe reproductive phenotype in patients harbouring these mutations. This hypothesis was tested by counting the number of GnRH neurones in adult transgenic mice with digenic heterozygous mutations in Fgfr1/Fgf8, Fgfr3/Fgf8 or Fgfr1/Fgfr3. Monogenic heterozygous mutations in Fgfr1, Fgf8 or Fgfr3 caused a 30–50% decrease in the total number of GnRH neurones. Interestingly, mice with digenic mutations in Fgfr1/Fgf8 showed a greater decrease in GnRH neurones compared to mice with a heterozygous defect in the Fgfr1 or Fgf8 alone. This compounding effect was not detected in mice with digenic heterozygous mutations in Fgfr3/Fgf8 or Fgfr1/Fgfr3. These results support the hypothesis that IHH/KS patients with digenic mutations in Fgfr1/Fgf8 may have a further reduction in the GnRH neuronal population compared to patients harbouring monogenic haploid mutations in Fgfr1 or Fgf8. Because only Fgfr1/Fgf8 compound deficiency leads to greater GnRH system defect, this also suggests that these fibroblast growth factor signalling components interact in a highly specific fashion to support GnRH neuronal development. PMID:20553372

  14. Expanding the Spectrum of Founder Mutations Causing Isolated Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Lee, Phil H.; Shaw, Natalie D.; Hall, Janet E.; Plummer, Lacey; Buck, Cassandra L.; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Jarzabek, Katarzyna; Wołczynski, Sławomir; Quinton, Richard; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Dode, Catherine; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Layman, Lawrence C.; Gusella, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Loss of function (LoF) mutations in more than 20 genes are now known to cause isolated GnRH deficiency (IGD) in humans. Most causal IGD mutations are typically private, ie, limited to a single individual/pedigree. However, somewhat paradoxically, four IGD genes (GNRH1, TAC3, PROKR2, and GNRHR) have been shown to harbor LoF founder mutations that are shared by multiple unrelated individuals. It is not known whether similar founder mutations occur in other IGD genes. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether shared deleterious mutations in IGD-associated genes represent founder alleles. Setting: This study was an international collaboration among academic medical centers. Methods: IGD patients with shared mutations, defined as those documented in three or more unrelated probands in 14 IGD-associated genes, were identified from various academic institutions, the Human Gene Mutation Database, and literature reports by other international investigators. Haplotypes of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and short tandem repeats surrounding the mutations were constructed to assess genetic ancestry. Results: A total of eight founder mutations in five genes, GNRHR (Q106R, R262Q, R139H), TACR3 (W275X), PROKR2 (R85H), FGFR1 (R250Q, G687R), and HS6ST1 (R382W) were identified. Most founder alleles were present at low frequency in the general population. The estimated age of these mutant alleles ranged from 1925 to 5600 years and corresponded to the time of rapid human population expansion. Conclusions: We have expanded the spectrum of founder alleles associated with IGD to a total of eight founder mutations. In contrast to the approximately 9000-year-old PROKR2 founder allele that may confer a heterozygote advantage, the rest of the founder alleles are relatively more recent in origin, in keeping with the timing of recent human population expansion and any selective heterozygote advantage of these alleles requires further evaluation. PMID:26207952

  15. Metabolic impact of adult-onset, isolated, growth hormone deficiency (AOiGHD) due to destruction of pituitary somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Lin, Qing; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Subbaiah, Papasani V; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Vankelecom, Hugo; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2011-01-19

    Growth hormone (GH) inhibits fat accumulation and promotes protein accretion, therefore the fall in GH observed with weight gain and normal aging may contribute to metabolic dysfunction. To directly test this hypothesis a novel mouse model of adult onset-isolated GH deficiency (AOiGHD) was generated by cross breeding rat GH promoter-driven Cre recombinase mice (Cre) with inducible diphtheria toxin receptor mice (iDTR) and treating adult Cre(+/-),iDTR(+/-) offspring with DT to selectively destroy the somatotrope population of the anterior pituitary gland, leading to a reduction in circulating GH and IGF-I levels. DT-treated Cre(-/-),iDTR(+/-) mice were used as GH-intact controls. AOiGHD improved whole body insulin sensitivity in both low-fat and high-fat fed mice. Consistent with improved insulin sensitivity, indirect calorimetry revealed AOiGHD mice preferentially utilized carbohydrates for energy metabolism, as compared to GH-intact controls. In high-fat, but not low-fat fed AOiGHD mice, fat mass increased, hepatic lipids decreased and glucose clearance and insulin output were impaired. These results suggest the age-related decline in GH helps to preserve systemic insulin sensitivity, and in the context of moderate caloric intake, prevents the deterioration in metabolic function. However, in the context of excess caloric intake, low GH leads to impaired insulin output, and thereby could contribute to the development of diabetes.

  16. Long-term Treatment with Oriental Medicinal Herb Artemisia princeps Alters Neuroplasticity in a Rat Model of Ovarian Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Bum; Kwon, Byeong-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Ji; Kim, Ji-Won; Chon, Jeong-Woo; Do, Moon-Ho; Park, Sang-Yong; Kim, Sun-Yeou; Maeng, Sung-Ho; Park, Yoo-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Artemisia princeps (AP) is a flowering perennial used as a traditional medicine and dietary supplement across East Asia. No study has yet assessed its effects on synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and much less in a model of ovarian hormone deficiency. We examined the influence of chronic oral AP ethanol extract treatment in ovariectomized rats on the induction of long-term depression in a representative synapse (CA3-CA1) of the hippocampus. Ovariectomized rats demonstrated lower trabecular mean bone mineral densities than sham, validating the establishment of pathology. Against this background of pathology, AP-treated ovariectomized rats exhibited attenuated long-term depression (LTD) in CA1 relative to water-treated controls as measured by increased field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSP) activation averages over the post-stimulation period. While pathological significance of long-term depression (LTD) in ovariectomized rats is conflicting, that AP treatment significantly affected its induction offers justification for further study of its influences on plasticity and its related disorders. PMID:25792871

  17. Human hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL): expression in white fat corrects the white adipose phenotype of HSL-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Mélanie; Soni, Krishnakant; Laurin, Nancy; Wang, Shu Pei; Mauriège, Pascale; Jirik, Frank R; Mitchell, Grant A

    2005-09-01

    In white adipose tissue (WAT), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) can mediate lipolysis, a central pathway in obesity and diabetes. Gene-targeted HSL-deficient (HSL-/-) mice with no detectable HSL peptide or activity (measured as cholesteryl esterase) have WAT abnormalities, including low mass, marked heterogeneity of cell diameter, increased diacylglycerol content, and low beta-adrenergic stimulation of adipocyte lipolysis. Three transgenic mouse strains preferentially expressing human HSL in WAT were bred to a HSL-/- background. One, HSL-/- N, expresses normal human HSL (41.3 +/- 9.1% of normal activity); two express a serine-to-alanine mutant (S554A) initially hypothesized to be constitutively active: HSL-/- ML, 50.3 +/- 12.3% of normal, and HSL-/- MH, 69.8 +/- 15.8% of normal. In WAT, HSL-/- N mice resembled HSL+/+ controls in WAT mass, histology, diacylglyceride content, and lipolytic response to beta-adrenergic agents. In contrast, HSL-/- ML and HSL-/- MH mice resembled nontransgenic HSL-/- mice, except that diacylglycerol content and perirenal and inguinal WAT masses approached normal in HSL-/- MH mice. Therefore, 1) WAT expression of normal human HSL markedly improves HSL-/- WAT biochemically, physiologically, and morphologically; 2) similar levels of S554A HSL have a low physiological effect despite being active in vitro; and 3) diacylglycerol accumulation is not essential for the development of the characteristic WAT pathology of HSL-/- mice.

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in children aged 6 to 12 years: single center's experience in Busan

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Young Eun; Kim, Bo Ryung; Choi, Won Bok; Kim, Young Mi; Cho, Min-Jung; Kim, Hye-Young; Park, Kyung Hee; Kim, Kwang Hoon; Chun, Peter; Kim, Su Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the prevalence and risk factors associated with vitamin D deficiency in children. Methods We analyzed the medical records of 330 patients from the age of 6 to 12, who visited the endocrinology clinic of the Department of Pediatrics at Pusan National University Hospital, from September, 2013 to May, 2014. According to their serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, the patients were grouped into either the deficiency group (25(OH)D<20 ng/mL), or the sufficiency group (25(OH)D≥20 ng/mL). The differences between the 2 groups were compared. Results There were 195 patients (59.1%) who had vitamin D deficiency. Their mean serum 25(OH)D level was 14.86±3.20 ng/mL. The differences in sex, age, and pubertal status between the 2 groups were not statistically significant. Weight standard deviation score (SDS), and body mass index SDS, were significantly higher in the vitamin D deficiency group (P=0.002 for each), compared to the sufficiency group. Compared with Autumn, both Spring (odds ratio [OR], 9.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3–22.0), and Winter (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 3.5–10.0), were risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. In multiple logistic regression analysis, only seasonal differences have been confirmed to have an effect on vitamin D deficiency. Conclusion Vitamin D deficiency in children aged 6 to 12 years is very common. Spring and Winter are the most important risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. We suggest that it is necessary to supplement the guideline for the vitamin D intake according to our situation. PMID:27777907

  19. Evaluation of Iron deficiency anemia and BMI in children suffering from Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Bazmamoun, H; Razavi, Z; Esfahani, H; Arefian

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest an association between H. pylori infection and disorders such as iron deficiency anemia and growth delay. Considering the high prevalence of H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia, this study was performed in order to evaluate their relevance in children undergoing an upper endoscopy. Materials and Methods In this case-control study, children aged 2 to 16 years old, undergoing endoscopy from March 2012 to March 2013 at Besat Hospital of Hamedan, were selected. Participants were divided in H.Pylori infected and non-infected groups. Then the two groups were compared in terms of body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of iron deficiency anemia. The presence of Helicobacter pylori infection in children was confirmed by Giemsa staining of gastric biopsy specimens. Collected data was analyzed by SPSS 17.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) and t-test and chi-square. Results In this study, 200 children (94 male and 106 female) were evaluated. The most common presenting symptom in both groups was abdominal pain. 8.2 % (9 cases) of the infected patients and 10.5% (10 cases) of the non-infected patients had iron deficiency anemia which this difference was not statistically significant (p=270). Also, no statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups in terms of gender (p=0.32), hemoglobin (p=0.35), Ferritin levels (p= 0.275) and body mass index (p= 0.273). Conclusion The results of this study not showed an association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia or body mass index in studied children PMID:25598957

  20. Identification of factors associated with good response to growth hormone therapy in children with short stature: results from the ANSWER Program®

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify factors associated with growth in children on growth hormone (GH) therapy using data from the American Norditropin Studies: Web-enabled Research (ANSWER) Program® registry. Methods GH-naïve children with GH deficiency, multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, idiopathic short stature, Turner syndrome, or a history of small for gestational age were eligible (N = 1,002). Using a longitudinal statistical approach, predictive factors were identified in patients with GHD for change from baseline in height standard deviation score (ΔHSDS) following 2 years of treatment. Results Gradual increases in ΔHSDS over time were observed for all diagnostic categories. Significant predictive factors of ΔHSDS, ranked by significance were: height velocity (HV) at 4 months > baseline age > baseline HSDS > baseline body mass index (BMI) SDS > baseline insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) SDS; gender was not significant. HV at 4 months and baseline BMI SDS were positively correlated, whereas baseline age, HSDS, and IGF-I SDS were negatively correlated with ΔHSDS. Conclusions These results may help guide GH therapy based on pretreatment characteristics and early growth response. PMID:21899782

  1. Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B; Prezelj, J; Poredos, P; Clayton, R N

    1999-02-01

    Hypopituitary patients have increased mortality from vascular disease, and in these patients, early markers of atherosclerosis [increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and reduced distensibility] are more prevalent. As GH replacement can reverse some risk factors of atherosclerosis, the present study examined the effect of GH treatment on morphological and functional changes in the carotid and brachial arteries of GH-deficient (GHD) adults. Eleven GHD hypopituitary men (24-49 yr old) were treated with recombinant human GH (0.018 U/kg BW x day) for 18 months. IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bifurcation (CB), and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) of the brachial artery were measured by B mode ultrasound before and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment, and values were compared with those in 12 age-matched control men. Serum concentrations of lipids, lipoprotein(a), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were also measured. In GHD men before treatment the IMTs of the CCA [mean(SD), 0.67(0.05) mm] and CB [0.75(0.04) mm] were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those in control men [0.52(0.07) and 0.65(0.07) mm, respectively]. GH treatment normalized the IMT of the CCA by 6 months [0.53(0.04) mm] and that of the CB by 3 months [0.68(0.05) mm]. The IMT of the carotid artery (CCA and CB) was negatively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = -0.53; P < 0.0001). There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated EDD of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6 and 18 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). GH treatment increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3 and 6 months, but did not reduce total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol and was without effect on lipoprotein(a). There was no correlation between plasma lipids and changes in IMT or EDD of the arteries examined. In conclusion, GH treatment of hypopituitary GHD men reverses early morphological and

  2. A recurring dominant negative mutation causes autosomal dominant growth hormone deficiency - a clinical research center study

    SciTech Connect

    Cogan, J.D.; Prince, M.; Phillips, J.

    1995-12-01

    Familial isolated GH deficiency type II (IGHD-II) is an autosomal dominant disorder that has been previously shown in some patients to be caused by heterogeneous GH gene defects that affect GH messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. We report here our findings of multiple G{r_arrow}A transitions of the first base of the donor splice site of IVS 3 (+1G{r_arrow}A) in IGHD II subjects from three nonrelated kindreds from Sweden, North America, and South Africa. This + 1G{r_arrow}A substitution creates an NlaIII site that was used to demonstrate that all affected individuals in all three families were heterozygous for the mutation. To determine the effect of this mutation of GH mRNA processing, HeLa cells were transfected with expression plasmids containing normal or mutant +1G{r_arrow}A alleles, and complementary DNAs from the resulting GH mRNAs were sequenced. The mutation was found to destroy the GH IVS3 donor splice site, causing skipping of exon 3 and loss of the codons for amino acids 32-71 of the mature GH peptide from the mutant GH mRNA. Our finding of exon 3 skipping in transcripts of the +1G{r_arrow}A mutant allele is identical to our previous report of a different sixth base transition (+6T{r_arrow}C) mutation of the IVS 3 donor splice site that also causes IGHD II. Microsatellite analysis of an affected subjects` DNA from each of the three nonrelated kindreds indicates that the +1G{r_arrow}A mutation arose independently in each family. Finding that neither grandparent has the mutation in the first family suggests that it arose de novo in that family. Our data indicate that (1) +1G{r_arrow}A IVS 3 mutations perturb GH mRNA splicing and cause IGHD II; and (2) these mutations can present as de novo GHD cases. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Puberty, statural growth, and growth hormone release in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kuperminc, Michelle N.; Gurka, Matthew J.; Houlihan, Christine M.; Henderson, Richard C.; Roemmich, James N.; Rogol, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are smaller than normally growing children.. The association between the growth hormone (GH) axis and growth in children with CP during puberty is unknown. We compared growth and markers of the GH axis in pre-pubertal and pubertal children with moderate to severe CP and without CP over a three-year period. Study design Twenty children with CP, ages 6–18, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels III–V, were compared to a group of sixty-three normally growing children of similar age. Anthropometry, Tanner stage, bone age, and laboratory analyses were performed every six months for three years. Laboratory values included spontaneous overnight GH release, fasting IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. Repeated measures models were used to evaluate interactions among Tanner stage and group (children with CP vs. reference children), taking into account gender, age, and nutritional status. Results Children with CP grew more slowly than those without CP at all Tanner stages (p<0.01). Patterns of IGF-1 and GH secretion in children with CP were similar to those of the reference group; however, the concentrations of IGF-1 (p<0.01) and GH (p<0.01) were lower in girls with CP, with a similar trend for boys (p=0.10 and 0.14, respectively). Conclusions Diminished circulating IGF-1 and GH concentrations may explain the differences in growth between the two groups. PMID:20216931

  4. Conjunctival impression cytology fails to detect subclinical vitamin A deficiency in young children.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Mahalanabis, D; Wahed, M A; Islam, M; Habte, D; Khaled, M A; Alvarez, J O

    1995-07-01

    Thirty-four asymptomatic children, ages 5-35 mo, were studied to compare the conjunctival impression cytology technique with the relative dose response test in detection of subclinical vitamin A deficiency. Conjunctival smears were collected from the infero-temporal-bulbar conjunctiva of each eye with a strip of cellulose acetate filter paper and transferred onto a glass slide. Venous blood was drawn at 0 and 5 h after administration of an oral dose of 1000 micrograms of retinol palmitate (relative dose response test). An increase in serum retinol concentration (> or = 20%) in the 5-h value was considered indicative of an inadequate liver store of vitamin A and hence subclinical vitamin A deficiency. Of the 34 children, 26 (76.5%) had moderate to severe protein-energy malnutrition. Only three children (9%) had abnormal conjunctival impression cytology, whereas 23 (68%) had abnormal relative dose response. Even more striking was the finding that only two of the 23 children with abnormal relative dose response had abnormal conjunctival impression cytology. The results suggest that the conjunctival impression cytology test has poor agreement with the relative dose response test results in assessing vitamin A status in young children. If relative dose response is considered an acceptable reference method for assessing vitamin A status, then the conjunctival impression cytology test cannot be considered a valid measure of subclinical vitamin A deficiency in this population. PMID:7616303

  5. [Nutritional deficiencies affecting children of the Third World. The example of Ethiopia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Vahlquist, B

    1977-10-01

    For the large non-privileged population groups in developing countries and diet shows many deficiencies, often with major disturbances of health as a consequence. This is particularly true for the children. The monotony and the bulkiness of the traditional diet, the often sparse number of meals as well as periodic deteriorations of the food situation ("hungry season") all contributes to make the nutritional situation precarious. The vicious circle between PEM and infections contribute in a major way to the high mortality rate among preschool children in developing countries. In this paper a review is given of different nutritional deficiency diseases affecting children in the Third World. The practical illustrations derive mainly from Ethiopia. During the period between 1962-1975 there has been lively cooperation in the field of nutritional research between Ethiopia and Sweden.

  6. Deficient Brainstem Encoding of Pitch in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Russo, N. M.; Skoe, E.; Trommer, B.; Nicol, T.; Zecker, S.; Bradlow, A.; Kraus, N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Deficient prosody is a hallmark of the pragmatic (socially contextualized) language impairment in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Prosody communicates emotion and intention and is conveyed through acoustic cues such as pitch contour. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine the subcortical representations of prosodic speech in children with ASD. Methods Using passively-evoked brainstem responses to speech syllables with descending and ascending pitch contours, we examined sensory encoding of pitch in children with ASD who had normal intelligence and hearing and were age-matched with typically-developing (TD) control children. Results We found that some children on the autism spectrum show deficient pitch tracking (evidenced by increased frequency and slope errors and reduced phase locking) compared with TD children. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of subcortical involvement in prosody encoding deficits in this population of children. Significance Our findings may have implications for diagnostic and remediation strategies in a subset of children with ASD and open up an avenue for future investigations. PMID:18558508

  7. Iron deficiency in Indian children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Monica; Jain, Rahul; Singh, Vikrant; Mallika, V

    2010-11-01

    A case control study was conducted at the Child Development and Early Intervention Clinic to determine the body iron status of children with ADHD, and study the correlation between the body iron status and ADHD symptoms. Serum ferritin was measured in newly diagnosed cases with ADHD and compared with that of controls. Correlation was studied between serum ferritin levels and the severity of ADHD symptoms as determined by Conners Rating Scale. Serum ferritin was found to be significantly lower in children with ADHD (6.04 ± 3.85 ng/mL) as compared to controls (48.96 ± 41.64 ng/mL, P value < 0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between serum ferritin levels and oppositional subscore on Conners Rating Scale. PMID:20453262

  8. Elevated serum polybrominated diphenyl ethers and alteration of thyroid hormones in children from Guiyu, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xijin; Liu, Junxiao; Zeng, Xiang; Lu, Fangfang; Chen, Aimin; Huo, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Informal electronic waste (e-waste) recycling results in serious environmental pollution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and heavy metals. This study explored whether there is an association between PBDEs, heavy metal and key growth- and development-related hormones in children from Guiyu, an e-waste area in southern China. We quantified eight PBDE congeners using gas chromatographic mass spectrometry, lead and cadmium utilizing graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, three thyroids with radioimmunoassay and two types of growth hormones by an enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) in 162 children, 4 to 6 years old, from Guiyu. In blood, median total PBDE was 189.99 ng/g lipid. Lead and cadmium concentrations in blood averaged 14.53±4.85 µg dL-1 and 0.77±0.35 µg L-1, respectively. Spearman partial correlation analysis illustrated that lead was positively correlated with BDE153 and BDE183. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was positively correlated with almost all PBDE congeners and negatively correlated with insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), whereas free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4) were negatively correlated with BDE154. However, no correlation between the hormones and blood lead or cadmium levels was found in this study. Adjusted multiple linear regression analysis showed that total PBDEs was negatively associated with FT3 and positively associated with TSH. Notably, FT4 was positively correlated with FT3, house functions as a workshop, and father's work involved in e-waste recycling and negatively correlated with vitamin consumptions. TSH was negatively related with FT4, paternal residence time in Guiyu, working hours of mother, and child bean products intake. IGFBP-3 was positively correlated with IGF-1 and house close to an e-waste dump. These results suggest that elevated PBDEs and heavy metals related to e-waste in Guiyu may be important risk factors for hormone alterations in children.

  9. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders. PMID:26926814

  10. Behavioral Effects of Org 2766, a Synthetic Analog of the Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (4-9), in 14 Outpatient Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buitelaar, Jan K.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen autistic children (ages 5-13) were administered Org 2766 (a synthetic analog of the adrenocorticotrophic hormone 4-9) or a placebo for 4 weeks. The hormone appeared to decrease stereotypic behavior and increase such behaviors as "change toys,""locomote," and "talk," though Aberrant Behavior Checklist ratings did not show significant…

  11. Reinforcement and Stimulant Medication Ameliorate Deficient Response Inhibition in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosch, Keri S; Fosco, Whitney D; Pelham, William E; Waxmonsky, James G; Bubnik, Michelle G; Hawk, Larry W

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the degree to which reinforcement, stimulant medication, and their combination impact response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Across three studies, participants with ADHD (n = 111, 25 girls) and typically-developing (TD) controls (n = 33, 6 girls) completed a standard version of the stop signal task (SST) and/or a reinforcement-manipulation SST with performance-contingent points. In two of these studies, these tasks were performed under placebo or 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg methylphenidate (MPH) conditions. Cross-study comparisons were conducted to test hypotheses regarding the separate and combined effects of reinforcement and methylphenidate on response inhibition among children with ADHD relative to TD controls. Baseline response inhibition was worse among children with ADHD compared to controls. MPH produced dose-related improvements in response inhibition in children with ADHD; compared to non-medicated TD controls, 0.3 mg/kg MPH normalized deficient response inhibition, and 0.6 mg/kg MPH resulted in better inhibition in children with ADHD. Reinforcement improved response inhibition to a greater extent for children with ADHD than for TD children, normalizing response inhibition. The combination of MPH and reinforcement improved response inhibition among children with ADHD compared to reinforcement alone and MPH alone, also resulting in normalization of response inhibition despite repeated task exposure. Deficient response inhibition commonly observed in children with ADHD is significantly improved with MPH and/or reinforcement, normalizing inhibition relative to TD children tested under standard conditions.

  12. Effects of maternal education on diet, anemia, and iron deficiency in Korean school-aged children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigated the relationship among socioeconomic status factors, the risk of anemia, and iron deficiency among school-aged children in Korea. Methods The sample consisted of fourth-grade students aged 10 y recruited from nine elementary schools in Korean urban areas in 2008 (n = 717). Anthropometric and blood biochemistry data were obtained for this cross-sectional observational study. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin levels lower than 11.5 g/dl. Iron deficiency was defined as serum iron levels lower than 40 ug/dl. We also obtained data on parental education from questionnaires and on children's diets from 3-day food diaries. Parental education was categorized as low or high, with the latter representing an educational level beyond high school. Results Children with more educated mothers were less likely to develop anemia (P = 0.0324) and iron deficiency (P = 0.0577) than were those with less educated mothers. This group consumed more protein (P = 0.0004) and iron (P = 0.0012) from animal sources than did the children of less educated mothers, as reflected by their greater consumption of meat, poultry, and derivatives (P < 0.0001). Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant inverse relationship between maternal education and the prevalence of anemia (odds ratio: 0.52; 95% confidence interval: 0.32, 0.85). Conclusions As a contributor to socioeconomic status, maternal education is important in reducing the risk of anemia and iron deficiency and in increasing children's consumption of animal food sources. PMID:22087564

  13. Thyroid hormone receptor-α deletion decreases heart function and exercise performance in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kiao Ling; Canaple, Laurence; Del Carmine, Peggy; Gauthier, Karine; Beylot, Michel; Lo, Ming

    2016-02-01

    The deletion of thyroid hormone receptor-α (TRα) in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice (ApoE(-/-)TRα(0/0)) accelerates the formation of atherosclerotic plaques without aggravation of hypercholesterolemia. To evaluate other predisposition risk factors to atherosclerosis in this model, we studied blood pressure (BP) and cardiac and vascular functions, as well as exercise tolerance in young adult ApoE(-/-)TRα(0/0) mice before the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Telemetric BP recorded for 4 consecutive days showed that the spontaneous systolic BP was slightly decreased in ApoE(-/-)TRα(0/0) compared with ApoE(-/-) mice associated with a reduced locomotor activity. The percentage of animals that completed endurance (57% vs. 89%) and maximal running (0% vs. 89% at 46 cm/s speed in ApoE(-/-)TRα(0/0) and ApoE(-/-) mice, respectively) tests was lower in ApoE(-/-)TRα(0/0) mice. Moreover, during the maximal running test, both maximal running speed and running distance were significantly reduced in ApoE(-/-)TRα(0/0) mice, associated with a blunted BP response to exercise. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a decreased interventricular septum thickness and an increased end-systolic left ventricular volume in ApoE(-/-)TRα(0/0) mice. Accordingly, left ventricular fractional shortening, ejection fraction, and stroke volume were all significantly decreased in ApoE(-/-)TRα(0/0) mice with a concomitant blunted cardiac output. No interstrain difference was observed in vascular reactivity, except that ApoE(-/-)TRα(0/0) mice exhibited an enhanced acetylcholine-induced relaxation in mesenteric and distal femoral arteries. In conclusion, the deletion of TRα in ApoE(-/-) mice alters cardiac structure and contractility; both could contribute to blunted BP response to physical exercise and impaired exercise performance.

  14. Characterization of soybean β-expansin genes and their expression responses to symbiosis, nutrient deficiency, and hormone treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Zhao, Jing; Walk, Thomas C; Liao, Hong

    2014-03-01

    Expansins are plant cell wall-loosening proteins encoded by a superfamily of genes including α-expansin, β-expansin, expansin-like A, and expansin-like B proteins. They play a variety of biological roles during plant growth and development. Expansin genes have been reported in many plant species, and results primarily from graminaceous members indicate that β-expansins are more abundant in monocots than in dicots. Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] is an important legume crop. This work identified nine β-expansin gene family members in soybean (GmEXPBs) that were divided into two distinct classes based on phylogeny and gene structure, with divergence between the two groups occurring more in introns than in exons. A total of 887 hormone-responsive and environmental stress-related putative cis-elements from 188 families were found in the 2-kb upstream region of GmEXPBs. Variations in number and type of cis-elements associated with each gene indicate that the function of these genes is differentially regulated by these signals. Expression analysis confirmed that the family members were ubiquitously, yet differentially expressed in soybean. Responsiveness to nutrient deficiency stresses and regulation by auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) and cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine) varied among GmEXPBs. In addition, most β-expansin genes were associated with symbiosis of soybean inoculated with Rhizobium or abuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Taken together, these results systematically investigate the characteristics of the entire GmEXPB family in soybean and comprise the first report analyzing the relationship of GmEXPBs with rhizobial or AMF symbiosis. This information is a valuable step in the process of understanding the expansin protein functions in soybean and opens avenues for continued researches.

  15. Peripheral bone mass is not affected by winter vitamin D deficiency in children and young adults from Ushuaia.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, M B; Wittich, A; Mautalen, C; Chaperon, A; Kizlansky, A

    2000-09-01

    Low vitamin D levels in elderly people are associated with reduced bone mass, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and increased fracture risk. Its effect on the growing skeleton is not well known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible influence of chronic winter vitamin D deficiency and higher winter parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels on bone mass in prepubertal children and young adults. The study was carried out in male and female Caucasian subjects. A total of 163 prepubertal children (X age +/- 1 SD: 8.9 +/- 0.7 years) and 234 young adults (22.9 +/- 3.6 years) who had never received vitamin D supplementation were recruited from two areas in Argentina: (1)Ushuaia (55 degrees South latitude), where the population is known to have low winter 25OHD levels and higher levels of PTH in winter than in summer, and (2)Buenos Aires (34 degrees S), where ultraviolet (UV) radiation and vitamin D nutritional status in the population are adequate all year round. Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) of the ultradistal and distal radius were measured in the young adults. Only distal radius measurements were taken in the children. Similar results were obtained in age-sex matched groups from both areas. The only results showing significant difference corresponded to comparison among the Ushuaian women: those whose calcium (Ca) intake was below 800 mg/day presented lower BMD and BMC values than those whose Ca intake was above that level (0.469 +/- 0.046 versus 0.498 +/- 0.041 g/cm(2), P < 0.02; 3.131 +/- 0.367 versus 3.339 +/- 0.386 g, P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, peripheral BMD and BMC were similar in children and young adults from Ushuaia and Buenos Aires in spite of the previously documented difference between both areas regarding UV radiation and winter vitamin D status. BMD of axial skeletal areas as well the concomitant effect of a low Ca diet and vitamin D deficiency on the growing skeleton should be studied further.

  16. Vitamin A deficiency impacts the structural segregation of gut microbiota in children with persistent diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zeyu; Wang, Yuting; Yang, Ting; Zhan, Xue; Li, Zhongyue; Hu, Huajian; Li, Tingyu; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether gut microbiota is associated with vitamin A nutritional levels in children with persistent diarrhea, a total of 59 pediatric patients with persistent diarrhea aged 1–12 months were selected from the Department of Gastroenterology at the Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, China. Subjects were hospitalized and divided into VA-deficient (n = 30) and VA-normal (n = 29) groups according to their venous serum retinol levels. Fecal samples from all 59 subjects were collected immediately after admission and analyzed by Illumina MiSeq for 16S rRNA genes to characterize the overall microbiota of the samples. The gut microbiota of the VA-deficient and VA-normal groups were compared using a bioinformatic statistical approach. The Shannon index (p = 0.02), Simpson index (p = 0.01) and component diagram data indicated significantly lower diversity in the VA-deficient than the VA-normal group. A metagenome analysis (LEfSe) and a differentially abundant features approach using Metastats revealed that Escherichia coli and Clostridium butyricum were the key phylotypes of the VA-normal group, while Enterococcus predominated the VA-deficient group. In conclusion, the diversity of gut microbiota and the key phylotypes are significantly different in children with persistent diarrhea at different VA nutritional levels.

  17. Vitamin A deficiency impacts the structural segregation of gut microbiota in children with persistent diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zeyu; Wang, Yuting; Yang, Ting; Zhan, Xue; Li, Zhongyue; Hu, Huajian; Li, Tingyu; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether gut microbiota is associated with vitamin A nutritional levels in children with persistent diarrhea, a total of 59 pediatric patients with persistent diarrhea aged 1–12 months were selected from the Department of Gastroenterology at the Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, China. Subjects were hospitalized and divided into VA-deficient (n = 30) and VA-normal (n = 29) groups according to their venous serum retinol levels. Fecal samples from all 59 subjects were collected immediately after admission and analyzed by Illumina MiSeq for 16S rRNA genes to characterize the overall microbiota of the samples. The gut microbiota of the VA-deficient and VA-normal groups were compared using a bioinformatic statistical approach. The Shannon index (p = 0.02), Simpson index (p = 0.01) and component diagram data indicated significantly lower diversity in the VA-deficient than the VA-normal group. A metagenome analysis (LEfSe) and a differentially abundant features approach using Metastats revealed that Escherichia coli and Clostridium butyricum were the key phylotypes of the VA-normal group, while Enterococcus predominated the VA-deficient group. In conclusion, the diversity of gut microbiota and the key phylotypes are significantly different in children with persistent diarrhea at different VA nutritional levels. PMID:27698538

  18. Deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care for ethnic minority children: a qualitative assessment among care providers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma outcomes are generally worse for ethnic minority children. Cultural competence training is an instrument for improving healthcare for ethnic minority patients. To develop effective training, we explored the mechanisms in paediatric asthma care for ethnic minority patients that lead to deficiencies in the care process. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews on care for ethnic minority children with asthma (aged 4-10 years) with paediatricians (n = 13) and nurses (n = 3) in three hospitals. Interviews were analysed qualitatively with a framework method, using a cultural competence model. Results Respondents mentioned patient non-adherence as the central problem in asthma care. They related non-adherence in children from ethnic minority backgrounds to social context factors, difficulties in understanding the chronic nature of asthma, and parents’ language barriers. Reactions reported by respondents to patients’ non-adherence included retrieving additional information, providing biomedical information, occasionally providing referrals for social context issues, and using informal interpreters. Conclusions This study provides keys to improve the quality of specialist paediatric asthma care to ethnic minority children, mainly related to non-adherence. Care providers do not consciously recognise all the mechanisms that lead to deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care they provide to ethnic minority children (e.g. communicating mainly from a biomedical perspective and using mostly informal interpreters). Therefore, the learning objectives of cultural competence training should reflect issues that care providers are aware of as well as issues they are unaware of. PMID:22551452

  19. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Vietnamese Children, 6 to 11 Years Old.

    PubMed

    Le Nguyen Bao, Khanh; Tran Thuy, Nga; Nguyen Huu, Chinh; Khouw, Ilse; Deurenberg, Paul

    2016-07-01

    In a population sample of 385 children, 6 to 11 years old, venous blood parameters-hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, red blood cell count (RBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), C-reactive protein (CRP), and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP)-were determined to get insight into the iron status. The prevalence of anemia was 11.4%; 5.6% had iron deficiency (ID), whereas 0.4% had ID anemia. Correction for inflammation based on CRP and AGP did not markedly change the overall prevalence of ID and ID anemia. Stunted children had lower Hb and ferritin values compared with nonstunted children, and thin children had lower values compared with normal-weight or overweight and obese children. Many nonanemic children had alert values for RBC, MCV, MCH, and MCHC. It is concluded that although the prevalence of anemia is of the magnitude of a mild public health problem, the iron status of many nonanemic children is borderline, as indicated by a high number of children with low values for red blood cytology. PMID:27052301

  20. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9-5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r(2) = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r(2) = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  1. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9–5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r2 = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r2 = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  2. Urinary levels of early kidney injury molecules in children with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Güneş, Ali; Aktar, Fesih; Tan, İlhan; Söker, Murat; Uluca, Ünal; Balık, Hasan; Mete, Nuriye

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate urine early kidney injury molecules, including human kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty-acid binding protein (L-FABP), N-acetyl-b-D-glucosaminidase A (NAG), and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in children with vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency (CD). Twelve children with vitamin B12 deficiency and 20 healthy matched controls were included. Hematologic parameters, serum urea, creatinine (Cr), electrolytes, B12 and folate levels were recorded. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated. Urine protein, electrolytes, andurinary early markers were measured. Patients with CD had significantly higher urine electrolyte/Cr ratios (p <0.05). Significantly higher urinary KIM-1/Cr, L-FABP/Cr, NAG/Cr and NGAL/Cr were found in CD group (p <0.05). Significant negative correlations were found between levels of serum B12 and urinary markers in the patients (p <0.05). Increased urinary kidney injury molecules and electrolytes in children with B12 deficiency suggest a possible subclinical renal dysfunction, which cannot be determined by conventional kidney function tests.

  3. Urinary levels of early kidney injury molecules in children with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Güneş, Ali; Aktar, Fesih; Tan, İlhan; Söker, Murat; Uluca, Ünal; Balık, Hasan; Mete, Nuriye

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate urine early kidney injury molecules, including human kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty-acid binding protein (L-FABP), N-acetyl-b-D-glucosaminidase A (NAG), and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in children with vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency (CD). Twelve children with vitamin B12 deficiency and 20 healthy matched controls were included. Hematologic parameters, serum urea, creatinine (Cr), electrolytes, B12 and folate levels were recorded. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated. Urine protein, electrolytes, andurinary early markers were measured. Patients with CD had significantly higher urine electrolyte/Cr ratios (p <0.05). Significantly higher urinary KIM-1/Cr, L-FABP/Cr, NAG/Cr and NGAL/Cr were found in CD group (p <0.05). Significant negative correlations were found between levels of serum B12 and urinary markers in the patients (p <0.05). Increased urinary kidney injury molecules and electrolytes in children with B12 deficiency suggest a possible subclinical renal dysfunction, which cannot be determined by conventional kidney function tests. PMID:27606644

  4. Vitamin A deficiency and low prevalence of anemia in Yaqui Indian children in northwest Mexico.

    PubMed

    Valencia, M E; Astiazarán, H; Esparza, J; González, L; Grijalva, M I; Cervera, A; Zazueta, P

    1999-12-01

    A study of 296 school-age Yaqui Indian children (6-10 y) was conducted in 26 rural communities. Vitamin A status was determined by retinol and carotenoid serum levels according to a method described previously (IVACG, 1982). Serum retinol and carotenoids in children were analyzed according to community size. Vitamin A intake was assessed in a sub-sample by means of a 24 h recall questionnaire. Serum retinol distribution showed that 6.3% of the children were below 10 microg/100 mL (0.35 micromol/L) and 40% were in the range of 10-20 microg/100 mL (0.35-0.70 micromol/L). Differences (p < 0.02) were found between small and large communities (Median, 95% CI): 19.2 (17.1, 20.9) microg/100 mL and 22.9 (20.3, 24.1) microg/100 mL. Serum carotenoid levels were significantly higher in large than in small and medium communities: 72 (68.2, 77.8) microg/100 mL versus 62.4 (53.3, 68.2) and 62.4 (55.7, 69.6) microg/100 mL, respectively. Food staples were wheat flour tortillas, pinto beans, corn tortillas, few animal products and scarce fresh vegetables. Mean vitamin A consumption was 244+/-29 microg RE (34.9% of the US RDA). Iron status showed that only 4 children were classified as anemic, with two of them having iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficient erythropoiesis was observed in 7.8% of the children and iron depletion only in 4.4%. The Yaqui diet seems to provide adequate amounts of iron but not of vitamin A or its precursors, which renders a vitamin A status of sub-clinical deficiency that could be considered a public health problem. PMID:10737228

  5. Prevalence of IgA deficiency in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moradinejad, Mohammad Hasan; Rafati, Ali Hoseinpoor; Ardalan, Maryam; Rabiei, Mahnaz; Farghadan, Maryam; Ashtiani, Mohammad Taghi Haghi; Pourpak, Zahra; Moin, Mostafa

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate any association between IgA deficiency (IgAD) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) among Iranian children.This case-control study was carried out on 83 children who were diagnosed as JRA according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria; Patients were admitted at the rheumatology clinic of Children's Medical Center, (Tehran). Serum immunoglobulins concentrations were determined by nephelometry method. Control group was 112 healthy children who were matched for age and gender. Informed consent obtained from all parents.Selective IgA deficiency (sIgAD) was found only in a boy (1.2%) among JRA children; however, partial IgA deficiency was found in 6(7.1%) of patients with JRA and in 12(10.7%) of control subjects, this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.46). Immunoglobulins levels in patients with JRA (IgM: 126.7±57.2, IgG: 1182.3±351 and IgA:169.3±98) were significantly higher than their controls (IgM: 104±52, IgG:802±220 and IgA: 94.6±47) (p<0.05). Patients with growth failure had higher IgM, IgG and IgA levels in comparison with patients without growth failure; however, this difference was significant about IgM and IgG levels (p<0.05).In contrast to other similar studies, the number of IgAD did not differ significantly between JRA patients and their control counterpart; this might be partly due to the high rate of consanguineous marriages in Iran that resulted in increased prevalence of clinically undiagnosed partial IgAD in general population. Hence, future epidemiological studies are warranted to make it clear.

  6. Vitamin A deficiency and low prevalence of anemia in Yaqui Indian children in northwest Mexico.

    PubMed

    Valencia, M E; Astiazarán, H; Esparza, J; González, L; Grijalva, M I; Cervera, A; Zazueta, P

    1999-12-01

    A study of 296 school-age Yaqui Indian children (6-10 y) was conducted in 26 rural communities. Vitamin A status was determined by retinol and carotenoid serum levels according to a method described previously (IVACG, 1982). Serum retinol and carotenoids in children were analyzed according to community size. Vitamin A intake was assessed in a sub-sample by means of a 24 h recall questionnaire. Serum retinol distribution showed that 6.3% of the children were below 10 microg/100 mL (0.35 micromol/L) and 40% were in the range of 10-20 microg/100 mL (0.35-0.70 micromol/L). Differences (p < 0.02) were found between small and large communities (Median, 95% CI): 19.2 (17.1, 20.9) microg/100 mL and 22.9 (20.3, 24.1) microg/100 mL. Serum carotenoid levels were significantly higher in large than in small and medium communities: 72 (68.2, 77.8) microg/100 mL versus 62.4 (53.3, 68.2) and 62.4 (55.7, 69.6) microg/100 mL, respectively. Food staples were wheat flour tortillas, pinto beans, corn tortillas, few animal products and scarce fresh vegetables. Mean vitamin A consumption was 244+/-29 microg RE (34.9% of the US RDA). Iron status showed that only 4 children were classified as anemic, with two of them having iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficient erythropoiesis was observed in 7.8% of the children and iron depletion only in 4.4%. The Yaqui diet seems to provide adequate amounts of iron but not of vitamin A or its precursors, which renders a vitamin A status of sub-clinical deficiency that could be considered a public health problem.

  7. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Korean Children Presenting with Nonspecific Lower-Extremity Pain

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Jung; Lee, Juyeob; Lee, Jun Ku

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although interest in the role played by vitamin D in bone health is increasing, little is known about the role of this vitamin in musculoskeletal pain in children. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children presenting with nonspecific lower extremity pains. Materials and Methods From 2011 to 2012, 183 children underwent evaluation for nonspecific lower-extremity pains. Patients with valid causes, such as fractures or transient synovitis, were excluded, as were those with underlying medical conditions, such as cerebral palsy and metabolic disease. Ultimately, 140 patients met the inclusion criteria. Levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25-(OH)D], the ideal indicator of vitamin D status, were measured in these children. Results Eighty-seven boys (62.1%) and 53 girls (37.9%) were included. The mean age at presentation was 5.2 years (range, 2-15). Serum 25-(OH)D levels were <10 ng/mL in 5.7% of patients, 10 to <20 ng/mL in 51.4%, 20 to <30 ng/mL in 37.9%, and ≥30 ng/mL in only 5.0%. Most patients visited the hospital in the winter (41.4%) (summer, 12.9%), and serum 25-(OH)D levels were also lowest in the winter (17.2±5.5 ng/mL). Conclusion This study found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency in Korean children with nonspecific lower-extremity pains, indicating a positive association between vitamin D deficiency and growing pains. More attention should be directed toward vitamin D and its role in the optimization of bone health. PMID:26256984

  8. Vitamin A deficiency and inflammatory markers among preschool children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands

    PubMed Central

    Maqsood, Maria; Dancheck, Barbara; Gamble, Mary V; Palafox, Neal A; Ricks, Michelle O; Briand, Kennar; Semba, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    Background The exclusion of individuals with elevated acute phase proteins has been advocated in order to improve prevalence estimates of vitamin A deficiency in surveys, but it is unclear whether this will lead to sampling bias. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the exclusion of individuals with elevated acute phase proteins is associated with sampling bias and to characterize inflammation in children with night blindness. Methods In a survey in the Republic of the Marshall Islands involving 281 children, aged 1–5 years, serum retinol, C-reactive protein (CRP), and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were measured. Results Of 281 children, 24 (8.5%) had night blindness and 165 (58.7%) had serum retinol <0.70 μmol/L. Of 248 children with AGP and CRP measurements, 123 (49.6%) had elevated acute phase proteins (CRP >5 mg/L and/or AGP >1000 mg/L). Among children with and without night blindness, the proportion with serum retinol <0.70 μmol/L was 79.2% and 56.8% (P = 0.03) and with anemia was 58.3% and 35.7% (P = 0.029), respectively. The proportion of children with serum retinol <0.70 μmol/L was 52.0% after excluding children with elevated acute phase proteins. Among children with and without elevated acute phase proteins, mean age was 2.8 vs 3.2 years (P = 0.016), the proportion of boys was 43.1% vs. 54.3% (P = 0.075), with no hospitalizations in the last year was 11.0% vs 23.6% (P = 0.024), and with anemia was 43.8% vs 31.7% (P = 0.05), respectively. Conclusions Exclusion of children with inflammation in this survey of vitamin A deficiency does not improve prevalence estimates for vitamin A deficiency and instead leads to sampling bias for variables such as age, gender, anemia, and hospitalization history. PMID:15588289

  9. Mercury exposure, nutritional deficiencies and metabolic disruptions may affect learning in children

    PubMed Central

    Dufault, Renee; Schnoll, Roseanne; Lukiw, Walter J; LeBlanc, Blaise; Cornett, Charles; Patrick, Lyn; Wallinga, David; Gilbert, Steven G; Crider, Raquel

    2009-01-01

    Among dietary factors, learning and behavior are influenced not only by nutrients, but also by exposure to toxic food contaminants such as mercury that can disrupt metabolic processes and alter neuronal plasticity. Neurons lacking in plasticity are a factor in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and mental retardation. Essential nutrients help maintain normal neuronal plasticity. Nutritional deficiencies, including deficiencies in the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, the amino acid methionine, and the trace minerals zinc and selenium, have been shown to influence neuronal function and produce defects in neuronal plasticity, as well as impact behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Nutritional deficiencies and mercury exposure have been shown to alter neuronal function and increase oxidative stress among children with autism. These dietary factors may be directly related to the development of behavior disorders and learning disabilities. Mercury, either individually or in concert with other factors, may be harmful if ingested in above average amounts or by sensitive individuals. High fructose corn syrup has been shown to contain trace amounts of mercury as a result of some manufacturing processes, and its consumption can also lead to zinc loss. Consumption of certain artificial food color additives has also been shown to lead to zinc deficiency. Dietary zinc is essential for maintaining the metabolic processes required for mercury elimination. Since high fructose corn syrup and artificial food color additives are common ingredients in many foodstuffs, their consumption should be considered in those individuals with nutritional deficits such as zinc deficiency or who are allergic or sensitive to the effects of mercury or unable to effectively metabolize and eliminate it from the body. PMID:19860886

  10. Clinical review: Thyroid hormone replacement in children after cardiac surgery – is it worth a try?

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Nikolaus A; Camphausen, Christoph K; Kececioglu, Deniz

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass produces a generalized systemic inflammatory response, resulting in increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Under these circumstances, a typical pattern of thyroid abnormalities is seen in the absence of primary disease, defined as sick euthyroid syndrome (SES). The presence of postoperative SES mainly in small children and neonates exposed to long bypass times and the pharmacological profile of thyroid hormones and their effects on the cardiovascular physiology make supplementation therapy an attractive treatment option to improve postoperative morbidity and mortality. Many studies have been performed with conflicting results. In this article, we review the important literature on the development of SES in paediatric postoperative cardiac patients, analyse the existing information on thyroid hormone replacement therapy in this patient group and try to summarize the findings for a recommendation. PMID:16719939

  11. Genesis of two most prevalent PROP1 gene variants causing combined pituitary hormone deficiency in 21 populations.

    PubMed

    Dusatkova, Petra; Pfäffle, Roland; Brown, Milton R; Akulevich, Natallia; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Kalina, Maria A; Kot, Karolina; Krzisnik, Ciril; Lemos, Manuel C; Malikova, Jana; Navardauskaite, Ruta; Obermannova, Barbora; Pribilincova, Zuzana; Sallai, Agnes; Stipancic, Gordana; Verkauskiene, Rasa; Cinek, Ondrej; Blum, Werner F; Parks, John S; Austerlitz, Frederic; Lebl, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Two variants (c.[301_302delAG];[301_302delAG] and c.[150delA];[150delA]) in the PROP1 gene are the most common genetic causes of recessively inherited combined pituitary hormones deficiency (CPHD). Our objective was to analyze in detail the origin of the two most prevalent variants. In the multicentric study were included 237 patients with CPHD and their 15 relatives carrying c.[301_302delAG];[301_302delAG] or c.[150delA];[150delA] or c.[301_302delAG];[ 150delA]. They originated from 21 different countries worldwide. We genotyped 21 single-nucleotide variant markers flanking the 9.6-Mb region around the PROP1 gene that are not in mutual linkage disequilibrium in the general populations--a finding of a common haplotype would be indicative of ancestral origin of the variant. Haplotypes were reconstructed by Phase and Haploview software, and the variant age was estimated using an allelic association method. We demonstrated the ancestral origin of both variants--c.[301_302delAG] was carried on 0.2 Mb-long haplotype in a majority of European patients arising ~101 generations ago (confidence interval 90.1-116.4). Patients from the Iberian Peninsula displayed a different haplotype, which was estimated to have emerged 23.3 (20.1-29.1) generations ago. Subsequently, the data indicated that both the haplotypes were transmitted to Latin American patients ~13.8 (12.2-17.0) and 16.4 (14.4-20.1) generations ago, respectively. The c.[150delA] variant that was carried on a haplotype spanning about 0.3 Mb was estimated to appear 43.7 (38.4-52.7) generations ago. We present strong evidence that the most frequent variants in the PROP1 gene are not a consequence of variant hot spots as previously assumed, but are founder variants.

  12. Extracellular Water and Blood Pressure in Adults with Growth Hormone (GH) Deficiency: A Genotype-Phenotype Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Anna G.; Bosaeus, Niklas; Nyström, Helena Filipsson; Svensson, Per-Arne; Bengtsson, Bengt-Åke; Nilsson, Staffan; Bosaeus, Ingvar; Boguszewski, Cesar Luiz; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults is associated with decreased extracellular water volume (ECW). In response to GH replacement therapy (GHRT), ECW increases and blood pressure (BP) reduces or remains unchanged. Our primary aim was to study the association between polymorphisms in genes related to renal tubular function with ECW and BP before and 1 year after GHRT. The ECW measures using bioimpedance analysis (BIA) and bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) were validated against a reference method, the sodium bromide dilution method (Br−). Design and Methods Using a candidate gene approach, fifteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nine genes with known impact on renal tubular function (AGT, SCNN1A, SCNN1G, SLC12A1, SLC12A3, KCNJ1, STK39, WNK1 and CASR) were genotyped and analyzed for associations with ECW and BP at baseline and with their changes after 1 year of GHRT in 311 adult GHD patients. ECW was measured with the Br−, BIA, and BIS. Results Both BIA and BIS measurements demonstrated similar ECW results as the reference method. At baseline, after adjustment for sex and BMI, SNP rs2291340 in the SLC12A1 gene was associated with ECW volume in GHD patients (p = 0.039). None of the SNPs influenced the ECW response to GHRT. One SNP in the SLC12A3 gene (rs11643718; p = 0.024) and three SNPs in the SCNN1G gene [rs5723 (p = 0.02), rs5729 (p = 0.016) and rs13331086 (p = 0.035)] were associated with the inter-individual differences in BP levels at baseline. A polymorphism in the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene (rs1965357) was associated with changes in systolic BP after GHRT (p = 0.036). None of these associations remained statistically significant when corrected for multiple testing. Conclusion The BIA and BIS are as accurate as Br− to measure ECW in GHD adults before and during GHRT. Our study provides the first evidence that individual polymorphisms may have clinically relevant effects on ECW and BP in GHD adults

  13. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency Anaemia Among School Children in Kenitra, Northwest of Morocco.

    PubMed

    Achouri, I; Aboussaleh, Y; Sbaibi, R; Ahami, A; El Hioui, M

    2015-04-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is an important health problem in Morocco. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of anaemia among school children in Kenitra. The sample represents school children of all educational levels and age ranged between 6-15 years. The level of hemoglobin, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration was measured in a group of 271 school children. The seric iron was assessed and anaemia was defined when hemoglobin < 11.5 g dL(-1). A questionnaire was developed to obtain information about the daily food consumption and socio-economic conditions. The prevalence of anaemia was 16.2%. The mean hemoglobin concentration was 12.53 g dL(-1) in boys and 12.52 g dL(-1) in girls. The results suggest that iron deficiency is an important determinant of anaemia in this population. There was a significant relationship between education of the mother and anaemia in children (p = 0.004) but not with the family income. It is concluded that improving the economic status of the family, women education and health education about balanced animal and plant food consumption are recommended strategies to reduce the burden of anaemia.

  14. Knowledge, awareness, attitudes and sources of vitamin D deficiency and sufficiency in Saudi children

    PubMed Central

    Alshamsan, Fatimah M.; Bin-Abbas, Bassam S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the awareness, knowledge, and attitudes regarding vitamin D and its sources among Saudi Arabian children. Methods: One hundred patients (vitamin D-deficient children) and 100 healthy children participated in the study. Participants were interviewed separately on topics including their awareness, knowledge, and attitudes regarding vitamin D using multiple-choice, and short-answer questions. This prospective, cross-sectional study was performed on children and adolescents between January 2011 and December 2011 at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results: Only 28% were aware of the sources of vitamin D, while 64% of healthy subjects were aware. Similarly, only 50% of patients and their parents knew of the health benefits of vitamin D, while 70% of healthy subjects had knowledge. Hence, our findings agree with previous findings that low levels of awareness and knowledge regarding vitamin D and its sources persist. Conclusion: Most vitamin D deficient cases were unaware of vitamin D sources. However, half of the patient/parents were aware of benefits of vitamin D. Hence, we recommend that an improved campaign for awareness, knowledge, and attitudes regarding vitamin D and its sources are needed. PMID:27146624

  15. Zinc deficiency in infants and children: a review of its complex and synergistic interactions.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Nancy F; Miller, Leland V; Hambidge, K Michael

    2014-11-01

    Zinc deficiency is estimated to contribute to over half a million deaths per year in infants and children under 5 years of age. This paper reviews the features of mild-to-moderate zinc deficiency, which include growth faltering, deficits in immune function and altered integrity and function of the gastro-intestinal tract. Sub-clinical features include oxidative stress and a pro-inflammatory state. The homeostatic response to low dietary zinc intake by increasing absorption is limited, especially if the source of zinc is of poor bioavailability, and conservation of endogenous intestinal losses is a critical component of adaptation. Owing to low zinc intakes, older breastfed infants, especially those of low birthweight, are predictably at risk of zinc deficiency if complementary food choices are unfortified and/or low in zinc. Host factors such as young age, poor intra-uterine zinc accretion owing to poor maternal status and/or prematurity, and gastro-intestinal dysfunction also potently predispose to zinc deficiency. Environmental enteropathy, which is prevalent in low-resource settings, may substantially impair zinc absorption and/or increase endogenous losses, and thus lead to relatively high zinc requirements. Emerging evidence highlights common features between chronic inflammation and zinc deficiency, and each may exacerbate the other. More investigations of zinc homeostasis in populations in low-resource settings are needed to better quantify absorption capacity and losses. Effective preventive strategies must address potentially higher zinc requirements as well as the underlying context that perpetuates a vicious cycle of zinc deficiency and multiple adverse outcomes.

  16. Clinical characteristics and follow-up of 5 young Chinese males with gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency caused by mutations in the KAL1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Li, Niu; Ding, Yu; Huang, Xiaodong; Shen, Yongnian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) pertains to a group of genetic disorders consisting of anosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome, KS) and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH). KS is genetically heterogeneous. We hereby present 5 young male patients with GnRH deficiency caused by mutations in the KAL1 gene. Their ages ranged from 9 months to 16 years. They were referred to our department for an endocrine consultation for micropenis. Hormone assays showed low circulating gonadotropins and testosterone. Molecular studies revealed KAL1 mutations in all cases, three reported nonsense sequence variants in the KAL1 gene were detected in 4 patients, respectively (c.784C > T (p.Arg 262*), c.1267C > T (p.Arg423*), and c.1270C > T (p.Arg424*)), and one patient harbored a novel hemizygous sequence variant [c.227G > A (p.Trp76*)]. Only one patient presented short stature without growth hormone deficiency and anosmia. Another patient had bilateral eyelid ptosis, trichiasis, and refractive error. This is the first report on the co-occurrence of a KAL1 gene mutation and tent-like upper lip in four patients. All of our cases had normal olfactory bulbs and showed no renal agenesis, cleft lip/palate, and hearing impairment. These cases expand our knowledge of the phenotype associated with KAL1 sequence variations, although the precise mechanism by which KAL1 gene influences the development of this phenotype is still unknown. PMID:26862482

  17. Elevated Serum Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Alteration of Thyroid Hormones in Children from Guiyu, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Liu, Junxiao; Zeng, Xiang; Lu, Fangfang; Chen, Aimin; Huo, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Informal electronic waste (e-waste) recycling results in serious environmental pollution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and heavy metals. This study explored whether there is an association between PBDEs, heavy metal and key growth- and development-related hormones in children from Guiyu, an e-waste area in southern China. We quantified eight PBDE congeners using gas chromatographic mass spectrometry, lead and cadmium utilizing graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, three thyroids with radioimmunoassay and two types of growth hormones by an enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) in 162 children, 4 to 6 years old, from Guiyu. In blood, median total PBDE was 189.99 ng/g lipid. Lead and cadmium concentrations in blood averaged 14.53±4.85 µg dL−1 and 0.77±0.35 µg L−1, respectively. Spearman partial correlation analysis illustrated that lead was positively correlated with BDE153 and BDE183. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was positively correlated with almost all PBDE congeners and negatively correlated with insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), whereas free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4) were negatively correlated with BDE154. However, no correlation between the hormones and blood lead or cadmium levels was found in this study. Adjusted multiple linear regression analysis showed that total PBDEs was negatively associated with FT3 and positively associated with TSH. Notably, FT4 was positively correlated with FT3, house functions as a workshop, and father's work involved in e-waste recycling and negatively correlated with vitamin consumptions. TSH was negatively related with FT4, paternal residence time in Guiyu, working hours of mother, and child bean products intake. IGFBP-3 was positively correlated with IGF-1 and house close to an e-waste dump. These results suggest that elevated PBDEs and heavy metals related to e-waste in Guiyu may be important risk factors for hormone alterations in children

  18. Thyroid hormone-regulated mouse cerebral cortex genes are differentially dependent on the source of the hormone: a study in monocarboxylate transporter-8- and deiodinase-2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Morte, Beatriz; Ceballos, Ainhoa; Diez, Diego; Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Di Cosmo, Caterina; Galton, Valerie Anne; Refetoff, Samuel; Bernal, Juan

    2010-05-01

    Thyroid hormones influence brain development through the control of gene expression. The concentration of the active hormone T(3) in the brain depends on T(3) transport through the blood-brain barrier, mediated in part by the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8/MCT8) and the activity of type 2 deiodinase (D2) generating T(3) from T(4). The relative roles of each of these pathways in the regulation of brain gene expression is not known. To shed light on this question, we analyzed thyroid hormone-dependent gene expression in the cerebral cortex of mice with inactivated Mct8 (Slc16a2) and Dio2 genes, alone or in combination. We used 34 target genes identified to be controlled by thyroid hormone in microarray comparisons of cerebral cortex from wild-type control and hypothyroid mice on postnatal d 21. Inactivation of the Mct8 gene (Mct8KO) was without effect on the expression of 31 of these genes. Normal gene expression in the absence of the transporter was mostly due to D2 activity because the combined disruption of Mct8 and Dio2 led to similar effects as hypothyroidism on the expression of 24 genes. Dio2 disruption alone did not affect the expression of positively regulated genes, but, as in hypothyroidism, it increased that of negatively regulated genes. We conclude that gene expression in the Mct8KO cerebral cortex is compensated in part by D2-dependent mechanisms. Intriguingly, positive or negative regulation of genes by thyroid hormone is sensitive to the source of T(3) because Dio2 inactivation selectively affects the expression of negatively regulated genes. PMID:20211971

  19. MBL2 deficiency is associated with higher genomic bacterial loads during meningococcemia in young children.

    PubMed

    Darton, T C; Jack, D L; Johnson, M; Borrow, R; Guiver, M; Kaczmarski, E B; Turner, M W; Klein, N J; Read, R C

    2014-12-01

    Mannose binding lectin (MBL2) is a soluble pattern recognition receptor that is key to generating innate immune responses to invasive infection, including against the cardinal Gram-negative bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. Individuals homozygous or heterozygous for any of three variant alleles of MBL2 (O/O or A/O genotypes) have deficient concentrations of MBL2 in circulating blood, but previous studies linking MBL deficiency to susceptibility to meningococcal disease have not revealed a consistent association. We genotyped 741 patients with microbiologically-proven meningococcal disease and correlated MBL2 genotype with plasma bacterial load of N. meningitidis with blood samples taken during hospital admission. We show that individuals with genotypes compatible with MBL2 deficiency have higher measurable levels of bacterial plasma genomic load with the greatest effect seen in children <2 years of age. However, the overall impact of this is minor, because there was no evidence that such genotypes are more common in children with meningococcal disease compared with uninfected cohorts. The findings suggest that MBL2 supports innate immune defence against meningococcal disease in the early months of life, before acquired immunity is sufficiently robust for effective natural protection.

  20. Calcium-regulating hormones, bone mineral content, breaking load and trabecular remodeling are altered in growing pigs fed calcium-deficient diets.

    PubMed

    Eklou-Kalonji, E; Zerath, E; Colin, C; Lacroix, C; Holy, X; Denis, I; Pointillart, A

    1999-01-01

    Studies on calcium nutrition in appropriate large animal models can be directly relevant to humans. We have examined the effect of dietary Ca deficiency on various bone and bone-related variables, including plasma markers, histomorphometry, mineral content and breaking strength in pigs. Three groups of eight 38-d-old female pigs were fed adequate (0.9%; control), low (0.4%; LCa) or very low (0.1%; VLCa) Ca diets for 32 d. Plasma Ca significantly decreased over time only in the VLCa-deficient pigs. The concentrations of the parathyroid hormones (PTH) and calcitriol increased as Ca deficiency developed, and the plasma PTH and calcitriol levels varied inversely with dietary Ca. The total bone ash contents, bending moments, trabecular bone volume and the mineral apposition rate all decreased as the calcium intake decreased. The osteoclast surface areas were greater than those of controls in both Ca-deficient groups, whereas the osteoblast surface areas were greater only in the VLCa group. The plasma osteoblast-related markers (alkaline phosphatase, carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen and osteocalcin) were either greater or unaffected in the Ca-deficient pigs. The results indicate that deficient bone mineralization combined with an increased bone resorption led to bone loss and fragility. The differences in the changes in bone cells (number and activity) between LCa and VLCa groups might be due to differences (time and extent) of circulating PTH and calcitriol. The defective mineralization in both Ca-depleted groups resulted mainly from the lack of Ca because their osteoblast activity was either maintained or stimulated. The results also underline the progressive sensitivity of pigs to Ca supply and the usefulness of this model. PMID:9915898

  1. Prevalence of thalassaemia, iron-deficiency anaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among Arab migrating nomad children, southern Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Pasalar, M; Mehrabani, D; Afrasiabi, A; Mehravar, Z; Reyhani, I; Hamidi, R; Karimi, M

    2014-12-17

    This study investigated the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and β-thalassaemia trait among Arab migrating nomad children in southern Islamic Republic of Iran. Blood samples were analysed from 134 schoolchildren aged < 18 years (51 males, 83 females). Low serum ferritin (< 12 ng/dL) was present in 17.9% of children (21.7% in females and 11.8% in males). Low haemoglobin (Hb) correlated significantly with a low serum ferritin. Only 1 child had G6PD deficiency. A total of 9.7% of children had HbA2 ≥ 3.5 g/dL, indicating β-thalassaemia trait (10.8% in females and 7.8% in males). Mean serum iron, serum ferritin and total iron binding capacity were similar in males and females. Serum ferritin index was as accurate as Hb index in the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anaemia. A high prevalence of β-thalassaemia trait was the major potential risk factor in this population.

  2. Personality, adrenal steroid hormones, and resilience in maltreated children: A multi-level perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2012-01-01

    In this multi-level investigation, resilience in adaptive functioning among maltreated and nonmaltreated low-income children (N = 677) was examined in relation to the regulation of two stress-responsive adrenal steroid hormones, cortisol and dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA), as well as the personality constructs of ego resiliency and ego control. Maltreatment status was not related to differences in average levels of morning or afternoon cortisol or DHEA. However, lower morning cortisol was related to higher resilient functioning, but only in nonmaltreated children. In contrast, among physically abused children, high morning cortisol was related to higher resilient functioning. Morning and afternoon DHEA was negatively related to resilient functioning. Although diurnal change in cortisol was not related to resilience, for DHEA, maltreated children with high resilience showed an atypical rise in DHEA from morning to afternoon. Morning and afternoon cortisol/DHEA ratios were positively related to resilient functioning, but did not interact with maltreatment status. Ego resiliency and ego control strongly differentiated maltreated and nonmaltreated children, and the personality variables were substantially predictive of resilience. When considered together, demonstrated effects of personality, cortisol, and DHEA maintained independent contributions in predicting resilience among high-risk youth. PMID:17705903

  3. Pathogens in children with severe combined immune deficiency disease or AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, D; Delage, G; Brochu, P; Michaud, J; Jasmin, G; Joncas, J H; Lapointe, N

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the frequency and severity of illnesses caused by various microbial pathogens in 15 children with severe combined immune deficiency disease (SCID) and 8 with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). There were 35 viral, 23 bacterial, 19 mycotic and 13 parasitic infections. Nineteen of the 23 patients died of infection; Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, giant-cell pneumonia due to paramyxoviruses and various disseminated viral infections were responsible for most deaths in both groups. The emerging role of paramyxoviruses was illustrated by the fact that they were responsible for giant-cell pneumonia in seven patients. Viral enteric infections were frequent in both groups. The variety of infectious microorganisms and the severity of resulting illnesses in the patients with AIDS were similar to those in the patients with SCID. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3719484

  4. Nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Márcia Marília Gomes Dantas; de Brito, Naira Josele Neves; de Medeiros Rocha, Érika Dantas; França, Mardone Cavalcante; de Almeida, Maria das Graças; Brandão-Neto, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc is an essential nutrient that is required for numerous metabolic functions, and zinc deficiency results in growth retardation, cell-mediated immune dysfunction, and cognitive impairment. Objective This study evaluated nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children. Design We performed a randomised, controlled, triple-blind study. The children were divided into a control group (10% sorbitol, n=31) and an experimental group (10 mg Zn/day, n=31) for 3 months. Anthropometric and dietary assessments as well as bioelectrical measurements were performed in all children. Results Our study showed (1) an increased body mass index for age and an increased phase angle in the experimental group; (2) a positive correlation between nutritional assessment parameters in both groups; (3) increased soft tissue, and mainly fat-free mass, in the body composition of the experimental group, as determined using bioelectrical impedance vector analysis; (4) increased consumption of all nutrients, including zinc, in the experimental group; and (5) an increased serum zinc concentration in both groups (p<0.0001). Conclusions Given that a reference for body composition analysis does not exist for intervention studies, longitudinal studies are needed to investigate vector migration during zinc supplementation. These results reinforce the importance of employing multiple techniques to assess the nutritional status of populations. PMID:26507491

  5. Growth hormone and its disorders.

    PubMed

    Ayuk, J; Sheppard, M C

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is synthesised and secreted by the somatotroph cells of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland. Its actions involve multiple organs and systems, affecting postnatal longitudinal growth as well as protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. GH hypersecretion results in gigantism or acromegaly, a condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality, while GH deficiency results in growth retardation in children and the GH deficiency syndrome in adults. This article, aimed at non-paediatric physicians, examines the clinical features, diagnosis, and current concepts in the management of these conditions. PMID:16397076

  6. Prolactin-deficient variants of GH3 rat pituitary tumor cells: linked expression of prolactin and another hormonally responsive protein in GH3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ivarie, R D; Morris, J A; Martial, J A

    1982-01-01

    GH3 cells normally synthesize and secrete two pituitary polypeptide hormones, prolactin and growth hormone. From an ethyl methane sulfonate-mutagenized population, prolactin low-producing variants have been isolated at a frequency near 20%. Intracellular prolactin synthesis in the variants was reduced 40- to 100-fold compared to wild-type cells while growth hormone synthesis varied less than 2-fold. This decrease was paralleled by a decrease in intracellular preprolactin mRNA. Although reduced, prolactin synthesis was still repressible by glucocorticoids. There was a coordinate loss of expression of p21, a thyroid and glucocorticoid hormone-regulated protein, in GH3 cells, whereas the synthesis and regulation of other hormonally responsive proteins were unimpaired in the variants. Since p21 expression was coordinately regained in a high-producing prolactin revertant cell, expression of the two proteins is tightly coupled in GH3 cells. The stability of the low-producing phenotype differed among variants. One (B2) gave rise to revertants at about 20% frequency even after two rounds of subcloning, whereas another (B3) was more stable in that only 1 weak revertant was found in 47 subclones. The reversion frequency of B3 cells was also measured at less than 0.5%. Unmutagenized GH3 cells were phenotypically stable in that no prolactin-deficient variant was found among 57 subclones. Since variants were ony found after ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenesis, the DNA alkylating agent appears to have promoted an epigenetic change in pituitary gene expression. Images PMID:7110131

  7. Iron Deficiency and the Cognitive and Psychomotor Development of Children: A Pilot Study with Institutionalized Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driva, A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes a pilot study, involving 48 institutionalized infants and toddlers, which aimed to treat iron deficiency anemia and to discover other factors contributing to the problem. Results indicate improvement in cognitive development after the administration of iron among three groups, while no significant differences were observed in psychomotor…

  8. [Serum values of cytokines in children with vitamin A deficiency disorders].

    PubMed

    Leal, Jorymar Y; Castejón, Haydée V; Romero, Tania; Ortega, Pablo; Gómez, Gisela; Amaya, Daisy; Estévez, Jesús

    2004-09-01

    Vitamin A Deficiency Disorders (VADD) have been associated with alterations of cellular differentiation, regulatory functions of the immune system and increased children morbidity and mortality rates due to acute respiratory and intestinal infections. The aim of the present study was to determine serum concentrations of Thl-Th2 cytokines in VADD children. The sample consisted of 138 children (F=72; M=66; 4-7 y old) living in slums in Maracaibo, Venezuela, with an adequate nutrition assessed by clinics and anthropometry. Vitamin A status was assessed by the Conjunctival Impression Cytology (CIC) technique following the ICEPO methodology, which determines Normal CIC = control or Abnormal CIC = VADD. The cytokines IL-10, IL-4 and IFN-gamma (pg/mL) were analyzed by the ELISA method; and IL-2 (U/mL) by the EAISA method. The Student's t test was applied to detect differences between values (p<0.05). No one child presented clinical evidence of VADD; 71 children (51.40%) exhibited normal CIC (control), whereas 67 children (48.60%) presented abnormal CIC indicative of sub-clinical manifestation of VADD. The prevalence was higher, although non significant, in females, 5-6 y old children and amerindians (51.39%, 64.18% and 60.40%, respectively). A diminished serum concentration of IL-10 was detected in VADD children, in comparison with the control group (4.41 +/- 1.27 pg/mL vs. 6.03 +/- 3.90 pg/mL) (p<0.03). The rest of studied cytokines were not significantly different with respect to control. The IL-10 diminution in VADD children would be related to the alteration of the inflammatory response at the level of respiratory and intestinal epithelia affected by infections.

  9. Cochlear Implant-Evoked Cortical Activation in Children with Cochlear Nerve Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuman; Grose, John; Hang, Anna X.; Buchman, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the results of cochlear implant-elicited cortical auditory evoked potentials (eCAEP) in children with cochlear nerve deficiency (CND). Study Design Case control series. Setting Tertiary academic referral center. Patients Seven children with CND that have a cochlear implant in their affected ear. Four children without CND served as controls. Intervention(s) eCAEPs were elicited by activation of individual cochlear implant electrodes. Main Outcome Measure(s) Onset responses (P1-N1-P2 complex). Results Three of 7 CND children demonstrated eCAEP responses across a broad range of electrodes despite having limited or no open set speech perception abilities using their implants. Two of these children had eCAEPs that were characterized by substantial variability in latency, amplitude, and number of electrodes with identifiable responses. The remaining 4 ears with CND and poor speech perception had multiphasic responses that are inconsistent with eCAEPs. Non-CND ears with excellent speech perception abilities demonstrated robust responses on all electrodes stimulated. Conclusions Abent eCAEP responses were indicative of poor open-set speech perception skills in all cases. However, eCAEP onset responses were measurable in some children with imaging evidence of CND, indicating probable cochlear nerve hypoplasia rather than aplasia. That some children with CND and poor speech perception had robust eCAEPs in some instances makes this particular measure of limited utility for predicting good speech perception outcomes following cochlear implantation in these children. The origin of multiphasic responses remains to be determined but may be of somatosensory origin in some instances. PMID:22872179

  10. Improved growth velocity of a patient with Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair (NS/LAH) without growth hormone deficiency by low-dose growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Kei; Takishima, Shigeru; Morioka, Chikako; Nishioka, Masato; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Aoki, Yoko; Shimohira, Masayuki; Kashimada, Kenichi; Morio, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair (NS/LAH; OMIM 607721) is caused by a heterozygous c.4A>G mutation in SHOC2. Most cases exhibit both growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and growth hormone insensitivity (GHI) and thus require a high dose of growth hormone (GH) therapy (e.g., 35-40 µg/kg/day). We report on a genetically diagnosed NS/LAH patient manifesting severe short stature (-3.85 SDs) with low serum level of IGF1, 30 ng/ml. The peak levels of GH stimulation tests were within the normal range, and GHI was not observed in the IGF1 generation test. However, with low-dose GH therapy (25 µg/kg/day) for two years, IGF1 level and height were remarkably improved (IGF1: 117 ng/ml, height SDs: -2.20 SDs). Further, catch-up of motor development and improvement of the proportion of extending limbs to trunk were observed (the Developmental Quotient score increased from 68 to 98 points, and the relative sitting height ratio decreased from 0.62 to 0.57). Our results suggest that endocrinological causes for short stature are variable in NS/LAH and that GH therapy should be considered as a possible treatment for delayed development in NS/LAH.

  11. Anti-infective use in children and pregnancy: current deficiencies and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gwee, Amanda; Cranswick, Noel

    2015-01-01

    There are a number of challenges to using anti-infective agents in children and pregnant women. There is limited understanding of the altered pharmacokinetics of anti-infectives in these populations and as a result, optimized dosing regimens are yet to be established. The potential adverse effects of the drug on pregnancy outcome and the developing foetus is a major consideration, and the long term implications of drug side effects must be taken into account when drug exposure occurs early in life. These factors hinder research and licensing of new anti-infective drugs in these populations. We describe the current deficiencies and future challenges of anti-infective use in children and pregnant women, providing specific examples. PMID:24588467

  12. Prevalence of classic signs and symptoms of rickets and vitamin D deficiency in Mongolian children and women.

    PubMed

    Uush, Tserendolgor

    2013-07-01

    In order to assess the current nutrition status of Mongolian population, including rickets and vitamin D deficiency of children and women, the Fourth National Nutrition Cross-Sectional Survey was conducted in 21 aimags (provinces) of 4 economic regions of the country and capital city Ulaanbaatar in 2010. Children of age under five years, and non-pregnant women of reproductive age were used as subjects for assessing rickets and vitamin D deficiency. A total of 400 households were randomly selected from each of 4 economic regions and Ulaanbaatar city. Clinical examinations were performed on 706 children of age under five years. Interviews were used to assess vitamin D supplement use. The serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured in 524 children aged 6-59 months and in 867 women of reproductive age. This survey found that 21.8% of children had vitamin D deficiency, 20.6% had low vitamin D reserve, and 30.0% of women had vitamin D deficiency and 22.2% had low vitamin D reserve. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children (35.0%, 95% CI, 24.7-47.0) and women (54.9%, 95% CI 45.5-64.0) in the Eastern Region was (35.0%, 95% CI, 24.7-47.0) significantly higher than in the Western, Khangai, Central Regions, and Ulaanbaatar. Further it was found that 27.4% of children under-two years had received vitamin D supplementation. The proportion of children, who did not receive vitamin D supplementation had a higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency than that of the children of the Eastern Region. None of the women who were involved in this survey had received vitamin D supplementation; 10.2% of them had delivered in the past 12 months, and 22.5% were breastfeeding. The prevalence of classic signs and symptoms of rickets were commonly reported among children of age under five, and skeletal abnormalities more commonly reported in children aged 12-47 months. In conclusion, there is a high prevalence of classic signs and symptoms of rickets in children of age under five

  13. Iron deficiency anemia among children: Addressing a global public health problem within a Canadian context.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Anna; Schauer, Claudia; Zlotkin, Stanley H

    2005-12-01

    Despite current Canadian pre- and perinatal nutrition programs, the prevalence of both iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is very high among young Aboriginal children from Canada's remote north. The major risk factors for IDA include prolonged consumption of evaporated cow's milk, chronic infection and prolonged exclusive breastfeeding. In the present article, the authors discuss IDA as a significant public health problem in Canadian Aboriginal communities. Whereas the prevalence of IDA in Canadian children is between 3.5% and 10.5% in the general population, in two Northern Ontario First Nations communities and one Inuit community, the anemia rate was 36%, with 56% having depleted iron stores. Traditional methods of preventing IDA, including targeted fortification, dietary diversification and supplementation, have not solved the problem. The authors' research group at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, conceived of the strategy of 'home fortification' with 'Sprinkles' - single-dose sachets containing micronutrients in a powder form, which are easily sprinkled onto any foods prepared in the household. In Sprinkles, the iron (ferrous fumarate) is encapsulated within a thin lipid layer to prevent the iron from interacting with food. Sprinkles have been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of anemia in many developing countries. Their use in Aboriginal communities to treat and prevent anemia is described in the present paper. The authors believe that children in Aboriginal communities across Canada would potentially benefit if Sprinkles were incorporated into Health Canada's current distribution system, in combination with a social marketing strategy to encourage their use.

  14. A clinical study on Pandu Roga, iron deficiency anemia, with Trikatrayadi Lauha suspension in children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhimanyu; Garai, Asish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Context: Nutritional iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia in India. The nearest correlation of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) can be made with Pandu Roga in Ayurveda. As the IDA is a very common prevalent disease in the society and the side effects of oral allopathic iron preparations are very common, therefore to get a better alternative, an Ayurvedic herbomineral medicine, the Trikatrayadi Lauha, was subjected to a clinical trial in children suffering from IDA. Aim: Evaluation of safety and efficacy of the compound Trikatrayadi Lauha suspension in children with IDA. Settings and Design: Randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 123 children of IDA for a period of 10 weeks. Clinical features and hematological parameters were documented before, during and after treatment. Statistical Analysis Used: Observations of the study were analyzed and findings were evaluated by using statistical methods (Student′s t test) Results: The present study shows that the trial drug Trikatrayadi Lauha suspension is effective to improve clinical features and hematological parameters significantly. The medicine is effective to increase the hemoglobin level 1.94 g/dL (8.52 -10.46 g/dL, P < 0.001) in 5 weeks and 3.33g/dL (8.52 -11.85g/dL, P < 0.001) in 10 weeks. No adverse effect of the trial drug was observed during the study. Conclusions: The results suggest that Trikatrayadi Lauha is significantly effective in the management of IDA in children. PMID:23326094

  15. Osteopontin deficiency enhances parathyroid hormone/ parathyroid hormone related peptide receptor (PPR) signaling-induced alteration in tooth formation and odontoblastic morphology.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Maki; Ono, Noriaki; Miyai, Kentano; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Hanyu, Ryo; Nagao, Masashi; Kamolratanakul, Paksinee; Notomi, Takuya; Rittling, Susan R; Denhardt, David T; Kronenberg, Henry M; Ezura, Yoichi; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Noda, Masaki

    2011-06-01

    Parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related protein receptor (PPR) signaling is known to be involved in tooth development. In bone, extracellular matrix protein osteopontin (OPN) is a negative regulator of PPR signaling in bone formation. However, the role of OPN in modulation of PPR action in tooth development is not understood. Therefore, we examined the tooth in double mutant mice. Constitutively active PPR was expressed specifically in the odontoblasts and osteoblasts (caPPR-tg) in the presence or absence of OPN. Radiographic analysis indicated that the length of the third molar (M3) and the incisor was decreased in the caPPR-tg mice compared to wild type, and such reduction in molar and incisor length was further enhanced in the absence of OPN (caPPR-tg OPN-KO). With respect to histology of incisors, caPPR-tg induced high cellularity and irregularity in odontoblastic shape and this was enhanced by the absence of OPN. These morphological observations suggest that OPN modulates PPR signaling that are involved in tooth formation.

  16. The association between salivary hormone levels and children's inpatient aggression: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Barzman, Drew H; Mossman, Douglas; Appel, Kacey; Blom, Thomas J; Strawn, Jeffrey R; Ekhator, Nosa N; Patel, Bianca; DelBello, Melissa P; Sorter, Michael; Klein, David; Geracioti, Thomas D

    2013-12-01

    Aggression is a common management problem for child psychiatry hospital units. We describe an exploratory study with the primary objective of establishing the feasibility of linking salivary concentrations of three hormones (testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA], and cortisol) with aggression. Between May 2011 and November 2011, we recruited 17 psychiatrically hospitalized boys (age 7-9 years). We administered the Brief Rating of Aggression by Children and Adolescents (BRACHA) and Predatory-Affective Aggression Scale (PAAS) upon admission. Saliva samples were collected from the participants during a 24-h period shortly after admission: immediately upon awakening, 30 min later, and again between 3:45 and 7:45 P.M. Nursing staff recorded Overt Aggression Scale ratings twice a day during hospitalization to quantify aggressive behavior. The salivary cortisol concentrations obtained from aggressive boys 30 min after awakening trended higher than levels from the non-aggressive boys (p = 0.06), were correlated with the number of aggressive incidents (p = 0.04), and trended toward correlation with BRACHA scores (p = 0.06). The aggressive boys also showed greater morning-to-evening declines in cortisol levels (p = 0.05). Awakening levels of DHEA and testosterone were correlated with the severity of the nearest aggressive incident (p < 0.05 for both). The BRACHA scores of the aggressive boys were significantly higher than scores of the non-aggressive boys (p < 0.001). Our data demonstrate the feasibility of collecting saliva from children on an inpatient psychiatric unit, affirm the utility of the BRACHA in predicting aggressive behavior, and suggest links between salivary hormones and aggression by children who undergo psychiatric hospitalization.

  17. Vitamin D levels in children with severe hemophilia A: an underappreciated deficiency.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut

    2015-04-01

    Osteoporosis in hemophilic patients is a significant problem. The causes of osteoporosis in hemophilic patients are lack of adequate exercise, multiple hemorrhage and inflammation, and low vitamin D levels. The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in children with severe hemophilia A. Forty-seven children with severe hemophilia were included in the study. None of the patients had previously received vitamin D supplementation. No patient had clinical or radiologic findings of rickets or seropositivity of hepatitis C virus or HIV. The mean age of the patients was 11.64 ± 5.70 (range, 2-18) years. The mean vitamin D level was 16.35 ± 7.49 ng/ml (range, 3.25-33.80). Vitamin D levels were below 10 ng/ml (severe vitamin D deficiency) in 9 cases (19%), between 10 and 19.99 ng/ml (vitamin D deficiency) in 23 cases (49%), between 20 and 29.99 ng/ml (vitamin D insufficiency) in 13 cases (28%), and above 30 ng/ml (normal vitamin D level) in 2 cases (4%). The mean serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D in the children with hemophilia during winter and autumn were significantly lower than that during summer (P = 0.0028 and P = 0.0091, respectively). A majority of our hemophilic patients (96%) had low vitamin D levels. The study showed that the risk of vitamin D deficiency is the most highest during winter and autumn. Normal lifelong vitamin D levels are especially important in hemophilia because of the possible synergistic effect of vitamin D levels on periarticular and general osteoporosis, which is intrinsic to hemophilic conditions. We advise routine checking of vitamin D levels twice a year and vitamin D supplementation to maintain its level between 30 and 100 ng/ml. PMID:25485786

  18. The impact of Vitamin D deficiency on asthma, allergic rhinitis and wheezing in children: An emerging public health problem

    PubMed Central

    Bener, Abdulbari; Ehlayel, Mohammad S.; Bener, Hale Z.; Hamid, Qutayba

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D deficiency has been declared a public health problem for both adults and children worldwide. Asthma and related allergic diseases are the leading causes of morbidity in children. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of Vitamin D deficiency in childhood asthma and other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and wheezing. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Primary Health Care Centers (PHCs), from March 2012 to October 2013. A total of 2350 Qatari children below the age of 16 were selected from PHCs, and 1833 agreed to participate in this study giving a response rate of (78%). Face-to-face interviews with parents of all the children were based on a questionnaire that included variables such as socio-demographic information, assessment of nondietary covariates, Vitamin D intake, type of feeding, and laboratory investigations. Their health status was assessed by serum Vitamin D (25-hydoxyvitamin D), family history and body mass index. Results: Most of the children who had asthma (38.5%), allergic rhinitis (34.8%) and wheezing (35.7%) were below 5 years. Consanguinity was significantly higher in parents of children with allergic rhinitis (48.6%), followed by those with asthma (46.4%) and wheezing (40.8%) than in healthy children (35.9%) (P < 0.001). The proportion of severe Vitamin D deficiency was significantly higher in children with wheezing (23.4%), allergic rhinitis (18.5%), and asthma (17%) than in healthy children (10.5%). Exposure to the sun was significantly less in Vitamin D deficient children with asthma (60.3%), allergic rhinitis (62.5%) and wheezing (64.4%) than in controls (47.1%) (P = 0.008). It was found that Vitamin D deficiency was a significant correlate for asthma (odds ratio [OR] =2.31; P < 0.001), allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.59; P < 0.001) and wheezing (relative risk = 1.29; P = 0.05). Conclusion: The study findings revealed a high prevalence of Vitamin D

  19. The Association between Cobalt Deficiency and Endemic Goiter in School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Gholamhoseinian, Ahmad; Nakhaee, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Background In Iran, an iodine deficiency control program was initiated in 1989 by iodizing salt. Despite this program, goiters have remained an endemic condition in most parts of Iran. Thus, it is possible that other factors aside from iodine deficiency may contribute to endemic goiter. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between cobalt deficiency and endemic goiter in a region of Iran with a high prevalence of goiter. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among school children aged 9 to 11 years in the city of Kerman, Iran. In the first phase of the study, a multistage, proportional-to-size, cluster sampling method was used to screen 5,380 out of 29,787 students. After the screening phase, 170 students (130 goitrous and 40 nongoitrous) were randomly selected, and serum and urine specimens were obtained. We measured thyroid function, serum cobalt level, and urinary iodine excretion. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The prevalence of grade 2 goiters was 34.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 31.5 to 42.5), with both sexes being equally affected. The weight and body mass index of goitrous subjects was significantly lower (P<0.001) than those of nongoitrous subjects. The serum cobalt levels were lower in goitrous subjects than in nongoitrous subjects (4.4±2.9 µg/L vs. 6.4±2.7 µg/L). The urinary iodine levels were also lower in goitrous subjects than in nongoitrous subjects (198.3±108.3 µg/L vs. 270.2±91.1 µg/L). Multiple regression analysis showed that only cobalt deficiency, not iodine deficiency, significantly contributed to the presence of goiter (odds ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.99; P=0.042). Conclusion Cobalt deficiency may be an important independent predicator for goiter in endemic regions, especially areas in which goiters persist despite salt iodization programs. PMID:25309789

  20. Prevalence and correlates of 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) cohort

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Kelly; Abraham, Alison G.; Friedman, Lisa Aronson; Johnson, Valerie L.; Kaskel, Frederick J.; Furth, Susan L.; Warady, Bradley A.; Portale, Anthony A.; Melamed, Michal L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D plays an important role in the mineral and bone disorder seen in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) is highly prevalent in the adult CKD population. Methods The prevalence and determinants of 25OHD deficiency (defined as a level <20 ng/ml) were examined longitudinally in 506 children in the CKiD cohort. Predictors of secondary hyperparathyroidism and the determinants of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) levels were also evaluated. Results Deficiency of 25OHD was observed in 28 % of the cohort at enrollment. Significant predictors of 25OHD deficiency were older age, non-white race, higher body mass index, assessment during winter, less often than daily milk intake, non-use of nutritional vitamin D supplement and proteinuria. Lower values of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), serum 25OHD, calcium and higher levels of FGF23 were significant determinants of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Lower GFR, low serum 25OHD, nephrotic-range proteinuria, and high FGF23 levels were significant determinants of serum 1, 25(OH)2 D levels. Conclusions Deficiency of 25OHD is prevalent in children with CKD and is associated with potentially modifiable risk factors such as milk intake, nutritional vitamin D supplement use, and proteinuria. 25OHD deficiency is a risk factor for secondary hyperparathyroidism and decreased serum 1, 25(OH)2D in children with CKD. PMID:26307635

  1. Anemia and iron deficiency in school children, adolescents, and adults: a community-based study in rural Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcelo U; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica; Bertolino, Carla N; Malafronte, Rosely S; Muniz, Pascoal T; Cardoso, Marly A

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of anemia and iron deficiency in 389 [corrected] rural Amazonians aged 5-90 years in Acre, Brazil. Anemia and iron deficiency were diagnosed in 16% and 19% of the population, respectively. Anemia was likely to have multiple causes; although nearly half of anemic school children and women had altered iron status indicators, only 19.7% of overall anemia was attributable to iron deficiency. Geo-helminth infection and a recent malaria episode were additional factors affecting iron status indicators in this population.

  2. The High Prevalence of Anemia in Cambodian Children and Women Cannot Be Satisfactorily Explained by Nutritional Deficiencies or Hemoglobin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wieringa, Frank Tammo; Dahl, Miriam; Chamnan, Chhoun; Poirot, Etienne; Kuong, Khov; Sophonneary, Prak; Sinuon, Muth; Greuffeille, Valerie; Hong, Rathavuth; Berger, Jacques; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine Amma; Laillou, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anemia is highly prevalent in Cambodian women and children, but data on causes of anemia are scarce. We performed a national micronutrient survey in children and women that was linked to the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey 2014 (CDHS-2014) to assess the prevalence of micronutrient deficiency, hemoglobin disorders and intestinal parasite infection. Methods: One-sixth of households from the CDHS-2014 were selected for a follow-up visit for the micronutrient survey. Households were visited from two weeks to two months after the CDHS-2014 visit. Data on micronutrient status were available for 1512 subjects (792 children and 720 women). Results: Anemia was found in 43% of the women and 53% of the children. Hemoglobin disorders affected >50% of the population, with Hemoglobin-E the most prevalent disorder. Deficiencies of iron (ferritin < 15 g/L), vitamin A (retinol-binding-protein (RBP) < 0.70 mol/L) or vitamin B12 (<150 pmol/L) were not prevalent in the women (<5% for all), whereas 17.8% of the women had low concentrations of folic acid (<10 nmol/L). In the children, the prevalence of iron, vitamin A, vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency was <10%. Zinc deficiency, hookworm infection and hemoglobinopathy were significantly associated with anemia in children, whereas in the women none of the factors was significantly associated with anemia. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was more prevalent in children <2 years, but in older children and women, the prevalence of IDA was <5%. The most prevalent, preventable causes of anemia were hookworm infection and zinc and folic acid deficiency. Over 40% of the anemia was not caused by nutritional factors. Conclusion: The very high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian women and children cannot be explained solely by micronutrient deficiencies and hemoglobin disorders. Micronutrient interventions to improve anemia prevalence are likely to have limited impact in the Cambodian setting. The focus of current interventions to

  3. Sex Hormones in Allergic Conjunctivitis: Altered Levels of Circulating Androgens and Estrogens in Children and Adolescents with Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Marta; Lambiase, Alessandro; Moretti, Costanzo; Bonini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a chronic allergic disease mainly affecting boys in prepubertal age and usually recovering after puberty. To evaluate a possible role of sex hormones in VKC, serum levels of sex hormones in children and adolescents with VKC were assessed. Methods. 12 prepubertal and 7 early pubertal boys with active VKC and 6 male patients with VKC in remission phase at late pubertal age and 48 healthy age and sex-matched subjects were included. Serum concentration of estrone, 17 beta-estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, total testosterone and free testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), cortisol, delta-4-androstenedione, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and sex-hormones binding globuline (SHBG) were evaluated. Results. Serum levels of Estrone were significantly increased in all groups of patients with VKC when compared to healthy controls (P < 0.001). Prepubertal and early pubertal VKC showed a significant decrease in DHT (P = 0.007 and P = 0.028, resp.) and SHBG (P = 0.01 and P = 0.002, resp.) when compared to controls and serum levels of SHBG were increased in late pubertal VKC in remission phase (P = 0.007). Conclusions and Relevance. VKC patients have different circulating sex hormone levels in different phases of the disease and when compared to nonallergic subjects. These findings suggest a role played by sex hormones in the pathogenesis and/or activity of VKC. PMID:25756057

  4. Growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Martin; Strasburger, Christian J

    2010-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a proteohormone secreted by the pituitary gland. It acts through binding to the hGH receptor, inducing either direct effects or initiating the production of insulin-like growth-factor I (IGF-I), the most important mediator of hGH effects. Growth hormone is primarily known to promote longitudinal growth in children and adolescents, but has also various important metabolic functions throughout adult life. Effects of hGH on the adult organism are well established from studies with recombinant growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in growth hormone deficient subjects. In this particular group of patients, replacement of hGH leads to increased lipolysis and lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvements in VO(2max), and maximal power output. Although extrapolation from these findings to the situation in well trained healthy subjects is impossible, and controlled studies in healthy subjects are scarce, abuse of hGH seems to be popular among athletes trying to enhance physical performance. Detection of the application of rhGH is difficult, especially because the amino acid sequence of rhGH is identical to the major 22,000 Da isoform of hGH normally secreted by the pituitary. Furthermore, some physiological properties of hGH secretion also hindered the development of a doping test: secreted in a pulsatile manner, it has a very short half-life in circulation, which leads to highly variable serum levels. Concentration alone therefore cannot prove the exogenous administration of hGH.Two approaches have independently been developed for the detection of hGH doping: The so-called "marker approach" investigates changes in hGH-dependent parameters like IGF-I or components of bone and collagen metabolism, which are increased after hGH injection. In contrast, the so-called "isoform approach" directly analyses the spectrum of molecular isoforms in circulation: the pituitary gland secretes a spectrum of homo- and heterodimers and - multimers of a variable

  5. [Growth and micronutrient deficiencies: profile of children attended at the day care center for the government of Paraiba, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Dixis Figueroa; Rocha, Ana Carolina Dantas; Sousa, Carolina Pereira da Cunha

    2013-11-01

    This article seeks to evaluate the growth of children attending public day care centers of the Government of the State of Paraiba and the relative significance of vitamin A, iron and zinc deficiencies. It involved a cross-sectional study of 240 preschool children. The following categories of nutritional status were considered: underweight (W/H < -2 z-scores), stunting (H/A < -2 z-scores) and overweight (W/H > +2 z-scores). Serum concentrations of retinol, zinc and hemoglobin were established to assess vitamin A deficiency (< 0.70 mmol/L), zinc deficiency (< 65 mmol/L) and anemia (< 110 g/L), respectively. The prevalence of stunting was 5.8%, that of overweight 3.8%, and that of underweight 0.4%. W/H z-scores were lower and statistically significant in children aged 12-36 months. An association was also found between W/H z-scores and maternal height. This association was also observed regarding body mass index. H/A z-scores were lower and statistically significant in low birth weight children. Lower hemoglobin concentrations were detected in children aged 12-36 months who were not receiving the financial support of the Bolsa Familia (Family Allowance) program. There was no significant association between vitamin A, iron and zinc deficiencies and the anthropometric indices studied.

  6. Zinc Deficiency: Descriptive Epidemiology and Morbidity among Preschool Children in Peri-urban Population in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Usha; Hiremath, Girish; Menon, Venugopal P.; Dhingra, Pratibha; Sarkar, Archana

    2009-01-01

    Community-based data relating to factors influencing zinc deficiency among preschool children in India are inadequate. Data of a large, double-blinded, randomized, controlled zinc-supplementation trial were used for assessing the descriptive epidemiology of zinc deficiency among children aged 6–35 months (n=940). In total, 609 children were followed up for 120 days for information on morbidity. Of these children, 116 from the control group belonging to the upper and the lower 25th quartile of plasma zinc status at baseline were selected for assessing the association of zinc deficiency with prospective morbidity. At baseline, demographic, socioeconomic and dietary information was collected, and anthropometric measurements and levels of plasma zinc were assessed. At baseline, 73.3% of the children were zinc-deficient (plasma zinc <70 µg/dL), of which 33.8% had levels of plasma zinc below 60 µg/dL. A significantly higher risk of morbidity was prevalent among the subjects with lower plasma zinc compared to those with higher levels of plasma zinc. PMID:19902798

  7. [Growth and micronutrient deficiencies: profile of children attended at the day care center for the government of Paraiba, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Dixis Figueroa; Rocha, Ana Carolina Dantas; Sousa, Carolina Pereira da Cunha

    2013-11-01

    This article seeks to evaluate the growth of children attending public day care centers of the Government of the State of Paraiba and the relative significance of vitamin A, iron and zinc deficiencies. It involved a cross-sectional study of 240 preschool children. The following categories of nutritional status were considered: underweight (W/H < -2 z-scores), stunting (H/A < -2 z-scores) and overweight (W/H > +2 z-scores). Serum concentrations of retinol, zinc and hemoglobin were established to assess vitamin A deficiency (< 0.70 mmol/L), zinc deficiency (< 65 mmol/L) and anemia (< 110 g/L), respectively. The prevalence of stunting was 5.8%, that of overweight 3.8%, and that of underweight 0.4%. W/H z-scores were lower and statistically significant in children aged 12-36 months. An association was also found between W/H z-scores and maternal height. This association was also observed regarding body mass index. H/A z-scores were lower and statistically significant in low birth weight children. Lower hemoglobin concentrations were detected in children aged 12-36 months who were not receiving the financial support of the Bolsa Familia (Family Allowance) program. There was no significant association between vitamin A, iron and zinc deficiencies and the anthropometric indices studied. PMID:24196902

  8. Social Costs of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6–59-Month-Old Children in India

    PubMed Central

    Plessow, Rafael; Arora, Narendra Kumar; Brunner, Beatrice; Tzogiou, Christina; Eichler, Klaus; Brügger, Urs; Wieser, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate nutrition has a severe impact on health in India. According to the WHO, iron deficiency is the single most important nutritional risk factor in India, accounting for more than 3% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. We estimate the social costs of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in 6–59-month-old children in India in terms of intangible costs and production losses. Materials and Methods We build a health economic model estimating the life-time costs of a birth cohort suffering from IDA between the ages of 6 and 59 months. The model is stratified by 2 age groups (6–23 and 24–59-months), 2 geographical areas (urban and rural), 10 socio-economic strata and 3 degrees of severity of IDA (mild, moderate and severe). Prevalence of anemia is calculated with the last available National Family Health Survey. Information on the health consequences of IDA is extracted from the literature. Results IDA prevalence is 49.5% in 6–23-month-old and 39.9% in 24–58-month-old children. Children living in poor households in rural areas are particularly affected but prevalence is high even in wealthy urban households. The estimated yearly costs of IDA in 6–59-month-old children amount to intangible costs of 8.3 m DALYs and production losses of 24,001 m USD, equal to 1.3% of gross domestic product. Previous calculations have considerably underestimated the intangible costs of IDA as the improved WHO methodology leads to a threefold increase of DALYs due to IDA. Conclusion Despite years of iron supplementation programs and substantial economic growth, IDA remains a crucial public health issue in India and an obstacle to the economic advancement of the poor. Young children are especially vulnerable due to the irreversible effects of IDA on cognitive development. Our research may contribute to the design of new effective interventions aiming to reduce IDA in early childhood. PMID:26313356

  9. Growth hormone treatment of adolescents with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) during the transition period: results of a survey among adult and paediatric endocrinologists from Italy. Endorsed by SIEDP/ISPED, AME, SIE, SIMA.

    PubMed

    Aimaretti, G; Attanasio, R; Cannavò, S; Nicoletti, M C; Castello, R; Di Somma, C; Garofalo, P; Iughetti, L; Loche, S; Maghnie, M; Mazzanti, L; Saggese, G; Salerno, M; Tonini, G; Toscano, V; Zucchini, S; Cappa, M

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of adolescents with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) during the transition period is a controversial issue. This paper is a contribution from the Italian community of paediatric and adult endocrinologists surveyed in a Delphi panel. The Delphi method is a structured communication technique, originally developed as a systematic, interactive forecasting method that relies on a panel of experts. The experts answer questionnaires in two or more rounds. There was substantial agreement on the definition of the problems associated with the diagnosis and treatment of adolescents with GHD in the transition period, as well as on the identification of the controversial issues which need further studies. There is general consensus on the need of re-testing all isolated idiopathic GHD after at least 30-day withdrawn from treatment, while in patients with multiple pituitary deficiency and low IGF-I levels there is generally no need to re-test. In patients with permanent or confirmed GHD, a starting low rhGH dose (0.01-0.03 mg per day) to be adjusted according to IGF-I concentrations is also widely accepted. For those continuing treatment, the optimal therapeutic schedule to obtain full somatic maturation, normalization of body composition and bone density, cardiovascular function and Quality of Life, need to be evaluated. PMID:25362629

  10. Gender identity of children and young adults with 5alpha-reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Praveen, E P; Desai, Ankush K; Khurana, M L; Philip, Jim; Eunice, Marumudi; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Kucheria, Kiran; Gupta, Devendra K; Seith, Ashu; Ammini, Ariachery C

    2008-02-01

    Male pseudohermaphroditism (46,XY DSD) due to 5alpha-reductase deficiency has been recognized for the last few decades. There is scant literature on this entity in India. We compiled data on five patients with this disorder. Four of our five patients were reared as females. Our assessment of these children reveals that they had male gender identity from childhood. Three of the four reared as females chose to change gender role at adolescence, while the fourth is still prepubertal. We conclude that all these patients had male gender identity from early childhood. The parents took note of this only after the appearance of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty, thereby giving an impression of change in gender identity and gender role.

  11. Status of iodine deficiency amongst school children in twenty four districts in southern India.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Umesh; Singh, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sada Nand

    2005-01-01

    The central legislation banning sale of non-iodized salt for edible purposes in the entire country was withdrawn by the Government in the year 2000. The present study was conducted in the year 2001 immediately after lifting the central ban to establish the baseline urinary iodine excretion levels in twenty four districts of Southern India. In each district all the senior secondary schools were enlisted and one school was selected by random sampling. About 120 children in the age group of 11 to 18 years were selected using the random number tables. The urinary iodine excretion levels were analysed using the wet digestion method. It was found that districts Rangareddy, Kolar, Yanam and Perambalour had median UIE levels less than 100 microg/l, indicating iodine deficiency. The findings of the present study highlights the success of Universal salt iodisation programme. The Government of India should reinitiate the process of central ban on sale of non iodised salt in the country to prevent the iodine deficiency disorders.

  12. DOES VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY CONTRIBUTE TO THE SEVERITY OF ASTHMA IN CHILDREN AND ADULTS?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Zaryab; Jaleel, Anila; Hameed, Kamran; Qazi, Salman; Suleman, Ahsan

    2015-01-01

    Role of vitamin D in the health of bones has been well established for over decades; It was known that its deficiency caused rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Later it was discovered that these can be corrected by giving vitamin D. Researchers discovered that vitamin D can be synthesized by exposure to sun. Hence it was also named "the sunshine vitamin". As time passed it was observed that low levels of vitamin D were associated with multiple diseases. This sparked the interest of the scientific community to further the research on vitamin D which led to the studies that started associating vitamin D with various diseases like cancers (prostate, colon and breast), autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis), infectious diseases (tuberculosis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV), cardiovascular diseases, mental illnesses (schizophrenia), diabetes mellitus (type 1, type 2 and gestational) and allergic conditions like asthma. With time, more studies were carried out relating levels of vitamin D to development of asthma, asthma exacerbations and risk factors leading to development of asthma like respiratory tract infections with positive associations. A number of studies were carried out which tried to explain the possible molecular mechanisms relating deficiency of vitamin D in pathogenesis of asthma. This review summarizes the role of vitamin D in development of asthma and probable mechanisms relating vitamin D to the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:26411139

  13. Increment in vitamin D level and bone mineral accrual in children with vitamin D deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Midha, Tanu; Singh, Satyajeet; Bajpai, Anurag; Tilak, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare different regimens of vitamin D with respect to its serum increment levels and bone mineral accrual in vitamin D-deficient children. Methods Children identified as being vitamin D deficient (serum levels<20 ng/mL) were divided into 3 treatment groups by stratified block randomization (group 1, 4,000 IU/day of vitamin D3 plus 50 mg/kg/day calcium for 12 weeks; group 2, 30,000 IU/wk of vitamin D3 plus 50 mg/kg/day calcium for 12 weeks; and group 3, 300,000 IU of vitamin D3 once intramuscularly plus 50 mg/kg/day calcium). After regimen completion, each child received a maintenance dose of 400 IU/day vitamin D3 plus 50 mg/kg/day calcium. Their serum vitamin D level was measured after 3 and 12 months. Total body less head bone mineral concentration (BMC) and total body less head bone mineral density (BMD) were measured after 12 months. Results The mean increment in serum vitamin D levels from baseline to 3 months was significantly higher in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2, but the levels from 3 to 12 months were almost similar among all 3 groups. There were no significant differences among the 3 groups with respect to percentage increase of BMD and BMC. Conclusion The injectable form of vitamin D was more efficacious than the oral forms in increasing the serum level to the normal range. All 3 regimens were equally effective in increasing the BMC and BMD. The 400 IU/day maintenance dose was sufficient to keep the serum level within the normal range. PMID:27588029

  14. Anemia, micronutrient deficiencies, and malaria in children and women in Sierra Leone prior to the Ebola outbreak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify the factors associated with anemia and to document the severity of micronutrient deficiencies, malaria and inflammation, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey was conducted. A three-stage sampling procedure was used to randomly select children <5 years of age and adult women...

  15. Iodine deficiency in Belarusian children as a possible factor stimulating the irradiation of the thyroid gland during the Chernobyl catastrophe.

    PubMed Central

    Gembicki, M; Stozharov, A N; Arinchin, A N; Moschik, K V; Petrenko, S; Khmara, I M; Baverstock, K F

    1997-01-01

    Ten years after the Chernobyl nuclear plant catastrophe more than 500 children in Belarus are suffering from thyroid cancer. The major cause of the high incidence of thyroid cancer in children under 15 years of age appears to be contamination resulting from that catastrophe, mainly with isotopes of radioactive iodine. Another important factor may be iodine deficiency in the environment. A countrywide program for investigation of goiter prevalence and iodine deficiency has been established in the Republic of Belarus with the assistance of the European World Health Organization office. The program will oversee the examination of 11,000 children and adolescents 6 to 18 years of age from 30 schools in urban and rural areas. The results obtained in a group of 824 children and adolescents (the pilot phase) are typical for significant iodine deficiency and moderate goiter endemism. It is clear that the present situation does not completely reflect the situation that existed at the time of the Chernobyl catastrophe. However, data from epidemiologic studies conducted many years before the accident showed high goiter prevalence in the contaminated areas, indicating that the prevalence of iodine deficiency at the time of the catastrophe was similar to the present one or even greater. Such an assumption could lead to a better understanding of the thyroid pathologies that have been observed. PMID:9467069

  16. Exome sequencing reveals two novel compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutations in a Polish patient with Desbuquois dysplasia type 2 and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jamsheer, Aleksander; Olech, Ewelina M; Kozłowski, Kazimierz; Niedziela, Marek; Sowińska-Seidler, Anna; Obara-Moszyńska, Monika; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna; Karczewski, Marek; Zemojtel, Tomasz

    2016-07-01

    Desbuquois dysplasia type 2 (DBQD2) is a rare recessively inherited skeletal genetic disorder characterized by severe prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, generalized joint laxity with dislocation of large joints and facial dysmorphism. The condition was recently described to result from autosomal recessive mutations in XYLT1, encoding the enzyme xylosyltransferase-1. In this paper, we report on a Polish patient with DBQD2 who presented with severe short stature of prenatal onset, joint laxity, psychomotor retardation and multiple radiological abnormalities including short metacarpals, advanced bone age and exaggerated trochanters. Endocrinological examinations revealed that sleep-induced growth hormone (GH) release and GH peak in clonidine- and glucagon-induced provocative tests as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein-3 levels were all markedly decreased, confirming deficiency of GH secretion. Bone age, unlikely to GH deficiency, was significantly advanced. To establish the diagnosis at a molecular level, we performed whole-exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis in the index patient, which revealed compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutations: c.595C>T(p.Gln199*) and c.1651C>T(p.Arg551Cys), both of which are novel. Sanger sequencing showed that the former mutation was inherited from the healthy mother, whereas the latter one most probably occurred de novo. Our study describes the first case of DBQD2 resulting from compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutation, expands the mutational spectrum of the disease and provides evidence that the severe growth retardation and microsomia observed in DBQD2 patients may result not only from the skeletal dysplasia itself but also from GH and IGF-1 deficiency. PMID:27030147

  17. Oxytocin and vasopressin hormone genes in children's externalizing problems: A cognitive endophenotype approach.

    PubMed

    Wade, Mark; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Knafo-Noam, Ariel; O'Connor, Thomas G; Jenkins, Jennifer M

    2016-06-01

    Externalizing problems are among the most common mental health problems of children. Research suggests that these problems are heritable, yet little is known about the specific genes involved in their pathophysiology. The current study examined a genotype-endophenotype-phenotype model of externalizing problems in 320 preschool-aged children. Markers of the oxytocin (OXT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) hormone genes were selected as candidates owing to their known association with psychopathology in other domains. We tested whether OXT and AVP variants were related to children's externalizing problems, as well as two cognitive endophenotypes presumed to underlie these problems: theory of mind (ToM) and executive functioning (EF). Externalizing problems were assessed at age 4.5 using a previously-validated rating scale. ToM and EF were measured with age-appropriate tasks. Using a family-based association design and controlling for non-genomic confounds, support was found for an association between a two-marker OXT haplotype (rs2740210-rs2770378) and a two-marker AVP haplotype (rs1887854-rs3761249) and externalizing problems. Specific associations of these haplotypes with ToM and EF were also observed. Further, ToM and EF were shown to independently and jointly predict externalizing problems, and to partially mediate the effects of OXT and AVP on externalizing problems. This study provides the first evidence that genetic variation in OXT and AVP may contribute to individual differences in childhood externalizing problems, and that these effects may operate through emerging neurocognitive abilities in the preschool period. PMID:27155104

  18. Iron deficiency anaemia in children of a peri-urban health facility.

    PubMed

    Murila, F V; Macharia, W M; Wafula, E M

    1999-09-01

    This cross-sectional survey, conducted in a periurban health center in Nairobi, Kenya, determined the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and its risk factors among 403 children aged 6 months to 6 years. Demographic data were obtained and each child was assessed for signs of IDA. Blood was drawn for hemoglobin determination. The diagnosis of IDA was made using predefined criteria. Findings revealed that the prevalence of IDA was 7.4% (95% confidence interval = 4.8-10.0) and was predominantly mild (93.6%). Age was found to be significantly associated with IDA, with a 14.6% prevalence rate in infants. No association was found between IDA and factors such as sex, birth weight, weaning age and weaning diet, sanitation, water source, or education of the mother. Although the study showed that IDA was not a major health problem in the area, as evidenced by the low prevalence rate and presence of only mild cases, there is still a need for emphasis on health education at the health facility since young children are at high risk of IDA.

  19. Urinary Kidney Injury Molecules in Children with Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Güneş, Ali; Ece, Aydın; Aktar, Fesih; Tan, İlhan; Söker, Murat; Karabel, Duran; Balık, Hasan; Uluca, Ünal; Şen, Velat; Yolbaş, İlyas

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the urine levels of human kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) in children with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). Material/Methods Thirty-five children with IDA and 32 matched healthy controls were recruited. We assessed complete blood count, serum iron, iron-binding capacity, ferritin, serum levels of urea, creatinine (Cr), sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and glucose levels. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated. Urinary NAG, NGAL, KIM-1, and L-FABP were measured and divided by urine creatinine for comparisons. Results There were no significant differences in serum urea, Cr, or eGFR between the IDA group and the control group (p>0.05, for all). IDA patients had significantly higher urine NGAL/Cr, L-FABP/Cr, KIM-1/Cr, and NAG/Cr compared with the control group (p<0.05). There were significant negative correlations between hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell count, and urine NGAL/Cr, NAG/Cr, L-FABP/Cr, KIM-1/Cr levels (p<0.05). Conclusions Higher urinary kidney injury molecule levels in IDA patients suggest a possible subclinical renal injury in pediatric IDA patients whose renal functions and serum electrolytes were normal. PMID:26697893

  20. The Effect of Recombinant Growth Hormone Treatment in Children with Idiopathic Short Stature and Low Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Kocaay, Pınar; Çamtosun, Emine; İsakoca, Mehmet; Hacıhamdioğlu, Bülent; Savaş Erdeve, Şenay; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Idiopathic short stature (ISS) constitutes a heterogeneous group of short stature which is not associated with an endocrine or other identifiable cause. Some ISS patients may have varying degrees of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) deficiency. Recombinant growth hormone (rGH) treatment has been used by some authors with variable results. Reports on long-term rGH treatment are limited. Methods: In this study, 21 slowly growing, non-GH-deficient ISS children who received rGH treatment for 3.62±0.92 years were evaluated at the end of a 5.42±1.67-year follow-up period. The study group included patients with low IGF-1 levels who also responded well to an IGF generation test. The patients were divided into two groups as good responders [height increment >1 standard deviation (SD)] and poor responders (height increment <1 SD) at the end of the follow-up period. Results: The height of the patients improved from -3.16±0.46 SD score (SDS) to -1.9±0.66 SDS. At the end of the follow-up period, mean height SDS was -1.72. Eleven of the patients showed a good response to treatment. Clinical parameters were essentially similar in the good responders and the poor responders groups. A female preponderance was noted in the good responders group. Conclusion: rGH treatment can safely be used in ISS children. Long-term GH treatment will ameliorate the height deficit and almost 40% of patients may reach their target height. PMID:26777041

  1. Markers of Bone Metabolism Are Affected by Renal Function and Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Methods Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6–18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10–60 ml/min/1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Conclusion Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity. PMID:25659076

  2. Changes in the hormone (ACTH, insulin,epinephrine) content of immune cells in children having acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Pállinger, Eva; Kovács, Gábor; Horváth, Zsuzsanna; Müller, Judit; Csaba, György

    2013-12-01

    Immune cells synthesize, store and secrete hormones, the level of which changes in ALL. In previous experiments the level of histamine, serotonin and triiodothyronine (T3)was studied, while at present that of ACTH, insulin and epinephrine, using flow cytometric analysis for the determination of cell subsets and detection of hormone content. The measurements were done in children at the time of diagnosis. ACTH was significantly elevated in each T cell subsets (total T, Th, Tc, activated T), while B and NK cells were not touched. The alterations in the insulin content (decrease in Tc and activated T cells) were uncertain, and NK cells contained significantly less insulin. The disease did not influence the cells' epinephrine content. There is not clear explanation for the importance of changes in the cells' hormone content, however, it is discussed in the text.

  3. Growth Hormone Response to L-Dopa and Clonidine in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Realmuto, George M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Seven medication-free autistic subjects (ages 6-19) were administered clonidine and L-Dopa to investigate neuroendocrine responses through changes in growth hormone levels. Findings showed that, compared to normal controls, the L-Dopa-stimulated growth hormone peak was delayed and the clonidine growth hormone peak was premature. (Author/JDD)

  4. Iron Deficiency Protects Against Severe Plasmodium falciparum Malaria and Death in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Gwamaka, Moses; Kurtis, Jonathan D.; Sorensen, Bess E.; Holte, Sarah; Morrison, Robert; Mutabingwa, Theonest K.; Fried, Michal

    2012-01-01

    (See the Editorial Commentary by Awah and Kaneko, on pages 1145–7.) Background. Iron supplementation may increase malaria morbidity and mortality, but the effect of naturally occurring variation in iron status on malaria risk is not well studied. Methods. A total of 785 Tanzanian children living in an area of intense malaria transmission were enrolled at birth, and intensively monitored for parasitemia and illness including malaria for up to 3 years, with an average of 47 blood smears. We assayed plasma samples collected at routine healthy-child visits, and evaluated the impact of iron deficiency (ID) on future malaria outcomes and mortality. Results. ID at routine, well-child visits significantly decreased the odds of subsequent parasitemia (23% decrease, P < .001) and subsequent severe malaria (38% decrease, P = .04). ID was also associated with 60% lower all-cause mortality (P = .04) and 66% lower malaria-associated mortality (P = .11). When sick visits as well as routine healthy-child visits are included in analyses (average of 3 iron status assays/child), ID reduced the prevalence of parasitemia (6.6-fold), hyperparasitemia (24.0-fold), and severe malaria (4.0-fold) at the time of sample collection (all P < .001). Conclusions. Malaria risk is influenced by physiologic iron status, and therefore iron supplementation may have adverse effects even among children with ID. Future interventional studies should assess whether treatment for ID coupled with effective malaria control can mitigate the risks of iron supplementation for children in areas of malaria transmission. PMID:22354919

  5. Biological Systems of Vitamin K: A Plasma Nutriproteomics Study of Subclinical Vitamin K Deficiency in 500 Nepalese Children

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Kerry J.; Cole, Robert N.; Wu, Lee S. F.; Yager, James D.; Groopman, John; Christian, Parul; West, Keith P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin K (VK) is a fat-soluble vitamin whose deficiency disrupts coagulation and may disturb bone and cardiovascular health. However, the scale and systems affected by VK deficiency in pediatric populations remains unclear. We conducted a study of the plasma proteome of 500 Nepalese children 6–8 years of age (male/female ratio = 0.99) to identify proteins associated with VK status. We measured the concentrations of plasma lipids and protein induced by VK absence-II (PIVKA-II) and correlated relative abundance of proteins quantified by mass spectrometry with PIVKA-II. VK deficiency (PIVKA-II >2 μg/L) was associated with a higher abundance of low-density lipoproteins, total cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (p < 0.01). Among 978 proteins observed in >10% of the children, five proteins were associated with PIVKA-II and seven proteins were differentially abundant between VK deficient versus sufficient children, including coagulation factor-II, hemoglobin, and vascular endothelial cadherin, passing a false discovery rate (FDR) threshold of 10% (q < 0.10). Among 27 proteins associated with PIVKA-II or VK deficiency at a less stringent FDR (q < 0.20), a network comprised of hemoglobin subunits and erythrocyte anti-oxidative enzymes were highly and positively correlated each other (all r > 0.7). Untargeted proteomics offers a novel systems approach to elucidating biological processes of coagulation, vascularization, and erythrocyte oxidative stress related to VK status. The results may help elucidate subclinical metabolic disturbances related to VK deficiency in populations. PMID:26913649

  6. Biological Systems of Vitamin K: A Plasma Nutriproteomics Study of Subclinical Vitamin K Deficiency in 500 Nepalese Children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Eun; Schulze, Kerry J; Cole, Robert N; Wu, Lee S F; Yager, James D; Groopman, John; Christian, Parul; West, Keith P

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin K (VK) is a fat-soluble vitamin whose deficiency disrupts coagulation and may disturb bone and cardiovascular health. However, the scale and systems affected by VK deficiency in pediatric populations remains unclear. We conducted a study of the plasma proteome of 500 Nepalese children 6-8 years of age (male/female ratio = 0.99) to identify proteins associated with VK status. We measured the concentrations of plasma lipids and protein induced by VK absence-II (PIVKA-II) and correlated relative abundance of proteins quantified by mass spectrometry with PIVKA-II. VK deficiency (PIVKA-II>2 μg/L) was associated with a higher abundance of low-density lipoproteins, total cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (p<0.01). Among 978 proteins observed in >10% of the children, five proteins were associated with PIVKA-II and seven proteins were differentially abundant between VK deficient versus sufficient children, including coagulation factor-II, hemoglobin, and vascular endothelial cadherin, passing a false discovery rate (FDR) threshold of 10% (q<0.10). Among 27 proteins associated with PIVKA-II or VK deficiency at a less stringent FDR (q<0.20), a network comprised of hemoglobin subunits and erythrocyte anti-oxidative enzymes were highly and positively correlated each other (all r>0.7). Untargeted proteomics offers a novel systems approach to elucidating biological processes of coagulation, vascularization, and erythrocyte oxidative stress related to VK status. The results may help elucidate subclinical metabolic disturbances related to VK deficiency in populations. PMID:26913649

  7. Biological Systems of Vitamin K: A Plasma Nutriproteomics Study of Subclinical Vitamin K Deficiency in 500 Nepalese Children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Eun; Schulze, Kerry J; Cole, Robert N; Wu, Lee S F; Yager, James D; Groopman, John; Christian, Parul; West, Keith P

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin K (VK) is a fat-soluble vitamin whose deficiency disrupts coagulation and may disturb bone and cardiovascular health. However, the scale and systems affected by VK deficiency in pediatric populations remains unclear. We conducted a study of the plasma proteome of 500 Nepalese children 6-8 years of age (male/female ratio = 0.99) to identify proteins associated with VK status. We measured the concentrations of plasma lipids and protein induced by VK absence-II (PIVKA-II) and correlated relative abundance of proteins quantified by mass spectrometry with PIVKA-II. VK deficiency (PIVKA-II>2 μg/L) was associated with a higher abundance of low-density lipoproteins, total cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (p<0.01). Among 978 proteins observed in >10% of the children, five proteins were associated with PIVKA-II and seven proteins were differentially abundant between VK deficient versus sufficient children, including coagulation factor-II, hemoglobin, and vascular endothelial cadherin, passing a false discovery rate (FDR) threshold of 10% (q<0.10). Among 27 proteins associated with PIVKA-II or VK deficiency at a less stringent FDR (q<0.20), a network comprised of hemoglobin subunits and erythrocyte anti-oxidative enzymes were highly and positively correlated each other (all r>0.7). Untargeted proteomics offers a novel systems approach to elucidating biological processes of coagulation, vascularization, and erythrocyte oxidative stress related to VK status. The results may help elucidate subclinical metabolic disturbances related to VK deficiency in populations.

  8. Reduced susceptibility to azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci formation and colon cancer in growth hormone deficient rats

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Robert E.; Goodlad, Robert A.; Poole, Aleksandra J.; Tyner, Angela L.; Robey, R. Brooks; Swanson, Steven M.; Unterman, Terry G.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the role of GH in colon carcinogenesis, we examined the formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACFs) and tumor development in wild type (WT) and GH-deficient, spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs) exposed to the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). Design ACF were quantified by stereomicroscopy and tumor number and weights were recorded for each animal. Cell proliferation was measured by vincristine metaphase arrest, flow cytometry, and bromode-oxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Apoptosis was measured by TUNEL staining and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. IGF-I was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Hexokinase activity was measured by spectrophotometric assay. PARP cleavage, and IGF-IR, and p27kip/cip expression were measured by Western blotting. Results ACFs detected by stereomicroscopy were markedly reduced (~85%) in SDRs vs. WT rats at 10, 25, and 28 weeks after AOM. Tumor incidence, number, and weight also were reduced in SDR vs. WT animals. AOM treatment increased cell proliferation in the distal colon (where tumors occur) of WT rats but not SDRs, and these changes corresponded to increased ACF and tumor formation. Apoptosis rates were similar in AOM-treated WT and SDRs. Alterations in serum IGF-I levels may contribute to differences in the proliferative response to AOM and decreased ACF formation in SDR vs. WT rats. Conclusions We conclude that early neoplastic lesions (ACFs) were reduced in GH-deficient animals. This effect corresponds with differences in AOM-induced proliferation, but not apoptosis. These data indicate that GH is required for the full effect of AOM on colon ACF and tumor development, and that the SDR rat is a promising model for studies regarding the role of GH/IGF system in the initiation and promotion of colon cancer. PMID:19406679

  9. Clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of non-classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency in Japanese children.

    PubMed

    Kashimada, Kenichi; Ishii, Tomohiro; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Ono, Makoto; Tajima, Toshihiro; Yokota, Ichiro; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Non-classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency (NC21-OHD) is a mild form of 21-hydroxylase deficiency lacking apparent symptoms of androgen excess at birth. Most NC21-OHD cases are diagnosed after the onset of puberty, while a substantial number of patients are not diagnosed during childhood. Previous studies have reported ethnic differences in the prevalence of NC21-OHD. To date, the clinical features of NC21-OHD in Japanese children have not been systemically reported. Thus, we performed 3 independent analyses: retrospective analyses of newborn screening in 2 major Japanese cities (Sapporo and Niigata) and a national surveillance collecting clinical information from pediatric endocrinologists throughout the country. During the last 10 years, one case of NC21-OHD was diagnosed by newborn screening in each city, resulting in incidences of 2.0 (95% confidence interval = 0.0-5.9) and 2.1 (0.0-6.2) per 1,000,000 in Sapporo and Niigata, respectively. We collected information from 85% of the 135 Councilors of Japanese Society of Pediatric Endocrinology. Fifteen NC21-OHD patients were diagnosed during childhood, resulting in the estimated prevalence of 0.58 (0.28-1.1) per 1,000,000. Eleven patients were discovered by newborn screening, 7 patients developed hyperandrogenism symptoms (2-8 years of age, median 7), and 9 patients were treated with hydrocortisone at the time of the survey. Ten out of 13 patients showed compound heterozygosity for the P30L mutation of CYP21A2. Our study suggests that the prevalence/incidence of NC21-OHD is lower than that in Western countries, and that the age for initial onset of androgen excess symptoms varies during the prepubertal period.

  10. Regulation of human growth hormone secretion and its disorders.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuzuru; Murakami, Yoshio; Sohmiya, Motoi; Nishiki, Masateru

    2002-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion from anterior pituitary is regulated by the hypothalamus and the mediators of GH actions. Major regulatory factors include GH releasing hormone (GHRH), somatostatin (SRIF), GH releasing peptide (ghrerin) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I). The principal physiological regulation mechanisms of GH secretion are neural endogenous rhythm, sleep, stress, exercise, and nutritional and metabolic signals. GH deficiency results from various hereditary or acquired causes, which may be isolated or combined with other pituitary hormone deficiencies. GH deficiency can be treated with recombinant human GH, which results in accelerating growth in children and normalization of intermediary metabolism in adults. GH hypersecretion mostly results from a pituitary tumor and causes acromegaly or gigantism. Hypersecretion of GH can be treated by transshenoidal surgery. Medical treatment with octreotide and analogs is also effective to reduce GH secretion in combination with or without the surgery. PMID:11838603

  11. Iodine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Elliott, T C

    1987-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) affects 800 million people in the world, yet iodine supplementation is one of the most cost-effective nutritional interventions known. Iodine is incorporated into thyroid hormones, necessary for regulating metabolic rate, growth, and development of the brain and nervous system. IDD may appear as goiter in adults, usually not a serious problem, or in cretinism in children, which is marked by severe mental and physical retardation, with irreversible hearing and speech defects and either deaf-mutism, squint and paralysis, or stunting and edema. Children supplemented by age 1 or 2 can sometimes be helped. Foods contain variable amounts of iodine dependent on the soil where they are grown, hence mountainous and some inland regions have high goiter and IDD incidence. There are also goitrogenic foods, typically those of the cabbage family. Diagnosis is clinical or by blood tests for thyroid hormone levels and ratios. Finger-stick methods are available. Prevention of IDD is simple with either iodized salt or flour, iodinated central water supplies, injectable or oral iodine-containing oil. All cost about $.04 per person per year, except injections, which cost about $1 per person, but have the advantage that they could be combined with immunizations. Local problems with supplements are loss of iodine in salt with storage in tropics, and local production of cheaper uniodinated salt. Emphasis should be given to pregnant women and young children. There is no harm in giving pregnant women iodine injections in 2nd or 3rd trimester. PMID:12343033

  12. Increased and early lipolysis in children with long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency during fast.

    PubMed

    Haglind, C Bieneck; Nordenström, A; Ask, S; von Döbeln, U; Gustafsson, J; Stenlid, M Halldin

    2015-03-01

    Children with long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCHAD) have a defect in the degradation of long-chain fatty acids and are at risk of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and insufficient energy production as well as accumulation of toxic fatty acid intermediates. Knowledge on substrate metabolism in children with LCHAD deficiency during fasting is limited. Treatment guidelines differ between centers, both as far as length of fasting periods and need for night feeds are concerned. To increase the understanding of fasting intolerance and improve treatment recommendations, children with LCHAD deficiency were investigated with stable isotope technique, microdialysis, and indirect calometry, in order to assess lipolysis and glucose production during 6 h of fasting. We found an early and increased lipolysis and accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines after 4 h of fasting, albeit no patients developed hypoglycemia. The rate of glycerol production, reflecting lipolysis, averaged 7.7 ± 1.6 µmol/kg/min, which is higher compared to that of peers. The rate of glucose production was normal for age; 19.6 ± 3.4 µmol/kg/min (3.5 ± 0.6 mg/kg/min). Resting energy expenditure was also normal, even though the respiratory quotient was increased indicating mainly glucose oxidation. The results show that lipolysis and accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines occurs before hypoglycemia in fasting children with LCHAD, which may indicate more limited fasting tolerance than previously suggested.

  13. Evaluation Efficacy of Ferrous Sulfate Therapy on Headaches of 5-15 Years Old Iron Deficient Children with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, R; Zare Bidoki, S; Ordooei, M

    2016-01-01

    Background Some researches have shown the association between iron deficiency and migraine headache in adults. The aim of present study was to evaluate efficacy of ferrous sulfate treatment on migraine headaches of 5-15 years old migraineur children with iron deficiency. Materials and Methods In a quasi- experimental study, monthly frequency, severity, duration and disability of headaches of 5-15 years old migraineur children that prophylactic therapy was indicated in them and had iron deficiency who were referred to Pediatric Neurology Clinic of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran between 2013 and 2015 and were treated with 2mg/kg/day topiramate plus 4mg/kg/day of ferrous sulfate for three consecutive months, were evaluated and headache characteristics before and after treatment were compared. Results In this study, 98 children with mean age of 9.72±3.19 were evaluated that 31children (31.6%) had iron deficiency. Monthly frequency (22.89±7.18 vs.14.5±4.56, P= 0.02), severity score (8.12± 1.76 vs. 5.03±1.15, P= 0.02) and disability score of headache (38.23±10.7vs. 30.12±7.46, P= 0.03) were more in children with iron deficiency. Iron therapy was effective in decreasing of monthlyfrequency 22.89± 7.18 vs. 10.13±4.51, P = 0.001), severity score (8.12±1.76 vs. 5.11±1.62, P =0.001), duration (2.14±1.23 vs.1.14±1.01, P= 0.001) and disability score of headache (38.23±10.7 vs. 22.87±8.65, P= 0.01). Conclusion In children, iron deficiency increased monthly frequency, severity and disability of migraine headache and ferrous sulfate can be used as a safe and effective drug in migraine prophylaxis. PMID:27222700

  14. Reversible Albumin-Binding GH Possesses a Potential Once-Weekly Treatment Profile in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Klose, Marianne; Marina, Djordje; Tanvig, Mette; Nielsen, Lene F.; Höybye, Charlotte; Andersen, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2016-01-01

    Context: NNC0195-0092 is a reversible, albumin-binding GH derivative, developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of multiple, once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092, compared with daily GH. Design and Setting: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, multiple-dose, dose-escalation trial. Patients: Thirty-four GH-treated adult subjects (male, n = 25) with GH deficiency participated in the study. Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were sequentially assigned into four cohorts of eight subjects, randomized within each cohort (3:1) to once-weekly NNC0195-0092 (n = 6) for 4 weeks (0.02, 0.04, 0.08, and 0.12 mg/kg) or daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex (n = 2) for 4 weeks with a dose replicating the pretrial dose of somatropin. A safety assessment was performed prior to initiating treatment at the next dose level of NNC0195-0092. Daily GH treatment was discontinued 14 days before the trial start. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics (IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein-3) profiles, and immunogenicity studies. Results: Numbers of adverse events were similar at the dose levels of 0.02, 0.04, and 0.08 mg/kg NNC0195-0092 vs daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex, whereas the number of adverse events was greater at the highest dose level of NNC0195-0092 (0.12 mg/kg). NNC0195-0092 (area under the curve[0–168h]) and peak plasma concentration) increased in a dose-dependent manner, and a dose-dependent increase in IGF-1 levels was observed. IGF-1 profiles were elevated for at least 1 week, and for the 0.02-mg/kg and 0.04-mg/kg NNC0195-0092 doses, the observed IGF-1 levels were similar to the levels for the active control group. Conclusion: Four once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (dose range 0.02–0.12 mg/kg) administered to adult patients with GH deficiency were well tolerated

  15. Reference intervals of thyroid hormones in a previously iodine-deficient but presently more than adequate area of Western China: a population-based survey.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Fang, Yujie; Jing, Da; Xu, Shaoyong; Ming, Jie; Gao, Bin; Shen, Han; Zhang, Rong; Ji, Qiuhe

    2016-04-25

    The aim of our study is to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of thyroid hormones in a previously iodine-deficient area but presently more than iodine-adequate area of Western China, and also to investigate the factors which affect thyroid function. The cross-sectional study conducted in Xi'an, was based on 2007-2008 China National Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Survey. Among 1286 participating adults, 717 were finally included as reference population. Thyrotropin (TSH), total triiodothyronine (T3), free triiodothyronine (FT3), total thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroperoxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) and thyroglobulin antibody (Tg-Ab) were measured. Thyroid ultrasound examination was also performed. The present study established the new RIs of serum TSH (0.43-5.51 mIU/L), FT4 (11.0-20.4 pmol/L), FT3 (3.63-5.73 pmol/L), T4 (67.8-157 mmol/L) and T3 (1.08-2.20 mmol/L), which were different from the data provided by the manufacturers. Significant differences among all the age groups were observed in FT3, but neither in TSH nor in FT4. The TSH levels in adults with pathologic ultrasonography results or positive thyroid autoantibody were significantly higher than those in reference adults. Our present results provide valuable references for the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in population of Western China. Considering that most inland areas of China have faced the challenge of the transition from iodine deficiency to adequacy or more than adequacy, we recommend physicians utilize our RIs to determine thyroid diseases in the similar areas with Xi'an in China. PMID:26842591

  16. Reference intervals of thyroid hormones in a previously iodine-deficient but presently more than adequate area of Western China: a population-based survey.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Fang, Yujie; Jing, Da; Xu, Shaoyong; Ming, Jie; Gao, Bin; Shen, Han; Zhang, Rong; Ji, Qiuhe

    2016-04-25

    The aim of our study is to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of thyroid hormones in a previously iodine-deficient area but presently more than iodine-adequate area of Western China, and also to investigate the factors which affect thyroid function. The cross-sectional study conducted in Xi'an, was based on 2007-2008 China National Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Survey. Among 1286 participating adults, 717 were finally included as reference population. Thyrotropin (TSH), total triiodothyronine (T3), free triiodothyronine (FT3), total thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroperoxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) and thyroglobulin antibody (Tg-Ab) were measured. Thyroid ultrasound examination was also performed. The present study established the new RIs of serum TSH (0.43-5.51 mIU/L), FT4 (11.0-20.4 pmol/L), FT3 (3.63-5.73 pmol/L), T4 (67.8-157 mmol/L) and T3 (1.08-2.20 mmol/L), which were different from the data provided by the manufacturers. Significant differences among all the age groups were observed in FT3, but neither in TSH nor in FT4. The TSH levels in adults with pathologic ultrasonography results or positive thyroid autoantibody were significantly higher than those in reference adults. Our present results provide valuable references for the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in population of Western China. Considering that most inland areas of China have faced the challenge of the transition from iodine deficiency to adequacy or more than adequacy, we recommend physicians utilize our RIs to determine thyroid diseases in the similar areas with Xi'an in China.

  17. Vitamin D deficiency and anthropometric indicators of adiposity in school-age children: a prospective study123

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Baylin, Ana; Mora-Plazas, Mercedes; Marin, Constanza; Arsenault, Joanne E; Hughes, Michael D; Willett, Walter C; Villamor, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cross-sectional studies have indicated that vitamin D serostatus is inversely associated with adiposity. It is unknown whether vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for the development of adiposity in children. Objective: We investigated the associations between vitamin D serostatus and changes in body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2), skinfold-thickness ratio (subscapular-to-triceps), waist circumference, and height in a longitudinal study in children from Bogota, Colombia. Design: We quantified plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations in baseline samples of a randomly selected group of 479 schoolchildren aged 5–12 y and classified vitamin D status as deficient [25(OH)D concentrations <50 nmol/L], insufficient [25(OH)D concentrations ≥50 and <75 nmol/L], or sufficient [25(OH)D concentrations ≥75 nmol/L]. We measured anthropometric variables annually for a median of 30 mo. We estimated the average change in each anthropometric indicator according to baseline vitamin D status by using multivariate mixed linear regression models. Results: Vitamin D–deficient children had an adjusted 0.1/y greater change in BMI than did vitamin D–sufficient children (P for trend = 0.05). Similarly, vitamin D–deficient children had a 0.03/y (95% CI: 0.01, 0.05/y) greater change in subscapular-to-triceps skinfold-thickness ratio and a 0.8 cm/y (95% CI: 0.1, 1.6 cm/y) greater change in waist circumference than did vitamin D–sufficient children. Vitamin D deficiency was related to slower linear growth in girls (−0.6 cm/y, P = 0.04) but not in boys (0.3 cm/y, P = 0.34); however, an interaction with sex was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Vitamin D serostatus was inversely associated with the development of adiposity in school-age children. PMID:20926524

  18. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among children aged 1 month to 16 years in Hangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that vitamin D deficiency in children is widespread. But the vitamin D status of Chinese children is seldom investigated. The objective of the present study was to survey the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in more than 6,000 children aged 1 month to 16 years in Hangzhou (latitude: 30°N), the capital of Zhejiang Province, southeast China. Methods The children aged 1 month to 16 years who came to the child health care department of our hospital, the children's hospital affiliated to Zhejiang university school of medicine, for health examination were taken blood for 25(OH) D measurement. Serum 25(OH) D levels were determined by direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and categorized as < 25, < 50, and < 75 nmol/L. Results A total of 6,008 children aged 1 month to 16 years participated in this cross-sectional study. All the subjects were divided into subgroups according to their age: 0-1y, 2-5y, 6-11y and 12-16y representing infancy, preschool, school age and adolescence stages respectively. The highest mean level of serum 25(OH)D was found in the 0-1y stage (99 nmol/L) and the lowest one was found in 12-16y stage (52 nmol/L). Accordingly, the prevalence of serum 25(OH)D levels of < 75 nmol/L and < 50 nmol/L were at the lowest among infants (33.6% and 5.4% respectively) and rose to the highest among adolescents (89.6% and 46.4% respectively). The mean levels of serum 25(OH)D and the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency changed according to seasons. In winter and spring, more than 50% of school age children and adolescents had a 25(OH)D level at < 50 nmol/L. If the threshold is changed to < 75 nmol/L, all of the adolescents (100%) had low 25(OH)D levels in winter and 93.7% school age children as well. Conclusions The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency among children in Hangzhou Zhejiang province is high, especially among children aged 6-16 years. We suggest that the recommendation for vitamin D

  19. Treatment with N- and C-Terminal Peptides of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Partly Compensate the Skeletal Abnormalities in IGF-I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Lozano, Daniel; Cediel, Rafael; Esbrit, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency causes growth delay, and IGF-I has been shown to partially mediate bone anabolism by parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is abundant in bone, and has osteogenic features by poorly defined mechanisms. We here examined the capacity of PTHrP (1–36) and PTHrP (107–111) (osteostatin) to reverse the skeletal alterations associated with IGF-I deficiency. Igf1-null mice and their wild type littermates were treated with each PTHrP peptide (80 µg/Kg/every other day/2 weeks; 2 males and 4 females for each genotype) or saline vehicle (3 males and 3 females for each genotype). We found that treatment with either PTHrP peptide ameliorated trabecular structure in the femur in both genotypes. However, these peptides were ineffective in normalizing the altered cortical structure at this bone site in Igf1-null mice. An aberrant gene expression of factors associated with osteoblast differentiation and function, namely runx2, osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of NF-κB ligand ratio, Wnt3a, cyclin D1, connexin 43, catalase and Gadd45, as well as in osteocyte sclerostin, was found in the long bones of Igf1-null mice. These mice also displayed a lower amount of trabecular osteoblasts and osteoclasts in the tibial metaphysis than those in wild type mice. These alterations in Igf1-null mice were only partially corrected by each PTHrP peptide treatment. The skeletal expression of Igf2, Igf1 receptor and Irs2 was increased in Igf1-null mice, and this compensatory profile was further improved by treatment with each PTHrP peptide related to ERK1/2 and FoxM1 activation. In vitro, PTHrP (1–36) and osteostatin were effective in promoting bone marrow stromal cell mineralization in normal mice but not in IGF-I-deficient mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that PTHrP (1–36) and osteostatin can exert several osteogenic actions even in the absence of IGF-I in the mouse bone. PMID:24503961

  20. Treatment with N- and C-terminal peptides of parathyroid hormone-related protein partly compensate the skeletal abnormalities in IGF-I deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; López-Herradón, Ana; Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Lozano, Daniel; Cediel, Rafael; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Esbrit, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency causes growth delay, and IGF-I has been shown to partially mediate bone anabolism by parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is abundant in bone, and has osteogenic features by poorly defined mechanisms. We here examined the capacity of PTHrP (1-36) and PTHrP (107-111) (osteostatin) to reverse the skeletal alterations associated with IGF-I deficiency. Igf1-null mice and their wild type littermates were treated with each PTHrP peptide (80 µg/Kg/every other day/2 weeks; 2 males and 4 females for each genotype) or saline vehicle (3 males and 3 females for each genotype). We found that treatment with either PTHrP peptide ameliorated trabecular structure in the femur in both genotypes. However, these peptides were ineffective in normalizing the altered cortical structure at this bone site in Igf1-null mice. An aberrant gene expression of factors associated with osteoblast differentiation and function, namely runx2, osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of NF-κB ligand ratio, Wnt3a , cyclin D1, connexin 43, catalase and Gadd45, as well as in osteocyte sclerostin, was found in the long bones of Igf1-null mice. These mice also displayed a lower amount of trabecular osteoblasts and osteoclasts in the tibial metaphysis than those in wild type mice. These alterations in Igf1-null mice were only partially corrected by each PTHrP peptide treatment. The skeletal expression of Igf2, Igf1 receptor and Irs2 was increased in Igf1-null mice, and this compensatory profile was further improved by treatment with each PTHrP peptide related to ERK1/2 and FoxM1 activation. In vitro, PTHrP (1-36) and osteostatin were effective in promoting bone marrow stromal cell mineralization in normal mice but not in IGF-I-deficient mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that PTHrP (1-36) and osteostatin can exert several osteogenic actions even in the absence of IGF-I in the mouse bone.

  1. Accelerated telomere attrition in children and teenagers with α1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Amparo; Pastor, Sara; Reula, Ana; Castillo, Silvia; Vicente, Silvia; Sanz, Francisco; Casas, Francisco; Torres, María; Fernández-Fabrellas, Estrella; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Dasí, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that oxidative stress accelerates telomere shortening in several lung pathologies. Since oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), we hypothesised that telomere shortening would be accelerated in AATD patients. This study aimed to assess telomere length in AATD patients and to study its association with α1-antitrypsin phenotypes.Telomere length, telomerase activity, telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression and biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured in 62 children and teenagers (aged 2-18 years) diagnosed with AATD and 18 controls (aged 3-16 years).Our results show that intermediate-risk (MZ; SZ) and high-risk (ZZ) AATD patients have significantly shorter telomeres and increased oxidative stress than controls. Correlation studies indicate that telomere length was related to oxidative stress markers in AATD patients. Multiple hypothesis testing revealed an association between telomere length, telomerase activity, hTERT expression and AATD phenotypes; high-risk patients showed shorter telomeres, lower hTERT expression and decreased telomerase activity than intermediate-risk and low-risk patients.AATD patients show evidence of increased oxidative stress leading to telomere attrition. An association between telomere and α1-antitrypsin phenotypes is observed suggesting that telomere length could be a promising biomarker for AATD disease progression.

  2. Predictive genetic testing in children: constitutional mismatch repair deficiency cancer predisposing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruwer, Zandrè; Algar, Ursula; Vorster, Alvera; Fieggen, Karen; Davidson, Alan; Goldberg, Paul; Wainwright, Helen; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Biallelic germline mutations in mismatch repair genes predispose to constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome (CMMR-D). The condition is characterized by a broad spectrum of early-onset tumors, including hematological, brain and bowel and is frequently associated with features of Neurofibromatosis type 1. Few definitive screening recommendations have been suggested and no published reports have described predictive testing. We report on the first case of predictive testing for CMMR-D following the identification of two non-consanguineous parents, with the same heterozygous mutation in MLH1: c.1528C > T. The genetic counseling offered to the family, for their two at-risk daughters, is discussed with a focus on the ethical considerations of testing children for known cancer-causing variants. The challenges that are encountered when reporting on heterozygosity in a child younger than 18 years (disclosure of carrier status and risk for Lynch syndrome), when discovered during testing for homozygosity, are addressed. In addition, the identification of CMMR-D in a three year old, and the recommended clinical surveillance that was proposed for this individual is discussed. Despite predictive testing and presymptomatic screening, the sudden death of the child with CMMR-D syndrome occurred 6 months after her last surveillance MRI. This report further highlights the difficulty of developing guidelines, as a result of the rarity of cases and diversity of presentation.

  3. [Index finger pollicization for congenitally deficient first finger of the hand in children].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Rueda, F; Ayala Montoro, J; Blanco López, F; Ocaña Losa, J M

    2001-10-01

    Pollicization is a single-stage neurovascular pedicle transfer of the index digit to function as a thumb. The objective of this study is to investigate the results of index finger pollicization for correction of congenital deficiency of the first ray in pediatric hand. We have done 6 pollicizations of index fingers in 6 hands (there were 2 right hands, 2 left hands, and 1 bilaterally) in 5 patients (4 boys and 1 girl) who had absent or nonfunctioning thumbs (type III-V of Blauth's classification). Associated anomalies where numerous and included radial club hand, mirror hand and cardiovascular and urologic anomalies. The average time of Kirschner wire extraction was 32 days (30 to 36 days) and to beginning the hand rehabilitation at 5 degrees to 10 degrees day. The average age at pollicization was 5.5 years (range 2 to 8 years), and follow-up averaged 8 years (5 to 11 years). The cosmetic and functional results were excellent, with manual dexterity of prehension and opposition. Pollicization in children can be performed at least 2 years of age, to due of minor risk of neurovascular lesion but without delayed the cortical representation of the pollicized finger.

  4. Lactate as a cerebral metabolic fuel for glucose-6-phosphatase deficient children.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, J; Berger, R; Smit, G P

    1984-04-01

    The main substrates for brain energy metabolism were measured in blood samples taken from the carotid artery and the internal jugular bulb of four children with glycogen storage disease caused by deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase. Multiple paired arterial and venous blood samples were analyzed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, glycerol and O2, and the arteriovenous differences of the concentrations were calculated. In the first three patients the substrates were measured in two successive conditions with lower and higher glucose-intake, respectively, inducing reciprocally higher and lower concentrations of blood lactate. In the fourth patient medium chain triglycerides were administered simultaneously with the glucose-containing gastric drip feeding. Lactate appeared to be taken up significantly. It consumed, if completely oxidized, between 40-50% of the total O2 uptake in most cases. Only once in one patient the uptake of lactate switched to its release, when the blood lactate level decreased to normal. D-beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate arteriovenous (A-V) differences were small to negligible and these ketone bodies, therefore, did not contribute substantially to the brain's energy expenditure. Glycerol was not metabolized by the brain. Lactate thus appeared to be the second brain fuel next to glucose. It may protect the brain against fuel depletion in case of hypoglycemia.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is a disorder of hormone production. This condition specifically affects steroid hormones, which are ... activity of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, which disrupts the production of steroid hormones. Changes in sex hormones such ...

  6. Alterations in vitamin D metabolite, parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor-23 concentrations in sclerostin-deficient mice permit the maintenance of a high bone mass.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Zachary C; Craig, Theodore A; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-04-01

    Humans with mutations of the sclerostin (SOST) gene, and knockout animals in which the Sost gene has been experimentally deleted, exhibit an increase in bone mass. We review the mechanisms by which Sost knockout mice are able to accrete increased amounts of calcium and phosphorus required for the maintenance of a high bone mass. Recently published information from our laboratory, shows that bone mass is increased in Sost-deficient mice through an increase in osteoblast and a decrease in osteoclast activity, which is mediated by activation of β-catenin and an increase in prostacyclin synthesis in osteocytes and osteoblasts. The increases in calcium and phosphorus retention required for enhanced bone mineral accretion are brought about by changes in the vitamin D endocrine system, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). Thus, in Sost knockout mice, concentrations of serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) are increased and concentrations of FGF-23 are decreased thereby allowing a positive calcium and phosphorus balance. Additionally, in the absence of Sost expression, urinary calcium is decreased, either through a direct effect of sclerostin on renal calcium handling, or through its effect on the synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D. Adaptations in vitamin D, PTH and FGF-23 physiology occur in the absence of sclerostin expression and mediate increased calcium and phosphorus retention required for the increase in bone mineralization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  7. Relationship between hyperglycemia, hormone disturbances, and clinical evolution in severely hyperglycemic post surgery critically ill children: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To study hormonal changes associated with severe hyperglycemia in critically ill children and the relationship with prognosis and length of stay in intensive care. Methods Observational study in twenty-nine critically ill children with severe hyperglycemia defined as 2 blood glucose measurements greater than 180 mg/dL. Severity of illness was assessed using pediatric index of mortality (PIM2), pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score, and pediatric logistic organ dysfunction (PELOD) scales. Blood glucose, glycosuria, insulin, C-peptide, cortisol, corticotropin, insulinlike growth factor-1, growth hormone, thyrotropin, thyroxine, and treatment with insulin were recorded. β-cell function and insulin sensitivity and resistance were determined on the basis of the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), using blood glucose and C-peptide levels. Results The initial blood glucose level was 249 mg/dL and fell gradually to 125 mg/dL at 72 hours. Initial β-cell function (49.2%) and insulin sensitivity (13.2%) were low. At the time of diagnosis of hyperglycemia, 50% of the patients presented insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction, 46% presented isolated insulin resistance, and 4% isolated β-cell dysfunction. β-cell function improved rapidly but insulin resistance persisted. Initial glycemia did not correlate with any other factor, and there was no relationship between glycemia and mortality. Patients who died had higher cortisol and growth hormone levels at diagnosis. Length of stay was correlated by univariate analysis, but not by multivariate analysis, with C-peptide and glycemic control at 24 hours, insulin resistance, and severity of illness scores. Conclusions Critically ill children with severe hyperglycemia initially present decreased β-cell function and insulin sensitivity. Nonsurvivors had higher cortisol and growth hormone levels and developed hyperglycemia later than survivors. PMID:24628829

  8. [Health and nutritional status of 'alternatively' fed infants and young children, facts and uncertainties. II. Specific nutritional deficiencies; discussion].

    PubMed

    Dagnelie, P C; Van Staveren, W A; Hautvast, J G

    1985-12-01

    This article, which is the second in a series of two articles, discusses available scientific information on the nutritional status of infants and preschool children on alternative diets with regard to calcium, iron, vitamin B12 and D. Some favourable aspects of alternative food habits in such children are also mentioned. Most studies report low intakes of vitamin D and in vegan and macrobiotic children also of calcium and vitamin B12, but it cannot be excluded that some alternative sources of these nutrient may have been missed. Deficiencies have been described for vitamin D and B12 but the evidence is often unconvincing. For example, exposure to sunlight has not been measured in most of the studies on rickets. From the literature available, it would appear that there is a need for longitudinal research on the growth and development of alternatively fed infants and preschool children and for information on the nutrient composition of alternative foods.

  9. Hormone replacement therapy: I. A pharmacoeconomic appraisal of its therapeutic use in menopausal symptoms and urogenital estrogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Whittington, R; Faulds, D

    1994-05-01

    Menopause and the accompanying reduction in estrogen production may cause a number of symptoms in women which include hot flushes, sweating, mood and sleep disturbances, fatigue and urogenital dysfunction. The effectiveness of estrogen-based hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in ameliorating these symptoms, and in preventing long term sequelae such as osteoporosis, is well established. Comparative trials indicate that oral conjugated estrogens 0.625mg, oral ethinyl estradiol 0.02mg and transdermal estradiol 0.05mg have equivalent efficacy in relief of mild to moderate menopausal symptoms and prevention of bone mineral loss. Concomitant progestogen therapy is usually prescribed for women with intact uteri to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma. The addition of progestogen maintains and may even enhance the bone-conserving effects of estrogen, and continuous regimens appear to reduce the incidence of irregular menses. Adverse reactions are predominantly local skin irritation with transdermal preparations (14% of patients) and systemic effects common to most forms of HRT including breast tenderness, flushing, headache and irregular bleeding, occurring in less than or equal to 2% of patients. Data concerning the effect of HRT on quality of life are limited, but most analyses have assigned utility values of 0.99 for mild and 0.95 for severe menopausal symptoms. However, recent clinical data suggest that these utility values may underestimate the impact of menopausal symptoms on quality of life. The cost benefit and cost effectiveness of HRT in the treatment of menopausal symptoms have not been fully researched, although preliminary results suggest that conjugated estrogens and transdermal estradiol compare well with alternative therapies such as veralipride and Chinese medicines. A Swedish study using a prevalence-based approach estimated that estriol treatment in all women with urinary incontinence aged greater than or equal to 65 years resulted in

  10. [Serum levels of Zn in children with different degress of nutritional deficiency].

    PubMed

    Amesty-Valbuena, Alis; Pereira-Medero, Nayda; Núñez-González, José Rafael de Jesús; García, Doris; de Villaroel, Monserrat Vicente; Granadillo, Víctor; Manzanilla, José; Fernández, Denny

    2006-12-01

    The importance of Zinc (Zn) as a necessary oligoclement for human nutrition begins in the first three decades of life. At the moment, the role that Zn plays in the infantile nutrition is very well-known, acquiring a special connotation in children with proteic-energetics malnutrition (PEM). In this study the daily ingestion and the serum measuremets of Zn were determined in 64 undernourished children (light, mild and severe) and in 25 eutrophic children with ages between 1 to 5 years, belonging to families of the strata IV and V according to the Graffar scale corrected by age. The results of the serum values of Zn were for the light undernourished of 39.73 +/- 14.97 microg/dL (30.38 microg/dL-44.56 microg/dL), for the mild undernourished of 35.07 +/- 28.13 microg/dL (27.76 microg/dL-65.80 microg/dL) and for the severe undernourished of 15.48 +/- 10.44 microg/dL (5.57 microg/dL-28.56 microg/dL), which were diminished in relation with the control group, 76.71 +/- 33.29 microg/dL (45.75 microg/dL - 78.27 microg/dL) with p < 0.0001. Equally, there were significant differences (p < 0.001) among the group of severe undernourished with the light undernourished and normal subjects. In relation with the daily ingestion of Zn, a statistically significant difference was observed only (p < 0.001) in the severe undernourished, 1.87 +/- 0.54 mg/día (1.20 mg/día-2.87 mg/día) when comparing them with the light undernourished, 5.48 +/- 0.98 mg/día (3.50 mg/día-7.87 mg/día), the mild undernourished, 4.99 +/- 1.24 mg/día (4.10 mg/día-11.42 mg/día) ) and the normal subjects, 6.22 +/- 0.98 mg/día (4.8 mg/día-8.02 mg/día). There was a positive correlation between ingestion and seric values of Zn when the 3 undernourished groups were studied. These results allow to conclude that both the seric values of Zn and its ingestion show modifications in relation with the degree of nutritional deficiency. PMID:17176903

  11. Vitamin D Deficiency and Glycemic Status in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Savastio, Silvia; Cadario, Francesco; Genoni, Giulia; Bellomo, Giorgio; Bagnati, Marco; Secco, Gioel; Picchi, Raffaella; Giglione, Enza; Bona, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D (25OHD) effects on glycemic control are unclear in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Aims of this study were to investigate 25OHD status among children with T1DM and its relationship with insulin sensitivity and glycemic status. Subjects and Methods A cross sectional study was carried out between 2008–2014. A total of 141 patients had a T1DM >12 months diagnosis and were enrolled in the present study. Of these 35 (24.8%) were migrants and 106 (75.2%) Italians (T2). We retrospectively analyzed data at the onset of the disease (T0)(64 subjects) and 12–24 months before the last visit (T1,124 subjects). Fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), 25OHD levels and daily insulin requirement were evaluated and Cholecalciferol 1000 IU/day supplementation for the management of vitamin D insufficiency (<75 nmol/L) was systematically added. Results A generalized 25OHD insufficiency was found at each study time, particularly in migrants. At T0, the 25OHD levels were inversely related to diabetic keto-acidosis (DKA) severity (p<0.05). At T1 and T2, subjects with 25OHD ≤25nmol/L (10 ng/mL) showed higher daily insulin requirement (p<0.05) and HbA1c values (p<0.01) than others vitamin D status. The 25OHD levels were negatively related with HbA1c (p<0.001) and daily insulin dose (p<0.05) during follow up. There was a significant difference in 25OHD (p<0.01) between subjects with different metabolic control (HbA1c <7.5%,7.5–8%,>8%), both at T1 and T2. In supplemented subjects, we found a significant increase in 25OHD levels (p<0.0001) and decrease of HbA1c (p<0.001) between T1 and T2, but this was not significant in the migrants subgroup. Multivariate regression analysis showed a link between HbA1c and 25OHD levels (p<0.001). Conclusions Children with T1DM show a generalized 25OHD deficiency that impact on metabolic status and glycemic homeostasis. Vitamin D supplementation improves glycemic control and should be considered as an

  12. Effect of recombinant human growth hormone on changes in height, bone mineral density, and body composition over 1-2 years in children with Hurler or Hunter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Polgreen, Lynda E; Thomas, William; Orchard, Paul J; Whitley, Chester B; Miller, Bradley S

    2014-02-01

    Patients with Hurler or Hunter syndrome typically have moderate to severe growth deficiencies despite therapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and/or enzyme replacement therapy. It is unknown whether treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) can improve growth in these children. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of hGH on growth, bone mineral density (BMD), and body composition in children with Hurler or Hunter syndrome enrolled in a longitudinal observational study. The difference in annual change in outcomes between hGH treated and untreated subjects was estimated by longitudinal regression models that adjusted for age, Tanner stage, and sex where appropriate. We report on 23 participants who completed at least 2 annual study visits (10 [43%] treated with hGH): Hurler syndrome (n=13) average age of 9.8 ± 3.1 years (range 5.3-13.6 years; 54% female) and Hunter syndrome (n=10) average age of 12.0 ± 2.7 years (range 7.0-17.0 years; 0% female). As a group, children with Hurler or Hunter syndrome treated with hGH had no difference in annual change in height (growth velocity) compared to those untreated with hGH. Growth velocity in hGH treated individuals ranged from -0.4 to 8.1cm/year and from 0.3 to 6.6 cm/year in the untreated individuals. Among children with Hunter syndrome, 100% (N=4) of those treated but only 50% of those untreated with hGH had an annual increase in height standard deviation score (SDS). Of the individuals treated with hGH, those with GHD had a trend towards higher annualized growth velocity compared to those without GHD (6.5 ± 1.9 cm/year vs. 3.5 ± 2.1cm/year; p=.050). Children treated with hGH had greater annual gains in BMD and lean body mass. In conclusion, although as a group we found no significant difference in growth between individuals treated versus not treated with hGH, individual response was highly variable and we are unable to predict who will respond to treatment. Thus

  13. Depleted iron stores and iron deficiency anemia associated with reduced ferritin and hepcidin and elevated soluble transferrin receptors in a multiethnic group of preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Hope A; Jean-Philippe, Sonia; Cohen, Tamara R; Vanstone, Catherine A; Agellon, Sherry

    2015-09-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is prevalent in subgroups of the Canadian population. The objective of this study was to examine iron status and anemia in preschool-age children. Healthy children (n = 430, 2-5 years old, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) were sampled from randomly selected daycares. Anthropometry, demographics, and diet were assessed. Biochemistry included hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), ferritin index, markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)), and hepcidin. Iron deficiency and anemia cutoffs conformed to the World Health Organization criteria. Differences among categories were tested using mixed-model ANOVA or χ(2) tests. Children were 3.8 ± 1.0 years of age, with a body mass index z score of 0.48 ± 0.97, and 51% were white. Adjusted intakes of iron indicated <1% were at risk for deficiency. Hemoglobin was higher in white children, whereas ferritin was higher with greater age and female sex. Inflammatory markers and hepcidin did not vary with any demographic variable. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 16.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0-20.0). Three percent (95% CI, 1.4-4.6) of children had iron deficiency anemia and 12.8% (95% CI, 9.6-16.0) had unexplained anemia. Children with iron deficiency, with and without anemia, had lower plasma ferritin and hepcidin but higher sTfR, ferritin index, and IL-6, whereas those with unexplained anemia had elevated TNFα. We conclude that iron deficiency anemia is not very common in young children in Montreal. While iron deficiency without anemia is more common than iron deficiency with anemia, the correspondingly reduced circulating hepcidin would have enabled heightened absorption of dietary iron in support of erythropoiesis.

  14. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol levels in relation to inflammatory response and disease severity in children with meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    van Woensel, J B; Biezeveld, M H; Alders, A M; Eerenberg, A J; Endert, E; Hack, E C; von Rosenstiel, I A; Kuijpers, T W

    2001-12-15

    This prospective observational study investigated the relationship of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to inflammatory markers and to disease severity in children with meningococcal disease. In total, 32 children were studied: 10 with distinct meningococcal meningitis (MM), 10 with MM and septic shock, and 12 with fulminant meningococcal septicemia (FMS). Levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 were lowest in the MM group and dramatically elevated in the FMS group. Cortisol and C-reactive protein levels were highest in the MM group and relatively low in the FMS group. Levels of ACTH and inflammatory markers decreased within the first 24 h of admission, but cortisol levels did not fluctuate. Cortisol was significantly inversely correlated with IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 (P < or =.04). These results suggest that the adrenal reserve in children is insufficient to handle the extreme conditions and stress associated with severe meningococcal disease.

  15. Long-term impact of maternal substance use during pregnancy and extrauterine environmental adversity: stress hormone levels of preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Charles R; Lambert, Brittany L; Bann, Carla M; Lester, Barry M; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta S; Whitaker, Toni M; Lagasse, Linda L; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2011-08-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with blunted stress responsivity within the extrauterine environment. This study investigated the association between PCE and diurnal salivary cortisol levels in preadolescent children characterized by high biological and/or social risk (n = 725). Saliva samples were collected at their home. Analyses revealed no group differences in basal evening or morning cortisol levels; however, children with higher degrees of PCE exhibited blunted overnight increases in cortisol, controlling for additional risk factors. Race and caregiver depression were also associated with diurnal cortisol patterns. Although repeated PCE may contribute to alterations in the normal or expected stress response later in life, sociodemographic and environmental factors are likewise important in understanding hormone physiology, especially as more time elapses from the PCE. Anticipating the potential long-term medical, developmental, or behavioral effects of an altered ability to mount a normal protective cortisol stress response is essential in optimizing the outcomes of children with PCE.

  16. Pharmacogenomics of insulin-like growth factor-I generation during GH treatment in children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A; Clayton, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Rodriguez-Arnao, M D; Skorodok, J; Ambler, G R; Zignani, M; Zieschang, J; Della Corte, G; Destenaves, B; Champigneulle, A; Raelson, J; Chatelain, P

    2014-01-01

    Individual responses to growth hormone (GH) treatment are variable. Short-term generation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is recognized as a potential marker of sensitivity to GH treatment. This prospective, phase IV study used an integrated genomic analysis to identify markers associated with 1-month change in IGF-I (ΔIGF-I) following initiation of recombinant human (r-h)GH therapy in treatment-naïve children with GH deficiency (GHD) (n=166) or Turner syndrome (TS) (n=147). In both GHD and TS, polymorphisms in the cell-cycle regulator CDK4 were associated with 1-month ΔIGF-I (P<0.05). Baseline gene expression was also correlated with 1-month ΔIGF-I in both GHD and TS (r=0.3; P<0.01). In patients with low IGF-I responses, carriage of specific CDK4 alleles was associated with MAPK and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in GHD, and with p53 and Wnt signaling pathways in TS. Understanding the relationship between genomic markers and early changes in IGF-I may allow development of strategies to rapidly individualize r-hGH dose. PMID:23567489

  17. Iodine deficiency in pregnancy, infancy and childhood and its consequences for brain development.

    PubMed

    Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Jaiswal, Nidhi

    2010-02-01

    Iodine deficiency during foetal development and early childhood is associated with cognitive impairment. Randomised clinical studies in school-aged children encountered in the literature indicate that cognitive performance can be improved by iodine supplementation, but most studies suffer from methodological constraints. Tests to assess cognitive performance in the domains that are potentially affected by iodine deficiency need to be refined. Maternal iodine supplementation in areas of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency may improve cognitive performance of the offspring, but randomised controlled studies with long-term outcomes are lacking. Studies in infants or young children have not been conducted. The best indicators for iodine deficiency in children are thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in newborns and thyroglobulin (Tg) in older children. Urinary iodine may also be useful but only at the population level. Adequate salt iodisation will cover the requirements of infants and children as well as pregnant women. However, close monitoring remains essential.

  18. [Prevalence and determinants of anemia in young children in French-speaking Africa. Role of iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Diouf, S; Folquet, M; Mbofung, K; Ndiaye, O; Brou, K; Dupont, C; N'dri, D; Vuillerod, M; Azaïs-Braesco, V; Tetanye, E

    2015-11-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are major public health issues worldwide and particularly in Africa. Reliable information about their prevalence and associated factors is required to allow for effective actions. In this study, we used data from recent (2006-2012) large population health surveys, carried out in 11 French-speaking African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo Brazzaville, Ivory Coast, Gabon, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Senegal). Hemoglobin (Hb) was assessed and demographic and health-related parameters were obtained from nation-representative samples of children aged 6-59 months. Anemia (Hb<11g/dL) was found in 72.4% of the children (60.2-87.8%), with no gender difference but a slightly lower incidence in older children (62% at age 4-5 years versus 85% at age 9 months), especially for the more severe forms (2.1% versus 8.7%, respectively). Anemia was only slightly but significantly affected by location (75.5% in rural areas versus 67.3% in towns), income (79.8% in lower quintile of income versus 62.3% in higher quintile), or maternal education (74.1% in children from non-educated mothers versus 62.4% in children whose mothers had secondary education). Nearly 50% of women of child-bearing age had anemia. In the countries that report this information, less than 50% (17-65%) of children consumed iron-rich foods regularly and only 12% (7.4-20.5%) received iron supplementation. Infection and parasitism are known to affect some markers of iron status, because of the inflammatory reaction, thereby making the diagnosis of iron deficiency difficult. In the study countries, acute respiratory diseases and diarrhea affected 6.2 and 15.6% of children aged between 6 and 59 months, respectively; their distribution according to age and location is very different from the one of anemia, which is also the case for the distribution of malaria. It is thus likely that a large part of the anemia observed in young children is due to iron

  19. [Prevalence and determinants of anemia in young children in French-speaking Africa. Role of iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Diouf, S; Folquet, M; Mbofung, K; Ndiaye, O; Brou, K; Dupont, C; N'dri, D; Vuillerod, M; Azaïs-Braesco, V; Tetanye, E

    2015-11-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are major public health issues worldwide and particularly in Africa. Reliable information about their prevalence and associated factors is required to allow for effective actions. In this study, we used data from recent (2006-2012) large population health surveys, carried out in 11 French-speaking African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo Brazzaville, Ivory Coast, Gabon, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Senegal). Hemoglobin (Hb) was assessed and demographic and health-related parameters were obtained from nation-representative samples of children aged 6-59 months. Anemia (Hb<11g/dL) was found in 72.4% of the children (60.2-87.8%), with no gender difference but a slightly lower incidence in older children (62% at age 4-5 years versus 85% at age 9 months), especially for the more severe forms (2.1% versus 8.7%, respectively). Anemia was only slightly but significantly affected by location (75.5% in rural areas versus 67.3% in towns), income (79.8% in lower quintile of income versus 62.3% in higher quintile), or maternal education (74.1% in children from non-educated mothers versus 62.4% in children whose mothers had secondary education). Nearly 50% of women of child-bearing age had anemia. In the countries that report this information, less than 50% (17-65%) of children consumed iron-rich foods regularly and only 12% (7.4-20.5%) received iron supplementation. Infection and parasitism are known to affect some markers of iron status, because of the inflammatory reaction, thereby making the diagnosis of iron deficiency difficult. In the study countries, acute respiratory diseases and diarrhea affected 6.2 and 15.6% of children aged between 6 and 59 months, respectively; their distribution according to age and location is very different from the one of anemia, which is also the case for the distribution of malaria. It is thus likely that a large part of the anemia observed in young children is due to iron

  20. Iron fortification of whole wheat flour reduces iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia and increases body iron stores in Indian school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Muthayya, Sumithra; Thankachan, Prashanth; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Amalrajan, Vani; Thomas, Tinku; Lubree, Himangi; Agarwal, Dhiraj; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Hurrell, Richard F; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Kurpad, Anura V

    2012-11-01

    Wheat is the primary staple food for nearly one-third of the world's population. NaFeEDTA is the only iron (Fe) compound suitable for fortifying high extraction flours. We tested the hypothesis that NaFeEDTA-fortified, whole wheat flour reduces Fe deficiency (ID) and improves body Fe stores (BIS) and cognitive performance in Indian children. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled, school feeding trial, 6- to 15-y-old, Fe-depleted children (n = 401) were randomly assigned to either a daily wheat-based lunch meal fortified with 6 mg of Fe as NaFeEDTA or an otherwise identical unfortified control meal. Hemoglobin (Hb) and Fe status were measured at baseline, 3.5 mo, and 7 mo. Cognitive performance was evaluated at baseline and 7 mo in children (n = 170) at one of the study sites. After 7 mo, the prevalence of ID and ID anemia in the treatment group significantly decreased from 62 to 21% and 18 to 9%, respectively. There was a time x treatment interaction for Hb, serum ferritin, transferrin receptor, zinc protoporphyrin, and BIS (all P < 0.0001). Changes in BIS differed between the groups; it increased in the treatment group (0.04 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) and decreased in the control group (-0.02 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) (P < 0.0001). In sensory tests, NaFeEDTA-fortified flour could not be differentiated from unfortified flour. There were no significant differences in cognitive performance tests between the groups. NaFeEDTA-fortified wheat flour markedly improved BIS and reduced ID in Fe-depleted children. It may be recommended for wider use in national school feeding programs. PMID:23014487

  1. Effects of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency on brain development in children.

    PubMed

    Black, Maureen M

    2008-06-01

    Folate deficiency in the periconceptional period contributes to neural tube defects; deficits in vitamin B12 (cobalamin) have negative consequences on the developing brain during infancy; and deficits of both vitamins are associated with a greater risk of depression during adulthood. This review examines two mechanisms linking folate and vitamin B12 deficiency to abnormal behavior and development in infants: disruptions to myelination and inflammatory processes. Future investigations should focus on the relationship between the timing of deficient and marginal vitamin B12 status and outcomes such as infant growth, cognition, social development, and depressive symptoms, along with prevention of folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:18709887

  2. [Mother-child interaction and child behavior in preschool children with a history of iron-deficiency anemia in infancy].

    PubMed

    De Andraca Oyarzún, I; Salas Aliaga, I; de la Parra Cieciwa, A; González López, B

    1993-09-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a highly prevalent nutritional disorder. Research in the last two decades shows that if this nutritional disorder occurs during the first two years of life it is associated with poor psychomotor performance and changes in behavior, such as reduced levels of responsitivy to persons and stimuli, irritability and inhibition. Further studies demonstrate that effects observed during infancy persist in the long term; preschool children who were anemic at twelve months show lower cognitive and motor scores than control children with normal iron nutritional status. In the study we evaluated 35 preschool children with an average age of 5 years and 6 months, 20 were anemic at one year and 15 had normal iron status. Behavior characteristics of the child and the mother-child interaction patterns were analyzed. All children participated in a semistructured play and teaching task trial which was filmed and later codified through a specially designed guideline. Results suggest that formerly anemic preschool children are less active, more inhibited and timid than the corresponding controls. Mothers of children with normal iron status during infancy are more responsive, having a rich two-way interaction with their sons, while mother of preschool children who were anemic are more frequently restricted to a response to the child. Although findings are not conclusive, they may direct future studies designed to clarify the complex relationship between anemia and behavior.

  3. Increased Risk for Vitamin D Deficiency in Obese Children with Both Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Setty-Shah, Nithya; Nwosu, Benjamin Udoka

    2014-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether the coexistence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD) increases the risk for vitamin D deficiency. Aims. To determine the vitamin D status and the risk for vitamin D deficiency in prepubertal children with both T1D and CD compared to controls, TID, and CD. Subjects and Methods. Characteristics of 62 prepubertal children of age 2–13 y with either CD + T1D (n = 22, 9.9 ± 3.1 y), CD only (n = 18, 8.9 ± 3.3 y), or T1D only (n = 22, 10.1 ± 2.8 y) were compared to 49 controls of the age of 8.0 ± 2.6 years. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L, overweight as BMI of >85th but <95th percentile, and obesity as BMI > 95th percentile. Results. The 4 groups had no difference in 25(OH)D (ANOVA P = 0.123) before stratification into normal-weight versus overweight/obese subtypes. Following stratification, 25(OH)D differed significantly between the subgroups (F(3,98) = 10.109, ANOVA P < 0.001). Post-hoc analysis showed a significantly lower 25(OH)D in the overweight/obese CD + T1D compared to the overweight/obese controls (P = 0.039) and the overweight/obese CD (P = 0.003). Subjects with CD + T1D were 3 times more likely to be vitamin D deficient (OR = 3.1 [0.8–11.9], P = 0.098), compared to controls. Conclusions. The coexistence of T1D and CD in overweight/obese prepubertal children may be associated with lower vitamin D concentration. PMID:25548555

  4. Stimulated Nitric Oxide Production and Arginine Deficiency in Cystic Fibrosis Children with Nutritional Failure

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Mariëlle PKJ; Com, Gulnur; Luiking, Yvette C; Deutz, Nicolaas EP

    2013-01-01

    Objective Reduced nitric oxide (NO) concentrations are found in the airways of many patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and are associated with increased airflow obstruction. We determined whether upregulated whole body de novo arginine synthesis and protein breakdown are present as a compensatory mechanism to meet the increased demand for arginine and nitric oxide production in pediatric patients with CF and nutritional failure. Study design In 16 children with CF, studied at the end of antibiotic treatment for a pulmonary exacerbation, and 17 healthy controls, whole body arginine, citrulline, and protein turnover were assessed by stable isotope methodology and de novo arginine synthesis, arginine clearance, NO synthesis, protein synthesis and breakdown, and net protein balance were calculated. The plasma isotopic enrichments and amino acid concentrations were measured by LC-MS/MS. Results Increased arginine clearance was found in patients with CF (p<0.001) whereas whole body NO production rate and plasma arginine levels were not different. Whole body arginine production (P<0.001), de novo arginine synthesis, and protein breakdown and synthesis (P<0.05) were increased in patients with CF, but net protein balance was comparable. Patients with CF with nutritional failure (n=7) had significantly higher NO production (P<0.05), de novo arginine synthesis, citrulline production (P<0.001), and plasma citrulline concentration (P<0.05) and lower plasma arginine concentration (P<0.05) than those without nutritional failure (n=9). Conclusions Nutritional failure in CF is associated with increased NO production. However, upregulation of de novo arginine synthesis and citrulline production was not sufficient to meet the increased arginine needs leading to arginine deficiency. PMID:23419590

  5. GH deficiency status combined with GH receptor polymorphism affects response to GH in children.

    PubMed

    Valsesia, Armand; Chatelain, Pierre; Stevens, Adam; Peterkova, Valentina A; Belgorosky, Alicia; Maghnie, Mohamad; Antoniazzi, Franco; Koledova, Ekaterina; Wojcik, Jerome; Farmer, Pierre; Destenaves, Benoit; Clayton, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Meta-analysis has shown a modest improvement in first-year growth response to recombinant human GH (r-hGH) for carriers of the exon 3-deleted GH receptor (GHRd3) polymorphism but with significant interstudy variability. The associations between GHRd3 and growth response to r-hGH over 3 years in relation to severity of GH deficiency (GHD) were investigated in patients from 14 countries. Treatment-naïve pre-pubertal children with GHD were enrolled from the PREDICT studies (NCT00256126 and NCT00699855), categorized by peak GH level (peak GH) during provocation test: ≤4 μg/l (severe GHD; n=45) and >4 to <10 μg/l mild GHD; n=49) and genotyped for the GHRd3 polymorphism (full length (fl/fl, fl/d3, d3/d3). Gene expression (GE) profiles were characterized at baseline. Changes in growth (height (cm) and SDS) over 3 years were measured. There was a dichotomous influence of GHRd3 polymorphism on response to r-hGH, dependent on peak GH level. GH peak level (higher vs lower) and GHRd3 (fl/fl vs d3 carriers) combined status was associated with height change over 3 years (P<0.05). GHRd3 carriers with lower peak GH had lower growth than subjects with fl/fl (median difference after 3 years -3.3 cm; -0.3 SDS). Conversely, GHRd3 carriers with higher peak GH had better growth (+2.7 cm; +0.2 SDS). Similar patterns were observed for GH-dependent biomarkers. GE profiles were significantly different between the groups, indicating that the interaction between GH status and GHRd3 carriage can be identified at a transcriptomic level. This study demonstrates that responses to r-hGH depend on the interaction between GHD severity and GHRd3 carriage. PMID:26340968

  6. A pharmacogenomic approach to the treatment of children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P; Chatelain, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Ambler, G R; Belgorosky, A; Quinteiro, S; Deal, C; Stevens, A; Raelson, J; Croteau, P; Destenaves, B; Olivier, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective Individual sensitivity to recombinant human GH (r-hGH) is variable. Identification of genetic factors contributing to this variability has potential use for individualization of treatment. The objective of this study was to identify genetic markers and gene expression profiles associated with growth response on r-hGH therapy in treatment-naïve, prepubertal children with GH deficiency (GHD) or Turner syndrome (TS). Design A prospective, multicenter, international, open-label pharmacogenomic study. Methods The associations of genotypes in 103 growth- and metabolism-related genes and baseline gene expression profiles with growth response to r-hGH (cm/year) over the first year were evaluated. Genotype associations were assessed with growth response as a continuous variable and as a categorical variable divided into quartiles. Results Eleven genes in GHD and ten in TS, with two overlapping between conditions, were significantly associated with growth response either as a continuous variable (seven in GHD, two in TS) or as a categorical variable (four more in GHD, eight more in TS). For example, in GHD, GRB10 was associated with high response (≥Q3; P=0.0012), while SOS2 was associated with low response (≤Q1; P=0.006), while in TS, LHX4 was associated with high response (P=0.0003) and PTPN1 with low response (P=0.0037). Differences in expression were identified for one of the growth response-associated genes in GHD (AKT1) and for two in TS (KRAS and MYOD1). Conclusions Carriage of specific growth-related genetic markers is associated with growth response in GHD and TS. These findings indicate that pharmacogenomics could have a role in individualized management of childhood growth disorders. PMID:23761422

  7. Effects on school children of prophylaxis of mothers with iodized oil in an area of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fierro-Benitez, R; Cazar, R; Stanbury, J B; Rodriguez, P; Garces, F; Fierro-Renoy, F; Estrella, E

    1988-05-01

    The results of tests of intellectual and psychomotor performance and school performance in a group of school children from a rural impoverished and iodine deficient Andean community whose mothers received injections of iodinated oil prior to the end of the first trimester of pregnancy have been compared with results in children from a neighboring comparable community whose mothers had received no iodinated oil. Subjects between ages 8 and 15 were studied. Statistically significant differences were not observed between the two groups in tests of intellectual function, but children of mothers who had received iodinated oil performed better on tests of psychomotor maturation. The group whose mothers had received oil performed distinctly better when assessed in terms of school drop-out rates, grades achieved, grades repeated, and in overall performance as judged by teacher notes in school records. Performance of both groups on standard tests of intellectual and psychomotor function was lower than standard scores. This may be a result of social and cultural deprivation, the general malnutrition prevailing in the region or other unidentified factors. The improved scoring and school performance exhibited by the children of mothers who received iodinated oil underlines the importance of prophylaxis with iodine in iodine deficient regions as one important contributor to community development.

  8. Disruption of thyroid hormone homeostasis in Ugt1a-deficient Gunn rats by microsomal enzyme inducers is not due to enhanced thyroxine glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Terrilyn A.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-10-01

    Microsomal enzyme inducers (MEI) that increase UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are thought to increase glucuronidation of thyroxine (T{sub 4}), thus reducing serum T{sub 4}, and subsequently increasing thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Ugt1a1 and Ugt1a6 mediate T{sub 4} glucuronidation. Therefore, this experiment determined the involvement of Ugt1a enzymes in increased T{sub 4} glucuronidation, decreased serum T{sub 4}, and increased TSH after MEI treatment. Male Wistar and Ugt1a-deficient Wistar (Gunn) rats were fed a control diet or diet containing pregnenolone-16{alpha}-carbonitrile (PCN; 800 ppm), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC; 200 ppm), or Aroclor 1254 (PCB; 100 ppm) for 7 days. Serum T{sub 4}, triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), and TSH concentrations, hepatic T{sub 4}/T{sub 3} glucuronidation, and thyroid histology and follicular cell proliferation were investigated. PCN, 3-MC, and PCB treatments decreased serum T{sub 4}, whereas serum T{sub 3} was maintained in both Gunn and Wistar rats (except for PCB treatment). TSH was increased in Wistar and Gunn rats after PCN (130 and 277%) or PCB treatment (72 and 60%). T{sub 4} glucuronidation in Wistar rats was increased after PCN (298%), 3-MC (85%), and PCB (450%), but was extremely low in Gunn rats, and unchanged after MEI. T{sub 3} glucuronidation was increased after PCN (121%) or PCB (58%) in Wistar rats, but only PCN increased T{sub 3} glucuronidation in Gunn rats (43%). PCN treatment induced thyroid morphological changes and increased follicular cell proliferation in both strains. These data demonstrate that T{sub 4} glucuronidation cannot be increased in Ugt1a-deficient Gunn rats. Thus, the decrease in serum T{sub 4}, increase in TSH, and increase in thyroid cell proliferation after MEI are not dependent on increased T{sub 4} glucuronidation, and cannot be attributed to Ugt1a enzymes.

  9. Vitamin D Deficiency and Its Predictors in a Country with Thirteen Months of Sunshine: The Case of School Children in Central Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Wakayo, Tolassa; Belachew, Tefera; Vatanparast, Hassan; Whiting, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Studies examining vitamin D status among children living in sunny climates indicated that children did not receive adequate vitamin D, however, this has not been looked at among children living in Ethiopia. In this study, we determined vitamin D deficiency and its predictors among school children aged 11–18 years, examining circulating 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D]. The school-based cross-sectional study was conducted in schools in Adama Town (n = 89) and in rural Adama (n = 85) for a total sample of 174. Students were randomly selected using multi-stage stratified sampling method from both settings. Socioeconomic status of parents and demographic, anthropometric, sun exposure status and blood 25(OH)D levels were obtained. Vitamin D deficiency, defined as circulating levels of 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L, was found in 42% of the entire study participants. Prevalence of deficiency was significantly higher among students in urban setting compared to rural (61.8% vs 21.2%, respectively, p<0.001). After controlling for potential confounders using multivariable logistic regression model, duration of exposure to sunlight, amount of body part exposed to sunlight, place of residence, maternal education, body fatness, having TV/computer at home and socioeconomic status were significant predictors of vitamin D deficiency. The findings suggest that Vitamin D deficiency was prevalent in healthy school children living both in urban and rural areas of a country with abundant year round sunshine providing UVB, with the prevalence of deficiency being significantly higher among urban school children who were less exposed to sunlight. Behaviour change communication to enhance exposure to ultraviolet light is critical to prevent vitamin D deficiency in tropical country like Ethiopia. Further study is required to assess the deleterious effect of its deficiency on bone mineral homeostasis of growing children in Ethiopia during their most critical period of bone development. PMID:25822900

  10. Iron, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Zinc Deficiencies in Children Presenting with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Villagomez, Amelia; Ramtekkar, Ujjwal

    2014-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder increasing in prevalence. Although there is limited evidence to support treating ADHD with mineral/vitamin supplements, research does exist showing that patients with ADHD may have reduced levels of vitamin D, zinc, ferritin, and magnesium. These nutrients have important roles in neurologic function, including involvement in neurotransmitter synthesis. The aim of this paper is to discuss the role of each of these nutrients in the brain, the possible altered levels of these nutrients in patients with ADHD, possible reasons for a differential level in children with ADHD, and safety and effect of supplementation. With this knowledge, clinicians may choose in certain patients at high risk of deficiency, to screen for possible deficiencies of magnesium, vitamin D, zinc, and iron by checking RBC-magnesium, 25-OH vitamin D, serum/plasma zinc, and ferritin. Although children with ADHD may be more likely to have lower levels of vitamin D, zinc, magnesium, and iron, it cannot be stated that these lower levels caused ADHD. However, supplementing areas of deficiency may be a safe and justified intervention. PMID:27417479

  11. Effects of early vitamin D deficiency rickets on bone and dental health, growth and immunity.

    PubMed

    Zerofsky, Melissa; Ryder, Mark; Bhatia, Suruchi; Stephensen, Charles B; King, Janet; Fung, Ellen B

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with adverse health outcomes, including impaired bone growth, gingival inflammation and increased risk for autoimmune disease, but the relationship between vitamin D deficiency rickets in childhood and long-term health has not been studied. In this study, we assessed the effect of early vitamin D deficiency on growth, bone density, dental health and immune function in later childhood to determine if children previously diagnosed with rickets were at greater risk of adverse health outcomes compared with healthy children. We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium, parathyroid hormone, bone mineral density, anthropometric measures, dietary habits, dental health, general health history, and markers of inflammation in 14 previously diagnosed rickets case children at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Center. We compared the findings in the rickets cases with 11 healthy children selected from the population of CHO staff families. Fourteen mothers of the rickets cases, five siblings of the rickets cases, and seven mothers of healthy children also participated. Children diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency rickets had a greater risk of fracture, greater prevalence of asthma, and more dental enamel defects compared with healthy children. Given the widespread actions of vitamin D, it is likely that early-life vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk of disease later in childhood. Further assessment of the long-term health effects of early deficiency is necessary to make appropriate dietary recommendations for infants at risk of deficiency.

  12. Is there “seasonal” variation in height velocity in children treated with growth hormone? Data from the National Cooperative Growth Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Growth rate In children is reported to have seasonal variability. There are fewer published data regarding seasonal variability while on growth hormone (GH) therapy, and none analyzing growth rate with respect to number of daylight hours. Methods We analyzed 11,587 3-month intervals in 2277 prepubertal children (boys ages 3–14 years, girls ages 3–12 years) with idiopathic GH deficiency from the National Cooperative Growth Study (NCGS) database. All were naive to recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy. Data were submitted from 31 US study centers. Seasonal variation in height velocity (HV) was assumed to be associated with the average number of daylight hours during the interval of time over which HV was computed. Number of daylight hours was determined from the date of the measurement and the latitude of the study center. Other independent variables evaluated included: height standard deviation score (SDS) at the beginning of the interval, chronologic age at the beginning of the interval, time from the start of rhGH treatment to the middle of the interval, month of the year, body mass index SDS at the beginning of the interval, rhGH dose/kg, mother’s height SDS, father’s height SDS, and log base 10 of the maximum stimulated GH concentration. Results All variables examined, except month of the year, correlated significantly with interval HV. There was significant “seasonal” variability at all latitudes, with summer annualized HV being greater than winter HV. This difference was greatest in the first year of therapy (0.146 cm/yr/daylight hour; P < 0.0001) but persisted in subsequent years (0.121 cm/yr/daylight hr; P < 0.0001). The difference increased with distance from the equator. Growth rate over the year was not different among the latitudes reflected in this North American study. Conclusions There is “seasonal” variation in growth of children on rhGH therapy that correlates with number of daylight hours. The effect is modest and

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  14. Reducing Iron Deficiency in 18-36-months-old US Children: Is the Solution Less Calcium?

    PubMed

    Kerling, Elizabeth H; Souther, Laura M; Gajewski, Byron J; Sullivan, Debra K; Georgieff, Michael K; Carlson, Susan E

    2016-09-01

    Objectives National surveys consistently identify iron deficiency (ID) in US children between 1 and 3 years of age, when the brain is rapidly developing and vulnerable to the effects of ID. However, controversy remains as to how best to recognize and prevent ID in young children, in part because of the multiple potential etiologies. The objective of this project was to assess ID in children and identify potential individual dietary predictors of status. Methods We examined three biomarkers of ID [soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and serum ferritin (SF), and body iron (calculated from sTfR and SF)] against parent-provided dietary calcium and iron intake for eight-three 18-36 month old children from middle class families. Results Using literature-based cutoffs, fourteen children (16.9 %) had at least one indicator of ID: low SF(<10 μg/l, 7.2 %), negative body iron (<0 mg/kg, 7.2 %) or elevated sTfR (>8.4 μg/ml, 13.2 %). All children consumed more than the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) Estimated Average Requirement of 3 mg/d iron. The mean iron intake of children identified with ID approximated the Recommended Dietary Allowance of 7 mg/d. Most children (81 %) consumed above the DRI Adequate Intake of 500 mg/d of calcium. Calcium intakes were generally high and predicted lower body iron (p = 0.0005), lower SF (p = 0.0086) and higher sTfR (p = 0.0176). Conclusions for Practice We found rates of ID similar to US national averages. Dietary calcium intake predicted lower iron status more than deficits in iron intake. Teaching parents to balance calcium and iron intake in toddlers could be a strategy to prevent ID. PMID:26987860

  15. Urinary iodine concentrations indicate iodine deficiency in pregnant Thai women but iodine sufficiency in their school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Gowachirapant, Sueppong; Winichagoon, Pattanee; Wyss, Laura; Tong, Bennan; Baumgartner, Jeannine; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2009-06-01

    The median urinary iodine concentration (UI) in school-aged children is recommended for assessment of iodine nutrition in populations. If the median UI is adequate in school-aged children, it is usually assumed iodine intakes are also adequate in the remaining population, including pregnant women. But iodine requirements sharply increase during pregnancy. In this study, our aim was to measure UI in pairs of pregnant women and their school-aged children from the same family, who were sharing meals, to directly assess whether a household food basket that supplies adequate iodine to school-aged children also meets the needs of pregnant women. UI was measured in spot urine samples from pairs (n = 302) of healthy pregnant mothers and their school-aged children in metropolitan Bangkok, Thailand. A dietary questionnaire was completed. The UI [median (range)] in the pregnant women {108 (11-558) microg/L [0.85 (0.086-4.41) micromol/L]} were lower than those of their school-aged children {200 (25-835) microg/L [1.58 (0.20-6.52) micromol/L]} (P < 0.001), indicating optimal iodine status in the children but mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency in their pregnant mothers. The estimated iodine intakes in the 2 groups were in the range of 130-170 microg/d. There was a modest positive correlation between UI in the pairs (r = 0.253; P < 0.01). A higher frequency of seafood meals was a significant predictor of UI in both groups, but household use of iodized salt was not. These data suggest the median UI in school-aged children should not be used as a surrogate for monitoring iodine status in pregnancy in central Thailand; pregnant women should be directly monitored.

  16. The relationship of PTH Bst BI polymorphism, calciotropic hormone levels, and dental fluorosis of children in China.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shibao; Li, Anqi; Cui, Liuxin; Huang, Qi; Chen, Hongyang; Guo, Xiaoyi; Luo, Yixin; Hao, Qianyun; Hou, Jiaxiang; Ba, Yue

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association of parathyroid hormone (PTH) gene Bst BI polymorphism, calciotropic hormone levels, and dental fluorosis of children. A case-control study was conducted in two counties (Kaifeng and Tongxu) in Henan Province, China in 2005-2006. Two hundred and twenty-five children were recruited and divided into three groups including dental fluorosis group (DFG), non-dental fluorosis group (NDFG) from high fluoride areas, and control group (CG). Urine fluoride content was determined using fluoride ion selective electrode; PTH Bst BI were genotyped using PCR-RFLP; osteocalcin (OC) and calcitonin (CT) levels in serum were detected using radioimmunoassay. Genotype distributions were BB 85.3% (58/68), Bb 14.7% (10/68) for DFG; BB 77.6% (52/67), Bb 22.4% (15/67) for NDFG; and BB 73.3% (66/90), Bb 27.7% (24/90) for CG. No significant difference of Bst BI genotypes was observed among three groups (P > 0.05). Serum OC and urine fluoride of children were both significantly higher in DFG and NDFG than in CG (P < 0.05, respectively), while a similar situation was not observed between DFG and NDFG in high fluoride areas (P > 0.05). Serum OC level of children with BB genotype was significantly higher compared to those with Bb genotype in high fluoride areas (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference of serum CT or calcium (Ca) was observed. In conclusion, there is no correlation between dental fluorosis and PTH Bst BI polymorphism. Serum OC might be a more sensitive biomarker for detecting early stages of dental fluorosis, and further studies are needed.

  17. Micronutrient deficiencies are common in 6- to 8-year-old children of rural Nepal, with prevalence estimates modestly affected by inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Kerry J; Christian, Parul; Wu, Lee S F; Arguello, Margia; Cui, Hongjie; Nanayakkara-Bind, Ashika; Stewart, Christine P; Khatry, Subarna K; LeClerq, Steven; West, Keith P

    2014-06-01

    Subclinical micronutrient deficiencies remain a hidden aspect of malnutrition for which comprehensive data are lacking in school-aged children. We assessed the micronutrient status of Nepalese children, aged 6 to 8 y, born to mothers who participated in a community-based antenatal micronutrient supplementation trial from 1999 to 2001. Of 3305 participants, plasma indicators were assessed in a random sample of 1000 children. Results revealed deficiencies of vitamins A (retinol <0.70 μmol/L, 8.5%), D (25-hydroxyvitamin D <50 nmol/L, 17.2%), E (α-tocopherol <9.3 μmol/L, 17.9%), K (decarboxy prothombin >2 μg/L, 20%), B-12 (cobalamin <150 pmol/L, 18.1%), B-6 [pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) <20 nmol/L, 43.1%], and β-carotene (41.5% <0.09 μmol/L), with little folate deficiency (6.2% <13.6 nmol/L). Deficiencies of iron [ferritin <15 μg/L, 10.7%; transferrin receptor (TfR) >8.3 mg/L, 40.1%; TfR:ferritin >500 μg/μg, 14.3%], iodine (thyroglobulin >40 μg/L, 11.4%), and selenium (plasma selenium <0.89 μmol/L, 59.0%) were observed, whereas copper deficiency was nearly absent (plasma copper <11.8 μmol/L, 0.7%). Hemoglobin was not assessed. Among all children, 91.7% experienced at least 1 micronutrient deficiency, and 64.7% experienced multiple deficiencies. Inflammation (α-1 acid glycoprotein >1 g/L, C-reactive protein >5 mg/L, or both) was present in 31.6% of children, affecting the prevalence of deficiency as assessed by retinol, β-carotene, PLP, ferritin, TfR, selenium, copper, or having any or multiple deficiencies. For any nutrient, population deficiency prevalence estimates were altered by ≤5.4% by the presence of inflammation, suggesting that the majority of deficiencies exist regardless of inflammation. Multiple micronutrient deficiencies coexist in school-aged children in rural Nepal, meriting more comprehensive strategies for their assessment and prevention. PMID:24744314

  18. Serum lipoprotein pattern as modified in G6PD-deficient children during haemolytic anaemia induced by fava bean ingestion.

    PubMed

    Dessì, S; Batetta, B; Spano, O; Pulisci, D; Mulas, M F; Muntoni, S; Armeni, M; Sanna, C; Antonucci, R; Pani, P

    1992-04-01

    In the present study, plasma lipid concentrations were determined at different times after admission in sera from G6PD-deficient children during haemolytic crisis induced by fava bean ingestion. Reductions in total, LDL and HDL cholesterol were found in association with the maximum of bone marrow hyperplasia. A return towards normal values occurred with regression of the disease. No changes in other lipid parameters were observed. These data suggest that alterations of lipoprotein pattern, other than in experimental animals, are also present in humans with non-malignant proliferative processes. These changes appear to be a consequence of the disease, probably due to an increased utilization of cholesterol by proliferating cells.

  19. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  20. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  1. Effects on vitamin A deficiency in children of periodic high-dose supplements and of fortified oil promotion in a deficient area of the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Mason, John B; Ramirez, Maria A; Fernandez, Chona M; Pedro, Regina; Lloren, Tina; Saldanha, Lisa; Deitchler, Megan; Eisele, T

    2011-09-01

    Regular semi-annual distribution of high-dose (200,000 IU) vitamin A capsules (VACs) to children 1 - 5 years of age (previously identified as underweight), in Leyte Province, the Philippines, was compared to providing extra VACs to give three-monthly dosing, and to vitamin A-fortified cooking oil (VAFO) promotion (with continued VACs every 6 months). Serum retinol (SR) was measured at baseline and after 12 or 18 months (for VAFO). No sustained increase in SR was determined from the three-month VAC dosing regimen, and the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD) as assessed by SR (< 20 mcg / dL) remained around 30 % (in line with national survey estimates over the previous 15 years). The major difference found was that 18 months of VAFO (of which 9 months had sustained promotion) was associated with reducing the prevalence of VAD to < 10 %. The effective fortification and lack of effect of semi-annual VAC results are in line with previous studies; testing with dosing of VAC every three months is a new intervention. The results imply that promotion of fortified oil would reduce VAD in these conditions; whether it can replace or needs to be added to semi-annual VAC dosing remains to be determined. A phased changeover to reliance on fortified commodities (including oil) with careful monitoring of VAD trends is indicated.

  2. Hormonal Correlates of Clozapine-Induced Weight Gain in Psychotic Children: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sporn, Alexandra L.; Bobb, Aaron J.; Gogtay, Nitin; Stevens, Hanna; Greenstein, Deanna K.; Clasen, Liv S.; Tossell, Julia W.; Nugent, Thomas; Gochman, Peter A.; Sharp, Wendy S.; Mattai, Anand; Lenane, Marge C.; Yanovski, Jack A.; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Weight gain is a serious side effect of atypical antipsychotics, especially in childhood. In this study, the authors examined six weight gain-related hormones in patients with childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) after 6 weeks of clozapine treatment. Method: Fasting serum samples for 24 patients with COS and 21 matched healthy controls…

  3. Nutritional megaloblastic anemia in young Turkish children is associated with vitamin B-12 deficiency and psychomotor retardation.

    PubMed

    Katar, Selahattin; Nuri Ozbek, Mehmet; Yaramiş, Ahmet; Ecer, Sultan

    2006-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the presence of psychomotor retardation, physical and laboratory examination in infants with megaloblastic anemia. Inclusion criteria for the study were; age 9 to 36 months, refusal of food except for breast and cow milk, loss of appetite, developmental delay, significant pallor, and hypersegmentation neutrophils in the peripheral blood smear. A total of 33 children fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled among 3368 patients attending Pediatric Outpatient Clinics of şirnak-Cizre State Hospital between January 25, 2004 and May 5, 2004. Mean age was 16.4 months. Thirty-two patients had Vitamin B12 deficiency, 1 patient had folate deficiency, and 10 patients had combined vitamin B12 and folate deficiency. Statistically, a positive significant relationship was detected between serum vitamin B12 levels and mean corpuscular volume (P = 0.001, r = 0.56), and between vitamin B12 levels and hemoglobin (P = 0.004, r = 0.49). We believe that preventative measures such as fortification of flour with vitamin B12, nutritional support with vitamin B12 for the mother during pregnancy and nursing, provision of adequate primary preventive health services, and starting complementary food after 6 months of age are important determinants for preventing megaloblastic anemia.

  4. [Iodine deficiency during pregnancy ].

    PubMed

    de Luis, D A; Aller, R; Izaola, O

    2005-09-01

    Iodine is an essential micronutrient, it would be administered every day with our diet. The main role of this micronutrient is the synthesis of thyroid hormone. Thyroid hormones are related with brain development and metabolic regulation. Iodine deficit is related with goitre, and an important problem "diseases related with iodine deficiency", including high rate of neonatal mortality, decrease of intelligence, delayed of growth, high rate of aborts and congenital abnormalities.A risk group is pregnant women. Some authors have been demonstrated the utility of iodine supplementation during pregnancy. A systematic review of Cochrane group has shown that iodine supplementation during pregnancy decreased neonatal mortality RR 0.71 (0.56-0.9), and decrease the incidence of cretinism in children under 4 years RR 0.27 (0.12-0.6). As final recommendations, a program in pregnant women must be development to treat with iodine such as we make with folic acid. Pills with iron and iodine (1 mg iron and 25 ug iodine) have been demonstrated better results that pills with iodine. Tablets are the main presentation due to the role of the women in our Society and the work time. Programs of iodine enriched salt have been demonstrated a follow up of 50%. PMID:16386080

  5. Anemia, Micronutrient Deficiencies, and Malaria in Children and Women in Sierra Leone Prior to the Ebola Outbreak - Findings of a Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Wirth, James P; Rohner, Fabian; Woodruff, Bradley A; Chiwile, Faraja; Yankson, Hannah; Koroma, Aminata S; Russel, Feimata; Sesay, Fatmata; Dominguez, Elisa; Petry, Nicolai; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; de Onis, Mercedes; Hodges, Mary H

    2016-01-01

    To identify the factors associated with anemia and to document the severity of micronutrient deficiencies, malaria and inflammation, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey was conducted. A three-stage sampling procedure was used to randomly select children <5 years of age and adult women from households in two strata (urban and rural). Household and individual data were collected, and blood samples from children and women were used to measure the prevalence of malaria, inflammation, and deficiencies of iron, vitamin A, folate, and vitamin B12. 839 children and 945 non-pregnant women were included in the survey. In children, the prevalence rates of anemia (76.3%; 95% CI: 71.8, 80.4), malaria (52.6%; 95% CI: 46.0, 59.0), and acute and chronic inflammation (72.6%; 95% CI: 67.5, 77.1) were high. However, the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (17.4%; 95% CI: 13.9, 21.6) was moderate, and the prevalence of iron deficiency (5.2%; 95% CI: 3.3, 8.1) and iron-deficiency anemia (3.8%; 95% CI: 2.5, 5.8) were low. Malaria and inflammation were associated with anemia, yet they explained only 25% of the population-attributable risk. In women, 44.8% (95% CI: 40.1, 49.5), 35.1% (95% CI: 30.1, 40.4), and 23.6% (95% CI: 20.4, 27.3) were affected by anemia, malaria, or inflammation, respectively. The prevalence rates of iron deficiency (8.3%; 95% CI: 6.2, 11.1), iron-deficiency anemia (6.1%; 95% CI: 4.4, 8.6), vitamin A deficiency (2.1%; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.1) and vitamin B12 deficiency (0.5%; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.4) were low, while folate deficiency was high (79.2%; 95% CI: 74.1, 83.5). Iron deficiency, malaria, and inflammation were significantly associated with anemia, but explained only 25% of cases of anemia. Anemia in children and women is a severe public health problem in Sierra Leone. Since malaria and inflammation only contributed to 25% of anemia, other causes of anemia, such as hemoglobinopathies, should also be explored. PMID:27163254

  6. Anemia, Micronutrient Deficiencies, and Malaria in Children and Women in Sierra Leone Prior to the Ebola Outbreak - Findings of a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, James P; Rohner, Fabian; Woodruff, Bradley A; Chiwile, Faraja; Yankson, Hannah; Koroma, Aminata S; Russel, Feimata; Sesay, Fatmata; Dominguez, Elisa; Petry, Nicolai; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; de Onis, Mercedes; Hodges, Mary H

    2016-01-01

    To identify the factors associated with anemia and to document the severity of micronutrient deficiencies, malaria and inflammation, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey was conducted. A three-stage sampling procedure was used to randomly select children <5 years of age and adult women from households in two strata (urban and rural). Household and individual data were collected, and blood samples from children and women were used to measure the prevalence of malaria, inflammation, and deficiencies of iron, vitamin A, folate, and vitamin B12. 839 children and 945 non-pregnant women were included in the survey. In children, the prevalence rates of anemia (76.3%; 95% CI: 71.8, 80.4), malaria (52.6%; 95% CI: 46.0, 59.0), and acute and chronic inflammation (72.6%; 95% CI: 67.5, 77.1) were high. However, the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (17.4%; 95% CI: 13.9, 21.6) was moderate, and the prevalence of iron deficiency (5.2%; 95% CI: 3.3, 8.1) and iron-deficiency anemia (3.8%; 95% CI: 2.5, 5.8) were low. Malaria and inflammation were associated with anemia, yet they explained only 25% of the population-attributable risk. In women, 44.8% (95% CI: 40.1, 49.5), 35.1% (95% CI: 30.1, 40.4), and 23.6% (95% CI: 20.4, 27.3) were affected by anemia, malaria, or inflammation, respectively. The prevalence rates of iron deficiency (8.3%; 95% CI: 6.2, 11.1), iron-deficiency anemia (6.1%; 95% CI: 4.4, 8.6), vitamin A deficiency (2.1%; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.1) and vitamin B12 deficiency (0.5%; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.4) were low, while folate deficiency was high (79.2%; 95% CI: 74.1, 83.5). Iron deficiency, malaria, and inflammation were significantly associated with anemia, but explained only 25% of cases of anemia. Anemia in children and women is a severe public health problem in Sierra Leone. Since malaria and inflammation only contributed to 25% of anemia, other causes of anemia, such as hemoglobinopathies, should also be explored. PMID:27163254

  7. Anemia, Micronutrient Deficiencies, and Malaria in Children and Women in Sierra Leone Prior to the Ebola Outbreak - Findings of a Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Wirth, James P; Rohner, Fabian; Woodruff, Bradley A; Chiwile, Faraja; Yankson, Hannah; Koroma, Aminata S; Russel, Feimata; Sesay, Fatmata; Dominguez, Elisa; Petry, Nicolai; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; de Onis, Mercedes; Hodges, Mary H

    2016-01-01

    To identify the factors associated with anemia and to document the severity of micronutrient deficiencies, malaria and inflammation, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey was conducted. A three-stage sampling procedure was used to randomly select children <5 years of age and adult women from households in two strata (urban and rural). Household and individual data were collected, and blood samples from children and women were used to measure the prevalence of malaria, inflammation, and deficiencies of iron, vitamin A, folate, and vitamin B12. 839 children and 945 non-pregnant women were included in the survey. In children, the prevalence rates of anemia (76.3%; 95% CI: 71.8, 80.4), malaria (52.6%; 95% CI: 46.0, 59.0), and acute and chronic inflammation (72.6%; 95% CI: 67.5, 77.1) were high. However, the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (17.4%; 95% CI: 13.9, 21.6) was moderate, and the prevalence of iron deficiency (5.2%; 95% CI: 3.3, 8.1) and iron-deficiency anemia (3.8%; 95% CI: 2.5, 5.8) were low. Malaria and inflammation were associated with anemia, yet they explained only 25% of the population-attributable risk. In women, 44.8% (95% CI: 40.1, 49.5), 35.1% (95% CI: 30.1, 40.4), and 23.6% (95% CI: 20.4, 27.3) were affected by anemia, malaria, or inflammation, respectively. The prevalence rates of iron deficiency (8.3%; 95% CI: 6.2, 11.1), iron-deficiency anemia (6.1%; 95% CI: 4.4, 8.6), vitamin A deficiency (2.1%; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.1) and vitamin B12 deficiency (0.5%; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.4) were low, while folate deficiency was high (79.2%; 95% CI: 74.1, 83.5). Iron deficiency, malaria, and inflammation were significantly associated with anemia, but explained only 25% of cases of anemia. Anemia in children and women is a severe public health problem in Sierra Leone. Since malaria and inflammation only contributed to 25% of anemia, other causes of anemia, such as hemoglobinopathies, should also be explored.

  8. Characterization of serum platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase. Correlation between deficiency of serum PAF acetylhydrolase and respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children.

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, M; Miyake, T; Yamanaka, T; Sugatani, J; Suzuki, Y; Sakata, S; Araki, Y; Matsumoto, M

    1988-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase has been recognized as an enzyme that inactivates PAF. We developed a convenient and reproducible method for determining human serum PAF acetylhydrolase activity. The assay was based on measurement of [14C]acetate produced from 1-O-alkyl-2-[14C]-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine upon precipitation of the complex of radioactive substrate and albumin with TCA. The apparent Km value of PAF acetylhydrolase (near the physiological concentration of serum protein) was 1.5 X 10(-4) M PAF. 32 subjects with serum PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency were found among 816 healthy Japanese adults. The low PAF acetylhydrolase activity in the deficient serum might not be due to the presence of enzyme inhibitor. Both the sensitivity to PAF and the metabolism of PAF in platelets from PAF acetylhydrolase-deficient subjects were almost the same as those of normal subjects. Deficiency in serum PAF acetylhydrolase appeared to be transmitted by autosomal recessive heredity among five Japanese families. Among healthy adults, healthy children, and asthmatic children, who were grouped into five classes on the basis of respiratory symptoms (remission, wheezy, mild, moderate, and severe groups), the probability of PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency was significantly higher in groups with severe symptoms (moderate and severe) (P less than 0.01). These results suggest that deficiency of serum PAF acetylhydrolase might be one of the factors leading to severe respiratory symptoms in asthmatic children. Images PMID:3198761

  9. Zinc deficiency in children with environmental enteropathy - development of new strategies: Report from an expert workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc deficiency is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. The WHO/UNICEF strategy for zinc supplementation as adjunctive therapy for diarrhea is poorly implemented. A conference of experts in zinc nutrition and gastrointestinal disorders was convened to consider approaches that might co...

  10. Finding a Needle in a Haystack: the Advantages of Liquid Chromatography--Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in Determination of Sex Hormones in Children.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, Shira; Ben-Dor, Anat

    2016-06-01

    Determination of steroid sex hormones concentrations in children is very important for diagnosis of a wide range of pubertal, adrenal and sex development disorders. The majority of hormone measurements are carried out using traditional immunoassays, due to their technical simplicity, cost and availability of commercial reagents. But, due to limited specificity and sensitivity, traditional immunoassays often fail to determine low concentration analytes such as sex hormones in pediatric blood. In the last decade, the LC-MS/MS assay has risen as a new player in the analytic diagnostic field. The assay has proven appropriate for detection of very low hormones concentrations in blood, is quite easy to perform and can detect multiple steroids from a single sample. For the routine determination of an individual or panel of steroids, LC-MS/MS is now the recommended method for most diagnostic laboratories.

  11. Synergistic effect of obesity and lipid ingestion in suppressing the growth hormone response to exercise in children.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stacy R; Hingorani, Sunita R; Rosa, Jaime S; Zaldivar, Frank P; Galassetti, Pietro R

    2012-07-01

    Diet plays an important role in modulating exercise responses, including activation of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1) axis. Obesity and fat ingestion were separately shown to reduce exercise GH responses, but their combined effect, especially important in children, has not been studied. We therefore measured the GH response to exercise [30-min intermittent cycling, ten 2-min bouts at ~80% maximal aerobic capacity (Vo(2max)), separated by 1-min rest], started 45 min after ingestion of a high-fat meal (HFM) in 16 healthy [controls; body mass index percentile (BMI%ile) 51 ± 7], and 19 obese (Ob, BMI%ile 97 ± 0.4) children. Samples were drawn at baseline (premeal), and at start, peak, and 30 min postexercise. In the Ob group, a marked ~75% suppression of the GH response (ng/ml) to exercise was observed (2.4 ± 0.6 vs. 10.6 ± 2.1, P < 0.001). This level of suppression was also significantly greater compared with age-, fitness-, and BMI-matched historical controls that had performed identical exercise in fasting conditions. Our data indicate that the reduction in the GH response to exercise, already present in obese children vs. healthy controls, is considerably amplified by ingestion of fat nutrients shortly before exercise, implying a potentially downstream negative impact on growth factor homeostasis and long-term modulation of physiological growth.

  12. Vitamin D deficiency in critically ill children: A roadmap to interventional research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies published this month in Pediatrics provide new and unique information regarding the relationship between vitamin D status and critical illnesses in children admitted to PICUs in the United States and Canada. These two studies, from Boston Children's Hospital and six PICUs in Canada, demo...

  13. Deficient Orthographic and Phonological Representations in Children with Dyslexia Revealed by Brain Activation Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Fan; Bitan, Tali; Chou, Tai-Li; Burman, Douglas D.; Booth, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The current study examined the neuro-cognitive network of visual word rhyming judgment in 14 children with dyslexia and 14 age-matched control children (8- to 14-year-olds) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: In order to manipulate the difficulty of mapping orthography to phonology, we used conflicting and…

  14. Electro-oculographic recordings reveal reading deficiencies in learning disabled children.

    PubMed

    Poblano, A; Córdoba de Caballero, B; Castillo, I; Cortés, V

    1996-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to learn the functional differences in reading tasks between two groups of children: those identified as learning disabled and a group of control children. During the earliest stages of learning to read, children adopt a logographic strategy, in which letter order is ignored and phonologic factors are secondary. The children later move into an alphabetic and then to an orthographic reading stage. Reading strategies can be studied by electro-oculographic (EOG) recordings during text reading. This investigation uses EOG to study text reading time, and number of saccadic and regressive movements, to test if learning disabled children show altered strategies on text reading. Nineteen learning disabled and thirteen control subjects were included in the study. Learning disabled children showed longer text reading time, and greater number of saccadic and regressive eye movements. Electro-oculographic recording is not a test customarily performed on learning disabled children. However, our results concerning the dynamic discriminative reading have shown that it can be a useful tool for the examination of learning disabled children. PMID:8987186

  15. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  16. An inflection point of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D for maximal suppression of parathyroid hormone is not evident from multi-site pooled data in children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In adults, maximal suppression of serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) has commonly been used to determine the sufficiency of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH) D]. In children and adolescents, the relationship between serum 25(OH) D and PTH is less clear, and most studies reporting a relationship are der...

  17. [Vitamin A deficiency and the anthropometric nutritional status of urban and rural marginalized children in the state of Zulia, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Amaya-Castellanos, Daisy; Viloria-Castejón, Haydée; Ortega, Pablo; Gómez, Gisela; Urrieta, Jesús R; Lobo, Pablo; Estévez, Jesús

    2002-06-01

    The present transversal study was carried out to estimate the prevalence of both vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and protein-energy malnutrition among children (24 to 85 months) from three urban slums (n = 173) in Maracaibo city, Zulia State, Venezuela and a rural slum area (n = 34), vieinal to Maracaibo, by measuring serum retinol and z score of anthropometric indices Height//Age (H//AZ); Weight//Age (W//AZ) and Weight//Height (W//HZ), compared to NCHS-WHO reference values. The Graffar's methodology adapted to Venezuela by Méndez Castellano (1986) confirmed the underprivileged socio-economic condition of the children population. For serum retinol analysis, peripheral venous blood was drawn and serum was treated according to the Bieri et al. (1979) technique and HPLC procedure. Values were recorded in microgram/dL. Statistical analysis was done by using Epi Info 2000, release 1.0 and SAS release 6.0 (1996) computer programs. The prevalence of VAD (serum retinol < 20 micrograms/dL) in the total children population (n = 207) was 22.2%, being higher in urban children than in rural children (22.5% vs 20.5%). No clinical signs of VAD were detected in the children. The nutritional status analysed by Z score of anthropometric indices revealed that 27.4% of children suffered from undernutrition (Z score = -2 to > -3 SD), being 15.4% stunted, 9.6% wasted and 2.6% with acute protein-energy malnutrition. Neither severe malnutrition nor overweight were detected. According with the H//AZ index, 54.6% of children had adequate nutrition. However 23% of them suffered from VAD. In children at risk of developing undernutrition (Z score = -1 to > -2 SD), 20.9% had VAD and of the stunted children, 21.9% presented VAD. With W//AZ, 60.3%, 29.9% and 9.1% of children were with adequate nutrition, at risk, or wasted respectively; of each group, 25.6%, 17.7% and 15%, respectively had serum retinol values below 20 micrograms/dL. The Z score of W//HZ indicator revealed that 87.4%, 10.4% and 2

  18. Growth hormone replacement in patients with Langerhan's cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Howell, S; Wilton, P; Shalet, S

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the impact of growth hormone on growth and the underlying disease in children with growth hormone deficiency as a result of Langerhan's cell histiocytosis.
STUDY DESIGN—Retrospective analysis of data from the Kabi (Pharmacia & Upjohn) international growth database (KIGS) for 82 children with Langerhan's cell histiocytosis treated with recombinant growth hormone.
RESULTS—At the start of treatment the median (10-90th centile) age was 9.0 (5.2 to 14.7) years, with a median height standard deviation score (SDS) of −2.0 (−3.5 to −0.9). The median pretreatment height velocity (measured in cm/year) was 3.6 (0.9 to 6.4); this increased to 8.8 (3.8 to 12.0) in the first year of treatment with growth hormone, and then remained significantly greater than the pretreatment height velocity at 7.3 (4.4 to 9.7) and 7.1 (4.1 to 9.3) cm/year in the second and third years, respectively. The median height SDS increased from −2.0 to −0.8 (−2.3 to 0.6) by the end of three years of treatment. There was no increase in the recurrence rate of the underlying disease and no adverse event could be directly attributed to growth hormone treatment, apart from one case of benign intracranial hypertension that resolved on stopping treatment with growth hormone.
CONCLUSIONS—Growth hormone replacement treatment for patients with Langerhan's cell histiocytosis with growth hormone deficiency is beneficial and safe.

 PMID:9659097

  19. Some trends in the somatic development of children and adolescents under iodine-deficiency: materials from the Saratov region.

    PubMed

    Godina, Elena Z; Khomyakova, Irena A; Purundjan, Arsen L; Zadorozhnaya, Ludmila V; Stepanova, Alevtina V

    2005-07-01

    2,106 girls and 2,169 boys from 7 to 17 were investigated in 2002-2004 in three urban settlements of the Saratov region (Povolzhje area): the town of Khvalynsk, population 15,000, with a low level of industrialization; the city of Balakovo, population 220,000, highly industrialized and with a nuclear power station; and the city of Saratov, population around 1,000,000 a regional capital, and also highly industrialized. The whole area, particularly the location of Khvalynsk, is also characterized by iodine deficiency (iodine concentration is 0.78 mkg/kg v. normal values of 5-7 mkg/kg). The program included about 30 anthropometric measurements, evaluation of developmental stages of secondary sexual characteristics, and information on menarcheal age by the status quo method. Information on parental occupation and education, as well as number of children per family was collected by questionnaire. For the analysis all the data were standardized, and further comparisons were made irrespective of age groups. The significance of differences was assessed by one-way ANOVA. For height, weight and chest circumference there are significant differences among the three populations (p < 0.001), with Khvalynsk children being the smallest in body height and weight. However, in chest circumference they are close to or even bigger (girls) than Balakovo children. The children from Khvalynsk are characterized by the lowest values for subcutaneous fat layer, both on the trunk and extremities. For the age of menarche, Khvalynsk girls have the highest values: 13 years 5 months (13.42). In Balakovo and Saratov, the corresponding figures are identical: 13 years 2 months (13.17). Secular changes in Khvalynsk and Saratov children are discussed as compared to the literature.

  20. Micronutrient Deficiencies and Related Factors in School-Aged Children in Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study in Libo Kemkem and Fogera Districts, Amhara Regional State

    PubMed Central

    Herrador, Zaida; Sordo, Luis; Gadisa, Endalamaw; Buño, Antonio; Gómez-Rioja, Rubén; Iturzaeta, Jose Manuel; de Armas, Lisset Fernandez; Benito, Agustín; Aseffa, Abraham; Moreno, Javier; Cañavate, Carmen; Custodio, Estefania

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The present study describes the distribution of selected micronutrients and anaemia among school-aged children living in Libo Kemkem and Fogera (Amhara State, Ethiopia), assessing differences by socio-demographic characteristics, health status and dietary habits. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out during May–December 2009. Socio-demographic characteristics, health status and dietary habits were collected. Biomarkers were determined for 764 children. Bivariate and multivariable statistical methods were employed to assess micronutrient deficiencies (MD), anaemia, and their association with different factors. Results More than two thirds of the school-aged children (79.5%) had at least one MD and 40.5% had two or more coexisting micronutrient deficiencies. The most prevalent deficiencies were of zinc (12.5%), folate (13.9%), vit A (29.3%) and vit D (49%). Anaemia occurred in 30.9% of the children. Children living in rural areas were more likely to have vit D insufficiency [OR: 5.9 (3.7–9.5)] but less likely to have folate deficiency [OR: 0.2 (0.1–0.4)] and anaemia [OR: 0.58 (0.35–0.97)]. Splenomegaly was positively associated with folate deficiency and anaemia [OR: 2.77 (1.19–6.48) and 4.91 (2.47–9.75)]. Meat and fish consumption were inversely correlated with zinc and ferritin deficiencies [OR: 0.2 (0.1–0.8) and 0.2 (0.1–0.9)], while oil consumption showed a negative association with anaemia and deficiencies of folate and vitamin A [0.58 (0.3–0.9), OR: 0.5 (0.3–0.9) and 0.6 (0.4–0.9)]. Serum ferritin levels were inversely correlated to the presence of anaemia (p<0.005). Conclusion There is a high prevalence of vitamin A deficiency and vitamin D insufficiency and a moderate prevalence of zinc and folate deficiencies in school-aged children in this area. The inverse association of anaemia and serum ferritin levels may be due to the presence of infectious diseases in the area. To effectively tackle malnutrition

  1. Iodine deficiency in pregnancy: the effect on neurodevelopment in the child.

    PubMed

    Skeaff, Sheila A

    2011-02-01

    Iodine is an integral part of the thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T(4)) and tri-iodothyronine (T(3)), necessary for normal growth and development. An adequate supply of cerebral T(3), generated in the fetal brain from maternal free T(4) (fT(4)), is needed by the fetus for thyroid hormone dependent neurodevelopment, which begins in the second half of the first trimester of pregnancy. Around the beginning of the second trimester the fetal thyroid also begins to produce hormones but the reserves of the fetal gland are low, thus maternal thyroid hormones contribute to total fetal thyroid hormone concentrations until birth. In order for pregnant women to produce enough thyroid hormones to meet both her own and her baby's requirements, a 50% increase in iodine intake is recommended. A lack of iodine in the diet may result in the mother becoming iodine deficient, and subsequently the fetus. In iodine deficiency, hypothyroxinemia (i.e., low maternal fT(4)) results in damage to the developing brain, which is further aggravated by hypothyroidism in the fetus. The most serious consequence of iodine deficiency is cretinism, characterised by profound mental retardation. There is unequivocal evidence that severe iodine deficiency in pregnancy impairs brain development in the child. However, only two intervention trials have assessed neurodevelopment in children of moderately iodine deficient mothers finding improved neurodevelopment in children of mothers supplemented earlier rather than later in pregnancy; both studies were not randomised and were uncontrolled. Thus, there is a need for well-designed trials to determine the effect of iodine supplementation in moderate to mildly iodine deficient pregnant women on neurodevelopment in the child. PMID:22254096

  2. Socioeconomic determinants of iron-deficiency anemia among children aged 6 to 59 months in India.

    PubMed

    Bharati, Susmita; Pal, Manoranjan; Chakrabarty, Suman; Bharati, Premananda

    2015-03-01

    The extent of anemia and its socioeconomic determinants among the preschool children (6-59 months old) in India have been studied in this article. Relevant data are taken from the third round of the National Family Health Survey. The initial analysis reveals some interesting features. The most affected children are in the age-group of 6 to 23 months. Beyond this age a decreasing trend is observed up to the age of 48 to 59 months. The highest and the lowest prevalence of anemia have been found to be in the central and the northeast zones, respectively. The vulnerable groups are the children of illiterate parents and those belonging to the poor families in the rural areas. Categorical logistic regression also confirms that status of literacy and wealth of parents have strong negative association with the status of anemia of the children.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is an inherited disorder that affects the adrenal glands . The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and ... body. In people with 21-hydroxylase deficiency , the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. ...

  4. Cell-mediated immunity in nutritional deficiency.

    PubMed

    McMurray, D N

    1984-01-01

    Dietary deficiencies of specific nutrients profoundly alter cell-mediated immune responses in man and experimental animals. Both moderate and severe deficiencies are associated with significant changes in immunocompetence. Diets with inadequate levels of protein, calories, vitamin A, pyridoxine, biotin and zinc result in loss of thymic cellularity. Secondary to thymic atrophy, the production of thymic hormones critical for the differentiation of T lymphocytes is reduced, especially in protein-calorie malnutrition and zinc deficiency. Confirmation of a T cell maturational defect in nutritional deprivation comes from the observations of decreased total (T3 and rosette-forming) T cells in the peripheral blood of children with kwashiorkor and marasmus, with preferential loss of helper/inducer (T4) T cell subsets. Reduced number and in vitro function of T cells have also been reported in experimental deficiencies of iron, zinc, copper, and vitamins A and E. Loss of cutaneous hypersensitivity to mitogens and antigens is a consistent sequela of dietary deficiencies of protein, vitamins A and C, pyridoxine, iron and zinc. Cell-mediated immunity directed against allogeneic histocompatibility antigens (e.g. mixed leukocyte cultures, graft versus host, skin graft rejection) may actually be enhanced by experimental protein and polyunsaturated fat deficiencies. Alternatively, pyridoxine, ascorbate and biotin deficiencies resulted in delayed rejection of skin allografts. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity is impaired in zinc-, iron- and copper-deficient mice, as well as in scorbutic guinea pigs. Natural killer (NK) cell function may be either enhanced or depressed, depending upon the nutrient and its effects on interferon production. Several authors have demonstrated normal or enhanced macrophage activity in a variety of experimental deficiencies. The extrapolation of these observations to infectious disease resistance is not straightforward, and depends upon the nature of

  5. IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency in children with recurrent respiratory infections and its relationship with chronic pulmonary damage.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Atlihan, F; Genel, F; Targan, S; Gunvar, T

    2005-01-01

    Most patients with IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency are asymptomatic but some may suffer from frequent mainly respiratory infections. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiencies and the rate of chronic pulmonary damage secondary to recurrent pulmonary infections in these children. Serum IgA and IgG subclass levels were measured in 225 children aged 6 months to 6 years with recurrent sinopulmonary infections (44 with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 100 with recurrent pulmonary infections and 81 with recurrent bronchiolitis). In order to determine chronic pulmonary damage due to recurrent infections in patients with recurrent pulmonary infections CT scans of thorax were also obtained. The overall frequency of antibody defects was found to be 19.1%. IgA deficiency was observed in 9.3%, IgG subclass deficiency in 8.4% and IgA + IgG subclass deficiency in 1.4%. The prevalance of IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency was 25% in patients with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 22% in patients with recurrent pulmonary infections and 12.3% in patients with recurrent bronchiolitis (p>0.05). Chronic pulmonary damage in lungs was determined radiologically in 17 of 100 cases with recurrent pulmonary infection. In IgG subclass deficiencies sequel changes, although not statistically significant, were observed five times more frequently than that of IgA deficiencies. CT scans revealed pulmonary sequels in 5 of the 22 (22.7%) patients with recurrent pulmonary infections and immunodeficiency (bronchiectasis in 2 patients with IgG3 deficiency, fibrotic changes in one with IgA deficiency and in one with IgG3 deficiency, bronchiolitis obliterans in one with IgG2 + IgG3 deficiency). On the other hand, pulmonary sequels were observed in 12 patients (15.4%) with normal immunoglobulin levels. Eight of them were bronchiolitis obliterans, 2 of them were atelectasia and 1 of them was bronchiectasia. We therefore suggest

  6. A comparative study of fluoride ingestion levels, serum thyroid hormone & TSH level derangements, dental fluorosis status among school children from endemic and non-endemic fluorosis areas.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navneet; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Verma, Pradhuman; Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Sachdeva, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine serum/urinary fluoride status and comparison of free T4, free T3 and thyroid stimulating hormone levels of 8 to 15 years old children with and without dental fluorosis living in an endemic and non-endemic fluorosis area. A sample group of 60 male and female school children, with or without dental fluorosis, consuming fluoride-contaminated water in endemic fluoride area of Udaipur district, Rajasthan were selected through a school dental fluorosis survey. The sample of 10 children of same age and socio-economic status residing in non endemic areas who did not have dental fluorosis form controls. Fluoride determination in drinking water, urine and blood was done with Ion 85 Ion Analyzer Radiometer with Hall et al. method. The thyroid gland functional test was done by Immonu Chemiluminiscence Micropartical Assay with Bayer Centaur Autoanalyzer. The significantly altered FT3, FT4 and TSH hormones level in both group1A and 1B school children were noted. The serum and urine fluoride levels were found to be increased in both the groups. A significant relationship of water fluoride to urine and serum fluoride concentration was seen. The serum fluoride concentration also had significant relationship with thyroid hormone (FT3/FT4) and TSH concentrations. The testing of drinking water and body fluids for fluoride content, along with FT3, FT4, and TSH in children with dental fluorosis is desirable for recognizing underlying thyroid derangements and its impact on fluorosis.

  7. Serum lipoprotein pattern as modified in G6PD-deficient children during haemolytic anaemia induced by fava bean ingestion.

    PubMed

    Dessì, S; Batetta, B; Spano, O; Pulisci, D; Mulas, M F; Muntoni, S; Armeni, M; Sanna, C; Antonucci, R; Pani, P

    1992-04-01

    In the present study, plasma lipid concentrations were determined at different times after admission in sera from G6PD-deficient children during haemolytic crisis induced by fava bean ingestion. Reductions in total, LDL and HDL cholesterol were found in association with the maximum of bone marrow hyperplasia. A return towards normal values occurred with regression of the disease. No changes in other lipid parameters were observed. These data suggest that alterations of lipoprotein pattern, other than in experimental animals, are also present in humans with non-malignant proliferative processes. These changes appear to be a consequence of the disease, probably due to an increased utilization of cholesterol by proliferating cells. PMID:1571275

  8. Selenium deficiency mitigates hypothyroxinemia in iodine-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Deckx, H; Bebe, N; Longombé, A O; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Dumont, J E

    1993-02-01

    Studies were performed to assess the role of combined selenium and iodine deficiency in the etiology of endemic myxedematous cretinism in a population in Zaire. One effect of selenium deficiency may be to lower glutathione peroxidase activity in the thyroid gland, thus allowing hydrogen peroxide produced during thyroid hormone synthesis to be cytotoxic. In selenium-and-iodine-deficient humans, selenium supplementation may aggravate hypothyroidism by stimulating thyroxin metabolism by the selenoenzyme type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Selenium supplementation is thus not indicated without iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation in cases of combined selenium and iodine deficiencies.

  9. Selenium deficiency mitigates hypothyroxinemia in iodine-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Deckx, H; Bebe, N; Longombé, A O; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Dumont, J E

    1993-02-01

    Studies were performed to assess the role of combined selenium and iodine deficiency in the etiology of endemic myxedematous cretinism in a population in Zaire. One effect of selenium deficiency may be to lower glutathione peroxidase activity in the thyroid gland, thus allowing hydrogen peroxide produced during thyroid hormone synthesis to be cytotoxic. In selenium-and-iodine-deficient humans, selenium supplementation may aggravate hypothyroidism by stimulating thyroxin metabolism by the selenoenzyme type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Selenium supplementation is thus not indicated without iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation in cases of combined selenium and iodine deficiencies. PMID:8427203

  10. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  11. Delayed Adrenarche may be an Additional Feature of Immunoglobulin Super Family Member 1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Severine; Craen, Margarita; Callewaert, Bert; Joustra, Sjoerd; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Wit, Jan Maarten; Turgeon, Marc Olivier; Bernard, Daniel J; De Schepper, Jean

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin super family member 1 (IGSF1) deficiency syndrome is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed surge in testosterone during puberty, macro-orchidism, and in some cases, hypoprolactinemia and/or transient growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Our patient was a 19-year-old male adolescent who had been treated since the age of 9 years with GH and thyroxine for an idiopathic combined GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) deficiency. His GH deficiency proved to be transient, but deficiencies of TSH and PRL persisted, and he had developed macro-orchidism since the end of puberty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and PROP1 and POU1F1 sequencing were normal. A disharmonious puberty (delayed genital and pubic hair development, bone maturation, and pubertal growth spurt, despite normal testicular growth) was observed as well as a delayed adrenarche, as reflected by very low dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and delayed pubarche. Direct sequencing of the IGSF1 gene revealed a novel hemizygous mutation, c.3127T>C, p.Cys1043Arg. Pathogenicity of the mutation was demonstrated in vitro. Male children with an idiopathic combined GH, PRL, and TSH deficiency, showing persistent central hypothyroidism but transient GH deficiency upon retesting at adult height, should be screened for mutations in the IGSF1 gene, especially when macro-orchidism and/or hypoprolactinemia are present. We suspect that delayed adrenarche, as a consequence of PRL deficiency, might be part of the clinical phenotype of patients with IGSF1 deficiency. PMID:26757742

  12. Delayed Adrenarche may be an Additional Feature of Immunoglobulin Super Family Member 1 Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hulle, Severine Van; Craen, Margarita; Callewaert, Bert; Joustra, Sjoerd; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Wit, Jan Maarten; Turgeon, Marc Olivier; Bernard, Daniel J.; Schepper, Jean De

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin super family member 1 (IGSF1) deficiency syndrome is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed surge in testosterone during puberty, macro-orchidism, and in some cases, hypoprolactinemia and/or transient growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Our patient was a 19-year-old male adolescent who had been treated since the age of 9 years with GH and thyroxine for an idiopathic combined GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) deficiency. His GH deficiency proved to be transient, but deficiencies of TSH and PRL persisted, and he had developed macro-orchidism since the end of puberty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and PROP1 and POU1F1 sequencing were normal. A disharmonious puberty (delayed genital and pubic hair development, bone maturation, and pubertal growth spurt, despite normal testicular growth) was observed as well as a delayed adrenarche, as reflected by very low dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and delayed pubarche. Direct sequencing of the IGSF1 gene revealed a novel hemizygous mutation, c.3127T>C, p.Cys1043Arg. Pathogenicity of the mutation was demonstrated in vitro. Male children with an idiopathic combined GH, PRL, and TSH deficiency, showing persistent central hypothyroidism but transient GH deficiency upon retesting at adult height, should be screened for mutations in the IGSF1 gene, especially when macro-orchidism and/or hypoprolactinemia are present. We suspect that delayed adrenarche, as a consequence of PRL deficiency, might be part of the clinical phenotype of patients with IGSF1 deficiency. PMID:26757742

  13. Obesity-Related Hormones in Low-Income Preschool-Age Children: Implications for School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Alison L.; Lumeng, Carey N.; Delproposto, Jennifer; Florek, Brian; Wendorf, Kristin; Lumeng, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying socioeconomic disparities in school readiness and health outcomes, particularly obesity, among preschool-aged children are complex and poorly understood. Obesity can induce changes in proteins in the circulation that contribute to the negative impact of obesity on health; such changes may relate to cognitive and emotion…

  14. Association of E-selectin with hematological, hormonal levels and plasma proteins in children with end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Meamar, Rokhsareh; Shafiei, Mohammad; Abedini, Amin; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Taheri, Shahram; Gheissari, Alaleh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypercoagulable state is a common serious problem in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD patients are in a condition of chronic inflammation. An increased level of E-selectin, “a key adhesion molecule that regulates leukocyte bindings to endothelium at damaged sites,” accompanies the higher risk of inflammation in ESRD patients. We aimed to investigate the possible correlation among E-selectin as an adhesion molecule, coagulation factors, and inflammatory factors in children with ESRD. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five child patients with ESRD who had been on regular dialysis treatment were registered in our study. Nighteen sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers were used as the control group. Laboratory tests were requested for the evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters, and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and for coagulation state; fibrinogen, protein C, and protein S were measured. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Biomerica, CA, and IDS, UK). for serum E-selectin assay was provided by R and D Systems (Abingdon, UK). Results: Hemoglubolin (Hb), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, calcium, PTH, triglyceride (TG) concentrations in serum as well as E-selectin showed significant difference between the two study groups, as indeed was expected. Serum E-selectin was significantly higher (P value = 0.033) in dialysis patients than in healthy subjects. E-selectin was positively correlated only with phosphorus in ESRD children (r = 0.398, P = 0.018). No association was found for other parameters. Conclusion: Although in our study circulating E-selectin concentration “as an inflammatory maker” is independently positively associated with limited blood markers, for better evaluation, well-designed cohort studies should be examined in ESRD children. PMID:27563628

  15. Human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Strobl, J S; Thomas, M J

    1994-03-01

    The study of human growth hormone is a little more than 100 years old. Growth hormone, first identified for its dramatic effect on longitudinal growth, is now known to exert generalized effects on protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional roles for growth hormone in human physiology are likely to be discovered in the areas of sleep research and reproduction. Furthermore, there is some indication that growth hormone also may be involved in the regulation of immune function, mental well-being, and the aging process. Recombinant DNA technology has provided an abundant and safe, albeit expensive, supply of human growth hormone for human use, but the pharmacological properties of growth hormone are poor. Most growth hormone-deficient individuals exhibit a secretory defect rather than a primary defect in growth hormone production, however, and advances in our understanding of the neuroendocrine regulation of growth hormone secretion have established the basis for the use of drugs to stimulate release of endogenously synthesized growth hormone. This promises to be an important area for future drug development. PMID:8190748

  16. Applications of Measures of Speed of Mental Operations among Children with Intellectual Deficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loranger, Michel; Blais, Marie Claude; Hopps, Sandra; Pepin, Michel; Boisvert, Jean-Marie; Doyon, Martin

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed use of five computerized analogy problems as a measure of mental speed with 62 children (ages 3-13) with mild/moderate mental retardation. Results found medium to high correlation between scores on the tasks and other cognitive measures and the adaptive behavior scale. The value of assessing cognitive speed in the cognitive…

  17. N300 Indexes Deficient Integration of Orthographic and Phonological Representations in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasko, Sandra; Bruder, Jennifer; Bartling, Jurgen; Schulte-Korne, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    In transparent orthographies, like German, children with developmental dyslexia (DD) are mainly characterized by a reading fluency deficit. The reading fluency deficit might be traced back to a scarce integration of orthographic and phonological representations. In order to address this question, the present study used EEG to investigate the N300,…

  18. Comparisons of thyroid hormone, intelligence, attention, and quality of life in children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome before and after endoscopic adenoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui-Wei; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Hong-Ping; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Xue-Mei; Fan, Xian-Liang; Tian, Yu-Dong; Jia, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the differences in thyroid hormone, intelligence, attention, and quality of life (QoL) of children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) before and after endoscopic adenoidectomy. Method. A total of 35 OSAHS children (21 males and 14 females with a mean age of 6.81 ± 1.08 years) were included in this study for analyzing the levels of thyroid hormone, intelligence, attention, and QoL. There were 22 children underwent endoscopic adenoidectomy with bilateral tonsillectomy (BT), while the other 13 children who underwent endoscopic adenoidectomy without bilateral tonsillectomy without BT. Results. Our results revealed no significant difference in serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in OSAHS children before and after endoscopic adenoidectomy (all P > 0.05). However, there were significant differences in full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) (92.45 ± 5.88 versus 106.23 ± 7.39, P < 0.001), verbal intelligence quotient (VIQ) (94.17 ± 15.01 versus 103.91 ± 9.74, P = 0.006), and performance intelligence quotient (PIQ) (94.12 ± 11.04 versus 104.31 ± 10.05, P = 0.001), attention (98.48 ± 8.74 versus 106.87 ± 8.58, P < 0.001), and total OSA-18 scores (87.62 ± 17.15 versus 46.61 ± 10.15, P < 0.001) between before and after endoscopic adenoidectomy in OSAHS children. Conclusion. Our findings provided evidence that the intelligence, attention, and QoL of OSAHS children may be significantly improved after endoscopic adenoidectomy.

  19. Iodine-deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Jooste, Pieter L; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2008-10-01

    2 billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. Assessment methods include urinary iodine concentration, goitre, newborn thyroid-stimulating hormone, and blood thyroglobulin. In nearly all countries, the best strategy to control iodine deficiency is iodisation of salt, which is one of the most cost-effective ways to contribute to economic and social development. When iodisation of salt is not possible, iodine supplements can be given to susceptible groups. Introduction of iodised salt to regions of chronic iodine-deficiency disorders might transiently increase the proportion of thyroid disorders, but overall the small risks of iodine excess are far outweighed by the substantial risks of iodine deficiency. International efforts to control iodine-deficiency disorders are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges. PMID:18676011

  20. Association of PCB, PBDE and PCDD/F body burdens with hormone levels for children in an e-waste dismantling area of Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peiwei; Lou, Xiaoming; Ding, Gangqiang; Shen, Haitao; Wu, Lizhi; Chen, Zhijian; Han, Jianlong; Han, Guangen; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2014-11-15

    Increased electronic waste (e-waste) has raised public concerns regarding exposure to numerous toxic contaminants, particularly polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). In China, the body burdens of PCBs, PBDEs and PCDD/Fs are associated with thyroid hormones in populations from e-waste dismantling sites; however, it is unclear whether this association occurs in children. In this study, we determined the serum levels of PCBs, PBDEs and PCDD/Fs and the endocrine hormones including free triiodothyronine (FT3), total triiodothyronine (TT3), free thyroxine (FT4), total thyroxine (TT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and growth hormone (GH) in 21 children from an e-waste dismantling area and 24 children from a control area. The results showed that the mean levels of ∑PCBs and ∑PBDEs in the exposure group were significantly higher than in the control group (40.56 and 32.09 ng g(-1) lipid vs. 20.69 and 8.43 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, p<0.01 for each), and the mean level of ∑PCDD/Fs in the exposure group was higher than in the control group, but the difference was not significant (206.17 vs. 160.27 pg g(-1) lipid, p>0.05). For the endocrine hormones, we did not find significant differences between the exposed and control groups, although the mean levels of FT3, TT3, TT4, ACTH, cortisol and GH were higher, whereas the mean levels of FT4 and TSH were lower in the exposed group. The mean level of ∑PBDEs was positively correlated with the mean levels of ∑PCBs (r=0.60, p<0.05) and ∑PCDD/Fs (r=0.61, p<0.05). Furthermore, the mean level of ∑PBDEs was positively correlated with ACTH (r=0.61, p<0.05). In conclusion, our data suggested that exposure to e-waste dismantling environment increased the body burdens of PCBs and PBDEs in local children and that these contaminants released from the e-waste might contribute to

  1. Justified and unjustified use of growth hormone

    PubMed Central

    van der Lely, A J

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy for children and adults with proven GH deficiency due to a pituitary disorder has become an accepted therapy with proven efficacy. GH is increasingly suggested, however, as a potential treatment for frailty, osteoporosis, morbid obesity, cardiac failure, and various catabolic conditions. However, the available placebo controlled studies have not reported many significant beneficial effects, and it might even be dangerous to use excessive GH dosages in conditions in which the body has just decided to decrease GH actions. GH can indeed induce changes in body composition that are considered to be advantageous to GH deficient and non-GH deficient subjects. In contrast to GH replacement therapy in GH deficient subjects, however, excessive GH action due to GH misuse seems to be ineffective in improving muscle power. Moreover, there are no available study data to indicate that the use of GH for non-GH deficient subjects should be advocated, especially as animal data suggest that lower GH levels are positively correlated with longevity. PMID:15466991

  2. Evaluation of gonadotropin responses to synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone in girls with idiopathic hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Foster, C M; Hopwood, N J; Beitins, I Z; Mendes, T M; Kletter, G B; Kelch, R P

    1992-10-01

    We hypothesized that prepubertal girls with gonadotropin deficiency would produce less follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in response to synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) than would gonadotropin-sufficient children. To test this hypothesis, we performed 103 GnRH tests serially in 21 children who had idiopathic hypopituitarism with growth hormone deficiency. We tried to predict whether puberty would occur in the 17 girls with bone ages of 8 years or less. Of these 17 girls, 4 failed to have spontaneous secondary sexual characteristics by age 16 1/2 years, and 12 had spontaneous complete pubertal development. One girl had incomplete pubertal maturation with partial gonadotropin deficiency; her results were combined with those of the girls who had no spontaneous pubertal development. With increasing bone age, the girls with complete pubertal development had a decrease in the increment of FSH released in response to GnRH, although basal gonadotropin concentrations did not change. For GnRH tests performed at bone ages of 8 years or less, basal luteinizing hormone (LH) values did not differ between girls with complete puberty and those with absent or incomplete puberty. However, basal FSH and the incremental response of LH and FSH to GnRH were greater in those with complete puberty. Only two girls with prepubertal bone ages at the time of testing, who subsequently had complete puberty, had incremental FSH responses to GnRH that were less than 5 IU/L. Individual incremental LH responses to GnRH did not discriminate well between groups. None of the girls with adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency, either originally or subsequently, had spontaneous puberty, but 4 of 12 girls with thyrotropin deficiency, either originally or subsequently, had complete puberty. We conclude that a significant increase in GnRH-stimulated FSH suggests that spontaneous pubertal development will occur in girls with idiopathic hypopituitarism. However, a low FSH response to GnRH may

  3. A Hospital Based Study to Establish the Correlation between Recurrent Wheeze and Vitamin D Deficiency Among Children of Age Group Less than 3 Years in Indian Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Santosh; Sheth, Ronak; Mauskar, Anupama V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early childhood wheezing is a heterogeneous condition, which has several phenotypic expressions and a complex relationship with the development of asthma later in life. New studies indicate the prevalence of recurrent wheeze to be associated with Vitamin D deficiency. This has not been explored in Indian settings widely, mandating this exploration. Aim To determine the severity of Vitamin D deficiency and its association with recurrent wheeze in children less than 3 years of age. Materials and Methods Consecutive type of non-probability sampling was followed for selection of study subjects with a total sample size to be 122 children in the Hospital setting. A pre- formed, pre- tested, structured interview schedule was used to obtain information. Estimation of 25 (OH) Vitamin D was done using ELISA method. Kit used for estimation was DLD Diagnostika GMBH 25(OH) Vitamin D ELISA from Germany. Standard statistical tools were used including Logistic regression analysis, and ROC curve, p value <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. SPSS software version 17.0 was used. Results Each 10ng/ml decrease in Vitamin D level is associated with 7.25% greater odds of wheezing. Our study also suggests, exclusive breast feeding and delaying of complementary feeding beyond 6 months of age are significant predictors of Vitamin D deficiency and have indirect association with increased incidence of wheezing in children. Conclusion The study concluded that Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of recurrent wheezing. PMID:27042548

  4. Co-existence of anemia, vitamin A deficiency and growth retardation among children 24-84 months old in Maracaibo, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Castejon, H V; Ortega, P; Amaya, D; Gomez, G; Leal, J; Castejon, Orlando J

    2004-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia has been associated with alterations in child development and psychomotor function, being myelination and dopaminergic functioning especially vulnerable. Iron deficiency, at different ages, has different reversible and irreversible effects on CNS. Anemia has also been related to vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and growth retardation. The aim of the present paper was to determine the coexistence of micronutrient deficiency, iron and vitamin A, and macronutrient deficiency (growth retardation). The sample consisted of 202 Venezuelan children, aged 24-84 month old, (104 girls, 98 boys); Anemia, VAD and growth retardation was evaluated by means of blood hemoglobin concentration analysis, HPLC serum retinol (values <20 microg/dl reveal VAD) and height/age and weight/age Z scores (< or = - 2 SD express stunting and underweight). Prevalence of anemia was 38.11%; VAD, 21.78%; stunting, 14.36% and underweight, 9.40%. Anemia and VAD clustered in 7.92%; anemia + stunting or + underweight coexisted in 5.94% and 2.97%, respectively. Stunting and underweight clustered with VAD in 2.97% and 1.48%. The three-way combination with anemia was only seen with stunting in 0.99% of the sample. The prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies remain as significant public health problems which should be simultaneously treated as virtually independent, giving priority to infant, toddler and preschool age groups. PMID:15279497

  5. Intake of Phthalate-tainted Foods and Serum Thyroid Hormones in Taiwanese Children and Adolescents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hui-Ju; Wu, Chia-Fang; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Huang, Po-Chin; Chen, Mei-Lien; Wang, Shu-Li; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chen, Chu-Chih; Wu, Wen-Chiu; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Hsiung, Chao A.; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2016-07-01

    On April-May, 2011, phthalates, mainly Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), were deliberately added to a variety of foodstuff as a substitute emulsifier in Taiwan. This study investigated the relationship between DEHP-tainted foodstuffs exposure and thyroid function in possibly affected children and adolescents. Two hundred fifty participants <18 years possibly exposed to DEHP were enrolled in this study between August 2012 and January 2013. Questionnaires were used to collect details on their past exposure to DEHP-tainted food items. Blood and urine samples were collected for biochemical workups to measure current exposure derived from three urinary DEHP metabolites using a creatinine excretion-based model. More than half of 250 participants were estimated to be exposed to DEHP-tainted foods found to exceed the recommend tolerable daily intake of DEHP established by the European Food Safety Authority (<50 μg/kg/day). The median daily DEHP intake (DDI) among those 250 participants was 46.52 μg/kg/day after multiple imputation. This value was ~10-fold higher than the current median DEHP intake (4.46 μg/kg/day, n = 240). Neither past nor current DEHP exposure intensity was significantly associated with serum thyroid profiles. Future studies may want to follow the long-term health effects of this food scandal in affected children and adolescents.

  6. Intake of Phthalate-tainted Foods and Serum Thyroid Hormones in Taiwanese Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hui-Ju; Wu, Chia-Fang; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Huang, Po-Chin; Chen, Mei-Lien; Wang, Shu-Li; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chen, Chu-Chih; Wu, Wen-Chiu; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Hsiung, Chao A.; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2016-01-01

    On April-May, 2011, phthalates, mainly Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), were deliberately added to a variety of foodstuff as a substitute emulsifier in Taiwan. This study investigated the relationship between DEHP-tainted foodstuffs exposure and thyroid function in possibly affected children and adolescents. Two hundred fifty participants <18 years possibly exposed to DEHP were enrolled in this study between August 2012 and January 2013. Questionnaires were used to collect details on their past exposure to DEHP-tainted food items. Blood and urine samples were collected for biochemical workups to measure current exposure derived from three urinary DEHP metabolites using a creatinine excretion-based model. More than half of 250 participants were estimated to be exposed to DEHP-tainted foods found to exceed the recommend tolerable daily intake of DEHP established by the European Food Safety Authority (<50 μg/kg/day). The median daily DEHP intake (DDI) among those 250 participants was 46.52 μg/kg/day after multiple imputation. This value was ~10-fold higher than the current median DEHP intake (4.46 μg/kg/day, n = 240). Neither past nor current DEHP exposure intensity was significantly associated with serum thyroid profiles. Future studies may want to follow the long-term health effects of this food scandal in affected children and adolescents. PMID:27470018

  7. Young Zanzibari Children with Iron Deficiency, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Stunting, or Malaria Have Lower Motor Activity Scores and Spend Less Time in Locomotion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Motor activity improves cognitive and social-emotional development through a child’s exploration of his or her physical and social environment. This study assessed anemia, iron deficiency, hemoglobin (Hb), length-for-age Z-score (LAZ), and malaria infection as predictors of motor activity in 771 chi...

  8. [Hormone replacement therapy--growth hormone, melatonin, DHEA and sex hormones].

    PubMed

    Fukai, Shiho; Akishita, Masahiro

    2009-07-01

    The ability to maintain active and independent living as long as possible is crucial for the healthy longevity. Hormones responsible for some of the manifestations associated with aging are growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), sex hormones and thyroid hormones. These hormonal changes are associated with changes in body composition, visceral obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, loss of cognitive functioning, reduction in well being, depression, as well as sexual dysfunction. With the prolongation of life expectancy, both men and women today live the latter third life with endocrine deficiencies. Hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing or delaying some aspects of aging.

  9. Potential Contribution of Iron Deficiency and Multiple Factors to Anemia Among 6- to 72-Month-Old Children in the Kokang Area of Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ai; Gao, Hongchong; Li, Bo; Yu, Kai; Win, Naing Naing; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Peiyu

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of anemia among children in Myanmar has been reported to be among the highest in the world. This study was conducted to determine 1) the prevalence of anemia in preschool children and 2) risk factors associated with anemia. A total of 138 children aged from 6 to 72 months were recruited through cluster sampling from six villages in Kokang. Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, blood trace elements, and anthropometric indicators were measured. Feces samples were collected to examine for the presence of ascarid eggs. The overall prevalence of anemia in children was 61.6%, including 10.9% with severe anemia. Meanwhile, high prevalence of stunting (40.0%), underweight (22.4%), wasting (6.3%), and small head circumference (6.7%) was found. Children with anemia were more prone to stunting. Children with severe anemia and moderate anemia had significantly lower blood iron and zinc levels than children without anemia (P < 0.001 and P = 0.007). The prevalence of ascarid infection was 64.9%; however, it was not associated with anemia. Drinking spring water was positively associated with anemia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.368). This study demonstrated that anemia is an important public health problem among children from the Kokang area. Iron deficiency and drinking spring water may be the important causes of anemia among children. PMID:26195457

  10. Growth hormone (GH)-transgenic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1)-deficient mice allow dissociation of excess GH and IGF1 effects on glomerular and tubular growth.

    PubMed

    Blutke, Andreas; Schneider, Marlon R; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger

    2016-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-transgenic mice with permanently elevated systemic levels of GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) reproducibly develop renal and glomerular hypertrophy and subsequent progressive glomerulosclerosis, finally leading to terminal renal failure. To dissociate IGF1-dependent and -independent effects of GH excess on renal growth and lesion development in vivo, the kidneys of 75 days old IGF1-deficient (I(-/-)) and of IGF1-deficient GH-transgenic mice (I(-/-)/G), as well as of GH-transgenic (G) and nontransgenic wild-type control mice (I(+/+)) were examined by quantitative stereological and functional analyses. Both G and I(-/-)/G mice developed glomerular hypertrophy, hyperplasia of glomerular mesangial and endothelial cells, podocyte hypertrophy and foot process effacement, albuminuria, and glomerulosclerosis. However, I(-/-)/G mice exhibited less severe glomerular alterations, as compared to G mice. Compared to I(+/+) mice, G mice exhibited renal hypertrophy with a significant increase in the number without a change in the size of proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells. In contrast, I(-/-)/G mice did not display significant PTE cell hyperplasia, as compared to I(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that GH excess stimulates glomerular growth and induces lesions progressing to glomerulosclerosis in the absence of IGF1. In contrast, IGF1 represents an important mediator of GH-dependent proximal tubular growth in GH-transgenic mice.

  11. Influence of sex and gonadal hormones on rat-liver and carcass lipids during the development of an essential fatty acid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ostwald, Rosemarie; Bouchard, Pauline; Miljanich, P.; Lyman, R. L.

    1965-01-01

    1. Groups of intact male and female rats and castrated rats injected with oestradiol or testosterone were given a diet containing hydrogenated coconut oil for 9 weeks, and at intervals the amounts and fatty acid compositions of the carcass and liver lipids were determined. 2. Male rats grew faster and larger, and exhibited typical external essential fatty acid deficiency symptoms sooner than did females. Testosterone-treated castrated male rats were similar to males, and oestradiol-injected castrated male rats resembled females. 3. Intact females maintained a higher linoleic acid concentration in their carcass than did males. Total amounts of carcass linoleic acid remained similar for all groups, only 200mg. being removed in 9 weeks regardless of body size. 4. The amounts of total cholesteryl esters were independent of liver size. They were higher in males and testosterone-treated castrated male rats than in females and oestrogen-treated castrated male rats. 5. Phospholipids represented about 80% of the liver lipids. The total amounts of the phospholipid linoleic acid and arachidonic acid were similar for all groups regardless of liver size, and were not affected appreciably by the deficiency. Females and oestrogen-treated castrated male rats maintained a higher proportion of phospholipid arachidonic acid for longer periods than did their male counterparts. Both the total amounts and the proportions of eicosatrienoic acid and palmitic acid were higher in males than in females. 6. Supplementation of the essential fatty acid-deficient diet with linoleic acid caused a rapid loss of eicosatrienoic acid and palmitic acid with a concomitant increase in stearic acid and arachidonic acid. 7. There were no obvious differences in the way that the essential fatty acids were metabolized or mobilized from adipose tissue of male or female rats during essential fatty acid deficiency. 8. The results indicated that the greater growth rate of the male rats caused them to require and

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and the risk of malaria and other diseases in children in Kenya: a case-control and a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Uyoga, Sophie; Ndila, Carolyne M; Macharia, Alex W; Nyutu, Gideon; Shah, Shivang; Peshu, Norbert; Clarke, Geraldine M; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A; Williams, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The global prevalence of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is thought to be a result of selection by malaria, but epidemiological studies have yielded confusing results. We investigated the relationships between G6PD deficiency and both malaria and non-malarial illnesses among children in Kenya. Methods We did this study in Kilifi County, Kenya, where the G6PD c.202T allele is the only significant cause of G6PD deficiency. We tested the associations between G6PD deficiency and severe and complicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria through a case-control study of 2220 case and 3940 control children. Cases were children aged younger than 14 years, who visited the high dependency ward of Kilifi County Hospital with severe malaria between March 1, 1998, and Feb 28, 2010. Controls were children aged between 3–12 months who were born within the same study area between August 2006, and September 2010. We assessed the association between G6PD deficiency and both uncomplicated malaria and other common diseases of childhood in a cohort study of 752 children aged younger than 10 years. Participants of this study were recruited from a representative sample of households within the Ngerenya and Chonyi areas of Kilifi County between Aug 1, 1998, and July 31, 2001. The primary outcome measure for the case-control study was the odds ratio for hospital admission with severe malaria (computed by logistic regression) while for the cohort study it was the incidence rate ratio for uncomplicated malaria and non-malaria illnesses (computed by Poisson regression), by G6PD deficiency category. Findings 2863 (73%) children in the control group versus 1643 (74%) in the case group had the G6PD normal genotype, 639 (16%) versus 306 (14%) were girls heterozygous for G6PD c.202T, and 438 (11%) versus 271 (12%) children were either homozygous girls or hemizygous boys. Compared with boys and girls without G6PD deficiency, we found significant

  13. Neuroplastic effects of music lessons on hippocampal volume in children with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Zendel, Benjamin Rich; Willoughby, Karen A; Rovet, Joanne F

    2013-12-01

    Children with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) who experience a neonatal thyroid hormone deficiency have reduced hippocampal volumes compared with healthy controls. Interestingly, evidence suggests that musical training can contribute to structural plasticity in a number of brain areas, including the hippocampus. Therefore, we investigated whether taking music lessons could ameliorate the volumetric reductions of the hippocampus in children with CH. Left and right hippocampal volumes were measured in four groups of children: children with CH with and without music lessons, and healthy controls with and without music lessons. We found that the volume of the right hippocampus was comparable between children with CH who had taken music lessons and the healthy controls. Children with CH who had not taken music lessons had reduced hippocampal volumes compared with the other three groups. These results suggest that music lessons may induce structural neuroplasticity in children with atypical hippocampal development because of early thyroid hormone deficiencies.

  14. Treatment with thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Bernadette; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency can have important repercussions. Treatment with thyroid hormone in replacement doses is essential in patients with hypothyroidism. In this review, we critically discuss the thyroid hormone formulations that are available and approaches to correct replacement therapy with thyroid hormone in primary and central hypothyroidism in different periods of life such as pregnancy, birth, infancy, childhood, and adolescence as well as in adult patients, the elderly, and in patients with comorbidities. Despite the frequent and long term use of l-T4, several studies have documented frequent under- and overtreatment during replacement therapy in hypothyroid patients. We assess the factors determining l-T4 requirements (sex, age, gender, menstrual status, body weight, and lean body mass), the major causes of failure to achieve optimal serum TSH levels in undertreated patients (poor patient compliance, timing of l-T4 administration, interferences with absorption, gastrointestinal diseases, and drugs), and the adverse consequences of unintentional TSH suppression in overtreated patients. Opinions differ regarding the treatment of mild thyroid hormone deficiency, and we examine the recent evidence favoring treatment of this condition. New data suggesting that combined therapy with T3 and T4 could be indicated in some patients with hypothyroidism are assessed, and the indications for TSH suppression with l-T4 in patients with euthyroid multinodular goiter and in those with differentiated thyroid cancer are reviewed. Lastly, we address the potential use of thyroid hormones or their analogs in obese patients and in severe cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia, and nonthyroidal illnesses.

  15. Two years of growth hormone therapy in young children with Prader-Willi syndrome: physical and neurodevelopmental benefits.

    PubMed

    Myers, Susan E; Whitman, Barbara Y; Carrel, Aaron L; Moerchen, Victoria; Bekx, M Tracy; Allen, David B

    2007-03-01

    Infants with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) typically display failure to thrive and decreased muscle mass with excess body fat for age. Growth hormone (GH) therapy in children with PWS improves, but does not normalize, body composition and muscle strength and agility. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of earlier GH therapy on anthropometric measurements, body composition, and psychomotor development in affected PWS infants and toddlers. Twenty-five subjects, ages 4-37 months, were randomized to 2 years of GH therapy (1 mg/m(2)/day) or 1 year of observation without GH treatment and then placed on GH (1.5 mg/m(2).day) for 1 year only. Anthropometric measurements were obtained by standard methods: percent body fat, lean body mass, and total body bone mineral density by dual x-ray absorptiometry; motor constructs of mobility and stability by the Toddler Infant Motor Evaluation; and cognitive and language function by the Capute Scales of Infant Language and Cognitive Development. GH-treated PWS subjects demonstrated normalization of length/height standard deviation scores (SDS), faster head growth, increased lean body mass accrual, and decreased percent body fat (P < 0.005 for all parameters), as well as improved language (P = 0.05) and cognitive (P = 0.02) quotient Z-scores compared with similarly aged untreated PWS subjects after 1 year into the study. PWS subjects treated before their first birthday spoke their first words at a mean age of 14.4 +/- 2.8 months and walked independently at 23.3 +/- 4.8 months. GH therapy was well-tolerated; however, one PWS subject experienced scoliosis progression. As greater benefits were seen in our study with early treatment, prompt referral to a pediatric endocrinologist for consideration of GH therapy is recommended for PWS at an early age. PMID:17103437

  16. Growth and growth hormone: An overview.

    PubMed

    Teran, Enrique; Chesner, Jaclyn; Rapaport, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Growth is a good indicator of a child's health. Growth disturbances, including short stature or growth failure, could be indications of illnesses such as chronic disease, nutritional deficits, celiac disease or hormonal abnormalities. Therefore, a careful assessment of the various requirements for normal growth needs to be done by history, physical examination, and screening laboratory tests. More details will be reviewed about the GH-IGF axis, its abnormalities with special emphasis on GH deficiency, its diagnosis and treatment. GH treatment indications in the US will be reviewed and a few only will be highlighted. They will include GH deficiency, as well as the treatment of children born SGA, including the results of a US study using FDA approved dose of 0.48mg/kg/week. GH deficiency in adults will also be briefly reviewed. Treatment of patients with SHOX deficiency will also be discussed. Possible side effects of GH treatment and the importance of monitoring safety will be highlighted. PMID:26936284

  17. Micronutrient deficiencies. Reports from the field -- Africa.

    PubMed

    Boulet, M

    1997-01-01

    Table salt can now be fortified with iodine and iron without interaction and without loss of potency. According to Levente Diosady, professor of Food Engineering at the University of Toronto, the amounts of the two micronutrients available to the human body have been significantly reduced when the two interacted. In the new technology, the iodine is covered with a dextrin (a water soluble starch) capsule that serves as a physical barrier to the iron. Micronutrient Initiative (an international secretariat based at IDRC that works to eliminate health problems resulting from iron, iodine, and vitamin A deficiencies) and IDRC supported the development of the technology. The efficiency of absorption of the two micronutrients in the new double fortified salt in the human body is being tested at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. Later testing will be conducted by University of Ghana scientists in IDRC-funded trials that will focus on women and their families in areas of Ghana where these deficiencies are endemic. Iodine is part of thyroid hormone, which contributes to brain development in the fetus and regulates human metabolism; iodine deficiency is the most frequent cause of preventable mental retardation. Related disorders include lethargy, physical disabilities, goiter, stillbirth, and neonatal death. Iron deficiency, the most common nutritional problem in the world (particularly among women, infants, and children), is associated with anemia, fatigue, learning problems, pregnancy complications, premature births, and maternal mortality. The two deficiencies together affect more than one-third of the world's population. Approximately 1.6 billion people, in more than 100 countries, live in areas where iodine is not available in sufficient amounts; those most at risk include about one-third of China's population. It is also a severe problem in the Himalayas, the Andes, India, and West Africa.

  18. Evidence that sensitivity to growth hormone (GH) is growth period and tissue type dependent: studies in GH-deficient lit/lit mice.

    PubMed

    Kasukawa, Yuji; Baylink, David J; Guo, Rongqing; Mohan, Subburaman

    2003-09-01

    We previously found that the magnitude of skeletal deficits caused by GH deficiency varied during different growth periods. To test the hypothesis that the sensitivity to GH is growth period dependent, we treated GH-deficient lit/lit mice with GH (4 mg/kg body weight.d) or vehicle during the prepubertal and pubertal (d 7-34), pubertal (d 23-34), postpubertal (d 42-55), and adult (d 204-217) periods and evaluated GH effects on the musculoskeletal system by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography. GH treatment during different periods significantly increased total body bone mineral content, bone mineral density (BMD), bone area, and lean body mass and decreased percentage of fat compared with vehicle; however, the magnitude of change varied markedly depending on the treatment period. For example, the increase in total body BMD was significantly (P < 0.01) greater when GH was administered between d 42-55 (15%) compared with pubertal (8%) or adult (7.7%) periods, whereas the net loss in percentage of body fat was greatest (-56%) when GH was administered between d 204 and 216 and least (-27%) when GH was administered between d 7 and 35. To determine whether GH-induced anabolic effects on the musculoskeletal system are maintained after GH withdrawal, we performed DEXA measurements 3-7 wk after stopping GH treatment. The increases in total body bone mineral content, BMD, and lean body mass, but not the decrease in body fat, were sustained after GH withdrawal. Our findings demonstrate that the sensitivity to GH in target tissues is growth period and tissue type dependent and that continuous GH treatment is necessary to maintain body fat loss but not BMD gain during a 3-7 wk follow-up.

  19. Determinants of Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Cohort of Children Aged 6-71 Months Living in the Northeast of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Francisca Helena Calheiros; da Silva, Camilo Adalton Mariano; Bonomo, Élido; Teixeira, Romero Alves; Pereira, Cíntia Aparecida de Jesus; dos Santos, Karina Benatti; Fausto, Maria Arlene; Negrão-Correa, Deborah Aparecida; Lamounier, Joel Alves; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide. The aim was to identify the prevalence and incidence of anemia in children and to identify predictors of this condition, including intestinal parasites, social, nutritional and environmental factors, and comorbidities. A population-based cohort study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 6-71 months living in Novo Cruzeiro in the Minas Gerais State. Data were collected in 2008 and 2009 by interview and included socio-economic and demographic information about the children and their families. Blood samples were collected for testing of hemoglobin, ferritin and C-reactive protein. Anthropometric measurements and parasitological analyses of fecal samples were performed. To identify risk factors associated with anemia multivariate analyses were performed using the generalized estimating equations (GEE). In 2008 and 2009, respectively, the prevalence rates of anemia were 35.9% (95%CI 31.2-40.8) and 9.8% (95%CI 7.2-12.9), the prevalence rates of iron deficiency were 18.4% (95%CI 14.7-22.6) and 21.8% (95%CI 17.8-26.2), and the incidence rates of anemia and iron deficiency were 3.2% and 21.8%. The following risk factors associated with anemia were: iron deficiency (OR = 3.2; 95%CI 2.0-.5.3), parasitic infections (OR = 1.9; 95%CI 1.2-2.8), being of risk of or being a low length/height-for-age (OR = 2.1; 95%CI 1.4-3.2), and lower retinol intake (OR = 1.7; 95%CI 1.1-2.7), adjusted over time. Nutritional factors, parasitic infections and chronic malnutrition were identified as risk factors for anemia. These factors can be verified in a chronic process and have been classically described as risk factors for these conditions.

  20. Understanding clinical investigations in children's endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kate; Collin, Jacqueline

    2015-10-01

    Children and young people referred to paediatric endocrinology services present with a wide range of illnesses and disorders varying from minor to life-threatening conditions. This article introduces the role of the children's endocrine nurse in caring for children and families undergoing investigations that are frequently undertaken to identify specific problems associated with pituitary, adrenal and thyroid glands. Although children with endocrine problems may be cared for in specialist centres, they may also present, for other health reasons, in secondary and primary care. In schools some children may need teachers to administer emergency medication. There is a high incidence of children diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency and an even higher incidence of congenital hypothyroidism. These children would benefit from health professionals having a broader understanding of their conditions. This article--the third in the endocrinology nursing series--aims to disseminate information and educate colleagues in children's nursing to raise the profile of children with long-term endocrine conditions.

  1. Seven years of follow up of trabecular bone score, bone mineral density, body composition and quality of life in adults with growth hormone deficiency treated with rhGH replacement in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Allo Miguel, Gonzalo; Serraclara Plá, Alicia; Partida Muñoz, Myriam Lorena; Martínez Díaz-Guerra, Guillermo; Hawkins, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is characterized by impaired physical activity, diminished quality of life (QoL), weight and fat mass gain, decreased muscle mass and decreased bone mineral density (BMD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term treatment (7 years) with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on metabolic parameters, body composition (BC), BMD, bone microarchitecture and QoL. Patients and Methods: In this prospective study, BMD and BC were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Bone microarchitecture was assessed with the trabecular bone score (TBS). The QoL-AGHDA test was used to assess QoL. Results: A total of 18 AGHD patients (mean age, 37.39 ± 12.42) were included. Body weight and body mass index (BMI) showed a significant increase after 7 years (p = 0.03 and p = 0.001, respectively). There was a significant tendency of body fat mass (BFM) (p = 0.028) and lean body mass (LBM) (p = 0.005) to increase during the 7 years of rhGH treatment. There was a significant increase in lumbar spine (LS) BMD (p = 0.01). TBS showed a nonsignificant decrease after 7 years of treatment, with a change of -0.86% ± 1.95. QoL showed a large and significant improvement (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Long-term rhGH treatment in AGHD patients induces a large and sustained improvement in QoL. Metabolic effects are variable with an increase in LBM as well as in BMI and BFM. There is a positive effect on BMD based on the increase in LS BMD, which stabilizes during long-term therapy and is not associated with a similar increase in bone microarchitecture. PMID:27293538

  2. Kenyan school children have multiple micronutrient deficiencies, but increased plasma vitamin B-12 is the only detectable micronutrient response to meat or milk supplementation.

    PubMed

    Siekmann, Jonathan H; Allen, Lindsay H; Bwibo, Nimrod O; Demment, Montague W; Murphy, Suzanne P; Neumann, Charlotte G

    2003-11-01

    Animal source foods (ASF) can provide micronutrients in greater amounts and more bioavailable forms compared to plant source foods, but their intake is low in many poor populations. However, the impact of ASF on micronutrient status of undernourished populations has not been assessed. Supplemental meat (60-85 g/d), milk (200-250 mL/d) or energy (isocaloric with the meat and milk, 240-300 kcal/d) were randomly assigned to 555 undernourished school children aged 5-14 y in a rural malaria-endemic area of Kenya, at one school meal daily for one school year. Blood and stool samples were collected at baseline and after 1 y to assess stool parasites, malaria, hemoglobin, serum or plasma C-reactive protein, ferritin, iron, zinc, copper, vitamin B-12, folate and retinol, and erythrocyte riboflavin. At baseline, there was a high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies (iron, zinc, vitamins A and B-12 and riboflavin), yet plasma ferritin was low in few children, and none had low serum copper. At the end of the year of supplementation, plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations were significantly increased in children fed the Meat or Milk meal; prevalence of severe plus moderate deficiency fell from 80.7% at baseline to 64.1% in the Meat group and from 71.6 to 45.1% in the Milk group, respectively. No significant improvement was observed in the status of other micronutrients compared to the Energy and Control groups, although malaria and other infections may have obscured effects. Supplementation with small amounts of meat or milk reduced the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency in these children.

  3. Effect of growth hormone (hGH) replacement therapy on physical work capacity and cardiac and pulmonary function in patients with hGH deficiency acquired in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nass, R; Huber, R M; Klauss, V; Müller, O A; Schopohl, J; Strasburger, C J

    1995-02-01

    The effects of 6 months of replacement therapy with recombinant human GH (hGH) on physical work capacity and cardiac structure and function were investigated in 20 patients with hGH deficiency of adult onset in a double blind, placebo-controlled trial. The GH dose of 12.5 micrograms/kg BW was self-administered daily sc. Oxygen consumption (VO2), CO2 production, and ventilatory volumes were measured during exercise on a bicycle spiroergometer. M-Mode echocardiography was performed using standard techniques. The VO2 max data, expressed per kg BW (mL/min.kg BW) showed a significant increase from 23.2 +/- 2.4 to 30.0 +/- 2.3 (P < 0.01) in the hGH-treated group, whereas the VO2 max data, expressed per lean body mass (milliliters per min/kg lean body mass) did not change significantly in either group. Maximal O2 pulse (milliliters per beat) increased significantly from 15.2 +/- 5.6 to 19.6 +/- 3.3 mL/beat (P < 0.01), but remained constant in the placebo group. The maximal power output (watts +/- SE) increased significantly (P < 0.01) from 192.5 +/- 13.5 to 227.5 +/- 11.5 in the hGH-treated group, but remained constant in the placebo group. Cardiac structure (left ventricular posterior wall, interventricular septum thickness, left ventricular mass, left ventricular end-systolic dimension, and left ventricular end-diastolic dimension) as well as echocardiographically assessed cardiac function did not change significantly after 6 months of treatment in either group. We conclude that hGH replacement in hGH-deficient adults improves oxygen uptake and exercise capacity. These improvements in pulmonary parameters might be due to an increase in respiratory muscle strength and partly to the changes in muscle volume per se observed during hGH replacement therapy. Furthermore, an increased cardiac output might contribute to the improvement in exercise performance during hGH treatment. According to our data, hGH replacement therapy leads to an improvement of exercise capacity and

  4. Favism, the commonest form of severe hemolytic anemia in Palestinian children, varies in severity with three different variants of G6PD deficiency within the same community.

    PubMed

    Reading, N Scott; Sirdah, Mahmoud M; Shubair, Mohammad E; Nelson, Benjamin E; Al-Kahlout, Mustafa S; Al-Tayeb, Jamal M; Aboud, Lina N; Shaban, Maysaa Abu; Luzzatto, Lucio; Prchal, Josef T

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common genetic abnormality known to predispose to acute hemolytic anemia (AHA), which can be triggered by certain drugs or infection. However, the commonest trigger is fava beans (Vicia faba) ingestion, causing AHA (favism), which may be life-threatening especially in children. G6PD deficiency is genetically highly heterogeneous, as nearly 200 different mutations have been observed. We have investigated the hematological features of acute favism in the Palestinian Gaza community that is characterized by the polymorphic coexistence of three different G6PD deficiency genes (G6PD A-, G6PD Cairo, G6PD Med). We have found by comparison to the general population (485 adults and 466 newborns) that children with favism, in terms of relative frequency, G6PD A- was under-represented, whereas G6PD Med was over-represented. We also found that the severity of anemia was significantly greater with G6PD Med and G6PD Cairo than with G6PD A-; and with G6PD Cairo, compared to the other two variants, there was greater hyperbilirubinemia, as well as persistence of mild anemia and reticulocytosis for as long as 4months after recovery from favism. This is the first report determining a differential impact of different G6PD mutations on the clinical features of favism in the same population and the same environment. PMID:27519946

  5. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone therapy on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolisms of children with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weibin; Li, Shuxian; Shen, Qiong; Guo, Xiuxia; Rong, Huijuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolisms of Turner syndrome (TS). Metho d s: Total 45 patients with TS admitted between Jul. 2008 and Jun. 2011 were involved in this study. All patients received the clinical evaluation of body fat, plasma lipids, proteins and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before and after rhGH therapy. Results : Our results indicated a significant decrease of body fat (FAT%) from 23.56±4.21 to 18.71±2.23 but no obvious change on the level of fat mass (FM) (p>0.05) was observed after rhGH therapy. We also detected significant changes on plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) from (1.65±0.58 mmol/L) to (2.20±0.65 mmol/L) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDH-C) from (2.55±0.55 mmol/L) to (2.10±0.54 mmol/L) after rhGH exposure. However, no statistical significance was detected on the level of plasma triglyceride (TG), cholesterol (CHO). Interestingly, the levels of plasma retinol binding protein (RbP) (32.55±4.28mg/L), transferrin (TRF) (2.95±0.40 mg/L), serum albumin (PRE) (250.00±45.50 mg/L) and albumin (propagated) (33.58±4.25 mg/L) were significantly increased. When it goes to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) test, there were 10 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) cases among all patients before and after rhGH therapy. No significant change was observed on homeostasis model assessment- insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) level during rhGH intervention. Conclusion : Abnormal lipid and protein metabolisms of the children with TS can be improved with rhGH therapy for 6 months. PMID:25097506

  6. Sex Differences in Somatotrope Dependency on Leptin Receptors in Young Mice: Ablation of LEPR Causes Severe Growth Hormone Deficiency and Abdominal Obesity in Males.

    PubMed

    Allensworth-James, Melody L; Odle, Angela; Haney, Anessa; Childs, Gwen

    2015-09-01

    Leptin receptor (LEPR) signaling controls appetite and energy expenditure. Somatotrope-specific deletion of the LEPRb signaling isoform causes GH deficiency and obesity. The present study selectively ablated Lepr exon 1 in somatotropes, which removes the signal peptide, causing the loss of all isoforms of LEPR. Excision of Lepr exon 1 was restricted to the pituitary, and mutant somatotropes failed to respond to leptin. Young (2-3 mo) males showed a severe 84% reduction in serum GH levels and more than 60% reduction in immunolabeled GH cells compared with 41%-42% reductions in GH and GH cells in mutant females. Mutant males (35 d) and females (45 d) weighed less than controls and males had lower lean body mass. Image analysis of adipose tissue by magnetic resonance imaging showed that young males had a 2-fold increase in abdominal fat mass and increased adipose tissue density. Young females had only an overall increase in adipose tissue. Both males and females showed lower energy expenditure and higher respiratory quotient, indicating preferential carbohydrate burning. Young mutant males slept less and were more restless during the dark phase, whereas the opposite was true of females. The effects of a Cre-bearing sire on his non-Cre-recombinase bearing progeny are seen by increased respiratory quotient and reduced litter sizes. These studies elucidate clear sex differences in the extent to which somatotropes are dependent on all isoforms of LEPR. These results, which were not seen with the ablation of Lepr exon 17, highlight the severe consequences of ablation of LEPR in male somatotropes. PMID:26168341

  7. α-Thalassemia frequency and mutations in children with hypochromic microcytic anemias and relation with β-thalassemia, iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Huseyin; Hanimeli, Ozlem; Karaca, Ozlem; Taneli, Fatma

    2012-04-01

    The majority of the anemias during childhood are hypochromic and microcytic. The aim of the present study was to determine the status of α-thalassemia mutations and its association with other etiologies, such as iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait, that are frequently seen hypochromic microcytic anemias in children. Children with hypochromic microcytic anemias were included in the study. Serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin levels, and hemoglobin electrophoresis with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method were analyzed. Reverse hybridization of biotinylated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product method was used for detection of α-globin gene mutations. Of the 46 patients involved in the study, 54.3% (n = 25) were boys, and 45.7% (n = 21) were girls. Iron deficiency anemia and β-thalassemia trait were diagnosed in 67.4% (n = 31) and 19.5% (n = 9), respectively. In 17.4% there were α-thalassemia mutations (in 10.9% 3.7 single-gene heterozygote mutation, in 4.3% 20.5-kb double-gene deletion mutation, and in 2.2% α-2 poly-A-1 heterozygote mutation was detected). In 2 patients (4.3%) no etiology was determined. In 2 patients (4.3%) association between iron deficiency anemia and α-thalassemia, in 1 patient (2.2%) association between β and α-thalassemia was detected. In conclusion, α-thalassemia carrier status and its association with other etiologies are frequently seen in Manisa. So, α-thalassemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypochromic microcytic anemias, especially in cases without iron deficiency (ID) and β-thalassemia carrier state.

  8. DNA methylation of LINE-1 and Alu repetitive elements in relation to sex hormones and pubertal timing in Mexican-American children

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Karen; Harley, Kim; Kogut, Katherine; Rauch, Stephen; Eskenazi, Brenda; Holland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms linking environmental exposures to earlier pubertal development are not well characterized. Epigenetics may play an important role, but data on the relationship between epigenetic marks and puberty, particularly in humans, is limited. Methods We used pyrosequencing to measure Alu and long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) methylation in DNA isolated from whole blood samples collected from newborns and 9-year-old children (n=266). Tanner staging was completed six times between ages 9 and 12 years to determine pubertal status, and hormone levels were measured in 12-year-old boys. Results Among girls, we observed a suggestive trend of increased odds of breast and pubic hair development with higher Alu and LINE-1 methylation in 9-year-old blood, respectively. The strongest association identified was an inverse association of LINE-1 methylation in 9-year-old girls with odds of experiencing menarche by age 12 (OR(95%CI): 0.63(0.46,0.87); p=0.005). We observed a consistent inverse relationship for Alu and LINE-1 methylation at 9 years with luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone and follicle stimulating hormone levels in boys but it was only significant between LINE-1 and LH. Conclusion DNA methylation of Alu and LINE-1 may be involved in puberty initiation and development. This relationship should be confirmed in future studies. PMID:26882368

  9. Growth hormone therapy and craniofacial bones: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Litsas, G

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has significant effects on linear bone growth, bone mass and bone metabolism. The primary role of GH supplementation in children with GH deficiency, those born small for gestational age or with other types of disorders in somatic development is to increase linear growth. However, GH therapy seems to elicit varying responses in the craniofacial region. Whereas the effects of GH administration on somatic development are well documented, comparatively little is known of its effects on the craniofacial region. The purpose of this review was to search the literature and compile results from both animal and human studies related to the impact of GH on craniofacial growth.

  10. Growth hormone deficiency in 'little' mice results in aberrant body composition, reduced insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), but does not affect IGFBP-2, -1 or -4.

    PubMed

    Donahue, L R; Beamer, W G

    1993-01-01

    Although GH is known to regulate somatic growth during development, its role in regulating adult body composition is less well defined. The effects of GH on individual body compartments--water, fat, protein and mineral--are achieved both by the action of GH and by a GH-induced hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). We used a genetic model of GH deficiency, the 'little' (gene symbol lit) mouse, to determine the GH regulation of IGF-I and its insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) and to define the interaction between these hormones and each body compartment in adults. Our results showed that GH-deficient lit/lit mice had reduced levels of serum IGF-I (range 38-130 micrograms/l) compared with normal lit/+ littermates (range 432-567 micrograms/l) between 2 and 52 weeks of age. The lit/lit mice did not experience the fivefold increase in IGF-I between 2 and 4 weeks of age that was seen in lit/+ mice. In lit/lit serum, overall binding of 125I-labelled IGF-I to the four IGFBPs was reduced, solely in response to a reduced amount of IGFBP-3. No overall differences were found between lit/lit and lit/+ mice in the binding of 125I-labelled IGF-I to IGFBP-2, -1 or -4. Age-related declines in IGF-I and IGFBPs were seen in lit/lit mice. However, adult levels of IGF-I were maintained in lit/+ mice to at least 52 weeks of age, as were levels of IGFBP-1 and -4, while IGFBP-3 and -2 declined with age. With respect to body composition, comparison of lit/lit with lit/+ mice showed that the lit/lit mice were characterized by abnormally large adipose tissue stores and reduced body water, protein and mineral from 2 weeks onward. These changes occurred despite normal energy intake in lit/lit mice up to 52 weeks of age, indicating that neither undernutrition nor hyperphagia is characteristic of this GH-induced model of obesity. Furthermore, lit/lit males accrued more body fat beginning at an earlier age than lit/lit females. With advancing age, the per cent body fat

  11. Profile of mecasermin for the long-term treatment of growth failure in children and adolescents with severe primary IGF-1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fintini, Danilo; Brufani, Claudia; Cappa, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHI) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) deficiency (IGFD) is characterized by deficit of IGF-1 production due to alteration of response of growth hormone (GH) receptor to GH. This syndrome is due to mutation of GH receptor or IGF-1 gene and patients affected showed no response to GH therapy. The only treatment is recombinant IGF-1 (mecasermin), which has been available since 1986, but approved in the United States by the US Food and Drug Administration only in 2005 and in Europe by the European Medicines Agency in 2007. To date, few studies are available on long-term treatment with mecasermin in IGFD patients and some of them have a very small number of subjects. In this review we discuss briefly clinical features of severe primary IGFD, laboratory findings, and indications for treatment. Results of long-term therapy with rhIGF1 (mecasermin) in patients affected by severe primary IGFD and possible side effects are explained. PMID:19707272

  12. Diagnosis of GH deficiency: auxologic and GH response criteria.

    PubMed

    Dash, R J; Pathmanathan, G; Prakash, S; Saini, J S

    1991-01-01

    Health providers examining children of short stature should assess adequacy of growth, determine growth rate, and predict final height with treatment. They can use established standards of growth to compare the child's height with that of other children of the same age to assess growth normalcy. If the child's height is lower than the 3rd/5th percentiles, the health provider must also determine whether the growth velocity is 3 cm/year by following the child for 6 months to 1 year, and whether retardation of skeletal maturity is of more than 2 bone age years to confirm abnormal growth. while the child is being followed for growth velocity, the health provider should prescribe a balanced nutritious diet. If these conditions are met and the child exhibits facial characteristics of growth hormone (GH) deficiency, central obesity, unusually small lower jaw, and prepuberal sex characteristics and behavior after usual age of puberty, the health provider can diagnose GH deficiency. 17% of children of short stature in a certain area of India have GH deficiency. The actual height, chronological age, and bone age are needed to predict the final adult height to monitor the impact of GH therapy. GH levels of less than 7 ng/ml in children not suffering from protein malnutrition suggest total GH deficiency. GH measurements must be done over 24 hours, since GH secretion is pulsatile. Sleep, exercise, and intravenous infusion of 0.5 g/kg body weight of arginine stimulates GH secretion. The most common pharmacologic tests to determine GH secretory status include insulin hypoglycemia and clonidine. Clonidine induces fewer side effects and is more safe than insulin hypoglycemia. Since a child can secrete normal amounts of GH with insulin hypoglycemia, the health provider should conduct 1 physiologic (sleep/exercise) test and 1-2 pharmacologic tests to diagnose GH deficiency.

  13. Design of, and first data from, PATRO Children, a multicentre, noninterventional study of the long-term efficacy and safety of Omnitrope® in children requiring growth hormone treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pfäffle, Roland; Schwab, Karl Otfried; Marginean, Otilia; Walczak, Mieczyslaw; Szalecki, Mieczyslaw; Schuck, Ellen; Zucchini, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the rationale, design and first data from PATRO Children, a postmarketing surveillance of the long-term efficacy and safety of somatropin (Omnitrope®) for the treatment of children requiring growth hormone treatment. Methods: PATRO Children is a multicentre, open, longitudinal, noninterventional study being conducted in children’s hospitals and specialised endocrinology clinics. The primary objective is to assess the long-term safety of Omnitrope® in routine clinical practice. Eligible patients are infants, children and adolescents (male or female) who are receiving treatment with Omnitrope® and who have provided informed consent. Patients who have been treated with another recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) product before starting Omnitrope® are eligible for inclusion. All adverse events (AEs) are monitored and recorded, with particular emphasis on: long-term safety; the recording of malignancies; the occurrence and clinical impact of anti-hGH antibodies; the development of diabetes during Omnitrope® treatment in children short for gestational age (SGA); safety issues in patients with Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS). Efficacy assessments include auxological parameters, plus insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3. Results: As of September 2012, 1837 patients were enrolled in the study from 184 sites in 10 European countries. To date, efficacy data are reassuring and consistent with previous studies. In addition, there have been no confirmed cases of diabetes occurring under Omnitrope® treatment, no reports of malignancy and no safety issues in PWS patients. Conclusions: The efficacy and safety profile of Omnitrope® in the PATRO Children study so far are as expected. The ongoing study will extend the safety database for Omnitrope®, and rhGH products more generally, in paediatric indications. Of particular interest, PATRO Children will add important information on the diabetogenic potential of

  14. Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone and Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Co-Secreting Tumors in Children and Adolescents Causing Cushing Syndrome: A Diagnostic Dilemma and How to Solve It

    PubMed Central

    Karageorgiadis, Alexander S.; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Biro, Juliana; Keil, Meg F.; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Quezado, Martha M.; Merino, Maria; Schrump, David S.; Kebebew, Electron; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Hunter, Maya K.; Alwazeer, Mouhammad R.; Karaviti, Lefkothea P.; Balazs, Andrea E.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Ectopic ACTH/CRH syndrome is a rare cause of Cushing syndrome (CS), especially in children. The localization, work-up, and management of ACTH/CRH-secreting tumors are discussed. Setting: A retrospective study was conducted of patients under 21 years of age evaluated at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for CS and diagnosed with ectopic ACTH/CRH-secreting tumors during the period 2009–2014. Patients: Seven patients with ectopic ACTH/CRH CS are included in this study with a median age 13.6 years (range 1–21), and 3 are female. Measurements: Clinical, biochemical, radiological features, treatment, and histological findings are described. Results: Seven patients were found to have ACTH/CRH-secreting tumors, all with neuroendocrine features. The site of the primary lesion varied: pancreas (3), thymus (2), liver (1), right lower pulmonary lobe (1). Patients underwent biochemical evaluation for CS, including diurnal serum cortisol and ACTH levels, urinary free cortisol levels (UFC), and CRH stimulation tests. All patients underwent radiological investigations including MRI, CT, and PET scan; imaging with octreotide and 68 gallium DOTATATE scans were performed in individual cases. Five patients underwent inferior petrosal sinus sampling; 4 patients had sampling for ACTH and CRH levels from additional sites. Three patients underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS), and 3 patients required bilateral adrenalectomy. Three patients (43%) died due to metastatic disease, demonstrating the high mortality rate. One of the unique findings in these seven patients is that in each case, their neuroendocrine tumors were ultimately proven to be co-secreting ACTH and CRH. This explains the enigmatic presentation, in which 3 patients initially thought to have Cushing's disease (CD) with corresponding pituitary hyperplasia underwent TSS prior to the correct localization of the causative tumor. Conclusions: Ectopic ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumors are extremely rare in children

  15. Long-chain n-3 PUFA supplementation decreases physical activity during class time in iron-deficient South African school children.

    PubMed

    Smuts, Cornelius M; Greeff, Jani; Kvalsvig, Jane; Zimmermann, Michael B; Baumgartner, Jeannine

    2015-01-28

    Both Fe deficiency and poor n-3 fatty acid status have been associated with behavioural changes in children. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Fe and DHA+EPA supplementation, alone or in combination, on physical activity during school days and on teacher-rated behaviour in healthy Fe-deficient school children. In a 2 × 2 factorial design, children (n 98, 6-11 years) were randomly assigned to receive (1) Fe (50 mg) plus DHA (420 mg)+EPA (80 mg), (2) Fe plus placebo, (3) placebo plus DHA+EPA or (4) placebo plus placebo as oral supplements (4 d/week) for 8.5 months. Physical activity was measured during four school days at baseline and endpoint using accelerometers, and data were stratified into morning class time (08.00-10.29 hours), break time (10.30-11.00 hours) and after-break class time (11.01-12.00 hours) for analysis. Classroom behaviour was assessed at endpoint using Conners' Teacher Rating Scales. DHA+EPA supplementation decreased physical activity counts during morning class time, increased sedentary physical activity, and decreased light- and moderate-intensity physical activities. Consistently, DHA+EPA supplementation increased sedentary physical activity and decreased light-intensity physical activity during after-break class time. Even though there were no treatment effects found on teacher-rated behaviour, lower physical activity during morning class time was associated with lower levels of teacher-rated hyperactivity and oppositional behaviour at endpoint. Despite a positive association between Fe status and physical activity during break time at baseline, Fe supplementation did not affect physical activity during break time and class time. Our findings suggest that DHA+EPA supplementation may decrease physical activity levels during class time, and further indicate that accelerometry might be a useful tool to assess classroom behaviour in healthy children.

  16. Whole cowpea meal fortified with NaFeEDTA reduces iron deficiency among Ghanaian school children in a malaria endemic area.

    PubMed

    Abizari, Abdul-Razak; Moretti, Diego; Zimmermann, Michael B; Armar-Klemesu, Margaret; Brouwer, Inge D

    2012-10-01

    Cowpeas, like other legumes, contain high amounts of native iron but are rich in phytic acid (PA) and polyphenols (PP) that inhibit iron absorption. NaFeEDTA may overcome the combined inhibitory effect of PA and PP. Our objective was to test the efficacy of NaFeEDTA-fortified cowpea meal in improving iron status of school children in a malaria endemic area. We conducted a double-blind, controlled trial with 5- to 12-y-old school children from 2 rural communities in northern Ghana (n = 241). Eligible children were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups to receive either cowpea meal fortified with 10 mg Fe/meal as NaFeEDTA, or an identical but nonfortified cowpea meal. Meals were provided 3 d/wk for a period of ~7 mo under strict supervision. Mass deworming and malaria antigenemia screening and treatment were carried out at baseline and 3.5 mo into the trial. Consumption of cowpea flour fortified with NaFeEDTA resulted in improvement of hemoglobin (P < 0.05), serum ferritin (P < 0.001), and body iron stores (P < 0.001) and reduction of transferrin receptor (P < 0.001) compared with nonfortified flour. Fortification resulted in a 30 and 47% reduction in the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) (P < 0.05), respectively. The results indicate that fortification of cowpea flour with NaFeEDTA overcomes the combined inhibitory effect of PA and PP and, when used for targeted school-based fortification of cowpea flour, is effective in reducing the prevalence of ID and IDA among school children in malaria endemic rural northern Ghana.

  17. Vitamin d deficiency in Saudi Arabs.

    PubMed

    Elsammak, M Y; Al-Wosaibi, A A; Al-Howeish, A; Alsaeed, J

    2010-05-01

    Vitamin D plays a critical role in bone metabolism and many cellular and immunological processes. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with various chronic diseases especially rickets in children and osteoporosis in adults. Adequate vitamin D intake is of paramount importance to protect against bone metabolic diseases and prevent the occurrence of complications (e. g., fracture and bone pains). This study aimed at the evaluation of vitamin D levels in a cohort of healthy Saudi Arabs. The comprised 139 healthy subjects coming for regular blood donation. Participants had full clinical examination and evaluation of their calcium and vitamin D intake and the degree of exposure to sunlight. Serum 25-OH vitamin D was determined using Liasion chemiluminescent immunoassay and serum parathormone levels were determined using the Architect 2,000 immunochemiluminescent assay. Our results showed increased prevalence of vitamin D deficiency between Saudi Arabs (both males and females) in the studied group of subjects. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) did not correlate with serum vitamin D level in either male or female groups (p<0.01). Our data illustrate a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency between Saudi Arabs and the importance for screening for vitamin D deficiency (irrespective of PTH level). We hypothesize that the reported vitamin D deficiency in the studied group of Saudi Arabs may reflect a possible inadequacy of the current level of vitamin D fortification of food products. We suggest that higher level of fortification of food products with vitamin D may be needed to compensate for the reduced skin vitamin D synthesis due to poor exposure to sunlight and to reverse this state of vitamin D deficiency in Saudi Arabs.

  18. Prevalence and Predictors of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Children under Five Years of Age in Pakistan, A Secondary Analysis of National Nutrition Survey Data 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Muhammad Atif; Black, Kirsten; Soofi, Sajid Bashir; Hussain, Imtiaz; Bhatti, Zaid; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Raynes-Greenow, Camille

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency Anemia (IDA) in children is a recognized public health problem that impacts adversely on child morbidity, mortality and impairs cognitive development. In Pakistan information on the true prevalence and predictors of IDA is limited. This study sought to investigate IDA in children under five years of age using data from a nationally representative stratified cross-sectional survey. Methods Secondary analysis was performed on the National Nutrition Survey in Pakistan 2011–2012. We used a pre-structured instrument to collect socio demographic and nutritional data on mothers and children. We also collected Anthropometric measurements and blood samples for micronutrient deficiencies. IDA was defined as having both haemoglobin levels of <110 g/L and ferritin levels of < 12 μg/L. Data analysis was performed by applying univariate and multivariate techniques using logistic regression through SPSS. Findings A total of 7138 children aged between 6–59 months were included in the analysis. The prevalence of IDA was 33.2%. In multivariate regression analysis adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were calculated. Age < 24 months (AOR 1.40, 95% CI 1.18–1.55 p <0.05), stunting (AOR 1.42 CI 1.23–1.63 p<0.05), presence of clinical anemia (AOR 5.69 CI 4.93–6.56 p<0.05), having a mother with IDA (AOR 1.72 CI 1.47–2.01 p<0.05) and household food insecurity (AOR 1.20 CI 1.10–1.40 P<0.05) were associated with IDA. Living in a rural area (AOR 0.77 CI 0.65–0.90 p<0.05) and being a female child (AOR 0.87 CI 0.76–0.98 p<0.05) were associated with reduced odds of IDA. Conclusion The prevalence of IDA amongst Pakistani children represents a moderate burden that disproportionately affects the youngest, growth retarded children, affected children are more likely to have mothers with IDA and live in areas where food security is lacking. National efforts to alleviate the burden of IDA should involve both short term vertical programs such as iron supplementation

  19. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... diagnosis or management of GM3 synthase deficiency: American Epilepsy Society: Find a Doctor Clinic for Special Children ( ...

  20. Nutritional Iron Deficiency Anemia: Magnitude and Its Predictors among School Age Children, Southwest Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Desalegn, Amare; Mossie, Andualem; Gedefaw, Lealem

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a global public health problem among school age children, which retards psychomotor development and impairs cognitive performance. There is limited data on prevalence and risk factors for IDA. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, and predictors of nutritional IDA in school age children in Southwest Ethiopia. Methodology A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia from April to July 2013. A total of 616 school children aged 6 to 12 years were included in the study using multistage sampling technique. A structured questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic data. Five milliliter venous blood was collected from each child for hematological examinations. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin level lower than 11.5 g/dl and 12 g/dl for age group of 5–11 years and 12–15 years, respectively. Iron deficiency anemia was defined when serum iron and ferritin levels are below 10 µmol/l and 15 µg/dl, respectively. Moreover, fresh stool specimen was collected for diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infection. Stained thick and thin blood films were examined for detection of Plasmodium infection and study of red blood cell morphology. Dietary patterns of the study subjects were assessed using food frequency questionnaire and anthropometric measurements were done. Data were analyzed using SPSS V-20.0 for windows. Result Overall, prevalence of anemia was 43.7%, and that of IDA was 37.4%. Not-consuming protein source foods [AOR = 2.30, 95%CI(1.04,5.14)], not-consuming dairy products [AOR = 1.83, 95%CI(1.14,5.14)], not-consuming discretionary calories [AOR = 2.77, 95%CI(1.42,5.40)], low family income [AOR = 6.14, 95%CI(2.90,12.9)] and intestinal parasitic infections [AOR = 1.45, 95%CI(1.23, 5. 27)] were predictors of IDA. Conclusion Iron deficiency anemia is a moderate public health problem in the study site. Dietary deficiencies and

  1. Determinants of Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Cohort of Children Aged 6-71 Months Living in the Northeast of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Francisca Helena Calheiros; da Silva, Camilo Adalton Mariano; Bonomo, Élido; Teixeira, Romero Alves; Pereira, Cíntia Aparecida de Jesus; dos Santos, Karina Benatti; Fausto, Maria Arlene; Negrão-Correa, Deborah Aparecida; Lamounier, Joel Alves; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide. The aim was to identify the prevalence and incidence of anemia in children and to identify predictors of this condition, including intestinal parasites, social, nutritional and environmental factors, and comorbidities. A population-based cohort study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 6–71 months living in Novo Cruzeiro in the Minas Gerais State. Data were collected in 2008 and 2009 by interview and included socio-economic and demographic information about the children and their families. Blood samples were collected for testing of hemoglobin, ferritin and C-reactive protein. Anthropometric measurements and parasitological analyses of fecal samples were performed. To identify risk factors associated with anemia multivariate analyses were performed using the generalized estimating equations (GEE). In 2008 and 2009, respectively, the prevalence rates of anemia were 35.9% (95%CI 31.2–40.8) and 9.8% (95%CI 7.2–12.9), the prevalence rates of iron deficiency were 18.4% (95%CI 14.7–22.6) and 21.8% (95%CI 17.8–26.2), and the incidence rates of anemia and iron deficiency were 3.2% and 21.8%. The following risk factors associated with anemia were: iron deficiency (OR = 3.2; 95%CI 2.0-.5.3), parasitic infections (OR = 1.9; 95%CI 1.2–2.8), being of risk of or being a low length/height-for-age (OR = 2.1; 95%CI 1.4–3.2), and lower retinol intake (OR = 1.7; 95%CI 1.1–2.7), adjusted over time. Nutritional factors, parasitic infections and chronic malnutrition were identified as risk factors for anemia. These factors can be verified in a chronic process and have been classically described as risk factors for these conditions. PMID:26445270

  2. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management.

  3. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management. PMID:26435857

  4. Dental Considerations in Children with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (Favism): A Review of the Literature and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pérez, Daniela; Butrón-Téllez Girón, Claudia; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an uncommon inherited enzyme deficiency characterized by hemolytic anemia, caused by the inability of erythrocytes to detoxify oxidizing agents such as drugs, infectious diseases, or fava bean ingestion. In this later case, the disorder is known as favism. The aim of the present report was to present a review of the literature in this disease, to describe a case report concerning an affected 9-year-old male, and to review the main implications and precautions in pediatric dental management. PMID:26435857

  5. Seasonal variations in calcidiol and parathyroid hormone levels in healthy children and adolescents in Navarre, Spain: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Gallinas-Victoriano, Fidel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the seasonal variations in calcidiol and parathyroid hormone serum levels along a natural year in a paediatric population living in a region of the north of Spain considering a normal nutrition status. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Navarra Hospital Complex, Pamplona, Spain. Participants A total of 413 Caucasian individuals (aged 3.1 to 15.4 years): 227 school children (96 males and 131 females) and 186 adolescents (94 males and 92 females), with normal nutritional status. Main outcome measures Clinical examination (sex, age, weight, height and body mass index) and blood testing (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, calcidiol and parathyroid hormone) during the year 2014. Results Calcidiol levels were lower during spring (25.96 ± 6.64 ng/mL) and reached its maximum level in summer (35.33 ± 7.51 ng/mL); parathyroid hormone levels were lower in summer (27.13 ± 7.89 pg/mL) and reached maximum level in autumn (34.73 ± 15.38 pg/mL). Hypovitaminosis D prevalence was 14.3% in summer and 75.3% in spring. Parathyroid hormone levels were compatible with secondary hyperparathyroidism in eight individuals (1.9%). There is a correlation (p < 0.01) between calcidiol and parathyroid hormone (r = −0.336). Logistic regression showed significant increased risk of hypovitaminosis in females (OR:1.63) and adolescents (OR:1.77), and when blood samples taken in autumn (OR:12.22), winter (OR:8.54) and spring (OR:19.72). Conclusions There is a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in the paediatric population with a healthy nutrition situation in Navarre, mainly during the months of autumn and winter, and, especially, in spring time. Given the difficulties in maintaining a sufficient amount of body vitamin D content along the year, it should be considered to give vitamin supplements and/or increase the intake of its natural dietary sources or vitamin D fortified foods. PMID:27066262

  6. Comparaison des Patterns de Sommeil d'Enfants Deficients et d'Enfants Autistiques (Comparison of Sleep Patterns in Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Children with Autism).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubar, Jean-Claude; And Others

    Based on the hypothesis that cognition and sleep are linked, this study compared the sleep patterns of nine children (ages 6-16) with autism with those of children with mental retardation and no disabilities. The children with autism were observed for two consecutive nights at a laboratory where their sleep patterns were recorded. Results found…

  7. Growth hormone in musculoskeletal pain states.