Science.gov

Sample records for hormone responsive spot

  1. Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot14 enhances catalysis of fatty acid synthase in lactating mammary epithelium[S

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Michael C.; Wellberg, Elizabeth A.; Lewis, Andrew S.; Terrell, Kristina L.; Merz, Andrea L.; Maluf, N. Karl; Serkova, Natalie J.; Anderson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot 14 has been consistently associated with de novo fatty acid synthesis activity in multiple tissues, including the lactating mammary gland, which synthesizes large quantities of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) exclusively via FASN. However, the molecular function of Spot14 remains undefined during lactation. Spot14-null mice produce milk deficient in total triglyceride and de novo MCFA that does not sustain optimal neonatal growth. The lactation defect was rescued by provision of a high fat diet to the lactating dam. Transgenic mice overexpressing Spot14 in mammary epithelium produced total milk fat equivalent to controls, but with significantly greater MCFA. Spot14-null dams have no diminution of metabolic gene expression, enzyme protein levels, or intermediate metabolites that accounts for impaired de novo MCFA. When [13C] fatty acid products were quantified in vitro using crude cytosolic lysates, native FASN activity was 1.6-fold greater in control relative to Spot14-null lysates, and add back of Spot14 partially restored activity. Recombinant FASN catalysis increased 1.4-fold and C = 14:0 yield was enhanced 4-fold in vitro following addition of Spot14. These findings implicate Spot14 as a direct protein enhancer of FASN catalysis in the mammary gland during lactation when maximal MCFA production is needed. PMID:24771867

  2. Role of prolactin and luteinizing hormone in regulating timing of implantation in the spotted skunk.

    PubMed

    Berria, M; Joseph, M M; Mead, R A

    1989-02-01

    The western spotted skunk exhibits an obligate delay of implantation lasting 200-220 days. The pituitary is essential for luteal activation. The corpora lutea, in turn, secrete the hormones necessary for blastocyst implantation. Two experiments were designed to determine which pituitary hormones are responsible for increasing luteal activity and induction of implantation. Forty-two pregnant skunks with delayed implanting blastocysts were treated as follows: 13 served as untreated controls, 6 received 0.5 mg prolactin (PRL) daily, and 5 received diluent beginning in January. Four received 1.5 mg bromocriptine (CB-154) daily, 3 received both CB-154 and PRL, 3 received diluent, 5 received a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) dispensed from osmotic minipumps, and 3 received diluent dispensed from osmotic minipumps starting in April. The skunks were subjected to a natural photoperiod. Duration of preimplantation and blood levels of progesterone and luteinizing hormone were measured. PRL significantly (p less than 0.05) shortened and CB-154 significantly (p less than 0.05) prolonged the duration of preimplantation when compared to controls (148 +/- 33.6 vs. 251 +/- 3.2 vs. 199 +/- 5.1 days, respectively). PRL was able to reverse the inhibitory effect of CB-154 when both were administered simultaneously (195 +/- 4.0 vs. 251 +/- 3.2 days). GnRHa had no significant (p greater than 0.05) effect on duration of preimplantation (199 +/- 5.1 days) when compared to controls (203 +/- 3.2 days). These results indicate that PRL is the primary pituitary hormone responsible for increased luteal activity and subsequent blastocyst implantation in the spotted skunk.

  3. Modelling hormonal response and development☆

    PubMed Central

    Voß, Ute; Bishopp, Anthony; Farcot, Etienne; Bennett, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    As our knowledge of the complexity of hormone homeostasis, transport, perception, and response increases, and their outputs become less intuitive, modelling is set to become more important. Initial modelling efforts have focused on hormone transport and response pathways. However, we now need to move beyond the network scales and use multicellular and multiscale modelling approaches to predict emergent properties at different scales. Here we review some examples where such approaches have been successful, for example, auxin–cytokinin crosstalk regulating root vascular development or a study of lateral root emergence where an iterative cycle of modelling and experiments lead to the identification of an overlooked role for PIN3. Finally, we discuss some of the remaining biological and technical challenges. PMID:24630843

  4. Hormonal component of tumor photodynamic therapy response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush

    2008-02-01

    The involvement of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones in the response of the treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) comes from the induction of acute phase response by this modality. This adrenal gland activity is orchestrated through the engagement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal axis incited by stress signals emanating from the PDT-treated tumor. Glucocorticoid hormone activity engendered within the context of PDT-induced acute phase response performs multiple important functions; among other involvements they beget acute phase reactant production, systemic neutrophil mobilization, and control the production of inflammation-modulating and immunoregulatory proteins.

  5. Effects of prenatal treatment with antiandrogens on luteinizing hormone secretion and sex steroid concentrations in adult spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta.

    PubMed

    Place, Ned J; Holekamp, Kay E; Sisk, Cheryl L; Weldele, Mary L; Coscia, Elizabeth M; Drea, Christine M; Glickman, Stephen E

    2002-11-01

    Prenatal androgen treatment can alter LH secretion in female offspring, often with adverse effects on ovulatory function. However, female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta), renowned for their highly masculinized genitalia, are naturally exposed to high androgen levels in utero. To determine whether LH secretion in spotted hyenas is affected by prenatal androgens, we treated pregnant hyenas with antiandrogens (flutamide and finasteride). Later, adult offspring of the antiandrogen-treated (AA) mothers underwent a GnRH challenge to identify sex differences in the LH response and to assess the effects of prenatal antiandrogen treatment. We further considered the effects of blocking prenatal androgens on plasma sex steroid concentrations. To account for potential differences in the reproductive state of females, we suppressed endogenous hormone levels with a long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRHa) and then measured plasma androgens after an hCG challenge. Plasma concentrations of LH were sexually dimorphic in spotted hyenas, with females displaying higher levels than males. Prenatal antiandrogen treatment also significantly altered the LH response to GnRH. Plasma estradiol concentration was higher in AA-females, whereas testosterone and androstenedione levels tended to be lower. This trend toward lower androgen levels disappeared after GnRHa suppression and hCG challenge. In males, prenatal antiandrogen treatment had long-lasting effects on circulating androgens: AA-males had lower T levels than control males. The sex differences and effects of prenatal antiandrogens on LH secretion suggest that the anterior pituitary gland of the female spotted hyena is partially masculinized by the high androgen levels that normally occur during development, without adverse effects on ovulatory function.

  6. Hormonal and biochemical responses to transcendental meditation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R; Joffe, B I; Lamprey, J M; Botha, A; Shires, R; Baker, S G; Seftel, H C

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to assess whether transcendental meditation (TM) could influence various endocrine responses in 10 experienced male meditators. Nine matched subjects, uninformed of the TM procedure, acted as controls. Meditators successfully practised their technique for 40 min in the morning while controls relaxed for this period. No significant differences emerged between these 2 groups with respect to carbohydrate metabolism (plasma glucose, insulin and pancreatic glucagon concentrations), pituitary hormones (growth hormone and prolactin) or the 'stress' hormones, cortisol and total catecholamines-although meditators tended to have higher mean catecholamine levels. Plasma free fatty acids were significantly elevated in meditators 40 min after completing the period of TM. No clear evidence was thus obtained that any of the stress, or stress-related, hormones were suppressed during or after meditation in the particular setting examined.

  7. [Cloning and promoter analysis of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone Ⅱ in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yu-Shan; Zhu, Zuo-Yan; Hu, Wei

    2013-07-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproduction in all vertebrates. We first cloned the cDNA and genomic DNA sequences coding for GnRHⅡ gene in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelis coioides), an economically important marine fish, and then cloned its promoter sequence. The region responsible for the cell-specific expression of GnRHⅡ was located between -2005 bp to -956 bp from the translation start site. GnRHⅡ promoter driven EGFP expression in transgenic zebrafish showed that GnRHⅡ-positive neurons were primarily located in the midbrain and in the eyes. Our results provide an improved understanding of the regulatory mechanism and function of GnRHⅡ of E. coioides.

  8. Electrophysiological responses of osteoclasts to hormones.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, J; Ward, A; Kanehisa, J; Heersche, J N

    1986-07-01

    Electrophysiological measurements were carried out on osteoclasts in vitro. Such isolated osteoclasts are able to resorb bone in vitro and contract in response to calcitonin (CT). Our measurements show that individual osteoclasts respond to CT with a significant transient hyperpolarization of membrane potential. Application of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and dibutyryl cAMP produced a transient hyperpolarization in some osteoclasts. Measurements on an osteoblastlike line (ROS 17/2.8) showed a sustained hyperpolarizing response to CT, which is similar to but smaller than the hyperpolarizing response to PTH and dibutyryl cAMP in this and some other osteoblastlike lines. In contrast to osteoblastlike cells, the osteoclasts have no long term membrane potential response to CT, to PTH, or to dibutyryl cAMP. These results show that there are distinct differences between osteoclasts and osteoblasts in their ion transport responses to hormones.

  9. Demographic response of northern spotted owls to barred owl removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diller, V. Lowell; Hamm, Keith A; Early, Desiree A; Lamphear, David W; Katie Dugger,; Yackulic, Charles B.; Schwarz, Carl J.; Carlson, Peter C.; McDonald, Trent L.

    2016-01-01

    Federally listed as threatened in 1990 primarily because of habitat loss, the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) has continued to decline despite conservation efforts resulting in forested habitat being reserved throughout its range. Recently, there is growing evidence the congeneric invasive barred owl (Strix varia) may be responsible for the continued decline primarily by excluding spotted owls from their preferred habitat. We used a long-term demographic study for spotted owls in coastal northern California as the basis for a pilot barred owl removal experiment. Our demography study used capture–recapture, reproductive output, and territory occupancy data collected from 1990 to 2013 to evaluate trends in vital rates and populations. We used a classic before-after-control-impact (BACI) experimental design to investigate the demographic response of northern spotted owls to the lethal removal of barred owls. According to the best 2-species dynamic occupancy model, there was no evidence of differences in barred or northern spotted owl occupancy prior to the initiation of the treatment (barred owl removal). After treatment, barred owl occupancy was lower in the treated relative to the untreated areas and spotted owl occupancy was higher relative to the untreated areas. Barred owl removal decreased spotted owl territory extinction rates but did not affect territory colonization rates. As a result, spotted owl occupancy increased in the treated area and continued to decline in the untreated areas. Prior to and after barred owl removal, there was no evidence that average fecundity differed on the 2 study areas. However, the greater number of occupied spotted owl sites on the treated areas resulted in greater productivity in the treated areas based on empirical counts of fledged young. Prior to removal, survival was declining at a rate of approximately 0.2% per year for treated and untreated areas. Following treatment, estimated survival was 0.859 for

  10. Estrogen mediation of hormone responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Robert R; Francois, Michelle; Castracane, V Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The roles of estrogens extend from the regulation of reproduction to other functions involved in control of metabolism, fluid balance, as well as gastrointestinal, lung, and brain function, with a strong effect on other hormones that subsequently alter the physiology of multiple tissues. As such, alteration of endogenous estrogens across the menstrual cycle, or from oral contraception and estrogen replacement therapy, can affect these tissues. Due to the important effects that estrogens have on different tissues, there are many investigations concerning the effects of a human estrogenic environment on endocrine responses to exercise. The following review will describe the consequences of varying estrogen levels on pituitary, adrenal, gonadal, and endocrine function, followed by discussion of the outcomes of different estrogen levels on endocrine tissues in response to exercise, problems encountered for interpretation of findings, and recommended direction for future research. PMID:22512823

  11. Combined hormonal infusion simulates the metabolic response to injury.

    PubMed Central

    Bessey, P Q; Watters, J M; Aoki, T T; Wilmore, D W

    1984-01-01

    To investigate the role of hormones as mediators of the metabolic response to injury, nine normal male volunteers received a continuous 74-hour infusion of the three 'stress' hormones: cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. As a control, each subject received a saline infusion during another 4-day period. Diets were constant and matched on both occasions. Hormonal infusion achieved hormone concentrations similar to those seen following mild-moderate injury. With this alteration in the endocrine environment significant hypermetabolism, negative nitrogen and potassium balances, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, sodium retention, and peripheral leukocytosis were observed. Additional studies with single hormone infusions indicated that these responses resulted from both additive and synergistic interactions of the hormones. Triple hormone infusion simulated many of the metabolic responses observed following mild-moderate injury and other catabolic illnesses. PMID:6431917

  12. Serum Spot 14 concentration is negatively associated with thyroid-stimulating hormone level

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Tseng, Fen-Yu; Chen, Pei-Lung; Chi, Yu-Chao; Han, Der-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Shiung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spot 14 (S14) is a protein involved in fatty acid synthesis and was shown to be induced by thyroid hormone in rat liver. However, the presence of S14 in human serum and its relations with thyroid function status have not been investigated. The objectives of this study were to compare serum S14 concentrations in patients with hyperthyroidism or euthyroidism and to evaluate the associations between serum S14 and free thyroxine (fT4) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. We set up an immunoassay for human serum S14 concentrations and compared its levels between hyperthyroid and euthyroid subjects. Twenty-six hyperthyroid patients and 29 euthyroid individuals were recruited. Data of all patients were pooled for the analysis of the associations between the levels of S14 and fT4, TSH, or quartile of TSH. The hyperthyroid patients had significantly higher serum S14 levels than the euthyroid subjects (median [Q1, Q3]: 975 [669, 1612] ng/mL vs 436 [347, 638] ng/mL, P < 0.001). In univariate linear regression, the log-transformed S14 level (logS14) was positively associated with fT4 but negatively associated with creatinine (Cre), total cholesterol (T-C), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and TSH. The positive associations between logS14 and fT4 and the negative associations between logS14 and Cre, TG, T-C, or TSH remained significant after adjustment with sex and age. These associations were prominent in females but not in males. The logS14 levels were negatively associated with the TSH levels grouped by quartile (ß = −0.3020, P < 0.001). The association between logS14 and TSH quartile persisted after adjustment with sex and age (ß = −0.2828, P = 0.001). In stepwise multivariate regression analysis, only TSH grouped by quartile remained significantly associated with logS14 level. We developed an ELISA to measure serum S14 levels in human. Female patients with hyperthyroidism had higher serum S14 levels

  13. [Sex Specificity in Age-Related Thyroid Hormone Responsiveness].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Similar to other systems, the endocrine system is affected by aging. Thyroid hormone, the action of which is affected by many factors, has been shown to be associated with longevity. The most useful marker for assessment of the thyroid hormone action is the TSH level. Although age and sex are believed to modify the pituitary set point or response to the free thyroid hormone concentration, the precise age- and sex-dependent responses to thyroid hormone have yet to be reported. In this lecture, molecular aspects of resistance to thyroid hormone are initially overviewed. After presentation of the evidence that the TSH-thyroid hormone axis is evolutionarily modified, and that negative feedback mechanisms may start to play roles in homeostatic regulation at the time of delivery, the rationale of age-dependent thyroid hormone resistance is introduced. To assess the age- and sex-dependent resistance to thyroid hormone, the index is provided by the formula based on the relationship between thyroid hormone and TSH levels. The index is calculated by the results of thyroid function tests obtained from the two individual clinical groups. From the results, there were negative relationships between the free T3 resistance index and age in males of both groups, while there were no apparent relationships in females. These findings indicate that there is a male-specific response to thyroid hormone with aging. Furthermore, the specific features of the response may not be affected by environmental factors such as the presence of disorders or medical treatments. PMID:27192800

  14. Enzyme action in the regulation of plant hormone responses.

    PubMed

    Westfall, Corey S; Muehler, Ashley M; Jez, Joseph M

    2013-07-01

    Plants synthesize a chemically diverse range of hormones that regulate growth, development, and responses to environmental stresses. The major classes of plant hormones are specialized metabolites with exquisitely tailored perception and signaling systems, but equally important are the enzymes that control the dose and exposure to the bioactive forms of these molecules. Here, we review new insights into the role of enzyme families, including the SABATH methyltransferases, the methylesterases, the GH3 acyl acid-amido synthetases, and the hormone peptidyl hydrolases, in controlling the biosynthesis and modifications of plant hormones and how these enzymes contribute to the network of chemical signals responsible for plant growth, development, and environmental adaptation.

  15. A major thyroid hormone response element in the third intron of the rat growth hormone gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sap, J; de Magistris, L; Stunnenberg, H; Vennström, B

    1990-01-01

    The rat growth hormone (RGH) gene constitutes a well-documented model system for the direct regulation of transcription by thyroid hormones. In order to analyse its interaction with sequences in the RGH gene, we have overproduced the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha (c-erbA) protein using a vaccinia virus expression system. The expressed protein bound T3 and DNA-cellulose with expected affinities, and the major binding site for the receptor protein was found to be located in the third intron of the RGH gene. This site displayed significantly higher affinity for the receptor protein than a previously described thyroid hormone response element (TRE) in the promoter of this gene, and also conferred stronger hormone responsiveness in vivo to a heterologous promoter. The data suggest that this novel TRE plays a major role in the regulation of rat growth hormone gene expression by thyroid hormones. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2155782

  16. Hormonal influences on neuroimmune responses in the CNS of females

    PubMed Central

    Monasterio, Nela; Vergara, Edgar; Morales, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Particular reproductive stages such as lactation impose demands on the female. To cope with these demands, her physiology goes through numerous adaptations, for example, attenuation of immune and stress responses. Hormonal fluctuation during lactation exerts a strong influence, inducing neuroplasticity in the hypothalamus and extrahypothalamic regions, and diminishing the stress and inflammatory responses. Thus, hormones confer decreased vulnerability to the female brain. This mini-review focuses on the adaptations of the immune and stress response during maternity, and on the neuroprotective actions of progesterone and prolactin and their effects on inflammation. The importance of pregnancy and lactation as experimental models to study immune responses and disease is also highlighted. PMID:24478642

  17. GH responses to growth hormone releasing factor in depression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R; Beer, R; Harris, B; John, R; Scanlon, M

    1989-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH), thyrotrophin (TSH) and prolactin response to growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) was investigated in 18 patients suffering from major depression with melancholia and in 18 age- and sex-matched normal controls. There was no significant difference in the GH response to GRF stimulation between the patients and controls and in neither subject group was there a demonstrable TSH or prolactin response to GRF. These findings indicate that the pathophysiology underlying the blunted GH response to pharmacological challenge, demonstrated in other studies, must lie at a suprapituitary level.

  18. Hormone-controlled UV-B responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Vanhaelewyn, Lucas; Prinsen, Els; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Vandenbussche, Filip

    2016-08-01

    Ultraviolet B (UV-B) light is a portion of solar radiation that has significant effects on the development and metabolism of plants. Effects of UV-B on plants can be classified into photomorphogenic effects and stress effects. These effects largely rely on the control of, and interactions with, hormonal pathways. The fairly recent discovery of the UV-B-specific photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) allowed evaluation of the role of downstream hormones, leading to the identification of connections with auxin and gibberellin. Moreover, a substantial overlap between UVR8 and phytochrome responses has been shown, suggesting that part of the responses caused by UVR8 are under PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR control. UV-B effects can also be independent of UVR8, and affect different hormonal pathways. UV-B affects hormonal pathways in various ways: photochemically, affecting biosynthesis, transport, and/or signaling. This review concludes that the effects of UV-B on hormonal regulation can be roughly divided in two: inhibition of growth-promoting hormones; and the enhancement of environmental stress-induced defense hormones.

  19. Periodic Wnt1 expression in response to ecdysteroid generates twin-spot markings on caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Junichi; Banno, Yutaka; Mita, Kazuei; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Toshiya; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Among various pigmentation patterns on caterpillars, sequential spot markings are often observed and used for aposematic colouration. In contrast to adult wings, caterpillar cuticle markings are repeatedly generated at each moult, but little is known about how the patterns are formed and maintained periodically. Here we focus on a silkworm mutant, multi lunar (L), with twin-spot markings on sequential segments. Positional cloning of L and expression analyses reveal that cis-regulatory change in Wnt1 is responsible for the spot patterning. The periodical upregulation of Wnt1 in response to ecdysteroid is detected only in epidermis within spot marking area. We verify by transgenic expression that the ectopic Wnt1 induces the additional pigmentation. Furthermore, the association of Wnt1 expression with spot markings is observed in the wild Bombyx species and swallowtail butterfly Papilio machaon. Taken together, we anticipate that periodic Wnt1 expression may contribute to natural variations of spot patterning on caterpillar cuticle.

  20. Proteome and radioimmunoassay analyses of pituitary hormones and proteins in response to feed restriction of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Björn; Albrecht, Dirk; Bruckmaier, Rupert; Viergutz, Torsten; Nürnberg, Gerd; Metges, Cornelia C

    2010-12-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system controls homeostasis during feed energy reduction. In order to examine which pituitary proteins and hormone variants are potentially associated with metabolic adaptation, pituitary glands from ad libitum and energy restrictively fed dairy cows were characterized using RIA and 2-DE followed by MALDI-TOF-MS. We found 64 different spots of regulatory hormones: growth hormone (44), preprolactin (16), luteinizing hormone (LH) (1), thyrotropin (1), proopiomelanocortin (1) and its cleavage product lipotropin (1), but none of these did significantly differ between feeding groups. Quantification of total pituitary LH and prolactin concentrations by RIA confirmed the results obtained by proteome analysis. Also, feed energy restriction provoked increasing non-esterified fatty acid, decreasing prolactin, but unaltered glucose, LH and growth hormone plasma concentrations. Energy restriction decreased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, triosephosphate isomerase, purine-rich element-binding protein A and elongation factor Tu, whereas it increased expression of proline synthetase co-transcribed homolog, peroxiredoxin III, β-tubulin and annexin A5 which is involved in the hormone secretion process. Our results indicate that in response to feed energy restriction the pituitary reservoir of all posttranslationally modified hormone forms remains constant. Changing plasma hormone concentrations are likely attributed to a regulated releasing process from the gland into the blood.

  1. A therapeutic response to a single diagnostic dose of luteinising hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Distiller, L A; Sagel, J; Polakow, E S; Morley, J E

    1975-01-11

    Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) administration is a useful provocative test for the evaluation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Seven cases with oligomenorrhoea or amenorrhoea are reported, in which a single diagnostic injection of LH-RH produced an apparent therapeutic response. Six patients converted to a regular normal menstrual cycle, and 4 of these had evidence of ovulation. The seventh patient conceived. It is postulated that in some cases of hypothalamic menstrual dysfunction the gonadotrophic imbalance may be corrected by a single intravenous dose of LH-RH.

  2. SIKs control osteocyte responses to parathyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Marc N.; Liang, Yanke; Goransson, Olga; Sundberg, Thomas B.; Wang, Jinhua; Williams, Elizabeth A.; O'Meara, Maureen J.; Govea, Nicolas; Beqo, Belinda; Nishimori, Shigeki; Nagano, Kenichi; Brooks, Daniel J.; Martins, Janaina S.; Corbin, Braden; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Wu, Joy Y.; Sakamoto, Kei; Foretz, Marc; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Baron, Roland; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Gardella, Thomas J.; Divieti-Pajevic, Paola; Gray, Nathanael S.; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) activates receptors on osteocytes to orchestrate bone formation and resorption. Here we show that PTH inhibition of SOST (sclerostin), a WNT antagonist, requires HDAC4 and HDAC5, whereas PTH stimulation of RANKL, a stimulator of bone resorption, requires CRTC2. Salt inducible kinases (SIKs) control subcellular localization of HDAC4/5 and CRTC2. PTH regulates both HDAC4/5 and CRTC2 localization via phosphorylation and inhibition of SIK2. Like PTH, new small molecule SIK inhibitors cause decreased phosphorylation and increased nuclear translocation of HDAC4/5 and CRTC2. SIK inhibition mimics many of the effects of PTH in osteocytes as assessed by RNA-seq in cultured osteocytes and following in vivo administration. Once daily treatment with the small molecule SIK inhibitor YKL-05-099 increases bone formation and bone mass. Therefore, a major arm of PTH signalling in osteocytes involves SIK inhibition, and small molecule SIK inhibitors may be applied therapeutically to mimic skeletal effects of PTH. PMID:27759007

  3. Response of crapemyrtle varieties to Cercospora leaf spot, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crapemyrtle varieties, Lagerstroemia spp., were evaluated for Cercospora leaf spot in two field test evaluations, planted in either 2004 or 2011 at the Otis L. Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, TN. The experimental designs for both test evaluations were a randomized complete block design...

  4. An acute increase in the stress hormone corticosterone is associated with mating behavior in both male and female red-spotted newts, Notophthalmus viridescens.

    PubMed

    Reedy, Aaron M; Edwards, Alex; Pendlebury, Chloe; Murdaugh, Laura; Avery, Ryan; Seidenberg, Jake; Aspbury, Andrea S; Gabor, Caitlin R

    2014-11-01

    Hormones play key, functional roles in mediating the tradeoff between survival and reproduction. Glucocorticoid hormones can inhibit reproduction and improve chances of survival during periods of stress. However, glucocorticoid hormones are, at times, also associated with successfully engaging in energetically costly courtship and mating behaviors. Corticosterone (CORT), a primary glucocorticoid hormone in amphibians, reptiles and birds, may be important in activating or sustaining energetically costly mating behaviors. We used a non-invasive, water-borne hormone assay to measure CORT release rates of male and female red-spotted newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) collected when either engaged in amplexus or when not engaged in amplexus. Because amplexus is energetically costly for males, we predicted that males would have higher CORT release rates than females. We also predicted that females in amplexus would have elevated CORT release rates because the restraint of amplexus prevents foraging and breathing and may be costly. Here we show that an acute increase in CORT is associated with amplexus behavior in both male and female red-spotted newts. Additionally we demonstrate that males have higher overall CORT release rates both in and out of amplexus than do females. Our results support the hypothesis that glucocorticoid hormones are associated with energetically costly courtship and mating behaviors for both sexes.

  5. Abnormal luteinizing hormone response patterns to synthetic gonadotrophin releasing hormone in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Katz, M; Carr, P J

    1976-08-01

    Basal gonadotrophin and sex steroid levels and responses to an intravenous injection of 100 mug gonadotrophin releasing hormone (Gn-RH) have been studied in 15 patients with polycystic ovaries. Mean basal LH concentration was raised and an excessive, exaggerated and prolonged response was observed after Gn-RH treatment, but patients could further be subdivided into two functional groups on the basis of their basal LH values and LH response patterns. Evidence was also produced which suggested a breakdown in the negative feedback mechanism in these patients.

  6. Quantification of insulin-like growth factor-1 in dried blood spots for detection of growth hormone abuse in sport.

    PubMed

    Cox, Holly D; Rampton, Jessica; Eichner, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    There is significant evidence that athletes are using recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to enhance performance, and its use is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and professional sports leagues. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the primary mediator of growth hormone action and is used as a biomarker for the detection of rhGH abuse. The current biomarker-based method requires collection and expedited shipment of venous blood which is costly and may decrease the number of tests performed. Measurement of GH biomarkers in dried blood spots (DBS) would considerably simplify sample collection and shipping methods to allow testing of a greater number of samples regardless of location. A method was developed to quantify intact IGF-1 protein in DBS by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A step-wise acid-acetonitrile extraction was optimized to achieve a sensitive assay with a lower limit of quantification of 50 ng/mL. IGF-1 remained stable at room temperature for up to 8 days, which would allow shipment of DBS cards at ambient temperature. In a comparison between plasma concentrations of IGF-1 and concentrations measured from venous and finger prick DBS, there was good correlation and agreement, r(2) of 0.8551 and accuracy of 86-113 % for venous DBS and r(2) of 0.9586 and accuracy of 89-122 % for finger prick DBS. The method is intended for use as a rapid screening method for IGF-1 to be used in the biomarker method of rhGH abuse detection.

  7. Growth hormone, prolactin and thyrotrophin responses to thyrotrophin-releasing hormone in diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Harrower, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and thyrotrophin (TSH) responses to thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) were studied in 15 insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Basal plasma GH levels were raised above 5 mu./l in 6 patients and following the injection of TRH there was a significant rise in plasma GH levels in 9. The mean rise in plasma GH from basal to peak values was significant in the group as a whole (P < 0.01). Basal PRL and TSH levels were normal and rose normally in response to TRH. GH release may be qualitatively abnormal in some diabetics and any such loss of specificity of GH-releasing mechanisms would further contribute to the raised GH levels found in many diabetics which would be of importance if GH is a factor in the aetiology of diabetic microangiopathy. PMID:6777767

  8. The role of thyroid hormones in stress response of fish.

    PubMed

    Peter, M C Subhash

    2011-06-01

    Thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)), the principal thyroid hormones (THs) secreted from the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, produce a plethora of physiologic actions in fish. The diverse actions of THs in fishes are primarily due to the sensitivity of thyroid axis to many physical, chemical and biological factors of both intrinsic and extrinsic origins. The regulation of THs homeostasis becomes more complex due to extrathyroidal deiodination pathways by which the delivery of biologically active T(3) to target cells has been controlled. As primary stress hormones and the end products of hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) and brain-sympathetic-chromaffin (BSC) axes, cortisol and adrenaline exert its actions on its target tissues where it promote and integrate osmotic and metabolic competence. Despite possessing specific osmoregulatory and metabolic actions at cellular and whole-body levels, THs may fine-tune these processes in accordance with the actions of hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. Evidences are presented that THs can modify the pattern and magnitude of stress response in fishes as it modifies either its own actions or the actions of stress hormones. In addition, multiple lines of evidence indicate that hypothalamic and pituitary hormones of thyroid and interrenal axes can interact with each other which in turn may regulate THs/cortisol-mediated actions. Even though it is hard to define these interactions, the magnitude of stress response in fish has been shown to be modified by the changes in the status of THs, pointing to its functional relationship with endocrine stress axes particularly with the interrenal axis. The fine-tuned mechanism that operates in fish during stressor-challenge drives the THs to play both fundamental and modulator roles in stress response by controlling osmoregulation and metabolic regulation. A major role of THs in stress response is thus evident in fish.

  9. Hormonal modulation of the heat shock response: insights from fish with divergent cortisol stress responses.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Sacha; Höglund, Erik; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Currie, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Acute temperature stress in animals results in increases in heat shock proteins (HSPs) and stress hormones. There is evidence that stress hormones influence the magnitude of the heat shock response; however, their role is equivocal. To determine whether and how stress hormones may affect the heat shock response, we capitalized on two lines of rainbow trout specifically bred for their high (HR) and low (LR) cortisol response to stress. We predicted that LR fish, with a low cortisol but high catecholamine response to stress, would induce higher levels of HSPs after acute heat stress than HR trout. We found that HR fish have significantly higher increases in both catecholamines and cortisol compared with LR fish, and LR fish had no appreciable stress hormone response to heat shock. This unexpected finding prevented further interpretation of the hormonal modulation of the heat shock response but provided insight into stress-coping styles and environmental stress. HR fish also had a significantly greater and faster heat shock response and less oxidative protein damage than LR fish. Despite these clear differences in the physiological and cellular responses to heat shock, there were no differences in the thermal tolerance of HR and LR fish. Our results support the hypothesis that responsiveness to environmental change underpins the physiological differences in stress-coping styles. Here, we demonstrate that the heat shock response is a distinguishing feature of the HR and LR lines and suggest that it may have been coselected with the hormonal responses to stress.

  10. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  11. Hormonal control of cold stress responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Eremina, Marina; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2016-02-01

    Cold stress responses in plants are highly sophisticated events that alter the biochemical composition of cells for protection from damage caused by low temperatures. In addition, cold stress has a profound impact on plant morphologies, causing growth repression and reduced yields. Complex signalling cascades are utilised to induce changes in cold-responsive gene expression that enable plants to withstand chilling or even freezing temperatures. These cascades are governed by the activity of plant hormones, and recent research has provided a better understanding of how cold stress responses are integrated with developmental pathways that modulate growth and initiate other events that increase cold tolerance. Information on the hormonal control of cold stress signalling is summarised to highlight the significant progress that has been made and indicate gaps that still exist in our understanding.

  12. Pituitary responsiveness to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone in different reproductive disorders. A review.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, J M; Greenblatt, R B

    1985-08-01

    As a result of the use of synthetic luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) (and its analogs), significant advances in modern clinical practice are being realized. We studied the use of LHRH as a test for pituitary reserve for gonadotropin secretion in different reproductive disorders. Synthetic LHRH was used as a diagnostic test for discriminating pituitary from hypothalamic disorders. After appropriate LHRH priming of the pituitary, LHRH was used to document hypothalamic dysfunction in patients with Kallmann's syndrome who had normal gonadotropin responsiveness to LHRH. The gonadotropin responsiveness to 100 micrograms of LHRH was impaired or absent in patients with panhypopituitarism, craniopharyngiomas, hemochromatosis and acromegaly accompanied by abnormal lactation. In women with gonadal dysgenesis, the absence of gonadal steroid feedback exacerbated the pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Women with hyperprolactinemia are also known to have a blunted gonadotropin response to endogenous and exogenous LHRH. An experimental rat model was developed in our laboratory to study the site of prolactin action on gonadotropin secretion. LHRH challenge tests during perphenazine-induced hyperprolactinemia in rats indicated that prolactin may decrease pituitary sensitivity to LHRH. Additional experiments indicated that the increased progesterone produced in these hyperprolactinemic (pseudopregnant) rats was probably responsible for the decreased pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether prolactin, which can alter ovarian steroidogenesis in vitro, interferes with ovulation directly in addition to affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  13. Gastric Bypass Reduces Symptoms and Hormonal Responses in Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Niclas; Börjesson, Joey Lau; Sundbom, Magnus; Wiklund, Urban; Karlsson, F Anders; Eriksson, Jan W

    2016-09-01

    Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery.

  14. Weightlifting Training and Hormonal Responses in Adolescent Males: Implications for Program Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Andrew C.; Schilling, Brian K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses monitoring of the training tolerance of junior- aged weightlifters, focusing on: whether the hormonal system can be used to monitor training status; puberty and the hormonal environment; whether training stresses can be monitored by the hormonal environment; adolescent weightlifters' hormonal response during a lifting session; whether…

  15. Hormone and immune response, with special reference to steroid hormone 1. A short review.

    PubMed

    Seiki, K; Sakabe, K; Kawashima, I; Fujii-Hanamoto, H

    1990-05-01

    Substantial evidence has been accumulated to support the gonadal regulation of immune functions. They are mainly based on the following observations: i) the existence of sexual dimorphism in immune response, ii) alteration of immune response by gonadectomy or sex steroid replacement, iii) alteration of immune response during pregnancy, and iv) existence of sex steroid receptors in the thymus tissue which affect T cell function through thymic hormones produced in the gland. In the present study, we have tried to review some of this evidence by adding our own findings. We also referred to the experimental findings which show that the thymus, brain and gonads are close-related functionally, and form a functional axis, the so-called "hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal-thymic" axis which is of great importance not only because it regulates immune response, but because its influence may extend to other organ system within the living body.

  16. Hormonal Responses to Active and Passive Recovery After Load Carriage.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Ritva S; Heinaru, Siiri; Nindl, Bradley C; Vaara, Jani P; Santtila, Matti; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2015-11-01

    Military operations often induce fatigue resulting from load carriage. Recovery promotes military readiness. This study investigated the acute effects of AR vs. PR after load carriage on maximal isometric leg extension force (MVC) and serum hormonal concentrations. Male reservists (27 ± 3 years, 180 ± 7 cm, 74 ± 11 kg, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 64 ± 9 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) completed PR (n = 8) or AR (n = 8) after 50 minutes of loaded (16 kg) uphill (gradient 4.0%) treadmill marching at individual anaerobic threshold. No differences were observed between groups in relative changes in MVC during the marching loading, after AR or PR or the next morning. Significant differences in relative responses to AR and PR postmarching loading were observed in serum testosterone (T), cortisol, and sex-hormone binding globulin immediately post AR and PR; however the next morning, all serum hormone concentrations had returned to normal. This study did not reveal any significant differences between the effects of AR and PR after an hour-long marching protocol at approximately anaerobic threshold on MVC or serum hormones the morning after the experimental marching protocol. Thus, based on the variable measured in this study, marching performed by physically fit army reservists at an intensity at or below anaerobic threshold may not necessitate specialized recovery protocols.

  17. A transcriptional reference map of defence hormone responses in potato

    PubMed Central

    Wiesel, Lea; Davis, Jayne L.; Milne, Linda; Redondo Fernandez, Vanesa; Herold, Miriam B.; Middlefell Williams, Jill; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E.; Harrower, Brian; Newton, Adrian C.; Birch, Paul R. J.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Hein, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are involved in diverse aspects of plant life including the regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction, as well as governing biotic and abiotic stress responses. We have generated a comprehensive transcriptional reference map of the early potato responses to exogenous application of the defence hormones abscisic acid, brassinolides (applied as epibrassinolide), ethylene (applied as the ethylene precursor aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid), salicylic acid and jasmonic acid (applied as methyl jasmonate). Of the 39000 predicted genes on the microarray, a total of 2677 and 2473 genes were significantly differentially expressed at 1 h and 6 h after hormone treatment, respectively. Specific marker genes newly identified for the early hormone responses in potato include: a homeodomain 20 transcription factor (DMG400000248) for abscisic acid; a SAUR gene (DMG400016561) induced in epibrassinolide treated plants; an osmotin gene (DMG400003057) specifically enhanced by aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid; a gene weakly similar to AtWRKY40 (DMG402007388) that was induced by salicylic acid; and a jasmonate ZIM-domain protein 1 (DMG400002930) which was specifically activated by methyl jasmonate. An online database has been set up to query the expression patterns of potato genes represented on the microarray that can also incorporate future microarray or RNAseq-based expression studies. PMID:26477733

  18. Blood lactate and hormonal responses to prototype flywheel ergometer workouts.

    PubMed

    Caruso, John F; Coday, Michael A; Monda, Julie K; Ramey, Elizabeth S; Hastings, Lori P; Vingren, Jakob L; Potter, William T; Kraemer, William J; Wickel, Eric E

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare blood lactate and hormonal responses with flywheel ergometer (FERG) leg presses for preliminary assessment of workouts best suited for future in-flight resistance exercise. Comprised of 10 repetition sets, the workouts entailed 3 sets of concentric and eccentric (CE3) actions, or concentric-only actions done for 3 (CO3) or 6 (CO6) sets. Methods employed included assessment of blood lactate concentrations ([BLa-]) before and 5 minutes postexercise. Venous blood was also collected before and at 1 and 30 minutes postexercise to assess growth hormone, testosterone, cortisol concentrations ([GH], [T], [C]) and [T/C] ratios. [BLa-] were compared with 2 (time) x 3 (workout) analysis of variance. Hormones were assessed with 2 (gender) x 3 (time) x 3 (workout) analysis of covariances. Results showed [BLa-] had a time effect. Growth hormone concentration showed gender x workout, gender x time, and workout x time interactions, whereas [T] had a 3-way interaction. [C] had gender, time, and workout effects. [T/C] yielded a gender x time interaction. It was concluded that, because CO6 and CE3 yielded similar anabolic hormonal data but the latter had a lower [C] 30 minutes postexercise, CE3 served as the best workout. Although the FERG was originally designed for microgravity, the effort put forth by current subjects was like that for workouts aimed at greater athletic performance and conditioning. Practical applications suggest that eccentric actions should be used for FERG workouts geared toward muscle mass and strength improvement. PMID:20145569

  19. Early growth and postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses.

    PubMed

    Perälä, Mia-Maria; Kajantie, Eero; Valsta, Liisa M; Holst, Jens J; Leiviskä, Jaana; Eriksson, Johan G

    2013-11-14

    Strong epidemiological evidence suggests that slow prenatal or postnatal growth is associated with an increased risk of CVD and other metabolic diseases. However, little is known whether early growth affects postprandial metabolism and, especially, the appetite regulatory hormone system. Therefore, we investigated the impact of early growth on postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses to two high-protein and two high-fat content meals. Healthy, 65-75-year-old volunteers from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study were recruited; twelve with a slow increase in BMI during the first year of life (SGI group) and twelve controls. Subjects ate a test meal (whey meal, casein meal, SFA meal and PUFA meal) once in a random order. Plasma glucose, insulin, TAG, NEFA, ghrelin, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 and a satiety profile were measured in the fasting state and for 4 h after each test meal. Compared with the controls, the SGI group had about 1·5-fold higher insulin responses after the whey meal (P= 0·037), casein meal (P= 0·023) and PUFA meal (P= 0·002). TAG responses were 34-69 % higher for the SGI group, but only the PUFA-meal responses differed significantly between the groups. The PYY response of the SGI group was 44 % higher after the whey meal (P= 0·046) and 115 % higher after the casein meal (P= 0·025) compared with the controls. No other statistically significant differences were seen between the groups. In conclusion, early growth may have a role in programming appetite regulatory hormone secretion in later life. Slow early growth is also associated with higher postprandial insulin and TAG responses but not with incretin levels.

  20. Diverse Hormone Response Networks in 41 Independent Drosophila Cell Lines

    DOE PAGES

    Stoiber, Marcus; Celniker, Susan; Cherbas, Lucy; Brown, Ben; Cherbas, Peter

    2016-01-15

    Steroid hormones induce cascades of gene activation and repression with transformative effects on cell fate . Steroid transduction plays a major role in the development and physiology of nearly all metazoan species, and in the progression of the most common forms of cancer. Despite the paramount importance of steroids in developmental and translational biology, a complete map of transcriptional response has not been developed for any hormone . In the case of 20-hydroxyecdysone (ecdysone) in Drosophila melanogaster, these trajectories range from apoptosis to immortalization. We mapped the ecdysone transduction network in a cohort of 41 cell lines, the largest suchmore » atlas yet assembled. We found that the early transcriptional response mirrors the distinctiveness of physiological origins: genes respond in restricted patterns, conditional on the expression levels of dozens of transcription factors. Only a small cohort of genes is constitutively modulated independent of initial cell state. Ecdysone-responsive genes tend to organize into directional same-stranded units, with consecutive genes induced from the same strand. Here, we identify half of the ecdysone receptor heterodimer as the primary rate-limiting step in the response, and find that initial receptor isoform levels modulate the activated cohort of target transcription factors. In conclusion, this atlas of steroid response reveals organizing principles of gene regulation by a model type II nuclear receptor and lays the foundation for comprehensive and predictive understanding of the ecdysone transduction network in the fruit fly.« less

  1. Immunoglobulin genes and antibody responses in the spotted wolffish (Anarhichas minor Olafsen).

    PubMed

    Espelid, S; Halse, M; Solem, S T; Jørgensen, T O

    2001-07-01

    The spotted wolffish Anarhichas minor Olafsen is a promising new species in aquaculture in the cold waters of northern Norway. In this paper, some basic immunological studies of this marine species are reported. Of comparative interest are the cDNA sequences of the immunoglobulin transcript and the antibody responses to model antigens. Of more practical importance are the humoral immune responses and antibody specificities to potentially pathogenic bacteria. Full length cDNA clones encoding the immunoglobulin heavy and light chains in the spotted wolffish were sequenced demonstrating variable degrees of similarity to other teleost fish species. Also in the spotted wolffish the CH4 domain was deleted in the transmembrane form of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) as a receptor on B cells, with the transmembrane exon spliced directly to the CH3 domain. The antibody responses to various antigens like hapten-carrier molecules, protein antigens and bacterial pathogens were relatively high, but with some interesting exceptions. Anti-hapten responses to NIP and FITC were high while anti-DNS responses were low, but more surprisingly, there was hardly any B-cell response to the carrier molecule LPH. On the other hand, protein antigens like CGG and BSA were highly immunogenic in the spotted wolffish as were the bacterial antigens Vibrio anguillarum, V. salmonicida and Aeromonas salmonicida.

  2. Outcome of growth hormone therapy in children with growth hormone deficiency showing an inadequate response to growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Saenger, P; Pescovitz, O H; Bercu, B B; Murray, F T; Landy, H; Brentzel, J; O'Dea, L; Hanson, B; Howard, C; Reiter, E O

    2001-06-01

    Saizen (recombinant growth hormone [GH]), 0.2 mg/(kg x wk), was given in an open-label fashion for an average of 51 mo to 27 children with presumed idiopathic GH deficiency who had withdrawn from a trial of Geref (recombinant GH-releasing hormone [GHRH] 1-29) because of inadequate height velocity (HV) (25 children), the onset of puberty (1 child), or injection site reactions (1 child). Measurements were made every 3-12 mo of a number of auxologic variables, including HV, height standard deviation score, and bone age. The children in the study showed excellent responses to Saizen. Moreover, first-year growth during Saizen therapy was inversely correlated with the GH response to provocative GHRH testing carried out 6 and 12 mo after the initiation of Geref treatment. These findings indicate that GH is effective in accelerating growth in GH-deficient children who do not show or maintain a satisfactory response to treatment with GHRH. In addition, they suggest that the initial response to GH therapy used in this way can be predicted by means of provoc-ative testing.

  3. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs. PMID:24714543

  4. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs.

  5. Hormonal modulation of extinction responses induced by sexual steroid hormones in rats.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Arancibia, S; Vazquez-Pereyra, F

    1994-01-01

    A functional interrelation between the nervous and endocrine systems has been established. However, few studies have dealt with the effects of sexual steroids on learning and memory. The aim of this work was to determine whether sexual steroid hormones could modulate the extinction response of a passive avoidance conditioning in rats. Male Wistar rats, randomly assigned to five groups, two controls and three experimental groups, were submitted to a one-trial passive avoidance conditioning and tested for their retention 24 hr after and during 10 weeks. One control group received no treatment at all, the other received vegetable oil, and the three experimental received 20 mg of testosterone enanthate, 0.8 mg estradiol valerate, or 4 mg nandrolone decanoate, respectively. All substances were applied in a 0.3 ml volume, 24 hours before training and before testing for retention each week during 10 weeks. Results indicate that the extinction process is modulated by these hormones, since testosterone and estradiol facilitate extinction, whereas the anabolic androgen produced a resistance to the extinction process.

  6. Growth hormone receptor polymorphism and growth hormone therapy response in children: a Bayesian meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Renehan, Andrew G; Solomon, Mattea; Zwahlen, Marcel; Morjaria, Reena; Whatmore, Andrew; Audí, Laura; Binder, Gerhard; Blum, Werner; Bougnères, Pierre; Santos, Christine Dos; Carrascosa, Antonio; Hokken-Koelega, Anita; Jorge, Alexander; Mullis, Primus E; Tauber, Maïthé; Patel, Leena; Clayton, Peter E

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy is used in the long-term treatment of children with growth disorders, but there is considerable treatment response variability. The exon 3-deleted growth hormone receptor polymorphism (GHR(d3)) may account for some of this variability. The authors performed a systematic review (to April 2011), including investigator-only data, to quantify the effects of the GHR(fl-d3) and GHR(d3-d3) genotypes on rhGH therapy response and used a recently established Bayesian inheritance model-free approach to meta-analyze the data. The primary outcome was the 1-year change-in-height standard-deviation score for the 2 genotypes. Eighteen data sets from 12 studies (1,527 children) were included. After several prior assumptions were tested, the most appropriate inheritance model was codominant (posterior probability = 0.93). Compared with noncarriers, carriers had median differences in 1-year change-in-height standard-deviation score of 0.09 (95% credible interval (CrI): 0.01, 0.17) for GHR(fl-d3) and of 0.14 (95% CrI: 0.02, 0.26) for GHR(d3-d3). However, the between-study standard deviation of 0.18 (95% CrI: 0.10, 0.33) was considerable. The authors tested by meta-regression for potential modifiers and found no substantial influence. They conclude that 1) the GHR(d3) polymorphism inheritance is codominant, contrasting with previous reports; 2) GHR(d3) genotypes account for modest increases in rhGH effects in children; and 3) considerable unexplained variability in responsiveness remains.

  7. Serum Growth Hormone Levels and the Response of Diabetic Retinopathy to Pituitary Ablation*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A. D.; Kohner, E. M.; Oakley, N. W.; Hartog, M.; Joplin, G. F.; Fraser, T. Russell

    1969-01-01

    Serum growth hormone levels were measured during insulin tolerance tests in 36 patients after yttrium-90 pituitary implantation for diabetic retinopathy. The response of the new blood vessels was more clearly related to loss of growth hormone function than was the improvement of retinal haemorrhages and microaneurysms. The overall response of the retinopathy was greatest when growth hormone function was lost. Since the loss of growth hormone function was related to the loss of other aspects of anterior pituitary function, a unique role of growth hormone in the response of diabetic retinopathy to pituitary ablation could not be established. PMID:5768460

  8. Gastroenteric hormone responses to hedonic eating in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Perillo, Donato; Canestrelli, Benedetta; Maj, Mario

    2013-08-01

    Hedonic eating differentiates from homeostatic eating on two main aspects: the first one is that eating occurs when there is no need for calorie ingestion and the second one is that the food is consumed exclusively for its gustatory and rewarding properties. Gastroeneteric hormones such as ghrelin, colecystokinin-33 (CCK) and peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36) are known to play a pivotal role in the homeostatic control of food intake. To the contrary, their role in hedonic eating has been never investigated. Here we report peripheral responses of CCK, PYY3-36 and ghrelin to the consumption of food for pleasure in well-nourished satiated healthy subjects. Plasma levels of CCK, PYY3-36 and ghrelin were measured in 7 satiated healthy subjects before and after ad libitum consumption of both a highly pleasurable food (hedonic eating) and an isoenergetic non-pleasurable food (non-hedonic eating). The consumption of food for pleasure was associated to a significantly increased production of the hunger hormone ghrelin and a significantly decreased secretion of the satiety hormone CCK. No significant changes in plasma PYY3-36 levels occurred in the two eating conditions. These preliminary data demonstrate that in hedonic eating the peripheral hunger signal represented by ghrelin secretion is enhanced while the satiety signal of CCK production is decreased. This could be responsible for the persistence of peripheral cues allowing a continued eating as well as for the activation of endogenous reward mechanisms, which can drive food consumption in spite of no energy need, only for reward.

  9. Thyroid Hormone Response Element Half-Site Organization and Its Effect on Thyroid Hormone Mediated Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Martin A.; Atlas, Ella; Wade, Mike G.; Yauk, Carole L.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) exerts its effects by binding to the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), which binds to TH response elements (TREs) to regulate target gene expression. We investigated the relative ability of liganded homodimers TR and retinoid X receptor (RXR), and the heterodimer TR/RXR, to regulate gene expression for the TRE half-site organizations: direct repeat 4 (DR4), inverted repeat 0 (IR0) and everted repeat 6 (ER6). Luciferase reporter assays using a DR4 TRE suggest that both the TR homodimer and TR/RXR heterodimer regulate luciferase expression in the presence of their respective ligands. However, in the presence of the IR0 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR and RXR alone increased luciferase activity and there was no effect of TR alone. The presence of 9-cis-retinoic acid was necessary for luciferase expression, whereas TH treatment alone was insufficient. For the ER6 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR, TR alone and RXR alone (in the presence of their respective ligands) all caused a significant increase in luciferase activity. When both ligands were present, transfection with both TR/RXR caused more activation. Finally, we investigated the efficacy of the TR-antagonist 1–850 in inhibiting transcription by TR or TR/RXR at DR4 and ER6 TREs. We found that 1–850 did not suppress luciferase activation in the presence of TR/RXR for the ER6 TRE, suggesting conformational changes of the ligand binding domain of the TR when bound to different TRE half-site organizations. Collectively, the findings indicate that there are fundamental differences between TRE configurations that affect nuclear receptor interactions with the response element and ability to bind ligands and antagonists. PMID:24971931

  10. Hormones and the growth of plants in response to gravity.

    PubMed

    Osborne, D J

    1976-01-01

    Plants are remarkable amongst living things in that all their parts (leaves, stems, roots and flowers) can orientate their position in response to gravity. Roots normally grow downwards towards the stimulus, shoots upwards away from the stimulus, while leaves and special kinds of stems like underground rhizomes or aerial runners have adaptations to grow horizontally, approximately at right angles to the gravitational field. This directional positioning of the organ in relation to gravity is achieved by a regulation of the growth of enlarging cells below the meristems or within the organ. Mature tissues in which further cell growth is precluded are therefore unable to reorientate if their position in the field is changed. Under conditions of zero gravity, roots and shoots continue to grow in opposite directions and the orientation of laterals with respect to the apex is essentially normal. This demonstrates the inherent polarity of plant cells and the internal correlative growth regulation that each organ exerts upon its neighbours. The perception of gravity, involving statoliths, membranes and "wound" ethylene, is discussed, together with the mechanisms by which the subsequent growth responses can be mediated by changes in endogenous hormones. Evidence for how such hormonal changes can lead to modifications of the rate, extent and reorientation of cell growth is reviewed for several geotropically responding systems.

  11. Growth Hormone Response after Administration of L-dopa, Clonidine, and Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Seigfried M.

    1993-01-01

    This study of eight growth-retarded children with Down's syndrome (aged 1 to 6.5 years) found that administration of growth hormone was more effective than either L-dopa or clonidine. Results suggest that children with Down's syndrome have both anatomical and biochemical hypothalamic derangements resulting in decreased growth hormone secretion and…

  12. Factors Associated with a Strong Response to the T-SPOT.TB in Patients with Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Mi; Kim, Sun-Mi; Park, Su Jin; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Sung-Han

    2014-12-01

    Limited data are available on which factors are associated with strong immunologic responses to T-SPOT.TB. We investigated the factors associated with strong positive responses in patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis (E-TB). Of 173 patients with E-TB who gave positive results on T-SPOT.TB, 26 (15%) with a strong positive response (defined as ≥1,000 spot-forming units (SFU)/2.5×10(5) PBMC to ESAT-6 or CFP-10) and 71 (41%) with a low positive response (≤ 99 SFU (6-99 SFU)/2.5×10(5) PBMC) were further analyzed. Miliary TB was independently associated with a strong positive response to T-SPOT.TB, while advanced age and immunosuppression were independently associated with weak positive T-SPOT.TB responses.

  13. Growth Hormone Response to L-Dopa and Clonidine in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Realmuto, George M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Seven medication-free autistic subjects (ages 6-19) were administered clonidine and L-Dopa to investigate neuroendocrine responses through changes in growth hormone levels. Findings showed that, compared to normal controls, the L-Dopa-stimulated growth hormone peak was delayed and the clonidine growth hormone peak was premature. (Author/JDD)

  14. Gonadotropin response to gonadotropin releasing hormone in acute schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cantalamessa, L; Catania, A; Silva, A; Orsatti, A; Baldini, M; Mosca, G; Zanussi, C; Cazzullo, C L

    1984-01-01

    To evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in acute schizophrenia, plasma FSH and LH concentrations were estimated both in basal conditions and after stimulation with gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH, 200 micrograms i.v.) in 14 young male patients with acute schizophrenia and in a age-matched group of 14 healthy male controls. Basal plasma PRL and testosterone levels were also measured. The mean basal levels of LH and FSH were slightly lower in schizophrenics, while the mean testosterone and prolactin levels were similar in the two groups. The FSH response to GnRH was significantly reduced in patients with acute schizophrenia, while the response of LH was similar in schizophrenics and in the controls. The possible significance of these findings is discussed in the contest of the complex neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin secretion and the overactivity of dopaminergic systems in acute schizophrenia.

  15. Microarray analysis reveals overlapping and specific transcriptional responses to different plant hormones in rice.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rohini; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Jain, Mukesh

    2012-08-01

    Hormones exert pleiotropic effects on plant growth and development throughout the life cycle. Many of these effects are mediated at molecular level via altering gene expression. In this study, we investigated the exogenous effect of plant hormones, including auxin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, on the transcription of rice genes at whole genome level using microarray. Our analysis identified a total of 4171 genes involved in several biological processes, whose expression was altered significantly in the presence of different hormones. Further, 28% of these genes exhibited overlapping transcriptional responses in the presence of any two hormones, indicating crosstalk among plant hormones. In addition, we identified genes showing only a particular hormone-specific response, which can be used as hormone-specific markers. The results of this study will facilitate further studies in hormone biology in rice.

  16. Effects of cysteamine on mRNA levels of growth hormone and its receptors and growth in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Xilan; Lin, Haoran

    2013-06-01

    Effects of cysteamine (CS) on growth hormone (GH) mRNA, two types of growth hormone receptor (GHR) mRNAs and growth rate in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) were investigated. CS could cause a modification in the structure of somatostatin, which is the most important neuroendocrine inhibitor of basal and stimulated growth hormone synthesis and release, and renders it nonimmunoreactive probably through interaction with the disulfide bonds. In the present study, cysteamine hydrochloride (CSH) enhanced the level of pituitary GH mRNA in a dose-dependent manner through attenuating or deleting the inhibiting action of somatostatin on GH mRNA expression. CSH at relatively low doses (from 1 to 3 mg/g diet) enhanced the levels of two types of GHR mRNAs in dose-dependent manner, whereas the stimulation induced by CSH declined from the peak at higher dose of CSH (4 mg/g diet). It might be attributed to the variation in GH-induced up-regulation of GHRs at different doses of GH. Feeding of CSH could induce remarkable enhancement of growth rate in orange-spotted grouper. In addition, the stimulatory effect of CSH could be potentiated by the additive effect of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog (LHRH-A). Compared with individual treatments, combined feeding of CSH and LHRH-A caused more efficient elevation of growth rate after 8 weeks of feeding. CSH and LHRH-A individually and in combination remarkably increased the levels of GH and GHR mRNAs compared with the control. The combined administration of CSH and LHRH-A in diet was most effective to enhance the level of GH and GHR1 mRNA. The morphological characteristics of the experimental fish were evaluated. Compared with control, the ratios of muscle RNA/DNA, condition factors (CF) and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) were significantly enhanced in the treated groups, while the highest values were observed in the combined treatment. All the results suggested that CSH (1-3 mg/g diet) is an effective

  17. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs.

  18. Characterisation and detection of spoilage mould responsible for black spot in dry-cured fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Rodríguez, Alicia; Cordero, Mirian; Bernáldez, Victoria; Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Córdoba, Juan J

    2015-02-01

    Moulds responsible for black spot spoilage of dry-cured fermented sausages were characterised. For this purpose, samples were taken from those dry-cured fermented sausages which showed black spot alteration. Most of the mould strains were first tentatively identified as Penicillium spp. due to their morphological characteristics in different culture conditions, with one strain as Cladosporium sp. The Cladosporium strain was the only one which provoked blackening in culture media. This strain was further characterised by sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA and β-tubulin genes. This mould strain was able to reproduce black spot formation in dry-cured fermented sausage 'salchichón' throughout the ripening process. In addition, a specific and sensitive real-time PCR method was also developed to detect Cladosporium oxysporum responsible for the black spot formation in sausages. This method could be of great interest for the meat industry to detect samples contaminated with this mould before spoilage of product avoiding economic losses for this sector.

  19. Sympathomimetic pressor responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mattila, J.; Bunag, R.D.

    1986-07-01

    Cardiovascular responses to centrally administered thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were studied in urethan-anesthetized rats to allow continuous recording of attendant changes in sympathetic nerve activity. Intracerebroventricular infusions of TRH consistently increased not only blood pressure and heart rate, but also spike frequency in splanchnic, renal, or cervical sympathetic nerves. Parasympathetic inhibition seemed unlikely because TRH responses were unaltered by cholinergic blockade with atropine, and efferent vagal nerve firing, instead of being reduced, was actually increased by TRH. An increased secretion of endogenous vasopressin also appeared unlikely, since TRH responses were essentially unaffected by either hypophysectomy or pretreatment with a vasopressin antagonist. Inasmuch as pharmacological ganglion blockade with pentolinium eliminated increases in splanchnic nerve firing but reduced the attendant tachycardia by only 50%, residual tachycardia after ganglion blockade was considered partly due to persistent sympathetic cardioaccelerator tone. On the other hand, because pressor responses to TRH were always accompanied by increased sympathetic nerve firing and were completely abolished after pentolinium-induced ganglioplegia, they were attributed solely to sympathetic hyperactivity.

  20. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces

    PubMed Central

    Marečková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S.; Nawaz Khan, Irum; Lawrence, Claire; Dickie, Erin; McQuiggan, Doug A.

    2014-01-01

    Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain’s response to faces and the use of oral contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use of OC and FFA response was replicated in an independent sample of 110 adolescent girls. Finally in a parallel behavioral study carried out in another sample of women, we found no evidence of differences in the pattern of eye movements while viewing faces between freely cycling women vs those taking oral contraceptives. The imaging findings might indicate enhanced processing of social cues in women taking OC and women during mid-cycle. PMID:23175677

  1. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces.

    PubMed

    Marecková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S; Nawaz Khan, Irum; Lawrence, Claire; Dickie, Erin; McQuiggan, Doug A; Paus, Tomás

    2014-02-01

    Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain's response to faces and the use of oral contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use of OC and FFA response was replicated in an independent sample of 110 adolescent girls. Finally in a parallel behavioral study carried out in another sample of women, we found no evidence of differences in the pattern of eye movements while viewing faces between freely cycling women vs those taking oral contraceptives. The imaging findings might indicate enhanced processing of social cues in women taking OC and women during mid-cycle.

  2. Hormonal response of the premature primate to operative stress.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A F; Lally, K P; Chwals, W J; McCurnin, D C; Gerstmann, D R; Shade, R A; deLemos, R A

    1993-06-01

    There are few data on the hormonal response to operation in the premature infant. Studies examining the response of newborn human infants have been performed on patients beyond the first few days of life, where some adaptation to postnatal life has occurred. This study evaluated the response of the newly born premature primate to surgical stress. Premature baboons (75% gestation) were intubated, mechanically ventilated and underwent thoracotomy at 2 hours of life with exposure of the ductus arteriosus (PDA). In group 1, formalin was infiltrated to keep the ductus patent. In group 2, the PDA was ligated. Controls had no operation. Blood was drawn at 0, 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours of age. Echocardiograms were performed to confirm patency or closure of the ductus and to monitor cardiac function. Epinephrine, norepinephrine, renin, and cortisol levels were measured. Cortisol levels rose in all groups. Operation stimulated a marked increase in catecholamine and renin levels in both operative groups, which was more marked in the group with PDA ligation at 24 hours. These data reflect expected pathophysiology since early PDA ligation exerts additional hemodynamic demand on the heart. In conclusion, the premature primate is able to mount a significant and severity-dependent endocrine response to stress. PMID:8331518

  3. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces.

    PubMed

    Marecková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S; Nawaz Khan, Irum; Lawrence, Claire; Dickie, Erin; McQuiggan, Doug A; Paus, Tomás

    2014-02-01

    Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain's response to faces and the use of oral contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use of OC and FFA response was replicated in an independent sample of 110 adolescent girls. Finally in a parallel behavioral study carried out in another sample of women, we found no evidence of differences in the pattern of eye movements while viewing faces between freely cycling women vs those taking oral contraceptives. The imaging findings might indicate enhanced processing of social cues in women taking OC and women during mid-cycle. PMID:23175677

  4. Metabolic response to human growth hormone during prolonged starvation

    PubMed Central

    Felig, Philip; Marliss, Errol B.; Cahill, George F.

    1971-01-01

    The metabolic response to human growth hormone (HGH) was studied in five obese subjects in the fed state and during prolonged (5-6 wk) starvation. In the fed state (three subjects), HGH induced an elevation in basal serum insulin concentration, a minimal increase in blood and urine ketone levels, and a marked reduction in urinary nitrogen and potassium excretion resulting in positive nitrogen and potassium balance. In prolonged fasting (four subjects), HGH administration resulted in a 2- to 3-fold increase in serum insulin which preceded a 50% elevation in blood glucose. Persistence of the lipolytic effects of HGH was indicated by a rise in free fatty acids and glycerol. The response differed markedly from the fed state in that blood β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate levels rose by 20-40%, resulting in total blood ketone acid concentrations of 10-12 mmoles/liter, ketonuria of 150-320 mmoles/day, and increased urinary potassium loss. The subjects complained of nausea, vomiting, weakness, and myalgias. Despite a 50% reduction in urea excretion during HGH administration, total nitrogen loss remained unchanged as urinary ammonia excretion rose by 50% and correlated directly with the degree of ketonuria. It is concluded that in prolonged starvation (a) HGH may have a direct insulinotropic effect on the beta cell independent of alterations in blood glucose concentration, (b) persistence of the lipolytic action of HGH results in severe exaggeration of starvation ketosis and interferes with its anticatabolic action by necessitating increased urinary ammonia loss, and (c) failure of HGH to reduce net protein catabolism in starvation suggests that this hormone does not have a prime regulatory role in conserving body protein stores during prolonged fasting. PMID:5540176

  5. Testicular response to melatonin or suprachiasmatic nuclei ablation in the spotted skunk.

    PubMed

    Berria, M; DeSantis, M; Mead, R A

    1990-07-01

    Testes of the Western spotted skunk enlarge and regress seasonally. The pineal hormone, melatonin, may be important in timing this seasonal reproductive activity. Likewise, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) have been implicated as possible neural regulators of pineal and reproductive events. These experiments were conducted to determine whether ablation of the SCN or constant administration of melatonin alters timing of the seasonal pattern of testicular regression and recrudescence. Male skunks (n = 24) were treated as follows: six received two empty Silastic capsules, six received two melatonin-filled Silastic capsules, six received sham lesions to the SCN, and six received lesions to the SCN (SCNx). All skunks were exposed to a natural photoperiod and had regressed testes at the onset of the experiment. Four of six males from the SCNx group had an average of 94 +/- 11.3% of these nuclei destroyed. Sham SCNx, animals with less than 40% of the SCN ablated, and males with empty capsules did not have fully enlarged testes until October. SCNx and melatonin-treated skunks exhibited a hastening of testicular recrudescence with maximal testis size being reached in June. Skunks with lesions to the SCN maintained enlarged testes for 5 months while all other groups exhibited rapid regression after attaining maximal testis size. Testicular regression occurred from July through October in animals receiving continuous melatonin, while controls exhibited recrudescence during this same period. Our data suggest that the SCN, melatonin, and thus the pineal gland, play a role in regulating the seasonal testicular cycle of the spotted skunk.

  6. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY.

    PubMed

    La Sala, Michael S; Hurtado, Maria D; Brown, Alicia R; Bohórquez, Diego V; Liddle, Rodger A; Herzog, Herbert; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Dotson, Cedrick D

    2013-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that the peripheral taste system may be modulated in the context of an animal's metabolic state. One purported mechanism for this phenomenon is that circulating gastrointestinal peptides modulate the functioning of the peripheral gustatory system. Recent evidence suggests endocrine signaling in the oral cavity can influence food intake (FI) and satiety. We hypothesized that these hormones may be affecting FI by influencing taste perception. We used immunohistochemistry along with genetic knockout models and the specific reconstitution of peptide YY (PYY) in saliva using gene therapy protocols to identify a role for PYY signaling in taste. We show that PYY is expressed in subsets of taste cells in murine taste buds. We also show, using brief-access testing with PYY knockouts, that PYY signaling modulates responsiveness to bitter-tasting stimuli, as well as to lipid emulsions. We show that salivary PYY augmentation, via viral vector therapy, rescues behavioral responsiveness to a lipid emulsion but not to bitter stimuli and that this response is likely mediated via activation of Y2 receptors localized apically in taste cells. Our findings suggest distinct functions for PYY produced locally in taste cells vs. that circulating systemically.

  7. Thyroid hormone responsive QTL and the evolution of paedomorphic salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Voss, S R; Kump, D K; Walker, J A; Shaffer, H B; Voss, G J

    2012-01-01

    The transformation of ancestral phenotypes into novel traits is poorly understood for many examples of evolutionary novelty. Ancestrally, salamanders have a biphasic life cycle with an aquatic larval stage, a brief and pronounced metamorphosis, followed by a terrestrial adult stage. Repeatedly during evolution, metamorphic timing has been delayed to exploit growth-permissive environments, resulting in paedomorphic salamanders that retain larval traits as adults. We used thyroid hormone (TH) to rescue metamorphic phenotypes in paedomorphic salamanders and then identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for life history traits that are associated with amphibian life cycle evolution: metamorphic timing and adult body size. We demonstrate that paedomorphic tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum complex) carry alleles at three moderate effect QTL (met1–3) that vary in responsiveness to TH and additively affect metamorphic timing. Salamanders that delay metamorphosis attain significantly larger body sizes as adults and met2 explains a significant portion of this variation. Thus, substitution of alleles at TH-responsive loci suggests an adaptive pleiotropic basis for two key life-history traits in amphibians: body size and metamorphic timing. Our study demonstrates a likely pathway for the evolution of novel paedomorphic species from metamorphic ancestors via selection of TH-response alleles that delay metamorphic timing and increase adult body size. PMID:22850698

  8. Hormonal response to Taekwondo fighting simulation in elite adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Pilz-Burstein, R; Ashkenazi, Y; Yaakobovitz, Y; Cohen, Y; Zigel, L; Nemet, D; Shamash, N; Eliakim, A

    2010-12-01

    Exercise training efficiency depends on the training load, as well as on the athlete's ability to tolerate it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of fighting simulation (3 fights, 6 min each, 30 min rest between fights) on anabolic (IGF-I, LH, FSH, estradiol, and testosterone) and catabolic hormones (cortisol) in elite, male (n = 10) and female (n = 10) adolescent (12-17 years) Taekwondo fighters. Blood samples were collected before the first and immediately after the third fight. The fighting simulation practice led to significant (p < 0.05) decreases in IGF-I (males -27.1 ± 25.6, females -22.4 ± 36.3 ng/ml), LH (males -0.7 ± 1.2, females -2.3 ± 3.3 U/L), and FSH (males -0.9 ± 0.5, females -1.5 ± 1.1 U/L), and to a significant increase (p < 0.05) in cortisol (males 141.9 ± 30.1, females 64.1 ± 30.6 mcg/dL) in both genders. Fighting simulation decreases in testosterone (males -1.9 ± 1.6, females -0.02 ± 0.06 ng/mL), and free androgen index (males -20.1 ± 21.5, females -0.3 ± 0.5) were significant (p < 0.05) only in male fighters. Exercise had no significant effect on estradiol, sex-hormone-binding globulins or thyroid function tests. Our data demonstrate that the physiologic and psychologic strain of a Taekwondo fighting simulation day led to a catabolic-type circulating hormonal response. PMID:20803154

  9. Pituitary and testicular response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone in normal and sulpiride-induced hyperprolactinaemic men.

    PubMed

    Nakano, R; Yagi, S; Nishi, T

    1988-05-01

    Pituitary and testicular response to an intravenous infusion of 480 micrograms luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) for 8 hours (1 microgram/min) was investigated in 8 male volunteers in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state. Eight normal men were given 150 mg of sulpiride daily for 14 days. Serum prolactin (PRL) levels were elevated significantly, but basal serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) did not change following daily oral administration of sulpiride in 8 normal men. Eight men showed biphasic LH response to LHRH infusion in both normal and hyperprolactinaemic state, and there was a rather exaggerated response in serum LH concentration in hyperprolactinaemic state. Serum FSH response to LHRH was similar in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state. Although slight increase in serum testosterone concentration was observed during LHRH infusion in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state, the statistical difference was not significant. The result of the present study suggests that the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, as measured by serum gonadotrophin and testosterone responses, is well reserved.

  10. Phylogenetic comparisons implicate sex hormone-binding globulin in "masculinization" of the female spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Hammond, Geoffrey L; Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Yalcinkaya, Tamer M; Underhill, Caroline; Place, Ned J; Glickman, Stephen E; Drea, Christine M; Wagner, Aaron P; Siiteri, Pentti K

    2012-03-01

    Exposures to sex steroids during fetal development are thought to contribute to the unique urogenital anatomy and social dominance of the female spotted hyena: overt phenotypes not shared by other hyenids (i.e. striped hyena, brown hyena, and aardwolf). Because both androgens and estrogens influence development of genitalia and behavior, and because plasma SHBG regulates their access to tissues, we compared the Shbg gene sequences, structures, and steroid-binding properties in the four extant hyenids. We found the hyenid Shbg genes (>95% identical) and mature protein sequences (98% identical) are highly conserved. As in other mammals, the hyenid SHBG all bind 5α-dihydrotestosterone with high affinity (K(d) = 0.62-1.47 nm), but they also bind estrone and dehydroepiandrosterone with similarly high affinity, and this unusual property was attributed to specific amino acids within their SHBG steroid-binding sites. Phylogenetic comparisons also indicated that the spotted hyena SHBG precursor uniquely lacks two leucine residues and has a L15W substitution within its secretion signal polypeptide, the reduced size and hydrophobicity of which markedly decreases the production of SHBG and may therefore explain why serum SHBG concentrations in male and female spotted hyenas are approximately five times lower than in other hyenids. This is important because low plasma SHBG concentrations in spotted hyenas will increase exposure to biologically active androgens and estrogen as well as to their precursors (dehydroepiandrosterone and estrone), which may contribute to the masculinized external genitalia of female spotted hyenas and to female social dominance over males. PMID:22253421

  11. Phylogenetic comparisons implicate sex hormone-binding globulin in "masculinization" of the female spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Hammond, Geoffrey L; Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Yalcinkaya, Tamer M; Underhill, Caroline; Place, Ned J; Glickman, Stephen E; Drea, Christine M; Wagner, Aaron P; Siiteri, Pentti K

    2012-03-01

    Exposures to sex steroids during fetal development are thought to contribute to the unique urogenital anatomy and social dominance of the female spotted hyena: overt phenotypes not shared by other hyenids (i.e. striped hyena, brown hyena, and aardwolf). Because both androgens and estrogens influence development of genitalia and behavior, and because plasma SHBG regulates their access to tissues, we compared the Shbg gene sequences, structures, and steroid-binding properties in the four extant hyenids. We found the hyenid Shbg genes (>95% identical) and mature protein sequences (98% identical) are highly conserved. As in other mammals, the hyenid SHBG all bind 5α-dihydrotestosterone with high affinity (K(d) = 0.62-1.47 nm), but they also bind estrone and dehydroepiandrosterone with similarly high affinity, and this unusual property was attributed to specific amino acids within their SHBG steroid-binding sites. Phylogenetic comparisons also indicated that the spotted hyena SHBG precursor uniquely lacks two leucine residues and has a L15W substitution within its secretion signal polypeptide, the reduced size and hydrophobicity of which markedly decreases the production of SHBG and may therefore explain why serum SHBG concentrations in male and female spotted hyenas are approximately five times lower than in other hyenids. This is important because low plasma SHBG concentrations in spotted hyenas will increase exposure to biologically active androgens and estrogen as well as to their precursors (dehydroepiandrosterone and estrone), which may contribute to the masculinized external genitalia of female spotted hyenas and to female social dominance over males.

  12. Growth hormone response to a growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulation test in a population-based study following cranial irradiation of childhood brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, M; Lassen, S; Poulsen, H S; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Schmiegelow, K; Hertz, H; Müller, J

    2000-01-01

    Children with brain tumors are at high risk of developing growth hormone deficiency (GHD) after cranial irradiation (CI) if the hypothalamus/pituitary (HP) axis falls within the fields of irradiation. The biological effective dose (BED) of irradiation to the HP region was determined, since BED gives a means of expressing the biological effect of various irradiation treatment schedules in a uniform way. Hypothalamic versus pituitary damage as cause of GHD was distinguished in 62 patients by comparing the growth hormone (GH) peak response to an insulin tolerance test (ITT)/arginine stimulation test and the GH response to a growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulation test. Peak GH response to a GHRH test was significantly higher (median 7.3 mU/l; range: 0.5--79.0 mU/l) than that of an ITT/arginine test (median 4.7 mU/l; range: 0.01--75.0 mU/l) (p = 0.017). Peak GH after a GHRH test was significantly inversely correlated to follow-up time (r(s) = -0.46, p < 0.0001) and to BED (R(s) = -0.28, p = 0.03), and both were found to be of significance in a multivariante regression analysis. We speculate that a significant number of patients developed hypothalamic radiation-induced damage to the GHRH secreting neurons, and secondary to this the pituitary gland developed decreased responsiveness to GHRH following CI in childhood.

  13. A theoretical study of electrical and thermal response in resistance spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Na, S.J.; Park, S.W.

    1996-08-01

    The effect of contact resistance including constriction and contamination resistance has been a major hurdle for the thermoelectrical analysis of the resistance spot welding process. In this paper, a simple model was suggested and used for calculating the electrical and thermal response of the resistance spot welding process to investigate the influence of contacting forces on the formation of weld nuggets. The electrode surface of the contact interface was assumed to be axisymmetric and its microasperities to have a trapezoidal cross-section. These microasperities were considered as the one-dimensional contact resistance elements in the finite element formulation. The contamination film was assumed to be a nonconducting oxide layer, which is very brittle, so that it is broken to some number of pieces when a contacting pressure is being applied. The crushed films were assumed to be distributed at regular intervals and to conserve their size and number during the welding process. The simulation results revealed that the proposed model can be successfully used to predict the effect of the contact resistance on the electrical and thermal response of the resistance spot welding process.

  14. Pituitary and adrenal hormone responses to pharmacological, physical, and psychological stimulation in habitual smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, C; Scherer, G; Strasburger, C J

    1994-10-01

    Hormone responses to injection of corticotropin-releasing hormone following bicycle ergometry and psychological stress were studied in ten habitual smokers and ten nonsmokers. Compared to injection of saline, significant increases were found in adrenocorticotropin, prolactin, growth hormone, total serum cortisol, and salivary cortisol under all three stimulations except for salivary cortisol under ergometry. Furthermore, the smokers showed significant elevations of all five hormones investigated following the smoking of two cigarettes of the subject's preferred brand. Comparisons of hormone responses between smokers and nonsmokers revealed a general trend towards stronger responses in nonsmokers. However, due to the small number of subjects investigated and considerable variation in the individual hormone responses these differences reached statistical significance only for growth hormone responses following ergometry and salivary cortisol responses after psychological stress. In addition, the circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol was measured on two occasions between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. in the subject's natural environment. The typical circadian pattern of decreasing cortisol levels was observed, with no significant differences between smokers and nonsmokers. We conclude that chronic nicotine consumption may lead to lower responses of multiple hormones not only to nicotine but to a variety of stimuli, and that these alterations do not necessarily affect unstimulated circadian profiles of free cortisol. PMID:7865987

  15. Responses of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin to prolonged administration of the dopamine antagonist in normal women and women with low-weight amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Larsen, S

    1981-06-01

    The responses of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin to prolonged administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist metoclopramide (5 mg twice daily) were investigated in six normal women and six women with low-weight amenorrhea (LWA). In contrast to the normal group, the LWA group showed no significant changes in the mean basal prolactin level or the mean prolactin response to stimulation with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, but there was an significant elevation of the mean net increase in luteinizing hormone after stimulation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone. On the basis of these data, the possibility of increased central dopaminergic activity in women with LWA is discussed. PMID:6788608

  16. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection.

  17. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection. PMID:6346309

  18. Identification and control of moulds responsible for black spot spoilage in dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Alía, Alberto; Andrade, María J; Rodríguez, Alicia; Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Bernáldez, Victoria; Córdoba, Juan J

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this work were to identify moulds responsible for black spot spoilage in the drying and cellar stages of dry-cured ham processing and evaluate the effectiveness of preventive actions for controlling this alteration. Four mould strains isolated from spoiled hams were identified by morphological characteristics and the ITS and β-tubulin sequencing. Two of them were Cladosporium oxysporum, one was C. cladosporioides and the remaining one was C. herbarum. These spoiling strains reproduced the black spots on dry-cured ham-based media and ham slices. Additionally, the effect of water activity (aw) conditions reached throughout dry-cured ham ripening and the activity of the protective culture Penicillium chrysogenum CECT 20922 against the spoiling moulds were evaluated. In the dry-cured ham model system the growth of the Cladosporium strains was minimised when the aw approaches 0.84 or in P. chrysogenum CECT 20922 inoculated dry-cured ham slices. Therefore such combination could be used to avoid the black spot formation in dry-cured ham.

  19. Identification and control of moulds responsible for black spot spoilage in dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Alía, Alberto; Andrade, María J; Rodríguez, Alicia; Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Bernáldez, Victoria; Córdoba, Juan J

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this work were to identify moulds responsible for black spot spoilage in the drying and cellar stages of dry-cured ham processing and evaluate the effectiveness of preventive actions for controlling this alteration. Four mould strains isolated from spoiled hams were identified by morphological characteristics and the ITS and β-tubulin sequencing. Two of them were Cladosporium oxysporum, one was C. cladosporioides and the remaining one was C. herbarum. These spoiling strains reproduced the black spots on dry-cured ham-based media and ham slices. Additionally, the effect of water activity (aw) conditions reached throughout dry-cured ham ripening and the activity of the protective culture Penicillium chrysogenum CECT 20922 against the spoiling moulds were evaluated. In the dry-cured ham model system the growth of the Cladosporium strains was minimised when the aw approaches 0.84 or in P. chrysogenum CECT 20922 inoculated dry-cured ham slices. Therefore such combination could be used to avoid the black spot formation in dry-cured ham. PMID:27468139

  20. The luteinizing hormone response to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, prostaglandin E2 and naloxone is modulated by divergent sensitivity to testosterone feedback.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, U; Pirke, K M

    1985-11-01

    Testosterone (T) levels necessary to suppress LH secretion are reduced in starvation, and increased feedback sensitivity to T is therefore postulated. The luteinizing hormone (LH) response to naloxone (Nal) is more easily suppressed by starvation than is its response to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LRH). If the divergent suppressibility is due to altered feedback sensitivity in starvation, it should be feasible to reproduce this phenomenon in normally nourished rats by increasing T levels. Adult male Wistar rats were castrated and implanted with silicone capsules (0-2.6 cm) filled with T. Indwelling jugular cannulae were implanted. On days 4 to 8 post operation rats were injected iv with LRH (25-400 ng/kg body weight), PGE2 (0.05-1.0 mg/kg body weight) or Nal (0.5-50 mg/kg body weight). Blood samples were drawn before and 10, 20 and 30 min after injection. Results show that the response to Nal was already suppressed at medium T levels. The LH response to PGE2 was diminished to a greater extent than the response to LRH but was never completely suppressed by increasing steroid levels. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that steroid feedback sensitivity augments with increasing levels of regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  1. Responses of ram lambs to active immunization against testosterone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Schanbacher, B D

    1982-03-01

    Active immunization of young ram lambs against testosterone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) was shown to block the growth attributes characteristic of intact ram lambs. Testosterone and LHRH-immunized lambs grew at a slower rate and converted feed to live weight gain less efficiently than albumin-immunized controls. Lambs immunized against testosterone and LHRH had high antibody titers for their respective antigens. Moreover, testosterone-immunized lambs had high serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone, whereas LHRH-immunized lambs had low to nondetectable serum concentrations of these hormones. Release of LH and testosterone following the intravenous administration of LHRH (250 ng) was absent in LHRH-immunized lambs, but quantitatively similar for intact and albumin-immunized control lambs. Testosterone-immunized lambs responded as did conventional castrates with a large LH release, but testosterone concentrations were unchanged. These findings are discussed relative to the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular endocrine axis and the importance of gonadotropin support for normal testicular development. These data show that LHRH immunoneutralization effectively retards testicular development and produces a castration effect in young ram lambs.

  2. Elucidation of defense-related signaling responses to spot blotch infection in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ranabir; Sharaff, Murali; Pradhan, Maitree; Sethi, Avinash; Bandyopadhyay, Tirthankar; Mishra, Vinod K; Chand, Ramesh; Chowdhury, Apurba K; Joshi, Arun K; Pandey, Shree P

    2016-04-01

    Spot blotch disease, caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana, is an important threat to wheat, causing an annual loss of ~17%. Under epidemic conditions, these losses may be 100%, yet the molecular responses of wheat to spot blotch remain almost uncharacterized. Moreover, defense-related phytohormone signaling genes have been poorly characterized in wheat. Here, we have identified 18 central components of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET), and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) signaling pathways as well as the genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway in wheat. In time-course experiments, we characterized the reprogramming of expression of these pathways in two contrasting genotypes: Yangmai #6 (resistant to spot blotch) and Sonalika (susceptible to spot blotch). We further evaluated the performance of a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) by crossing Yangmai#6 and Sonalika (parents) and subsequent selfing to F10 under field conditions in trials at multiple locations. We characterized the reprogramming of defense-related signaling in these RILs as a consequence of spot blotch attack. During resistance to spot blotch attack, wheat strongly elicits SA signaling (SA biogenesis as well as the NPR1-dependent signaling pathway), along with WRKY33 transcription factor, followed by an enhanced expression of phenylpropanoid pathway genes. These may lead to accumulation of phenolics-based defense metabolites that may render resistance against spot blotch. JA signaling may synergistically contribute to the resistance. Failure to elicit SA (and possibly JA) signaling may lead to susceptibility against spot blotch infection in wheat.

  3. Phenotypic integration and independence: Hormones, performance, and response to environmental change

    PubMed Central

    Ketterson, Ellen D.; Atwell, Jonathan W.; McGlothlin, Joel W.

    2009-01-01

    Hormones coordinate the co-expression of behavioral, physiological, and morphological traits, giving rise to correlations among traits and organisms whose parts work well together. This article considers the implications of these hormonal correlations with respect to the evolution of hormone-mediated traits. Such traits can evolve owing to changes in hormone secretion, hormonal affinity for carrier proteins, rates of degradation and conversion, and interaction with target tissues to name a few. Critically, however, we know very little about whether these changes occur independently or in tandem, and thus whether hormones promote the evolution of tight phenotypic integration or readily allow the parts of the phenotype to evolve independently. For example, when selection favors a change in expression of hormonally mediated characters, is that alteration likely to come about through changes in hormone secretion (signal strength), changes in response to a fixed level of secretion (sensitivity of target tissues), or both? At one extreme, if the phenotype is tightly integrated and only the signal responds via selection's action on one or more hormonally mediated traits, adaptive modification may be constrained by past selection for phenotypic integration. Alternatively, response to selection may be facilitated if multivariate selection favors new combinations that can be easily achieved by a change in signal strength. On the other hand, if individual target tissues readily “unplug” from a hormone signal in response to selection, then the phenotype may be seen as a loose confederation that responds on a trait-by-trait basis, easily allowing adaptive modification, although perhaps more slowly than if signal variation were the primary mode of evolutionary response. Studies reviewed here and questions for future research address the relative importance of integration and independence by comparing sexes, individuals, and populations. Most attention is devoted to the

  4. Modulation of long-term memory and extinction responses induced by growth hormone (GH) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) in rats.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Rivas, S; Rivas-Arancibia, S; Vázquez-Pereyra, F; Vázquez-Sandoval, R; Borgonio-Pérez, G

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the participation of growth hormone (GH) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) in the modulation of long-term memory and the extinction response of a passive avoidance task in rats. However, the effect on memory vary according to the age of the animals due to plasma levels of either hormone being modified during the aging process. Male Wistar rats were divided according to age into two experimental blocks (young rats 3 months old and aged rats 24 months old at the start of the experiment) where each block received the same treatment. Each experimental block was then divided randomly into three groups where two were experimental and the other served as control. The animals were then submitted to a one-trial passive avoidance conditioning and tested for memory retention 24 hrs after as well as twice a week until the extinction response occurred. The control group received an isotonic saline solution and the other two groups received 0.8 U.I. of GH or 4 mcg of GHRH respectively. All substances were in a 0.08 ml volume and applied 24 hrs before training as well as 24 hrs before each retention session. The results indicate that GH and GHRH modulate long-term memory as well as the extinction response and in either case the response seems to vary with age. GH and GHRH facilitates long-term memory in young rats but not in aged rats. Finally, whereas GH delays the extinction response in both groups, GHRH retards the extinction only in aged rats.

  5. Hormonal response to exercise in humans: influence of hypoxia and physical training.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, M; Bangsbo, J; Lortie, G; Galbo, H

    1988-02-01

    Hypoxia and physical training alter the responses of glucoregulatory hormones to absolute work loads in opposite directions. These effects have tentatively been ascribed to changes in maximal O2 consumption (VO2 max) and ensuing changes in relative work loads. However, hypoxia as well as training may more specifically influence the hormonal response. We therefore differentiated the influence of hypoxia, training, and VO2 max, respectively, on the hormonal response to bicycle exercise. Responses to hypoxia in a low-pressure chamber (PB = 465 vs. 730 Torr) were studied at given absolute and relative (85% VO2 max) work loads in seven endurance-trained athletes (T) and 7 age and weight-matched sedentary subjects (C). Concentrations in plasma of norepinephrine, growth hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol were always closely related to the relative work load. However, the epinephrine response in T, but not in C, was at the same relative work load higher during hypoxia (5.84 +/- 0.83 nmol/l) than during normoxia (4.26 +/- 0.44, P less than 0.05). These results indicate that the hormonal response is influenced by hypoxia and physical training, mainly via changes in the relative work load. However, in trained subjects both at rest and during exercise, an enhancing effect of hypoxia per se on the epinephrine response is seen, probably due to an increased adrenal medullary secretory responsiveness in long-term endurance-trained subjects.

  6. Negative regulation of the innate antiviral immune response by TRIM62 from orange spotted grouper.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Zhou, Sheng; Wang, Shaowen; Yang, Min; Qin, Qiwei; Huang, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    Increased reports uncovered that mammalian tripartite motif-containing 62 (TRIM62) exerts crucial roles in cancer and innate immune response. However, the roles of fish TRIM62 in antiviral immune response remained uncertain. In this study, a TRIM62 gene was cloned from orange spotted grouper (EcTRIM62) and its roles in grouper RNA virus infection was elucidated in vitro. EcTRIM62 shared 99% and 83% identity to bicolor damselfish (Stegastes partitus) and human (Homo sapiens), respectively. Sequence alignment indicated that EcTRIM62 contained three domains, including a RING-finger domain, a B-box domain and a SPRY domain. In healthy grouper, the transcript of EcTRIM62 was predominantly detected in brain and liver, followed by heart, skin, spleen, fin, gill, intestine, and stomach. Subcellular localization analysis indicated that bright fluorescence spots were observed in the cytoplasm of EcTRIM62-transfected grouper spleen (GS) cells. During red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis (RGNNV) infection, overexpression of EcTRIM62 significantly enhanced the severity of CPE and increased viral gene transcriptions. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of EcTRIM62 significantly decreased the transcription level of interferon signaling molecules, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF7, interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5), myxovirus resistance gene MXI, and MXII, suggesting that the negative regulation of interferon immune response by EcTRIM62 might directly contributed to its enhancing effect on RGNNV replication. Furthermore, our results also demonstrated that overexpression of EcTRIM62 was able to differently regulate the expression levels of pro-inflammation cytokines. In addition, we found the ectopic expression of EcTIRM62 negatively regulated MDA5-, but not mediator of IRF3 activation (MITA)-induced interferon immune response. Further studies showed that the deletion of RING domain and SPRY domain

  7. Negative regulation of the innate antiviral immune response by TRIM62 from orange spotted grouper.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Zhou, Sheng; Wang, Shaowen; Yang, Min; Qin, Qiwei; Huang, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    Increased reports uncovered that mammalian tripartite motif-containing 62 (TRIM62) exerts crucial roles in cancer and innate immune response. However, the roles of fish TRIM62 in antiviral immune response remained uncertain. In this study, a TRIM62 gene was cloned from orange spotted grouper (EcTRIM62) and its roles in grouper RNA virus infection was elucidated in vitro. EcTRIM62 shared 99% and 83% identity to bicolor damselfish (Stegastes partitus) and human (Homo sapiens), respectively. Sequence alignment indicated that EcTRIM62 contained three domains, including a RING-finger domain, a B-box domain and a SPRY domain. In healthy grouper, the transcript of EcTRIM62 was predominantly detected in brain and liver, followed by heart, skin, spleen, fin, gill, intestine, and stomach. Subcellular localization analysis indicated that bright fluorescence spots were observed in the cytoplasm of EcTRIM62-transfected grouper spleen (GS) cells. During red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis (RGNNV) infection, overexpression of EcTRIM62 significantly enhanced the severity of CPE and increased viral gene transcriptions. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of EcTRIM62 significantly decreased the transcription level of interferon signaling molecules, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF7, interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5), myxovirus resistance gene MXI, and MXII, suggesting that the negative regulation of interferon immune response by EcTRIM62 might directly contributed to its enhancing effect on RGNNV replication. Furthermore, our results also demonstrated that overexpression of EcTRIM62 was able to differently regulate the expression levels of pro-inflammation cytokines. In addition, we found the ectopic expression of EcTIRM62 negatively regulated MDA5-, but not mediator of IRF3 activation (MITA)-induced interferon immune response. Further studies showed that the deletion of RING domain and SPRY domain

  8. A specific area of olfactory cortex involved in stress hormone responses to predator odours.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Kunio; Lu, Zhonghua; Ye, Xiaolan; Olson, David P; Lowell, Bradford B; Buck, Linda B

    2016-04-01

    Instinctive reactions to danger are critical to the perpetuation of species and are observed throughout the animal kingdom. The scent of predators induces an instinctive fear response in mice that includes behavioural changes, as well as a surge in blood stress hormones that mobilizes multiple body systems to escape impending danger. How the olfactory system routes predator signals detected in the nose to achieve these effects is unknown. Here we identify a specific area of the olfactory cortex in mice that induces stress hormone responses to volatile predator odours. Using monosynaptic and polysynaptic viral tracers, we found that multiple olfactory cortical areas transmit signals to hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons, which control stress hormone levels. However, only one minor cortical area, the amygdalo-piriform transition area (AmPir), contained neurons upstream of CRH neurons that were activated by volatile predator odours. Chemogenetic stimulation of AmPir activated CRH neurons and induced an increase in blood stress hormones, mimicking an instinctive fear response. Moreover, chemogenetic silencing of AmPir markedly reduced the stress hormone response to predator odours without affecting a fear behaviour. These findings suggest that AmPir, a small area comprising <5% of the olfactory cortex, plays a key part in the hormonal component of the instinctive fear response to volatile predator scents. PMID:27001694

  9. A specific area of olfactory cortex involved in stress hormone responses to predator odors

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, Kunio; Lu, Zhonghua; Ye, Xiaolan; Olson, David P.; Lowell, Bradford B.; Buck, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    Instinctive reactions to danger are critical to the perpetuation of species and are observed throughout the animal kingdom. The scent of predators induces an instinctive fear response in mice that includes behavioral changes as well as a surge in blood stress hormones that mobilizes multiple body systems to escape impending danger1,2. How the olfactory system routes predator signals detected in the nose to achieve these effects is unknown. Here we identify a specific area of the olfactory cortex that induces stress hormone responses to volatile predator odors. Using monosynaptic and polysynaptic viral tracers, we found that multiple olfactory cortical areas transmit signals to hypothalamic CRH (corticotropin releasing hormone) neurons, which control stress hormone levels. However, only one minor cortical area, the amygdalo-piriform transition area (AmPir), contained neurons upstream of CRH neurons that were activated by volatile predator odors. Chemogenetic stimulation of AmPir activated CRH neurons and induced an increase in blood stress hormone, mimicking an instinctive fear response. Moreover, chemogenetic silencing of AmPir markedly reduced the stress hormone response to predator odors without affecting a fear behavior. These findings suggest that AmPir, a small area comprising <5% of the olfactory cortex, plays a key role in the hormonal component of the instinctive fear response to volatile predator scents. PMID:27001694

  10. Disease resistance or growth: the role of plant hormones in balancing immune responses and fitness costs

    PubMed Central

    Denancé, Nicolas; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Goffner, Deborah; Molina, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth and response to environmental cues are largely governed by phytohormones. The plant hormones ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) play a central role in the regulation of plant immune responses. In addition, other plant hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinins, gibberellins, and brassinosteroids, that have been thoroughly described to regulate plant development and growth, have recently emerged as key regulators of plant immunity. Plant hormones interact in complex networks to balance the response to developmental and environmental cues and thus limiting defense-associated fitness costs. The molecular mechanisms that govern these hormonal networks are largely unknown. Moreover, hormone signaling pathways are targeted by pathogens to disturb and evade plant defense responses. In this review, we address novel insights on the regulatory roles of the ABA, SA, and auxin in plant resistance to pathogens and we describe the complex interactions among their signal transduction pathways. The strategies developed by pathogens to evade hormone-mediated defensive responses are also described. Based on these data we discuss how hormone signaling could be manipulated to improve the resistance of crops to pathogens. PMID:23745126

  11. A specific area of olfactory cortex involved in stress hormone responses to predator odours.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Kunio; Lu, Zhonghua; Ye, Xiaolan; Olson, David P; Lowell, Bradford B; Buck, Linda B

    2016-04-01

    Instinctive reactions to danger are critical to the perpetuation of species and are observed throughout the animal kingdom. The scent of predators induces an instinctive fear response in mice that includes behavioural changes, as well as a surge in blood stress hormones that mobilizes multiple body systems to escape impending danger. How the olfactory system routes predator signals detected in the nose to achieve these effects is unknown. Here we identify a specific area of the olfactory cortex in mice that induces stress hormone responses to volatile predator odours. Using monosynaptic and polysynaptic viral tracers, we found that multiple olfactory cortical areas transmit signals to hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons, which control stress hormone levels. However, only one minor cortical area, the amygdalo-piriform transition area (AmPir), contained neurons upstream of CRH neurons that were activated by volatile predator odours. Chemogenetic stimulation of AmPir activated CRH neurons and induced an increase in blood stress hormones, mimicking an instinctive fear response. Moreover, chemogenetic silencing of AmPir markedly reduced the stress hormone response to predator odours without affecting a fear behaviour. These findings suggest that AmPir, a small area comprising <5% of the olfactory cortex, plays a key part in the hormonal component of the instinctive fear response to volatile predator scents.

  12. Growth hormone-releasing hormone disruption extends lifespan and regulates response to caloric restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liou Y; Spong, Adam; Swindell, William R; Fang, Yimin; Hill, Cristal; Huber, Joshua A; Boehm, Jacob D; Westbrook, Reyhan; Salvatori, Roberto; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We examine the impact of targeted disruption of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in mice on longevity and the putative mechanisms of delayed aging. GHRH knockout mice are remarkably long-lived, exhibiting major shifts in the expression of genes related to xenobiotic detoxification, stress resistance, and insulin signaling. These mutant mice also have increased adiponectin levels and alterations in glucose homeostasis consistent with the removal of the counter-insulin effects of growth hormone. While these effects overlap with those of caloric restriction, we show that the effects of caloric restriction (CR) and the GHRH mutation are additive, with lifespan of GHRH-KO mutants further increased by CR. We conclude that GHRH-KO mice feature perturbations in a network of signaling pathways related to stress resistance, metabolic control and inflammation, and therefore provide a new model that can be used to explore links between GHRH repression, downregulation of the somatotropic axis, and extended longevity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01098.001 PMID:24175087

  13. [Hormonal response following the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, estradiol and gestil in sheep].

    PubMed

    Batzhargalin, E

    1985-01-01

    Studies were carried out in an anestral season with three ovariectomized and four intact sheep to establish the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. It was found that following three-fold injections with GnRH (250 ng, 250 ng, and 40 micrograms) at 2-hour intervals an immediate rise of the luteinizing hormone in the peripheral blood followed, tending to increase further with each injection. The concentration of this hormone after treatment with 17-beta-estradiol at the rate of 20 micrograms was first suppressed below the initial level up to the 8-12th hour, followed by a peak in its release between the 12th and the 24th hour. At stimulation with gonadotropic preparations the ovaries in the intact sheep responded with the gradual rise of the 17-beta-estradiol level, reaching a maximum at the 18th hour following injection, while in the ovariectomized animals there were no essential changes with the treatment during the experimental period. Data made it reasonable to believe that the application of these preparations might be useful in testing the functional state of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in sheep.

  14. Hypertrophic response of the Association of Thyroid Hormone and Exercise in the Heart of Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Rodrigues; Resende, Elmiro Santos; Lopes, Leandro; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Chagas, Rafaella; Fidale, Thiago; Rodrigues, Poliana

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy is a component of cardiac remodeling occurring in response to an increase of the activity or functional overload of the heart. Objective Assess hypertrophic response of the association of thyroid hormone and exercise in the rat heart. Methods We used 37 Wistar rats, male, adults were randomly divided into four groups: control, hormone (TH), exercise (E), thyroid hormone and exercise (H + E); the group received daily hormone levothyroxine sodium by gavage at a dose of 20 μg thyroid hormone/100g body weight, the exercise group took swimming five times a week, with additional weight corresponding to 20% of body weight for six weeks; in group H + E were applied simultaneously TH treatment groups and E. The statistics used was analysis of variance, where appropriate, by Tukey test and Pearson correlation test. Results The T4 was greater in groups TH and H + E. The total weight of the heart was greater in patients who received thyroid hormone and left ventricular weight was greater in the TH group. The transverse diameter of cardiomyocytes increased in groups TH, E and H + E. The percentage of collagen was greater in groups E and H + E Correlation analysis between variables showed distinct responses. Conclusion The association of thyroid hormone with high-intensity exercise produced cardiac hypertrophy, and generated a standard hypertrophy not directly correlated to the degree of fibrosis. PMID:24676374

  15. Gender-specific regulation of response to thyroid hormone in aging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Similar to other systems, the endocrine system is affected by aging. Thyroid hormone, the action of which is affected by many factors, has been shown to be associated with longevity. The most useful marker for the assessment of thyroid hormone action is TSH level. Although age and gender are believed to modify the pituitary set point or response to free thyroid hormone concentration, the precise age- and gender-dependent responses to thyroid hormone have yet to be reported. Methods We analyzed the results of 3564 thyroid function tests obtained from patients who received medication at both out- and inpatient clinics of Shinshu University Hospital. Subjects were from among those with thyroid function test results in the normal or mildly abnormal range. Based on a log-linear relationship between the concentrations of FHs and TSH, we established the putative resistance index to assess the relation between serum FH and TSH levels. Results Free thyroid hormone and TSH concentration showed an inverse log-linear relation. In males, there was a negative relationship between the free T3 resistance index and age. In females, although there were no relationships between age and FHs, the indices were positively related to age. Conclusions These findings indicated that there is a gender-specific response to thyroid hormone with aging. Although the TSH level is a useful marker for the assessment of peripheral thyroid hormone action, the values should be interpreted carefully, especially with regard to age- and gender-related differences. PMID:22280879

  16. Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications ofPrice-Responsive Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-08-01

    Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulatedelectricity industries share one common feature: the absence of anysignificant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, most electricity consumers stillpay an average cost based regulated retail tariff held over from the eraof vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are oftenforced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in openmarkets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who aresometimes additionally forbidden by regulators from signing hedgingcontracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time(or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price ofelectricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumptionaccordingly. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic,which together with the non storability of electricity that requiresmarket clearing over very short time steps spawn many other problemsassociated with electricity markets, such as exercise of market power andprice volatility. Indeed, electricity generation resources can bestretched to the point where system adequacy is threatened. Economictheory suggests that even modest price responsiveness can relieve thestress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To quantify thiseffect, actual generator bid data from the New York control area is usedto construct supply stacks and intersect them with demand curves ofvarious slopes to approximate the effect of different levels of demandresponse. The potential impact of real-time pricing (RTP) on theequilibrium spot price and quantity is then estimated. These resultsindicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a moreprice-responsive demand providing policymakers with a measure of howprices can be potentially reduced and consumption maintained within thecapability of generation assets.

  17. The hemic response of white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) with inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Amy B; Parkinson, Lily A; Grant, Krystan R; Carlson, Eric; Campbell, Terry W

    2016-05-01

    As elasmobranch medicine becomes more commonplace, there continues to be confusion with techniques and evaluation of the shark hemogram and it remains unknown if they are able to mount an inflammatory hemic response. The aims of this study were to compare two total white blood cell (WBC) count techniques, establish a reference interval for captive white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum), and determine if elasmobranchs are capable of mounting an inflammatory hemic response. Correlation statistics were performed on hematologic results for healthy female bamboo sharks to assess the use of Natt-Herrick's and phloxine methods. Total WBC counts and differentials were obtained from males with severe traumatic clasper wounds and compared to the healthy females. We elected clasper amputation as the preferred treatment intervention and post-operative hematology was performed one month later. There was poor correlation of leukocyte counts between the two WBC count methods. Hematologic values were established for the females and males pre- and post-operatively. Males with wounds had a marked leukocytosis and heterophilia. Post-operative blood work showed a resolution of total WBC count and a trend toward resolution of the heterophilia. This study provides hematologic values for white-spotted bamboo sharks and confirms that the Natt-Herrick's method is preferred for lymphocytic species. Hematologic differences present in males with clasper wounds suggests that elasmobranchs do mount an inflammatory hemic response. Treatment via clasper amputation proved to be a safe and efficient means for clinical treatment that led to a trend toward resolution of the inflammatory leukogram. Zoo Biol. 35:251-259, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The hemic response of white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) with inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Amy B; Parkinson, Lily A; Grant, Krystan R; Carlson, Eric; Campbell, Terry W

    2016-05-01

    As elasmobranch medicine becomes more commonplace, there continues to be confusion with techniques and evaluation of the shark hemogram and it remains unknown if they are able to mount an inflammatory hemic response. The aims of this study were to compare two total white blood cell (WBC) count techniques, establish a reference interval for captive white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum), and determine if elasmobranchs are capable of mounting an inflammatory hemic response. Correlation statistics were performed on hematologic results for healthy female bamboo sharks to assess the use of Natt-Herrick's and phloxine methods. Total WBC counts and differentials were obtained from males with severe traumatic clasper wounds and compared to the healthy females. We elected clasper amputation as the preferred treatment intervention and post-operative hematology was performed one month later. There was poor correlation of leukocyte counts between the two WBC count methods. Hematologic values were established for the females and males pre- and post-operatively. Males with wounds had a marked leukocytosis and heterophilia. Post-operative blood work showed a resolution of total WBC count and a trend toward resolution of the heterophilia. This study provides hematologic values for white-spotted bamboo sharks and confirms that the Natt-Herrick's method is preferred for lymphocytic species. Hematologic differences present in males with clasper wounds suggests that elasmobranchs do mount an inflammatory hemic response. Treatment via clasper amputation proved to be a safe and efficient means for clinical treatment that led to a trend toward resolution of the inflammatory leukogram. Zoo Biol. 35:251-259, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26970476

  19. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A.; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs. PMID:26106585

  20. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-07-12

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems.

  1. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems PMID:27420076

  2. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems. PMID:27420076

  3. Rickettsia massiliae and Rickettsia conorii Israeli Spotted Fever Strain Differentially Regulate Endothelial Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Bechelli, Jeremy; Smalley, Claire; Milhano, Natacha; Walker, David H; Fang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsiae primarily target microvascular endothelial cells. However, it remains elusive how endothelial cell responses to rickettsiae play a role in the pathogenesis of rickettsial diseases. In the present study, we employed two rickettsial species with high sequence homology but differing virulence to investigate the pathological endothelial cell responses. Rickettsia massiliae is a newly documented human pathogen that causes a mild spotted fever rickettsiosis. The "Israeli spotted fever" strain of R. conorii (ISF) causes severe disease with a mortality rate up to 30% in hospitalized patients. At 48 hours post infection (HPI), R. conorii (ISF) induced a significant elevation of IL-8 and IL-6 while R. massiliae induced a statistically significant elevated amount of MCP-1 at both transcriptional and protein synthesis levels. Strikingly, R. conorii (ISF), but not R. massiliae, caused a significant level of cell death or injury in HMEC-1 cells at 72 HPI, demonstrated by live-dead cell staining, annexin V staining and lactate dehydrogenase release. Monolayers of endothelial cells infected with R. conorii (ISF) showed a statistically significant decrease in electrical resistance across the monolayer compared to both R. massiliae-infected and uninfected cells at 72 HPI, suggesting increased endothelial permeability. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibitors of caspase-1 significantly reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase by R. conorii (ISF)-infected HMEC-1 cells, which suggests the role of caspase-1 in mediating the death of endothelial cells. Taken together, our data illustrated that a distinct proinflammatory cytokine profile and endothelial dysfunction, as evidenced by endothelial cell death/injury and increased permeability, are associated with the severity of rickettsial diseases.

  4. Fluoride inhibition of the hydro-osmotic response of the toad urinary bladder to antidiuretic hormone.

    PubMed

    Yorio, T; Sinclair, R; Henry, S

    1981-11-01

    The hydro-osmotic response of the toad bladder to antidiuretic hormone and cyclic AMP was inhibited by the methoxyflurane metabolite, fluoride. The osmotic transfer of water in the absence of hormone was unaffected by fluoride as was the hydroosmotic response due to hypertonicity of the serosal bathing media. Osmotic water movements across N-ethylmaleimide-"fixed" vasopressin or cyclic AMP-stimulated bladders were likewise unchanged by fluoride, suggesting that fluoride is exerting an action subsequent to the endogenous formation of cyclic AMP but before the final effector mechanism. Fluoride increased intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations even in the presence of added hormone. Fluoride suppressed calmodulin activity and prevented its activation of phosphodiesterase. Fluoride had no effect on oxygen consumption of toad urinary bladder cells but reduced lactate formation and anerobic metabolism. This decrease in the glycolytic energy source did not contribute to the inhibition of the hormonal response since 2-deoxyglucose was without effect on hormonal mediated osmotic-water flow. It is postulated that the fluoride-induced polyuria after methoxyflurane anesthesia may be due in part to the ability of fluoride to interfere with calcium and calmodulin-initiated processes (other than phosphodiesterase activity) that may occur in the stimulus-reabsorption coupling response of antidiuretic hormone.

  5. Different responses of selected hormones to three types of exercise in young men.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Keith A; Gilbert, Kate L; Hall, George M; Andrews, Robert C; Thompson, Dylan

    2013-03-01

    Exercise is a potent stimulus for release of growth hormone (GH), cortisol, testosterone and prolactin, and prolonged exercise inhibits insulin secretion. These responses seem to be specific to the type of exercise but this has been poorly characterised primarily because they have not been compared during exercise performed by the same individuals. We investigated hormone responses to resistance, sprint and endurance exercise in young men using a repeated measures design in which each subject served as their own control. Eight healthy non-obese young adults (18-25 years) were studied on four occasions in random order: 30-s cycle ergometer sprint (Sprint), 30-min resistance exercise bout (Resistance), 30-min cycle at 70 % VO(2max) (Endurance), and seated rest in the laboratory (Rest). Cortisol, GH, testosterone, prolactin, insulin and glucose concentrations were measured for 60 min after the four different interventions. Endurance and sprint exercise significantly increased GH, cortisol, prolactin and testosterone. Sprint exercise also increased insulin concentrations, whereas this decreased in response to endurance exercise. Resistance exercise significantly increased only testosterone and glucose. Sprint exercise elicited the largest response per unit of work, but the smallest response relative to mean work rate in all hormones. In conclusion, the nature and magnitude of the hormone response were influenced by exercise type, perhaps reflecting the roles of these hormones in regulating metabolism during and after resistance, sprint and endurance exercise.

  6. A serotonin receptor antagonist, but not melatonin, modulates hormonal responses to capture stress in two populations of garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis and Thamnophis sirtalis concinnus).

    PubMed

    Lutterschmidt, Deborah I; Mason, Robert T

    2005-05-01

    Hormonal and behavioral responses to a stressor depend on many factors, including the influence of other hormones. We examined the role of melatonin in modulating hormonal responses to capture stress in two populations of male garter snakes, Thamnophis sirtalis. Studies of red-sided (T. sirtalis parietalis) and red-spotted (T. sirtalis concinnus) garter snakes were conducted in the field with free-living snakes. Populations of red-sided garter snakes in south-central Manitoba, Canada undergo a period of winter dormancy for approximately 8 months each year followed by an attenuated mating season (4-5 weeks) in early spring. In contrast, the mid-latitude red-spotted garter snake in western Oregon, USA has an extended breeding season and can be active during 10-12 months of the year given appropriate environmental conditions. We chose to study these two populations of garter snakes to investigate possible variation in melatonin function among snakes with different suites of environmental adaptations. To better address these questions, we also examined the effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan (a precursor of melatonin synthesis) and ketanserin (a serotonergic type 2A receptor antagonist) on hormonal responses to capture stress. We observed a trend of increased corticosterone and decreased androgen concentrations in northern-latitude red-sided garter snakes (T. sirtalis parietalis) subjected to 4 h of capture stress during the spring. However, these differences were not statistically significant. During the fall, red-sided garter snakes showed no change in corticosterone or androgen concentrations in response to the capture stress treatments. We speculate that northern-latitude red-sided garter snakes suppress hormonal responses to capture stress during preparation for winter dormancy. Treatment with melatonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan, or ketanserin did not significantly influence corticosterone or androgen concentrations of northern-latitude red-sided garter snakes during the

  7. Uncovering blind spots in education and practice leadership: towards a collaborative response to the nurse shortage.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sandra; Thorne, Sally; Mildon, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    As the nursing shortage becomes an increasingly prominent everyday pressure for practice leaders, the search for quick solutions has intensified. A widespread perception has emerged within the service sector that nursing education is failing to fulfill its responsibility to prepare the next generation of nurses. This perception is escalating tensions between leaders in the education and practice sectors, and creating new barriers towards finding collaborative solutions. Although the "job ready/practice ready" debate between practice and education has been a long-standing undercurrent within nursing, extreme shortages affecting practice sector performance across the country create conditions that fuel heightened distrust and division. In this context, it becomes increasingly important that nursing leaders in education and practice engage in thoughtful and respectful dialogue to ensure that tensions between the two sectors are managed and counterproductive schisms prevented. In this paper, we deconstruct some of the current thinking regarding responsibility for the current problem by describing differences in the distinct cultures and contexts of the practice and education sectors, noting potential "blind spots" that interfere with our mutual understanding and encouraging a better-informed, shared responsibility to promote constructive engagement in preparing tomorrow's nursing workforce. PMID:19521159

  8. Comparative analysis of chrysanthemum transcriptome in response to three RNA viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Lian, Sen; Jo, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Hyosub; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-06-01

    The chrysanthemum is one of popular flowers in the world and a host for several viruses. So far, molecular interaction studies between the chrysanthemum and viruses are limited. In this study, we carried out a transcriptome analysis of chrysanthemum in response to three different viruses including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A chrysanthemum 135K microarray derived from expressed sequence tags was successfully applied for the expression profiles of the chrysanthemum at early stage of virus infection. Finally, we identified a total of 125, 70 and 124 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for CMV, TSWV and PVX, respectively. Many DEGs were virus specific; however, 33 DEGs were commonly regulated by three viruses. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified a total of 132 GO terms, and of them, six GO terms related stress response and MCM complex were commonly identified for three viruses. Several genes functioning in stress response such as chitin response and ethylene mediated signaling pathway were up-regulated indicating their involvement in establishment of host immune system. In particular, TSWV infection significantly down-regulated genes related to DNA metabolic process including DNA replication, chromatin organization, histone modification and cytokinesis, and they are mostly targeted to nucleosome and MCM complex. Taken together, our comparative transcriptome analysis revealed several genes related to hormone mediated viral stress response and DNA modification. The identified chrysanthemums genes could be good candidates for further functional study associated with resistant to various plant viruses.

  9. Use of dried blood spots to define antibody response to the Strongyloides stercoralis recombinant antigen NIE.

    PubMed

    Mounsey, Kate; Kearns, Therese; Rampton, Melanie; Llewellyn, Stacey; King, Mallory; Holt, Deborah; Currie, Bart J; Andrews, Ross; Nutman, Thomas; McCarthy, James

    2014-10-01

    An approach to improve the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection is the use of serologic assays utilising the NIE antigen from S. stercoralis, with good diagnostic sensitivity and excellent specificity reported. Detection of antibody eluted from dried blood spots (DBS) has shown utility in large-scale seroepidemiological studies for a range of conditions and is appealing for use with children where sample collection is difficult. We adapted an existing NIE-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the testing of strongyloides antibody response on DBS, and evaluated it in a population screening and mass drug administration programme (MDA) for strongyloidiasis conducted in an Australian indigenous community. Study participants were treated with 200 μg/kg ivermectin (>15 kg) or 3× 400 mg albendazole (<15kg). The sensitivity of the NIE DBS-ELISA was determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis to be 85.7%. A total of 214 DBS were collected from 184 participants across two screening and MDA encounters. A total of 27 of 164 participants (16.5%) tested positive for S. stercoralis NIE-DBS prior to MDA treatment, and 6 of 50 participants (12.0%) tested positive after treatment. These prevalence values are similar to those documented by standard serology in the same community. For 30 participants where a DBS was collected at both MDA 1 and 2, a significant decline in ELISA values was evident post treatment (0.12-0.02, p=0.0012). These results are in agreement with previous studies documenting the high seroprevalence of S. stercoralis in remote Australian Indigenous communities, and suggest that collection of dried blood spots may be a useful approach for field diagnosis of S. stercoralis seroprevalence.

  10. Role of various hormones in photosynthetic responses of green plants under environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Poonam; Bhardwaj, Renu; Kaur, Ravdeep; Bali, Shagun; Kaur, Parminder; Sirhindi, Geetika; Thukral, Ashwani K; Ohri, Puja; Vig, Adarsh P

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress includes adverse factors like water deficit, high salinity, enhanced temperature and heavy metals etc. These stresses alter the normal growth and metabolic processes of plants including photosynthesis. Major photosynthetic responses under various stresses include inhibition of photosystems (I and II), changes in thylakoid complexes, decreased photosynthetic activity and modifications in structure and functions of chloroplasts etc. Various defense mechanisms are triggered inside the plants in response to these stresses that are regulated by plant hormones or plant growth regulators. These phytohormones include abscisic acid, auxins, cytokinins, ethylene, brassinosteroids, jasmonates and salicylic acid etc. The present review focuses on stress protective effects of plants hormones on the photosynthetic responses.

  11. Sexual dimorphism of stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction: the corticotropin releasing hormone perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas V.

    1995-01-01

    This review higlghts key aspects of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) biology of potential relevance to the sexual dimorphism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction, and introduces two important new concepts based on the regulatory potential of the human (h) CRH gene: (1) a proposed mechanism to account for the tissue-specific antithetical responses of hCRH gene expression to glucocorticolds, that may also explain the frequently observed antithetical effects of chronic glucocorticoid administration in clinical practice and (2) a heuristic diagram to illustrate the proposed modulation of the stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction by steroid hormones, from the perspective of the CRH system. PMID:18475634

  12. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  13. Hyperspectral Imaging for Determining Pigment Contents in Cucumber Leaves in Response to Angular Leaf Spot Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan-Ru; Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Ke-Qiang; Cheng, Fan; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technique was employed to determine spatial distributions of chlorophyll (Chl), and carotenoid (Car) contents in cucumber leaves in response to angular leaf spot (ALS). Altogether, 196 hyperspectral images of cucumber leaves with five infection severities of ALS were captured by a hyperspectral imaging system in the range of 380–1,030 nm covering 512 wavebands. Mean spectrum were extracted from regions of interest (ROIs) in the hyperspectral images. Partial least square regression (PLSR) models were used to develop quantitative analysis between the spectra and the pigment contents measured by biochemical analyses. In addition, regression coefficients (RCs) in PLSR models were employed to select important wavelengths (IWs) for modelling. It was found that the PLSR models developed by the IWs provided the optimal measurement results with correlation coefficient (R) of prediction of 0.871 and 0.876 for Chl and Car contents, respectively. Finally, Chl and Car distributions in cucumber leaves with the ALS infection were mapped by applying the optimal models pixel-wise to the hyperspectral images. The results proved the feasibility of hyperspectral imaging for visualizing the pigment distributions in cucumber leaves in response to ALS. PMID:27283050

  14. Hyperspectral Imaging for Determining Pigment Contents in Cucumber Leaves in Response to Angular Leaf Spot Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Ru; Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Ke-Qiang; Cheng, Fan; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technique was employed to determine spatial distributions of chlorophyll (Chl), and carotenoid (Car) contents in cucumber leaves in response to angular leaf spot (ALS). Altogether, 196 hyperspectral images of cucumber leaves with five infection severities of ALS were captured by a hyperspectral imaging system in the range of 380-1,030 nm covering 512 wavebands. Mean spectrum were extracted from regions of interest (ROIs) in the hyperspectral images. Partial least square regression (PLSR) models were used to develop quantitative analysis between the spectra and the pigment contents measured by biochemical analyses. In addition, regression coefficients (RCs) in PLSR models were employed to select important wavelengths (IWs) for modelling. It was found that the PLSR models developed by the IWs provided the optimal measurement results with correlation coefficient (R) of prediction of 0.871 and 0.876 for Chl and Car contents, respectively. Finally, Chl and Car distributions in cucumber leaves with the ALS infection were mapped by applying the optimal models pixel-wise to the hyperspectral images. The results proved the feasibility of hyperspectral imaging for visualizing the pigment distributions in cucumber leaves in response to ALS. PMID:27283050

  15. Molecular immune response of the American lobster (Homarus americanus) to the White Spot Syndrome Virus.

    PubMed

    Clark, K Fraser; Greenwood, Spencer J; Acorn, Adam R; Byrne, Philip J

    2013-11-01

    The adult American lobster (Homarus americanus) is susceptible to few naturally occurring pathogens, and no viral pathogen is known to exist. Despite this, relatively little is known about the H. americanus immune system and nothing is known about its potential viral immune response. Hundreds of rural communities in Atlantic Canada rely on the lobster fishery for their economic sustainability and could be devastated by large-scale pathogen-mediated mortality events. The White Spot Syndrome Virus is the most economically devastating viral pathogen to global shrimp aquaculture production and has been proposed to be capable of infecting all decapod crustaceans including the European Lobster. An in vivo WSSV injection challenge was conducted in H. americanus and WSSV was found to be capable of infecting and replicating within lobsters held at 20°C. The in vivo WSSV challenge also generated the first viral disease model of H. americanus and allowed for the high-throughput examination of transcriptomic changes that occur during viral infection. Microarray analysis found 136 differentially expressed genes and the expression of a subset of these genes was verified using RT-qPCR. Anti-lipopolysaccharide isoforms and acute phase serum amyloid protein A expression did not change during WSSV infection, contrary to previous findings during bacterial and parasitic infection of H. americanus. This, along with the differential gene expression of thioredoxin and trypsin isoforms, provides compelling evidence that H. americanus is capable of mounting an immune response specific to infection by different pathogen classes.

  16. Response of Alternaria spp. from sugar beet leaf spots to fungicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf spot caused in sugar beet by Alternaria species has been a minor foliar disease issue in the United States. Recently in Michigan and other growing regions an increasing incidence of Alternaria leaf spot has been observed and without evidence of predisposing plant yellowing. One possible reason...

  17. How plants handle multiple stresses: hormonal interactions underlying responses to abiotic stress and insect herbivory.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy; Rieu, Ivo; Mariani, Celestina; van Dam, Nicole M

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive plant responses to specific abiotic stresses or biotic agents are fine-tuned by a network of hormonal signaling cascades, including abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid. Moreover, hormonal cross-talk modulates plant responses to abiotic stresses and defenses against insect herbivores when they occur simultaneously. How such interactions affect plant responses under multiple stresses, however, is less understood, even though this may frequently occur in natural environments. Here, we review our current knowledge on how hormonal signaling regulates abiotic stress responses and defenses against insects, and discuss the few recent studies that attempted to dissect hormonal interactions occurring under simultaneous abiotic stress and herbivory. Based on this we hypothesize that drought stress enhances insect resistance due to synergistic interactions between JA and ABA signaling. Responses to flooding or waterlogging involve ethylene signaling, which likely reduces plant resistance to chewing herbivores due to its negative cross-talk with JA. However, the outcome of interactions between biotic and abiotic stress signaling is often plant and/or insect species-dependent and cannot simply be predicted based on general knowledge on the involvement of signaling pathways in single stress responses. More experimental data on non-model plant and insect species are needed to reveal general patterns and better understand the molecular mechanisms allowing plants to optimize their responses in complex environments. PMID:27095445

  18. Investigation of Responsiveness to Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone in Growth Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Sang Ouk; Hwang, You-Cheol; Jeong, In-Kyung; Oh, Seungjoon

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate how the paradoxical response of GH secretion to TRH changes according to tumor volumes. Methods. Patients with newly diagnosed acromegaly were classified as either TRH responders or nonresponders according to the results of a TRH stimulation test (TST), and their clinical characteristics were compared according to responsiveness to TRH and tumor volumes. Results. A total of 41 acromegalic patients who underwent the TST were included in this study. Between TRH responders and nonresponders, basal GH, IGF-I levels, peak GH levels, and tumor volume were not significantly different, but the between-group difference of GH levels remained near significant over the entire TST time. ΔGHmax-min during the TST were significantly different according to the responsiveness to TRH. Peak GH levels and ΔGHmax-min during the TST showed significantly positive correlations with tumor volume with higher levels in macroadenomas than in microadenomas. GH levels over the entire TST time also remained significantly higher in macroadenomas than in microadenomas. Conclusion. Our data demonstrated that the paradoxical response of GH secretion to TRH in GH-producing pituitary adenomas was not inversely correlated with tumor volumes. PMID:24348552

  19. Sex hormones modulate the immune response to Plasmodium berghei ANKA in CBA/Ca mice.

    PubMed

    Legorreta-Herrera, Martha; Mosqueda-Romo, Néstor Aarón; Nava-Castro, Karen Elizabeth; Morales-Rodríguez, Ana Laura; Buendía-González, Fidel Orlando; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Susceptibility to malaria differs between females and males, and this sexual dimorphism may have important implications for the effects of vaccines and drugs. However, little is known about the mechanisms mediating these sexual differences. Because the main differences between sexes are dictated by sex hormones, we studied the effect of gonadal steroids on immune responses to malaria in CBA/Ca mice. We decreased sex hormones levels by gonadectomy and evaluated the splenic index and the cells involved in the immune response, including T cells (CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+) and NK(+)), B cells and macrophages (Mac-3(+)) in the spleens of female and male mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. In addition, we measured antibody and cytokine levels in blood. Gonadectomy increased T(+) and B(+) splenic cells in both sexes but increased Mac-3(+) cells only in male mice. By contrast, gonadectomy decreased the NK(+) cell population only in male mice. In general, female mice developed higher antibody levels than males. Contrary to our expectations, gonadectomy increased the synthesis of IgG1, IgG2b, IgG3, and total IgG in female mice, indicating negative regulation of antibody production by female sex hormones. Gonadectomy increased the synthesis of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) only in female mice, suggesting that female sex hormones have anti-inflammatory properties. This work demonstrates that the levels of sex hormones affect the immune response and should be considered when designing malaria vaccines.

  20. Central stimulation of hormone release and the proliferative response of lymphocytes in humans.

    PubMed

    Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Vigas, M

    1995-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) may communicate with the immune system by direct innervation of lymphoid organs and/or by neurotransmitters and changes in neuroendocrine functioning and hormone release. The consequences of selective transient changes in circulating hormones on immune functioning in humans have not yet been studied. To address this problem, the authors evaluated the lymphoproliferative responses to optimal and suboptimal concentrations of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweek mitogen (PWM) under selective enhancement of circulating growth hormone, prolactin, or norepinephrine. The authors failed to demonstrate any effect of elevated growth hormone levels after clonidine challenge on the lymphoproliferative response to mitogens. Similarly, the results did not show any effect of elevated prolactin concentrations induced by domperidone administration on the immune test. Exposure of volunteers to cold resulted in elevation of plasma norepinephrine levels without changes in growth hormone, epinephrine, or cortisol secretion. Cold exposure induced elevation of plasma norepinephrine and reduction of the lymphoproliferative response to the suboptimal dosage of PHA. The reduction was significant 180 and 240 min after exposure. These results are indicative of a relationship between norepinephrine and immunity. PMID:8534322

  1. Response to three years of growth hormone therapy in girls with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hong Kyu; Lee, Hae Sang; Ko, Jung Hee; Hwang, Il Tae

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Short stature is the most common finding in patients with Turner syndrome. Improving the final adult height in these patients is a challenge both for the patients and physicians. We investigated the clinical response of patients to growth hormone treatment for height improvement over the period of three years. Methods Review of medical records from 27 patients with Turner syndrome treated with recombinant human growth hormone for more than 3 years was done. Differences in the changes of height standard deviation scores according to karyotype were measured and factors influencing the height changes were analyzed. Results The response to recombinant human growth hormone was an increase in the height of the subjects to a mean value of 1.1 standard deviation for subjects with Turner syndrome at the end of the 3-year treatment. The height increment in the first year was highest. The height standard deviation score in the third year was negatively correlated with the age at the beginning of the recombinant human growth hormone treatment. Different karyotypes in subjects did not seem to affect the height changes. Conclusion Early growth hormone administration in subjects with Turner syndrome is helpful to improve height response to the treatment. PMID:24904845

  2. Effects of theophylline infusion on the growth hormone (GH) and prolactin response to GH-releasing hormone administration in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Losa, M; Alba-Lopez, J; Schopohl, J; Sobiesczcyk, S; Chiodini, P G; Müller, O A; von Werder, K

    1988-10-01

    Since theophylline has been shown to blunt the GH response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in normal subjects, we investigated whether the same effect of theophylline administration could be reproduced in patients with active acromegaly. Ten acromegalic patients received on two different days 100 micrograms GHRH iv alone and the same GHRH dose during a constant infusion of theophylline (3.56 mg/min), beginning 2 h before GHRH administration. In the whole group theophylline did not affect basal GH secretion significantly (from a mean of 44.6 +/- 14.4 at 0 min to 41.8 +/- 13.5 ng/ml at 120 min). However, the amount of GH released after GHRH stimulation was lower when theophylline was concomitantly infused (7525 +/- 3709 ng min/ml vs. 12038 +/- 6337 ng min/ml; p less than 0.05). The inhibitory effect of theophylline was not homogeneous, since either marked or minimal reductions of the GHRH-stimulated GH secretion occurred. Serum PRL levels increased after GHRH administration in 6 patients and theophylline infusion had no influence upon this response. Peak GHRH levels were not different in both studies (14.9 +/- 1.7 and 17.1 +/- 4.0 ng/ml, respectively). Free fatty acid levels rose progressively during theophylline administration (from 0.66 +/- 0.10 at 0 min to 1.04 +/- 0.10 mEq/l at 240 min) and were significantly higher than after GHRH stimulation alone from 180 min up to the end of the test. Our results demonstrate that in active acromegaly theophylline blunts the GH response to GHRH, though this effect is not uniformly seen in all patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Spotted vesicles, striped micelles, and responsive Janus assemblies induced by ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Christian, David A.; Tian, Aiwei; Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Levental, Ilya; Rajagopal, Karthikan; Janmey, Paul A.; Liu, Andrea J.; Baumgart, Tobias; Discher, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    Selective binding of multivalent ligands within a mixture of polyvalent amphiphiles provides, in principle, a mechanism to drive domain formation in self-assemblies. Divalent cations are shown here to crossbridge polyanionic amphiphiles that thereby demix from neutral amphiphiles and form spots or rafts within vesicles as well as stripes within cylindrical micelles. Calcium and copper crossbridged domains of synthetic block copolymers or natural lipid (PIP2, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate) possess tunable sizes, shapes, and/or spacings that can last for years. Lateral segregation in these ‘responsive Janus assemblies’ couples weakly to curvature and proves restricted within phase diagrams to narrow regimes of pH and cation concentration that are centered near the characteristic binding constants for polyacid interactions. Remixing at high pH is surprising, but a theory for Strong Lateral Segregation (SLS) shows that counterion entropy dominates electrostatic crossbridges, thus illustrating the insights gained into ligand induced pattern formation within self-assemblies. PMID:19734886

  4. Toll receptor response to white spot syndrome virus challenge in giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinling; Zhao, Lingling; Jin, Min; Li, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Chen, Yihong; Ren, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Toll receptors are evolutionary ancient families of pattern recognition receptors with crucial roles in invertebrate innate immune response. In this study, we identified a Toll receptor (MrToll) from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrToll is 4257 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 1367 amino acids. MrToll contains 17 LRR domains, a transmembrane domain, and a TIR domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrToll was grouped with Drosophila Toll7 and other arthropod Tolls. The transcripts of MrToll are mainly distributed in the heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. A low level of MrToll expression can be detected in hemocytes and the lymphoid organ. MrToll expression in gills was gradually upregulated to the highest level from 24 h to 48 h during the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The expression levels of the crustin (Cru) genes Cru3 and Cru7 in gills were relatively lower than those of Cru2 and Cru4. The expression levels of Cru3 and Cru7 were inhibited after the RNA interference of MrToll in gills during the WSSV challenge. The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) genes ALF2, ALF3, ALF4, and ALF5 were also regulated by MrToll in gills during the virus challenge. These findings suggest that MrToll may contribute to the innate immune defense of M. rosenbergii against WSSV.

  5. Metabolic product response profiles of Cherax quadricarinatus towards white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiwei; Ye, Yangfang; Chen, Zhen; Shao, Yina; Xie, Xiaolu; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Hai-Peng; Li, Chenghua

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the most devastating viral pathogens in both shrimp and crayfish farms, which often causes disease outbreak and leads to massive moralities with significant economic losses of aquaculture. However, limited research has been carried out on the intrinsic mechanisms toward WSSV challenge at the metabolic level. To gain comprehensive insight into metabolic responses induced by WSSV, we applied an NMR approach to investigate metabolic changes of crayfish gill and hepatopancreas infected by WSSV for 1, 6 and 12 h. In gill, an enhanced energy metabolism was observed in WSSV-challenged crayfish samples at 1 h, as marked by increased glucose, alanine, methionine, glutamate and uracil. Afterwards, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism as well as osmoregulation were markedly increased at 6 hpi, as shown by elevated glucose, alanine, methionine, fumarate, tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine, phosphorylcholine, betaine and uracil, whereas no obvious metabolites change was detected at 12 hpi. As for hepatopancreas, disturbed lipid metabolism and induced osmotic regulation was found at 6 hpi based on the metabolic biomarkers such as branched chain amino acids, threonine, alanine, methionine, glutamate, glutamine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lactate and lipid. However, no obvious metabolic change was shown in hepatopancreas at both 1 hpi and 12 hpi. Taken together, our present results provided essential metabolic information about host-pathogen interactions in crayfish, which shed new light on our understanding of WSSV infection at metabolic level. PMID:27068762

  6. IP-10 measured by Dry Plasma Spots as biomarker for therapy responses in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Tonby, Kristian; Ruhwald, Morten; Kvale, Dag; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Ma

    2015-03-18

    Tuberculosis (TB) has huge impact on human morbidity and mortality and biomarkers to support rapid TB diagnosis and ensure treatment initiation and cure are needed, especially in regions with high prevalence of multi-drug resistant TB. Soluble interferon gamma inducible protein 10 (IP-10) analyzed from dry plasma spots (DPS) has potential as an immunodiagnostic marker in TB infection. We analyzed IP-10 levels in plasma directly and extracted from DPS in parallel by ELISA from 34 clinically well characterized patients with TB disease before and throughout 24 weeks of effective anti-TB chemotherapy. We detected a significant decline of IP-10 levels in both plasma and DPS already after two weeks of therapy with good correlation between the tests. This was observed both in pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. In conclusion, plasma IP-10 may serve as an early biomarker for anti-TB chemotherapy responses and the IP-10 DPS method has potential to be developed into a point-of care test for use in resource-limited settings. Further studies must be performed to validate the use of IP-10 DPS in TB high endemic countries.

  7. Differential Responses to Steroid Hormones in Fibroblasts From the Vocal Fold, Trachea, and Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Mukudai, Shigeyuki; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Nishio, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Bando, Hideki; Hirota, Ryuichi; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Hisa, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that fibroblasts are target cells for steroids such as sex hormones and corticoids. The characteristics of fibroblasts vary among tissues and organs. Our aim in this study is to examine differences in responses to steroid hormones among fibroblasts from different cervicothoracic regions. We compared the actions of steroid hormones on cultured fibroblasts from the vocal folds, which are considered to be the primary target of steroid hormones, and the trachea and esophagus in adult male rats. Expression of steroid hormone receptors (androgen receptor, estrogen receptor α, and glucocorticoid receptor) was identified by immunofluorescence histochemistry. Androgen receptor was much more frequently expressed in fibroblasts from the vocal fold than in those from the trachea and esophagus. Cell proliferation analysis showed that administration of testosterone, estradiol, or corticosterone suppressed growth of all 3 types of fibroblasts. However, mRNA expression for extracellular matrix–associated genes, including procollagen I and III and elastin, and hyaluronic acid synthase I was elevated only by addition of testosterone to fibroblasts from the vocal fold. These results indicate that each steroid hormone exerts region-specific effects on cervicothoracic fibroblasts with different properties through binding to specific receptors. PMID:25514085

  8. Response of the pigeon crop sac to mammotrophic hormones: Comparison between relaxin and prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Bani, G.; Sacchi, T.B.; Bigazzi, M. )

    1990-10-01

    The effects of relaxin (RLX), a hormone that has previously been demonstrated to have mammotrophic properties, were studied in the pigeon crop sac, a well-known target organ for mammotrophic and lactogenic hormones, and compared with the effects produced by prolactin (PRL). The two hormones were injected directly over the crop at different doses and the response was evaluated after differing times of exposure. RLX causes a dose-related increase in wet and dry weights and ({sup 3}H)thymidine and ({sup 3}H)uridine uptake by the crop mucosa, as well as morphological changes indicating growth and differentiation of the epithelial cells similar to those occurring during physiological activation in incubation and hatching. At the doses assayed, the effects of RLX were nearly identical to those obtained following PRL in the short-term experiments, but differences in functional responses were found in the long-term experiment.

  9. Cutaneous microvascular response during local cold exposure - the effect of female sex hormones and cold perception.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Ksenija; Music, Mark; Finderle, Zare

    2016-11-01

    It is generally known that differences exist between males and females with regard to sensitivity to cold. Similar differences even among females in different hormonal balance might influence microvascular response during cold provocation testing. The aim of the present study was to measure sex hormone levels, cold and cold pain perception thresholds and compare them to cutaneous laser-Doppler flux response during local cooling in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. In the luteal phase a more pronounced decrease in laser-Doppler flux was observed compared to follicular phase during local cooling at 15°C (significant difference by Dunnett's test, p<0.05). In addition, statistically significant correlations between progesterone level and laser-Doppler flux response to local cooling were observed during the follicular (R=-0.552, p=0.0174) and during the luteal phases (R=0.520, p=0.0271). In contrast, the correlation between estradiol level and laser-Doppler flux response was observed only in the follicular phase (R=-0.506, p=0.0324). Our results show that individual sensitivity to cold influences cutaneous microvascular response to local cooling; that microvascular reactivity is more pronounced during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle; and that reactivity correlates with hormone levels. The effect of specific sex hormone levels is related to the cold-provocation temperature. PMID:27430896

  10. Spot cooling. Part 1: Human responses to cooling with air jets

    SciTech Connect

    Melikov, A.K.; Halkjaer, L.; Arakelian, R.S.; Fanger, P.O.

    1994-12-31

    Eight standing male subjects and a thermal manikin were studied for thermal, physiological, and subjective responses to cooling with an air jet at room temperatures of 28 C, 33 C, and 38 C and a constant relative humidity of 50%. The subjects wore a standard uniform and performed light work. A vertical jet and a horizontal jet were employed The target area of the jet, i.e., the cross section of the jet where it first met the subject, had a diameter of 0.4 m and was located 0.5 m from the outlet. Experiments were performed at average temperatures at the jet target area of 20 C, 24 C, and 28 C. Each experiment lasted 190 minutes and was performed with three average velocities at the target area: 1 and 2 m/s and the preferred velocity selected by the subjects. The impact of the relative humidity of the room air, the jet`s turbulence intensity, and the use of a helmet on the physiological and subjective responses of the eight subjects was also studied The responses of the eight subjects were compared with the responses of a group of 29 subjects. The spot cooling improved the thermal conditions of the occupants. The average general thermal sensation for the eight subjects was linearly correlated to the average mean skin temperature and the average sweat rate. An average mean skin temperature of 33 C and an average sweat rate of 33 g{center_dot}h{sup {minus}1} m{sup {minus}2} were found to correspond to a neutral thermal sensation. The local thermal sensation at the neck and at the arm exposed to the cooling jet was found to be a function of the room air temperature and the local air velocity and temperature of the jet. The turbulence intensity of the cooling jet and the humidity of the room air had no impact on the subjects` physiological and subjective responses. Large individual differences were observed in the evaluation of the environment and in the air velocity preferred by the subjects.

  11. Shrimp miRNAs regulate innate immune response against white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kaewkascholkul, Napol; Somboonviwat, Kulwadee; Asakawa, Shuichi; Hirono, Ikuo; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNAs of RNA interference pathways that regulate gene expression through partial complementary base-pairing to target mRNAs. In this study, miRNAs that are expressed in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-infected Penaeus monodon, were identified using next generation sequencing. Forty-six miRNA homologs were identified from WSSV-infected shrimp hemocyte. Stem-loop real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that 11 out of 16 selected miRNAs were differentially expressed upon WSSV infection. Of those, pmo-miR-315 and pmo-miR-750 were highly responsive miRNAs. miRNA target prediction revealed that the miRNAs were targeted at 5'UTR, ORF, and 3'UTR of several immune-related genes such as genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, signaling transduction proteins, heat shock proteins, oxidative stress proteins, proteinases or proteinase inhibitors, proteins in blood clotting system, apoptosis-related proteins, proteins in prophenoloxidase system, pattern recognition proteins and other immune molecules. The highly conserved miRNA homolog, pmo-bantam, was characterized for its function in shrimp. The pmo-bantam was predicted to target the 3'UTR of Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (KuSPI). Binding of pmo-bantam to the target sequence of KuSPI gene was analyzed by luciferase reporter assay. Correlation of pmo-bantam and KuSPI expression was observed in lymphoid organ of WSSV-infected shrimp. These results implied that miRNAs might play roles as immune gene regulators in shrimp antiviral response.

  12. Responses of growth hormone aggregates to different intermittent exercise intensities.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Martyn R; Kraemer, William J; Kraemer, Robert R; Durand, Robert J; Acevedo, Edmund O; Johnson, Lisa G; Castracane, V D; Scheett, Timothy P; French, Duncan N; Volek, Jeff S

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of high-intensity intermittent exercise on the presence of circulating growth hormone (GH) aggregates measured using two different assay techniques. Six male subjects with endurance training background participated in this study under both exercise and no-exercise control conditions. After resting blood sampling, subjects completed an intermittent treadmill exercise protocol at four speeds predicted to elicit a specific VO(2):60% VO(2max) for 10 min, 75% for 10 min, 90% for 5 min, and 100% for 2 min. After each exercise intensity was completed treadmill speed was reduced to a walk (3.5-4 min) for blood sampling. Sampling continued every 15 min for 1 h into recovery. All samples were then measured for GH concentrations using Nichols immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) and Diagnostic Systems Laboratory's immunofunctional assay (IFA). A second set of samples was chemically reduced using reduced glutathione (GSH; 10 mM for 18 h at room temperature) to break disulfide bonds between possible oligomeric GH complexes, and subsequently assayed using the same GH assays. With the IRMA, GH was significantly elevated ( P<0.05) after the 75% workload and remained elevated through 30 min post-exercise. After adding GSH to the sample, the IRMA indicated significant increases in GH as early as the 60% exercise intensity and remained elevated through 45 min into recovery. At 75%, the GSH assay run was significantly higher than the non-GSH assay run. With the IFA, GH was significantly elevated at 60% in the non-GSH condition, whereas the GSH assay run indicated significant elevations at 75%. Both GSH and non-GSH conditions remained elevated through 30 min into recovery. These data indicate that the addition of GSH to serum samples prior to assay via an IRMA may break existing disulfide bonds between aggregated GH molecules, thus altering the apparent assay signal to reveal greater total GH in the sample.

  13. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lisse, Thomas S.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as “vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins”, behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vitamin D and estrogen resistances. This set of interactors belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family of previously known pre-mRNA-interacting proteins. This review provides new insights into the mechanism by which these novel regulators of signaling and metabolism can act to regulate responses to vitamin D and estrogen. In addition the review also describes other molecules that are known to influence nuclear receptor signaling through interaction with hormone response elements. PMID:21236284

  14. Gender Differences in Subjective and Physiological Responses to Caffeine and the Role of Steroid Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amanda M.

    2011-01-01

    Background We have shown previously that male and female adolescents differ in their responses to caffeine, but to date, the mechanisms underlying these gender differences are unknown. Objective The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that differences in circulating steroid hormones mediate gender differences in response to caffeine. Methods Subjective and physiological responses to caffeine were tested in adolescents using a double-blind, placebo controlled, crossover design. Participants were tested every 2 weeks for 8 weeks and received placebo and caffeine (2 mg/kg) twice each. Females were tested with placebo and caffeine in each phase of their menstrual cycle. Salivary concentrations of testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone were also measured. Results Males showed greater positive subjective effects than females. In females, higher levels of estradiol were associated with little or no subjective responses to caffeine, but lower levels of estradiol were associated with negative subjective responses to caffeine relative to placebo. There were gender differences in cardiovascular responses to caffeine, with males showing greater decreases in heart rate after caffeine administration than females, but females showing greater increases in diastolic blood pressure than males after caffeine administration. These gender differences may be related to steroid hormone concentrations. Blood pressure responses to caffeine were lower in males when estradiol was high, but higher in females when estradiol was high. Conclusions When taken together, these findings suggest that males and females differ in their responses to caffeine and that these differences may be mediated by changes in circulating steroid hormones. PMID:24761262

  15. Incretin and islet hormonal responses to fat and protein ingestion in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard D; Larsen, Marianne O; Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Jelic, Katarina; Lindgren, Ola; Deacon, Carolyn F; Ahrén, Bo

    2008-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate islet function after carbohydrate ingestion. Whether incretin hormones are of importance for islet function after ingestion of noncarbohydrate macronutrients is not known. This study therefore examined integrated incretin and islet hormone responses to ingestion of pure fat (oleic acid; 0.88 g/kg) or protein (milk and egg protein; 2 g/kg) over 5 h in healthy men, aged 20-25 yr (n=12); plain water ingestion served as control. Both intact (active) and total GLP-1 and GIP levels were determined as was plasma activity of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). Following water ingestion, glucose, insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP levels and DPP-4 activity were stable during the 5-h study period. Both fat and protein ingestion increased insulin, glucagon, GIP, and GLP-1 levels without affecting glucose levels or DPP-4 activity. The GLP-1 responses were similar after protein and fat, whereas the early (30 min) GIP response was higher after protein than after fat ingestion (P<0.001). This was associated with sevenfold higher insulin and glucagon responses compared with fat ingestion (both P<0.001). After protein, the early GIP, but not GLP-1, responses correlated to insulin (r(2)=0.86; P=0.0001) but not glucagon responses. In contrast, after fat ingestion, GLP-1 and GIP did not correlate to islet hormones. We conclude that, whereas protein and fat release both incretin and islet hormones, the early GIP secretion after protein ingestion may be of primary importance to islet hormone secretion.

  16. Evaluation of gonadotropin responses to synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone in girls with idiopathic hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Foster, C M; Hopwood, N J; Beitins, I Z; Mendes, T M; Kletter, G B; Kelch, R P

    1992-10-01

    We hypothesized that prepubertal girls with gonadotropin deficiency would produce less follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in response to synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) than would gonadotropin-sufficient children. To test this hypothesis, we performed 103 GnRH tests serially in 21 children who had idiopathic hypopituitarism with growth hormone deficiency. We tried to predict whether puberty would occur in the 17 girls with bone ages of 8 years or less. Of these 17 girls, 4 failed to have spontaneous secondary sexual characteristics by age 16 1/2 years, and 12 had spontaneous complete pubertal development. One girl had incomplete pubertal maturation with partial gonadotropin deficiency; her results were combined with those of the girls who had no spontaneous pubertal development. With increasing bone age, the girls with complete pubertal development had a decrease in the increment of FSH released in response to GnRH, although basal gonadotropin concentrations did not change. For GnRH tests performed at bone ages of 8 years or less, basal luteinizing hormone (LH) values did not differ between girls with complete puberty and those with absent or incomplete puberty. However, basal FSH and the incremental response of LH and FSH to GnRH were greater in those with complete puberty. Only two girls with prepubertal bone ages at the time of testing, who subsequently had complete puberty, had incremental FSH responses to GnRH that were less than 5 IU/L. Individual incremental LH responses to GnRH did not discriminate well between groups. None of the girls with adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency, either originally or subsequently, had spontaneous puberty, but 4 of 12 girls with thyrotropin deficiency, either originally or subsequently, had complete puberty. We conclude that a significant increase in GnRH-stimulated FSH suggests that spontaneous pubertal development will occur in girls with idiopathic hypopituitarism. However, a low FSH response to GnRH may

  17. Within subject variation of satiety hormone responses to a standard lunch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Insulin (Ins), leptin (Lep), GLP-1, and glucagon (Glg) are known regulators of glucose metabolism and food intake, but reproducibility in response to a meal challenge is not well characterized. We assessed within-subject variation of these hormones in 14 young adult women.Methods: Subjec...

  18. Growth Hormone Effects in Immune Stress: AKT/eNOS Signaling Module in the Cellular Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The activation of the constitutive endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) and expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) with subsequent nitric oxide production are among the early cellular responses that follow in a systemic exposure of animals to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Growth hormone (GH) has been sh...

  19. Response to luteinizing releasing hormone, thyrotrophic releasing hormone, and human chorionic gonadotropin administration in healthy men at different risks for prostatic cancer and in prostatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hill, P; Wynder, E L; Garbaczewski, L; Garnes, H; Walker, A R

    1982-05-01

    A comparative study of the pituitary and testicular response to luteinizing releasing hormone (LHRH), thyrotrophic releasing hormone (TRH), and human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) administration was carried out in (a) low-risk young South African black men and high-risk North American black men for prostatic cancer and (b) healthy elderly South African men and South African black men with prostatic cancer. A comparable HCG response occurred in young South African and North American black men, while a greater release of prolactin, but a lesser release of luteinizing hormone in response to LHRH:TRH occurred in South African black men. The response to HCG was comparable in elderly and young South African black men, although the prolactin release in response to TRH was greater in elderly men. A more prolonged release of luteinizing hormone was evident in men with prostatic cancer. Higher estradiol and estrone but lower androstenedione levels occurred in men with prostatic cancer. Data suggest that, in the elderly South African black men with prostatic cancer, estrogen metabolism is modified and that either the estrogen level or the higher estrogen:androgen levels modify the pituitary response to LHRH:TRH. A Western diet enhanced the changes in hormone profiles evident in black South African men with prostatic cancer. PMID:6802486

  20. Responses of sex steroid hormones to different intensities of exercise in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koji; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Katayama, Keisho; Ishida, Koji; Kanao, Yoji; Saito, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that acute exercise elevates sex steroid hormone concentrations in rodents and that sprint exercise increases circulating testosterone in healthy young men. However, the effect of different exercise intensities on sex steroid hormone responses at different levels of physical fitness is still unclear. In this study, we compared circulating sex steroid hormone responses at different exercise intensities in athletes and non-athletes. Eight male endurance athletes and 11 non-athletes performed two 15 min sessions of submaximal exercise at 40 and 70% peak oxygen uptake (V̇(O2peak)), respectively, and exercised at 90% V̇(O2peak) until exhaustion. Venous blood samples were collected during the last minute of each submaximal exercise session and immediately after exhaustion. Acute exercise at 40, 70 and 90% V̇(O2peak) induced significant increases in serum dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and free testosterone concentrations in non-athletes. On the contrary, only 90% V̇O2 peak exercise led to an increase in serum DHEA and free testosterone concentrations in athletes. Serum 5α-dihydrotestosterone concentrations increased with 90% V̇(O2peak) exercise in both athletes and non-athletes. Additionally, serum estradiol concentrations were significantly increased at moderate and high exercise intensities in both athletes and non-athletes. These results indicate that in endurance athletes, serum sex steroid hormone concentrations, especially serum DHEA and 5α-dihydrotestosterone concentrations, increased only with high-intensity exercise, suggesting that different responses of sex steroid hormone secretion are induced by different exercise intensities in individuals with low and high levels of physical fitness. In athletes, therefore, high-intensity exercise may be required to increase circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations.

  1. Prolactin and growth hormone responses to hypoglycemia in patients with systemic sclerosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovensky, Jozef; Raffayova, Helena; Imrich, Richard; Radikova, Zofia; Penesova, Adela; Macho, Ladislav; Lukac, Jozef; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Vigas, Milan

    2006-06-01

    This study compared prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) responses to hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) with those in matched healthy controls. No differences were found in glucose and GH responses to hypoglycemia in both groups of patients compared to controls. SSc patients had lower PRL response (P < 0.05) to hypoglycemia compared to controls. PRL response tended to be lower also in PsA patients, however the difference did not reach level of statistical significance (P = 0.11). The present study showed decreased PRL response to hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with SSc. PMID:16855141

  2. Toll receptor response to white spot syndrome virus challenge in giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinling; Zhao, Lingling; Jin, Min; Li, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Chen, Yihong; Ren, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Toll receptors are evolutionary ancient families of pattern recognition receptors with crucial roles in invertebrate innate immune response. In this study, we identified a Toll receptor (MrToll) from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrToll is 4257 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 1367 amino acids. MrToll contains 17 LRR domains, a transmembrane domain, and a TIR domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrToll was grouped with Drosophila Toll7 and other arthropod Tolls. The transcripts of MrToll are mainly distributed in the heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. A low level of MrToll expression can be detected in hemocytes and the lymphoid organ. MrToll expression in gills was gradually upregulated to the highest level from 24 h to 48 h during the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The expression levels of the crustin (Cru) genes Cru3 and Cru7 in gills were relatively lower than those of Cru2 and Cru4. The expression levels of Cru3 and Cru7 were inhibited after the RNA interference of MrToll in gills during the WSSV challenge. The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) genes ALF2, ALF3, ALF4, and ALF5 were also regulated by MrToll in gills during the virus challenge. These findings suggest that MrToll may contribute to the innate immune defense of M. rosenbergii against WSSV. PMID:27542619

  3. A Hormone-Responsive C1-Domain-Containing Protein At5g17960 Mediates Stress Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Ravindran Vijay; Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Verma, Vivek; Wijaya, Edward; Kumar, Prakash P.

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones play a critical role in mediating plant stress response. They employ a variety of proteins for coordinating such processes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, some members of a Cys-rich protein family known as C1-clan proteins were involved in stress response, but the actual function of the protein family is largely unknown. We studied At5g17960, a C1-clan protein member that possesses three unique C1 signature domains viz. C1_2, C1_3 and ZZ/PHD type. Additionally, we identified 72 other proteins in A. thaliana that contain all three unique signature domains. Subsequently, the 73 proteins were phylogenetically classified into IX subgroups. Promoter motif analysis of the 73 genes identified the presence of hormone-responsive and stress-responsive putative cis-regulatory elements. Furthermore, we observed that transcript levels of At5g17960 were induced in response to different hormones and stress treatments. At1g35610 and At3g13760, two other members of subgroup IV, also showed upregulation upon GA3, biotic and abiotic stress treatments. Moreover, seedlings of independent transgenic A. thaliana lines ectopically expressing or suppressing At5g17960 also showed differential regulation of several abiotic stress-responsive marker genes. Thus, our data suggest that C1-domain-containing proteins have a role to play in plant hormone-mediated stress responses, thereby assigning a putative function for the C1-clan protein family. PMID:25590629

  4. MRI in predicting the response of ovarian endometriomas to hormone therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimura, Kazuro; Okizuka, Hiromi; Kaji, Yasushi

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to investigate the usefulness of MRI in predicting the response of endometriomas to hormone therapy. MRI and laparoscopy at the onset of treatment and follow-up MRI after 6 months of hormone therapy were performed in 21 patients with 49 endometriomas. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained with a 1.5 T apparatus using a body coil. The lesions were divided into a responder group and a nonresponder group according to whether the lesion size decreased by 50% or not. With MRI, shading was seen in 25 of 27 lesions (93%) from the nonresponder group, but in only 6 of 22 (27%) from the responder group. Low SI rim was seen in 59% of the responders and 89% of the nonresponders. Multiplicity in 68% of the responders and in 85% of the nonresponders and irregularity in 41% of the responders and in 78% of the nonresponders were shown. Multiple logistic analysis revealed shading was the most important factor in prediction of the response to hormone therapy. Shading was an important sign in evaluating the response of endometriomas to hormone therapy. MRI may assist in selecting the appropriate therapy for endometriomas. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Small Molecule Inhibited Parathyroid Hormone Mediated cAMP Response by N–Terminal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Baumann, Monika; Balbach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to certain classes of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) stimulates the rapid synthesis of cAMP through G protein. Human parathyroid hormone (PTH), a member of class B GPCRs, binds to its receptor via its N–terminal domain, thereby activating the pathway to this secondary messenger inside cells. Presently, GPCRs are the target of many pharmaceuticals however, these drugs target only a small fraction of structurally known GPCRs (about 10%). Coordination complexes are gaining interest due to their wide applications in the medicinal field. In the present studies we explored the potential of a coordination complex of Zn(II) and anthracenyl–terpyridine as a modulator of the parathyroid hormone response. Preferential interactions at the N–terminal domain of the peptide hormone were manifested by suppressed cAMP generation inside the cells. These observations contribute a regulatory component to the current GPCR–cAMP paradigm, where not the receptor itself, but the activating hormone is a target. To our knowledge, this is the first report about a coordination complex modulating GPCR activity at the level of deactivating its agonist. Developing such molecules might help in the control of pathogenic PTH function such as hyperparathyroidism, where control of excess hormonal activity is essentially required. PMID:26932583

  6. Endocrine Modulation of Olfactory Responsiveness: Effects of the Orexigenic Hormone Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Loch, Diana; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Finding food sources is a prerequisite for an acute food intake. This process is initiated by ghrelin released from X/A-like cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Because food finding often depends on olfaction, the question arises whether ghrelin may affect the responsiveness of the olfactory system. Monitoring odor-induced activation of the mouse olfactory epithelium via Egr1 expression revealed that after a nasal application of ghrelin, more sensory neurons responded upon odor exposure indicating an increased responsiveness. The higher reactivity of olfactory neurons was accompanied with an increased activity of receptor-specific glomeruli. In search for mechanisms underlying the ghrelin-mediated sensitization of olfactory neurons, it was shown that Ghsr1a, the ghrelin receptor gene, but not the hormone itself was expressed in the olfactory epithelium. Further analysis of isolated cells revealed that the receptor was in fact expressed in mature olfactory sensory neurons. Treatment with a ghrelin receptor antagonist abolished the ghrelin effect, strengthening the notion that ghrelin and its receptor are responsible for the enhanced neuronal responsiveness. In contrast to the effects of the "hunger" hormone ghrelin, the short-term "satiety" hormone PYY3-36 did not affect olfactory responsiveness. The results demonstrate that ghrelin, which signals acute hunger, renders the olfactory system more responsive to odors.

  7. A second corticotropin-releasing hormone gene (CRH2) is conserved across vertebrate classes and expressed in the hindbrain of a basal neopterygian fish, the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus).

    PubMed

    Grone, Brian P; Maruska, Karen P

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the origins of the vertebrate stress-response system, we searched sequenced vertebrate genomes for genes resembling corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). We found that vertebrate genomes possess, in addition to CRH, another gene that resembles CRH in sequence and syntenic environment. This paralogous gene was previously identified only in the elephant shark (a holocephalan), but we find it also in marsupials, monotremes, lizards, turtles, birds, and fishes. We examined the relationship of this second vertebrate CRH gene, which we name CRH2, to CRH1 (previously known as CRH) and urocortin1/urotensin1 (UCN1/UTS1) in primitive fishes, teleosts, and tetrapods. The paralogs CRH1 and CRH2 likely evolved via duplication of CRH during a whole-genome duplication early in the vertebrate lineage. CRH2 was subsequently lost in both teleost fishes and eutherian mammals but retained in other lineages. To determine where CRH2 is expressed relative to CRH1 and UTS1, we used in situ hybridization on brain tissue from spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), a neopterygian fish closely related to teleosts. In situ hybridization revealed widespread distribution of both crh1 and uts1 in the brain. Expression of crh2 was restricted to the putative secondary gustatory/secondary visceral nucleus, which also expressed calcitonin-related polypeptide alpha (calca), a marker of parabrachial nucleus in mammals. Thus, the evolutionary history of CRH2 includes restricted expression in the brain, sequence changes, and gene loss, likely reflecting release of selective constraints following whole-genome duplication. The discovery of CRH2 opens many new possibilities for understanding the diverse functions of the CRH family of peptides across vertebrates. PMID:25521515

  8. Pancreatic islet hormone response to oral glucose in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sirinek, K R; O'Dorisio, T M; Howe, B; McFee, A S

    1985-01-01

    Pancreatic islet peptides, as well as other gastrointestinal hormones, have been implicated in both the pathogenesis of obesity and the etiology of associated metabolic derangements. This study evaluated the pancreatic islet and gastrointestinal (GI) hormone response to oral glucose in 20 morbidly obese (151% above ideal body weight) patients. Glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinism, and exaggerated gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) release occurred following glucose ingestion. Significant release of PP occurred in 14 patients, while only six patients had release of somatostatin. No significant changes in plasma concentrations of glucagon occurred. Since GIP is insulinotropic in the presence of hyperglycemia, the hyperinsulinism of morbid obesity may be secondary to the abnormally high glucose-stimulated GIP levels in these patients. Failure of glucagon suppression in response to oral glucose many contribute to the hyperglycemia noted. Somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide may be responsible for some of the metabolic derangements of morbid obesity. PMID:2860876

  9. Evolutionary endocrinology of juvenile hormone esterase in Gryllus assimilis: direct and correlated responses to selection.

    PubMed

    Zera, A J; Zhang, C

    1995-11-01

    Hemolymph juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) activity on the third day of the last stadium in the cricket, Gryllus assimilis, exhibited a significant response to selection in each of six replicate lines. Mean realized heritability was 0.26 +/- 0.04. The response was due to changes in whole-organism enzyme activity as well as to changes in the proportion of enzyme allocated to the hemolymph compartment. In vivo juvenile hormone metabolism differed between some lines selected for high vs. low enzyme activity. Only minimal differences were observed between lines with respect to hemolymph protein concentration or whole-cricket activity of juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase, the other major JH-degrading enzyme. Dramatic correlated responses to selection, equal in magnitude to the direct response, were observed for JHE activity on each of three other days of the last juvenile stadium. In contrast, no correlated responses in JHE activity were observed in adults. This indicates that JHE activities throughout the last stadium will evolve as a highly correlated unit independent of adult activities and the evolution of endocrine mechanisms regulating juvenile development can be decoupled from those controlling adult reproduction. This study represents the first quantitative-genetic analysis of naturally occurring endocrine variation in an insect species.

  10. Quantitative trait loci controlling light and hormone response in two accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Borevitz, Justin O; Maloof, Julin N; Lutes, Jason; Dabi, Tsegaye; Redfern, Joanna L; Trainer, Gabriel T; Werner, Jonathan D; Asami, Tadao; Berry, Charles C; Weigel, Detlef; Chory, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    We have mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for natural variation in light and hormone response between the Cape Verde Islands (Cvi) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana using recombinant inbred lines (RILs). Hypocotyl length was measured in four light environments: white, blue, red, and far-red light and in the dark. In addition, white light plus gibberellin (GA) and dark plus the brassinosteroid biosynthesis inhibitor brassinazole (BRZ) were used to detect hormone effects. Twelve QTL were identified that map to loci not previously known to affect light response, as well as loci where candidate genes have been identified from known mutations. Some QTL act in all environments while others show genotype-by-environment interaction. A global threshold was established to identify a significant epistatic interaction between two loci that have few main effects of their own. LIGHT1, a major QTL, has been confirmed in a near isogenic line (NIL) and maps to a new locus with effects in all light environments. The erecta mutation can explain the effect of the HYP2 QTL in the blue, BRZ, and dark environments, but not in far-red. LIGHT2, also confirmed in an NIL, has effects in white and red light and shows interaction with GA. The phenotype and map position of LIGHT2 suggest the photoreceptor PHYB as a candidate gene. Natural variation in light and hormone response thus defines both new genes and known genes that control light response in wild accessions. PMID:11861571

  11. Genetic architecture of a hormonal response to gene knockdown in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Ihle, Kate E; Rueppell, Olav; Huang, Zachary Y; Wang, Ying; Fondrk, M Kim; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V

    2015-01-01

    Variation in endocrine signaling is proposed to underlie the evolution and regulation of social life histories, but the genetic architecture of endocrine signaling is still poorly understood. An excellent example of a hormonally influenced set of social traits is found in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): a dynamic and mutually suppressive relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and the yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg) regulates behavioral maturation and foraging of workers. Several other traits cosegregate with these behavioral phenotypes, comprising the pollen hoarding syndrome (PHS) one of the best-described animal behavioral syndromes. Genotype differences in responsiveness of JH to Vg are a potential mechanistic basis for the PHS. Here, we reduced Vg expression via RNA interference in progeny from a backcross between 2 selected lines of honey bees that differ in JH responsiveness to Vg reduction and measured JH response and ovary size, which represents another key aspect of the PHS. Genetic mapping based on restriction site-associated DNA tag sequencing identified suggestive quantitative trait loci (QTL) for ovary size and JH responsiveness. We confirmed genetic effects on both traits near many QTL that had been identified previously for their effect on various PHS traits. Thus, our results support a role for endocrine control of complex traits at a genetic level. Furthermore, this first example of a genetic map of a hormonal response to gene knockdown in a social insect helps to refine the genetic understanding of complex behaviors and the physiology that may underlie behavioral control in general.

  12. Genetic Architecture of a Hormonal Response to Gene Knockdown in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Rueppell, Olav; Huang, Zachary Y.; Wang, Ying; Fondrk, M. Kim; Page, Robert E.; Amdam, Gro V.

    2015-01-01

    Variation in endocrine signaling is proposed to underlie the evolution and regulation of social life histories, but the genetic architecture of endocrine signaling is still poorly understood. An excellent example of a hormonally influenced set of social traits is found in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): a dynamic and mutually suppressive relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and the yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg) regulates behavioral maturation and foraging of workers. Several other traits cosegregate with these behavioral phenotypes, comprising the pollen hoarding syndrome (PHS) one of the best-described animal behavioral syndromes. Genotype differences in responsiveness of JH to Vg are a potential mechanistic basis for the PHS. Here, we reduced Vg expression via RNA interference in progeny from a backcross between 2 selected lines of honey bees that differ in JH responsiveness to Vg reduction and measured JH response and ovary size, which represents another key aspect of the PHS. Genetic mapping based on restriction site-associated DNA tag sequencing identified suggestive quantitative trait loci (QTL) for ovary size and JH responsiveness. We confirmed genetic effects on both traits near many QTL that had been identified previously for their effect on various PHS traits. Thus, our results support a role for endocrine control of complex traits at a genetic level. Furthermore, this first example of a genetic map of a hormonal response to gene knockdown in a social insect helps to refine the genetic understanding of complex behaviors and the physiology that may underlie behavioral control in general. PMID:25596612

  13. Effect of gender and sex hormones on immune responses following shock.

    PubMed

    Angele, M K; Schwacha, M G; Ayala, A; Chaudry, I H

    2000-08-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies show a gender dimorphism of the immune and organ responsiveness in the susceptibility to and morbidity from shock, trauma, and sepsis. In this respect, cell-mediated immune responses are depressed in males after trauma-hemorrhage, whereas they are unchanged or enhanced in females. Sex hormones contribute to this gender-specific immune response after adverse circulatory conditions. Specifically, studies indicate that androgens are responsible for the immunodepression after trauma-hemorrhage in males. In contrast, female sex steroids seem to exhibit immunoprotective properties after trauma and severe blood loss, because administration of estrogen prevents the androgen-induced immunodepression in castrated male mice. Nonetheless, the precise underlying mechanisms for these immunomodulatory effects of sex steroids after shock remain unknown. Although testosterone depletion, testosterone receptor antagonism, or estrogen treatment has been shown to prevent the depression of immune functions after trauma-hemorrhage, it remains to be established whether differences in the testosterone-estradiol ratio are responsible for the immune dysfunction. Furthermore, sex hormone receptors have been identified on various immune cells, suggesting direct effects. Thus, the immunomodulatory properties of sex hormones after trauma-hemorrhage might represent novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of immunodepression in trauma patients.

  14. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process. PMID:26959229

  15. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Breitel, Dario A; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-03-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process. PMID:26959229

  16. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Breitel, Dario A; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-03-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process.

  17. Effects of oestrogen on microRNA expression in hormone-responsive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Lorenzo; Ravo, Maria; Nassa, Giovanni; Tarallo, Roberta; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Giurato, Giorgio; Cirillo, Francesca; Stellato, Claudia; Silvestro, Silvana; Cantarella, Concita; Rizzo, Francesca; Cimino, Daniela; Friard, Olivier; Biglia, Nicoletta; De Bortoli, Michele; Cicatiello, Luigi; Nola, Ernesto; Weisz, Alessandro

    2012-06-01

    Oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates oestrogen effects in hormone-responsive cells. Following oestrogenic activation, ERα directly regulates the transcription of target genes via DNA binding. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small noncoding RNAs that function as negative regulators of protein-coding gene expression. They are found aberrantly expressed or mutated in cancer, suggesting their crucial role as either oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes. Here, we analysed changes in miRNA expression in response to oestrogen in hormone-responsive breast cancer MCF-7 and ZR-75.1 cells by microarray-mediated expression profiling. This led to the identification of 172 miRNAs up- or down-regulated by ERα in response to 17β-oestradiol, of which 52 are similarly regulated by the hormone in the two cell models investigated. To identify mechanisms by which ERα exerts its effects on oestrogen-responsive miRNA genes, the oestrogen-dependent miRNA expression profiles were integrated with global in vivo ERα binding site mapping in the genome by ChIP-Seq. In addition, data from miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles obtained under identical experimental conditions were compared to identify relevant miRNA target transcripts. Results show that miRNAs modulated by ERα represent a novel genomic pathway to impact oestrogen-dependent processes that affect hormone-responsive breast cancer cell behaviour. MiRNome analysis in tumour tissues from breast cancer patients confirmed a strong association between expression of these small RNAs and clinical outcome of the disease, although this appears to involve only marginally the oestrogen-regulated miRNAs identified in this study. PMID:22274890

  18. Establishing a statistic model for recognition of steroid hormone response elements.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Maria; Lin, Feng; Lin, Valerie C-L

    2006-10-01

    Identification of hormone response elements (HREs) is essential for understanding the mechanism of hormone-regulated gene expression. To date, there has been a lack of effective bioinformatics tools for recognition of specific HRE such as Progesterone Response Elements (PRE). In this paper, a comprehensive survey and comparison of in silico methods is conducted for establishing a more accurate statistic model. Homogeneity of steroid HRE is analyzed and a reliable training dataset is constructed through extensive searching for experimentally validated response elements from more than 150 literature sources. Based on the observation that the verified HREs carry di-nucleotide preservation in comparison with uniform nucleotide distributions, both mono and di-nucleotide Position Weight Matrices are computed to extract the statistic pattern of the positions. It is followed by the sequence transition pattern recognition using a specifically designed profile Hidden Markov Model. Reciprocal combination of the statistic and transition patterns significantly improves the performance of the model in terms of higher sensitivity and specificity. Upon acquisition of the putative response elements in the promoter areas of vertebrate genes, a qualitative scheme is applied to assess the probability for each gene to be a hormone primary target. Using >650 records of experimentally validated steroid hormone response elements, a high sensitivity level of 73% and high specificity level of one prediction per 8.24 kb is reached, allowing this model to be used for further prediction of primary target genes through the analysis of their upstream promoters, for human or other vertebrate genomes of interest. Additional documents, supplementary data and the web-based program developed for response elements prediction are freely available for academic research at . Submission of putative gene promoter regions for recognition of potential regulatory PREs can be as long as 5 kb.

  19. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses.

  20. Molecular characterization of Xanthomonas strains responsible for bacterial leaf spot of tomato in Ethiopia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial spot of tomato (BST) is a major constraint to tomato production in Ethiopia and many other countries leading to significant crop losses. In the present study, using pathogenicity tests, sensitivity to copper and streptomycin, and multilocus sequence analysis, a diverse group of Xanthomonas...

  1. Behavioral and antennal responses of spotted wing drosophila, drosophila suzukii, to volatiles from fruit extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Native to Southeast Asia, the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, has become a serious pest of soft-skinned fruit crops since its introduction into North America and Europe in 2008. Current monitoring strategies use baits based on fermentation products; however, to date, no fruit-based vola...

  2. Hormonal responses to resistance exercise after ingestion of carnosine and anserine.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazushige; Maemura, Hirohiko; Takamatsu, Kaoru; Ishii, Naokata

    2011-02-01

    Intramuscular carnosine buffers protons (H+) in skeletal muscle. We examined the effects of supplementation with chicken breast meat extract (CBEX) containing carnosine and anserine on hormonal responses to resistance exercise. Twenty-two men were assigned to a CBEX drink group (CBEX containing total 2 g of carnosine and anserine) (n = 14) or a placebo drink group (n = 8). The subjects ingested the prescribed drink (100 mL) twice daily for 30 days without physical training. Before and after the supplementation period, the subjects completed 5 sets of bilateral knee extension exercises (with a 90-s rest between sets). The magnitude of the increase in exercise-induced free testosterone did not change significantly after supplementation in either group. The blood lactate response to exercise was attenuated after supplementation in both groups (p < 0.05). In the CBEX group, the plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations after exercise were significantly lower after supplementation (p < 0.05). The serum growth hormone response to exercise was also reduced in the CBEX group after supplementation (delta value: 5.4 ± 1.9 ng/mL [pre] vs. 1.6 ± 0.5 ng/mL [post], p = 0.05). No significant differences in exercise-induced strength reduction (fatigue index) were observed in the 2 groups after supplementation. These results suggest that short-term supplementation with CBEX attenuates the exercise-induced epinephrine, norepinephrine, and growth hormone responses. PMID:20224451

  3. A volcano-seismic event spotting system for the use in rapid response systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Conny; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    The classification of seismic signals of volcanic origin is an important task in monitoring active volcanoes. The number and size of certain types of seismic events usually increase before periods of volcanic crisis and can be used to quantify the volcanic activity. Due to the advantage of providing consistent, objective and time-invariant results automatic classification systems are preferred. Most automatic classification systems are trained in a supervised fashion from a sufficiently large pre-classified data set. The setup of an automatic classification system thus requires the pre-existence of these training data. For a rapid volcano-response team, however, the situation is often different. In the worst case, no prior observations exist (e.g. re-awakening of a dormant volcano). More frequently, archive data exist for a particular observatory network, but no record of seismicity for a high volcanic activity level exists and new seismicity patterns occur. Usually, the networks are additionally sparse and new equipment will be installed for better surveillance during the actual crisis. For the new recording sites again no prior example data is available. Finally, due to the imminent crisis there might be no time for the time-consuming and tedious process of preparing a training data set. For all these reasons a classification system which allows a "learning-while-recording" approach would be very advantageous for use in rapid response systems. Within this study, we show a novel seismic event spotting approach in order to reduce the dependency on the existence of previously acquired data bases and classification schemes. One main goal is therefore to provide the observatory staff with a robust event classification system based on a minimum number of reference waveforms and thus allowing for a fast build-up of a volcanic signal classification scheme as early as interesting events have been identified. For implementation issues we make use of the Hidden Markov

  4. Improving Response to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer: New Targets, New Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S; Vidula, Neelima; Ma, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer expresses the estrogen and or progesterone receptors (ER and PR). In tumors without concomitant HER2 amplification, hormone therapy is a major treatment option for all disease stages. Resistance to hormonal therapy is associated with disease recurrence and progression. Recent studies have identified a number of resistance mechanisms leading to estrogen-independent growth of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer as a result of genetic and epigenetic alterations, which could be exploited as novel therapeutic targets. These include acquired mutations in ER-alpha (ESR1) in response to endocrine deprivation; constitutive activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4 and 6; cross talk between ER and growth factor receptor signaling such as HER family members, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathways, intracellular growth, and survival signals PI3K/Akt/mTOR; and epigenetic modifications by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as well as interactions with tumor microenvironment and host immune response. Inhibitors of these pathways are being developed to improve efficacy of hormonal therapy for treatment of both metastatic and early-stage disease. Two agents are currently approved in the United States for the treatment of metastatic HR+ breast cancer, including the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Management of toxicity is a critical aspect of treatment; the primary toxicity of everolimus is stomatitis (treated with topical steroids) and of palbociclib is neutropenia (treated with dose reduction/delay). Many agents are in clinical trials, primarily in combination with hormone therapy; novel combinations are under active investigation. PMID:27249746

  5. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun or other sources of ...

  6. No hormone to rule them all: Interactions of plant hormones during the responses of plants to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shigenaga, Alexandra M; Argueso, Cristiana T

    2016-08-01

    Plant hormones are essential regulators of plant growth and immunity. In the last few decades, a vast amount of information has been obtained detailing the role of different plant hormones in immunity, and how they work together to ultimately shape the outcomes of plant pathogen interactions. Here we provide an overview on the roles of the main classes of plant hormones in the regulation of plant immunity, highlighting their metabolic and signaling pathways and how plants and pathogens utilize these pathways to activate or suppress defence.

  7. Phytohormone signaling pathway analysis method for comparing hormone responses in plant-pest interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phytohormones mediate plant defense responses to pests and pathogens. In particular, the hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, and abscisic acid have been shown to dictate and fine-tune defense responses, and identification of the phytohormone components of a particular defense response is commonly used to characterize it. Identification of phytohormone regulation is particularly important in transcriptome analyses. Currently there is no computational tool to determine the relative activity of these hormones that can be applied to transcriptome analyses in soybean. Findings We developed a pathway analysis method that provides a broad measure of the activation or suppression of individual phytohormone pathways based on changes in transcript expression of pathway-related genes. The magnitude and significance of these changes are used to determine a pathway score for a phytohormone for a given comparison in a microarray experiment. Scores for individual hormones can then be compared to determine the dominant phytohormone in a given defense response. To validate this method, it was applied to publicly available data from previous microarray experiments that studied the response of soybean plants to Asian soybean rust and soybean cyst nematode. The results of the analyses for these experiments agreed with our current understanding of the role of phytohormones in these defense responses. Conclusions This method is useful in providing a broad measure of the relative induction and suppression of soybean phytohormones during a defense response. This method could be used as part of microarray studies that include individual transcript analysis, gene set analysis, and other methods for a comprehensive defense response characterization. PMID:22846705

  8. pS2 and response to adjuvant hormone therapy in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Spyratos, F.; Andrieu, C.; Hacène, K.; Chambon, P.; Rio, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed 319 primary breast tumours for cytosolic pS2 content, with a median follow-up of 6 years. pS2 status correlated positively with oestradiol and progesterone receptors and negatively with Scarff, Bloom and Richardson grade. pS2 positivity was associated with longer overall survival, particularly in patients who received hormone therapy, in whom pS2 status was also predictive of the response to therapy. PMID:8297741

  9. Sex differences in acute hormonal and subjective response to naltrexone: the impact of menstrual cycle phase

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Daniel J.O.; King, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Women often exhibit larger hormonal and subjective responses to opioid receptor antagonists than men, but the biological mechanisms mediating this effect remain unclear. Among women, fluctuations in estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) across the menstrual cycle (MC) affect the endogenous opioid system. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to compare acute naltrexone response between women in the early follicular phase of the MC (low E2 and P4), women in the luteal phase of the MC (high E2 and P4), and men. Seventy healthy controls (n = 46 women) participated in two morning sessions in which they received 50 mg naltrexone or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced order. Women were randomized to complete both sessions in either the early follicular (n = 23) or luteal phase of the MC. Serum cortisol, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone (LH), salivary cortisol, and subjective response were assessed upon arrival to the laboratory and at regular intervals after pill administration. In luteal and early follicular women but not men, naltrexone (vs. placebo) increased serum cortisol and prolactin levels from baseline; however, the naltrexone-induced increases in these hormones were significantly greater in luteal women than early follicular women. Additionally, only luteal women demonstrated an increase from baseline in salivary cortisol levels and the severity of adverse drug effects in response to naltrexone. In sum, the results indicate that luteal phase women are more sensitive to acute hormonal and subjective effects of naltrexone than early follicular women and men. These findings may have important implications for the use of naltrexone in women. PMID:25459893

  10. Thyroid hormones inhibit TGF-β signaling and attenuate fibrotic responses.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Merino, Elvira; Martín Orozco, Rosa; Ruíz-Llorente, Lidia; Martínez-Iglesias, Olaia A; Velasco-Martín, Juan Pedro; Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Fanjul-Rodríguez, Luisa; Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; Regadera, Javier; Aranda, Ana

    2016-06-14

    TGF-β, the most potent profibrogenic factor, acts by activating SMAD (mothers against decapentaplegic) transcription factors, which bind to SMAD-binding elements in target genes. Here, we show that the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), through binding to its nuclear receptors (TRs), is able to antagonize transcriptional activation by TGF-β/SMAD. This antagonism involves reduced phosphorylation of SMADs and a direct interaction of the receptors with SMAD3 and SMAD4 that is independent of T3-mediated transcriptional activity but requires residues in the receptor DNA binding domain. T3 reduces occupancy of SMAD-binding elements in response to TGF-β, reducing histone acetylation and inhibiting transcription. In agreement with this transcriptional cross-talk, T3 is able to antagonize fibrotic processes in vivo. Liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride is attenuated by thyroid hormone administration to mice, whereas aged TR knockout mice spontaneously accumulate collagen. Furthermore, skin fibrosis induced by bleomycin administration is also reduced by the thyroid hormones. These findings define an important function of the thyroid hormone receptors and suggest TR ligands could have beneficial effects to block the progression of fibrotic diseases.

  11. Thyroid hormones inhibit TGF-β signaling and attenuate fibrotic responses.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Merino, Elvira; Martín Orozco, Rosa; Ruíz-Llorente, Lidia; Martínez-Iglesias, Olaia A; Velasco-Martín, Juan Pedro; Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Fanjul-Rodríguez, Luisa; Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; Regadera, Javier; Aranda, Ana

    2016-06-14

    TGF-β, the most potent profibrogenic factor, acts by activating SMAD (mothers against decapentaplegic) transcription factors, which bind to SMAD-binding elements in target genes. Here, we show that the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), through binding to its nuclear receptors (TRs), is able to antagonize transcriptional activation by TGF-β/SMAD. This antagonism involves reduced phosphorylation of SMADs and a direct interaction of the receptors with SMAD3 and SMAD4 that is independent of T3-mediated transcriptional activity but requires residues in the receptor DNA binding domain. T3 reduces occupancy of SMAD-binding elements in response to TGF-β, reducing histone acetylation and inhibiting transcription. In agreement with this transcriptional cross-talk, T3 is able to antagonize fibrotic processes in vivo. Liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride is attenuated by thyroid hormone administration to mice, whereas aged TR knockout mice spontaneously accumulate collagen. Furthermore, skin fibrosis induced by bleomycin administration is also reduced by the thyroid hormones. These findings define an important function of the thyroid hormone receptors and suggest TR ligands could have beneficial effects to block the progression of fibrotic diseases. PMID:27247403

  12. Hormonal Regulation of Response to Oxidative Stress in Insects-An Update.

    PubMed

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-01-01

    Insects, like other organisms, must deal with a wide variety of potentially challenging environmental factors during the course of their life. An important example of such a challenge is the phenomenon of oxidative stress. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKH) as principal stress responsive hormones in insects involved in activation of anti-oxidative stress response pathways. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of oxidative stress experimentally induced by various stressors and monitored by suitable biomarkers, and on detailed characterization of AKH's role in the anti-stress reactions. These reactions are characterized by a significant increase of AKH levels in the insect body, and by effective reversal of the markers-disturbed by the stressors-after co-application of the stressor with AKH. A plausible mechanism of AKH action in the anti-oxidative stress response is discussed as well: this probably involves simultaneous employment of both protein kinase C and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathways in the presence of extra and intra-cellular Ca(2+) stores, with the possible involvement of the FoxO transcription factors. The role of other insect hormones in the anti-oxidative defense reactions is also discussed. PMID:26516847

  13. Hormonal Regulation of Response to Oxidative Stress in Insects—An Update

    PubMed Central

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-01-01

    Insects, like other organisms, must deal with a wide variety of potentially challenging environmental factors during the course of their life. An important example of such a challenge is the phenomenon of oxidative stress. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKH) as principal stress responsive hormones in insects involved in activation of anti-oxidative stress response pathways. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of oxidative stress experimentally induced by various stressors and monitored by suitable biomarkers, and on detailed characterization of AKH’s role in the anti-stress reactions. These reactions are characterized by a significant increase of AKH levels in the insect body, and by effective reversal of the markers—disturbed by the stressors—after co-application of the stressor with AKH. A plausible mechanism of AKH action in the anti-oxidative stress response is discussed as well: this probably involves simultaneous employment of both protein kinase C and cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate pathways in the presence of extra and intra-cellular Ca2+ stores, with the possible involvement of the FoxO transcription factors. The role of other insect hormones in the anti-oxidative defense reactions is also discussed. PMID:26516847

  14. Hormonal Regulation of Response to Oxidative Stress in Insects-An Update.

    PubMed

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-10-27

    Insects, like other organisms, must deal with a wide variety of potentially challenging environmental factors during the course of their life. An important example of such a challenge is the phenomenon of oxidative stress. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKH) as principal stress responsive hormones in insects involved in activation of anti-oxidative stress response pathways. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of oxidative stress experimentally induced by various stressors and monitored by suitable biomarkers, and on detailed characterization of AKH's role in the anti-stress reactions. These reactions are characterized by a significant increase of AKH levels in the insect body, and by effective reversal of the markers-disturbed by the stressors-after co-application of the stressor with AKH. A plausible mechanism of AKH action in the anti-oxidative stress response is discussed as well: this probably involves simultaneous employment of both protein kinase C and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathways in the presence of extra and intra-cellular Ca(2+) stores, with the possible involvement of the FoxO transcription factors. The role of other insect hormones in the anti-oxidative defense reactions is also discussed.

  15. Metabolomics Analysis of Hormone-Responsive and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Responses to Paclitaxel Identify Key Metabolic Differences.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Delisha A; Winnike, Jason H; McRitchie, Susan L; Clark, Robert F; Pathmasiri, Wimal W; Sumner, Susan J

    2016-09-01

    To date, no targeted therapies are available to treat triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), while other breast cancer subtypes are responsive to current therapeutic treatment. Metabolomics was conducted to reveal differences in two hormone receptor-negative TNBC cell lines and two hormone receptor-positive Luminal A cell lines. Studies were conducted in the presence and absence of paclitaxel (Taxol). TNBC cell lines had higher levels of amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, nucleotides, and nucleotide sugars and lower levels of proliferation-related metabolites like choline compared with Luminal A cell lines. In the presence of paclitaxel, each cell line showed unique metabolic responses, with some similarities by type. For example, in the Luminal A cell lines, levels of lactate and creatine decreased while certain choline metabolites and myo-inositol increased with paclitaxel. In the TNBC cell lines levels of glutamine, glutamate, and glutathione increased, whereas lysine, proline, and valine decreased in the presence of drug. Profiling secreted inflammatory cytokines in the conditioned media demonstrated a greater response to paclitaxel in the hormone-positive Luminal cells compared with a secretion profile that suggested greater drug resistance in the TNBC cells. The most significant differences distinguishing the cell types based on pathway enrichment analyses were related to amino acid, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism pathways, whereas several biological pathways were differentiated between the cell lines following treatment. PMID:27447733

  16. Immune responses of orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, against virus-like particles of betanodavirus produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Xiong; Jin, Bao-Lei; Xu, Yu; Huang, Li-Jie; Huang, Run-Qing; Zhang, Yong; Kwang, Jimmy; He, Jian-Guo; Xie, Jun-Feng

    2014-01-15

    Betanodaviruses are the causative agents of viral nervous necrosis (VNN), a serious disease of cultured marine fish worldwide. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the good novel vaccine candidates to control this disease. Until now, betanodavirus vaccine studies mainly focused on the humoral immune response and mortality after virus challenge. However, little is known about the activation of genes responsible for cellular and innate immunity by vaccines. In the present study, VLPs of orange-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (OGNNV) were produced in prokaryotes and their ability to enter Asian sea bass cells was the same as native virus, suggesting that they possess a similar structure to OGNNV. VLPs immunogenicity was then determined by intramuscularly vaccinating Epinephelus coioides at different concentrations (1.5 or 15 μg g(-1) fish body weight, FBW) and immunizing frequencies (administration once, twice and thrice). A single vaccination with the dosage of 1.5 μg g(-1) FBW is enough to provoke high titer antibodies (average 3 fold higher than that of negative control) with strong neutralizing antibody titer as early as 1 week post immunization. Furthermore, quantitative PCR analysis revealed that eleven genes associated with humoral, cellular and innate immunities were up-regulated in the liver, spleen and head kidney at 12h post immunization, correlating with the early antibody response. In conclusion, we demonstrated that VLP vaccination induced humoral immune responses and activated genes associated with cellular and innate immunity against betanodavirus infection in orange-spotted grouper.

  17. Circulating hormones and pituitary responsiveness in young epileptic men receiving long-term antiepileptic medication.

    PubMed

    Macphee, G J; Larkin, J G; Butler, E; Beastall, G H; Brodie, M J

    1988-01-01

    Impairment of libido and sexual potency are commonly reported by male epileptic patients. This may be partly a consequence of medication. Circulating hormones were measured in 53 postpubertal male epileptic patients less than 45 years of age and in an age-matched control group (n = 40), consisting of 14 untreated epileptic patients and 26 unmedicated healthy subjects. A subgroup also underwent a combined gonadotrophin- and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (LH-RH/TRH) pituitary stimulation test. Untreated patients did not differ from healthy subjects for any parameter, and their data were combined for comparison with the treated epileptic patients. Total testosterone (T), androstenedione, and basal follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations were similar in all patient groups. Patients receiving more than one drug had higher sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (p less than 0.01) and lower free T and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHAS) levels (both p less than 0.001) than controls. Carbamazepine (CBZ) monotherapy also reduced free T (p less than 0.05) and DHAS (p less than 0.001) and increased basal prolactin (p less than 0.01). In these two groups of patients, basal luteinising hormone (LH) was elevated (p less than 0.01), presumably as a pituitary response to increased T catabolism. There was a negative correlation between free T and circulating CBZ (r = -0.54, p less than 0.05) in the monotherapy patients. Phenytoin (PHT) was associated with a rise in SHBG (p less than 0.01) and a fall in DHAS (p less than 0.001). Basal LH was also elevated, but this just failed to reach statistical significance (p less than 0.1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Effect of dark pretreatment on the kinetics of response of barley pulvini to gravistimulation and hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, T. G.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1988-01-01

    Starch in pulvinus amyloplasts of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Larker) disappears when 45-day-old, light-grown plants are given 5 days of continuous darkness. The effect of this loss on the pulvinus graviresponse was evaluated by following changes in the kinetics of response during the 5-day dark period. Over 5 days of dark pretreatment, the lag to initial graviresponse and the subsequent half-time to maximum steady state bending rate increased significantly while the maximum bending rate did not change. The change in response to applied indoleacetic acid (100 micromolar) plus gibberellic acid (10 micromolar) without gravistimulation, under identical dark pretreatments, was used as a model system for the response component of gravitropism. Dark pretreatment did not change the lag to initial response following hormone application to vertical pulvini, but both the maximum bending rate and the half-time to the maximum rate were significantly reduced. Also, after dark pretreatment, significant bending responses following hormone application were observed in vertical segments with or without added sucrose, while gravistimulation produced a response only if segments were given sucrose. These results indicate that starch-filled amyloplasts are required for the graviresponse of barley pulvini and suggest that they function in the stimulus perception and signal transduction components of gravitropism.

  19. Taste matters - effects of bypassing oral stimulation on hormone and appetite responses.

    PubMed

    Spetter, Maartje S; Mars, Monica; Viergever, Max A; de Graaf, Cees; Smeets, Paul A M

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between oral and gastric signals is an important part of food intake regulation. Previous studies suggest that bypassing oral stimulation diminishes the suppression of hunger and increases gastric emptying rate. However, the role of appetite hormones, like cholecystokinin-8 and ghrelin, in this process is still unclear. Our objective was to determine the contributions of gastric and oral stimulation to subsequent appetite and hormone responses and their effect on ad libitum intake. Fourteen healthy male subjects (age 24.6±3.8y, BMI 22.3±1.6kg/m(2)) completed a randomized, single-blinded, cross-over experiment with 3 treatment-sessions: 1) Stomach distention: naso-gastric infusion of 500mL/0kJ water, 2) Stomach distention with caloric content: naso-gastric infusion of 500mL/1770kJ chocolate milk, and 3) Stomach distention with caloric content and oral exposure: oral administration of 500mL/1770kJ chocolate milk. Changes in appetite ratings and plasma glucose, insulin, cholecystokinin-8, and active and total ghrelin concentrations were measured at fixed time-points up to 30min after infusion or oral administration. Subsequently, subjects consumed an ad libitum buffet meal. Oral administration reduced appetite ratings more than both naso-gastric infusions (P<0.0001). Gastric infusion of a caloric load increased insulin and cholecystokinin-8 and decreased total ghrelin concentrations more than ingestion (all P<0.0001). No differences in active ghrelin response were observed between conditions. Ad libitum intake did not differ between oral and gastric administration of chocolate milk (P>0.05). Thus, gastric infusion of nutrients induces greater appetite hormone responses than ingestion does. These data provide novel and additional evidence that bypassing oral stimulation not only affects the appetite profile but also increases anorexigenic hormone responses, probably driven in part by faster gastric emptying. This confirms the idea that learned

  20. Taste matters - effects of bypassing oral stimulation on hormone and appetite responses.

    PubMed

    Spetter, Maartje S; Mars, Monica; Viergever, Max A; de Graaf, Cees; Smeets, Paul A M

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between oral and gastric signals is an important part of food intake regulation. Previous studies suggest that bypassing oral stimulation diminishes the suppression of hunger and increases gastric emptying rate. However, the role of appetite hormones, like cholecystokinin-8 and ghrelin, in this process is still unclear. Our objective was to determine the contributions of gastric and oral stimulation to subsequent appetite and hormone responses and their effect on ad libitum intake. Fourteen healthy male subjects (age 24.6±3.8y, BMI 22.3±1.6kg/m(2)) completed a randomized, single-blinded, cross-over experiment with 3 treatment-sessions: 1) Stomach distention: naso-gastric infusion of 500mL/0kJ water, 2) Stomach distention with caloric content: naso-gastric infusion of 500mL/1770kJ chocolate milk, and 3) Stomach distention with caloric content and oral exposure: oral administration of 500mL/1770kJ chocolate milk. Changes in appetite ratings and plasma glucose, insulin, cholecystokinin-8, and active and total ghrelin concentrations were measured at fixed time-points up to 30min after infusion or oral administration. Subsequently, subjects consumed an ad libitum buffet meal. Oral administration reduced appetite ratings more than both naso-gastric infusions (P<0.0001). Gastric infusion of a caloric load increased insulin and cholecystokinin-8 and decreased total ghrelin concentrations more than ingestion (all P<0.0001). No differences in active ghrelin response were observed between conditions. Ad libitum intake did not differ between oral and gastric administration of chocolate milk (P>0.05). Thus, gastric infusion of nutrients induces greater appetite hormone responses than ingestion does. These data provide novel and additional evidence that bypassing oral stimulation not only affects the appetite profile but also increases anorexigenic hormone responses, probably driven in part by faster gastric emptying. This confirms the idea that learned

  1. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Billestrup, N.; Moeldrup, A.; Serup, P.; Nielsen, J.H. ); Mathews, L.S.; Norstedt, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, the authors have transfected a GH receptor cDNA under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein promoter into RIN5-AH cells. The transfected cells were found to exhibit an increased expression of GH receptors and to contain a specific GH receptor mRNA that was not expressed in the parent cell line. The expression of GH receptors in one clone (1.24) selected for detailed analysis was increased 2.6-fold compared to untransfected cells. The increased GH receptor expression was accompanied by an increased responsiveness to GH. Thus, the maximal GH-stimulated increase of insulin biosynthesis was 4.1-fold in 1.24 cells compared to 1.9-fold in the nontransfected RIN5-AH cells. The expression of the transfected receptor was stimulated 1.6- and 2.3-fold when cells were cultured in the presence of 25 or 50 {mu}M Zn{sup 2+} was associated with an increased magnitude of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis. A close stoichiometric relationship between the level of receptor expression and the level of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis was observed. They conclude from these results that the hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the effect of GH on insulin biosynthesis in RIN5-AH cells.

  2. Effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and arginine-vasotocin on the sperm-release response of Günther's Toadlet, Pseudophryne guentheri

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is an exogenous hormone commonly used to induce spermiation in anuran amphibians. Over the past few decades, the LHRH dose administered to individuals and the frequency of injection has been highly variable. The sperm-release responses reported have been correspondingly diverse, highlighting a need to quantify dose-response relationships on a species-specific basis. This study on the Australian anuran Pseudophryne guentheri first evaluated the spermiation response of males administered one of five LHRHa doses, and second, determined whether AVT administered in combination with the optimal LHRHa dose improved sperm-release. Methods Male toadlets were administered a single dose of 0, 1, 2, 4 or 8 micrograms/g body weight of LHRHa. A 4 micrograms/g dose of AVT was administered alone or in combination with 2 micrograms/g LHRHa. Spermiation responses were evaluated at 3, 7 and 12 h post hormone administration (PA), and sperm number and viability were quantified using fluorescent microscopy. Results LHRHa administration was highly effective at inducing spermiation in P. guentheri, with 100% of hormone-treated males producing sperm during the experimental period. The number of sperm released in response to 2 micrograms/g LHRHa was greater than all other doses administered and sperm viability was highest in the 1 microgram/g treatment. The administration of AVT alone or in combination with LHRHa resulted in the release of significantly lower sperm numbers. Conclusion Overall, results from this study suggest that in P. guentheri, LHRHa is effective at inducing spermiation, but that AVT inhibits sperm-release. PMID:21059269

  3. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses of Resistant Host Responses in Arachis diogoi Challenged with Late Leaf Spot Pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dilip; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2015-01-01

    Late leaf spot is a serious disease of peanut caused by the imperfect fungus, Phaeoisariopsis personata. Wild diploid species, Arachis diogoi. is reported to be highly resistant to this disease and asymptomatic. The objective of this study is to investigate the molecular responses of the wild peanut challenged with the late leaf spot pathogen using cDNA-AFLP and 2D proteomic study. A total of 233 reliable, differentially expressed genes were identified in Arachis diogoi. About one third of the TDFs exhibit no significant similarity with the known sequences in the data bases. Expressed sequence tag data showed that the characterized genes are involved in conferring resistance in the wild peanut to the pathogen challenge. Several genes for proteins involved in cell wall strengthening, hypersensitive cell death and resistance related proteins have been identified. Genes identified for other proteins appear to function in metabolism, signal transduction and defence. Nineteen TDFs based on the homology analysis of genes associated with defence, signal transduction and metabolism were further validated by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses in resistant wild species in comparison with a susceptible peanut genotype in time course experiments. The proteins corresponding to six TDFs were differentially expressed at protein level also. Differentially expressed TDFs and proteins in wild peanut indicate its defence mechanism upon pathogen challenge and provide initial breakthrough of genes possibly involved in recognition events and early signalling responses to combat the pathogen through subsequent development of resistivity. This is the first attempt to elucidate the molecular basis of the response of the resistant genotype to the late leaf spot pathogen, and its defence mechanism. PMID:25646800

  4. Phosphotransferase protein EIIANtr interacts with SpoT, a key enzyme of the stringent response, in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Katja; Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Bowien, Botho; Stülke, Jörg; Görke, Boris

    2014-04-01

    EIIA(Ntr) is a member of a truncated phosphotransferase (PTS) system that serves regulatory functions and exists in many Proteobacteria in addition to the sugar transport PTS. In Escherichia coli, EIIA(Ntr) regulates K(+) homeostasis through interaction with the K(+) transporter TrkA and sensor kinase KdpD. In the β-Proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, EIIA(Ntr) influences formation of the industrially important bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). PHB accumulation is controlled by the stringent response and induced under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. Knockout of EIIA(Ntr) increases the PHB content. In contrast, absence of enzyme I or HPr, which deliver phosphoryl groups to EIIA(Ntr), has the opposite effect. To clarify the role of EIIA(Ntr) in PHB formation, we screened for interacting proteins that co-purify with Strep-tagged EIIA(Ntr) from R. eutropha cells. This approach identified the bifunctional ppGpp synthase/hydrolase SpoT1, a key enzyme of the stringent response. Two-hybrid and far-Western analyses confirmed the interaction and indicated that only non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) interacts with SpoT1. Interestingly, this interaction does not occur between the corresponding proteins of E. coli. Vice versa, interaction of EIIA(Ntr) with KdpD appears to be absent in R. eutropha, although R. eutropha EIIA(Ntr) can perfectly substitute its homologue in E. coli in regulation of KdpD activity. Thus, interaction with KdpD might be an evolutionary 'ancient' task of EIIA(Ntr) that was subsequently replaced by interaction with SpoT1 in R. eutropha. In conclusion, EIIA(Ntr) might integrate information about nutritional status, as reflected by its phosphorylation state, into the stringent response, thereby controlling cellular PHB content in R. eutropha. PMID:24515609

  5. Taste signaling elements expressed in gut enteroendocrine cells regulate nutrient-responsive secretion of gut hormones.

    PubMed

    Kokrashvili, Zaza; Mosinger, Bedrich; Margolskee, Robert F

    2009-09-01

    Many of the receptors and downstream signaling elements involved in taste detection and transduction are also expressed in enteroendocrine cells where they underlie the chemosensory functions of the gut. In one well-known example of gastrointestinal chemosensation (the "incretin effect"), it is known that glucose that is given orally, but not systemically, induces secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (the incretin hormones), which in turn regulate appetite, insulin secretion, and gut motility. Duodenal L cells express sweet taste receptors, the taste G protein gustducin, and several other taste transduction elements. Knockout mice that lack gustducin or the sweet taste receptor subunit T1r3 have deficiencies in secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and in the regulation of plasma concentrations of insulin and glucose in response to orally ingested carbohydrate-ie, their incretin effect is dysfunctional. Isolated small intestine and intestinal villi from gustducin null mice displayed markedly defective glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion in response to glucose, indicating that this is a local circuit of sugar detection by intestinal cells followed by hormone secretion from these same cells. Modulating hormone secretion from gut "taste cells" may provide novel treatments for obesity, diabetes, and malabsorption syndromes. PMID:19571229

  6. Stimulation of hormone-responsive adenylate cyclase activity by a factor present in the cell cytosol.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S; Crawford, A; Amirrasooli, H; Johnson, S; Pollock, A; Ollis, C; Tomlinson, S

    1980-01-01

    1. Homogenates of whole tissues were shown to contain both intracellular and extracellular factors that affected particulate adenylate cyclase activity in vitro. Factors present in the extracellular fluids produced an inhibition of basal, hormone- and fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity but factors present in the cell cytosol increased hormone-stimulated activity with relatively little effect on basal or fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity. 2. The existence of this cytosol factor or factors was investigated using freshly isolated human platelets, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes, and cultured cells derived from rat osteogenic sarcoma, rat calvaria, mouse melanoma, pig aortic endothelium, human articular cartilage chondrocytes and human bronchial carcinoma (BEN) cells. 3. The stimulation of the hormone response by the cytosol factor ranged from 60 to 890% depending on the tissue of origin of the adenylate cyclase. 4. In each case the behaviour of the factor was similar to the action of GTP on that particular adenylate cyclase preparation. 5. No evidence of tissue or species specificity was found, as cytosols stimulated adenylate cyclase from their own and unrelated tissues to the same degree. 6. In the human platelet, the inclusion of the cytosol in the assay of adenylate cyclase increased the rate of enzyme activity in response to stimulation by prostaglandin E1 without affecting the amount of prostaglandin E1 required for half-maximal stimulation or the characteristics of enzyme activation by prostaglandin E. PMID:7396869

  7. Receptors bound to antiprogestin from abortive complexes with hormone responsive elements.

    PubMed

    Guiochon-Mantel, A; Loosfelt, H; Ragot, T; Bailly, A; Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Perricaudet, M; Milgrom, E

    1988-12-15

    The mechanism of action of antisteroids is not understood and explanations of their antagonistic activity have been sought at all levels of hormone action. It has been proposed that antisteroids, after binding to receptor, trap it into a non-activated (non DNA-binding) form possibly through interaction with a heat-shock protein of relative molecular mass (Mr) 90,000 (90 K), or that the antisteroids provoke binding of receptor to nonspecific DNA sites but not to hormone responsive elements (HREs), or that the antisteroid-receptor complexes can bind to HREs but form abortive complexes that fail to regulate transcription. We have constructed a deleted cDNA encoding a mutant form of rabbit progesterone receptor which exhibits constitutive activity, that is, binds to HREs in the absence of hormone and thus bypasses the first two steps discussed above. Co-transfection experiments allowed the expression of both constitutive and wild-type receptors in the same recipient cells. Antiprogestin RU486-wild-type receptor complexes completely suppressed the activity of the constitutive receptor on a reporter gene, showing that the inhibition is at the level of their common responsive elements. PMID:3200320

  8. Overlapping dose responses of spermatogenic and extragonadal testosterone actions jeopardize the principle of hormonal male contraception.

    PubMed

    Oduwole, Olayiwola O; Vydra, Natalia; Wood, Nicholas E M; Samanta, Luna; Owen, Laura; Keevil, Brian; Donaldson, Mandy; Naresh, Kikkeri; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone (T), alone or in combination with progestin, provides a promising approach to hormonal male contraception. Its principle relies on enhanced negative feedback of exogenous T to suppress gonadotropins, thereby blocking the testicular T production needed for spermatogenesis, while simultaneously maintaining the extragonadal androgen actions, such as potency and libido, to avoid hypogonadism. A serious drawback of the treatment is that a significant proportion of men do not reach azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, commensurate with contraceptive efficacy. We tested here, using hypogonadal luteinizing hormone/choriongonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) knockout (LHR(-/-)) mice, the basic principle of the T-based male contraceptive method, that a specific T dose could maintain extragonadal androgen actions without simultaneously activating spermatogenesis. LHR(-/-) mice were treated with increasing T doses, and the responses of their spermatogenesis and extragonadal androgen actions (including gonadotropin suppression and sexual behavior) were assessed. Conspicuously, all dose responses to T were practically superimposable, and no dose of T could be defined that would maintain sexual function and suppress gonadotropins without simultaneously activating spermatogenesis. This finding, never addressed in clinical contraceptive trials, is not unexpected in light of the same androgen receptor mediating androgen actions in all organs. When extrapolated to humans, our findings may jeopardize the current approach to hormonal male contraception and call for more effective means of inhibiting intratesticular T production or action, to achieve consistent spermatogenic suppression.

  9. Increased prolactin secretion and thyrotrophin response to thyrotrophin releasing hormone in Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumanov, P

    1995-01-01

    The reports published thus far on prolactin and thyrotrophin secretion in patients with Klinefelter's syndrome are controversial. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interrelation between prolactin on one hand, and hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and thyrotrophin, on the other, in males with Klinefelter's syndrome. Fifteen patients with Klinefelter's syndrome, aged between 17 and 43 years, and 15 healthy males, aged 22-35 years, were studied. Mean +/- SD basal serum prolactin levels were 529.6 +/- 174.6 mU l-1 in the patients, and 270.1 +/- 113.0 mU l-1 in the control group (P < 0.001). Following 200 micrograms thyrotrophin releasing hormone, an enhanced prolactin response was seen in the males with Klinefelter's syndrome. There was no evidence of any of the well-known causes of hyperprolactinaemia. The response of thyrotrophin to thyrotrophin releasing hormone was more pronounced in Klinefelter patients in comparison with controls. Presumably, in Klinefelter's syndrome both alterations--of prolactin and thyrotrophin secretion--may be caused by decrease of testosterone levels or they could reflect a disturbance in neuroendocrine regulation with some neurotransmitter imbalance.

  10. Thyroid hormone and dietary carbohydrate induce different hepatic zonation of both "spot 14" and acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase: a novel mechanism of coregulation.

    PubMed

    Kinlaw, W B; Tron, P; Witters, L A

    1993-08-01

    The S14 gene encodes a protein found in the nuclei of lipogenic tissues that is induced synergistically by thyroid hormone (T3) and dietary carbohydrate, as are several lipogenic enzymes. In hyperthyroid rats, hepatic expression of S14 protein is zonated. The established association of S14 gene expression with lipogenesis, therefore, prompted a comparison of the zonal distribution of induction of S14 and acetyl-coenzyme-A-carboxylase (ACC), a rate-determining enzyme of fatty acid synthesis, by T3, dietary carbohydrate, and both stimuli together. As determined by immunohistochemistry, liver from chow-fed hypothyroid or euthyroid fasted rats showed essentially no reactivity for either S14 or ACC. Sections from hyperthyroid rats exhibited nuclear staining with anti-S14 antibodies and cytoplasmic reactivity for ACC that was primarily perivenous in both cases. In contrast, sections from euthyroid-fasted animals refed a high carbohydrate, fat-free diet for 3 days exhibited panlobular expression of both antigens. Animals receiving both T3 and high carbohydrate diet refeeding showed increased intensity of staining, compared to the refed group, for both S14 and ACC across the entire lobule. Therefore, in rats consuming normal chow, T3 induced S14 and ACC only in the perivenous zone of the acinus, whereas it further induced these proteins across the entire lobule in the presence of increased carbohydrate intake. Modulation, by the carbohydrate content of the diet, of the fraction of the liver that may express S14 and ACC in response to T3 provides a mechanism for coregulation of the genes involved in hepatic lipid formation. Moreover, the observed cozonation of S14 and ACC as well as the quantitatively similar effects of T3 and dietary carbohydrate on S14, ACC, fatty acid synthetase, and ATP-citrate lyase protein abundance prompt the speculation that S14 acts in the nucleus to promote expression of the genes involved in the lipogenic pathway.

  11. Modeling of the parathyroid hormone response after calcium intake in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Eun; Jeon, Sangil; Lee, Jongtae; Han, Seunghoon; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Plasma ionized calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations are tightly regulated in the body and maintained within a narrow range; thus it is challenging to quantify calcium absorption under normal physiologic conditions. This study aimed to develop a mechanistic model for the parathyroid hormone (PTH) response after calcium intake and indirectly compare the difference in oral calcium absorption from PTH responses. PTH and Ca(2+) concentrations were collected from 24 subjects from a clinical trial performed to evaluate the safety and calcium absorption of Geumjin Thermal Water in comparison with calcium carbonate tablets in healthy subjects. Indirect response models (NONMEM Ver. 7.2.0) were fitted to observed Ca(2+) and PTH data, respectively, in a manner that absorbed but unobserved Ca(2+) inhibits the secretion of PTH. Without notable changes in Ca(2+) levels, PTH responses were modeled and used as a marker for the extent of calcium absorption. PMID:24976761

  12. Salivary Hormones Response to Preparation and Pre-competitive Training of World-class Level Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Guilhem, Gaël; Hanon, Christine; Gendreau, Nicolas; Bonneau, Dominique; Guével, Arnaud; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the response of salivary hormones of track and field athletes induced by preparation and pre-competitive training periods in an attempt to comment on the physiological effects consistent with the responses of each of the proteins measured. Salivary testosterone, cortisol, alpha-amylase, immunoglobulin A (IgA), chromogranin A, blood creatine kinase activity, and profile of mood state were assessed at rest in 24 world-class level athletes during preparation (3 times in 3 months) and pre-competitive (5 times in 5 weeks) training periods. Total mood disturbance and fatigue perception were reduced, while IgA (+61%) and creatine kinase activity (+43%) increased, and chromogranin A decreased (−27%) during pre-competitive compared to preparation period. A significant increase in salivary testosterone (+9 to +15%) and a decrease in testosterone/cortisol ratio were associated with a progressive reduction in training load during pre-competitive period (P < 0.05). None of the psycho-physiological parameters were significantly correlated to training load during the pre-competitive period. Results showed a lower adrenocortical response and autonomic activity, and an improvement of immunity status, in response to the reduction in training load and fatigue, without significant correlations of salivary hormones with training load. Our findings suggest that saliva composition is sensitive to training contents (season period) but could not be related to workload resulting from track and field athletics training. PMID:26635619

  13. An Arabidopsis WDR protein coordinates cellular networks involved in light, stress response and hormone signals.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Huey-Wen; Feng, Ji-Huan; Feng, Yung-Lin; Wei, Miam-Ju

    2015-12-01

    The WD-40 repeat (WDR) protein acts as a scaffold for protein interactions in various cellular events. An Arabidopsis WDR protein exhibited sequence similarity with human WDR26, a scaffolding protein implicated in H2O2-induced cell death in neural cells. The AtWDR26 transcript was induced by auxin, abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene (ET), osmostic stress and salinity. The expression of AtWDR26 was regulated by light, and seed germination of the AtWDR26 overexpression (OE) and seedling growth of the T-DNA knock-out (KO) exhibited altered sensitivity to light. Root growth of the OE seedlings increased tolerance to ZnSO4 and NaCl stresses and were hypersensitive to inhibition of osmotic stress. Seedlings of OE and KO altered sensitivities to multiple hormones. Transcriptome analysis of the transgenic plants overexpressing AtWDR26 showed that genes involved in the chloroplast-related metabolism constituted the largest group of the up-regulated genes. AtWDR26 overexpression up-regulated a large number of genes related to defense cellular events including biotic and abiotic stress response. Furthermore, several members of genes functioning in the regulation of Zn homeostasis, and hormone synthesis and perception of auxin and JA were strongly up-regulated in the transgenic plants. Our data provide physiological and transcriptional evidence for AtWDR26 role in hormone, light and abiotic stress cellular events.

  14. Short term response of insulin, glucose, growth hormone and corticosterone to acute vibration in rats.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, C. B.; Leon, H. A.; Chackerian, M.

    1971-01-01

    Study carried out to obtain some notion of the initial phasing and interactive effects among some hormones known to be responsive to vibration stress. Sprague-Dawley derived rats were exposed to the acute effects of confinement and confinement with lateral (plus or minus G sub y) vibration. The coincident monitoring of glucose, insulin, growth hormone, and corticosterone plasma levels, during and immediately subsequent to exposure to brief low level vibration, exhibits the effects of inhibition of insulin release by epinephrine. The ability of insulin (IRI) to return rapidly to basal levels, from appreciably depressed levels during vibration, in the face of elevated levels of glucose is also shown. Corticosterone responds with almost equal rapidity, but in opposite phase to the IRI. The immuno-assayable growth hormone (IGH) dropped from a basal level of 32 ng/ml to 7.3 ng/ml immediately subsequent to vibration and remained at essentially that level throughout the experiment (60 min). Whether these levels represent a real fall in the rat or whether they merely follow the immuno-logically deficient form is still in question.

  15. [Factors responsible for spatial population genetic Structure in white-spotted char Salvelinus leucomaensis (Pallas)].

    PubMed

    Salmenkova, E A; Omelchenko, V T

    2014-12-01

    Using personal data obtained earlier on the spatial population genetic structure of white-spotted char at ten microsatellite loci, an analysis of factors shaping the interpopulation divergence was performed. The primary role of genetic drift in population differentiation over the distribution range was demonstrated, compared to the practically absent role of stepwise mutation process. This result points to the common origin and relative connections between southern and northern population groups. In the majority of populations, no bottleneck effect was detected. Exclusion of the genetically peculiar Primorye population from the analysis resulted in the identification of the isolation by distance signatures among the examined populations. Such an association can be determined by the migratory exchange between the populations, or it could have formed during the historical post-Pleistocene colonization of the range.

  16. Responses to olfactory stimuli in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta): II. Discrimination of conspecific scent.

    PubMed

    Drea, Christine M; Vignieri, Sacha N; Kim, H Sharon; Weldele, Mary L; Glickman, Stephen E

    2002-12-01

    Scent marking in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) includes the deposition of anal sac secretions, or "paste," and presumably advertises territorial ownership. To test whether captive hyenas classify and discriminate individuals using odor cues in paste, the authors conducted behavioral discrimination bioassays and recorded hyena investigation of paste extracted from various conspecific donors. In Experiment 1, subjects directed most investigative behavior toward scents from unfamiliar hyenas and members of the opposite sex. In Experiment 2, male hyenas discriminated between concurrent presentations of paste from various unfamiliar females in similar reproductive states. Thus, pasted scent marks convey information about the sex, familiarity, and even identity of conspecifics. Aside from territory maintenance, scent marking may also communicate information about individual sexual status.

  17. Hormone responses to a continuous bout of rock climbing in men.

    PubMed

    Sherk, Vanessa D; Sherk, Kyle A; Kim, SoJung; Young, Kaelin C; Bemben, Debra A

    2011-04-01

    Rock climbing is rapidly increasing in popularity as a recreational activity and as a competitive sport. Few studies have tested acute physiological responses to climbing, and no studies to date have tested hormone responses to a climbing-based workout. This study aimed to measure testosterone (T), growth hormone (GH), and cortisol (C) responses to continuous vertical climbing in young male rock climbers. Ten male rock climbers, aged between 21 and 30 years, climbed laps on a submaximal 55' climbing route for 30 min, or until exhaustion, whichever came first. Heart rate (HR) was recorded after every lap. Blood samples were collected by venipuncture before (Pre), immediately post (IP), and 15 min after the climbing exercise (P15) to assess blood lactate and plasma GH, T, and C. Subjects climbed 24.9 ± 1.9 min and 507.5 ± 82.5 feet. Peak HR was 182.1 ± 2.3 bpm, and lactate (Pre: 2.9 ± 0.6 mmol/dL, IP: 11.1 ± 1.0 mmol/dL) significantly (P < 0.05) increased from Pre to IP. T concentrations significantly (P < 0.05) increased from Pre (6.04 ± 0.31 ng/mL) to IP (7.39 ± 0.40 ng/mL) and returned to baseline at P15 (6.23 ± 0.33 ng/mL). Cortisol levels did not significantly change during the protocol. GH significantly (P < 0.01) increased from Pre (0.63 ± 0.17 ng/mL) to IP (19.89 ± 4.53 ng/mL) and remained elevated at P15 (15.03 ± 3.89 ng/mL). An acute, short-term bout of high-intensity continuous climbing was an effective exercise stimulus for elevating plasma testosterone and growth hormone levels in young males.

  18. Plasma nesfatin-1 and glucoregulatory hormone responses to two different anaerobic exercise sessions.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari-Niaki, Abbass; Kraemer, Robert R; Soltani, Raheleh

    2010-11-01

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently discovered anorectic protein derived from posttranslational processing of the nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2) gene. It is expressed in adipose tissue and is also found in plasma. Nesfatin-1 expression is significantly affected by nutritional status and its actions may be involved in the inhibition of the orexigenic effect of ghrelin. Although the effects of physical exercise on several anorectic and orexigenic hormones have been reported, no studies have investigated its effects upon circulating concentrations of nesfatin-1. We investigated the effects of acute strenuous interval exercise and circuit exercise on nesfatin and other hormones affected by metabolic stress. Fourteen provincial and national level young male-kickboxing volunteers participated [age 20.71 ± 2.6 years, height 176.6 ± 2.8 cm, body weight 67.2 ± 3.3 kg, and body mass index (BMI) 21.56 ± 1.42 kg/m(2)]. After an overnight fast, responses to a running-based anaerobic sprint test (RAST; 7 sets of 6 × 35 m every 10 s with 1 min rest in between sets) and a non-combat kickboxing session (NCKB; 7 sets of 6 techniques, 20 s per technique with 1 min rest in between sets) were determined. Venous blood samples were collected before, immediately after, and 45 as well as 95 min following the exercises. Plasma GH, insulin, glucose and lactate concentrations significantly increased immediately following the RAST and NCKB protocols, however, plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations were not significantly altered. Higher plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations occurred in response to the RAST compared with the NCKB protocols. Although the exercise protocols elicited metabolic stress that significantly altered circulating glucoregulatory hormones, plasma glucose and lactate, there was no significant change in plasma nesfatin-1. A lack of nesfatin-1 response to the exercise protocols may be partially due to the fasting condition.

  19. Hormonal responses to extreme fasting in subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) pups.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Delphine; Atkinson, Shannon; Guinet, Christophe; Groscolas, René; Arnould, John P Y

    2012-04-15

    Surviving prolonged fasting implies closely regulated alterations in fuel provisioning to meet metabolic requirements, while preserving homeostasis. Little is known, however, of the endocrine regulations governing such metabolic adaptations in naturally fasting free-ranging animals. The hormonal responses to natural prolonged fasting and how they correlate to the metabolic adaptations observed, were investigated in subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) pups, which, because of the intermittent pattern of maternal attendance, repeatedly endure exceptionally long fasting episodes throughout their development (1-3 mo). Phase I fasting was characterized by a dramatic decrease in plasma insulin, glucagon, leptin, and total l-thyroxine (T(4)) associated with reductions in mass-specific resting metabolic rate (RMR), plasma triglycerides, glycerol, and urea-to-creatine ratio, while nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and β-OHB increased. In contrast, the metabolic steady-state of phase II fasting reached within 6 days was associated with minimal concentrations of insulin, glucagon, and leptin; unchanged cortisol and triiodothyronine (T(3)); and moderately increased T(4). The early fall in insulin and leptin may mediate the shift to the strategy of energy conservation, protein sparing, and primary reliance on body lipids observed in response to the cessation of feeding. In contrast to the typical mammalian starvation response, nonelevated cortisol and minimal glucagon levels may contribute to body protein preservation and downregulation of catabolic pathways, in general. Furthermore, thyroid hormones may be involved in a process of energy conservation, independent of pups' nutritional state. These original hormonal settings might reflect an adaptation to the otariid repeated fasting pattern and emphasize the crucial importance of a tight physiological control over metabolism to survive extreme energetic constraints.

  20. Responses to olfactory stimuli in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta): I. Investigation of environmental odors and the function of rolling.

    PubMed

    Drea, Christine M; Vignieri, Sacha N; Cunningham, Sarah B; Glickman, Stephen E

    2002-12-01

    Olfaction is crucial to spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta), yet there are no controlled studies of their reactions to odors. In Experiment 1, the authors examined responses of captive hyenas to various environmental (prey, nonprey animal, and plant) odors. Subjects approached and sniffed all odors equally but preferentially licked prey odors, scent marked next to odors, and rolled in animal-based odors. In Experiment 2, the authors examined the function of rolling by applying odors to the pelts of captive hyenas. When hyenas wore carrion, they gained positive social attention (increased investigation and allogrooming) from pen mates, but when they wore camphor, the normal social greeting ceremony was curtailed. Thus, olfactory stimuli elicit specific responses, influence where behavior is directed, and can be used to affect social interaction.

  1. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9-5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r(2) = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r(2) = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  2. The hypothalamic-pituitary response in SLE. Regulation of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol release.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Jezová, D; Koska, J; Lukác, J; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuroendocrine regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and activation of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the hypothalamic-pituitary response to a well-defined stimulus under standardised conditions in patients with SLE. Plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol were determined in venous blood drawn through an indwelling cannula during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (0.1 U/kg b.w., i.v.) in ten patients and in 12 age-, gender- and weight-matched healthy subjects. Basal PRL concentrations were higher in patients vs healthy controls (12 vs 6 ng/ml, P < 0.01), though still within the physiological range. Insulin-induced plasma PRL and GH were significantly increased both in patients and healthy subjects; however, the increments or areas under the curves were not different in the two groups. Plasma cortisol response showed moderate attenuation in patients. Sensitivity of pituitary lactotrothrops to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 microg, i.v.) was the same in patients and control subjects. In SLE patients with low activity of the disease the sensitivity of pituitary PRL release to TRH administration remained unchanged. The hypothalamic response to stress stimulus (hypoglycaemia) was comparable in patients and healthy subjects. PMID:9736325

  3. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9–5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r2 = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r2 = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  4. Association of follicle stimulating hormone receptor promoter with ovarian response in IVF-ET patients

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Wang; Jing, Gao; Liangbin, Xia; Ting, Zhang; Ying, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor ovarian response phenomenon has been observed in some of the in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer patients. Some investigations found that follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene plays a role in the process, but no direct evidence shows the correlation between genotypes of FSHR and ovarian response. Objective: Exploring the molecular mechanism behind the mutation of FSHR promoter association with ovarian granulosa cells and poor ovarian response. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was performed using 158 women undergoing the controlled short program ovarian stimulation for IVF treatment. The 263 bp DNA fragments before the follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor 5' initiation site were sequenced in the patients under IVF cycle, 70 of which had poor ovarian response and 88 showed normal ovarian responses. Results: With a mutation rate of 40%, 63 in 158 cases showed a 29th site G→A point mutation; among the mutated cases, the mutation rate of the poor ovarian responders was significantly higher than the normal group (60% versus 23.9%; χ2=21.450, p<0.001). Besides, the variability was also obvious in antral follicle count, and ovum pick-ups. The estradiol peak values and the number of mature eggs between the two groups had significant difference. However, there was no obvious variability (t=0.457, p=0.324) in the basic FSH values between the two groups (normal group, 7.2±2.3 U/L; mutation group, 7.1±2.0 U/L). Conclusion: The activity of FSHR promoter is significantly affected by the 29th site G→A mutation that will weaken promoter activity and result in poor response to FSH. PMID:26730247

  5. Head-up tilt and lower body suction: comparison of hormone responses in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H G; Vigas, M; Sauseng-Fellegger, G; König, E M; Lichardus, B; Jezová, D

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, in the same subjects, hormonal responses to 30-min head-up tilt (HUT) and lower body suction (LBNP) of different intensity (24 degrees and 70 degrees, and 15 and 35 mm Hg, respectively). Basal pooled individual data from -10 min (n = 32) were within normal reference limits: norepinephrine (NE) averaged 318 +/- 23 pg/ml; epinephrine, 34.0 +/- 5.5 pg/ml; plasma renin activity (PRA), 0.72 +/- 0.08 ng ATII/ml/h; aldosterone, 164 +/- 20 pg/ml; atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), 29.9 +/- 2.0 pg/ml; cGMP, 6.29 +/- 0.59 mmol/l; cortisol, 95.7 +/- 5.8 ng/ml; and ACTH, 50.3 +/- 2.6 pg/ml. The low-level stimuli failed to induce consistent changes in hormone levels. From the onset of the stimulus (minute 0) to its termination (minute 30), norepinephrine (NE) increased by 101% with LBNP-35, and by 70% with HUT70, respectively. The NE increase with LBNP-35 was higher (p < 0.05) than with HUT70. Epinephrine rose with HUT70 (by 162%) only. PRA increased by 157% with LBNP-35, and by 119% with HUT70, respectively; these responses were not significantly different. Aldosterone rose equally (by 85 and 89%) with LBNP-35 and HUT70 but not with the low-level stimuli. No consistent changes were observed in ANP, c-GMP or ACTH concentrations. Cortisol values fell during the LBNP and HUT24 situations but rose transiently after HUT70. We conclude that the hormones investigated respond differently to head-up posture and lower body suction and in a specific manner. Greater effects of high-level stimuli (HUT70, LBNP-35) were noted as compared to low-level stimuli (HUT24, LBNP-15). The application of combined sets of models stimulating the cardiovascular system may aid in the analysis of responses of hormonal systems in man. PMID:9085364

  6. Sex differences, hormones, and fMRI stress response circuitry deficits in psychoses

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jill M.; Lancaster, Katie; Longenecker, Julia M.; Abbs, Brandon; Holsen, Laura M.; Cherkerzian, Sara; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Makris, Nicolas; Tsuang, Ming T.; Buka, Stephen L.; Seidman, Larry J.; Klibanski, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Psychosis involves dysregulation of response to stress, particularly to negative valence stimuli. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of psychosis have shown hyperactivity in hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, and anterior cingulate cortex, and orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortices. Sex differences in these deficits may be associated with steroid hormone pathway abnormalities, i.e., dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal and -gondal axes. We predicted abnormal steroid hormone levels in psychosis cases would be associated with hyperactivity in hypothalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus, and hypoactivity in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices in a sex-dependent way, with more severe deficits in men than women with psychosis. We studied 32 psychosis cases (50.0% women) and 39 controls (43.6% women) using a novel visual stress challenge while collecting blood throughout functional magnetic resonance imaging procedures. Males with psychosis showed hyperactivity across all hypothesized regions, including the hypothalamus and anterior cingulate cortex by family-wise corrected significance. Females showed hyperactivity in the hippocampus and amygdala and hypoactivity in orbital and medial prefrontal cortices, the latter by family-wise correction. Interaction of case status by sex was significant in the medial prefrontal cortex and, marginally so, in the left orbitofrontal cortex, with female cases (vs. healthy females and males) exhibiting the lowest activity. Male and female cases compared with their healthy counterparts were hypercortisolemic, which was associated with hyperactivity in prefrontal cortices in male cases and hypoactivity in female cases. This was further associated, respectively, with low bioavailable testosterone in male cases and low estradiol in female cases. Findings suggest disruptions in neural-hormone associations in response to stress are sex-dependent in psychosis, particularly in the prefrontal cortex. PMID

  7. A distinct glucocorticoid hormone response regulates phosphoprotein maturation in rat hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Karlsen, K; Vallerga, A K; Hone, J; Firestone, G L

    1986-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormone-dependent maturation of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) phosphorylated polyprotein (Pr74) allows experimental access to certain posttranslational regulatory circuits under steroid control in M1.54 cells, an MMTV-infected rat hepatoma cell line. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that [35S]methionine-labeled Pr74 synthesized in uninduced cells could be converted posttranslationally into p24, a stable phosphorylated maturation product, only after 4 h of exposure to 1 microM dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid. This regulated processing could be prevented by prior exposure, during the chase period, to inhibitors of RNA (actinomycin D) or protein (cycloheximide or puromycin) synthesis. Moreover, half-maximal production of p24 occurred at 10 nM dexamethasone, a concentration that approximated half-maximal receptor binding and stimulation of MMTV transcript synthesis. Kinetic, hormonal, and genetic evidence suggest that p24 expression did not require or result from the overall glucocorticoid-dependent increase in polyprotein concentration. First, 20 h after dexamethasone withdrawal, Pr74 maturation was completely deinduced, whereas the absolute level of this MMTV precursor remained 10-fold over its basal level. Second, progesterone, which competes with dexamethasone for receptor binding, facilitated the regulated production of p24 but prevented the steroid-mediated accumulation of functional MMTV mRNA. Lastly, certain glucocorticoid-responsive variants, derived from M1.54 cells by resistance to complement cytolysis, expressed p24 in the presence or absence of glucocorticoid-induced levels of Pr74. Taken together, our results suggest that the glucocorticoid-regulated maturation of MMTV phosphopolyproteins resulted from an independent hormone response that required normal receptor function and de novo RNA and protein synthesis. Images PMID:3023857

  8. The dopaminergic hyper-responsiveness of the shell of the nucleus accumbens is hormone-dependent.

    PubMed

    Barrot, M; Marinelli, M; Abrous, D N; Rougé-Pont, F; Le Moal, M; Piazza, P V

    2000-03-01

    The dopaminergic projection to the shell of the nucleus accumbens is the most reactive to stress, reward and drugs of abuse and this subregion of the nucleus accumbens is also considered a target of therapeutic effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs (APD). In this report we show, by means of in vivo microdialysis and Fos immunohistochemistry, that the hyper-responsiveness which characterizes the dopaminergic transmission to the shell is dependent on glucocorticoid hormones. In Sprague-Dawley rats, after suppression of endogenous glucocorticoids by adrenalectomy, extracellular dopamine levels selectively decreased in the shell, whilst they remained unchanged in the core. This effect was observed in basal conditions, after a mild stress (vehicle injection), as well as after subcutaneous administration of morphine (2 mg/kg, s.c. ) or intraperitoneal injection of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). The decrease in dopamine observed in the shell had a postsynaptic impact, as shown by less induction of Fos-like proteins selectively in the shell in response to cocaine. However, the induction of Fos-like proteins by the full D1 agonist SKF82958 (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) remained unchanged after adrenalectomy, suggesting that the changes in Fos expression after cocaine injection were likely to depend on changes in extracellular dopamine levels rather than on changes in postsynaptic sensitivity to dopamine. The effects of adrenalectomy were glucocorticoid-specific given that they were prevented by corticosterone treatment. This anatomical specificity in the control of neuronal activity by a hormonal input highlights the role of steroid hormones in shaping the functional activity of the brain. PMID:10762327

  9. Caffeine Attenuates Acute Growth Hormone Response to a Single Bout of Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo-Han; Lin, Jung-Chang

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine consume on substrate metabolism and acute hormonal responses to a single bout of resistance exercise (RE). Ten resistance-trained men participated in this study. All subjects performed one repetition maximum (1RM) test and then performed two protocols: caffeine (CAF, 6 mg·kg-1) and control (CON) in counter balanced order. Subjects performed RE (8 exercises, 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% of 1RM) after caffeine or placebo ingestion one hour prior to RE. Blood samples collected prior to treatment ingestion (pre-60), immediately prior to RE (pre-exe), and 0, 15, 30 min post to RE (P0, P15, P30) for analysis of insulin, testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, glucose, free fatty acid and lactic acid. Each experiment was separated by seven days. In this study, statistical analysis of a two-way analysis of variance (treatment by time) with repeated measures was applied. After ingesting caffeine, the concentrations of free fatty acid (pre- exe, P0, P15, P30) in CAF were significantly higher than CON (p < 0.05). Additionally, the responses of GH (P0, P15, P30) in CAF were significantly lower than CON (p < 0.05), whereas the concentrations of insulin, testosterone and cortisol were not different between CAF and CON (p < 0.05) after RE. The results of this study indicated that caffeine ingestion prior to RE might attenuate the response of GH. This effect might be caused by the elevation in blood FFA concentration at the beginning of RE. Key points Caffeine ingestion may attenuate the response of GH to a single bout of resistance exercise. The depression of GH response may be caused by the elevation in serum FFA concentration at the beginning of resistance exercise. Caffeine ingestion before resistance exercise may not alert the concentration of cortisol and testosterone. PMID:24149694

  10. Growth Hormone Tumor Histological Subtypes Predict Response to Surgical and Medical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kiseljak-Vassiliades, Katja; Carlson, Nichole E.; Borges, Manuel T.; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K.; Lillehei, Kevin O.; Kerr, Janice M.; Wierman, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Growth hormone (GH) pituitary tumors are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current treatments, including surgery and medical therapy with somatostatin analogues (SSA), dopamine agonists and/or a GH receptor antagonist, result in disease remission in approximately half of patients. Predictors of GH tumor response to different therapies have been incompletely defined based on histologic subtype, particularly densely (DG) versus sparsely (SG) granulated adenomas. The aim of this study was to examine our own institutional experience with GH adenomas and correlate how subtype related to clinical parameters as well as response to surgery and medical therapies. Methods A retrospective chart review of 101 acromegalic patients operated by a single neurosurgeon was performed. Clinical data were correlated with histologic subtype and disease control, as defined by IGF-1 levels, and random growth hormone levels in response to surgery and/or medical therapies. Results SG tumors, compared to DG, occurred in younger patients (p=0.0010), were 3-fold larger (p=0.0030), but showed no differences in tumor-invasion characteristics (p=0.12). DG tumors had a higher rate of remission in response to surgery compared to SG, 65.7% vs. 14.3% (p<0.0001), as well as to medical therapy with SSAs (68.8% for DG vs. 28.6% for SG tumors; p=0.028). SG tumors not controlled with SSAs consistently responded to a switch to, or addition of, a GH receptor antagonist. Conclusions Histological GH tumor subtyping implicates a different clinical phenotype and biologic behavior, and provides prognostic significance for surgical success and response to medical therapies. PMID:25129651

  11. Hormonal and electrolyte responses to acute isohemic volume expansion in unanesthetized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenault, V. M.; Morris, M.; Lynch, C. D.; Maultsby, S. J.; Hutchins, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the time course of the metabolic response to isohemic blood volume expansion (30%) in normotensive, unanesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Whole blood, drawn from a femoral artery catheter of conscious donor rats, was infused into the jugular vein of recipient rats. Blood samples were drawn from a carotid artery of recipient rats at time points beginning immediately post-volume expansion (IPVE) up through 5 days post-volume expansion (PVE). To characterize the attendant compensatory mechanisms, the plasma concentrations of electrolytes and fluid regulatory hormones were determined. Hematocrit began to raise IPVE and was significantly elevated above control IPVE 20, 30, 40, 60, and 90 min, and 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr PVE. Consistent with our current understanding of the hormonal response to excess volume, atrial natriuretic factor was significantly increased above the prevolume expansion (control) values 0-30 min PVE. Surprisingly, plasma aldosterone levels were significantly increased above control at 20 and 30 min and 6 hr PVE, whereas plasma renin activity was significantly decreased 30-40 min PVE. Plasma sodium was not changed from control values except for a significant increase at 6 hr post-volume expansion. Plasma potassium, osmolality, and arginine vasopressin levels were not altered by the volume expansion. These studies delineate the physiologic time scheme operative in the regulation of fluid volume during acute ischemic volume expansion.

  12. Stress-induced hormonal and mood responses in scuba divers: a field study.

    PubMed

    Anegg, U; Dietmaier, G; Maier, A; Tomaselli, F; Gabor, S; Kallus, K W; Smolle-Jüttner, F M

    2002-04-26

    The majority of injuries in scuba-divers are attributable to inappropriate behavior under stressful diving conditions, predominantly involving panic reactions emerging from elevated levels of anxiety. Divers with an elevated level of anxiety and poor coping are at higher risk of developing panic reactions than those possessing more adequate stress-coping-mechanisms. In the comparison of two extreme groups of seven divers each with opposite stress coping strategies, prolactin was found to be a hormonal marker with a significant increase in the sub-group of the stress-controllers. This hormonal response was observed in a recreational and a stressful dive, and in the latter with a more distinct elevation. Along with the self-reported emotional conditions under immersion, these data suggest that an increased prolactin level reflects a state of elevated physical and mental activation and vigilance. Facing a stressful situation subjects with more emotional concern and the tendency to surrender react by "blunted responses" and show significantly lower elevations of the prolactin levels in contrast to subjects with the very opposite psychological features. The other observed somatic parameters (epinephrine, norepinephrine) showed significant increases during and after dives (with the exception of saliva cortisol), however without any significant group difference.

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Litopenaeus vannamei in Response to White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiuli; Xie, Daxiang; Zhao, Yongzhen; Yang, Chunling; Li, Yongmei; Ma, Ning; Li, Ming; Yang, Qiong; Liao, Zhenping; Wang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) is the most extensively farmed crustacean species in the world. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the major pathogens in the cultured shrimp. However, the molecular mechanisms of the host-virus interaction remain largely unknown. In this study, the impact of WSSV infection on host gene expression in the hepatopancreas of L. vannamei was investigated through the use of 454 pyrosequencing-based RNA-Seq of cDNA libraries developed from WSSV-challenged shrimp or normal controls. By comparing the two cDNA libraries, we show that 767 host genes are significantly up-regulated and 729 genes are significantly down-regulated by WSSV infection. KEGG analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that the distribution of gene pathways between the up- and down-regulated genes is quite different. Among the differentially expressed genes, several are found to be involved in various processes of animal defense against pathogens such as apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, Wnt signaling and antigen processing and presentation pathways. The present study provides valuable information on differential expression of L. vannamei genes following WSSV infection and improves our current understanding of this host-virus interaction. In addition, the large number of transcripts obtained in this study provides a strong basis for future genomic research on shrimp. PMID:23991181

  14. Involvement of lignin and hormones in the response of woody poplar taproots to mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Trupiano, Dalila; Di Iorio, Antonino; Montagnoli, Antonio; Lasserre, Bruno; Rocco, Mariapina; Grosso, Alessandro; Scaloni, Andrea; Marra, Mauro; Chiatante, Donato; Scippa, Gabriella S

    2012-09-01

    Mechanical stress is a widespread condition caused by numerous environmental factors that severely affect plant stability. In response to mechanical stress, plants have evolved complex response pathways able to detect mechanical perturbations and inducing a suite of modifications in order to improve anchorage. The response of woody roots to mechanical stresses has been studied mainly at the morphological and biomechanical level, whereas investigations on the factors triggering these important alterations are still at the initial stage. Populus has been widely used to study the response of stem to different mechanical stresses and, since it has the first forest tree genome to be decoded, represents a model woody plant for addressing questions on the mechanisms controlling adaptation of woody roots to changing environments. In this study, a morphological and physiological analysis was used to investigate factors controlling modifications in Populus nigra woody taproots subjected to mechanical stress. An experimental model analyzing spatial and temporal mechanical force distribution along the woody taproot axis enabled us to compare the events occurring in its above-, central- and below-bending sectors. Different morphogenetic responses and local variations of lignin and plant hormones content have been observed, and a relation with the distribution of the mechanical forces along the stressed woody taproots is hypothesized. We investigated the differences of the response to mechanical stress induction during the time; in this regard, we present data referring to the effect of mechanical stress on plant transition from its condition of winter dormancy to that of full vegetative activity.

  15. Competition effects on physiological responses to exercise: performance, cardiorespiratory and hormonal factors.

    PubMed

    Viru, M; Hackney, Anthony C; Karelson, K; Janson, T; Kuus, M; Viru, A

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanisms for increased exercise performance in conditions of competition. Endurance trained subjects (n=14) performed incremental treadmill running to exhaustion in control laboratory conditions (non-competition) and in conditions of simulated competition to assess performance (running duration). Heart rate and respiration gases were monitored continuously through each exercise condition. Blood lactate, cortisol, growth hormone and testosterone concentrations were also determined at pre- (rest) and postexercise in each condition. Results indicated competition exercise performance was significantly increased 4.2% (+49 sec; p<0.05) as was peak VO2 response 4.4% (+2.5 ml O2 x kg(-1) x min(-1); p<0.05) versus non-competition. No significant differences were found in peak measurements of minute ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, ventilation threshold, post-exercise lactate, heart rate, or the ventilation equivalent for O 2 between the exercise conditions. In both conditions growth hormone and testosterone concentrations increased significantly in response to exercise (p<0.001), whereas cortisol responses post-exercise were significantly elevated in the competition (p<0.05) but not in the control condition (p>0.05). These findings support that in competitive situations the affective state (motivation) experienced by athletes can enhance performance in exercise events, and lead to an increased peak oxygen uptake. The magnitude of the improvement is of a substantial nature and of a level seen with some training programs. Competitive conditions also augment the cortisol response to exercise, suggesting that enhanced sympatho-adrenal system activation occur in such situations which may be one of the key "driving forces" to performance improvement.

  16. Effect of inositol and tri-iodothyronine on the hormonal responsiveness of hepatocytes obtained from partially hepatectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Bahena, J; García-Sáinz, J A

    1984-01-01

    Hepatocytes obtained from animals partially hepatectomized (72 h before the experiment) have a diminished responsiveness to alpha 1-adrenergic amines, vasopressin, angiotensin and glucagon and an increased responsiveness to beta-adrenergic amines. Administration of inositol or tri-iodothyronine to the hepatectomized animals induced a recovery in the hepatocyte responsiveness to the Ca2+-dependent hormones and abolished that to beta-adrenergic amines; the response to glucagon was not improved. PMID:6508748

  17. Growth hormone response to different consecutive stress stimuli in healthy men: is there any difference?

    PubMed

    Jezova, D; Radikova, Z; Vigas, M

    2007-06-01

    The contribution of growth hormone (GH), released during acute and repeated stressful situations, to the development of stress-related disorders is often neglected. We have hypothesized that the modulation of the GH response to sequential stress exposure in humans depends mainly on the nature of the stressor. To test this hypothesis, we compared GH responses to different stressful situations, namely aerobic exercise, hypoglycemia and hyperthermia, which were applied in two sequential sessions separated by 80-150 min. In addition, administration of the dopaminergic drug apomorphine was used as a pharmacological stimulus. GH responses to submaximal exercise (bicycle ergometer, increasing work loads of 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 W/kg, total duration 20 min) and hyperthermia in a sauna (80 degrees C, 30 min) were prevented when preceded by the same stress stimulus. Hypoglycemia induced by insulin (0.1 IU/kg intravenously) resulted in a significant GH response also during the second of the two consecutive insulin tests, though the response was reduced. Administration of apomorphine (0.75 mg subcutaneously) or insulin prevented the increase in GH release in response to a sequential bolus of apomorphine, while hypoglycemia induced a significant elevation in GH levels even if applied after a previous treatment with apomorphine. In conclusion, the feedback inhibition of the GH response to a sequential stress stimulus depends on the stimulus used. Unlike in the case of exercise and hyperthermia, mechanisms involved in the stress response to hypoglycemia appear to overcome the usual feedback mechanisms and to re-induce the GH response when applied after another stimulus. PMID:17514589

  18. Peri-pubertal exposure to testicular hormones organizes response to novel environments and social behaviour in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gillian R; Kulbarsh, Kyle D; Spencer, Karen A; Duval, Camille

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has shown that exposure to testicular hormones during the peri-pubertal period of life has long-term, organizational effects on adult sexual behaviour and underlying neural mechanisms in laboratory rodents. However, the organizational effects of peri-pubertal testicular hormones on other aspects of behaviour and brain function are less well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of manipulating peri-pubertal testicular hormone exposure on later behavioural responses to novel environments and on hormone receptors in various brain regions that are involved in response to novelty. Male rodents generally spend less time in the exposed areas of novel environments than females, and this sex difference emerges during the peri-pubertal period. Male Lister-hooded rats (Rattus norvegicus) were castrated either before puberty or after puberty, then tested in three novel environments (elevated plus-maze, light-dark box, open field) and in an object/social novelty task in adulthood. Androgen receptor (AR), oestrogen receptor (ER1) and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRF-R2) mRNA expression were quantified in the hypothalamus, hippocampus and medial amygdala. The results showed that pre-pubertally castrated males spent more time in the exposed areas of the elevated-plus maze and light-dark box than post-pubertally castrated males, and also confirmed that peri-pubertal hormone exposure influences later response to an opposite-sex conspecific. Hormone receptor gene expression levels did not differ between pre-pubertally and post-pubertally castrated males in any of the brain regions examined. This study therefore demonstrates that testicular hormone exposure during the peri-pubertal period masculinizes later response to novel environments, although the neural mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated.

  19. Peri-pubertal exposure to testicular hormones organizes response to novel environments and social behaviour in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gillian R.; Kulbarsh, Kyle D.; Spencer, Karen A.; Duval, Camille

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that exposure to testicular hormones during the peri-pubertal period of life has long-term, organizational effects on adult sexual behaviour and underlying neural mechanisms in laboratory rodents. However, the organizational effects of peri-pubertal testicular hormones on other aspects of behaviour and brain function are less well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of manipulating peri-pubertal testicular hormone exposure on later behavioural responses to novel environments and on hormone receptors in various brain regions that are involved in response to novelty. Male rodents generally spend less time in the exposed areas of novel environments than females, and this sex difference emerges during the peri-pubertal period. Male Lister-hooded rats (Rattus norvegicus) were castrated either before puberty or after puberty, then tested in three novel environments (elevated plus-maze, light–dark box, open field) and in an object/social novelty task in adulthood. Androgen receptor (AR), oestrogen receptor (ER1) and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRF-R2) mRNA expression were quantified in the hypothalamus, hippocampus and medial amygdala. The results showed that pre-pubertally castrated males spent more time in the exposed areas of the elevated-plus maze and light–dark box than post-pubertally castrated males, and also confirmed that peri-pubertal hormone exposure influences later response to an opposite-sex conspecific. Hormone receptor gene expression levels did not differ between pre-pubertally and post-pubertally castrated males in any of the brain regions examined. This study therefore demonstrates that testicular hormone exposure during the peri-pubertal period masculinizes later response to novel environments, although the neural mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. PMID:26159287

  20. Parathyroid hormone modulates the response of osteoblast-like cells to mechanical stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, K. D.; Duncan, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical loading stimulates many responses in bone and osteoblasts associated with osteogenesis. Since loading and parathyroid hormone (PTH) activate similar signaling pathways in osteoblasts, we postulate that PTH can potentiate the effects of mechanical stimulation. Using an in vitro four-point bending device, we found that expression of COX-2, the inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, was dependent on fluid forces generated across the culture plate, but not physiologic levels of strain in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. Addition of 50 nM PTH during loading increased COX-2 expression at both subthreshold and threshold levels of fluid forces compared with either stimuli alone. We also demonstrated that application of fluid shear to MC3T3-E1 cells induced a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Although PTH did not significantly change [Ca(2+)](i) levels, flow and PTH did produce a significantly greater [Ca(2+)](i) response and increased the number of responding cells than is found in fluid shear alone. The [Ca(2+)](i) response to these stimuli was significantly decreased when the mechanosensitive channel inhibitor, gadolinium, was present. These studies indicate that PTH increases the cellular responses of osteoblasts to mechanical loading. Furthermore, this response may be mediated by alterations in [Ca(2+)](i) by modulating the mechanosensitive channel.

  1. Hormonal and metabolic response in middle-aged women to moderate physical effort during aerobics.

    PubMed

    Charmas, Małgorzata; Opaszowski, Benedykt H; Charmas, Robert; Rózańska, Dorota; Jówko, Ewa; Sadowski, Jerzy; Dorofeyeva, Lena

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the metabolic and hormone response in middle-aged women to acute physical aerobic exercise accompanied by music, the so-called "aerobics." The experiment (single 60-minute aerobics session) included 11 women aged between 30 and 50. The following variables were determined in blood samples collected from the participants four times (in fasting state [I], before exercise [II], after exercise [III], and after 12 hours of rest [IV]): concentration of lactic acid, glucose, free fatty acids, leptin, insulin, growth hormone, testosterone, and cortisol. Furthermore, the measurements included body mass before and after the exercise, and body temperature was taken in the auditory canal and on the forehead. The heart rate was registered during the exercise on a continuous basis. In all cases, the heart rate did not reach its maximum level, and on average, it amounted to approximately 70% of the maximum pulse rate. Therefore, this effort can be considered as submaximal. In all cases, we observed loss of body mass (from 0.2 to 0.7 kg) (p > 0.02) increase in the temperature measured on forehead. Significantly, accompanied by nonsignificant increase in the temperature measured on the tympanic membrane was registered. Single loading gives rise to change in hormone and metabolic profiles. Furthermore, a decrease in blood concentration of glucose before and after aerobics (p > 0.001) could be observed, and if the determination taken at measurement IV of glucose in blood is taken into consideration, then the value taken in measurement I is significantly the highest in relation to other measurements. Concentration of free fatty acids were increased (p > 0.002) after exercise and remained on the same level until the following day. The levels of insulin were significantly decreased, but growth hormone levels were increased. The exercise had no impact on testosterone concentration, whereas average blood concentration of leptin in the successive

  2. Regulation of hormonal responses of sweet pepper as affected by salinity and elevated CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Piñero, María Carmen; Houdusse, Fabrice; Garcia-Mina, Jose M; Garnica, María; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the extent to which the predicted CO2 -protective effects on the inhibition of growth, impairment of photosynthesis and nutrient imbalance caused by saline stress are mediated by an effective adaptation of the endogenous plant hormonal balance. Therefore, sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum, cv. Ciclón) were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] (400 or 800 µmol mol(-1)) with a nutrient solution containing 0 or 80 mM NaCl. The results show that, under saline conditions, elevated [CO2] increased plant dry weight, leaf area, leaf relative water content and net photosynthesis compared with ambient [CO2], whilst the maximum potential quantum efficiency of photosystem II was not modified. In salt-stressed plants, elevated [CO2 ] increased leaf NO3(-) concentration and reduced Cl(-) concentration. Salinity stress induced ABA accumulation in the leaves but it was reduced in the roots at high [CO2], being correlated with the stomatal response. Under non-stressed conditions, IAA was dramatically reduced in the roots when high [CO2] was applied, which resulted in greater root DW and root respiration. Additionally, the observed high CK concentration in the roots (especially tZR) could prevent downregulation of photosynthesis at high [CO2], as the N level in the leaves was increased compared with the ambient [CO2], under salt-stress conditions. These results demonstrate that the hormonal balance was altered by the [CO2], which resulted in significant changes at the growth, gas exchange and nutritional levels.

  3. Responsiveness of alpha 1 and beta 1 cochlear Na, K-ATPase isoforms to thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Zuo, J; Rarey, K E

    1996-05-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on Na, K-ATPase subunit isoforms under euthyroid (EUTH), hypothyroid (HYPO) and hyperthyroid (HYPER) states were investigated via immunocytochemistry and the use of polyclonal antibodies specific to each isoform (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 3 and beta 1, beta 2). In HYPO animals, there was a distinct decrease in Na, K-ATPase alpha 1 isoform immunoreactivity in the stria vascularis (SV), spiral ganglion (SG) cells, spiral limbus (SLi) and cochlear nerve (CN) as compared with that in EUTH animals by the 17th day of the experiment. Immunostaining of the alpha 1 isoform increased in HYPER animals as compared with that in HYPO animals, and reached a level comparable to that in EUTH animals after 2 days of triiodothyronine (T3) treatment. Levels of alpha 2, alpha 3 and beta 2 isoforms did not appear to be affected by T3 administration. By the 19th day of a low I2 diet, the immunoreactive intensity of the beta 1 isoform was reduced in cochlear tissues of HYPO animals as compared with that in EUTH animals. The immunoreactivity of the beta 1 isoform increased after treatment with T3 for 4 days and was comparable with levels in EUTH animals. These data indicate that alpha 1 and beta 1 isoforms within specific cochlear regions of the adult rat are responsive to thyroid hormone.

  4. Effects of lifting tempo on one repetition maximum and hormonal responses to a bench press protocol.

    PubMed

    Headley, Samuel A; Henry, Kelley; Nindl, Bradley C; Thompson, Brian A; Kraemer, William J; Jones, Margaret T

    2011-02-01

    This study was carried out in 2 parts: part 1 was designed to measure the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press with 2 different moderate-velocity tempos (2/0/2) vs. (2/0/4) in male lifters while part 2 compared the hormonal responses at the same tempos as described in part 1. In both parts 1 and 2, the 1RMs (lbs) were higher on the 2/0/2 tempo than on the 2/0/4 tempo. The change in plasma volume (PV) was greater after the 2/0/4 tempo (-5.7 ± 1.7% vs. 0.96 ± 1.2%, p < 0.05). All blood parameters were significantly (p < 0.05) higher post-exercise compared with baseline. With PV corrected, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (ng·mL⁻¹) was higher with the 2/0/2 tempo only (pre-exercise: 277.4 ± 21.8, post-exercise: 308.1 ± 22.9; 2/0/4 tempo pre-exercise: 277.2 ± 17.6, post-exercise: 284.8 ± 21.2). In conclusion, heavier loads can be lifted and more total work can be performed using a (2/0/2) tempo compared with a slower (2/0/4) tempo, but with the exception of IGF-1, the hormonal responses are similar. Individuals may get the same metabolic responses to training by using different tempos, but they will need to use less weight at a slower tempo.

  5. The effects of sex and hormonal status on the physiological response to acute psychosocial stress.

    PubMed

    Kajantie, Eero; Phillips, David I W

    2006-02-01

    Whether one is male or female is one of the most important determinants of human health. While males are more susceptible to cardiovascular and infectious disease, they are outnumbered by women for many autoimmune disorders, fibromyalgia and chronic pain. Recently, individual differences in the physiological response to stress have emerged as a potentially important risk factor for these disorders. This raises the possibility that sex differences in prevalence of disease could at least in part be explained by sex differences in the nature of the physiological response to stress. In a psychophysiological laboratory, the autonomic nervous system response can be provoked by many different stressors including physical, mental and psychosocial tasks, while the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) response seems to be more specific to a psychosocial challenge incorporating ego involvement. The responses of both systems to different psychosocial challenges have been subject to extensive research, although in respect of sex differences the HPAA response has probably been more systematically studied. In this review, we focus on sex differences in HPAA and autonomic nervous system responses to acute psychosocial stress. Although some differences are dependent on the stressor used, the responses of both systems show marked and consistent differences according to sex, with the phase of the menstrual cycle, menopausal status and pregnancy having marked effects. Between puberty and menopause, adult women usually show lower HPAA and autonomic responses than men of same age. However, the HPAA response is higher in the luteal phase, when for example post stress free cortisol levels approach those of men. After menopause, there is an increase in sympathoadrenal responsiveness, which is attenuated during oral hormone replacement therapy, with most evidence suggesting that HPAA activity shows the same trends. Interestingly, pregnancy is associated with an attenuated response of

  6. Characterization of a vacuolar processing enzyme expressed in Arachis diogoi in resistance responses against late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dilip; Rampuria, Sakshi; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Shukla, Pawan; Kirti, P B

    2015-05-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes are cysteine proteases responsible for maturation of vacuolar proteins. They have been shown to possess caspase-1-like activity, mediate cell death and display increased activity during pathogen infections. A transcript derived fragment corresponding to VPE was found to be up-regulated in a cDNA-AFLP analysis of host responses of a wild peanut, Arachis diogoi upon challenge from the late leaf spot pathogen Phaeoisariopsis personata, which was subsequently validated by q-PCR in a time course analysis, where susceptible peanut did not show its upregulation. In transient conditional and constitutive expression studies in tobacco leaves using agroinfiltration, we have observed that expression of AdVPE was associated with hypersensitive response (HR) like cell death. AdVPE expression was found to be high at 24 h post estradiol application and this was associated with the enhanced co-expression of molecular markers of HR cell death genes and genes for pathogenesis related proteins indicating that AdVPE positively regulates defense responses and its estradiol induced expression is sufficient for HR-like cell death in tobacco. We found that AdVPE expression was very strongly induced in response to sodium nitroprusside, which indicates its involvement in stress signaling. Induced expression of AdVPE in response to jasmonic acid and ethylene also indicates its involvement in an interconnected network of signaling. Transgenic tobacco plants ectopically expressing AdVPE exhibited enhanced resistance against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae, Alternaria alternata var.  nicotianae and Rhizoctonia solani. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the heterologous expression of a pathogen induced VPE enhancing resistance to fungal pathogens with cell death phenomenon under transient expression. PMID:25893777

  7. A rapid release of corticosteroid-binding globulin from the liver restrains the glucocorticoid hormone response to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoxiao; Droste, Susanne K; Gutièrrez-Mecinas, María; Collins, Andrew; Kersanté, Flavie; Reul, Johannes M H M; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2011-10-01

    A strict control of glucocorticoid hormone responses to stress is essential for health. In blood, glucocorticoid hormones are for the largest part bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), and just a minor fraction of hormone is free. Only free glucocorticoid hormone is able to exert biological effects, but little is known about its regulation during stress. We found, using a dual-probe in vivo microdialysis method, that in rats, the forced-swim stress-induced rise in free corticosterone (its major glucocorticoid hormone) is strikingly similar in the blood and in target compartments such as the subcutaneous tissue and the brain. However, in all compartments, the free corticosterone response was delayed by 20-30 min as compared with the total corticosterone response in the blood. We discovered that CBG is the key player in this delay. Swim stress evoked a fast (within 5 min) and profound rise in CBG protein and binding capacity in the blood through a release of the protein from the liver. Thus, the increase in circulating CBG levels after stress restrains the rise in free corticosterone concentrations for approximately 20 min in the face of mounting total hormone levels in the circulation. The stress-induced increase in CBG seems to be specific for moderate and strong stressors. Both restraint stress and forced swimming caused an increase in circulating CBG, whereas its levels were not affected by mild novelty stress. Our data uncover a new, highly dynamic role for CBG in the regulation of glucocorticoid hormone physiology after acute stress.

  8. Hormone-regulated defense and stress response networks contribute to heterosis in Arabidopsis F1 hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Groszmann, Michael; Gonzalez-Bayon, Rebeca; Lyons, Rebecca L.; Greaves, Ian K.; Kazan, Kemal; Peacock, W. James; Dennis, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Plant hybrids are extensively used in agriculture to deliver increases in yields, yet the molecular basis of their superior performance (heterosis) is not well understood. Our transcriptome analysis of a number of Arabidopsis F1 hybrids identified changes to defense and stress response gene expression consistent with a reduction in basal defense levels. Given the reported antagonism between plant immunity and growth, we suggest that these altered patterns of expression contribute to the greater growth of the hybrids. The altered patterns of expression in the hybrids indicate decreases to the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis pathway and increases in the auxin [indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)] biosynthesis pathway. SA and IAA are hormones known to control stress and defense responses as well as plant growth. We found that IAA-targeted gene activity is frequently increased in hybrids, correlating with a common heterotic phenotype of greater leaf cell numbers. Reduced SA concentration and target gene responses occur in the larger hybrids and promote increased leaf cell size. We demonstrated the importance of SA action to the hybrid phenotype by manipulating endogenous SA concentrations. Increasing SA diminished heterosis in SA-reduced hybrids, whereas decreasing SA promoted growth in some hybrids and phenocopied aspects of hybrid vigor in parental lines. Pseudomonas syringae infection of hybrids demonstrated that the reductions in basal defense gene activity in these hybrids does not necessarily compromise their ability to mount a defense response comparable to the parents. PMID:26527659

  9. The effects of age, sex, and hormones on emotional conflict-related brain response during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cservenka, Anita; Stroup, Madison L; Etkin, Amit; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2015-10-01

    While cognitive and emotional systems both undergo development during adolescence, few studies have explored top-down inhibitory control brain activity in the context of affective processing, critical to informing adolescent psychopathology. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain response during an Emotional Conflict (EmC) Task across 10-15-year-old youth. During the EmC Task, participants indicated the emotion of facial expressions, while disregarding emotion-congruent and incongruent words printed across the faces. We examined the relationships of age, sex, and gonadal hormones with brain activity on Incongruent vs. Congruent trials. Age was negatively associated with middle frontal gyrus activity, controlling for performance and movement confounds. Sex differences were present in occipital and parietal cortices, and were driven by activation in females, and deactivation in males to Congruent trials. Testosterone was negatively related with frontal and striatal brain response in males, and cerebellar and precuneus response in females. Estradiol was negatively related with fronto-cerebellar, cingulate, and precuneus brain activity in males, and positively related with occipital response in females. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the effects of age, sex, and sex steroids during an emotion-cognition task in adolescents. Further research is needed to examine longitudinal development of emotion-cognition interactions and deviations in psychiatric disorders in adolescence.

  10. Selected hormonal and immunological responses to strenuous live-fire firefighting drills.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Petruzzello, S J; Chludzinski, M A; Reed, J J; Woods, J A

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of strenuous live-fire firefighting drills and a 90 min recovery period on selected hormonal, immunological and psychological variables. Apparently healthy, male, professional firefighters (n = 11) performed three trials of standardized firefighting tasks in a live-fire training structure. There was significant leukocytosis immediately post firefighting activity that persisted following recovery, although there was a variable response among the leukocyte subsets. Most notable was the decrease in number and percentage of lymphocytes following 90 min of recovery. Plasma levels of ACTH and cortisol were significantly elevated post firefighting activity and cortisol remained elevated following 90 min of recovery. Elevated cortisol immediately following activity was related to reduced feelings of energy. These data demonstrate the magnitude of the physiological and psychological disruption following strenuous firefighting activity and suggest that immune function may be altered following such activity. This is a finding that may have practical consequences for this group of first responders.

  11. Gastrointestinal hormone responses to meals before and after gastric bypass and vertical banded gastroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, J M; Kuemmerle, J F; O'Dorisio, T M; Rayford, P; Martin, D; Engle, K; Wolf, L; Sugerman, H J

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the gastrointestinal hormone responses to meals in morbidly obese patients before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP; n = 9) or vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG; n = 7). On consecutive days before and after operation, we measured changes in peripheral blood levels of glucose, insulin, enteroglucagon, serotonin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and cholecystokinin (CCK) in response to a standardized glucose or protein-fat meal. The percentage of excess weight lost at 6 months after operation was 66.3% +/- 4% and 41.8% +/- 5% for GBP and VBG, respectively (p less than 0.01). The 3-hour integrated glucose response to a glucose meal decreased from 145.3 +/- 33.7 to 75.8 +/- 15.7 g min/L (p less than 0.02) after GBP. This was associated with a decrease in 3-hour integrated insulin response from 22.8 +/- 8.2 to 10.5 +/- 4.9 mU min/L. Vertical banded gastroplasty patients had lesser reductions of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Neither the CCK, serotonin, nor VIP responses to meals were altered by either operation. The 3-hour integrated enteroglucagon response to glucose increased markedly in GBP patients after operation from 11.8 +/- 6 to 133.4 +/- 38 nmol min/mL (p less than 0.02). This increase in enteroglucagon occurred at the same time as development of dumping symptoms, which occurred exclusively in GBP patients after glucose but not protein. We conclude that (1) GBP surgery for morbid obesity results in amelioration of glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, (2) CCK does not mediate an endocrine satiety effect of surgery, (3) GBP is associated with an exaggerated enteroglucagon response to glucose, and (4) enteroglucagon appears to be a marker of the dumping syndrome in GBP patients. PMID:2192696

  12. Adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Aju; Davidson, Nancy E

    2015-11-01

    Multiple strategies for endocrine treatment of premenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer have been assessed and results have been presented over the last two years. These include tamoxifen for 5-10 years (ATLAS and aTTom), tamoxifen for 5 years followed by aromatase inhibitor (AI) for 5 years for women who have become postmenopausal (MA-17); ovarian ablation (OA) by surgery (EBCTCG overview); ovarian function suppression (OFS) by LHRH agonist (LHRH agonist meta-analysis); or combinations of approaches including OFS plus tamoxifen or AI (SOFT, TEXT, ABCSG 12 and E3193). Many of these trials have taken place in the backdrop of (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy which can confound interpretation because such therapy can suppress ovarian function either transiently or permanently. Nonetheless these trials suggest in aggregate that 10 years of tamoxifen are better than 5 years and that a program of extended adjuvant therapy of tamoxifen for 5 years followed by aromatase inhibitor for 5 years is effective for suitable candidates. The SOFT and E3193 trials do not show a major advantage for use of OFS + tamoxifen compared to tamoxifen alone. The joint SOFT/TEXT analysis and ABCGS12 trials both suggest that outcomes can be excellent with the use of combined endocrine therapy alone in properly selected patients but give conflicting results with regard to potential benefits for OFS + AI compared with OFS + tamoxifen. Further work will be needed to ascertain long-term outcomes, identify factors that predict who will benefit from extended adjuvant endocrine therapy, and assess role of OFS by medical or surgical means. It is clear, however, that endocrine therapy is a critical part of the adjuvant regimen for most premenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer, and a subset of these women with luminal A-type tumors can be safely treated with endocrine therapy alone.

  13. Biphasic hormonal responses to the adrenocorticolytic DDT metabolite 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asp, Vendela; Ulleras, Erik; Lindstroem, Veronica; Bergstroem, Ulrika; Oskarsson, Agneta; Brandt, Ingvar

    2010-02-01

    The DDT metabolite 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE (3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE) has been proposed as a lead compound for an improved adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) treatment. ACC is a rare malignant disorder with poor prognosis, and the current pharmacological therapy o,p'-DDD (mitotane) has limited efficacy and causes severe adverse effects. 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE is bioactivated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 11B1 in mice and causes formation of irreversibly bound protein adducts, reduced glucocorticoid secretion, and cell death in the adrenal cortex of several animal species. The present study was carried out to assess similarities and differences between mice and humans concerning the adrenocorticolytic effects of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE. The results support previous indications that humans are sensitive to the adrenocorticolytic actions of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE by demonstrating protein adduct formation and cytotoxicity in the human adrenocortical cell line H295R. However, neither the irreversible binding nor the cytotoxicity of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE in H295R cells was inhibited by the CYP11B1 inhibitor etomidate. We also report biphasic responses to 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE in cortisol and aldosterone secretion as well as in mRNA levels of the steroidogenic genes StAR, CYP11B1 and CYP11B2. Hormone levels and mRNA levels were increased at lower concentrations of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE, while higher concentrations decreased hormone levels. These biphasic responses were not observed with o,p'-DDD or with the precursor DDT metabolite p,p'-DDE. Based on these results, 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE remains a viable lead compound for drug design, although the adrenocorticolytic effects of 3-MeSO{sub 2}-DDE in human cells seem more complex than in murine cells.

  14. Fructose modifies the hormonal response and modulates lipid metabolism during aerobic exercise after glucose supplementation.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Juan M; Da Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo E; Ruano-Ruíz, Juan A; Caballero-Villarraso, Javier; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Túnez-Fiñana, Isaac; Tasset-Cuevas, Inmaculada; Pérez-Martínez, Pablo; López-Miranda, José; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic response when aerobic exercise is performed after the ingestion of glucose plus fructose is unclear. In the present study, we administered two beverages containing GluF (glucose+fructose) or Glu (glucose alone) in a randomized cross-over design to 20 healthy aerobically trained volunteers to compare the hormonal and lipid responses provoked during aerobic exercise and the recovery phase. After ingesting the beverages and a 15-min resting period, volunteers performed 30 min of moderate aerobic exercise. Urinary and blood samples were taken at baseline (t(-15)), during the exercise (t(0), t(15) and t(30)) and during the recovery phase (t(45), t(75) and t(105)). Plasma insulin concentrations were higher halfway through the exercise period and during acute recuperation (t(15) and t(75); P<0.05) following ingestion of GluF than after Glu alone, without any differences between the effects of either intervention on plasma glucose concentrations. Towards the end of the exercise period, urinary catecholamine concentrations were lower following GluF (t(45); P<0.05). Plasma triacylglycerol (triglyceride) concentrations were higher after the ingestion of GluF compared with Glu (t(15), t(30), t(45) and t(105); P<0.05). Furthermore, with GluF, we observed higher levels of lipoperoxides (t(15), t(30), t(45) and t(105); P<0.05) and oxidized LDL (low-density lipoprotein; t(30); P<0.05) compared with after the ingestion of Glu alone. In conclusion, hormonal and lipid alterations are provoked during aerobic exercise and recovery by the addition of a dose of fructose to the pre-exercise ingestion of glucose.

  15. Hormonal responses to concurrent strength and endurance training with different exercise orders.

    PubMed

    Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Izquierdo, Mikel; dos Santos, Mariah Gonçalves; Martins, Jocelito Bijoldo; Rodrigues Lhullier, Francisco L; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Silva, Rodrigo Ferrari; Kruel, Luiz Fernando M

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the intrasession sequencing of concurrent strength and aerobic training on the acute testosterone (TT) and cortisol (COR) responses. Ten recreationally strength-trained young men (23.5 ± 0.9 years) performed 2 exercise interventions: aerobic-strength (AS) and strength-aerobic (SA), which consisted of 30 minutes of aerobic exercise on a cycle ergometer at 75% of maximal heart rate and 3 sets of 8 repetitions at 75% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in 4 strength exercises. Maximal heart rate was determined using a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer. Blood samples were collected before, between exercise modalities, and immediately after the concurrent training sessions to determine basal and acute total TT and COR concentrations. There were significant increases in TT after the first modality in both exercise orders (p < 0.05). However, the TT level remained significantly higher than the resting levels after the second exercise modality only in the AS (p < 0.05) which resulted in a significant higher relative total change after the complete concurrent training session compared with SA (p < 0.05). Regarding COR, there were significant increases after the first modality in both AS and SA orders (p < 0.05), but the COR returned to resting levels after the second modality in both AS and SA interventions. During AS and SA, the change observed after the first modality performance was greater than that after the second in both hormones. The present results suggest that the TT response is optimized after the AS order, whereas both AS and SA produced similar hormonal levels at all time points. However, it is important to state that the present results should be applied only when short duration and moderate intensity aerobic training is performed.

  16. Metabolic and hormonal responses during exercise at 20°, 0° and -20°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, A.; Laurencelle, L.; Paulin, L.; Therminarias, A.; Brisson, G. R.; Audet, A.; Dulac, S.; Vogelaere, P.

    1989-12-01

    This study was designed to clarify the effects of cold air exposure on metabolic and hormonal responses during progressive incremental exercise. Eight healthy males volunteered for the study. Informed consent was obtained from every participant. The following protocol was administered to each subject on three occasions in a climatic chamber in which the temperature was 20°, 0° or -20°C with relative humidity at 60%±1%. Exercise tests were conducted on an electrically braked ergocycle, and consisted of a propressive incremental maximal exercise. Respiratory parameters were continuously monitored by an automated open-circuit sampling system Exercise blood lactate (LA), free fatty acids (FFA), glucose levels, bicarbonate concentration (HCO{3/-}), acidbase balance, plasma epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) were determined from venous blood samples obtained through an indwelling brachial catheter. Maximal oxygen uptake was significantly different between conditions: 72.0±5.4 ml kg-1 min-1 at 20°C; 68.9±5.1 ml kg-1 min-1 at 0°C and 68.5±4.6 ml kg-1 min-1 at -20°C. Workload, time to exhaustion, glucose levels and rectal Catecholamines and lactate values were not significantly altered by thermal conditions after maximal exercise but the catecholamines were decreased during rest. Bicarbonate, respiratory quotient, lactate and ventilatory thresholds increased significantly at -20°C. The data support the contention that metabolic and hormonal responses following progressive incremental exercise are altered by cold exposure and they indicate a marked decrease in maximal oxygen uptake, time to exhaustion and workload.

  17. Different plant hormones regulate similar processes through largely nonoverlapping transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Nemhauser, Jennifer L; Hong, Fangxin; Chory, Joanne

    2006-08-11

    Small-molecule hormones govern every aspect of the biology of plants. Many processes, such as growth, are regulated in similar ways by multiple hormones, and recent studies have revealed extensive crosstalk among different hormonal signaling pathways. These results have led to the proposal that a common set of signaling components may integrate inputs from multiple hormones to regulate growth. In this study, we tested this proposal by asking whether different hormones converge on a common set of transcriptional targets in Arabidopsis seedlings. Using publicly available microarray data, we analyzed the transcriptional effects of seven hormones, including abscisic acid, gibberellin, auxin, ethylene, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, and jasmonate. A high-sensitivity analysis revealed a surprisingly low number of common target genes. Instead, different hormones appear to regulate distinct members of protein families. We conclude that there is not a core transcriptional growth-regulatory module in young Arabidopsis seedlings.

  18. Potentiation of Hormonal Responses to Hemorrhage and Fasting, but not Hypoglycemia in Conscious Adrenalectomized Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    Bilateral adrenalectomy (ADRX) in rats removes the source of two major stress-responsive hormones, corticosterone and epinephrine. To test how ADRX rats with-stand stress, we performed the following experiments in adult male rats provided with indwelling femoral arterial and venous cannulae and either ADRX or sham-adrenalectomized (Sham) 3 days later and given 0.5% NaCl to drink. Five to 6 days after adrenal surgery the rats were studied after either a 15 ml/kg.5 min hemorrhage or after an overnight fast followed by insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In fed unstressed ADRX rats, basal mean arterial blood pressure was slightly decreased; heart rate was increased; blood volume, vasopressin, and oxytocin concentrations were not different from sham values; and renin and norepinephrine were significantly elevated. The recovery of arterial pressure after hemorrhage in the ADRX rats was similar to that in the sham group over a 5-h period; however, the responses of vasopressin and oxytocin were significantly greater, and those of renin and norepinephrine were markedly potentiated in the ADRX group. Heart rate recovered faster in the ADRX group and was elevated, compared to the sham value, for most of the 5-h period. Restitution of blood volume was attenuated in the ADRX group, although the restitution of plasma protein was not different between the groups. A significant difference in the change in plasma osmolality between groups after hemorrhage may account for the attenuated restitution of blood volume. After an overnight fast, which reduced blood volume in both groups of rats, the plasma renin concentration rose still further in ADRX rats; the differences in other measured variables observed between fed ADRX and sham groups remained the same. The insulin-induced 50% decrease in glucose caused minor effects on arterial blood pressure and heart rate and occasioned responses in renin and norepinephrine of similar magnitudes in the two groups. We conclude that in the absence of

  19. Survival Rate and Hematological Responses with Temperature Changes of Red Spotted Grouper, Epinephelus akaara in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Youn; Han, Kyeong Ho; Cho, Jae Kwon; Kim, Kyong Min; Son, Maeng Hyun; Park, Jae Min; Kang, Hee Woong

    2016-06-01

    The effect of sudden changes of water temperature (WT) on the survival rate and physiological responses of the red spotted grouper (Epinephelus akaara) were examined by manipulating WT control system for 9 days. Experimental condition was divided in two different regimes at low (from 10°C to 4°C, decreased 1℃/d) and high (from 28°C to 34°C, increased 1°C/d) WT. Survival rate of experimental fishes were observed, and determined the changes of hematological characteristics by analyzing plasma levels of cortisol, glucose, total protein, and electrolytes (Na(+), Cl-, K(+)). No mortality was observed until low WT 6°C (144 h) and high WT 32°C (96 h), and 100% mortality was observed at low WT 4°C (216 h) and high WT 35°C (171 h). Plasma levels of cortisol and glucose increased rapidly as decreasing WT, and the loss of swimming ability and respiration response was observed at low WT 7°C and high WT 34°C conditions. PMID:27660825

  20. Survival Rate and Hematological Responses with Temperature Changes of Red Spotted Grouper, Epinephelus akaara in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Youn; Han, Kyeong Ho; Cho, Jae Kwon; Kim, Kyong Min; Son, Maeng Hyun; Park, Jae Min; Kang, Hee Woong

    2016-01-01

    The effect of sudden changes of water temperature (WT) on the survival rate and physiological responses of the red spotted grouper (Epinephelus akaara) were examined by manipulating WT control system for 9 days. Experimental condition was divided in two different regimes at low (from 10°C to 4°C, decreased 1℃/d) and high (from 28°C to 34°C, increased 1°C/d) WT. Survival rate of experimental fishes were observed, and determined the changes of hematological characteristics by analyzing plasma levels of cortisol, glucose, total protein, and electrolytes (Na+, Cl–, K+). No mortality was observed until low WT 6°C (144 h) and high WT 32°C (96 h), and 100% mortality was observed at low WT 4°C (216 h) and high WT 35°C (171 h). Plasma levels of cortisol and glucose increased rapidly as decreasing WT, and the loss of swimming ability and respiration response was observed at low WT 7°C and high WT 34°C conditions.

  1. Survival Rate and Hematological Responses with Temperature Changes of Red Spotted Grouper, Epinephelus akaara in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Youn; Han, Kyeong Ho; Cho, Jae Kwon; Kim, Kyong Min; Son, Maeng Hyun; Park, Jae Min; Kang, Hee Woong

    2016-01-01

    The effect of sudden changes of water temperature (WT) on the survival rate and physiological responses of the red spotted grouper (Epinephelus akaara) were examined by manipulating WT control system for 9 days. Experimental condition was divided in two different regimes at low (from 10°C to 4°C, decreased 1℃/d) and high (from 28°C to 34°C, increased 1°C/d) WT. Survival rate of experimental fishes were observed, and determined the changes of hematological characteristics by analyzing plasma levels of cortisol, glucose, total protein, and electrolytes (Na+, Cl–, K+). No mortality was observed until low WT 6°C (144 h) and high WT 32°C (96 h), and 100% mortality was observed at low WT 4°C (216 h) and high WT 35°C (171 h). Plasma levels of cortisol and glucose increased rapidly as decreasing WT, and the loss of swimming ability and respiration response was observed at low WT 7°C and high WT 34°C conditions. PMID:27660825

  2. Altered postprandial hormone and metabolic responses in a simulated shift work environment.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, D C; Hampton, S M; Morgan, L; Deacon, S; Arendt, J

    1998-09-01

    The circadian rhythms of most night shift workers do not adapt fully to the imposed behavioural schedule, and this factor is considered to be responsible for many of the reported health problems. One way in which such disturbances might be mediated is through inappropriate hormonal and metabolic responses to meals, on the night shift. Twelve healthy subjects (four males and eight females) were studied on three occasions at the same clock time (1330 h), but at different body clock times, after consuming test meals, first in their normal environment, secondly after a forced 9 h phase advance (body clock time approximately 2230 h) and then again 2 days later in the normal environment. They were given a low-fat pre-meal at 0800 h, then a test meal at 1330 h with blood sampling for the following 9 h. Parameters measured included plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), triacylglycerol (TAG), insulin, C-peptide, proinsulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, and urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin. In contrast with a previous study with a high-fat pre-meal, postprandial glucose and insulin responses were not affected by the phase shift. However, basal plasma NEFAs were lower immediately after the phase shift (P < 0.05). Incremental (difference from basal) TAG responses were significantly higher (P < 0.05) immediately after the phase shift compared with before. Two-day post-phase shift responses showed partial reversion to baseline values. This study suggests that it takes at least 2 days to adapt to eating meals on a simulated night shift, and that the nutritional content of the pre-meals consumed can have a marked effect on postprandial responses during a simulated phase shift. Such findings may provide a partial explanation for the increased occurrence of cardiovascular disease reported in shift workers.

  3. Histidine kinases in plants: cross talk between hormone and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Nongpiur, Ramsong; Soni, Praveen; Karan, Ratna; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Pareek, Ashwani

    2012-10-01

    Two-component signaling pathways involve sensory histidine kinases (HK), histidine phosphotransfer proteins (HpT) and response regulators (RR). Recent advancements in genome sequencing projects for a number of plant species have established the TCS family to be multigenic one. In plants, HKs operate through the His-Asp phosphorelay and control many physiological and developmental processes throughout the lifecycle of plants. Despite the huge diversity reported for the structural features of the HKs, their functional redundancy has also been reported via mutant approach. Several sensory HKs having a CHASE domain, transmembrane domain(s), transmitter domain and receiver domain have been reported to be involved in cytokinin and ethylene signaling. On the other hand, there are also increasing evidences for some of the sensory HKs to be performing their role as osmosensor, clearly indicating toward a possible cross-talk between hormone and stress responsive cascades. In this review, we bring out the latest knowledge about the structure and functions of histidine kinases in cytokinin and ethylene signaling and their role(s) in development and the regulation of environmental stress responses.

  4. Nuclear receptor coactivators facilitate vitamin D receptor homodimer action on direct repeat hormone response elements.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, A; Ozawa, Y; Chin, W W

    2000-03-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates target gene expression. Although VDR forms stable heterodimer complex with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) on vitamin D-response elements (VDREs), it is still not clear whether VDR/RXR heterodimers are the only VDR complexes responsible for vitamin D-mediated gene transcription. In this report, we analyzed the effect of nuclear receptor coactivators (SRC-1 and TRAM-1) on VDR homodimer and VDR/RXR heterodimer formation by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found that VDR forms stable homodimers after interaction with the coactivators on a VDRE (DR+3). Of particular note, DR+4 and DR+5 hormone-response elements (HREs) may also support such interactions. Cotransfection experiments revealed further that the coactivators enhance ligand-induced VDR transcription on these elements. Our studies suggest the important role of VDR homodimers, in addition to VDR/RXR heterodimers, in vitamin D-induced transactivation. Thus, specific coactivator-VDR interactions on HREs may determine target gene transactivation.

  5. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Simulated Competition Part I: Metabolic, Hormonal, Cellular Damage, and Heart Rate Responses.

    PubMed

    Andreato, Leonardo V; Julio, Ursula F; Panissa, Valeria L G; Esteves, João V D C; Hardt, Felipe; de Moraes, Solange M F; de Souza, Camila O; Franchini, Emerson

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze physiological responses in Brazilian jiu-jitsu athletes during simulated competition. To this end, 10 athletes (age: 28 ± 4 years, body mass: 81.8 ± 7.4 kg, body fat: 13.0 ± 4.8%, systematic practice: 11 ± 4 years) were analyzed in simulated competition (4 matches of 10 minutes). Blood samples were taken to assess energy demand, hormonal responses, and cell damage. Additionally, the heart rate variability (HRV) response was analyzed. The main results show that in simulated competition, during the last matches, athletes had lower lactate (p < 0.001), epinephrine (p < 0.001), norepinephrine (p < 0.001), and insulin (p = 0.002) concentrations. Increases observed in creatine kinase (p < 0.001), aspartate aminotransferase (p < 0.001), alanine aminotransferase (p = 0.007), and creatinine (p < 0.001) seen, especially, in the last matches are indicative of possible cell damage. The HRV reflected a decrease in the RR medium (average of the normal R-R intervals) (p = 0.001) during the competition. Thus, it is concluded that successive matches from competition generate a gradual decrease of adrenergic and glycolytic activities, which is accompanied by a gradual increase in cell damage markers and decrease in the RR medium of the HRV. PMID:26308831

  6. Hormonal contraceptives suppress oxytocin-induced brain reward responses to the partner's face.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Dirk; Plota, Jessica; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Maier, Wolfgang; Hurlemann, René

    2016-05-01

    The hypothalamic peptide oxytocin (OXT) has been identified as a key modulator of pair-bonding in men, but its effects in women are still elusive. Moreover, there is substantial evidence that hormonal contraception (HC) influences partner preferences and sexual satisfaction, which constitute core domains of OXT function. We thus hypothesized that OXT effects on partner-related behavioral and neural responses could be significantly altered in women using HC. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study involving 40 pair-bonded women, 21 of whom were using HC, we investigated whether a 24-IU nasal dose of OXT would modulate brain reward responses evoked by the romantic partner's face relative to the faces of familiar and unfamiliar people. Treatment with OXT increased the perceived attractiveness of the partner relative to other men, which was paralleled by elevated responses in reward-associated regions, including the nucleus accumbens. These effects of OXT were absent in women using HC. Our results confirm and extend previous findings in men that OXT interacts with the brain reward system to reinforce partner value representations, indicating a common OXT-dependent mechanism underlying partner attraction in both sexes. This mechanism may be disturbed in women using HC, suggesting that gonadal steroids could alter partner-specific OXT effects. PMID:26722017

  7. Candida albicans phospholipomannan: a sweet spot for controlling host response/inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fradin, Chantal; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; Jouault, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    Fungal cell walls contain several types of glycans, which play important roles in the pathogenesis of fungal infection and host immune response. Among them, glycosphingolipids have attracted much attention lately since they contribute actively to the fungi development and fungal-induced pathogenesis. Although glycosphingolipids are present in pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi, pathogenic strains exhibit distinct glycan structures on their sphingolipids, which contribute to the regulatory processes engaged in inflammatory response. In Candida albicans, phospholipomannan (PLM) represents a prototype of these sphingolipids. Through its glycan and lipid moieties, PLM induces activation of host signaling pathways involved in the initial recognition of fungi, causing immune system disorder and persistent fungal disease. In this review, first we describe the general aspects of C. albicans sphingolipids synthesis with a special emphasize on PLM synthesis and its insertion into the cell wall. Then, we discuss the role of PLM glycosylation in regulating immune system activation and its contribution to the chronic persistent inflammation found in Candida infections and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  8. Bed rest suppresses bioassayable growth hormone release in response to muscle activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Bigbee, A. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hormonal responses to muscle activity were studied in eight men before (-13 or -12 and -8 or -7 days), during (2 or 3, 8 or 9, and 13 or 14 days) and after (+2 or +3 and +10 or +11 days) 17 days of bed rest. Muscle activity consisted of a series of unilateral isometric plantar flexions, including 4 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), 48 contractions at 30% MVC, and 12 contractions at 80% MVC, all performed at a 4:1-s work-to-rest ratio. Blood was collected before and immediately after muscle activity to measure plasma growth hormone by radioimmunoassay (IGH) and by bioassay (BGH) of tibia epiphyseal cartilage growth in hypophysectomized rats. Plasma IGH was unchanged by muscle activity before, during, or after bed rest. Before bed rest, muscle activity increased (P < 0.05) BGH by 66% at -13 or -12 days (2,146 +/- 192 to 3,565 +/- 197 microg/l) and by 92% at -8 or -7 days (2,162 +/- 159 to 4,161 +/- 204 microg/l). After 2 or 3 days of bed rest, there was no response of BGH to the muscle activity, a pattern that persisted through 8 or 9 days of bed rest. However, after 13 or 14 days of bed rest, plasma concentration of BGH was significantly lower after than before muscle activity (2,594 +/- 211 to 2,085 +/- 109 microg/l). After completion of bed rest, muscle activity increased BGH by 31% at 2 or 3 days (1,807 +/- 117 to 2,379 +/- 473 microg/l; P < 0.05), and by 10 or 11 days the BGH response was similar to that before bed rest (1,881 +/- 75 to 4,160 +/- 315 microg/l; P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the ambulatory state of an individual can have a major impact on the release of BGH, but not IGH, in response to a single bout of muscle activity.

  9. Thyroid hormone-regulated gene expression in juvenile mouse liver: identification of thyroid response elements using microarray profiling and in silico analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disruption of thyroid hormone signalling can alter growth, development and energy metabolism. Thyroid hormones exert their effects through interactions with thyroid receptors that directly bind thyroid response elements and can alter transcriptional activity of target genes. The effects of short-term thyroid hormone perturbation on hepatic mRNA transcription in juvenile mice were evaluated, with the goal of identifying genes containing active thyroid response elements. Thyroid hormone disruption was induced from postnatal day 12 to 15 by adding goitrogens to dams' drinking water (hypothyroid). A subgroup of thyroid hormone-disrupted pups received intraperitoneal injections of replacement thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (replacement). An additional group received only thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (hyperthyroid). Hepatic mRNA was extracted and hybridized to Agilent mouse microarrays. Results Transcriptional profiling enabled the identification of 28 genes that appeared to be under direct thyroid hormone-regulation. The regulatory regions of the genome adjacent to these genes were examined for half-site sequences that resemble known thyroid response elements. A bioinformatics search identified 33 thyroid response elements in the promoter regions of 13 different genes thought to be directly regulated by thyroid hormones. Thyroid response elements found in the promoter regions of Tor1a, 2310003H01Rik, Hect3d and Slc25a45 were further validated by confirming that the thyroid receptor is associated with these sequences in vivo and that it can bind directly to these sequences in vitro. Three different arrangements of thyroid response elements were identified. Some of these thyroid response elements were located far up-stream (> 7 kb) of the transcription start site of the regulated gene. Conclusions Transcriptional profiling of thyroid hormone disrupted animals coupled with a novel bioinformatics search revealed new thyroid

  10. Active immunization of gilts against gonadotropin-releasing hormone: effects on secretion of gonadotropins, reproductive function, and responses to agonists of gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Esbenshade, K L; Britt, J H

    1985-10-01

    Sexually mature gilts were actively immunized against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by conjugating GnRH to bovine serum albumin, emulsifying the conjugate in Freund's adjuvant, and giving the emulsion as a primary immunization at Week 0 and as booster immunizations at Weeks 10 and 14. Antibody titers were evident by 2 wk after primary immunization and increased markedly in response to booster immunizations. Active immunization against GnRH caused gonadotropins to decline to nondetectable levels, gonadal steroids to decline to basal levels, and the gilts to become acyclic. Prolactin concentrations in peripheral circulation were unaffected by immunization against GnRH. The endocrine status of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis was examined by giving GnRH and two agonists to GnRH and by ovariectomy. An i.v. injection of 100 micrograms GnRH caused release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in control animals, but not in gilts immunized against GnRH. In contrast, administration of 5 micrograms D-(Ala6, des-Gly-NH2(10] ethylamide or 5 micrograms D-(Ser-t-But6, des-Gly-NH2(10] ethylamide resulted in immediate release of LH and FSH in both control and GnRH-immunized gilts. Circulating concentrations of LH and FSH increased after ovariectomy in the controls, but remained at nondetectable levels in gilts immunized against GnRH. Prolactin concentrations did not change in response to ovariectomy. We conclude that cyclic gilts can be actively immunized against GnRH and that this causes cessation of estrous cycles and inhibits secretion of LH, FSH, and gonadal steroids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Spotted inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2010-11-01

    We describe new scenarios for generating curvature perturbations when inflaton (curvaton) has significant interactions. We consider a ''spot'', which arises from interactions associated with an enhanced symmetric point (ESP) on the trajectory. Our first example uses the spot to induce a gap in the field equation. We observe that the gap in the field equation may cause generation of curvature perturbation if it does not appear simultaneous in space. The mechanism is similar to the scenario of inhomogeneous phase transition. Then we observe that the spot interactions may initiate warm inflation in the cold Universe. Creation of cosmological perturbation is discussed in relation to the inflaton dynamics and the modulation associated with the spot interactions.

  12. Common and divergent physiological, hormonal and metabolic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana and Thellungiella halophila to water and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Arbona, Vicent; Argamasilla, Rosa; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2010-11-01

    To explain the higher tolerance of Thellungiella to abiotic stress in comparison to Arabidopsis, several studies have focused on differences in ion absorption and gene expression. However, little is known about hormone regulation and metabolic responses. In this work, plants of both species were subjected to desiccation and salt stress to compare common and divergent responses. In control conditions, the number of significantly upregulated mass features as well as proline levels was higher in Tellungiella than in Arabidopsis. When subjected to desiccation, both species exhibited similar rates of water loss but proline over accumulation only occurred in Thellungiella; both species accumulated ABA and JA with a similar trend although Arabidopsis showed higher concentrations of both hormones which indicated a stronger impact of desiccation on Arabidopsis. However, Arabidopsis showed a higher number of significantly altered mass features than Thellungiella. Under salt stress, Thellungiella plants accumulated lower amounts of Cl(-) ions than Arabidopsis but exhibited a similar proline response. Under these conditions, ABA and JA levels increased in Arabidopsis whereas minimal changes in both hormone concentrations were recorded in Thellungiella. Contrastingly, the impact of salt stress on metabolite profiles was higher in Thellungiella than in Arabidopsis. Overall, data indicated that physiological responses in Arabidopsis are induced after stress imposition through hormonal regulation whereas Thellungiella has a basal metabolic configuration, better prepared to endure environmental cues.

  13. Neovascularization is influenced by androgenic hormones in the tissue implant response.

    PubMed

    Butler Jr Phd, Kenneth R; Benghuzzi Phd, Hamed; Tucci Phd, Michelle; Puckett Phd, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effect of androgens on the neovascularization of the fibrous tissue surrounding tricalcium phosphate (TCP) implants. Sixteen animals in four experimental groups (n = 4/group) were implanted with one TCP implant each. Group I animals were implanted with the sham TCP ceramic (Control). Group II animals received a testosterone-loaded ceramic. Group III animals were implanted with a dihydrotestosterone containing bioceramic. Group IV animals received the androstenedione filled bioceramic. At 90 days post-implantation, the fibrous tissue surrounding the implants were evaluated microscopically following staining with routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson’s trichrome, and Papanicolaou stains. Using Image Pro (Media Cybernetics, Silver Spring, MD) digital analysis software, data were collected to compare the hormonal effects on the number (per high power field) and size of blood vessels (micrometers, µm) within the fibrous tissue surrounding all four groups. The presence of androgens greatly affected the angiogenic response within the fibrous tissue. All three hormones exhibited less neovascularization compared to the control. Though not as dramatic as androstenedione (3±0), both testosterone (12±1) and dihydrotestosterone (10±1) suppressed the number of blood vessels present in the fibrous tissue capsule compared to control (13±1). However, the circumference of the vessels was much larger for the testosterone (236µm ±8µm) and dihydrotestosterone (256µm±4µm) treated groups compared to the androstenedione (146µm ±7µm) or control (163µm±3µm) groups. The results of this study demonstrate androgens strongly vary in their effect on neovascularization by limiting the number of new vessels developed while contributing to the presence of larger vessels within the fibrous tissue surrounding TCP implants loaded with testosterone and dihydrotestosterone.

  14. In vivo genomic footprinting of thyroid hormone-responsive genes in pituitary tumor cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Ahn, I M; Larsen, P R

    1996-01-01

    We studied the effects of thyroid hormone (T3) on nuclear protein-DNA interactions by using dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and DNase I ligation-mediated PCR footprinting. We examined an endogenous gene the growth hormone (GH) gene, and a stably transfected plasmid containing the chicken lysozyme silencer (F2) T3 response element (TRE) gene, F2-TRE-TK-CAT, both in pituitary tumor (GC) cells. The 235-1 cell line, which expresses prolactin (PRL) and Pit-1, but not the T3 receptor (TR) or GH, was used as a control. DMS and DNase I footprinting identified protected G residues in the Pit-1, Sp1, and Zn-15 binding sites of the GH gene in GC, but not in 235-1, cells. There was no specific protection of the tripartite GH TRE at -180 bp against either DMS or DNase I in the absence or presence of T3 in either cell line. However, T3 increased protection of the Pit-1 and Sp1 binding sites against DMS in GC cells. In GC cells stably transfected with a plasmid containing F2-TRE-TK-CAT or TRalpha, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression was T3 inducible and DMS footprinting revealed both F2 TRE TR-binding half sites in a pattern suggesting the binding of TR homodimers before and during T3 exposure. We conclude that the GH gene is accessible to specific nuclear proteins in GC, but not in 235-1, cells and that T3 enhances this interaction, although there is no evidence of TR binding to the low-affinity rat GH TRE. The presence of TR binding to the high-affinity F2 TRE before and during T3 exposure suggests that reversible interaction of T3 with DNA-bound TRs, rather than transient T3-TR contact with TREs, determines the level of T3-stimulated transcriptional activation. PMID:8754847

  15. Early spring sex differences in luteinizing hormone response to gonadotropin releasing hormone in co-occurring resident and migrant dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Greives, Timothy J; Fudickar, Adam M; Atwell, Jonathan W; Meddle, Simone L; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2016-09-15

    To optimally time reproduction, animals must coordinate changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The extent of intra-species variation in seasonal timing of reproductive function is considerable, both within and among populations. Dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) populations are known to differ in their reproductive timing response to cues experienced in the same habitat in late winter/early spring. Specifically in juncos cohabitating on shared wintering grounds, residents initiate breeding and reproductive activity but migrants delay reproductive development and prepare to migrate before breeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that the pituitary gland acts as a 'control point' to modulate differential HPG axis activity across populations. We sampled free-living resident and migrant juncos on their shared over-wintering grounds in March, thus all individuals were experiencing the same environmental cues, including photoperiod. We predicted that during this critical time of transition, residents would more readily respond to repeated gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation with increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), in contrast to migrants, which should delay full reproductive activity. Our data indicate that migrant females, while still on the overwintering grounds, have a reduced LH response to repeated GnRH injections compared to resident females. Male migrant and resident birds did not differ in their responsiveness to repeated GnRH. Our results suggest a sex difference in the costs of mistimed activation of the HPG axis, with female migrants being less responsive than residents females and males to repeated stimulation. Further, our data implicate a key role for the pituitary in regulating appropriate reproductive timing responses. PMID:27374492

  16. Diminution of prolactin and increase of thyrotrophin response to thyrotrophin releasing hormone occurring independently of changes in basal level of these hormones during treatment of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    van Groenendael, J H; Fischer, H R; Hackeng, W H; Schopman, W; Silberbusch, J

    1983-08-01

    In order to study the effect of rising thyroid hormone levels in hypothyroidism upon prolactin responses to TRH, in relation to changes in basal prolactin concentration and to changes in TSH responses, we followed 18 patients by performing TRH tests before and after 14, 28, 42 and 56 d on gradually increasing levothyroxine dosages, plus a final test when euthyroidism was achieved. Basal prolactin rose initially, at day 14, followed by a return on days 28, 42 and 56 to a level similar to the pretherapeutic value, while at euthyroidism prolactin had fallen below the original value. The area under the prolactin response curve on TRH stimulation was unchanged at 14 d, notwithstanding the rise of basal prolactin concentration. At 28, 42 and 56 d the responses declined progressively along with basal prolactin concentrations that remained equivalent to the pretreatment level. The TSH response to TRH rose at 14, 28, and 42 d along with a continuous downward course of basal TSH. Thus, substitution with L-thyroxine inhibited the responsivity of prolactin but enhanced that of TSH to TRH. The fact that these changes occurred in opposite directions, appears to rule out a negative feed-back effect of T4 on hypothalamic TRH secretion. The effects on responses were shown to occur independently of those on basal secretion of prolactin and TSH. PMID:6411393

  17. Plasma Stress Responses in Juvenile Red-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus akaara) exposed to Abrupt Salinity Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Hyung Bae; Baek, Hea Ja

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine acute plasma stress responses in two size groups of juvenile Epinephelus akaara (average body weight: 8.4±2.1 and 3.3±0.6 g; 150 and 120 days after hatch, respectively) exposed to abrupt salinity drops (from 34 practical salinity unit, PSU seawater to 18, 10 PSU (experiment 1) or 26, 18, 10 PSU (experiment 2), respectively). Plasma glucose, glutamic oxalate transaminase, glutamic pyruvate transaminase, red blood cell counts, and gill histology were determined during 72 h exposure. Significantly increased plasma glucose, glutamic oxalate transaminase levels, and red blood cell counts were observed in fish exposed to 18 or 10 PSU. Histological changes, such as hyperplasia and lifting of epithelium in the gill secondary lamellae, were also observed in fish exposed to 18 or 10 PSU at 72 h post-drop. E. akaara exposed to sudden salinity drops to 18 or 10 PSU still seems to undergo the primary adjustment phase before fish reaches a new homeostasis, whereas fish exposed to 26 PSU seems to mount osmotic changes. Therefore, the no observed adverse effect levels for 72 h acute salinity challenge was 26 PSU in our study, and salinity drop to 18 PSU and below can possibly cause acute adverse effect, in which fish could be vulnerable to additional stresses such as a temperature changes or handling stress. PMID:27796000

  18. Isolation of a thyroid hormone-responsive gene by immunoprecipitation of thyroid hormone receptor-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, J; Eisenman, R N

    1994-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) receptor (TR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that acts through specific binding sites in the promoter region of target genes. In order to identify new genes that are regulated by T3, we used anti-TR antiserum to immunoprecipitate TR-DNA complexes from GH4 cell nuclei that had previously been treated with a restriction enzyme. Screening of the immunopurified, cloned DNA for TR binding sites by electrophoretic mobility shift assay yielded 53 positive clones. A subset of these clones was specifically immunoprecipitated with anti-TR antiserum and may therefore represent biologically significant binding sites. One of these clones, clone 122, was characterized in detail. It includes sequences highly related to the NICER long terminal repeat-like element and contains three TR binding sites as determined by DNase I footprinting. Two of the clone 122 TR binding sites are located upstream of the TATA box, and one is located downstream. The TR binding site downstream from the promoter was necessary and sufficient to confer T3-dependent regulation in transient transfection experiments. Expression of a reporter construct under the control of the clone 122 promoter region was activated by TR in the absence of ligand and returned to basal levels after T3 addition. Clone 122 sequences hybridize to at least two different mRNAs of approximately 6 and 10 kb from GH4 cells. The levels of both of these mRNAs increased upon removal of T3. Our studies suggest that specific immunoprecipitation of chromatin allows identification of binding sites and target genes for transcription factors. Images PMID:7935476

  19. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  20. Responses of the two‐spotted oak buprestid, Agrilus biguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to host tree volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Christine M; Sumner, Mary E; Caulfield, John C; Reed, Katy; Inward, Daegan JG; Leather, Simon R; Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A; Denman, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND Agrilus bigutattus (Fabricius) is a forest pest of increasing importance in the United Kingdom. The larvae damage weakened native oaks and are thought to contribute to premature tree death. Suspected links with acute oak decline (AOD) are not yet confirmed, but AOD‐predisposed trees appear to become more susceptible to A. biguttatus attack. Thus, management may be necessary for control of this insect. To explore the possibility of monitoring beetle populations by baited traps, the host tree volatiles regulating A. biguttatus–oak interactions were studied. RESULTS Biologically active volatile organic compounds in dynamic headspace extracts of oak foliage and bark were identified initially by coupled gas chromatography–electroantennography (GC‐EAG) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC‐MS), and the structures were confirmed by GC coinjection with authentic compounds. Of two synthetic blends of these compounds comprising the active leaf volatiles, the simpler one containing three components evoked strongly positive behavioural responses in four‐arm olfactometer tests with virgin females and males, although fresh leaf material was more efficient than the blend. The other blend, comprising a five‐component mixture made up of bark volatiles, proved to be as behaviourally active for gravid females as bark tissue. CONCLUSIONS These initial results on A. biguttatus chemical ecology reveal aspects of the role of attractive tree volatiles in the host‐finding of beetles and underpin the development of semiochemically based surveillance strategies for this forest insect. © 2015 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26663022

  1. Effects of thyroid hormone on. beta. -adrenergic responsiveness of aging cardiovascular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimoto, G.; Hashimoto, K.; Hoffman, B.B.

    1987-03-01

    The authors have compared the effects of ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation on the heart and peripheral vasculature of young (2-mo-old) and older (12-mo-old) rats both in the presence and absence of triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/)-induced hyperthyroidism. The hemodynamic consequences of T/sub 3/ treatment were less prominent in the aged hyperthyroid rats compared with young hyperthyroid rats (both in intact and pithed rats). There was a decrease in sensitivity of chronotropic responsiveness to isoproterenol in older pithed rats, which was apparently reversed by T/sub 3/ treatment. The number and affinity of myocardial ..beta..-adrenergic receptor sites measured by (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol were not significantly different in young and older control rats; also, ..beta..-receptor density increased to a similar extent in both young and older T/sub 3/-treated rats. The ability of isoproterenol to relax mesenteric arterial rings, markedly blunted in older rats, was partially restored by T/sub 3/ treatment without their being any change in isoproterenol-mediated relaxation in the arterial preparation from young rats. The number and affinity of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptors measured in the mesenteric arteries was unaffected by either aging or T/sub 3/ treatment. The data suggest that effects of thyroid hormone and age-related alterations of cardiovascular responsiveness to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation are interrelated in a complex fashion with a net result that the hyperkinetic cardiovascular manifestations in hyperthyroidism are attenuated in the older animals.

  2. Age-related changes in mouse taste bud morphology, hormone expression, and taste responsivity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu-Kyong; Cong, Wei-na; Cai, Huan; Kim, Wook; Maudsley, Stuart; Egan, Josephine M; Martin, Bronwen

    2012-04-01

    Normal aging is a complex process that affects every organ system in the body, including the taste system. Thus, we investigated the effects of the normal aging process on taste bud morphology, function, and taste responsivity in male mice at 2, 10, and 18 months of age. The 18-month-old animals demonstrated a significant reduction in taste bud size and number of taste cells per bud compared with the 2- and 10-month-old animals. The 18-month-old animals exhibited a significant reduction of protein gene product 9.5 and sonic hedgehog immunoreactivity (taste cell markers). The number of taste cells expressing the sweet taste receptor subunit, T1R3, and the sweet taste modulating hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1, were reduced in the 18-month-old mice. Concordant with taste cell alterations, the 18-month-old animals demonstrated reduced sweet taste responsivity compared with the younger animals and the other major taste modalities (salty, sour, and bitter) remained intact. PMID:22056740

  3. Hormones and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Low-Dose Effects and Nonmonotonic Dose Responses

    PubMed Central

    Colborn, Theo; Hayes, Tyrone B.; Heindel, Jerrold J.; Jacobs, David R.; Lee, Duk-Hee; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.; Zoeller, R. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    For decades, studies of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have challenged traditional concepts in toxicology, in particular the dogma of “the dose makes the poison,” because EDCs can have effects at low doses that are not predicted by effects at higher doses. Here, we review two major concepts in EDC studies: low dose and nonmonotonicity. Low-dose effects were defined by the National Toxicology Program as those that occur in the range of human exposures or effects observed at doses below those used for traditional toxicological studies. We review the mechanistic data for low-dose effects and use a weight-of-evidence approach to analyze five examples from the EDC literature. Additionally, we explore nonmonotonic dose-response curves, defined as a nonlinear relationship between dose and effect where the slope of the curve changes sign somewhere within the range of doses examined. We provide a detailed discussion of the mechanisms responsible for generating these phenomena, plus hundreds of examples from the cell culture, animal, and epidemiology literature. We illustrate that nonmonotonic responses and low-dose effects are remarkably common in studies of natural hormones and EDCs. Whether low doses of EDCs influence certain human disorders is no longer conjecture, because epidemiological studies show that environmental exposures to EDCs are associated with human diseases and disabilities. We conclude that when nonmonotonic dose-response curves occur, the effects of low doses cannot be predicted by the effects observed at high doses. Thus, fundamental changes in chemical testing and safety determination are needed to protect human health. PMID:22419778

  4. Hormones and endocrine-disrupting chemicals: low-dose effects and nonmonotonic dose responses.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Laura N; Colborn, Theo; Hayes, Tyrone B; Heindel, Jerrold J; Jacobs, David R; Lee, Duk-Hee; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M; vom Saal, Frederick S; Welshons, Wade V; Zoeller, R Thomas; Myers, John Peterson

    2012-06-01

    For decades, studies of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have challenged traditional concepts in toxicology, in particular the dogma of "the dose makes the poison," because EDCs can have effects at low doses that are not predicted by effects at higher doses. Here, we review two major concepts in EDC studies: low dose and nonmonotonicity. Low-dose effects were defined by the National Toxicology Program as those that occur in the range of human exposures or effects observed at doses below those used for traditional toxicological studies. We review the mechanistic data for low-dose effects and use a weight-of-evidence approach to analyze five examples from the EDC literature. Additionally, we explore nonmonotonic dose-response curves, defined as a nonlinear relationship between dose and effect where the slope of the curve changes sign somewhere within the range of doses examined. We provide a detailed discussion of the mechanisms responsible for generating these phenomena, plus hundreds of examples from the cell culture, animal, and epidemiology literature. We illustrate that nonmonotonic responses and low-dose effects are remarkably common in studies of natural hormones and EDCs. Whether low doses of EDCs influence certain human disorders is no longer conjecture, because epidemiological studies show that environmental exposures to EDCs are associated with human diseases and disabilities. We conclude that when nonmonotonic dose-response curves occur, the effects of low doses cannot be predicted by the effects observed at high doses. Thus, fundamental changes in chemical testing and safety determination are needed to protect human health. PMID:22419778

  5. Adaptive Human CDKAL1 Variants Underlie Hormonal Response Variations at the Enteroinsular Axis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia Lin; Cai, James J.; Huang, Shang Yu; Cheng, Po Jen; Chueh, Ho Yen; Hsu, Sheau Yu Teddy

    2014-01-01

    Recent analyses have identified positively selected loci that explain differences in immune responses, body forms, and adaptations to extreme climates, but variants that describe adaptations in energy-balance regulation remain underexplored. To identify variants that confer adaptations in energy-balance regulation, we explored the evolutionary history and functional associations of candidate variants in 207 genes. We screened single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that had been associated with energy-balance regulation for unusual genetic patterns in human populations, followed by studying associations among selected variants and serum levels of GIP, insulin, and C-peptide in pregnant women after an oral glucose tolerance test. Our analysis indicated that 5′ variants in CDKAL1, CYB5R4, GAD2, and PPARG are marked with statistically significant signals of gene–environment interactions. Importantly, studies of serum hormone levels showed that variants in CDKAL1 are associated with glucose-induced GIP and insulin responses (p<0.05). On the other hand, a GAD2 variant exhibited a significant association with glucose-induced C-peptide response. In addition, simulation analysis indicated that a type 2 diabetes risk variant in CDKAL1 (rs7754840) was selected in East Asians ∼6,900 years ago. Taken together, these data indicated that variants in CDKAL1 and GAD2 were targets of prior environmental selection. Because the selection of the CDKAL1 variant overlapped with the selection of a cluster of GIP variants in the same population ∼11,800 to 2,000 years ago, we speculate that these regulatory genes at the human enteroinsular axis could be highly responsive to environmental selection in recent human history. PMID:25222615

  6. Influence of competition playing venue on the hormonal responses, state anxiety and perception of effort in elite basketball athletes.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Ademir F S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Freitas, Camila G; Drago, Gustavo; Oliveira, Roney; Crewther, Blair T; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-05-10

    This study examined the influence of competition playing venue on the hormonal responses, state anxiety and perception of effort in elite basketball players. Eighteen males from two basketball teams were monitored during two competitive matches that were played against each other on a home and away basis. Salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations were measured before and after each match. The Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2) test was also administrated prior to each match and session ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were taken post-game. Playing at home was accompanied by elevated pre-match T concentration, as compared to playing away (p<0.05). The matches played at home were also won. Salivary T and C concentrations were similarly elevated across the matches (percent changes from pre to post) played either at home or away. No significant differences in state anxiety and perception of effort were identified between the playing venues. Pre-match T and C concentrations and the percent changes in these hormones were significantly related to somatic anxiety, especially when playing at home (p<0.05). In conclusion, the competition playing venue appeared to influence athlete salivary hormonal responses prior to elite basketball matches. These hormonal responses were associated with player's anxiety state, which might contribute to performance and the eventual match outcomes.

  7. White blood cell and hormonal responses to 4300 m altitude before and after intermittent altitude exposure.

    PubMed

    Beidleman, Beth A; Muza, Stephen R; Fulco, Charles S; Cymerman, Allen; Staab, Janet E; Sawka, Michael N; Lewis, Steven F; Skrinar, Gary S

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that brief daily IAE (intermittent altitude exposure) was equally as effective as continuous altitude residence in inducing physiological adaptations consistent with altitude acclimatization. Although the positive benefits of IAE have been clearly defined, the potential negative consequences of IAE on health, specifically the immune system, remain undefined. The present study determined the effects of IAE on WBC (white blood cell) and hormonal responses during rest and exercise at 4300 m altitude. Six lowlanders (age, 23+/-2 years; body weight, 77+/-6 kg; values are means+/-S.E.M.) completed a VO(2)max (maximal O(2) uptake) and submaximal cycle ergometer test during a 30-h SL (sea level) exposure and during a 30 h exposure to 4300 m altitude-equivalent once before (PreIAE) and once after (PostIAE) a 3-week period of IAE (4 hxday(-1), 5 daysxweek(-1), 4300 m). The submaximal cycle ergometer test consisted of two consecutive 15-min work bouts at 40% and 70% of altitude-specific VO(2)max. Blood samples were obtained at rest and during both exercise work bouts for measurements of WBC count, leucocyte subset counts, cortisol, adrenaline (epinephrine) and noradrenaline (norepinephrine). WBC, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts increased significantly (P<0.05) during rest and exercise from SL to PreIAE and decreased (P<0.05) during rest and exercise from PreIAE to PostIAE. Monocyte counts decreased (P<0.05) during rest and exercise from PreIAE to PostIAE, but eosinophil and basophil counts did not change. Cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline did not change during rest or exercise from SL to PreIAE or PostIAE, but all increased significantly (P<0.05) from rest during the two work bouts. In conclusion, this type of IAE stimulus did not induce a hormonal stress response and did no harm in terms of activation of the immune system at altitude, as measured by WBC and leucocyte subset counts. This method of pre-acclimatization can therefore be

  8. Parathyroid Hormone Responses to Catecholamines and to Changes of Extracellular Calcium in Cows

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Juerg W.; Fischer, Jan A.; Hunziker, Willi H.; Binswanger, U.; Picotti, Giovanni B.; Da Prada, Mosè; Guillebeau, Albin

    1978-01-01

    Modifications of the plasma level of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (PTH) in cattle were induced by changes of the plasma concentrations of epinephrine, isoproterenol, or calcium. During abrupt hypocalcemia, PTH, obtained by infusions with ethylene glycol-bis (β-aminoethylether) N, N′-tetraacetate (EGTA), increased during the first 4-8 min. After a transient decline, the hormone levels rose again and remained elevated. Infusions of calcium suppressed the hypocalcemia-induced augmentation of PTH levels within a few minutes. Prolonged epinephrine (and isoproterenol) infusions also rapidly increased PTH levels, however, in this case, they returned to basal concentrations after 50-60 min. Additional epinephrine infusions could not further raise PTH values. Moreover, three short-lasting infusions of epinephrine (7 min each), given at 30-min intervals, increased PTH levels to the same extent, whereas additional infusions were much less effective. The PTH response to epinephrine was completely restored, when the interval after a prolonged epinephrine infusion had been prolonged to > 100 min. During moderate hypocalcemia, occurring at the end of EGTA infusions and lasting for 90 min, the PTH response to a short-lasting epinephrine infusion (7 min) was more pronounced than in normocalcemic animals. During severe hypocalcemia, in which superimposed short-lasting infusions of EGTA (7 min) led to an additional abrupt fall of plasma calcium concentrations but not to a corresponding additional rise of the PTH levels, epinephrine rapidly and further increased PTH concentrations. On the other hand, at the end of prolonged infusions of epinephrine, when additional infusions of epinephrine were ineffective in raising PTH levels, EGTA-induced hypocalcemia consistently increased PTH concentrations. The EGTA-induced augmentation of PTH levels was enhanced by epinephrine and isoproterenol but not by propranolol. The present findings indicate, that variations of the extracellular

  9. Lack of association of acute phase response proteins with hormone levels and antidepressant medication in perimenopausal depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depression is associated with higher plasma levels of positive acute-phase proteins, as well as with lower plasma levels of negative acute-phase proteins. The aim of this study is to examine the levels of acute-phase response proteins and whether these levels are influenced by reproductive hormones and antidepressant medication in the perimenopausal depression. Methods Sixty-five women (age range: 40–58 years old) participated in this study. All women were in the perimenopausal phase. The diagnosis of depression was made through a psychiatric interview and with the aid of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17 (HAM-D 17). The acute-phase response proteins, such as haptoglobin (HP), transferrine (TRf), α1-antitrypsin, complement protein 3 (C3), complement protein 4 (C4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and the reproductive hormones, for example follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol (E2), were analyzed using standard laboratory methods. Pearson’s correlations were applied to evaluate the relationship between acute-phase proteins and hormones. Results Perimenopausal women were divided into three groups. The first group consisted of normal controls, the second one involved depressed perimenopausal women, who were taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and the third one included depressed women that were not treated with SSRIs. Depressed women in perimenopause, when being compared to non-depressed women, did not differ as to serum levels of acute-phase proteins. There was a positive correlation between HP and E2 in depressed perimenopausal women, who were not taking SSRIs. Conclusions The lack of association between acute-phase proteins and depressive mood mentioned in this study does not support previous findings in patients with major depression. This negative finding in perimenopausal depression indicates either the absence or a more complex nature of the interactions between acute-phase proteins

  10. Microarray Analysis of Juvenile Hormone Response in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microchip array encompassing probes for 14,010 genes of Drosophila melanogaster was used to analyze the effect of juvenile hormone (JH) on genome-wide gene expression. JH is a member of a key group of insect hormones involved in regulating larval development and adult reproductive processes. Altho...

  11. SPOT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jason T.; Welsh, Sam J.; Farinetti, Antonio L.; Wegner, Tim; Blakeslee, James; Deboeck, Toni F.; Dyer, Daniel; Corley, Bryan M.; Ollivierre, Jarmaine; Kramer, Leonard; Zimmerman, Patrick L.; Khatri, Reshma

    2010-01-01

    A Spacecraft Position Optimal Tracking (SPOT) program was developed to process Global Positioning System (GPS) data, sent via telemetry from a spacecraft, to generate accurate navigation estimates of the vehicle position and velocity (state vector) using a Kalman filter. This program uses the GPS onboard receiver measurements to sequentially calculate the vehicle state vectors and provide this information to ground flight controllers. It is the first real-time ground-based shuttle navigation application using onboard sensors. The program is compact, portable, self-contained, and can run on a variety of UNIX or Linux computers. The program has a modular objec-toriented design that supports application-specific plugins such as data corruption remediation pre-processing and remote graphics display. The Kalman filter is extensible to additional sensor types or force models. The Kalman filter design is also strong against data dropouts because it uses physical models from state and covariance propagation in the absence of data. The design of this program separates the functionalities of SPOT into six different executable processes. This allows for the individual processes to be connected in an a la carte manner, making the feature set and executable complexity of SPOT adaptable to the needs of the user. Also, these processes need not be executed on the same workstation. This allows for communications between SPOT processes executing on the same Local Area Network (LAN). Thus, SPOT can be executed in a distributed sense with the capability for a team of flight controllers to efficiently share the same trajectory information currently being computed by the program. SPOT is used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) for Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and International Space Station Program (ISSP) operations, and can also be used as a post -flight analysis tool. It is primarily used for situational awareness, and for contingency situations.

  12. Effects of age and sex on hormonal responses to weightlessness simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larochelle, F.; Leach, C.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of horizontal bedrest on the excretion of catecholamines, aldosterone, and cortisol by human subjects grouped by age and sex are examined. The responses are assessed by assays of 24-hr urine samples collected throughout the studies. In 36-45-yr-olds, the excretion of epinephrine increases, whereas it decreases in the 46-55- and 56-65-yr-old groups. Norepinephrine excretion decreases (5-27%) in all groups during bedrest. Aldosterone excretion increases in the younger two groups of both males (19 and 6%) and females (47 and 9%). A slight decrease is observed in 56-65-yr-old males (6%), whereas excretion in females is unchanged. Cortisol excretion increases in the youngest groups of both men (12%) and women (13%) but decreases in the 56-65-yr-old groups (6 and 5%). For the two groups of intermediate age (46-55 yr), excretion in females decreases (15%), whereas in males it increases (19%). It is believed that hormone measurements may be of value in explaining variation in stress tolerance due to age and/or sex during space flight.

  13. Response of parathyroid hormone to anaerobic exercise in adolescent female athletes.

    PubMed

    Takada, H; Washino, K; Nagashima, M; Iwata, H

    1998-02-01

    It has been shown that moderate exercise suppresses parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion, while strenuous exercise is apt to induce continuous secretion, which has a negative effect on bone mineral densities (BMD). The present study investigated a typical response of PTH to brief exercise. The study group comprised six adolescent female basketball players whose BMD were within normal limits. Maximal anaerobic power by three-step cycling was loaded on each subject. The first blood sample was drawn 30 min prior to testing test, the second was immediately following, the third was 15 min after, and the fourth was 30 min after. The proportional change in plasma volume was -11.5% immediately following (P < 0.05), +2.1% 15 min after, and +5.5% at 30 min after exercise (P < 0.05). The expected value was calculated on the assumption of no effect, except changes in plasma volume, by exercise. The measured values of PTH and calcium (Ca) immediately after exercise were lower than each of the expected values (P < 0.05 for both). At 15 min after, there was no significant difference between expected and measured values of PTH, Ca and magnesium (Mg), respectively. At 30 min after, the measured value of Ca and Mg was higher than each expected value (P < 0.05 for both). It was concluded that PTH secretion is suppressed transiently immediately after maximal anaerobic exercise and is then stimulated during the recovery time in normal BMD subjects.

  14. The effect of increased lipid intake on hormonal responses during aerobic exercise in endurance-trained men.

    PubMed

    Christ, Emanuel R; Zehnder, Monica; Boesch, Chris; Trepp, Roman; Mullis, Primus E; Diem, Peter; Décombaz, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    In view of the growing health problem associated with obesity, clarification of the regulation of energy homeostasis is important. Peripheral signals, such as ghrelin and leptin, have been shown to influence energy homeostasis. Nutrients and physical exercise, in turn, influence hormone levels. Data on the hormonal response to physical exercise (standardized negative energy balance) after high-fat (HF) or low-fat (LF) diet with identical carbohydrate intake are currently not available. The aim of the study was to investigate whether a short-term dietary intervention with HF and LF affects ghrelin and leptin levels and their modulators, GH, insulin and cortisol, before and during aerobic exercise. Eleven healthy, endurance-trained male athletes (W(max) 365 +/- 29 W) were investigated twice in a randomized crossover design following two types of diet: 1. LF - 0.5 g fat/kg body weight (BW) per day for 2.5 days; 2. HF - 0.5 g fat/kg BW per day for 1 day followed by 3.5 g fat/kg BW per day for 1.5 days. After a standardized carbohydrate snack in the morning, metabolites and hormones (GH, ghrelin, leptin, insulin and cortisol) were measured before and at regular intervals throughout a 3-h aerobic exercise test on a cycloergometer at 50% of W(max). Diet did not significantly affect GH and cortisol concentrations during exercise but resulted in a significant increase in ghrelin and decrease in leptin concentrations after LF compared with HF diet (area under the curve (AUC) ghrelin LF vs HF: P < 0.03; AUC leptin LF vs HF: P < 0.02, Wilcoxon rank test). These data suggest that acute negative energy balance induced by exercise elicits a hormonal response with opposite changes of ghrelin and leptin. In addition, the hormonal response is modulated by the preceding intake of fat.

  15. Spot14/Spot14R expression may be involved in MSC adipogenic differentiation in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QIFEI; YANG, JUNLIN; LIN, XIANG; HUANG, ZIFANG; XIE, CHAOFAN; FAN, HENGWEI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the different expression levels of thyroid hormone responsive (THRSP; Spot14)/S14 related, Mig12 (S14R) during bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) adipogenesis in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. MSCs were retrospectively isolated from AIS patients and controls, and adipogenic differentiation was induced. Total RNA was extracted for Affymetrix 3′-IVT expression profiling microarrays and compared with the results from healthy controls. The results were confirmed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validation and the protein expression levels of Spot14 and its paralogous gene S14R by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 300 significantly altered mRNAs were detected (111 upregulated and 189 downregulated) and confirmed by RT-qPCR. The mRNA expression levels of seven genes, including Spot14, were altered by >2-fold in AIS patients. Spot14/S14R was selected for further investigation. The results of the western blotting demonstrated that mRNA and protein expression levels of Spot14/S14R were significantly higher in AIS patients than the controls (P<0.05). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated Spot14 was expressed in 85% (17/20 cases) in adipose tissue samples from AIS patients and 23.1% (3/13 cases) of adipose tissue samples from controls. The positive ratio of Spot14 in adipose tissue samples from AIS was significantly higher than the controls (P<0.001). The results of the present study indicated that Spot14/S14R were differently expressed in MSC adipogenesis in AIS patients, and they may be important in the abnormal adipogenic differentiation in AIS. PMID:27082501

  16. Lipolysis in diabetic adipocytes: differences in response to growth hormone and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S S; Schwartz, Y; Rawlinson, T

    1987-09-01

    The sensitivity to lipolytic agents is altered in diabetic vs. control animals. Because of its role as a diabetogenic hormone and its ability to elicit lipolysis, GH was studied in isolated fat cells (IFC) from control and streptozotocin-diabetic (STZ-DM) rats. IFCs from the epididymal fat of 150 to 200-g normal and STZ-DM Holtzman rats were prepared by collagenase digestion. Lipolysis was measured by glycerol release after either incubation or perifusion with the following concentrations: epinephrine (EPI), 0.01-0.1 microM; theophylline, 0.01-1.0 mg/ml; adenosine deaminase (ADA), and bovine GH (bGH), 0.01-1.0 microgram/ml. Rats, rendered diabetic by STZ (65 mg/kg), were used on day 3. In a dose-response study comparing glycerol release from control and STZ-DM IFC, IFC were preincubated with 1.0 microgram/ml bGH and then incubated with varying concentrations of EPI or bGH. In STZ-DM, we noted increased lipolytic sensitivity to low concentrations of EPI or bGH. Furthermore, in perifusion, STZ-DM IFC did not require obligatory preincubation with bGH for optimal glycerol release. The addition of ADA increased glycerol release from incubated IFC (STZ-DM and controls). In both systems an enhanced lipolytic response to theophylline was seen in the presence of bGH in control and STZ-DM. It was thus concluded that IFC from normal animals do not respond to GH without preincubation. IFC from STZ-DM rats show a lipolytic response to GH without preincubation. Preincubation with GH increases the lipolytic response of IFC from STZ-DM to all lipolytic agents compared to control responses. In addition, ADA greatly enhanced lipolysis in IFC from STZ-DM compared to that in controls. Together these data demonstrate enhanced sensitivity to both lipolytic stimuli and adenosine suppression of lipolysis in IFC from STZ-DM. PMID:3622374

  17. Utility of event-related potentials in predicting antidepressant treatment response: An iSPOT-D report.

    PubMed

    van Dinteren, Rik; Arns, Martijn; Kenemans, Leon; Jongsma, Marijtje L A; Kessels, Roy P C; Fitzgerald, Paul; Fallahpour, Kamran; Debattista, Charles; Gordon, Evian; Williams, Leanne M

    2015-11-01

    It is essential to improve antidepressant treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) and one way this could be achieved is by reducing the number of treatment steps by employing biomarkers that can predict treatment outcome. This study investigated differences between MDD patients and healthy controls in the P3 and N1 component from the event-related potential (ERP) generated in a standard two-tone oddball paradigm. Furthermore, the P3 and N1 are investigated as predictors for treatment outcome to three different antidepressants. In the international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D)--a multi-center, international, randomized, prospective practical trial--1008 MDD participants were randomized to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine-XR. The study also recruited 336 healthy controls. Treatment response and remission were established after eight weeks using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. P3 and N1 latencies and amplitudes were analyzed using a peak-picking approach and further replicated by using exact low resolution tomography (eLORETA). A reduced P3 was found in MDD patients compared to controls by a peak-picking analysis. This was validated in a temporal global field power analysis. Source density analysis revealed that the difference in cortical activity originated from the posterior cingulate and parahippocampal gyrus. Male non-responders to venlafaxine-XR had significantly smaller N1 amplitudes than responders. This was demonstrated by both analytical methods. Male non-responders to venlafaxine-XR had less activity originating from the left insular cortex. The observed results are discussed from a neural network viewpoint. PMID:26282359

  18. Immune responses and immune-related gene expression profile in orange-spotted grouper after immunization with Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dan, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Tuan-Wei; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing

    2013-03-01

    In order to elucidate the immune-protective mechanisms of inactivated Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine, different doses of C. irritans theronts were used to immunize orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We measured serum immobilization titer, blood leukocyte respiratory burst activity, serum alternative complement activity, and serum lysozyme activity weekly. In addition, the expression levels of immune-related genes such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), major histocompatibility complexes I and II (MHC I and II), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined in spleen and gills. The results showed that the immobilization titer, respiratory burst activity, and alternative complement activity of immunized fish were significantly increased, and the levels of the last two immune parameters in the high-dose vaccine group were significantly higher than in the low-dose vaccine group. Serum lysozyme activity in the high-dose vaccine group was significantly higher than in the PBS control group. Vaccination also regulated host immune-related gene expression. For example, at 2- and 3- weeks post immunization, IL-1β expression in the high-dose vaccine group spleen was significantly increased. At 4-weeks post immunization, the fish were challenged with a lethal dose of parasite, and the survival rates of high-dose vaccine group, low-dose vaccine group, PBS control group, and adjuvant control group were 80%, 40%, 0%, and 10% respectively. These results demonstrate that inactivated C. irritans vaccination improves specific and nonspecific immune responses in fish, enhancing their anti-parasite ability. These effects are vaccine antigen dose-dependent.

  19. Salivary hormone and immune responses to three resistance exercise schemes in elite female athletes.

    PubMed

    Nunes, João A; Crewther, Blair T; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Tricoli, Valmor; Viveiros, Luís; de Rose, Dante; Aoki, Marcelo S

    2011-08-01

    This study examined the salivary hormone and immune responses of elite female athletes to 3 different resistance exercise schemes. Fourteen female basketball players each performed an endurance scheme (ES-4 sets of 12 reps, 60% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load, 1-minute rest periods), a strength-hypertrophy scheme (SHS-1 set of 5RM, 1 set of 4RM, 1 set of 3RM, 1 set of 2RM, and 1set of 1RM with 3-minute rest periods, followed by 3 sets of 10RM with 2-minute rest periods) and a power scheme (PS-3 sets of 10 reps, 50% 1RM load, 3-minute rest periods) using the same exercises (bench press, squat, and biceps curl). Saliva samples were collected at 07:30 hours, pre-exercise (Pre) at 09:30 hours, postexercise (Post), and at 17:30 hours. Matching samples were also taken on a nonexercising control day. The samples were analyzed for testosterone, cortisol (C), and immunoglobulin A concentrations. The total volume of load lifted differed among the 3 schemes (SHS > ES > PS, p < 0.05). Postexercise C concentrations increased after all schemes, compared to control values (p < 0.05). In the SHS, the postexercise C response was also greater than pre-exercise data (p < 0.05). The current findings confirm that high-volume resistance exercise schemes can stimulate greater C secretion because of higher metabolic demand. In terms of practical applications, acute changes in C may be used to evaluate the metabolic demands of different resistance exercise schemes, or as a tool for monitoring training strain.

  20. Inhibition of thyrotropin response to TSH-releasing hormone by thyroxine in hypothyroid rats

    SciTech Connect

    Boado, R.J.; Zaninovich, A.A.; Ulloa, E.R.; Fernandez Pol, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Pharmacological amounts of throxine (T4) can inhibit the thyrotropin (TSH) response to TSH-releasing hormone (TRH) before its conversion to triiodothyronine (T3) in the hypophysis of euthyroid rate. The present work tested physiological doses of T4 in hypothyroid rats. Rats were treated with iopanoic acid (IOP) 5 mg/100 g BW 24, 12 and 1.5 hours preceding the study, to prevent intrapituitary conversion of T4 to T3. Nonradioactive T4 was injected iv at time 0. At 20 min a 1 ..mu..g/100 g BW dose of TRH was injected iv. Blood samples were drawn at times 0, 20, and 30 min for determination by radioimmunoassay of plasma T4, T3, and TSH. In untreated rats basal TSH was 1450 +- 200 (SEM) ..mu..U/ml. At 20 min it was 105 +- 12% the basal value and at 30 min (10 min post-TRH) plasma TSH rose to 165 +- 14%. In T4-treated rats, those injected with IOP or with the vehicle alone both had the TSH response suppressed. IOP reduced intrapitutiary T3 from 4.6 +- 2.4 to 0.5 +- 0.2 fmol/min/gland. Thirty min. following the iv injection of 150 ..mu..Ci of double-labeled /sup 125/I-T4, the in vitro cytoplasmic radioactivity in control rats was 1.3 +- 0.13 x 10-/sup 2/% of the injected dose (75% T4, 17% T3), while in nuclei it was 4.2 +- 3.6 x 10-/sup 3/% (5l% T4, 28% T3). The injection of 25 ..mu..g of nonradioactive T4 decreased /sup 125/I-T4 in cytoplasm with no changes in nuclei. These findings suggest an intrinsic capacity of T4 to control TRH stimulation of TSH through binding to cytoplasmic receptors.

  1. Multifunctional receptor model for dioxin and related compound toxic action: possible thyroid hormone-responsive effector-linked site.

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, J D

    1989-01-01

    Molecular/theoretical modeling studies have revealed that thyroid hormones and toxic chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons of environmental significance (for which dioxin or TCDD is the prototype) have similar structural properties that could be important in molecular recognition in biochemical systems. These molecular properties include a somewhat rigid, sterically accessible and polarizable aromatic ring and size-limited, hydrophobic lateral substituents, usually contained in opposite adjoining rings of a diphenyl compound. These molecular properties define the primary binding groups thought to be important in molecular recognition of both types of structures in biochemical systems. Similar molecular reactivities are supported by the demonstration of effective specific binding of thyroid hormones and chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons with four different proteins, enzymes, or receptor preparations that are known or suspected to be involved in the expression of thyroid hormone activity. These binding interactions represent both aromatic-aromatic (stacking) and molecular cleft-type recognition processes. A multiple protein or multifunctional receptor-ligand binding mechanism model is proposed as a way of visualizing the details and possible role of both the stacking and cleft type molecular recognition factors in the expression of biological activity. The model suggests a means by which hormone-responsive effector-linked sites (possible protein-protein-DNA complexes) can maintain highly structurally specific control of hormone action. Finally, the model also provides a theoretical basis for the design and conduct of further biological experimentation on the molecular mechanism(s) of action of toxic chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons and thyroid hormones. Images FIGURE 3. A FIGURE 3. B FIGURE 3. C FIGURE 3. D PMID:2551666

  2. OsERF2 controls rice root growth and hormone responses through tuning expression of key genes involved in hormone signaling and sucrose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guiqing; Qin, Hua; Zhou, Jiahao; Quan, Ruidang; Lu, Xiangyang; Huang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Haiwen

    2016-02-01

    Root determines plant distribution, development progresses, stress response, as well as crop qualities and yields, which is under the tight control of genetic programs and environmental stimuli. Ethylene responsive factor proteins (ERFs) play important roles in plant growth and development. Here, the regulatory function of OsERF2 involved in root growth was investigated using the gain-function mutant of OsERF2 (nsf2857) and the artificial microRNA-mediated silenced lines of OsERF2 (Ami-OsERF2). nsf2857 showed short primary roots compared with the wild type (WT), while the primary roots of Ami-OsERF2 lines were longer than those of WT. Consistent with this phenotype, several auxin/cytokinin responsive genes involved in root growth were downregulated in nsf2857, but upregulated in Ami-OsERF2. Then, we found that nsf2857 seedlings exhibited decreased ABA accumulation and sensitivity to ABA and reduced ethylene-mediated root inhibition, while those were the opposite in Ami-ERF2 plants. Moreover, several key genes involved in ABA synthesis were downregulated in nsf2857, but unregulated in Ami-ERF2 lines. In addition, OsERF2 affected the accumulation of sucrose and UDPG by mediating expression of key genes involved in sucrose metabolism. These results indicate that OsERF2 is required for the control of root architecture and ABA- and ethylene-response by tuning expression of series genes involved in sugar metabolism and hormone signaling pathways.

  3. A novel zinc-binding alcohol dehydrogenase 2 from Arachis diogoi, expressed in resistance responses against late leaf spot pathogen, induces cell death when transexpressed in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dilip; Rampuria, Sakshi; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Kirti, Pulugurtha B

    2016-03-01

    A novel zinc-binding alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (AdZADH2) was significantly upregulated in a wild peanut, Arachis diogoi treated with conidia of late leaf spot (LLS) pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata. This upregulation was not observed in a comparative analysis of cultivated peanut, which is highly susceptible to LLS. This zinc-binding alcohol dehydrogenase possessed a Rossmann fold containing NADB domain in addition to the MDR domain present in all previously characterized plant ADH genes/proteins. Transient over-expression of AdZADH2 under an estradiol inducible promoter (XVE) resulted in hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in tobacco leaf. However, the same level of cell death was not observed when the domains were transiently expressed individually. Cell death observed in tobacco was associated with overexpression of cell death related proteins, antioxidative enzymes such as SOD, CAT and APX and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. In A. diogoi, AdZADH2 expression was significantly upregulated in response to the plant signaling hormones salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and sodium nitroprusside. PMID:27047748

  4. Fetal and neonatal iron deficiency exacerbates mild thyroid hormone insufficiency effects on male thyroid hormone levels and brain thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Thomas W; Prohaska, Joseph R; Georgieff, Michael K; Anderson, Grant W

    2014-03-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression.

  5. Fetal and Neonatal Iron Deficiency Exacerbates Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Effects on Male Thyroid Hormone Levels and Brain Thyroid Hormone-Responsive Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Thomas W.; Prohaska, Joseph R.; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression. PMID:24424046

  6. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  7. Metabolic responses to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) vary with life-history stage in adult male northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, David C; Somo, Derek A; Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-08-01

    Strong individual and life-history variation in serum glucocorticoids has been documented in many wildlife species. Less is known about variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness and its impact on metabolism. We challenged 18 free-ranging adult male northern elephant seals (NES) with an intramuscular injection of slow-release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) over 3 sample periods: early in the breeding season, after 70+ days of the breeding fast, and during peak molt. Subjects were blood sampled every 30 min for 2h post-injection. Breeding animals were recaptured and sampled at 48 h. In response to the ACTH injection, cortisol increased 4-6-fold in all groups, and remained elevated at 48 h in early breeding subjects. ACTH was a strong secretagogue for aldosterone, causing a 3-8-fold increase in concentration. Cortisol and aldosterone responses did not vary between groups but were correlated within individuals. The ACTH challenge produced elevations in plasma glucose during late breeding and molting, suppressed testosterone and thyroid hormone at 48 h in early breeding, and increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids and ketoacids during molting. These data suggest that sensitivity of the HPA axis is maintained but the metabolic impacts of cortisol and feedback inhibition of the axis vary with life history stage. Strong impacts on testosterone and thyroid hormone suggest the importance of maintaining low cortisol levels during the breeding fast. These data suggest that metabolic adaptations to extended fasting in NES include alterations in tissue responses to hormones that mitigate deleterious impacts of acute or moderately sustained stress responses.

  8. Metabolic responses to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) vary with life-history stage in adult male northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, David C; Somo, Derek A; Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-08-01

    Strong individual and life-history variation in serum glucocorticoids has been documented in many wildlife species. Less is known about variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness and its impact on metabolism. We challenged 18 free-ranging adult male northern elephant seals (NES) with an intramuscular injection of slow-release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) over 3 sample periods: early in the breeding season, after 70+ days of the breeding fast, and during peak molt. Subjects were blood sampled every 30 min for 2h post-injection. Breeding animals were recaptured and sampled at 48 h. In response to the ACTH injection, cortisol increased 4-6-fold in all groups, and remained elevated at 48 h in early breeding subjects. ACTH was a strong secretagogue for aldosterone, causing a 3-8-fold increase in concentration. Cortisol and aldosterone responses did not vary between groups but were correlated within individuals. The ACTH challenge produced elevations in plasma glucose during late breeding and molting, suppressed testosterone and thyroid hormone at 48 h in early breeding, and increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids and ketoacids during molting. These data suggest that sensitivity of the HPA axis is maintained but the metabolic impacts of cortisol and feedback inhibition of the axis vary with life history stage. Strong impacts on testosterone and thyroid hormone suggest the importance of maintaining low cortisol levels during the breeding fast. These data suggest that metabolic adaptations to extended fasting in NES include alterations in tissue responses to hormones that mitigate deleterious impacts of acute or moderately sustained stress responses. PMID:24798580

  9. Arabidopsis BNT1, an atypical TIR-NBS-LRR gene, acting as a regulator of the hormonal response to stress.

    PubMed

    Sarazin, Vivien; Duclercq, Jérome; Mendou, Benjamin; Aubanelle, Laurent; Nicolas, Veyres; Aono, Mitsuko; Pilard, Serge; Guerineau, François; Sangwan-Norreel, Brigitte; Sangwan, Rajbir S

    2015-10-01

    During their life cycle, plants have to cope with fluctuating environmental conditions. The perception of the stressful environmental conditions induces a specific stress hormone signature specifying a proper response with an efficient fitness. By reverse genetics, we isolated and characterized a novel mutation in Arabidopsis, associated with environmental stress responses, that affects the At5g11250/BURNOUT1 (BNT1) gene which encode a Toll/Interleukin1 receptor-nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) protein. The knock-out bnt1 mutants displayed, in the absence of stress conditions, a multitude of growth and development defects, suchas severe dwarfism, early senescence and flower sterility, similar to those observed in vitro in wild type plants upon different biotic and/or abiotic stresses. The disruption of BNT1 causes also a drastic increase of the jasmonic, salicylic and abscisic acids as well as ethylene levels. Which was consistent with the expression pattern observed in bnt1 showing an over representation of genes involved in the hormonal response to stress? Therefore, a defect in BNT1 forced the plant to engage in an exhausting general stress response, which produced frail, weakened and poorly adapted plants expressing "burnout" syndromes. Furthermore, by in vitro phenocopying experiments, physiological, chemical and molecular analyses, we propose that BNT1 could represent a molecular link between stress perception and specific hormonal signature. PMID:26398806

  10. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  11. Immunoreactive and bioactive growth hormone responses to resistance exercise in men who are lean or obese.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Kraemer, William J; Kennett, Mary J; Comstock, Brett A; Maresh, Carl M; Denegar, Craig R; Volek, Jeff S; Hymer, Wesley C

    2011-08-01

    It has been suggested that obese individuals have a blunted growth hormone (GH) response to spontaneous and stimulated GH secretion. The present study was designed to examine the effects of a high-volume, whole body acute resistance exercise (RE) protocol on immunoreactive GH (iGH), bioactive GH (bGH), and GH-binding protein (GHBP) in sedentary lean and obese men. Nine obese (mean ± SD: 20.8 ± 2.1 yr old, 177.0 ± 4.1 cm height, 108.7 ± 15.9 kg body mass, 37.6 ± 5.29% body fat) and nine lean (20.1 ± 2.1 yr old, 177.8 ± 8.7 cm height, 71.7 ± 5.8 kg body mass, 14.7 ± 3.54% body fat) men completed an acute RE protocol (6 exercises, 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 85-95% of 10 repetitions maximum with 120- and 90-s rest periods), and blood samples were collected before, at the midpoint, and immediately after exercise and during recovery (+50, +70, and +110). In contrast to prior studies, which examined acute responses to cardiovascular exercise protocols, groups did not differ in iGH response to the exercise stimulus. However, bGH concentrations overall were significantly lower in the obese than the lean participants (P < 0.001). Additionally, obese individuals had significantly higher GHBP concentrations (P < 0.001). Results suggest that obese and lean sedentary men performing a high-volume, whole body acute RE protocol demonstrate similar increases in iGH. Blunted bGH and elevated GHBP concentrations are indicative of altered GH activity associated with obesity. Prior research findings of blunted iGH response may be attributable to RE protocols not equated on relative intensity or volume. These results underscore the complexity of pituitary biology and its related mechanisms and may have implications for exercise prescription in the treatment of obesity.

  12. DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY ALTERS THE AMPLITUDE OF THE ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONSE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose: The thyroid hormone (TH) system is one of the targets of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Since TH is essential for proper brain development, disruption by exposure to chemicals during development can result in adverse neurological outcomes. Previous studies revealed th...

  13. The effect of Yohimbine, an alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, on the growth hormone response to apomorphine in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, S; Thavundayil, J X; Krishnan, B; Nair, N P; Schwartz, G; Guyda, H

    1996-01-01

    Yohimbine HCl (16 mg po) administered 30 min before clonidine (CLON) (2 ug/kg infused over 10 min) (N = 5) or apomorphine HCl (Apo) (0.5 mg sc) (N = 10) antagonized the growth hormone (GH) response to CLON but had no effect on the GH response to Apo in normal men. This finding suggests that in humans, alpha2 adrenergic mechanisms do not modulate dopaminergic function, at least not in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and that the GH response to Apo is not mediated via an alpha2 adrenergic link. PMID:8820174

  14. Hormone responsiveness of isolated catfish hepatocytes in perifusion system is higher than in flasks incubation.

    PubMed

    Ottolenghi, C; Puviani, A C; Fabbri, E; Capuzzo, A; Brighenti, L; Plisetskaya, E M

    1994-07-01

    Hepatocytes were isolated from catfish (lctalurus melas) by conventional collagenase digestion. Sensitivities of liver cells isolated from the same fish to the glycogenolytic action of epinephrine, mammalian glucagon, catfish glucagon, catfish glucagon-like peptide, synthetic fragment 19-29 of anglerfish glucagon I, fragment 19-29 of anglerfish glucagon II, and anglerfish glucagon II were compared in two different systems: perifusion in a Bio-Gel P4 column and flask incubation. Both experimental procedures were continued for a total of 100-120 min, while hormones were applied simultaneously to both preparations for 10 min. Effluent fractions from the columns and incubation media from the flasks were collected for glucose determination. The hormonal effects were clearly enhanced in perifused cells compared to those in cells incubated in flasks, the effect being especially evident at physiological concentrations of hormones. The hormonal effects in both systems were dose-dependent. Epinephrine and mammalian glucagon (10 nM), applied separately to the same column, produced two different peaks, glucagon causing more glucose production than epinephrine. In the presence of 0.4 mM glucose in the perifusion system, hormonal effects were diminished, implying that glucose accumulation during incubation of liver cells in flasks might affect hormonal effects. The results obtained in this study indicate that piscine hepatocytes suspended and perifused in a Bio-Gel column are more sensitive to physiological concentrations of glycogenolytic hormones and may represent a new tool for experimental studies of fish liver metabolism and its hormonal regulation. PMID:7926655

  15. The meaning of anti-Müllerian hormone levels in patients at a high risk of poor ovarian response.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jong; Lee, Geun Ho; Gong, Du Sik; Yoon, Tae Ki; Lee, Woo Sik

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of ovarian reserve play an important role in predicting the clinical results of assisted reproductive technology (ART). The ideal markers of ovarian reserve for clinical applications should have high specificity in order to determine genuine poor responders. Basal follicle-stimulating hormone levels, antral follicle count, and serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels have been suggested as ovarian reserve tests that may fulfill this requirement, with serum AMH levels being the most promising parameter. Serum AMH levels have been suggested to be a predictor of clinical pregnancy in ART for older women, who are at a high risk for decreased ovarian response. We reviewed the prognostic significance of ovarian reserve tests for patients undergoing ART treatment, with a particular focus on the significance of serum AMH levels in patients at a high risk of poor ovarian response. PMID:27689035

  16. The meaning of anti-Müllerian hormone levels in patients at a high risk of poor ovarian response

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jong; Lee, Geun Ho; Gong, Du Sik; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of ovarian reserve play an important role in predicting the clinical results of assisted reproductive technology (ART). The ideal markers of ovarian reserve for clinical applications should have high specificity in order to determine genuine poor responders. Basal follicle-stimulating hormone levels, antral follicle count, and serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels have been suggested as ovarian reserve tests that may fulfill this requirement, with serum AMH levels being the most promising parameter. Serum AMH levels have been suggested to be a predictor of clinical pregnancy in ART for older women, who are at a high risk for decreased ovarian response. We reviewed the prognostic significance of ovarian reserve tests for patients undergoing ART treatment, with a particular focus on the significance of serum AMH levels in patients at a high risk of poor ovarian response. PMID:27689035

  17. The meaning of anti-Müllerian hormone levels in patients at a high risk of poor ovarian response

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jong; Lee, Geun Ho; Gong, Du Sik; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of ovarian reserve play an important role in predicting the clinical results of assisted reproductive technology (ART). The ideal markers of ovarian reserve for clinical applications should have high specificity in order to determine genuine poor responders. Basal follicle-stimulating hormone levels, antral follicle count, and serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels have been suggested as ovarian reserve tests that may fulfill this requirement, with serum AMH levels being the most promising parameter. Serum AMH levels have been suggested to be a predictor of clinical pregnancy in ART for older women, who are at a high risk for decreased ovarian response. We reviewed the prognostic significance of ovarian reserve tests for patients undergoing ART treatment, with a particular focus on the significance of serum AMH levels in patients at a high risk of poor ovarian response.

  18. Systemic above- and belowground cross talk: hormone-based responses triggered by Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivores in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kammerhofer, Nina; Egger, Barbara; Dobrev, Petre; Vankova, Radomira; Hofmann, Julia; Schausberger, Peter; Wieczorek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Above- and belowground plant parts are simultaneously attacked by different pests and pathogens. The host mediates these interactions and physiologically reacts, e.g. with local and systemic alterations of endogenous hormone levels coupled with coordinated transcriptional changes. This in turn affects attractiveness and susceptibility of the plant to subsequent attackers. Here, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is used to study stress hormone-based systemic responses triggered by simultaneous root parasitism by the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivory by the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and the spider mite Tetranychus urticae. First, HPLC/MS and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR are used to show that nematode parasitism strongly affects stress hormone levels and expression of hormone marker genes in shoots. Previous nematode infection is then demonstrated to affect the behavioural and life history performance of both arthropods. While thrips explicitly avoid nematode-infected plants, spider mites prefer them. In addition, the life history performance of T. urticae is significantly enhanced by nematode infection. Finally, systemic changes triggered by shoot-feeding F. occidentalis but not T. urticae are shown to make the roots more attractive for H. schachtii. This work emphasises the importance of above- and belowground signalling and contributes to a better understanding of plant systemic defence mechanisms against plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:26324462

  19. Systemic above- and belowground cross talk: hormone-based responses triggered by Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivores in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kammerhofer, Nina; Egger, Barbara; Dobrev, Petre; Vankova, Radomira; Hofmann, Julia; Schausberger, Peter; Wieczorek, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Above- and belowground plant parts are simultaneously attacked by different pests and pathogens. The host mediates these interactions and physiologically reacts, e.g. with local and systemic alterations of endogenous hormone levels coupled with coordinated transcriptional changes. This in turn affects attractiveness and susceptibility of the plant to subsequent attackers. Here, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is used to study stress hormone-based systemic responses triggered by simultaneous root parasitism by the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivory by the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and the spider mite Tetranychus urticae. First, HPLC/MS and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR are used to show that nematode parasitism strongly affects stress hormone levels and expression of hormone marker genes in shoots. Previous nematode infection is then demonstrated to affect the behavioural and life history performance of both arthropods. While thrips explicitly avoid nematode-infected plants, spider mites prefer them. In addition, the life history performance of T. urticae is significantly enhanced by nematode infection. Finally, systemic changes triggered by shoot-feeding F. occidentalis but not T. urticae are shown to make the roots more attractive for H. schachtii. This work emphasises the importance of above- and belowground signalling and contributes to a better understanding of plant systemic defence mechanisms against plant-parasitic nematodes.

  20. Thyroid Hormone Receptor α Plays an Essential Role in Male Skeletal Muscle Myoblast Proliferation, Differentiation, and Response to Injury.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Anna; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Nam-Ho; Liu, Yan-Yun; Yang, An; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Kahng, Andrew; Cervantes, Vanessa; Tripuraneni, Nikita; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Perin, Laura; Brent, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in myogenesis, the process required for skeletal muscle development and repair, although the mechanisms have not been established. Skeletal muscle develops from the fusion of precursor myoblasts into myofibers. We have used the C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblast cell line, primary myoblasts, and mouse models of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) α and β, to determine the role of thyroid hormone in the regulation of myoblast differentiation. T3, which activates thyroid hormone receptor (TR) α and β, increased myoblast differentiation whereas GC1, a selective TRβ agonist, was minimally effective. Genetic approaches confirmed that TRα plays an important role in normal myoblast proliferation and differentiation and acts through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Myoblasts with TRα knockdown, or derived from RTH-TRα PV (a frame-shift mutation) mice, displayed reduced proliferation and myogenic differentiation. Moreover, skeletal muscle from the TRα1PV mutant mouse had impaired in vivo regeneration after injury. RTH-TRβ PV mutant mouse model skeletal muscle and derived primary myoblasts did not have altered proliferation, myogenic differentiation, or response to injury when compared with control. In conclusion, TRα plays an essential role in myoblast homeostasis and provides a potential therapeutic target to enhance skeletal muscle regeneration.

  1. Growth hormone response to a standardised exercise test in relation to puberty and stature.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, S A; Torresani, T; Prader, A

    1987-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) was measured before and 10 minutes after a standardised bicycle exercise test (duration 15 minutes) in 37 short children (group 1: mean (SD) age 12.8 (3.5) years; mean (SD) bone age 10.4 (3.6) years; mean (SD) height standard deviation score (SDS) -2.8 (0.7], 16 tall children (group 2: mean age 12.9 (2.8) years; mean bone age 13.9 (1.4) years; mean height SDS 3.0 (0.8], and 30 normal children (group 3: mean age 13.3 (3.2) years; mean bone age 12.8 (3.4) years; mean height SDS -0.4 (0.8]. Results of GH are expressed as mean (SEM). The pre-exercise GH was similar in the three groups (group 1, 8.0 (2.3) mU/l, group 2, 8.5 (2.5) mU/l, and group 3, 8.3 (2.3) mU/l). There was a significant rise in GH after exercise in all three groups. GH after exercise was higher in group 2 (35.1 (2.5) mU/l) compared with groups 1 and 3 (17.8 (3.0) and (20.8 (3.2) mU/l). Post-exercise GH was less than 10 mU/l in 29 children (34% total; 49% group 1, 6% group 2, and 34% group 3). There was a positive relation between post-exercise GH and both bone age and public hair stage. Multiple regression analysis revealed that relevant predictors of a rise in GH with exercise were different for the sexes in these children with varying stature: for boys, bone age and pubic hair stage; for girls, height and height SDS. All the tall girls were in puberty. No statistical relation was observed between post-experience GH and cardiovascular response to exercise, time of day of exercise, time of eating before exercise, and plasma insulin or insulin to glucose ratio at time of exercise. We conclude that the GH response to the physiological stimulus of exercise is higher in puberty compared with childhood. Therefore, although children may be suspected of having GH deficiency after a failure of GH to increase after exercise, a non-response may be a normal finding in prepubertal children, independent of stature. PMID:3813636

  2. Role of adipokinetic hormone and adenosine in the anti-stress response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zemanová, Milada; Stašková, Tereza; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The role of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and adenosine in the anti-stress response was studied in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and adults carrying a mutation in the Akh gene (Akh(1)), the adenosine receptor gene (AdoR(1)), or in both of these genes (Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant). Stress was induced by starvation or by the addition of an oxidative stressor paraquat (PQ) to food. Mortality tests revealed that the Akh(1) mutant was the most resistant to starvation, while the AdoR(1) mutant was the most sensitive. Conversely, the Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant was more sensitive to PQ toxicity than either of the single mutants. Administration of PQ significantly increased the Drome-AKH level in w(1118) and AdoR(1) larvae; however, this was not accompanied by a simultaneous increase in Akh gene expression. In contrast, PQ significantly increased the expression of the glutathione S-transferase D1 (GstD1) gene. The presence of both a functional adenosine receptor and AKH seem to be important for the proper control of GstD1 gene expression under oxidative stress, however, the latter appears to play more dominant role. On the other hand, differences in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity among the strains, and between untreated and PQ-treated groups were minimal. In addition, the glutathione level was significantly lower in all untreated AKH- or AdoR-deficient mutant flies as compared with the untreated control w(1118) flies and further declined following treatment with PQ. All oxidative stress characteristics modified by mutations in Akh gene were restored or even improved by 'rescue' mutation in flies which ectopically express Akh. Thus, the results of the present study demonstrate the important roles of AKH and adenosine in the anti-stress response elicited by PQ in a D. melanogaster model, and provide the first evidence for the involvement of adenosine in the anti-oxidative stress response in insects. PMID:27374982

  3. Effects of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone response, growth and feed conversion efficiency in buffalo heifers (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Haldar, A; Prakash, B S

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the benefits of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) on growth and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) in buffaloes. Twelve Murrah buffalo heifers (Bubalus bubalis) of mean age 24.8 months and mean body weight 302.4kg were divided into two groups (treatment and control) with six animals in each group. The buffaloes were given intravenous injections of bovine GRF (bGRF) at a dose rate of 10microg/100kg body weight or an equal volume of saline at 15-day intervals for a period of 9 months. Plasma growth hormone (GH) responses to bGRF challenge were measured in blood samples collected at 90-day intervals on days 1, 90, 180 and 270 and samples were taken at -60, -30, 0, +10, +20, +30, +60, +120 and +180min relative to bGRF injection. Blood samples were also collected weekly by jugular venepuncture for the quantification of plasma GH. The average growth rate (AGR) and FCE of all animals were recorded at 15-day intervals. Plasma GH concentrations increased (P=0.001) steadily following bGRF challenge, peaking 10-20min after challenge and declining to baseline by 180min. In the treatment group, there were no significant differences (P>0.05) in either the peak heights of the GH response or the area under the curve (AUC) of the GH response after bGRF challenge on any of the four occasions of intensive bleeding. There were overall increases in plasma GH concentrations (P<0.01), AGR (P<0.01) and FCE (P=0.05) in the treatment group compared with the control animals. The study showed that GH responsiveness to administration of bGRF at 15-day intervals over 9 months of treatment remained unchanged in buffalo heifers. Exogenous bGRF treatment for a long period can therefore enhance GH release leading to higher growth rates and better feed conversion efficiency in buffalo heifers. PMID:17113797

  4. The Scientific Basis for Modeling Northern Spotted Owl Habitat: A Response to Loehle, Irwin, Manly, and Merrill

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently revised the recovery plan (USFWS 2011) and designated Critical Habitat (USFWS 2012a) for the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina). The Critical Habitat designation was based in part on a map of relative habitat suitability...

  5. Thyroid hormones directly activate the expression of the human and mouse uncoupling protein-3 genes through a thyroid response element in the proximal promoter region

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The transcription of the human UCP3 (uncoupling protein-3) gene in skeletal muscle is tightly regulated by metabolic signals related to fatty acid availability. However, changes in thyroid status also modulate UCP3 gene expression, albeit by unknown mechanisms. We created transgenic mice bearing the entire human UCP3 gene to investigate the effect of thyroid hormones on human UCP3 gene expression. Treatment of human UCP3 transgenic mice with thyroid hormones induced the expression of the human gene in skeletal muscle. In addition, transient transfection experiments demonstrate that thyroid hormones activate the transcription of the human UCP3 gene promoter when MyoD and the TR (thyroid hormone receptor) were co-transfected. The action of thyroid hormones on UCP3 gene transcription is mediated by the binding of the TR to a proximal region in the UCP3 gene promoter that contains a direct repeat structure. An intact DNA sequence of this site is required for thyroid hormone responsiveness and TR binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the TR binds this element in vivo. The murine Ucp3 gene promoter was also dependent on MyoD and responsive to thyroid hormone in transient transfection assays. However, it was much less sensitive to thyroid hormone than the human UCP3 promoter. In summary, UCP3 gene transcription is activated by thyroid hormone treatment in vivo, and this activation is mediated by a TRE (thyroid hormone response element) in the proximal promoter region. Such regulation suggests a link between UCP3 gene expression and the effects of thyroid hormone on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. PMID:15496137

  6. Acute Hormonal and Force Responses to Combined Strength and Endurance Loadings in Men and Women: The “Order Effect”

    PubMed Central

    S. Taipale, Ritva; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine acute responses and recovery of serum hormones and muscle force following combined strength (S) and endurance (E) loading sessions in which the order of exercises is reversed (ES vs. SE). Methods This cross-over study design included recreationally endurance trained men and women (age 21–45 years, n = 12 men n = 10 women) who performed both loadings. Maximal bilateral isometric strength (MVC), isometric rate of force development (RFD) and serum concentrations of testosterone (T), cortisol (C), growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured during and after both loadings. Results Both of the present combined (ES and SE) loadings led to a greater acute decrease in MVC in men than in women, while RFD was slightly affected only in men. Recovery of MVC and RFD to baseline was complete at 24 h regardless of the order of exercises. In men, neuromuscular fatigue was accompanied by increased C concentrations observed post SE. This was followed by decreased concentrations of T at 24 h and 48 h that were significantly lower than those observed following ES. GH response in men also differed significantly post loadings. In women, only a significant difference in T between ES and SE loadings was observed at post. Conclusion These observed differences in hormonal responses despite similarities in neuromuscular fatigue in men indicate the presence of an order effect as the body was not fully recovered at 48 h following SE. These findings may be applicable in training prescription in order to optimize specific training adaptations. PMID:23408956

  7. Short-term Hormone Treatment Modulates Emotion Response Circuitry in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Love, Tiffany; Smith, Yolanda R.; Persad, Carol C.; Tkaczyk, Anne; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of combination hormone therapy (HT) on emotional processing in postmenopausal women using functional neuroimaging. Design A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study was performed. Setting A tertiary care university medical center. Participants Ten healthy postmenopausal women (mean age 56.9 years, S.D. = 1.4) were recruited. Interventions Women were randomized to the order they received combined hormone therapy, 5 ug ethinyl estradiol and 1 mg norethindrone acetate, and placebo. Volunteers received hormone therapy or placebo for 4 weeks, followed by a one month washout period, and then received the other treatment for 4 weeks. Subjects participated in an fMRI emotional processing task, where they were asked to rate emotional pictures as positive, negative, or neutral. Main Outcome Measure Brain activation patterns were compared between hormone therapy and placebo conditions within subjects. Results During negative emotional presentations, after subtracting the effect of neutral images, areas of significant differences between HT and placebo conditions were identified in the orbital, frontal, cingulate and occipital cortices. During positive emotional image presentation there were significant differences between placebo and HT conditions within the medial frontal cortex. Conclusions Short-term menopausal treatment with combination hormone therapy affects regional brain activity within areas implicated in emotional processing. PMID:19243753

  8. Does aerobic exercise affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal response in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Aysun; Tur, Birkan Sonel; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Oztuna, Derya; Erdogan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia is not clear. This study aimed to analyze the effects of a 6-week aerobic exercise program on the HPA axis in patients with fibromyalgia and to investigate the effects of this program on the disease symptoms, patients’ fitness, disability, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty fibromyalgia patients were randomized to Group 1 (stretching and flexibility exercises at home for 6 weeks) and Group 2 (aerobic exercise three times a week and the same at-home exercises as Group 1 for 6 weeks). Serum levels of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and growth hormone were analyzed at baseline and at the end of, and 1 hr after an exercise stress test. [Results] Group 2 showed better improvement in morning stiffness duration and pain. Growth hormone levels significantly increased after intervention and cortisol levels significantly decreased at time-time interaction in both groups. No significant differences in adrenocorticotropic hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 were found. [Conclusion] The results of this study seem to support the hypothesis that there is a dysregulation of the HPA axis in patients with FM, and that a six-week exercise program can influence symptoms and affect the HPA axis hormones. PMID:26311959

  9. Differential neural responses to child and sexual stimuli in human fathers and non-fathers and their hormonal correlates

    PubMed Central

    Mascaro, Jennifer S.; Hackett, Patrick D.; Rilling, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented importance of paternal caregiving for positive child development, little is known about the neural changes that accompany the transition to fatherhood in humans, or about how changes in hormone levels affect paternal brain function. We compared fathers of children aged 1–2 with non-fathers in terms of hormone levels (oxytocin and testosterone), neural responses to child picture stimuli, and neural responses to visual sexual stimuli. Compared to non-fathers, fathers had significantly higher levels of plasma oxytocin and lower levels of plasma testosterone. In response to child picture stimuli, fathers showed stronger activation than non-fathers within regions important for face emotion processing (caudal middle frontal gyrus [MFG]), mentalizing (temporo-parietal junction [TPJ]) and reward processing (medial orbitofrontal cortex [mOFC]). On the other hand, non-fathers had significantly stronger neural responses to sexually provocative images in regions important for reward and approach-related motivation (dorsal caudate and nucleus accumbens). Testosterone levels were negatively correlated with responses to child stimuli in the MFG. Surprisingly, neither testosterone nor oxytocin levels predicted neural responses to sexual stimuli. Our results suggest that the decline in testosterone that accompanies the transition to fatherhood may be important for augmenting empathy toward children. PMID:24882167

  10. Hormonal responses of metoclopramide-treated subjects experiencing nausea or emesis during parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall L.

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), vasopressin (AVP), epinephrine (EPI), and norepinephrine (NE) in 22 subjects administered 10 to 20 mg of metoclopramide prior to parabolic flight are measured. The effect of metoclopramide on motion sickness is examined. It is observed that metoclopramide is ineffective in the modulation of motion sickness due to stressful linear and angular acceleration and orbital flight, and it does not affect serum hormones prior to parabolic flight. It is detected that the serum level of AVP declines following emesis induced by parabolic flight and stressful angular acceleration; the serum levels of ACTH and EPI are elevated by parabolic flight and stressful angular acceleration; and serum NE is significantly elevated immediately following emesis. The possible roles of these hormones in the etiology of space motion sickness are discussed.

  11. OsERF2 controls rice root growth and hormone responses through tuning expression of key genes involved in hormone signaling and sucrose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guiqing; Qin, Hua; Zhou, Jiahao; Quan, Ruidang; Lu, Xiangyang; Huang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Haiwen

    2016-02-01

    Root determines plant distribution, development progresses, stress response, as well as crop qualities and yields, which is under the tight control of genetic programs and environmental stimuli. Ethylene responsive factor proteins (ERFs) play important roles in plant growth and development. Here, the regulatory function of OsERF2 involved in root growth was investigated using the gain-function mutant of OsERF2 (nsf2857) and the artificial microRNA-mediated silenced lines of OsERF2 (Ami-OsERF2). nsf2857 showed short primary roots compared with the wild type (WT), while the primary roots of Ami-OsERF2 lines were longer than those of WT. Consistent with this phenotype, several auxin/cytokinin responsive genes involved in root growth were downregulated in nsf2857, but upregulated in Ami-OsERF2. Then, we found that nsf2857 seedlings exhibited decreased ABA accumulation and sensitivity to ABA and reduced ethylene-mediated root inhibition, while those were the opposite in Ami-ERF2 plants. Moreover, several key genes involved in ABA synthesis were downregulated in nsf2857, but unregulated in Ami-ERF2 lines. In addition, OsERF2 affected the accumulation of sucrose and UDPG by mediating expression of key genes involved in sucrose metabolism. These results indicate that OsERF2 is required for the control of root architecture and ABA- and ethylene-response by tuning expression of series genes involved in sugar metabolism and hormone signaling pathways. PMID:26659593

  12. Salivary steroid hormone response to whole-body cryotherapy in elite rugby players.

    PubMed

    Grasso, D; Lanteri, P; Di Bernardo, C; Mauri, C; Porcelli, S; Colombini, A; Zani, V; Bonomi, F G; Melegati, G; Banfi, G; Lombardi, G

    2014-01-01

    Saliva represents a low stress, not-invasively collected matrix that allows steroid hormone monitoring in athletes by reflecting type, intensity and duration of exercise. Whole body cryotherapy (WBC) consists of short whole-body exposures to extremely cold air (-110° to -140°C) which, despite being initially used to treat inflammatory diseases, is currently acquiring increasing popularity in sports medicine. Cryostimulation practice is now widely accepted as an effective treatment to accelerate muscle recovery in rugby players. The aim of this work was to study the changes of steroid hormones in saliva of rugby players after both 2 and 14 consecutive WBC sessions, in order to investigate the effects of the treatment on their salivary steroid hormonal profile. Twenty-five professional rugby players, belonging to the Italian National Team, underwent a 7-day cryotherapy protocol consisting of 2 daily sessions. Saliva samples were taken in the morning prior to the start of the WBC, in the evening after the end of the second WBC, and in the morning of the day after the last WBC session. The samples were analyzed for cortisol, DHEA, testosterone and estradiol using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Cortisol and DHEA showed a reduction already after the 2 WBC sessions of the first day; after 14 consecutive WBC sessions cortisol, DHEA, and estradiol levels decreased, while testosterone increased as did the testosterone to cortisol ratio. These results were confirmed by the fact that the majority of subjects showed variations exceeding the critical difference (CD). In conclusion, we found that WBC acutely affects the salivary steroid hormone profile, and the results are evident already after only one twice-daily session. Most significantly, after one-week of consecutive twice-daily WBC sessions, all the hormones were modified. This is the first experimental report that links changes in the hormonal asset to WBC.

  13. Expression of complement and pentraxin proteins in acute phase response elicited by tumor photodynamic therapy: the engagement of adrenal hormones.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Soroush; Huang, Naiyan; Korbelik, Mladen

    2010-12-01

    Treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) was recently shown to trigger a strong acute phase response. Using the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) model, the present study examined complement and pentraxin proteins as PDT-induced acute phase reactants. The results show a distinct pattern of changes in the expression of genes encoding these proteins in the tumor, as well as host liver and spleen, following PDT mediated by photosensitizer Photofrin™. These changes were influenced by glucocorticoid hormones, as evidenced by transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptor and the upregulation of gene encoding this receptor. The expression of gene for glucocorticoid-induced zipper (GILZ) protein, whose activity is particularly susceptible to glucocorticoid regulation, was also changed in PDT-treated tumors. A direct demonstration that tumor PDT induces glucocorticoid hormone upregulation is provided by documenting elevated levels of serum corticosterone in mice bearing PDT-treated LLC tumors. Tumor response to PDT was negatively affected by blocking glucocorticoid receptor activity, which suggests that glucocorticoid hormones have a positive impact on the therapeutic outcome with this therapy.

  14. Standard of Care and Controversies in the Adjuvant Endocrine Treatment of Hormone-Responsive Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bauerschlag, Dirk O.; Maass, Nicolai; Schem, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hormone-responsive early breast cancer is a highly curable disease. In premenopausal women, tamoxifen (TAM) is still the standard treatment. Nowadays, up to 10 years of TAM can be safely administered, especially in women who remain premenopausal. Patients who are considered to be perimenopausal should be initially treated like premenopausal patients. Depending on their serum hormone levels, these patients can be safely switched to an aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy once the estradiol (E2) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels prove the established postmenopausal status. In postmenopausal women, several sequences of endocrine treatment are available. The AI therapy can be induced upfront or sequentially by switching from Tam to AI and vice versa. Extended endocrine therapy, by adding up to 5 years of letrozole after 5 years of TAM, has also been proven to be beneficial in certain patient subgroups. Genotyping of cytochromes such as CYP2D6 did not have any added value in identifying patients who are at higher risk of recurrence. Nevertheless, in all patients the side effects need to be given high consideration. New strategies developed to overcome endocrine resistance are tested in clinical studies. New co-administered drugs such as specific inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Src, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) do improve endocrine responsiveness in metastatic disease and will eventually be introduced in the treatment of early breast cancer. PMID:25404889

  15. Hemodynamic and hormonal responses to lower body negative pressure in men with varying profiles of strength and aerobic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Mathes, K. L.; Lasley, M. L.; Tomaselli, C. M.; Frey, M. A.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    Hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) were examined in 24 healthy men to test the hypothesis that responsiveness of reflex control of blood pressure during orthostatic challenge is associated with interactions between strength and aerobic power. Subjects underwent treadmill tests to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2max) and isokinetic dynamometer tests to determine knee extensor strength. Based on predetermined criteria, subjects were classified into one of four fitness profiles of six subjects each, matched for age, height, and body mass: (a) low strength/average aerobic fitness, (b) low strength/high aerobic fitness, (c) high strength/average aerobic fitness, and (d) high strength/high aerobic fitness. Following 90 min of 0.11 rad (6 degrees) head-down tilt (HDT), each subject underwent graded LBNP to -6.7 kPa or presyncope, with maximal duration 15 min, while hemodynamic, cardiac, and hormonal responses were measured. All groups exhibited typical hemodynamic, hormonal, and fluid shift responses during LBNP, with no intergroup differences between high and low strength characteristics. Subjects with high aerobic power exhibited greater (P < 0.05) stroke volume and lower (P < 0.05) heart rate, vascular peripheral resistance, and mean arterial pressure during rest, HDT, and LBNP. Seven subjects, distributed among the four fitness profiles, became presyncopal. These subjects showed greatest reduction in mean arterial pressure during LBNP, had greater elevations in vasopressin, and lesser increases in heart rate and peripheral resistance. Neither VO2max nor leg strength were associated with fall in arterial pressure or with syncopal episodes. We conclude that interactions between aerobic and strength fitness characteristics do not influence responses to LBNP challenge.

  16. Negative energy balance in a male songbird, the Abert's towhee, constrains the testicular endocrine response to luteinizing hormone stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Scott; Gao, Sisi; Valle, Shelley; Bittner, Stephanie; Hutton, Pierce; Meddle, Simone L.; Deviche, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Energy deficiency can suppress reproductive function in vertebrates. As the orchestrator of reproductive function, endocrine activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis is potentially an important mechanism mediating such effects. Previous experiments in wild-caught birds found inconsistent relationships between energy deficiency and seasonal reproductive function, but these experiments focused on baseline HPG axis activity and none have investigated the responsiveness of this axis to endocrine stimulation. Here, we present data from an experiment in Abert's towhees, Melozone aberti, using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) challenges to investigate whether energy deficiency modulates the plasma testosterone responsiveness of the HPG axis. Wild-caught birds were either ad libitum fed or energetically constrained via chronic food restriction during photoinduced reproductive development. Energy deficiency did not significantly affect the development of reproductive morphology, the baseline endocrine activity of the HPG axis, or the plasma testosterone response to GnRH challenge. Energy deficiency did, however, decrease the plasma testosterone responsiveness to LH challenge. Collectively, these observations suggest that energy deficiency has direct gonadal effects consisting of a decreased responsiveness to LH stimulation. Our study, therefore, reveals a mechanism by which energy deficiency modulates reproductive function in wild birds in the absence of detectable effects on baseline HPG axis activity. PMID:26333925

  17. Biological regulation of receptor-hormone complex concentrations in relation to dose-response assessments for endocrine-active compounds.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M E; Barton, H A

    1999-03-01

    Some endocrine-active compounds (EACs) act as agonists or antagonists of specific hormones and may interfere with cellular control processes that regulate gene transcription. Many mechanisms controlling gene expression are universal to organisms ranging from unicellular bacteria to more complex plants and animals. One mechanism, coordinated control of batteries of gene products, is critical in adaptation of bacteria to new environments and for development and tissue differentiation in multi-cellular organisms. To coordinately activate sets of genes, all living organisms have devised molecular modules to permit transitions, or switching, between different functional states over a small range of hormone concentration, and other modules to stabilize the new state through homeostatic interactions. Both switching and homeostasis are regulated by controlling concentrations of hormone-receptor complexes. Molecular control processes for switching and homeostasis are inherently nonlinear and often utilize autoregulatory feedback loops. Among the biological processes contributing to switching phenomena are receptor autoinduction, induction of enzymes for ligand synthesis, mRNA stabilization/activation, and receptor polymerization. This paper discusses a variety of molecular switches found in animal species, devises simple quantitative models illustrating roles of specific molecular interactions in creating switching modules, and outlines the impact of these switching processes and other feedback loops for risk assessments with EACs. Quantitative simulation modeling of these switching mechanisms made it apparent that highly nonlinear dose-response curves for hormones and EACs readily arise from interactions of several linear processes acting in concert on a common control point. These nonlinear mechanisms involve amplification of response, rather than multimeric molecular interactions as in conventional Hill relationships. PMID:10330682

  18. Rapid Weight Loss Elicits Harmful Biochemical and Hormonal Responses in Mixed Martial Arts Athletes.

    PubMed

    Coswig, Victor Silveira; Fukuda, David Hideyoshi; Del Vecchio, Fabrício Boscolo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare biochemical and hormonal responses between mixed martial arts (MMA) competitors with minimal prefight weight loss and those undergoing rapid weight loss (RWL). Blood samples were taken from 17 MMA athletes (Mean± SD; age: 27.4 ±5.3yr; body mass: 76.2 ± 12.4kg; height: 1.71 ± 0.05m and training experience: 39.4 ± 25 months) before and after each match, according to the official events rules. The no rapid weight loss (NWL, n = 12) group weighed in on the day of the event (~30 min prior fight) and athletes declared not having used RWL strategies, while the RWL group (n = 5) weighed in 24 hr before the event and the athletes claimed to have lost 7.4 ± 1.1kg, approximately 10% of their body mass in the week preceding the event. Results showed significant (p < .05) increases following fights, regardless of group, in lactate, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine, and cortisol for all athletes. With regard to group differences, NWL had significantly (p < .05) greater creatinine levels (Mean± SD; pre to post) (NWL= 101.6 ± 15-142.3 ± 22.9μmol/L and RWL= 68.9 ± 10.6-79.5 ± 15.9μmol/L), while RWL had higher LDH (median [interquartile range]; pre to post) (NWL= 211.5[183-236] to 231[203-258]U/L and RWL= 390[370.5-443.5] to 488[463.5-540.5]U/L) and AST (NWL= 30[22-37] to 32[22-41]U/L and 39[32.5-76.5] to 72[38.5-112.5] U/L) values (NWL versus RWL, p < .05). Post hoc analysis showed that AST significantly increased in only the RWL group, while creatinine increased in only the NWL group. The practice of rapid weight loss showed a negative impact on energy availability and increased both muscle damage markers and catabolic expression in MMA fighters. PMID:25811230

  19. Rapid Weight Loss Elicits Harmful Biochemical and Hormonal Responses in Mixed Martial Arts Athletes.

    PubMed

    Coswig, Victor Silveira; Fukuda, David Hideyoshi; Del Vecchio, Fabrício Boscolo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare biochemical and hormonal responses between mixed martial arts (MMA) competitors with minimal prefight weight loss and those undergoing rapid weight loss (RWL). Blood samples were taken from 17 MMA athletes (Mean± SD; age: 27.4 ±5.3yr; body mass: 76.2 ± 12.4kg; height: 1.71 ± 0.05m and training experience: 39.4 ± 25 months) before and after each match, according to the official events rules. The no rapid weight loss (NWL, n = 12) group weighed in on the day of the event (~30 min prior fight) and athletes declared not having used RWL strategies, while the RWL group (n = 5) weighed in 24 hr before the event and the athletes claimed to have lost 7.4 ± 1.1kg, approximately 10% of their body mass in the week preceding the event. Results showed significant (p < .05) increases following fights, regardless of group, in lactate, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine, and cortisol for all athletes. With regard to group differences, NWL had significantly (p < .05) greater creatinine levels (Mean± SD; pre to post) (NWL= 101.6 ± 15-142.3 ± 22.9μmol/L and RWL= 68.9 ± 10.6-79.5 ± 15.9μmol/L), while RWL had higher LDH (median [interquartile range]; pre to post) (NWL= 211.5[183-236] to 231[203-258]U/L and RWL= 390[370.5-443.5] to 488[463.5-540.5]U/L) and AST (NWL= 30[22-37] to 32[22-41]U/L and 39[32.5-76.5] to 72[38.5-112.5] U/L) values (NWL versus RWL, p < .05). Post hoc analysis showed that AST significantly increased in only the RWL group, while creatinine increased in only the NWL group. The practice of rapid weight loss showed a negative impact on energy availability and increased both muscle damage markers and catabolic expression in MMA fighters.

  20. Hormonal modulation of food intake in response to low leptin levels induced by hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, M. M.; Stein, T. P.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    A loss in fat mass is a common response to centrifugation and it results in low circulating leptin concentrations. However, rats adapted to hypergravity are euphagic. The focus of this study was to examine leptin and other peripheral signals of energy balance in the presence of a hypergravity-induced loss of fat mass and euphagia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were centrifuged for 14 days at gravity levels of 1.25, 1.5, or 2 G, or they remained stationary at 1 G. Urinary catecholamines, urinary corticosterone, food intake, and body mass were measured on Days 11 to 14. Plasma hormones and epididymal fat pad mass were measured on Day 14. Mean body mass of the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than controls, and no differences were found in food intake (g/day/100 g body mass) between the hypergravity groups and controls. Epididymal fat mass was 14%, 14%, and 21% lower than controls in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups, respectively. Plasma leptin was significantly reduced from controls by 46%, 45%, and 65% in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups, respectively. Plasma insulin was significantly lower in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups than controls by 35%, 38%, and 33%. No differences were found between controls and hypergravity groups in urinary corticosterone. Mean urinary epinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Mean urinary norepinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.25, 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Significant correlations were found between G load and body mass, fat mass, leptin, urinary epinephrine, and norepinephrine. During hypergravity exposure, maintenance of food intake is the result of a complex relationship between multiple pathways, which abates the importance of leptin as a primary signal.

  1. Hormonal modulation of food intake in response to low leptin levels induced by hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Moran, M M; Stein, T P; Wade, C E

    2001-09-01

    A loss in fat mass is a common response to centrifugation and it results in low circulating leptin concentrations. However, rats adapted to hypergravity are euphagic. The focus of this study was to examine leptin and other peripheral signals of energy balance in the presence of a hypergravity-induced loss of fat mass and euphagia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were centrifuged for 14 days at gravity levels of 1.25, 1.5, or 2 G, or they remained stationary at 1 G. Urinary catecholamines, urinary corticosterone, food intake, and body mass were measured on Days 11 to 14. Plasma hormones and epididymal fat pad mass were measured on Day 14. Mean body mass of the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than controls, and no differences were found in food intake (g/day/100 g body mass) between the hypergravity groups and controls. Epididymal fat mass was 14%, 14%, and 21% lower than controls in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups, respectively. Plasma leptin was significantly reduced from controls by 46%, 45%, and 65% in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups, respectively. Plasma insulin was significantly lower in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups than controls by 35%, 38%, and 33%. No differences were found between controls and hypergravity groups in urinary corticosterone. Mean urinary epinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Mean urinary norepinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.25, 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Significant correlations were found between G load and body mass, fat mass, leptin, urinary epinephrine, and norepinephrine. During hypergravity exposure, maintenance of food intake is the result of a complex relationship between multiple pathways, which abates the importance of leptin as a primary signal.

  2. The Nature of Compensatory Response to Low Thyroid Hormone in Developing Brain.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Thyroid hormone is essential for normal brain development, but the degree to which the developing brain is sensitive to small perturbations in serum thyroxin is not clear. An important concept related to this is that the developing brain possesses potent mechanisms to co...

  3. Bovine acute-phase response following different doses of corticotrophin-releasing hormone challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fourteen weaned Angus steers (BW = 191 ± 2.1 kg, age = 167 ± 4.7 d) fitted with an indwelling jugular catheter and a rectal temperature (RT) monitoring device were ranked by BW and assigned to receive 1 of 3 treatments (i.v.): 1) 0.1 ug of bovine corticotrophin-release hormone (CRH)/kg of BW (CRH1; ...

  4. Steroid hormone modulation of cAMP production in response to beta adrenergic receptor stimulation in genital tract myocytes.

    PubMed

    DiGiovanni, L; Austin, R; Phillippe, M

    1992-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor stimulation results in smooth muscle relaxation through activation of adenylyl cyclase and subsequent cyclic AMP (cAMP) production. The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of steroid hormones (i.e. testosterone and hydrocortisone) on beta 2-adrenergic receptors and their signal transduction in the DDT1 MF-2 genital tract myocyte. Radioligand binding studies demonstrated that these two steroid hormones produced a 70 to 80% increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in these myocytes. Stimulation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptors with isoproterenol resulted in a significant increase of cAMP in control myocytes; cells treated with testosterone for 24 h demonstrated a comparable response to isoproterenol, whereas hydrocortisone for 24 h resulted in a 50% greater cAMP response. In contrast to the response at 24 h, stimulation of myocytes after testosterone treatment for 48 h resulted in a cAMP response comparable to that seen in response to hydrocortisone at 24 h. Studies performed using theophylline demonstrated similar cAMP responses at 24 h between the control and testosterone-treated myocytes, thereby ruling out the possibility that the delayed increase of the cAMP response after testosterone was caused by stimulation of phosphodiesterase. Direct stimulation with forskolin resulted in greater cAMP production in the testosterone-treated myocytes compared to controls, thereby refuting the possibility that testosterone directly suppresses adenylyl cyclase activity at 24 h. These findings suggest that although both testosterone and hydrocortisone produce a twofold increase in beta 2-adrenergic receptor density in the DDT1 myocytes, beta 2-adrenergic receptors expressed in response to hydrocortisone appear functional at 24 h resulting in increased cAMP production, whereas those expressed in response to testosterone require 48 h to demonstrate increased functional activity.

  5. Are Estrogen Receptor Genomic Aberrations Predictive of Hormone Therapy Response in Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Tabarestani, Sanaz; Motallebi, Marzieh; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil

    2016-01-01

    Context Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer constitutes the majority of these cancers. Hormone therapy has significantly improved clinical outcomes for early- and late-stage hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Although most patients with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent, approximately 20% - 30% of patients eventually experience a recurrence. During the last two decades, there have been tremendous efforts to understand the biological mechanisms of hormone therapy resistance, with the ultimate goal of implementing new therapeutic strategies to improve the current treatments for ER positive breast cancer. Several mechanisms of hormone therapy resistance have been proposed, including genetic alterations that lead to altered ER expression or ERs with changed protein sequence. Evidence Acquisition A Pubmed search was performed utilizing various related terms. Articles over the past 20 years were analyzed and selected for review. Results On the basis of published studies, the frequencies of ESR1 (the gene encoding ER) mutations in ER positive metastatic breast cancer range from 11% to 55%. Future larger prospective studies with standardized mutation detection methods may be necessary to determine the true incidence of ESR1 mutations. ESR1 amplification in breast cancer remains a controversial issue, with numerous studies either confirmed or challenged the reports of ESR1 amplification. The combination of intra-tumor heterogeneity regarding ESR1 copy number alterations and low level ESR1 copy number increase may account for these discrepancies. Conclusions While numerous unknown issues on the role of ESR1 mutations in advanced breast cancer remain, these new findings will certainly deepen current knowledge on molecular evolution of breast cancer and acquired resistance to hormone therapy.

  6. Influence of Spinal and General Anesthesia on the Metabolic, Hormonal, and Hemodynamic Response in Elective Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Snezana B.; Pavlovic, Aleksandar P.; Trpkovic, Sladjana V.; Ilić, Aleksandra N.; Sekulic, Ana D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the significance of spinal anesthesia in the suppression of the metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic response to surgical stress in elective surgical patients compared to general anesthesia. Material/Methods The study was clinical, prospective, and controlled and it involved 2 groups of patients (the spinal and the general anesthesia group) who underwent the same surgery. We monitored the metabolic and hormonal response to perioperative stress based on serum cortisol level and glycemia. We also examined how the different techniques of anesthesia affect these hemodynamic parameters: systolic arterial pressure (AP), diastolic AP, heart rate (HR), and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). These parameters were measured before induction on anesthesia (T1), 30 min after the surgical incisions (T2), 1 h postoperatively (T3) and 24 h after surgery (T4). Results Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in the general anesthesia group compared to the spinal anesthesia group (p<0.01). Glycemia was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.05). There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between serum cortisol levels and glycemia at all times observed (p<0.01). Systolic and diastolic AP did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.191, p=0.101). The HR was significantly higher in the general anesthesia group (p<0.01). SpO2 values did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.081). Conclusions Based on metabolic, hormonal, and hemodynamic responses, spinal anesthesia proved more effective than general anesthesia in suppressing stress response in elective surgical patients. PMID:25284266

  7. Biomonitoring of Lake Garda: Identification of ciliate species and symbiotic algae responsible for the "black-spot" bloom during the summer of 2004.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Sandra; Buonanno, Federico; Pellegrini, Giovanna; Pozzi, Sabrina; Ballarini, Patrizia; Miceli, Cristina

    2008-06-01

    At the end of July 2004, a "black-spot" appeared in the western portion of Lake Garda, an oligomictic lake classified as meso-oligotrophic. A few days later, this phenomenon spread throughout the lake. A first analysis by optical microscopy revealed that the origin of the black spot was a ciliated protozoan. Ciliates represent a small percentage of the total zooplanktonic community of Lake Garda and have never produced bloom episodes. Using morphological and molecular analysis, we characterized the protozoan responsible for the bloom as Stentor amethystinus and its symbiotic algae as a Chlorella sp. Continuous monitoring of the northeast of Lake Garda showed that the apex of the S. amethystinus bloom took place during the first 20 days of August, and the highest density of S. amethystinus occurred in the euphotic zone. During this period, high chlorophyll a values were obtained in water samples collected from the euphotic zone due to the presence of the endosymbiont Chlorella. After early September, the black spot completely disappeared, and the causative organism was detected at low concentration only in the southern basin of the lake. The results obtained on the progress of the black spot phenomenon led us to hypothesize that: (i) S. amethystinus was recently introduced in Lake Garda by anthropogenic activities or it was already a member of the zooplanktonic community but at a very low concentration; (ii) S. amethystinus blooms may have been driven by an unusual high availability of total phosphorous in the euphotic zone and (iii) Lake Garda is not the preferred habitat for S. amethystinus.

  8. Biomonitoring of Lake Garda: Identification of ciliate species and symbiotic algae responsible for the "black-spot" bloom during the summer of 2004.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Sandra; Buonanno, Federico; Pellegrini, Giovanna; Pozzi, Sabrina; Ballarini, Patrizia; Miceli, Cristina

    2008-06-01

    At the end of July 2004, a "black-spot" appeared in the western portion of Lake Garda, an oligomictic lake classified as meso-oligotrophic. A few days later, this phenomenon spread throughout the lake. A first analysis by optical microscopy revealed that the origin of the black spot was a ciliated protozoan. Ciliates represent a small percentage of the total zooplanktonic community of Lake Garda and have never produced bloom episodes. Using morphological and molecular analysis, we characterized the protozoan responsible for the bloom as Stentor amethystinus and its symbiotic algae as a Chlorella sp. Continuous monitoring of the northeast of Lake Garda showed that the apex of the S. amethystinus bloom took place during the first 20 days of August, and the highest density of S. amethystinus occurred in the euphotic zone. During this period, high chlorophyll a values were obtained in water samples collected from the euphotic zone due to the presence of the endosymbiont Chlorella. After early September, the black spot completely disappeared, and the causative organism was detected at low concentration only in the southern basin of the lake. The results obtained on the progress of the black spot phenomenon led us to hypothesize that: (i) S. amethystinus was recently introduced in Lake Garda by anthropogenic activities or it was already a member of the zooplanktonic community but at a very low concentration; (ii) S. amethystinus blooms may have been driven by an unusual high availability of total phosphorous in the euphotic zone and (iii) Lake Garda is not the preferred habitat for S. amethystinus. PMID:18371947

  9. The response of thyroid hormones, biochemical and enzymological biomarkers to pyrene exposure in common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Shirdel, Iman; Kalbassi, Mohammad Reza; Shokri, Milad; Olyaei, Roya; Sharifpour, Issa

    2016-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are discharged into aquatic environments through anthropogenic activities mainly industrial and municipal effluents. There is little information on the adverse effects of pyrene, a member of the PAH family which is classified as a priority pollutant by the USEPA, on fish biochemical and physiological endpoints, particularly thyroid hormones. The present study investigated the effects of subacute semi-static pyrene exposure on biochemical, enzymological and ionoregulatory responses as well as thyroid hormones in common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The fish (140±10g, 1(+) year) were exposed to 10, 50 and 100µg/l nominal concentrations of pyrene for 35 days. The results revealed that pyrene at these concentrations significantly altered plasma levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, total protein, albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Moreover, plasma thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) were significantly decreased in fish exposed to pyrene. In contrast, plasma electrolytes (sodium, potassium and calcium) levels remained statistically unchanged after exposure to the various pyrene concentrations. In conclusion, the studied biomarkers may be used as monitoring tools to evaluate pyrene toxicity. Pyrene induced diverse effects on the physiological endpoints of common carp, thus this chemical should be considered in toxicity studies concerning PAHs. Furthermore, this study confirmed that there was an interaction between pyrene and the thyroid system in fish. Therefore, the thyroid system may be used to assess the impact of pyrene on fish. PMID:27123973

  10. Hormonal responses and test meal intake among obese teenagers before and after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding123

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Michael J; Schebendach, Janet; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Zimmerli, Ellen; Korner, Judith; Yanovski, Jack A; Zitsman, Jeffrey L; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Background: Relatively little is known about changes in eating behavior or hormonal responses to food after bariatric surgery in adolescents. Objective: This study compared eating behavior and hormones among adolescents in a bariatric surgery program with those in nonoverweight control adolescents and evaluated changes before and after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). Design: Fasting leptin, peptide YY (PYY), and ghrelin concentrations were obtained, and postprandial ghrelin and PYY area under the curve (AUC) were assessed after a single-item breakfast. Intake from an ad libitum lunchtime multi-item meal was measured. Results: Compared with controls (n = 9), all presurgical candidates (n = 20) had significantly greater fasting leptin, lower fasting ghrelin, and lower AUC ghrelin but similar PYY and AUC PYY. Preoperative candidates did not differ from controls in total energy consumed during the test meal. Postoperatively, among the 11 participants with data both before and after surgery, BMI (in kg/m2) decreased by 3.5 (P < 0.001), significantly less energy was consumed in the test meal, and a smaller number of foods were selected. AUC ghrelin and PYY did not significantly change before or after LAGB. Conclusions: Few significant short-term changes were observed in appetitive hormones after LAGB. It is unclear whether objective measures of eating behavior will prove useful in evaluating the impact of bariatric surgery on outcomes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as CT00764127. PMID:23985807

  11. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  12. A screening assay for thyroid hormone signaling disruption based on thyroid hormone-response gene expression analysis in the frog Pelophylax nigromaculatus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinfeng; Li, Yuanyuan; Qin, Zhanfen; Wang, Huili; Li, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    Amphibian metamorphosis provides a wonderful model to study the thyroid hormone (TH) signaling disrupting activity of environmental chemicals, with Xenopus laevis as the most commonly used species. This study aimed to establish a rapid and sensitive screening assay based on TH-response gene expression analysis using Pelophylax nigromaculatus, a native frog species distributed widely in East Asia, especially in China. To achieve this, five candidate TH-response genes that were sensitive to T3 induction were chosen as molecular markers, and T3 induction was determined as 0.2 nmol/L T3 exposure for 48 hr. The developed assay can detect the agonistic activity of T3 with a lowest observed effective concentration of 0.001 nmol/L and EC50 at around 0.118-1.229 nmol/L, exhibiting comparable or higher sensitivity than previously reported assays. We further validated the efficiency of the developed assay by detecting the TH signaling disrupting activity of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a known TH signaling disruptor. In accordance with previous reports, we found a weak TH agonistic activity for TBBPA in the absence of T3, whereas a TH antagonistic activity was found for TBBPA at higher concentrations in the presence of T3, showing that the P. nigromaculatus assay is effective for detecting TH signaling disrupting activity. Importantly, we observed non-monotonic dose-dependent disrupting activity of TBBPA in the presence of T3, which is difficult to detect with in vitro reporter gene assays. Overall, the developed P. nigromaculatus assay can be used to screen TH signaling disrupting activity of environmental chemicals with high sensitivity. PMID:26257357

  13. Role of emotional processing in depressive responses to sex-hormone manipulation: a pharmacological fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, S; Madsen, K H; Pinborg, A; Heede, M; Knudsen, G M; Siebner, H R; Frokjaer, V G

    2015-01-01

    Sex-hormone fluctuations may increase risk for developing depressive symptoms and alter emotional processing as supported by observations in menopausal and pre- to postpartum transition. In this double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, we used blood-oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate if sex-steroid hormone manipulation with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) influences emotional processing. Fifty-six healthy women were investigated twice: at baseline (follicular phase of menstrual cycle) and 16 ± 3 days post intervention. At both sessions, fMRI-scans during exposure to faces expressing fear, anger, happiness or no emotion, depressive symptom scores and estradiol levels were acquired. The fMRI analyses focused on regions of interest for emotional processing. As expected, GnRHa initially increased and subsequently reduced estradiol to menopausal levels, which was accompanied by an increase in subclinical depressive symptoms relative to placebo. Women who displayed larger GnRHa-induced increase in depressive symptoms had a larger increase in both negative and positive emotion-elicited activity in the anterior insula. When considering the post-GnRHa scan only, depressive responses were associated with emotion-elicited activity in the anterior insula and amygdala. The effect on regional activity in anterior insula was not associated with the estradiol net decline, only by the GnRHa-induced changes in mood. Our data implicate enhanced insula recruitment during emotional processing in the emergence of depressive symptoms following sex-hormone fluctuations. This may correspond to the emotional hypersensitivity frequently experienced by women postpartum. PMID:26624927

  14. Role of emotional processing in depressive responses to sex-hormone manipulation: a pharmacological fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, S; Madsen, K H; Pinborg, A; Heede, M; Knudsen, G M; Siebner, H R; Frokjaer, V G

    2015-01-01

    Sex-hormone fluctuations may increase risk for developing depressive symptoms and alter emotional processing as supported by observations in menopausal and pre- to postpartum transition. In this double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, we used blood−oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate if sex-steroid hormone manipulation with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) influences emotional processing. Fifty-six healthy women were investigated twice: at baseline (follicular phase of menstrual cycle) and 16±3 days post intervention. At both sessions, fMRI-scans during exposure to faces expressing fear, anger, happiness or no emotion, depressive symptom scores and estradiol levels were acquired. The fMRI analyses focused on regions of interest for emotional processing. As expected, GnRHa initially increased and subsequently reduced estradiol to menopausal levels, which was accompanied by an increase in subclinical depressive symptoms relative to placebo. Women who displayed larger GnRHa-induced increase in depressive symptoms had a larger increase in both negative and positive emotion-elicited activity in the anterior insula. When considering the post-GnRHa scan only, depressive responses were associated with emotion-elicited activity in the anterior insula and amygdala. The effect on regional activity in anterior insula was not associated with the estradiol net decline, only by the GnRHa-induced changes in mood. Our data implicate enhanced insula recruitment during emotional processing in the emergence of depressive symptoms following sex-hormone fluctuations. This may correspond to the emotional hypersensitivity frequently experienced by women postpartum. PMID:26624927

  15. Effect of Time of Day on Performance, Hormonal and Metabolic Response during a 1000-M Cycling Time Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Alan Lins; Lopes-Silva, João Paulo; Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Arita, Danielle Yuri; Bishop, David John; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of time of day on performance, pacing, and hormonal and metabolic responses during a 1000-m cycling time-trial. Nine male, recreational cyclists visited the laboratory four times. During the 1st visit the participants performed an incremental test and during the 2nd visit they performed a 1000-m cycling familiarization trial. On the 3rd and 4th visits, the participants performed a 1000-m TT at either 8 am or 6 pm, in randomized, repeated-measures, crossover design. The time to complete the time trial was lower in the evening than in the morning (88.2±8.7 versus 94.7±10.9 s, respectively, p<0.05), but there was no significant different in pacing. However, oxygen uptake and aerobic mechanical power output at 600 and 1000 m tended to be higher in the evening (p<0.07 and 0.09, respectively). There was also a main effect of time of day for insulin, cortisol, and total and free testosterone concentration, which were all higher in the morning (+60%, +26%, +31% and +22%, respectively, p<0.05). The growth hormone, was twofold higher in the evening (p<0.05). The plasma glucose was ∼11% lower in the morning (p<0.05). Glucagon, norepinephrine, epinephrine and lactate were similar for the morning and evening trials (p>0.05), but the norepinephrine response to the exercise was increased in the morning (+46%, p<0.05), and it was accompanied by a 5-fold increase in the response of glucose. Muscle recruitment, as measured by electromyography, was similar between morning and evening trials (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that performance was improved in the evening, and it was accompanied by an improved hormonal and metabolic milieu. PMID:25289885

  16. Effect of time of day on performance, hormonal and metabolic response during a 1000-M cycling time trial.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Alan Lins; Lopes-Silva, João Paulo; Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Arita, Danielle Yuri; Bishop, David John; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of time of day on performance, pacing, and hormonal and metabolic responses during a 1000-m cycling time-trial. Nine male, recreational cyclists visited the laboratory four times. During the 1st visit the participants performed an incremental test and during the 2nd visit they performed a 1000-m cycling familiarization trial. On the 3rd and 4th visits, the participants performed a 1000-m TT at either 8 am or 6 pm, in randomized, repeated-measures, crossover design. The time to complete the time trial was lower in the evening than in the morning (88.2±8.7 versus 94.7±10.9 s, respectively, p<0.05), but there was no significant different in pacing. However, oxygen uptake and aerobic mechanical power output at 600 and 1000 m tended to be higher in the evening (p<0.07 and 0.09, respectively). There was also a main effect of time of day for insulin, cortisol, and total and free testosterone concentration, which were all higher in the morning (+60%, +26%, +31% and +22%, respectively, p<0.05). The growth hormone, was twofold higher in the evening (p<0.05). The plasma glucose was ∼11% lower in the morning (p<0.05). Glucagon, norepinephrine, epinephrine and lactate were similar for the morning and evening trials (p>0.05), but the norepinephrine response to the exercise was increased in the morning (+46%, p<0.05), and it was accompanied by a 5-fold increase in the response of glucose. Muscle recruitment, as measured by electromyography, was similar between morning and evening trials (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that performance was improved in the evening, and it was accompanied by an improved hormonal and metabolic milieu.

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary hormones during critical illness: a dynamic neuroendocrine response.

    PubMed

    Langouche, Lies; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2014-01-01

    Independent of the underlying condition, critical illness is characterized by a uniform dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-peripheral axes. In most axes a clear biphasic pattern can be distinguished. The acute phase of critical illness is characterized by low peripheral effector hormone levels such as T3, IGF-1 and testosterone, despite an actively secreting pituitary. The adrenal axis with high cortisol levels in the presence of low ACTH levels is a noteworthy exception. In the prolonged phase of critical illness, low peripheral effector hormone levels coincide with a uniform suppression of the neuroendocrine axes, predominantly of hypothalamic origin. The severity of the alterations in the different neuroendocrine axes is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality, but it remains unknown whether the observed changes are cause or consequence of adverse outcome. Several studies have identified therapeutic potential of hypothalamic releasing factors, but clinical outcome remains to be investigated with sufficiently powered randomized controlled trials.

  18. Overexpression of the CBF2 transcriptional activator in Arabidopsis suppresses the responsiveness of leaf tissue to the stress hormone ethylene.

    PubMed

    Sharabi-Schwager, M; Samach, A; Porat, R

    2010-07-01

    The plant hormone ethylene affects myriad developmental processes ranging from seed germination to organ senescence, and plays a crucial role in plant resistance to environmental stresses. The C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding factor genes (CBF1-3) are transcriptional activators involved in plant low-temperatures responses; their overexpression enhances frost tolerance, but also has various pleiotropic effects on growth and development, mainly growth retardation and delay of flowering and senescence. We found that overexpression of CBF2 in Arabidopsis suppressed leaf tissue responsiveness to ethylene as compared with wild-type plants, as manifested in significantly delayed senescence and chlorophyll degradation. In wild-type plants, exposure to ethylene at 0.1 microl.l(-1) for 48 h caused 50% reduction in chlorophyll levels as compared to leaves held in air alone, whereas CBF2-overexpressing plants required an ethylene concentration of 10.0 microl.l(-1) to cause the same effect. Furthermore, continuous exposure to ethylene at 1.0 microl.l(-1) reduced chlorophyll content in wild-type leaves by 50% after 42 h but took 72 h in CBF2-overexpressing plants. Transcript profiling of ethylene receptors and signal transduction genes in leaves of wild-type and CBF2-overexpressing plants, by means of the Affymetrix ATH1 genome array, revealed only minor differences in gene expression patterns - insufficient to explain the observed responsiveness differences. Nevertheless, we found that overexpression of CBF2 significantly increased transcript levels of 17 ABA biosynthetic and responsive genes and, thus, may have affected leaf responsiveness to ethylene via contrasting interactions with other hormones, mainly ABA. Overall, the current findings suggest that overexpression of the CBF2 transcriptional activator in Arabidopsis may, at least in part, contribute to the observed delay of leaf senescence and enhanced plant fitness by suppressing leaf responsiveness to

  19. Endocrine and immunological responses to adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) administration in juvenile harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) during winter and summer.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Mandy J; Atkinson, Shannon

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing interest in measuring endocrine and immune parameters in free-ranging seals and sea lions, but there is a lack of understanding in how an acute stress response, often associated with capture and handling, influences these parameters of interest. The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of a simulated stressor on both endocrine and immune parameters. During two seasons, exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) was administered to seven female juvenile harbor seals and the response of several hormones (cortisol, aldosterone, total and free thyroxine and total triiodothyronine) and immunological parameters (total and differential leukocyte counts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) proliferation) were assessed. Cortisol peaked at 165 min (winter 203.1±84.7 ng/ml; summer 205.3±65.7 ng/ml) and remained significantly elevated 240 min after ACTH infusion in both seasons. Aldosterone peaked at 90 min (winter 359.3±249.3 pg/ml; summer 294.1±83.7 pg/ml) and remained elevated 240 min after administration of ACTH in both seasons. An increase in circulating total white blood cells was driven primarily by the increase in neutrophils which occurred simultaneously with a decrease in lymphocytes leading to an overall increase in neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio. These findings demonstrate that a simulated stress response in juvenile harbor seals results in a predictable increase in both cortisol and aldosterone concentrations, and were associated with altered immunological parameters.

  20. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A; López-Climent, María F; Casaretto, José A; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  1. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A.; López-Climent, María F.; Casaretto, José A.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  2. Antitumor Responses Stimulated by Dendritic Cells Are Improved by Triiodothyronine Binding to the Thyroid Hormone Receptor β.

    PubMed

    Alamino, Vanina A; Mascanfroni, Iván D; Montesinos, María M; Gigena, Nicolás; Donadio, Ana C; Blidner, Ada G; Milotich, Sonia I; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Masini-Repiso, Ana M; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Pellizas, Claudia G

    2015-04-01

    Bidirectional cross-talk between the neuroendocrine and immune systems orchestrates immune responses in both physiologic and pathologic settings. In this study, we provide in vivo evidence of a critical role for the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) in controlling the maturation and antitumor functions of dendritic cells (DC). We used a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) β mutant mouse (TRβPV) to establish the relevance of the T3-TRβ system in vivo. In this model, TRβ signaling endowed DCs with the ability to stimulate antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses during tumor development. T3 binding to TRβ increased DC viability and augmented DC migration to lymph nodes. Moreover, T3 stimulated the ability of DCs to cross-present antigens and to stimulate cytotoxic T-cell responses. In a B16-OVA mouse model of melanoma, vaccination with T3-stimulated DCs inhibited tumor growth and prolonged host survival, in part by promoting the generation of IFNγ-producing CD8(+) T cells. Overall, our results establish an adjuvant effect of T3-TRβ signaling in DCs, suggesting an immediately translatable method to empower DC vaccination approaches for cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Structure of a Thyroid Hormone Receptor DNA-Binding Domain Homodimer Bound to an Inverted Palindrome DNA Response Element

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Young, Matthew A.

    2010-10-22

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR), as a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, can recognize and bind different classes of DNA response element targets as either a monomer, a homooligomer, or a heterooligomer. We report here the first crystal structure of a homodimer TR DNA-binding domain (DBD) in complex with an inverted repeat class of thyroid response element (TRE). The structure shows a nearly symmetric structure of the TR DBD assembled on the F2 TRE where the base recognition contacts in the homodimer DNA complex are conserved relative to the previously published structure of a TR-9-cis-retinoic acid receptor heterodimer DNA complex. The new structure also reveals that the T-box region of the DBD can function as a structural hinge that enables a large degree of flexibility in the position of the C-terminal extension helix that connects the DBD to the ligand-binding domain. Although the isolated TR DBDs exist as monomers in solution, we have measured highly cooperative binding of the two TR DBD subunits onto the inverted repeat DNA sequence. This suggests that elements of the DBD can influence the specific TR oligomerization at target genes, and it is not just interactions between the ligand-binding domains that are responsible for TR oligomerization at target genes. Mutational analysis shows that intersubunit contacts at the DBD C terminus account for some, but not all, of the cooperative homodimer TR binding to the inverted repeat class TRE.

  4. Endocrine and immunological responses to adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) administration in juvenile harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) during winter and summer.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Mandy J; Atkinson, Shannon

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing interest in measuring endocrine and immune parameters in free-ranging seals and sea lions, but there is a lack of understanding in how an acute stress response, often associated with capture and handling, influences these parameters of interest. The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of a simulated stressor on both endocrine and immune parameters. During two seasons, exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) was administered to seven female juvenile harbor seals and the response of several hormones (cortisol, aldosterone, total and free thyroxine and total triiodothyronine) and immunological parameters (total and differential leukocyte counts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) proliferation) were assessed. Cortisol peaked at 165 min (winter 203.1±84.7 ng/ml; summer 205.3±65.7 ng/ml) and remained significantly elevated 240 min after ACTH infusion in both seasons. Aldosterone peaked at 90 min (winter 359.3±249.3 pg/ml; summer 294.1±83.7 pg/ml) and remained elevated 240 min after administration of ACTH in both seasons. An increase in circulating total white blood cells was driven primarily by the increase in neutrophils which occurred simultaneously with a decrease in lymphocytes leading to an overall increase in neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio. These findings demonstrate that a simulated stress response in juvenile harbor seals results in a predictable increase in both cortisol and aldosterone concentrations, and were associated with altered immunological parameters. PMID:26086360

  5. Bone age is the best predictor of growth response to recombinant human growth hormone in Turner’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Nagwa Abdallah; Eldin Metwaly, Nermeen Salah; El-Moguy, Fatma Ahmed; Hafez, Mona Hassan; Abd El Dayem, Soha M.; Farid, Tarek Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is approved for use in children with Turner’s syndrome (TS) in most industrialized countries and is recommended in the recently issued guidelines. We determined the growth responses of girls who are treated with rhGH for TS, with an aim to identify the predictors of growth response. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-six prepubertal girls with TS, documented by peripheral blood karyotype, were enrolled. All the patients received biosynthetic growth hormone therapy with a standard dose of 30 IU/m2/week. The calculated dose per week was divided for 6 days and given subcutaneously at night. RESULTS: This study showed that rhGH therapy provides satisfactory auxological results. Bone age delay is to be considered as a predictive factor which may negatively influence the effect of rhGH therapy on final height. The growth velocity in the preceding year is the most important predictor of rhGH therapy response. CONCLUSION: These observations help us to guide rhGH prescription, to reduce the risks and costs. PMID:21206698

  6. Masculinized otoacoustic emissions in female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    McFadden, Dennis; Pasanen, Edward G; Weldele, Mary L; Glickman, Stephen E; Place, Ned J

    2006-08-01

    In humans and rhesus monkeys, click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are stronger in females than in males, and there is considerable circumstantial evidence that this sex difference is attributable to the greater exposure to androgens prenatally in males. Because female spotted hyenas are highly androgenized beginning early in prenatal development, we expected an absence of sexual dimorphism in the CEOAEs of this species. The CEOAEs obtained from 9 male and 7 female spotted hyenas confirmed that expectation. The implication is that the marked androgenization to which female spotted hyenas are exposed masculinizes the cochlear mechanism responsible for CEOAEs. The CEOAEs measured in 3 male and 3 female hyenas that had been treated with anti-androgenic agents during prenatal development were stronger than the CEOAEs of the untreated animals, in accord with the implied inverse relationship between prenatal androgen exposure and the strength of the cochlear mechanisms producing CEOAEs. The CEOAEs of three ovariectomized females and two castrated males were essentially the same as those for the untreated females and males, suggesting that there is little or no activational effect of hormones on CEOAE strength in spotted hyenas. Distortion product OAEs (DPOAEs) also were measured. Those sex differences also were generally small (as they are in humans), and the effects of the anti-androgen agents were inconsistent. Thus, prenatal androgen exposure apparently does affect OAEs, but the effects appear to be greater for the reflection-based cochlear mechanism that underlies CEOAEs than for the nonlinear cochlear mechanism underlying DPOAEs.

  7. Using odor cues to elicit a behavioral and hormonal response in zoo-housed African wild dogs.

    PubMed

    Rafacz, Michelle L; Santymire, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory enrichment, like odor cues, can positively affect behavior, reproductive success, and stress physiology in zoo-housed species. Our goal was to determine if odor cues were enriching to the African wild dog (AWD; Lycaon pictus), a species with a complex social structure and a highly developed sense of smell. Our objectives were to: (1) examine changes in activity levels and stress hormone physiology in response to fecal odor cues from natural competitor and natural/unnatural prey species; and (2) determine whether these odor cues could function as effective enrichment for zoo-housed AWDs. Over a 6-month period, fecal samples were collected from two males (AWD 1: dominant, AWD 2: subordinate), fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGMs) were validated using an ACTH-challenge, and hormones were analyzed for FGMs by enzyme immunoassay. Behavioral observations were conducted using scan-sampling, and contact and proximity were recorded. AWDs were presented with three fecal odor cues: LION (competitor), CATTLE (unnatural prey), and GAZELLE (natural prey). Only the GAZELLE cue elicited an increase in activity (10.6%) in both individuals and increased positive social behaviors with higher frequencies of affiliative, submissive, and dominant behavior. AWD 1 demonstrated lower (P < 0.05) FGMs than AWD 2 both before and after all odor cues, and FGMs decreased (P = 0.08) in AWD 2 after all cues. We conclude that exposure to natural prey odor cues may be used as effective enrichment for AWDs, and that changes in stress hormone physiology in response to odor cues may be dependent on social rank in this species.

  8. Using odor cues to elicit a behavioral and hormonal response in zoo-housed African wild dogs.

    PubMed

    Rafacz, Michelle L; Santymire, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory enrichment, like odor cues, can positively affect behavior, reproductive success, and stress physiology in zoo-housed species. Our goal was to determine if odor cues were enriching to the African wild dog (AWD; Lycaon pictus), a species with a complex social structure and a highly developed sense of smell. Our objectives were to: (1) examine changes in activity levels and stress hormone physiology in response to fecal odor cues from natural competitor and natural/unnatural prey species; and (2) determine whether these odor cues could function as effective enrichment for zoo-housed AWDs. Over a 6-month period, fecal samples were collected from two males (AWD 1: dominant, AWD 2: subordinate), fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGMs) were validated using an ACTH-challenge, and hormones were analyzed for FGMs by enzyme immunoassay. Behavioral observations were conducted using scan-sampling, and contact and proximity were recorded. AWDs were presented with three fecal odor cues: LION (competitor), CATTLE (unnatural prey), and GAZELLE (natural prey). Only the GAZELLE cue elicited an increase in activity (10.6%) in both individuals and increased positive social behaviors with higher frequencies of affiliative, submissive, and dominant behavior. AWD 1 demonstrated lower (P < 0.05) FGMs than AWD 2 both before and after all odor cues, and FGMs decreased (P = 0.08) in AWD 2 after all cues. We conclude that exposure to natural prey odor cues may be used as effective enrichment for AWDs, and that changes in stress hormone physiology in response to odor cues may be dependent on social rank in this species. PMID:24375480

  9. Seasonal and sex differences in responsiveness to adrenocorticotropic hormone contribute to stress response plasticity in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis).

    PubMed

    Dayger, Catherine A; Lutterschmidt, Deborah I

    2016-04-01

    As in many vertebrates, hormonal responses to stress vary seasonally in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis). For example, males generally exhibit reduced glucocorticoid responses to a standard stressor during the spring mating season. We asked whether variation in adrenal sensitivity to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) explains why glucocorticoid responses to capture stress vary with sex, season and body condition in red-sided garter snakes. We measured glucocorticoids at 0, 1 and 4 h after injection with ACTH (0.1 IU g(-1)body mass) or vehicle in males and females during the spring mating season and autumn pre-hibernation period. Because elevated glucocorticoids can influence sex steroids, we also examined androgen and estradiol responses to ACTH. ACTH treatment increased glucocorticoids in both sexes and seasons. Spring-collected males had a smaller integrated glucocorticoid response to ACTH than autumn-collected males. The integrated glucocorticoid response to ACTH differed with sex during the spring, with males having a smaller glucocorticoid response than females. Although integrated glucocorticoid responses to ACTH did not vary with body condition, we observed an interaction among season, sex and body condition. In males, ACTH treatment did not alter androgen levels in either season, but androgen levels decreased during the sampling period. Similar to previous studies, plasma estradiol was low or undetectable during the spring and autumn, and therefore any effect of ACTH treatment on estradiol could not be determined. These data provide support for a mechanism that partly explains how the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis integrates information about season, sex and body condition: namely, variation in adrenal responsiveness to ACTH. PMID:26896543

  10. Maize miRNA and target regulation in response to hormone depletion and light exposure during somatic embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Hernández, Elva C.; Alejandri-Ramírez, Naholi D.; Juárez-González, Vasti T.; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D.

    2015-01-01

    Maize somatic embryogenesis (SE) is induced from the immature zygotic embryo in darkness and under the appropriate hormones' levels. Small RNA expression is reprogrammed and certain miRNAs become particularly enriched during induction while others, characteristic to the zygotic embryo, decrease. To explore the impact of different environmental cues on miRNA regulation in maize SE, we tested specific miRNA abundance and their target gene expression in response to photoperiod and hormone depletion for two different maize cultivars (VS-535 and H-565). The expression levels of miR156, miR159, miR164, miR168, miR397, miR398, miR408, miR528, and some predicted targets (SBP23, GA-MYB, CUC2, AGO1c, LAC2, SOD9, GR1, SOD1A, PLC) were examined upon staged hormone depletion in the presence of light photoperiod or darkness. Almost all examined miRNA, except miR159, increased upon hormone depletion, regardless photoperiod absence/presence. miR528, miR408, and miR398 changed the most. On the other hand, expression of miRNA target genes was strongly regulated by the photoperiod exposure. Stress-related miRNA targets showed greater differences between cultivars than development-related targets. miRNA/target inverse relationship was more frequently observed in darkness than light. Interestingly, miR528, but not miR159, miR168 or miR398, was located on polyribosome fractions suggesting a role for this miRNA at the level of translation. Overall our results demonstrate that hormone depletion exerts a great influence on specific miRNA expression during plant regeneration independently of light. However, their targets are additionally influenced by the presence of photoperiod. The reproducibility or differences observed for particular miRNA-target regulation between two different highly embryogenic genotypes provide clues for conserved miRNA roles within the SE process. PMID:26257760

  11. A Mechanism to Enhance Cellular Responsivity to Hormone Action: Krüppel-Like Factor 9 Promotes Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β Autoinduction During Postembryonic Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Knoedler, Joseph R; Denver, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-β (trb) is induced by TH (autoinduced) in Xenopus tadpoles during metamorphosis. We previously showed that Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9) is rapidly induced by TH in the tadpole brain, associates in chromatin with the trb upstream region in a developmental stage and TH-dependent manner, and forced expression of Klf9 in the Xenopus laevis cell line XTC-2 accelerates and enhances trb autoinduction. Here we investigated whether Klf9 can promote trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo. Using electroporation-mediated gene transfer, we transfected plasmids into premetamorphic tadpole brain to express wild-type or mutant forms of Klf9. Forced expression of Klf9 increased baseline trb mRNA levels in thyroid-intact but not in goitrogen-treated tadpoles, supporting that Klf9 enhances liganded TR action. As in XTC-2 cells, forced expression of Klf9 enhanced trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo and also increased TH-dependent induction of the TR target genes klf9 and thbzip. Consistent with our previous mutagenesis experiments conducted in XTC-2 cells, the actions of Klf9 in vivo required an intact N-terminal region but not a functional DNA binding domain. Forced expression of TRβ in tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer increased baseline and TH-induced TR target gene transcription, supporting a role for trb autoinduction during metamorphosis. Our findings support that Klf9 acts as an accessory transcription factor for TR at the trb locus during tadpole metamorphosis, enhancing trb autoinduction and transcription of other TR target genes, which increases cellular responsivity to further TH action on developmental gene regulation programs.

  12. Response to long-term growth hormone therapy in patients affected by RASopathies and growth hormone deficiency: Patterns of growth, puberty and final height data.

    PubMed

    Tamburrino, Federica; Gibertoni, Dino; Rossi, Cesare; Scarano, Emanuela; Perri, Annamaria; Montanari, Francesca; Fantini, Maria Pia; Pession, Andrea; Tartaglia, Marco; Mazzanti, Laura

    2015-11-01

    RASopathies are developmental disorders caused by heterozygous germline mutations in genes encoding proteins in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Reduced growth is a common feature. Several studies generated data on growth, final height (FH), and height velocity (HV) after growth hormone (GH) treatment in patients with these disorders, particularly in Noonan syndrome, the most common RASopathy. These studies, however, refer to heterogeneous cohorts in terms of molecular information, GH status, age at start and length of therapy, and GH dosage. This work reports growth data in 88 patients affected by RASopathies with molecularly confirmed diagnosis, together with statistics on body proportions, pubertal pattern, and FH in 33, including 16 treated with GH therapy for proven GH deficiency. Thirty-three patients showed GH deficiency after pharmacological tests, and were GH-treated for an average period of 6.8 ± 4.8 years. Before starting therapy, HV was -2.6 ± 1.3 SDS, and mean basal IGF1 levels were -2.0 ± 1.1 SDS. Long-term GH therapy, starting early during childhood, resulted in a positive height response compared with untreated patients (1.3 SDS in terms of height-gain), normalizing FH for Ranke standards but not for general population and Target Height. Pubertal timing negatively affected pubertal growth spurt and FH, with IGF1 standardized score increased from -2.43 to -0.27 SDS. During GH treatment, no significant change in bone age velocity, body proportions, or cardiovascular function was observed.

  13. Prenatal SSRI alters the hormonal and behavioral responses to stress in female mice: Possible role for glucocorticoid resistance.

    PubMed

    Avitsur, Ronit; Grinshpahet, Rachel; Goren, Naama; Weinstein, Ido; Kirshenboim, Or; Chlebowski, Noa

    2016-08-01

    Life time prevalence of major depression disorder (MDD) is higher in women compared to men especially during the period surrounding childbirth. Women suffering from MDD during pregnancy use antidepressant medications, particularly Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI). These drugs readily cross the placental barrier and impact the developing fetal brain. The present study assessed the effects of prenatal exposure to fluoxetine (FLX), an SSRI antidepressant drug, on corticosterone and behavioral responses to stress in female mice. In young females, prenatal FLX significantly elevated corticosterone response to continuous stress. In adults, prenatal FLX augmented corticosterone response to acute stress and suppressed the response to continuous stress. Additionally, prenatal FLX significantly augmented stress-induced increase in locomotion and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in adult, but not young mice. The dexamethasone suppression test revealed that prenatal FLX induced a state of glucocorticoid resistance in adult females, indicating that the negative feedback control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to stress was disrupted. These findings provide the first indication of altered hormonal and behavioral responses to continuous stress and suggest a role for the development of glucocorticoid resistance in these effects. According to these findings, prenatal environment may have implications for stress sensitivity and responsiveness to life challenges. Furthermore, this study may assist in understanding the limitations and precautions that should be taken in the use of SSRIs during pregnancy. PMID:27283378

  14. Medical hypophysectomy: I. Dose-response using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, D; Littman, B A; Hodgen, G D

    1984-07-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis can be "dissected" in a nonsurgical and reversible fashion by the administration of a potent gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist. We created a transient, functional lesion at the level of the pituitary gonadotrope by using a potent GnRH antagonist ([ Ac- pClPhe1 , pClDPhe2 , DTrp3 , DArg6 , DAla10 ]-GnRH). In long-term castrate cynomolgus monkeys, doses of 0.05 to 2.0 mg/kg/day intramuscularly were administered for a total of 32 days. At doses up to 0.2 mg/kg/day, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in circulation were only moderately suppressed; these subjects responded to an estradiol challenge by manifesting an LH elevation or surge within 48 hours. At doses of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg/day, FSH and LH secretion was suppressed to or below the limits of assay detection within 7 days, remaining in a severely hypogonadotropic state for the remainder of the treatment interval. Using 2 mg/kg/day, estradiol-positive feedback for midcycle-like LH/FSH surges was fully inhibited. This suppression of gonadotropin secretion was rapidly reversible, in that circulating gonadotropin levels had returned to pretreatment castrate levels within 60 days after termination of GnRH antagonist treatments. These findings suggest that potent GnRH antagonists can effectively create a hypogonadotropic milieu without the initial enhancement of gonadotropin secretion that occurs during initiation of GnRH agonist therapy. "Medical hypophysectomy" through GnRH antagonist administration may permit a more direct and controlled approach to gonadal therapies such as ovulation induction.

  15. The magic spot: a ppGpp binding site on E. coli RNA polymerase responsible for regulation of transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Ross, Wilma; Vrentas, Catherine E; Sanchez-Vazquez, Patricia; Gaal, Tamas; Gourse, Richard L

    2013-05-01

    The global regulatory nucleotide ppGpp ("magic spot") regulates transcription from a large subset of Escherichia coli promoters, illustrating how small molecules can control gene expression promoter-specifically by interacting with RNA polymerase (RNAP) without binding to DNA. However, ppGpp's target site on RNAP, and therefore its mechanism of action, has remained unclear. We report here a binding site for ppGpp on E. coli RNAP, identified by crosslinking, protease mapping, and analysis of mutant RNAPs that fail to respond to ppGpp. A strain with a mutant ppGpp binding site displays properties characteristic of cells defective for ppGpp synthesis. The binding site is at an interface of two RNAP subunits, ω and β', and its position suggests an allosteric mechanism of action involving restriction of motion between two mobile RNAP modules. Identification of the binding site allows prediction of bacterial species in which ppGpp exerts its effects by targeting RNAP.

  16. Hormonal diterpenoids derived from ent-kaurenoic acid are involved in the blue-light avoidance response of Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid hormones that regulate growth and development in flowering plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens has part of the GA biosynthetic pathway from geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurenoic acid via ent-kaurene, but it does not produce GA. Disruption of the ent-kaurene synthase gene in P. patens suppressed caulonemal differentiation. Application of ent-kaurene or ent-kaurenoic acid restored differentiation, suggesting that derivative(s) of ent-kaurenoic acid, but not GAs, are endogenous regulator(s) of caulonemal cell differentiation. The protonemal growth of P. patens shows an avoidance response under unilateral blue light. Physiological studies using gene mutants involved in ent-kaurene biosynthesis confirmed that diterpenoid(s) regulate the blue-light response. Here, we discuss the implications of these findings, and provide data for the ent-kaurene oxidase gene-disrupted mutant.

  17. Hormonal and Hydroxycinnamic Acids Profiles in Banana Leaves in Response to Various Periods of Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    López-Climent, María F.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. “Grand Nain”) subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA) concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA) after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA) and cinnamic acids (CA) were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress. PMID:24977208

  18. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  19. Markedly Elevated Antibody Responses in Wild versus Captive Spotted Hyenas Show that Environmental and Ecological Factors Are Important Modulators of Immunity.

    PubMed

    Flies, Andrew S; Mansfield, Linda S; Grant, Chris K; Weldele, Mary L; Holekamp, Kay E

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have shaped the vertebrate immune system over time, but proximal mechanisms control the onset, duration, and intensity of immune responses. Based on testing of the hygiene hypothesis, it is now well known that microbial exposure is important for proper development and regulation of the immune system. However, few studies have examined the differences between wild animals in their natural environments, in which they are typically exposed to a wide array of potential pathogens, and their conspecifics living in captivity. Wild spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) are regularly exposed to myriad pathogens, but there is little evidence of disease-induced mortality in wild hyena populations, suggesting that immune defenses are robust in this species. Here we assessed differences in immune defenses between wild spotted hyenas that inhabit their natural savanna environment and captive hyenas that inhabit a captive environment where pathogen control programs are implemented. Importantly, the captive population of spotted hyenas was derived directly from the wild population and has been in captivity for less than four generations. Our results show that wild hyenas have significantly higher serum antibody concentrations, including total IgG and IgM, natural antibodies, and autoantibodies than do captive hyenas; there was no difference in the bacterial killing capacity of sera collected from captive and wild hyenas. The striking differences in serum antibody concentrations observed here suggest that complementing traditional immunology studies, with comparative studies of wild animals in their natural environment may help to uncover links between environment and immune function, and facilitate progress towards answering immunological questions associated with the hygiene hypothesis. PMID:26444876

  20. Markedly Elevated Antibody Responses in Wild versus Captive Spotted Hyenas Show that Environmental and Ecological Factors Are Important Modulators of Immunity.

    PubMed

    Flies, Andrew S; Mansfield, Linda S; Grant, Chris K; Weldele, Mary L; Holekamp, Kay E

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have shaped the vertebrate immune system over time, but proximal mechanisms control the onset, duration, and intensity of immune responses. Based on testing of the hygiene hypothesis, it is now well known that microbial exposure is important for proper development and regulation of the immune system. However, few studies have examined the differences between wild animals in their natural environments, in which they are typically exposed to a wide array of potential pathogens, and their conspecifics living in captivity. Wild spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) are regularly exposed to myriad pathogens, but there is little evidence of disease-induced mortality in wild hyena populations, suggesting that immune defenses are robust in this species. Here we assessed differences in immune defenses between wild spotted hyenas that inhabit their natural savanna environment and captive hyenas that inhabit a captive environment where pathogen control programs are implemented. Importantly, the captive population of spotted hyenas was derived directly from the wild population and has been in captivity for less than four generations. Our results show that wild hyenas have significantly higher serum antibody concentrations, including total IgG and IgM, natural antibodies, and autoantibodies than do captive hyenas; there was no difference in the bacterial killing capacity of sera collected from captive and wild hyenas. The striking differences in serum antibody concentrations observed here suggest that complementing traditional immunology studies, with comparative studies of wild animals in their natural environment may help to uncover links between environment and immune function, and facilitate progress towards answering immunological questions associated with the hygiene hypothesis.

  1. Markedly Elevated Antibody Responses in Wild versus Captive Spotted Hyenas Show that Environmental and Ecological Factors Are Important Modulators of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Flies, Andrew S.; Mansfield, Linda S.; Grant, Chris K.; Weldele, Mary L.; Holekamp, Kay E.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have shaped the vertebrate immune system over time, but proximal mechanisms control the onset, duration, and intensity of immune responses. Based on testing of the hygiene hypothesis, it is now well known that microbial exposure is important for proper development and regulation of the immune system. However, few studies have examined the differences between wild animals in their natural environments, in which they are typically exposed to a wide array of potential pathogens, and their conspecifics living in captivity. Wild spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) are regularly exposed to myriad pathogens, but there is little evidence of disease-induced mortality in wild hyena populations, suggesting that immune defenses are robust in this species. Here we assessed differences in immune defenses between wild spotted hyenas that inhabit their natural savanna environment and captive hyenas that inhabit a captive environment where pathogen control programs are implemented. Importantly, the captive population of spotted hyenas was derived directly from the wild population and has been in captivity for less than four generations. Our results show that wild hyenas have significantly higher serum antibody concentrations, including total IgG and IgM, natural antibodies, and autoantibodies than do captive hyenas; there was no difference in the bacterial killing capacity of sera collected from captive and wild hyenas. The striking differences in serum antibody concentrations observed here suggest that complementing traditional immunology studies, with comparative studies of wild animals in their natural environment may help to uncover links between environment and immune function, and facilitate progress towards answering immunological questions associated with the hygiene hypothesis. PMID:26444876

  2. Breeding status affects the hormonal and metabolic response to acute stress in a long-lived seabird, the king penguin.

    PubMed

    Viblanc, Vincent A; Gineste, Benoit; Robin, Jean-Patrice; Groscolas, René

    2016-09-15

    Stress responses are suggested to physiologically underlie parental decisions promoting the redirection of behaviour away from offspring care when survival is jeopardized (e.g., when facing a predator). Besides this classical view, the "brood-value hypothesis" suggests that parents' stress responses may be adaptively attenuated to increase fitness, ensuring continued breeding when the relative value of the brood is high. Here, we test the brood-value hypothesis in breeding king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus), long-lived seabirds for which the energy commitment to reproduction is high. We subjected birds at different breeding stages (courtship, incubation and chick brooding) to an acute 30-min capture stress and measured their hormonal (corticosterone, CORT) and metabolic (non-esterified fatty acid, NEFA) responses to stress. We found that CORT responses were markedly attenuated in chick-brooding birds when compared to earlier stages of breeding (courtship and incubation). In addition, NEFA responses appeared to be rapidly attenuated in incubating and brooding birds, but a progressive increase in NEFA plasma levels in courting birds suggested energy mobilization to deal with the threat. Our results support the idea that stress responses may constitute an important life-history mechanism mediating parental reproductive decisions in relation to their expected fitness outcome. PMID:27449343

  3. Seasonal variation in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone response to kisspeptin in sheep: possible kisspeptin regulation of the kisspeptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Qun; Roa, Alexandra; Clarke, Iain J; Smith, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    Kisspeptin signaling in the hypothalamus appears critical for the onset of puberty and driving the reproductive axis. In sheep, reproduction is seasonal, being activated by short days and inhibited by long days. During the non-breeding (anestrous) season, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin secretion is reduced, as is the expression of Kiss1 mRNA in the brain. Conversely, the luteinizing hormone response to kisspeptin during this time is greater. To determine whether the GnRH response to kisspeptin is increased during anestrus, we utilized hypophysial portal blood sampling. In anestrus ewes, the GnRH and LH responses to kisspeptin were greater compared to the breeding season (luteal phase). To ascertain whether this difference reflects a change in Kiss1r, we measured its expression on GnRH neurons using in situ hybridization. The level of Kiss1r was greater during the non-breeding season compared to the breeding season. To further examine the mechanism underlying this change in Kiss1r, we examined Kiss1r/GnRH expression in ovariectomized ewes (controlling for sex steroids) during the breeding and non-breeding seasons, and also ovariectomized non-breeding season ewes with or without estradiol replacement. In both experiments, Kiss1r expression on GnRH neurons was unchanged. Finally, we examined the effect of kisspeptin treatment on Kiss1r. Kiss1r expression on GnRH neurons was reduced by kisspeptin infusion. These studies indicate the kisspeptin response is indeed greater during the non-breeding season and this may be due in part to increased Kiss1r expression on GnRH neurons. We also show that kisspeptin may regulate the expression of its own receptor.

  4. Appetite, appetite hormone and energy intake responses to two consecutive days of aerobic exercise in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Jessica A; King, James A; McFarlane, Ewan; Baker, Luke; Bradley, Chloe; Crouch, Nicole; Hill, David; Stensel, David J

    2015-09-01

    Single bouts of exercise do not cause compensatory changes in appetite, food intake or appetite regulatory hormones on the day that exercise is performed. It remains possible that such changes occur over an extended period or in response to a higher level of energy expenditure. This study sought to test this possibility by examining appetite, food intake and appetite regulatory hormones (acylated ghrelin, total peptide-YY, leptin and insulin) over two days, with acute bouts of exercise performed on each morning. Within a controlled laboratory setting, 15 healthy males completed two, 2-day long (09:00-16:00) experimental trials (exercise and control) in a randomised order. On the exercise trial participants performed 60 min of continuous moderate-high intensity treadmill running (day one: 70.1 ± 2.5% VO2peak, day two: 70.0 ± 3.2% VO2max (mean ± SD)) at the beginning of days one and two. Across each day appetite perceptions were assessed using visual analogue scales and appetite regulatory hormones were measured from venous blood samples. Ad libitum energy and macronutrient intakes were determined from meals provided two and six hours into each day and from a snack bag provided in-between trial days. Exercise elicited a high level of energy expenditure (total = 7566 ± 635 kJ across the two days) but did not produce compensatory changes in appetite or energy intake over two days (control: 29,217 ± 4006 kJ; exercise: 28,532 ± 3899 kJ, P > 0.050). Two-way repeated measures ANOVA did not reveal any main effects for acylated ghrelin or leptin (all P > 0.050). However a significant main effect of trial (P = 0.029) for PYY indicated higher concentrations on the exercise vs. control trial. These findings suggest that across a two day period, high volume exercise does not stimulate compensatory appetite regulatory changes.

  5. Differential response of tomato genotypes to Xanthomonas-specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns and correlation with bacterial spot (Xanthomonas perforans) resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Krishna; Louws, Frank J; Williamson, John D; Panthee, Dilip R

    2016-01-01

    Plants depend on innate immune responses to retard the initial spread of pathogens entering through stomata, hydathodes or injuries. These responses are triggered by conserved patterns in pathogen-encoded molecules known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the first responses, and the resulting ‘oxidative burst’ is considered to be a first line of defense. In this study, we conducted association analyses between ROS production and bacterial spot (BS; Xanthomonas spp.) resistance in 63 genotypes of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). A luminol-based assay was performed on leaf tissues that had been treated with a flagellin 22 (flg22), flagellin 28 and a Xanthomonas-specific flg22 (flg22-Xac) peptide, to measure PAMP-induced ROS production in each genotype. These genotypes were also assessed for BS disease response by inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans, race T4. Although there was no consistent relationship between peptides used and host response to the BS, there was a significant negative correlation (r=−0.25, P<0.05) between foliar disease severity and ROS production, when flg22-Xac was used. This response could potentially be used to identify the Xanthomonas-specific PRR allele in tomato, and eventually PAMP-triggered immunity loci could be mapped in a segregating population. This has potential significance in tomato improvement. PMID:27555919

  6. Differential response of tomato genotypes to Xanthomonas-specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns and correlation with bacterial spot (Xanthomonas perforans) resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Krishna; Louws, Frank J; Williamson, John D; Panthee, Dilip R

    2016-01-01

    Plants depend on innate immune responses to retard the initial spread of pathogens entering through stomata, hydathodes or injuries. These responses are triggered by conserved patterns in pathogen-encoded molecules known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the first responses, and the resulting 'oxidative burst' is considered to be a first line of defense. In this study, we conducted association analyses between ROS production and bacterial spot (BS; Xanthomonas spp.) resistance in 63 genotypes of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). A luminol-based assay was performed on leaf tissues that had been treated with a flagellin 22 (flg22), flagellin 28 and a Xanthomonas-specific flg22 (flg22-Xac) peptide, to measure PAMP-induced ROS production in each genotype. These genotypes were also assessed for BS disease response by inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans, race T4. Although there was no consistent relationship between peptides used and host response to the BS, there was a significant negative correlation (r=-0.25, P<0.05) between foliar disease severity and ROS production, when flg22-Xac was used. This response could potentially be used to identify the Xanthomonas-specific PRR allele in tomato, and eventually PAMP-triggered immunity loci could be mapped in a segregating population. This has potential significance in tomato improvement. PMID:27555919

  7. Neuromuscular function, hormonal, and mood responses to a professional rugby union match.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel J; Finn, Charlotte V; Cunningham, Daniel J; Shearer, David A; Jones, Marc R; Harrington, Bradley J; Crewther, Blair T; Cook, Christian J; Kilduff, Liam P

    2014-01-01

    We examined the recovery time-course of neuromuscular function (NMF), the testosterone and cortisol hormonal milieu, and mood for 60 hours after a competitive match in professional rugby union players (n = 14). Thirty-six hours prematch (19:30 hours kick-off), baseline saliva samples (testosterone, cortisol, and testosterone to cortisol [T/C] ratio), countermovement jump performances (peak power output [PPO]), and mood disruption (Brief Assessment of Mood Questionnaire) were collected and was repeated at 12, 36, and 60 hours postmatch. Peak power output decreased below baseline at 12 hours (baseline 6,100 ± 565 W vs. 12 h 5,680 ± 589 W; p = 0.004) and 36 hours (5,761 ± 639 W; p < 0.001) but had recovered at 60 hours (5,950 ± 505 W; p = 0.151). Cortisol concentrations increased from baseline at 12 hours (baseline 0.40 ± 0.09 µg·dl-1 vs. 12 h 0.60 ± 0.20 µg·dl-1; p = 0.004) and 36 hours (0.60 ± 0.20 µg·dl-1; p = 0.027) but were similar at 60 hours postmatch. Testosterone concentrations decreased from baseline at 12 hours (baseline 214 ± 84 pg·ml-1 vs. 12 h 151 ± 56 pg·ml-1; p = 0.023) and 36 hours (173 ± 71 pg·ml-1; p = 0.016) but were similar at 60 hours postmatch. The T/C ratio decreased from baseline at 12 hours (baseline 551 ± 219 vs. 12 h 266 ± 123; p = 0.001) and 36 hours (310 ± 148; p = 0.027) before returning to baseline at 60 hours postmatch. Mood disturbance increased at 12 hours (p = 0.031) before returning to baseline at 36 and 60 hours postmatch. There were no relationships between changes in PPO, testosterone, cortisol, T/C ratio, and mood. In conclusion, postmatch changes in NMF, salivary hormones, and mood disturbance were identified in professional rugby union players. Players and coaches can expect reduced NMF and hormonal disruption for 36 hours before recovering at 60 hours postmatch, with mood recovered by 36 hours postmatch. Knowledge of these recovery time-courses may prove useful for player training program design and

  8. Mongolian blue spots

    MedlinePlus

    Mongolian spots; Congenital dermal melanocytosis; Dermal melanocytosis ... Mongolian blue spots are common among persons who are of Asian, Native American, Hispanic, East Indian, and African descent. The color ...

  9. Response of progeny bred from Bolivian and North American cultivars in integrated management systems for leaf spot of peanut (Arachis hypogaea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early leaf spot caused by the fungus Cercospora arachidicola, and late leaf spot caused by the fungus Cercosporidium personatum, are major yield-reducing diseases of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) in the southeastern U.S. Effective control of both leaf spots can be reached with integrated disease man...

  10. Effects of ginseng ingestion on growth hormone, testosterone, cortisol, and insulin-like growth factor 1 responses to acute resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Youl Kang, Ho; Hwan Kim, Seung; Jun Lee, Woen; Byrne, Heidi K

    2002-05-01

    Ginseng, an herbal plant, has been ingested by many athletes in Oriental regions of the world in order to improve stamina and to facilitate rapid recovery from injuries. However, adequate investigation has not been conducted to examine the ergogenic effects of ginseng. To examine the effects of ginseng supplements on hormonal status following acute resistance exercise, eight male college students were randomly given water (control; CON) or 20 g of ginseng root extract (GIN) treatment immediately after a standardized exercise bout. Venous blood samples were drawn before and immediately after exercise and at 4 time points during a 2-hour recovery period. Human growth hormone, testosterone, cortisol, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. The responses of plasma hormones following ginseng consumption were not significant between CON and GIN treatments during the 2-hour recovery period. These results do not support the use of ginseng to promote an anabolic hormonal status following resistance exercise.

  11. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in plant defence response: from protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions to hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase Ds (PLDs) and PLD-derived phosphatidic acids (PAs) play vital roles in plant hormonal and environmental responses and various cellular dynamics. Recent studies have further expanded the functions of PLDs and PAs into plant-microbe interaction. The molecular diversities and redundant functions make PLD-PA an important signalling complex regulating lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling in plant defence through protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions or hormone signalling. Different PLD-PA signalling complexes and their targets have emerged as fast-growing research topics for understanding their numerous but not yet established roles in modifying pathogen perception, signal transduction, and downstream defence responses. Meanwhile, advanced lipidomics tools have allowed researchers to reveal further the mechanisms of PLD-PA signalling complexes in regulating lipid metabolism and signalling, and their impacts on jasmonic acid/oxylipins, salicylic acid, and other hormone signalling pathways that essentially mediate plant defence responses. This review attempts to summarize the progress made in spatial and temporal PLD/PA signalling as well as PLD/PA-mediated modification of plant defence. It presents an in-depth discussion on the functions and potential mechanisms of PLD-PA complexes in regulating actin filament/microtubule cytoskeleton, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling, and in influencing lipid metabolism-derived metabolites as critical signalling components in plant defence responses. The discussion puts PLD-PA in a broader context in order to guide future research.

  12. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in plant defence response: from protein–protein and lipid–protein interactions to hormone signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase Ds (PLDs) and PLD-derived phosphatidic acids (PAs) play vital roles in plant hormonal and environmental responses and various cellular dynamics. Recent studies have further expanded the functions of PLDs and PAs into plant–microbe interaction. The molecular diversities and redundant functions make PLD–PA an important signalling complex regulating lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling in plant defence through protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions or hormone signalling. Different PLD–PA signalling complexes and their targets have emerged as fast-growing research topics for understanding their numerous but not yet established roles in modifying pathogen perception, signal transduction, and downstream defence responses. Meanwhile, advanced lipidomics tools have allowed researchers to reveal further the mechanisms of PLD–PA signalling complexes in regulating lipid metabolism and signalling, and their impacts on jasmonic acid/oxylipins, salicylic acid, and other hormone signalling pathways that essentially mediate plant defence responses. This review attempts to summarize the progress made in spatial and temporal PLD/PA signalling as well as PLD/PA-mediated modification of plant defence. It presents an in-depth discussion on the functions and potential mechanisms of PLD–PA complexes in regulating actin filament/microtubule cytoskeleton, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling, and in influencing lipid metabolism-derived metabolites as critical signalling components in plant defence responses. The discussion puts PLD–PA in a broader context in order to guide future research. PMID:25680793

  13. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, S.R.; Lin, C.S.; Potts, J.T. Jr.; Rosenthal, A.S.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and ..mu..(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay.

  14. Hormonal responses to physical and cognitive stress in a school setting.

    PubMed

    Budde, Henning; Pietrassyk-Kendziorra, Sascha; Bohm, Sebastian; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Little is known about the influence of physical and cognitive stress on the concentration of steroid hormones (SHs) in a school setting. Forty high school students from the 9th grade were randomly assigned to two intervention groups: physical and cognitive stress. Saliva collection took place before (pre-test) and after (post-test) 12 min of high intensity exercise in a defined heart rate (HR) interval (70-85% HR (max); n=19) and cognitive testing (Letter Digit Span and d2-test, n=21), respectively. Saliva was analyzed for testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Results indicated a significant increase of T and C due to a physical but not cognitive stressor. Thus, only the physical stressor was capable of activating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis.

  15. A hormone-DNA repair circuit governs the response to genotoxic insult

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; Dean, Jeffry L.; Schrecengost, Randy S.; de Leeuw, Renee; Han, Sumin; Ma, Teng; Den, Robert B.; Dicker, Adam P.; Feng, Felix Y.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in DNA repair promote tumor development, but the impact on tumor progression is poorly understood. Here, discovery of a biochemical circuit linking hormone signaling to DNA repair and therapeutic resistance is reported. Findings demonstrate that androgen receptor (AR) activity is induced by DNA damage, and promotes expression and activation of a gene expression program governing DNA repair. Subsequent investigation revealed that activated AR promotes resolution of double-strand breaks and resistance to DNA damage both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, DNAPKcs was identified as a key target of AR after damage, controlling AR-mediated DNA repair and cell survival after genotoxic insult. Finally, DNAPKcs was shown to potentiate AR function, consistent with a dual role in both DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. Combined, these studies identify the AR-DNAPKcs circuit as a major effector of DNA repair and therapeutic resistance, and establish a new node for therapeutic intervention in advanced disease. PMID:24027197

  16. Hormonal responses and tolerance to cold of female quail following parathion ingestion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Sileo, L.; Scanes, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-week-old female bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus), maintained at 26 + 1?C, were provided diets containing 0,25, or 100 ppm parathion ad libitum. After 10 days, birds were exposed to mild cold (6 + 1?C) for 4,8, 12, 24, or 48 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in birds receiving 25 and 100 ppm parathion. Body weight, egg production, and plasma luteinizing hormone and progesterone concentrations were reduced in birds receiving 100 ppm parathion compared with other groups. Cold exposure did not alter plasma corticosterone levels in the 0- and 25-ppm parathion groups, but a two- to five fold elevation of plasma corticosterone was observed in birds fed 100 ppm parathion. These findings indicate that (i) short-term ingestion of parathion can impair reproduction possibly by altering gonadotropin or steroid secretion, and (ii) tolerance to cold may be reduced following ingestion of this organophosphate.

  17. Psychophysiological stress responses in postmenopausal women before and after hormonal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Collins, A; Hanson, U; Eneroth, P; Hagenfeldt, K; Lundberg, U; Frankenhaeuser, M

    1982-01-01

    Seventeen females with a history of hot flushes, perspiration, and amenorrhea of at least 6 months' duration, and a serum FSH level exceeding 40 IU/l entered a cyclic treatment with 17 beta-estradiol and estriol combined with norethsterone (Trisekvens, Novo). Each patient took part in three experimental sessions, six weeks apart, in which stress was induced by mental performance tests. To permit separation of treatment and habituation effects the patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups, Group 1 starting therapy after the first, Group 2 after the second session. Treatment eliminated hot flushes and perspiration and reduced serum FSH levels without causing changes in blood pressure or heart rate. There was no correlation between hormonal treatment and excretion of catecholamines during stress. Testosterone and androstenedione serum levels remained unchanged during therapy. Self-reports showed that tiredness, headache, tension and anxiety were significantly reduced following treatment.

  18. Testosterone response to a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist in Hawaiian monk seals (Monachus schauinslandi).

    PubMed

    Atkinson, S; Gilmartin, W G; Lasley, B L

    1993-01-01

    Adult male Hawaiian monk seals were administered a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist to determine its effectiveness in reducing the testicular production of testosterone. Blood samples were collected from four treated seals and two control seals at weekly intervals for 10 weeks and again at the beginning of the following breeding season. The GnRH-agonist had an initial, brief, stimulating effect on circulating testosterone, but this was followed by an inhibitory effect that lasted for 7 to 8 weeks. The plasma concentrations of testosterone were within normal ranges by the following spring. These results demonstrate a reversible form of long-term androgen suppression, which may have applicability in a variety of wildlife management programmes. PMID:8464023

  19. Modulation of cultured porcine granulosa cell responsiveness to follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Ovarian follicular development is dependent upon the coordinated growth and differentiation of the granulosa cells which line the follicle. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) induces granulosa cell differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates granulosa cell proliferation in vitro. The interaction of these two effectors upon selected parameters of growth and differentiation was examined in monolayer cultures of porcine granulose cells. Analysis of the EGF receptor by /sup 125/I-EGF binding revealed that the receptor was of high affinity with an apparent dissociation constant of 4-6 x 10/sup -10/ M. The average number of receptors per cell varied with the state of differentiation both in vivo and in vitro; highly differentiated cells bound two-fold less /sup 125/I-EGF and this effect was at least partially induced by FSH in vitro. EGF receptor function was examined by assessing EGF effects on cell number and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. EGF stimulated thymidine incorporation in both serum-free and serum-supplemented culture, but only in serum-supplemented conditions was cell number increased. EGF receptor function was inversely related to the state of differentiation and was attenuated by FSH. The FSH receptor was examined by /sup 125/I-FSH binding. EGF increased FSH receptor number, and lowered the affinity of the receptor. The function of these receptors was assessed by /sup 125/I-hCG binding and progesterone radioimmunoassay. If EGF was present continuously in the cultures. FSH receptor function was attenuated regardless of FSH receptor number. A preliminary effort to examine the mechanism of this interaction was performed by analyzing hormonally controlled protein synthesis with /sup 35/S-methionine labeling, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. FSH promoted the expression of a 27,000 dalton protein. This effect was attenuated by EGF.

  20. Synergistic effect of obesity and lipid ingestion in suppressing the growth hormone response to exercise in children.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stacy R; Hingorani, Sunita R; Rosa, Jaime S; Zaldivar, Frank P; Galassetti, Pietro R

    2012-07-01

    Diet plays an important role in modulating exercise responses, including activation of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1) axis. Obesity and fat ingestion were separately shown to reduce exercise GH responses, but their combined effect, especially important in children, has not been studied. We therefore measured the GH response to exercise [30-min intermittent cycling, ten 2-min bouts at ~80% maximal aerobic capacity (Vo(2max)), separated by 1-min rest], started 45 min after ingestion of a high-fat meal (HFM) in 16 healthy [controls; body mass index percentile (BMI%ile) 51 ± 7], and 19 obese (Ob, BMI%ile 97 ± 0.4) children. Samples were drawn at baseline (premeal), and at start, peak, and 30 min postexercise. In the Ob group, a marked ~75% suppression of the GH response (ng/ml) to exercise was observed (2.4 ± 0.6 vs. 10.6 ± 2.1, P < 0.001). This level of suppression was also significantly greater compared with age-, fitness-, and BMI-matched historical controls that had performed identical exercise in fasting conditions. Our data indicate that the reduction in the GH response to exercise, already present in obese children vs. healthy controls, is considerably amplified by ingestion of fat nutrients shortly before exercise, implying a potentially downstream negative impact on growth factor homeostasis and long-term modulation of physiological growth.

  1. Ricinus communis L. stem bark extracts regulate ovarian cell functions and secretory activity and their response to Luteinising hormone.

    PubMed

    Nath, S; Kadasi, A; Grossmann, R; Sirotkin, A V; Kolesarova, A; Talukdar, A D; Choudhury, M D

    2015-01-01

    Ricinus communis L. has ethnopharmacological contraceptive reputation but its stem bark has unexplored mechanisms of action in female reproductive system. In the present study, the effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts from the stem bark of the plant was examined on basic porcine ovarian granulosa cell functions and its response to Luteinising hormone (LH)-the upstream hormonal regulator. Systemic treatment of methanolic and aqueous extracts stimulated cell proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA) and also promoted cell apoptosis (caspase-3). Aqueous extract has inverted the stimulatory effect of LH on PCNA but not on caspase-3. Methanolic extract stimulated as well as inhibited progesterone release and stimulated testosterone secretion. Whereas aqueous extract inhibited both steroid releases and suppressed the stimulatory effect of LH on progesterone release and promoted the inhibitory effect of LH on testosterone release. In conclusion, the present study unveils the mechanism of action of R. communis stem bark in in vitro condition. These suggest its possible contraceptive efficacy by exerting its regulatory role over LH and on basic ovarian cell functions and secretion activity. PMID:26311247

  2. Behavioral and hormonal responses to corticosterone in the male red-sided garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis.

    PubMed

    Moore, I T; Mason, R T

    2001-04-01

    Stress and glucocorticoids are generally thought to suppress reproductive function at multiple levels. We tested the hypotheses that exogenous corticosterone would suppress sexual behavior in a dose-dependent manner, as well as drive a decrease in plasma testosterone levels in the male red-sided garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis. We examined this by challenging individual males with intraperitoneal injections of exogenous corticosterone, and subsequently exposing them to sexually attractive females or taking a blood sample. Previous work has demonstrated a hormonal but no behavioral response to stress in this species. In this study, increasing concentrations of exogenous corticosterone rapidly suppressed mating behavior in a threshold manner. However, exogenous corticosterone had no effect on plasma levels of testosterone. Thus, these data suggest that the mechanism is in place for corticosterone to suppress mating behavior in this species and that these effects do not occur because of an indirect effect on plasma levels of testosterone but rather are the direct effect of the hormone itself. In addition, the negative relationship observed previously between plasma levels of corticosterone and testosterone in this species was probably not the direct result of corticosterone acting on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Rather, our results seem to indicate that the negative associations between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and the HPG axis occur at other levels of these neuroendocrine pathways.

  3. Ricinus communis L. stem bark extracts regulate ovarian cell functions and secretory activity and their response to Luteinising hormone.

    PubMed

    Nath, S; Kadasi, A; Grossmann, R; Sirotkin, A V; Kolesarova, A; Talukdar, A D; Choudhury, M D

    2015-01-01

    Ricinus communis L. has ethnopharmacological contraceptive reputation but its stem bark has unexplored mechanisms of action in female reproductive system. In the present study, the effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts from the stem bark of the plant was examined on basic porcine ovarian granulosa cell functions and its response to Luteinising hormone (LH)-the upstream hormonal regulator. Systemic treatment of methanolic and aqueous extracts stimulated cell proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA) and also promoted cell apoptosis (caspase-3). Aqueous extract has inverted the stimulatory effect of LH on PCNA but not on caspase-3. Methanolic extract stimulated as well as inhibited progesterone release and stimulated testosterone secretion. Whereas aqueous extract inhibited both steroid releases and suppressed the stimulatory effect of LH on progesterone release and promoted the inhibitory effect of LH on testosterone release. In conclusion, the present study unveils the mechanism of action of R. communis stem bark in in vitro condition. These suggest its possible contraceptive efficacy by exerting its regulatory role over LH and on basic ovarian cell functions and secretion activity.

  4. Proliferation of rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cells in culture: Lack of mitogenic response to steroid or gonadotropic hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Toth-Fejel, Suellen; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2002-06-30

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer and approximately 90% of ovarian cancers derive from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), yet the biology of the OSE is poorly understood. Factors associated with increased risk of non-hereditary ovarian cancer include the formation of inclusion cysts, effects of reproductive hormones cytokeratin, vimentin, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, estrogen receptor-a, and progesterone receptor. We show that these cells activate MAP Kinase and proliferate in response to extracellular calcium, as do human and rat OSE. In contrast, the gonadotropic hormones FSH (4-400 IU/L), LH (8.5-850 IU/l), and hCG (10-1000 IU/l) fail to stimulate proliferation. We find that concentrations of progesterone and estrogen normally present in follicles just prior to ovulation ( ~1000 ng/ml) significantly decrease the number of mitotically active RhOSE cells as determined by PCNA labelling, total cell count, and 3H-thymidine uptake, while lower steroid concentrations have no effect.

  5. Expression analysis of androgen-responsive genes in the prostate of veal calves treated with anabolic hormones.

    PubMed

    Toffolatti, L; Rosa Gastaldo, L; Patarnello, T; Romualdi, C; Merlanti, R; Montesissa, C; Poppi, L; Castagnaro, M; Bargelloni, L

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify indirect molecular biomarkers of anabolic treatments in veal calves, an animal experiment was performed using two combinations of growth promoters (consisting of boldenone undecylenate and estradiol benzoate, and of testosterone enantate and estradiol benzoate). We selected a set of 12 genes that are known to be androgen responsive in other mammalian species. The expression profile of this set of genes was analysed on prostate samples of veal calves using a real-time RT-PCR approach. For each selected gene the corresponding bovine sequence was obtained and a gene specific real-time assay was optimised and validated. The amplification was shown to be highly specific, linear and efficient. High reproducibility (<1%) and low-test variability (<2.5%) were also been achieved. Messenger RNA levels were quantified in prostate samples, non-parametric analysis of variance showed significant up-regulation of three genes (MAF, ESR1 and AR) and significant down-regulation of four genes (HMGCS1, HPGD, DBI, and LIM) in treated samples when compared with untreated controls. To assess the possibility of identifying hormone-treated animals by molecular means we performed a discriminant analysis that was effective in classifying treated and non-treated samples with an accuracy of 93%. Our results indicate that identification of treatment with steroid hormones in veal calves by means of gene expression analysis is a feasible approach and could be improved increasing both the number of genes and the number of controls analysed. PMID:16023321

  6. Ultrasonographic predictors of response of European eels (Anguilla anguilla) to hormonal treatment for induction of ovarian development.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anna V; McEvoy, Fintan J; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Politis, Sebastian N; Amigo, José M

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine ultrasonographic predictors of ovarian development in European eels (Anguilla anguilla) undergoing hormonal treatment for assisted reproduction. ANIMALS 83 female European eels. PROCEDURES Eels received weekly IM injections of salmon pituitary extract (first injection = week 1). Ultrasonography of the ovaries was performed twice during hormonal treatment (weeks 7 and 11). Eels were identified on the basis of body weight as having an adequate response by weeks 14 to 20 or an inadequate response after injections for 21 weeks. Eels were euthanized at the end of the experiment and classified by use of ovarian histologic examination. Ovarian cross-sectional area and size of eel (ie, length (3) ) were used to classify eels (fast responder, slow responder, or nonresponder) and to calculate an ultrasonographic-derived gonadosomatic index. Gray-level co-occurrence matrices were calculated from ovarian images, and 22 texture features were calculated from these matrices. RESULTS The ultrasonographic-derived gonadosomatic index differed significantly between fast responders and slow responders or nonresponders at both weeks 7 and 11. Principal component analysis revealed a pattern of separation between the groups, and partial least squares discriminant analysis revealed signals in the ovarian texture that discriminated females that responded to treatment from those that did not. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Ovarian texture information in addition to morphometric variables can enhance ultrasonographic applications for assisted reproduction of eels and potentially other fish species. This was a novel, nonlethal method for classifying reproductive response of eels and the first objective texture analysis performed on ultrasonographic images of the gonads of fish. PMID:27111015

  7. Metabolic and hormonal responses during repeated bouts of brief and intense exercise: effects of pre-exercise glucose ingestion.

    PubMed

    Wouassi, D; Mercier, J; Ahmaidi, S; Brun, J F; Mercier, B; Orsetti, A; Préfaut, C

    1997-01-01

    We investigated metabolic and hormonal responses during repeated bouts of brief and intense exercise (a force-velocity test; Fv test) and examined the effect of glucose ingestion on these responses and on exercise performance. The test was performed twice by seven subjects [27 (2) years] according to a double-blind randomized crossover protocol. During the experimental trial (GLU), the subjects ingested 500 ml of glucose polymer solution containing 25 g glucose 15 min before starting the exercise. During the control trial (CON), the subjects received an equal volume of sweet placebo (aspartame). Exercise performance was assessed by calculating peak anaerobic power (W(an,peak)). Venous plasma lactate concentration increased significantly during the Fv test (P < 0.001), but no difference was found between CON and GLU. Blood glucose first decreased significantly from the beginning of exercise up to the 6-kg load (P < 0.001) and then increased significantly at W(an,peak) and for up to 10 min during the recovery period (P < 0.001) in both CON and GLU. Insulin concentrations decreased significantly in both groups, but were higher at W(an,peak) in GLU compared with CON (P < 0.05). Glucagon and epinephrine did not change significantly in either group, but epinephrine was significantly lower in GLU after glucose ingestion (P < 0.05) and at W(an,peak) (P < 0.05). W(an,peak) was not significantly different between CON and GLU. In conclusion, blood glucose and insulin concentrations decreased during repeated bouts of brief and intense exercise, while blood lactate concentration increased markedly without any significant change in glucagon and epinephrine concentrations. Glucose ingestion altered metabolic and hormonal responses during the Fv test, but the performance as measured by W(an,peak) was not changed.

  8. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of tumor suppressor protein p53 from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides in response to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zeng-Hua; Liu, Yu-Feng; Luo, Sheng-Wei; Chen, Chu-Xian; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2013-11-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a critical component of cell cycle checkpoint responses. It upregulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in response to DNA damage and other cellular perturbations, and promotes apoptosis when DNA repair pathways are overwhelmed. In the present study, the cDNA of p53 from the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) (Ec-p53) was cloned by the combination of homology cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approaches. The full-length cDNA of Ec-p53 was of 1921 bp, including an open reading frame (ORF) of 1143 bp encoding a polypeptide of 380 amino acids with predicted molecular weight of 42.3 kDa and theoretical isoelectric point of 7.0. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assays revealed that Ec-p53 was ubiquitously expressed in all the examined tissues but with high levels in intestine and liver of the orange-spotted grouper. In addition, we measured the DNA damage and apoptosis in the blood cells and the percentage of dead and damaged blood cells. Our results suggest that oxidative stress and DNA damage occurred in grouper in conditions where the temperature was 15 ± 0.5 °C. Furthermore, qRT-PCR and western blot confirmed that low temperature stress induced upregulation of Ec-p53 in the mRNA and protein levels. These results suggest that low temperature-induced oxidative stress may cause DNA damage or apoptosis, and cooperatively stimulate the expression of Ec-p53, which plays a critical role in immune defense and antioxidant responses.

  9. Semiquantitative hormone receptor level influences response to trastuzumab-containing neoadjuvant chemotherapy in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Rohit; Dabbs, David J; Beriwal, Sushil; Yildiz, Isil A; Badve, Preeti; Soran, Atilla; Johnson, Ronald R; Brufsky, Adam M; Lembersky, Barry C; McGuire, Kandace P; Ahrendt, Gretchen M

    2011-03-01

    Pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy without trastuzumab in hormone receptor-negative/HER2+ tumors is seen in 27-45% of cases. In contrast, estrogen receptor (ER)+/HER2+ tumors demonstrate pathologic complete response in ∼ 8% of cases and is generally limited to weak-to-moderate ER+/HER2+ tumors. It is speculated that addition of trastuzumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen will increase the pathologic complete response rates in all HER2+ tumors. A list of HER2+ patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (with trastuzumab) in the years 2007-2010 was obtained from our hospital database. The 104 HER2+ tumors were classified into three groups based on semiquantitative hormone receptor and HER2 results as follows: ERBB2 (ER-/PR-[H-score ≤10]/HER2+), Luminal B-HER2 Hybrid (LBHH; weak to moderate ER+ [H-score 11-199]/HER2+), and Luminal A-HER2 Hybrid (LAHH; strong ER+[H-score ≥200]/HER2+). Pathologic complete response was defined as absence of invasive carcinoma in the resection specimen and in the lymph nodes. Percentage tumor volume reduction was also calculated based on pretherapy size and detailed evaluation of the resection specimen. In all, 52% (25 of 48 cases) of ERBB2 tumors showed pathologic complete response, which was significantly higher than the pathologic complete response rate in LBHH (33%; 10 of 30) and LAHH (8%; 2 of 26) tumors. Average percentage tumor volume reduction was also highest in ERBB2 tumors (86%), followed by LBHH (74%) and LAHH (64%) tumors. We conclude that addition of trastuzumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen significantly increases the pathologic complete response rates in all HER2+ tumors. However, the benefit of trastuzumab is highest in ER-negative tumors and progressively decreases with increase in tumor ER expression. This information can be utilized to counsel patients considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the same principle could be applied in the adjuvant setting. PMID:21102420

  10. Metabolic Response of Strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) Leaves Exposed to the Angular Leaf Spot Bacterium (Xanthomonas fragariae).

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Sun; Jin, Jong Sung; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-03-01

    Plants have evolved various defense mechanisms against biotic stress. The most common mechanism involves the production of metabolites that act as defense compounds. Bacterial angular leaf spot disease (Xanthomonas fragariae) of the strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) has become increasingly destructive to strawberry leaves and plant production. In this study, we examined metabolic changes associated with the establishment of long-term bacterial disease stress using UPLC-QTOF mass spectrometry. Infected leaves showed decreased levels of gallic acid derivatives and ellagitannins, which are related to the plant defense system. The levels of phenylalanine, tryptophan, and salicylic acid as precursors of aromatic secondary metabolites were increased in inoculated leaves, whereas levels of coumaric acid, quinic acid, and flavonoids were decreased in infected plants, which are involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway. In addition, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity, a key enzyme in the phenylpropanoid pathway, was decreased following infection. These results suggest that long-term bacterial disease stress may lead to down-regulation of select molecules of the phenylpropanoid metabolic pathway in strawberry leaves. This approach could be applied to explore the metabolic pathway associated with plant protection/breeding in strawberry leaves. PMID:26890088

  11. Metabolic Response of Strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) Leaves Exposed to the Angular Leaf Spot Bacterium (Xanthomonas fragariae).

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Sun; Jin, Jong Sung; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-03-01

    Plants have evolved various defense mechanisms against biotic stress. The most common mechanism involves the production of metabolites that act as defense compounds. Bacterial angular leaf spot disease (Xanthomonas fragariae) of the strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) has become increasingly destructive to strawberry leaves and plant production. In this study, we examined metabolic changes associated with the establishment of long-term bacterial disease stress using UPLC-QTOF mass spectrometry. Infected leaves showed decreased levels of gallic acid derivatives and ellagitannins, which are related to the plant defense system. The levels of phenylalanine, tryptophan, and salicylic acid as precursors of aromatic secondary metabolites were increased in inoculated leaves, whereas levels of coumaric acid, quinic acid, and flavonoids were decreased in infected plants, which are involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway. In addition, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity, a key enzyme in the phenylpropanoid pathway, was decreased following infection. These results suggest that long-term bacterial disease stress may lead to down-regulation of select molecules of the phenylpropanoid metabolic pathway in strawberry leaves. This approach could be applied to explore the metabolic pathway associated with plant protection/breeding in strawberry leaves.

  12. Three members of Ras GTPase superfamily are response to white spot syndrome virus challenge in Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Ye, Ting; Jin, Min; Wang, Wen; Hui, Kaimin; Ren, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Members of the Ras-like GTPase superfamily are key regulators of diverse cellular and developmental events, including differentiation, cell division, vesicle transport, nuclear assembly, and cytoskeleton control. In this study, three Ras family members (MjRap, MjRas, and MjRal) were cloned from Marsupenaeus japonicus. The full lengths of MjRap, MjRas, and MjRal are 788, 1330, and 2074 bp, which encode the proteins of 186, 202, and 198 amino acids respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Rap, Ras, and Ral from different species gather together. The MjRap, MjRas, and MjRal genes were ubiquitously expressed in the hemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and muscle. Results from the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that MjRal in the gills was upregulated 48 and 72 h post-White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. No change in the MjRap or MjRas transcript was observed in the gills under the WSSV challenge. The RNAi of MjRal could enhance the WSSV replication. Injection of rMjRal protein could inhibit WSSV replication, but had no effect on VP28 expression. So, it could be concluded that MjRal was involved in shrimp anti-viral innate immune defense by inhibiting the WSSV replication. PMID:27349204

  13. Does mental arithmetic before head up tilt have an effect on the orthostatic cardiovascular and hormonal responses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Nandu; Lackner, Helmut Karl; Papousek, Ilona; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Jezova, Daniela; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut G.

    2011-05-01

    Passive head up tilt (HUT) and mental arithmetic (MA) are commonly used for providing mental and orthostatic challenges, respectively. In animal experiments, even a single exposure to a stressor has been shown to modify the response to subsequent stress stimulus. We investigated whether MA applied before HUT elicits synergistic responses in orthostatic heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), heart rate variability and arterial blood pressure. The 15 healthy young males were subjected to two randomized protocols: (a) HUT and (b) HUT preceded by MA, with sessions randomized and ≥2 weeks apart. Beat to beat continuous hemodynamic variables were measured and saliva samples taken for hormonal assay. HUT alone increased HR from 59±7 (baseline) to 80±10 bpm (mean±SD) and mean blood pressure (MBP) from 88±10 to 91±14 mmHg. HUT results after MA were not different from those with HUT alone. The activity of alpha amylase showed differences during the experiments irrespective of the protocols. We conclude that mental challenge does not affect orthostatic cardiovascular responses when applied before; the timing of mental loading seems to be critical if it is intended to alter cardiovascular responses to upright standing.

  14. On the spot ethical decision-making in CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear event) response: approaches to on the spot ethical decision-making for first responders to large-scale chemical incidents.

    PubMed

    Rebera, Andrew P; Rafalowski, Chaim

    2014-09-01

    First responders to chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) events face decisions having significant human consequences. Some operational decisions are supported by standard operating procedures, yet these may not suffice for ethical decisions. Responders will be forced to weigh their options, factoring-in contextual peculiarities; they will require guidance on how they can approach novel (indeed unique) ethical problems: they need strategies for "on the spot" ethical decision making. The primary aim of this paper is to examine how first responders should approach on the spot ethical decision-making amid the stress and uncertainty of a CBRN event. Drawing on the long-term professional CBRN experience of one of the authors, this paper sets out a series of practical ethical dilemmas potentially arising in the context of a large-scale chemical incident. We propose a broadly consequentialist approach to on the spot ethical decision-making, but one which incorporates ethical values and rights as "side-constraints".

  15. Activin Modulates the Transcriptional Response of LβT2 Cells to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone and Alters Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Bailey, Janice S.; Coss, Djurdjica; Lin, Bo; Tsutsumi, Rie; Lawson, Mark A.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Both GnRH and activin are crucial for the correct function of pituitary gonadotrope cells. GnRH regulates LH and FSH synthesis and secretion and gonadotrope proliferation, whereas activin is essential for expression of FSH. Little is known, however, about the interplay of signaling downstream of these two hormones. In this study, we undertook expression profiling to determine how activin pre-treatment alters the transcriptional response of LβT2 gonadotrope cells to GnRH stimulation. Activin treatment alone altered the transcriptional profile of 303 genes including inducing that of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B1 gene that converts estrone to 17β-estradiol, altering the sensitivity of the cells to estrone. Furthermore, activin had a dramatic effect on the response of LβT2 cells to GnRH. Hierarchical clustering of 2453 GnRH-responsive genes identified groups of genes the response of which to GnRH was either enhanced or blunted after activin treatment. Mapping of these genes to gene ontology classifications or signaling pathways highlighted significant differences in the classes of altered genes. In the presence of activin, GnRH regulates genes in pathways controlling cell energetics, cytoskeletal rearrangements, organelle organization, and mitosis in the absence of activin, but genes controlling protein processing, cell differentiation, and secretion. Therefore, we demonstrated that activin enhanced GnRH induction of p38MAPK activity, caused GnRH-dependent phosphorylation of p53, and reduced the ability of GnRH to cause G1 arrest. Thus, although activin alone changes a modest number of transcripts, activin pretreatment dramatically alters the response to GnRH from an antiproliferative response to a more differentiated, synthetic response appropriate for a secretory cell. PMID:16772531

  16. Intrauterine growth restriction perturbs nucleosome depletion at a growth hormone-responsive element in the mouse IGF-1 gene.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Robert A; Yost, Christian C; Yu, Xing; Wiedmeier, Julia E; Callaway, Christopher W; Brown, Ashley S; Lane, Robert H; Fung, Camille M

    2015-12-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a common human pregnancy complication. IUGR offspring carry significant postnatal risk for early-onset metabolic syndrome, which is associated with persistent reduction in IGF-1 protein expression. We have previously shown that preadolescent IUGR male mice have decreased hepatic IGF-1 mRNA and circulating IGF-1 protein at postnatal day 21, the age when growth hormone (GH) normally upregulates hepatic IGF-1 expression. Here we studied nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation at a putative growth hormone-responsive element in intron 2 (in2GHRE) of the hepatic IGF-1 gene in normal, sham-operated, and IUGR mice. Nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation were determined in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in liver at postnatal days 14, 21, and 42. For CpG methylation, additional time points out to 2 yr were analyzed. We confirmed the putative mouse in2GHRE was GH-responsive, and in normal mice, a single nucleosome was displaced from the hepatic in2GHRE by postnatal day 21, which exposed two STAT5b DNA binding sites. Nucleosome displacement correlated with developmentally programmed CpG demethylation. Finally, IUGR significantly altered the nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) at the in2GHRE of IGF-1 on postnatal day 21, with either complete absence of the NDR or with a shifted NDR exposing only one of two STAT5b DNA binding sites. An NDR shift was also seen in offspring of sham-operated mothers. We conclude that prenatal insult such as IUGR or anesthesia/surgery could perturb the proper formation of a well-positioned NDR at the mouse hepatic IGF-1 in2GHRE necessary for transitioning to an open chromatin state.

  17. Direct regulation of microRNA biogenesis and expression by estrogen receptor beta in hormone-responsive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Paris, O; Ferraro, L; Grober, O M V; Ravo, M; De Filippo, M R; Giurato, G; Nassa, G; Tarallo, R; Cantarella, C; Rizzo, F; Di Benedetto, A; Mottolese, M; Benes, V; Ambrosino, C; Nola, E; Weisz, A

    2012-09-20

    Estrogen effects on mammary epithelial and breast cancer (BC) cells are mediated by the nuclear receptors ERα and ERβ, transcription factors that display functional antagonism with each other, with ERβ acting as oncosuppressor and interfering with the effects of ERα on cell proliferation, tumor promotion and progression. Indeed, hormone-responsive, ERα+ BC cells often lack ERβ, which when present associates with a less aggressive clinical phenotype of the disease. Recent evidences point to a significant role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in BC, where specific miRNA expression profiles associate with distinct clinical and biological phenotypes of the lesion. Considering the possibility that ERβ might influence BC cell behavior via miRNAs, we compared miRNome expression in ERβ+ vs ERβ- hormone-responsive BC cells and found a widespread effect of this ER subtype on the expression pattern of these non-coding RNAs. More importantly, the expression pattern of 67 miRNAs, including 10 regulated by ERβ in BC cells, clearly distinguishes ERβ+, node-negative, from ERβ-, metastatic, mammary tumors. Molecular dissection of miRNA biogenesis revealed multiple mechanisms for direct regulation of this process by ERβ+ in BC cell nuclei. In particular, ERβ downregulates miR-30a by binding to two specific sites proximal to the gene and thereby inhibiting pri-miR synthesis. On the other hand, the receptor promotes miR-23b, -27b and 24-1 accumulation in the cell by binding in close proximity of the corresponding gene cluster and preventing in situ the inhibitory effects of ERα on pri-miR maturation by the p68/DDX5-Drosha microprocessor complex. These results indicate that cell autonomous regulation of miRNA expression is part of the mechanism of action of ERβ in BC cells and could contribute to establishment or maintenance of a less aggressive tumor phenotype mediated by this nuclear receptor. PMID:22231442

  18. Hormonal, metabolic, and cardiorespiratory responses of young and adult athletes to a single session of high-intensity cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Engel, Florian; Härtel, Sascha; Wagner, Matthias Oliver; Strahler, Jana; Bös, Klaus; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of a single high-intensity interval training (HIIT) session on salivary cortisol (SC) levels, physiological responses, and performance in trained boys and men. Twenty-three boys (11.5 ± 0.8 years) and 25 men (29.7 ± 4.6 years) performed HIIT (4 consecutive Wingate Anaerobic Tests). SC in boys and men increased after HIIT from 5.55 ± 3.3 nmol/l to 15.13 ± 9.7 nmol/l (+173%) and from 7.07 ± 4.7 nmol/l to 19.19 ± 12.7 nmol/l (+171%), respectively (p < .01). Pretest SC as well as posttest changes were comparable in both groups (both p < .01). Peak blood lactate concentration was significantly lower in boys (12.6 ± 3.5 mmol/l) than in men (16.3 ± 3.1 mmol/l; p < .01). Throughout the HIIT, mean heart rates in boys were higher (p < .001) but relative peak oxygen uptake (ml·min-1·kg-1; p < .05) and performance were lower (p < .001) in boys than in men. HIIT in young athletes is associated with a higher activation of the hormonal stress axis than other types of exercise regimes as described in the literature. This study is the first to show a pronounced SC increase to HIIT in trained boys accompanied by elevated levels of blood lactate concentrations and heart rate suggesting a high cardio-respiratory, metabolic, and hormonal response to HIIT in 11-year-old boys.

  19. Intrauterine growth restriction perturbs nucleosome depletion at a growth hormone-responsive element in the mouse IGF-1 gene.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Robert A; Yost, Christian C; Yu, Xing; Wiedmeier, Julia E; Callaway, Christopher W; Brown, Ashley S; Lane, Robert H; Fung, Camille M

    2015-12-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a common human pregnancy complication. IUGR offspring carry significant postnatal risk for early-onset metabolic syndrome, which is associated with persistent reduction in IGF-1 protein expression. We have previously shown that preadolescent IUGR male mice have decreased hepatic IGF-1 mRNA and circulating IGF-1 protein at postnatal day 21, the age when growth hormone (GH) normally upregulates hepatic IGF-1 expression. Here we studied nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation at a putative growth hormone-responsive element in intron 2 (in2GHRE) of the hepatic IGF-1 gene in normal, sham-operated, and IUGR mice. Nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation were determined in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in liver at postnatal days 14, 21, and 42. For CpG methylation, additional time points out to 2 yr were analyzed. We confirmed the putative mouse in2GHRE was GH-responsive, and in normal mice, a single nucleosome was displaced from the hepatic in2GHRE by postnatal day 21, which exposed two STAT5b DNA binding sites. Nucleosome displacement correlated with developmentally programmed CpG demethylation. Finally, IUGR significantly altered the nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) at the in2GHRE of IGF-1 on postnatal day 21, with either complete absence of the NDR or with a shifted NDR exposing only one of two STAT5b DNA binding sites. An NDR shift was also seen in offspring of sham-operated mothers. We conclude that prenatal insult such as IUGR or anesthesia/surgery could perturb the proper formation of a well-positioned NDR at the mouse hepatic IGF-1 in2GHRE necessary for transitioning to an open chromatin state. PMID:26487705

  20. Immune gene expression profile of Penaeus monodon in response to marine yeast glucan application and white spot syndrome virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wilsy; Lowman, Douglas; Antony, Swapna P; Puthumana, Jayesh; Bright Singh, I S; Philip, Rosamma

    2015-04-01

    Immunostimulant potential of eight marine yeast glucans (YG) from Candida parapsilosis R20, Hortaea werneckii R23, Candida spencermartinsiae R28, Candida haemulonii R63, Candida oceani R89, Debaryomyces fabryi R100, Debaryomyces nepalensis R305 and Meyerozyma guilliermondii R340 were tested against WSSV challenge in Penaeus monodon post larvae (PL). Structural characterization of these marine yeast glucans by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicated structures containing (1-6)-branched (1-3)-β-D-glucan. PL were fed 0.2% glucan incorporated diet once in seven days for a period of 45 days and the animals were challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The immunostimulatory activity of yeast glucans were assessed pre- and post-challenge WSSV by analysing the expression profile of six antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes viz., anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF), crustin-1, crustin-2, crustin-3, penaeidin-3 and penaeidin-5 and 13 immune genes viz., alpha-2-macroglobulin (α-2-M), astakine, caspase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase, haemocyanin, peroxinectin, pmCathepsinC, prophenol oxidase (proPO), Rab-7, superoxide dismutase and transglutaminase. Expression of seven WSSV genes viz., DNA polymerase, endonuclease, protein kinase, immediate early gene, latency related gene, thymidine kinase and VP28 were also analysed to detect the presence and intensity of viral infection in the experimental animals post-challenge. The study revealed that yeast glucans (YG) do possess immunostimulatory activity against WSSV and also supported higher survival (40-70 %) post-challenge WSSV. Among the various glucans tested, YG23 showed maximum survival (70.27%), followed by YG20 (66.66%), YG28 (60.97%), YG89 (58.53%), YG100 (54.05%), YG63 (48.64%), YG305 (45.7%) and YG340 (43.24%). PMID:25555812

  1. Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Benefits a Non-Vector Arthropod, Tetranychus Urticae, by Modulating Different Plant Responses in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Nachappa, Punya; Margolies, David C.; Nechols, James R.; Whitfield, Anna E.; Rotenberg, Dorith

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between plant viruses and non-vector arthropod herbivores is poorly understood. However, there is accumulating evidence that plant viruses can impact fitness of non-vector herbivores. In this study, we used oligonucleotide microarrays, phytohormone, and total free amino acid analyses to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and a non-vector arthropod, twospotted spider mite (Tetranychusurticae), on tomato plants, Solanumlycopersicum. Twospotted spider mites showed increased preference for and fecundity on TSWV-infected plants compared to mock-inoculated plants. Transcriptome profiles of TSWV-infected plants indicated significant up-regulation of salicylic acid (SA)-related genes, but no apparent down-regulation of jasmonic acid (JA)-related genes which could potentially confer induced resistance against TSM. This suggests that there was no antagonistic crosstalk between the signaling pathways to influence the interaction between TSWV and spider mites. In fact, SA- and JA-related genes were up-regulated when plants were challenged with both TSWV and the herbivore. TSWV infection resulted in down-regulation of cell wall-related genes and photosynthesis-associated genes, which may contribute to host plant susceptibility. There was a three-fold increase in total free amino acid content in virus-infected plants compared to mock-inoculated plants. Total free amino acid content is critical for arthropod nutrition and may, in part, explain the apparent positive indirect effect of TSWV on spider mites. Taken together, these data suggest that the mechanism(s) of increased host suitability of TSWV-infected plants to non-vector herbivores is complex and likely involves several plant biochemical processes. PMID:24058708

  2. Hyponatremia in Severe Malaria: Evidence for an Appropriate Anti-diuretic Hormone Response to Hypovolemia

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Josh; Hossain, Amir; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Hassan, Mahtab Uddin; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lam, Sophia W. K.; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Maude, Richard J.; Yunus, Emran Bin; Haque, Gofranul; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2009-01-01

    Although hyponatremia occurs in most patients with severe malaria, its pathogenesis, prognostic significance, and optimal management have not been established. Clinical and biochemical data were prospectively collected from 171 consecutive Bangladeshi adults with severe malaria. On admission, 57% of patients were hyponatremic. Plasma sodium and Glasgow Coma Score were inversely related (rs = −0.36, P < 0.0001). Plasma antidiuretic hormone concentrations were similar in hyponatremic and normonatremic patients (median, range: 6.1, 2.3–85.3 versus 32.7, 3.0–56.4 pmol/L; P = 0.19). Mortality was lower in hyponatremic than normonatremic patients (31.6% versus 51.4%; odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.44 [0.23–0.82]; P = 0.01 by univariate analysis). Plasma sodium normalized with crystalloid rehydration from (median, range) 127 (123–140) mmol/L on admission to 136 (128–149) mmol/L at 24 hours (P = 0.01). Hyponatremia in adults with severe malaria is common and associated with preserved consciousness and decreased mortality. It likely reflects continued oral hypotonic fluid intake in the setting of hypovolemia and requires no therapy beyond rehydration. PMID:19141852

  3. Bovine serum thyroxine, prolactin, growth hormone, glucocorticoid, and thyroxine binding globulin response to thyroprotein.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G H; Convey, E M; Tucker, H A; Reineke, E P; Thomas, J W; Byrne, J J

    1975-05-01

    Twenty-one lactating Holstein cows were assigned randomly to groups of seven and received: (1) no treatment; (2) 15 g thyroprotein daily for 5 wk; or (3) 15 g thyroprotein daily for 13 wk. Combined averages for serum thyroxine of cows in thyroprotein groups increased linearly from a baseline of 54 ng/ml to a peak of 135 ng/ml at 6 days after thyroprotein feeding was begun. Serum thyroxine then decreased to approximately 80 ng/ml at 23 days of thyroprotein feeding which was maintained during the remainder of the feeding period. Following thyroprotein withdrawal from the diet serum thyroxine concentration decreased to 24 ng/ml at 6 days. Neither serum prolactin, growth hormone, nor total glucocorticoids were affected by thyroprotein feeding or withdrawal. Average milk production of cows in the control group decreased linearly with time. Milk production of cows fed thyroprotein for 5 wk averaged 2.2 to 3.3 kg/day more than cows in the control group and that of cows fed thyroprotein for 13 wk averaged .95 to 2.5 kg/day more than controls for 60 days, but between 60 and 91 days it was .9 kg/day less than controls.

  4. Regional responsiveness of the tibia to intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone as affected by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Tanner, S.; Curren, T.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether the acute inhibition of bone formation and deficit in bone mineral induced by skeletal unloading can be prevented, we studied the effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) administration (8 micrograms/100 g/day) on growing rats submitted to 8 days of skeletal unloading. Loss of weight bearing decreased periosteal bone formation by 34 and 51% at the tibiofibular junction and tibial midshaft, respectively, and reduced the normal gain in tibial mass by 35%. Treatment with PTH of normally loaded and unloaded animals increased mRNA for osteocalcin (+58 and +148%, respectively), cancellous bone volume in the proximal tibia (+41 and +42%, respectively), and bone formation at the tibiofibular junction (+27 and +27%, respectively). Formation was also stimulated at the midshaft in unloaded (+47%, p < 0.05), but not loaded animals (-3%, NS). Although cancellous bone volume was preserved in PTH-treated, unloaded animals, PTH did not restore periosteal bone formation to normal nor prevent the deficit in overall tibial mass induced by unloading. We conclude that the effects of PTH on bone formation are region specific and load dependent. PTH can prevent the decrease in cancellous bone volume and reduce the decrement in cortical bone formation induced by loss of weight bearing.

  5. Short Stature in Partially Corrected X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency- Suboptimal Response to Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Shum, Elaine; Zarember, Kol A.; Rezvani, Geoffrey; Rosenfeld, Ron G.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Malech, Harry L.

    2009-01-01

    Background X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results from defects in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) required for signaling by receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, -4, -7, -9, -15, and -21 (1). Following haploidentical bone marrow transplant without myelo-conditioning for XSCID, most patients achieve partial reconstitution(2) often limited to T lymphocytes. Many partially corrected patients manifest extreme short stature (<5th percentile). Previous reports have implicated γc in growth hormone (GH) receptor signaling, thus severe growth failure in XSCID may be related to the underlying γc defect. Objective To evaluate the GH/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) axes in 3 children with XSCID and partial immune reconstitution with profound growth failure. Methods The IGF-1 generation test was performed by administering recombinant GH subcutaneously for 5 days, and measuring serum levels for IGF-1 before GH injection, and on days 5 and 8. Results Study of the somatotropic axis revealed profoundly diminished IGF-1 production following rGH challenge in all 3 patients. Conclusion The data indicate that the GH/IGF-1 axes in these partially corrected XSCID patients with severe short stature is profoundly impaired, and supports previous studies suggesting that the underlying γc defect may contribute to the severe growth failure in XSCID. This supports a role for defective γc in extreme short stature of XSCID, and raises the possibility of recombinant IGF-1 treatment to bypass this defect. PMID:19189700

  6. Effects of sex and early maternal abuse on adrenocorticotropin hormone and cortisol responses to the corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge during the first 3 years of life in group-living rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    SANCHEZ, MAR M.; MCCORMACK, KAI; GRAND, ALISON P.; FULKS, RICHELLE; GRAFF, ANNE; MAESTRIPIERI, DARIO

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the development of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis in 21 group-living rhesus monkeys infants that were physically abused by their mothers in the first few months of life and in 21 nonabused controls. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) responses to a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge were assessed at 6-month intervals during the subjects’ first 3 years of life. Abused infants exhibited greater cortisol responses to CRH than controls across the 3 years. Abused infants also exhibited blunted ACTH secretion in response to CRH, especially at 6 months of age. Although there were no significant sex differences in abuse experienced early in life, females showed a greater cortisol response to CRH than males at all ages. There were no significant sex differences in the ACTH response to CRH, or significant interactions between sex and abuse in the ACTH or cortisol response. Our findings suggest that early parental maltreatment results in greater adrenocortical, and possibly also pituitary, responsiveness to challenges later in life. These long-term alterations in neuroendocrine function may be one the mechanisms through which infant abuse results in later psychopathologies. Our study also suggests that there are developmental sex differences in adrenal function that occur irrespective of early stressful experience. The results of this study can enhance our understanding of the long-term effects of child maltreatment as well as our knowledge of the development of the HPA axis in human and nonhuman primates. PMID:20102646

  7. Effects of sex and early maternal abuse on adrenocorticotropin hormone and cortisol responses to the corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge during the first 3 years of life in group-living rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Mar M; McCormack, Kai; Grand, Alison P; Fulks, Richelle; Graff, Anne; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in 21 group-living rhesus monkeys infants that were physically abused by their mothers in the first few months of life and in 21 nonabused controls. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) responses to a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge were assessed at 6-month intervals during the subjects' first 3 years of life. Abused infants exhibited greater cortisol responses to CRH than controls across the 3 years. Abused infants also exhibited blunted ACTH secretion in response to CRH, especially at 6 months of age. Although there were no significant sex differences in abuse experienced early in life, females showed a greater cortisol response to CRH than males at all ages. There were no significant sex differences in the ACTH response to CRH, or significant interactions between sex and abuse in the ACTH or cortisol response. Our findings suggest that early parental maltreatment results in greater adrenocortical, and possibly also pituitary, responsiveness to challenges later in life. These long-term alterations in neuroendocrine function may be one the mechanisms through which infant abuse results in later psychopathologies. Our study also suggests that there are developmental sex differences in adrenal function that occur irrespective of early stressful experience. The results of this study can enhance our understanding of the long-term effects of child maltreatment as well as our knowledge of the development of the HPA axis in human and nonhuman primates.

  8. Enhanced responsiveness to parathyroid hormone and induction of functional differentiation of cultured rabbit costal chondrocytes by a pulsed electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Y; Endo, N; Takigawa, M; Asada, A; Takahashi, H; Suzuki, F

    1987-10-22

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields promote healing of delayed united and ununited fractures by triggering a series of events in fibrocartilage. We examined the effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field (recurrent bursts, 15.4 Hz, of shorter pulses of an average of 2 gauss) on rabbit costal chondrocytes in culture. A pulsed electromagnetic field slightly reduced the intracellular cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) level in the culture. However, it significantly enhanced cAMP accumulation in response to parathyroid hormone (PTH) to 140% of that induced by PTH in its absence, while it did not affect cAMP accumulation in response to prostaglandin E1 or prostaglandin I2. The effect on cAMP accumulation in response to PTH became evident after exposure of the cultures to the pulsed electromagnetic field for 48 h, and was dependent upon the field strength. cAMP accumulation in response to PTH is followed by induction of ornithine decarboxylase, a good marker of differentiated chondrocytes, after PTH treatment for 4 h. Consistent with the enhanced cAMP accumulation, ornithine decarboxylase activity induced by PTH was also increased by the pulsed electromagnetic field to 170% of that in cells not exposed to a pulsed electromagnetic field. Furthermore, stimulation of glycosaminoglycan synthesis, a differentiated phenotype, in response to PTH was significantly enhanced by a pulsed electromagnetic field. Thus, a pulsed electromagnetic field enhanced a series of events in rabbit costal chondrocytes in response to PTH. These findings show that exposure of chondrocytes to a pulsed electromagnetic field resulted in functional differentiation of the cells.

  9. The Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Suppresses TLR2-Mediated Functional Responses through IRAK-M in Normal Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sunhyo; Johnson, Andrew; Park, Yoonkyung; Kim, Beomjoon; Norris, David; Armstrong, Cheryl A.; Song, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a highly conserved 13-aa neuropeptide derived from pro-opiomelanocortin by post-translational processing, which has been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory activity and a wide range of immunosuppressive activities in the skin. However, the regulatory effect of α-MSH is not completely clear in cutaneous innate immunity. In this study, we investigate the functional regulation of α-MSH in TLR2-mediated inflammatory responses in normal human keratinocytes (HKs). α-MSH pretreatment down-regulated the Staphylococcus aureus LTA-induced expression of both TLR2 and IL-8 as well as NF-κB nuclear translocation in HK cells. The inhibitory effect of α-MSH was blocked by agouti signaling protein (ASP), an α-MSH receptor-1 antagonist. To investigate the mechanism of this response in more detail, siRNA of IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, was utilized in these studies. The α-MSH suppressive effect on IL-8 production and NF-κB transactivation was inhibited by IRAK-M siRNA transfection in HK cells. These results indicate that α-MSH is capable of suppressing keratinocyte TLR2-mediated inflammatory responses induced by S. aureus-LTA, thus demonstrating another novel immunomodulatory activity of α-MSH in normal human keratinocytes. PMID:26309029

  10. Neuropeptide Receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 Regulate Caenorhabditis elegans Avoidance Response to the Plant Stress Hormone Methyl Salicylate

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jintao; Xu, Zhaofa; Tan, Zhiping; Zhang, Zhuohua; Ma, Long

    2015-01-01

    Methyl salicylate (MeSa) is a stress hormone released by plants under attack by pathogens or herbivores . MeSa has been shown to attract predatory insects of herbivores and repel pests. The molecules and neurons underlying animal response to MeSa are not known. Here we found that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a strong avoidance response to MeSa, which requires the activities of two closely related neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2. Molecular analyses suggest that NPR-1 expressed in the RMG inter/motor neurons is required for MeSa avoidance. An NPR-1 ligand FLP-18 is also required. Using a rescuing npr-2 promoter to drive a GFP transgene, we identified that NPR-2 is expressed in multiple sensory and interneurons. Genetic rescue experiments suggest that NPR-2 expressed in the AIZ interneurons is required for MeSa avoidance. We also provide evidence that the AWB sensory neurons might act upstream of RMGs and AIZs to detect MeSa. Our results suggest that NPR-2 has an important role in regulating animal behavior and that NPR-1 and NPR-2 act on distinct interneurons to affect C. elegans avoidance response to MeSa. PMID:25527285

  11. Growth hormone response to catecholamine depletion in unmedicated, remitted subjects with major depressive disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Homan, Philipp; Drevets, Wayne C; Hasler, Gregor

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether the human growth hormone (HGH) response to catecholamine depletion differs between fully remitted patients with major depressive disorder and healthy control subjects. Fourteen unmedicated subjects with remitted major depressive disorder (RMDD) and 11 healthy control subjects underwent catecholamine depletion with oral α-methylparatyrosine (AMPT) in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. The main outcome measure was the serum level of HGH. The diagnosis × drug interaction for HGH serum concentration was significant (F₁,₂₃ = 7.66, P < 0.02). This interaction was attributable to the HGH level increasing after AMPT administration in the RMDD subjects but not in the healthy subjects. In the RMDD sample, the AMPT-induced increase in HGH concentration correlated inversely with AMPT-induced anxiety symptoms as assessed using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (r = -0.63, P < 0.02). There was a trend toward an inverse correlation of the AMPT-induced HGH concentration changes with AMPT-induced depressive symptoms as measured by the BDI (r = -0.53, P = 0.05). Following catecholamine depletion, the RMDD subjects were differentiated from control subjects by their HGH responses. This finding, together with the negative correlation between HGH response and AMPT-induced anxiety symptoms in RMDD subjects, suggests that AMPT administration results in a deeper nadir in central catecholaminergic transmission, as reflected by a greater disinhibition of HGH secretion, in RMDD subjects versus control subjects.

  12. Anophthalmia, hearing loss, abnormal pituitary development and response to growth hormone therapy in three children with microdeletions of 14q22q23

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microdeletions of 14q22q23 have been associated with eye abnormalities and pituitary defects. Other phenotypic features in deletion carriers including hearing loss and response to growth hormone therapy are less well recognized. We studied genotype and phenotype of three newly identified children with 14q22q23 deletions, two girls and one boy with bilateral anophthalmia, and compared them with previously published deletion patients and individuals with intragenic defects in genes residing in the region. Results The three deletions were de novo and ranged in size between 5.8 and 8.9 Mb. All three children lacked one copy of the OTX2 gene and in one of them the deletion involved also the BMP4 gene. All three patients presented partial conductive hearing loss which tended to improve with age. Analysis of endocrine and growth phenotypes showed undetectable anterior pituitary, growth hormone deficiency and progressive growth retardation in all three patients. Growth hormone therapy led to partial catch-up growth in two of the three patients but just prevented further height loss in the third. Conclusions The pituitary hypoplasia, growth hormone deficiency and growth retardation associated with 14q22q23 microdeletions are very remarkable, and the latter appears to have an atypical response to growth hormone therapy in some of the cases. PMID:24581273

  13. Effect of extended morning fasting upon ad libitum lunch intake and associated metabolic and hormonal responses in obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, E A; Richardson, J D; Tsintzas, K; Thompson, D; Betts, J A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Breakfast omission is positively associated with obesity and increased risk of disease. However, little is known about the acute effects of extended morning fasting upon subsequent energy intake and associated metabolic/regulatory factors in obese adults. Subjects/Methods: In a randomised cross-over design, 24 obese men (n=8) and women (n=16) extended their overnight fast by omitting breakfast consumption or ingesting a typical carbohydrate-rich breakfast of 2183±393 kJ (521±94 kcal), before an ad libitum pasta lunch 3 h later. Blood samples were obtained throughout the day until 3 h post lunch and analysed for hormones implicated in appetite regulation, along with metabolic outcomes and subjective appetite measures. Results: Lunch intake was unaffected by extended morning fasting (difference=218 kJ, 95% confidence interval −54 kJ, 490 kJ; P=0.1) resulting in lower total intake in the fasting trial (difference=−1964 kJ, 95% confidence interval −1645 kJ, −2281 kJ; P<0.01). Systemic concentrations of peptide tyrosine–tyrosine and leptin were lower during the afternoon following morning fasting (P⩽0.06). Plasma-acylated ghrelin concentrations were also lower following the ad libitum lunch in the fasting trial (P<0.05) but this effect was not apparent for total ghrelin (P⩾0.1). Serum insulin concentrations were greater throughout the afternoon in the fasting trial (P=0.05), with plasma glucose also greater 1 h after lunch (P<0.01). Extended morning fasting did not result in greater appetite ratings after lunch, with some tendency for lower appetite 3 h post lunch (P=0.09). Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that, in obese adults, extended morning fasting does not cause compensatory intake during an ad libitum lunch nor does it increase appetite during the afternoon. Morning fasting reduced satiety hormone responses to a subsequent lunch meal but counterintuitively also reduced concentrations of

  14. Serum IGF-I and hormonal responses to incremental exercise in athletes with and without left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zebrowska, Aleksandra; Gąsior, Zbigniew; Langfort, Józef

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the response of insulin-like growth factor (IGF- I), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and some hormones, i.e., testosterone (T), growth hormone (GH), cortisol (C), and insulin (I), to maximal exercise in road cyclists with and without diagnosed left ventricular hypertrophy. M-mode and two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography was performed in 30 professional male endurance athletes and a group of 14 healthy untrained subjects using a Hewlett-Packard Image Point HX ultrasound system with standard imaging transducers. Echocardiography and an incremental physical exercise test were performed during the competitive season. Venous blood samples were drawn before and immediately after the maximal cycling exercise test for determination of somatomedin and hormonal concentrations. The basal concentration of IGF-I was statistically higher (p < 0.05) in athletes with left ventricular muscle hypertrophy (LVH) when compared to athletes with a normal upper limit of the left ventricular wall (LVN) (p < 0.05) and to the control group (CG) (p < 0.01). The IGF-I level increased significantly at maximal intensity of incremental exercise in CG (p < 0.01), LVN (p < 0.05) and LVH (p < 0.05) compared to respective values at rest. Long-term endurance training induced an increase in resting (p < 0.01) and post-exercise (p < 0.05) IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio in athletes with LVH compared to LVN. The testosterone (T) level was lower in LVH at rest compared to LVN and CG groups (p < 0.05). These results indicate that resting serum IGF-I concentration were higher in trained subjects with LVH compared to athletes without LVH. Serum IGF- I/IGFBP-3 elevation at rest and after exercise might suggest that IGF-I act as a potent stimulant of left ventricular hypertrophy in chronically trained endurance athletes. Key pointsIn sports training athletes engaged in the same training regimen acquired different stages of cardiac hypertrophy.Physical exercise had a significant

  15. Serum anti-Müllerian hormone levels as a predictor of the ovarian response and IVF outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min Hye; Yoo, Ji Hee; Cha, Sun Hwa; Park, Chan Woo; Yang, Kwang Moon; Song, In Ok; Koong, Mi Kyoung; Kang, Inn Soo

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels could be predict ovarian poor/hyper response and IVF cycle outcome. Methods Between May 2010 and January 2011, serum AMH levels were evaluated with retrospective analysis. Three hundred seventy infertile women undergoing 461 IVF cycles between the ages of 20 and 42 were studied. We defined the poor response as the number of oocytes retrieved was equal or less than 3, and the hyper response as more than 25 oocytes retrieved. Serum AMH was measured by commercial enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results The number of oocytes retrieved was more correlated with the serum AMH level (r=0.781, p<0.01) than serum FSH (r=-0.412, p<0.01). The cut-off value of serum AMH levels for poor response was 1.05 ng/mL (receiver operating characteristic [ROC] curves/area under the curve [AUC], ROCAUC=0.85, sensitivity 74%, specificity 87%). Hyper response cut-off value was 3.55 ng/mL (ROCAUC=0.91, sensitivity 94%, specificity 81%). When the study group was divided according to the serum AMH levels (low: <1.05 ng/mL, middle: 1.05 ng/mL - 3.55 ng/mL, high: >3.55 ng/mL), the groups showed no statistical differences in mature oocyte rates (71.6% vs. 76.5% vs. 74.8%) or fertilization rates (76.9% vs. 76.6% vs. 73.8%), but showed significant differences in clinical pregnancy rates (21.7% vs. 24.1% vs. 40.8%, p=0.017). Conclusion The serum AMH level can be used to predict the number of oocytes retrieved in patients, distinguishing poor and high responders. PMID:22384435

  16. Does short-term fasting lead to stressed-out parents? A study of incubation commitment and the hormonal stress responses and recoveries in snow petrels.

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Wingfield, John C; Parenteau, Charline; Pellé, Marie; Chastel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The hormonal stress response is flexible and can be modulated by individuals according to its costs and benefits. Therefore, it is predicted that parents in poor body condition should modify their hormonal stress response, and thus, redirect energy allocation processes from parental care to self-maintenance when stressors occur. To test this prediction, most studies on free-living vertebrates have only focused on the stress response while the stress recovery - how quickly hormonal levels return to baseline values - has been neglected. Moreover, most studies have only focused on corticosterone - the primary mediator of allostasis - without paying attention to prolactin despite its major role in mediating parental behaviors. Here, we examined the effect of a short-term fasting event on the corticosterone and prolactin stress responses and recoveries, and we subsequently explored their relationships with parental decision in the snow petrel (Pagodroma nivea). By comparing the hormonal profiles of fasting and non-fasting snow petrels, we showed that parents modulate their corticosterone (but not prolactin) stress response according to their energetic status. We also described for the first time the hormonal stress recoveries in wild birds and found that they did not differ between fasting and non-fasting birds. Importantly, egg neglect was negatively correlated with circulating prolactin but not corticosterone levels in this species, demonstrating therefore a complex link between body condition, parental behavior and circulating corticosterone and prolactin levels. We suggest that both corticosterone and prolactin play a major role in the way parents adjust to stressors. This multiple signaling may allow parents to fine-tune their response to stressors, and especially, to activate specific allostasis-related mechanisms in a timely manner. PMID:25456104

  17. Does short-term fasting lead to stressed-out parents? A study of incubation commitment and the hormonal stress responses and recoveries in snow petrels.

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Wingfield, John C; Parenteau, Charline; Pellé, Marie; Chastel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The hormonal stress response is flexible and can be modulated by individuals according to its costs and benefits. Therefore, it is predicted that parents in poor body condition should modify their hormonal stress response, and thus, redirect energy allocation processes from parental care to self-maintenance when stressors occur. To test this prediction, most studies on free-living vertebrates have only focused on the stress response while the stress recovery - how quickly hormonal levels return to baseline values - has been neglected. Moreover, most studies have only focused on corticosterone - the primary mediator of allostasis - without paying attention to prolactin despite its major role in mediating parental behaviors. Here, we examined the effect of a short-term fasting event on the corticosterone and prolactin stress responses and recoveries, and we subsequently explored their relationships with parental decision in the snow petrel (Pagodroma nivea). By comparing the hormonal profiles of fasting and non-fasting snow petrels, we showed that parents modulate their corticosterone (but not prolactin) stress response according to their energetic status. We also described for the first time the hormonal stress recoveries in wild birds and found that they did not differ between fasting and non-fasting birds. Importantly, egg neglect was negatively correlated with circulating prolactin but not corticosterone levels in this species, demonstrating therefore a complex link between body condition, parental behavior and circulating corticosterone and prolactin levels. We suggest that both corticosterone and prolactin play a major role in the way parents adjust to stressors. This multiple signaling may allow parents to fine-tune their response to stressors, and especially, to activate specific allostasis-related mechanisms in a timely manner.

  18. Gut hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glycemic responses to erythritol and xylitol in lean and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K; Cajacob, Lucian; Keller, Nino; Doody, Alison; Rehfeld, Jens F; Drewe, Juergen; Peterli, Ralph; Beglinger, Christoph; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity and a possible association with increasing sucrose consumption, nonnutritive sweeteners are gaining popularity. Given that some studies indicate that artificial sweeteners might have adverse effects, alternative solutions are sought. Xylitol and erythritol have been known for a long time and their beneficial effects on caries prevention and potential health benefits in diabetic patients have been demonstrated in several studies. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are released from the gut in response to food intake, promote satiation, reduce gastric emptying (GE), and modulate glucose homeostasis. Although glucose ingestion stimulates sweet taste receptors in the gut and leads to incretin and gastrointestinal hormone release, the effects of xylitol and erythritol have not been well studied. Ten lean and 10 obese volunteers were given 75 g of glucose, 50 g of xylitol, or 75 g of erythritol in 300 ml of water or placebo (water) by a nasogastric tube. We examined plasma glucose, insulin, active GLP-1, CCK, and GE with a [(13)C]sodium acetate breath test and assessed subjective feelings of satiation. Xylitol and erythritol led to a marked increase in CCK and GLP-1, whereas insulin and plasma glucose were not (erythritol) or only slightly (xylitol) affected. Both xylitol and erythritol induced a significant retardation in GE. Subjective feelings of appetite were not significantly different after carbohydrate intake compared with placebo. In conclusion, acute ingestion of erythritol and xylitol stimulates gut hormone release and slows down gastric emptying, whereas there is no or only little effect on insulin release. PMID:27117004

  19. Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes hyperactivity, lean body composition, and hormonal responses across the murine life course

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Olivia S.; Peterson, Karen E.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Mancuso, Peter; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of adult-onset diseases is influenced by perinatal exposure to altered environmental conditions. One such exposure, bisphenol A (BPA), has been associated with obesity and diabetes, and consequently labeled an obesogen. Using an isogenic murine model, we examined the effects of perinatal exposure through maternal diet to 50 ng (n=20), 50 μg (n=21), or 50 mg (n=18) BPA/kg diet, as well as controls (n=20) on offspring energy expenditure, spontaneous activity, and body composition at 3, 6, and 9 mo of age, and hormone levels at 9 and 10 mo of age. Overall, exposed females and males exhibited increased energy expenditure (P<0.001 and 0.001, respectively) throughout the life course. In females, horizontal and vertical activity increased (P=0.07 and 0.06, respectively) throughout the life course. Generally, body composition measures were not different throughout the life course in exposed females or males (all P>0.44), although body fat and weight decreased in exposed females at particular ages (all P<0.08). Milligram-exposed females had improved glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and leptin profiles (all P<0.10). Thus, life-course analysis illustrates that BPA is associated with hyperactive and lean phenotypes. Variability across studies may be attributable to differential exposure duration and timing, dietary fat and phytoestrogen content, or lack of sophisticated phenotyping across the life course.—Anderson, O.S., Peterson, K.E., Sanchez, B.N., Zhang, Z., Mancuso, P., Dolinoy, D.C. Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes hyperactivity, lean body composition, and hormonal responses across the murine life course. PMID:23345456

  20. Response to copper excess in Arabidopsis thaliana: Impact on the root system architecture, hormone distribution, lignin accumulation and mineral profile.

    PubMed

    Lequeux, Hélène; Hermans, Christian; Lutts, Stanley; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2010-08-01

    Growth, in particular reorganization of the root system architecture, mineral homeostasis and root hormone distribution were studied in Arabidopsis thaliana upon copper excess. Five-week-old Arabidopsis plants growing in hydroponics were exposed to different Cu(2+) concentrations (up to 5 muM). Root biomass was more severely inhibited than shoot biomass and Cu was mainly retained in roots. Cu(2+) excess also induced important changes in the ionome. In roots, Mg, Ca, Fe and Zn concentrations increased, whereas K and S decreased. Shoot K, Ca, P, and Mn concentrations decreased upon Cu(2+) exposure. Further, experiments with seedlings vertically grown on agar were carried out to investigate the root architecture changes. Increasing Cu(2+) concentrations (up to 50 muM) reduced the primary root growth and increased the density of short lateral roots. Experiment of split-root system emphasized a local toxicity of Cu(2+) on the root system. Observations of GUS reporter lines suggested changes in auxin and cytokinin accumulations and in mitotic activity within the primary and secondary root tips treated with Cu(2+). At toxic Cu(2+) concentrations (50 muM), these responses were accompanied by higher root apical meristem death. Contrary to previous reports, growth on high Cu(2+) did not induce an ethylene production. Finally lignin deposition was detected in Cu(2+)-treated roots, probably impacting on the translocation of nutrients. The effects on mineral profile, hormonal status, mitotic activity, cell viability and lignin deposition changes on the Cu(2+)-induced reorganization of the root system architecture are discussed.

  1. Gut hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glycemic responses to erythritol and xylitol in lean and obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Wölnerhanssen, Bettina K; Cajacob, Lucian; Keller, Nino; Doody, Alison; Rehfeld, Jens F; Drewe, Juergen; Peterli, Ralph; Beglinger, Christoph; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity and a possible association with increasing sucrose consumption, nonnutritive sweeteners are gaining popularity. Given that some studies indicate that artificial sweeteners might have adverse effects, alternative solutions are sought. Xylitol and erythritol have been known for a long time and their beneficial effects on caries prevention and potential health benefits in diabetic patients have been demonstrated in several studies. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are released from the gut in response to food intake, promote satiation, reduce gastric emptying (GE), and modulate glucose homeostasis. Although glucose ingestion stimulates sweet taste receptors in the gut and leads to incretin and gastrointestinal hormone release, the effects of xylitol and erythritol have not been well studied. Ten lean and 10 obese volunteers were given 75 g of glucose, 50 g of xylitol, or 75 g of erythritol in 300 ml of water or placebo (water) by a nasogastric tube. We examined plasma glucose, insulin, active GLP-1, CCK, and GE with a [(13)C]sodium acetate breath test and assessed subjective feelings of satiation. Xylitol and erythritol led to a marked increase in CCK and GLP-1, whereas insulin and plasma glucose were not (erythritol) or only slightly (xylitol) affected. Both xylitol and erythritol induced a significant retardation in GE. Subjective feelings of appetite were not significantly different after carbohydrate intake compared with placebo. In conclusion, acute ingestion of erythritol and xylitol stimulates gut hormone release and slows down gastric emptying, whereas there is no or only little effect on insulin release.

  2. Reduced behavioral response to gonadal hormones in mice shipped during the peripubertal/adolescent period.

    PubMed

    Laroche, Julie; Gasbarro, Lauren; Herman, James P; Blaustein, Jeffrey D

    2009-05-01

    Animals shipped from commercial suppliers to laboratories are exposed to a wide variety of stressors. Female C57Bl6/J mice shipped during the peripubertal/adolescent period (6 wk old) display lower levels of female sexual behavior in response to estradiol and progesterone injections after ovariectomy when tested in adulthood than female mice shipped in adulthood (12 wk old). These shipping-induced reductions in female sexual behavior appear to be limited to a vulnerable period around the time of puberty. Likewise, male mice shipped at 6 wk of age express lower levels of masculine sexual behavior in response to testosterone treatment as adults than do mice shipped when 12 wk old. RIA of corticosterone levels in response to behavior testing revealed that, upon first exposure to testing, mice shipped at 6 wk of age have reduced corticosterone levels. These results suggest that during the peripubertal/adolescent period, mice of both sexes are susceptible to the effects of stressors associated with shipping. Furthermore, they suggest that stress during this period has enduring, negative influences on behavioral responses to estradiol and progesterone in females and to testosterone in males, and it induces changes in response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. These results suggest that age at shipping is a critical variable that may influence many endocrinological studies, and they suggest that the peripubertal/adolescent period is a period of vulnerability to some stressors.

  3. Endocrine responses of healthy parrots to ACTH and thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Zenoble, R D; Kemppainen, R J; Young, D W; Clubb, S L

    1985-12-01

    Effects of exogenous ACTH on plasma corticosterone and cortisol concentrations and the effects of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on plasma triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) were determined in the following 3 species of parrots: red-lored Amazon (group 1), blue-fronted Amazon (group 2), and African gray (group 3). Each bird was given ACTH (0.125 mg/bird) IM, except for 3 to 4 birds in each group, which were given saline solution (controls). Blood samples were collected before and 90 minutes after ACTH stimulation. In group 1 (n = 12), mean plasma corticosterone concentrations increased significantly (P less than 0.001) from 1.06 microgram/dl (before ACTH) to 4.89 micrograms/dl (after ACTH); mean corticosterone concentrations increased in the control birds from 1.06 microgram/dl to 1.84 microgram/dl; and mean cortisol concentrations increased only slightly from 0.228 microgram/dl to 0.266 microgram/dl. In group 2 (n = 12), mean corticosterone concentrations increased significantly (P less than 0.001) from 2.09 micrograms/dl to 10.58 micrograms/dl; control mean corticosterone concentrations decreased slightly from 2.09 micrograms/dl to 1.77 microgram/dl; and mean cortisol concentrations increased from less than or equal to 0.16 microgram/dl to 0.266 microgram/dl. In group 3 (n = 12), mean plasma corticosterone concentrations increased significantly (P less than or equal to 0.001) from 2.33 micrograms/dl to 4.67 micrograms/dl; mean control plasma corticosterone concentrations decreased from 2.33 micrograms/dl to 1.68 microgram/dl; and plasma corticol concentrations were not detectable. Each bird was given TSH, IM (1 U/bird). Blood samples were collected before and 6 hours after TSH administration. Saline solution was not administered as controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonist Overuse: Urologists’ Response to Reimbursement and Characteristics Associated with Persistent Overuse

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Carpenter, William R.; Jackson, George L.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Liu, Huan; Weinberger, Morris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medicare reimbursement cuts have been associated with declining Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist overuse in localized prostate cancer. Medical school affiliation and foreign training have been associated with persistent overuse. However, physician-level prescribing changes and the practice type of persistent overusers have not been examined. We sought to describe physician-level changes in GnRH agonist overuse and test the association of time in practice and solo practice type with GnRH agonist overuse. METHODS We matched American Medical Association physician data for 2,138 urologists to SEER–Medicare data for 12,943 men diagnosed with early stage and lower grade adenocarcinoma of the prostate between 2000 and 2007. We conducted a population-based, retrospective study using multi-level modeling to control for patient and provider characteristics. RESULTS Three distinct patterns of GnRH agonist overuse were observed. Urologists’ time in practice was not associated with GnRH agonist overuse (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.05).However, solo practice type (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.34–2.02), medical school affiliation (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.55–0.77), and patient race were. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.37–2.27), Hispanics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.12–1.79) and men of “other” race (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.04–1.99) had greater odds of receiving unnecessary GnRH agonists. CONCLUSIONS GnRH agonist overuse remains high among some urologists who may be professionally isolated and difficult to reach. These urologists treat more vulnerable populations, which may contribute to health disparities in prostate cancer treatment quality. Nonetheless, these findings provide guidance to develop interventions to address overuse in prostate cancer. PMID:25849354

  5. Postnatal growth of broilers in response to in ovo administration of chicken growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Kocamis, H; Yeni, Y N; Kirkpatrick-Keller, D C; Killefer, J

    1999-08-01

    The effect of in ovo administration of chicken growth hormone (cGH) on growth rate and efficiency of gain, organ, and long bone growth of 42-d-old broiler chickens was investigated. Eggs were injected once with 100 microL vehicle (0.03 M NaHCO3, 0.15 M NaCl, pH 8.3) per embryo or vehicle containing 100 ng cGH/100 microL per embryo (n = 630 eggs total) on one of the following Days: 1, 4, or 7 through 18 of embryogenesis. There was no significant difference in hatchability between control and cGH treatment groups on any given injection day. Cumulative feed conversion of all treatment groups was improved relative to their respective control groups (P < 0.05). In ovo administration of cGH on Day 15 or 16 of incubation increased body weights (P < 0.01) of female broilers. On the other hand, body weights of male broilers were significantly increased by treatment on Day 1 (P < 0.04). Breast weights of female broilers from treatment groups Day 15 or 16 were increased (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively). Liver weights of female broilers from treatment groups Day 1 and 15 were increased (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, respectively). In contrast, in ovo administration of cGH on Day 11 of incubation increased liver weights of male broilers (P < 0.03). There was no significant difference between control and treatment groups, in terms of heart or leg weights, or in Warner-Bratzler shear force of Pectoralis profundus muscle. Hydroxyproline concentration and cross-sectional area of female broiler tibias from treatment groups Day 11 or Day 16 were increased (P < 0.05), and ultimate breaking strength (stress) of tibias from the same groups was reduced (P < 0.05). In ovo administration of cGH altered growth and tissue development of broiler chickens in a time by sex dependent fashion.

  6. Response to fish specific reproductive hormones and endocrine disrupting chemicals of a Sertoli cell line expressing endogenous receptors from an endemic cyprinid Gnathopogon caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Shogo; Koyama, Yoshie; Shimada, Manami; Ono, Yuriko; Tooyama, Ikuo; Fujioka, Yasuhiro; Sakai, Noriyoshi; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Takada, Tatsuyuki

    2013-09-15

    Fish Sertoli cells play a critical role in spermatogenesis by mediating androgen and progestogen signaling. Their hormonal response, however, considerably differ among species. Therefore it would be ideal to use Sertoli cells originated from the fish of interest to investigate the effects of hormones as well as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The aim of this study was to investigate the responses to reproductive hormones and EDCs of a Sertoli cell line that we established from an endemic cyprinid Gnathopogon caerulescens. As the Sertoli cell line expressed endogenous androgen and progestogen receptors, we were able to detect hormone responses by transfecting only a reporter vector (pGL4.36) expressing luciferase under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus-long terminal repeat (MMTV-LTR) promoter into the cell line. Unlike previous reporter gene assays using fish steroid hormone receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines, luciferase activities were induced by the fish specific androgen (11-ketotestosterone) and progestogen (17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one), but not by testosterone and progesterone, at physiologically relevant concentrations. Furthermore, we found 4-nonylphenol (NP) but not bisphenol A showed strong anti-androgenic effects, implying that NP may have direct anti-androgenic effects on fish Sertoli cells in vivo. This is the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, of anti-androgenic effects of NP in a fish Sertoli cell line. In addition, neither NP nor BPA showed anti-progestogenic effects. These results suggest that the Sertoli cell line established from the fish of interest can be a useful in vitro tool for investigating the mechanisms of reproductive hormones and EDCs in the specific fish. PMID:23770217

  7. Influence of processing and cooking of carrots in mixed meals on satiety, glucose and hormonal response.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, K; Asp, N G; Hagander, B; Nyman, M; Schweizer, T

    1995-02-01

    The influence of processing and cooking on the metabolic response to carrots in mixed meals was explored in two consecutive harvest years. The contribution of dietary fibre (4.4 g 1989 and 6.6 g 1990) from carrots was chosen to be different in order to compare effects with varying doses. The meals, composed of carrots, creamed potatoes, meat balls, lingonberry jam, white bread and light beer, were served in the morning after an overnight fast to 10 healthy male volunteers. Carrots were investigated raw, processed (blanched and frozen) and variously cooked (thawed, boiled and microwaved). The amount of dietary fibre from the vegetable, and the content of energy, digestible carbohydrates, fat and protein were similar in the meals compared. Significantly lower glucose, insulin and C-peptide responses and higher satiety scores were elicited with raw carrots than with microwaved ones, harvest year 1989. The next year, with a higher dietary fibre intake from carrots, there were significant effects of processing only on the glucose response. Plasma beta-carotene levels tended to be higher postprandially with raw carrots than with microwaved ones. Hence, ordinary processing and cooking of vegetables can affect the metabolic response to a mixed meal. However, the influence seems to be varying and of minor importance in ordinary meals. Increasing vegetable portions entailing a higher soluble fibre content and a higher viscosity could further reduce the influence of processing.

  8. PSA Response to Lenalidomide Therapy in a Pre-Treated Patient with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Refractory to Hormones and Chemotherapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gasent Blesa, Joan Manel; Godoy, Miguel Peris; Esparcia, María Fonfría; Mollá, Sara Blasco; Magán, Balbino Mancheño; Sempere Ortells, José Miguel; Sánchez, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC) occurs when prostate cancer is no longer responsive to hormone therapy. Treatment options are limited, and there is a clear necessity for therapies that improve outcome. Preclinical and clinical evidence supports the role of the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide in HRPC. In this paper, we report that lenalidomide showed antitumoral activity in a patient with HRPC and bone metastases pre-treated with chemotherapy, decreased the PSA level and improved the patient's health status for the first 5 months. It is important to emphasize that it was not associated with hematologic toxicity. PMID:22666210

  9. High Sensitivity of Aged Mice to Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Anorexia Corresponds to Elevated Proinflammatory Cytokine and Satiety Hormone Responses

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erica S.; Flannery, Brenna M.; Gardner, Elizabeth M.; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal grains, is a public health concern because of its adverse effects on the gastrointestinal and immune systems. The objective of this study was to compare effects of DON on anorectic responses in aged (22 mos) and adult (3 mos) mice. Aged mice showed increased feed refusal with both acute i.p. (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and dietary (1, 2.5, 10 ppm) DON exposure in comparison to adult mice. In addition to greater suppression of food intake from dietary DON exposure, aged mice also exhibited greater but transient body weight suppression. When aged mice were acutely exposed to 1 mg/kg bw DON i.p., aged mice displayed elevated DON and DON3GlcA tissue levels and delayed clearance in comparison with adult mice. Acute DON exposure also elicited higher proinflammatory cytokine and satiety hormone responses in the plasma of the aged group compared with the adult group. Increased susceptibility to DON-induced anorexia in aged mice relative to adult mice suggests that advanced life stage could be a critical component in accurate human risk assessments for DON and other trichothecenes. PMID:26492270

  10. Lack of consistent hormonal responses to capture during the breeding season of the bearded dragon, Pogona barbata.

    PubMed

    Cree, A; Amey, A P; Whittier, J M

    2000-06-01

    The bearded dragon (Pogona barbata: Agamidae) is a diurnal, oviparous, multi-clutching lizard from Australia. We examined plasma hormonal responses to capture in males and females during the spring breeding season. Corticosterone concentrations at capture (0 h; < or =3 min after capture) were low (males: 1.81+/-0.63 ng/ml; females 2. 23+/-0.47 ng/ml) and within sexes were unrelated to the time of the day, snout-vent length or, in females, reproductive condition (vitellogenic, gravid, assumed spent). Corticosterone concentrations at capture were significantly and inversely correlated with body condition in males, but not in females. Unexpectedly, neither sex showed significant changes in mean concentrations of corticosterone at 3.5 or 24 h after capture compared with 0 h values. Corticosterone concentrations at 3.5 h after capture did not differ between dragons bled at capture or not. Concentrations of progesterone in both the sexes did not change between 0 h and 3.5 or 24 h after capture. Testosterone concentrations in males at capture were moderate (10.1+/-2.2 ng/ml), and unchanged at 3.5 h after capture. The adrenocortical axis of adult bearded dragons in the breeding season seems remarkably unresponsive to capture compared with many other reptiles. Low adrenocortical responses to capture may be a feature of reptiles known to adjust well to captivity. PMID:10936767

  11. Lack of consistent hormonal responses to capture during the breeding season of the bearded dragon, Pogona barbata.

    PubMed

    Cree, A; Amey, A P; Whittier, J M

    2000-06-01

    The bearded dragon (Pogona barbata: Agamidae) is a diurnal, oviparous, multi-clutching lizard from Australia. We examined plasma hormonal responses to capture in males and females during the spring breeding season. Corticosterone concentrations at capture (0 h; < or =3 min after capture) were low (males: 1.81+/-0.63 ng/ml; females 2. 23+/-0.47 ng/ml) and within sexes were unrelated to the time of the day, snout-vent length or, in females, reproductive condition (vitellogenic, gravid, assumed spent). Corticosterone concentrations at capture were significantly and inversely correlated with body condition in males, but not in females. Unexpectedly, neither sex showed significant changes in mean concentrations of corticosterone at 3.5 or 24 h after capture compared with 0 h values. Corticosterone concentrations at 3.5 h after capture did not differ between dragons bled at capture or not. Concentrations of progesterone in both the sexes did not change between 0 h and 3.5 or 24 h after capture. Testosterone concentrations in males at capture were moderate (10.1+/-2.2 ng/ml), and unchanged at 3.5 h after capture. The adrenocortical axis of adult bearded dragons in the breeding season seems remarkably unresponsive to capture compared with many other reptiles. Low adrenocortical responses to capture may be a feature of reptiles known to adjust well to captivity.

  12. Hormonally responsive breast cancer cells in a microfluidic co-culture model as a sensor of microenvironmental activity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Jessica D; Berry, Scott M; Powers, Ginny L; Beebe, David J; Alarid, Elaine T

    2013-05-01

    Breast cancer cell growth and therapeutic response are manipulated extrinsically by microenvironment signals. Despite recognition of the importance of the microenvironment in a variety of tumor processes, predictive measures that incorporate the activity of the surrounding cellular environment are lacking. In contrast, tumor cell biomarkers are well established in the clinic. Expression of Estrogen Receptor-alpha (ERα) is the primary defining feature of hormonally responsive tumors and is the molecular target of therapy in the most commonly diagnosed molecular subtype of breast cancer. While a number of soluble factors have been implicated in ERα activation, the complexity of signaling between the cellular microenvironment and the cancer cell implies multivariate control. The cumulative impact of the microenvironment signaling, which we define as microenvironmental activity, is more difficult to predict than the sum of its parts. Here we tested the impact of an array of microenvironments on ERα signaling utilizing a microfluidic co-culture model. Quantitative immunofluorescence was employed to assess changes in ERα protein levels, combined with gene expression and phosphorylation status, as measures of activation. Analysis of microenvironment-induced growth under the same conditions revealed a previously undescribed correlation between growth and ERα protein down-regulation. These data suggest an expanded utility for the tumor biomarker ERα, in which the combination of dynamic regulation of ERα protein and growth in a breast cancer biosensor cell become a read-out of the microenvironmental activity. PMID:23559098

  13. Hormonal Neuroendocrine and Vasoconstrictor Peptide Responses of Ball Game and Cyclic Sport Elite Athletes by Treadmill Test

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to evaluate complex hormonal response in ball game and cyclic sport elite athletes through an incremental treadmill test, since, so far, variables in experimental procedures have often hampered comparisons of data. Methods We determined anthropometric data, heart rate, maximal oxygen uptake, workload, plasma levels of lactate, adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, cortisol, angiontensinogen and endothelin in control (n = 6), soccer (n = 8), handball (n = 12), kayaking (n = 9) and triathlon (n = 9) groups based on a Bruce protocol through a maximal exercise type of spiroergometric test. Results We obtained significant increases for adrenaline, 2.9- and 3.9-fold by comparing the normalized means for soccer players and kayakers and soccer players and triathletes after/before test, respectively. For noradrenaline, we observed an even stronger, three-time significant difference between each type of ball game and cyclic sport activity. Conclusions Exercise related adrenaline and noradrenaline changes were more pronounced than dopamine plasma level changes and revealed an opportunity to differentiate cyclic and ball game activities and control group upon these parameters. Normalization of concentration ratios of the monitored compounds by the corresponding maximal oxygen uptake reflected better the differences in the response level of adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine and cortisol. PMID:26717409

  14. High Sensitivity of Aged Mice to Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Anorexia Corresponds to Elevated Proinflammatory Cytokine and Satiety Hormone Responses.

    PubMed

    Clark, Erica S; Flannery, Brenna M; Gardner, Elizabeth M; Pestka, James J

    2015-10-19

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal grains, is a public health concern because of its adverse effects on the gastrointestinal and immune systems. The objective of this study was to compare effects of DON on anorectic responses in aged (22 mos) and adult (3 mos) mice. Aged mice showed increased feed refusal with both acute i.p. (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and dietary (1, 2.5, 10 ppm) DON exposure in comparison to adult mice. In addition to greater suppression of food intake from dietary DON exposure, aged mice also exhibited greater but transient body weight suppression. When aged mice were acutely exposed to 1 mg/kg bw DON i.p., aged mice displayed elevated DON and DON3GlcA tissue levels and delayed clearance in comparison with adult mice. Acute DON exposure also elicited higher proinflammatory cytokine and satiety hormone responses in the plasma of the aged group compared with the adult group. Increased susceptibility to DON-induced anorexia in aged mice relative to adult mice suggests that advanced life stage could be a critical component in accurate human risk assessments for DON and other trichothecenes.

  15. The influence of sex and gonadectomy on the growth hormone and corticosterone response to hexarelin in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sibilia, V; Cocchi, D; Pagani, F; Pecile, A; Netti, C

    2000-12-01

    The present study is designed to investigate the role of sex and gonadal status in the growth hormone (GH) and corticosterone response to hexarelin (HEXA), a GH-releasing peptide, which also causes a stimulatory action on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HEXA (80 microg/Kg) was administered intracarotid to anesthetized intact or gonadectomized male (ORC) and female (OVX) middle-aged rats. The GH stimulatory response to HEXA was gender-related since the GH increase was significantly (p < 0.001) higher in intact males (area under the curve, AUC= 12560 +/- 1784 ng/ml.45 min) than in females (AUC= 4628 +/- 257 ng/ml.45 min). This sex difference does not depend on circulating gonadal steroids since it persists in ORC (AUC = 11980 +/- 1136 ng/ml.45 min) and OVX (AUC = 5539 +/- 614 ng/ml.45 min) rats. The different effects of HEXA on corticosterone secretion detected in male and female rats are probably dependent on the prevailing activity of the HPA axis. In fact, in male rats that have low basal corticosterone levels, HEXA caused an increase in corticosterone secretion, which was significantly (p< 0.05) higher in ORC than in intact rats. The increase in corticosterone secretion by HEXA both in intact and OVX females was delayed, probably due to the elevated initial corticosterone levels, which could have activated the glucocorticoid negative feedback. We suggest that gender-specific patterns in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary function could be responsible for the GH and corticosterone sexually differentiated responses to HEXA.

  16. Developmental changes in melanophores and their asymmetrical responsiveness to melanin-concentrating hormone during metamorphosis in barfin flounder (Verasper moseri).

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoki; Matsuda, Taihei; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Tagawa, Masatomo

    2013-12-01

    Barfin flounder larvae exhibit unique black coloration, as well as left-right asymmetry in juvenile stage as in other flatfish. In this study, we first assessed the changes in melanophores with development and then investigated their responsiveness to melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) during metamorphosis. Larval-type melanophores appeared on both sides of the body before metamorphosis, whereas adult-type melanophores appeared only on the ocular side after metamorphosis. Even in the individuals of this species displaying black coloration, the density of larval-type melanophores was similar to that in transparent larvae of other species. However, unlike in transparent larvae, larval-type melanophores completely dispersed in the black larvae of this species. Therefore, the black coloration during larval stages was mainly due to dispersion, and not the density, of larval-type melanophores. In vitro MCH treatment revealed, for the first time, the responsiveness of melanophores in larval stages. On the ocular side, larval-type melanophores aggregated against MCH during larval stages, while, in the larvae at later metamorphic stages and in juveniles, larval-type melanophores did not aggregate, although aggregation of adult-type melanophores was noted. In contrast, on the blind side, the responsiveness of larval-type melanophores to MCH was consistently present from larval to juvenile stages. The metamorphic transition of MCH responsiveness from larval- to adult-type melanophores only on the ocular side suggests the larval (therefore, immature) nature of the blind side skin. We propose that the inhibited development, and thus the retention of the larval-type skin leads to the formation of the blind side characteristics and is the central mechanism for the flatfish asymmetry.

  17. Endocrine response and ovum transport in women treated with D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the postovulatory period.

    PubMed

    Guiloff, E; Salvatierra, A M; Ortiz, M E; Croxatto, H B

    1982-01-15

    Possible alterations in ovum transport during increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis were investigated in women. D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone, a synthetic peptide with potent gonadotropin-releasing activity, was used to induce a gonadotropin surge and stimulate ovarian steroid secretion in the postovulatory phase. The compound was administered intramuscularly or intravenously 24, 48, or 72 hours following the maximum preovulatory LH level in plasma in seven women. An immediate and pronounced gonadotropin surge accompanied by a moderate increase in the estradiol and progesterone level was obtained in all cases. Ova were recovered from the fallopian tubes in four of the seven women 24 hours following treatment. The rate of recovery and the location of ova within the genital tract indicate that the treatment and the resulting endocrine changes failed to accelerate migration of the ova toward the uterus. This observation, taken together with other negative findings previously reported, suggests that in comparison with other mammals transport of the ovum in the woman is relatively insensitive to endocrine changes occurring in the postovulatory phase.

  18. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) attenuates morphine-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in opioid-responsive SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Ratka, A; Simpkins, J W

    1997-04-01

    SK-N-SH cells were used to assess the effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on opioid receptor-mediated changes in cyclic AMP (cAMP). Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 1 microM) caused a dramatic increase in cAMP levels. Treatment with 10 microM morphine (MOR) significantly inhibited the stimulatory effect of PGE1, LHRH (0.8 microM) caused an increase in the basal level of intracellular cAMP and potentiated the stimulatory effect of PGE1 on cAMP accumulation. In cells pretreated with LHRH the inhibitory effect of MOR on cAMP accumulation was significantly attenuated. An LHRH antagonist had no effect on cAMP. The involvement of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins in the actions of LHRH was studied. PTX increased the stimulatory effect of PGE1 on cAMP and attenuated the inhibitory effect of MOR. However, PTX pretreatment prevented the effects of LHRH on the intracellular actions of PGE1 but exerted an additive effect with LHRH in blocking the MOR-induced decrease in cAMP levels. We conclude that LHRH attenuates the inhibitory, opioid receptor-mediated effect of MOR on intracellular cAMP accumulation in SK-N-SH cells, and that the G protein-independent mechanism may be involved in LHRH-induced attenuation of the inhibitory effect of MOR on neuronal cAMP.

  19. Exploring Jasmonates in the Hormonal Network of Drought and Salinity Responses.

    PubMed

    Riemann, Michael; Dhakarey, Rohit; Hazman, Mohamed; Miro, Berta; Kohli, Ajay; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Present and future food security is a critical issue compounded by the consequences of climate change on agriculture. Stress perception and signal transduction in plants causes changes in gene or protein expression which lead to metabolic and physiological responses. Phytohormones play a central role in the integration of different upstream signals into different adaptive outputs such as changes in the activity of ion-channels, protein modifications, protein degradation, and gene expression. Phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling, and recently also phytohormone crosstalk have been investigated intensively, but the function of jasmonates under abiotic stress is still only partially understood. Although most aspects of jasmonate biosynthesis, crosstalk and signal transduction appear to be similar for biotic and abiotic stress, novel aspects have emerged that seem to be unique for the abiotic stress response. Here, we review the knowledge on the role of jasmonates under drought and salinity. The crosstalk of jasmonate biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways with those of abscisic acid (ABA) is particularly taken into account due to the well-established, central role of ABA under abiotic stress. Likewise, the accumulating evidence of crosstalk of jasmonate signaling with other phytohormones is considered as important element of an integrated phytohormonal response. Finally, protein post-translational modification, which can also occur without de novo transcription, is treated with respect to its implications for phytohormone biosynthesis, signaling and crosstalk. To breed climate-resilient crop varieties, integrated understanding of the molecular processes is required to modulate and tailor particular nodes of the network to positively affect stress tolerance.

  20. Identification and characterization of a functional retinoic acid/thyroid hormone-response element upstream of the human insulin gene enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A R; Wilson, M E; London, N J; James, R F; Docherty, K

    1995-01-01

    A deletion analysis of the human insulin gene extending to 2 kb upstream of the transcription start site provided evidence of regulatory sequences located upstream of the insulin-linked polymorphic region (ILPR). Within this ILPR-distal region is a sequence (Ink, for insulin kilobase upstream) which contains three potential nuclear hormone-receptor half-sites, closely matching the consensus sequence AGGTCA. These sequences are arranged as a palindromic element with zero spacing over-lapping a direct repeat with 2 bp spacing. The Ink sequence was used in electrophoretic mobility-shift assays within nuclear extracts from COS-7 cells overexpressing the vitamin D, thyroid hormone or retinoic acid receptors, or from an insulin-expressing hamster cell line, HIT-T15. These studies suggest that the insulin-expressing cell line contains thyroid hormone and retinoic acid receptors at least, and that these receptors are able to recognize the Ink sequence. Three copies of the Ink sequence were placed upstream of the thymidine kinase promoter and firefly luciferase reporter gene. In COS-7 cells expressing the appropriate nuclear hormone receptor, this construct was responsive to both thyroid hormone (18-fold) and all-trans-retinoic acid (31-fold). In HIT-T15 cells the same construct responded to all-trans-retinoic acid, but not to thyroid hormone. Within the context of a 2 kb insulin gene fragment, the Ink sequence was shown to be activated by retinoic acid and by the retinoic acid receptor, but acted as a negative element in the presence of both retinoic acid and the retinoic acid receptor. Mutagenesis studies demonstrated that the palindromic sequence was important for the retinoic acid response, and for binding of complexes containing retinoic acid receptor. In human islets of Langerhans, retinoic acid was shown to stimulate insulin mRNA levels. These results demonstrate that a functional nuclear hormone-receptor-response element is located upstream of the human ILPR. As

  1. COMPARATIVE EMBRYONIC AND LARVAL DEVELOPMENTAL RESPONSES OF THE ESTUARINE GRASS SHRIMP (PALAEMONETES PUGIO) TO THE JUVENILE HORMONE AGONIST FENOXYCARB

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work was undertaken in order to develop a sensitive bioassay which indicates adverse effects of estuarine-applied insecticides on nontarget species. Newly developed 'third generation' insecticides are designed to act as hormone agonists and bind to endogenous insect hormone...

  2. A comparison of the growth responses following intramuscular GHRH plasmid administration versus daily growth hormone injections in young pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of daily porcine growth hormone (GH) injections versus plasmid-driven porcine GH-releasing hormone (pGHRH) production to promote growth was assessed. Ten-day-old piglets were injected intramuscularly with 0.1, 1, or 3 mg pGHRH, or a control plasmid followed by electroporation. Plasmid c...

  3. Hot spots, hot moments and time-span of changes in drivers and their responses on carbon cycling in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomelleri, E.; Forkel, M.; Fuchs, R.; Jung, M.; Mahecha, M. D.; Reichstein, M.; Weber, U.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a complete quantitative assessment of the annual to decadal variability, hotspots of changes and the temporal magnitude of regional trends and variability for the main drivers of carbon cycle like climate and land use and their responses for Europe. For this purpose we used an harmonized climatic data set (ERA Interim and WATCH) and an historical land-use change reconstruction (HILDAv1, Fuchs in prep.). Both the data sets cover the period 1900-2010 and have a 0.25 deg spatial resolution. As driver response we used two different empirically up-scaled GPP fields: the first (MTE) obtained by the application of model trees (Jung et al. 2009) and a second (LUE) based on a light use efficiency model (Tomelleri in prep.). Both the approaches are based on the up-scaling of Fluxnet observations. The response fields have monthly temporal resolution and are limited to the period 1982-2011. We estimated break-points in time series of driver and response variables based on the method of Bai and Perron (2003) to identify changes in trends. This method was implemented in Verbesselt et al. 2010 and applied by deJong et al. 2011 to detect phenological and abrupt changes and trends in vegetation activity based on satellite-derived vegetation index time series. The analysis of drivers and responses allowed to identify the dominant factors driving the biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange. The synchronous analysis of climatic drivers and land use change allowed us to explain most of the temporal and spatial variability showing that in the regions and time period where the most land use change occurred the climatic drivers are not sufficient to explain trends and oscillation in carbon cycling. The comparison of our analysis for the up-scaling methods shows some agreement: we found inconsistency in the spatial and temporal patterns in regions where the Fluxnet network is less dense. This can be explained by the conceptual difference in the up

  4. Effects of the Transcendental Meditation program on adaptive mechanisms: changes in hormone levels and responses to stress after 4 months of practice.

    PubMed

    MacLean, C R; Walton, K G; Wenneberg, S R; Levitsky, D K; Mandarino, J P; Waziri, R; Hillis, S L; Schneider, R H

    1997-05-01

    Stress has been implicated in both somatic and mental disorders. The mechanisms by which stress leads to poor health are largely unknown. However, studies in animals suggest that chronic stress causes high basal cortisol and low cortisol response to acute stressors and that such changes may contribute to disease. Previous studies of the Transcendental Meditation (TM) technique as a possible means of countering effects of stress have reported altered levels of several hormones both during the practice and longitudinally after regular practice of this technique. In this prospective, random assignment study, changes in baseline levels and acute responses to laboratory stressors were examined for four hormones-cortisol, growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone and testosterone-before and after 4 months of either the TM technique or a stress education control condition. At pre- and post-test, blood was withdrawn continuously through an indwelling catheter, and plasma or serum samples were frozen for later analysis by radioimmunoassay. The results showed significantly different changes for the two groups, or trends toward significance, for each hormone over the 4 months. In the TM group, but not in the controls, basal cortisol level and average cortisol across the stress session decreased from pre- to post-test. Cortisol responsiveness to stressors, however, increased in the TM group compared to controls. The baselines and/or stress responsiveness for TSH and GH changed in opposite directions for the groups, as did the testosterone baseline. Overall, the cortisol and testosterone results appear to support previous data suggesting that repeated practice of the TM technique reverses effects of chronic stress significant for health. The observed group difference in the change of GH regulation may derive from the cortisol differences, while the TSH results are not related easily to earlier findings on the effects of chronic stress.

  5. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Mai, W.-Y.; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD4{sup +} T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer.

  6. Exploring Jasmonates in the Hormonal Network of Drought and Salinity Responses.

    PubMed

    Riemann, Michael; Dhakarey, Rohit; Hazman, Mohamed; Miro, Berta; Kohli, Ajay; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Present and future food security is a critical issue compounded by the consequences of climate change on agriculture. Stress perception and signal transduction in plants causes changes in gene or protein expression which lead to metabolic and physiological responses. Phytohormones play a central role in the integration of different upstream signals into different adaptive outputs such as changes in the activity of ion-channels, protein modifications, protein degradation, and gene expression. Phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling, and recently also phytohormone crosstalk have been investigated intensively, but the function of jasmonates under abiotic stress is still only partially understood. Although most aspects of jasmonate biosynthesis, crosstalk and signal transduction appear to be similar for biotic and abiotic stress, novel aspects have emerged that seem to be unique for the abiotic stress response. Here, we review the knowledge on the role of jasmonates under drought and salinity. The crosstalk of jasmonate biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways with those of abscisic acid (ABA) is particularly taken into account due to the well-established, central role of ABA under abiotic stress. Likewise, the accumulating evidence of crosstalk of jasmonate signaling with other phytohormones is considered as important element of an integrated phytohormonal response. Finally, protein post-translational modification, which can also occur without de novo transcription, is treated with respect to its implications for phytohormone biosynthesis, signaling and crosstalk. To breed climate-resilient crop varieties, integrated understanding of the molecular processes is required to modulate and tailor particular nodes of the network to positively affect stress tolerance. PMID:26648959

  7. Hormonal Responses to Cholinergic Input Are Different in Humans with and without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dunai, Judit; Kilpatrick, Rachel; Oestricker, Lauren Z.; Wallendorf, Michael J.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Reeds, Dominic N.; Wice, Burton M.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors regulate insulin and glucagon release in rodents but their importance for similar roles in humans is unclear. Bethanechol, an acetylcholine analogue that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, was used to examine the role of peripheral muscarinic signaling on glucose homeostasis in humans with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 10), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 11), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; n = 9). Subjects received four liquid meal tolerance tests, each with a different dose of oral bethanechol (0, 50, 100, or 150 mg) given 60 min before a meal containing acetaminophen. Plasma pancreatic polypeptide (PP), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose, glucagon, C-peptide, and acetaminophen concentrations were measured. Insulin secretion rates (ISRs) were calculated from C-peptide levels. Acetaminophen and PP concentrations were surrogate markers for gastric emptying and cholinergic input to islets. The 150 mg dose of bethanechol increased the PP response 2-fold only in the IGT group, amplified GLP-1 release in the IGT and T2DM groups, and augmented the GIP response only in the NGT group. However, bethanechol did not alter ISRs or plasma glucose, glucagon, or acetaminophen concentrations in any group. Prior studies showed infusion of xenin-25, an intestinal peptide, delays gastric emptying and reduces GLP-1 release but not ISRs when normalized to plasma glucose levels. Analysis of archived plasma samples from this study showed xenin-25 amplified postprandial PP responses ~4-fold in subjects with NGT, IGT, and T2DM. Thus, increasing postprandial cholinergic input to islets augments insulin secretion in mice but not humans. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01434901 PMID:27304975

  8. Exploring Jasmonates in the Hormonal Network of Drought and Salinity Responses

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Michael; Dhakarey, Rohit; Hazman, Mohamed; Miro, Berta; Kohli, Ajay; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Present and future food security is a critical issue compounded by the consequences of climate change on agriculture. Stress perception and signal transduction in plants causes changes in gene or protein expression which lead to metabolic and physiological responses. Phytohormones play a central role in the integration of different upstream signals into different adaptive outputs such as changes in the activity of ion-channels, protein modifications, protein degradation, and gene expression. Phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling, and recently also phytohormone crosstalk have been investigated intensively, but the function of jasmonates under abiotic stress is still only partially understood. Although most aspects of jasmonate biosynthesis, crosstalk and signal transduction appear to be similar for biotic and abiotic stress, novel aspects have emerged that seem to be unique for the abiotic stress response. Here, we review the knowledge on the role of jasmonates under drought and salinity. The crosstalk of jasmonate biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways with those of abscisic acid (ABA) is particularly taken into account due to the well-established, central role of ABA under abiotic stress. Likewise, the accumulating evidence of crosstalk of jasmonate signaling with other phytohormones is considered as important element of an integrated phytohormonal response. Finally, protein post-translational modification, which can also occur without de novo transcription, is treated with respect to its implications for phytohormone biosynthesis, signaling and crosstalk. To breed climate-resilient crop varieties, integrated understanding of the molecular processes is required to modulate and tailor particular nodes of the network to positively affect stress tolerance. PMID:26648959