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Sample records for hormones gastrin sth

  1. Gastrin induces parathyroid hormone-like hormone expression in gastric parietal cells.

    PubMed

    Al Menhali, Asma; Keeley, Theresa M; Demitrack, Elise S; Samuelson, Linda C

    2017-06-01

    Parietal cells play a fundamental role in stomach maintenance, not only by creating a pathogen-free environment through the production of gastric acid, but also by secreting growth factors important for homeostasis of the gastric epithelium. The gastrointestinal hormone gastrin is known to be a central regulator of both parietal cell function and gastric epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. Our previous gene expression profiling studies of mouse stomach identified parathyroid hormone-like hormone (PTHLH) as a potential gastrin-regulated gastric growth factor. Although PTHLH is commonly overexpressed in gastric tumors, its normal expression, function, and regulation in the stomach are poorly understood. In this study we used pharmacologic and genetic mouse models as well as human gastric cancer cell lines to determine the cellular localization and regulation of this growth factor by the hormone gastrin. Analysis of Pthlh(LacZ/+) knock-in reporter mice localized Pthlh expression to parietal cells in the gastric corpus. Regulation by gastrin was demonstrated by increased Pthlh mRNA abundance after acute gastrin treatment in wild-type mice and reduced expression in gastrin-deficient mice. PTHLH transcripts were also observed in normal human stomach as well as in human gastric cancer cell lines. Gastrin treatment of AGS-E gastric cancer cells induced a rapid and robust increase in numerous PTHLH mRNA isoforms. This induction was largely due to increased transcriptional initiation, although analysis of mRNA half-life showed that gastrin treatment also extended the half-life of PTHLH mRNA, suggesting that gastrin regulates expression by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We show that the growth factor parathyroid hormone-like hormone (PTHLH) is expressed in acid-secreting parietal cells of the mouse stomach. We define the specific PTHLH mRNA isoforms expressed in human stomach and in human gastric cancer cell lines and

  2. Sulfated gastrin stimulates ghrelin and growth hormone release but inhibits insulin secretion in cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongqiong; Yannaing, Swe; Thanthan, Sint; Kuwayama, Hideto

    2011-11-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of gastrin on the circulating levels of ghrelin, growth hormone (GH), insulin, glucagon and glucose in ruminants. Two experiments were done in eight Holstein steers. Animals were randomly assigned to receive intravenous bolus injections: (1) 0.1% bovine serum albumin in saline as vehicle, 0.8, 4.0 and 20.0 μg/kg body weight (BW) of bovine sulfated gastrin-34; (2) vehicle, 0.53 μg/kg BW of bovine sulfated gastrin-17 alone or combined with 20.0 μg/kg BW of [D-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6, the selective antagonist of GHS-R1a. Blood samples were collected from -10 to 150 min relative to injection time. Concentrations of acyl and total ghrelin in response to gastrin-34 injection were significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. Concentrations of GH were also markedly elevated by gastrin-34 injection; however, the effect of 20.0 μg/kg was weaker than that of 4.0 μg/kg. The three doses of gastrin-34 equally decreased insulin levels within 15 min and maintained the level until the time of last sampling. Gastrin-34 had no effect (P > 0.05) on the levels of glucagon and glucose. Levels of acyl ghrelin increased after administration of gastrin-17 alone or combined with [D-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6; however, [D-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6 did not block the elevation of GH by gastrin-17. The present results indicate that sulfated gastrin stimulates both ghrelin and GH release, but the GHS-R1a may not contribute to the release of GH by gastrin. Moreover, sulfated gastrin seems to indirectly maintain the homeostasis of blood glucose through the down-regulation of insulin in ruminants.

  3. NF-kappaB mediated transcriptional repression of acid modifying hormone gastrin.

    PubMed

    Datta De, Dipanjana; Datta, Arindam; Bhattacharjya, Sumana; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major pathogen associated with the development of gastroduodenal diseases. It has been reported that H. pylori induced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1B is one of the various modulators of acid secretion in the gut. Earlier we reported that IL1B-activated NFkB down-regulates gastrin, the major hormonal regulator of acid secretion. In this study, the probable pathway by which IL1B induces NFkB and affects gastrin expression has been elucidated. IL1B-treated AGS cells showed nine-fold activation of MyD88 followed by phosphorylation of TAK1 within 15 min of IL1B treatment. Furthermore, it was observed that activated TAK1 significantly up-regulates the NFkB subunits p50 and p65. Ectopic expression of NFkB p65 in AGS cells resulted in about nine-fold transcriptional repression of gastrin both in the presence and absence of IL1B. The S536A mutant of NFkB p65 is significantly less effective in repressing gastrin. These observations show that a functional NFkB p65 is important for IL1B-mediated repression of gastrin. ChIP assays revealed the presence of HDAC1 and NFkB p65 along with NCoR on the gastrin promoter. Thus, the study provides mechanistic insight into the IL1B-mediated gastrin repression via NFkB.

  4. NF-kappaB Mediated Transcriptional Repression of Acid Modifying Hormone Gastrin

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjya, Sumana; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major pathogen associated with the development of gastroduodenal diseases. It has been reported that H. pylori induced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1B is one of the various modulators of acid secretion in the gut. Earlier we reported that IL1B-activated NFkB down-regulates gastrin, the major hormonal regulator of acid secretion. In this study, the probable pathway by which IL1B induces NFkB and affects gastrin expression has been elucidated. IL1B-treated AGS cells showed nine-fold activation of MyD88 followed by phosphorylation of TAK1 within 15 min of IL1B treatment. Furthermore, it was observed that activated TAK1 significantly up-regulates the NFkB subunits p50 and p65. Ectopic expression of NFkB p65 in AGS cells resulted in about nine-fold transcriptional repression of gastrin both in the presence and absence of IL1B. The S536A mutant of NFkB p65 is significantly less effective in repressing gastrin. These observations show that a functional NFkB p65 is important for IL1B-mediated repression of gastrin. ChIP assays revealed the presence of HDAC1 and NFkB p65 along with NCoR on the gastrin promoter. Thus, the study provides mechanistic insight into the IL1B-mediated gastrin repression via NFkB. PMID:24009751

  5. Zinc ions upregulate the hormone gastrin via an E-box motif in the proximal gastrin promoter.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Kovac, Suzana; Chang, Mike; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2014-02-01

    Gastrin and its precursors act as growth factors for the normal and neoplastic gastrointestinal mucosa. As the hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride upregulates the gastrin gene, the effect of other metal ions on gastrin promoter activity was investigated. Gastrin mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, gastrin peptides by RIA, and gastrin promoter activity by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Exposure to Zn(2)(+) ions increased gastrin mRNA concentrations in the human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximum stimulation of 55 ± 14-fold at 100 μM (P<0.05). Significant stimulation was also observed with Cd(2)(+) and Cu(2)(+), but not with Ca(2)(+), Mg(2)(+), Ni(2)(+), or Fe(3)(+) ions. Activation of MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways is necessary but not sufficient for gastrin induction by Zn(2)(+). Deletional mutation of the gastrin promoter identified an 11 bp DNA sequence, which contained an E-box motif, as necessary for Zn(2)(+)-dependent gastrin induction. The fact that E-box binding transcription factors play a crucial role in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), together with our observation that Zn(2)(+) ions upregulate the gastrin gene in AGS cells by an E-box-dependent mechanism, suggests that Zn(2)(+) ions may induce an EMT, and that gastrin may be involved in the transition.

  6. [Synthesis of peptides with gastrinlike activity. Studies on the structure-activity relationship of the natural hormone human little gastrin I].

    PubMed

    Göhring, W; Moroder, L; Borin, G; Lobbia, A; Bali, J P; Wünsch, E

    1984-01-01

    To identify the role of the block of glutamic acid residues characteristic for the gastrin molecule, a series of shortened peptides related to the human little-gastrin-I sequence were synthesized. The biological activities of these gastrin peptides strongly suggest in the pentaglutamic acid sequence a specific information for a pronounced amplification of the hormonal activity.

  7. Gastrins and gastrinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hansky, J.

    1984-01-01

    The past 20 years have seen gastrin attain true hormonal status. Its structure has been characterized, it has been synthesized, radioimmunoassays for its measurement in blood and tissues have been developed and its physiology and metabolism elucidated. Of much interest to clinicians has been the association between gastrin and tumours of the pancreas (gastrinomas) and atrophic gastritis. The advent of gastrin measurement has facilitated the diagnosis of gastrinoma and the availability of powerful acid suppressants has altered the therapy of gastrinoma. PMID:6390404

  8. Gastrins, iron and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S

    2009-09-01

    This minireview explores the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. The peptide hormone gastrin is a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with μM affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron binding is essential for biological activity. The ferric ion ligands have been identified as glutamates 7, 8 and 9 in the 18 amino acid peptide glycine-extended gastrin. An interaction between gastrin and transferrin was first demonstrated by covalent crosslinking techniques, and has been recently confirmed by surface plasmon resonance. We have therefore proposed that gastrins act as catalysts in the loading of transferrin with iron. Several recent lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron overload disease haemochromatosis, and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentrations, suggest that gastrins may be involved in iron homeostasis. In addition the recognition that ferric ions may play an unexpected role in the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins may assist in the development of new therapies for colorectal carcinoma.

  9. Novel roles of gastrin.

    PubMed

    Dimaline, Rod; Varro, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    The existence of the hormone gastrin in the distal stomach (antrum) has been known for almost 110 years, and the physiological function of this amidated peptide in regulating gastric acid secretion via the CCK2 receptor is now well established. In this brief review we consider important additional roles of gastrin, including regulation of genes encoding proteins such as plasminogen activator inhibitors and matrix metalloproteinases that have important actions on extracellular matrix remodelling. These actions are, at least in part, effected by paracrine signalling pathways and make important contributions to maintaining functional integrity of the gastric epithelium. Recent studies also provide support for the idea that gastrin, in concert with other hormones, could potentially contribute a post-prandial incretin effect. We also review recent developments in the biology of other gastrin gene products, including the precursor progastrin, which causes proliferation of the colonic epithelium and in certain circumstances may induce cancer formation. Glycine-extended biosynthetic processing intermediates also have proliferative effects in colonic mucosa and in some oesophageal cancer cell lines. Whether these additional gene products exert their effects through the CCK2 receptor or a separate entity is currently a matter of debate.

  10. [Gastrointestinal hormones during pregnancy--immunoreactive secretin and gastrin in serum and fetal tissue (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Miyagami, J; Matsuhashi, K; Kanazawa, M; Yanaihara, T; Nakayama, T

    1980-01-01

    The concentrations of immunoreactive secretin (S) and gastrin (G) in maternal peripheral vein (MV) during pregnancy and MV, umbilical artery (UA) and umbilical vein (UV) at delivery and fetal tissue of 19, 23 weeks of gestation obtained after therapeutic abortion were measured by specific radioimmunoassay. S-specific antisera was generated in rabbits against highly purified synthetic S. Newly synthesized S analog (Tyr1)-S was indicated by enzymic method. The radioimmunoassay of S was performed by double antibody method using synthetic S as standard. G was measured by RIA kit (Dainabot radioisotope Lab.). The sensitivity of the assays for S and G was 50 pg/ml. The fetal tissue were extracted by water-boiling method and purified by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 column. The S levels in MV increase as gestational age advances and reach to the maximum levels of 248 +/- 150 pg/ml, while no increase tendency was noticed in G levels. The S levels in MV, UA and UV at delivery (n = 18) were 307 +/- 158 pg/ml, 460 +/- 166 pg/ml and 424 +/- 126 pg/ml, respectively. The S levels in cord blood is statistically higher than that in MV (p less than 0.05). The G levels in MV, UA and UV were 67 +/- 22 pg/ml, 101 +/- 63 pg/ml and 91 +/- 38 pg/ml. The differences of the values between MV and cord blood are significant (p less than 0.05). S like material in fetal upper gastrointestinal tracts was found high in concentration. The extract of fetal duodenum showed a displacement curve paralleled to that of the standard S. In addition, relatively high concentration of immunoreactive S was found in cerebral cortex obtained from fetus of 23 weeks of gestation. G concentration in fetal tissue was also demonstrated. The evidence of immunoreactive S and G in fetal blood and fetal gastrointestinal tracts was reported. These results may be of importance to provide the information in understanding the physiology of the fetus.

  11. Gastrins, iron homeostasis and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Suzana; Anderson, Gregory J; Baldwin, Graham S

    2011-05-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin has been identified as a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. The importance of gastric acid in the absorption of dietary iron first became evident 50 years ago when iron deficiency anemia was recognized as a long-term consequence of partial gastrectomy. This review summarizes the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with micromolar affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron binding is essential for biological activity in vitro and in vivo. The demonstration of an interaction between gastrin and transferrin by biochemical techniques led to the proposal that gastrins catalyze the loading of transferrin with iron. Several lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron overload disease hemochromatosis and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentration, suggest the potential involvement of gastrins in iron homeostasis. Conversely, recognition that ferric ions play an unexpected role in the biological activity of gastrins may assist in the development of useful therapies for colorectal carcinoma and other disorders of mucosal proliferation in the gastrointestinal tract. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  12. Gastrins, Iron Homeostasis and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Suzana; Anderson, Gregory J.; Baldwin, Graham S.

    2011-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin has been identified as a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. The importance of gastric acid in the absorption of dietary iron first became evident 50 years ago when iron-deficiency anemia was recognised as a long-term consequence of partial gastrectomy. This review summarises the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with micromolar affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron-binding is essential for biological activity in vitro and in vivo. The demonstration of an interaction between gastrin and transferrin by biochemical techniques led to the proposal that gastrins catalyse the loading of transferrin with iron. Several lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron-overload disease hemochromatosis and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentration, suggest the potential involvement of gastrins in iron homeostasis. Conversely, recognition that ferric ions play an unexpected role in the biological activity of gastrins may assist in the development of useful therapies for colorectal carcinoma and other disorders of mucosal proliferation in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21320535

  13. Gastrin gene expression and regulation in rat islet cell lines.

    PubMed

    Brand, S J; Wang, T C

    1988-11-15

    Gastrin gene expression was observed in two permanent rat insulinoma (RIN) cell lines derived from a rat insulinoma. Gastrin expression was selective; highest expression was seen in a cell line which did not express other islet cell hormones. Gastrin mRNA transcription initiated from the same promoter as antral gastrin mRNA. DNA transfection studies with a gastrin chloramphenicol acetyltransferase chimeric gene showed higher expression in gastrin-expressing RIN cells than non-gastrin-expressing islet cells. This implies that gastrin-expressing RIN cells selectively express a trans-acting transcriptional activator which binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences within the 5'-flanking DNA sequence and first exon of the gastrin gene. The gastrin peptide precursor synthesized in these RIN cell lines is subject to the same repertoire of posttranslational modifications within the cell's secretory apparatus (endoproteolytic cleavage, tyrosine sulfation, and C-terminal amidation) as seen in antral G cells. Gastrin mRNA levels in these RIN cells were selectively increased by increasing the extracellular calcium concentration. Membrane depolarization also stimulated gastrin mRNA levels, probably through activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. Thus, these gastrin-expressing RIN cell lines provide permanent cell lines useful in analyzing the cellular regulation of gastrin gene expression.

  14. Gastrin-induced proliferation involves MEK partner 1 (MP1).

    PubMed

    Steigedal, Tonje S; Prestvik, Wenche S; Selvik, Linn-Karina M; Fjeldbo, Christina S; Bruland, Torunn; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-03-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is an important factor for the maintenance and homeostasis of the gastric mucosa. We show that gastrin stimulates proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in the human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the MAPK scaffold protein MEK partner 1 (MP1) is important for gastrin-induced phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2 and that MP1 promotes gastrin-induced proliferation of AGS-GR cells. Our results suggest a role of MP1 in gastrin-induced cellular responses involved in proliferation and homeostasis of the gastric mucosa.

  15. Role of gastrin-peptides in Barrett's and colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Eduardo; Lanas, Angel; Piazuelo, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Gastrin is the main hormone responsible for the stimulation of gastric acid secretion; in addition, gastrin and its derivatives exert proliferative and antiapoptotic effects on several cell types. Gastrin synthesis and secretion are increased in certain situations, for example, when proton pump inhibitors are used. The impact of sustained hypergastrinemia is currently being investigated. In vitro experiments and animal models have shown that prolonged hypergastrinemia may be related with higher cancer rates; although, this relationship is less clear in human beings. Higher gastrin levels have been shown to cause hyperplasia of several cell types; yet, the risk for developing cancer seems to be the same in normo- and hypergastrinemic patients. Some tumors also produce their own gastrin, which can act in an autocrine manner promoting tumor growth. Certain cancers are extremely dependent on gastrin to proliferate. Initial research focused only on the effects of amidated gastrins, but there has been an interest in intermediates of gastrin in the last few decades. These intermediates aren’t biologically inactive; in fact, they may exert greater effects on proliferation and apoptosis than the completely processed forms. In certain gastrin overproduction states, they are the most abundant gastrin peptides secreted. The purpose of this review is to examine the gastrin biosynthesis process and to summarize the results from different studies evaluating the production, levels, and effects of the main forms of gastrin in different overexpression states and their possible relationship with Barrett’s and colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:23236230

  16. Role of gastrin-peptides in Barrett's and colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Eduardo; Lanas, Angel; Piazuelo, Elena

    2012-12-07

    Gastrin is the main hormone responsible for the stimulation of gastric acid secretion; in addition, gastrin and its derivatives exert proliferative and antiapoptotic effects on several cell types. Gastrin synthesis and secretion are increased in certain situations, for example, when proton pump inhibitors are used. The impact of sustained hypergastrinemia is currently being investigated. In vitro experiments and animal models have shown that prolonged hypergastrinemia may be related with higher cancer rates; although, this relationship is less clear in human beings. Higher gastrin levels have been shown to cause hyperplasia of several cell types; yet, the risk for developing cancer seems to be the same in normo- and hypergastrinemic patients. Some tumors also produce their own gastrin, which can act in an autocrine manner promoting tumor growth. Certain cancers are extremely dependent on gastrin to proliferate. Initial research focused only on the effects of amidated gastrins, but there has been an interest in intermediates of gastrin in the last few decades. These intermediates aren't biologically inactive; in fact, they may exert greater effects on proliferation and apoptosis than the completely processed forms. In certain gastrin overproduction states, they are the most abundant gastrin peptides secreted. The purpose of this review is to examine the gastrin biosynthesis process and to summarize the results from different studies evaluating the production, levels, and effects of the main forms of gastrin in different overexpression states and their possible relationship with Barrett's and colorectal carcinogenesis.

  17. Gastrin increases its own synthesis in gastrointestinal cancer cells via the CCK2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Suzana; Xiao, Lin; Shulkes, Arthur; Patel, Oneel; Baldwin, Graham S

    2010-11-05

    The involvement of the gastrointestinal hormone gastrin in the development of gastrointestinal cancer is highly controversial. Here we demonstrate a positive-feedback loop whereby gastrin, acting via the CCK2 receptor, increases its own expression. Such an autocrine loop has not previously been reported for any other gastrointestinal hormone. Gastrin promoter activation was dependent on the MAP kinase pathway and did not involve Sp1 binding sites or epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation. As the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer cells with amidated gastrin led to increased expression of non-amidated gastrins, the positive-feedback loop may contribute to the sustained increase in circulating gastrins observed in colorectal cancer patients.

  18. Effects of gastrin on calcium homeostasis in chickens

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, P.; Gagnemo-Persson, R.; Orberg, J.; Chen, D.; Hakanson, R. )

    1991-09-01

    As in the rat, gastrin and an extract of the acid-producing part of the stomach (proventriculus) were found to lower the blood Ca2+ concentration in the chicken. Furthermore, gastrin enhanced the uptake of 45Ca into the femur. It has been suggested previously that gastrin causes hypocalcemia in the rat by releasing gastrocalcin, a hypothetical hormone thought to reside in the acid-producing part of the stomach. The results of the present study in the chicken are in agreement with this concept. Not only exogenous, but also endogenous gastrin lowered blood calcium levels. Thus, the serum gastrin concentration was increased in response to ranitidine-evoked blockade of the gastric acid output; the rise in gastrin was associated with a transient drop in blood calcium. Also, food intake produced a rise in the serum gastrin concentration and a transient drop in blood calcium. However, injection of ranitidine or food intake in proventriclectomized (acid-producing part of the stomach extirpated) chickens failed to lower blood calcium, supporting the view that the gastrin-evoked hypocalcemia depends upon an agent in the gastric (proventriculus) mucosa. The authors suggest that endogenous and exogenous gastrin evoke hypocalcemia in the chicken by the same mechanism as that which has been postulated in the rat, i.e. by mobilization of the candidate hormone gastrocalcin from endocrine cells in the acid-producing gastric mucosa.

  19. [Participation of growth hormone and insulin in the regulation of gastric secretion in athletes wrestler in sportive and post sportive ontogenesis].

    PubMed

    Panov, S F; Pleshakov, A A; Batrakov, A A; Nepliuev, D A

    2010-01-01

    The role of gastrin, STH, insulin and glucose in the formation, and long-term adaptation of gastric secretion in athletes--wrestlers in the sportive and post sportive ontogeny Revealed an undulation in the age dynamics of the basal secretion of hormones and glucose in the blood. The ups and downs of different waves in the dynamics occur in sensitive periods of ontogeny. In a bicycle stress load changes in the secretion of hormones and glucose levels in 90% of cases are not statistically significant, but insufficient to achieve the end result of regulation--an adequate level of hydrolysis of proteins in response to physical stress.

  20. Serum gastrin level in early childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Sann, L; Chayvialle, A P; Bremond, A; Lambert, R

    1975-01-01

    Serum gastrin concentration was measured in newborns and infants with no gastrointestinal disorders, in the fasting state and after food stimulation. Mean fasting concentration in 14 newborns aged 1 to 12 days (130 . 4 pg/ml +/- 11 . 4 SE) was significantly higher than the mean value in 23 infants aged 1.5 to 22 months (101.4 +/- 6.6 pg/ml). Ingestion of the usual milk meal resulted in a definite rise of the serum gastrin level in the 5 subjects tested (3 newborns and 2 infants). The mean fasting serum gastrin level in 6 babies with hiatus hernia and gastro-oesophageal reflux was found to be no different from the corresponding value in 8 age-matched controls. However, a conspicuously raised fasting gastrin concentration was observed in one infant with lower oesophageal dyskinesia. The results indicate that the release of gastrin and the reactivity of the hormone-producing sites to food stimulation in early life are similar to those in adult humans. No defect of gastrin release was shown in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:1244175

  1. Gastrin and gastric surgery.

    PubMed

    Fabri, P J; McGuigan, J E

    1976-01-01

    The development of the radioimmunoassay for gastrin has resulted in significant increases in our knowledge of the physiology of the stomach and antrum, and in an objective recognition of the interaction of the gastrin and vagus mechanisms. Recent identification of multiple species of gastrin in the circulation, however, raises questions as to the significance of early experimental results. Until the various aspects of gastrin and their relative contributions in the normal state and in pathologic processes are identified, the significance of gastrin levels in the evaluation of patients with uncomplicated ulcer disease is unclear. Although many investigators have attempted to correlate changes in serum gastrin levels in response to various stimuli with the completeness of vagotomy or the likelihood of recurrence, it is too early to give any clinical significance to these reports. Several points in particular seem worthy of emphasis: 1. Preoperative serum gastrin levels are currently of no value in selecting an operation for the treatment of duodenal ulcer disease. 2. The difference in serum gastrin levels in response to feeding that may be shown to exist between groups of normal subjects and duodenal ulcer patients is not a value in diagnosing ulcer disease in a specific patient, nor in differentiating duodenal ulcer from other conditions. 3. The measurement of serum gastrin levels in association with Hollander tests, while perhaps of potential future benefit, does not improve the accuracy of the Hollander test nor do results necessarily relate to vagal innervation. 4. Postoperative serum gastrin levels are increased after vagotomy. The degree of hypergastrinemia after vagotomy does not correlate with risk of ulcer recurrence. 5. Hypergastrinemia (greater than 1000 pg. per ml.) in the presence of hyperacidity is essentially pathognomonic of the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Calcium and secretin infusions do not add to the diagnosis if clear-cut clinical and laboratory

  2. The art of measuring gastrin in plasma: a dwindling diagnostic discipline?

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2008-01-01

    The gastrointestinal hormone gastrin is measured in plasma in physiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic investigations. In the diagnosis of hypergastrinaemic diseases such as gastrinomas and gastric achlorhydria, measurement of gastrin concentrations in circulation is crucial. Gastrin circulates, however, not as a single peptide but as a mixture of peptides of different lengths and amino acid derivatizations. Moreover, in hypergastrinaemia the peptide pattern changes. Consequently, diagnostic gastrin measurements require immunoassays that recognize the pathological plasma patterns, which are characterized by a predominance of the large peptides (gastrin-34 and gastrin-71) and less, if any, of the shorter main form of gastrin in normal tissue, gastrin-17. Alternatively, and in specific cases, "processing-independent assays" (PIA) for progastrin may be considered, since hypersecreting gastrin cells also release substantial amounts of biosynthetic precursors and processing intermediates. Recently, gastrin kits that do not take the pathological plasma patterns into account have been marketed and may miss the diagnosis. Therefore, proper diagnosis of gastrinomas and other hypergastrinaemic diseases requires insight into cellular gastrin synthesis and peripheral metabolism, and also into the design of useful immunoassays. This review discusses the art of measuring gastrin in plasma with adequate diagnostic specificity.

  3. Gastrin and cholecystokinin in human cerebrospinal fluid. Immunochemical determination of concentrations and molecular heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, J F; Kruse-Larsen, C

    1978-10-20

    To determine whether gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK), recently found in the central nervous sytem, were present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we studied human specimens by sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays for the two related polypeptide hormones. The concentration of gastrin in cerebrospinal fluid from 10 neurologically normal persons ranged from 1.5 to 8.0 pM (mean 3.4 pM), whereas the concentration of CCK ranged from 4 to 55 pM (mean 14 pM). The molecular heterogeneity of gastrin and CCK in CSF was determined by gel chromatography of concentrated fluid monitored by 3 gastrin radioimmunoassays specific for different sequences of gastrin17 and 3 CCK radioimmunoassays specific for different sequences of CCK33. Chromatography revealed that gastrin was present in molecular forms corresponding to gastrin34 ('big gastrin') and gastrin17. CCK was present in molecular forms corresponding to the COOH-terminal octapeptide amide of CCK33 and a fragment corresponding to sequence 25-29 of CCK33. Also, a peptide corresponding to COOH-terminal tetrapeptide amide common to both gastrin and CCK was found. The results indicate that true gastrin as well as CCK are present in CSF, and that both hormones display a molecular heterogeneity similar to that found in extracts of brain tissue.

  4. Gastrin blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor. Medicines that can increase gastrin measurements include antacids, H 2 -blocking agents (such as cimetidine), and ... Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach Use of antacids or medicines to treat heartburn Zollinger-Ellison syndrome , ...

  5. Studies on gastrin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, K. S.

    1964-01-01

    These three papers present studies on gastrin. The first paper describes a method of biological assay using the rat. The second paper demonstrates that the highest concentration of gastrin-like activity occurs in the antral mucosa, with a clear gradient of concentration of activity down the gut. However, it is to be noted that the total amount of extractable activity is greatest in the duodenum, although the concentration there is less than in the antrum. No activity was detected in the pancreas. The third paper studies the contents of gastrin-like activity in patients with duodenal ulcer and demonstrates higher figures when stenosis is present. Patients with benign gastric ulcer and carcinomata showed results equal to or greater than in those with the average uncomplicated duodenal ulcer. It was noted that two patients with dilated antra both had very low total gastrin-like activity. There was no correlation between total activity and maximal histamine-stimulated output of acid. There was, however, a positive correlation between the insulin-stimulated acid secretion and the total gastrin-like activity in the cases of uncomplicated duodenal ulcers. The clinical studies are still tentative in view of the several variables present, but it seems likely that they will in due course clarify the role of gastrin in the ulcer problem. PMID:14209916

  6. Gastrin: a distinct fate of neurogenin3 positive progenitor cells in the embryonic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Suissa, Yaron; Magenheim, Judith; Stolovich-Rain, Miri; Hija, Ayat; Collombat, Patrick; Mansouri, Ahmed; Sussel, Lori; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz; McCracken, Kyle; Wells, James M; Heller, R Scott; Dor, Yuval; Glaser, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenin3(+) (Ngn3(+)) progenitor cells in the developing pancreas give rise to five endocrine cell types secreting insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin. Gastrin is a hormone produced primarily by G-cells in the stomach, where it functions to stimulate acid secretion by gastric parietal cells. Gastrin is expressed in the embryonic pancreas and is common in islet cell tumors, but the lineage and regulators of pancreatic gastrin(+) cells are not known. We report that gastrin is abundantly expressed in the embryonic pancreas and disappears soon after birth. Some gastrin(+) cells in the developing pancreas co-express glucagon, ghrelin or pancreatic polypeptide, but many gastrin(+) cells do not express any other islet hormone. Pancreatic gastrin(+) cells express the transcription factors Nkx6.1, Nkx2.2 and low levels of Pdx1, and derive from Ngn3(+) endocrine progenitor cells as shown by genetic lineage tracing. Using mice deficient for key transcription factors we show that gastrin expression depends on Ngn3, Nkx2.2, NeuroD1 and Arx, but not Pax4 or Pax6. Finally, gastrin expression is induced upon differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to pancreatic endocrine cells expressing insulin. Thus, gastrin(+) cells are a distinct endocrine cell type in the pancreas and an alternative fate of Ngn3+ cells.

  7. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R; Murugesan, Senthil V; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea; Dockray, Graham J

    2015-07-15

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling.

  8. GASTRIN, INFLAMMATION, AND CARCINOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Celia; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic infection of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter pylori has long been recognized as a significant risk factor for gastric cancer, and indeed, this model represents the prototypical inflammation-associated cancer. In this review, we present the latest clinical and experimental evidence showing that gastrin peptides and their receptors (the cholecystokinin [CCK2] receptors) potentiate the progression of gastric cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies in the presence of inflammation. Recent Findings We highlight the feed-forward mechanisms by which gastrin and CCK2 receptor expression are upregulated during inflammation and in GI cancers, summarize gastrin’s pro-inflammatory role by inducing the production cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), and relate evidence suggesting that gastrin and their receptors modulate the function of immune cells and fibroblasts following cellular stress, injury, repair, as well as during cancer progression. Summary We discuss trends for future studies directed toward the elucidation of gastrin peptides’ role in regulating inter-cellular molecular signaling mechanisms between local and circulating immune cells, fibroblasts, epithelial cells, and other cell-types in the microenvironments of inflammation-related cancers. Elucidation of the molecular and cellular pathways that relate inflammation with cancer may provide additional opportunities to develop complementary therapies that target the inflammatory microenvironment of the cancer. PMID:19907321

  9. Gastrin: The Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ability to navigate and access the features of this website will be ... Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Gastrin Related tests: Helicobacter pylori , Gastric Acid At a Glance Test ...

  10. Chinchilla "big" and "little" gastrins.

    PubMed

    Shinomura, Y; Eng, J; Yalow, R S

    1987-02-27

    Gastrin heptadecapeptides (gastrins I and II which differ in the presence of sulfate on the tyrosine of the latter) have been purified and sequenced from several mammalian species including pig, dog, cat, sheep, cow, human and rat. A 34 amino acid precursor ("big" gastrin), generally accounting for only 5% of total gastrin immunoreactivity, has been purified and sequenced only from the pig, human, dog and goat. Recently we have demonstrated that guinea pig (GP) "little" gastrin is a hexadecapeptide due to a deletion of a glutamic acid in the region 6-9 from its NH2-terminus and that GP "big" gastrin is a 33 amino acid peptide. The chinchilla, like the GP, is a New World hystricomorph. This report describes the extraction and purification of "little" and "big" gastrins from 31 chinchilla antra. Chinchilla "little" gastrin is a hexadecapeptide with a sequence identical to that of the GP and its "big" gastrin is a 33 amino acid peptide with the following sequence: (See text)

  11. Recent improvements on micro-thermocouple based SThM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, TP; Thiery, L.; Teyssieux, D.; Briand, D.; Vairac, P.

    2017-01-01

    The scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has become a versatile tool for local surface temperature mapping or measuring thermal properties of solid materials. In this article, we present recent improvements in a SThM system, based on a micro-wire thermocouple probe associated with a quartz tuning fork for contact strength detection. Some results obtained on an electrothermal micro-hotplate device, operated in active and passive modes, allow demonstrating its performance as a coupled force detection and thermal measurement system.

  12. Identification of ezrin as a target of gastrin in immature mouse gastric parietal cells.

    PubMed

    Pagliocca, Adelina; Hegyi, Peter; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Rackstraw, Stephen A; Khan, Zara; Burdyga, Galina; Wang, Timothy C; Dimaline, Rod; Varro, Andrea; Dockray, Graham J

    2008-11-01

    The gastric acid-secreting parietal cell exhibits profound morphological changes on stimulation. Studies in gastrin null (Gas-KO) mice indicate that maturation of parietal cell function depends on the hormone gastrin acting at the G-protein-coupled cholecystokinin 2 receptor. The relevant cellular mechanisms are unknown. The application of differential mRNA display to samples of the gastric corpus of wild-type (C57BL/6) and Gas-KO mice identified the cytoskeletal linker protein, ezrin, as a previously unsuspected target of gastrin. Gastrin administered in vivo or added to gastric glands in vitro increased ezrin abundance in Gas-KO parietal cells. In parietal cells of cultured gastric glands from wild-type mice treated with gastrin, histamine or carbachol, ezrin was localized to vesicular structures resembling secretory canaliculi. In contrast, in cultured parietal cells from Gas-KO mice, ezrin was typically distributed in the cytosol, and this did not change after incubation with gastrin, histamine or carbachol. However, priming with gastrin for approximately 24 h, either in vivo prior to cell culture or by addition to cultured gastric glands, induced the capacity for secretagogue-stimulated localization of ezrin to large vesicular structures in Gas-KO mice. Similarly, in a functional assay based on measurement of intracellular pH, cultured parietal cells from Gas-KO mice were refractory to gastrin unless primed. The priming effect of gastrin was not attributable to the paracrine mediator histamine, but was prevented by inhibitors of protein kinase C and transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. We conclude that in gastrin null mice there is reduced ezrin expression and a defect in ezrin subcellular distribution in gastric parietal cells, and that both can be reversed by priming with gastrin.

  13. Gastrin and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, Helge L.; Sagatun, Liv; Mjønes, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer although occurring in reduced frequency is still an important disease, partly because of the bad prognosis when occurring in western countries. This decline in occurrence may mainly be due to the reduced prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, which is the most important cause of gastric cancer. There exist many different pathological classifications of gastric carcinomas, but the most useful seems to be the one by Lauren into intestinal and diffuse types since these types seldom transform into the other and also have different epidemiology. During the nearly 30 years that have passed since the groundbreaking description of Hp as the cause of gastritis and gastric cancer, a continuous search for the mechanism by which Hp infection causes gastric cancer has been done. Interestingly, it is mainly atrophic gastritis of the oxyntic mucosa that predisposes to gastric cancer possibly by inducing hypoacidity and hypergastrinemia. There are many arguments in favor of an important role of gastrin and its target cell, the enterochromaffin-like cell, in gastric carcinogenesis. The role of gastrin in gastric carcinogenesis implies caution in the long-term treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion inducing secondary hypergastrinemia, in a common disease like gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:28144230

  14. Incretin physiology beyond glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide: cholecystokinin and gastrin peptides.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, J F

    2011-04-01

    Gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK) are homologous hormone systems known to regulate gastric acid secretion, gallbladder emptying, and cell growth in the pancreas and stomach. They are, however, also involved in the development and secretory functions of pancreatic islet cells. For instance, foetal and neonatal islets express significant amounts of gastrin, and human as well as porcine islet cells express the gastrin/CCK-B receptor abundantly. Therefore, exogenous gastrin and CCK peptides stimulate insulin and glucagon secretion in man. Accordingly, endogenous hypergastrinaemia is accompanied by islet cell hyperplasia and increased insulin secretion. Conventionally, the effect of gastrointestinal hormones on insulin secretion (the incretin effect) has been defined and quantified in relation to oral versus intravenous glucose loadings. Under these unphysiological conditions, the release of gastrin and CCK and, hence, their effect on insulin secretion are modest in comparison with the effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Consequently, the interest of CCK and gastrin in incretin research has for decades been limited. A few years ago, however, it was suggested that gastrin together with epidermal growth factor or later GLP-1 might stimulate beta cell growth and secretion. Recent studies have shown that the combination of gastrin and GLP-1 actually restores normoglycaemia in diabetic mice. Therefore, a short review of the incretin system in a broader functional context that includes gastrin and CCK peptides may be timely.

  15. Helicobacter pylori Induction of the Gastrin Promoter Through GC-Rich DNA Elements

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Tamara P.; Gray, Brian M.; Eaton, Kathyrn A.; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infection has been linked to the development of chronic gastritis, duodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. H. pylori- infected patients and animal models develop hypergastrinemia, chronic gastritis, and gastric atrophy. Since gastrin is an important regulator of gastric acid secretion and cell growth, H. pylori regulation of this hormone has been implicated in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effect of H. pylori infection on gastrin gene expression in mice and the effect of human isolates of the bacteria on gastrin transcription in a cell line. In addition to an increase in gastrin mRNA in H. pylori-infected mice, we found that the bacteria induced the endogenous human gastrin gene through MAP kinase-dependent signaling but not NFκB-dependent signaling. Moreover, activation of gastrin through MAPK signaling did not require CagA or VacA virulence factors. In transfection studies, we demonstrated that H. pylori-induction of the gastrin promoter thorough a GC-rich motif was mediated by inducible binding of Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors. In conclusion, co-culturing live H. pylori bacteria with human cells is sufficient to induce gastrin gene expression. PMID:21083750

  16. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  17. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S; George, Graham N; Pushie, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  18. NR4A2 is regulated by gastrin and influences cellular responses of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells.

  19. An OmpA-Like Protein from Acinetobacter spp. Stimulates Gastrin and Interleukin-8 Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Ofori-Darko, Ernest; Zavros, Yana; Rieder, Gabriele; Tarlé, Susan A.; Van Antwerp, Mary; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial overgrowth in the stomach may occur under conditions of diminished or absent acid secretion. Under these conditions, secretion of the hormone gastrin is elevated. Alternatively, bacterial factors may directly stimulate gastrin. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that mice colonized for 2 months with a mixed bacterial culture of opportunistic pathogens showed an increase in serum gastrin. To examine regulation of gene expression by bacterial proteins, stable transformants of AGS cells expressing gastrin or interleukin-8 (IL-8) promoters were cocultured with live organisms. Both whole-cell sonicates and a heat-stable fraction were also coincubated with the cells. A level of 108 organisms per ml stimulated both the gastrin and IL-8 promoters. Heat-stable proteins prepared from these bacterial sonicates stimulated the promoter significantly more than the live organism or unheated sonicates. A 38-kDa heat-stable protein stimulating the gastrin and IL-8 promoters was cloned and found to be an OmpA-related protein. Immunoblotting using antibody to the OmpA-like protein identified an Acinetobacter sp. as the bacterial species that expressed this protein and colonized the mouse stomach. Moreover, reintubation of mice with a pure culture of the Acinetobacter sp. caused gastritis. We conclude that bacterial colonization of the stomach may increase serum gastrin levels in part through the ability of the bacteria to produce OmpA-like proteins that directly stimulate gastrin and IL-8 gene expression. These results implicate OmpA-secreting bacteria in the activation of gastrin gene expression and raise the possibility that a variety of organisms may contribute to the increase in serum gastrin and subsequent epithelial cell proliferation in the hypochlorhydric stomach. PMID:10816525

  20. NR4A2 Is Regulated by Gastrin and Influences Cellular Responses of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Misund, Kristine; Selvik, Linn-Karina Myrland; Rao, Shalini; Nørsett, Kristin; Bakke, Ingunn; Sandvik, Arne K.; Lægreid, Astrid; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S.; Thommesen, Liv

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2) expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1), suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells. PMID:24086717

  1. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D. Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. PMID:25977510

  2. Dynamics of regulatory networks in gastrin-treated adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Doni Jayavelu, Naresh; Bar, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    Understanding gene transcription regulatory networks is critical to deciphering the molecular mechanisms of different cellular states. Most studies focus on static transcriptional networks. In the current study, we used the gastrin-regulated system as a model to understand the dynamics of transcriptional networks composed of transcription factors (TFs) and target genes (TGs). The hormone gastrin activates and stimulates signaling pathways leading to various cellular states through transcriptional programs. Dysregulation of gastrin can result in cancerous tumors, for example. However, the regulatory networks involving gastrin are highly complex, and the roles of most of the components of these networks are unknown. We used time series microarray data of AR42J adenocarcinoma cells treated with gastrin combined with static TF-TG relationships integrated from different sources, and we reconstructed the dynamic activities of TFs using network component analysis (NCA). Based on the peak expression of TGs and activity of TFs, we created active sub-networks at four time ranges after gastrin treatment, namely immediate-early (IE), mid-early (ME), mid-late (ML) and very late (VL). Network analysis revealed that the active sub-networks were topologically different at the early and late time ranges. Gene ontology analysis unveiled that each active sub-network was highly enriched in a particular biological process. Interestingly, network motif patterns were also distinct between the sub-networks. This analysis can be applied to other time series microarray datasets, focusing on smaller sub-networks that are activated in a cascade, allowing better overview of the mechanisms involved at each time range.

  3. AFM and SThM Characterization of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foy, Christopher; Sidorov, Anton; Chen, Xunchi; Ruan, Ming; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    We report on detailed characterization of epitaxial grown graphene on SiC and chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on Cu foil using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). We focus on the electronic and thermal properties of graphene grain boundaries, and thus providing valuable feedback to materials growth. Specifically, we perform thermal conductivity contrast mapping and surface potential mapping of graphene, and compare with that obtained on the Au electrodes and the substrate.

  4. A high-fat diet regulates gastrin and acid secretion through primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Saqui-Salces, Milena; Dowdle, William E; Reiter, Jeremy F; Merchant, Juanita L

    2012-08-01

    The role of primary cilia in the gastrointestinal tract has not been examined. Here we report the presence of primary cilia on gastric endocrine cells producing gastrin, ghrelin, and somatostatin (Sst), hormones regulated by food intake. During eating, cilia in the gastric antrum decreased, whereas gastric acid and circulating gastrin increased. Mice fed high-fat chow showed a delayed decrease in antral cilia, increased plasma gastrin, and gastric acidity. Mice fed high-fat chow for 3 wk showed lower cilia numbers and acid but higher gastrin levels than mice fed a standard diet, suggesting that fat affects gastric physiology. Ex vivo experiments showed that cilia in the corpus responded to acid and distension, whereas cilia in the antrum responded to food. To analyze the role of gastric cilia, we conditionally deleted the intraflagellar transport protein Ift88 (Ift88(-/fl)). In fed Ift88(-/fl) mice, gastrin levels were higher, and gastric acidity was lower. Moreover, gastrin and Sst gene expression did not change in response to food as in controls. At 8 mo, Ift88(-/fl) mice developed foveolar hyperplasia, hypergastrinemia, and hypochlorhydria associated with endocrine dysfunction. Our results show that components of food (fat) are sensed by antral cilia on endocrine cells, which modulates gastrin secretion and gastric acidity.

  5. Cholecystokinin and gastrin receptors targeting in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajani; Chandra, Vishal; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2012-12-01

    Cholecystokinin and Gastrin are amongst the first gastrointestinal hormone discovered. In addition to classical actions (contraction of gallbladder, growth and secretion in the stomach and pancreas), these also act as growth stimulants for gastrointestinal malignancies and cell lines. Growth of these tumours is inhibited by antagonists of the cholecystokinin and gastrin receptors. These receptors provides most promising approach in clinical oncology and several specific radiolabelled ligands have been synthesized for specific tumour targeting and therapy of tumours overexpressing these receptors. Therefore, definition of the molecular structure of the receptor involved in the autocrine/paracrine loop may contribute to novel therapies for gastrointestinal cancer. Hence, this review tries to focus on the role and distribution of these hormones and their receptors in gastrointestinal cancer with a brief talk about the clinical trial using available agonist and antagonist in gastrointestinal cancers.

  6. Immunohistochemical examination of gastrin, gastrin precursors, and gastrin/CCK-2 receptor in human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Aping; Liu, Jinzhong; Liu, Yiqing; Bjørnsen, Tone; Varro, Andrea; Cui, Guanglin

    2008-12-01

    A promoting effect of gastrin on stimulating Barrett's oesophagus proliferation has been demonstrated, but whether it plays a regulating role for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) to date has not been fully investigated. The aim of this study is to examine the expressions of gastrin, gastrin precursors and gastrin/CCK-2 receptor in ESCC. Tissue specimen sections from 38 patients with ESSC obtained from a high incidence area of north China were assessed using immunohistochemistry for amidated gastrin, gastrin precursors (progastrin and glycine-extended gastrin) and gastrin/CCK-2 receptors. Their clinical histopathological significance was also analyzed. Of 38 ESCC, the immunoreactivities of gastrin, glycine-extended gastrin and progastrin were observed in 13.2% (5/38), 7.9% (3/38) and 23.68% (9/38) cases. The expression of progastrin was obviously higher than other gastrins, though not significantly (P > 0.05). In positive cases for gastrin or glycine-extended gastrin, the scores of positive tumor cell numbers were at a lower density (<10/abundant-distributed field). However, the scores of progastrin positive tumor cell density in five of nine positive cases were over 10/abundant-distributed field. The immunoreactivity of gastrin/CCK-2 receptor was also observed in 15.8% (6/38) ESCC cases. There was not significant correlation regarding immunohistochemical results with known histomorphological parameters i.e. gender, tumor location and TNM stages. Based on our current results, ESCC tumor cells could be a possible cellular source of gastrin precursors, which has been postulated to play a role in regulating the growth in some human tumor cells.

  7. Gastrin: an acid-releasing, proliferative and immunomodulatory peptide?

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Sara; Alvarez, Angeles; Víctor, Víctor M

    2010-01-01

    Gastrin release is affected by gastric inflammatory conditions. Antral G cells respond to inflammatory mediators by increasing gastrin secretion. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that gastrin exerts immunomodulatory and proinflammatory effects. Gastrin could be a contributing factor to these pathologies, which may constitute a new justification for pharmacological blockade of gastrin action.

  8. Do alcoholic beverages have an additional effect on the postprandial gastrin response in humans?

    PubMed

    Te Wierik, E; Veenstra, J; Schaafsma, G

    1991-01-01

    The hormone gastrin plays an important role in the regulation of acid secretion in the stomach which, in turn, stimulates the digestion of food. Previous studies reported that administration of beer and wine but not ethanol and spirits increases gastrin secretion in fasting volunteers. It is not known whether alcoholic beverages combined with a normal meal have an additional effect on the postprandial gastrin response. We therefore measured the gastrin response in eight volunteers who received either alcoholic beverages (40 g alcohol) in the form of beer, red wine or spirits, or mineral water as control in combination with a dinner. Two glasses were drunk before the meal, two glasses during the meal. Plasma gastrin concentrations were twofold increased at one hour after the dinner as compared to predinner values. However, no additional effect of beer, wine or spirits on this postprandial response was seen. The present study does not support the hypothesis that the consumption of beer or wine during a meal has a positive effect on the release of gastrin and therefore most probably does not contribute to an improved digestion of food by stimulation of acid secretion.

  9. A duodenal role in gastrin release

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, J. R.; Ardill, Joy; Kennedy, T. L.; Buchanan, K. D.

    1974-01-01

    Observations on the plasma gastrin response to feeding protein in patients with the dumping syndrome, patients with pyloric stenosis, and patients asymptomatic after gastric surgery suggested that the duodenum might be important in the mechanism of gastrin release. This duodenal role was confirmed by the finding that when the stimulus was placed directly in the duodenum peak gastrin levels occurred earlier than when the stimulus was placed directly in the stomach. PMID:4422726

  10. Intracoronary gastrin 17 increases cardiac perfusion and function through autonomic nervous system, CCK receptors, and nitric oxide in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Caimmi, Philippe; Molinari, Claudio; Uberti, Francesca; Mary, David; Vacca, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    The release of gastrointestinal hormones has been reported to modulate reflex cardiovascular responses caused by gastric distension, although the role played by gastrin 17 is as yet unknown. The present study was therefore planned to determine the primary in vivo effect of gastrin 17 on coronary blood flow and cardiac function and the involvement of autonomic nervous system, CCK1/2 receptors, and nitric oxide (NO). In 40 anesthetized pigs, gastrin 17 was infused into the left anterior descending coronary artery at constant heart rate and arterial blood pressure. In 35 of the 40 pigs, the mechanisms of the observed hemodynamic responses were analyzed by repeating gastrin 17 infusion after autonomic nervous system and NO blockade, and after specific CCK receptors agonists/antagonists administration. Intracoronary gastrin 17 administration caused dose-related increases of both coronary blood flow and cardiac function. The intracoronary co-administration of CCK33/pentagastrin and gastrin 17 potentiated the coronary effects observed when the above agents were given alone (P <0.05). The potentiation of the cardiac response was observed only with the co-administration of pentagastrin and gastrin 17 (P <0.05). Moreover, blockade of muscarinic cholinoceptors (intravenous atropine) and of α-adrenoceptors (intravenous phentolamine) did not abolish the hemodynamic responses to gastrin 17. The cardiac and vascular effects of the hormone were prevented by blockade of β-adrenoceptors (intravenous atenolol and butoxamine), CCK1/2 receptors (intracoronary lorglumide and CAM-1028), and NO synthase (intracoronary Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester). In conclusion, gastrin 17 primarily increased coronary blood flow and cardiac function through the involvement of CCK receptors, β-adrenoceptors, and NO release.

  11. Role of Annexin-II in GI cancers: interaction with gastrins/progastrins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pomila

    2007-07-08

    The role of the gastrin peptide hormones (G17, G34) and their precursors (progastrins, PG; gly-extended gastrin, G-gly), in gastrointestinal (GI) cancers has been extensively reviewed in recent years [W. Rengifo-Cam, P. Singh, Role of progastrins and gastrins and their receptors in GI and pancreatic cancers: targets for treatment, Curr. Pharm. Des. 10 (19) (2004) 2345-2358; M. Dufresne, C. Seva, D. Fourmy, Cholecystokinin and gastrin receptors, Physiol. Rev. 86 (3) (2006) 805-847; A. Ferrand, T.C. Wang, Gastrin and cancer: a review, Cancer Lett. 238 (1) (2006) 15-29]. A possible important role of progastrin peptides in colon carcinogenesis has become evident from experiments with transgenic mouse models [W. Rengifo-Cam, P. Singh, (2004); A. Ferrand, T.C. Wang, (2006)]. It is now known that growth stimulatory and co-carcinogenic effects of gastrin/PG peptides are mediated by both proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of the peptides on target cells [H. Wu, G.N. Rao, B. Dai, P. Singh, Autocrine gastrins in colon cancer cells Up-regulate cytochrome c oxidase Vb and down-regulate efflux of cytochrome c and activation of caspase-3, J. Biol. Chem. 275 (42) (2000) 32491-32498; H. Wu, A. Owlia, P. Singh, Precursor peptide progastrin(1-80) reduces apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells and upregulates cytochrome c oxidase Vb levels and synthesis of ATP, Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 285 (6) (2003) G1097-G1110]. Several receptor subtypes have been described that mediate growth effects of gastrin peptides [W. Rengifo-Cam, P. Singh (2004); M. Dufresne, C. Seva, D. Fourmy, (2006)]. Recently, we identified Annexin II as a high affinity binding protein for gastrin/PG peptides [P. Singh, H. Wu, C. Clark, A. Owlia, Annexin II binds progastrin and gastrin-like peptides, and mediates growth factor effects of autocrine and exogenous gastrins on colon cancer and intestinal epithelial cells, Oncogene (2006), doi:10.1038/sj.onc.1209798]. Importantly, the expression of

  12. Plasma gastrin and cholecystokinin response after pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with Billroth-I type of reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Tangoku, A.; Nishikawa, M.; Adachi, A.; Suzuki, T. )

    1991-07-01

    Plasma gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK) responses were measured after a pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) using the Billroth-I type reconstruction combined with distal partial gastrectomy (standard PD) and combined with preservation of the pylorus and the duodenal bulb (PPPD). Six unoperated patients, 4 men and 2 women, were studied as control subjects. Basal plasma levels of gastrin were significantly higher in controls than in patients who had a standard PD (p less than 0.05) and gastrin responses to a meal were also blunted in these patients. In contrast basal and postprandial levels of gastrin after PPPD were significantly higher than these found in patients with standard PD (p less than 0.05). Postprandial gastrin response after PPPD were similar in pattern to these found in controls. Integrated gastrin release after PPPD was less than that of the control but was significantly greater than that in patients with standard PD. Basal plasma levels of CCK in the patients after the standard PD were significantly lower than in controls and significantly higher postprandial levels of CCK were found after PPPD compared to standard PD (p less than 0.05). However integrated CCK from 0 to 120 minutes were not significantly different between PPPD and standard PD groups. Based on these observations concerning hormonal release of gastrin and CCK, preservation of the stomach and the duodenal bulb appears to be a more physiologic reconstructive procedure than the standard PD. In addition the operation probably has more beneficial effect on the injured pancreas in time.

  13. Prosequence switching: an effective strategy to produce biologically active E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin STh.

    PubMed

    Weiglmeier, Philipp R; Berkner, Hanna; Seebahn, Angela; Vogel, Nico; Schreiber, Rainer; Wöhrl, Birgitta M; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Rösch, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections account for the majority of cases of acute secretory diarrhea. The causative agents are enterotoxins secreted by ETEC, among them is the heat-stable enterotoxin, STh. STh is a 19-amino acid peptide containing three disulfide bonds that stimulates fluid secretion in the bowel by binding to the receptor domain of intestinal guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C). Since GC-C agonists have pharmacologic potential for diagnosis and treatment of disorders such as constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C), chronic constipation, and colorectal carcinoma, it is crucial to develop methods for the large-scale production of STh and related peptides. Here, we present a strategy for recombinant expression of STh that relies on the use of the prosequence of human uroguanylin to support proper folding and disulfide bond formation. The chimeric protein CysCys-STh consisting of the propeptide of uroguanylin as N-terminus and the STh peptide as C-terminus was expressed in E. coli, and an efficient purification protocol was developed. Trypsin digestion of this protein released the enterotoxin which could be obtained in high purity. NMR and mass spectrometry confirmed the identity and homogeneity of the toxin, and its biological activity was confirmed by a cell-based in vivo assay. The expression scheme introduced here represents a cost-efficient and scalable way of STh production.

  14. The role of proteasome beta subunits in gastrin-mediated transcription of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 and regenerating protein1.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Adrian; Howarth, Alice; Varro, Andrea; Dimaline, Rod

    2013-01-01

    The hormone gastrin physiologically regulates gastric acid secretion and also contributes to maintaining gastric epithelial architecture by regulating expression of genes such as plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 (PAI-2) and regenerating protein 1 (Reg1). Here we examine the role of proteasome subunit PSMB1 in the transcriptional regulation of PAI-2 and Reg1 by gastrin, and its subcellular distribution during gastrin stimulation. We used the gastric cancer cell line AGS, permanently transfected with the CCK2 receptor (AGS-GR) to study gastrin stimulated expression of PAI-2 and Reg1 reporter constructs when PSMB1 was knocked down by siRNA. Binding of PSMB1 to the PAI-2 and Reg1 promoters was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Subcellular distribution of PSMB1 was determined by immunocytochemistry and Western Blot. Gastrin robustly increased expression of PAI-2 and Reg1 in AGS-GR cells, but when PSMB1 was knocked down the responses were dramatically reduced. In ChIP assays, following immunoprecipitation of chromatin with a PSMB1 antibody there was a substantial enrichment of DNA from the gastrin responsive regions of the PAI-2 and Reg1 promoters compared with chromatin precipitated with control IgG. In AGS-GR cells stimulated with gastrin there was a significant increase in the ratio of nuclear:cytoplasmic PSMB1 over the same timescale as recruitment of PSMB1 to the PAI-2 and Reg1 promoters seen in ChIP assays. We conclude that PSMB1 is part of the transcriptional machinery required for gastrin stimulated expression of PAI-2 and Reg1, and that its change in subcellular distribution in response to gastrin is consistent with this role.

  15. Gastrin upregulates the prosurvival factor secretory clusterin in adenocarcinoma cells and in oxyntic mucosa of hypergastrinemic rats.

    PubMed

    Fjeldbo, Christina Sæten; Bakke, Ingunn; Erlandsen, Sten Even; Holmseth, Jannicke; Lægreid, Astrid; Sandvik, Arne K; Thommesen, Liv; Bruland, Torunn

    2012-01-01

    We show that the gastric hormone gastrin induces the expression of the prosurvival secretory clusterin (sCLU) in rat adenocarcinoma cells. Clusterin mRNA was still upregulated in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, although at a lower level. This indicates that gastrin induces clusterin transcription independently of de novo protein synthesis but requires de novo protein synthesis of signal transduction pathway components to achieve maximal expression level. Luciferase reporter assay indicates that the AP-1 transcription factor complex is involved in gastrin-mediated activation of the clusterin promoter. Gastrin-induced clusterin expression and subsequent secretion is dependent on sustained treatment, because removal of gastrin after 1-2 h abolished the response. Neutralization of secreted clusterin by a specific antibody abolished the antiapoptotic effect of gastrin on serum starvation-induced apoptosis, suggesting that extracellular clusterin is involved in gastrin-mediated inhibition of apoptosis. The clusterin response to gastrin was validated in vivo in hypergastrinemic rats, showing increased clusterin expression in the oxyntic mucosa, as well as higher levels of clusterin in plasma. In normal rat oxyntic mucosa, clusterin protein was strongly expressed in chromogranin A-immunoreactive neuroendocrine cells, of which the main cell type was the histidine decarboxylase-immunoreactive enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell. The association of clusterin with neuroendocrine differentiation was further confirmed in human gastric ECL carcinoids. Interestingly, in hypergastrinemic rats, clusterin-immunoreactive cells formed distinct groups of diverse cells at the base of many glands. Our results suggest that clusterin may contribute to gastrin's growth-promoting effect on the oxyntic mucosa.

  16. Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) is induced by gastrin and inhibits migration of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas.

  17. Gastrin and D1 dopamine receptor interact to induce natriuresis and diuresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Asico, Laureano D; Zheng, Shuo; Villar, Van Anthony M; He, Duofen; Zhou, Lin; Zeng, Chunyu; Jose, Pedro A

    2013-11-01

    Oral NaCl produces a greater natriuresis and diuresis than the intravenous infusion of the same amount of NaCl. Gastrin is the major gastrointestinal hormone taken up by renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells. We hypothesized that renal gastrin and dopamine receptors interact to synergistically increase sodium excretion, an impaired interaction of which may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. In Wistar-Kyoto rats, infusion of gastrin induced natriuresis and diuresis, which was abrogated in the presence of a gastrin (cholecystokinin B receptor [CCKBR]; CI-988) or a D1-like receptor antagonist (SCH23390). Similarly, the natriuretic and diuretic effects of fenoldopam, a D1-like receptor agonist, were blocked by SCH23390, as well as by CI-988. However, the natriuretic effects of gastrin and fenoldopam were not observed in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The gastrin/D1-like receptor interaction was also confirmed in RPT cells. In RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto but not spontaneously hypertensive rats, stimulation of either D1-like receptor or gastrin receptor inhibited Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, an effect that was blocked in the presence of SCH23390 or CI-988. In RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats, CCKBR and D1 receptor coimmunoprecipitated, which was increased after stimulation of either D1 receptor or CCKBR in RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto rats; stimulation of one receptor increased the RPT cell membrane expression of the other receptor, effects that were not observed in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These data suggest that there is a synergism between CCKBR and D1-like receptors to increase sodium excretion. An aberrant interaction between the renal CCK BR and D1-like receptors (eg, D1 receptor) may play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  18. Gastrin mediated down regulation of ghrelin and its pathophysiological role in atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Rau, T T; Sonst, A; Rogler, A; Burnat, G; Neumann, H; Oeckl, K; Neuhuber, W; Dimmler, A; Faller, G; Brzozowski, T; Hartmann, A; Konturek, P C

    2013-12-01

    The gastric hormone ghrelin is known as an important factor for energy homeostasis, appetite regulation and control of body weight. So far, ghrelin has mainly been examined as a serological marker for gastrointestinal diseases, and only a few publications have highlighted its role in local effects like mucus secretion. Ghrelin can be regarded as a gastroprotective factor, but little is known about the distribution and activity of ghrelin cells in pathologically modified tissues. We aimed to examine the morphological changes in ghrelin expression under several inflammatory, metaplastic and carcinogenic conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. In particular, autoimmune gastritis showed interesting remodeling effects in terms of ghrelin expression within neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia by immunohistochemistry. Using confocal laser microscopy, the gastrin/cholecystokinin receptor (CCKB) could be detected on normal ghrelin cells as well as in autoimmune gastritis. Functionally, we found evidence for a physiological interaction between gastrin and ghrelin in a primary rodent cell culture model. Additionally, we gathered serological data from patients with different basic gastrin levels due to long-term autoimmune gastritis or short-term proton pump inhibitor treatment with slightly reactive plasma gastrin elevations. Total ghrelin plasma levels showed a significantly inverse correlation with gastrin under long-term conditions. Autoimmune gastritis as a relevant condition within gastric carcinogenesis therefore has two effects on ghrelin-positive cells due to hypergastrinemia. On the one hand, gastrin stimulates the proliferation of ghrelinpositive cells as integral part of neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia, while on the other hand, plasma ghrelin is reduced by gastrin and lost in pseudopyloric and intestinal metaplastic areas. Ghrelin is necessary for the maintenance of the mucosal barrier and might play a role in gastric carcinogenesis, if altered under these pre

  19. Gastrin biosynthesis in canine G cells.

    PubMed

    Stepan, Vinzenz; Sugano, Kentaro; Yamada, Tadataka; Park, Jung; Dickinson, Chris J

    2002-05-01

    Gastrin requires extensive posttranslational processing for full biological activity. It is presumed that progastrin is cleaved at pairs of basic amino acids by a prohormone convertase to form a glycine-extended intermediate (G-Gly) that serves as a substrate for peptidyl-glycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), resulting in COOH-terminally amidated gastrin. To confirm the nature of progastrin processing in a primary cell line, we performed [(35)S]methionine-labeled pulse-chase biosynthetic experiments in canine antral G cells. Radiolabeled progastrin reached a peak earlier than observed for G-Gly or amidated gastrin. G-Gly radioactivity accumulated in G cells and preceded the appearance of radioactivity in amidated gastrin. The conversion of G-Gly to amidated gastrin was enhanced by the PAM cofactor ascorbic acid. To determine whether one member of the prohormone convertase family (PC2) was responsible for progastrin cleavage, G cells were incubated with PC2 antisense oligonucleotide probes. Cells treated with antisense probes had reduced PC2 expression, an accumulation of radiolabeled progastrin, and a delay in the formation of amidated gastrin. Progastrin in antral G cells is cleaved via PC2 to form G-Gly that is converted to amidated gastrin via the actions of PAM.

  20. Gastrin stimulates renal dopamine production by increasing the renal tubular uptake of l-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Yanrong; Yang, Yu; Yang, Jian; Asico, Laureano D; Chen, Wei; Felder, Robin A; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A; Yang, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    Gastrin is a peptide hormone that is involved in the regulation of sodium balance and blood pressure. Dopamine, which is also involved in the regulation of sodium balance and blood pressure, directly or indirectly interacts with other blood pressure-regulating hormones, including gastrin. This study aimed to determine the mechanisms of the interaction between gastrin and dopamine and tested the hypothesis that gastrin produced in the kidney increases renal dopamine production to keep blood pressure within the normal range. We show that in human and mouse renal proximal tubule cells (hRPTCs and mRPTCs, respectively), gastrin stimulates renal dopamine production by increasing the cellular uptake of l-DOPA via the l-type amino acid transporter (LAT) at the plasma membrane. The uptake of l-DOPA in RPTCs from C57Bl/6J mice is lower than in RPTCs from normotensive humans. l-DOPA uptake in renal cortical slices is also lower in salt-sensitive C57Bl/6J than in salt-resistant BALB/c mice. The deficient renal cortical uptake of l-DOPA in C57Bl/6J mice may be due to decreased LAT-1 activity that is related to its decreased expression at the plasma membrane, relative to BALB/c mice. We also show that renal-selective silencing of Gast by the renal subcapsular injection of Gast siRNA in BALB/c mice decreases renal dopamine production and increases blood pressure. These results highlight the importance of renal gastrin in stimulating renal dopamine production, which may give a new perspective in the prevention and treatment of hypertension. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Regulated expression of the human gastrin gene in mice.

    PubMed

    Mensah-Osman, Edith; Labut, Ed; Zavros, Yana; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Law, David J; Merchant, Juanita L

    2008-11-29

    Gastrin is secreted from neuroendocrine cells residing in the adult antrum called G cells, but constitutively low levels are also expressed in the duodenum and fetal pancreas. Gastrin normally regulates gastric acid secretion by stimulating the proliferation of enterochromaffin-like cells and the release of histamine. Gastrin and progastrin forms are expressed in a number of pathological conditions and malignancies. However, the DNA regulatory elements in the human versus the mouse gastrin promoters differ suggesting differences in their transcriptional control. Thus, we describe here the expression of the human gastrin gene using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) in the antral and duodenal cells of gastrin null mice. All 5 founder lines expressed the 253 kb human gastrin BAC. hGasBAC transgenic mice were bred onto a gastrin null background so that the levels of human gastrin peptide could be analyzed by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay without detecting endogenous mouse gastrin. We have shown previously that chronically elevated gastrin levels suppress somatostatin. Indeed, infusion of amidated rat gastrin depressed somatostatin levels, stimulated gastric acid secretion and an increase in the numbers of G cells in the antrum and duodenum. In conclusion, human gastrin was expressed in mouse enteroendocrine cells and was regulated by somatostatin. This mouse model provides a unique opportunity to study regulation of the human gastrin promoter in vivo by somatostatin and possibly other extracellular regulators contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in transcriptional control of the human gene.

  2. Importance of gastrin in the pathogenesis and treatment of gastric tumors

    PubMed Central

    Burkitt, Michael D; Varro, Andrea; Pritchard, D Mark

    2009-01-01

    In addition to regulating acid secretion, the gastric antral hormone gastrin regulates several important cellular processes in the gastric epithelium including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, tissue remodelling and angiogenesis. Elevated serum concentrations of this hormone are caused by many conditions, particularly hypochlorhydria (as a result of autoimmune or Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-induced chronic atrophic gastritis or acid suppressing drugs) and gastrin producing tumors (gastrinomas). There is now accumulating evidence that altered local and plasma concentrations of gastrin may play a role during the development of various gastric tumors. In the absence of H pylori infection, marked hypergastrinemia frequently results in the development of gastric enterochromaffin cell-like neuroendocrine tumors and surgery to remove the cause of hypergastrinemia may lead to tumor resolution in this condition. In animal models such as transgenic INS-GAS mice, hypergastrinemia has also been shown to act as a cofactor with Helicobacter infection during gastric adenocarcinoma development. However, it is currently unclear as to what extent gastrin also modulates human gastric adenocarcinoma development. Therapeutic approaches targeting hypergastrinemia, such as immunization with G17DT, have been evaluated for the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma, with some promising results. Although the mild hypergastrinemia associated with proton pump inhibitor drug use has been shown to cause ECL-cell hyperplasia and to increase H pylori-induced gastric atrophy, there is currently no convincing evidence that this class of agents contributes towards the development of gastric neuroendocrine tumors or gastric adenocarcinomas in human subjects. PMID:19115463

  3. Radioimmunoassay of gastrin: studies in pernicious anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hansky, J.; Korman, M. G.; Soveny, C.; John, D. J. B. St

    1971-01-01

    Serum gastrin levels in patients with pernicious anaemia were measured by immunoassay in the fasting state, following gastric perfusion with 0·9% saline, 0·1N hydrochloric acid, and solutions of increasing acidity, and after the intravenous injection or infusion of secretin. The fasting serum gastrin level was measured in 21 patients with pernicious anaemia and found to be elevated at 1,036 ± 215 pg per ml. Gastric perfusion with saline (pH 4·7) caused a mean fall in serum gastrin of 30% in four patients; perfusion with hydrochloric acid caused a further slight fall. Perfusion with solutions of increasing acidity resulted in a sharp fall in serum gastrin levels when the acidity was changed from pH 6 to pH 4. A single intravenous injection of secretin produced a mean maximal fall of 44% in the serum gastrin level in four patients, whereas continuous infusion of secretin produced a fall of 35% in four other patients. These studies suggest that the gastrin-secreting cells of the stomach are not affected by the atrophic process in pernicious anaemia and remain subject to the regulating control of acid and secretin. PMID:5548565

  4. Gastrin Induces Nuclear Export and Proteasome Degradation of Menin in Enteric Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Sinju; Meininger, Cameron A; Kang, Anthony J; Photenhauer, Amanda L; Hayes, Michael M; Sahoo, Nirakar; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Ding, Lin; Giordano, Thomas J; Else, Tobias; Madrigal, David J; Low, Malcolm J; Campbell, Fiona; Baker, Ann-Marie; Xu, Haoxing; Wright, Nicholas A; Merchant, Juanita L

    2017-08-28

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1 (MEN1) locus encodes the nuclear protein and tumor suppressor menin. MEN1 mutations frequently cause neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) such as gastrinomas, characterized by their predominant duodenal location and local metastasis at time of diagnosis. Diffuse gastrin cell hyperplasia precedes the appearance of MEN1 gastrinomas, which develop within submucosal Brunner's glands. We investigated how menin regulates expression of the gastrin gene and induces generation of submucosal gastrin-expressing cell hyperplasia. Primary enteric glial cultures were generated from the VillinCre:Men(1FL/FL):Sst(-/-) mice or C57BL/6 mice (controls), with or without inhibition of gastric acid by omeprazole. Primary enteric glial cells from VillinCre:Men1FL/FL:Sst(+/+) mice were incubated with gastrin and separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Cells were incubated with forskolin and H89 to activate or inhibit protein kinase A (a family of enzymes whose activity depends on cellular levels of cyclic AMP). Gastrin was measured in blood, tissue, and cell cultures using an ELISA. Immunoprecipitation with menin or ubiquitin was used to demonstrate post-translational modification of menin. Primary glial cells were incubated with leptomycin b and MG132 to block nuclear export and proteasome activity, respectively. We obtained human duodenal, lymph node, and pancreatic gastrinoma samples, collected from patients who underwent surgery from 1996 through 2007 in the United States or the United Kingdom. Enteric glial cells that stained positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP+) expressed gastrin de novo through a mechanism that required PKA. Gastrin-induced nuclear export of menin via cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR)-mediated activation of PKA. Once exported from the nucleus, menin was ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome. GFAP and other markers of enteric glial cells, e.g., p75 and S100B, colocalized with gastrin in human duodenal

  5. Helicobacter pylori related hypergastrinaemia is the result of a selective increase in gastrin 17.

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, G; Ardill, J E; Fillmore, D; Chittajallu, R S; Fullarton, G M; McColl, K E

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection increases the serum concentration of gastrin, and this may be one of the mechanisms by which it predisposes to duodenal ulceration. Different forms of circulating gastrin were studied both basally and postprandially in 13 duodenal ulcer patients before and one month after eradication of H pylori. Three antisera that are specific for particular regions of the gastrin molecules were used. Gel chromatography indicated that > 90% of the circulating gastrin consisted of gastrin (G) 17 and G34 both before and after eradicating the infection. The basal median total immunoreactive gastrin concentration fell from 26 pmol/l (range 11-43) to 19 pmol/l (8-39) (p < 0.05), entirely because of a fall in G17 from 6 pmol/l (< 2.4-25) to < 2.4 pmol/l (< 2.4-23) (p < 0.001). The median (range) basal G34 values were similar before (15 pmol (2-36)) and after (10 pmol (2-30)) eradication. The median total immunoreactive gastrin concentration determined 20 minutes postprandially fell from 59 pmol/l (38-114) to 33 pmol/l (19-88) (p < 0.005), and again this was entirely the result of a fall in G17 from 43 pmol/l (9-95) to 17 pmol/l (< 2.4-52) (p < 0.001). The median postprandial G34 values were similar before (13 pmol/l, range 6-42) and after (15 pmol/l, range 6-30) eradication. Eating stimulated a noticeable rise in G17 but little change in G34, both in the presence and absence of H pylori. The finding that H pylori infection selectively increases G17 explains why the infection causes mainly postprandial hypergastrinaemia. G17 is increased selectively because H pylori predominantly affects the antral mucosa which is the main source of G17 whereas G34 is mainly duodenal in origin. This study also indicates that the increased concentration of gastrin in H pylori infection is the result of an increase in one of the main biologically active forms of the hormone. PMID:8314507

  6. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I binds to developing gastrin cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Z H; Blom, J; Larsson, L I

    1998-03-01

    We have previously reported that antropyloric gastrin (G) and somatostatin (D) cells derive from precursor (G/D) cells that coexpress both hormones. We have now analyzed this endocrine cell pedigree for binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), which previously has been reported to represent a useful marker for cell differentiation. Subpopulations of G/D, D, and G cells were all found to express UEA-I binding. Labelling with bromodeoxyuridine showed that UEA-I positive G cells possessed a higher labelling index than UEA-I negative G cells. These data suggest that the UEA-I positive G cells represent maturing cells still involved in DNA synthesis and cell division. Electron microscopically, specific UEA-I binding sites were localized to the secretory granules and the apical cell membrane of G cells. We conclude that UEA-I represents a differentiation marker for G cells. Moreover, the presence of UEA-I binding sites in these cells may be relevant for Helicobacter pylori-mediated disturbances of gastric acid secretion and gastrin hypersecretion.

  7. Tumour gastrin expression and serum gastrin concentrations in dogs with gastric carcinoma are poor diagnostic indicators.

    PubMed

    Seim-Wikse, T; Kolbjørnsen, O; Jörundsson, E; Benestad, S L; Bjornvad, C R; Grotmol, T; Kristensen, A T; Skancke, E

    2014-01-01

    Hypergastrinaemia is observed commonly in human patients with gastric carcinoma and is associated with atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection, both of which predispose to development of gastric tumours. Increased expression of gastrin is also described as a prognostic indicator for gastric carcinoma in man. Gastric carcinoma is rare in dogs and generally carries a grave prognosis. In this study, the expression of gastrin was investigated immunohistochemically in gastric biopsy samples from 64 dogs with gastric carcinoma. Serum gastrin concentrations were measured in 15 of these dogs and compared with those of seven healthy control dogs. Tumour tissue expressed gastrin in 8% (5/64) of the dogs with gastric carcinoma. There was no significant difference in serum gastrin concentrations between dogs with gastric carcinoma and healthy controls (P = 0.08). Expression of gastrin in gastric carcinomas is less common in dogs than in man and may therefore not be relied on as a prognostic marker in this species. Serum gastrin concentration alone is also not a useful biomarker for gastric carcinoma in dogs.

  8. A GC-rich element confers epidermal growth factor responsiveness to transcription from the gastrin promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, J L; Demediuk, B; Brand, S J

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha are important determinants of mucosal integrity in the gastrointestinal tract, and they act both directly and indirectly to prevent ulceration in the stomach. Consistent with this physiological role, EGF stimulates transcription of gastrin, a peptide hormone which regulates gastric acid secretion and mucosal growth. EGF stimulation of gastrin transcription is mediated by a GC-rich gastrin EGF response element (gERE) (GGGGCGGGGTGGGGGG) which lies between -54 and -68 in the human gastrin promoter. The gERE sequence also confers weaker responsiveness to phorbol ester stimulation. The gERE sequence differs from previously described EGF response elements. The gERE DNA sequence specifically interacts with a GH4 DNA-binding protein distinct from previously described transcription factors (Egr-1 and AP2) which bind GC-rich sequences and mediate transcriptional activation by growth factors. Furthermore, the gERE element does not bind the Sp1 transcription factor even though the gERE sequence contains a high-affinity Sp1-binding site (GGCGGG). Images PMID:2017173

  9. Stimulation of proliferation in the colorectal mucosa by gastrin precursors is blocked by desferrioxamine.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Audrey; Lachal, Shamilah; Bramante, Gianni; Kovac, Suzana; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2010-07-01

    Precursors of the peptide hormone gastrin stimulate proliferation in the colorectal mucosa and promote the development of colorectal carcinoma. Gastrins bind two ferric ions selectively and with high affinity, and the biological activity of glycine-extended gastrin (Ggly) in vitro is dependent on the presence of ferric ions. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not iron is required for biological activity of progastrin and Ggly in vivo. Rats that had undergone a colostomy were infused with Ggly, and proliferation was measured in the defunctioned rectal mucosa. Proliferation was also measured in the colonic mucosa of hGAS and MTI-Ggly mice, which, by definition, overexpress progastrin and Ggly, respectively. The requirement for iron was assessed by thrice-weekly injection of the chelating agent desferrioxamine (DFO). The proliferation index in the defunctioned rectal mucosa was significantly increased in the Ggly-infused rats, and the increase was significantly reduced after treatment with DFO. Treatment with DFO significantly reduced the crypt height and proliferation index in the colonic mucosa of hGAS and MTI-Ggly mice but had no effect on the same variables in wild-type mice. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the biological activity of progastrin and Ggly in vivo is dependent on the presence of ferric ions and further suggest that chelating agents may block the stimulatory effects of gastrin precursors in the development of colorectal carcinoma.

  10. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2006-12-12

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  11. Gastrin Receptor-Avid Peptide Conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2005-07-26

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  12. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Sieckman, Gary; Smith, Charles J.; Gali, Hariprasad

    2006-06-13

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a-moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  13. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  14. Gastrin receptors on isolated canine parietal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soll, A.H.; Amirian, D.A.; Thomas, L.P.; Reedy, T.J.; Elashoff, J.D.

    1984-05-01

    The receptors in the fundic mucosa that mediate gastrin stimulation of acid secretion have been studied. Synthetic human gastrin-17-I (G17) with a leucine substitution in the 15th position ((Leu15)-G17) was iodinated by chloramine T; high saturable binding was found to enzyme-dispersed canine fundic mucosal cells. /sup 127/I-(Leu15)-G17, but not /sup 127/I-G17, retained binding potency and biological activity comparable with uniodinated G17. Fundic mucosal cells were separated by size by using an elutriator rotor, and specific /sup 125/I-(Leu-15)-G17 binding in the larger cell fractions was highly correlated with the distribution of parietal cells. There was, however, specific gastrin binding in the small cell fractions, not accounted for by parietal cells. Using sequential elutriation and stepwise density gradients, highly enriched parietal and chief cell fractions were prepared; /sup 125/I-(Leu15)-G17 binding correlated positively with the parietal cell (r . 0.98) and negatively with chief cell content (r . -0.96). In fractions enriched to 45-65% parietal cells, specific /sup 125/I-(Leu15)-G17 binding was rapid, reaching a steady state at 37 degrees C within 30 min. Dissociation was also rapid, with the rate similar after 100-fold dilution or dilution plus excess pentagastrin. At a tracer concentration from 10 to 30 pM, saturable binding was 7.8 +/- 0.8% per 10(6) cells (mean +/- SE) and binding in the presence of excess pentagastrin accounted for 11% of total binding. G17 and carboxyl terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin (26-33) were equipotent in displacing tracer binding and in stimulating parietal cell function ((/sup 14/C)aminopyrine accumulation), whereas the tetrapeptide of gastrin (14-17) had a much lower potency. Proglumide inhibited gastrin binding and selectively inhibited gastrin stimulation of parietal cell function.

  15. Involvement of STH7 in light-adapted development in Arabidopsis thaliana promoted by both strigolactone and karrikin.

    PubMed

    Thussagunpanit, Jutiporn; Nagai, Yuko; Nagae, Miyu; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Nakano, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hidemitsu; Asami, Tadao

    2017-02-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) and karrikins (KARs) regulate photomorphogenesis. GR24, a synthetic SL and KAR1, a KAR, inhibit the hypocotyl elongation of Arabidopsis thaliana in a weak light. GR24 and KAR1 up-regulate the expression of STH7, encoding a transcription factor belonging to the double B-box zinc finger subfamily. In this study, we used STH7-overexpressing (STH7ox) lines and functionally defective STH7 (STH7-SRDX) mutants to investigate roles of SLs and KARs in photomorphogenesis of Arabidopsis. Hypocotyl elongation of STH7-SRDX mutants was less sensitive to both GR24 and KAR1 treatment than that of wild-type Arabidopsis under weak light conditions. Furthermore, the chlorophyll and anthocyanin content was increased in STH7ox lines when de-etiolated with light and GR24-treated plants had enhanced anthocyanin production. GR24 and KAR1 treatment significantly increased the expression level of photosynthesis-related genes LHCB1 and rbcS. The results strongly suggest that SL and KAR induce photomorphogenesis of Arabidopsis in an STH7-dependent manner.

  16. Bismuth ions inhibit the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Suzana; Loh, Su-Wen; Lachal, Shamilah; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2012-02-15

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins in vitro and in vivo. Bi3+ ions also bind to glycine-extended gastrin17 (Ggly), but inhibit Ggly-induced cell proliferation and migration in gastrointestinal cell lines in vitro. The aims of the present study were firstly, to establish the mechanism by which Bi3+ ions inhibit the binding of Fe3+ ions to Ggly, and secondly, to test the effect of Bi3+ ions on the activity of non-amidated gastrins in vivo. The interaction between Bi3+ ions, Fe3+ ions and Ggly was investigated by ultraviolet spectroscopy. The effect of Bi3+ ions on colorectal mucosal proliferation was measured in three animal models. In vitro in the presence of Bi3+ ions the affinity of Fe3+ ions for Ggly was substantially reduced; the data was better fitted by a mixed, rather than a competitive, inhibition model. In rats treated with Ggly alone proliferation in the rectal mucosa was increased by 318%, but was reduced to control values (p < 0.001) in animals receiving oral bismuth plus Ggly. Proliferation in the colonic mucosa of mice overexpressing Ggly or progastrin was significantly greater than in wild-type mice, but was no greater than control (p < 0.01) in animals receiving oral bismuth. Thus a reduction in the binding of Fe3+ ions to Ggly and progastrin in the presence of Bi3+ ions is a likely explanation for the ability of oral bismuth to block the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins in vivo.

  17. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  18. The Effects of Secretin, Pancreozymin, and Gastrin on Insulin and Glucagon Secretion in Anesthetized Dogs *

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Roger H.; Ketterer, Hermann; Dupré, John; Eisentraut, Anna M.

    1967-01-01

    The effects upon islet hormone secretion of highly purified preparations of secretin and of pancreozymin-cholecystokinin and of a crude gastrin-containing extract of hog antrum have been studied in acutely operated dogs. All three preparations were shown to cause a striking increase in insulin concentration in the pancreaticoduodenal venous plasma after their rapid endoportal injection in anesthetized dogs. With each hormone preparation, the peak in insulin secretion occurred 1 minute after injection, and a rapid decline was observed immediately thereafter. Whereas secretin and gastrin failed to alter significantly the pancreaticoduodenal venous glucagon or arterial glucose concentration, pancreozymin caused a dramatic rise in pancreaticoduodenal venous glucagon concentration, which reached a peak 3 minutes after injection, and hyperglycemia was noted to occur soon thereafter. Endoportal infusion of secretin and pancreozymin for 20 minutes caused responses that were sustained but qualitatively identical to the responses noted after rapid injection of the hormones. The beta-cytotropic effect of secretin was abolished by the infusion of epinephrine. These results could not be attributed to the small degree of contamination of the enteric hormone preparations with insulin or glucagon, and it would appear that secretin, pancreozymin, and probably gastrin have insulin-releasing activity and that pancreozymin has, in addition, glucagon-releasing activity. The demonstration that these three hormones possess insulin-releasing activity suggests that there is in the gastrointestinal tract a chain of betacytotropic hormones from antrum to ileum that is capable of augmenting insulin secretion as required for disposal of substrate loads. It is suggested that the existence of this “entero-insular axis” prevents high substrate concentrations that would otherwise follow ingestion of large meals were the insular response entirely a function of arterial substrate concentration

  19. Serum gastrin in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, I L; Sells, R A; McConnell, R B; Dockray, G J

    1980-12-01

    The realisation that circulating gastrin is heterogeneous necessitates a reappraisal of gastrin's role in the increased incidence of duodenal ulcer disease that occurs in chronic renal failure. Radioimmunoassays employing region-specific antisera have been used to examine renal and extrarenal factors controlling serum gastrin concentration in patients with chronic renal failure. The present study has shown that basal serum gastrin concentrations measured with a carboxyl-terminal specific antibody were significantly higher in eight patients with chronic renal failure treated by dietary restriction (388+/-196 pM) than in 14 patients with chronic renal failure treated by haemodialysis (28.7+/-4.6 pM). However, basal gastrin concentrations in both groups of patients were significantly higher than in 25 normal subjects (12.3+/-1.8 pM) and showed significant negative correlations with maximal gastric acid secretion (p < 0.01). Markedly raised basal gastrin concentrations were observed only in chronic renal failure patients who were also achlorhydric. Although the peak postprandial increment in big gastrin concentration in 11 chronic renal failure patients (34.0+/-7.5 pM) was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than in 25 normal subjects (19.5+/-4.6 pM), the little gastrin responses were not significantly different. In addition, clearance of exogenous little gastrin was similar in four chronic failure patients (clearance half time: 8.1+/-0.7 min) and four normal subjects (clearance half time: 6.5+/-1.2 min). These studies suggest that the human kidney is unimportant in the metabolism of little gastrin. As circulating little gastrin is six times more potent than big gastrin in stimulating acid secretion, these studies suggest that the raised gastrin concentrations observed in patients with chronic renal failure have little significance in terms of their increased incidence of duodenal ulcer disease.

  20. Differences and significance of motilin, vasoactive intestinal peptide and gastrin in blood and gallbladder tissues of patients with gallstones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Su, Yang; Jin, Jun-Zhe; Fan, Ying; Yu, Hong; Zhang, Li-Kui

    2008-02-01

    The disorders of gallbladder motility may play an important role in the formation of gallstones. Many neural and hormonal factors and their interactions regulate gallbladder motility and bile flow into the duodenum. Further study in these factors may help to reveal the etiology of gallbladder diseases. This study was undertaken to assess the relationship of the levels of motilin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and gastrin in blood and gallbladder tissues with the formation of cholelithiasis. The levels of motilin, gastrin and VIP in blood and gallbladder tissues of 36 patients with gallbladder stones, 14 patients with gallbladder polyps, 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with common bile duct stones were measured by radioimmunoassay. The level of motilin in plasma and gallbladder tissues of the gallbladder stone group was higher than that of the control and gallbladder polyp groups (P<0.05). The levels of plasma VIP and serum gastrin were much higher than those of the other three groups (P<0.01). The level of VIP in gallbladder tissues was higher than that of the control and gallbladder polyp groups (P<0.01). The abnormal excretion of hormonal factors is closely related to gallstone formation. The high level of VIP in gallbladder tissues may be an important cause of gallbladder hypomotility. The abnormal level of serum gastrin may be related to the gastrointestinal symptoms of patients with gallstones.

  1. [Hormonal and pharmacological modification of the ileocecal sphincter].

    PubMed

    Stremmel, W; Kurpreugsch, K; Langewitz, W

    1977-04-01

    Ileocecal shincter (ICS) pressure was evaluated in response to hormonal and pharmacological stimuli in rabbits. The effect of exogeneous gastrin (pentagastrin) and glucagon, metoclopramide and neostigmin on the ICS pressure was studied. Gastrin, glucagon and metoclopramide increased the pressure whereas neostigmin lowered it. These results suggest that this junctional zone is not only a valve but a real shincter, which is affected by gastrointestinal hormones and pharmacological substances. Further examinations are necessary to study the role of the ICS after gastrointestinal surgery.

  2. Analytical expression of s-th power of Gram matrix for group covariant signals and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuda, T. S.; Shiromoto, K.

    2011-10-01

    Analytical expression of s-th power of the Gram matrix is shown when the quantum signals are group covariant. An application of the formula to coded quantum signals by classical linear codes over a finite field is also shown.

  3. Role of CCK/gastrin receptors in gastrointestinal/metabolic diseases and results of human studies using gastrin/CCK receptor agonists/antagonists in these diseases

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the estabished and possible roles of CCK1 and CCK2 receptors in gastrointestinal (GI) and metabolic diseases are reviewed and available results from human agonist/antagonist studies are discussed. While there is evidence for the involvement of CCK1R in numerous diseases including pancreatic disorders, motility disorders, tumor growth, regulation of satiety and a number of CCK-deficient states, the role of CCK1R in these conditions is not clearly defined. There are encouraging data from several clinical studies of CCK1R antagonists in some of these conditions, but their role as therapeutic agents remains unclear. The role of CCK2R in physiological (atrophic gastritis, pernicious anemia) and pathological (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome) hypergastrinemic states, its effects on the gastric mucosa (ECL cell hyperplasia, carcinoids, parietal cell mass) and its role in acid-peptic disorders are clearly defined. Furthermore, recent studies point to a possible role for CCK2R in a number of GI malignancies. Current data from human studies of CCK2R antagonists are presented and their potential role in the treatment of these conditions reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CCK2 receptors as targets for medical imaging is discussed. Even though cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin were among the first gastrointestinal hormones discovered [1,2], both their physiological roles as well as their roles in clinically relevant gastrointestinal diseases remain unclear and even controversial in many cases [3–6]. The structural characterization of CCK and gastrin [7,8], pharmacological identification [9–13] and cloning [14,15] of CCK and gastrin receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R), characterization of receptor location, peptide and receptor genes, development of receptor antagonists and receptor/agonist knockout animals [16–21] have led to important advancements in our understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological role of CCK and gastrin signaling [3]. Most of these topics

  4. Phylogeny and molecular evolution of the Acc1 gene within the StH genome species in Triticeae (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Sha, Li-Na; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Hai-Qin; Kang, Hou-Yang; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2013-10-15

    To estimate the phylogeny and molecular evolution of a single-copy gene encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1) within the StH genome species, two Acc1 homoeologous sequences were isolated from nearly all the sampled StH genome species and were analyzed with those from 35 diploid taxa representing 19 basic genomes in Triticeae. Sequence diversity patterns and genealogical analysis suggested that (1) the StH genome species from the same areas or neighboring geographic regions are closely related to each other; (2) the Acc1 gene sequences of the StH genome species from North America and Eurasia are evolutionarily distinct; (3) Dasypyrum has contributed to the nuclear genome of Elymus repens and Elymus mutabilis; (4) the StH genome polyploids have higher levels of sequence diversity in the H genome homoeolog than the St genome homoeolog; and (5) the Acc1 sequence may evolve faster in the polyploid species than in the diploids. Our result provides some insight on evolutionary dynamics of duplicate Acc1 gene, the polyploidy speciation and phylogeny of the StH genome species. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [The role of hormones from the mucosa of the gastric antrum in regulating gastric secretion].

    PubMed

    Groĭsman, S D; Gubkin, V A; Babenkov, G D

    1993-09-01

    Removal of antral mucosa obviously reduced the sensitivity of glandulocytes to pentagastrin in dogs with Basov-Pavlov fistulae. Activation of the endocrinal cells of the antral mucosa after fundal and antral parts separation exerted an opposite effect. The data obtained suggest that, along with gastrin, there is another hormonal factor facilitating the action of gastrin in the antral mucosa.

  6. Sex-related Differences in Gastrin Release and Parietal Cell Sensitivity to Gastrin in Healthy Human Beings

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, M.; Richardson, C. T.; Walsh, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    We compared serum gastrin concentrations and gastric acid secretion basally and in response to a mixed meal in age-matched women and men. Women had significantly higher basal serum gastrin concentrations (P < 0.01) and two- to threefold higher food-stimulated serum gastrin concentrations (P < 0.001) than men. Basal and food-stimulated serum gastrin concentrations in women did not fluctuate significantly during the menstrual cycle. Sex-related differences in food-stimulated serum gastrin concentrations were not due to differences in antral pH because pH after the meal in women and men had been kept constant at 5.0 by in vivo intragastric titration with sodium bicarbonate. Studies using an antibody that reacts only with potent gastrin heptadecapeptide species (G-17-I and II) indicated that women also had threefold higher serum G-17 concentrations after the meal than men (P < 0.005). Elevated serum G-17 concentrations after the meal in women were due to increased release of G-17 rather than slower clearance of G-17 from the circulation. Despite elevated serum gastrin concentrations in response to food, women secreted approximately the same amount of acid relative to their maximal secretory capacity as men. Furthermore, during exogenous G-17 infusion, which led to identical serum gastrin concentrations in women and men, the dose-response curve for acid secretion in women was shifted significantly to the right of the G-17 dose-response curve in men (P < 0.02). The dose of G-17 that stimulated half of peak acid secretion was two to three times higher in women than in men, reflecting significantly reduced sensitivity of parietal cells to gastrin in women (P < 0.05). Our studies suggest that, compared with men, women release greater amounts of gastrin but are at the same time less sensitive to stimulation of acid secretion by gastrin. PMID:6826731

  7. CI-988 Inhibits EGFR Transactivation and Proliferation Caused by Addition of CCK/Gastrin to Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Moreno, Paola; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-07-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) which are present on lung cancer cells. CCK-8 stimulates the proliferation of lung cancer cells, whereas the CCK2R receptor antagonist CI-988 inhibits proliferation. GPCR for some gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters mediate lung cancer growth by causing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Here, the role of CCK/gastrin and CI-988 on EGFR transactivation and lung cancer proliferation was investigated. Addition of CCK-8 or gastrin-17 (100 nM) to NCI-H727 human lung cancer cells increased EGFR Tyr(1068) phosphorylation after 2 min. The ability of CCK-8 to cause EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation was blocked by CI-988, gefitinib (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor), PP2 (Src inhibitor), GM6001 (matrix metalloprotease inhibitor), and tiron (superoxide scavenger). CCK-8 nonsulfated and gastrin-17 caused EGFR transactivation and bound with high affinity to NCI-H727 cells, suggesting that the CCK2R is present. CI-988 inhibited the ability of CCK-8 to cause ERK phosphorylation and elevate cytosolic Ca(2+). CI-988 or gefitinib inhibited the basal growth of NCI-H727 cells or that stimulated by CCK-8. The results indicate that CCK/gastrin may increase lung cancer proliferation in an EGFR-dependent manner.

  8. Expression of cholecystokinin2-receptor in rat and human L cells and the stimulation of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by gastrin treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Cao, Xun; Liu, Xiao-Min

    2015-03-01

    Gastrin is a gastrointestinal hormone secreted by G cells. Hypergastrinemia can improve blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. These positive effects are primarily due to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells. In recent years, many receptors that regulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) have been identified in enteroendocrine L cell lines. This led us to hypothesize that, in addition to the trophic effects of gastrin on β-cells, L cells also express cholecystokinin2-receptor (CCK2R), which may regulate GLP-1 secretion and have synergistic effects on glucose homeostasis. Our research provides a preliminary analysis of CCK2R expression and the stimulating effect of gastrin treatment on GLP-1 secretion in a human endocrine L cell line, using RT-PCR, Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and ELISA analyses. The expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3, which regulate GLP-1 biosynthesis, were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Double immunofluorescence labeling was utilized to assess the intracellular localization of CCK2R and GLP-1 in L cells harvested from rat colon tissue. Our results showed that CCK2R was expressed in both the human L cell line and the rat L cells. We also showed that treatment with gastrin, a CCK2R agonist, stimulated the secretion of GLP-1, and that this effect was likely due to increased expression of proglucagon and PCSK1 (also known as prohormone convertase 3 (PC3 gene)). These results not only provide a basis for the role gastrin may play in intestinal L cells, and may also provide the basis for the development of a method of gastrin-mediated glycemic regulation.

  9. Prohormone convertases 1/3 and 2 together orchestrate the site-specific cleavages of progastrin to release gastrin-34 and gastrin-17.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Zhu, Xiaorong; Norrbom, Christina; Bundgaard, Jens R; Johnsen, Anders H; Nielsen, John E; Vikesaa, Jonas; Stein, Jeffrey; Dey, Arunangsu; Steiner, Donald F; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2008-10-01

    Cellular synthesis of peptide hormones requires PCs (prohormone convertases) for the endoproteolysis of prohormones. Antral G-cells synthesize the most gastrin and express PC1/3, 2 and 5/6 in the rat and human. But the cleavage sites in progastrin for each PC have not been determined. Therefore, in the present study, we measured the concentrations of progastrin, processing intermediates and alpha-amidated gastrins in antral extracts from PC1/3-null mice and compared the results with those in mice lacking PC2 and wild-type controls. The expression of PCs was examined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization of mouse G-cells. Finally, the in vitro effect of recombinant PC5/6 on progastrin and progastrin fragments containing the relevant dibasic cleavage sites was also examined. The results showed that mouse G-cells express PC1/3, 2 and 5/6. The concentration of progastrin in PC1/3-null mice was elevated 3-fold. Chromatography showed that cleavage of the Arg(36)Arg(37) and Arg(73)Arg(74) sites were grossly decreased. Accordingly, the concentrations of progastrin products were markedly reduced, alpha-amidated gastrins (-34 and -17) being 25% of normal. Lack of PC1/3 was without effect on the third dibasic site (Lys(53)Lys(54)), which is the only processing site for PC2. Recombinant PC5/6 did not cleave any of the dibasic processing sites in progastrin and fragments containing the relevant dibasic processing sites. The complementary cleavages of PC1/3 and 2, however, suffice to explain most of the normal endoproteolysis of progastrin. Moreover, the results show that PCs react differently to the same dibasic sequences, suggesting that additional structural factors modulate the substrate specificity.

  10. Quantifying the Local Seebeck Coefficient using Scanning Thermoelectric Microscopy (SThEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrath, Jenna; Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Pipe, Kevin; Goldman, Rachel

    2013-03-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices allow reliable solid-state conversion of heat to electricity. The efficiency of a TE device is determined by the figure of merit, ZT, which is sensitive to the Seebeck coefficient, S. A promising alternative to traditional macroscale measurements of S is scanning thermoelectric microscopy (SThEM), which can profile S with nm resolution. In SThEM, an unheated scanning tunneling microscopy tip acts as a high-resolution voltmeter probe to measure the thermally-induced voltage, V, in a heated sample. However, the temperature (T) gradient is not localized to the sample, and the measured V is a convolution of voltages within the region of non-zero temperature gradient. Therefore we have developed a 1D Fourier heat conduction model to predict the T gradient in the tip and to deconvolute the measured V within the sample. This approach enables direct conversion between the measured V and the local S. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-PI0000012. Y.H. Lin and R.S. Goldman are supported in part by the DOE under contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46339.

  11. Autoantibody to the gastrin receptor in pernicious anemia

    SciTech Connect

    de Aizpurua, H.J.; Ungar, B.; Toh, B.H.

    1985-08-22

    The authors examined serum IgG fractions from 20 patients with pernicious anemia and 25 control subjects for their capacity to inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)15-leu human gastrin-17 to parietal-cell-enriched gastric mucosal cells. IgG fractions from six patients reduced gastrin binding by 45.6 +/- 12.2 per cent, as compared with a reduction of 1.8 +/- 0.7 per cent by fractions from the 25 controls. The fractions from these six patients also reduced gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake by gastric cells (an index of gastric acid secretory activity in vitro) by 50.2 +/- 8.4 per cent (mean +/- S.D.), as compared with 9.2 +/- 4.1 per cent for the controls. IgG fractions from six other patients that did not reduce gastrin binding also inhibited gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake, by 48.1 +/- 9.1 per cent. These reductions in gastrin binding and aminopyrine uptake were abolished by absorption of the IgG fractions with suspensions of viable gastric mucosal cells but not by absorption with liver or kidney cells. The IgG fractions did not inhibit (/sup 3/H)histamine binding or histamine-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake. These results suggest that serum IgG from some patients with pernicious anemia contains autoantibodies to the gastrin receptor.

  12. The gastrin/cholecystokinin-B receptor on prostate cells--a novel target for bifunctional prostate cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Sturzu, Alexander; Klose, Uwe; Sheikh, Sumbla; Echner, Hartmut; Kalbacher, Hubert; Deeg, Martin; Nägele, Thomas; Schwentner, Christian; Ernemann, Ulrike; Heckl, Stefan

    2014-02-14

    The means of identifying prostate carcinoma and its metastases are limited. The contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging clinical diagnostics are not taken up into the tumor cells, but only accumulate in the interstitial space of the highly vasculated tumor. We examined the gastrin/cholecystokinin-B receptor as a possible target for prostate-specific detection using the C-terminal seven amino acid sequence of the gastrin peptide hormone. The correct sequence and a scrambled control sequence were coupled to the fluorescent dye rhodamine and the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium (Gd)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). Expression analysis of the gastrin receptor mRNA was performed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on PC3 prostate carcinoma cells, U373 glioma, U2OS osteosarcoma and Colo205 colon carcinoma cells. After having confirmed elevated expression of gastrin receptor in PC3 cells and very low expression of the receptor in Colo205 cells, these two cell lines were used to create tumor xenografts on nude mice for in vivo experiments. Confocal lasers scanning microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging showed a high specificity of the correct conjugate for the PC3 xenografts. Staining of the PC3 xenografts was much weaker with the scrambled conjugate while the Colo205 xenografts showed no marked staining with any of the conjugates. In vitro experiments comparing the correct and scrambled conjugates on PC3 cells by magnetic resonance relaxometry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting confirmed markedly higher specificity of the correct conjugate. The investigations show that the gastrin receptor is a promising tumor cell surface target for future prostate-cancer-specific imaging applications.

  13. Serum gastrin and cholecystokinin are associated with subsequent development of gastric cancer in a prospective cohort of Finnish smokers.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gwen; Abnet, Christian C; Choo-Wosoba, Hyoyoung; Vogtmann, Emily; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Taylor, Philip R; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius; Dawsey, Sanford M; Rehfeld, Jens F; Freedman, Neal D

    2017-03-27

    Gastrin, which induces gastric acid secretion, and a structurally similar hormone, cholecystokinin (CCK)-a potent acid inhibitor, may each play a role in gastric cancer. However, few studies have investigated this hypothesis in humans. We therefore investigated whether serum gastrin or CCK concentrations at baseline were associated with the incidence of gastric non-cardia adenocarcinomas (GNCA), oesophagogastric junctional adenocarcinomas (EGJA) or gastric carcinoid tumours over 24 years of follow-up in a study nested within the all-male Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study of Finnish smokers. Totals of 283 incident GNCA, 96 EGJA and 10 gastric carcinoid cases, and 778 matched controls, were included in our analysis. Gastrin and CCK were measured using specific radioimmunoassays. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by multivariable logistic regression with adjustment for all known or suspected confounding factors, including Helicobacter pylori seropositivity. Those with high gastrin (Q4 vs Q1), had an increased risk of GNCA (fully adjusted OR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.21, 3.05) and gastric carcinoids, though the small number of carcinoid cases meant the fully adjusted model was unstable (age-adjusted continuous model OR: 4.67; 95% CI: 2.67, 8.15). CCK was associated with risk of GNCA only for those in Q3 relative to Q1 (OR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.33, 0.96), and no significant trend was observed. Our data suggest that high serum concentrations of gastrin may be associated independently with an increased risk of gastric cancer; the role of CCK in cancer risk is less clear.

  14. [Study of the effect of sclareol glycol diterpene on the release of adenohypophysial hormones prolactin, somatotropin and adenocorticotrophic hormone].

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Zh

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a semisynthetic diterpene sclareol glycol (SG) on the release of adenohypophysial hormones prolactin, somatotrophic hormone (STH) and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) were studied in the plasma of the rat. The effects of SG were investigated also parallel with diterpene forskolin (F) on the release of prolactin and STH in tissue cultures of adenohypophysial cells of the rat. The experiments established that SG increased in a low dose, but in higher dose lowered the concentration of plasma prolactin and STH. These effects were found even after 15 minutes after its intraperitoneal administration. SG induced mainly an increase of plasma concentration of ACTH. In tissue cultures of adenohypophysial cells SG caused lowering of prolactin concentration and an increase of STH; under these conditions F caused only an increase in the concentration of these hormones. The results show that SG influences secretion of prolactin, STH and ACTH in various ways in comparison with F. This might be due to th their various chemical structure and to their basic mechanisms of action (mainly by 3',5'-AMP for P; besides 3, 5'-AMP substantial participation of DA-ergic and GABA-ergic mediation for SG).

  15. GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR IN BREAST CANCER MEDIATES CELLULAR MIGRATION AND INTERLEUKIN-8 EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Celia; Ives, Kirk; Hellmich, Helen L.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancers aberrantly express gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) hormone and its cognate receptor, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R). Experimental evidence suggests that bombesin (BBS), the pharmacological homologue of GRP, promotes breast cancer growth and progression. The contribution of GRP-R to other poor prognostic indicators in breast cancer, such as the expression of the EGF-R family of growth factors, and hormone insensitivity is unknown. Materials and Methods Two estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer cell lines were used. MDA-MB-231 overexpress both EGFR and GRPR, whereas SK-BR-3 cells express EGF-R but lack GRP-R. Cellular proliferation was assessed by Coulter counter. Chemotactic migration was performed using Transwell chambers and the migrated cells were quantified. Northern blot and real-time PCR were used to evaluate if pro-angiogenic factor interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA expression. Results In MDA-MB-231 cells, GRP-R and EGF-R synergize to regulate cell migration, IL-8 expression, but not cell proliferation. In SK-BR-3 cells, ectopic expression of GRP-R was sufficient to increase migration and IL-8 mRNA. Conclusions These data suggest relevant roles for GRP-R in ER-negative breast cancer progression. Future mechanistic studies to define the molecular role of GRP-R in breast cancer metastasis provide novel targets for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:19631337

  16. Serum gastrin in canine chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluates serum gastrin concentrations in dogs with chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis, as well as its possible relationship with the severity of lesions present in the stomach. To achieve this aim, 5 dogs without gastrointestinal disease and 15 dogs with chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis were included. Serum gastrin concentrations were significantly increased in dogs with chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis compared with those in dogs without gastrointestinal disease. Also, there was a positive correlation between the severity of the gastric lesion and the serum gastrin concentration. Our findings indicate the possibility that gastrin plays a role in the etiology of an accompanying chronic antral gastritis in canine chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis. PMID:16152719

  17. Gastrin attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced intestinal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihao; Luo, Yongli; Cheng, Yunjiu; Zou, Dezhi; Zeng, Aihong; Yang, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a devastating complication when the blood supply is reflowed in ischemic organs. Gastrin has critical function in regulating acid secretion, proliferation, and differentiation in the gastric mucosa. We aimed to determine whether gastrin has an effect on intestinal I/R damage. Intestinal I/R injury was induced by 60-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery followed by 60-min reperfusion, and the rats were induced to be hypergastrinemic by pretreated with omeprazole or directly injected with gastrin. Some hypergastrinemic rats were injected with cholecystokinin-2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist prior to I/R operation. After the animal surgery, the intestine was collected for histological analysis. Isolated intestinal epithelial cells or crypts were harvested for RNA and protein analysis. CCK-2 receptor expression, intestinal mucosal damage, cell apoptosis, and apoptotic protein caspase-3 activity were measured. We found that high gastrin in serum significantly reduced intestinal hemorrhage, alleviated extensive epithelial disruption, decreased disintegration of lamina propria, downregulated myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α, and caspase-3 activity, and lead to low mortality in response to I/R injury. On the contrary, CCK-2 receptor antagonist L365260 could markedly impair intestinal protection by gastrin on intestinal I/R. Severe edema of mucosal villi with severe intestinal crypt injury and numerous intestinal villi disintegrated were observed again in the hypergastrinemic rats with L365260. The survival in the hypergastrinemic rats after intestinal I/R injury was shortened by L365260. Finally, gastrin could remarkably upregulated intestinal CCK-2 receptor expression. Our data suggest that gastrin by omeprazole remarkably attenuated I/R induced intestinal injury by enhancing CCK-2 receptor expression and gastrin could be a potential mitigator for intestinal I/R damage in the clinical setting. PMID

  18. Complexes of gastrin with In(3+), Ru(3+) or Ga(3+) ions are not recognised by the cholecystokinin 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Laval, Marie; Marshall, Kathryn M; Sachinidis, John; Scott, Andrew; Eutick, Mal; Baldwin, Graham S

    2017-07-12

    The peptide hormone gastrin (Gamide) binds trivalent metal ions, including indium (In), ruthenium (Ru) and gallium (Ga), with high affinity. Complexes of gastrin with chelated isotopes of In and Ga have previously been used for the location of tumours expressing the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R). The aim of the present study was to purify the complexes of Gamide with radioactive isotopes of In, Ru or Ga and to investigate their ability to bind to the CCK2R. The radioactive Gamide complexes were purified on Sep-Pak C18 cartridges or by anion exchange HPLC. Binding to the CCK2R was assessed with a stably transfected clone of the gastric carcinoma cell line AGS. The (106)Ru-Gamide complex could be eluted from the C18 cartridge; the (111)In-Gamide and (68)Ga-Gamide complexes bound irreversibly. All three complexes were successfully purified by anion exchange HPLC. The failure to detect binding of the (111)In-Gamide, (106)Ru-Gamide and (68)Ga-Gamide complexes to the CCK2R suggests that formation of these complexes will not be useful for the detection of tumours expressing this receptor, but may instead provide alternative ways to block the actions of Gamide as a growth factor or a stimulant of gastric acid secretion. The complexes between the hormone gastrin and radioactive (111)In, (106)Ru or (68)Ga ions were purified by anion exchange HPLC using a NaCl gradient. The failure to detect binding of the complexes to the cholecystokinin 2 receptor suggests that metal ion treatment may provide novel approaches to block the biological actions of gastrin.

  19. Gastrin concentrations in plasma of cats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R E; Marks, S L; Kass, P H; Cowgill, L D

    1998-09-15

    To determine the prevalence of hypergastrinemia in cats with naturally developing chronic renal failure (CRF) and the correlation between gastrin concentration in plasma and severity of CRF. Cohort study. 30 cats with naturally developing CRF and 12 clinically normal control cats. Gastrin concentrations in plasma were determined by double-antibody radioimmunoassay of blood samples obtained from cats after food was withheld 8 hours. Concentrations were compared, using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA. 18 cats with CRF had high gastrin concentrations (median, 45 pg/ml; range, < 18 to > 1,333 pg/ml), compared with those for control cats (< 18 pg/ml). Prevalence of hypergastrinemia increased with severity of renal insufficiency. Three of 9 cats with mild CRF, 6 of 11 cats with moderate CRF, and 9 of 10 cats with severe CRF had high gastrin concentrations. Gastrin concentrations were significantly different between control cats and cats with CRF, regardless of disease severity. The potential role of high concentrations of gastrin on gastric hyperacidity, uremic gastritis, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract, and associated clinical signs of hypergastrinemia (e.g., anorexia and vomiting) may justify use of histamine2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors to suppress gastric acid secretion in cats with CRF that have these clinical signs.

  20. Iodine-123 MIBG imaging in a generalized pancreatic polypeptide-gastrin-serotonin secreting tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, G.; Vanden Houte, K.; Segers, O.; Bossuyt, A.

    1988-05-01

    The usefulness of radio-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a specific radiopharmaceutical agent for scintigraphic imaging and treatment of phaeochromocytoma and neuroblastoma, has been extended to the location of carcinoid tumors. Scintigraphic evaluation with I-123 MIBG in a patient with a histologically proven endocrine tumor (apudoma) of unknown origin with liver and bone metastases is reported. Elevated plasma hormone levels of gastrin, pancreatic polypeptide, and serotonin were found. Tumoral content of these hormones was immunocytochemically confirmed on liver biopsy. I-123 MIBG uptake could be seen in those areas of the liver with deficient lesions in the Tc-99m colloid image with a maximal uptake in a large mass at the level of the left liver lobe. No abnormal uptake could be observed at any other level, which was in contrast with autopsy findings of generalized metastatic disease.

  1. Gastrin in portal and peripheral venous blood after feeding in man

    PubMed Central

    Dencker, H.; Håkanson, R.; Liedberg, G.; Norryd, C.; Oscarson, J.; Rehfeld, J. F.; Stadil, F.

    1973-01-01

    The concentrations of immunoreactive gastrin in serum from portal and peripheral venous blood were determined in 10 patients with indwelling portal catheters before and after feeding. No significant differences were found between the gastrin concentrations in portal and peripheral serum. Gel filtration studies of serum did not reveal any differences between the gastrin components of portal and peripheral venous serum. Since neither the concentrations of immunoreactive gastrin nor the four gastrin components differed between portal and peripheral serum it is suggested that the liver is without effect on gastrin metabolism. PMID:4761604

  2. Autoantibody against diiodinated tyrosine-gastrin in a patient with Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, M.; Adachi, H.; Aoki, E.; Iida, Y.; Kasagi, K.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.; Torizuka, K.

    1987-01-01

    We describe autoantibodies against iodinated gastrin in a patient with Graves' disease. Values for serum gastrin differed in this case, depending on which of two different radioimmunoassay (RIA) kits was used. RIA with the dextran-coated charcoal method for separation of free tracer gastrin gave a value less than 9.5 pmol/L, whereas the value by a RIA kit by the double-antibody method was 318 pmol/L. The patient's serum contained a binding protein for /sup 125/I-labeled gastrin, as detected by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography. The IgG fraction was responsible for the ability of serum to bind /sup 125/I-labeled gastrin. Interestingly, of the two possible forms of iodinated gastrins, monoiodinated (MIT) and diiodinated (DIT) tyrosine-/sup 125/I-labeled gastrin, only the latter bound to patient's IgG. Furthermore, DIT-gastrin, but not gastrin or MIT-gastrin, inhibited the binding of DIT-/sup 125/I-labeled gastrin. The patient's serum evidently contains autoantibodies against DIT-gastrin that interfere with RIA of gastrin.

  3. Complex morphology of gastrin-releasing G-cells in the antral region of the mouse stomach.

    PubMed

    Frick, Claudia; Rettenberger, Amelie Therese; Lunz, Malena Luisa; Breer, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Gastrin-releasing enteroendocrine cells (G-cells) are usually described as flask-shaped cells with a large base and a small apical pole, integrated in the epithelium lining the basal region of the antral invaginations in the stomach. By means of a transgenic mouse line in which the enhanced version of GFP is endogenously expressed under the control of a gastrin promoter, we have analyzed the spatial distribution and morphological features of G-cells. We found that G-cells were not only located at the basal region of the invagination but to a lesser extent also at the upper region. Visualization of the entire cellular morphology revealed that G-cells show complex morphologies. Basally located G-cells are roundish-shaped cells which project a prominent apical process towards the lumen and extend basal protrusions containing the hormone gastrin that were frequently found in close proximity to blood vessels and occasionally in the vicinity of nerve fibers. Inspection of G-cells in the upper region of antral invaginations disclosed a novel population of G-cells. These cells have a spindle-like contour and long apical and basal processes which extend vertically along the antral invagination, parallel to the lumen. This G-cell population seems to be in contact with a network of nerve fibers. While the functional role of these untypical G-cells is still elusive, the results of this study provide some useful indications to possible roles of these G-cells.

  4. Calcium handling in porcine coronary endothelial cells by gastrin-17.

    PubMed

    Grossini, E; Molinari, C; Sigaudo, L; Biella, M; Mary, D A S G; Vacca, G

    2013-04-01

    In porcine coronary artery endothelial cells (PCAEC), gastrin-17 has recently been found to increase nitric oxide (NO) production by the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) isoform through cholecystokinin 1/2 (CCK1/2) receptors and the involvement of protein kinase A (PKA), PKC and the β2-adrenoreceptor-related pathway. As eNOS is the Ca(2)(+)-dependent isoform of the enzyme, we aimed to examine the effects of gastrin-17 on Ca(2)(+) movements. Thus, experiments were performed in Fura-2-acetoxymethyl-ester-loaded PCAEC, where changes of cytosolic Ca(2)(+) ([Ca(2)(+)]c) caused by gastrin-17 were analysed and compared with those of CCK receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors agonists/antagonists. In addition, some experiments were performed by stimulating cells with gastrin-17 in the presence or absence of cAMP/PKA activator/inhibitor and of phospholipase C (PLC) and Ca(2)(+)-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockers. The results have shown that gastrin-17 can promote a transient increase in [Ca(2)(+)]c mainly originating from an intracellular pool sensitive to thapsigargin and from the extracellular space. In addition, the response of cells to gastrin-17 was increased by the adenylyl cyclase activator and the β2-adrenoreceptor agonists and affected mainly by the CCK2 receptor agonists/antagonists. Moreover, the effects of gastrin-17 were prevented by β2-adrenoreceptors and CaMKII blockers and the adenylyl cyclase/PKA and PLC inhibitors. Finally, in PCAEC cultured in Na(+)-free medium or loaded with the plasma membrane Ca(2)(+) pump inhibitor, the gastrin-17-evoked Ca(2)(+) transient was long lasting. In conclusion, this study shows that gastrin-17 affected intracellular Ca(2)(+) homeostasis in PCAEC by both promoting a discharge of an intracellular pool and by interfering with the operation of store-dependent channels through mainly CCK2 receptors and PKA/PLC- and CaMKII-related signalling downstream of β2-adrenoreceptor stimulation.

  5. Pathophysiology of Gastric NETs: Role of Gastrin and Menin.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Sinju; Kang, Anthony J; Merchant, Juanita L

    2017-07-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) were initially identified as a separate entity in the early 1900s as a unique malignancy that secretes bioactive amines. GI-NETs are the most frequent type and represent a unique subset of NETs, because at least 75% of these tumors represent gastrin stimulation of the enterochromaffin-like cell located in the body of the stomach. The purpose of this review is to understand the specific role of gastrin in the generation of Gastric NETs (G-NETs). We review here the origin of enterochromaffin cells gut and the role of hypergastrinemia in gastric enteroendocrine tumorigenesis. We describe generation of the first genetically engineered mouse model of gastrin-driven G-NETs that mimics the human phenotype. The common mechanism observed in both the hypergastrinemic mouse model and human carcinoids is translocation of the cyclin-dependent inhibitor p27(kip) to the cytoplasm and its subsequent degradation by the proteasome. Therapies that block degradation of p27(kip), the CCKBR2 gastrin receptor, or gastrin peptide are likely to facilitate treatment.

  6. Role of proton pump inhibitors in preventing hypergastrinemia-associated carcinogenesis and in antagonizing the trophic effect of gastrin.

    PubMed

    Han, Y-M; Park, J-M; Kangwan, N; Jeong, M; Lee, S; Cho, J Y; Ko, W J; Hahm, K B

    2015-04-01

    Gastrin is the main hormone stimulating gastric acid secretion, but it exerts proliferative and anti-apoptotic actions on various cancer cell types, in addition to its well-known trophic effect on enterochromaffin-like cells. As treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increases the biosynthesis and secretion of gastrin, it has been postulated that treatment with PPIs could increase the risk of cancer, especially in Barrett's esophagus, gastric carcinoids, and colorectal cancer (CRC). Some tumors produce gastrin of their own, which can act in an autocrine manner to promote tumor growth. In addition, gastrin is known to foster the tumor microenvironment. However, in spite of these potentially increased cancer risks due to PPI-induced hypergastrinemia, prospective, large-scale cohort studies did not show an increase in CRC prevalence. The question as to why the long-term use of PPIs was not associated with an increased cancer risk of CRC might be answered by the fact that the PPIs antagonized the trophic effects of hypergastrinemia. Furthermore, the blockade of proton pumps or potassium channels in cancer cells could limit the abnormal glycolytic energy metabolism of cancer cells. Apart from their suppressive effect on gastric acids, PPIs exert an anti-tumor effect through the selective induction of apoptosis as well as an anti-inflammatory effect, and they protect cells from developing chemo- or radiotherapeutic resistance. Moreover, the anti-carcinogenic actions of PPIs were augmented with PPI-induced hypergastrinemia. Together with their potential targeted killing of cancer stem cells, these effects demonstrate their potential anti-cancer actions.

  7. Pb2+ induces gastrin gene expression by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and transcription factor activator protein 1 in human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chien-Pin; Tsai, Yao-Ting; Chen, Yao-Li; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Joseph T; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Shiurba, Robert; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2015-02-01

    Divalent lead ions (Pb(2+) ) are toxic environmental pollutants known to cause serious health problems in humans and animals. Absorption of Pb(2+) from air, water, and food takes place in the respiratory and digestive tracts. The ways in which absorbed Pb(2+) affects cell physiology are just beginning to be understood at the molecular level. Here, we used reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting to analyze cultures of human gastric carcinoma cells exposed to 10 μM lead nitrate. We found that Pb(2+) induces gastrin hormone gene transcription and translation in a time-dependent manner. Promoter deletion analysis revealed that activator protein 1 (AP1) was necessary for gastrin gene transcription in cells exposed to Pb(2+) . MitogIen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 suppressed the Pb(2+) -induced increase in messenger RNA. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors AG1478 and PD153035 reduced both transcription and phosphorylation by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Cells exposed to Pb(2+) also increased production of c-Jun protein, a component of AP1, and over-expression of c-Jun enhanced activation of the gastrin promoter. In sum, the findings suggest the EGFR-ERK1/2-AP1 pathway mediates the effects of Pb(2+) on gastrin gene activity in cell culture.

  8. Effect of colectomy on cholecystokinin and gastrin release.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, K; Wiener, I; Fried, G M; Lilja, P; Watson, L C; Thompson, J C

    1982-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect of resection of the colon on the release of cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin. A standard food stimulation test was performed in five dogs. Peripheral blood samples were collected for future measurement of CCK and gastrin by specific radioimmunoassay. Each dog underwent subtotal colectomy with side-to-end ileoproctostomy. The food stimulation test was repeated at approximately weekly intervals for eight weeks after colectomy. Basal plasma CCK levels of 139 +/- 21 pg/ml before colectomy did not change after colectomy. Total amount CCK released after food was increased significantly at both four (5.94 +/- 0.78 ng min/ml) and eight (13.00 +/- 2.72 ng min/ml) weeks after colectomy in comparison with that observed prior to colectomy (2.94 +/- 0.54 ng min/ml). Basal serum gastrin levels of 28 +/- 9 pg/ml did not change significantly after colectomy. Total amount of gastrin released after food was increased significantly at both two (8651 +/- 2294 pg min/ml) and three (6940 +/- 1426 pg min/ml) weeks after operation, but at none of the later weeks. The precolectomy output, used for comparison, was 5608 +/- 1346 pg min/ml. It was concluded that resection of the colon leads to an increase in release of CCK and gastrin after food stimulation. This finding provides further evidence that the colon contains a factor that inhibits the release of CCK and gastrin, and that the colon functions as an endocrine organ. PMID:7149821

  9. Markov Model Predicts Changes in STH Prevalence during Control Activities Even with a Reduced Amount of Baseline Information

    PubMed Central

    Montresor, Antonio; Deol, Arminder; à Porta, Natacha; Lethanh, Nam; Jankovic, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating the reduction in levels of infection during implementation of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) control programmes is important to measure their performance and to plan interventions. Markov modelling techniques have been used with some success to predict changes in STH prevalence following treatment in Viet Nam. The model is stationary and to date, the prediction has been obtained by calculating the transition probabilities between the different classes of intensity following the first year of drug distribution and assuming that these remain constant in subsequent years. However, to run this model longitudinal parasitological data (including intensity of infection) are required for two consecutive years from at least 200 individuals. Since this amount of data is not often available from STH control programmes, the possible application of the model in control programme is limited. The present study aimed to address this issue by adapting the existing Markov model to allow its application when a more limited amount of data is available and to test the predictive capacities of these simplified models. Method We analysed data from field studies conducted with different combination of three parameters: (i) the frequency of drug administration; (ii) the drug distributed; and (iii) the target treatment population (entire population or school-aged children only). This analysis allowed us to define 10 sets of standard transition probabilities to be used to predict prevalence changes when only baseline data are available (simplified model 1). We also formulated three equations (one for each STH parasite) to calculate the predicted prevalence of the different classes of intensity from the total prevalence. These equations allowed us to design a simplified model (SM2) to obtain predictions when the classes of intensity at baseline were not known. To evaluate the performance of the simplified models, we collected data from the scientific literature on

  10. Soil transmitted helminth (STH) infections in an indigenous community in Ortigueira, Paraná, Brazil and relationship with its nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, A; Scolari, C; Torti, C; Urbani, C

    2002-12-01

    Within the frame of World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines for the control of soil transmitted helminth (STH) infections, a baseline survey has been conducted in Queimadas Indian schoolchildren (group A) as compared with urban schoolchildren (group B), both located in Ortigueira, Paraná, Brazil, with the aim of orientating investigations. In an opportunistic study, the possible relationship between STH infection and nutritional status has been investigated. A total of 236 schoolchildren aged 5-15 years were enrolled, 100 in group A and 136 in group B. Prevalence of STH infections and heavy intensity infections were significantly higher in the group A (P < .001). A statistical significant correlation between stunting (Z-score < -2) and intensity of STH infections was noted. These results strongly suggested that mass treatment would be indicated in the indigenous community, possibly leading to improved nutritional status.

  11. Serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and C-reactive protein in a group of Norwegian sled dogs during training and after endurance racing: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fergestad, Marte Ekeland; Jahr, Tuva Holt; Krontveit, Randi I; Skancke, Ellen

    2016-04-26

    High incidences of gastritis and gastric ulceration are observed in sled dogs participating in endurance races. Exercise-induced increases in hormones like gastrin and cortisol have been suggested as possible contributing factors. An increase in C-reactive protein (CRP) has also been observed in canines during physical exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of long distance racing on the serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and CRP in a group of sled dogs, by comparing the results achieved early in the training season and after participating in a long distance race; "Femundløpet". Dogs that only trained to the race, but did not compete in the race, were used as control dogs. Sixty-five sled dogs participated in the study; 46 competing dogs (25 completing and 21 non-completing the race) and 19 non-racing dogs (control dogs). The blood samples were collected in October 2012 and February 2013. The post-race serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and CRP was significantly elevated in sled dogs participating in the race (both completing and non-completing dogs) when compared to the results from training. However, no significant differences were observed between the two sampling dates in the control dogs. Post-race results for completing and non-completing dogs were also compared. This demonstrated a significant elevation in gastrin in non-completing versus completing dogs, and a significant elevation in cortisol in completing compared to non-completing dogs. Participation in a long distance race was associated with a significant increase in serum gastrin, cortisol and CRP in sled dogs.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1325 - Gastrin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastrin test system. 862.1325 Section 862.1325 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1325 - Gastrin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gastrin test system. 862.1325 Section 862.1325 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1325 - Gastrin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastrin test system. 862.1325 Section 862.1325 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1325 - Gastrin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastrin test system. 862.1325 Section 862.1325 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1325 - Gastrin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastrin test system. 862.1325 Section 862.1325 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862...

  17. [Role of gastrointestinal hormones in pathogenesis of functional diseases of the digestive system in adolescent].

    PubMed

    Mosiienko, H P

    2008-01-01

    The author studied concentration of gastrin and holecistokinin in 68 adolescent with functional disease of the digestive system and vegetative dysfunctions. Considerable increase was established in the level of blood plasma gastrin in patients with gastroesophageal reflux and functional dyspepsia associated with increased motor function of the stomach. There is direct interrelation between the level of blood hormones and rate of vegetative dysfunctions and it testifies the role of the neuroendocrine system in the development of diseases of gastrointestinal system in adolescents.

  18. Gel filtration studies on immunoreactive gastrin in serum from Zollinger-Ellison patients

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Jens F.; Stadil, Flemming

    1973-01-01

    Sera from 15 patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome were subjected to gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 superfine columns (10 × 2000 mm). The concentration of gastrin in the effluent was determined by a sensitive radioimmunoassay. Immunoreactive gastrin was eluted in four components in 14 sera. (1) Component I, eluted in the same position as proinsulin, constituted 9·7 ± 1·2 (mean ± SEM)% of the total immunoreactivity. (2) Component II (`big gastrin') eluted between proinsulin and insulin constituted 57·8 ± 4·1% (mean ± SEM) of immunoreactive gastrin. In three sera with the highest concentration of gastrin, component II appeared biphasic. (3) Component III (`little gastrin') was distributed in two peaks; the first one eluted in the same position as the heptadecapeptide gastrin II made up 17·4 ± 2·7 (mean ± SEM)% of the total immunoreactivity; the second one eluted in the same position as gastrin I constituted 9·5 ± 1·3 (mean ± SEM)%. (4) Component IV (`minigastrin') was eluted immediately before the salt peak and constituted 5·6 ± 1·4 (mean ± SEM)%. In one serum only components I and II were present. After incubation with trypsin all immunoreactivity in components I and II was converted to heptadecapeptide-like gastrins. The findings suggest that immunoreactive gastrin in serum from Zollinger-Ellison patients is circulating in at least four components of different molecular size. PMID:4197748

  19. Gastrin response to candidate messengers in intact conscious rats monitored by antrum microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Peter; Håkanson, Rolf; Norlén, Per

    2010-08-09

    We monitored gastrin release in response to locally applied candidate messengers in intact conscious rats. Earlier studies have been performed on anaesthetized animals, isolated pieces of antrum, or purified preparations of gastrin cells. In this study we created an experimental situation to resemble physiological conditions, using reverse microdialysis to administer regulatory peptides and amines that might affect gastrin secretion. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the antrum of the rat stomach. Three days later, putative messenger compounds were administered via the probe. Their effects on basal (24 h fast) and omeprazole-stimulated (400 micromol/kg/day, 4 days peroral administration) gastrin release were monitored by continuous measurement (3 h) of gastrin in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). Fasted rats (low microdialysate gastrin, 2.1+/-0.1 pmol l(-1)) were used to study stimulation of gastrin release. Omeprazole-treated rats (high microdialysate gastrin, 95.8+/-6.7 pmol l(-1)) were used to study suppression of gastrin release. The following agents raised the concentration of microdialysate gastrin (peak response): gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) (11-fold increase at a near-maximal dose), carbachol (5-fold increase), serotonin (2-fold increase) and isoprenaline (20-fold increase). Adrenaline and noradrenaline induced transient but powerful elevation (40- and 20-fold increase). Somatostatin, galanin and bradykinin (at near-maximal doses) suppressed omeprazole-stimulated gastrin release (50% decrease). Calcitonin gene-related peptide, ghrelin, gastric inhibitory peptide, motilin, neurotensin, neuromedin U-25, peptide YY and vasoactive intestinal peptide were without effect on gastrin release, as were aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, glycine, dopamine and histamine. The results support the view that G cells operate under neurocrine/paracrine control. They were stimulated by agents present in enteric neurons (GRP, galanin

  20. Molecular forms of gastrin in antral mucosa, plasma and gastric juice during vagal stimulation of anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Uvnäs-Wallensten, K; Rehfeld, J F

    1976-10-01

    Gastrin was released by electrical vagal stimulation in anesthetized cats. Antral mucosa, blood and gastric juice samples collected during vagal stimulation were subjected to gel filtration in order to characterize the different molecular forms of gastrin. In antral mucosa component III (gastrin-17) predominated. Besides, the antrum contained 5 per cent component II (gastrin-34, "big" gastrin), 1 per cent component I and trace amounts of component IV (gastrin-14 or "mini" gastrin). Immediately after vagal stimulation, component III (gastrin-17) appeared in the gastric venous effluent followed within a few minutes by component IV (gastrin-14). Component I and II (gastrin-34) were not detectable in any of the plasma samples. We suggest that component III (gastrin-17) is released from the antral mucosa and is then rapidly metabolized to component IV (gastrin-14) possibly to a significant extent in the fundic region of the stomach. Large amounts of component III (gastrin-17) were found in the vagally-induced gastric juice. Only very small amounts of degradation products were present, indicating that cat gastrin is relatively resistant to peptic degradation and acid hydrolysis.

  1. [The Wolfram syndrome: diabetes mellitus, hypacusis, optic atrophy and short stature in STH deficiency].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, M; Boehmer, H; Zumbach, M; Borcea, V; Grauer, A; Kasperk, C; Heilmann, P; Ziegler, R; Wahl, P; Nawroth, P P

    1997-01-24

    A 43-year-old man was known for 3 years to have diabetes mellitus. For 2 months before admission he had symptoms of hyperglycaemia with polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss, as well as impairment of vision and declining fitness. In addition to bilateral deafness he was clearly of normally proportioned short stature (150 cm). The levels of blood sugar (221 mg/dl), HbA1c(10.2%), triglycerides (496 mg/dl) and cholesterol (323 mg/dl) were raised, while the concentration of somatotropic hormone was diminished, both before and after arginine administration. Fundoscopy revealed concentric diminution of the visual fields with left amblyopia. Visual evoked potentials and colour sense testing revealed bilateral optical atrophy, and the audiogram demonstrated deafness. These findings provided the diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome, namely insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, deafness, optical atrophy and small stature with somatotropic hormone deficiency. On insulin treatment the metabolic state became normal (HbA1c 7.5%, normal lipid profile). It was decided that the deficiency in somatotropic hormone regulation did not require treatment. Cardinal symptoms of the autosomally recessive Wolfram syndrome are insulin-dependent diabetes and optic nerve atrophy. Several types of hormonal abnormalities are associated with it, including a deficiency in the somatotropic axis. To obtain early and adequate hormonal substitution requires extensive endocrinological diagnosis of a disease which frequently becomes manifest in childhood or adolescence.

  2. Follow-up study of gastrin response after resection of the jejunum and the ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Kajiwara, T; Tamura, K; Suzuki, T

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the effect of resection of the jejunum and ileum on gastrin release. The intravenous infusion of L. arginine in a dose of 0.5 g per kg body weight for 30 minutes proved to be most practical in evaluating gastrin release in addition to insulin and glucagon release. Serum gastrin levels in response to this dose of arginine were determined before and three weeks, three months and one year after resection of the jejunum and of the ileum. At three weeks, a significant increase in gastrin levels occurred in bothe the fasting state and after stimulation in dogs with either jejunum or ileum resection. At three months, the elevated gastrin response persisted only in those with jejunum resection. By one year, the gastrin levels had fallen in almost all dogs to approximately the preoperative levels. PMID:603274

  3. The Role of Gastrin and CCK Receptors in Pancreatic Cancer and other Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jill P.; Fonkoua, Lionel K.; Moody, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) peptide gastrin is an important regulator of the release of gastric acid from the stomach parietal cells and it also plays an important role in growth of the gastrointestinal tract. It has become apparent that gastrin and its related peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) are also significantly involved with growth of GI cancers as well as other malignancies through activation of the cholecystokinin-B (CCK-B) receptor. Of interest, gastrin is expressed in the embryologic pancreas but not in the adult pancreas; however, gastrin becomes re-expressed in pancreatic cancer where it stimulates growth of this malignancy by an autocrine mechanism. Strategies to down-regulate gastrin or interfere with its interface with the CCK receptor with selective antibodies or receptor antagonists hold promise for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and other gastrin - responsive tumors. PMID:26929735

  4. The Role of Gastrin and CCK Receptors in Pancreatic Cancer and other Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jill P; Fonkoua, Lionel K; Moody, Terry W

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) peptide gastrin is an important regulator of the release of gastric acid from the stomach parietal cells and it also plays an important role in growth of the gastrointestinal tract. It has become apparent that gastrin and its related peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) are also significantly involved with growth of GI cancers as well as other malignancies through activation of the cholecystokinin-B (CCK-B) receptor. Of interest, gastrin is expressed in the embryologic pancreas but not in the adult pancreas; however, gastrin becomes re-expressed in pancreatic cancer where it stimulates growth of this malignancy by an autocrine mechanism. Strategies to down-regulate gastrin or interfere with its interface with the CCK receptor with selective antibodies or receptor antagonists hold promise for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and other gastrin--responsive tumors.

  5. A Feline Case of Hepatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma with Gastrin Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    KITA, Chiaki; YAMAGAMI, Tetsushi; KINOUCHI, Shigemi; NAKANO, Masayuki; NAGATA, Nao; SUZUKI, Hitomi; OHTAKE, Yuzo; MIYOSHI, Takuma; IRIE, Mitsuhiro; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 5-year-old castrated Japanese domestic cat was presented with persistent vomiting. Ultrasound examinations revealed many masses only in the liver, and the fine needle aspiration was performed. Cytologically, polygonal or oval shaped tumor cells forming rosette and cord-like patterns were demonstrated, and then, the hepatic lesions were diagnosed as neuroendocrine carcinoma tentatively. The cat died one month after admission and was necropsied. Histopathologically, the tumor cells of the hepatic mass were arranged in typical rosette and cord-like structures. They were considerably uniform in size with hyperchromatic round nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Most of tumor cells were immunopositive for chromogranin A, and some were positive for gastrin. The findings indicate the possibility that the present case was a gastrin-producing neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:24492315

  6. A feline case of hepatic neuroendocrine carcinoma with gastrin immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Kita, Chiaki; Yamagami, Tetsushi; Kinouchi, Shigemi; Nakano, Masayuki; Nagata, Nao; Suzuki, Hitomi; Ohtake, Yuzo; Miyoshi, Takuma; Irie, Mitsuhiro; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2014-06-01

    A 5-year-old castrated Japanese domestic cat was presented with persistent vomiting. Ultrasound examinations revealed many masses only in the liver, and the fine needle aspiration was performed. Cytologically, polygonal or oval shaped tumor cells forming rosette and cord-like patterns were demonstrated, and then, the hepatic lesions were diagnosed as neuroendocrine carcinoma tentatively. The cat died one month after admission and was necropsied. Histopathologically, the tumor cells of the hepatic mass were arranged in typical rosette and cord-like structures. They were considerably uniform in size with hyperchromatic round nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Most of tumor cells were immunopositive for chromogranin A, and some were positive for gastrin. The findings indicate the possibility that the present case was a gastrin-producing neuroendocrine carcinoma.

  7. Motilin and gastrin secretion and lipid profile in preterm neonates following prebiotics supplementation: a double-blind randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Dasopoulou, Maria; Briana, Despina D; Boutsikou, Theodora; Karakasidou, Eirini; Roma, Eleftheria; Costalos, Christos; Malamitsi-Puchner, Ariadne

    2015-03-01

    Gut hormones play an important role in the adaptation of the immature neonatal gut, and their secretion may be modulated by prebiotics. Furthermore, prebiotics are well known for their hypolipidemic potentials. We tested the hypothesis that prebiotics could alter motilin and gastrin secretion and reduce lipids in healthy preterms. A total of 167 newborns were randomized to either a prebiotics enriched formula containing dietary oligosaccharides (short-chain galacto-oligo-saccharides/long-chain fructo-oligo-saccharides [scGOS/lcFOS]), at a concentration of 0.8 g/100 ml, or a common preterm formula. Day 1 and 16 basal motilin, gastrin concentrations, and lipids were evaluated together with growth parameters, gastric residue, bowel habits, and feeding tolerance. Adverse events including necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and septicemia were also recorded. Mean motilin increase and day 16 mean values were greater for the intervention, compared with the control group (P = .001, P = .005, respectively), while gastrin remained high in both groups. Mean cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) increase were significantly greater in the control, compared with the intervention (P = .037, and P = .001) group. Day 16 LDL levels were significantly higher in the control group. Mean weight was increased in the control group, while gastric residue was less and stool frequency was increased in the intervention group. NEC and septicemia were not statistically different between groups. A prebiotics enriched formula resulted in significant surge of motilin relating to reduced gastric residue, compared with a common preterm formula. Mean cholesterol change was lower, while LDL was not increased in the prebiotics group, compared with the control group. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with STh and STp genotypes is associated with diarrhea both in children in areas of endemicity and in travelers.

    PubMed

    Bölin, Ingrid; Wiklund, Gudrun; Qadri, Firdausi; Torres, Olga; Bourgeois, A Louis; Savarino, Stephen; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2006-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea among children in developing countries and in travelers to areas of ETEC endemicity. ETEC strains isolated from humans may produce a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and two types of the heat-stable enterotoxin STa, called STh and STp, encoded by the estA gene. Two commonly used assay methods for the detection of STa, the infant mouse assay or different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, are unable to distinguish between the two subtypes of ST. Different genotypic methods, such as DNA probes or PCR assays, may, however, allow such discrimination. Using gene probes, it has recently been reported that ETEC strains producing STp as the only enterotoxin are not associated with diarrhea. In this study, we have used highly specific PCR methods, including newly designed primers for STh together with previously described STp primers, to compare the relative distribution of STh and STp in ETEC isolated from children with diarrhea in three different geographically distinct areas, i.e., Bangladesh, Egypt, and Guatemala, and from travelers to Mexico and Guatemala. It was found that ETEC strains producing STp were as commonly isolated from cases of diarrhea as strains producing STh both in Egypt and Guatemala, whereas STp strains were considerably less common in Bangladesh. No difference was found in the relative distribution of STh and STp in ETEC strains isolated from travelers with diarrhea and from asymptomatic carriers. Irrespective of ST genotype, the disease symptoms were also similar in both children and travelers.

  9. Interaction of a Swi3 homolog with Sth1 provides evidence for a Swi/Snf-related complex with an essential function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Treich, I; Carlson, M

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi/Snf complex has a role in remodeling chromatin structure to facilitate transcriptional activation. The complex has 11 components, including Swi1/Adr6, Swi2/Snf2, Swi3, Snf5, Snf6, Snf11, Swp73/Snf12, and Tfg3. Mammalian homologs of these proteins have been shown to form multiple Swi/Snf-related complexes. Here we characterize an S. cerevisiae Swi3 homolog (Swh3) and present evidence that it associates in a complex with a Snf2 homolog, Sthl. We identified Swh3 as a protein that interacts with the N terminus of Snf2 in the two-hybrid system. Swh3 and Swi3 are functionally distinct, and overexpression of one does not compensate for loss of the other. Swh3 is essential for viability and does not activate transcription of reporters. The Snf2 sequence that interacts with Swh3 was mapped to a region conserved in Sth1. We show that Swh3 and Sth1 fusion proteins interact in the two-hybrid system and coimmunoprecipitate from yeast cell extracts. We also map interactions between Swh3 and Sth1 and examine the role of a leucine zipper motif in self-association of Swh3. These findings, together with previous analysis of Sth1, indicate that Swh3 and Sth1 are associated in a complex that is functionally distinct from the Swi/Snf complex and essential for viability. PMID:9121424

  10. Nano-Localized Thermal Analysis and Mapping of Surface and Sub-Surface Thermal Properties Using Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Maria J; Amaral, Joao S; Silva, Nuno J O; Amaral, Vitor S

    2016-12-01

    Determining and acting on thermo-physical properties at the nanoscale is essential for understanding/managing heat distribution in micro/nanostructured materials and miniaturized devices. Adequate thermal nano-characterization techniques are required to address thermal issues compromising device performance. Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is a probing and acting technique based on atomic force microscopy using a nano-probe designed to act as a thermometer and resistive heater, achieving high spatial resolution. Enabling direct observation and mapping of thermal properties such as thermal conductivity, SThM is becoming a powerful tool with a critical role in several fields, from material science to device thermal management. We present an overview of the different thermal probes, followed by the contribution of SThM in three currently significant research topics. First, in thermal conductivity contrast studies of graphene monolayers deposited on different substrates, SThM proves itself a reliable technique to clarify the intriguing thermal properties of graphene, which is considered an important contributor to improve the performance of downscaled devices and materials. Second, SThM's ability to perform sub-surface imaging is highlighted by thermal conductivity contrast analysis of polymeric composites. Finally, an approach to induce and study local structural transitions in ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni-Mn-Ga thin films using localized nano-thermal analysis is presented.

  11. Synthesis and biological activities of some human gastrin analogs.

    PubMed

    Lima-Leite, A C; Fulcrand, P; Galleyrand, J C; Berge, G; Aumelas, A; Bali, J P; Castel, J; Martinez, J

    1996-10-01

    The synthesis of analogs of the C-terminal tridecapeptide of gastrin is described. These pseudopeptide analogs were obtained either by replacing the C-terminal phenylalanine amide with 2-phenylethylalcohol or with 2-phenylethylamine, or by replacing the peptide bond between Trp and Leu, or between Leu and Asp with an aminomethylene (CH2NH). The ability of these compounds to stimulate gastric acid secretion in anesthetized rats and to inhibit binding of labeled CCK-8 to isolated cells from rabbit fundic mucosa was tested. [desPhe13, Leu11]-HG-12-I-beta-phenylethylester 33, [desPhe13, Leu11]-HG-12-II-beta-phenylethylester 38, [desPhe13, Leu11]-HG-12-I-beta-phenylethylamide 32, and [desPhe13, Leu11]-HG-12-II-beta-phenylethylamide 37 acted as gastrin receptor antagonists, while [Trp10-psi(CH2NH)-Leu11]-HG-13-I 31 and [Trp10-psi(CH2NH)-Leu11]-HG-13-II 36 acted as agonists. Unexpectedly, [Leu11-psi(CH2NH)-Asp12]-HG-13-I 30 and [Leu11-psi (CH2NH)-Asp12]-HG-13-II 35 were almost devoid of affinity for the gastrin receptor.

  12. Gastrin: from pathophysiology to cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Maddalo, Gemma; Spolverato, Ylenia; Rugge, Massimo; Farinati, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    Gastrin has been identified as the principal effector of gastric secretion, but several studies have demonstrated its role as a biomarker of cancer risk and as a growth factor for colorectal, stomach, liver, and pancreatic cancer. Hypergastrinemia characterizes autoimmune gastritis, with body and fundic gland atrophy and increased risk for both gastric adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. Gastric type I carcinoids develop in the context of autoimmune gastritis because of the stimulus exerted by gastrin on enterochromaffin-like cells and remain gastrin-sensitive for long durations because the removal of hypergastrinemia leads to tumor regression. The treatment of gastric carcinoid is still open to debate, but when the disease frequently relapses, or is multicentric or infiltrating, surgery is advocated or, in the alternative, a costly and long-lasting treatment with long-acting somatostatin analogues is prescribed. A technology allowing the preparation of an immunogen eliciting an immune system response with generation of antibodies against G17 has been developed. This vaccine has been tested in patients with colorectal, pancreatic or advanced gastric cancer. The vaccine has also been used in the treatment of gastric type I carcinoids, and the administration of G17DT in patients harboring these lesions leads to carcinoid regression. Antigastrin vaccination in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer obviously needs validation, but this immunotherapy may well represent a simple, inexpensive, and active 'adjuvant' treatment.

  13. Analysis of gastrin-releasing peptide gene and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor gene in patients with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Katrin; Görgens, Heike; Bräuer, David; Einsle, Franziska; Noack, Barbara; von Kannen, Stephanie; Grossmann, Maria; Hoyer, Jürgen; Strobel, Alexander; Köllner, Volker; Weidner, Kerstin; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Schackert, Hans K

    2014-10-01

    A gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) knock-out mouse model provided evidence that the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its neural circuitry operate as a negative feedback-loop regulating fear, suggesting a novel candidate mechanism contributing to individual differences in fear-conditioning and associated psychiatric disorders such as agoraphobia with/without panic disorder. Studies in humans, however, provided inconclusive evidence on the association of GRP and GRPR variations in agoraphobia with/without panic disorder. Based on these findings, we investigated whether GRP and GRPR variants are associated with agoraphobia. Mental disorders were assessed via the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI) in 95 patients with agoraphobia with/without panic disorder and 119 controls without any mental disorders. A complete sequence analysis of GRP and GRPR was performed in all participants. We found no association of 16 GRP and 7 GRPR variants with agoraphobia with/without panic disorder.

  14. Sth1p, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Snf2p/Swi2p homolog, is an essential ATPase in RSC and differs from Snf/Swi in its interactions with histones and chromatin-associated proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Du, J; Nasir, I; Benton, B K; Kladde, M P; Laurent, B C

    1998-01-01

    The essential Sth1p is the protein most closely related to the conserved Snf2p/Swi2p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sth1p purified from yeast has a DNA-stimulated ATPase activity required for its function in vivo. The finding that Sth1p is a component of a multiprotein complex capable of ATP-dependent remodeling of the structure of chromatin (RSC) in vitro, suggests that it provides RSC with ATP hydrolysis activity. Three sth1 temperature-sensitive mutations map to the highly conserved ATPase/helicase domain and have cell cycle and non-cell cycle phenotypes, suggesting multiple essential roles for Sth1p. The Sth1p bromodomain is required for wild-type function; deletion mutants lacking portions of this region are thermosensitive and arrest with highly elongated buds and 2C DNA content, indicating perturbation of a unique function. The pleiotropic growth defects of sth1-ts mutants imply a requirement for Sth1p in a general cellular process that affects several metabolic pathways. Significantly, an sth1-ts allele is synthetically sick or lethal with previously identified mutations in histones and chromatin assembly genes that suppress snf/swi, suggesting that RSC interacts differently with chromatin than Snf/Swi. These results provide a framework for understanding the ATP-dependent RSC function in modeling chromatin and its connection to the cell cycle. PMID:9799253

  15. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp)

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J.; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located. PMID:27054573

  16. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp).

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located.

  17. Contribution of gastrin to cysteamine-induced gastric acid secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    van de Brug, F J; Jansen, J B; Kuijpers, I J; Lamers, C B

    1993-01-01

    The role of circulating gastrin in cysteamine induced gastric acid secretion was examined in conscious male Wistar rats, provided with a portal vein catheter, a jugular vein catheter and a pyloric drainage tube. Intravenous infusion of 0.3 nmol/kg.30 min of gastrin 17-l resulted in serum gastrin concentrations of 1138 +/- 151 pg/ml and gastric acid secretion of 104 +/- 36 mumol H+/kg.30 min. This acid response was abolished by intravenous injection of 60 microliters of a gastrin-antiserum, indicating the efficacy of immunoneutralization with this antiserum in vivo. Intravenous bolus administration of 125 mg/kg of cysteamine induced increases in serum gastrin concentration (864 +/- 96 pg/ml) and gastric acid outputs (107 +/- 27 mumol H+/kg.30 min) not significantly different from the gastrin 17-l infusion experiments. Gastrin antiserum abolished cysteamine-induced gastric acid secretion, indicating that gastric acid secretion induced by 125 mg/kg of cysteamine is largely mediated by circulating gastrin in rats.

  18. Effect of cysteamine on secretion of gastrin and somatostatin from the rat stomach

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, C.; Bakich, V.; Trotter, T.; Kwok, Y.N.; Nishimura, E.; Pederson, R.; Brown, J.

    1984-05-01

    Cysteamine (beta-mercaptoethylamine HCl) administration to rats induces a hypergastrinemia and a reduction in gastric tissue somatostatin content. The possibility that this reduction may contribute to the elevated gastrin levels has been investigated in the isolated perfused rat stomach. Cysteamine (1 mM) rapidly increased immunoreactive gastrin release to levels ranging between 41% and 125% above basal. Increasing the dose to 10 mM caused a 1148% increase in immunoreactive gastrin. Secretion of somatosc immunoreactivity did not change. Perfusion of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (1 nM) induced a sustained increase in somatostatin like immunoreactivity secretion and a transient rise in gastrin. Addition of 10 mM cysteamine during gastric inhibitory polypeptide perfusion caused a 300% increase in immunoreactive gastrin. These levels were lower than in response to cysteamine alone. The results demonstrate that cysteamine can stimulate immunoreactive gastrin secretion without any change in somatostatinlike immunoreactivity release. When somatostatinlike immunoreactivity secretion is stimulated by an agent such as gastric inhibitory polypeptide, the cysteamine-induced release of immunoreactive gastrin is attenuated, suggesting the presence of a functional linkage between somatostatin and gastrin under these conditions.

  19. A Speculative Role for Stromal Gastrin Signaling in Development and Dissemination of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matters, Gail L; Clawson, Gary A

    2013-01-01

    The peptide growth factor gastrin and its receptor, the G-protein coupled cholecystokinin receptor type B (CCKBR), play an integral role in the growth and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Gastrin immunoreactivity is found in the fetal pancreas but its expression is not detected in normal pancreas after birth, except when it is re-expressed in malignant lesions. PMID:25346875

  20. Induction of gastrin expression in gastrointestinal cells by hypoxia or cobalt is independent of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Kovac, Suzana; Chang, Mike; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2012-07-01

    Gastrin and its precursors have been shown to promote mitogenesis and angiogenesis in gastrointestinal tumors. Hypoxia stimulates tumor growth, but its effect on gastrin gene regulation has not been examined in detail. Here we have investigated the effect of hypoxia on the transcription of the gastrin gene in human gastric cancer (AGS) cells. Gastrin mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, gastrin peptides were measured by RIA, and gastrin promoter activity was measured by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Exposure to a low oxygen concentration (1%) increased gastrin mRNA concentrations in wild-type AGS cells (AGS) and in AGS cells overexpressing the gastrin receptor (AGS-cholecystokinin receptor 2) by 2.1 ± 0.4- and 4.1 ± 0.3-fold (P < 0.05), respectively. The hypoxia mimetic, cobalt chloride (300 μM), increased gastrin promoter activity in AGS cells by 2.4 ± 0.3-fold (P < 0.05), and in AGS-cholecystokinin receptor 2 cells by 4.0 ± 0.3-fold (P < 0.05), respectively. The observations that either deletion from the gastrin promoter of the putative binding sites for the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) or knockdown of either the HIF-1α or HIF-1β subunit did not affect gastrin promoter inducibility under hypoxia indicated that the hypoxic activation of the gastrin gene is likely HIF independent. Mutational analysis of previously identified Sp1 regulatory elements in the gastrin promoter also failed to abrogate the induction of promoter activity by hypoxia. The observations that hypoxia up-regulates the gastrin gene in AGS cells by HIF-independent mechanisms, and that this effect is enhanced by the presence of gastrin receptors, provide potential targets for gastrointestinal cancer therapy.

  1. Gastric morphology and serum gastrin levels in pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, K J; Dowling, F; Wright, J P; Taylor, K B

    1976-01-01

    Mucosal biopsies from multiple sites in the stomachs of 21 patients with pernicious anaemia have been examined. The histological changes almost always involved the entire gastric mucosa, including that of the pyloric antrum. Metaplastic changes were almost universal and consisted of intestinal metaplasia in the body and antrum and pyloric metaplasia in the body. The severity of the pyloric metaplasia was such as to make the distinction between body and antrum on biopsy impossible. No relationship was found between serum gastrin activity and the histological appearances of the gastric antrum or body. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:964688

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection, gastrin and cyclooxygenase-2 in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yun; Sun, Kun; Xu, Wei; Li, Xiao-Lin; Shen, Hong; Sun, Wei-Hao

    2014-09-28

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms and a main cause of death worldwide, especially in China and Japan. Numerous epidemiological, animal and experimental studies support a positive association between chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and the development of gastric cancer. However, the exact mechanism whereby H. pylori causes gastric carcinogenesis remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is elevated in gastric carcinomas and in their precursor lesions. In this review, we present the latest clinical and experimental evidence showing the role of gastrin and COX-2 in H. pylori-infected patients and their possible association with gastric cancer risk.

  3. Progress in developing cholecystokinin (CCK)/gastrin receptor ligands which have therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Tapia, Jose A.; Sancho, Veronica; Jensen, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Gastrin and CCK are two of the oldest hormones and within the last 15 years there has been an exponential increase in knowledge of their pharmacology, cell biology, receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) and roles in physiology and pathological conditions. Despite these advances there is no approved disease indication for CCK receptor antagonists and only minor use of agonists. In this review the important factors determining this slow therapeutic development are reviewed. To assess this it is necessary to briefly review what is known about the roles of CCK receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) in normal human physiology, their role in pathologic conditions, the selectivity of available potent CCKR agonists/antagonists as well as review their use in human conditions to date and the results. Despite extensive studies in animals and some in humans, recent studies suggest that monotherapy with CCK1R agonists will not be effective in obesity, nor CCK2R antagonists in panic disorders or CCK2R antagonists to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer. Areas that require more study include the use of CCK2R agonists for imaging tumors and radiotherapy, CCK2R antagonists in hypergastrinemic states especially with long term PPI use and for potentiation of analgesia as well as use of CCK1R antagonists for a number of gastrointestinal disorders [motility disorders (irritable bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, constipation) and pancreatitis (acute, chronic)]. PMID:17997137

  4. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with STh and STp Genotypes Is Associated with Diarrhea Both in Children in Areas of Endemicity and in Travelers▿

    PubMed Central

    Bölin, Ingrid ; Wiklund, Gudrun; Qadri, Firdausi; Torres, Olga; Bourgeois, A. Louis; Savarino, Stephen; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2006-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea among children in developing countries and in travelers to areas of ETEC endemicity. ETEC strains isolated from humans may produce a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and two types of the heat-stable enterotoxin STa, called STh and STp, encoded by the estA gene. Two commonly used assay methods for the detection of STa, the infant mouse assay or different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, are unable to distinguish between the two subtypes of ST. Different genotypic methods, such as DNA probes or PCR assays, may, however, allow such discrimination. Using gene probes, it has recently been reported that ETEC strains producing STp as the only enterotoxin are not associated with diarrhea. In this study, we have used highly specific PCR methods, including newly designed primers for STh together with previously described STp primers, to compare the relative distribution of STh and STp in ETEC isolated from children with diarrhea in three different geographically distinct areas, i.e., Bangladesh, Egypt, and Guatemala, and from travelers to Mexico and Guatemala. It was found that ETEC strains producing STp were as commonly isolated from cases of diarrhea as strains producing STh both in Egypt and Guatemala, whereas STp strains were considerably less common in Bangladesh. No difference was found in the relative distribution of STh and STp in ETEC strains isolated from travelers with diarrhea and from asymptomatic carriers. Irrespective of ST genotype, the disease symptoms were also similar in both children and travelers. PMID:16943355

  5. Evidence for a significant role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced hypersecretion of gastric acid.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, K; Shimizu, K; Ikeda, M; Watanabe, S; Hayashi, N

    1997-01-01

    Cysteamine has been known to stimulate gastric acid secretion and to induce duodenal ulcers in rats. We investigated the role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion in the perfused rat stomach. Intravenous infusion of cysteamine (75 mg/kg/h) resulted in a significant increase in acid secretion, which was accompanied by a marked increase in the plasma gastrin concentration. The cysteamine-induced increase in gastric acid secretion was completely blocked by i.v. injection of anti-gastrin rabbit serum (500 microliters). In addition, i.v. infusion of a CCK-B/gastrin receptor antagonist (L-365,260) (1 mg/kg/h) also suppressed the cysteamine-induced increase in acid secretion. Atropine significantly, but only partially, inhibited the increase. The elevated plasma gastrin levels induced by cysteamine were unaffected by atropine and L-365,260. In conclusion, cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion is mediated mainly by cysteamine-induced gastrin release and partially by cholinergic factors. Furthermore, gastrin release caused by cysteamine appears to be independent of cholinergic tone.

  6. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami; Ripoche, Doriane; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Chen, Yuan-Jia; Rehfeld, Jens F; Lepinasse, Florian; Hervieu, Valérie; Pattou, François; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bertolino, Philippe; Zhang, Chang Xian

    2015-10-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have migrated from the duodenum. In the current study, we further characterized previously described transient pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells using cell lineage tracing in a pan-pancreatic progenitor and a pancreatic endocrine progenitor model. We provide evidence showing that pancreatic gastrin-expressing cells, found from embryonic day 12.5 until postnatal day 7, are derived from pancreatic Ptf1a(+) and neurogenin 3-expressing (Ngn3(+)) progenitors. Importantly, the majority of them coexpress glucagon, with 4% coexpressing insulin, indicating that they are a temporary subpopulation of both alpha and beta cells. Interestingly, Men1 disruption in both Ngn3 progenitors and beta and alpha cells resulted in the development of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors, suggesting that the latter developed from islet cells. Finally, we detected gastrin expression using three human cohorts with pancreatic endocrine tumors (pNETs) that have not been diagnosed as gastrinomas (in 9/34 pNETs from 6/14 patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, in 5/35 sporadic nonfunctioning pNETs, and in 2/20 sporadic insulinomas), consistent with observations made in mouse models. Our work provides insight into the histogenesis of pancreatic gastrin-expressing tumors.

  7. In vivo analysis of mouse gastrin gene regulation in enhanced GFP-BAC transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Shibata, Wataru; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Jin, Guangchun; Yang, Xiangdong; Ericksen, Russell; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Asfaha, Samuel; Quante, Michael; Betz, Kelly S; Shulkes, Arthur; Wang, Timothy C

    2011-02-01

    Gastrin is secreted from a subset of neuroendocrine cells residing in the gastric antrum known as G cells, but low levels are also expressed in fetal pancreas and intestine and in many solid malignancies. Although past studies have suggested that antral gastrin is transcriptionally regulated by inflammation, gastric pH, somatostatin, and neoplastic transformation, the transcriptional regulation of gastrin has not previously been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we describe the creation of an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter (mGAS-EGFP) mouse using a bacterial artificial chromosome that contains the entire mouse gastrin gene. Three founder lines expressed GFP signals in the gastric antrum and the transitional zone to the corpus. In addition, GFP(+) cells could be detected in the fetal pancreatic islets and small intestinal villi, but not in these organs of the adult mice. The administration of acid-suppressive reagents such as proton pump inhibitor omeprazole and gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist YF476 significantly increased GFP signal intensity and GFP(+) cell numbers in the antrum, whereas these parameters were decreased by overnight fasting, octreotide (long-lasting somatostatin ortholog) infusion, and Helicobacter felis infection. GFP(+) cells were also detected in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and importantly in the colonic tumor cells induced by administration with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium salt. This transgenic mouse provides a useful tool to study the regulation of mouse gastrin gene in vivo, thus contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in transcriptional control of the gastrin gene.

  8. Menin and JunD regulate gastrin gene expression through proximal DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Mensah-Osman, Edith J; Veniaminova, Natalia A; Merchant, Juanita L

    2011-11-01

    Mutations in the MEN1 gene correlate with multiple endocrine neoplasia I (MEN1). Gastrinomas are the most malignant of the neuroendocrine tumors associated with MEN1. Because menin and JunD proteins interact, we examined whether JunD binds to and regulates the gastrin gene promoter. Both menin and JunD are ubiquitous nuclear proteins that we showed colocalize in the gastrin-expressing G cells of the mouse antrum. Transfection with a JunD expression vector alone induced endogenous gastrin mRNA in AGS human gastric cells, and the induction was blocked by menin overexpression. We mapped repression by menin to both a nonconsensus AP-1 site and proximal GC-rich elements within the human gastrin promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, EMSAs, and DNA affinity precipitation assays documented that JunD and Sp1 proteins bind these two elements and are both targets for menin regulation. Consistent with menin forming a complex with histone deacetylases, we found that repression of gastrin gene expression by menin was reversed by trichostatin A. In conclusion, proximal DNA elements within the human gastrin gene promoter mediate interactions between JunD, which induces gastrin gene expression and menin, which suppresses JunD-mediated activation.

  9. In vivo analysis of mouse gastrin gene regulation in enhanced GFP-BAC transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Shibata, Wataru; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Jin, Guangchun; Yang, Xiangdong; Ericksen, Russell; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Asfaha, Samuel; Quante, Michael; Betz, Kelly S.; Shulkes, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Gastrin is secreted from a subset of neuroendocrine cells residing in the gastric antrum known as G cells, but low levels are also expressed in fetal pancreas and intestine and in many solid malignancies. Although past studies have suggested that antral gastrin is transcriptionally regulated by inflammation, gastric pH, somatostatin, and neoplastic transformation, the transcriptional regulation of gastrin has not previously been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we describe the creation of an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter (mGAS-EGFP) mouse using a bacterial artificial chromosome that contains the entire mouse gastrin gene. Three founder lines expressed GFP signals in the gastric antrum and the transitional zone to the corpus. In addition, GFP(+) cells could be detected in the fetal pancreatic islets and small intestinal villi, but not in these organs of the adult mice. The administration of acid-suppressive reagents such as proton pump inhibitor omeprazole and gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist YF476 significantly increased GFP signal intensity and GFP(+) cell numbers in the antrum, whereas these parameters were decreased by overnight fasting, octreotide (long-lasting somatostatin ortholog) infusion, and Helicobacter felis infection. GFP(+) cells were also detected in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and importantly in the colonic tumor cells induced by administration with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium salt. This transgenic mouse provides a useful tool to study the regulation of mouse gastrin gene in vivo, thus contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in transcriptional control of the gastrin gene. PMID:21051525

  10. Reciprocal regulation of antral gastrin and somatostatin gene expression by omeprazole-induced achlorhydria.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, S J; Stone, D

    1988-01-01

    Gastric acid exerts a feedback inhibition on the secretion of gastrin from antral G cells. This study examines whether gastrin gene expression is also regulated by changes in gastric pH. Achlorhydria was induced in rats by the gastric H+/K+ ATPase inhibitor, omeprazole (100 mumol/kg). This resulted in fourfold increases in both serum gastrin (within 2 h) and gastrin mRNA levels (after 24 h). Antral somatostatin D cells probably act as chemoreceptors for gastric acid to mediate a paracrine inhibition on gastrin secretion from adjacent G cells. Omeprazole-induced achlorhydria reduced D-cell activity as shown by a threefold decrease in antral somatostatin mRNA levels that began after 24 h. Exogenous administration of the somatostatin analogue SMS 201-995 (10 micrograms/kg) prevented both the hypergastrinemia and the increase in gastrin mRNA levels caused by omeprazole-induced achlorhydria. Exogenous somatostatin, however, did not influence the decrease in antral somatostatin mRNA levels seen with achlorhydria. These data, therefore, support the hypothesis that antral D cells act as chemoreceptors for changes in gastric pH, and modulates somatostatin secretion and synthesis to mediate a paracrine inhibition on gastrin gene expression in adjacent G cells. Images PMID:2901431

  11. Anaesthetic agents inhibit gastrin-stimulated but not basal histamine release from rat stomach ECL cells.

    PubMed

    Norlén, P; Kitano, M; Lindström, E; Håkanson, R

    2000-06-01

    By mobilizing histamine in response to gastrin, the ECL cells in the oxyntic mucosa play a key role in the control of the parietal cells and hence of gastric acid secretion. General anaesthesia suppresses basal and gastrin- and histamine-stimulated acid secretion. The present study examines if the effect of anaesthesia on basal and gastrin-stimulated acid secretion is associated with suppressed ECL-cell histamine secretion. A microdialysis probe was implanted in the submucosa of the ventral aspect of the acid-producing part of the stomach (32 rats). Three days later, ECL-cell histamine mobilization was monitored 2 h before and 4 h after the start of intravenous infusion of gastrin (5 nmol kg(-1) h(-1)). The rats were either conscious or anaesthetized. Four commonly used anaesthetic agents were given 1 h before the start of the experiments by intraperitoneal injection: chloral hydrate (300 mg kg(-1)), pentobarbitone (40 mg kg(-1)), urethane (1.5 g kg(-1)) and a mixture of fluanisone/fentanyl/midazolam (15/0.5/7.5 mg kg(-1)). In a parallel series of experiments, basal- and gastrin-induced acid secretion was monitored in six conscious and 25 anaesthetized (see above) chronic gastric fistula rats. All anaesthetic agents lowered gastrin-stimulated acid secretion; also the basal acid output was reduced (fluanisone/fentanyl/midazolam was an exception). Anaesthesia reduced gastrin-stimulated but not basal histamine release by 55 - 80%. The reduction in gastrin-induced acid response (70 - 95%) was strongly correlated to the reduction in gastrin-induced histamine mobilization. The correlation is in line with the view that the reduced acid response to gastrin reflects impaired histamine mobilization. Rat stomach ECL cells were purified by counter-flow elutriation. Gastrin-evoked histamine mobilization from the isolated ECL cells was determined in the absence or presence of anaesthetic agents in the medium. With the exception of urethane, they inhibited gastrin

  12. Effect of nephrectomy on the rate and pattern of the disappearance of exogenous gastrin in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Clendinnen, B. Guy; Reeder, David D.; Brandt, E. N.; Thompson, James C.

    1973-01-01

    Studies of gastrin metabolism were performed in four dogs before and after nephrectomy. Synthetic human gastrin I was infused for two hours and serum samples were obtained at various times during and after infusion. Serum concentrations of gastrin were measured by radioimmunoassay. A two-compartment model was employed to calculate half-lives under each of four experimental conditions, low and high infusion rates, used both before and after nephrectomy. The model half-life was greatly prolonged after nephrectomy at both infusion rates (from 2·54 min to 5·15 min at the low rate, and from 2·85 min to 7·88 min at the high rate). The metabolic clearance rate, an expression of the rate of catabolism during infusion, decreased significantly after nephrectomy at both infusion rates. These observations indicate that the kidney is an important organ for the catabolism of exogenous gastrin. PMID:4719213

  13. An expedient route to a potent gastrin/CCK-B receptor antagonist (+)-AG-041R.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeki; Shibuya, Masatoshi; Kanoh, Naoki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu

    2009-10-02

    An enantiocontrolled synthesis of (+)-AG-041R (1), a potent gastrin/CCK-B receptor antagonist, has been achieved employing a chiral rhodium(II)-catalyzed, oxidative intramolecular aza-spiroannulation as the key step.

  14. Cyclic nucleotides of canine antral smooth muscle. Effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin.

    PubMed

    Baur, S; Grant, B; Wooton, J

    1981-01-07

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin on the intracellular content of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in antral circular muscle have been determined. 2. Acetylcholine results in a significant but transient increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 3. Isoproterenol and norepinephrine increase intracellular cyclic AMP. Based on half-maximal effective doses, isoproterenol is 2.7-times more effective than norepinephrine. The increase in intracellular cyclic AMP by both agents is inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine, indicating that both agents act on the muscle cell by a beta-receptor-coupled mechanism. 4. Gastrin has no demonstrable effect on either cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. This suggests that while gastrin and acetylcholine can produce a like myoelectric response in the muscle cell, the action of gastrin is mediated by a separate receptor, presumably on the muscle cell, and not by a release of acetylcholine.

  15. Structure-activity relationships of C-terminal tri- and tetrapeptide fragments that inhibit gastrin activity.

    PubMed

    Martinez, J; Bali, J P; Magous, R; Laur, J; Lignon, M F; Briet, C; Nisato, D; Castro, B

    1985-03-01

    A series of tri- and tetrapeptide derivatives, analogues of the gastrin C-terminal region with no phenylalanine residue, were synthesized. These peptides were tested for their ability to inhibit gastrin-stimulated acid secretion in vivo as well as binding of [125I]-(Nle11)-HG-13 to gastric mucosal cell receptors in vitro. Most of the peptides tested exhibited gastrin antagonist activity in vivo and in vitro. Most active derivatives were 20-30 times more potent than the well-known gastrin antagonist derivatives proglumide and benzotript and had 20-200 times more binding affinity. The smallest fragment exhibiting antagonist activity was the tripeptide Boc-L-tryptophyl-L-methionyl-L-aspartic acid amide.

  16. Induction of follistatin precedes gastric transformation in gastrin deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Weiqun; Saqui-Salces, Milena; Zavros, Yana; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2008-11-21

    We previously showed that antral gastric tumors develop in gastrin-deficient (Gas{sup -/-}) mice. Therefore Gas{sup -/-}mice were studied sequentially over 12 months to identify molecular mechanisms underlying gastric transformation. Fundic atrophy developed by 9 months in Gas{sup -/-} mice. Antral mucosal hyperplasia developed coincident with the focal loss of TFF1 and Muc5AC. Microarray analysis of 12 month Gas{sup -/-} tumors revealed an increase in follistatin, an activin/BMP antagonist. We found that elevated follistatin expression occurred in the proliferative neck zone of hyperplastic antrums, in antral tumors of Gas{sup -/-} mice, and also in human gastric cancers. Follistatin induced cyclin D1 and the trefoil factors TFF1 and TFF2 in a gastric cancer cell line. We concluded that antral hyperplasia in Gas{sup -/-} mice involves amplification of mucous cell lineages due to follistatin, suggesting its role in the development of antral gastric tumors.

  17. Gastrin stimulates expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nørsett, Kristin G; Steele, Islay; Duval, Cedric; Sammut, Stephen J; Murugesan, Senthil V M; Kenny, Susan; Rainbow, Lucille; Dimaline, Rod; Dockray, Graham J; Pritchard, D Mark; Varro, Andrea

    2011-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is associated with cancer progression, fibrosis and thrombosis. It is expressed in the stomach but the mechanisms controlling its expression there, and its biological role, are uncertain. We sought to define the role of gastrin in regulating PAI-1 expression and to determine the relevance for gastrin-stimulated cell migration and invasion. In gastric biopsies from subjects with elevated plasma gastrin, the abundances of PAI-1, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), and uPA receptor (uPAR) mRNAs measured by quantitative PCR were increased compared with subjects with plasma concentrations in the reference range. In patients with hypergastrinemia due to autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis, there was increased abundance of PAI-1, uPA, and uPAR mRNAs that was reduced by octreotide or antrectomy. Immunohistochemistry revealed localization of PAI-1 to parietal cells and enterochromaffin-like cells in micronodular neuroendocrine tumors in hypergastrinemic subjects. Transcriptional mechanisms were studied by using a PAI-1-luciferase promoter-reporter construct transfected into AGS-G(R) cells. There was time- and concentration-dependent increase of PAI-1-luciferase expression in response to gastrin that was reversed by inhibitors of the PKC and MAPK pathways. In Boyden chamber assays, recombinant PAI-1 inhibited gastrin-stimulated AGS-G(R) cell migration and invasion, and small interfering RNA treatment increased responses to gastrin. We conclude that elevated plasma gastrin concentrations are associated with increased expression of gastric PAI-1, which may act to restrain gastrin-stimulated cell migration and invasion.

  18. Role of indigenous lactobacilli in gastrin-mediated acid production in the mouse stomach.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Matsuoka, Takashi; Kumaki, Nobue; Asami, Yukio; Koga, Yasuhiro

    2011-10-01

    It is known that the stomach is colonized by indigenous lactobacilli in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the role of such lactobacilli in the development of the stomach. For a DNA microarray analysis, germ-free BALB/c mice were orally inoculated with 10(9) CFU lactobacilli, and their stomachs were excised after 10 days to extract RNA. As a result, lactobacillus-associated gnotobiotic mice showed dramatically decreased expression of the gastrin gene in comparison to germ-free mice. The mean of the log(2) fold change in the gastrin gene was -4.3. Immunohistochemistry also demonstrated the number of gastrin-positive (gastrin(+)) cells to be significantly lower in the lactobacillus-associated gnotobiotic mice than in the germ-free mice. However, there was no significant difference in the number of somatostatin(+) cells in these groups of mice. Consequently, gastric acid secretion also decreased in the mice colonized by lactobacilli. In addition, an increase in the expression of the genes related to muscle system development, such as nebulin and troponin genes, was observed in lactobacillus-associated mice. Moreover, infection of germ-free mice with Helicobacter pylori also showed the down- and upregulation of gastrin and muscle genes, respectively, in the stomach. These results thus suggested that indigenous lactobacilli in the stomach significantly affect the regulation of gastrin-mediated gastric acid secretion without affecting somatostatin secretion in mice, while H. pylori also exerts such an effect on the stomach.

  19. Role of Indigenous Lactobacilli in Gastrin-Mediated Acid Production in the Mouse Stomach ▿

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Matsuoka, Takashi; Kumaki, Nobue; Asami, Yukio; Koga, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the stomach is colonized by indigenous lactobacilli in mice. The aim of this study was to examine the role of such lactobacilli in the development of the stomach. For a DNA microarray analysis, germ-free BALB/c mice were orally inoculated with 109 CFU lactobacilli, and their stomachs were excised after 10 days to extract RNA. As a result, lactobacillus-associated gnotobiotic mice showed dramatically decreased expression of the gastrin gene in comparison to germ-free mice. The mean of the log2 fold change in the gastrin gene was −4.3. Immunohistochemistry also demonstrated the number of gastrin-positive (gastrin+) cells to be significantly lower in the lactobacillus-associated gnotobiotic mice than in the germ-free mice. However, there was no significant difference in the number of somatostatin+ cells in these groups of mice. Consequently, gastric acid secretion also decreased in the mice colonized by lactobacilli. In addition, an increase in the expression of the genes related to muscle system development, such as nebulin and troponin genes, was observed in lactobacillus-associated mice. Moreover, infection of germ-free mice with Helicobacter pylori also showed the down- and upregulation of gastrin and muscle genes, respectively, in the stomach. These results thus suggested that indigenous lactobacilli in the stomach significantly affect the regulation of gastrin-mediated gastric acid secretion without affecting somatostatin secretion in mice, while H. pylori also exerts such an effect on the stomach. PMID:21803885

  20. Gastrin promotes intestinal polyposis through cholecystokinin-B receptor-mediated proliferative signaling and fostering tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Han, Y-M; Park, J-M; Park, S-H; Hahm, K B; Hong, S P; Kim, E-H

    2013-08-01

    Increased serum gastrin concentrations in patients with colorectal cancer suggested the tumorigenic trophic effect of gastrin. Detailed and global molecular mechanisms explaining trophic effect of gastrin had not been revealed. In the current study, intestinal polyposis of APC(Min/⁺) mice was compared between phosphate buffered saline (PBS) injected and gastrin (10 μg/kg, thrice per week) injected group. Total number of intestinal polyposis was counted and immunohistochemical staining with F4/80 and CD3 was done. MTT assay, cell cycle analysis, and Western blot for cyclin D1, CDK4, and β-catenin were performed in Raw 264.7 and HCT116 cells before and after gastrin administration. Experiments were repeated with YM022 or transfection with si-cholecystokinin-B receptor (CCK-B-R). Intraperitoneal gastrin significantly increased intestinal polyposis in APC(Min/⁺) mice (P<0.005), in which significant increases in macrophage were noted on F4/80 immunohistochemical staining (Plt;0.05) as well as Ki-67 staining (Plt;0.05) after gastrin. On comparative cytokine array, gastrin increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin 3Rβ (IL-3Rβ), stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), and thymus-derived chemotactic agent 3 (TCA-3) in macrophage cells, which was further confirmed with real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis (P<0.05). In addition to increased inflammatory cytokines, gastrin increased macrophage proliferation accompanied with increased cyclin D1 and CDK4. Targeted for HCT116 cells, gastrin significantly increased proliferation as well as increases in synthetic phase of cell cycle. YM022 as gastrin antagonist significantly abolished the trophic actions of gastrin (P<0.05). HCT116 cells transfected with siCCK-B-R, gastrin did not increase either cell cycle or β-catenin in spite of gastrin administration. Conclusively, gastrin promoted intestinal polyposis through either direct gastrin receptor

  1. Long-term outcome of stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) versus stapled hemorrhoidopexys (STH) for grade III-IV hemorrhoids: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Simone; Spirch, Saverio; Scarpa, Marco; Ricci, Francesco; Lumachi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Circular stapled transanal hemorrhoidopexy (STH) was first introduced by A. Longo for the correction of internal mucosal prolapse and obstructed defecation and in 1998, was proposed as alternative to conventional excisional hemorrhoidectomy. More recently, stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) has gradually gained popularity, as the Longo procedure, in the treatment of hemorrhoids. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of STARR as alternative to STH in patients with grade III (n=218, 68.1%) and IV (n=102, 31.9%) hemorrhoids. A group of 320 consecutive patients (median age=51 years; range=16-85) underwent STH (n=281) or STARR (n=39) procedure. The rate of postoperative bleeding (53.8% vs. 74.4%, p<0.01) was significantly reduced in patients who underwent STARR procedure, which required a longer (45 ± 22 vs. 26 ± 11 min, p<0.01) operative time. There were no differences between groups with regard to use of painkillers, postoperative pain intensity, short- (three months) and long-term (one and three years) residual pain, soiling, incontinence and urgency. Patients treated with the STARR procedure had lower recurrence rate of hemorrhoids and a lower incidence of prolapse, both at one year (none vs. 1.4%, p=0.593 and 2.6% vs. 5.3%, p=0.396, respectively) and at two years (none vs. 6.8%, p=0.078 and none vs. 13.2%, p=0.012, respectively). The one-year (9.0 ± 1.8 vs. 9.4 ± 0.7, p=0.171) and two-year (9.6 ± 0.8 vs. 9.1 ± 1.7, p=0.072) general satisfaction was similar but higher in STARR patients than in the STH group. In conclusion, according to our preliminary results, the STARR procedure leads to a lower incidence of complications and recurrences and should be considered for patients with grade III or IV hemorrhoids previously selected for stapled hemorrhoidectomy, as a promising alternative to STH. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. [Changes of plasma endocrine hormone in pilots under Coriolis acceleration].

    PubMed

    Dai, Y; Ji, G; Huang, Y; Sun, X; Dai, F

    1998-04-01

    Plasma endocrine hormones were studied in both 24 motion sickness (orthostatic intolerance) and healthy pilots. Coriolis acceleration of 3.75, 5.00 and 6.25 pi 2 cm/s2 were given with intervals of 3-4 min AT-II, insulin, cortisol, Aldosterone and gastrin were determined by radioimmunoassay. It was found that aldosterone, AT-II, gastrin increased with increase of coriolis acceleration in all pilots. (P < 0.05), but cortisol and insulin only increased in healthy pilots (P < 0.05). It suggests excitation of the autonomic nervous system might be insufficient in orthostatic intolerant pilots and that determination of endocrine hormones may be useful in the evaluation of autonomic nervous activities.

  3. Pure Human Big Gastrin IMMUNOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES, DISAPPEARANCE HALF TIME, AND ACID-STIMULATING ACTION IN DOGS

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John H.; Debas, Haile T.; Grossman, Morton I.

    1974-01-01

    Biological properties of pure natural human “big gastrin” (designated G-34 because it contains 34 amino acid residues) were compared with those of pure natural heptadecapeptide gastrins (G-17) from human and porcine sources. Radioimmunoassay inhibition curves indicated that G-17 was nearly 1.5 times more potent than G-34 with the antibody used in this study. This difference was confirmed by demonstration of increased immunoreactivity generated when G-34 was converted to G-17 by trypsinization. When infused intravenously into dogs with gastric fistulas and Heidenhain pouches in equimolar doses, G-34 produced slightly higher acid secretory responses than G-17. Responses to sulfated and nonsulfated forms were not significantly different, nor were responses to human and porcine G-17. During infusion of equimolar doses, steady-state serum gastrin concentrations were more than fivefold higher with G-34 than with G-17. The difference in steady-state blood concentrations could be accounted for by a corresponding difference in removal rates. The half times of the G-34 preparations averaged 15.8 min and the half times of the G-17 preparations averaged 3.2 min. The calculated spaces of distribution for G-17 and G-34 were similar, about 25% of body weight. When the increment in serum gastrin was plotted against acid secretory response it was found that nearly five times greater increments in molar concentrations of G-34 than of G-17 were required to produce the same rate of acid secretion. The potency of these two molecular forms of gastrin can be expressed in two different ways. Based on exogenous molar doses, the potencies of G-34 and G-17 were similar. However, based on molar increments in serum gastrin concentration, G-17 was approximately five times more potent than G-34. Hence, fractionation of these gastrin components may be important in estimation of the acid-stimulating action represented by total serum gastrin as measured by radio-immunoassay. PMID:4847254

  4. [Effects of Chinese herbs for cool-moistening and freeing collaterals on serum gastrin and surface electrogastrogram in patients of diabetes mellitus with gastroparesis].

    PubMed

    Rong, Shi-ling; Li, Dian-gui; Fan, Hong-mei; Zheng, Yanping

    2004-11-01

    To explore the effect of Chinese herbs (CH) for cool-moistening and freeing collaterals on gastro-dynamic disturbance in patients of diabetes mellitus type 2 with gastroparesis (DM-GP). Fifty-three patients of DM-GP were enrolled and treated with CH (n = 28) and Cisapride (n = 25) respectively for 4 weeks, the changes of gastrin and electro-gastrogram (EGG) before and after treatment were observed. After treatment, the EGG improved significantly, showing the rhythm significantly improved, and level of serum gastrin lowered significantly, as compared with those before treatment, the difference was significant (P<0.01), but insignificant difference was found between the two groups. Fifteen patients in each group were followed-up afar stopping medication for 3 months, recurrence occurred in 1 patient of CH treated group, and 2 patients of Cisapride treated group. No adverse reaction was found in the rest patients. CH could obviously improve the gastro-intestinal motility and hormones abnormality.

  5. Retro-inverso forms of gastrin5-12 are as biologically active as glycine-extended gastrin in vitro but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Laval, Marie; Sims, Ioulia; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2015-12-01

    Non-amidated gastrin peptides such as glycine-extended gastrin (Ggly) are biologically active in vitro and in vivo and have been implicated in the development of gastric and colonic cancers. Previous studies have shown that the truncated form of Ggly, the octapeptide LE5AY, was still biologically active in vitro, and that activity was dependent on ferric ion binding but independent of binding to the cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2) receptor. The present work was aimed at creating more stable gastrin-derived 'super agonists' using retro-inverso technology. The truncated LE5AY peptide was synthesized using end protecting groups in three forms with l-amino acids (GL), d-amino acids (GD) or retro-inverso (reverse order with d-amino acids; GRI). All of these peptides bound ferric ions with a 2:1 (Fe: peptide) ratio. As predicted, Ggly, GL and GRI were biologically active in vitro and increased cell proliferation in mouse gastric epithelial (IMGE-5) and human colorectal cancer (DLD-1) cell lines, and increased cell migration in DLD-1 cells. These activities were likely via the same mechanism as Ggly since no CCK1 or CCK2 binding was identified, and GD remained inactive in all assays. Surprisingly, unlike Ggly, GL and GRI were not active in vivo. While Ggly stimulated colonic crypt height and proliferation rates in gastrin knockout mice, GL and GRI did not. The apparent lack of activity may be due to rapid clearance of these smaller peptides. Nevertheless further work designing and testing retro-inverso gastrins is warranted, as it may lead to the generation of super agonists that could potentially be used to treat patients with gastrointestinal disorders with reduced mucosal function.

  6. Annexin II binds progastrin and gastrin-like peptides, and mediates growth factor effects of autocrine and exogenous gastrins on colon cancer and intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Wu, H; Clark, C; Owlia, A

    2007-01-18

    We and others have reported the presence of novel progastrin (PG)/gastrin receptors on normal and cancerous intestinal cells. We had earlier reported the presence of 33-36 kDa gastrin-binding proteins on cellular membranes of colon cancer cells. The goal of the current study was to identify the protein(s) in the 33-36 kDa band, and analyse its functional significance. A carbodiimide crosslinker was used for crosslinking radio-labeled gastrins to membrane proteins from gastrin/PG responsive cell lines. Native membrane proteins, crosslinked to the ligand, were solubulized and enriched by >1000-fold, and analysed by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry. The peptide masses were researched against the NCBInr database using the ProFound search engine. Annexin II (ANX II) was identified, and confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry. As HCT-116 cells express autocrine PG, the in situ association of PG with ANX II was demonstrated in pulldown assays. Direct binding of PG with ANX II was confirmed in an in vitro binding assay. In order to confirm a functional importance of these observations, sense and anti-sense (AS) ANX II RNA-expressing clones of intestinal epithelial (IEC-18) and human colon cancer (HCT-116) cell lines were generated. AS clones demonstrated a significant loss in the growth response to exogenous (IEC-18) and autocrine (HCT-116) PG. We have thus discovered that membrane-associated ANX II binds PG/gastrins, and partially mediates growth factor effects of the peptides.

  7. Effect of intragastric infusions of ethanol and wine on serum gastrin concentration and gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W L; Barnett, C; Walsh, J H

    1986-12-01

    The effects of ethanol and wine on serum gastrin concentration and gastric acid secretion were evaluated in 13 normal volunteers. Solutions studied were pure ethanol (5%, 12%, and 36%), red wine, and white wine. Each solution contained 28 g of ethanol and each was administered as a slow, steady intragastric infusion to simulate normal ingestion of beverages. When compared to saline (control), none of the pure ethanol solutions increased serum gastrin concentration or gastric acid secretion significantly. In contrast, red and white wine (12% ethanol vol/vol) were potent stimulants of gastrin release and acid secretion when compared either to saline or pure 12% ethanol. Mean (+/- SEM) peak serum gastrin increases with 300 ml of red wine, white wine, saline, and pure 12% ethanol were 253 +/- 125, 182 +/- 91, 13 +/- 2, and 11 +/- 3 pg/ml, respectively (p less than 0.05 for red and white wine versus saline or 12% ethanol), and the mean peak acid outputs were 28.6 +/- 2.8, 27.9 +/- 1.9, 9.3 +/- 2.0, and 11.9 +/- 1.3 mmol/h, respectively (p less than 0.05 for red and white wine versus saline or 12% ethanol). We conclude that red and white wine stimulate gastric acid secretion, probably by enhanced release of gastrin, and that this effect is not due to the ethanol content of wine.

  8. Improvement of autism spectrum disorder symptoms in three children by using gastrin-releasing peptide.

    PubMed

    Becker, Michele Michelin; Bosa, Cleonice; Oliveira-Freitas, Vera Lorentz; Goldim, José Roberto; Ohlweiler, Lygia; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Riesgo, Rudimar Dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability and potential therapeutic effects of gastrin-releasing peptide in three children with autistic spectrum disorder. Case series study with the intravenous administration of gastrin-releasing peptide in the dose of 160pmol/kg for four consecutive days. To evaluate the results, parental impressions the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) Scale. Each child underwent a new peptide cycle after two weeks. The children were followed for four weeks after the end of the infusions. The gastrin-releasing peptide was well tolerated and no child had adverse effects. Two children had improved social interaction, with a slight improvement in joint attention and the interaction initiatives. Two showed reduction of stereotypes and improvement in verbal language. One child lost his compulsion to bathe, an effect that lasted two weeks after each infusion cycle. Average reduction in CARS score was 2.8 points. CGI was "minimally better" in two children and "much better" in one. This study suggests that the gastrin-releasing peptide is safe and may be effective in improving key symptoms of autism spectrum disorder, but its results should be interpreted with caution. Controlled clinical trials-randomized, double-blinded, and with more children-are needed to better evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of gastrin-releasing peptide in autism. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment of Gastrin-Secreting Tumor With Sustained-Release Octreotide Acetate in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangho; Hosoya, Kenji; Takagi, Satoshi; Okumura, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old, intact male Shiba Inu was presented with loose stool, polydipsia, hematuria, vomiting, and anorexia. On abdominal ultrasonography, numerous nodules were detected in the hepatic parenchyma distributed diffusely throughout all lobes. Excisional biopsy of one of the nodules was performed via exploratory laparotomy. A histopathological diagnosis of the lesion was carcinoid, and the tumor cells stained positive to chromogranin A and gastrin. The serum gastrin level of the dog was 45,613 pg/mL (reference range: 160-284). In addition to medical treatment with omeprazole(c) and famotidine(e), suppression of gastrin secretion was attempted with octreotide acetate. A test dose of octreotide acetate significantly decreased the serum gastrin level to approximately one third of the baseline in 2 hr and the effect lasted approximately for 6 hr. On day 21, treatment with sustained-release formulation of octreotide acetate(a) (5 mg intramuscular, q 4 wk) was initiated. The serum gastrin concentration gradually decreased over 32 days and then progressively increased in parallel with the progression of the hepatic nodules. The dog gradually developed recurrence of initial clinical signs, and was lost to follow-up on day 510.

  10. Effects of pirenzepine on omeprazole-induced gastrin gene expression in rat antral tissues.

    PubMed

    Tari, A; Hamada, M; Kamiyasu, T; Fukino, Y; Sumii, M; Sumii, K; Kajiyama, G

    1996-06-01

    Pirenzepine has inhibitory effects on gastrin secretion both in vivo and in vitro. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism responsible for the suppression of omeprazole-induced hypergastrinemia that occurs with pirenzepine treatment. The effects were measured in rats treated with oral omeprazole plus intraperitoneal pirenzepine or saline once daily for seven days in the antrum. The serum gastrin level increased significantly by more than sixfold with omeprazole treatment; additional treatment with pirenzepine suppressed this increase by 48%. Pirenzepine treatment did not change the level of gastrin mRNA but significantly increased the level of somatostatin mRNA. Combination treatment with omeprazole plus pirenzepine significantly decreased the gastrin mRNA level to half and significantly increased the somatostatin mRNA level up to 1.4-fold of the levels achieved with omeprazole treatment alone. These results suggest that the stimulatory effect of omeprazole on gastrin synthesis is partially blocked by pirenzepine via mediation of somatostatin synthesis in the antrum.

  11. The Diagnostic Value of Gastrin-17 Detection in Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ling, Li; Li, Shanshan; Qin, Guiping; Cui, Wei; Li, Xiang; Ni, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of gastrin-17 (G-17) for the early detection of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). An extensive literature search was performed, with the aim of selecting publications that reported the accuracy of G-17 in predicting CAG, in the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Chinese Biological Medicine, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP. To assess the diagnostic value of G-17, the following statistics were estimated and described: sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 894 patients and 1950 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these studies were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45–0.51) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77–0.81), respectively. The DOR was 5.93 (95% CI: 2.93–11.99), and the AUC was 0.82. G-17 may have potential diagnostic value because it has good specificity and a moderate DOR and AUC for CAG. However, more studies are needed to improve the sensitivity of this diagnostic tool in the future. PMID:27149493

  12. Gastrin-releasing peptide stimulates glycoconjugate release from feline trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, J.D.; Baraniuk, J.N.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Kaliner, M.A.; Shelhamer, J.H. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) on respiratory glycoconjugate (RGC) secretion was investigated in a feline tracheal organ culture model. RGC secretion was stimulated by GRP in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations from 10(-8) to 10(-5) M (range 15-38% increase above control) with a peak effect within 0.5-1 h of incubation. GRP-(14-27), the receptor binding portion of GRP, and the related molecule, bombesin, also stimulated RGC secretion by approximately 20% above control. Acetyl-GRP-(20-27) stimulated RGC release by 10%, whereas GRP-(1-16) was inactive. Autoradiographic studies with 125I-GRP revealed that specific binding was restricted to the submucosal glands and the surface epithelium. A specific radioimmunoassay showed the content of GRP in feline trachea after extraction with ethanol-acetic acid to be 156 +/- 91 fmol/g wet wt. Indirect immunohistochemistry indicated that ganglion cells located just outside the cartilage contained GRP-immunoreactive materials. GRP is a novel mucus secretagogue that may participate in regulating airway mucosal gland secretion.

  13. The role of endogenous gastrin in the development of enterochromaffin-like cell carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis: a study with the specific gastrin receptor antagonist AG-041R.

    PubMed

    Chiba, T; Kinoshita, Y; Sawada, M; Kishi, K; Baba, A; Hoshino, E

    1998-01-01

    We examined the effects of a newly synthesized gastrin receptor antagonist, AG-041R, on the growth of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis both in vitro and in vivo. AG-041R was as potent as the well known gastrin antagonist L365,260 in inhibiting not only the gastrin-induced release of histamine from but also histidine decarboxylase (HDC) gene expression in the ECL carcinoid tumor cells. AG-041R also inhibited gastrin-induced DNA synthesis and c-fos gene expression in the tumor cells. Furthermore, AG-041R significantly inhibited the growth of the transplanted Mastomys ECL carcinoid tumors in vivo. From these data, it is concluded that endogenous gastrin is involved in the growth of ECL carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis. Moreover, AG-041R is shown to have a potential as an anti-neoplastic agent for ECL carcinoid tumor of the stomach.

  14. stg fimbrial operon from S. Typhi STH2370 contributes to association and cell disruption of epithelial and macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, Liliana; Fuentes, Juan A; Trombert, A Nicole; Jofré, Matías R; Villagra, Nicolás A; Valenzuela, Luis M; Mora, Guido C

    2015-07-07

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) stg operon, encoding a chaperone/usher fimbria (CU), contributes to an increased adherence to human epithelial cells. However, one report suggests that the presence of the Stg fimbria impairs the monocyte--bacteria association, as deduced by the lower level of invasion to macrophage-like cells observed when the stg fimbrial cluster was overexpressed. Nevertheless, since other CU fimbrial structures increase the entry of S. Typhi into macrophages, and considering that transcriptomic analyses revealed that stg operon is indeed expressed in macrophages, we reassessed the role of the stg operon in the interaction between S. Typhi strain STH2370 and human cells, including macrophage-like cells and mononuclear cells directly taken from human peripheral blood. We compared S. Typhi STH2370 WT, a Chilean clinical strain, and the S. Typhi STH2370 Δstg mutant with respect to association and invasion using epithelial and macrophage-like cells. We observed that deletion of stg operon reduced the association and invasion of S. Typhi, in both cellular types. The presence of the cloned stg operon restored the WT phenotype in all the cases. Moreover, we compared Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium 14028s (S. Typhimurium, a serovar lacking stg operon) and S. Typhimurium heterologously expressing S. Typhi stg. We found that the latter presents an increased cell disruption of polarized epithelial cells and an increased association in both epithelial and macrophage-like cells. S. Typhi stg operon encodes a functional adhesin that participates in the interaction bacteria-eukaryotic cells, including epithelial cells and macrophages-like cells. The phenotypes associated to stg operon include increased association and consequent invasion in bacteria-eukaryotic cells, and cell disruption.

  15. Autoradiographic demonstration of gastrin-releasing peptide-binding sites in the rat gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.; Oda, M.; Kaneko, K.; Akaiwa, Y.; Tsukada, N.; Komatsu, H.; Tsuchiya, M.

    1988-04-01

    The location of (/sup 125/I)iodotyrosyl gastrin-releasing peptide-binding sites in the rat fundic mucosa was studied. Peptide specificity was demonstrated by competitive binding studies using the addition of a large amount of cold gastrin-releasing peptide or substance P. Autoradiography of the stomach tissue was carried out by freeze-drying, embedding in Epon, wet-sectioning with ethylene glycol, and dry-mounting the emulsion film by the wire-loop method to prevent loss of the labeled substance. Specific binding sites of gastrin-releasing peptide were found on D cells, surface mucus cells, and parietal cells, whereas few binding sites were seen on the chief or mucus neck cells.

  16. Unsulfated cholecystokinin: An overlooked hormone?

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Agersnap, Mikkel

    2012-01-10

    Tyrosyl O-sulfation is a common posttranslational derivatization of proteins that may also modify regulatory peptides. Among these are members of the cholecystokinin (CCK)/gastrin family. While sulfation of gastrin peptides is without effect on the bioactivity, O-sulfation is crucial for the cholecystokinetic activity (i.e. gallbladder emptying) of CCK peptides. Accordingly, the purification of CCK as a sulfated peptide was originally monitored by its gallbladder emptying effect. Since then, the dogma has prevailed that CCK peptides are always sulfated. The dogma is correct in a semantic context since the gallbladder expresses only the CCK-A receptor that requires sulfation of the ligand. CCK peptides, however, are also ligands for the CCK-B receptors that do not require ligand sulfation. Consequently, unsulfated CCK peptides may act via CCK-B receptors. Since in vivo occurrence of unsulfated products of proCCK with an intact α-amidated C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence (-Trp-Met-Asp-PheNH(2)) has been reported, it is likely that unsulfated CCK peptides constitute a separate hormone system that acts via CCK-B receptors. This review discusses the occurrence, molecular forms, and possible physiological as well as pathophysiological significance of unsulfated CCK peptides.

  17. Definition of the residues required for the interaction between glycine-extended gastrin and transferrin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Suzana; Ferrand, Audrey; Estève, Jean-Pierre; Mason, Anne B; Baldwin, Graham S

    2009-09-01

    Transferrin is the main iron transport protein found in the circulation, and the level of transferrin saturation in the blood is an important indicator of iron status. The peptides amidated gastrin(17) (Gamide) and glycine-extended gastrin(17) (Ggly) are well known for their roles in controlling acid secretion and as growth factors in the gastrointestinal tract. Several lines of evidence, including the facts that transferrin binds gastrin, that gastrins bind ferric ions, and that the level of expression of gastrins positively correlates with transferrin saturation, suggest the possible involvement of the transferrin-gastrin interaction in iron homeostasis. In the present work, the interaction between gastrins and transferrin has been characterized by surface plasmon resonance and covalent crosslinking. First, an interaction between iron-free apo-transferrin and Gamide or Ggly was observed. The fact that no interaction was observed in the presence of the chelator EDTA suggested that the gastrin-ferric ion complex was the interacting species. Moreover, removal of ferric ions with EDTA reduced the stability of the complex between apo-transferrin and gastrins, and no interaction was observed between Gamide or Ggly and diferric transferrin. Second, some or all of glutamates at positions 8-10 of the Ggly molecule, together with the C-terminal domain, were necessary for the interaction with apo-transferrin. Third, monoferric transferrin mutants incapable of binding iron in either the N-terminal or C-terminal lobe still bound Ggly. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that gastrin peptides bind to nonligand residues within the open cleft in each lobe of transferrin and are involved in iron loading of transferrin in vivo.

  18. Effect of H. pylori infection on gastrin, ghrelin, motilin, and gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Eren, Makbule; Çolak, Ömer; Işıksoy, Serap; Yavuz, Aslı

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux and possible mechanisms in Helicobacter pylori infection. Symptoms of H. pylori-infected children, their total gastroesophageal reflux episodes, acid exposure percentage, gastrin, ghrelin, and motilin levels were evaluated before and after H. pylori eradication. Forty-two H. pylori-infected children were eligible for this study. Acid exposure % and total reflux episodes before and after H. pylori eradication were 10.2%±14.8% vs. 7.71%±5.0% and 94.7%±102.1% vs. 64.6%±55.0%, respectively (p=0.28, p=0.082). There was an insignificant change in the serum gastrin (93.4±153.8 pmol/L vs. 1.28±149.4 pmol/L, p=0.67), ghrelin (7.69±197.5 pg/mL vs. 8.36±299.5 pg/mL, p=0.274), and motilin (75.1±81.2 pg/mL vs. 97.2±80.5 pg/mL, p=0.206) levels after eradication. Gastrin and ghrelin levels were negatively correlated after H. pylori eradication (r=-0.38, p=0.031). There was no association between gastroesophageal reflux episodes and gastrin, ghrelin, and motilin levels (r=0.25 and p=0.11; r= 0.24 and p=0.13; r=-0.23 and p=0.14, respectively). H. pylori infection is neither protective nor harmful in the gastroesophageal reflux. Neither ghrelin nor motilin levels was associated with gastroesophageal reflux. None of gastrin, ghrelin, and motilin levels was affected by H. pylori infection. There is an inverse association between gastrin and ghrelin levels after H. pylori eradication.

  19. Hormonal status and fluid electrolyte metabolism in motion sickness

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, A.I.; Nichiporuk, I.A.; Yasnetsov, V.V.; Shashkov, V.S.

    1988-04-01

    In the first experimental series, 10 healthy male test subjects with a high susceptibility to motion sickness showed a significant increase of ACTH, cortisol, STH, prolactin, ADH, aldosterone concentrations, and plasma renin activity after vestibular tests. The 10 subjects with a moderate susceptibility exhibited a still higher increase of the hormones, except plasma renin. The 8 test subjects with a low susceptibility displayed a considerable increase in ACTH, cortisol, and STH after vestibular stimulation. In the second experimental series, the increase of STH, cortisol, ADH, aldosterone and renin occurred immediately after rotation in the moderate susceptibility subjects and an hour after exposure in the high susceptibility subjects. This may be indicative of specific immediate adaptation mechanisms or excitation transfer in the CNS in high susceptibility persons. In the third experimental animal series, the permeability of the blood-brain barrier for /sup 125/I and IgG increased after rotation. Greater concentrations of potassium, chloride, and urea in CSF are suggestive of an inhibition process activation in the CNS and, probably, of an active urea transport by the vascular plexus epithelium which maintains constant osmotic pressure of cerebral extracellular fluid and prevents hyper-hydration of CNS neurons.

  20. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  1. Synthesis of gastrin antagonists, analogues of the C-terminal tetrapeptide of gastrin, by introduction of a beta-homo residue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Fulcrand, P; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Bali, J P; Martinez, J

    1989-03-01

    A series of analogues of Boc-Trp-Leu-Asp-Phe-NH2, a potent gastrin agonist, were synthesized by introducing a beta-homo residue in the sequence. These compounds were tested in vivo on acid secretion, in the anesthetized rat, and for their ability to inhibit binding of labeled gastrin to its receptors on gastric mucosal cells. These analogues behaved as gastrin antagonists. The most potent compounds in this series were Boc-Trp-Leu-beta-homo-Asp-NHCH2C6H5 (10) (IC50 = 1 microM, ED50 = 0.2 mg/kg), Boc-Trp-Leu-beta-homo-Asp-NHCH2CH2C6H5 (11) (IC50 = 0.75 microM, ED50 = 0.5 mg/kg), Boc-Trp-Leu-beta-homo-Asp-Phe-NH2 (12) (IC50 = 1.5 microM, ED50 = 0.1 mg/kg), and Boc-Trp-Leu-beta-homo-Asp-D-Phe-NH2 (13) (IC50 = 2 microM, ED50 = 0.1 mg/kg). We could demonstrate the importance of the region of the peptide bond between leucine and aspartic acid and of the structure of the C-terminal dipeptide Asp-Phe-NH2, for exhibiting biological activity on acid secretion.

  2. Activation by zinc of the human gastrin gene promoter in colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Laval, Marie; Estacio, Ortis; Hudson, Damien F; Kalitsis, Paul; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2015-10-01

    Over-expression of growth factors can contribute to the development and progression of cancer, and gastrins in particular have been implicated in accelerating the development of gastrointestinal cancers. Previously our group showed that hypoxia, cobalt chloride (a hypoxia mimetic) and zinc chloride could activate the expression of the gastrin gene in vitro. To characterise activation of the gastrin promoter by zinc ions further in vivo, TALEN technology was used to engineer a luciferase reporter construct into the endogenous human gastrin gene promoter in SW480 colon cancer cells. Gastrin promoter activity in the resultant Gast(luc) SW480 colon cancer cells was then measured by bioluminescence in cell culture and in tumour xenografts in SCID mice. Activation of intracellular signalling pathways was assessed by Western blotting. Activation of the gastrin promoter by zinc ions was concentration dependent in vitro and in vivo. Zinc ions significantly stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (MAPK pathway) but not of Akt (PI3K pathway). We conclude that the endogenous gastrin promoter is responsive to zinc ions, likely via activation of the MAPK pathway.

  3. Serum from patients with pernicious anaemia blocks gastrin stimulation of acid secretion by parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Aizpurua, H J; Ungar, B; Toh, B H

    1985-01-01

    We examined 51 sera from patients with pernicious anaemia for their capacity to block maximal gastrin stimulation of acid secretion by isolated rodent gastric parietal cells. 14C-aminopyrine accumulation was used as the index of acid secretion in vitro. Sera from patients with pernicious anaemia gave significantly (P less than 0.005) more block of maximal gastrin stimulation of acid secretion (61.7 +/- 37.8%) than sera from 10 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (19.6 +/- 17.7%), 10 with scleroderma (34.2 +/- 22.3%), five with rheumatoid arthritis (22.4 +/- 15.6%) or 30 from healthy persons (27.4 +/- 12.8%). Maximal histamine stimulation of acid secretion was not inhibited. The blocking factor was present in serum IgG fractions, and serum and IgG fractions gave parallel dose-response and dilution curves. The serum block was abolished by absorption with gastric mucosal cells and correlated with the presence of parietal cell surface autoantibody. We conclude that serum immunoglobulin in pernicious anaemia can block gastrin stimulation of acid secretion and suggest that this block may be mediated by competition with gastrin for surface receptors on parietal cells. PMID:4042425

  4. Effect of green tea catechins on gastric mucosal dysplasia in insulin-gastrin mice.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takashi; Ohtani, Masahiro; Suto, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Makoto; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Hidetaka; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-06-01

    Green tea catechins (GTCs) have been implicated in various physiological effects, including anti-carcinogenic activities. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of GTCs specifically on the development of gastritis and pre-malignant lesions in insulin-gastrin mice. Nine-week-old male INS-GAS mice (n=38) were supplemented with GTCs for 4 and 28 weeks, and their body weights, serum gastrin levels, histopathology and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in gastric tissue and mucosal cell proliferation were monitored. Body weights of the GTC-treated mice were significantly lower than those of the untreated controls (P≤0.05). Serum gastrin levels were suppressed at the age of 37-weeks (P≤0.05). The histopathological scores indicated that the extent of dysplasia was significantly diminished (P≤0.05), although GTC supplementation did not affect the inflammation scores. The messenger RNA levels of interferon (IFN)-γ were significantly reduced at the age of 13 weeks (P≤0.05), although the changes did not reach statistical significance at the age of 37 weeks (P=0.056). The labeling index of Ki-67 immunohistochemistry was significantly decreased (P≤0.05). These results demonstrated that GTCs may play a protective role in the development of gastritis and pre-malignant lesions via an IFN-γ, gastrin, and mucosal cell proliferation-dependent mechanism in this rodent model and potentially in humans.

  5. Role of Vitamin D on the Inhibition of Gastrin Production After Cisplatin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Kopachik, Will

    2000-01-01

    In rats cisplatin induces hypocalcemia, bloating of the stomach, and ulceration ameliorated through calcium supplements. This study was undertaken to test the role of calcium on the gastrin mRNA production in vitro and in vivo. RIN B6 cells were cultured in medium with calcium (1.8, 3.6 and 7.2 mM) and the active form of vitamin D (calcijex). Cisplatin was added (10 μg/ml) for 12 hrs and cells were harvested for RNA from various treatment groups. Male Wistar rats were treated with cisplatin (9 mg/kg), before and after vitamin D (0.3 mg/100g/week). The rats were killed and stomach tissues excised on 1, 6, 10 and 15 days after cisplatin treatment. RNA from the stomach was analyzed using the northern blot technique. Gastrin mRNA was suppressed after cisplatin treatment both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro calcium but not vitamin D additions partially prevented the gastrin mRNA. In vivo, however, vitamin D and calcium were equally effective in preventing gastrin mRNA loss. PMID:18475933

  6. Gastrin, gastric acid secretion, and gastric microflora in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, K; Uvnäs-Moberg, K; Nord, C E; Johansson, C; Gullberg, R

    1986-01-01

    The relation between the basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion, plasma gastrin, and the gastric microflora was examined in 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Sixteen patients (36%) had basal achlorhydria, and of these, 10 (22%) had achlorhydria or hypochlorhydria after stimulation with pentagastrin. The peak acid output and acidity showed inverse correlation with the disease duration but were not associated with age or with the degree of physical disability. Hypergastrinaemia was found in nine patients (20%), of whom 6 (13%) had significant titres of parietal cell antibody. The acidity of the peak acid output showed negative correlation with plasma gastrin. It was confirmed that the gastric secretory state is a determinant of plasma gastrin levels and in addition influences the growth of micro-organisms in the gastric lumen. The type of microflora in the non-acid stomach was similar to that found in the saliva. A subgroup of eight females was identified who showed low gastric acid secretion rates, positive bacterial cultures, and atlantoaxial subluxation. Gastrin- and insulin-like immunoreactivities were found in joint fluid. The concentrations reflected their plasma levels, suggesting that the peptides are not released at the inflammatory site, but rather that they reach synovial fluid from circulating blood. PMID:3524480

  7. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor with cinacalcet increases serum gastrin levels in healthy older subjects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastric acidity is postulated to enhance calcium absorption since calcium is better dissolved at low pH. Extracellular calcium stimulates gastrin and gastric acid secretion in humans. Ex vivo studies indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), which is expressed on the surface of human G cells...

  8. Effect of ranitidine bismuth citrate on postprandial plasma gastrin and pepsinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, A G; Lam, W M; Luk, Y W; Sercombe, J; Sawyerr, A M; Hudson, M; Samloff, I M; Pounder, R E

    1993-01-01

    Ranitidine bismuth citrate was compared with an equipotent dose of ranitidine, to determine whether the former, by an anti-Helicobacter pylori activity, would counteract the rise of gastrin resulting from ranitidine's gastric acid antisecretory activity. Twenty four men with duodenal ulcers were studied before and on the 8th day of dosing with either ranitidine bismuth citrate 800 mg twice daily or ranitidine 300 mg twice daily (double blind, randomised, parallel groups). Fasting and postprandial plasma gastrin and plasma pepsinogen I and II concentrations were measured, and a 13C-urea breath test was performed before and on the 8th day of dosing. The 13C-urea breath tests were positive in 21 patients before dosing and remained positive in nine of nine of the ranitidine dosed patients, whereas only two of 12 patients treated with ranitidine bismuth citrate remained positive. The expected rise in meal stimulated plasma gastrin with ranitidine was seen in the 12 patients who received ranitidine but, despite suppression of H pylori urease activity in 10 of 12 patients taking ranitidine bismuth citrate, there was no attenuation of the meal stimulated gastrin rise. There was no significant difference in the mean derived (4 hour) plasma pepsinogen I and II concentrations after dosing with ranitidine or ranitidine bismuth citrate. PMID:8472980

  9. Gastrin treatment stimulates β-cell regeneration and improves glucose tolerance in 95% pancreatectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Noèlia; Joanny, Géraldine; Escoriza, Jéssica; Vilaseca, Marina; Montanya, Eduard

    2011-07-01

    β-Cell mass reduction is a central aspect in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and substitution or regeneration of the lost β-cells is a potentially curative treatment of diabetes. To study the effects of gastrin on β-cell mass in rats with 95% pancreatectomy (95%-Px), a model of pancreatic regeneration, rats underwent 95% Px or sham Px and were treated with [15 leu] gastrin-17 (Px+G and S+G) or vehicle (Px+V and S+V) for 15 d. In 95% Px rats, gastrin treatment reduced hyperglycemia (280 ± 52 mg vs. 436 ± 51 mg/dl, P < 0.05), and increased β-cell mass (1.15 ± 0.15 mg)) compared with vehicle-treated rats (0.67 ± 0.15 mg, P < 0.05). Gastrin treatment induced β-cell regeneration by enhancing β-cell neogenesis (increased number of extraislet β-cells in Px+G: 0.42 ± 0.05 cells/mm(2) vs. Px+V: 0.27 ± 0.07 cells/mm(2), P < 0.05, and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 expression in ductal cells of Px+G: 1.21 ± 0.38% vs. Px+V: 0.23 ± 0.10%, P < 0.05) and replication (Px+G: 1.65 ± 0.26% vs. S+V: 0.64 ± 0.14%; P < 0.05). In addition, reduced β-cell apoptosis contributed to the increased β-cell mass in gastrin-treated rats (Px+G: 0.07 ± 0.02%, Px+V: 0.23 ± 0.05%; P < 0.05). Gastrin action on β-cell regeneration and survival increased β-cell mass and improved glucose tolerance in 95% Px rats, supporting a potential role of gastrin in the treatment of diabetes.

  10. CCK2 receptor antagonists: pharmacological tools to study the gastrin-ECL cell-parietal cell axis.

    PubMed

    Håkanson, R; Ding, X Q; Norlén, P; Lindström, E

    1999-03-17

    Gastrin-recognizing CCK2 receptors are expressed in parietal cells and in so-called ECL cells in the acid-producing part of the stomach. ECL cells are endocrine/paracrine cells that produce and store histamine and chromogranin A (CGA)-derived peptides, such as pancreastatin. The ECL cells are the principal cellular transducer of the gastrin-acid signal. Activation of the CCK2 receptor results in mobilization of histamine (and pancreastatin) from the ECL cells with consequent activation of the parietal cell histamine H2 receptor. Thus, release of ECL-cell histamine is a key event in the process of gastrin-stimulated acid secretion. The oxyntic mucosal histidine decarboxylase (HDC) activity and the serum pancreastatin concentration are useful markers for the activity of the gastrin-ECL cell axis. Powerful and selective CCK2 receptor antagonits have been developed from a series of benzodiazepine compounds. These agents are useful tools to study how gastrin controls the ECL cells. Conversely, the close control of ECL cells by gastrin makes the gastrin-ECL cell axis well suited for evaluating the antagonistic potential of CCK2 receptor antagonists with the ECL-cell HDC activity as a notably sensitive and reliable parameter. The CCK2 receptor antagonists YF476, YM022, RP73870, JB93182 and AG041R were found to cause prompt inhibition of ECL-cell histamine and pancreastatin secretion and synthesis. The circulating pancreastatin concentration is raised, was lowered when the action of gastrin on the ECL cells was blocked by the CCK2 receptor antagonists. These effects were associated with inhibition of gastrin-stimulated acid secretion. In addition, sustained receptor blockade was manifested in permanently decreased oxyntic mucosal HDC activity, histamine concentration and HDC mRNA and CGA mRNA concentrations. CCK2 receptor blockade also induced hypergastrinemia, which probably reflects the impaired gastric acid secretion (no acid feedback inhibition of gastrin release

  11. Gastrin induces ductal cell dedifferentiation and β-cell neogenesis after 90% pancreatectomy.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Noèlia; Montanya, Eduard

    2014-10-01

    Induction of β-cell mass regeneration is a potentially curative treatment for diabetes. We have recently found that long-term gastrin treatment results in improved metabolic control and β-cell mass expansion in 95% pancreatectomised (Px) rats. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of gastrin-induced β-cell mass expansion after Px. After 90%-Px, rats were treated with gastrin (Px+G) or vehicle (Px+V), pancreatic remnants were harvested on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 and used for gene expression, protein immunolocalisation and morphometric analyses. Gastrin- and vehicle-treated Px rats showed similar blood glucose levels throughout the study. Initially, after Px, focal areas of regeneration, showing mesenchymal cells surrounding ductal structures that expressed the cholecystokinin B receptor, were identified. These focal areas of regeneration were similar in size and cell composition in the Px+G and Px+V groups. However, in the Px+G group, the ductal structures showed lower levels of keratin 20 and β-catenin (indicative of duct dedifferentiation) and higher levels of expression of neurogenin 3 and NKX6-1 (indicative of endocrine progenitor phenotype), as compared with Px+V rats. In Px+G rats, β-cell mass and the number of scattered β-cells were significantly increased compared with Px+V rats, whereas β-cell replication and apoptosis were similar in the two groups. These results indicate that gastrin treatment-enhanced dedifferentiation and reprogramming of regenerative ductal cells in Px rats, increased β-cell neogenesis and fostered β-cell mass expansion.

  12. Gut hormone release after intestinal resection.

    PubMed Central

    Besterman, H S; Adrian, T E; Mallinson, C N; Christofides, N D; Sarson, D L; Pera, A; Lombardo, L; Modigliani, R; Bloom, S R

    1982-01-01

    To investigate the possible role of gut and pancreatic hormones in the adaptive responses to gut resection, plasma concentrations of the circulating hormones were measured, in response to a test breakfast, in patients with either small or large intestinal resection and in healthy control subjects. In 18 patients with partial ileal resection a significant threefold rise was found in basal and postprandial levels of pancreatic polypeptide, a fourfold increase in motilin, and more than a twofold increase in gastrin and enteroglucagon levels compared with healthy controls. In contrast, nine patients with colonic resection had a threefold rise in levels of pancreatic polypeptide only. One or more of these peptides may have a role in stimulating the adaptive changes found after gut resection. PMID:7117905

  13. The homeoproteins MAB-18 and CEH-14 insulate the dauer collagen gene col-43 from activation by the adjacent promoter of the Spermatheca gene sth-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bando, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Tatsuji; Kagawa, Hiroaki

    2005-04-22

    Genome searches in this study indicate that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans genome has 2582 bidirectionally oriented genes that account for more than 25% of the total genes. We analyze the transcriptional repression system for one of these predicted bidirectional promoters, which controls the expression of the spermathecal gene sth-1 and collagen gene col-43. These two genes are separated by 1.3 kb and are transcribed bidirectionally. sth-1 is expressed in spermatheca after the L4 stage and col-43 is expressed in the hypodermal cells of the L2d dauer stage. The upstream regions required for the expression of sth-1 and col-43 shared an overlapped control sequence. Two homeoproteins, MAB-18 and CEH-14, were isolated by yeast one-hybrid screening as binding proteins of the overlapped region. MAB-18 bound to two homeodomain-binding sites and interacted with CEH-14 to repress col-43 expression in spermatheca. These results indicate that the two homeoproteins interact with each other to repress col-43 expression in sth-1-expressing tissues. This is the first report of bidirectional gene regulation analysis in the C.elegans genome.

  14. Increased gastrin gene expression provides a physiological advantage to mice under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Laval, Marie; Baldwin, Graham S; Shulkes, Arthur; Marshall, Kathryn M

    2015-01-15

    Hypoxia, or a low concentration of O2, is encountered in humans undertaking activities such as mountain climbing and scuba diving and is important pathophysiologically as a limiting factor in tumor growth. Although data on the interplay between hypoxia and gastrins are limited, gastrin expression is upregulated by hypoxia in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines, and gastrins counterbalance hypoxia by stimulating angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine if higher concentrations of the gastrin precursor progastrin are protective against hypoxia in vivo. hGAS mice, which overexpress progastrin in the liver, and mice of the corresponding wild-type FVB/N strain were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. Iron status was assessed by measurement of serum iron parameters, real-time PCR for mRNAs encoding critical iron regulatory proteins, and Perls' stain and atomic absorption spectrometry for tissue iron concentrations. FVB/N mice lost weight at a faster rate and had higher sickness scores than hGAS mice exposed to hypoxia. Serum iron levels were lower in hGAS than FVB/N mice and decreased further when the animals were exposed to hypoxia. The concentration of iron in the liver was strikingly lower in hGAS than FVB/N mice. We conclude that increased circulating concentrations of progastrin provide a physiological advantage against systemic hypoxia in mice, possibly by increasing the availability of iron stores. This is the first report of an association between progastrin overexpression, hypoxia, and iron homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Carbamoylcholine and gastrin induce inositol lipid turnover in canine gastric parietal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, T.; Fisher, S.K.; Park, J.; Seguin, E.B.; Agranoff, B.W.; Yamada, Tadataka )

    1988-07-01

    The potential role of inositol phospholipid turnover in mediating acid secretion was examined in a preparation enriched for isolated canine gastric parietal cells. The stimulatory effects of carbamoylcholine (carbachol) and gastrin on parietal cell uptake of ({sup 14}C)aminopyrine were linked to dose- and time-dependent selective reduction in cellular phosphatidylinositol content, although the specific fatty acid composition of the phosphoinositides was not altered. Analysis of ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphates accumulated in cells prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)inositol revealed an increase in labeled inositol trisphosphate by 5 min of incubation with either carbachol or gastrin. Furthermore, after preincubation of parietal cells in medium containing ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate, the two secretagogues elicited a time-dependent decrease in {sup 32}P labeling of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and concomitant increase in labeling of phosphatidic acid. These data demonstrate that the acid secretagogue actions of carbachol and gastrin are correlated with turnover of cellular inositol phospholipids in a preparation consisting predominantly of parietal cells.

  16. Isolation from beer and structural determination of a potent stimulant of gastrin release.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Y; Kohda, H; Kusumoto, A; Naoki, H; Matsumoto, N; Amachi, T; Suwa, Y; Fukazawa, H; Ishida, H; Tsuji, K; Nukaya, H

    1999-01-01

    Beer was subjected to five successive chromatographic procedures to isolate the gastrin release-inducing activity, guided by bioassay of the fractions in anaesthetized Donryu rats. The procedures were: (1) hydrophobic interaction chromatography (aqueous effluent with an HP20 column); (2) weak cation-exchange chromatography (1 M acetic acid eluate with a CM Sephadex C-25 column); (3) gel filtration (methanol eluate with a Sephadex LH-20 column); (4) same as (2); (5) high-performance liquid chromatography (YMC-Pack ODS-AM with 7% acetonitrile-0.01 M HCl). The active component finally isolated had a specific activity approximately 10000 times higher than that of beer. It was identified by means of mass, 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses as N-methyltyramine (NMT). The dose of NMT giving maximal gastrin-releasing activity was 25 microg/kg, and the 50% effective dose was approximately 10 microg/kg on oral administration to rats. NMT was isolated and identified as a gastrin release inducer in beer. Its concentration in beer is sufficient to account for most of the activity of beer.

  17. Expression, purification and characterization of recombinant toxins consisting of truncated gastrin 17 and pseudomonas exotoxin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Li; Liu, Xi-Lin; Lu, Shi-Ying; Ren, Hong-Lin; Li, Yan-Song; Hu, Pan; Wang, Quan; Tong, Weihua; Yan, Dong-Ming; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Song; Jin, Wen; Liu, Zeng-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity around world. However the effectiveness of the current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer is limited. Recombinant targeted toxins may represent a novel direction of cancer therapy. In this study, we aimed to explore whether recombinant toxins fused with the truncated forms of G17 could target to kill cancer cells by recognizing CCK2R. Four recombinant Pseudomonas toxins PE38 fused with the forward or reverse truncated forms of G17 (G14 and G13) were successfully constructed, expressed, and purified. Their characteristics were further analyzed by SDS-PAGE, western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that only reversely fused recombinant toxins rG14PE38 and rG13PE38 exhibited certain toxicity on several cancer cell lines, and a competition assay indicated that the binding of the reverse gastrin-endotoxin to CCK2R (+) cells may be mediated by interaction between gastrin/gastrin-like and CCK2R.

  18. Association between serum pepsinogen A and C levels, serum gastrin concentrations and Helicobacter pylori antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kullich, W; Pöllmann, G; Czerwenka, C; Klein, G

    1999-01-01

    Pepsinogen A and C as well as gastrin were measured in the serum of 117 patients with rheumatic diseases. Moreover, the patients were divided up in groups by aids of a semiquantitative, rapid enzyme immunoassay for detection of Helicobacter pylori: 20 patients without H. pylori antibodies (AB) negative, 18 positive + (= weak AB-titre), 21 positive +2 (medium AB-titre), and 58 positive +3 (high AB-titre). The semiquantitative determinations of H. pylori-AB correlated with pepsinogen A, C and gastrin. Patients with H. pylori-AB positive +3 showed significantly higher values of pepsinogen C (p < or = 0.01) as well as pepsinogen A and gastrin (p < or = 0.05) than H. pylori-AB negative patients. Significantly increased levels of pepsinogen A (> 150 ng/ml) and C (> 25 ng/ml) were found to occur in 39% and 100% of patients with high H. pylori-AB titres. The measurement of serum pepsinogen C concentrations may provide additional diagnostic information of the extent of mucosal lesions in patients with positive H. pylori-AB titres treated with antirheumatic drugs. Our findings suggest that the semi-quantitative classification of positive AB-results can be useful in cases determining H. pylori infection and mucosal irritation if other investigations are not available.

  19. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin after coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Van Deventer, G; Kamemoto, E; Kuznicki, J T; Heckert, D C; Schulte, M C

    1992-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that differences in the processing of raw coffee beans can account for some of the variability in gastric effects of coffee drinking. Coffees were selected to represent several ways that green coffee beans are treated, ie, processing variables. These included instant and ground coffee processing, decaffeination method (ethyl acetate or methylene chloride extraction), instant coffee processing temperature (112 degrees F or 300 degrees F), and steam treatment. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin was measured in eight human subjects after they consumed each of the different coffees. Consumption of coffee was followed by a sustained decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure (P less than 0.05) except for three of the four coffees treated with ethyl acetate regardless of whether or not they contained caffeine. Caffeinated ground coffee stimulated more acid secretion that did decaf ground coffees (P less than 0.05), but not more than a steam-treated caffeinated coffee. Instant coffees did not differ in acid-stimulating ability. Ground caffeinated coffee resulted in higher blood gastrin levels than other ground coffees (P less than 0.05). Freeze-dried instant coffee also tended toward higher gastrin stimulation. It is concluded that some of the observed variability in gastric response to coffee consumption can be traced to differences in how green coffee beans are processed.

  20. Effects of intranasal and peripheral oxytocin or gastrin-releasing peptide administration on social interaction and corticosterone levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kent, Pamela; Awadia, Alisha; Zhao, Leah; Ensan, Donna; Silva, Dinuka; Cayer, Christian; James, Jonathan S; Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul

    2016-02-01

    The intranasal route of drug administration has gained increased popularity as it is thought to allow large molecules, such as peptide hormones, more direct access to the brain, while limiting systemic exposure. Several studies have investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in humans as this peptide is associated with prosocial behavior. There are, however, few preclinical studies investigating the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in rodents. Oxytocin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and it has been suggested that oxytocin's ability to increase sociability may occur through a reduction in stress reactivity. Another peptide that appears to influence both social behavior and HPA axis activity is gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), but it is not known if these GRP-induced effects are related. With this in mind, in the present study, we assessed the effects of intranasal and intraperitoneal oxytocin and GRP administration on social interaction and release of corticosterone in rats. Intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of 20, but not 5 μg, of oxytocin significantly increased social interaction, whereas intranasal and peripheral administration of GRP (20 but not 5 μg) significantly decreased levels of social interaction. In addition, while intranasal oxytocin (20 μg) had no effect on blood corticosterone levels, a marked increase in blood corticosterone levels was observed following intraperitoneal oxytocin administration. With GRP, intranasal (20 μg) but not peripheral administration increased corticosterone levels. These findings provide further evidence that intranasal peptide delivery can induce behavioral alterations in rodents which is consistent with findings from human studies. In addition, the peptide-induced changes in social interaction were not linked to fluctuations in corticosterone levels.

  1. p-21-Activated kinase 1 mediates gastrin-stimulated proliferation in the colorectal mucosa via multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Nhi; Yim, Mildred; Chernoff, Jonathan; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; He, Hong

    2013-03-15

    Gastrins, including amidated (Gamide) and glycine-extended (Ggly) forms, function as growth factors for the gastrointestinal mucosa. The p-21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) plays important roles in growth factor signaling networks that control cell motility, proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. PAK1, activated by both Gamide and Ggly, mediates gastrin-stimulated proliferation and migration, and activation of β-catenin, in gastric epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PAK1 in the regulation by gastrin of proliferation in the normal colorectal mucosa in vivo. Mucosal proliferation was measured in PAK1 knockout (PAK1 KO) mice by immunohistochemistry. The expression of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of the signaling molecules PAK1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and protein kinase B (AKT), and the expression of β-catenin and its downstream targets c-Myc and cyclin D1, were measured in gastrin knockout (Gas KO) and PAK1 KO mice by Western blotting. The expression and activation of PAK1 are decreased in Gas KO mice, and these decreases are associated with reduced activation of ERK, AKT, and β-catenin. Proliferation in the colorectal mucosa of PAK1 KO mice is reduced, and the reduction is associated with reduced activation of ERK, AKT, and β-catenin. In compensation, antral gastrin mRNA and serum gastrin concentrations are increased in PAK1 KO mice. These results indicate that PAK1 mediates the stimulation of colorectal proliferation by gastrins via multiple signaling pathways involving activation of ERK, AKT, and β-catenin.

  2. The role of endogenous gastrin in the development of enterochromaffin-like cell carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis: a study with the specific gastrin receptor antagonist AG-041R.

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, T.; Kinoshita, Y.; Sawada, M.; Kishi, K.; Baba, A.; Hoshino, E.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the effects of a newly synthesized gastrin receptor antagonist, AG-041R, on the growth of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis both in vitro and in vivo. AG-041R was as potent as the well known gastrin antagonist L365,260 in inhibiting not only the gastrin-induced release of histamine from but also histidine decarboxylase (HDC) gene expression in the ECL carcinoid tumor cells. AG-041R also inhibited gastrin-induced DNA synthesis and c-fos gene expression in the tumor cells. Furthermore, AG-041R significantly inhibited the growth of the transplanted Mastomys ECL carcinoid tumors in vivo. From these data, it is concluded that endogenous gastrin is involved in the growth of ECL carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis. Moreover, AG-041R is shown to have a potential as an anti-neoplastic agent for ECL carcinoid tumor of the stomach. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10461356

  3. Molecular biology of the peptide hormone families.

    PubMed

    Pearson, R K; Anderson, B; Dixon, J E

    1993-12-01

    The application of recombinant molecular biology has lead to remarkable advances in our understanding of the basic mechanisms of cell function in general and of the polarized GI endocrine cell in particular. This article focuses on some of the advances made towards determining the contribution of peptide hormone gene regulation to the regulation of physiological events in the GI tract. Application of these techniques to other subcellular processes involved in peptide hormone physiology such as subcellular trafficing in the regulated secretory pathway and post-translational processing have been equally impressive. For example, many of the key enzymes in the peptide hormone processing cascade have been cloned and are being studied at a molecular level. We have focused this article on the SS and gastrin peptides because of their known physiologic importance and interactions, and the depth of analysis accomplished to date. Studies using SS and gastrin as models have established principals that cover the spectrum of luminal regulation of gene activity to the identification of a single amino acid residue responsible for cAMP induction of SS gene expression. Many genes in the GI endocrine system have been cloned and the article by Dr. Habener (elsewhere in this issue) discusses progress made in understanding the complex regulation of the glucagon gene. We anticipate similar advances in studies of cholecystokinin, secretin, motilin, VIP, pancreatic polypeptide, and neuropeptide Y, whose genes have been cloned and initially characterized. Finally, as outlined in this article, the mechanisms of regulation of a specific gene often differ between sites of expression, even within the GI tract. Direct studies of the subcellular mechanisms regulating gene expression and other processes in GI endocrine cells await novel methods to maintain and propagate these cells. These studies will almost certainly involve new and creative uses of recombinant molecular biology.

  4. CCK receptors-related signaling involved in nitric oxide production caused by gastrin 17 in porcine coronary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Caimmi, Philippe; Molinari, Claudio; Uberti, Francesca; Mary, David; Vacca, Giovanni

    2012-03-05

    In anesthetized pigs gastrin-17 increased coronary blood flow through CCK1/CCK2 receptors and β(2)-adrenoceptors-related nitric oxide (NO) release. Since the intracellular pathway has not been investigated the purpose of this study was to examine in coronary endothelial cells the CCK1/CCK2 receptors-related signaling involved in the effects of gastrin-17 on NO release. Gastrin-17 caused a concentration-dependent increase of NO production (17.3-62.6%; p<0.05), which was augmented by CCK1/CCK2 receptors agonists (p<0.05). The effect of gastrin-17 was amplified by the adenylyl-cyclase activator and β(2)-adrenoceptors agonist (p<0.05), abolished by cAMP/PKA and β(2)-adrenoceptors and CCK1/CCK2 receptors blockers, and reduced by PLC/PKC inhibitor. Finally, Western-blot revealed the preferential involvement of PKA vs. PKC as downstream effectors of CCK1/CCK2 receptors activation leading to Akt, ERK, p38 and endothelial NOS (eNOS) phosphorylation. In conclusion, in coronary endothelial cells, gastrin-17 induced eNOS-dependent NO production through CCK1/CCK2 receptors- and β(2)-adrenoceptors-related pathway. The intracellular signaling involved a preferential PKA pathway over PKC.

  5. Gastrin decreases Na+,K+-ATPase activity via a PI 3-kinase- and PKC-dependent pathway in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianbing; Konkalmatt, Prasad R; Yang, Yu; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-04-01

    The natriuretic effect of gastrin suggests a role in the coordinated regulation of sodium balance by the gastrointestinal tract and the kidney. The renal molecular targets and signal transduction pathways for such an effect of gastrin are largely unknown. Recently, we reported that gastrin induces NHE3 phosphorylation and internalization via phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and PKCα. In this study, we show that gastrin induced the phosphorylation of human Na(+),K(+)-ATPase at serine 16, resulting in its endocytosis via Rab5 and Rab7 endosomes. The gastrin-stimulated phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was dependent on PI 3-kinase because the phosphorylation was blocked by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. The phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was also blocked by chelerythrine, a pan-PKC inhibitor, Gö-6976, a conventional PKC (cPKC) inhibitor, and BAPTA-AM, an intracellular calcium chelator, suggesting the importance of cPKC and intracellular calcium in the gastrin signaling pathway. The gastrin-mediated phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was also inhibited by U-73122, a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor. These results suggest that gastrin regulates sodium hydrogen exchanger and pump in renal proximal tubule cells at the apical and basolateral membranes.

  6. The gastrin receptor antagonist netazepide (YF476) prevents oxyntic mucosal inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Sørdal, Øystein; Waldum, Helge; Nordrum, Ivar S; Boyce, Malcolm; Bergh, Kåre; Munkvold, Bjørn; Qvigstad, Gunnar

    2013-12-01

    Long-term Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastritis leading to hypergastrinemia and predisposes to gastric cancer. Our aim was to assess the role of gastrin in oxyntic mucosal inflammation in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils by means of the gastrin receptor antagonist netazepide (YF476). We studied 60 gerbils for 18 months and left five animals uninfected (control group), inoculated 55 with H. pylori, and treated 28 of the infected animals with netazepide (Hp+YF476 group). Twenty-seven infected animals were given no treatment (Hp group). We measured plasma gastrin and intraluminal pH. H. pylori detection and histologic evaluations of the stomach were carried out. All 55 inoculated animals were H. pylori positive at termination. Eighteen animals in the Hp group had gastritis. There was a threefold increase in mucosal thickness in the Hp group compared to the Hp+YF476 group, and a threefold increase in oxyntic neuroendocrine cells in the Hp group compared to the Hp+YF476 group (p < .05). All animals in the Hp+YF476 group had macro- and microscopically normal findings in the stomach. Plasma gastrin was higher in the Hp group than in the control group (172 ± 16 pmol/L vs 124 ± 5 pmol/L, p < .05) and highest in the Hp+YF476 group (530 ± 36 pmol/L). Intraluminal pH was higher in the Hp group than in the Hp+YF476 group (2.51 vs 2.30, p < .05). The gastrin antagonist netazepide prevents H. pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils. Thus, gastrin has a key role in the inflammatory reaction of the gastric mucosa to H. pylori infection in this species. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Preclinical evaluation of 68Ga-DOTA-minigastrin for the detection of cholecystokinin-2/gastrin receptor-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Laverman, Peter; Oyen, Wim J G; Béhé, Martin; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C

    2011-04-01

    In comparison to somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, gastrin receptor scintigraphy using 111In-DTPA-minigastrin (MG0) showed added value in diagnosing neuroendocrine tumors. We investigated whether the 68Ga-labeled gastrin analogue DOTA-MG0 is suited for positron emission tomography (PET), which could improve image quality. Targeting of cholecystokinin-2 (CCK2)/gastrin receptor-positive tumor cells with DOTA-MG0 labeled with either 111In or 68Ga in vitro was investigated using the AR42J rat tumor cell line. Biodistribution was examined in BALB/c nude mice with a subcutaneous AR42J tumor. In vivo PET imaging was performed using a preclinical PET-computed tomographic scanner. DOTA-MG0 showed high receptor affinity in vitro. Biodistribution studies revealed high tumor uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-MG0: 4.4 ± 1.3 %ID/g at 1 hour postinjection. Coadministration of an excess unlabeled peptide blocked the tumor uptake (0.7 ± 0.1 %ID/g), indicating CCK2/gastrin receptor-mediated uptake (p  =  .0005). The biodistribution of 68Ga-DOTA-MG0 was similar to that of 111In-DOTA-MG0. Subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumors were clearly visualized by small-animal PET imaging with 5 MBq 68Ga-DOTA-MG0. 111In- and 68Ga-labeled DOTA-MG0 specifically accumulate in CCK2/gastrin receptor-positive AR42J tumors with similar biodistribution apart from the kidneys. AR42J tumors were clearly visualized by microPET. Therefore, 68Ga-DOTA-MG0 is a promising tracer for PET imaging of CCK2/gastrin receptor-positive tumors in humans.

  8. Decrease of serum level of gastrin in healthy Japanese adults by the change of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Tadashi; Chinda, Daisuke; Matsuzaka, Masashi; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2014-12-01

    In Japan, the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is decreasing and the number of patients who receive eradication therapy is increasing. Although the serum level of gastrin is affected by H. pylori infection, the normal level has been unchanged for more than 20 years. The aim of this study was to study whether the present normal range for the serum gastrin level is appropriate for Japanese at present or in the near future. We studied 810 adults (40-80 years old) who participated in a health survey in 2012. We measured H. pylori stool antigen, titer of serum antibody to H. pylori, and serum level of gastrin. The patient's H. pylori status was defined as positive or negative when the results of both stool antigen and serology were concordant. Subjects who were taking proton-pump inhibitor and had a previous history of gastric surgery were excluded. Mean serum level of gastrin was 66.2±49.6 pg/mL in 281 H. pylori-negative subjects and 69.7±42.2 pg/mL in 115 patients who had H. pylori eradicated at least 2 years ago. The level of gastrin was 134.4±145.6 pg/mL in 224 patients with H. pylori infection and the level was significantly higher when compared with those in uninfected subjects and eradicated patients (P<0.01). Because the situation of H. pylori infection has changed remarkably in Japan, a new appropriate normal range of gastrin should be established using current Japanese populations. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. The Effect of Salt Intake and Potassium Supplementation on Serum Gastrin Levels in Chinese Adults: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; He, Wen-Wen; Liu, Yan-Chun; Lin, Yi-Feng; Hong, Lu-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Excess dietary salt is strongly correlated with cardiovascular disease, morbidity, and mortality. Conversely, potassium likely elicits favorable effects against cardiovascular disorders. Gastrin, which is produced by the G-cells of the stomach and duodenum, can increase renal sodium excretion and regulate blood pressure by acting on the cholecystokinin B receptor. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of altered salt and potassium supplementation on serum gastrin levels in humans. A total of 44 subjects (38–65 years old) were selected from a rural community in northern China. All subjects were sequentially maintained on a relatively low-salt diet for 7 days (3.0 g/day of NaCl), a high-salt diet for 7 days (18.0 g/day of NaCl), and then a high-salt diet supplemented with potassium for another 7 days (18.0 g/day of NaCl + 4.5 g/day of KCl). The high-salt intake significantly increased serum gastrin levels (15.3 ± 0.3 vs. 17.6 ± 0.3 pmol/L). This phenomenon was alleviated through potassium supplementation (17.6 ± 0.3 vs. 16.5 ± 0.4 pmol/L). Further analyses revealed that serum gastrin was positively correlated with 24 h urinary sodium excretion (r = 0.476, p < 0.001). By contrast, gastrin level was negatively correlated with blood pressure in all dietary interventions (r = −0.188, p = 0.031). The present study indicated that variations in dietary salt and potassium supplementation affected the serum gastrin concentrations in the Chinese subjects. PMID:28420122

  10. Cancer vaccines for hormone/growth factor immune deprivation: a feasible approach for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    González, G; Lage, A

    2007-05-01

    One of the older and most validated cancer treatments is endocrine therapy. Some tumors are dependent on hormone stimulation for growth, and therefore therapeutic interventions aiming to deprive the cells of the hormone are feasible and have been successful. Tumor growth also depends in some cases on growth factors, so that the concept of hormone-dependence can be extended to growth factors deprivation. Hormone deprivation has been therapeutically achieved up to now by surgical, radiation and chemical means. However, the immune system usually can be manipulated to recognize hormones and growth factors, and in fact some autoimmune diseases exists involving autoantibodies against hormones. The idea of inducing a deprivation of hormones and growth factors by active immunizations is appealing, and initial evidence about the feasibility of this approach is starting to appear in the literature. Clinical trials have been initiated using immunization with human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), gastrin, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) / gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Preliminary data already show that antibody titers can be elicited, which results in a decrease in the concentration of a given hormone or growth factor. Both the antibody titers and the decrease in the hormone level are related to survival. This immunological approach for hormone and growth factor deprivation creates the possibility of chronic management of advanced cancer patients.

  11. Spontaneous ECL cell carcinomas in cotton rats: natural course and prevention by a gastrin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, Tom C; Kawase, Shiro; Håkanson, Rolf; Torp, Sverre H; Fossmark, Reidar; Qvigstad, Gunnar; Sandvik, Arne K; Waldum, Helge L

    2003-12-01

    In our inbred strain of cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) 50% of the females develop spontaneous ECL cell-derived tumors in the acid-producing part of the stomach due to hypergastrinemia secondary to gastric hypoacidity. Although the mechanism behind the hypoacidity is unknown, the female cotton rat is an excellent model for studying ECL cell-related tumorigenesis. In this study we wanted to explore the malignancy potential of these tumors and the ability of a gastrin receptor antagonist (YF476) to prevent their development. First, nine hypergastrinemic female cotton rats (10 months of age) were diagnosed by laparotomy as having gastric tumors. They were killed 6 months later. Second, 18 female cotton rats (2 months of age) were dosed monthly for 6 months with YF476 (500 micro mol/kg body wt) by s.c. injection, while 21 age-matched animals received vehicle. Samples from each stomach were collected for histology, immunohistochemistry and northern blot analysis. The gastric tumors harbored cells with immunohistochemical features of ECL cells. The tumors were found at times to invade and penetrate the stomach wall and to metastasize to perigastric sites. ECL-derived tumor cells were discovered in peritoneal fluid. At death only 1 out of 18 animals given YF476 displayed carcinomas (invasive growth), compared with 7 out of 21 in the vehicle dosed control group (P = 0.048). The spontaneous gastric tumors in cotton rats derived from ECL cells. The tumors were able to penetrate the stomach wall and to metastasize by intracavital seeding. Gastrin receptor blockade lowered the incidence of such tumors. We propose that the tumors are ECL cell carcinomas and that gastrin is the driving force behind the transformation from normal to malignant ECL cells.

  12. Monitoring the impact of a mebendazole mass drug administration initiative for soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) control in the Western Visayas Region of the Philippines from 2007 through 2011.

    PubMed

    Sanza, Megan; Totanes, Francis Isidore; Chua, Paul Lester; Belizario, Vicente Y

    2013-08-01

    School-aged children in tropical developing countries carry the highest burden of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections in the world. The Western Visayas region of the Philippines continues to struggle with this as a major public health issue in both private and public schools. The War on Worms-Western Visayas approach was launched in 2007 with school-based mass drug administration (MDA) as one of the strategies to control morbidity from STH in support of the Department of Health - Integrated Helminth Control Program. This study aimed to determine trends in prevalence and intensity of STH infections as well as to assess related morbidity and program sustainability through 2011. A cross-sectional parasitologic survey was conducted on three independent samples of Grade 3 students in 2007, 2009, and 2011. Supporting aggregate data were obtained for MDA coverage, National Achievement Test mean percentage scores, and nutritional status. Tests for trend were utilized to detect changes in prevalence over time, with a particular emphasis on trends seen between 2009 and 2011. The initial impact of the program was robust as cumulative prevalence, infection intensities, and parasite densities were all reduced four years following the launch. However, subsequent and significant increases in each were found from 2009 until 2011. These results implicate issues with program sustainability, despite consistent MDA, and existing frameworks for environmental sanitation, hygiene, and education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gastric acid secretion and gastrin production in the short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, N S; Evans, P; King, R F

    1985-01-01

    Excess gastric acid secretion and gastrin production may occur in patients with the short bowel syndrome but the two measurements have never been made simultaneously in man in response to a food stimulus. Using the technique of intragastric titration, this was carried out in eight patients after extensive small bowel resection resulting mainly from vascular occlusion and in eight matched normal control subjects. Basal acid output and peak acid output in response to pentagastrin was also measured separately. Although peak and integrated serum gastrin concentrations were significantly greater in patients (450 +/- SE 109 pg/ml; 113 +/- 2.9X10(-3) pg/ml/min) compared with control subjects (174 +/- 98 pg/ml; 6.1 +/- 2.0X10(-3) pg/ml/min p less than 0.05), no concomitant increase in acid secretion was shown either during intragastric titration or in response to pentagastrin. These findings indicate that there is no rationale for treating these patients with long term anti-ulcer therapy. PMID:4029719

  14. Medullary thyroid carcinoma - PET/CT imaging with 68Ga-labelled gastrin and somatostatin analogues.

    PubMed

    Kunikowska, Jolanta; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Pawlak, Dariusz; Ruchała, Marek; Kolasa, Anna; Janicka-Jedyńska, Małgorzata; Woźniak, Aldona; Mikołajczak, Renata; Królicki, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    a 75-year-old man with a 10-year history of nodular goitre was referred for clinical evaluation. The ultrasound scan revealed enlarged thyroid right lobe almost fully filled with a heterogeneous nodule with numerous calcifications. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy suggested medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Before the surgery the patient was referred to the nuclear medicine department and somatostatin receptor imaging (SRS; 68Ga-DOTATATE) with PET/CT was performed. The scan demonstrated an increased uptake within the right thyroid mass. Subsequent PET/CT with 68Ga-gastrin analogue (MG48) revealed the same indications as the SRS: an increased alveolar uptake in the right thyroid mass without the signs of lymph node metastases. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy and central lymph nodes dissection. Histopathology examination confirmed the presence of MTC with vascular invasion, but without lymph node metastases (pT3NoMx according to the 7th edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual). Immunohistochemical staining revealed positive reaction to calcitonin and CD56, whereas the reaction to thyroglobulin remained negative. The Ki-67 was 1%. Staining for SSTR2 and CCK2 showed high cytoplasmic expression in both cases. Knowledge of the presence of CCK2 receptor in MTC patients may be an important indication for the choice of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The presence of both the receptor types, cholecystokinin-2/gastrin and somatostatin, is possibly an interesting combination as far as the therapeutic target is concerned.

  15. Heterogeneous expression of cholecystokinin and gastrin receptor in stomach and pancreatic cancer: An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajani; Kim, Jong Joo; Tewari, Mallika; Shukla, Hari Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin (Gs) are a well known trophic factor for the gastrointestinal tract and their trophic effects are shown mainly toward pancreas and stomach, respectively. Though, the exact characterization of CCK and Gs receptors subtype (cholecystokinin type A receptor [CCKAR] and cholecystokinin type B receptor/gastrin receptor [CCKBR/GR]) in stomach cancer (SC) and pancreatic cancer (PC) is still controversial and necessities further validation. CCKAR and CCKBR/GR expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 55 SC, 25 benign gastric diseases (BGDs), 38 PC (including periampullary carcinoma), and 10 normal pancreatic tissue. The results were statistically correlated with the patient's clinical history to observe the prognostic significance if any. CCKAR expression was detected in 18.2% of SC, 20% of BGD, 65.8% of PC, and 30.0% of normal pancreas tissue samples. The CCKBR/GR expression was detected in 58.2% of SC, 48.0% of BGD, 18.4% of PC, and 60.0% of normal pancreas tissue samples. CCKBR/GR expression was significantly high in well and moderately differentiated SC samples as compared to poorly differentiated samples. Our study showed significantly higher expression of CCKAR and down regulation of CCKBR in PC as compared to control while CCKBR/GR was detected in majority of SC samples. Thus, our study suggests that CCK and Gs receptors may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications. However, study need to be validated in significantly bigger sample size and need to be replicated in different cohorts.

  16. Effect of somatostatin on the growth of gastrointestinal mucosa and pancreas in rats. Role of endogenous gastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Dembiński, A; Warzecha, Z; Konturek, S J; Schally, A V

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influence of somatostatin on the growth of gastric, duodenal, and pancreatic tissue in rats placed on liquid diet. In the first part of the study animals were fed an elemental liquid diet for 10 days and then killed, and the growth of the oxyntic gland area of the stomach, 2 cm segments of duodenum and pancreatic tissue was determined. Feeding an elemental diet caused a decrease in organ weight, nucleic acid contents and serum gastrin level. Subsequent addition of pentagastrin prevented this reduction in organ weight and RNA and DNA contents while somatostatin failed to affect the decrease in growth parameters or serum gastrin level in tests with or without addition of pentagastrin. In a second part of the study, sham operated and antrectomised rats were used. Antrectomy caused a significant decrease in serum gastrin concentration and resulted in a significant reduction in the weight and RNA and DNA contents of the tissue tested. As in liquid diet, subsequent administration of pentagastrin prevented the reduction in the growth parameters both in tests with and without somatostatin. These results suggest that somatostatin inhibits the growth of the gastroduodenal mucosa by a mechanism involving, at least in part, the suppression of gastrin release. PMID:2446962

  17. Effect on gastric secretion, gastrin and histamine release during and after long-term treatment by pirenzepine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vatier, J; Riquet, W; Célice-Pingaud, C; Olivier, A; Mignon, M; Farinotti, R

    1996-01-01

    We assessed the effects of pirenzepine (2 mg/kg per os) on gastric secretion and gastrin and histamine release in response to food and histamine dihydrochloride infusion in four dogs during 24 weeks of treatment and for 15 weeks after the end of treatment. The results were compared to those obtained in the same animals in control experiments, before treatment, and in four untreated dogs. Pirenzepine absorption was checked by measuring plasma concentrations. Pirenzepine led to a significant reduction in acid and pepsin secretion in response to histamine. In response to food, the reduction in secretion was concomitant with a reduction in gastrin and histamine release. Baseline concentrations of gastrin were reduced, while those of histamine were unchanged. No side effects were observed. After treatment, a long time lapse (about 15 weeks) was required for acid and pepsin secretion and gastrinemia to return to control levels, while histamine release in response to food normalized rapidly. Pirenzepine fixes selectively to M1 muscarinic receptors of the synaptic ganglion, thus inhibiting the effect of vagal stimulation, especially on pepsin secretion. Our data suggest that it might also fix to M1 receptors located on ECL cells, thereby reducing histamine release. In addition, pirenzepine probably fixes to other muscarinic receptors inhibiting gastrin release and resulting in a G and secretory cell mass reduction, probably by increasing somatostatin release.

  18. Gastrin/cholecystokinin-like immunoreactive peptides in the Dungeness crab, Cancer magister (Dana): immunochemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Larson, B A; Vigna, S R

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize a gastrin/cholecystokinin-like immunoreactant (G/CCK-LI) extractable from the crab, Cancer magister. G/CCK-LI was extracted best in boiling water and was found mainly in the stomach, hemolymph and carapace. A relatively large immunoreactive peptide in the stomach and apparently smaller forms in the hemolymph and carapace were separated by Sephadex G-50 fractionation. Anion-exchange chromatography further fractionated the stomach form into three major peaks. The crab material cross-reacted with three antisera specific for the common C-terminus of gastrin/CCK, but cross-reacted much less with three antisera directed against other portions of the gastrin molecule. Partially purified crab stomach G/CCK-LI inhibited the binding of labeled CCK to mouse brain G/CCK receptors but not to rat pancreatic CCK receptors. The crab peptide did not stimulate rat gastric acid or rat pancreatic amylase secretion. These results indicate that the crab peptides are structurally similar to, but distinguishable from, the bioactive C-terminal amino acid sequence common to gastrins and CCKs.

  19. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and FSH mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  20. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and Fsh mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  1. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of estrogen , a hormone that helps control the menstrual cycle . Changing estrogen levels can bring on symptoms such ... of two hormones—estrogen and progesterone —control your menstrual cycle. These hormones are made by the ovaries . Estrogen ...

  2. Calcium-sensing receptor is a physiologic multimodal chemosensor regulating gastric G-cell growth and gastrin secretion.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianying; Petersen, Clark D; Coy, David H; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Thomas, Craig J; Pollak, Martin R; Wank, Stephen A

    2010-10-12

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is the major sensor and regulator of extracellular Ca(2+), whose activity is allosterically regulated by amino acids and pH. Recently, CaR has been identified in the stomach and intestinal tract, where it has been proposed to function in a non-Ca(2+) homeostatic capacity. Luminal nutrients, such as Ca(2+) and amino acids, have been recognized for decades as potent stimulants for gastrin and acid secretion, although the molecular basis for their recognition remains unknown. The expression of CaR on gastrin-secreting G cells in the stomach and their shared activation by Ca(2+), amino acids, and elevated pH suggest that CaR may function as the elusive physiologic sensor regulating gastrin and acid secretion. The genetic and pharmacologic studies presented here comparing CaR-null mice and wild-type littermates support this hypothesis. Gavage of Ca(2+), peptone, phenylalanine, Hepes buffer (pH 7.4), and CaR-specific calcimimetic, cinacalcet, stimulated gastrin and acid secretion, whereas the calcilytic, NPS 2143, inhibited secretion only in the wild-type mouse. Consistent with known growth and developmental functions of CaR, G-cell number was progressively reduced between 30 and 90 d of age by more than 65% in CaR-null mice. These studies of nutrient-regulated G-cell gastrin secretion and growth provide definitive evidence that CaR functions as a physiologically relevant multimodal sensor. Medicinals targeting diseases of Ca(2+) homeostasis should be reviewed for effects outside traditional Ca(2+)-regulating tissues in view of the broader distribution and function of CaR.

  3. Lansoprazole induces mucosal protection through gastrin receptor-dependent up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shingo; Sun, Wei-Hao; Tsujii, Masahiko; Kawai, Naoki; Kimura, Arata; Kakiuchi, Yoshimi; Yasumaru, Shoichi; Komori, Masato; Murata, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yutaka; Kawano, Sunao; Hori, Masatsugu

    2002-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are antiulcer agents that have both gastric antisecretory and mucosal protective actions. The mechanisms of PPI-induced gastric mucosal protection are not known. The present study was designed to examine the mechanism for lansoprazole-induced gastric mucosal protection in rats. Rats were given 0.5, 5, and 50 mg/kg/day lansoprazole alone or both lansoprazole (50 mg/kg/day) and a specific gastrin receptor antagonist 3R-1-(2,2-diethoxyethyl)-((4-methylphenyl)amino-carbonyl methyl)-3-((4-methylphenyl)ureidoindoline-2- one) (AG-041R) (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day) for 14 days. Serum gastrin concentrations were measured. The expression of cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) in the gastric mucosa was analyzed using Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. Another series of rats was used to examine the 1) levels of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in gastric mucosa, 2) influences of the drugs on gastric damage caused by absolute ethanol, and 3) effects of a COX-2-specific inhibitor on PGE2 in the gastric mucosa and the mucosal protection afforded by lansoprazole. Lansoprazole dose dependently increased the serum gastrin concentration and enhanced the mucosal expression of COX-2 but not that of COX-1. Lansoprazole increased gastric mucosal PGE2 and reduced gastric damage caused by ethanol. Concomitant administration of AG-041R abolished the lansoprazole-induced COX-2 expression, and increased mucosal PGE2 and mucosal protection. A specific COX-2 inhibitor blocked the lansoprazole-induced increase in mucosal PGE2 and mucosal protection. Activation of gastrin receptors by endogenous gastrin has a pivotal role in the effects of lansoprazole on COX-2 up-regulation and mucosal protection in the rat stomach.

  4. Effects of Ostertagia ostertagi and omeprazole treatment on feed intake and gastrin-related responses in the calf.

    PubMed

    Fox, M T; Uche, U E; Vaillant, C; Ganabadi, S; Calam, J

    2002-05-10

    Infection with the bovine abomasal nematode, Ostertagia ostertagi, results in a loss of acid-secreting parietal cells and an increase in gastric pH. The effects of an experimental infection with Ostertagia and/or daily treatment with omeprazole (OMP) at 2mgkg(-1) bodyweight for four consecutive days (experiment days 24-27, inclusive) on voluntary feed intake, blood and tissue gastrin concentrations, abomasal G-cell numbers, gastric pH, and blood cholecystokinin (CCK) and pepsinogen concentrations were investigated in the calf. Ostertagia-infected calves demonstrated a significant drop in feed intake between days 24 and 27 post-infection (38%; P<0.001) and in G-cell numbers (42%; P<0.05) and significant increases in abomasal pH (P<0.001), fundic mucosal weight (99%; P<0.01), and blood gastrin (P<0.05) and pepsinogen (P<0.0001). OMP treatment of worm-free animals resulted in a significant drop in intake between days 24 and 27 (30%; P<0.001) and in G-cell numbers (17%; P<0.05) and significant increases in abomasal pH (P<0.01) and blood gastrin (P<0.001). OMP treatment of Ostertagia-infected animals with an existing hypergastrinaemia had no effect on feed intake, abomasal pH, blood gastrin or pepsinogen or abomasal G-cell numbers. Blood CCK concentrations were also unaffected by either Ostertagia infection or OMP treatment. These data suggest that: (a) the depression in feed intake associated with OMP in worm-free calves was not due to a side effect of drug treatment; (b) inappetance in Ostertagia-infected animals is closely associated with the parasite-induced hypergastrinaemia; and (c) the elevation in abomasal pH was a major factor responsible for the elevated blood gastrin concentrations seen in parasitised and OMP-treated animals.

  5. Peptidyl hormones of endocrine cells origin in the gut--their discovery and physiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, P; Warzecha, Z; Dembinski, A

    2015-02-01

    In 1902 William Bayliss and Ernest Starling discovered secretin and it was the beginning of general endocrinology as well as, endocrinology of gastrointestinal tract. Ernest Starling was also a first person who introduced a term hormone for the substances which serves to transfer the information between cells of organism. Subsequent years delivered discovery of successive hormones of the digestive tract. Gastrin was discovered in 1905; whereas cholecystokinin in 1928. Ghrelin and obestatin are last hormones determined in the gastrointestinal tract and they were found in 1999 and 2006, respectively. Both above hormones are originating from the common prohormone. In 60s of past century, the biochemical structure of the gastrointestinal tract hormones was determined for the first time. Substantial progress in endocrinology of the digestive tract took place when radioimmunoassay was employed to measure of hormones concentration. Subsequently, radiolabeled hormones were used to localize hormonal receptors. Next breakthrough in the gastrointestinal tract endocrinology happened after introduction to experimental methods the cloning of complementary DNA. This method has allowed, among the others, to establish the full structure of receptors as well as, a genes coding hormones and their receptors. Discovery of genes structure allowed subsequently introducing these genes into foreign cells, what gives a chance to obtain significant amount of recombined hormones possessing species specificity. This review is presenting a history of the gastrointestinal tract endocrinology, as well as a relevance of gastrointestinal tract hormones in the regulation of body physiological activity.

  6. Loss of bombesin-induced feeding suppression in gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Lori L.; Ladenheim, Ellen E.; Akeson, Mark; Way, James M.; Weber, H. Christian; Sutliff, Vince E.; Jensen, Robert T.; Wine, Lara J.; Arnheiter, Heinz; Battey, James F.

    1998-01-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) is one of three members of the mammalian bombesin subfamily of seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors that mediate diverse biological responses including secretion, neuromodulation, chemotaxis, and growth. The X chromosome-linked GRP-R gene is expressed widely during embryonic development and predominantly in gastrointestinal, neuronal, and neuroendocrine systems in the adult. Surprisingly, gene-targeted mice lacking a functional GRP-R gene develop and reproduce normally and show no gross phenotypic abnormalities. However, peripheral administration of bombesin at dosages up to 32 nmol/kg to such mice had no effect on the suppression of glucose intake, whereas normal mice showed a dose-dependent suppression of glucose intake. These data suggest that selective agonists for the GRP-R may be useful in inducing satiety. PMID:9501238

  7. Targeting prostate cancer cells with genetically engineered polypeptide-based micelles displaying gastrin-releasing peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Garg, Sanjay; Eldi, Preethi; Zhou, Fiona Huan-Huan; Johnson, Ian R D; Brooks, Doug A; Lam, Frankie; Rychkov, Grigori; Hayball, John; Albrecht, Hugo

    2016-11-20

    In recent years G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have emerged as crucial tumorigenic factors that drive aberrant cancer growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Consequently, a number of GPCRs are strongly expressed in cancer derived cell lines and tissue samples. Therefore a rational anti-cancer strategy is the design of nano-medicines that specifically target GPCRs to bind and internalise cytotoxic drugs into cancer cells. Herein, we report the genetic engineering of a self-assembling nanoparticle based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), which has been fused with gastrin releasing peptide (GRP). These nanoparticles increased intracellular calcium concentrations when added to GRP receptor positive PC-3 prostate cancer cells, demonstrating specific receptor activation. Moreover, GRP-displaying fluorescent labelled nanoparticles showed specific cell-surface interaction with PC-3 prostate cancer cells and increased endocytic uptake. These nanoparticles therefore provide a targeted molecular carrier system for evaluating the delivery of cytotoxic drugs into cancer cells.

  8. PAK1 interacts with beta-catenin and is required for the regulation of the beta-catenin signalling pathway by gastrins.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2008-10-01

    Beta-catenin regulates cell-cell adhesion by binding to E-cadherin at the cell membrane and, when translocated into the nucleus, mediates signalling by activation of transcription factors such as TCF4. Mutations of the components of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway are found in many gastrointestinal cancers. Gastrins, including amidated (Gamide) and glycine-extended (Ggly) gastrin(17), stimulate the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells. Gastrins also regulate beta-catenin signalling through multiple pathways which seem to converge on p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In this study, we have investigated the role of PAK1 in the regulation of beta-catenin signalling by gastrins. Here we report for the first time that PAK1 associated with beta-catenin. Both Gamide and Ggly stimulated the phosphorylation and activation of beta-catenin in a PAK1-dependent manner. A kinase-inactive mutant PAK1(K299A) blocked the gastrin-stimulated dissociation of beta-catenin from E-cadherin, translocation of beta-catenin from the cell membrane to the nucleus, and association of beta-catenin with the transcription factor TCF4. The PAK1(K299A) mutant also inhibited the stimulation of the expression of c-myc and cyclin D1, and of cell proliferation and migration, by gastrins. The results indicate that gastrins regulate beta-catenin signalling through a PAK1-dependent pathway. PAK1 seems to be the point of convergence of multiple signalling pathways activated by gastrins.

  9. Evaluation of three novel cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor antagonists: a study of their effects on rat stomach enterochromaffin-like cell activity.

    PubMed

    Ding, X Q; Lindström, E; Håkanson, R

    1997-11-01

    Gastrin stimulates rat stomach enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells via activation of cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptors. The stimulation is manifested in the activation of the histamine-forming enzyme histidine decarboxylase and in the secretion of histamine and pancreastatin, a chromogranin A-derived peptide. We have examined the short-term effects of three novel cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor antagonists (YF476, JB93182 and AG041R) on the ECL cells in intact fasted rats. The drugs and/or gastrin were infused intravenously for 3 hr and the oxyntic mucosal histidine decarboxylase activity and the serum pancreastatin concentration were measured. We also studied the effects of the three drugs on gastric emptying in mice, a cholecystokinin-A receptor-mediated response. YF476, JB93182 and AG041R antagonized the gastrin-evoked histidine decarboxylase activation in a dose-dependent manner. YF476, JB93182 and AG041R induced maximal inhibition at 0.03, 0.1 and 0.1 mumol kg-1 hr-1, respectively; the corresponding ID50 values were 0.002, 0.008, and 0.01 mumol kg-1 hr-1. YF476 was selected for further analysis. It produced a rightward shift of the gastrin dose-response curve, consistent with competitive inhibition. Moreover, it antagonized the omeprazole-evoked histidine decarboxylase activation and the gastrin- and omeprazole-induced rise in the circulating pancreastatin concentration. None of the three drugs tested inhibited gastric emptying or prevented the cholecystokinin-8s-induced inhibition of gastric emptying at the doses tested. The results show that YF476, JB93182 and AG041R are potent and selective cholecystokinin-B/ gastrin receptor antagonists, and that YF476 is 4-5 times more potent than JB93182 and AG041R.

  10. Spinal cord interneurons expressing the gastrin releasing peptide receptor convey itch through VGLUT2-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Aresh, Bejan; Freitag, Fabio B; Perry, Sharn; Blümel, Edda; Lau, Joey; Franck, Marina C M; Lagerström, Malin C

    2017-02-01

    Itch is a sensation that promotes the desire to scratch, which can be evoked by mechanical and chemical stimuli. In the spinal cord, neurons expressing the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) have been identified as specific mediators of itch. However, our understanding of the GRPR-population in the spinal cord, and thus how these neurons exercise their functions, is limited. For this purpose, we constructed a Cre line designed to target the GRPR population of neurons (Grpr-Cre). Our analysis revealed that Grpr-Cre cells in the spinal cord are predominantly excitatory interneurons that are found in the dorsal lamina, especially in lamina II-IV. Application of the specific agonist gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) induced spike responses in 43.3% of the patched Grpr-Cre neurons, where the majority of the cells displayed a tonic firing property. Additionally, our analysis showed that the Grpr-Cre population expresses Vglut2 mRNA and mice ablated of Vglut2 in Grpr-Cre cells (Vglut2-lox;Grpr-Cre mice) displayed less spontaneous itch, and attenuated responses to both histaminergic and non-histaminergic agents. We could also show that application of the itch-inducing peptide natriuretic polypeptide b (NPPB) induces calcium influx in a sub-population of Grpr-Cre neurons. To summarize, our data indicate that the Grpr-Cre spinal cord neural population is composed of interneurons that use VGLUT2-mediated signaling for transmitting chemical and spontaneous itch stimuli to the next, currently unknown, neurons in the labeled line of itch.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  11. Preclinical evaluation of new radioligand of cholecystokinin/gastrin receptors in endocrine tumors xenograft nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillouet, S.; Caselles, O.; Dierickx, L. O.; Mestre, B.; Nalis, J.; Picard, C.; Favre, G.; Poirot, M.; Silvente-Poirot, S.; Courbon, F.

    2007-02-01

    The cholecystokinin(CCK)/gastrin 2 receptors (R-CCK2) are overexpressed in 90% of medullary thyroid cancers (MTC) and in 60% of small cell lung cancers but not or poorly in corresponding healthy tissues. They represent a relevant target for the diagnosis and internal targeted radiotherapy of these tumors. Although previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of radiolabeled CCK/gastrin to target CCK-2 receptor-expressing tissues in animals and patients, some problems remained unsolved to identify an optimum candidate for in vivo targeting of R-CCK2-expressing tumors. By a rational approach and " in silico" drug design, we synthesized a new CCK-derivative with high affinity for the R-CCK2. The aim of this study was to achieve the radiolabeling of a new radioligand, to assess its efficacy using a published CCK radioligand ( 111In-DTPA-CCK8) as a control for the R-CCK2 targeting. This new CCK-derivative was radiolabeled with 111In. Nude mice, bearing the human MTC TT tumors and NIH-3T3 cell line expressing a tumorigenic mutant of the R-CCK2, were injected with this radiolabeled peptide. In vivo planar scintigraphies were acquired. Thereafter, biodistribution studies (%ID/g tissue) were done. The conditions of radiolabelling were optimized to obtain a radiochemical purity >90%. Scintigraphic images of xenograft mice showed significant tumor uptake with a target to nontarget ratio higher than two. These results were confirmed by the biodistribution studies which showed as expected a significant activity in the spleen, the liver and the kidneys. Therefore, this new radiolabeled compound is a promised new candidate for molecular imaging and internal radiotherapy for R-CCK2 tumor targeting.

  12. Quantification of serum levels of pepsinogens and gastrin to assess eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Luigi; Di Mario, Francesco; Vaira, Dino; Rugge, Massimo; Franzè, Angelo; Plebani, Mario; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Lucarini, Paolo; Lera, Maurizio; Scarpignato, Carmelo

    2011-05-01

    We investigated whether serum levels of pepsinogen (sPG)I and sPGII, the ratio of sPGI to sPGII, or serum levels of gastrin-17 (sG17), can be used to assess eradication of Helicobacter Pylori 8 weeks after treatment. We performed a prospective study of 228 consecutive patients with H pylori infections. At the start of the trial (baseline), patients were assessed using the (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) and endoscopy, and serum levels of pepsinogens and gastrin levels were measured. Patients were offered a 7-day triple therapy and asked to return 8 weeks after treatment for another (13)C-UBT and measurements of serum levels of sG17, sPGI, and sPGII (175 patients completed the study). The eradication rate of H pylori was 67%. Percentage variation in levels of sPGI and sPGII, the ratio of sPGI to sPGII, and in levels of sG17 resulted in area under the curve values of 0.858, 0.973, 0.940, and 0.810, respectively, for H pylori eradication. A decrease of 22.7% or greater in the level of sPGII detected H pylori eradication with 100% sensitivity and 96.6% specificity. Spectrum analysis did not identify differences in accuracy. Percentage variation of sPGII levels 8 weeks after therapy for H pylori infection correlates with eradication. Additional studies are needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mercuric chloride-induced gastrin/cholecystokinin 8 immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of the terrestrial slug Semperula maculata: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Londhe, Sunil; Kamble, Nitin

    2013-12-01

    We measured the immunoreactivity of the neuropeptide gastrin cholecystokinin 8 (gastrin/CCK 8) in neurons of the terrestrial slug Semperula maculata following acute treatment with mercuric chloride (HgCl2). The distribution of gastrin/CCK 8 was analyzed in neurons of different regions, specifically from cerebral ganglia (procerebrum (pro-c), mesocerebrum (meso-c) and metacerebrum (meta-c). In the control group, neurons of pedal, pleural, parietal and visceral ganglia showed positive immunoreactivity using vertebrate antiserum against gastrin/CCK 8. Gastrin/CCK 8 immunoreactivity was also seen in the fibers and neuropil region of all ganglia. In the cerebral ganglion, 10, 12 and 8 % of the neurons from pro-c, meso-c and meta-c, respectively, were stained with the antibody. The immunostaining was increased in neurons (giant, large, medium and small) after HgCl2 treatment. The treatment greatly increased the mucin content within the neurons. Exposure to HgCl2 enhanced gastrin immunoreactivity in the neurons and this increased with time. Results are discussed in the context of neuropathology in cerebral ganglia associated with the feeding behavior of Semperula maculata.

  14. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Learn About Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ...

  15. Hormones and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ...

  16. [Serological tests of functional activity of the digestive system (gastrin, pepsinogen-I, trypsin), general IgE and serum cortisol levels in children with hepatitis A and B].

    PubMed

    Kalagina, L S; Pavlov, Ch S; Fomin, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The mild form of hepatitis A and B with children is attended by a functional activity of pancreatic gland (tripsin), mucous coats of stomach and duodenum (gastrin) which permits to consider them as a factor of the risk of digestive organs combined pathology starting with the disease acuity. Differences in gastrin levels with children depending on hepatitis etiology were specified. Highest levels of gastrin were observed with persons suffering from hepatitis B.

  17. Further studies on the use of serum gastrin levels in assessing the significance of low serum B12 levels.

    PubMed

    Miller, A; Slingerland, D W; Cardarelli, J; Burrows, B A

    1989-07-01

    The reported incidence of low serum vitamin B12 levels in patients ranges from 4% to 8%. In only a small percentage can this be ascribed to readily diagnosed pernicious anemia, malabsorption syndrome, or to gastrointestinal surgery. This leaves a number of patients in whom the meaning of the low serum B12 is not immediately apparent. In 71 patients with intact gastrointestinal tracts, hematological indices did not adequately separate patients with decreased absorption of unbound B12 from those with normal absorption. A low absorption of B12, either unbound or food-bound, was found, however, when the level of serum gastrin was elevated. In contrast, a normal absorption of unbound B12 was likely (95% of 44 patients) when the serum gastrin was normal.

  18. Synthesis of analogues of the Des-Phe-NH2 C-terminal hexapeptide of cholecystokinin showing gastrin antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Laur, J; Rodriguez, M; Aumelas, A; Bali, J P; Martinez, J

    1986-04-01

    Four analogues of Z-CCK-27-32-NH2, Z-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2, a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist have been synthesized by solution methodology. In these analogues, Z-Tyr(SO3-)-Nle-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2 16, Z-Tyr(SO3-)-Nle-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-NH2 17, BOC-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2 24 and Boc-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-NH2 25 methionyl residues were replaced by norleucyl residues. Preliminary biological activity on gastrin-induced acid secretion, in rat, are reported. These derivatives proved to antagonize the action of gastrin, with ED 50 of between 0.5 and 3 mg/kg.

  19. Hormonal responses to complete or hydrolyzed protein diets in patients after upper gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Simko, V; Chen, M H

    1986-01-01

    Six gastrointestinal hormones were measured in the plasma of six healthy controls and long-term changes were evaluated in six patients 2-20 years after upper gastrointestinal surgery. In a metabolic unit study we determined fasting hormonal levels, the time to peak hormonal response, and a 135-minute hormonal response to the meal. Test meals were isocaloric, 500 kcal, and isonitrogenous, consisting either of natural breakfast components or of complete liquid diets with intact protein (Ensure) or hydrolyzed protein (Vital). Postsurgical subjects were in good health and had no postcibal complaints. Nevertheless, their hemoglobin and serum albumin were significantly lower than in controls. Postsurgical subjects had higher fasting gastrin (121.3 +/- 11.6 vs 65.4 +/- 6.6 pg/ml, P less than .01) and motilin (148.7 +/- 32.9 vs 70.4 +/- 13.1 pg/ml, P less than .05) than controls. In postsurgical patients the peak gastrin and pancreatic glucagon responses to meals were obtained in significantly shorter time. Their total response to motilin and secretin to meals was significantly lower than in controls. Fasting glucose and the meal-induced responses of insulin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide were not different from controls. The nature of dietary protein did not significantly affect hormonal responses to feeding. We conclude that gastrointestinal hormonal changes persist many years after surgery. These changes are probably related to faster transit of meals with a generally weaker total hormonal response to feeding. Although these differences from normal may be nutritionally well compensated, they may become important in periods of metabolic stress.

  20. Gastrin stimulates a cholecystokinin-2-receptor-expressing cardia progenitor cell and promotes progression of Barrett's-like esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Wang, Hongshan; Au, Andrew S.; Luna, Aesis M.; Chang, Wenju; Jin, Guangchun; Bhagat, Govind; Abrams, Julian A.; Friedman, Richard A.; Varro, Andrea; Wang, Kenneth K.; Boyce, Malcolm; Rustgi, Anil K.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.; Quante, Michael; Wang, Timothy C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is increasing, but factors contributing to malignant progression of its precursor lesion, Barrett's esophagus (BE), have not been defined. Hypergastrinemia caused by long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), has been suggested as one possible risk factor. The gastrin receptor, CCK2R, is expressed in the cardia and upregulated in BE, suggesting the involvement of the gastrin-CCK2R pathway in progression. In the L2-IL-1β mouse model, Barrett's-like esophagus arises from the gastric cardia. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the effect of hypergastrinemia on CCK2R+ progenitor cells in L2-IL-1β mice. Design L2-IL-1β mice were mated with hypergastrinemic (INS-GAS) mice or treated with PPIs to examine the effect of hypergastrinemia in BE progression. CCK2R-CreERT crossed with L2-IL-1β mice were used to analyze the lineage progenitor potential of CCK2R+ cells. Cardia glands were cultured in vitro, and the effect of gastrin treatment analyzed. L2-IL-1β mice were treated with a CCK2R antagonist YF476 as a potential chemopreventive drug. Results Hypergastrinemia resulted in increased proliferation and expansion of Barrett's-like esophagus. Lineage tracing experiments revealed that CCK2R+ cells are long-lived progenitors that can give rise to such lesions under chronic inflammation. Gastrin stimulated organoid growth in cardia culture, while CCK2R inhibition prevented Barrett's-like esophagus and dysplasia. Conclusions Our data suggest a progression model for BE to EAC in which CCK2R+ progenitor cells, stimulated by hypergastrinemia, proliferate to give rise to metaplasia and dysplasia. Hypergastrinemia can result from PPI use, and the effects of hypergastrinemia in human BE should be studied further. PMID:27448962

  1. Action of ethanol and some alcoholic beverages on gastric acid secretion and release of gastrin in humans.

    PubMed

    Singer, M V; Leffmann, C; Eysselein, V E; Calden, H; Goebell, H

    1987-12-01

    The action of intragastric ethanol in various concentrations (1.4%-40% vol/vol) and of beer, white wine, cognac, and whisky on gastric acid secretion and release of gastrin was studied in healthy humans. Ethanol concentrations of 1.4% and 4% (vol/vol), but not higher, significantly (p less than 0.05) increased gastric acid secretion to 23% and 22%, respectively, of incremental maximal acid output [i.e., observed response to pentagastrin (6 micrograms/kg s.c.) minus basal acid output]. The 1-h incremental gastric acid responses to beer and wine were 96% and 61%, respectively, of incremental maximal acid output. Neither cognac nor whisky had any stimulatory effect. The 1-h incremental gastric acid response to an 8% peptone meal was 40% of incremental maximal acid output, and to peptone plus white wine 77%. Plasma gastrin levels were not altered by ethanol, cognac, and whisky. The 1-h integrated plasma gastrin responses to beer and white wine were 119% and 77%, respectively, of the response to the peptone meal. We conclude that (a) the action of pure ethanol on gastric acid secretion is related to its concentration: concentrations of 1.4% and 4% are moderate stimulants; concentrations of 5%-40% have no effect, or rather an inhibitory effect; (b) beer and white wine, but not whisky and cognac, are potent stimulants of gastric acid secretion; (c) the stimulatory mechanism of low ethanol concentrations is unknown; and (d) nonalcoholic constituents of beer and wine are most likely responsible for the stimulatory actions of both beverages on gastric acid secretion and release of gastrin.

  2. Gastrin Is an Essential Cofactor for Helicobacter-Associated Gastric Corpus Carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Tu, Shuiping; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida A.; Whary, Mark T.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Rickman, Barry H.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Lertkowit, Nantaporn; Varro, Andrea; Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously described a synergistic interaction between hypergastrinemia and Helicobacter felis infection on gastric corpus carcinogenesis in FVB/N mice housed under specific-pathogen-free conditions. However, gastrin-deficient (GAS-KO) mice on a mixed C57BL/6/129Sv genetic background maintained in conventional housing were reported to develop spontaneous gastric antral tumors. Therefore, we investigated the role of gastrin in Helicobacter-associated gastric carcinogenesis in H. felis-infected mice on a uniform C57BL/6 background housed in specific-pathogen-free conditions. Hypergastrinemic transgenic (INS-GAS) mice, GAS-KO mice, and C57BL/6 wild-type mice were infected with H. felis for either 12 or 18 months. At 12 months postinfection, INS-GAS mice had mild corpus dysplasia, while B6 wild-type mice had either severe gastritis or metaplasia, and GAS-KO mice had only mild to moderate gastritis. At 18 months postinfection, both INS-GAS and B6 wild-type mice had both severe atrophic gastritis and corpus dysplasia, while GAS-KO mice had severe gastritis with mild gastric atrophy, but no corpus dysplasia. In contrast, both GAS-KO and B6 wild-type mice had mild to moderate antral dysplasia, while INS-GAS mice did not. H. felis antral colonization remained stable over time among the three groups of mice. These results point to a distinct effect of gastrin on carcinogenesis of both the gastric corpus and antrum, suggesting that gastrin is an essential cofactor for gastric corpus carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:19556515

  3. Efficient asymmetric synthesis of novel gastrin receptor antagonist AG-041R via highly stereoselective alkylation of oxindole enolates.

    PubMed

    Emura, Takashi; Esaki, Toru; Tachibana, Kazutaka; Shimizu, Makoto

    2006-10-27

    An efficient method for asymmetric synthesis of the potent Gastrin/CCK-B receptor antagonist AG-041R was developed. Core oxindole stereochemistry was established by asymmetric alkylation of oxindole enolates with bromoacetic acid esters, using l-menthol as a chiral auxiliary. The key alkylation reaction of the oxindole enolates generated tetrasubstituted chiral intermediates with high diastereoselectivity. The stereoselective alkylation reactions are described in detail.

  4. Effect of netazepide, a gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist, on gastric acid secretion and rabeprazoleinduced hypergastrinaemia in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Malcolm; Dowen, Sally; Turnbull, Gillian; van den Berg, Frans; Zhao, Chun-Mei; Chen, Duan; Black, James

    2015-01-01

    Aims To compare gastric acid suppression by netazepide, a gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist, with that by a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), and to determine if netazepide can prevent the trophic effects of PPI-induced hypergastrinaemia. Methods Thirty healthy subjects completed a double-blind, randomized, parallel group trial of oral netazepide and rabeprazole, alone and combined, once daily for 6 weeks. Primary end points were: basal and pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid and 24 h circulating gastrin and chromogranin A (CgA) at baseline, start and end of treatment, gastric biopsies at baseline and end of treatment and basal and pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid and dyspepsia questionnaire after treatment withdrawal. Results All treatments similarly inhibited pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion. All treatments increased serum gastrin, but the combination and rabeprazole did so more than netazepide alone. The combination also reduced basal acid secretion. Rabeprazole increased plasma CgA, whereas netazepide and the combination reduced it. None of the biopsies showed enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell hyperplasia. Withdrawal of treatments led neither to rebound hyperacidity nor dyspepsia. Conclusions Netazepide suppressed pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion as effectively as did rabeprazole. The reduction in basal acid secretion and greater increase in serum gastrin by the combination is consistent with more effective acid suppression. Despite our failure to show rabeprazole-induced ECL cell hyperplasia and rebound hyperacidity, the increase in plasma CgA after rabeprazole is consistent with a trophic effect on ECL cells, which netazepide prevented. Thus, netazepide is a potential treatment for the trophic effects of hypergastrinaemia and, with or without a PPI, is a potential treatment for acid-related conditions. PMID:25335860

  5. Balanced incomplete block designs in biological assay illustrated by the assay of gastrin using a youden square

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, D.

    1963-01-01

    General equations are given for computing the results of any (j+j) dose parallel line biological assay based on an incomplete block design. Only the information from comparisons within blocks is used. The computation is illustrated numerically by means of a (2+2) assay of gastrin devised and performed by Lai (1962), in which only three of the four doses could be given to each animal. PMID:14066152

  6. [Hormonal regulation of calcium metabolism after space flights of different duration].

    PubMed

    Pozharskaia, L G; Noskov, V B

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of examinations of 19 cosmonauts, 12 of whom made 7-day flights and 7 took part in space flights of 150, 211 or 237 days. In plasma, parathyrin, calcitonin and gastrin concentrations were measured. A complex mosaic of hormonal regulation of bone metabolism reflects multifactorial and flexible patterns of calcium homeostasis, with individual variations included. It is probable that the specific weight of different components of the system maintaining calcium homeostasis varies depending on the exposure time and activity of related regulatory systems.

  7. Synthesis and biological activity of partially modified retro-inverso pseudopeptide derivatives of the C-terminal tetrapeptide of gastrin.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Dubreuil, P; Bali, J P; Martinez, J

    1987-05-01

    The effects of partial retro-inverso modifications of selected peptide bonds of the N-terminal tetrapeptide of gastrin have been studied. In some of the synthesized compounds, the phenylalanyl residue has been replaced by the (R,S)-2-benzylmalonyl, 3-phenylpropionyl, benzylcarbamoyl, or benzyloxycarbonyl moieties. All pseudopeptides showed affinity for the gastrin receptor, in vitro, with potencies varying from IC50 = 10(-7) to IC50 = 10(-4) M. These compounds exhibited little or no activity on acid secretion in the anesthetized rat but were able to antagonize the action of gastrin. Among the most potent were Boc-Trp-Leu-gAsp-CO-CH2CH2C6H5 (20) (ED50 = 0.15 microM/kg), Boc-Trp-Leu-gAsp-m(R,S)Phe-NH2 (3) (ED50 = 0.15 microM/kg), and Boc-Trp-gLeu-D-Asp-m(R,S)Phe-NH2 (7) (ED50 = 0.3 microM/kg).

  8. CEA Level, Radical Surgery, CD56 and CgA Expression Are Prognostic Factors for Patients With Locoregional Gastrin-Independent GNET.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Bi, Xinyu; Zhao, Jianjun; Huang, Zhen; Zhou, Jianguo; Li, Zhiyu; Zhang, Yefan; Li, Muxing; Chen, Xiao; Hu, Xuhui; Chi, Yihebali; Zhao, Dongbing; Zhao, Hong; Cai, Jianqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gastrin-independent gastric neuroendocrine tumors (GNETs) are highly malignant. Radical resections and lymphadenectomy are considered to be the only possible curative treatment for these tumors. However, the prognosis of gastrin-independent GNETs is not well defined. In this study, we identified prognostic factors of locoregional gastrin-independent GNETs.All patients diagnosed with locoregional gastrin-independent GNETs between 2000 and 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical characteristics, blood tests, pathological characteristics, treatments, and follow-up data of the patients were collected and analyzed.Of the 66 patients diagnosed with locoregional gastrin-independent GNETs, 57 (86.4%) received radical resections, 7 (10.6%) with palliative resection, 1 (1.5%) with gastrojejunostomy, and 1 (1.5%) with exploration surgeries. The median survival time for these patients was 19.0 months (interquartile range, 11.0-38.0). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 72%, 34%, and 28%, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (P = 0.04), radical resection (P = 0.04), and positive Cluster of Differentiation 56 (CD56) expression (P = 0.016) were significant prognostic factors on overall survival rate. Further univariate and multivariate analysis of 57 patients who received radical resections found that CgA expression (P = 0.35) and CEA level (P = 0.33) are independent prognostic factors.Gastrin-independent GNETs had poor prognosis. Serum CEA level, radical surgery, CD56 and CgA expression are markers to evaluate the survival of patients with locoregional gastrin-independent GNETs.

  9. The Role of H. pylori CagA in Regulating Hormones of Functional Dyspepsia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wang-Ping; Wang, Zhong-Qiong; Deng, Jia-Qi; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, Hp) colonizes the stomachs of approximately 20%–80% of humans throughout the world. The Word Healthy Organization (WHO) classified H. pylori as a group 1 carcinogenic factor in 1994. Recently, an increasing number of studies has shown an association between H. pylori infection and various extragastric diseases. Functional dyspepsia (FD) is considered a biopsychosocial disorder with multifactorial pathogenesis, and studies have shown that infection with CagA-positive H. pylori strains could explain some of the symptoms of functional dyspepsia. Moreover, CagA-positive H. pylori strains have been shown to affect the secretion of several hormones, including 5-HT, ghrelin, dopamine, and gastrin, and altered levels of these hormones might be the cause of the psychological disorders of functional dyspepsia patients. This review describes the mutual effects of H. pylori and hormones in functional dyspepsia and provides new insight into the pathogenesis of functional dyspepsia. PMID:27840636

  10. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause Fact Sheet Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause January, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol ... take HT for symptom relief.) What are bioidentical hormones? Bioidentical hormones are identical to the hormones that ...

  11. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help diagnose and monitor the treatment of acromegaly and gigantism . Growth hormone is essential for normal ... signs and symptoms of GH excess ( gigantism and acromegaly ). Suppression testing may be done when a pituitary ...

  12. Effects of white wine, Coke and water on basal and food-stimulated gastric acid secretion and gastrin release in the dog.

    PubMed

    Soldani, G; Bertelli, A A; Mengozzi, G; Polloni, A; Bertelli, A

    1987-01-01

    The effects of three types of white wine (10% ethanol; pH 2.84-3.26), Coke (pH 2.45) and water (pH 8.03) on basal and food-stimulated gastric acid secretion in dogs were investigated. Water and Coke did not significantly modify acid secretion and gastrin release under basal conditions. By contrast, white wine or water +10% ethanol significantly increased acid secretion, with a tendency to elevate plasma gastrin concentrations. Acid secretion and gastrin release induced by a standard meal were not significantly modified by previous administration of Coke and water. In contrast, white wine and water +10% ethanol significantly increased food-stimulated total acid output, without changing plasma gastrin levels. It is concluded that Coke and water have only trivial effects on basal and on food-stimulated gastric acid secretion and gastrin release in the dog. The gastric stimulant effect of white wine is mainly related to its percentage of alcohol regardless of the slight differences in pH of the solutions.

  13. Expression of cholecystokinin, gastrin, and their receptors in the mouse cornea.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Coto, Ana F; Alonso-Ron, Carlos; Alcalde, Ignacio; Gallar, Juana; Meana, Álvaro; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Belmonte, Carlos

    2014-03-28

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide that has been identified in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Gastrin (GAST) is a related peptide never explored in the cornea. The presence and role of both gastrointestinal peptides in the cornea and corneal sensory neurons remain to be established. We explored here in mice whether CCK, GAST, and their receptors CCK1R and CCK2R are expressed in the corneal epithelium and trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the cornea. We used RT-PCR analysis to detect mRNAs of CCK, GAST, CCK1R, and CCK2R in mouse cornea epithelium, trigeminal ganglia, and primary cultured corneal epithelial cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to localize these peptides and their receptors in the cornea, cultured corneal epithelial cells, and corneal nerves, as well as in the cell bodies of corneal trigeminal ganglion neurons identified by retrograde labeling with Fast Blue. Mouse corneal epithelial cells in the cornea in situ and in cell cultures expressed CCK and GAST. Only the receptor CCK2R was found in the corneal epithelium. In addition, mouse corneal afferent sensory neurons expressed CCK and GAST, and the CCK1R receptors. The presence of CCK, GAST, and their receptors in the mouse corneal epithelium, and in trigeminal ganglion neurons supplying sensory innervation to the cornea, opens the possibility that these neuropeptides are involved in corneal neurogenic inflammation and in the modulation of repairing/remodeling processes following corneal injury.

  14. Oxygen, gastrin-releasing Peptide, and pediatric lung disease: life in the balance.

    PubMed

    Sunday, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Excessive oxygen (O2) can cause tissue injury, scarring, aging, and even death. Our laboratory is studying O2-sensing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) and the PNEC-derived product gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from exposure to hyperoxia, ozone, or ionizing radiation (RT) can induce PNEC degranulation and GRP secretion. PNEC degranulation is also induced by hypoxia, and effects of hypoxia are mediated by free radicals. We have determined that excessive GRP leads to lung injury with acute and chronic inflammation, leading to pulmonary fibrosis (PF), triggered via ROS exposure or by directly treating mice with exogenous GRP. In animal models, GRP-blockade abrogates lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. The optimal time frame for GRP-blockade and the key target cell types remain to be determined. The concept of GRP as a mediator of ROS-induced tissue damage represents a paradigm shift about how O2 can cause injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. The host PNEC response in vivo may depend on individual ROS sensing mechanisms and subsequent GRP secretion. Ongoing scientific and clinical investigations promise to further clarify the molecular pathways and clinical relevance of GRP in the pathogenesis of diverse pediatric lung diseases.

  15. The Diagnostic Value of Gastrin-17 Detection in Atrophic Gastritis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ling, Li; Li, Shanshan; Qin, Guiping; Cui, Wei; Li, Xiang; Ni, Hong

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of gastrin-17 (G-17) for the early detection of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG).An extensive literature search was performed, with the aim of selecting publications that reported the accuracy of G-17 in predicting CAG, in the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Chinese Biological Medicine, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP. To assess the diagnostic value of G-17, the following statistics were estimated and described: sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 894 patients and 1950 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these studies were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45-0.51) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77-0.81), respectively. The DOR was 5.93 (95% CI: 2.93-11.99), and the AUC was 0.82.G-17 may have potential diagnostic value because it has good specificity and a moderate DOR and AUC for CAG. However, more studies are needed to improve the sensitivity of this diagnostic tool in the future.

  16. AG-041R, a gastrin/CCK-B antagonist, stimulates chondrocyte proliferation and metabolism in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ochi, M; Kawasaki, K; Kataoka, H; Uchio, Y; Nishi, H

    2001-05-25

    A newly synthesized compound, AG-041R, 3R-1-(2,2Diethoxyethyl)-3-((4methylphenyl) amino-carbonylmethyl)-3-((4methylphenyl)ureido-indoline-2-one), is a cholecyctokinin-B/gastrin receptor antagonist, but unexpectedly magnified cartilage formation in vivo. Indeed, AG-041R is a potentially effective reagent for the repair of articular cartilage defects. To clarify its effects on chondrocytes, we studied the proliferation, matrix formation, and gene expression of rabbit primary chondrocytes cultured in type I collagen gel composites with AG-041R. Both proliferation and glycosaminoglycan synthesis were stimulated with 1 microM AG-041R, but suppressed with 10 microM. The ratio of the amounts of two chondroitin sulfate isomers, chondroitin-6-sulfate to chondroitin-4-sulfate (an indicator of cartilage maturation), increased with 1 microM but decreased with 10 microM AG-041R. Gene expression analysis showed there was no change in the relative expression levels of chondrocyte markers, Type II collagen and Aggrecan, and osteoblast and adipocyte markers, Type I collagen and PPARgamma, respectively. These findings suggest that adequate concentrations of AG-041R stimulate proliferation of chondrocytes in the matrix, without changing their differentiated characteristics.

  17. Obese and lean Zucker rats respond similarly to intraperitoneal administration of gastrin-releasing peptides.

    PubMed

    Washington, Martha C; Park, Karen H; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2014-08-01

    The Zucker rat is an animal model used to study obesity and the control of food intake by various satiety peptides. The amphibian peptide bombesin (Bn) reduces cumulative food intake similarly in both obese and lean weanling Zucker rats. Here, we hypothesized that intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of gastrin-releasing peptides-10, -27 and -29 (GRP-10, GRP-27, GRP-29), which are the mammalian forms of Bn, would reduce first meal size (MS, 10% sucrose) and prolong the intermeal interval (IMI, time between first and second meals) similarly in obese and lean adult Zucker rats. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-10, GRP-27 and GRP-29 (0, 2.1, 4.1 and 10.3 nmol/kg) i.p. to obese and lean male Zucker rats (who were deprived of overnight food but not water) and then measured the first and second MS, IMI and satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS). We found that in both obese and lean rats, all forms of GRP reduced the first MS, and in lean rats, they also decreased the second MS. Additionally, GRP-10 and GRP-29 prolonged the IMI in both obese and lean rats, but GRP-27 only prolonged it in lean rats. Finally, we found that all forms of GRP increased the SR in both obese and lean rats. In agreement with our hypothesis, we conclude that all forms of GRP reduce food intake in obese and lean adult Zucker rats similar to Bn in weanling rats.

  18. Gastrin-releasing peptide blockade as a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shutang; Potts, Erin N.; Cuttitta, Frank; Foster, W. Michael; Sunday, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is synthesized by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in inflammatory lung diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Many BPD infants develop asthma, a serious disorder of intermittent airway obstruction. Despite extensive research, early mechanisms of asthma remain controversial. The incidence of asthma is growing, now affecting >300 million people worldwide. To test the hypothesis that GRP mediates asthma, we used two murine models: ozone exposure for air pollution-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway disease. BALB/c mice were given small molecule GRP blocking agent 77427, or GRP blocking antibody 2A11, before exposure to ozone or OVA challenge. In both models, GRP blockade abrogated AHR and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophages and granulocytes, and decreased BAL cytokines implicated in asthma, including those typically derived from Th1 (e.g., IL-2, TNFα), Th2 (e.g., IL-5, IL-13), Th17 (IL-17), macrophages (e.g., MCP-1, IL-1), and neutrophils (KC = IL-8). Dexamethasone generally had smaller effects on all parameters. Macrophages, T cells, and neutrophils express GRP receptor (GRPR). GRP blockade diminished serine phosphorylation of GRPR with ozone or OVA. Thus, GRP mediates AHR and airway inflammation in mice, suggesting that GRP blockade is promising as a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach to treat and/or prevent asthma in humans. PMID:21252304

  19. Diurnal regulation of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor in the mouse circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Romeo, Russell D; McEwen, Bruce S; Silver, Rae

    2006-02-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms are generated by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. SCN neurons are heterogeneous and can be classified according to their function, anatomical connections, morphology and/or peptidergic identity. We focus here on gastrin-releasing peptide- (GRP) and on GRP receptor- (GRPr) expressing cells of the SCN. Pharmacological application of GRP in vivo or in vitro can shift the phase of circadian rhythms, and GRPr-deficient mice show blunted photic phase shifting. Given the in vivo and in vitro effects of GRP on circadian behavior and on SCN neuronal activity, we investigated whether the GRPr might be under circadian and/or diurnal control. Using in situ hybridization and autoradiographic receptor binding, we localized the GRPr in the mouse SCN and determined that GRP binding varies with time of day in animals housed in a light-dark cycle but not in conditions of constant darkness. The latter results were confirmed with Western blots of SCN tissue. Together, the present findings reveal that changes in GRPr are light driven and not endogenously organized. Diurnal variation in GRPr activity probably underlies intra-SCN signaling important for entrainment and phase shifting.

  20. [Serum gastrin: interests and limitations of radio-immunoassay (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rougier, P; Linhart, N; Bok, B

    1980-01-01

    Radio-immunoassay of serum gastrin may now be carried out in all laboratories of radio-immunology. Comparison of two commercial kits A: Schwartz-Mann and B: CEA-SORIN according to criteria of specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility within and between systems, shows that they both permit the detection of pathological hypergastrinemias (Zollinger Ellison and atropic gastritis). Both kits have an identical intra-system coefficient of variation (10 p. cent and 7 p. cent for A, 5 p. cent and 8 p. cent for B) on the other hand, the inter-system coefficient of variation is better for kit B (22,4 p. cent and 37 p. cent for kit A, and 11,5 p. cent and 14,2 p. cent for kit B). The normal values for each kit are quite different: 97 + 64 pg.ml-1 for A and 51 . 23 pg.ml-1 for B preventing one from comparing estimations carried out with two different kits.

  1. Gastrin Releasing Peptide Modulates Fast Delayed Rectifier Potassium Current in Per1-Expressing SCN Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Karen L.; Kudo, Takashi; Colwell, Christopher S.; McMahon, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and maintains 24-h physiological rhythms, the phases of which are set by the local environmental light-dark cycle. Gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) communicates photic phase setting signals in the SCN by increasing neurophysiological activity of SCN neurons. Here, the ionic basis for persistent GRP-induced changes in neuronal activity was investigated in SCN slice cultures from Per1::GFP reporter mice during the early night. Recordings from Per1-fluorescent neurons in SCN slices several hours after GRP treatment revealed a significantly greater action potential frequency, a significant increase in voltage-activated outward current at depolarized potentials, and a significant increase in 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) sensitive fast delayed rectifier (fDR) potassium currents when compared to vehicle-treated slices. In addition, the persistent increase in spike rate following early night GRP application was blocked in SCN neurons from mice deficient in Kv3 channel proteins. Because fDR currents are regulated by the clock and are elevated in amplitude during the day, the present results support the model that GRP delays the phase of the clock during the early night by prolonging day-like membrane properties of SCN cells. Furthermore, these findings implicate fDR currents in the ionic basis for GRP-mediated entrainment of the primary mammalian circadian pacemaker. PMID:21454290

  2. Postprandial gut hormone responses and glucose metabolism in cholecystectomized patients.

    PubMed

    Sonne, David P; Hare, Kristine J; Martens, Pernille; Rehfeld, Jens F; Holst, Jens J; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K

    2013-02-15

    Preclinical studies suggest that gallbladder emptying, via bile acid-induced activation of the G protein-coupled receptor TGR5 in intestinal L cells, may play a significant role in the secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and, hence, postprandial glucose homeostasis. We examined the secretion of gut hormones in cholecystectomized subjects to test the hypothesis that gallbladder emptying potentiates postprandial release of GLP-1. Ten cholecystectomized subjects and 10 healthy, age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched control subjects received a standardized fat-rich liquid meal (2,200 kJ). Basal and postprandial plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), cholecystokinin (CCK), and gastrin were measured. Furthermore, gastric emptying and duodenal and serum bile acids were measured. We found similar basal glucose concentrations in the two groups, whereas cholecystectomized subjects had elevated postprandial glucose excursions. Cholecystectomized subjects had reduced postprandial concentrations of duodenal bile acids, but preserved postprandial plasma GLP-1 responses, compared with control subjects. Also, cholecystectomized patients exhibited augmented fasting glucagon. Basal plasma CCK concentrations were lower and peak concentrations were higher in cholecystectomized patients. The concentrations of GIP, GLP-2, and gastrin were similar in the two groups. In conclusion, cholecystectomized subjects had preserved postprandial GLP-1 responses in spite of decreased duodenal bile delivery, suggesting that gallbladder emptying is not a prerequisite for GLP-1 release. Cholecystectomized patients demonstrated a slight deterioration of postprandial glycemic control, probably because of metabolic changes unrelated to incretin secretion.

  3. Gastrointestinal hormone mRNA expression in human colonic adenocarcinomas, hepatic metastases and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Monges, G; Biagini, P; Cantaloube, J F; De Micco, P; Parriaux, D; Seitz, J F; Delpero, J R; Hassoun, J

    1996-01-01

    Aims—(1) To investigate the expression of the four main hormones of the digestive tract by performing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on a series of samples, comprising tumoral and healthy colonic tissues, hepatic metastases and colonic cell line samples; and (2) to study the patterns of labelling obtained with serological and morphological markers. Methods—After extraction and reverse transcription, gastrin, somatostatin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and transforming growth factor α (TGFα) mRNAs were detected by PCR and nested PCR using specific primers. The corresponding proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results—The cell lines expressed all four mRNAs. Gastrin mRNA was present in most tumoral and metastatic samples, while the somatostatin transcript was detected in all samples and was frequently overexpressed in the normal colon. TGFα mRNA was expressed systematically in tumours of the right and transverse colon, but not in those located in the left colon; the expression of CCK mRNA was systematically absent in the left colon. Conclusions—The data presented here shed some light on the transcriptional events involved in the production of the various hormones present in the gastrointestinal tract, in both healthy and tumoral tissues. The various mRNAs expressed in cell lines are therefore not systematically expressed in the human pathology. Images PMID:16696065

  4. Gastrin releasing peptide-29 requires vagal and splanchnic neurons to evoke satiation and satiety.

    PubMed

    Wright, Susan A; Washington, Martha C; Garcia, Carlos; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that gastrin-releasing peptide-29 (GRP-29), the large molecular form of GRP in rats, reduces meal size (MS, intake of 10% sucrose solution) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). In these studies, we first investigated possible pathways for these responses in rats undergoing total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (VGX, removal of vagal afferent and efferent innervation of the gut), celiaco-mesenteric ganglionectomy (CMGX, removal of splanchnic afferent and efferent innervation of the gut) and combined VGX and CMGX. Second, we examined if the duodenum communicates the feeding signals (MS and IMI) of GRP-29 (0, 0.3, 1.0, 2.1, 4.1, 10.3 and 17.2 nmol/kg) with the feeding control areas of the hindbrain by performing duodenal myotomy (MYO), a procedure that severs some layers of the duodenal wall including the vagal, splanchnic and enteric neurons. We found that GRP-29 (2.1, 4.1, 10.3, 17.2 nmol/kg) reduced the size of the first meal (10% sucrose) and (1, 4.1, 10.3 nmol/kg) prolongs the first IMI but did not affect the subsequent meals or IMIs. In addition, CMGX and combined VGX/CMGX attenuated reduction of MS by GRP-29 and all surgeries attenuated the prolongation of the IMI. Therefore, reduction of MS and prolongation of IMI by GRP-29 require vagal and splanchnic nerves, and the duodenum is the major conduit that communicates prolongation of IMI by GRP-29 with the brain.

  5. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment.

  6. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  7. Prognostic Value of Prepro-Gastrin Releasing Peptide in Lung Cancer Patients; NCI-Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafik, Nevine F; Rahoma, M; Elshimy, Reham A A; El kasem, Fatma M Abou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prior series investigated the expression of prepro-gastrin releasing peptide (prepro-GRP) in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients. Our aim was to assess any prepro-GRP role as a prognostic factor for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and NSCLC and correlations with clinical presentation and treatment outcome. Methods: A prospective study was conducted during the time period from the beginning of January 2012 till the end of January 2014. Prepro-GRP expression was analysed using a nested RT-PCR assay in peripheral blood of 62 untreated lung cancer patients attending the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, and 30 age and sex matched healthy volunteers. Results: Among the 62 lung cancer cases, there were 24 (38.7%) SCLC, and 38 (61.3%) NSCLC (10 squamous cell carcinomas, 12 adenocarcinomas, 11 large cell carcinomas, 4 undifferentiated carcinomas, and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma). Twenty six patients (41.9%) were prepro-GRP positive. Prepro-GRP expression was higher (58.3%) among SCLC patients compared to NSCLC (squamous cell carcinoma (15.4%), large cell carcinoma (36.4%), and adenocarcinoma (25%)). Mean OS among prepro-GRP negative cases was longer than that among preprogastrin positive cases (17.6 vs 14.9 months). The mean PFS durations among preprogastrin negative versus positive cases were 7.7 vs 4.6 months (p= 0.041). No difference in response to chemotherapy was identified between the groups (p=0.983). Conclusion: Prepro-GRP is suggested to be a useful prognostic marker for lung cancer patients, especially with the fast- growing, bad prognostic SCLC type. More studies should aim at detailed understanding of the mechanisms of prepro-GRP action and its use in monitoring the response to treatment in a larger cohort. PMID:28124884

  8. Prognostic Value of Prepro-Gastrin Releasing Peptide in Lung Cancer Patients; NCI-Prospective Study

    PubMed

    Shafik, Nevine F; Rahoma, m; Elshimy, Reham A A; M Abou El kasem, Fatma

    2016-12-01

    Background: Prior series investigated the expression of prepro-gastrin releasing peptide (prepro-GRP) in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients. Our aim was to assess any prepro-GRP role as a prognostic factor for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and NSCLC and correlations with clinical presentation and treatment outcome. Methods: A prospective study was conducted during the time period from the beginning of January 2012 till the end of January 2014. Prepro-GRP expression was analysed using a nested RT-PCR assay in peripheral blood of 62 untreated lung cancer patients attending the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, and 30 age and sex matched healthy volunteers. Results: Among the 62 lung cancer cases, there were 24 (38.7%) SCLC, and 38 (61.3%) NSCLC (10 squamous cell carcinomas, 12 adenocarcinomas, 11 large cell carcinomas, 4 undifferentiated carcinomas, and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma). Twenty six patients (41.9%) were prepro-GRP positive. Prepro-GRP expression was higher (58.3%) among SCLC patients compared to NSCLC (squamous cell carcinoma (15.4%), large cell carcinoma (36.4%), and adenocarcinoma (25%)). Mean OS among prepro-GRP negative cases was longer than that among preprogastrin positive cases (17.6 vs 14.9 months). The mean PFS durations among preprogastrin negative versus positive cases were 7.7 vs 4.6 months (p= 0.041). No difference in response to chemotherapy was identified between the groups (p=0.983). Conclusion: Prepro-GRP is suggested to be a useful prognostic marker for lung cancer patients, especially with the fast- growing, bad prognostic SCLC type. More studies should aim at detailed understanding of the mechanisms of prepro-GRP action and its use in monitoring the response to treatment in a larger cohort. Creative Commons Attribution License

  9. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) promotes EMT, growth, and invasion in canine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Elshafae, Said M; Hassan, Bardes B; Supsavhad, Wachiraphan; Dirksen, Wessel P; Camiener, Rachael Y; Ding, Haiming; Tweedle, Michael F; Rosol, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) is upregulated in early and late-stage human prostate cancer (PCa) and other solid tumors of the mammary gland, lung, head and neck, colon, uterus, ovary, and kidney. However, little is known about its role in prostate cancer. This study examined the effects of a heterologous GRPr agonist, bombesin (BBN), on growth, motility, morphology, gene expression, and tumor phenotype of an osteoblastic canine prostate cancer cell line (Ace-1) in vitro and in vivo. The Ace-1 cells were stably transfected with the human GRPr and tumor cells were grown in vitro and as subcutaneous and intratibial tumors in nude mice. The effect of BBN was measured on cell proliferation, cell migration, tumor growth (using bioluminescence), tumor cell morphology, bone tumor phenotype, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis gene expression (quantitative RT-PCR). GRPr mRNA expression was measured in primary canine prostate cancers and normal prostate glands. Bombesin (BBN) increased tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro and tumor growth and invasion in vivo. BBN upregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers (TWIST, SNAIL, and SLUG mRNA) and downregulated epithelial markers (E-cadherin and β-catenin mRNA), and modified tumor cell morphology to a spindle cell phenotype. Blockade of GRPr upregulated E-cadherin and downregulated VIMENTIN and SNAIL mRNA. BBN altered the in vivo tumor phenotype in bone from an osteoblastic to osteolytic phenotype. Primary canine prostate cancers had increased GRPr mRNA expression compared to normal prostates. These data demonstrated that the GRPr is important in prostate cancer growth and progression and targeting GRPr may be a promising strategy for treatment of prostate cancer. Prostate 76:796-809, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Immunochemical studies on big gastrin using NH2-terminal specific antisera.

    PubMed

    Dockray, G J

    1980-12-01

    Methods are described for obtaining antisera specific for the NH2-terminal regions of human and porcine big gastrin (G34) that can be used in radioimmunoassays. Three antisera have been characterized in detail: one (L66) raised to human 1--15 (Tyr7-Pro8-Ser9) G34 has an antigenic determinant in the 1--6 region of human G34; a second (L107) raised to 1--19 hG34 has an antigenic determinant in the 1--12 region. Both these antisera react weakly with porcine G34. A third antiserum (L33) raised to porcine G34 has an antigenic determinant in the 1--12 region of this peptide, and reacts weakly with human G34. In human antral extracts fractionated on Sephadex G50, L66 and L107 revealed a minor peak of immunoreactivity corresponding to G34, and a major peak corresponding to the NH2-terminal tryptic peptide of G34. Concentrations of the latter peptide were closely similar to those of G17 (i. e.) the COOH-terminal tryptic peptide of G34), consistent with the idea that G34 is cleaved within G-cells by a trypsin-like enzyme to yield G17. Antiserum L33 revealed small amounts of immunoreactivity in antral extracts of dog and cat, but did not reveal significant immunoreactivity in rat antral extracts. In contrast, L66 reacted with rat antral extracts, but not dog or cat. The sequences of G34 in these species are not known, but the results suggest significant differences compared with human and porcine G34, and indicate a high degree of species-specificity with NH2-terminal G34 antisera.

  11. SILENCING GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR SUPPRESSES KEY REGULATORS OF AEROBIC GLYCOLYSIS IN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Rellinger, Eric J.; Romain, Carmelle; Choi, SunPhil; Qiao, Jingbo; Chung, Dai H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Under normoxic conditions, cancer cells use aerobic glycolysis as opposed to glucose oxidation for energy production; this altered metabolism correlates with poor outcomes in neuroblastoma. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) regulate aerobic glycolysis, while pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 2 (PDP2) promotes glucose oxidation. Here, we sought to determine whether gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) signaling regulates glucose metabolism. Procedure Neuroblastoma cell lines, BE(2)-C and SK-N-AS, were used. PCR microararay for glucose metabolism was performed on GRP-R silenced cells. Target protein expression was validated using Western blotting and VEGF ELISA. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2) was used to induce chemical hypoxia. Efficacy of targeting PDK regulation in neuroblastoma was assessed using dichloroacetate (DCA) by conducting cell viability assays and Western blotting for apoptotic markers. Results Silencing GRP-R decreased HIF-1α expression and blocked VEGF expression and secretion in both normoxic and CoCl2 induced hypoxia. PCR array analysis identified that GRP-R silencing reduced PDK4 and increased PDP2 mRNA expression. These findings were validated by Western blotting. CoCl2 induced hypoxia increased VEGF secretion, HIF-1α, and PDK4 expression. PDK4 silencing decreased HIF-1α expression and VEGF expression and secretion. DCA treatment decreased BE(2)-C and SK-N-AS proliferation while promoting cell death. GRP-R silencing and DCA treatment synergistically halted BE(2)-C proliferation. Conclusions We report that GRP-R regulates glucose metabolism in neuroblastoma by modulating HIF-1α, PDK4 and PDP2. PDK4 regulates glucose metabolism, in part, via regulation of HIF-1α. Synergistic consequences of GRP-R inhibition and DCA treatment may suggest a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of aggressive neuroblastoma. PMID:25630799

  12. Beta Cell Mass Restoration in Alloxan-Diabetic Mice Treated with EGF and Gastrin.

    PubMed

    Song, Imane; Patel, Oelfah; Himpe, Eddy; Muller, Christo J F; Bouwens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    One week of treatment with EGF and gastrin (EGF/G) was shown to restore normoglycemia and to induce islet regeneration in mice treated with the diabetogenic agent alloxan. The mechanisms underlying this regeneration are not fully understood. We performed genetic lineage tracing experiments to evaluate the contribution of beta cell neogenesis in this model. One day after alloxan administration, mice received EGF/G treatment for one week. The treatment could not prevent the initial alloxan-induced beta cell mass destruction, however it did reverse glycemia to control levels within one day, suggesting improved peripheral glucose uptake. In vitro experiments with C2C12 cell line showed that EGF could stimulate glucose uptake with an efficacy comparable to that of insulin. Subsequently, EGF/G treatment stimulated a 3-fold increase in beta cell mass, which was partially driven by neogenesis and beta cell proliferation as assessed by beta cell lineage tracing and BrdU-labeling experiments, respectively. Acinar cell lineage tracing failed to show an important contribution of acinar cells to the newly formed beta cells. No appearance of transitional cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon, a hallmark for alpha-to-beta cell conversion, was found, suggesting that alpha cells did not significantly contribute to the regeneration. An important fraction of the beta cells significantly lost insulin positivity after alloxan administration, which was restored to normal after one week of EGF/G treatment. Alloxan-only mice showed more pronounced beta cell neogenesis and proliferation, even though beta cell mass remained significantly depleted, suggesting ongoing beta cell death in that group. After one week, macrophage infiltration was significantly reduced in EGF/G-treated group compared to the alloxan-only group. Our results suggest that EGF/G-induced beta cell regeneration in alloxan-diabetic mice is driven by beta cell neogenesis, proliferation and recovery of insulin. The

  13. Specializations of Gastrin Releasing Peptide Cells of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Drouyer, Elise; LeSauter, Joseph; Hernandez, Amanda L.; Silver, Rae

    2010-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus regulates daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. It is constituted of a heterogeneous population of cells which together form the circuits underlying its master clock function. Numerous studies suggest the existence of two regions that have been termed core and shell. At a gross level, differences between these regions map to distinct functional differences, though the specific role(s) of various peptidergic cellular phenotypes remains unknown. In mouse, gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) cells lie in the core, are directly retinorecipient and lack detectable rhythmicity in clock gene expression, raising interest in their role in the SCN. Here, we provide evidence that calbindin expressing cells of perinatal mouse SCN express GRP, identified by a green fluorescent protein (GFP+), but lack detectable calbindin later in development. To explore the intra-SCN network in which GRP neurons participate, individual GFP+ cells were filled with tracer and their morphological characteristics, processes, and connections, as well as those of their non-GFP containing immediate neighbors, were compared. The results show that GFP+ neurons form a dense network of local circuits within the core, revealed by appositions on other GFP+ cells and by the presence of dye-coupled cells. Dendrites and axons of GFP+ cells make appositions on arginine vasopressin neurons, while non-GFP cells have a less extensive fiber network, largely confined to the region of GFP+ cells. The results point to specialized circuitry within the SCN, presumably supporting synchronization of neural activity and reciprocal communication between core and shell regions. PMID:20151358

  14. Inter- and intraspecies polymorphisms in the cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor alter drug efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kopin, A S; McBride, E W; Gordon, M C; Quinn, S M; Beinborn, M

    1997-09-30

    The brain cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor (CCK-BR) is a major target for drug development because of its postulated role in modulating anxiety, memory, and the perception of pain. Drug discovery efforts have resulted in the identification of small synthetic molecules that can selectively activate this receptor subtype. These drugs include the peptide-derived compound PD135,158 as well as the nonpeptide benzodiazepine-based ligand, L-740,093 (S enantiomer). We now report that the maximal level of receptor-mediated second messenger signaling that can be achieved by these compounds (drug efficacy) markedly differs among species homologs of the CCK-BR. Further analysis reveals that the observed differences in drug efficacy are in large part explained by single or double aliphatic amino acid substitutions between respective species homologs. This interspecies variability in ligand efficacy introduces the possibility of species differences in receptor-mediated function, an important consideration when selecting animal models for preclinical drug testing. The finding that even single amino acid substitutions can significantly affect drug efficacy prompted us to examine ligand-induced signaling by a known naturally occurring human CCK-BR variant (glutamic acid replaced by lysine in position 288; 288E --> K). When examined using the 288E --> K receptor, the efficacies of both PD135,158 and L-740, 093 (S) were markedly increased compared with values obtained with the wild-type human protein. These observations suggest that functional variability resulting from human receptor polymorphisms may contribute to interindividual differences in drug effects.

  15. Lutetium-177-labeled gastrin releasing peptide receptor binding analogs: a novel approach to radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Panigone, S; Nunn, A D

    2006-12-01

    Optimization of therapy for individual patients remains a goal of clinical practice. Radionuclide imaging can identify those patients who may benefit from subsequent targeted therapy by providing regional information on the distribution of the target. An ideal situation may be when the imaging and the therapeutic compounds are the same agent. Two antibodies ([ [90Y]ibritumomab, [131I]tositumomab) are now approved for the systemic radiotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The main hurdle is to deliver higher absorbed doses to the more refractory solid tumors paying particular regard to the bone marrow toxicity. The low dose is thought to be a result of the large size of antibodies slowing delivery to the target. Peptides having high affinity to receptors expressed on cancer cells are a promising alternative. They are usually rapidly excreted from the body through renal and/or hepatobiliary excretion thus creating a prolonged accumulation of the radioactivity in the kidneys, which represents a recognized issue for systemic radiotherapy. The first radiopeptide developed was a somatostatin analogue, which led to a major breakthrough in the field. Beside the kidney issue, somatostatin use remains limited to few cancers that express receptors in sufficiently large quantities, mainly neuroendocrine tumors. The gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) receptor is an attractive target for development of new radiopeptides with diagnostic and therapeutic potential. This is based upon the functional expression of GRP receptors in several of the more prevalent cancers including prostate, breast, and small cell lung cancer. This review covers the efforts currently underway to develop new and clinically promising GRP-receptor specific molecules labeled with imageable and therapeutic radionuclides.

  16. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  17. Types of hormone therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of hormone therapy; Hormone replacement therapy - types; Menopause - types of hormone therapy; HT - types; Menopausal hormone ... Menopause symptoms include: Hot flashes Night sweats Sleep problems Vaginal dryness Anxiety Moodiness Less interest in sex ...

  18. Modulation of phagocytic function in murine peritoneal macrophages by bombesin, gastrin-releasing peptide and neuromedin C.

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, M; Del Rio, M; Ferrandez, M D; Hernanz, A

    1991-01-01

    Bombesin, as well as the two mammalian bombesin-like peptides gastrin-releasing peptide and neuromedin C, have been shown in this study to stimulate in vitro all steps of the phagocytic process in murine peritoneal macrophages: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of cells (Candida albicans) and inert particles (latex beads), and production of superoxide anion as measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. A dose-response relationship was observed, with maximal stimulation of phagocytic process between 10(-12)M and 10(-9)M. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and neuromedin C caused a higher activation of adherence, chemotaxis and ingestion of C. albicans than bombesin. The three neuropeptides induced in murine macrophages a significant, but transient, increase of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) levels at 60 seconds. On the contrary, these neuropeptides produced a rapid, transient and significant decrease of cAMP at 30 seconds. These results suggest that there are close relations between IP3 and cAMP messenger systems and the phagocytic process in murine peritoneal macrophages when these cells are incubated in the presence of bombesin, GRP or neuromedin C. PMID:1649124

  19. Paracrine effects of bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide and other growth factors on pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Speirs, V; Bienkowski, E; Wong, V; Cutz, E

    1993-05-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are numerous in the fetus where they have been implicated to have a role in fetal lung development. We assessed the effects of putative growth factors, gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), cholecystokinin (CCK), gastrin (GN), serotonin (5-HT), and epidermal growth factor (EGF), some of which are produced by PNEC, either alone or in combination, on cultured fetal rabbit PNEC from 20, 24, and 28 day fetuses. GRP increased the total protein of the cultures over a 7 day period in an age-dependent manner, with greatest effect in cultures from the 24 day fetus, no effect with the 28 day fetus, and an inhibitory effect on 20 day cultures. This was accompanied by an increase in PNEC, which could be blocked by treatment of the cultures with a monoclonal antibody to GRP (2A11). There was no increase in 3H-thymidine labeling of PNEC in GRP treated cultures but an increase in numbers of cells partially stained for 5-HT, suggesting the induction of a precursor cell. Other growth factors had neither an inhibitory nor a stimulatory effect either alone or in combination with GRP. Preliminary studies with 125I-GRP receptor localization suggests that the GRP receptor is mostly expressed on pulmonary fibroblasts, and less on epithelial cells, so that the role for GRP in fetal lung development, at least in the rabbit, is probably indirect, acting via a paracrine mechanism.

  20. Relative distribution of gastrin-, CCK-8-, NPY- and CGRP-immunoreactive cells in the digestive tract of dorado (Salminus brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Pereira, R T; Costa, L S; Oliveira, I R C; Araújo, J C; Aerts, M; Vigliano, F A; Rosa, P V

    2015-04-01

    The endocrine cells (ECs) of the gastrointestinal mucosa form the largest endocrine system in the body, not only in terms of cell numbers but also in terms of the different produced substances. Data describing the association between the relative distributions of the peptide-specific ECs in relation to feeding habits can be useful tools that enable the creation of a general expected pattern of EC distribution. We aimed to investigate the distribution of ECs immunoreactive for the peptides gastrin (GAS), cholecystokinin (CCK-8), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in different segments of the digestive tract of carnivorous fish dorado (Salminus brasiliensis) by using immunohistochemistry procedures. The distribution of endocrine cells immunoreactive for gastrin (GAS), cholecystokinin (CCK-8), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in digestive tract of dorado S. brasiliensis was examined by immunohistochemistry. The results describe the association between the distribution of the peptide-specific endocrine cells and feeding habits in different carnivorous fish. The largest number of endocrine cells immunoreactive for GAS, CCK-8, and CGRP were found in the pyloric stomach region and the pyloric caeca. However, NPY-immunoreactive endocrine cells were markedly restricted to the midgut. The distribution pattern of endocrine cells identified in S. brasiliensis is similar to that found in other carnivorous fishes.

  1. Gastrin-stimulated Gα13 Activation of Rgnef Protein (ArhGEF28) in DLD-1 Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Masià-Balagué, Miriam; Izquierdo, Ismael; Garrido, Georgina; Cordomí, Arnau; Pérez-Benito, Laura; Miller, Nichol L G; Schlaepfer, David D; Gigoux, Véronique; Aragay, Anna M

    2015-06-12

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rgnef (also known as ArhGEF28 or p190RhoGEF) promotes colon carcinoma cell motility and tumor progression via interaction with focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Mechanisms of Rgnef activation downstream of integrin or G protein-coupled receptors remain undefined. In the absence of a recognized G protein signaling homology domain in Rgnef, no proximal linkage to G proteins was known. Utilizing multiple methods, we have identified Rgnef as a new effector for Gα13 downstream of gastrin and the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor. In DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells depleted of Gα13, gastrin-induced FAK Tyr(P)-397 and paxillin Tyr(P)-31 phosphorylation were reduced. RhoA GTP binding and promoter activity were increased by Rgnef in combination with active Gα13. Rgnef co-immunoprecipitated with activated Gα13Q226L but not Gα12Q229L. The Rgnef C-terminal (CT, 1279-1582) region was sufficient for co-immunoprecipitation, and Rgnef-CT exogenous expression prevented Gα13-stimulated SRE activity. A domain at the C terminus of the protein close to the FAK binding domain is necessary to bind to Gα13. Point mutations of Rgnef-CT residues disrupt association with active Gα13 but not Gαq. These results show that Rgnef functions as an effector of Gα13 signaling and that this linkage may mediate FAK activation in DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells.

  2. Critical evaluation of the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide in dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Devin M; Li, Hui; Liu, Xian-Yu; Shen, Kai-Feng; Liu, Xue-Ting; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Munanairi, Admire; Chen, Xiao-Jun; Yin, Jun; Sun, Yan-Gang; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-01-01

    There are substantial disagreements about the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in sensory neurons and whether GRP antibody cross-reacts with substance P (SP). These concerns necessitate a critical revaluation of GRP expression using additional approaches. Here, we show that a widely used GRP antibody specifically recognizes GRP but not SP. In the spinal cord of mice lacking SP (Tac1 KO), the expression of not only GRP but also other peptides, notably neuropeptide Y (NPY), is significantly diminished. We detected Grp mRNA in dorsal root ganglias using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization and RNA-seq. We demonstrated that Grp mRNA and protein are upregulated in dorsal root ganglias, but not in the spinal cord, of mice with chronic itch. Few GRP+ immunostaining signals were detected in spinal sections following dorsal rhizotomy and GRP+ cell bodies were not detected in dissociated dorsal horn neurons. Ultrastructural analysis further shows that substantially more GRPergic fibers form synaptic contacts with gastrin releasing peptide receptor-positive (GRPR+) neurons than SPergic fibers. Our comprehensive study demonstrates that a majority of GRPergic fibers are of primary afferent origin. A number of factors such as low copy number of Grp transcripts, small percentage of cells expressing Grp, and the use of an eGFP GENSAT transgenic as a surrogate for GRP protein have contributed to the controversy. Optimization of experimental procedures facilitates the specific detection of GRP expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons. PMID:27068287

  3. Gastrin-stimulated Gα13 Activation of Rgnef Protein (ArhGEF28) in DLD-1 Colon Carcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Masià-Balagué, Miriam; Izquierdo, Ismael; Garrido, Georgina; Cordomí, Arnau; Pérez-Benito, Laura; Miller, Nichol L. G.; Schlaepfer, David D.; Gigoux, Véronique; Aragay, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rgnef (also known as ArhGEF28 or p190RhoGEF) promotes colon carcinoma cell motility and tumor progression via interaction with focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Mechanisms of Rgnef activation downstream of integrin or G protein-coupled receptors remain undefined. In the absence of a recognized G protein signaling homology domain in Rgnef, no proximal linkage to G proteins was known. Utilizing multiple methods, we have identified Rgnef as a new effector for Gα13 downstream of gastrin and the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor. In DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells depleted of Gα13, gastrin-induced FAK Tyr(P)-397 and paxillin Tyr(P)-31 phosphorylation were reduced. RhoA GTP binding and promoter activity were increased by Rgnef in combination with active Gα13. Rgnef co-immunoprecipitated with activated Gα13Q226L but not Gα12Q229L. The Rgnef C-terminal (CT, 1279–1582) region was sufficient for co-immunoprecipitation, and Rgnef-CT exogenous expression prevented Gα13-stimulated SRE activity. A domain at the C terminus of the protein close to the FAK binding domain is necessary to bind to Gα13. Point mutations of Rgnef-CT residues disrupt association with active Gα13 but not Gαq. These results show that Rgnef functions as an effector of Gα13 signaling and that this linkage may mediate FAK activation in DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells. PMID:25922072

  4. Effect of 13-NLE-motilin on gastric secretion, serum gastrin level and mucosal blood flow in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Krol, R; Wünsch, E

    1977-01-01

    1. In dogs with gastric fistulas and vagally innervated fundic and antral pouches, 13-norleucine-motilin (13-nle-motilin), a synthetic analogue of motilin, infused intravenously in graded doses produced a dose-dependent increase in gastric acid and pepsin outputs. 2. The motilin-induced stimulation of gastric secretion occurred independently of antral pH and was not accompanied by any alteration in the serum gastrin level suggesting that motilin did not affect the release of gastrin. 3. When infused intravenously in a constant dose against a constant background stimulation with pentagastrin or histamine 13-nle-motilin inhibited both acid and pepsin secretion from the main stomach and fundic pouch. 4. The inhibitory effect of 13-nle-motilin was always associated with a marked reduction in mucosal blood flow but without any change in the ratio of aminopyrine concentration in the gastric juice and blood plasma indicating that this peptide primarily affected gastric secretion but did not limit the gastric mucosal microcirculation. PMID:321755

  5. Hormonal abnormalities of the pancreas and gut in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; McKiernan, J; Johnstone, D I; Hiller, E J; Vyas, H; Sarson, D L; Bloom, S R

    1980-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of cystic fibrosis on alimentary hormones in 10 children by measuring the pancreatic and gut hormone rsponse to a milk drink. Plasma insulin and gastric inhibitory peptide were both significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively, at 15 min) in the patients with cystic fibrosis, compared with controls, even though the early glucose rise was greater in the former group (P < 0.05 at 15 min). Fasting levels of pancreatic polypeptide were significantly lower in the fibrocystic children (P < 0.01), and the normal response to milk was completely abolished in these patients (P < 0.001). Fasting plasma enteroglucagon concentrations were grossly abolished in the cystic fibrosis patients (P < 0.001) and these remained elevated throughout the test. No significant differences were seen in basal or postmilk responses of plasma glucagon, gastrin, secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or motilin in cystic fibrosis. It would thus appear that the pancreatic polypeptide cell is more susceptible to the effects of the disease process than the beta or alpha cell in cystic fibrosis. Some aspects of the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine system were similar to those seen in celiac disease and tropical sprue and may, therefore, effect a similar hormonal response in these patients with cystic fibrosis to those with mucosal damage.

  6. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Wild Type Homozygozity of Polymorphisms +896 and +1196 Is Associated with High Gastrin Serum Levels and Peptic Ulcer Risk.

    PubMed

    Pohjanen, Vesa-Matti; Koivurova, Olli-Pekka; Huhta, Heikki; Helminen, Olli; Mäkinen, Johanna M; Karhukorpi, Jari M; Joensuu, Tapio; Koistinen, Pentti O; Valtonen, Jarno M; Niemelä, Seppo E; Karttunen, Riitta A; Karttunen, Tuomo J

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 is a part of the innate immune system and recognizes Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms +896 (rs4986790) and +1196 (rs4986791) in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori related gastroduodenal diseases in relation to gastric secretion and inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms, serum gastrin-17 and pepsinogen I and II concentrations were determined, and gastroscopies with histopathological analyses were performed to 216 dyspeptic patients. As genotype controls, 179 controls and 61 gastric cancer patients were studied. In our study, the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 polymorphisms were in total linkage disequilibrium. The homozygous wild types displayed higher gastrin-17 serum concentrations than the mutants (p = 0.001) and this effect was independent of Helicobacter pylori. The homozygous wild types also displayed an increased risk for peptic ulcers (OR: 4.390). Toll-like receptor 4 genotypes did not show any association with Helicobacter pylori positivity or the features of gastric inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 expression was seen in gastrin and somatostatin expressing cells of antral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Our results suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 4 in gastric acid regulation and that the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 wild type homozygozity increases peptic ulcer risk via gastrin secretion.

  7. The human gastrin/cholecystokinin type B receptor gene: Alternative splice donor site in exon 4 generates two variant mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Song, I.; Brown, D.R.; Wiltshire, R.N.; Gantz, I.; Trent, J.M.; Yamada, T. )

    1993-10-01

    Gastrin and its carboxyl-terminal homolog cholecystokinin (CCK) exert a variety of biological actions in the brain and gastrointestinal tract that are mediated in part through one or more G protein-coupled receptors which exhibit similar affinity for both peptides. Genomic clones encoding a human gastrin/CCK[sub B] receptor were isolated by screening a human EMBL phage library with a partial-length DNA fragment which was based on the nucleotide sequence of the canine gastrin receptor. The gene contained a 1356-bp open reading frame consisting of five exons interrupted by 4 introns and was assigned to human chromosome 11p15.4. A region of exon 4, which encodes a portion of the putative third intracellular loop, appears to be alternatively spliced to yield two different mRNAs, one containing (452 aminio acids; long isoform) and the other lacking (447 amino acids; short isoform) the pentapeptide sequence Gly-Gly-Ala-Gly-Pro. The two receptor isoforms may contribute to functional differences in gastrin- and CCK-mediated signal transduction. 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Development of potent gastrin-releasing peptide antagonists having a D-Pro-psi(CH2NH)-Phe-NH2 C terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Leban, J J; Kull, F C; Landavazo, A; Stockstill, B; McDermed, J D

    1993-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a 27-amino acid neuroendocrine hormone that may play a role in the pathophysiology of small cell lung carcinoma. GRP and bombesin, a structurally related peptide, stimulate the growth of some cultured cell types. C-terminal GRP peptide analogs were developed that inhibited 6 nM bombesin-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation into quiescent murine Swiss 3T3 cells, which routinely produced a 6-fold stimulation over the basal extent of incorporation. The peptides were also analyzed for their capacity to inhibit the binding of 50 pM 125I-labeled GRP to Swiss 3T3 cells. The combination of two chemical modifications, each antagonistic in itself, led to the creation of antagonists with orders of magnitude greater potency than either modification alone. (i) Antagonist analogs of the form -Leu26-psi(CH2NH)-Xaa27-NH2 [where Xaa is Leu, norleucine (Nle), or Phe; residues numbered after GRP], similar to those introduced by Coy and coworkers [for review, see Jensen, R. T. & Coy, D. H. (1991) Trends Pharmacol. Sci. 12, 13-19], were found to have nanomolar potencies. (ii) We found that an octapeptide C-terminal GRP analog having D-Pro adjacent to the C-terminal amino acid amide was antagonistic, with a potency of 40 nM. By combining both modifications, specific analogs were found with potencies > 1000-fold greater than our lead structure--[(4'-hydroxy)-3-phenylpropanoyl]-Pro-Arg-Gly-Asn-His-Tr p-Ala-Val - Gly-His-Leu-psi(CH2NH)-Nle-NH2--and greater than any antagonist previously reported. The analogs [(4'-hydroxy)-3-phenylpropanoyl]-His-Trp-Ala-Val-D-Ala-His-D-Pro- psi(CH2NH)-Phe-NH2 and 1-naphthoyl-His-Trp-Ala-Val-D-Ala-His-D-Pro-psi(CH2NH)-Phe-NH2 antagonized [3H]thymidine incorporation with IC50 values of approximately 0.3 nM and inhibited the binding of 125I-labeled GRP with IC50 values of approximately 1 pM. These peptides may be of use in the study of the physiology of GRP. PMID:8446610

  9. Development of potent gastrin-releasing peptide antagonists having a D-Pro-psi(CH2NH)-Phe-NH2 C terminus.

    PubMed

    Leban, J J; Kull, F C; Landavazo, A; Stockstill, B; McDermed, J D

    1993-03-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a 27-amino acid neuroendocrine hormone that may play a role in the pathophysiology of small cell lung carcinoma. GRP and bombesin, a structurally related peptide, stimulate the growth of some cultured cell types. C-terminal GRP peptide analogs were developed that inhibited 6 nM bombesin-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation into quiescent murine Swiss 3T3 cells, which routinely produced a 6-fold stimulation over the basal extent of incorporation. The peptides were also analyzed for their capacity to inhibit the binding of 50 pM 125I-labeled GRP to Swiss 3T3 cells. The combination of two chemical modifications, each antagonistic in itself, led to the creation of antagonists with orders of magnitude greater potency than either modification alone. (i) Antagonist analogs of the form -Leu26-psi(CH2NH)-Xaa27-NH2 [where Xaa is Leu, norleucine (Nle), or Phe; residues numbered after GRP], similar to those introduced by Coy and coworkers [for review, see Jensen, R. T. & Coy, D. H. (1991) Trends Pharmacol. Sci. 12, 13-19], were found to have nanomolar potencies. (ii) We found that an octapeptide C-terminal GRP analog having D-Pro adjacent to the C-terminal amino acid amide was antagonistic, with a potency of 40 nM. By combining both modifications, specific analogs were found with potencies > 1000-fold greater than our lead structure--[(4'-hydroxy)-3-phenylpropanoyl]-Pro-Arg-Gly-Asn-His-Tr p-Ala-Val - Gly-His-Leu-psi(CH2NH)-Nle-NH2--and greater than any antagonist previously reported. The analogs [(4'-hydroxy)-3-phenylpropanoyl]-His-Trp-Ala-Val-D-Ala-His-D-Pro- psi(CH2NH)-Phe-NH2 and 1-naphthoyl-His-Trp-Ala-Val-D-Ala-His-D-Pro-psi(CH2NH)-Phe-NH2 antagonized [3H]thymidine incorporation with IC50 values of approximately 0.3 nM and inhibited the binding of 125I-labeled GRP with IC50 values of approximately 1 pM. These peptides may be of use in the study of the physiology of GRP.

  10. Conveyance of partial agonism/antagonism to bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide analogues on Swiss 3T3 cells by a carboxyl-terminal leucine insertion.

    PubMed

    Kull, F C; Leban, J J; Landavazo, A; Stewart, K D; Stockstill, B; McDermed, J D

    1992-10-15

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a neuroendocrine hormone that may be involved in the pathophysiology of small cell lung carcinoma. We describe carboxylterminal peptide analogues of GRP and bombesin, a 14-residue amphibian homologue, that were modeled after the antagonist [Leu13-psi(CH2NH)-Leu14]bombesin and retained the psi bond. Three novel peptides contained a Leu insertion amino to the psi bond, i.e. ... Leu13Leu14 psi X (residues numbered after bombesin) where X = LeuNH2 or norleucine-NH2). The Leu-insertion analogues behaved as pure partial agonists/antagonists when examined for the ability to stimulate [3H]thymidine incorporation into quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells (agonist activity) and to diminish the agonist response of GRP (antagonist activity). A time course of [3H]thymidine incorporation into quiescent cells indicated maximal incorporation at 20-h post-peptide addition for bombesin and GRP and a Leu-insertion peptide, but the extent of the incorporation for the Leu-insertion peptide was half that of GRP and bombesin. The agonist dose responses of the Leu-insertion peptides (EC50 values of 1-10 nM) paralleled GRP and bombesin, but the maximal response of the Leu-insertion peptides, even at concentrations as high as 10(-4) M, was half the maximal value of GRP or bombesin. High concentrations of the Leu-insertion peptides antagonized 10 nM GRP (a concentration that produced a near-maximal GRP response) yielding a response that was half the maximal value of GRP and equivalent to the maximal response of the Leu-insertion peptides alone. Analogues of the form ... Leu13 psi X behaved as complete antagonists. The KD values of the Leu-insertion peptides for competitive binding versus 125I-GRP (2-50 nM) were as potent as parent ... Leu14 agonists. Stability studies indicated that peptide potencies for both agonist and antagonist activities diminished upon peptide incubation in medium or on cells. The results suggested that, for the Leu-insertion peptides

  11. A comparative study of the peroxidase-antiperoxidase method and an avidin-biotin complex method for studying polypeptide hormones with radioimmunoassay antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hsu, S M; Raine, L; Fanger, H

    1981-05-01

    A highly sensitive immunoenzymatic technic is presented. The method involves three sequential steps: (1) primary antibody, (2) biotin-labeled secondary antibody, and (3) avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex. Avidin, an egg white protein, has four binding sites for the low-molecular-weight vitamin biotin. Many moieties of biotin can be coupled to the peroxidase molecule. Thus, since a relatively large amount of avidin is incubated with biotin-labeled peroxidase, avidin serves as a link between biotin-peroxidase molecules; in turn, biotin-peroxidase serves as a link between avidin molecules. Consequently, this large lattice-like complex with biotin-binding capability can be attracted to the sites of biotin-labeled antibody, producing a superior staining sensitivity. Several commercially available radioimmunoassay antibodies (e.g., antiglucagon, prolactin, gastrin, growth hormone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone antibodies) were tested for immunohistochemical staining. The unlabeled antibody peroxidase-antiperoxidase method fails to stain gastrin or thyroid-stimulating secretory cells when using these antibodies, and a relatively high antibody concentration is required to produce a positive reaction for glucagon, prolactin, and growth hormone. In contrast, the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method successfully demonstrates polypeptide hormones even when antibodies are diluted 20 to 40 times.

  12. Somatostatin, misoprostol and galanin inhibit gastrin- and PACAP-stimulated secretion of histamine and pancreastatin from ECL cells by blocking specific Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Björkqvist, Maria; Bernsand, Maria; Eliasson, Lena; Håkanson, Rolf; Lindström, Erik

    2005-08-15

    The oxyntic mucosa is rich in ECL cells. They secrete histamine and chromogranin A-derived peptides, such as pancreastatin, in response to gastrin and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). Secretion is initiated by Ca2+ entry. While gastrin stimulates secretion by opening L-type and N-type Ca2+ channels, PACAP stimulates secretion by activating L-type and receptor-operated Ca2+ channels. Somatostatin, galanin and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) inhibit gastrin- and PACAP-stimulated secretion from the ECL cells. In the present study, somatostatin and the PGE2 congener misoprostol inhibited gastrin- and PACAP-stimulated secretion 100%, while galanin inhibited at most 60-65%. Bay K 8644, a specific activator of L-type Ca2+ channels, stimulated ECL-cell secretion, an effect that was inhibited equally effectively by somatostatin, misoprostol and galanin (75-80% inhibition). Pretreatment with pertussis toxin, that inactivates inhibitory G-proteins, prevented all three agents from inhibiting stimulated secretion (regardless of the stimulus). Pretreatment with nifedipine (10 microM), an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, reduced PACAP-evoked pancreastatin secretion by 50-60%, gastrin-evoked secretion by approximately 80% and abolished the response to Bay K 8644. The nifedipine-resistant response to PACAP was abolished by somatostatin and misoprostol but not by galanin. Gastrin and PACAP raised the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a biphasic manner, believed to reflect mobilization of internal Ca2+ followed by Ca2+ entry. Somatostatin and misoprostol blocked Ca2+ entry (and histamine and pancreastatin secretion) but not mobilization of internal Ca2+. The present observations on isolated ECL cells suggest that Ca2+ entry rather than mobilization of internal Ca2+ triggers exocytosis, that gastrin and PACAP activate different (but over-lapping) Ca2+ channels, that somatostatin, misoprostol and galanin interact with inhibitory G-proteins to block Ca2+ entry via L-type Ca

  13. Role of gastrin in the development of gastric mucosa, ECL cells and A-like cells in newborn and young rats.

    PubMed

    Björkqvist, Maria; Dornonville de la Cour, Charlotta; Zhao, Chun-Mei; Gagnemo-Persson, Rebecca; Håkanson, Rolf; Norlén, Per

    2002-10-15

    Histamine-producing ECL cells and ghrelin-producing A-like cells are endocrine/paracrine cell populations in the acid-producing part of the rat stomach. While the A-like cells operate independently of gastrin, the ECL cells respond to gastrin with mobilization of histamine and chromogranin A (CGA)-derived peptides, such as pancreastatin. Gastrin is often assumed to be the driving force behind the postnatal development of the gastric mucosa in general and the ECL cells in particular. We tested this assumption by examining the oxyntic mucosa (with ECL cells and A-like cells) in developing rats under the influence of YF476, a cholecystokinin-2 (CCK(2)) receptor antagonist. The drug was administered by weekly subcutaneous injections starting at birth. The body weight gain was not affected. Weaning occurred at days 15-22 in both YF476-treated and age-matched control rats. Circulating gastrin was low at birth and reached adult levels 2 weeks after birth. During and after weaning (but not before), YF476 greatly raised the serum gastrin concentration (because of abolished acid feedback inhibition of gastrin release). The weight of the stomach was unaffected by YF476 during the first 2-3 weeks after birth. From 4 to 5 weeks of age, the weight and thickness of the gastric mucosa were lower in YF476-treated rats than in controls. Pancreastatin-immunoreactive cells (i.e. all endocrine cells in the stomach) and ghrelin-immunoreactive cells (A-like cells) were few at birth and increased gradually in number until 6-8 weeks of age (control rats). At first, YF476 did not affect the development of the pancreastatin-immunoreactive cells, but a few weeks after weaning, the cells were fewer in the YF476 rats. The ECL-cell parameters (oxyntic mucosal histamine and pancreastatin concentrations, the histidine decarboxylase (HDC) activity, the HDC mRNA levels and serum pancreastatin concentration) increased slowly until weaning in both YF476-treated and control rats. From then on, there

  14. The protective and hormonal effects of proanthocyanidin against gastric mucosal injury in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yoshikazu; Matsui, Teruaki; Arakawa, Yasuyuki

    2004-09-01

    Proanthocyanidin, a grape-seed polyphenol, has been reported to have protective properties against vascular injury and ulcers, preventive effects against atherosclerosis and cancer, and antioxidative effects, such as improving lipid metabolism and slowing aging. However, little has been reported on its antiulcer effects. We aimed to elucidate the antiulcer mechanism of proanthocyanidin. Gravinol, containing 89.3% proanthocyanidin, was used. Proanthocyanidin solution, in distilled water, at 0.002%, 0.02%, 0.2%, or 1%, was given to rats ad libitum for 2 weeks. Distilled water was given to control rats. The effect of proanthocyanidin on gastric mucosal injury was investigated with the water-immersion restraint stress model. The ratios of areas of hemorrhagic erosion were compared as the lesion index. Myeloperoxidase activities were also examined, as an index of tissue injury. Superoxide dismutase activity was measured to examine its antioxidative effect. Furthermore, serum gastrin, somatostatin, histamine, and prostaglandin E(2) levels were measured in this rat model. Proanthocyanidin administration significantly suppressed gastric mucosal injury, induced by water-immersion restraint stress, in a dose-dependent manner. Myeloperoxidase activities were also significantly inhibited, whereas superoxide dismutase activities were significantly stimulated. As to gastrointestinal hormones, the secretion of gastrin, somatostatin, and histamine was significantly inhibited, while prostaglandin E(2) secretion was significantly stimulated. Proanthocyanidin was shown to have a protective effect on the gastric mucosa. The mechanisms underlying the effect of proanthocyanidin were considered to be the following: anti-gastrin and anti-histamine effects to prevent attacks by water-immersion restraint stress, and mucoprotective properties, bestowed by increased prostaglandin and increased superoxide dismutase activities in the gastric mucosa.

  15. Syndromic versus non-syndromic sporadic gastrin-producing neuroendocrine tumors of the duodenum: comparison of pathological features and biological behavior.

    PubMed

    Rosentraeger, M Johannes; Garbrecht, Nele; Anlauf, Martin; Raffel, Andreas; Knoefel, Wolfram T; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klöppel, Günter

    2016-03-01

    Sporadic gastrin-producing neuroendocrine tumors of the duodenum present either with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) or with unspecific symptoms. While syndromic gastrin-producing neuroendocrine tumors often show metastases at the time of diagnosis, those without a syndrome do not. The aim of the study was to search for clinicopathological features that may distinguish the two categories of gastrin-producing duodenal tumors. In a retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical and pathological data in a series of 41 patients with syndromic (i.e., gastrinomas) or non-syndromic duodenal gastrin-producing neuroendocrine tumors (ns-gas-NETs). Twenty-four (59 %) of the 41 patients had tumors that were associated with a ZES and were classified as gastrinomas. These tumors showed a higher Ki-67 index than that of the ns-gas-NETs (1.74 vs. 0.85 %, p = 0.012). In addition, they had more lymph node metastases (75 vs. 6 %, p < 0.001) and showed liver metastases and thus presented much more frequently in TNM stage ≥III (75 vs. 6 %; p < 0.001) than their non-syndromic counterparts. Gastrinomas were removed surgically, ns-gas-NETs endoscopically. We did not observe any significant differences in overall survival or recurrence of disease. Duodenal gastrinomas show no clear morphological features that distinguish them from their non-syndromic counterparts. However, the patients with gastrinomas present in a more advanced stage of disease and need surgical treatment, while non-syndromic gastrin-producing duodenal NETs may be cured by complete endoscopical removal.

  16. Statistical analysis of serum pepsinogen I (PG I) and II (PG II) levels, PG I/PG II ratios and serum gastrin levels in a general population.

    PubMed

    Kazuo, A; Junichi, M

    1996-10-01

    To allow adoption of serum pepsinogen as a screening indicator of gastric cancer, serum pepsinogen I & II levels, the ratios of PG I / PG II and the serum gastrin levels in a general population were studied using 850 samples selected at random from a rural area in Japan. The collected data were analyzed statistically to determine the distribution characteristics by various categories of sex and age. The following results were obtained:1. The distributions of PG I and PG II, the ratios of PG I/PG II and serum gastrin values largely deviated from the normal distribution. Therefore, the use of non-parametrical methods was recommended for analysis of these data.2. Although no significant difference between all selected men and all selected women was observed in any of the three parameters of PG I and PG II levels and the ratios of PG I / PG II, a significant difference between men and women was observed for PG I levels in under-fifty age groups. On the other hand, the median serum gastrin value (92.0 pg/ml) in all selected men was significantly lower than that (101.0 pg/ml) in all selected women. A statistically significant difference between men and women was observed in serum gastrin levels both in the under-forty age group and in the sixty and over age group.3. No significant difference was observed in the pattern of changes in PG I levels with increasing age in either men or women. While PG II levels in men varied irregularly with advancing age, PG II levels in women showed obvious increases with advancing age. The ratios of PG I / PG II showed a tendency to decrease with advancing age in both men and women. Conversely, serum gastrin levels increased with advancing age in both men and women.

  17. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Learn About Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ...

  18. [Incretin hormones].

    PubMed

    Cáp, J

    2011-04-01

    Incretin hormones are peptides that are secreted from endocrine cell of gastrointestinal tract after nutrient ingestion and stimulate insulin secretion. Glucosodependent Insulinotropic Peptide--GIP is released from K-cells of duodenum and proximal jejunum, recently GIP synthesis has been proved in pancreatic alpha cells. Besides the incretin effect causes GIP increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis in fat tissue, increased bone formation and decreased resorption and has protective and proliferative effect on CNS neurons. Both GIP agonists (to treat diabetes) and antagonist (to treat obesity) are being studied. Another incretin hormone is derived in intestinal I-cells by posttranslational processing of proglucagon--glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). GLP-1 stimulates insuline production and inhibits glucagon secretion, exerts proliferative and antiapoptotic effect on beta-cells. Via receptors on vagal nerve and central mechanisms decreases food intake and decreases body weight. By deceleration of gastric emptying it attenuates increases in meal-associated blood glucose levels. It exerts cardioprotective effects. GLP-1 receptors have been proved in liver recently but decreased liver glucose production and increased glucose uptake by liver and muscle are mediated indirectly by altering insulin and glucagons levels. GLP-2 stimulates enterocytes proliferation, up-regulates intestinal nutrient transport, improves intestinal barrier function, and inhibits gastric and intestinal motility. GLP-2 also reduces bone resorption.

  19. Bombesin-conjugated nanoparticles improve the cytotoxic efficacy of docetaxel against gastrin-releasing but androgen-independent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kulhari, Hitesh; Pooja, Deep; Singh, Mayank K; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Adams, David J; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Bombesin (BBN)-conjugated polymeric nanoparticles to target docetaxel (DTX) to prostate cancer cells that overexpress gastrin-releasing peptides receptors. In vitro cytotoxicity, uptake of nanoparticles and inhibition of cell migration were assessed against human prostate cancer cells. Preclinical pharmacokinetic and tissue-distribution studies of nanoparticles were performed in Balb/c mice and results compared with the marketed formulation Taxotere(®). BBN-conjugated DTX-loaded nanoparticles exhibited higher cytotoxicity, inhibition of cell migration and colony formation than non-targeted nanoparticles or DTX alone. More BBN-conjugated nanoparticles were taken up at a faster rate than unconjugated nanoparticles. In vivo, this drug delivery improved pharmacokinetics of DTX by increasing mean residence time and decreasing clearance. This study provides an alternate approach for polysorbate-free delivery of DTX, with improved in vivo performance.

  20. Two prohormones for gastrin-releasing peptide are encoded by two mRNAs differing by 19 nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Spindel, E.R.; Zilberberg, M.D.; Habener, J.F.; Chin, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    In studies on the molecular biology of human gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), the authors have discovered an example of a change in translational reading frame apparently produced through alternative RNA splicing. Complementary DNAs prepared from a pulmonary carcinoid tumor rich in GRP immunoreactivity had one of two different-sized internal DNA fragments after digestion with the restriction enzyme Pvu II. Nucleotide sequences of the two DNA fragments were identical except for 19 additional nucleotides present in the larger fragment. The region of the mRNA containing the 19 nucleotides corresponded to the carboxyl-terminal region of the human GRP precursor. The resulting shift in reading frame causes a difference of 10 amino acids in size and an overall sequence difference of 27 amino acids between the two GRP prohormones so formed. The change in reading frame described here is unusual in eukaryotes and is yet another mechanism to produce diversity in the generation of biological peptides.

  1. Changes in small intestinal motility and related hormones by acupuncture stimulation at Zusanli (ST 36) in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jung-Hee; Lee, Deuk-Joo; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kwon, Sunoh; Park, Hi-Joon; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Hyejung; Kim, Seungtae

    2017-03-01

    To clarify the effects of acupuncture stimulation at Zusanli (ST 36) on the hormonal changes. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 mice received acupuncture stimulation at acupoint ST 36 or Quchi (LI 11) once a day for 3 or 5 days in the acupuncture-stimulated groups, but not received in the normal group (n=6 in each group). On day 3 or 5, animals were given 0.1 mL of charcoal orally with a bulbed steel needle, 30 min after the last acupuncture stimulation. Ten minutes later, mice were anesthetized, and the intestinal transit and the concentrations of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), motilin, ghrelin and gastrin in the serum were measured. Compared to no acupuncture stimulation, acupuncture stimulation at ST 36 for 5 days increased the intestinal transit and down-regulated the concentration of VIP and up-regulated the concentrations of motilin, ghrelin and gastrin (P<0.05 or 0.01), whereas acupuncture stimulation at LI 11 did not change them signifificantly (P>0.05). Acupuncture stimulation at ST 36 for 5 days enhances the small intestinal motility and regulates the secretion of hormones related to small intestinal motility.

  2. Gastrin induces sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 phosphorylation and mTOR activation via a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-/protein kinase C-dependent but AKT-independent pathway in renal proximal tubule cells derived from a normotensive male human.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianbing; Jose, Pedro A

    2013-02-01

    Gastrin is natriuretic, but its renal molecular targets and signal transduction pathways are not fully known. In this study, we confirmed the existence of CCKBR (a gastrin receptor) in male human renal proximal tubule cells and discovered that gastrin induced S6 phosphorylation, a downstream component of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3 kinase)-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Gastrin also increased the phosphorylation of sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 (NHE3) at serine 552, caused its internalization, and decreased its expression at the cell surface and NHE activity. The phosphorylation of NHE3 and S6 was dependent on PI3 kinases because it was blocked by 2 different PI3-kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294,002. The phosphorylation of NHE3 and S6 was not affected by the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 but was blocked by a pan-PKC (chelerythrine) and a conventional PKC (cPKC) inhibitor (Gö6976) (10 μM) and an intracellular calcium chelator, 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)-ester, suggesting the importance of cPKC and intracellular calcium in the gastrin signaling pathway. The cPKC involved was probably PKCα because it was phosphorylated by gastrin. The gastrin-mediated phosphorylation of NHE3, S6, and PKCα was via phospholipase C because it was blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor, U73122 (10 μM). The phosphorylation (activation) of AKT, which is usually upstream of mammalian target of rapamycin in the classic PI3 kinase-AKT-p70S6K signaling pathway, was not affected, suggesting that the gastrin-induced phosphorylation of NHE3 and S6 is dependent on both PI3 kinase and PKCα but not AKT.

  3. Gastrin Induces Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger 3 Phosphorylation and mTOR Activation via a Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase-/Protein Kinase C-Dependent but AKT-Independent Pathway in Renal Proximal Tubule Cells Derived From a Normotensive Male Human

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gastrin is natriuretic, but its renal molecular targets and signal transduction pathways are not fully known. In this study, we confirmed the existence of CCKBR (a gastrin receptor) in male human renal proximal tubule cells and discovered that gastrin induced S6 phosphorylation, a downstream component of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3 kinase)-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Gastrin also increased the phosphorylation of sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 (NHE3) at serine 552, caused its internalization, and decreased its expression at the cell surface and NHE activity. The phosphorylation of NHE3 and S6 was dependent on PI3 kinases because it was blocked by 2 different PI3-kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294,002. The phosphorylation of NHE3 and S6 was not affected by the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 but was blocked by a pan-PKC (chelerythrine) and a conventional PKC (cPKC) inhibitor (Gö6976) (10 μM) and an intracellular calcium chelator, 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)-ester, suggesting the importance of cPKC and intracellular calcium in the gastrin signaling pathway. The cPKC involved was probably PKCα because it was phosphorylated by gastrin. The gastrin-mediated phosphorylation of NHE3, S6, and PKCα was via phospholipase C because it was blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor, U73122 (10 μM). The phosphorylation (activation) of AKT, which is usually upstream of mammalian target of rapamycin in the classic PI3 kinase-AKT-p70S6K signaling pathway, was not affected, suggesting that the gastrin-induced phosphorylation of NHE3 and S6 is dependent on both PI3 kinase and PKCα but not AKT. PMID:23275470

  4. Relationship among serum creatinine, serum gastrin, calcium-phosphorus product, and uremic gastropathy in cats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McLeland, S M; Lunn, K F; Duncan, C G; Refsal, K R; Quimby, J M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats is associated with gastrointestinal signs commonly attributed to uremic gastropathy. Consequently, patients often are treated with antacids and gastrointestinal protectants. This therapeutic regimen is based on documented gastric lesions in uremic humans and dogs, but the nature and incidence of uremic gastropathy in cats are unknown. Evaluate uremic gastropathy in CKD cats to facilitate refinement of medical management for gastrointestinal signs. Thirty-seven CKD cats; 12 nonazotemic cats Stomachs were evaluated for the presence of classic uremic gastropathy lesions. Histopathologic lesions were compared with serum creatinine concentrations, calcium-phosphorus product (CPP), and serum gastrin concentrations. Gastric ulceration, edema, and vascular fibrinoid change were not observed. The most important gastric lesions in CKD cats were fibrosis and mineralization. Sixteen CKD cats (43%) had evidence of gastric fibrosis of varying severity and 14 CKD cats (38%) had gastric mineralization. CKD cats were more likely to have gastric fibrosis and mineralization than nonazotemic controls (P = .005 and P = .021, respectively). Only cats with moderate and severe azotemia had gastric mineralization. CPP was correlated with disease severity; severely azotemic CKD cats had significantly higher CPP when compared with nonazotemic controls, and to mildly and moderately azotemic cats (P < .05). Gastrin concentrations were significantly higher in CKD cats when compared with nonazotemic controls (P = .003), but increased concentrations were not associated with gastric ulceration. Uremic gastropathy in CKD cats differs from that described in other species and this difference should be considered when devising medical management. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    Growth hormone deficiency means the pituitary gland does not make enough growth hormone. ... The pituitary gland is located at the base of the brain. This gland controls the body's balance of hormones. It ...

  6. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  7. Menopause and Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... use hormone therapy to prevent memory loss or Alzheimer’s disease? No, do not use hormone therapy to prevent memory loss or Alzheimer’s disease. Do hormones protect against aging and wrinkles ...

  8. Basal and postprandial plasma levels of PYY, ghrelin, cholecystokinin, gastrin and insulin in women with moderate and morbid obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zwirska-Korczala, K; Konturek, S J; Sodowski, M; Wylezol, M; Kuka, D; Sowa, P; Adamczyk-Sowa, M; Kukla, M; Berdowska, A; Rehfeld, J F; Bielanski, W; Brzozowski, T

    2007-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS), defined as central obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance, has been associated with inflammatory biomarkers and cardiovascular diseases. This study was carried out on three groups of women; lean controls, moderately obese with MS (OB-MS) and morbidly obese with MS (MOB-MS). The main objectives were: 1. to analyze the plasma levels of total and acylated ghrelin, peptide YY(3-36) (PYY(3-36)), cholecystokinin (CCK), gastrin and insulin levels under basal conditions and in response to a standard mixed meal, and 2. to elucidate the relationship between the plasma levels of these gut peptides and metabolic syndrome parameters. Plasma levels of the gut hormones were measured by radioimmunoassays at time 0 just before the meal and at 30, 60 and 120 min after a meal ingestion. Traditional lipid profile and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP), the strongest biomarker of inflammation were also determined in OB-MS and MOB-MS. When compared to OB-MS, MOB-MS exhibited much higher anthropometric parameters such as waist circumference, higher fat mass and higher plasma levels of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and hs-CRP. Both these obese groups revealed significantly higher values of body mass index (BMI), fat mass, total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, insulin resistance (IR) calculated from homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) and hs-CRP compared to the values recorded in lean subjects. Fasting PYY(3-36) level was lower, while fasting acylated ghrelin was higher in MOB-MS than in OB-MS. Plasma total and acylated ghrelin levels were significantly lower in OB-MS compared to lean women. In MOB-MS women the fasting PYY(3-36) levels were lower compared to lean controls and OB-MS, whilst postprandially in both OB-MS and MOB-MS, it was much lower than in lean women. The fasting plasma levels of total and acylated ghrelin and their postprandial decrease

  9. Plasma concentrations of cholecystokinin, CCK-8, and CCK-33, 39 in rats, determined by a method based on enzyme digestion of gastrin before HPLC and RIA detection of CCK.

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, A; Carlquist, M; Hansen, S; Uvnäs-Moberg, K

    1989-01-01

    A new specific method for determination of cholecystokinin, CCK-8, and CCK-33, 39 in rat plasma is described. Plasma CCK radioimmunoassay (RIA) is difficult, because of cross-reactivity with gastrin. In the rat, problems because of difficulties in separating gastrin from CCK by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) exist. These were solved by enzyme digestion of gastrin before HPLC separation of molecular variants of CCK from gastrin fragments. Cholecystokinin immunoreactive forms in the HPLC fractions were determined by an antibody, which recognises the carboxyl terminus of CCK and gastrin. Fasting concentrations of small (CCK-8) and large (CCK-33, 39) molecular forms of CCK averaged 1.9 (0.3) pM and were raised to 13.4 (3.8) pM in rats fed ad libitum. Cholecystokinin in lactating rats rose two-fold after suckling, compared with 2.8 fold in response to feeding. The basal ratio between CCK-8 and CCK-33, 39 was approximately 1:1, but increased in favour of CCK-8 after feeding and in response to suckling. Gastrin like immunoreactivity measured in unextracted plasma was found to rise after feeding, but was unchanged in response to suckling. PMID:2703143

  10. Deciding about hormone therapy

    MedlinePlus

    HRT - deciding; Estrogen replacement therapy - deciding; ERT- deciding; Hormone replacement therapy - deciding; Menopause - deciding; HT - deciding; Menopausal hormone therapy - deciding; MHT - deciding

  11. Calcitonin, the forgotten hormone: does it deserve to be forgotten?

    PubMed Central

    Felsenfeld, Arnold J.; Levine, Barton S.

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin is a 32 amino acid hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland. Calcitonin has been preserved during the transition from ocean-based life to land dwellers and is phylogenetically older than parathyroid hormone. Calcitonin secretion is stimulated by increases in the serum calcium concentration and calcitonin protects against the development of hypercalcemia. Calcitonin is also stimulated by gastrointestinal hormones such as gastrin. This has led to the unproven hypothesis that postprandial calcitonin stimulation could play a role in the deposition of calcium and phosphate in bone after feeding. However, no bone or other abnormalities have been described in states of calcitonin deficiency or excess except for diarrhea in a few patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Calcitonin is known to stimulate renal 1,25 (OH)2 vitamin D (1,25D) production at a site in the proximal tubule different from parathyroid hormone and hypophosphatemia. During pregnancy and lactation, both calcitonin and 1,25D are increased. The increases in calcitonin and 1,25D may be important in the transfer of maternal calcium to the fetus/infant and in the prevention and recovery of maternal bone loss. Calcitonin has an immediate effect on decreasing osteoclast activity and has been used for treatment of hypercalcemia. Recent studies in the calcitonin gene knockout mouse have shown increases in bone mass and bone formation. This last result together with the presence of calcitonin receptors on the osteocyte suggests that calcitonin could possibly affect osteocyte products which affect bone formation. In summary, a precise role for calcitonin remains elusive more than 50 years after its discovery. PMID:25815174

  12. Occurrence of FSH, inhibin and other hypothalamic-pituitary-intestinal hormones in normal fertility, subfertility, and tumors of human testes.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M K; Garde, S V; Sheth, A R

    1995-01-01

    To compare the distribution of peptide hormones in presumably normal human testicular tissues and specimens exhibiting any of five pathologies. Biopsies from patients having testicular malfunctions were prepared as sections and specifically immunohistochemically stained for inhibin, FSH, serotonin, AUP, and oxytocin. Immunocytochemical studies revealed the presence of various hypophysial-pituitary-intestinal hormones, viz., FSH, inhibin, arginine vasopressin (AVP), calcitonin, serotonin, oxytocin, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), gastrin, secretin, and somatostatin in human testicular biopsies exhibiting normal spermatogenesis, Sertoli-cell-only syndrome, spermatogenic arrest, Leydig cell hyperplasia, Leydig cell tumor, and seminoma. Intensity of immunostaining for all peptides except FSH was stronger in cases of subfertile as compared to normal testis. Intensity of immunostaining with inhibin was maximum in Leydig cell tumor. These regulatory peptides may be involved in the pathophysiology of the testes.

  13. [Hormonal dysnatremia].

    PubMed

    Karaca, P; Desailloud, R

    2013-10-01

    Because of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) disorder on production or function we can observe dysnatremia. In the absence of production by posterior pituitary, central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurs with hypernatremia. There are hereditary autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X- linked forms. When ADH is secreted but there is an alteration on his receptor AVPR2, it is a nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in acquired or hereditary form. We can make difference on AVP levels and/or on desmopressine response which is negative in nephrogenic forms. Hyponatremia occurs when there is an excess of ADH production: it is a euvolemic hypoosmolar hyponatremia. The most frequent etiology is SIADH (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH), a diagnostic of exclusion which is made after eliminating corticotropin deficiency and hypothyroidism. In case of brain injury the differential diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome has to be discussed, because its treatment is perfusion of isotonic saline whereas in SIADH, the treatment consists in administration of hypertonic saline if hyponatremia is acute and/or severe. If not, fluid restriction demeclocycline or vaptans (antagonists of V2 receptors) can be used in some European countries. Four types of SIADH exist; 10 % of cases represent not SIADH but SIAD (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis) due to a constitutive activation of vasopressin receptor that produces water excess. c 2013 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Application of 2-chlorotrityl resin in solid phase synthesis of (Leu15)-gastrin I and unsulfated cholecystokinin octapeptide. Selective O-deprotection of tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Gatos, D; Kapolos, S; Poulos, C; Schäfer, W; Yao, W Q

    1991-12-01

    The carboxyl terminal dipeptide amide, Fmoc-Asp-Phe-NH2, of gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK) has been attached in high yield through its free side chain carboxyl group to the acid labile 2-chlorotrityl resin. The obtained peptide resin ester has been applied in the solid phase synthesis of partially protected (Leu15)-gastrin I utilising Fmoc-amino acids. Quantitative cleavage of this peptide from resin, with the t-butyl type side chain protection intact is achieved using mixtures of acetic acid/trifluoroethanol/dichloromethane. Under the same conditions complete detritylation of the tyrosine phenoxy function occurs simultaneously. Thus, the solid-phase synthesis of peptides selectively deprotected at the side chain of tyrosine is rendered possible by the use of 2-chlorotrityl resin and Fmoc-Tyr(Trt)-OH. The efficiency of this approach has been proved by the subsequent high-yield synthesis of three model peptides and the CCK-octapeptide.

  15. Gastric mucosal hyperplasia via upregulation of gastrin induced by persistent activation of gastric innate immunity in major histocompatibility complex class II deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, T; Nishio, A; Okazaki, K; Uza, N; Ueno, S; Kido, M; Inoue, S; Kitamura, H; Kiriya, K; Ohashi, S; Asada, M; Tamaki, H; Matsuura, M; Kawasaki, K; Suzuki, K; Uchida, K; Fukui, H; Nakase, H; Watanabe, N; Chiba, T

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim Major histocompatibility complex class II deficient (Aα0/0) mice have decreased CD4+ T cells, making them immunologically similar to patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Both patients with AIDS and Aα0/0 mice have hypertrophic gastric folds. To clarify the mechanism of gastric mucosal hyperplasia, we investigated the pathophysiology and the role of the innate immunity in the stomach of Aα0/0 mice. Methods Stomachs from 1–6 month old Aα0/0 mice, kept under specific pathogen free conditions, were examined at 1 month intervals histologically and immunohistochemically. Gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, Toll‐like receptors (TLRs), cyclooxygenase (COX)‐2, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the gastric mucosa was investigated. Serum gastrin levels and gastric acidity were measured. Bacterial culture of the stomach was performed. To clarify the roles of hypergastrinaemia in the gastric mucosa, a gastrin receptor antagonist (AG041R) was administered. Results Aα0/0 mice had a diffusely thick corpus mucosa with infiltration of CD11b+ granulocytes and macrophages. Anti‐Ki67 staining demonstrated expansion of the proliferating neck zone. Gene expression of interleukin 1β, interferon γ, TLR‐2, TLR‐4, and COX‐2 were upregulated, and MPO activity was increased. Only a small amount of non‐pathogenic bacteria was detected in the stomach. Serum gastrin levels and Reg‐Iα positive cells in the gastric mucosa increased, despite normal gastric acidity. After treatment with AG041R, gastric mucosal thickness was significantly reduced. Conclusion Persistent activation of innate immunity in the stomach induced gastric mucosal hyperplasia through upregulation of gastrin synthesis in Aα0/0 mice, suggesting a pathophysiology similar to the gastric changes in patients with AIDS. PMID:16322110

  16. Alkaloids from Mahonia bealei posses anti-H⁺/K⁺-ATPase and anti-gastrin effects on pyloric ligation-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Su-Li; Li, Hui; He, Xin; Zhang, Run-Qi; Sun, Yu-He; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-09-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanism(s) of the total alkaloids (TA) from Mahonia bealei in treating pyloric ligation-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Animals were sacrificed after 19 h of the ligation. Gastric acid, peptic activities, mucin levels, H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities and the gastrin level were analyzed. To improve the accuracy of the observations, IPP 6.0 software was introduced to measure the area of ulcer. TA (18.56 mg/kg/day, i.g.) showed an antiulcer effect by significantly decreasing the gastric ulcer areas (11.28 mm(2)) compared with model group (26.36 mm(2)). The TA ulcer inhibition ratio was 57.2%, compared with the effect of the positive control, omeprazole (62.96%). The results also showed that TA had a significant effect in inhibiting the release of H(+)/K(+)-ATPase, reducing the content of gastrin and decreasing gastric acidity on experimental animals. However, the TA had no significant effects on gastric mucus secretion and pepsin activity. Data indicated that TA had gastric ulcer protective effects by modulating the H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and gastrin level. TA has a potential to be developed as a pharmacological agent for the treatment of gastric ulcers.

  17. Z-360 Suppresses Tumor Growth in MIA PaCa-2-bearing Mice via Inhibition of Gastrin-induced Anti-Apoptotic Effects.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Makoto; Kuki, Kazumasa; Hori, Yuko; Tanaka, Takao

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the anti-tumor mechanism of Z-360, a gastrin/cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R) antagonist, in MIA PaCa-2 cells and in a subcutaneous xenograft mice model. The anti-tumor effects of Z-360 and/or gemcitabine were monitored using a MIA PaCa-2 xenograft model. The effect of Z-360 on apoptosis in the model was examined by TUNEL staining and real-time PCR analysis and the effect in MIA PaCa-2 cells stably expressing human CCK2R was also evaluated by caspase-3/7 activity. In this xenograft model, Z-360 significantly reduced the tumor weight, increased TUNEL-positive cells and suppressed the expression of anti-apoptosis factors such as survivin, XIAP and Mcl-1, and these effects of Z-360 combined with gemcitabine were more effective. Furthermore, gastrin-17 and gastrin-34 inhibited apoptosis in vitro and Z-360 dose-dependently abrogated this effect. These results suggest that Z-360 exerts an anti-tumor effect through a reduction in anti-apoptosis factors by blocking CCK2R. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Hormone therapy in acne.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli

    2013-01-01

    Underlying hormone imbalances may render acne unresponsive to conventional therapy. Relevant investigations followed by initiation of hormonal therapy in combination with regular anti-acne therapy may be necessary if signs of hyperandrogenism are present. In addition to other factors, androgen-stimulated sebum production plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acne in women. Sebum production is also regulated by other hormones, including estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, glucocorticoids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and melanocortins. Hormonal therapy may also be beneficial in female acne patients with normal serum androgen levels. An understanding of the sebaceous gland and the hormonal influences in the pathogenesis of acne would be essential for optimizing hormonal therapy. Sebocytes form the sebaceous gland. Human sebocytes express a multitude of receptors, including receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters and the receptors for steroid and thyroid hormones. Various hormones and mediators acting through the sebocyte receptors play a role in the orchestration of pathogenetic lesions of acne. Thus, the goal of hormonal treatment is a reduction in sebum production. This review shall focus on hormonal influences in the elicitation of acne via the sebocyte receptors, pathways of cutaneous androgen metabolism, various clinical scenarios and syndromes associated with acne, and the available therapeutic armamentarium of hormones and drugs having hormone-like actions in the treatment of acne.

  19. The effect of bariatric surgery on gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Meek, Claire L; Lewis, Hannah B; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M; Park, Adrian J

    2016-03-01

    Bariatric surgery for obesity has proved to be an extremely effective method of promoting long-term weight reduction with additional beneficial metabolic effects, such as improved glucose tolerance and remission of type 2 diabetes. A range of bariatric procedures are in common use, including gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Although the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of bariatric surgery are unclear, gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptides are thought to play an important role. The aim of this review is to summarise the effects of different bariatric surgery procedures upon gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptides, including ghrelin, gastrin, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucose-dependent insulinotropic hormone (GIP), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, insulin, glucagon and somatostatin.

  20. Gene expression of ornithine decarboxylase, cyclooxygenase-2, and gastrin in atrophic gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori before and after eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Konturek, Peter C; Rembiasz, Kazimierz; Konturek, Stanislaw J; Stachura, Jerzy; Bielanski, Wladyslaw; Galuschka, K; Karcz, Danuta; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2003-01-01

    H. pylori (Hp) -induced atrophic gastritis is a well-known risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Whether Hp eradication can prevent or retard the progress of atrophy and metaplasia has been the topic of numerous studies but the subject remains controversial. Recently, the increased expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), gastrin and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 has been shown to be increased in premalignant lesions in gastric mucosa and to play an essential role in the malignant transformation. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of eradication therapy on atrophic gastritis and analyze the gene expression for ODC, COX-2 and gastrin in gastric mucosa after succesful eradication in patients with atrophic gastritis. Twenty patients with chronic atrophic gastritis including both corpus and antrum of the stomach were included in this study. Four antral mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained from antrum and four from corpus. The histopathologic evaluation of gastritis was based on Sydney classification of gastritis. All patients were Hp positive based on the [13C] urea breath test (UBT) and the presence of anti-Hp IgG and anti-CagA-antibodies detected by ELISA. The patients were then eradicated with triple therapy consiting of omeprazol (2 x 20 mg), amoxycillin (2 x 1 g) and clarithromycin (2 x 500 mg) for seven days and vitamin C 1 g/day for three months. In gastric mucosal samples obtained from the antrum and corpus before and after eradication, the mRNA expression for ODC, COX-2, and gastrin was assessed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In all patients the gastric secretory analysis was performed by measuring gastric acid output and serum gastrin levels. After triple therapy the successful eradication assessed by UBT was observed in 95% of patients. In 45% of patients the infection with CagA-positive Hp strain was observed. Three months after eradication a significant reduction in the gastric activity (neutrophilic

  1. Plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations in an elderly latino population are predicted by serum gastrin concentrations and crystalline vitamin B-12 intake.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alison K; Miller, Joshua W; Green, Ralph; Haan, Mary N; Allen, Lindsay H

    2003-09-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency increases with age, probably resulting from malabsorption of food-bound B-12 secondary to gastric atrophy. On the basis of this assumption, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommends those aged >50 y consume crystalline vitamin B-12. There is limited information on the prevalence of gastric atrophy in the elderly and whether the IOM recommendation would be effective. The objective of this study was to assess predictors of vitamin B-12 status and their interactions in free-living elderly. Individuals (n = 57) with deficient plasma vitamin B-12 (p-B12 < 148 pmol/L) were compared with 68 individuals with marginal p-B12 (148-221 pmol/L) and 52 with normal p-B12 (>221 pmol/L) in a cross-sectional sample (n = 1546) of elderly (>60 y) Latinos in California. Associations were examined among p-B12 and serum gastrin, vitamin B-12 intake from food and crystalline sources, and medications that putatively affect vitamin B-12 absorption. Serum gastrin was elevated, indicating gastric atrophy, in 48% of participants with deficient p-B12, 23% with marginal p-B12 and 21% of normal p-B12 participants, and was a significant predictor of deficient p-B12 and high plasma homocysteine (p-tHcy). Median total vitamin B-12 intake exceeded recommendations and was similar among status groups. Crystalline vitamin B-12 intake in the normal p-B12 group was higher than in the deficient p-B12 group (P < 0.01), and tended to be higher than the marginal group (P = 0.07). When serum gastrin was elevated, p-B12 was predicted by crystalline vitamin B-12, but not by intake of vitamin B-12 from food. Elevated serum gastrin was highly prevalent and predicted vitamin B-12 depletion. Crystalline vitamin B-12 intake predicted p-B12 in individuals with elevated serum gastrin, supporting IOM recommendations to increase consumption of crystalline vitamin B-12.

  2. AG-041R, a cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor antagonist, stimulates the repair of osteochondral defect in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toru; Kawasaki, Kenzo; Uchio, Yuji; Kataoka, Hiroko; Terashima, Masaharu; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2002-03-29

    A newly synthesized compound (AG-041R), 3R-1-(2,2Diethoxyethyl)-((4methylphenyl) amino-carbonyl methyl)-3-((4methylphenyl) ureido-indoline-2-one), is a cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor antagonist which has stimulatory effects on the matrix synthesis of chondrocytes in vitro. In this study, we examined the effect of AG-041R on the repair of osteochondral defects (cylindrical, 4 mm diameter) in the patellar groove of the rabbit knee joint. At the time of operation, 100 microl of 1 microM of AG-041R was administered, followed by 200 microl with an osmotic pump for 14 days. Histological and biochemical evaluations were performed at 12 and 24 weeks after surgery. The histological score of the AG-041R-treated group, the quantity of glycosaminoglycan and the ratio of chondroitin sulfate in the AG-041R-treated tissue were significantly higher than in the untreated group. Moreover, the degeneration of cartilage around the defect was suppressed in the AG-041R-treated group. These findings suggest that AG-041R is effective for the repair of osteochondral defects.

  3. Gastrin inhibits a novel, pathological colon cancer signaling pathway involving EGR1, AE2 and P-ERK

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ling-Jun; Liu, Rui-Jun; Zeng, Zhi; Alper, Seth L.; Cui, Heng-Jing; Lu, Yang; Zheng, Lin; Yan, Zhao-Wen; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Human anion exchanger 2 (AE2) is a plasma membrane protein that regulates intracellular pH and cell volume. AE2 contributes to transepithelial transport of chloride and bicarbonate in normal colon and other epithelial tissues. We now report that AE2 overexpression in colon cancer cells is correlated with expression of the nuclear proliferation marker, Ki67. Survival analysis of 24 patients with colon cancer in early stage or 33 patients with tubular adenocarcinoma demonstrated that expression of AE2 is correlated with poor prognosis. Cellular and molecular experiments indicated that AE2 expression promoted proliferation of colon cancer cells. In addition, we found that transcription factor EGR1 underlies AE2 upregulation, and the AE2 sequester p16INK4a (P16) in the cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. Cytoplasmic P16 enhanced ERK phosphorylation and promoted proliferation of colon cancer cells. Gastrin inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells by suppressing expression of EGR1 and AE2 and by blocking ERK phosphorylation. Taken together, our data describe a novel EGR1/AE2/P16/P-ERK signaling pathway in colon carcinogenesis, with implications for pathologic prognosis and for novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:22228178

  4. Gastrin inhibits a novel, pathological colon cancer signaling pathway involving EGR1, AE2, and P-ERK.

    PubMed

    Song, Ling-Jun; Liu, Rui-Jun; Zeng, Zhi; Alper, Seth L; Cui, Heng-Jing; Lu, Yang; Zheng, Lin; Yan, Zhao-Wen; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Human anion exchanger 2 (AE2) is a plasma membrane protein that regulates intracellular pH and cell volume. AE2 contributes to transepithelial transport of chloride and bicarbonate in normal colon and other epithelial tissues. We now report that AE2 overexpression in colon cancer cells is correlated with expression of the nuclear proliferation marker, Ki67. Survival analysis of 24 patients with colon cancer in early stage or 33 patients with tubular adenocarcinoma demonstrated that expression of AE2 is correlated with poor prognosis. Cellular and molecular experiments indicated that AE2 expression promoted proliferation of colon cancer cells. In addition, we found that transcription factor EGR1 underlies AE2 upregulation and the AE2 sequester p16INK4a (P16) in the cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. Cytoplasmic P16 enhanced ERK phosphorylation and promoted proliferation of colon cancer cells. Gastrin inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells by suppressing expression of EGR1 and AE2 and by blocking ERK phosphorylation. Taken together, our data describe a novel EGR1/AE2/P16/P-ERK signaling pathway in colon carcinogenesis, with implications for pathologic prognosis and for novel therapeutic approaches.

  5. A high-affinity, high-stability photoacoustic agent for imaging gastrin-releasing peptide receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Levi, Jelena; Sathirachinda, Ataya; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the utility of targeted photoacoustic imaging (PAI) in providing molecular information to complement intrinsic functional and anatomical details of the vasculature within prostate lesion. We developed a PAI agent, AA3G-740, that targets gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), found to be highly overexpressed in prostate cancer. The binding specificity of the agent was evaluated in human prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and LNCaP, and antagonist properties determined by cell internalization and intracellular calcium mobilization studies. The imaging sensitivity was assessed for the agent itself and for the PC3 cells labeled with agent. The in vivo stability of the agent was determined in human plasma and in the blood of living mice. The in vivo binding of the agent was evaluated in PC3 prostate tumor models in mice, and was validated ex vivo by optical imaging. AA3G-740 demonstrated strong and specific binding to GRPR. The sensitivity of detection in vitro indicated suitability of the agent to image very small lesions. In mice, the agent was able to bind to GRPR even in poorly vascularized tumors leading to nearly 2-fold difference in photoacoustic signal relative to the control agent. The ability to image both vasculature and molecular profile outside the blood vessels gives molecular PAI a unique advantage over currently used imaging techniques. The imaging method presented here can find application both in diagnosis and in image-guided biopsy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Characterization of gastrin-releasing peptide immunoreactivity in distinct storage particles in guinea pig myenteric and Torpedo electromotor neurones.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C; Whittaker, V P; Agoston, D V

    1990-01-01

    Using high resolution centrifugal density-gradient separation of cytoplasmic extracts of guinea pig myenteric plexus and Torpedo electric tissue, we have succeeded in isolating fractions of storage particles rich in gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). In extracts of myenteric plexus and gradients derived therefrom, the 10-amino acid GRP peptide (GRP-10) was the sole form present; this was bimodally distributed in the gradients, one peak copurifying with Golgi membranes and apparently consisting of immature storage particles, the other with other synaptophysin-rich neuropeptide-containing particles. In extracts of electric organ, a tissue rich in cholinergic electromotor nerve terminals, and gradients derived therefrom, GRP-like immunoreactivity behaved in gel permeation and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography like the 27-amino acid peptide (GRP-27). About half of the immunoreactivity sedimented in the centrifugal gradient to a region rich in particles containing vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-like immunoreactivity; the remainder was recovered in a very dense region of the gradient containing larger membrane fragments, including synaptosomes. The electromotor nerves and cell bodies also contained GRP-27-like immunoreactivity in relatively high concentration as did the Torpedo gut. It is concluded that this GRP-like peptide is packaged in dense storage particles in the electromotor neurones.

  7. LH (Luteinizing Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... for luteinizing hormone (LH), a hormone associated with reproduction and the stimulation of the release of an ... LH and FSH with the development of secondary sexual characteristics at an unusually young age are an ...

  8. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3D Patient Education mobile app The Hormone Health Network helps you and your health care provider have ... Copyright Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. Terms & Policies Network Partners The Hormone Health Network partners with other ...

  9. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb, babies ...

  10. Homologies between the amino acid sequences of some vertebrate peptide hormones and peptides isolated from invertebrate sources.

    PubMed

    De Loof, A; Schoofs, L

    1990-01-01

    1. The 4K-prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) or bombyxin and the melanization-reddish coloration hormone of the silkworm Bombyx mori resemble insulin and insulin-like growth factors. 2. The family of adipokinetic/red pigment concentrating hormones has some similarity with glucagon. 3. Members of the FMRFamide family are found in vertebrates as well as in invertebrates. 4. In Locusta, a molecule immunologically and biologically related to amphibian melanophore stimulating hormone has been partially characterized. 5. Enkephalins and enkephalin-related peptides occur in insects and other invertebrates. 6. Peptides belonging to the tachykinin family have been isolated from molluscan (Octopus) salivary glands and from insect nervous tissue (Locusta migratoria). 7. Invertebrate arginine-vasotocin homologs have been isolated from an insect (Locusta migratoria) and from a mollusc (Conus). 8. In Leucophaea, Locusta and Drosophila, peptides resembling those of the vertebrate gastrin/cholecystokinin family have been identified. 9. As the number of different neuro-/gut peptides with possible function(s) as hormone, neurotransmitter or neuromodulator is now estimated to be of the order of a few hundred, more similarities will probably show up in the near future.

  11. [Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes].

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes are a group of genetic conditions characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones. Three syndromes, in which resistance to hormone action is respectively due to mutations in the gene encoding for thyroid hormone receptor TRβ, impaired T4 and T3 transport, and impaired conversion of T4 to T3 mediated by deiodinases. An updated review of each of these forms of resistance is provided, and their pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical approaches are discussed.

  12. Hormone treatment of depression

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    There is a well-established relationship between alterations of various hormonal systems and psychiatric disorders, both in endocrine and psychiatric patients. This has led to clinical and research studies examining the efficacy of the different hormones for treatment of depression. These data will be reviewed with particular regard to the thyroid, gonadal, pineal, and adrenal cortex hormones. The data generally provide limited, but varying evidence for the antidepressant efficacy of these hormones. PMID:21485752

  13. [Growth hormone treatment update].

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Short stature in children is a common cause for referral to pediatric endocrinologists, corresponding most times to normal variants of growth. Initially growth hormone therapy was circumscribed to children presenting growth hormone deficiency. Since the production of recombinant human hormone its use had spread to other pathologies.

  14. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    The endocrine system is made up of organs and tissues that produce hormones. Hormones are natural chemicals produced in one ... hormones that control the other structures in the endocrine system. The amount of these regulating hormones stays about ...

  15. The novel GLP-1-gastrin dual agonist ZP3022 improves glucose homeostasis and increases β-cell mass without affecting islet number in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Dalbøge, Louise S; Almholt, Dorthe L C; Neerup, Trine S R; Vrang, Niels; Jelsing, Jacob; Fosgerau, Keld

    2014-08-01

    Antidiabetic treatments aiming to preserve or even to increase β-cell mass are currently gaining increased interest. Here we investigated the effect of chronic treatment with the novel glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-gastrin dual agonist ZP3022 (HGEGTFTSDLSKQMEEEAVRLFIEWLKN-8Ado-8Ado-YGWLDF-NH2) on glycemic control, β-cell mass and proliferation, and islet number. Male db/db mice were treated with ZP3022, liraglutide, or vehicle for 2, 4, or 8 weeks, with terminal assessment of hemoglobin A1c, basal blood glucose, and plasma insulin concentrations. Pancreata were removed for immunohistochemical staining and stereological quantification of β-cell mass, islet numbers, proliferation, and apoptosis. Treatment with ZP3022 or liraglutide led to a significant improvement in glycemic control. ZP3022 treatment resulted in a sustained increase in β-cell mass after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, whereas the effect of liraglutide was transient. The expansion in β-cell mass observed in the ZP3022-treated mice appeared to be driven by increased β-cell proliferation in existing islets rather than by formation of new islets, as mean islet mass increased but the number of islets remained constant. Our data demonstrate that the GLP-1-gastrin dual agonist ZP3022 causes a sustained improvement in glycemic control accompanied by an increase in β-cell mass, increased proliferation, and increased mean islet mass. The results highlight that the GLP-1-gastrin dual agonist increases β-cell mass more than liraglutide and that dual agonists could potentially be developed into a new class of antidiabetic treatments.

  16. Molecular and functional characterization of cionin receptors in the ascidian, Ciona intestinalis: the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate cholecystokinin/gastrin family.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Toshio; Ogasawara, Michio; Satake, Honoo

    2012-04-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin are vertebrate brain-gut peptides featured by a sulfated tyrosine residue and a C-terminally amidated tetrapeptide consensus sequence. Cionin, identified in the ascidian, Ciona intestinalis, the closest species to vertebrates, harbors two sulfated tyrosines and the CCK/gastrin consensus tetrapeptide sequence. While a putative cionin receptor, cior, was cloned, the ligand-receptor relationship between cionin and CioR remains unidentified. Here, we identify two cionin receptors, CioR1 and CioR2, which are the aforementioned putative cionin receptor and its novel paralog respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CioRs are homologous to vertebrate CCK receptors (CCKRs) and diverged from a common ancestor in the Ciona-specific lineage. Cionin activates intracellular calcium mobilization in cultured cells expressing CioR1 or CioR2. Monosulfated and nonsulfated cionin exhibited less potent or no activity, indicating that CioRs possess pharmacological features similar to the vertebrate CCK-specific receptor CCK1R, rather than its subtype CCK2R, given that a sulfated tyrosine in CCK is required for binding to CCK1R, but not to CCK2R. Collectively, the present data reveal that CioRs share a common ancestor with vertebrate CCKRs and indicate that CCK and CCK1R form the ancestral ligand-receptor pair in the vertebrate CCK/gastrin system. Cionin is expressed in the neural complex, digestive organs, oral siphon and atrial siphons, whereas the expression of ciors was detected mainly in these tissues and the ovary. Furthermore, cioninergic neurons innervate both of the siphons. These results suggest that cionin is involved in the regulation of siphonal functions.

  17. Development and analytical performance evaluation of an automated chemiluminescent immunoassay for pro-gastrin releasing peptide (ProGRP).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Toru; Fujita, Kenju; Kinukawa, Hideki; Matsuoka, Yoshiharu; Patil, Rahul D; Beligere, Gangamani S; Chan, Sabrina S; Dowell, Barry L; Sokoll, Lori; Elliott, Debra; Chan, Daniel W; Scheuer, Cornelia; Hofmann, Karin; Stieber, Petra; Sakurai, Yousuke; Iizuka, Masayuki; Saegusa, Haruhisa; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Pro-gastrin releasing peptide (ProGRP) concentrations in blood play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The automated quantitative ARCHITECT ProGRP assay was developed to aid in the differential diagnosis and in the management of SCLC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analytical performance of this chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay at multiple sites. ARCHITECT ProGRP measures ProGRP using a two-step sandwich using monoclonal anti-ProGRP antibodies coated on paramagnetic microparticles and labeled with acridinium. Analytical performance of the assay was evaluated at four sites: Abbott Japan, Denka Seiken, the Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Munich. Total precision (%CV) for nine analyte concentrations was between 2.2 and 5.7. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was between 0.20 pg/mL and 0.88 pg/mL. The functional sensitivity at 20% CV was between 0.66 pg/mL and 1.73 pg/mL. The assay was linear up to 50,000 pg/mL using a 1:10 autodilution protocol. The calibration curve was stable for 30 days. Comparison with the Fujirebio microtiter plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) ProGRP assay gave a slope of 0.93 and a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.99. These results demonstrate that the ARCHITECT ProGRP assay has excellent sensitivity, precision, and correlation to a reference method. This assay provides a convenient automated method for ProGRP measurement in serum and plasma in hospitals and clinical laboratories.

  18. Protective effect of RC-3095, an antagonist of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, P G; Grespan, R; Pinto, L G; Meurer, L; Brenol, J C T; Roesler, R; Schwartsmann, G; Cunha, F Q; Xavier, R M

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the antiinflammatory effects of RC-3095 in 2 experimental models of arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and antigen-induced arthritis (AIA), and to determine the mechanisms of action involved. RC-3095 was administered daily to mice with CIA and mice with AIA, after induction of disease with methylated bovine serum albumin. Disease incidence and severity were assessed using a clinical index and evaluation of histologic features, respectively. In mice with CIA, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) was detected by immunohistochemical analysis, while in mice with AIA, migration of neutrophils, presence of glycosaminoglycans, and lymphocyte proliferation, determined using the MTT assay, were assessed. Expression of cytokines interleukin-17 (IL-17), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) was evaluated in all mouse knees using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treg cell production was assessed by flow cytometry in the joints of mice with AIA. In mice with AIA, administration of RC-3095 reduced neutrophil migration, mechanical hypernociception, and proteoglycan loss. These findings were associated with inhibition of the levels of all 3 proinflammatory cytokines, decreased lymphocyte proliferation, and increased Treg cell numbers. In the CIA model, treatment with RC-3095 led to a significant reduction in arthritis clinical scores and the severity of disease determined histologically. Synovial inflammation, synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, and extensive erosive changes were all dramatically reduced in the arthritic mice treated with RC-3095. Furthermore, arthritic mice treated with RC-3095 showed a significant reduction in the concentrations of IL-17, IL-1β, and TNFα, and showed a diminished expression of GRPR. These findings suggest that the GRP pathway has a significant role in chronic arthritis, and its inhibition can be explored as a possible therapeutic strategy in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2011 by the American College

  19. Long-Term Treatment Sequelae After External Beam Irradiation With or Without Hormonal Manipulation for Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies 85-31, 86-10, and 92-02

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A. Bae, Kyoungwha; Pilepich, Miljenko; Hanks, Gerald; Shipley, William

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) morbidity from external beam irradiation used to treat adenocarcinoma of the prostate continue to be a concern of physicians and patients alike. In addition, for locally advanced/high-risk cancer, the appropriate use of hormonal manipulation in addition to radiation therapy (RT) may increase toxicity. We analyzed three large Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) studies (85-31, 86-10, and 92-02) to try to address these issues. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,922 patients were accrued with a median follow-up of 10.3 years for surviving patients. The RTOG scoring scheme was used to assess GI, GU, and other toxicities. Toxicity reported was Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Patient toxicity level was assessed by study and by treatment type combining RT only vs. RT + short-course hormone therapy (STH) vs. RT + long-term hormone therapy (LTH). Results: Multivariate analysis reveals that age >70 was statistically significantly associated with a decrease in late any Grade 3+ toxicity (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78, p = 0.0476) adjusted for treatment type. Comparing treatment type, patients treated with RT+STH had a statistically significant lower probability of Grade 3+ GI, GU, and other toxicity compared with RT alone (p = .00006; p = 0.0037; p = 0.0127, respectively). Patients treated with RT+LTH had a statistically significant lower probability of Grade 3+ GU toxicity compared with RT alone (p = 0.023). Conclusions: These data show that external beam radiation therapy remains a safe option for locally advanced/high-risk prostate cancer, and the use of hormonal manipulation does appear to be protective for GU and GI toxicity depending upon length of treatment.

  20. Standardization of hormone determinations.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2013-12-01

    Standardization of hormone determinations is important because it simplifies interpretation of results and facilitates the use of common reference values for different assays. Progress in standardization has been achieved through the introduction of more homogeneous hormone standards for peptide and protein hormones. However, many automated methods for determinations of steroid hormones do not provide satisfactory result. Isotope dilution-mass spectrometry (ID-MS) has been used to establish reference methods for steroid hormone determinations and is now increasingly used for routine determinations of steroids and other low molecular weight compounds. Reference methods for protein hormones based on MS are being developed and these promise to improve standardization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hormones and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blackstein, Martin Elliot

    1984-01-01

    Hormonal therapy is the first systemic therapy to have been used successfully in the treatment of cancer. Developments in steroid hormone receptor assays in the last decade have resulted in the first predictable assays for cancer therapy. The role of hormones, in both the development and treatment of breast, prostate and uterine cancer, is reviewed. Because hormonal therapy is generally a less toxic palliative treatment than other treatments (e.g., chemotherapy and radiation), it has been used for malignancies such as malignant melanoma, hypernephroma, and carcinoid. PMID:21278945

  2. Clinical Relevance of Targeting the Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor, Somatostatin Receptor 2, or Chemokine C-X-C Motif Receptor 4 in Breast Cancer for Imaging and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dalm, Simone U; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Look, Maxime P; Melis, Marleen; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Foekens, John A; de Jong, Marion; Martens, John W M

    2015-10-01

    Imaging and therapy using radioligands targeting receptors overexpressed on tumor cells is successfully applied in neuroendocrine tumor patients. Because expression of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), and chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 4 (CXCR4) has been demonstrated in breast cancer, targeting these receptors using radioligands might offer new imaging and therapeutic opportunities for breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to correlate messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of GRPR, SSTR2, and CXCR4 with clinicopathologic and biologic factors, and with prognosis and prediction to therapy response, in order to identify specific breast cancer patient groups suited for the application of radioligands targeting these receptors. First, we studied GRPR and SSTR2 expression in 13 clinical breast cancer specimens by in vitro autoradiography and correlated this with corresponding mRNA levels to investigate whether mRNA levels reliably represent cell surface expression. Next, GRPR, SSTR2, and CXCR4 mRNA levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in 915 primary breast cancer tissues and correlated with known clinicopathologic and biologic factors, disease-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival (DFS, MFS, and OS, respectively). In 224 adjuvant hormonal treatment-naïve estrogen receptor (ER, ESR1)-positive patients who received tamoxifen as first-line therapy for recurrent or metastatic disease, the expression levels of the receptors were correlated with progression-free survival. Our results showed a significant positive correlation between GRPR and SSTR2 expression analyzed by in vitro autoradiography and by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient [Rs]=0.94, P<0.001, and Rs=0.73, P=0.0042, respectively). Furthermore, high GRPR and SSTR2 mRNA levels were observed more frequently in ESR1

  3. Gastrin-releasing Peptide Receptor Imaging in Breast Cancer Using the Receptor Antagonist 68Ga-RM2 And PET

    PubMed Central

    Stoykow, Christian; Erbes, Thalia; Maecke, Helmut R; Bulla, Stefan; Bartholomä, Mark; Mayer, Sebastian; Drendel, Vanessa; Bronsert, Peter; Werner, Martin; Gitsch, Gerald; Weber, Wolfgang A; Stickeler, Elmar; Meyer, Philipp T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is overexpressed in breast cancer. The present study evaluates GRPR imaging as a novel imaging modality in breast cancer by employing positron emission tomography (PET) and the GRPR antagonist 68Ga-RM2. Methods: Fifteen female patients with biopsy confirmed primary breast carcinoma (3 bilateral tumors; median clinical stage IIB) underwent 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT for pretreatment staging. In vivo tumor uptake of 68Ga-RM2 was correlated with estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor expression, HER2/neu status and MIB-1 proliferation index in breast core biopsy specimens. Results: 13/18 tumors demonstrated strongly increased 68Ga-RM2 uptake compared to normal breast tissue (defined as PET-positive). All PET-positive primary tumors were ER- and PR-positive (13/13) in contrast to only 1/5 PET-negative tumors. Mean SUVMAX of ER-positive tumors was 10.6±6.0 compared to 2.3±1.0 in ER-negative tumors (p=0.016). In a multivariate analysis including ER, PR, HER2/neu and MIB-1, only ER expression predicted 68Ga-RM2 uptake (model: r2=0.55, p=0.025). Normal breast tissue showed inter- and intraindividually variable, moderate GRPR binding (SUVMAX 2.3±1.0), while physiological uptake of other organs was considerably less except pancreas. Of note, 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT detected internal mammary lymph nodes with high 68Ga-RM2 uptake (n=8), a contralateral axillary lymph node metastasis (verified by biopsy) and bone metastases (n=1; not detected by bone scan and CT). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT is a promising imaging method in ER-positive breast cancer. In vivo GRPR binding assessed by 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT correlated with ER expression in primary tumors of untreated patients. PMID:27446498

  4. Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging for Radiation Dose Calculation of a 90Y-Labeled Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Lohrmann, Christian; Zhang, Hanwen; Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Desai, Pooja; Zanzonico, Pat B.; O’Donoghue, Joseph; Irwin, Christopher P.; Reiner, Thomas; Grimm, Jan; Weber, Wolfgang A.

    2015-01-01

    90Y has been used to label various new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. However, measuring the radiation dose delivered by 90Y is challenging because of the absence of suitable γ emissions and its low abundance of positron emissions. For the treatment of prostate cancer, radiolabeled gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) antagonists have yielded promising results in mouse models. In this study, we evaluated whether Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) could be used to determine radiation doses of a 90Y-labeled GRPr antagonist in nude mice. Methods Mice bearing subcutaneous prostate cancer xenografts were injected with 0.74–18.5 MBq of the 90Y-labeled GRPr antagonist DOTA-AR and underwent in vivo and ex vivo CLI at 1–48 h after injection. After imaging, animals were sacrificed, their tumors and organs were harvested, and the activity concentration was measured by liquid scintillation counting. In a second set of experiments, Cerenkov photon counts for tumor and kidney on in vivo CLI were converted to activity concentrations using conversion factors determined from the first set of experiments. Results 90Y-DOTA-AR concentration in the 3 tumor models ranged from 0.5% to 4.8% of the injected activity per gram at 1 h after injection and decreased to 0.05%–0.15 injected activity per gram by 48 h after injection. A positive correlation was found between tumor activity concentrations and in vivo CLI signal (r2 = 0.94). A similar correlation was found for the renal activity concentration and in vivo Cerenkov luminescence (r2 = 0.98). Other organs were not distinctly visualized on the in vivo images, but ex vivo CLI was also correlated with the radioactivity concentration (r2 = 0.35–0.94). Using the time–activity curves from the second experiment, we calculated radiation doses to tumor and kidney of 0.33 ± 0.12 (range, 0.21–0.66) and 0.06 ± 0.01 (range, 0.05–0.08) Gy/MBq, respectively. Conclusion CLI is a promising, low-cost modality to measure

  5. Gastrin-releasing Peptide Receptor Imaging in Breast Cancer Using the Receptor Antagonist (68)Ga-RM2 And PET.

    PubMed

    Stoykow, Christian; Erbes, Thalia; Maecke, Helmut R; Bulla, Stefan; Bartholomä, Mark; Mayer, Sebastian; Drendel, Vanessa; Bronsert, Peter; Werner, Martin; Gitsch, Gerald; Weber, Wolfgang A; Stickeler, Elmar; Meyer, Philipp T

    2016-01-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is overexpressed in breast cancer. The present study evaluates GRPR imaging as a novel imaging modality in breast cancer by employing positron emission tomography (PET) and the GRPR antagonist (68)Ga-RM2. Fifteen female patients with biopsy confirmed primary breast carcinoma (3 bilateral tumors; median clinical stage IIB) underwent (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT for pretreatment staging. In vivo tumor uptake of (68)Ga-RM2 was correlated with estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor expression, HER2/neu status and MIB-1 proliferation index in breast core biopsy specimens. 13/18 tumors demonstrated strongly increased (68)Ga-RM2 uptake compared to normal breast tissue (defined as PET-positive). All PET-positive primary tumors were ER- and PR-positive (13/13) in contrast to only 1/5 PET-negative tumors. Mean SUVMAX of ER-positive tumors was 10.6±6.0 compared to 2.3±1.0 in ER-negative tumors (p=0.016). In a multivariate analysis including ER, PR, HER2/neu and MIB-1, only ER expression predicted (68)Ga-RM2 uptake (model: r(2) =0.55, p=0.025). Normal breast tissue showed inter- and intraindividually variable, moderate GRPR binding (SUVMAX 2.3±1.0), while physiological uptake of other organs was considerably less except pancreas. Of note, (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT detected internal mammary lymph nodes with high (68)Ga-RM2 uptake (n=8), a contralateral axillary lymph node metastasis (verified by biopsy) and bone metastases (n=1; not detected by bone scan and CT). Our study demonstrates that (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT is a promising imaging method in ER-positive breast cancer. In vivo GRPR binding assessed by (68)Ga-RM2-PET/CT correlated with ER expression in primary tumors of untreated patients.

  6. Parathyroid Hormone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body does not produce enough parathyroid hormone [PTH; a natural substance needed to control the amount ... Parathyroid hormone injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: tingling, tickling, or ...

  7. Is homosexuality hormonally determined?

    PubMed

    Birke, L I

    1981-01-01

    This paper suggest there is insufficient evidence to conclude that homosexuality has endocrine bases. The search for hormonal correlates occurs within a model that views homosexuality as a medical problem requiring biological explanations and a program of treatment or prevention. This search is heavily rooted in popular conceptions of gender-appropriate behavior, as well as in naive concepts of the significance of hormonal changes. Two kinds of hormonal study are considered here. Researchers may either (a) investigate hormone levels in adult populations or (b) investigate hypotheses of behavioral determination by prenatal hormones. Much of the latter information derives from animal studies, commonly on the laboratory rat. This paper questions the validity of assumptions underlying these studies--assumptions about the behavior of the laboratory rat itself and, more importantly, about the legitimacy of this animal as a model for human behavior. It is suggested that, although such hypotheses are naive, their current popularity arises from their potential role in "controlling" homosexuality.

  8. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. Testosterone is one ...

  9. Anti-Müllerian Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Anti-Müllerian Hormone Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: AMH; AMH Hormone Test; Müllerian-inhibiting Hormone; MIH; Müllerian Inhibiting Factor; ...

  10. Facile solid-phase synthesis of sulfated tyrosine-containing peptides: total synthesis of human big gastrin-II and cholecystokinin (CCK)-39.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, K; Aida, C; Fujiwara, H; Yagami, T; Futaki, S; Kogire, M; Ida, J; Inoue, K

    2001-01-12

    Chemical synthesis of tyrosine O-sulfated peptides is still a laborious task for peptide chemists because of the intrinsic acid-lability of the sulfate moiety. An efficient cleavage/deprotection procedure without loss of the sulfate is the critical difficulty remaining to be solved for fluoren-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-based solid-phase synthesis of sulfated peptides. To overcome the difficulty, TFA-mediated solvolysis rates of a tyrosine O-sulfate [Tyr(SO3H)] residue and two protecting groups, tBu for the hydroxyl group of Ser and 2,2,4,6,7-pentamethyldihydrobenzofuran-5-sulfonyl (Pbf) for the guanidino group of Arg, were examined in detail. The desulfation obeyed first-order kinetics with a large entropy (59.6 J.K-1.mol-1) and enthalpy (110.5 kJ.mol-1) of activation. These values substantiated that the desulfation rate of the rigidly solvated Tyr(SO3H) residue was strongly temperature-dependent. By contrast, the SN1-type deprotections were less temperature-dependent and proceeded smoothly in TFA of a high ionizing power. Based on the large rate difference between the desulfation and the SN1-type deprotections in cold TFA, an efficient deprotection protocol for the sulfated peptides was developed. Our synthetic strategy for Tyr(SO3H)-containing peptides with this effective deprotection protocol is as follows: (i) a sulfated peptide chain is directly constructed on 2-chlorotrityl resin with Fmoc-based solid-phase chemistry using Fmoc-Tyr(SO3Na)-OH as a building block; (ii) the protected peptide-resin is treated with 90% aqueous TFA at 0 degree C for an appropriate period of time for the cleavage and deprotection. Human cholecystokinin (CCK)-12, mini gastrin-II (14 residues), and little gastrin-II (17 residues) were synthesized with this method in 26-38% yields without any difficulties. This method was further applied to the stepwise synthesis of human big gastrin-II (34 residues), CCK-33 and -39. Despite the prolonged acid treatment (15-18 h at 0 degree C), the

  11. Fetal organ growth in response to oesophageal infusion of amniotic fluid, colostrum, milk or gastrin-releasing peptide: a study in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Trahair, J F; Sangild, P T

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that the infusion of the biological fluids to which the developing gut is normally exposed (i.e. amniotic fluid, colostrum, milk) and a single growth factor (gastrin-releasing peptide), which is found in high concentrations in fetal fluids and milk, could ameliorate the altered growth induced by the elimination of swallowed input secondary to ligation of the oesophagus. At 108-110 days of gestation the fetal oesophagus was ligated and a catheter inserted towards the stomach (32 fetuses). At 117-119 days of gestation saline (n = 5), amniotic fluid (n = 5), colostral whey (n = 5), milk whey (n = 5) or gastrin-releasing peptide (3.6 nmol day(-1), n = 6), was infused for 7 days (4 x 20 mL day(-1)), or no infusion was given (ligated group, n = 6). A further 15 fetuses were not ligated (normal group, n = 15). All fetuses had carotid artery and/or jugular vein catheters implanted. At 124-126 days of gestation the fetus was delivered and fetal body and organ weights recorded. Analysing the results by ANOVA, there were no effects of either ligation alone or infusion after ligation on fetal weight, crown-rump length, or weight relative to bodyweight of heart, adrenal, pancreas, large intestine and cecum. There were significant differences between the infusion groups for lungs, kidney, pancreas, total gut, abomasum, small intestine, spleen, chest and neck thymus, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Ligation alone significantly reduced small intestinal growth and increased kidney and spleen growth. Colostrum infusion enhanced growth of most organs. Gastrin-releasing peptide significantly increased growth of all the immune organs studied. It was concluded that at an age when premature delivery could be encountered, the fetal gut is capable of significant adaptive growth, to varying degrees, depending on the enteral diet. Growth effects in organs distant to the gut suggest that either gastrointestinal uptake and transport of growth factors or

  12. 1H and 13C n.m.r. studies of pseudo-peptide analogues of the C-terminal tetrapeptide of gastrin.

    PubMed

    Aumelas, A; Rodriguez, M; Heitz, A; Castro, B; Martinez, J

    1987-11-01

    1H and 13C n.m.r. study of pseudo-peptide analogues of the C-terminal tetrapeptide of gastrin, obtained by replacing each peptide bond by a "reduced peptide bond", one at a time, e.g. Boc-Trp psi (CH2NH)Leu-Asp-Phe-NH2 2, Boc-Trp-Leu psi (CH2NH) Asp-Phe-NH2 3, Boc-Trp-Leu-Asp psi (CH2NH)Phe-NH2 4, were reported. The CH2NH bond was completely characterized. 1H and 13C spectroscopic data were reported. It appeared from the present work that the modifications produced by the replacement of a peptide bond by a CH2NH bond were localized around the CH2NH.

  13. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormone for the body’s needs. This is called Hypothyroidism and may be caused by a non-functioning ... or by a non-functioning pituitary gland (see Hypothyroidism Brochure ). Hypothyroidism, is the most common reason for ...

  14. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy (a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a doctor’s instructions). ... that bioidentical hormones, whether prepared by a compounding pharmacy or pharmaceutical company, are safer to use than ...

  15. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called acromegaly . In children it is called gigantism . Too little growth hormone can cause a slow ... growth due to excess GH during childhood, called gigantism. (A special test is done to confirm this ...

  16. Gastric neuroendocrine tumors: prevalence in Europe, USA, and Japan, and rationale for treatment with a gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Malcolm; Thomsen, Liv

    2015-05-01

    Gastric carcinoids (neuroendocrine tumors) arise from enterochromaffin-like cells in the gastric mucosa. Most are caused by hypergastrinemia. The objectives were to determine if their prevalence in Europe, USA and Japan meets the criteria for an orphan disease and to justify treatment with a gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist. We obtained data from European and USA cancer registries, and searched PubMed. Prevalence per 10,000 population obtained from cancer registries was: median 0.32 (range 0.09-0.92) for Europe; and 0.17 for the USA, equivalent to 4812 for the whole population. A PubMed search for gastric carcinoids yielded prevalence for Japan only, which was 0.05 per 10,000 population, equivalent to 665 for the entire population. A further search for gastric carcinoids in patients with pernicious anemia (PA) or autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), two presentations of about 80% of gastric carcinoids, produced prevalence rates of 5.2-11%. Prevalence of PA itself was 0.12-1.9%. Data on CAG epidemiology were sparse. Prevalence of gastric carcinoids varied widely. All sources probably underestimate prevalence. However, prevalence was below the limits required for recognition by drug regulatory authorities as an orphan disease: 5 per 10,000 population of Europe; 200,000 for the whole population of the USA; and 50,000 for the whole population of Japan. Because gastric carcinoids are an orphan disease, and nonclinical and healthy volunteer studies support treatment with netazepide, a gastrin/CCK2 antagonist, netazepide has been designated an orphan medicinal product in Europe and the USA for development as targeted treatment for gastric carcinoids.

  17. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  18. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases. PMID:28117293

  19. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Murat

    2016-01-05

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  20. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  1. Hormonal Responses to Synthetic Luteinizing Hormone and Follicle Stimulating Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Man

    PubMed Central

    Besser, G. M.; McNeilly, A. S.; Anderson, D. C.; Marshall, J. C.; Harsoulis, P.; Hall, R.; Ormston, B. J.; Alexander, L.; Collins, W. P.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, synthetic decapeptide luteinizing hormone/follicle stimulating hormone-releasing hormone (LH/FSH-RH), have been studied in 18 normal men and five women in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle. Rapid and dose-dependent (25 to 100 μg) increases in serum immunoreactive LH were seen, which reached a peak 20 to 30 minutes after a rapid intravenous injection. Similar but much smaller increases in serum immunoreactive FSH were seen. These conclusions have been validated by using two different immunoassay systems for each hormone. The LH/FSH-RH therefore causes both LH and FSH release in man as in animals but does not affect growth hormone, thyrotrophin, or ACTH. The gonadotrophin responses were the same in the women as in the men but were insufficient in the men to cause statistically significant changes in the serum levels of the gonadal steroid hormones, testosterone or oestradiol, or in their precursors 17 α-hydroxyprogesterone or progesterone. In the women, however, there was a rise in oestradiol after the 100-μg doses. The use of LH/FSH-RH will provide an important test to define the level of the lesion in hypogonadal patients and also should be valuable in the treatment of some types of male and female infertility. A simple and clinically useful LH/FSH-RH test of pituitary function is described (100 μg given intravenously), and the provisional normal responses of LH and FSH at 20 and 60 minutes are given. PMID:4339974

  2. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably constitutes another point at which intervention may promote efficient digestion and nutrient uptake. In recent decades, gut hormones have come to occupy a central place in the complex neuroendocrine interactions that underlie the regulation of energy balance. Many gut peptides have been shown to influence energy intake. The most well studied in this regard are cholecystokinin (CCK), pancreatic polypeptide, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin and ghrelin. With the exception of ghrelin, these hormones act to increase satiety and decrease food intake. The mechanisms by which gut hormones modify feeding are the subject of ongoing investigation. Local effects such as the inhibition of gastric emptying might contribute to the decrease in energy intake. Activation of mechanoreceptors as a result of gastric distension may inhibit further food intake via neural reflex arcs. Circulating gut hormones have also been shown to act directly on neurons in hypothalamic and brainstem centres of appetite control. The median eminence and area postrema are characterized by a deficiency of the blood–brain barrier. Some investigators argue that this renders neighbouring structures, such as the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius in the brainstem, susceptible to influence by circulating factors. Extensive reciprocal connections exist between these areas and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and other energy-regulating centres of the

  3. Thyroid hormone transporter defects.

    PubMed

    Grüters, Annette

    2007-01-01

    In in vitro experiments, active transport of thyroid hormones had been repeatedly demonstrated. The membrane transporters for thyroid hormones which have been identified include the organic anion transporting polypeptide, heterodimeric amino acid transporters and the monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) which are the focus of this chapter. The gene encoding MCT8 which was identified as a specific thyroid hormone transporter is located on chromosome Xq13.2. The expression pattern of MCT8 indicates that MCT8 plays an important role in the development of the central nervous system by transporting thyroid hormone into neurons as its main target cells. Mutational analysis of the MCT8 gene revealed mutations or deletions in the MCT8 gene in unrelated male patients with severe psychomotor retardation and biochemical findings consistent with thyroid hormone resistance. Indeed, thyroid function tests in patients with MCT8 mutations demonstrated marked elevations of serum T3 (in the thyrotoxic range), a significant decrease in serum T4 or fT4 and normal to elevated TSH levels.

  4. Hormonal control of euryhalinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takei, Yoshio; McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  5. Obesity: the hormonal milieu.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Anne; Diamond, Frank B

    2008-02-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions throughout the world and poses significant health and economic burdens to both developed and developing societies. Most recent data from the NHANES study (2003-2004) report that 17.1% of US children are overweight and 32.2% of adults are obese, a significant increase compared with data obtained only 6 years earlier. The neurohormonal control of appetite, body composition, and glucose homeostasis is mediated by hormones secreted from adipose tissue, endocrine glands, and enteroendocrine cells, which converge at the vagus nerve, brainstem and hypothalamus to modulate complex interactions of neurotransmitters and central appetite-regulating peptides. These hormonal signals are tightly regulated to maintain body weight/adiposity within a narrow, individually defined range that may be further impacted by variables such as ingested calories, meal composition, and lifestyle. Clinical manifestations of obesity, the metabolic syndrome and impaired glucose tolerance reflect biochemical alterations in a complex hormonal milieu. Elucidation of these hormonal perturbations in obese patients has already provided novel pharmacologic treatments to improve weight management and address the metabolic sequelae of obesity. The remarkable redundancy of these hormones, however, and their interactions make a monopharmaceutical approach unlikely to be successful.

  6. [Hormones and hair growth].

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-06-01

    With respect to the relationship between hormones and hair growth, the role of androgens for androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and hirsutism is best acknowledged. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that intervene in androgen metabolism have been successfully developed for treatment of these conditions. Clinical observations of hair conditions involving hormones beyond the androgen horizon have determined their role in regulation of hair growth: estrogens, prolactin, thyroid hormone, cortisone, growth hormone (GH), and melatonin. Primary GH resistance is characterized by thin hair, while acromegaly may cause hypertrichosis. Hyperprolactinemia may cause hair loss and hirsutism. Partial synchronization of the hair cycle in anagen during late pregnancy points to an estrogen effect, while aromatase inhibitors cause hair loss. Hair loss in a causal relationship to thyroid disorders is well documented. In contrast to AGA, senescent alopecia affects the hair in a diffuse manner. The question arises, whether the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between the age-related reduction of circulating hormones and organ function also applies to hair and the aging of hair.

  7. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  8. Male hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K

    2006-06-01

    Efforts are underway to develop additional forms of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development involves the administration of exogenous testosterone (T). When administered to a man, T functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis. After 2-3 months of treatment, low levels of these gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in a majority of men. Hormonal contraception with exogenous T has proven to be free from serious adverse effects and is well tolerated by men. In addition, sperm counts uniformly normalize when the exogenous T is discontinued. Thus, male hormonal is safe, effective and reversible; however, spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some diminished potential for fertility persists. Because of this recent studies have combined T with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing antagonists to further suppress pituitary gonadotropins and optimize contraceptive efficacy. Current combinations of T and progestogens completely suppress spermatogenesis without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable T, which can be administered every 8 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  9. A Morphometric Study of Antral G-Cell Density in a Sample of Adult General Population: Comparison of Three Different Methods and Correlation with Patient Demography, Helicobacter pylori Infection, Histomorphology and Circulating Gastrin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Fredrik; Borch, Kurt; Rehfeld, Jens F; Franzén, Lennart E

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been linked to hypergastrinemia and either decreased or normal G-cell content in the antral mucosa. To clarify this controversial issue, we quantitatively determined antral G-cell content on the same biopsy specimens with three different methods and examined whether these methods are intercorrelated and the relation of these methods to plasma gastrin concentrations, demography, the occurrence of H. pylori infection and chronic gastritis. Gastric antral mucosal biopsy sections from 273 adults (188 with and 85 without H pylori infection) from a general population sample were examined immunohistochemically for G-cells using cell counting, stereology (point counting) and computerized image analysis. Gastritis was scored according to the updated Sydney system. Basal plasma gastrin concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. The three methods for G-cell quantification were poorly correlated and the results showed no correlation with basal plasma gastrin concentrations. The antral G-cell density and scores for H. pylori colonization were positively related to age. Neither the scores for chronic inflammation, nor the scores for inflammatory activity, atrophy or intestinal metaplasia were consistently related to the antral G-cell content. In conclusion, the results of three techniques for G-cell quantification in the gastric antral mucosa were poorly intercorrelated and none of the methods correlated with plasma gastrin concentrations. Age and scores for H pylori colonization seem to be determinants of the G-cell density. That common morphometric techniques correlate poorly is of utmost importance to bear in mind when quantitative morphological studies are planned, compared or interpreted. PMID:19079618

  10. [Growth hormone signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Zych, Sławomir; Szatkowska, Iwona; Czerniawska-Piatkowska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The substantial improvement in the studies on a very complicated mechanism-- growth hormone signaling in a cell, has been noted in last decade. GH-induced signaling is characterized by activation of several pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the signal transducer and activator of transcription and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3) pathways. This review shows a current model of the growth hormone receptor dimerization, rotation of subunits and JAK2 kinase activation as the initial steps in the cascade of events. In the next stages of the signaling process, the GH-(GHR)2-(JAK2)2 complex may activate signaling molecules such as Stat, IRS-1 and IRS-2, and particularly all cascade proteins that activate MAP kinase. These pathways regulate basal cellular functions including target gene transcription, enzymatic activity and metabolite transport. Therefore growth hormone is considered as a major regulator of postnatal growth and metabolism, probably for mammary gland growth and development too.

  11. [Hormonal perturbations in fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, J L; Perrin, A E; Grunenberger, F; Goichot, B

    2001-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain and fatigue without biological detectable disturbances. The mechanisms of this disease are unknown. It has been postulated that it can be the consequence of a chronic stress mediated mainly through the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system. These fields have been extensively studied. Results were scattered and non convincing. A reduction of growth hormone and IGF-1 levels described in a third of patients has led to a double blind random clinical trial with biogenetic growth hormone. Results were equivocal . Other hormonal systems are grossly normals and circadian rhythms are unaltered. Despite some arguments in favour of a CRH neurons hyperactivity, these results are not able to consolide a particular physiopathological mechanism and to argument for a new therapeutic approach. Many of the abnormalities may be the consequence of psychological disturbances.

  12. Ovarian hormones and obesity.

    PubMed

    Leeners, Brigitte; Geary, Nori; Tobler, Philippe N; Asarian, Lori

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake, i.e. eating and energy expenditure (EE). Severe obesity is more prevalent in women than men worldwide, and obesity pathophysiology and the resultant obesity-related disease risks differ in women and men. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Pre-clinical and clinical research indicate that ovarian hormones may play a major role. We systematically reviewed the clinical and pre-clinical literature on the effects of ovarian hormones on the physiology of adipose tissue (AT) and the regulation of AT mass by energy intake and EE. Articles in English indexed in PubMed through January 2016 were searched using keywords related to: (i) reproductive hormones, (ii) weight regulation and (iii) central nervous system. We sought to identify emerging research foci with clinical translational potential rather than to provide a comprehensive review. We find that estrogens play a leading role in the causes and consequences of female obesity. With respect to adiposity, estrogens synergize with AT genes to increase gluteofemoral subcutaneous AT mass and decrease central AT mass in reproductive-age women, which leads to protective cardiometabolic effects. Loss of estrogens after menopause, independent of aging, increases total AT mass and decreases lean body mass, so that there is little net effect on body weight. Menopause also partially reverses women's protective AT distribution. These effects can be counteracted by estrogen treatment. With respect to eating, increasing estrogen levels progressively decrease eating during the follicular and peri-ovulatory phases of the menstrual cycle. Progestin levels are associated with eating during the luteal phase, but there does not appear to be a causal relationship. Progestins may increase binge eating and eating stimulated by negative emotional states during the luteal phase. Pre-clinical research indicates that one mechanism for the pre-ovulatory decrease in eating is a

  13. Ovarian hormones and gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Zachariasen, R D

    1991-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of the ovarian hormones--estrogen and progestins--during pregnancy, puberty, the menstrual cycle, and oral contraceptive (OC) use are associated with an increased incidence of gingival inflammation and exudate. Gingivitis is induced by the micro- organisms that compose subgingival plaque, particularly anaerobic organisms. The ovarian hormones both stimulate bacterial growth and promote the inflammatory process. In the presence of sex hormones, the metabolic breakdown of folate is increased, leading to a folate deficiency that enhances the inflammatory destruction of oral tissue. Gingivitis occurs in an estimated 60-75% of pregnancy women, but the numbers of gingivitis-producing bacteria decrease toward the end of pregnancy and the gingival tissues return to their previous state. In OC users, on the other hand, inflammation of the gingiva is chronic and may increase over time. If gingivitis is already present at the onset of pregnancy or OC use, the inflammation will become progressively more severe. Although these effects cannot be avoided, ovarian hormone- induced gingivitis can be substantially minimized of low plaque levels exist at the beginning of pregnancy or pill initiation.

  14. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin; TeBG Formal name: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Related tests: Testosterone , Free Testosterone, ... I should know? How is it used? The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test may be used ...

  15. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  16. Training-overtraining: performance, and hormone levels, after a defined increase in training volume versus intensity in experienced middle- and long-distance runners.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, M; Gastmann, U; Petersen, K G; Bachl, N; Seidel, A; Khalaf, A N; Fischer, S; Keul, J

    1992-12-01

    Performance and hormones were determined in eight middle- and nine long-distance runners after an increase in training volume (ITV, February 1989) or intensity (ITI, February 1990). Seven runners participated in both studies. The objective was to cause an overtraining syndrome. The mean training volume of 85.9 km week-1 increased within 3 weeks to 176.6 km week-1 during ITV and 96-98% of training volume was performed as long-distance runs at mean(s.d.) 67(8)% of maximum capacity. Speed endurance, high-speed and interval runs averaging 9 km week-1 increased within 3 weeks to 22.7 km during ITI, and the total volume increased from 61.6 to 84.7 km. A plateau in endurance performance and decrease in maximum performance occurred during ITV, probably due to overtraining, with performance incompetence over months. Nocturnal catecholamine excretion decreased markedly (47-53%), contrary to exercise-related plasma catecholamine responses, which increased. Resting and exercise-related cortisol and aldosterone levels decreased. Improvement in endurance and maximum performance occurred during ITI indicating a failure to cause an overtraining syndrome in ITI. Decrease in noctural catecholamine excretion was clearly lower (9-26%), exercise-related catecholamine responses showed a significant decrease, cortisol and aldosterone levels remained almost constant, exercise-related prolactin levels decreased slightly. There were no differences in insulin, C-peptide, free testosterone, somatotropic hormone (STH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). The decrease in nocturnal catecholamine excretion during ITV might indicate a decrease in intrinsic sympathetic activity in exhausted sportsmen. But it remains open whether this reflected a central nervous system incompetence.

  17. Cleavage of arginyl-arginine and lysyl-arginine from the C-terminus of pro-hormone peptides by human germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and the C-domain of human somatic ACE.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R E; Williams, T A; Sajid, M; Corvol, P; Coates, D

    1997-01-01

    Mammalian germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (gACE) is a single-domain dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase found exclusively in male germ cells, which has almost identical sequence and enzymic properties with the C-domain of the two-domain somatic ACE. Mutant mice that do not express gACE are infertile, suggesting a role for the enzyme in the processing of undefined peptides involved in fertilization. A number of spermatid peptides [e.g. cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin] are processed from pro-hormones by endo- and exo-proteolytic cleavages which might generate substrates for gACE. We have shown that peptide hormone intermediates with Lys/Arg-Arg at the C-terminus are high-affinity substrates for human gACE. gACE from human sperm cleaved Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of the CCK5-GRR (GWMDFGRR), a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of a CCK-gastrin prohormone intermediate. Hydrolysis of CCK5-GRR by recombinant human C-domain ACE was Cl- dependent, with maximal activity achieved in 5-10 mM NaCl at pH 6.4. C-Domain ACE cleaved Lys/Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of dynorphin-(1-7), a pro-TRH peptide KRQHPGKR, and two insect peptides FSPRLGKR and FSPRLGRR. C-Domain ACE displayed high affinity towards all these substrates with Vmax/Km values between 14 and 113 times greater than the Vmax/Km for the conversion of the best known ACE substrate, angiotensin I, into angiotensin II. In conclusion, we have identified a new class of substrates for human gACE, and we suggest that gACE might be an alternative to carboxypeptidase E for the trimming of basic dipeptides from the C-terminus of intermediates generated from pro-hormones by subtilisin-like convertases in human male germ cells. PMID:9371719

  18. In Vitro Mouse and Human Serum Stability of a Heterobivalent Dual-Target Probe That Has Strong Affinity to Gastrin-Releasing Peptide and Neuropeptide Y1 Receptors on Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arijit; Raju, Natarajan; Tweedle, Michael; Kumar, Krishan

    2017-02-01

    Receptor-targeting radiolabeled molecular probes with high affinity and specificity are useful in studying and monitoring biological processes and responses. Dual- or multiple-targeting probes, using radiolabeled metal chelates conjugated to peptides, have potential advantages over single-targeting probes as they can recognize multiple targets leading to better sensitivity for imaging and radiotherapy when target heterogeneity is present. Two natural hormone peptide receptors, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and Y1, are specifically interesting as their expression is upregulated in most breast and prostate cancers. One of our goals has been to develop a dual-target probe that can bind both GRP and Y1 receptors. Consequently, a heterobivalent dual-target probe, t-BBN/BVD15-DO3A (where a GRP targeting ligand J-G-Abz4-QWAVGHLM-NH2 and Y1 targeting ligand INP-K [ɛ-J-(α-DO3A-ɛ-DGa)-K] YRLRY-NH2 were coupled), that recognizes both GRP and Y1 receptors was synthesized, purified, and characterized in the past. Competitive displacement cell binding assay studies with the probe demonstrated strong affinity (IC50 values given in parentheses) for GRP receptors in T-47D cells (18 ± 0.7 nM) and for Y1 receptors in MCF7 cells (80 ± 11 nM). As a further evaluation of the heterobivalent dual-target probe t-BBN/BVD15-DO3A, the objective of this study was to determine its mouse and human serum stability at 37°C. The in vitro metabolic degradation of the dual-target probe in mouse and human serum was studied by using a (153)Gd-labeled t-BBN/BVD15-DO3A and a high-performance liquid chromatography/radioisotope detector analytical method. The half-life (t1/2) of degradation of the dual-target probe in mouse serum was calculated as 7 hours and only ∼20% degradation was seen after 6 hours incubation in human serum. The slow in vitro metabolic degradation of the dual-target probe can be compared with the degradation t1/2 of the corresponding monomeric probes, BVD15-DO3A

  19. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  20. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  1. Hormone Profiling in Plant Tissues.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    Plant hormones are for a long time known to act as chemical messengers in the regulation of physiological processes during a plant's life cycle, from germination to senescence. Furthermore, plant hormones simultaneously coordinate physiological responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. To study the hormonal regulation of physiological processes, three main approaches have been used (1) exogenous application of hormones, (2) correlative studies through measurements of endogenous hormone levels, and (3) use of transgenic and/or mutant plants altered in hormone metabolism or signaling. A plant hormone profiling method is useful to unravel cross talk between hormones and help unravel the hormonal regulation of physiological processes in studies using any of the aforementioned approaches. However, hormone profiling is still particularly challenging due to their very low abundance in plant tissues. In this chapter, a sensitive, rapid, and accurate method to quantify all the five "classic" classes of plant hormones plus other plant growth regulators, such as jasmonates, salicylic acid, melatonin, and brassinosteroids is described. The method includes a fast and simple extraction procedure without time consuming steps as purification or derivatization, followed by optimized ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis. This protocol facilitates the high-throughput analysis of hormone profiling and is applicable to different plant tissues.

  2. Bioidentical Hormones for Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Variation on a Theme

    PubMed Central

    Bythrow, Jenna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progesterone creams and natural or bioidentical compounded estrogen preparations are being promoted to consumers as safe alternatives to conventional menopausal hormone therapy and as health-promoting tonics. No reliable data support these claims. SAFETY Natural hormones, including estradiol, estriol, estrone, and progesterone, can be expected to have the same adverse event profile as conventional menopausal hormone regimens. SALIVARY HORMONE TESTS Salivary tests may be used to persuade asymptomatic consumers to use hormones (or symptomatic patients to use higher doses than those needed to mitigate symptoms), a practice that can be expected to result in adverse events. PMID:17549577

  3. How gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and αvβ3 integrin expression reflect reorganization features of tumors after hyperthermia treatments.

    PubMed

    Hallasch, Sandra; Frick, Sindy; Jung, Maximilian; Hilger, Ingrid

    2017-07-31

    The outcome of tumor treatment via hyperthermia in the clinic has been reported to be heterogeneous. Here, we assessed how the presence of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and αvβ3 integrin together with the morphology of the vascularization reflects the growth behavior of tumors after hyperthermia treatment. MDA-MB-231 tumor bearing mice were treated either with high (46 °C) or low dose (42 °C) water hyperthermia for 60 min. Changes of GRPR and αvβ3 integrin expression were assessed via multiplexed optical imaging. Vascularization was reconstructed and quantified by µCT imaging after contrast agent injection. We found that high dose hyperthermia is capable of increasing the expression of GRPR, αvβ3 integrin, CD31, and Ki67 in tumors. Also the morphology of tumor vasculature changed (increased relative blood volume and small-diameter vessel density, decreased expression of α-SMA). Low dose hyperthermia induced comparatively moderate effects on the investigated protein expression pattern and vascular remodeling. We conclude that under defined circumstances, specific temperature doses affect the reorganization of tumor regrowth, which is triggered by residual "dormant" cells even though tumor volumes are transiently decreasing. Further on, GRPR, αvβ3 integrin expression are versatile tools to surveil potential tumor regrow during therapy, beyond the conventional determination of tumor volumes.

  4. Gastrin-releasing peptide and its receptor increase arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes invasiveness through activating the PI3K/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Clarimundo, Vanessa Schuck; Farinon, Mirian; Pedó, Renata Ternus; Teixeira, Vivian Oliveira Nunes; Nör, Carolina; Gulko, Percio S; Xavier, Ricardo Machado; de Oliveira, Patricia Gnieslaw

    2017-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that leads to joint destruction. The fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) has a central role on the disease pathophysiology. The present study aimed to examine the role of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its receptor (GRPR) on invasive behavior of mice fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), as well as to evaluate GRP-induced signaling on PI3K/AKT pathway. The expression of GRPR in FLS was investigated by immunocytochemistry, western blot (WB) and qRT-PCR. The proliferation and invasion were assessed by SRB and matrigel-transwell assay after treatment with GRP and/or RC-3095 (GRPR antagonist), and/or Ly294002 (inhibitor of PI3K/AKT pathway). Finally, AKT phosphorylation was assessed by WB. GRPR protein was detected in FLS and the exposure to GRP increased FLS invasion by nearly two-fold, compared with untreated cells (p<0.05), while RC-3095 reversed that effect (p<0.001). GRP also increased phosphorylated AKT expression in FLS. When Ly294002 was added with GRP, it prevented the GRP-induced increased cell invasiveness (p<0.001). These data suggest that GRPR expression in FLS and that exogenous GRP are able to activate FLS invasion. This effect occurs at least in part through the AKT activation. Therefore, understanding of the GRP/GRPR pathway could be relevant in the development of FLS-targeted therapy for RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Intravenous infusion of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 and bombesin in rats reveals differential effects on meal size and intermeal interval length

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Martha C.; Salyer, Sarah; Aglan, Amnah H.; Sayegh, Ayman I.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 (GRP-27) or bombesin (BN) (at 0.21, 0.41 and 1.03 nmol/kg) reduces meal size (MS) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). Here, we hypothesized that the intravenous (i.v) administration of the same doses of GRP-27 and BN will be as effective as the i.p administration in evoking these feeding responses. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-27 and BN i.v and measured first MS (10% sucrose), IMI, satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS) and second MS in overnight food-deprived but not water-deprived male Sprague Dawley rats. We found that (1) only GRP-27 reduced the first MS, (2) BN prolonged the IMI, (3) GRP-27 and BN increased the SR and (4) only BN reduced the size of the second meal. Contrary to our hypothesis, the i.v administration of GRP-27 and BN affected the MS and IMI differently than did the i.p administration. In conclusion, this pharmacological study suggests that the MS and IMI are regulated at different sites. PMID:24291388

  6. Spinal neurons that contain gastrin-releasing peptide seldom express Fos or phosphorylate extracellular signal-regulated kinases in response to intradermal chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Polgár, Erika; Todd, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is thought to play a role in the itch evoked by intradermal injection of chloroquine. Although some early studies suggested that GRP was expressed in pruriceptive primary afferents, it is now thought that GRP in the spinal cord is derived mainly from a population of excitatory interneurons in lamina II, and it has been suggested that these are involved in the itch pathway. To test this hypothesis, we used the transcription factor Fos and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) to look for evidence that interneurons expressing GRP were activated following intradermal injection of chloroquine into the calf, in mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in these cells. Results Injection of chloroquine resulted in numerous Fos- or phospho-ERK (pERK) positive cells in the somatotopically appropriate part of the superficial dorsal horn. The proportion of all neurons in this region that showed Fos or pERK was 18% and 21%, respectively. However, among the GRP–EGFP, only 7% were Fos-positive and 3% were pERK-positive. As such, GRP–EGFP cells were significantly less likely than other neurons to express Fos or to phosphorylate ERK. Conclusions Both expression of Fos and phosphorylation of ERK can be used to identify dorsal horn neurons activated by chloroquine injection. However, these results do not support the hypothesis that interneurons expressing GRP are critical components in the itch pathway. PMID:27270268

  7. A role for glucocorticoid-signaling in depression-like behavior of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Monje, Francisco J; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cabatic, Maureen; Lubec, Gert; Herkner, Kurt R; Pollak, Daniela D

    2011-08-01

    Abstract Background. The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is highly expressed in the limbic system, where it importantly regulates emotional functions and in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it is central for the photic resetting of the circadian clock. Mice lacking GRPR presented with deficient light-induced phase shift in activity as well altered emotional learning and amygdala function. The effect of GRPR deletion on depression-like behavior and its molecular signature in the amygdala, however, has not yet been evaluated. Methods. GRPR knock-out mice (GRPR-KO) were tested in the forced-swim test and the sucrose preference test for depression-like behavior. Gene expression in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala was evaluated by micorarray analysis subsequent to laser-capture microdissection-assisted extraction of mRNA. The expression of selected genes was confirmed by RT-PCR. Results. GRPR-KO mice were found to present with increased depression-like behavior. Microarray analysis revealed down-regulation of several glucocorticoid-responsive genes in the basolateral amygdala. Acute administration of dexamethasone reversed the behavioral phenotype and alterations in gene expression. Discussion. We propose that deletion of GRPR leads to the induction of depression-like behavior which is paralleled by dysregulation of amygdala gene expression, potentially resulting from deficient light-induced corticosterone release in GRPR-KO.

  8. Stereochemistry of amino acid spacers determines the pharmacokinetics of (111)In-DOTA-minigastrin analogues for targeting the CCK2/gastrin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kolenc Peitl, Petra; Tamma, MariaLuisa; Kroselj, Marko; Braun, Friederike; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Sollner Dolenc, Marija; Maecke, Helmut R; Mansi, Rosalba

    2015-06-17

    The metabolic instability and high kidney retention of minigastrin (MG) analogues hamper their suitability for use in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy of CCK2/gastrin receptor-expressing tumors. High kidney retention has been related to N-terminal glutamic acids and can be substantially reduced by coinjection of polyglutamic acids or gelofusine. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the stereochemistry of the N-terminal amino acid spacer on the enzymatic stability and pharmacokinetics of (111)In-DOTA-(d-Glu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2 ((111)In-PP11-D) and (111)In-DOTA-(l-Glu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2 ((111)In-PP11-L). Using circular dichroism measurements, we demonstrate the important role of secondary structure on the pharmacokinetics of the two MG analogues. The higher in vitro serum stability together with the improved tumor-to-kidney ratio of the (d-Glu)6 congener indicates that this MG analogue might be a good candidate for further clinical study.

  9. Intravenous infusion of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 and bombesin in rats reveals differential effects on meal size and intermeal interval length.

    PubMed

    Washington, Martha C; Salyer, Sarah; Aglan, Amnah H; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 (GRP-27) or bombesin (BN) (at 0.21, 0.41 and 1.03nmol/kg) reduces meal size (MS) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). Here, we hypothesized that the intravenous (i.v.) administration of the same doses of GRP-27 and BN will be as effective as the i.p. administration in evoking these feeding responses. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-27 and BN i.v. and measured first MS (10% sucrose), IMI, satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS) and second MS in overnight food-deprived but not water-deprived male Sprague Dawley rats. We found that (1) only GRP-27 reduced the first MS, (2) BN prolonged the IMI, (3) GRP-27 and BN increased the SR and (4) only BN reduced the size of the second meal. Contrary to our hypothesis, the i.v. administration of GRP-27 and BN affected the MS and IMI differently than did the i.p. administration. In conclusion, this pharmacological study suggests that the MS and IMI are regulated at different sites.

  10. Comparative Anatomy of Gastrin-releasing Peptide Pathways in the Trigeminal Sensory System of Mouse and the Asian House Musk Shrew Suncus murinus

    PubMed Central

    Takanami, Keiko; Inoue, Kaihei; Mukai, Hiroki; Tamura, Kei; Jogahara, Takamichi; Oda, Sen-ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) has recently been identified as an itch-signaling molecule in the primary afferents and spinal cord of rodents. However, little information exists on the expression and localization of GRP in the trigeminal somatosensory system other than in rats. We examined the generality of the trigeminal GRP system in mammals using two distinct species, suncus as a model of specialized placental mammals known to have a well-developed trigeminal sensory system and mice as a representative small laboratory animal. We first analyzed the gross morphology of the trigeminal somatosensory system in suncus to provide a brainstem atlas on which to map GRP distribution. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that 8% of trigeminal ganglion neurons in suncus and 6% in mice expressed GRP. Expression was restricted to cells with smaller somata. The GRP-containing fibers were densely distributed in the superficial layers of the caudal part of the trigeminal spinal nucleus (Vc) but rare in the rostral parts, both in suncus and mice. Expression of GRP receptor mRNA and protein was also detected in the Vc of suncus. Taken together, these results suggest that the trigeminal GRP system mediating itch sensation is conserved in mammals. PMID:28127106

  11. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist or N-acetylcysteine combined with omeprazol protect against mitochondrial complex II inhibition in a rat model of gastritis.

    PubMed

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Petronilho, Fabricia C; Araújo, João H; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Daufenbach, Juliana F; Cardoso, Mariane R; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2011-03-01

    The pathophysiology of gastritis involves an imbalance between gastric acid attack and mucosal defence. In addition, the gastric mucosal injury results in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Several studies have shown the association of mitochondrial disorders with gastrointestinal dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activity in the stomach of rats with gastritis induced by indomethacin (IDM) and treated with omeprazole (OM), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonist RC-3095. Adult male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 7 days with OM, NAC, RC-3095, combination of OM plus RC-3095, OM plus NAC and water (control). The animals were then submitted to fasting for 24 hr; IDM was administered. The rats were killed 6 hr later, and the stomachs were used for evaluation of macroscopic damage and respiratory chain activity. Our results showed that complex I and IV activities were not affected by administration of IDM. On the other hand, complex II and III activities were inhibited. In addition, OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC did not reverse complex II activity inhibition. However, the complex III activity inhibition was reversed only with the combined use of OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC. Our results are in agreement with previous studies indicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal tract disease and we suggest that GRPR antagonism might be a novel therapeutic strategy in gastritis.

  12. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  13. Hormones and Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    OHE 1 hypothesis are cancer patients and lacto- vegetarians . The evidence is rather clear that certain sparse. Schneider and co-workers used a Both of... Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Giske Ursin, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles...TYPE AND DATES COVERED I October 1997 Final (30 Sep 94 - 29 Sep 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Hormones and Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J

  14. [Acne and hormones].

    PubMed

    Faure, Michel

    2002-04-15

    Androgens stimulate sebum production which is necessary for the development of acne. Acne in women may thus be considered as a manifestation of cutaneous androgenization. Most of acnes may be related to an idiopathic skin hyperandrogenism due to in situ enzyme activity and androgen receptor hypersensitivity, as also noted in idiopathic hirsutism. Some acne may correspond to elevated ovarian or adrenal androgen secretion. The presence of acne in women may lead to a diagnosis of functional hyperandrogenism, either polycysticovary syndrome or nonclassical 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Plasma level assays for testosterone, delta 4 androstenedione and 17-OH progesterone and ovarian echography are necessary to determine the possibility for an ovarian or adrenal hyperandrogenism, but not to better treat acne. The goal of hormonal therapy in acne is to oppose the effects of androgens on the sebaceous gland. Hormones may be used in female acne in the absence of endocrine abnormalities. Antiandrogens (cyproterone acetate or aldactone) may be useful in severe acne, hormonal contraceptives with cyproterone acetate or non androgenic progestins in mild or common acne often in association with other anti-acneic drugs. Glucocorticoids have to be administered in acne fulminans and other forms of acute, severe, inflammatory acne, for their anti-inflammatory properties.

  15. Sex hormones and acne.

    PubMed

    Ju, Qiang; Tao, Tao; Hu, Tingting; Karadağ, Ayşe Serap; Al-Khuzaei, Safaa; Chen, WenChieh

    The skin is an endocrine organ with the expression of metabolizing enzymes and hormone receptors for diverse hormones. The sebaceous gland is the main site of hormone biosynthesis, especially for androgens, and acne is the classical androgen-mediated dermatosis. In sebocytes, conversion of 17-hydroxyprogesterone directly to dihydrotestosterone bypassing testosterone has been demonstrated, while type II 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase can inactivate the action of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. The androgen receptor-dependent genomic effect of dihydrotestosterone on sebocytes is confirmed. Further evidence supports the PI3 K/Akt/FoxO1/mTOR signaling in the involvement of the interplay between androgens, insulin, insulin-like growth factor, and hyperglycemic diet in acne. Androgens not only regulate embryology and lipogenesis/sebum synthesis in sebocytes but also influence inflammation in acne. Genetic studies indicate that regulation of the androgen receptor is an important factor in severe acne. Further studies are required to understand the effect of estrogen and progesterone on sebaceous gland and comedogenesis, considering the change of acne in pregnancy and postmenopausal acne. Special attention should be paid to nonobese patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome and hyperandrogenism-insulin resistance-acanthosis nigricans syndrome. In spite of extensive gynecologic experience in the use of combined oral contraceptives for acne, evidence based on dermatologic observation should be intensified.

  16. [Hormones and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Lacka, Katarzyna; Czyzyk, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Hormones have an influence on many tissues and organs, including the cardio-vascular system (CVS). Depending on their activity on CVS, they can be divided into 4 groups: having hypertensive or hypotensive influence and chronotropic positive or negative action. Endocrine regulation in CVS may occur in many ways. Apart from hormones usually connected with CVS regulation, other more recently, discovered ones can act on it. A few of these act directly through specific receptors in heart or vessel wall cells, whereas some act indirectly - stimulating other neuroendocrine factors. Additionally, novel mechanisms of signal transduction have been discovered for steroid and thyroid hormones, which are independent of gene transcription regulation and are - known as "nongenomic". Hormones which increase blood pressure include: urotensin II, endothelins, angiotensin II, catecholamines, aldosterone, antidiuretic hormone, glucocorticosteroids, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and leptin. On the other hand, blood pressure can be decreased by: natriuretic peptides, the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, angiotensin 1-7, substance P, neurokinin A, ghrelin, Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), oxytocin, and, sex hormones. Hormones which when appearing in excess increase the heart rate are: catecholamines, endothelins, glucocorticosteroids, thyroid hormones, leptin and PTHrP. Those which decrease the heart rate include: natriuretic peptides, substance P, neurokinin A, oxytocin, angiotensin 1-7. This paper describes the contemporary view of the functions of hormones which act on the vessel tree and heart. The particular effect of mediator depends on many circumstances i.e.: hormone concentration, receptor type. It may also undergo contraregulation. The majority of those hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of CVS diseases', which can result in the development of new medicines.

  17. A nonpeptidyl growth hormone secretagogue.

    PubMed

    Smith, R G; Cheng, K; Schoen, W R; Pong, S S; Hickey, G; Jacks, T; Butler, B; Chan, W W; Chaung, L Y; Judith, F

    1993-06-11

    A nonpeptidyl secretagogue for growth hormone of the structure 3-amino-3-methyl-N-(2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2-oxo-1-([2'-(1H-tetrazol-5 -yl) (1,1'-biphenyl)-4-yl]methyl)-1H-1-benzazepin-3(R)-yl)-butanamid e (L-692,429) has been identified. L-692,429 synergizes with the natural growth hormone secretagogue growth hormone-releasing hormone and acts through an alternative signal transduction pathway. The mechanism of action of L-692,429 and studies with peptidyl and nonpeptidyl antagonists suggest that this molecule is a mimic of the growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide His-D-Trp-Ala-Trp-D-Phe-Lys-NH2 (GHRP-6). L-692,429 is an example of a nonpeptidyl specific secretagogue for growth hormone.

  18. [Hormone replacement therapy].

    PubMed

    Nozue, E

    1994-03-01

    Hormone replacement therapy after menopause has shown so many advantages, such as reduction in risk of coronary artery disease and osteoporotic fracture besides treatment for climacteric symptoms, yet disadvantage such as a probability of an increase in the risk of breast cancer with long-term use still remains. In Japan HRT is now at the starting point. We must try to make more effort to accumulate data on the safety of HRT during-and-after menopause. It is our hope that doctors, not only gynecologists, but also doctors of other specialties will join our program for the health and happiness of women after menopause.

  19. Frailty, sarcopenia, and hormones.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E; Malmstrom, Theodore K

    2013-06-01

    Frailty is now a definable clinical syndrome with a simple screening test. Age-related changes in hormones play a major role in the development of frailty by reducing muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia). Selective Androgen Receptor Molecules and ghrelin agonists are being developed to treat sarcopenia. The role of Activin Type IIB soluble receptors and Follistatin-like 3 mimetics is less certain because of side effects. Exercise (resistance and aerobic), vitamin D and protein supplementation, and reduction of polypharmacy are keys to the treatment of frailty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hormone Abuse Prevention and What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ...

  1. Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0553 TITLE: Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jennifer K. Simpson Francemary Modugno...NUMBER Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02-1-0553 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has

  2. Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0553 TITLE: Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jennifer K. Simpson, R.N. Francesmary...August 2004 Annual Summary (I Aug 2003 - 31 Jul 2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Hormonal Determinants of Mammographic Density DAMD17-02...proprietary or confidential information) Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has been shown to increase breast cancer risk as well as to increase breast

  3. Curcumin Ameliorates Reserpine-Induced Gastrointestinal Mucosal Lesions Through Inhibiting IκB-α/NF-κB Pathway and Regulating Expression of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide and Gastrin in Rats.

    PubMed

    Long, Lingli; Wang, Jingnan; Chen, Ningning; Zheng, Shuhui; Shi, Lanying; Xu, Yuxia; Luo, Canqiao; Deng, Yubin

    2016-06-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate whether curcumin protects against reserpine-induced gastrointestinal mucosal lesions (GMLs) in rats and to explore the mechanism of curcumin's action. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control group, reserpine-treated group, reserpine treatment group with curcumin at high dose (200 mg/kg), and reserpine treatment group with curcumin at low dose (100 mg/kg). Rats in reserpine-treated group were induced by intraperitoneally administered reserpine (0.5 mg/kg) for 28 days. TUNEL staining and hematoxylin and eosin staining were used to evaluate the apoptotic cells and morphologic changes. In addition, to explore the mechanism of curcumin in protecting GMLs, we used serum of experimental rats to assess the level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ by ELISA and radioimmunoassay. The protein levels of NF-κB, p-IκB-α, IκB-α, Bcl-2, Bax, and cleaved-caspase-3 were examined by western blot analysis. Data were analyzed with SPSS 19.0 software package. Curcumin treatment prevented tissue damage and cell death in the reserpine-treated rats and effectively decreased inflammatory response and balanced the expression of VIP and gastrin in the reserpine-treated rats. NF-κB, p-IκB-α, Bax, and cleaved-caspase-3 were increased in the reserpine group, but the curcumin high-dose group inhibited them. Curcumin can target the IκB-α/NF-κB pathway to inhibit inflammatory response and regulate the level of VIP and gastrin in reserpine-induced GML rats.

  4. Mammalian sex hormones in plants.

    PubMed

    Janeczko, Anna; Skoczowski, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of mammalian sex hormones and their physiological role in plants is reviewed. These hormones, such as 17beta-estradiol, androsterone, testosterone or progesterone, were present in 60-80% of the plant species investigated. Enzymes responsible for their biosynthesis and conversion were also found in plants. Treatment of the plants with sex hormones or their precursors influenced plant development: cell divisions, root and shoot growth, embryo growth, flowering, pollen tube growth and callus proliferation. The regulatory abilities of mammalian sex hormones in plants makes possible their use in practice, especially in plant in vitro culture.

  5. Thyroid Hormones and Methylmercury Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Daniel M.; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for cellular metabolism, growth, and development. In particular, an adequate supply of thyroid hormones is critical for fetal neurodevelopment. Thyroid hormone tissue activation and inactivation in brain, liver, and other tissues is controlled by the deiodinases through the removal of iodine atoms. Selenium, an essential element critical for deiodinase activity, is sensitive to mercury and, therefore, when its availability is reduced, brain development might be altered. This review addresses the possibility that high exposures to the organometal, methylmercury (MeHg), may perturb neurodevelopmental processes by selectively affecting thyroid hormone homeostasis and function. PMID:18716716

  6. Hormone therapy in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio

    2010-05-01

    Steroid hormones are deeply involved in the pathophysiology of immune-mediated rheumatic diseases and used for their treatment. Purpose of the review is to update on recent roles and mechanisms of action of important steroid hormones such as glucocorticoids, estrogens, and D hormone (vitamin D) in order to optimize their therapeutical use. Endogenous glucocorticoids are characterized by a circadian rhythm of production that must be respected in case of exogenous low-dose long-term glucocorticoid replacement therapy of rheumatic diseases. Estrogens are enhancers of the humoral immune response and increase cell proliferation. Therefore, estrogens represent a risk factor for the development of autoimmunity and their therapeutical use must be avoided in patients with active immune-mediated diseases. Vitamin D, as synthesized in the skin from cholesterol, is a real steroid hormone (D hormone). The immunosuppressive activities of D hormone are reduced in chronic rheumatic diseases, as low plasma levels of the hormone are evident and justify its therapeutical use. The optimization of the therapeutical use of steroid hormones such as glucocorticoids, estrogens or D hormone is now possible following recent basic and clinical research achievements.

  7. Synthesis of Z-CCK-27-32-NH2, Z-Tyr(SO-3)-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2, a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist and an inhibitor of gastrin-induced acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Briet, C; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1985-09-01

    The synthesis of the hexapeptide Z-Tyr(SO-3)-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-NH2, representing the C-terminal sequence of cholecystokinin minus the C-terminal phenylalanyl residue is described. This peptide was shown to be the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist in vitro described to date. It is also able to inhibit gastrin-induced acid secretion in vivo, in the rat and was proved to antagonize the action of the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin in the central nervous system.

  8. Hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Scharbo-Dehaan, M

    1996-12-01

    More than 40 million women in the United States are now going through or are past menopause. Another 3.5 million or more will reach midlife in the next decade. As their life expectancy increases (mean life expectancy of women is now approximately 84 years), so does the need for therapeutic regimens related to reproductive function and aging in woman. Few medical treatments available to menopausal and postmenopausal women have as much potential benefit as well as possible health risks as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Despite the increasing amount of scientific data available regarding the benefits of HRT, a degree of uncertainty still remains, both in the minds of some women, and with some health professionals, regarding the risks associated with long-term therapy. Even though the literature is voluminous, contradictory, and unclear, health providers must be able to keep abreast of current knowledge about the benefits, risks, and unknowns of these drugs. The purpose of this article is to provide a review and an update on the types of hormones available for HRT, their pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, and their risks, benefits, and contraindications. Newer products, specially compounded formulas, new regimens, and new modes of delivery that offer women alternatives and allow care to be individualized are described. In addition, some of the ongoing management dilemmas that practitioners face with the woman who chooses HRT are presented with practical solutions and suggestions.

  9. [Hormone replacement therapy--growth hormone, melatonin, DHEA and sex hormones].

    PubMed

    Fukai, Shiho; Akishita, Masahiro

    2009-07-01

    The ability to maintain active and independent living as long as possible is crucial for the healthy longevity. Hormones responsible for some of the manifestations associated with aging are growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), sex hormones and thyroid hormones. These hormonal changes are associated with changes in body composition, visceral obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, loss of cognitive functioning, reduction in well being, depression, as well as sexual dysfunction. With the prolongation of life expectancy, both men and women today live the latter third life with endocrine deficiencies. Hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing or delaying some aspects of aging.

  10. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Chatalic, Kristell L S; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C; Nock, Berthold A; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of (177)Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (68)Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with (177)Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with (177)Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients.

  11. Impact of dianionic and dicationic linkers on tumor uptake and biodistribution of [(64) Cu]Cu/NOTA peptide-based gastrin-releasing peptide receptors antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Nematallah; Dumulon-Perreault, Véronique; Ait-Mohand, Samia; Paquette, Michel; Lecomte, Roger; Guérin, Brigitte

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigated for the first time the influence of 2-aminoethyl-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (APCA) and amino-hexanedioic-1-acid (AHDA) on tumor uptake and elimination kinetics of [(64) Cu]-radiolabeled gastrin releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) antagonists. Three GRPR antagonists containing the RM26 sequence were synthesized and conjugated with NOTA via different linkers (LK): polyethylene glycol (PEG-neutral), APCA (dicationic) or AHDA (dianionic). The NOTA-LK-RM26 peptides were radiolabeled with (64) Cu to assess their pharmacokinetic and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging properties using PC3 tumor-bearing athymic nude mice. The inhibition constants (Ki ) of the 3 (nat) Cu/NOTA-LK-RM26 peptides bearing PEG, dicationic and dianionic linkers were 0.98 ± 0.48 nM, 0.95 ± 0.21 nM, and 17.97 ± 2.79 nM, respectively. The [(64) Cu] NOTA-LK-RM26 conjugates were prepared with labeling yields superior to 95% and specific activities of 67 to 77 TBq/mmol. The 3 radiopeptides were stable in vivo and showed GRPR-specific uptake in pancreas with a very fast washout of this tissue observed for [(64) Cu]-NOTA-AHDA-RM26 peptide. Results from imaging studies displayed specific PC3 tumor uptake for both [(64) Cu]-NOTA-APCA- and AHDA-RM26, similar kidney elimination and fast liver washout. Considering their adequate imaging characteristics, [(64) Cu]-NOTA-LK-RM26 bearing APCA- and AHDA-linkers are promising candidates for GRPR-targeted PET imaging prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chatalic, Kristell L.S.; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C.; Nock, Berthold A.; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M.; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic 68Ga-/177Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of 177Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of 68Ga-/177Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 68Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with 177Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients. PMID:26722377

  13. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a 64Cu-Labeled NOTA-Bn-SCN-Aoc-Bombesin Analogue in Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Expressing Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Craft, Jeffrey M.; De Silva1, Ravindra A.; Lears, Kimberly A.; Andrews, Rebecca; Liang, Kexian; Achilefu, Samuel; Rogers, Buck E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Bombesin (BN) is an amphibian peptide that binds to the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR). It has been demonstrated that BN analogues can be radiolabeled for potential diagnosis and treatment of GRPR-expressing malignancies. Previous studies have conjugated various chelators to the eight C-terminal amino acids of BN (BN(7-14)) for radiolabeling with 64Cu. Recently, (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid) (NOTA) has been evaluated as the five coordinate 64Cu complex with results indicating GRPR-specific tumor uptake. This study aimed to conjugate S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-NOTA (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) to BN(7-14) such that it could form a six coordinate complex with 64Cu and evaluate the resulting peptide. Methods p-SCN-NOTA was conjugated to 8-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc)-BN(7-14) in solution to yield NOTA-Bn-SCN-Aoc-BN(7-14). The unlabeled peptide was evaluated in a cell binding assay using PC-3 prostate cancer cells and 125I-Tyr4-BN to determine the IC50 value. The peptide was radiolabeled with 64Cu and evaluated for internalization into PC-3 cells and for tumor uptake in mice bearing PC-3 xenografts using biodistribution and microPET imaging studies. Results The binding assay demonstrated that NOTA-Bn-SCN-Aoc-BN(7-14) bound with high affinity to GRPR with an IC50 of 1.4 nM. The radiolabeled peptide demonstrated time-dependent internalization into PC-3 cells. In vivo, the peptide demonstrated tumor-specific uptake and imaging that was comparable to that of previously reported 64Cu-labeled BN analogues. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that 64Cu-NOTA-Bn-SCN-Aoc-BN(7-14) binds to GRPR expressing cells and that it can be used for imaging of GRPR-expressing prostate cancer. PMID:22261146

  14. ROLES OF LIGHT AND SEROTONIN IN THE REGULATION OF GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE AND ARGININE VASOPRESSIN OUTPUT IN THE SCN CIRCADIAN CLOCK

    PubMed Central

    Francl, Jessica M.; Kaur, Gagandeep; Glass, J. David

    2010-01-01

    Daily timing of the mammalian circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is regulated by photic input from the retina via the retinohypothalamic tract. This signaling is mediated by glutamate which activates SCN retinorecipient units communicating to pacemaker cells in part through the release of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). Efferent signaling from the SCN involves another SCN-containing peptide, arginine vasopressin (AVP). It is notable that little is known concerning the mechanisms regulating these peptides, as literature on in vivo peptide release in the SCN is sparse. Here, microdialysis-radioimmunoassay procedures were used to characterize mechanisms controlling GRP and AVP release in the hamster SCN. In animals housed under a 14hr:10hr 24hr LD cycle both peptides exhibited daily fluctuations of release, with levels increasing during the morning to peak around midday. Under constant darkness, this pattern persisted for AVP, but rhythmicity was altered for GRP, characterized by a broad plateau throughout the subjective night and early subjective day. Neuronal release of the peptides was confirmed by their suppression with reverse-microdialysis perfusion of calcium blockers and stimulation with depolarizing agents. Reverse-microdialysis perfusion with the 5-HT1A,7 agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, during the day significantly suppressed GRP but had little effect on AVP. Also, perfusion with the glutamate agonist NMDA, or exposure to light at night, increased GRP but did not affect AVP. These analyses reveal distinct daily rhythms of SCN peptidergic activity, with GRP but not AVP release attenuated by serotonergic activation that inhibits photic phase-resetting, and activated by glutamatergic and photic stimulation that mediate this phase-resetting. PMID:20731711

  15. Male mice lacking the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) display elevated preference for conspecific odors and increased social investigatory behaviors.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Wada, E; Wada, K

    2000-07-07

    Previously, we generated gastrin-releasing peptide receptor null mutant mice (GRP-R-deficient mice), and found that these animals displayed increased non-aggressive social responses in an ordinary social interaction test using a resident-intruder method. In the present study, we examined in more detail the social behaviors of GRP-R-deficient male mice. In social interaction tests, GRP-R-deficient mice showed more social responses, such as sniffing and nosing, relative to wild-type mice, and similar results were obtained whether GRP-R-deficient mice served as intruders or residents. In the same way, they showed more contact behaviors toward an anesthetized conspecific, and less locomotor activity than wild-type mice in a social investigation test toward an anesthetized male mouse. Since olfactory systems play important roles in the social behavior of rodents, olfactory preference tests were conducted in order to evaluate the olfactory properties of GRP-R-deficient mice. The results suggest that no differences exist between wild-type mice and GRP-R-deficient mice in the preference between a novel sawdust odor and their own odor, or that of other male mice. However, GRP-R-deficient mice preferred the odor of other male mice to their own, in contrast to wild-type mice. Furthermore, the preferences of GRP-R-deficient and wild-type mice were not disrupted by intraperitoneal infusion of diazepam (1.5 mg/kg). These results indicate that neither the motion, nor the behavior of conspecifics, nor reduced anxiety lead to the increased non-aggressive social responses and/or social investigatory behaviors in GRP-R-deficient mice. Rather, these latter behaviors may be a consequence of altered cognition of conspecific odors in the mutant mice.

  16. Prospects of Targeting the Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptor and Somatostatin Receptor 2 for Nuclear Imaging and Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Simone U.; Schrijver, Willemijne A. M. E.; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Look, Maxime P.; Ziel - van der Made, Angelique C. J.; de Weerd, Vanja; Martens, John W.; van Diest, Paul J.; de Jong, Marion; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and the somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) are overexpressed on primary breast cancer (BC), making them ideal candidates for receptor-mediated nuclear imaging and therapy. The aim of this study was to determine whether these receptors are also suitable targets for metastatic BC. Methods mRNA expression of human BC samples were studied by in vitro autoradiography and associated with radioligand binding. Next, GRPR and SSTR2 mRNA levels of 60 paired primary BCs and metastases from different sites were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Receptor mRNA expression levels were associated with clinico-pathological factors and expression levels of primary tumors and corresponding metastases were compared. Results Binding of GRPR and SSTR radioligands to tumor tissue correlated significantly with receptor mRNA expression. High GRPR and SSTR2 mRNA levels were associated with estrogen receptor (ESR1)-positive tumors (p<0.001 for both receptors). There was no significant difference in GRPR mRNA expression of primary tumors versus paired metastases. Regarding SSTR2 mRNA expression, there was also no significant difference in the majority of cases, apart from liver and ovarian metastases which showed a significantly lower expression compared to the corresponding primary tumors (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). Conclusion Targeting the GRPR and SSTR2 for nuclear imaging and/or treatment has the potential to improve BC care in primary as well as metastatic disease. PMID:28107508

  17. Distinct functions of opioid-related peptides and gastrin-releasing peptide in regulating itch and pain in the spinal cord of primates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heeseung; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    How neuropeptides in the primate spinal cord regulate itch and pain is largely unknown. Here we elucidate the sensory functions of spinal opioid-related peptides and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in awake, behaving monkeys. Following intrathecal administration, β-endorphin (10–100 nmol) and GRP (1–10 nmol) dose-dependently elicit the same degree of robust itch scratching, which can be inhibited by mu-opioid peptide (MOP) receptor and GRP receptor (BB2) antagonists, respectively. Unlike β-endorphin, which produces itch and attenuates inflammatory pain, GRP only elicits itch without affecting pain. In contrast, enkephalins (100–1000 nmol) and nociceptin-orphanin FQ (3–30 nmol) only inhibit pain without eliciting itch. More intriguingly, dynorphin A(1–17) (10–100 nmol) dose-dependently attenuates both β-endorphin- and GRP-elicited robust scratching without affecting pain processing. The anti-itch effects of dynorphin A can be reversed by a kappa-opioid peptide (KOP) receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. These nonhuman primate behavioral models with spinal delivery of ligands advance our understanding of distinct functions of neuropeptides for modulating itch and pain. In particular, we demonstrate causal links for itch-eliciting effects by β-endorphin-MOP receptor and GRP-BB2 receptor systems and itch-inhibiting effects by the dynorphin A-KOP receptor system. These studies will facilitate transforming discoveries of novel ligand-receptor systems into future therapies as antipruritics and/or analgesics in humans. PMID:26119696

  18. Anti-ulcerogenic mechanisms of the sesquiterpene lactone onopordopicrin-enriched fraction from Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae): role of somatostatin, gastrin, and endogenous sulfhydryls and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Ana Beatriz Albino; Luiz-Ferreira, Anderson; Cola, Maíra; Di Pietro Magri, Luciana; Batista, Leonia Maria; de Paiva, Joseilson Alves; Trigo, José Roberto; Souza-Brito, Alba R M

    2012-04-01

    Arctium lappa L. has been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, depurative, and digestive stimulant and in dermatological conditions. The mechanisms involved in the anti-ulcerogenic activity of the sesquiterpene onopordopicrin (ONP)-enriched fraction (termed the ONP fraction), obtained from A. lappa leaves, were studied. The gastroprotective mechanism of the ONP fraction was evaluated in experimental in vivo models in rodents, mimicking this disease in humans. ONP fraction (50 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly inhibited the mucosal injury induced by ethanol/HCl solution (75%), indomethacin/bethanecol (68.9%), and stress (58.3%). When the ONP fraction was investigated in pylorus ligature, it did not induce alteration in the gastric volume but did modify the pH and total acid concentration of gastric juice. ONP fraction significantly increased serum somatostatin levels (82.1±4.1 vs. control group 12.7±4 pmol/L) and decreased serum gastrin levels (62.6±6.04 vs. control group 361.5±8.2 μU/mL). Mucus production was not significantly altered by the ONP fraction. Gastroprotection by the ONP fraction was completely inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide treatment and did not modify the effect in the animals pretreated with l-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester. These results suggest an antisecretory mechanism involved with the antiulcerogenic effect of the ONP fraction. However, only endogenous sulfhydryls play an important role in gastroprotection of the ONP fraction.

  19. Early phosphorylation events following the treatment of Swiss 3T3 cells with bombesin and the mammalian bombesin-related peptide, gastrin-releasing peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Isacke, C M; Meisenhelder, J; Brown, K D; Gould, K L; Gould, S J; Hunter, T

    1986-01-01

    Bombesin and the related mammalian peptides, such as gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), are potent mitogens for some fibroblast cell lines. Here we have examined the bombesin- and GRP-mediated changes in the phosphorylation of proteins in Swiss 3T3 cells and compared these to the events observed after platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and tumor promoter treatment. In agreement with previous reports, bombesin, GRP and PDGF, but not EGF, increased the activity of protein kinase C. This was assayed by an inhibition of [125I]EGF binding, stimulation in phosphorylation of pp60c-src on serine 12 and stimulation in phosphorylation of a group of 80 kd proteins. The different phosphorylated forms of the 80 kd proteins were examined by tryptic peptide mapping and shown to contain multiple phosphorylation sites. An investigation of the tyrosine phosphorylation events following mitogen treatment revealed a significant difference between PDGF and the bombesin peptides. PDGF treatment caused a marked increase in total cellular phosphotyrosine levels, and tyrosine phosphorylation both of known substrates and its own receptor. In contrast, bombesin and GRP treatments resulted in only a weak or undetectable increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of total cellular protein or known substrates. In this respect bombesin and GRP were more similar to EGF. The fact that the bombesin peptides do not induce a phosphorylation response identical with either PDGF or EGF suggests that there is not a single common signal pathway which is activated by all these mitogens. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2431903

  20. Neuromedin B and gastrin releasing peptide excite arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y neurons in a novel transgenic mouse expressing strong renilla GFP in NPY neurons

    PubMed Central

    van den Pol, Anthony N.; Yao, Yang; Fu, Li-Ying; Foo, Kylie; Huang, Hao; Coppari, Roberto; Lowell, Brad; Broberger, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most widespread neuropeptides in the brain. Transgenic mice were generated that expressed bright renilla GFP in most or all of the known NPY cells in the brain, which otherwise were not identifiable. GFP expression in NPY cells was confirmed with immunocytochemistry and single cell RT-PCR. NPY neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus play an important role in energy homeostasis and endocrine control. Whole cell patch clamp recording was used to study identified arcuate NPY cells. Primary agents that regulate energy balance include melanocortin receptor agonists, AgRP, and cannabinoids; none of these substances substantially influenced electrical properties of NPY neurons. In striking contrast, neuropeptides of the bombesin family, including gastrin releasing peptide and neuromedin B which are found in axons in the arcuate nucleus and may also be released from the gut to signal the brain, showed strong direct excitatory actions at nanomolar levels on the NPY neurons, stronger than the actions of ghrelin and hypocretin/orexin. Bombesin-related peptides reduced input resistance and depolarized the membrane potential. The depolarization was attenuated by several factors: substitution of choline for sodium, extracellular Ni2+, inclusion of BAPTA in the pipette, KB-R7943 and SKF96365. Reduced extracellular calcium enhanced the current, which reversed around − 20 mV. Together, these data suggest two mechanisms, activation of non-selective cation channels and the sodium/calcium exchanger. Since both NPY and POMC neurons, which we also studied, are similarly directly excited by bombesin-like peptides, the peptides may function to initiate broad activation, rather than the cell-type selective activation or inhibition reported for many other compounds that modulate energy homeostasis. PMID:19357287

  1. Identification and characterization of gastrointestinal hormone immunoreactive cells in the skin and parotoids of Chinese toad Bufo gargarizans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Xue; Zhang, Sheng-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The skin and skin secretion of Chinese toad Bufo gargarizans have long been used in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the exact types and location of bioactive substances in Bufo gargarizans skin still have not been fully elucidated. The aim of the study was to investigate the distribution and density of six types of gastrointestinal (GI) hormone immunoreactive (IR) cells in the skin and parotoids of Bufo gargarizans. Immunohistochemistry was used for qualitative and semiquantitative analysis of GI hormone presence in the dorsal and ventral skin, and parotoids of eight adult Chinese toads. Six types of IR cells were found: serotonin (5-HT), glucagon (GLU), gastrin (GAS), somatostatin (SS), pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and neuropeptide Y(NPY) IR cells. They were mainly present in the epidermis and skin glands. 5-HT-IR cells were distributed in all layers of epidermis and glands, with higher density in the glands. Glucagon was prominently expressed in the epidermis and the bottle-shaped glands of parotoids; however, it was not present in the granular glands of skin and parotoids. The distributions of GAS and SS-IR cells were similar since they were present mainly in mucous, granular and bottle-shaped glands, while these cell types were absent in the differentiated glands of parotoids. PP-IR cells were predominant in the granular glands and the bottle-shaped glands. The expression of NPY was high in epidermal stratum granulosum and mucous glands of the dorsal skin, the bottle-shaped glands and differentiated glands of parotoids, while NPY-IR was rarely seen in the granular glands of ventral skin, and not present in the granular glands of dorsal skin and parotoids. The expression of several types of GI hormones in the skin and parotoids of Bufo gargarizans varies depending on tissue and type of glands.

  2. Thyroid hormone and the heart.

    PubMed

    Moolman, J A

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone has important cardiovascular effects, and abnormalities of its production cause cardiovascular morbidity. The role of both excessive and insufficient thyroid hormone production in the pathogenesis of clinical cardiac diseases can be deduced from thyroid hormone-induced molecular changes. Thyroid hormone regulates the expression of myocardial genes regulating the handling of calcium, which affects both systolic and diastolic myocardial function. Thyroid hormone also has indirect and direct effects on peripheral vascular smooth muscle tone, and alters the coupling of the left ventricle and arterial system. Excessive production of thyroid hormone results in an increased cardiac output as well as increased cardiac work efficiency, but reduced cardiac reserve. Amiodarone therapy for cardiac rhythm can cause both hyper- and hypothyroidism. Amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) can be due to either excessive thyroid hormone production (type I AIT) or thyroid hormone release due to an inflammatory condition (type II AIT). Classification of AIT is helpful in guiding therapy. Amiodarone causes changes in the thyroid function tests of euthyroid patients on therapy--it inhibits the conversion of T(4) and T(3), which results in decreased T(3) and slightly increased T(4) serum levels in euthyroid patients. Baseline thyroid functions should therefore be determined before starting amiodarone therapy, and at 6-monthly intervals thereafter.

  3. Hormonal Programming Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Tobet, Stuart A; Lara, Hernan E; Lucion, Aldo B; Wilson, Melinda E; Recabarren, Sergio E; Paredes, Alfonso H

    2013-01-01

    Hormones influence countless biological processes across the lifespan, and during developmental sensitive periods hormones have the potential to cause permanent tissue-specific alterations in anatomy and physiology. There are numerous critical periods in development wherein different targets are affected. This review outlines the proceedings of the Hormonal Programming in Development session at the US-South American Workshop in Neuroendocrinology in August 2011. Here we discuss how gonadal hormones impact various biological processes within the brain and gonads during early development and describe the changes that take place in the aging female ovary. At the cellular level, hormonal targets in the brain include neurons, glia, or vasculature. On a genomic/epigenomic level, transcription factor signaling and epigenetic changes alter the expression of hormone receptor genes across development and following ischemic brain insult. In addition, organizational hormone exposure alters epigenetic processes in specific brain nuclei and may be a mediator of sexual differentiation of the neonatal brain. During development of the ovary, exposure to excess gonadal hormones leads to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Exposure to excess androgens during fetal development also has a profound effect on the development of the male reproductive system. In addition, increased sympathetic nerve activity and stress during early life have been linked to PCOS symptomology in adulthood. Finally, we describe how age-related decreases in fertility are linked to high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), which enhances sympathetic nerve activity and alters ovarian function. PMID:22700441

  4. Growth hormone stimulation test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is usually performed to identify if hGH (human growth hormone) is deficient. The test is performed by administering the amino acid arginine in a vein to raise hGH levels. The test measures the ability of the pituitary to secrete growth hormone in ...

  5. Effects of hormones on sleep.

    PubMed

    Steiger, A; Antonijevic, I A; Bohlhalter, S; Frieboes, R M; Friess, E; Murck, H

    1998-01-01

    Administration of hormones to humans and animals results in specific effects on the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) and nocturnal hormone secretion. Studies with pulsatile administration of various neuropeptides in young and old normal controls and in patients with depression suggest they play a key role in sleep-endocrine regulation. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulates GH and slow wave sleep (SWS) and inhibits cortisol, whereas corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) exerts opposite effects. Changes in the GHRH:CRH ratio contribute to sleep-endocrine aberrations during normal ageing and acute depression. In addition, galanin and neuropeptide Y promote sleep, whereas, in the elderly, somatostatin impairs sleep. The rapid eye movement (REM)-nonREM cycle is modulated by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. Cortisol stimulates SWS and GH, probably by feedback inhibition of CRH. Neuroactive steroids exert specific effects on the sleep EEG, which can be explained by gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor modulation.

  6. Quo vadis plant hormone analysis?

    PubMed

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Novák, Ondřej; Floková, Kristýna; Tarkowski, Petr; Turečková, Veronika; Grúz, Jiří; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav

    2014-07-01

    Plant hormones act as chemical messengers in the regulation of myriads of physiological processes that occur in plants. To date, nine groups of plant hormones have been identified and more will probably be discovered. Furthermore, members of each group may participate in the regulation of physiological responses in planta both alone and in concert with members of either the same group or other groups. The ideal way to study biochemical processes involving these signalling molecules is 'hormone profiling', i.e. quantification of not only the hormones themselves, but also their biosynthetic precursors and metabolites in plant tissues. However, this is highly challenging since trace amounts of all of these substances are present in highly complex plant matrices. Here, we review advances, current trends and future perspectives in the analysis of all currently known plant hormones and the associated problems of extracting them from plant tissues and separating them from the numerous potentially interfering compounds.

  7. Hormone therapy for transgender patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many transgender men and women seek hormone therapy as part of the transition process. Exogenous testosterone is used in transgender men to induce virilization and suppress feminizing characteristics. In transgender women, exogenous estrogen is used to help feminize patients, and anti-androgens are used as adjuncts to help suppress masculinizing features. Guidelines exist to help providers choose appropriate candidates for hormone therapy, and act as a framework for choosing treatment regimens and managing surveillance in these patients. Cross-sex hormone therapy has been shown to have positive physical and psychological effects on the transitioning individual and is considered a mainstay treatment for many patients. Bone and cardiovascular health are important considerations in transgender patients on long-term hormones, and care should be taken to monitor certain metabolic indices while patients are on cross-sex hormone therapy. PMID:28078219

  8. Types of Cancer Treatment: Hormone Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Describes how hormone therapy slows or stops the growth of breast and prostate cancers that use hormones to grow. Includes information about the types of hormone therapy and side effects that may happen.

  9. Types of Cancer Treatment: Hormone Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Describes how hormone therapy slows or stops the growth of breast and prostate cancers that use hormones to grow. Includes information about the types of hormone therapy and side effects that may happen.

  10. Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Avais; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pearce, Simon H S; Zaman, Azfar; Iervasi, Giorgio; Razvi, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial and vascular endothelial tissues have receptors for thyroid hormones and are sensitive to changes in the concentrations of circulating thyroid hormones. The importance of thyroid hormones in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis can be deduced from clinical and experimental data showing that even subtle changes in thyroid hormone concentrations - such as those observed in subclinical hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, and low triiodothyronine syndrome - adversely influence the cardiovascular system. Some potential mechanisms linking the two conditions are dyslipidaemia, endothelial dysfunction, blood pressure changes, and direct effects of thyroid hormones on the myocardium. Several interventional trials showed that treatment of subclinical thyroid diseases improves cardiovascular risk factors, which implies potential benefits for reducing cardiovascular events. Over the past 2 decades, accumulating evidence supports the association between abnormal thyroid function at the time of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that thyroid hormones can have an important therapeutic role in reducing infarct size and improving myocardial function after acute MI. In this Review, we summarize the literature on thyroid function in cardiovascular diseases, both as a risk factor as well as in the setting of cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure or acute MI, and outline the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  11. Vitamins as hormones.

    PubMed

    Reichrath, J; Lehmann, B; Carlberg, C; Varani, J; Zouboulis, C C

    2007-02-01

    Vitamins A and D are the first group of substances that have been reported to exhibit properties of skin hormones, such as organized metabolism, activation, inactivation, and elimination in specialized cells of the tissue, exertion of biological activity, and release in the circulation. Vitamin A and its two important metabolites, retinaldehyde and retinoic acids, are fat-soluble unsaturated isoprenoids necessary for growth, differentiation and maintenance of epithelial tissues, and also for reproduction. In a reversible process, vitamin A is oxidized IN VIVO to give retinaldehyde, which is important for vision. The dramatic effects of vitamin A analogues on embryogenesis have been studied by animal experiments; the clinical malformation pattern in humans is known. Retinoic acids are major oxidative metabolites of vitamin A and can substitute for it in vitamin A-deficient animals in growth promotion and epithelial differentiation. Natural vitamin A metabolites are vitamins, because vitamin A is not synthesized in the body and must be derived from carotenoids in the diet. On the other hand, retinoids are also hormones - with intracrine activity - because retinol is transformed in the cells into molecules that bind to and activate specific nuclear receptors, exhibit their function, and are subsequently inactivated. The mechanisms of action of natural vitamin A metabolites on human skin are based on the time- and dose-dependent influence of morphogenesis, epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation, epithelial and mesenchymal synthetic performance, immune modulation, stimulation of angiogenesis and inhibition of carcinogenesis. As drugs, vitamin A and its natural metabolites have been approved for the topical and systemic treatment of mild to moderate and severe, recalcitrant acne, photoaging and biologic skin aging, acute promyelocytic leukaemia and Kaposi's sarcoma. On the other hand, the critical importance of the skin for the human body's vitamin D endocrine

  12. Plant hormone signaling lightens up: integrators of light and hormones.

    PubMed

    Lau, On Sun; Deng, Xing Wang

    2010-10-01

    Light is an important environmental signal that regulates diverse growth and developmental processes in plants. In these light-regulated processes, multiple hormonal pathways are often modulated by light to mediate the developmental changes. Conversely, hormone levels in plants also serve as endogenous cues in influencing light responsiveness. Although interactions between light and hormone signaling pathways have long been observed, recent studies have advanced our understanding by identifying signaling integrators that connect the pathways. These integrators, namely PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3 (PIF3), PIF4, PIF3-LIKE 5 (PIL5)/PIF1 and LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), are key light signaling components and they link light signals to the signaling of phytohormones, such as gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), auxin and cytokinin, in regulating seedling photomorphogenesis and seed germination. This review focuses on these integrators in illustrating how light and hormone interact.

  13. Hormonal contraception and cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Brito, Milena Bastos; Nobre, Fernando; Vieira, Carolina Sales

    2011-04-01

    Hormonal contraception is the most widely used method to prevent unplanned pregnancies. The literature has shown an association between cardiovascular risk and use of hormone therapy. With the purpose of providing better guidelines on contraception methods for women with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, we have reviewed the literature on the subject. This review describes the latest data from the scientific literature concerning the influence of hormonal contraceptives on arterial thrombosis, venous thrombosis and systemic high blood pressure, which are diseases that have become increasingly prevalent among young females.

  14. Hormone replacement therapy and longevity.

    PubMed

    Comhaire, F

    2016-02-01

    To assess whether hormone replacement therapy influences longevity, an analysis was made of published life tables allowing for the calculation of the relative benefit of hormone replacement therapy on longevity in men with late onset hypogonadism and in post-menopausal women. It was found that testosterone replacement therapy of men suffering from late onset hypogonadism increased survival rate by 9-10% in 5 years, similar to that of eugonadal, non-LOH men with normal endogenous testosterone secretion. Oestrogen replacement therapy resulted in increased survival by 2.6% in 5 years. It is concluded that hormone replacement therapy increases longevity.

  15. Hormonal Signaling in the Gut*

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Clémence D.; Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Rasmussen, Brittany A.; Duca, Frank A.; Lam, Tony K. T.

    2014-01-01

    The gut is anatomically positioned to play a critical role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, providing negative feedback via nutrient sensing and local hormonal signaling. Gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are released following a meal and act on local receptors to regulate glycemia via a neuronal gut-brain axis. Additionally, jejunal nutrient sensing and leptin action are demonstrated to suppress glucose production, and both are required for the rapid antidiabetic effect of duodenal jejunal bypass surgery. Strategies aimed at targeting local gut hormonal signaling pathways may prove to be efficacious therapeutic options to improve glucose control in diabetes. PMID:24577102

  16. Hormonal signaling in the gut.

    PubMed

    Côté, Clémence D; Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Rasmussen, Brittany A; Duca, Frank A; Lam, Tony K T

    2014-04-25

    The gut is anatomically positioned to play a critical role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, providing negative feedback via nutrient sensing and local hormonal signaling. Gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are released following a meal and act on local receptors to regulate glycemia via a neuronal gut-brain axis. Additionally, jejunal nutrient sensing and leptin action are demonstrated to suppress glucose production, and both are required for the rapid antidiabetic effect of duodenal jejunal bypass surgery. Strategies aimed at targeting local gut hormonal signaling pathways may prove to be efficacious therapeutic options to improve glucose control in diabetes.

  17. Hormone signaling in plant development.

    PubMed

    Durbak, Amanda; Yao, Hong; McSteen, Paula

    2012-02-01

    Hormone signaling plays diverse and critical roles during plant development. In particular, hormone interactions regulate meristem function and therefore control formation of all organs in the plant. Recent advances have dissected commonalities and differences in the interaction of auxin and cytokinin in the regulation of shoot and root apical meristem function. In addition, brassinosteroid hormones have recently been discovered to regulate root apical meristem size. Further insights have also been made into our understanding of the mechanism of crosstalk among auxin, cytokinin, and strigolactone in axillary meristems.

  18. Clinical Translation of a Dual Integrin αvβ3- and Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor-Targeting PET Radiotracer, 68Ga-BBN-RGD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Niu, Gang; Lang, Lixin; Li, Fang; Fan, Xinrong; Yan, Xuefeng; Yao, Shaobo; Yan, Weigang; Huo, Li; Chen, Libo; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Zhaohui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to document the first-in-human application of a (68)Ga-labeled heterodimeric peptide BBN-RGD (bombesin-RGD) that targets both integrin αvβ3 and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR). We evaluated the safety and assessed the clinical diagnostic value of (68)Ga-BBN-RGD PET/CT in prostate cancer patients in comparison with (68)Ga-BBN. Five healthy volunteers (4 men and 1 woman; age range, 28-53 y) were enrolled to validate the safety of (68)Ga-BBN-RGD. Dosimetry was calculated using the OLINDA/EXM software. Thirteen patients with prostate cancer (4 newly diagnosed and 9 posttherapy) were enrolled. All the patients underwent PET/CT scans 15-30 min after intravenous injection of 1.85 MBq (0.05 mCi) per kilogram of body weight of (68)Ga-BBN-RGD and also accepted (68)Ga-BBN PET/CT within 2 wk for comparison. With a mean injected dose of 107.3 ± 14.8 MBq per patient, no side effect was found during the whole procedure and 2 wk follow-up, demonstrating the safety of (68)Ga-BBN-RGD. A patient would be exposed to a radiation dose of 2.90 mSv with an injected dose of 129.5 MBq (3.5 mCi), which is much lower than the dose limit set by the Food and Drug Administration. In 13 patients with prostate cancer diagnosed by biopsy, (68)Ga-BBN-RGD PET/CT detected 3 of 4 primary tumors, 14 metastatic lymph nodes, and 20 bone lesions with an SUVmax of 4.46 ± 0.50, 6.26 ± 2.95, and 4.84 ± 1.57, respectively. Only 2 of 4 primary tumors, 5 lymph nodes, and 12 bone lesions were positive on (68)Ga-BBN PET/CT, with the SUVmax of 2.98 ± 1.24, 4.17 ± 1.89, and 3.61 ± 1.85, respectively. This study indicates the safety and efficiency of a new type of dual integrin αvβ3- and GRPR-targeting PET radiotracer in prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a 64Cu-labeled NOTA-Bn-SCN-Aoc-bombesin analogue in gastrin-releasing peptide receptor expressing prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Craft, Jeffrey M; De Silva, Ravindra A; Lears, Kimberly A; Andrews, Rebecca; Liang, Kexian; Achilefu, Samuel; Rogers, Buck E

    2012-07-01

    Bombesin (BN) is an amphibian peptide that binds to the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR). It has been demonstrated that BN analogues can be radiolabeled for potential diagnosis and treatment of GRPR-expressing malignancies. Previous studies have conjugated various chelators to the eight C-terminal amino acids of BN [BN(7-14)] for radiolabeling with 64Cu. Recently, (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid) (NOTA) has been evaluated as the five-coordinate 64Cu complex, with results indicating GRPR-specific tumor uptake. This study aimed to conjugate S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-NOTA (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) to BN(7-14) such that it could form a six-coordinate complex with 64Cu and to evaluate the resulting peptide. p-SCN-NOTA was conjugated to 8-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc)-BN(7-14) in solution to yield NOTA-Bn-SCN-Aoc-BN(7-14). The unlabeled peptide was evaluated in a cell binding assay using PC-3 prostate cancer cells and 125I-Tyr4-BN to determine the IC50 value. The peptide was radiolabeled with 64Cu and evaluated for internalization into PC-3 cells and for tumor uptake in mice bearing PC-3 xenografts using biodistribution and micro-positron emission tomography imaging studies. The binding assay demonstrated that NOTA-Bn-SCN-Aoc-BN(7-14) bound with high affinity to GRPR with an IC50 of 1.4 nM. The radiolabeled peptide demonstrated time-dependent internalization into PC-3 cells. In vivo, the peptide demonstrated tumor-specific uptake and imaging that were comparable to those of previously reported 64Cu-labeled BN analogues. These studies demonstrate that 64Cu-NOTA-Bn-SCN-Aoc-BN(7-14) binds to GRPR-expressing cells and that it can be used for imaging of GRPR-expressing prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gastrin-Releasing Peptide/Neuromedin B Receptor Antagonists PD176252, PD168368, and Related Analogs Are Potent Agonists of Human Formyl-Peptide ReceptorsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Jutila, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    N-Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) involved in host defense and sensing cellular dysfunction. Thus, FPRs represent important therapeutic targets. In the present studies, we screened 32 ligands (agonists and antagonists) of unrelated GPCRs for their ability to induce intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with human FPR1, FPR2, or FPR3. Screening of these compounds demonstrated that antagonists of gastrin-releasing peptide/neuromedin B receptors (BB1/BB2) PD168368 [(S)-a-methyl-a-[[[(4-nitrophenyl)amino]carbonyl]amino]-N-[[1-(2-pyridinyl) cyclohexyl]methyl]-1H-indole-3-propanamide] and PD176252 [(S)-N-[[1-(5-methoxy-2-pyridinyl)cyclohexyl]methyl]-a-methyl-a-[[-(4-nitrophenyl)amino]carbonyl]amino-1H-indole-3-propanamide] were potent mixed FPR1/FPR2 agonists, with nanomolar EC50 values. Cholecystokinin-1 receptor agonist A-71623 [Boc-Trp-Lys(ε-N-2-methylphenylaminocarbonyl)-Asp-(N-methyl)-Phe-NH2] was also a mixed FPR1/FPR2 agonist, but with a micromolar EC50. Screening of 56 Trp- and Phe-based PD176252/PD168368 analogs and 41 related nonpeptide/nonpeptoid analogs revealed 22 additional FPR agonists. Most were potent mixed FPR1/FPR2/FPR3 agonists with nanomolar EC50 values for FPR2, making them among the most potent nonpeptide FPR2 agonists reported to date. In addition, these agonists were also potent chemoattractants for murine and human neutrophils and activated reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils. Molecular modeling of the selected agonists using field point methods allowed us to modify our previously reported pharmacophore model for the FPR2 ligand binding site. This model suggests the existence of three hydrophobic/aromatic subpockets and several binding poses of FPR2 agonists in the transmembrane region of this receptor. These studies demonstrate that FPR agonists could include ligands of unrelated GPCR and that analysis of such compounds can enhance our

  1. A rhesus monkey model to characterize the role of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in lung development. Evidence for stimulation of airway growth.

    PubMed Central

    Li, K; Nagalla, S R; Spindel, E R

    1994-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is developmentally expressed in human fetal lung and is a growth factor for normal and neoplastic lung but its role in normal lung development has yet to be clearly defined. In this study we have characterized the expression of GRP and its receptor in fetal rhesus monkey lung and determined the effects of bombesin on fetal lung development in vitro. By RNA blot analysis, GRP mRNA was first detectable in fetal monkey lung at 63 days gestation, reached highest levels at 80 days gestation, and then declined to near adult levels by 120 days gestation; a pattern closely paralleling GRP expression in human fetal lung. As in human lung, in situ hybridization localized GRP mRNA to neuroendocrine cells though during the canalicular phase of development (between 63-80 days gestation) GRP mRNA was present not only in classic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, but also in cells of budding airways. Immunohistochemistry showed that bombesin-like immunoreactivity was present in neuroendocrine cells, but not in budding airways, suggesting that in budding airways either the GRP mRNA is not translated, is rapidly secreted, or a related, but different RNA is present. RNase protection analysis using a probe to the monkey GRP receptor demonstrated that the time course of receptor RNA expression closely paralleled the time course of GRP RNA expression. In situ hybridization showed that GRP receptors were primarily expressed in epithelial cells of the developing airways. Thus GRP would appear to be secreted from neuroendocrine cells to act on target cells in developing airways. This hypothesis was confirmed by organ culture of fetal monkey lung in the presence of bombesin and bombesin antagonists. Bombesin treatment at 1 and 10 nM significantly increased DNA synthesis in airway epithelial cells and significantly increased the number and size of airways in cultured fetal lung. In fact, culturing 60 d fetal lung for 5 d with 10 nM bombesin increased airway size

  2. Calciotropic hormones during reproduction.

    PubMed

    Verhaeghe, J; Bouillon, R

    1992-03-01

    This review summarizes the reported effects of the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and lactation on serum concentration of the calciotropic hormones PTH and 1,25(OH)2D. A midcycle rise in PTH and 1,25(OH)2D has been observed, but in the majority of studies there was no change in PTH and 1,25(OH)2D concentrations throughout the menstrual cycle. Both total and free 1,25(OH)2D levels are increased during pregnancy. The renal 1,25(OH)2D production is stimulated, and there is some evidence of 1,25(OH)2D production by decidua/placenta and fetal kidney in vitro; the decidual/placental production should not be overestimated in vivo. The increased renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity is possibly mediated by estrogens and PTH, although the effect of pregnancy on PTH remains uncertain. Increased serum 1,25(OH)2D concentrations probably result in a rise of intestinal calcium absorption during pregnancy. There is a postdelivery drop in PTH and 1,25(OH)2D levels, but they are increased when lactation is prolonged, or in mothers nursing twins. The l alpha-hydroxylase activity during lactation may be stimulated by PTH, but also by prolactin.

  3. Steroid hormones and BDNF.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, N; Russo, M; Santoro, A N; Litta, P; Cela, V; Genazzani, A R

    2013-06-03

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin abundantly expressed in several areas of the central nervous system (CNS) and is known to induce a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy, to enhance specific learning and memory processes. BDNF is one of the key molecules modulating brain plasticity and it affects cognitive deficit associated with aging and neurodegenerative disease. Several studies have shown an altered BDNF production and secretion in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases but also in mood disorders like depression, eating disorders and schizophrenia. Plasma BDNF is also a biomarker of impaired memory and general cognitive function in aging women. Gonadal steroids are involved in the regulation of several CNS processes, specifically mood, affective and cognitive functions during fertile life and reproductive aging. These observations lead many scientists to investigate a putative co-regulation between BDNF and gonadal and/or adrenal steroids and their relationship with gender difference in the incidence of mental diseases. This overview aims to summarize the current knowledge on the correlation between BDNF expression/function and both gonadal (progesterone, estrogens, and testosterone) and adrenal hormones (mainly cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)) with relevance in clinical application.

  4. Specific involvement of gonadal hormones in the functional maturation of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons.

    PubMed

    Gouty-Colomer, Laurie-Anne; Méry, Pierre-François; Storme, Emilie; Gavois, Elodie; Robinson, Iain C; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Mollard, Patrice; Desarménien, Michel G

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the key hormone involved in the regulation of growth and metabolism, two functions that are highly modulated during infancy. GH secretion, controlled mainly by GH releasing hormone (GHRH), has a characteristic pattern during postnatal development that results in peaks of blood concentration at birth and puberty. A detailed knowledge of the electrophysiology of the GHRH neurons is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating postnatal GH secretion. Here, we describe the unique postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of GHRH neurons and their regulation by gonadal hormones. Using GHRH-eGFP mice, we demonstrate that already at birth, GHRH neurons receive numerous synaptic inputs and fire large and fast action potentials (APs), consistent with effective GH secretion. Concomitant with the GH secretion peak occurring at puberty, these neurons display modifications of synaptic input properties, decrease in AP duration, and increase in a transient voltage-dependant potassium current. Furthermore, the modulation of both the AP duration and voltage-dependent potassium current are specifically controlled by gonadal hormones because gonadectomy prevented the maturation of these active properties and hormonal treatment restored it. Thus, GHRH neurons undergo specific developmental modulations of their electrical properties over the first six postnatal weeks, in accordance with hormonal demand. Our results highlight the importance of the interaction between the somatotrope and gonadotrope axes during the establishment of adapted neuroendocrine functions.

  5. Network Identification of Hormonal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vis, Daniel J.; Westerhuis, Johan A.; Hoefsloot, Huub C. J.; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; van der Greef, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Relations among hormone serum concentrations are complex and depend on various factors, including gender, age, body mass index, diurnal rhythms and secretion stochastics. Therefore, endocrine deviations from healthy homeostasis are not easily detected or understood. A generic method is presented for detecting regulatory relations between hormones. This is demonstrated with a cohort of obese women, who underwent blood sampling at 10 minute intervals for 24-hours. The cohort was treated with bromocriptine in an attempt to clarify how hormone relations change by treatment. The detected regulatory relations are summarized in a network graph and treatment-induced changes in the relations are determined. The proposed method identifies many relations, including well-known ones. Ultimately, the method provides ways to improve the description and understanding of normal hormonal relations and deviations caused by disease or treatment. PMID:24852517

  6. Hormonal Regulation of Leaf Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William P.

    1968-01-01

    A review is given of the progress made during the last 6 years in elucidating the nature, locus of action, and transport properties of the endogenous hormones that control leaf abscission. PMID:16657014

  7. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3-4):251-258. [PubMed Abstract] Lee RJ, Smith MR. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer. In: Chabner ... 1, 2014. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1405095 Ryan CJ, Smith MR, Fizazi K, et al. Abiraterone acetate plus ...

  8. Adrenal gland hormone secretion (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The adrenal gland secretes steroid hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone. It also makes precursors that can be converted to ... steroids (androgen, estrogen). A different part of the adrenal gland makes adrenaline (epinephrine). When the glands produce more ...

  9. Hormone therapy for breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mood swings Depression Loss of interest in sex Drug Side Effects The side effects of hormone therapy depend on the drug. Common side effects include hot flashes, night sweats, and vaginal dryness . ...

  10. Simple hormones but complex signalling.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Hannes; Kuhlemeier, Cris

    2003-02-01

    It has not been easy to make sense of the pleiotropic effects of plant hormones, especially of auxins; but now, it has become possible to study these effects within the framework of what we know about signal transduction in general. Changes in local auxin concentrations, perhaps even actively maintained auxin gradients, signal to networks of transcription factors, which in turn signal to downstream effectors. Transcription factors can also signal back to hormone biosynthetic pathways.

  11. Ghrelin: much more than a hunger hormone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ghrelin is a multifaceted gut hormone that activates its receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin's hallmark functions are its stimulatory effects on growth hormone release, food intake and fat deposition. Ghrelin is famously known as the 'hunger hormone'. However, ample recen...

  12. Hormones and Borderline Personality Features

    PubMed Central

    Evardone, Milagros; Alexander, Gerianne M.; Morey, Leslie C.

    2009-01-01

    Borderline personality is diagnosed in clinical settings three times more often in women than in men, and symptom severity in women appears sensitive to circulating sex steroid levels. In non-human mammals, prenatal hormones contribute to the development of sex-linked behavior and their responsiveness to postnatal hormones. Therefore, this study examined the hypothesis that prenatal hormones may influence the development of borderline personality traits by measuring a marker of perinatal androgen action, the 2D:4D ratio, and salivary hormone levels in 58 men and 52 women. Participants completed the Borderline Features Subscales (BOR) of the Personality Assessment Inventory, gender role questionnaires, and four sex-linked cognitive tasks. Digit ratios were a significant predictor of the affective component of borderline personality, such that in both sexes 2D:4D ratios suggestive of weaker perinatal androgen action contributed to greater borderline personality features overall and greater affective instability. In addition, women reporting greater affective instability showed larger changes in estradiol across the session, consistent with the influence of stress and emotional reactivity on hormonal function. These findings are consistent with an increasing body of research suggesting that hormonal factors associated with the expression of typical gender-linked behavior may also contribute to the expression of gender-linked maladaptive behavior. PMID:19554197

  13. Hormones and Borderline Personality Features.

    PubMed

    Evardone, Milagros; Alexander, Gerianne M; Morey, Leslie C

    2008-01-01

    Borderline personality is diagnosed in clinical settings three times more often in women than in men, and symptom severity in women appears sensitive to circulating sex steroid levels. In non-human mammals, prenatal hormones contribute to the development of sex-linked behavior and their responsiveness to postnatal hormones. Therefore, this study examined the hypothesis that prenatal hormones may influence the development of borderline personality traits by measuring a marker of perinatal androgen action, the 2D:4D ratio, and salivary hormone levels in 58 men and 52 women. Participants completed the Borderline Features Subscales (BOR) of the Personality Assessment Inventory, gender role questionnaires, and four sex-linked cognitive tasks. Digit ratios were a significant predictor of the affective component of borderline personality, such that in both sexes 2D:4D ratios suggestive of weaker perinatal androgen action contributed to greater borderline personality features overall and greater affective instability. In addition, women reporting greater affective instability showed larger changes in estradiol across the session, consistent with the influence of stress and emotional reactivity on hormonal function. These findings are consistent with an increasing body of research suggesting that hormonal factors associated with the expression of typical gender-linked behavior may also contribute to the expression of gender-linked maladaptive behavior.

  14. The evolution of peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Niall, H D

    1982-01-01

    Despite limitations in our present knowledge it is already possible to discern the main features of peptide hormone evolution, since the same mechanisms (and indeed the same hormone molecules) function in many different ways. This underlying unity of organization has its basis in the tendency of biochemical networks, once established, to survive and diversify. The most surprising recent findings in endocrinology have been the discovery of vertebrate peptide hormones in multiple sites within the same organism, and the reports, persuasive but requiring confirmation, of vertebrate hormones in primitive unicellular organisms (20, 20a). Perhaps the major challenge for the future is to define the roles and interactions of the many peptide hormones identified in brain (18). The most primitive bacteria and the human brain, though an enormous evolutionary distance apart, may have more in common than we have recognized until now. As Axelrod & Hamilton have pointed out in a recent provocative article, "The Evolution of Cooperation" (1), bacteria, though lacking a brain, are capable of adaptive behavior that can be analysed in terms of game theory. It is clear that we can learn a great deal about the whole evolutionary process from a study of the versatile and durable peptide hormones molecules.

  15. Growth hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carter-Su, Christin; Schwartz, Jessica; Argetsinger, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Over 20years ago, our laboratory showed that growth hormone (GH) signals through the GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. We showed that GH binding to its membrane-bound receptor enhances binding of JAK2 to the GHR, activates JAK2, and stimulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of both JAK2 and GHR. The activated JAK2/GHR complex recruits a variety of signaling proteins, thereby initiating multiple signaling pathways and cellular responses. These proteins and pathways include: 1) Stat transcription factors implicated in the expression of multiple genes, including the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1; 2) Shc adapter proteins that lead to activation of the grb2-SOS-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1,2 pathway; 3) insulin receptor substrate proteins implicated in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Akt pathway; 4) signal regulatory protein α, a transmembrane scaffold protein that recruits proteins including the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2; and 5) SH2B1, a scaffold protein that can activate JAK2 and enhance GH regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent work has focused on the function of SH2B1. We have shown that SH2B1β is recruited to and phosphorylated by JAK2 in response to GH. SH2B1 localizes to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and focal adhesions; it also cycles through the nucleus. SH2B1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and promotes GH-dependent motility of RAW264.7 macrophages. Mutations in SH2B1 have been found in humans exhibiting severe early-onset childhood obesity and insulin resistance. These mutations impair SH2B1 enhancement of GH-induced macrophage motility. As SH2B1 is expressed ubiquitously and is also recruited to a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, our results raise the possibility that effects of SH2B1 on the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, including neurons, may play a role in regulating body weight.

  16. Physical and hormonal evaluation of transsexual patients during hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Meyer, W J; Finkelstein, J W; Stuart, C A; Webb, A; Smith, E R; Payer, A F; Walker, P A

    1981-08-01

    The optimal hormonal therapy for transsexual patients is not known. The physical and hormonal characteristics of 38 noncastrate male-to-female transsexuals and 14 noncastrate female-to-male transsexuals have been measured before and/or during therapy with various forms and dosages of hormonal therapy. All patients were hormonally and physically normal prior to therapy. Ethinyl estradiol was superior to conjugated estrogen in suppression of testosterone and gonadotropins but equal in effecting breast growth. The changes in physical and hormonal characteristics were the same for 0.1 mg/d and 0.5 mg/d of ethinyl estradiol. The female-to-male transsexuals were well managed with a dose of intramuscular testosterone cypionate of 400 mg/month, usually given 200 mg every two weeks. The maximal clitoral length reached was usually 4 cm. Higher doses of testosterone did not further increase clitoral length or suppression of gonadotropins; lower doses did not suppress the gonadotropins. Based on the information found in this study, we recommend 0.1 mg/d of ethinyl estradiol for the noncastrate male-to-female transsexual and 200 mg of intramuscular testosterone cypionate every two weeks for the noncastrate female-to-male transsexual.

  17. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casula, Sabina; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2012-01-01

    Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin fold-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4) to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i) they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii) could play a role in modulating cell proliferation – in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS)-13 cells is threefold to fourfold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh)-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a fivefold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma, and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches. PMID:22675319

  18. Disorders of antidiuretic hormone.

    PubMed

    Vokes, T J; Robertson, G L

    1988-06-01

    Disorders of thirst and vasopressin secretion present clinically in one of three ways: as hypotonic polyuria (DI), as hypodipsic hyponatremia, and as hyponatremia. In evaluating a patient with DI, the major challenge is to differentiate between primary polydipsia and neurogenic and nephrogenic DI. This is best accomplished through a series of steps that start with simple clinical observation, and progress, as necessary, to more complicated diagnostic procedures (Fig. 1). If the diagnosis is not clear from the clinical setting and the patient's history, the first step is to measure plasma osmolality and sodium under conditions of ad libitum fluid intake. If the results are clearly above the upper limit of normal range, primary polydipsia is excluded and the work-up can proceed directly to administration of vasopressin or DDAVP and/or a measurement of plasma vasopressin levels to differentiate between neurogenic and nephrogenic DI. If basal plasma osmolality and sodium fall within normal range, the standard dehydration test should be performed. If urine osmolality does not increase above that of plasma despite evident dehydration, primary polydipsia is excluded and the effect of vasopressin or DDAVP on urine osmolality should be examined to differentiate between neurogenic and nephrogenic DI. If administration of antidiuretic hormone increases urine osmolality by more than 50 per cent, the patient has severe neurogenic DI. If the increase in urine osmolality is less than 50 per cent, the patient has nephrogenic DI. In patients who do not concentrate urine above that of plasma in response to dehydration, the best approach is to measure plasma vasopressin, osmolality, and sodium after the latter have been increased above normal range by dehydration and/or infusion of hypertonic saline. When these results are plotted on a suitable nomogram (Fig. 2), neurogenic DI can be clearly diagnosed from the relative deficiency of vasopressin. In patients with normal vasopressin

  19. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists in premenopausal hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sing-Huang; Wolff, Antonio C

    2007-02-01

    Ovarian function suppression for the treatment of premenopausal breast cancer was first used in the late 19th century. Traditionally, ovarian function suppression had been accomplished irreversibly via irradiation or surgery, but analogues of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) have emerged as reliable and reversible agents for this purpose, especially the LH-RH agonists. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonists are in earlier stages of development in breast cancer and are not currently in clinical use. Luteinizing hormonereleasing hormone agonists act by pituitary desensitization and receptor downregulation, thereby suppressing gonadotrophin release. Limited information is available comparing the efficacies of the depot preparations of various agonists, but pharmacodynamic studies have shown comparable suppressive capabilities on estradiol and luteinizing hormone. At present, only monthly goserelin is Food and Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive, premenopausal metastatic breast cancer in the United States. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists have proven to be as effective as surgical oophorectomy in premenopausal advanced breast cancer. They offer similar outcomes compared with tamoxifen, but the endocrine combination appears to be more effective than LH-RH agonists alone. In the adjuvant setting, LH-RH agonists versus no therapy reduce the annual odds of recurrence and death in women aged>50 years with estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists alone or in combination with tamoxifen have shown disease-free survival rates similar to chemotherapy with CMF (cyclophosphamide/methotrexate/5-fluorouracil). Outcomes of chemotherapy with or without LH-RH agonists are comparable, though a few trials favor the combination in young premenopausal women (aged<40 years). Adjuvant LH-RH agonists with or without tamoxifen might be as efficacious as tamoxifen alone

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of 64Cu-Labeled SarAr-Bombesin Analogs in Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor–Expressing Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Ferdani, Riccardo; Liang, Kexian; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Andrews, Rebecca; Sherman, Christopher D.; Achilefu, Samuel; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2011-01-01

    Bombesin is a 14–amino-acid amphibian peptide that binds with high affinity to the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), which is overexpressed on a variety of solid tumors. It has been demonstrated that bombesin analogs can be radiolabeled with a variety of radiometals for potential diagnosis and treatment of GRPR-positive tumors. In this regard, several studies have used different chelators conjugated to the 8 C-terminal amino acids of bombesin(7–14) for radiolabeling with 64Cu. These analogs have demonstrated GRPR-specific small-animal PET of tumors but have various advantages and disadvantages. The objective of this study was to conjugate the previously described (1-N-(4-aminobenzyl)-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]-eicosane-1,8-diamine) (SarAr) chelator to bombesin (7–14), radiolabel the conjugate with 64Cu, and evaluate in vitro and in vivo. Methods SarAr was synthesized as previously published and conjugated to bombesin(7–14) by solid-phase peptide synthesis using standard Fmoc chemistry. Succinic acid (SA), 8-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc), and Gly-Ser-Gly (GSG) were used as linkers between SarAr and bombesin(7–14) to yield the resulting SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7–14) and SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7–14) peptides. The unlabeled peptides were evaluated in a competitive binding assay using PC-3 prostate cancer cells and 125I-Tyr4-bombesin to determine the inhibitory concentration of 50%. The peptides were radiolabeled with 64Cu and evaluated for internalization into PC-3 cells in vitro and for in vivo tumor uptake in mice bearing PC-3 xenografts using biodistribution and small-animal PET/CT studies. Results The competitive binding assay demonstrated that both SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7–14) and SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7–14) bound with high affinity to GRPR with an inhibitory concentration of 50% of 3.5 and 4.5 nM, respectively. Both peptides were radiolabeled with 64Cu at room temperature without further purification and demonstrated similar

  1. Action of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: involvement of novel arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, G D; Capdevila, J; Chacos, N; Manna, S; Falck, J R

    1983-01-01

    Anterior pituitary cells were incubated in the presence of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and one of three inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism:indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase system; nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an antioxidant that inhibits lipoxygenase; and icosatetraynoic acid, an acetylenic analogue of arachidonic acid that blocks all known pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism. Indomethacin was ineffective in blocking luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was only marginally capable of inhibiting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Icosatetraynoic acid at 10 microM completely inhibited stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Addition of several epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites to cells in vitro resulted in secretion of luteinizing hormone equal to or greater than that induced by 10 nM luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. The half-maximal effective dose for these compounds was approximately 50 nM. The 5,6-epoxyicosatrienoic acid was the most potent of the compounds tested. These studies suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone release is closely coupled with the production of oxidized arachidonic acid metabolites. Moreover, one or more of the epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites might be a component of the cascade of reactions initiated by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone that ultimately results in secretion of luteinizing hormone. PMID:6344087

  2. [Women, immunity and sexual hormones].

    PubMed

    Denenberg, R

    1995-01-01

    How a weakened immune system affects the female's reproductive system is explained. The female's endocrine system controls the menstrual and reproductive systems, and the immune system attacks harmful substances and organisms. The hypothalamus stimulates the pituitary gland to produce the hormones FSH and LH, which in turn signal the ovaries to produce estrogen and progesterone. These hormones cause a mature egg to be released. If fertilized, the egg remains within the uterus; if not, menstruation occurs. HIV-positive females often complain of menstrual cycle changes, such as irregular periods, depression, or pain. The virus, other complications, or medications, such as AZT, may cause these symptoms. Estrogen therapy may help those with suppressed immune systems who have premature menopause. Oral contraceptives offer protection against pregnancy, but not HIV. It is not known if the pill reacts adversely with AIDS treatment drugs. Lists are provided showing the pros and cons of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy.

  3. Electrochemical biosensors for hormone analyses.

    PubMed

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have a unique place in determination of hormones due to simplicity, sensitivity, portability and ease of operation. Unlike chromatographic techniques, electrochemical techniques used do not require pre-treatment. Electrochemical biosensors are based on amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric, and conductometric principle. Amperometric technique is a commonly used one. Although electrochemical biosensors offer a great selectivity and sensitivity for early clinical analysis, the poor reproducible results, difficult regeneration steps remain primary challenges to the commercialization of these biosensors. This review summarizes electrochemical (amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric and conductometric) biosensors for hormone detection for the first time in the literature. After a brief description of the hormones, the immobilization steps and analytical performance of these biosensors are summarized. Linear ranges, LODs, reproducibilities, regenerations of developed biosensors are compared. Future outlooks in this area are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hormones and prostate cancer: what's next?

    PubMed

    Hsing, A W

    2001-01-01

    In summary, the hormonal hypothesis remains one of the most important hypotheses in prostate cancer etiology. Although epidemiologic data regarding the role of hormones are still inconclusive, there are many intriguing leads. Armed with more complete methodological data, state-of-the-art hormone assays, sound epidemiologic design, and a more thorough analytical approach, a new generation of studies should yield critical data and insights to help clarify further the role of hormones in prostate cancer. These new studies may determine ultimately whether racial/ethnic differences in hormonal levels and in genetic susceptibility to hormone-metabolizing genes can help explain the very large racial/ethnic differences in prostate cancer risk.

  5. [Premenstrual asthma: relation to hormones].

    PubMed

    Hernández Colin, D; Zárate Treviño, A; Martínez Cairo Cueto, S

    1997-01-01

    Exacerbation of asthmatic symptoms just before or at the time of menstruation documented in some women with asthma has been called "premenstrual asthma" (PMA). The effect of sex hormones on airway function has not been well studied in spite of much evidence to suggest, therefore about relationships between the sex hormones and airway. The investigations of (PMA) have been based on studies of asthmatics already aware of a deterioration of asthma premenstrually. Little is known, therefore, about relationships between the menstrual cycle with asthma and (PMA) subjects. Although the mechanism of PMA remains unclear.

  6. Principles and pitfalls of free hormone measurements.

    PubMed

    Faix, James D

    2013-10-01

    The free hormone hypothesis states that a hormone's physiological effects depend on the free hormone concentration, not the total hormone concentration. Although the in vivo relationship between free hormone and protein-bound hormone is complex, most experts have applied this view to the design of assays used to assess the free hormone concentration in the blood sampled for testing in vitro. The history of the measurement of free thyroxine, probably the most frequently requested free hormone determination, offers a good example of the approaches that have been taken. Methods that require physical separation of the free hormone from the protein-bound hormone must address both the potential disturbance in the equilibrium between the two, as well as the challenge of quantifying small levels of hormone accurately and precisely. The implementation of mass spectrometry in the clinical laboratory has helped to develop proposed reference measurement procedures. These must be utilized to standardize the variety of immunoassay approaches that currently represent options commercially available to the routine clinical laboratory. Practicing endocrinologists should discuss the details of the free hormone assays offered by the clinical laboratory they utilize for patient result reporting, and clinical laboratories should implement the recommendations of published guidelines to ensure that free hormone results using commercially available immunoassays are as accurate and precise as possible.

  7. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain. In children, GH is essential for normal growth, muscle and bone strength, and distribution of body fat. ... Delayed puberty What are the side effects of growth hormone therapy? Mild to moderate side ... Muscle or joint pain • Mildly underactive thyroid gland • Swelling ...

  8. Growth Hormone: Use and Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... GH helps children grow taller (also called linear growth), increases muscle mass, and decreases body fat. In both children ... syndrome In adults, GH is used to treat • Growth hormone deficiency • Muscle wasting (loss of muscle tissue) from HIV • Short ...

  9. Anabolic steroids and growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Haupt, H A

    1993-01-01

    Athletes are generally well educated regarding substances that they may use as ergogenic aids. This includes anabolic steroids and growth hormone. Fortunately, the abuse of growth hormone is limited by its cost and the fact that anabolic steroids are simply more enticing to the athlete. There are, however, significant potential adverse effects regarding its use that can be best understood by studying known growth hormone excess, as demonstrated in the acromegalic syndrome. Many athletes are unfamiliar with this syndrome and education of the potential consequences of growth hormone excess is important in counseling athletes considering its use. While athletes contemplating the use of anabolic steroids may correctly perceive their risks for significant physiologic effects to be small if they use the steroids for brief periods of time, many of these same athletes are unaware of the potential for habituation to the use of anabolic steroids. The result may be incessant use of steroids by an athlete who previously considered only short-term use. As we see athletes taking anabolic steroids for more prolonged periods, we are likely to see more severe medical consequences. Those who eventually do discontinue the steroids are dismayed to find that the improvements made with the steroids generally disappear and they have little to show for hours or even years of intense training beyond the psychological scars inherent with steroid use. Counseling of these athletes should focus on the potential adverse psychological consequences of anabolic steroid use and the significant risk for habituation.

  10. FSH (Follicle-Stimulating Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), a hormone associated with reproduction and the development of eggs in women and ... FSH and LH with the development of secondary sexual characteristics at an unusually young age are an ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Testing (4 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Ateleiotic dwarfism Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal dominant isolated somatotropin deficiency ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition dwarfism, growth hormone deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency ...

  12. The concept of multiple hormonal dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Marcello; Cattabiani, Chiara; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Ceda, Gianpaolo

    2010-01-01

    Aging process is accompanied by hormonal changes characterized by an imbalance between catabolic hormones that remain stable and anabolic hormones (testosterone, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), that decrease with age. Despite the multiple hormonal dysregulation occurring with age, the prevalent line of research in the last decades has tried to explain many age-related phenomena as consequence of one single hormonal derangement with disappointing results. In this review we will list the relationship between hormonal anabolic deficiency and frailty and mortality in older population, providing evidence to the notion that multiple hormonal dysregulation rather than change in single anabolic hormone is a powerful marker of poor health status and mortality.

  13. Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003691.htm Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test To use the sharing features on ... page, please enable JavaScript. The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-RP) test measures the level of a ...

  14. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... and your heart Are you taking — or considering — hormone therapy to treat bothersome menopausal symptoms? Understand potential risks to your heart and whether hormone therapy is right for you. By Mayo Clinic Staff ...

  15. 'Love Hormone' Helps Dads and Babies Bond

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163657.html 'Love Hormone' Helps Dads and Babies Bond Brain scans show ... FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The "love hormone" oxytocin may program fathers to bond with their ...

  16. Thyroid Hormones as Renal Cell Cancer Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Damian; Bartnik, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cancer development and metastasis. What is more, changes across the genome, as well as alternative splicing, may affect the activity of the thyroid hormone receptors. Mechanism of action of the thyroid hormone is different in every cancer; therefore in this review thyroid hormone and its receptor are presented as a regulator of renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27034829

  17. "Sex Hormones" in Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehm, Ross H.; Young, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which the term "sex hormone" is used in science textbooks, and whether the use of the term "sex hormone" is associated with pre-empirical concepts of sex dualism, in particular the misconceptions that these so-called "sex hormones" are sex specific and restricted to sex-related physiological functioning. We found…

  18. "Sex Hormones" in Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehm, Ross H.; Young, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which the term "sex hormone" is used in science textbooks, and whether the use of the term "sex hormone" is associated with pre-empirical concepts of sex dualism, in particular the misconceptions that these so-called "sex hormones" are sex specific and restricted to sex-related physiological functioning. We found…

  19. Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor that Progressed to Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) Syndrome with Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) Production

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Rie; Sato, Shotaro; Otsuka, Fumiko; Ueno, Makoto; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Katakami, Hideki; Taniyama, Matsuo; Nagasaka, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old woman who had a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) with lymph node metastasis. After 15 months of octreotide treatment, glucose control deteriorated and pigmentation of the tongue and moon face developed, leading to the diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome. An abnormal secretion of growth hormone (GH) was identified, and the plasma growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) level was elevated. A tumor biopsy specimen positively immunostained for ACTH and GHRH. Ectopic hormone secretion seems to have evolved along with the progression of the PNET. PMID:27746436

  20. Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor that Progressed to Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) Syndrome with Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) Production.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Rie; Sato, Shotaro; Otsuka, Fumiko; Ueno, Makoto; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Katakami, Hideki; Taniyama, Matsuo; Nagasaka, Shoichiro

    The patient was a 61-year-old woman who had a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) with lymph node metastasis. After 15 months of octreotide treatment, glucose control deteriorated and pigmentation of the tongue and moon face developed, leading to the diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome. An abnormal secretion of growth hormone (GH) was identified, and the plasma growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) level was elevated. A tumor biopsy specimen positively immunostained for ACTH and GHRH. Ectopic hormone secretion seems to have evolved along with the progression of the PNET.

  1. Peripheral activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Granata, R

    2016-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates GH synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition to its endocrine role, GHRH exerts a wide range of extrapituitary effects which include stimulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation, and inhibition of apoptosis. Accordingly, expression of GHRH, as well as the receptor GHRH-R and its splice variants, has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types. Among the direct peripheral activities, GHRH regulates pancreatic islet and β-cell survival and function and endometrial cell proliferation, promotes cardioprotection and wound healing, influences the immune and reproductive systems, reduces inflammation, indirectly increases lifespan and adiposity and acts on skeletal muscle cells to inhibit cell death and atrophy. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly clear that GHRH exerts important extrapituitary functions, suggesting potential therapeutic use of the peptide and its analogs in a wide range of medical settings.

  2. Parathyroid hormone - Secretion and metabolism in vivo.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habener, J. F.; Powell, D.; Murray, T. M.; Mayer, G. P.; Potts, J. T., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Gel filtration and radioimmunoassay were used to determine the molecular size and immunochemical reactivity of parathyroid hormone present in gland extracts, in the general peripheral circulation, and in parathyroid effluent blood from patients with hyperparathyroidism, as well as from calves and from cattle. It was found that parathyroid hormone secreted from the parathyroids in man and cattle is at least as large as the molecule extracted from normal bovine glands. However, once secreted into the circulation the hormone is cleaved, and one or more fragments, immunologically, dissimilar to the originally secreted hormone, constitute the dominant form of circulating immunoreactive hormone.

  3. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update

    PubMed Central

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  4. Parathyroid hormone - Secretion and metabolism in vivo.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habener, J. F.; Powell, D.; Murray, T. M.; Mayer, G. P.; Potts, J. T., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Gel filtration and radioimmunoassay were used to determine the molecular size and immunochemical reactivity of parathyroid hormone present in gland extracts, in the general peripheral circulation, and in parathyroid effluent blood from patients with hyperparathyroidism, as well as from calves and from cattle. It was found that parathyroid hormone secreted from the parathyroids in man and cattle is at least as large as the molecule extracted from normal bovine glands. However, once secreted into the circulation the hormone is cleaved, and one or more fragments, immunologically, dissimilar to the originally secreted hormone, constitute the dominant form of circulating immunoreactive hormone.

  5. Thyroid hormone and dehydroepiandrosterone permit gluconeogenic hormone responses in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kneer, N; Lardy, H

    2000-03-01

    The importance of the sn-glycerol- 3-phosphate (G-3-P) electron transfer shuttle in hormonal regulation of gluconeogenesis was examined in hepatocytes from rats with decreased mitochondrial G-3-P dehydrogenase activity (thyroidectomized) or increased G-3-P dehydrogenase activity [triiodothyronine (T(3)) or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) treated]. Rates of glucose formation from 10 mM lactate, 10 mM pyruvate, or 2.5 mM dihydroxyacetone were somewhat less in hypothyroid cells than in cells from normal rats but gluconeogenic responses to calcium addition and to norepinephrine (NE), glucagon (G), or vasopressin (VP) were similar to the responses observed in cells from normal rats. However, with 2. 5 mM glycerol or 2.5 mM sorbitol, substrates that must be oxidized in the cytosol before conversion to glucose, basal gluconeogenesis was not appreciably altered by hypothyroidism but responses to calcium and to the calcium-mobilizing hormones were abolished. Injecting thyroidectomized rats with T(3) 2 days before preparing the hepatocytes greatly enhanced gluconeogenesis from glyc erol and restored the response to Ca(2+) and gluconeogenic hormones. Feeding dehydroepiandrosterone for 6 days depressed gluconeogenesis from lactate or pyruvate but substantially increased glucose production from glycerol in euthyroid cells and restored responses to Ca(2+) in hypothyroid cells metabolizing glycerol. Euthyroid cells metabolizing glycerol or sorbitol use the G-3-P and malate/aspartate shuttles to oxidize excess NADH generated in the cytosol. The transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetate (AOA) decreased gluconeogenesis from glycerol 40%, but had little effect on responses to Ca(2+) and NE. However, in hypothyroid cells, with minimal G-3-P dehydrogenase, AOA decreased gluconeogenesis from glycerol more than 90%. Thus, the basal rate of gluconeogenesis from glycerol in the euthyroid cells is only partly dependent on electron transport from cytosol to mitochondria via the malate

  6. Parathyroid hormone therapy for hypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Cusano, Natalie E.; Rubin, Mishaela R.; Bilezikian, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a disease characterized by hypocalcemia and insufficient parathyroid hormone (PTH). It is a rare disorder that has been given an orphan disease designation in the United States and European Union. Hypoparathyroidism is the only endocrine deficiency disease for which the missing hormone, PTH, is not yet an approved therapy. Conventional therapy includes calcium and active vitamin D supplementation, often in large doses. Although serum calcium can be controlled with conventional therapy, it can be a challenge and, moreover, does not address other aspects of the disease, such as abnormal skeletal features and reduced quality of life. This review focuses on PTH replacement therapy in hypoparathyroidism, utilizing the full-length molecule PTH(1–84) as well as the fully active but truncated form PTH(1–34). PTH therapy addresses some aspects of the disease not ameliorated with conventional therapy. PMID:25617172

  7. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy.

  8. Thyroid hormone disorders and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Yu, Zhui; Li, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with high mortality, which results from severe infection and can lead to secondary organ dysfunction. It is one of the most common cause of death in intensive care unit. Clinical reports have shown that sepsis was often accompanied by thyroid dysfunction, which is called "low triiodothyronine (T3)" syndrome and characterized by decreased blood total T3 and free T3, and by normal or decreased thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This syndrome may greatly affect the prognosis of patients with sepsis. The main purpose of this review is to illustrate the role of thyroid hormone disorder in the development and prognosis of sepsis.

  9. Ovarian hormones and drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Moran-Santa Maria, Megan M; Flanagan, Julianne; Brady, Kathleen

    2014-11-01

    There are significant gender differences in course, symptomology, and treatment of substance use disorders. In general data from clinical and preclinical studies of substance use disorders suggest that women are more vulnerable than men to the deleterious consequences of drug use at every phase of the addiction process. In addition data from epidemiologic studies suggest that the gender gap in the prevalence of substance use is narrowing particularly among adolescence. Therefore, understanding the role of estrogen and progesterone in mediating responses to drugs of abuse is of critical importance to women's health. In this review we will discuss findings from clinical and preclinical studies of (1) reproductive cycle phase; (2) endogenous ovarian hormones; and (3) hormone replacement on responses to stimulants, nicotine, alcohol, opioids, and marijuana. In addition, we discuss data from recent studies that have advanced our understanding of the neurobiologic mechanisms that interact with estrogen and progesterone to mediate drug-seeking behavior.

  10. Modelling hormonal response and development.

    PubMed

    Voß, Ute; Bishopp, Anthony; Farcot, Etienne; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2014-05-01

    As our knowledge of the complexity of hormone homeostasis, transport, perception, and response increases, and their outputs become less intuitive, modelling is set to become more important. Initial modelling efforts have focused on hormone transport and response pathways. However, we now need to move beyond the network scales and use multicellular and multiscale modelling approaches to predict emergent properties at different scales. Here we review some examples where such approaches have been successful, for example, auxin-cytokinin crosstalk regulating root vascular development or a study of lateral root emergence where an iterative cycle of modelling and experiments lead to the identification of an overlooked role for PIN3. Finally, we discuss some of the remaining biological and technical challenges. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:24007251

  12. A Simulated Growth Hormone Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Mary

    1996-08-01

    Growth hormone is a drug that is sometimes abused by amateur or professional athletes for performance-enhancement. This laboratory is a semimicroscale simulation analysis of a sample of "urine" to detect proteins of two very different molecular weights. Gel filtration uses a 10 mL disposable pipette packed with Sephadex. Students analyze the fractions from the filtration by comparing colors of the Brilliant Blue Coomassie Dye as it interacts with the proteins in the sample to a standard set of known concentration of protein with the dye. The simulated analysis of growth hormone is intended to be included in a unit on organic chemistry or in the second year of high school chemistry.

  13. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Woroń, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens. PMID:26327902

  14. [Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)--youth hormone?].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Z; Kesik, S

    2001-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphated metabolite (DHEA-S) are endogenous steroid hormones, synthesized by the adrenal cortex, gonads and CNS. The secretion