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Sample records for horticultural irrigation water

  1. Use of Dehydrated Agar to Estimate Microbial Water Quality for Horticulture Irrigation.

    PubMed

    Meador, Dustin P; Fisher, Paul R; Guy, Charles L; Harmon, Philip F; Peres, Natalia A; Teplitski, Max

    2016-07-01

    Petrifilms are dehydrated agar culture plates that have been used to quantify colony forming units (CFU) mL of either aerobic bacteria (Petrifilm-AC) or fungus (Petrifilm-YM), depending on substrate composition. Microbes in irrigation systems can indicate biofilm risk and potential clogging of irrigation emitters. The research objective was to compare counts on Petrifilms versus traditional, hydrated-agar plates using samples collected from recirculated irrigation waters and cultures of isolated known species. The estimated count (in CFU mL) from a recirculated irrigation sample after 7 d of incubation on Petrifilm-YM was only 5.5% of the count quantified using sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) with chloramphenicol after 14 d. In a separate experiment with a known species, Petrifilm-YM did not successfully culture zoospores of . Isolates of viable zoospores were cultured successfully on potato-dextrose agar (PDA), with comparable counts with a vegetable juice medium supplemented with the antibiotics pimaricin, ampicillin, rifamycin, pentochloronitrobenzene and hymexazol (PARP-H). The quantification of pv. Begoniaceae on Petrifilm-AC was not significantly different ( < 0.05) than on PDA, but was lower than on Reasoner and Goldrich agar (R2A) or with a hemocytometer. The current formulation of Petrifilm-YM is unlikely to be a useful monitoring method for plant pathogens in irrigation water because of the inability to successfully culture oomycetes. However, Petrifilm-AC was an effective method to quantify bacteria and can provide an easy-to-use on-farm tool to monitor biofilm risk and microbial density.

  2. Use of Dehydrated Agar to Estimate Microbial Water Quality for Horticulture Irrigation.

    PubMed

    Meador, Dustin P; Fisher, Paul R; Guy, Charles L; Harmon, Philip F; Peres, Natalia A; Teplitski, Max

    2016-07-01

    Petrifilms are dehydrated agar culture plates that have been used to quantify colony forming units (CFU) mL of either aerobic bacteria (Petrifilm-AC) or fungus (Petrifilm-YM), depending on substrate composition. Microbes in irrigation systems can indicate biofilm risk and potential clogging of irrigation emitters. The research objective was to compare counts on Petrifilms versus traditional, hydrated-agar plates using samples collected from recirculated irrigation waters and cultures of isolated known species. The estimated count (in CFU mL) from a recirculated irrigation sample after 7 d of incubation on Petrifilm-YM was only 5.5% of the count quantified using sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) with chloramphenicol after 14 d. In a separate experiment with a known species, Petrifilm-YM did not successfully culture zoospores of . Isolates of viable zoospores were cultured successfully on potato-dextrose agar (PDA), with comparable counts with a vegetable juice medium supplemented with the antibiotics pimaricin, ampicillin, rifamycin, pentochloronitrobenzene and hymexazol (PARP-H). The quantification of pv. Begoniaceae on Petrifilm-AC was not significantly different ( < 0.05) than on PDA, but was lower than on Reasoner and Goldrich agar (R2A) or with a hemocytometer. The current formulation of Petrifilm-YM is unlikely to be a useful monitoring method for plant pathogens in irrigation water because of the inability to successfully culture oomycetes. However, Petrifilm-AC was an effective method to quantify bacteria and can provide an easy-to-use on-farm tool to monitor biofilm risk and microbial density. PMID:27380096

  3. Heavy metals in the irrigation water, soils and vegetables in the Philippi horticultural area in the Western Cape Province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Malan, M; Müller, F; Cyster, L; Raitt, L; Aalbers, J

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the extent of heavy metal contamination in the Philippi horticultural area in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in the irrigation water, soils and vegetables in both winter and summer cropping seasons with an ICP-AES and tested against certified standards. Differences were found in heavy metal concentrations between the winter and summer cropping seasons in the irrigation water, soils and vegetables. Certain heavy metals exceeded the maximum permissible concentrations in the irrigation water, soils and vegetables produced in South Africa. These toxic concentrations were predominantly found in the summer cropping season for the soils and in the crops produced in winter. It is thus suggested that further studies are carried out in the Philippi horticultural area to determine the sources of the heavy metals to try and mitigate the inputs thereof and therefore reduce the amount of heavy metals entering the human food chain.

  4. Wastewater treatment by a modular, domestic-scale reedbed system for safe horticultural irrigation.

    PubMed

    Derry, Chris; Maheshwari, Basant

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the sequential treatment performance of a commercial, domestic-scale modular reedbed system intended to provide safe horticultural irrigation water. Previously only mechanical treatment systems involving forced aeration with subsequent disinfection, usually by tablet-chlorination, had been accredited in Australia. The modular design of the hybrid, subsurface-flow reedbed system offered 5 control points where monitoring and management of the treatment train could be carried out. Ten chemical parameters (chemical and biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, nitrite nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, total nitrogen, dissolved oxygen percentage saturation and suspended solids) and 4 microbial parameters (total coliform, Escherichia coli, enterococci and Clostridium perfringens) reached satisfactory levels as a result of the treatment process. Health requirements for safe horticultural irrigation were met by the outlet of the second reedbed, providing a high level of treatment-backup capacity in terms of the remaining 2 reedbeds. This suggested that chlorination was a redundant backup precaution in treating irrigation water to the acceptable regional guideline level for all horticultural uses, including the spray irrigation of salad crops eaten raw.

  5. Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitken, James

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment in the field of horticulture and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains a validated competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography. The following…

  6. Treated sewage effluent (water) potential to be used for horticultural production in Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emongor, V. E.; Ramolemana, G. M.

    Botswana being semi-arid and arid country, the provision of drinking water and water for agricultural production is becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. Measures that can augment the available sources of water or measures that can reduce the demand on potable water should be given serious consideration. Horticulturists have incorporated new technology into many of their production programs, which has enabled them to grow more horticultural crops with less water; however, more effort is needed. Techniques such as drip irrigation, sensors, growing plants with low water requirements, timing and scheduling of irrigation to the growth needs of the plant, mulching, and establishing a minimum water quality standard for horticultural crops must be used to stretch agricultural water supplies. Recycling agricultural water and using treated municipal sewage effluent is a viable option for increasing horticultures’ future water supply in Botswana. Agriculture wastewater and sewage effluents often contain significant quantities of heavy metals and other substances that may be toxic to people but beneficial to horticultural crops. However, before sewage effluent can be used for commercial production of vegetables and fruits, research must be undertaken to determine whether there is accumulation of heavy metals and faecal coliforms in the edible portion of the horticultural produce which may be detrimental to human health 15-20 years later. Research must be undertaken to assess the impact of sewage effluent on soil physical, chemical properties and environment after continued use.

  7. Kasza: design of a closed water system for the greenhouse horticulture.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, Raphaël T; Voogt, Wim; Pickhardt, Pieter W

    2008-01-01

    The need for a closed and sustainable water system in greenhouse areas is stimulated by the implementation in the Netherlands of the European Framework Directive. The Dutch national project Kasza: Design of a Closed Water System for the Greenhouse Horticulture will provide information how the water system in a greenhouse horticulture area can be closed. In this paper the conceptual design of two systems to close the water cycle in a greenhouse area is described. The first system with reverse osmosis system can be used in areas where desalination is required in order to be able to use the recycle water for irrigation of all crops. The second system with advanced oxidation using UV and peroxide can be applied in areas with more salt tolerant crops and good (low sodium) water sources for irrigation. Both systems are financially feasible in new greenhouse areas with substantial available recycle water.

  8. Technology stretches irrigation water

    SciTech Connect

    Phene, C.J.

    1985-02-01

    A new solar-powered irrigation system is described which is controlled by computers. Sensors monitor soil moisture and transpiration; an automatic weather station records solar radiation, wind, air temperature and humidity. Infrared thermometers measure and record foliage temperatures. Lasers guide the wheeled towers through the crop rows metering out needed water as determined by the system. Photovoltaic cells provide the power for the towers.

  9. Water management practices, irrigated cropland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation is practiced on about 17 percent of the world’s arable land and accounts for 33 percent of the world’s food production. U.S. Department of Agriculture conservation programs are commonly used to improve water management on irrigated land and reduce impacts of irrigation on the environment ...

  10. Phenotypic plasticity of stem water potential correlates with crop load in horticultural trees.

    PubMed

    Sadras, Victor O; Trentacoste, Eduardo R

    2011-05-01

    Conceptual models accounting for the influence of source:sink ratio on water relations of trees are theoretically relevant from a physiological perspective and practically important for irrigation scheduling. Midday stem water potential of horticultural trees often declines with increasing crop load but the actual response depends on environmental, management and plant factors. Here we advance a quantitative synthesis of the response of stem water potential to crop load from the perspective of phenotypic plasticity, defined as 'the amount by which the expression of individual characteristics of a genotype are changed by different environments'. Data sets of stem water potential for contrasting crop loads were compiled for apple (Malus domestica L. Borkh.), olive (Olea europea L.), peach (Prunus persica L.), pear (Pyrus communis L.) and plum (Prunus domestica L.). Phenotypic plasticity of stem water potential was calculated as the slope of the linear regression between stem water potential for each crop load and the environmental mean of stem water potential across crop loads. Regression lines for trees with different crop load diverged with decreasing environmental mean stem water potential. For the pooled data, plasticity of stem water potential was a linear function of relative crop load. This represents a significant shift in perspective: the effect of crop load on the trait per se (stem water potential) is environmentally contingent, but the effect of crop load on the plasticity of the trait is not. We conclude that research on the effects of crop load on tree water relations would return more robust results if plant traits are considered from the dual perspective of the trait per se and its plasticity.

  11. EFFICACY OF NOVEL WATER DISINFECTION TECHNIQUES IN HORTICULTURAL NUTRIENT RECYCLING.

    PubMed

    Heungens, K; Clierinck, M; Inghelbrecht, S; Vissers, M

    2015-01-01

    Hydroponic systems used for growing potted ornamentals in greenhouses are commonly ebb-and-flow irrigation systems. The drainage water is usually recycled to save water and nutrients. To avoid the spread of pathogens in these closed irrigation systems, disinfection of the recycled water is standard practice. Growers can use slow sand filtration or UV-radiation techniques, but these methods are often either not sulted for specific problems or they require an excessively large investment. The objective of this study was to test less expensive but effective alternative disinfection systems. The efficacy of five disinfection systems against fungi and oomycetes was determined: Aqua-Hort (based on Cu-ions), Reciclean (performic acid), D1-OX Forte (CIO2), ECA (electrochemically activated water = anodic oxidation: hypochlorite and free radicals) and Newtec (also anodic oxidation). These five systems and a no-sterilization control were integrated in small closed ebb-and-flow circuits with nutrient solution reservoirs of 400 L each. Activity against Fusarium was excellent with ECA, good with Newtec and DI-OX Forte, moderate with high doses of Reciclean (250 ppm H2O2 and poor with the Aqua-Hort. There was no Pythium in the ECA and Newtec systems, while still so in the Aqua-Hort system, even at high doses (up to 7 ppm Cu++). Although the Reciclean (up to 100 ppm H2O2) and Aqua-Hort systems did not perform well against the pathogens, they did very well against algae; especially Reciclean was also useful against duckweed in water and liverwort on soil substrates. Concentrations of total Cl were elevated in water, substrate and plants after treatments with ECA and Newtec; other accumulations were Cu (Aqua-Hort), Na and SO4 (DI-OX Forte). However, only on a limited number of plant species these accumulations produced phytotoxic effects.

  12. EFFICACY OF NOVEL WATER DISINFECTION TECHNIQUES IN HORTICULTURAL NUTRIENT RECYCLING.

    PubMed

    Heungens, K; Clierinck, M; Inghelbrecht, S; Vissers, M

    2015-01-01

    Hydroponic systems used for growing potted ornamentals in greenhouses are commonly ebb-and-flow irrigation systems. The drainage water is usually recycled to save water and nutrients. To avoid the spread of pathogens in these closed irrigation systems, disinfection of the recycled water is standard practice. Growers can use slow sand filtration or UV-radiation techniques, but these methods are often either not sulted for specific problems or they require an excessively large investment. The objective of this study was to test less expensive but effective alternative disinfection systems. The efficacy of five disinfection systems against fungi and oomycetes was determined: Aqua-Hort (based on Cu-ions), Reciclean (performic acid), D1-OX Forte (CIO2), ECA (electrochemically activated water = anodic oxidation: hypochlorite and free radicals) and Newtec (also anodic oxidation). These five systems and a no-sterilization control were integrated in small closed ebb-and-flow circuits with nutrient solution reservoirs of 400 L each. Activity against Fusarium was excellent with ECA, good with Newtec and DI-OX Forte, moderate with high doses of Reciclean (250 ppm H2O2 and poor with the Aqua-Hort. There was no Pythium in the ECA and Newtec systems, while still so in the Aqua-Hort system, even at high doses (up to 7 ppm Cu++). Although the Reciclean (up to 100 ppm H2O2) and Aqua-Hort systems did not perform well against the pathogens, they did very well against algae; especially Reciclean was also useful against duckweed in water and liverwort on soil substrates. Concentrations of total Cl were elevated in water, substrate and plants after treatments with ECA and Newtec; other accumulations were Cu (Aqua-Hort), Na and SO4 (DI-OX Forte). However, only on a limited number of plant species these accumulations produced phytotoxic effects. PMID:27141749

  13. Crop water productivity and irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern irrigation systems offer large increases in crop water productivity compared with rainfed or gravity irrigation, but require different management approaches to achieve this. Flood, sprinkler, low-energy precision application, LEPA, and subsurface drip irrigation methods vary widely in water a...

  14. Soil water monitoring equipment for irrigation scheduling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equipment for monitoring soil water content and sometimes bulk electrical conductivity can be used for scheduling irrigations if the accuracy of the equipment is sufficient to avoid damanging plants and wasting water and fertilizer. Irrigation scheduling is the process of deciding when to irrigate a...

  15. Infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, William C.; Thiros, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    The ground-water hydrology of Panguitch Valley and adjacent areas, south-central Utah, was studied during 1988-90. One objective of the study was to measure ground-water recharge from infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water. Water-level and soil-moisture data were used to estimate travel times for water moving down through the soil profile, and to compare quantities of water reaching the water table after application of flood and sprinkler irrigation. During this study, estimates of travel times from land surface to the water table ranged from 11 days in June 1989 to 2 days in September 1989. Estimates of irrigation water recharging the ground-water system ranged from 25 to 75 percent of the water applied to the flood-irrigated field. Virtually no recharge was apparent for the sprinkler-irrigated field.

  16. Deficit irrigation for reducing agricultural water use.

    PubMed

    Fereres, Elias; Soriano, María Auxiliadora

    2007-01-01

    At present and more so in the future, irrigated agriculture will take place under water scarcity. Insufficient water supply for irrigation will be the norm rather than the exception, and irrigation management will shift from emphasizing production per unit area towards maximizing the production per unit of water consumed, the water productivity. To cope with scarce supplies, deficit irrigation, defined as the application of water below full crop-water requirements (evapotranspiration), is an important tool to achieve the goal of reducing irrigation water use. While deficit irrigation is widely practised over millions of hectares for a number of reasons - from inadequate network design to excessive irrigation expansion relative to catchment supplies - it has not received sufficient attention in research. Its use in reducing water consumption for biomass production, and for irrigation of annual and perennial crops is reviewed here. There is potential for improving water productivity in many field crops and there is sufficient information for defining the best deficit irrigation strategy for many situations. One conclusion is that the level of irrigation supply under deficit irrigation should be relatively high in most cases, one that permits achieving 60-100% of full evapotranspiration. Several cases on the successful use of regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) in fruit trees and vines are reviewed, showing that RDI not only increases water productivity, but also farmers' profits. Research linking the physiological basis of these responses to the design of RDI strategies is likely to have a significant impact in increasing its adoption in water-limited areas. PMID:17088360

  17. Integrated irrigation and drainage water management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results from several research projects conducted in the 1990's are summarized in this manuscript. The first projects are irrigation studies that evaluated the impact of pre-plant irrigation water on crop water use and deep percolation losses. The results showed significant losses with pre-plant ir...

  18. Water Resources Impacts on Tribal Irrigation Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minihane, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Branch of Irrigation and Power provides oversight and technical support to select irrigation projects and systems on tribal lands. The BIA provides operations and maintenance support for 16 irrigation systems. To make the best use of limited resources, the BIA must incorporate climate change impacts on hydrology and water management for these irrigation systems in the coming decades. The 16 irrigation projects discussed here are divided into three climatological regions: the Pacific Northwest Region, the Greater Rocky Mountain Region, and the Western, Southwest, & Navajo Region. Significant climate projections that impact irrigation systems in one or more of these regions include increased temperatures and evaporative demand, earlier snowmelt and runoff, an increase in floods, an increase in heavy precipitation events, an increase in the frequency and intensity of droughts, and declining water supplies. Some irrigation projects are particularly vulnerable to these climate impacts because they are in already water-stressed areas or areas in which water resources are over-allocated. Other irrigation projects will have to adjust their storage and water management strategies to accommodate changes in the timing of streamflow. Overall, though, the BIA will be better able to assist tribal nations by incorporating expected climate impacts into their water resources management practices.

  19. Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.

    2016-03-22

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of 2013 irrigation water use in Kansas. The published regional and county-level statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented. Total reported irrigation water use in 2013 was 3.3 million acre-feet of water applied to 3.0 million irrigated acres.

  20. Mediterranean irrigation under climate change: more efficient irrigation needed to compensate increases in irrigation water requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fader, M.; Shi, S.; von Bloh, W.; Bondeau, A.; Cramer, W.

    2015-08-01

    Irrigation in the Mediterranean is of vital importance for food security, employment and economic development. This study systematically assesses how climate change and increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations may affect irrigation requirements in the Mediterranean region by 2080-2090. Future demographic change and technological improvements in irrigation systems are accounted for, as is the spread of climate forcing, warming levels and potential realization of the CO2-fertilization effect. Vegetation growth, phenology, agricultural production and irrigation water requirements and withdrawal were simulated with the process-based ecohydrological and agro-ecosystem model LPJmL after a large development that comprised the improved representation of Mediterranean crops. At present the Mediterranean region could save 35 % of water by implementing more efficient irrigation and conveyance systems. Some countries like Syria, Egypt and Turkey have higher saving potentials than others. Currently some crops, especially sugar cane and agricultural trees, consume in average more irrigation water per hectare than annual crops. Different crops show different magnitude of changes in net irrigation requirements due to climate change, being the increases most pronounced in agricultural trees. The Mediterranean area as a whole might face an increase in gross irrigation requirements between 4 and 18 % from climate change alone if irrigation systems and conveyance are not improved (2 °C global warming combined with full CO2-fertilization effect, and 5 °C global warming combined with no CO2-fertilization effect, respectively). Population growth increases these numbers to 22 and 74 %, respectively, affecting mainly the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean. However, improved irrigation technologies and conveyance systems have large water saving potentials, especially in the Eastern Mediterranean, and may be able to compensate to some degree the increases due to climate change and

  1. Investigation of 10 herbicides in surface waters of a horticultural production catchment in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Allinson, Graeme; Bui, AnhDuyen; Zhang, Pei; Rose, Gavin; Wightwick, Adam M; Allinson, Mayumi; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Herbicides are regularly applied in horticultural production systems and may migrate off-site, potentially posing an ecological risk to surface waterways. However, few studies have investigated the levels and potential ecotoxicological impact of herbicides in horticultural catchments in southern Australia. This study investigated the presence of 10 herbicides at 18 sites during a 5-month period in horticulturally important areas of the Yarra Valley in southeastern Australia. Seven of the 10 herbicides were detected in the streams, in 39 % of spot water samples, in 25 % of surface sediment samples, and in >70 % of the passive sampler systems deployed. Few samples contained residues of ≥2 herbicides. Simazine was the herbicide most frequently detected in water, sediment, and passive sampler samples and had the highest concentrations in water (0.67 μg/L) and sediment (260 μg/kg dry weight). Generally the concentrations of the herbicides detected were several orders of magnitude lower than reported ecotoxicological effect values, including those for aquatic plants and algae, suggesting that concentrations of individual chemicals in the catchment were unlikely to pose an ecological risk. However, little is known about the combined effects of simultaneous, low-level exposure of multiple herbicides of the same mode of action on Australian aquatic organisms nor their contribution when found in mixtures with other pesticides. Further research is required to adequately assess the risk of pesticides in Victorian aquatic environments. PMID:24935816

  2. New soil water sensors for irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective irrigation management is key to obtaining the most crop production per unit of water applied and increasing production in the face of competing demands on water resources. Management methods have included calculating crop water needs based on weather station measurements, calculating soil ...

  3. Irrigation management strategies to improve Water Use Efficiency of potatoes crop in Central Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazouani, Hiba; Provenzano, Giuseppe; Rallo, Giovanni; Mguidiche, Amel; Douh, Boutheina; Boujelben, Abdelhamid

    2015-04-01

    In Tunisia, the expansion of irrigated area and the semiarid climate make it compulsory to adopt strategies of water management to increase water use efficiency. Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), providing the application of high frequency small irrigation volumes below the soil surface have been increasingly used to enhance irrigation efficiency. At the same time, deficit irrigation (DI) has shown successful results with a large number of crop in various countries. However, for some crops like potatoes, DI is difficult to manage due to the rapid effect of water stress on tuber yield. Irrigation frequency is a key factor to schedule subsurface drip irrigation because, even maintaining the total seasonal volume, soil wetting patterns can result different during the growth period, with consequence on crop yield. Despite the need to enhance water use efficiency, only a few studies related to deficit irrigation of horticultural crops have been made in Tunisia. Objective of the paper was to assess the effects of different on-farm irrigation strategies on water use efficiency of potatoes crop irrigated with subsurface drip irrigation in a semiarid area of central Tunisia. After validation, Hydrus-2D model was used to simulate soil water status in the root zone, to evaluate actual crop evapotranspiration and then to estimate indirectly water use efficiency (IWUE), defined as the ratio between crop yield and total amount of water supplied with irrigation. Field experiments, were carried out in Central Tunisia (10° 33' 47.0" E, 35° 58' 8.1° N, 19 m a.s.l) on a potatoes crop planted in a sandy loam soil, during the growing season 2014, from January 15 (plantation of tubers) to May 6 (harvesting). Soil water status was monitored in two plots (T1 and T2) maintained under the same management, but different irrigation volumes, provided by a SDI system. In particular, irrigation was scheduled according to the average water content measured in the root zone, with a total of 8

  4. Irrigation water sources and irrigation application methods used by U.S. plant nursery producers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Krishna P.; Pandit, Mahesh; Hinson, Roger

    2016-02-01

    We examine irrigation water sources and irrigation methods used by U.S. nursery plant producers using nested multinomial fractional regression models. We use data collected from the National Nursery Survey (2009) to identify effects of different firm and sales characteristics on the fraction of water sources and irrigation methods used. We find that regions, sales of plants types, farm income, and farm age have significant roles in what water source is used. Given the fraction of alternative water sources used, results indicated that use of computer, annual sales, region, and the number of IPM practices adopted play an important role in the choice of irrigation method. Based on the findings from this study, government can provide subsidies to nursery producers in water deficit regions to adopt drip irrigation method or use recycled water or combination of both. Additionally, encouraging farmers to adopt IPM may enhance the use of drip irrigation and recycled water in nursery plant production.

  5. Basic Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Barbra Farabough

    This learning packet contains teaching suggestions and student learning materials for a course in basic horticulture aimed at preparing students for employment in a number of horticulture areas. The packet includes nine sections and twenty instructional units. Following the standard format established for Oklahoma vocational education materials in…

  6. Water conservation in irrigation can increase water use

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Frank A.; Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Climate change, water supply limits, and continued population growth have intensified the search for measures to conserve water in irrigated agriculture, the world's largest water user. Policy measures that encourage adoption of water-conserving irrigation technologies are widely believed to make more water available for cities and the environment. However, little integrated analysis has been conducted to test this hypothesis. This article presents results of an integrated basin-scale analysis linking biophysical, hydrologic, agronomic, economic, policy, and institutional dimensions of the Upper Rio Grande Basin of North America. It analyzes a series of water conservation policies for their effect on water used in irrigation and on water conserved. In contrast to widely-held beliefs, our results show that water conservation subsidies are unlikely to reduce water use under conditions that occur in many river basins. Adoption of more efficient irrigation technologies reduces valuable return flows and limits aquifer recharge. Policies aimed at reducing water applications can actually increase water depletions. Achieving real water savings requires designing institutional, technical, and accounting measures that accurately track and economically reward reduced water depletions. Conservation programs that target reduced water diversions or applications provide no guarantee of saving water. PMID:19015510

  7. Quality assessment of irrigation water under a combination of rain and irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Virginia; Costa, Jose Luis

    2015-04-01

    Complementary irrigation is one of the proposed management practices to increase the area under grain production mainly in the Humid Pampas. The most common source of irrigation water in the Humid Pampas comes from groundwater and is characterized by its high sodium bicarbonate content. However, the effect of the combination of irrigation and rain water on the chemical and physical properties of soils, especially when irrigation water comprises water with sodium bicarbonate, is still not well documented. The objective of the present study is to establish irrigation water suitability criteria under conditions of combined rain and irrigation. The trials were carried out on six irrigated plots and another five plots were chosen for validation purposes. Hydraulic conductivity and bulk density were measured in the field. Soil chemical analysis was performed on undisturbed soil samples. Supplementary irrigation using sodium bicarbonate water raises the soil electrical conductivity, the pH, exchangeable sodium percentage, soil sodium adsorption ratio and cation exchange capacity which produce an increase in bulk density, reducing the overall porosity of the soil. The effect of the soil sodium adsorption ratio on the soil hydraulic conductivity was evident when the soil sodium adsorption ratio levels were greater than 3.5. The dilution factor proposed in this study allows the classification of water for complementary irrigation linked to the management of irrigation.

  8. Alternative disinfectant water treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternative disinfestant water treatments are disinfestants not as commonly used by the horticultural industry. Chlorine products that produce hypochlorous acid are the main disinfestants used for treating irrigation water. Chlorine dioxide will be the primary disinfestant discussed as an alternativ...

  9. Quality requirements for irrigation with sewage water

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwer, H.; Idelovitch, E. )

    1987-11-01

    Irrigation is an excellent use for sewage effluent because it is mostly water with nutrients. For small flows, the effluent can be used on special, well-supervised sewage farms, where forage, fiber, or seed crops are grown that can be irrigated with standard primary or secondary effluent. Large-scale use of the effluent requires special treatment so that it meets the public health, agronomic, and aesthetic requirements for unrestricted use. Crops in the unrestricted-use category include those that are consumed raw or brought raw into the kitchen. Most state or government standards deal only with public health aspects, and prescribe the treatment processes or the quality parameters that the effluent must meet before it can be used to irrigate a certain category of crops. However, agronomic aspects related to crops and soils must also be taken into account. Quality parameters to be considered include bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens; total salt content and sodium adsorption ratio of the water; nitrogen; phosphorus; chloride and chlorine; bicarbonate; heavy metals, boron, and other trace elements; pH; and synthetic organics. 23 refs., 9 tabs.

  10. Development of Strategies for Sustainable Irrigation Water Management in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Ermolaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    During 1960 - 1990 years irrigated areas in Russia have increased rapidly, helping to boost agricultural output. Although the impressive achievements of irrigation in this period its large experience indicates problems and failures of irrigation water management. In addition to large water use and low irrigation water efficiency, environmental concerns (excessive water depletion, water quality reduction, water logging, soil degradation) are usually considered like the most significant problem of the irrigation sector. Despite of considerable shrinking of irrigated areas in Russia and decreasing of water withdrawal for irrigation purposes during two last decades a degradation of environment as well as degradation of soil and water resources in irrigated areas was prolonged and will probably continue if current irrigation practices are maintained. Nowadays, in different regions of Russia there are societal demand to restore agricultural irrigation in Russia as answer to challenges from climate pattern changes and degradation of land & water resources. In the respect of these demands there is a need to develop strategies for sustainability of agricultural irrigation in Russia that should be based on three main societal objectives: costeffective use of water in irrigated agriculture at farm level, and satisfactory preserving the natural environment. Therefore sustainable irrigation water management is not only an objective at farm level but also an overall goal at the local and regional as well. A way to achieve sustainability in irrigation water management is to solve the local conflicts arising from the interactions between water use at irrigation areas and surrounding environment. Thus should be based on the development of irrigation framework program including on the irrigation water management issues, policies & decisions making at federal and regional levels should be based on the indicators of environment & irrigation water efficiency monitoring promoting the

  11. Water-Energy balance in pressure irrigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis; Laguna, Francisco V.; Castañón, Guillermo; Gil, María; Benitez, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Modernization of irrigation schemes, generally understood as transformation of surface irrigation systems into pressure -sprinkler and trickle- irrigation systems, aims at, among others, improving irrigation efficiency and reduction of operation and maintenance efforts made by the irrigators. Automation techniques become easier after modernization, and operation management plays an important role in energy efficiency issues. Modern systems use to include elevated water reservoirs with enough capacity to irrigate during peak water demand period about 16 to 48 h. However, pressure irrigation systems, in contrast, carry a serious energy cost. Energy requirements depend on decisions taken on management strategies during the operation phase, which are conditioned by previous decisions taken on the design project of the different elements which compose the irrigation system. Most of the countries where irrigation activity is significant bear in mind that modernization irrigation must play a key role in the agricultural infrastructure policies. The objective of this study is to characterize and estimate the mean and variation of the energy consumed by common types of irrigation systems according to their management possibilities. Also is an objective to estimate the fraction of the water reservoirs available along the irrigation campaign for storing the energy from renewable sources during their availability periods. Simulation taking into account all elements comprising the irrigation system has been used to estimate the energy requirements of typical irrigation systems of several crop production systems. The simulation of various types of irrigation systems and management strategies, in the framework imposed by particular cropping systems, would help to develop criteria for improving the energy balance in relation to the irrigation water supply productivity and new opportunities in the renewable energy field.

  12. An overview of soil water sensors for salinity & irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation water management has to do with the appropriate application of water to soils, in terms of amounts, rates, and timing to satisfy crop water demands while protecting the soil and water resources from degradation. Accurate irrigation management is even more important in salt affected soils ...

  13. A multisector analysis of urban irrigation and water savings potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijoor, N.; Kim, H.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Urban irrigation strains limited water supplies in semi-arid areas such as Orange County, CA, yet the quantity and controlling factors of urban irrigation are not well understood. The goals of this research are to (1) quantify and compare landscape irrigation applied by residential and commercial sectors in various retail agencies at a parcel scale (2) determine over- and under-irrigation compared to theoretical need (3) determine the climatic and socioeconomic controls on landscape irrigation. A research partnership was established between six water retail agencies in Orange County, CA representing a wide range of climatic and economic conditions. These agencies contributed between 3 and 13 years of water use data on a monthly/bimonthly basis. Irrigation depth (mm) was estimated using the "minimum month method," and landscape evapotranspiration was calculated using the Hargreaves equation for 122,345 parcels. Multiple regressions of water use were conducted with climatic and socioeconomic variables as possible explanatory variables. Single family residences accounted for the majority of urban water use. Findings from 112,192 single family residences (SFRs) show that total and indoor water use declined, though irrigation did not significantly change. Average irrigation for SFRs was 94 L/day, and a large proportion (42%) of irrigation was applied in excess to landscapes. Air temperature was found to be the primary driver of irrigation. We mapped over-irrigation relative to plant water demand to highlight areas that can be targeted for water conservation efforts. We also show the water savings that would be gained by improving the efficiency of irrigation systems. The information gained in this study would be useful for developing water use efficiency policies and/or educational programs to promote sustainable irrigation practices at the individual parcel scale.

  14. Mediterranean agriculture: More efficient irrigation needed to compensate increases in future irrigation water requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fader, Marianela; Shi, Sinan; von Bloh, Werner; Bondeau, Alberte; Cramer, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Irrigation in the Mediterranean is of vital importance for food security, employment and economic development. Our research shows that, at present, Mediterranean region could save 35% of water by implementing more efficient irrigation and conveyance systems. Some countries like Syria, Egypt and Turkey have higher saving potentials than others. Currently some crops, especially sugar cane and agricultural trees, consume in average more irrigation water per hectare than annual crops (1). Also under climate change, more efficient irrigation is of vital importance for counteracting increases in irrigation water requirements. The Mediterranean area as a whole might face an increase in gross irrigation requirements between 4% and 18% from climate change alone by the end of the century if irrigation systems and conveyance are not improved. Population growth increases these numbers to 22% and 74%, respectively, affecting mainly the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean. However, improved irrigation technologies and conveyance systems have large water saving potentials, especially in the Eastern Mediterranean, and may be able to compensate to some degree the increases due to climate change and population growth. Both subregions would need around 35% more water than today if they could afford some degree of modernization of irrigation and conveyance systems and benefit from the CO2-fertilization effect (1). However, in some scenarios (in this case as combinations of climate change, irrigation technology, influence of population growth and CO2-fertilization effect) water scarcity may constrain the supply of the irrigation water needed in future in Algeria, Libya, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Serbia, Morocco, Tunisia and Spain (1). In this study, vegetation growth, phenology, agricultural production and irrigation water requirements and withdrawal were simulated with the process-based ecohydrological and agro-ecosystem model LPJmL ("Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Land") after a

  15. Mediterranean irrigation under climate change: more efficient irrigation needed to compensate for increases in irrigation water requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fader, M.; Shi, S.; von Bloh, W.; Bondeau, A.; Cramer, W.

    2016-03-01

    Irrigation in the Mediterranean is of vital importance for food security, employment and economic development. This study systematically assesses how climate change and increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations may affect irrigation requirements in the Mediterranean region by 2080-2090. Future demographic change and technological improvements in irrigation systems are taken into account, as is the spread of climate forcing, warming levels and potential realization of the CO2-fertilization effect. Vegetation growth, phenology, agricultural production and irrigation water requirements and withdrawal were simulated with the process-based ecohydrological and agro-ecosystem model LPJmL (Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Land) after an extensive development that comprised the improved representation of Mediterranean crops. At present the Mediterranean region could save 35 % of water by implementing more efficient irrigation and conveyance systems. Some countries such as Syria, Egypt and Turkey have a higher savings potential than others. Currently some crops, especially sugar cane and agricultural trees, consume on average more irrigation water per hectare than annual crops. Different crops show different magnitudes of changes in net irrigation requirements due to climate change, the increases being most pronounced in agricultural trees. The Mediterranean area as a whole may face an increase in gross irrigation requirements between 4 and 18 % from climate change alone if irrigation systems and conveyance are not improved (4 and 18 % with 2 °C global warming combined with the full CO2-fertilization effect and 5 °C global warming combined with no CO2-fertilization effect, respectively). Population growth increases these numbers to 22 and 74 %, respectively, affecting mainly the southern and eastern Mediterranean. However, improved irrigation technologies and conveyance systems have a large water saving potential, especially in the eastern Mediterranean, and may be able to

  16. Green and blue water footprint reduction in irrigated agriculture: effect of irrigation techniques, irrigation strategies and mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukalla, A. D.; Krol, M. S.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Consumptive water footprint (WF) reduction in irrigated crop production is essential given the increasing competition for fresh water. This study explores the effect of three management practices on the soil water balance and plant growth, specifically on evapotranspiration (ET) and yield (Y) and thus the consumptive WF of crops (ET/Y). The management practices are: four irrigation techniques (furrow, sprinkler, drip and subsurface drip (SSD)); four irrigation strategies (full (FI), deficit (DI), supplementary (SI) and no irrigation); and three mulching practices (no mulching, organic (OML) and synthetic (SML) mulching). Various cases were considered: arid, semi-arid, sub-humid and humid environments; wet, normal and dry years; three soil types; and three crops. The AquaCrop model and the global WF accounting standard were used to relate the management practices to effects on ET, Y and WF. For each management practice, the associated green, blue and total consumptive WF were compared to the reference case (furrow irrigation, full irrigation, no mulching). The average reduction in the consumptive WF is: 8-10 % if we change from the reference to drip or SSD; 13 % when changing to OML; 17-18 % when moving to drip or SSD in combination with OML; and 28 % for drip or SSD in combination with SML. All before-mentioned reductions increase by one or a few per cent when moving from full to deficit irrigation. Reduction in overall consumptive WF always goes together with an increasing ratio of green to blue WF. The WF of growing a crop for a particular environment is smallest under DI, followed by FI, SI and rain-fed. Growing crops with sprinkler irrigation has the largest consumptive WF, followed by furrow, drip and SSD. Furrow irrigation has a smaller consumptive WF compared with sprinkler, even though the classical measure of "irrigation efficiency" for furrow is lower.

  17. How to save water by choice of irrigation application method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is known that irrigation application method can impact crop water use and water use efficiency, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood, particularly in terms of the water and energy balances during the growing season from pre-irrigation through planting, early growth and yield de...

  18. Green and blue water footprint reduction in irrigated agriculture: effect of irrigation techniques, irrigation strategies and mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukalla, A. D.; Krol, M. S.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Consumptive water footprint (WF) reduction in irrigated crop production is essential given the increasing competition for freshwater. This study explores the effect of three management practices on the soil water balance and plant growth, specifically on evapotranspiration (ET) and yield (Y) and thus the consumptive WF of crops (ET / Y). The management practices are four irrigation techniques (furrow, sprinkler, drip and subsurface drip (SSD)), four irrigation strategies (full (FI), deficit (DI), supplementary (SI) and no irrigation), and three mulching practices (no mulching, organic (OML) and synthetic (SML) mulching). Various cases were considered: arid, semi-arid, sub-humid and humid environments in Israel, Spain, Italy and the UK, respectively; wet, normal and dry years; three soil types (sand, sandy loam and silty clay loam); and three crops (maize, potato and tomato). The AquaCrop model and the global WF accounting standard were used to relate the management practices to effects on ET, Y and WF. For each management practice, the associated green, blue and total consumptive WF were compared to the reference case (furrow irrigation, full irrigation, no mulching). The average reduction in the consumptive WF is 8-10 % if we change from the reference to drip or SSD, 13 % when changing to OML, 17-18 % when moving to drip or SSD in combination with OML, and 28 % for drip or SSD in combination with SML. All before-mentioned reductions increase by one or a few per cent when moving from full to deficit irrigation. Reduction in overall consumptive WF always goes together with an increasing ratio of green to blue WF. The WF of growing a crop for a particular environment is smallest under DI, followed by FI, SI and rain-fed. Growing crops with sprinkler irrigation has the largest consumptive WF, followed by furrow, drip and SSD. Furrow irrigation has a smaller consumptive WF compared with sprinkler, even though the classical measure of "irrigation efficiency" for furrow

  19. [Optimal allocation of irrigation water resources based on systematical strategy].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuai; Zhang, Shu-qing

    2015-01-01

    With the development of the society and economy, as well as the rapid increase of population, more and more water is needed by human, which intensified the shortage of water resources. The scarcity of water resources and growing competition of water in different water use sectors reduce water availability for irrigation, so it is significant to plan and manage irrigation water resources scientifically and reasonably for improving water use efficiency (WUE) and ensuring food security. Many investigations indicate that WUE can be increased by optimization of water use. However, present studies focused primarily on a particular aspect or scale, which lack systematic analysis on the problem of irrigation water allocation. By summarizing previous related studies, especially those based on intelligent algorithms, this article proposed a multi-level, multi-scale framework for allocating irrigation water, and illustrated the basic theory of each component of the framework. Systematical strategy of optimal irrigation water allocation can not only control the total volume of irrigation water on the time scale, but also reduce water loss on the spatial scale. It could provide scientific basis and technical support for improving the irrigation water management level and ensuring the food security. PMID:25985685

  20. Cell-programmed death induced by walnut husk washing waters in three horticultural crops.

    PubMed

    Petriccione, Milena; Papa, Stefania; Ciniglia, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    Walnut husk washing waters (WHWW), a by-product of walnut production, are indiscriminately used for irrigation without preliminary risk assessment. Basing on previous in vitro results on the toxicity of this by-product, we have followed the morphophysiological development of Zea mays, Lactuca sativa cv. Gentilina and L. sativa cv. Canasta under diluted and undiluted WHWW irrigation. Significant development alterations have been observed in root and shoot elongations for all crops as well as in total biomass and chlorophyll content. The genotoxic potential of WHWW has been concurrently verified; acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining evidenced chromatin modifications and DNA degradation and also was confirmed by DNA laddering. The DNA instability was also assessed through RAPD, thus suggesting the danger of the by-product of walnut processing and focusing the attention on the necessity of an efficient treatment of WHWWs. The findings obtained by PCA of agronomic and physiological traits suggested that establishing guidelines for the administration of WHWW for irrigation is of great importance, and it is necessary to supervise their use in agricultural soils.

  1. Consumptive Water Use and Crop Coefficients of Irrigated Sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In semi-arid environments, the use of irrigation is necessary for sunflower production to reach its maximum potential. The aim of this study was to quantify the consumptive water use and crop coefficients of irrigated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) without soil water limitations during two growing...

  2. Site-Specific Sprinkler Irrigation in a Water Limited Future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Available water supplies for irrigation are becoming more and more limited in the western USA and other locations around the world, and this trend is accelerating. This will force major changes to physical and managerial aspects as well as design of water delivery and on-farm irrigation systems. Th...

  3. Institutional aspects of proportional water allocation in practice: case of the Odzani River Irrigation Company, Save Catchment, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senzanje, A.; van der Zaag, P.

    Under the new Water Act [Government of Zimbabwe, 1998. Water Act, Chapter 20:24, No. 31/98. Government Printers, Harare] of Zimbabwe which abolished the priority date system for the allocation of surface water in a catchment, it is widely believed that the alternative will be the proportional water allocation system. The proportional water allocation system has been practiced by groups of water users in a number of sub-catchments in Zimbabwe including Mupfuri, Mazowe and Odzi River systems, mainly in the form of dam syndicates (groups of users jointly owning a dam) and irrigation companies (groups of irrigators sharing one source of water). This paper presents the practical experiences with, and lessons that can be learnt from proportional water allocation in the Odzani River Irrigation Company (ORIC) on the Odzi River system in Manicaland in Zimbabwe. ORIC was formed under the provisions of the old Water Act after the construction of the canal, and currently has 50 irrigating members. They are engaged in a variety of agricultural enterprises that include crop production, horticulture and dairying. All members have sub-permits (sub-rights) that enable them to draw water, but the company has a single permit to abstract water from the Odzi River into their supply canal. Farmers’ perception and understanding of proportional water allocation varied but generally defined it as getting a certain percentage of water depending on the amount available in the canal and one’s water permit. One of the major sources of problems in ORIC is inequitable access to water arising from water poaching. Overall, ORIC farmers felt that for proportional water allocation to work properly, the services of a fulltime water bailiff are required, farmers must have their own storage facilities, water should be metered, members should participate fully in decision making, politics should be kept to a minimum and conflicts must be resolved internally.

  4. Spatial distribution and temporal variability of arsenic in irrigated rice fields in Bangladesh. 1. Irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Linda C; Hug, Stephan J; Dittmar, Jessica; Voegelin, Andreas; Saha, Ganesh C; Ali, M Ashraf; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2007-09-01

    Around 38% of the area of Bangladesh is irrigated with groundwater to grow dry season crops, most importantly boro rice. Due to high As concentrations in many groundwaters, over 1000 tons of As are thus transferred to arable soils each year, creating a potential risk for future food production. We studied the reactions and changing speciation of As, Fe, P, and other elements in initially anoxic water during and after irrigation and the resulting spatial distribution of As input to paddy soils near Sreenagar (Munshiganj), 30 km south of Dhaka, in January and April 2005 and February 2006. The irrigation water had a constant concentration of 397 +/- 7 microg L(-1) As (approximately 84% As(III)), 11 +/- 0.1 mg L(-1) Fe, and 2 +/- 0.1 mg L(-1) P. During the fast flow along the longest irrigation channel (152 m) As, Fe, and P speciation changed, but total concentrations did not decrease significantly, indicating that As input to fields was independent of the length of the irrigation channels. In contrast, during slow water flow across the fields, As, Fe, and P concentrations decreased strongly with increasing distance from the water inlet, due to formation and settling of As- and P-bearing Fe aggregates and by adsorption to soil minerals. Total As concentrations in field water were approximately 3 times higher close to the inlet than in the opposite field corner shortly after irrigation, and decreased to below 35 microg L(-1) over the next 72 h. The laterally heterogeneous transfer of As, Fe, and P from irrigation waterto soil has important consequences for their distribution in irrigated fields and needs to be considered in sampling and in assessing the dynamics and mass balances of As fluxes among irrigation water, soil, and floodwater. PMID:17937267

  5. Spatial distribution and temporal variability of arsenic in irrigated rice fields in Bangladesh. 1. Irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Linda C; Hug, Stephan J; Dittmar, Jessica; Voegelin, Andreas; Saha, Ganesh C; Ali, M Ashraf; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2007-09-01

    Around 38% of the area of Bangladesh is irrigated with groundwater to grow dry season crops, most importantly boro rice. Due to high As concentrations in many groundwaters, over 1000 tons of As are thus transferred to arable soils each year, creating a potential risk for future food production. We studied the reactions and changing speciation of As, Fe, P, and other elements in initially anoxic water during and after irrigation and the resulting spatial distribution of As input to paddy soils near Sreenagar (Munshiganj), 30 km south of Dhaka, in January and April 2005 and February 2006. The irrigation water had a constant concentration of 397 +/- 7 microg L(-1) As (approximately 84% As(III)), 11 +/- 0.1 mg L(-1) Fe, and 2 +/- 0.1 mg L(-1) P. During the fast flow along the longest irrigation channel (152 m) As, Fe, and P speciation changed, but total concentrations did not decrease significantly, indicating that As input to fields was independent of the length of the irrigation channels. In contrast, during slow water flow across the fields, As, Fe, and P concentrations decreased strongly with increasing distance from the water inlet, due to formation and settling of As- and P-bearing Fe aggregates and by adsorption to soil minerals. Total As concentrations in field water were approximately 3 times higher close to the inlet than in the opposite field corner shortly after irrigation, and decreased to below 35 microg L(-1) over the next 72 h. The laterally heterogeneous transfer of As, Fe, and P from irrigation waterto soil has important consequences for their distribution in irrigated fields and needs to be considered in sampling and in assessing the dynamics and mass balances of As fluxes among irrigation water, soil, and floodwater.

  6. Ornamental Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    Each of the 32 curriculum modules in this packet for ornamental horticulture instruction contains a brief description of the module content, a list of the major division or units, the overall objectives, objectives by units, content outline and suggested teaching methods, student application activities, and evaluation procedures. A listing of…

  7. Heartland Horticulture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poquette, Bonnie L.

    2009-01-01

    Midwestern gardeners are legendary for enduring and outwitting winter, with its heavy snowpack and recurring freezes and thaws. Most of them also reckon with a relatively short growing period. All of them find their horticultural plans complicated by hot, humid summers. In fact, the Midwest deals with four seasons dictating special considerations…

  8. SOEP: Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Chris; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Theme articles on horticulture discuss how students develop basic skills in supervised occupational experience programs, how to develop a good program without additional funding, describe a program at a junior college, and outline a program preparing students for job entry or higher education. (JOW)

  9. Energy requirements in pressure irrigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, R.; Rodríguez-Sinobas, L.; Juana, L.; Laguna, F. V.; Castañón, G.; Gil, M.; Benítez, J.

    2012-04-01

    Modernization of irrigation schemes, generally understood as transformation of surface irrigation systems into pressure -sprinkler and trickle- irrigation systems, aims at, among others, improving irrigation efficiency and reduction of operation and maintenance efforts made by the irrigators. However, pressure irrigation systems, in contrast, carry a serious energy cost. Energy requirements depend on decisions taken on management strategies during the operation phase, which are conditioned by previous decisions taken on the design project of the different elements which compose the irrigation system. Most of the countries where irrigation activity is significant bear in mind that modernization irrigation must play a key role in the agricultural infrastructure policies. The objective of this study is to characterize and estimate the mean and variation of the energy consumed by common types of irrigation systems and their management possibilities. The work includes all processes involved from the diversion of water into irrigation specific infrastructure to water discharge by the emitters installed on the crop fields. Simulation taking into account all elements comprising the irrigation system has been used to estimate the energy requirements of typical irrigation systems of several crop production systems. It has been applied to extensive and intensive crop systems, such us extensive winter crops, summer crops and olive trees, fruit trees and vineyards and intensive horticulture in greenhouses. The simulation of various types of irrigation systems and management strategies, in the framework imposed by particular cropping systems, would help to develop criteria for improving the energy balance in relation to the irrigation water supply productivity.

  10. Estimating irrigation water use in the humid eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levin, Sara B.; Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate accounting of irrigation water use is an important part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Use Information Program and the WaterSMART initiative to help maintain sustainable water resources in the Nation. Irrigation water use in the humid eastern United States is not well characterized because of inadequate reporting and wide variability associated with climate, soils, crops, and farming practices. To better understand irrigation water use in the eastern United States, two types of predictive models were developed and compared by using metered irrigation water-use data for corn, cotton, peanut, and soybean crops in Georgia and turf farms in Rhode Island. Reliable metered irrigation data were limited to these areas. The first predictive model that was developed uses logistic regression to predict the occurrence of irrigation on the basis of antecedent climate conditions. Logistic regression equations were developed for corn, cotton, peanut, and soybean crops by using weekly irrigation water-use data from 36 metered sites in Georgia in 2009 and 2010 and turf farms in Rhode Island from 2000 to 2004. For the weeks when irrigation was predicted to take place, the irrigation water-use volume was estimated by multiplying the average metered irrigation application rate by the irrigated acreage for a given crop. The second predictive model that was developed is a crop-water-demand model that uses a daily soil water balance to estimate the water needs of a crop on a given day based on climate, soil, and plant properties. Crop-water-demand models were developed independently of reported irrigation water-use practices and relied on knowledge of plant properties that are available in the literature. Both modeling approaches require accurate accounting of irrigated area and crop type to estimate total irrigation water use. Water-use estimates from both modeling methods were compared to the metered irrigation data from Rhode Island and Georgia that were used to

  11. Comparison of normal saline with tap water for wound irrigation.

    PubMed

    Moscati, R; Mayrose, J; Fincher, L; Jehle, D

    1998-07-01

    This study compared irrigation with tap water versus saline for removing bacteria from simple skin lacerations. The study was conducted in an animal model with a randomized, nonblinded crossover design using 10 500-g laboratory rats. Two full-thickness skin lacerations were made on each animal and inoculated with standardized concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus broth. Tissue specimens were removed before and after irrigation with 250 cc of either normal saline from a sterile syringe or water from a faucet. Bacterial counts were determined for each specimen and compared before and after irrigation. There was a mean reduction in bacterial counts of 81.6% with saline and 65.3% with tap water (P = .34). One tap water specimen had markedly aberrant bacterial counts compared with others. Excluding this specimen, the mean reduction for tap water was 80.2%. In this model, reduction in bacterial contamination of simple lacerations was not different comparing tap water with normal saline as an irrigant.

  12. Estimating irrigation water use in the humid eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levin, Sara B.; Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate accounting of irrigation water use is an important part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Use Information Program and the WaterSMART initiative to help maintain sustainable water resources in the Nation. Irrigation water use in the humid eastern United States is not well characterized because of inadequate reporting and wide variability associated with climate, soils, crops, and farming practices. To better understand irrigation water use in the eastern United States, two types of predictive models were developed and compared by using metered irrigation water-use data for corn, cotton, peanut, and soybean crops in Georgia and turf farms in Rhode Island. Reliable metered irrigation data were limited to these areas. The first predictive model that was developed uses logistic regression to predict the occurrence of irrigation on the basis of antecedent climate conditions. Logistic regression equations were developed for corn, cotton, peanut, and soybean crops by using weekly irrigation water-use data from 36 metered sites in Georgia in 2009 and 2010 and turf farms in Rhode Island from 2000 to 2004. For the weeks when irrigation was predicted to take place, the irrigation water-use volume was estimated by multiplying the average metered irrigation application rate by the irrigated acreage for a given crop. The second predictive model that was developed is a crop-water-demand model that uses a daily soil water balance to estimate the water needs of a crop on a given day based on climate, soil, and plant properties. Crop-water-demand models were developed independently of reported irrigation water-use practices and relied on knowledge of plant properties that are available in the literature. Both modeling approaches require accurate accounting of irrigated area and crop type to estimate total irrigation water use. Water-use estimates from both modeling methods were compared to the metered irrigation data from Rhode Island and Georgia that were used to

  13. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horticultural Review allows extensive reviews of the state of the knowledge on certain topics or crops. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential, is outlined with an Introduction, Botany, Horticulture, Propagation, Uses and Conclusion sections. This review compiles literature from around the w...

  14. Using soil water sensors to improve irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation water management has to do with the appropriate application of water to soils, in terms of amounts, rates, and timing to satisfy crop water demands while protecting the soil and water resources from degradation. In this regard, sensors can be used to monitor the soil water status; and som...

  15. The relationship between irrigation water demand and drought in the Yellow River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Weihao; Peng, Shaoming; Jiang, Guiqin; Wu, Jian

    2016-10-01

    In order to organize water for drought resistance reasonably, we need to study the relationship between irrigation water demand and meteorological drought in quantitative way. We chose five typical irrigation districts including the Qingtongxia irrigation district, Yellow River irrigation districts of Inner Mongolia in the upper reaches of the Yellow River, the Fen river irrigation district and the Wei river irrigation district in the middle reaches of the Yellow River and the irrigation districts in the lower reaches of the Yellow River as research area. Based on the hydrology, meteorology, groundwater and crop parameters materials from 1956 to 2010 in the Yellow River basin, we selected reconnaissance drought index (RDI) to analyze occurrence and evolution regularity of drought in the five typical irrigation districts, and calculated the corresponding irrigation water demand by using crop water balance equation. The relationship of drought and irrigation water demand in each typical irrigation district was studied by using grey correlation analysis and relevant analysis method, and the quantitative relationship between irrigation water demand and RDI was established in each typical irrigation district. The results showed that the RDI can be applied to evaluate the meteorological drought in the typical irrigation districts of the Yellow River basin. There is significant correlation between the irrigation water demand and RDI, and the grey correlation degree and correlation coefficient increased with increasing crops available effective rainfall. The irrigation water demand of irrigation districts in the upstream, middle and downstream of the Yellow River basin presented different response degrees to drought. The irrigation water demand increased 105 million m3 with the drought increasing one grade (RDI decreasing 0.5) in the Qingtongxia irrigation district and Yellow River irrigation districts of Inner Mongolia. The irrigation water demand increased 219 million m3

  16. Crop water stress indices correlated with soil water storage: Implications for variable rate irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water sensing methods are now coming to be used for irrigation scheduling of whole fields. However, newly introduced variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems require information about soil water content in many areas of a field, each called an irrigation management zone. Commonly available soil w...

  17. Analytical steady-state solutions for water-limited cropping systems using saline irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the diminishing availability of good quality water for irrigation, it is increasingly important that irrigation and salinity management tools be able to target submaximal crop yields and support the use of marginal quality waters. In this work, we present a steady-state irrigated systems mod...

  18. Modelling the influence of irrigation abstractions on Scotland's water resources.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S M; Chalmers, N; Stalham, M; Lilly, A; Crabtree, B; Johnston, L

    2003-01-01

    Legislation to control abstraction of water in Scotland is limited and for purposes such as irrigation there are no restrictions in place over most of the country. This situation is set to change with implementation of the European Water Framework Directive. As a first step towards the development of appropriate policy for irrigation control there is a need to assess the current scale of irrigation practices in Scotland. This paper presents a modelling approach that has been used to quantify spatially the volume of water abstractions across the country for irrigation of potato crops under typical climatic conditions. A water balance model was developed to calculate soil moisture deficits and identify the potential need for irrigation. The results were then combined with spatial data on potato cropping and integrated to the sub-catchment scale to identify the river systems most at risk from over-abstraction. The results highlight that the areas that have greatest need for irrigation of potatoes are all concentrated in the central east-coast area of Scotland. The difference between irrigation demand in wet and dry years is very significant, although spatial patterns of the distribution are similar.

  19. Irrigation with desalinated water: A step toward increasing water saving and crop yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, Avner; Israeli, Yair; Elingold, Idan; Levi, Menashe; Levkovitch, Irit; Russo, David; Assouline, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    We examined the impact of two different approaches to managing irrigation water salinity: salt leaching from the field ("conventional" management) and water desalination before field application ("alternative" management). Freshwater commonly used for irrigation (FW) and desalinated water (DS) were applied to the high-water-demanding crop banana at four different rates. Both irrigation rate and water salinity significantly affected yield. DS application consistently produced higher yields than FW, independently of irrigation rate. The highest yield for FW-irrigation was achieved with the highest irrigation rate, whereas the same yield was obtained in the case of DS-irrigation with practically half the amount of water. Yield decreased with FW-irrigation, even when the water salinity, ECi, was lower than the limit considered safe for soil and crops. Irrigating with FW provided a massive amount of salt which accumulated in the rhizosphere, inducing increased osmotic potential of the soil solution and impairing plant water uptake. Furthermore, applying the "conventional" management, a significant amount of salt is leached from the rhizosphere, accumulating in deeper soil layers, and eventually reaching groundwater reservoirs, thus contributing to the deterioration of both soil and water quality. Removal of salt excess from the water before it reaches the field by means of DS-irrigation may save significant amounts of irrigation water by reducing the salt leaching requirements while increasing yield and improving fruit quality, and decreasing salt load in the groundwater.

  20. Municipal, industrial, and irrigation water use in Washington, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dion, N.P.; Lum, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    An assessment of water use in 1975 in the 39 counties and 62 Water Resources Inventory Areas of Washington, indicated that 2.49 trillion gallons of water was used for municipal, industrial, and irrigation purposes. That amount represents a 10-percent increase over a similar water-use assessment in 1965, but a slight decrease from that of 1970. Total municipal water use, which includes municipally supplied industrial water, was 283 billion gallons. Industry used 442 billion gallons, of which 121 billion gallons was from municipal systems and 321 billion gallons was for self-suppled systems. Of the 604 billion gallons of water used for municipal and industrial supplies 145 billion gallons was ground water, 444 billion gallons was fresh surface water, and 14.8 billion gallons was saline surface water. A compilation of statewide industrial use as categorized by SIC (Lumber and Wood Products), SIC 28 (Chemicals and Allied Products), and SIC 20 (Food and Kindred Products)--accounted for about 65 percent of the total water used in industrial processes , In 1975, 5.79 million acre-feet of irrigation water (1,890 billion gallons) as applied to 1.52 million acres. This water was 95 percent surface water and 5 percent ground water. About 97 percent of the irrigation water was supplied in eastern Washington, to about 94 percent of the irrigated acreage in the State. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Fertilization and blending alternatives for irrigation with desalinated water.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gal, Alon; Yermiyahu, Uri; Cohen, Shabtai

    2009-01-01

    In arid-zone agriculture where available irrigation water is saline, desalination is becoming an attractive method for increasing yields and reducing negative environmental consequences. However, irrigation with desalinated water can be problematic if essential nutrients, including Ca, Mg, and S, removed during reverse osmosis, are not reintroduced. We evaluated two strategies for supplying these nutrients - direct fertilization and blending of desalinated with saline groundwater -experimentally in a greenhouse and in a model for a case study regarding pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) production. Reducing salinity from electrical conductivity (EC) 3.20 to EC 0.40 dS m(-1) by reverse-osmosis desalination increased maximum yields by almost 50% while allowing a reduction of applied irrigation water to half of that with the saline water, but the associated cost of fertilizing with Ca, Mg, and S minerals was high (around $0.50 m(-3)). Blending 30% saline water with 70% desalinated water brought Ca, Mg, and S minerals to satisfactory levels while producing water with salinity of EC = 1.35 dS m(-1). Comparison of relative pepper yields and analysis of simulated results showed that irrigation with blended water maintained yields greater than 90% compared to irrigation with fully desalinated water, but only as irrigation rates were increased by more than 50%. The environmental cost of the increase in irrigation-water salinity from EC 0.40 to EC 1.35 dS m(-1) in the blended water was shown to be substantial as it involved five times greater loading (into the soil) and leaching (beyond the root zone) of salts and other contaminants.

  2. Drip irrigation management in different chufa planting strategies: yield and irrigation water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Seva, Nuria; San Bautista, Alberto; López-Galarza, Salvador; Maroto, José Vicente; Pascual, Bernardo

    2013-04-01

    In a study presented in the EGU assembly 2012, it was analysed how yield and irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE) in chufa (Cyperus esculentus L. var. sativus), crop, were affected by planting strategy (ridges and flat raised beds, with two and three plant rows along them) and irrigation system [furrow (FI) and drip irrigation (DI)]. Each irrigation session started when the Volumetric Soil Water Content (VSWC) in ridges dropped to 80% of field capacity; beds were irrigated simultaneously with ridges and with the same irrigation duration. R produced lower yield than the two types of beds, and yields in DI were higher than those FI. Ridges led to the highest IWUE with DI, and to the lowest with FI. Then, it was decided to analyse, in DI, how yield and IWUE responded to start each irrigation session when the VSWC in the central point of different planting strategies [ridges (R), and flat raised beds with two (b) and three (B) plant rows along them] dropped to 80% of field capacity. In R and b, plants were irrigated by a single dripline per plant row, while in B two irrigation layouts were assayed: a single dripline per plant row (B3) and two driplines per bed (B2), placing each dripline between two planting rows. Irrigation session stop was also automated as a function of the VSWC. Results show that yield was affected (P˜0.01) by planting strategy; the greatest yield was obtained in b (2.4 kgm-2), differing (P˜0.05) from that obtained in R (2.1 kgm-2), with intermediate yields in B2 (2.3 kgm-2) and B3 (2.3 kgm-2). Yield was not affected (P˜0.05) by the utilisation of two or three driplines in B. Considerably less irrigation water was applied (IWA) in R (376 mm) than in B3 (465 mm), B2 (475 mm) and b (502 mm). This automatic irrigation management, as a function of the VSWC in each planting strategy, lead to adjust the IWA to the plant water requirements, which were similar in all three flat raised beds, since they correspond to the same planting density, that was

  3. Introduction to Horticulture. Teacher Edition. Horticulture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication is designed to provide a core of instruction for the many different fields in agricultural/horticultural education. This course contains 21 instructional units that cover the following topics: introduction to horticulture; beginning a career in horticulture; hand and power tools; introduction to safety; growing facilities;…

  4. Water savings potentials of irrigation systems: dynamic global simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägermeyr, J.; Gerten, D.; Heinke, J.; Schaphoff, S.; Kummu, M.; Lucht, W.

    2015-04-01

    Global agricultural production is heavily sustained by irrigation, but irrigation system efficiencies are often surprisingly low. However, our knowledge of irrigation efficiencies is mostly confined to rough indicative estimates for countries or regions that do not account for spatio-temporal heterogeneity due to climate and other biophysical dependencies. To allow for refined estimates of global agricultural water use, and of water saving and water productivity potentials constrained by biophysical processes and also non-trivial downstream effects, we incorporated a dynamic representation of the three major irrigation systems (surface, sprinkler, and drip) into a process-based bio- and agrosphere model, LPJmL. Based on this enhanced model we provide a gridded worldmap of dynamically retrieved irrigation efficiencies reflecting differences in system types, crop types, climatic and hydrologic conditions, and overall crop management. We find pronounced regional patterns in beneficial irrigation efficiency (a refined irrigation efficiency indicator accounting for crop-productive water consumption only), due to differences in these features, with lowest values (< 30%) in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and highest values (> 60%) in Europe and North America. We arrive at an estimate of global irrigation water withdrawal of 2396 km3 (2004-2009 average); irrigation water consumption is calculated to be 1212 km3, of which 511 km3 are non-beneficially consumed, i.e. lost through evaporation, interception, and conveyance. Replacing surface systems by sprinkler or drip systems could, on average across the world's river basins, reduce the non-beneficial consumption at river basin level by 54 and 76%, respectively, while maintaining the current level of crop yields. Accordingly, crop water productivity would increase by 9 and 15%, respectively, and by much more in specific regions such as in the Indus basin. This study significantly advances the global quantification of

  5. Results from a 3-year deficit irrigation experiment with drip-irrigated maize to improve water productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloss, Sebastian; Schütze, Niels; Grundmann, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Water for irrigation farming is severely limited in arid and semi-arid regions, hence reliable and robust strategies are needed that allow to use the available resources efficiently. Controlled deficit irrigation (DI) is one strategy that can help to use water in an effective way while still ensuring considerable yields from harvest. It needs precise irrigation control however where sensors are used to determine when to irrigate. Therefore, thresholds that trigger irrigation need to be chosen carefully. An irrigation experiment with drip-irrigated maize was conducted in three consecutive years (2010-2012) where different controlled DI strategies were tested. The experiments took place in a greenhouse at TU München in Freising, Germany, and comprised treatments with constant and varying irrigation thresholds throughout the growing season, which were compared to fully irrigated reference treatments. Thresholds were determined in soil tension as it is closely related to the working principle behind plant transpiration and treatments evaluated with regard to their water productivity (WP - yield over applied irrigation water). The irrigation thresholds were determined prior to the experiment by a stochastic simulation-based framework that consisted of a weather generator, the crop growth model Daisy, and an optimization algorithm for finding optimal thresholds under limiting water supply. Achieved results show similar or better WP compared to the reference and generally high WP compared to values from literature which suggests this methodology is a promising approach to improve WP.

  6. Maximizing grain sorghum water use efficiency under deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development and evaluation of sustainable and efficient irrigation strategies is a priority for producers faced with water shortages resulting from aquifer depletion, reduced base flows, and reallocation of water to non-agricultural sectors. Under a limited water supply, yield maximization may not b...

  7. Soil Water Sensing-Focus on Variable Rate Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling using soil water sensors is an exercise in maintaining the water content of the crop root zone soil above a lower limit defined by the management allowed depletion (MAD) for that soil and crop, but not so wet that too much water is lost to deep percolation. The management allow...

  8. Comparative study of irrigation water use and groundwater recharge under various irrigation schemes in an agricultural region, central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih-Kai; Jang, Cheng-Shin; Tsai, Cheng-Bin

    2016-04-01

    The risk of rice production has increased notably due to climate change in Taiwan. To respond to growing agricultural water shortage without affecting normal food production in the future, the application of water-saving irrigation will be a substantial resolution. However, the adoption of water-saving irrigation may result in the reducing of groundwater recharge because continuous flooding in the paddy fields could be regarded as an important source for groundwater recharge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the irrigation water-saving benefit and groundwater recharge deficit when adopting the System of Rice Intensification, known as SRI methodology, in the Choushui River alluvial fan (the largest groundwater pumping and the most important rice-cropping region in central Taiwan). The three-dimensional finite element groundwater model, FEMWATER, was applied to simulate the infiltration process and groundwater recharge under SRI methodology and traditional irrigation schemes including continuous irrigation, and rotational irrigation in two rice-crop periods with hydro-climatic data of 2013. The irrigation water use was then calculated by water balance. The results showed that groundwater recharge amount of SRI methodology was slightly lower than those of traditional irrigation schemes, reduced 3.6% and 1.6% in the first crop period, and reduced 3.2% and 1.6% in the second crop period, compared with continuous irrigation and rotational irrigation, respectively. However, the SRI methodology achieved notably water-saving benefit compared to the disadvantage of reducing the groundwater recharge amount. The field irrigation requirement amount of SRI methodology was significantly lower than those of traditional irrigation schemes, saving 37% and 20% of irrigation water in the first crop period, and saving 53% and 35% in the second crop period, compared with continuous irrigation and rotational irrigation, respectively. Therefore, the amount of groundwater pumping for

  9. Irrigation response and water productivity of deficit to fully irrigated spring camelina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Camelina [Camelina sativa L. Crantz] is an oil seed crop that could be adapted to the northern High Plains of the USA as a biofuel crop. Decreased ground water allocations in Nebraska necessitated determining the impact of limited irrigation on camelina. The objective of this research was to determi...

  10. Yield, irrigation response, and water productivity of deficit to fully irrigated spring canola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canola (Brassica napus) is an oil-seed crop that is adapted to the northern High Plains of the USA and is considered a viable rotational and biofuel crop. However, decreased ground water allocations have necessitated determining the impact of limited irrigation on canola productivity. The objectives...

  11. Irrigation infrastructure and water appropriation rules for food security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Abdelaziz A.; Amer, Saud A.; Ward, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    In the developing world's irrigated areas, water management and planning is often motivated by the need for lasting food security. Two important policy measures to address this need are improving the flexibility of water appropriation rules and developing irrigation storage infrastructure. Little research to date has investigated the performance of these two policy measures in a single analysis while maintaining a basin wide water balance. This paper examines impacts of storage capacity and water appropriation rules on total economic welfare in irrigated agriculture, while maintaining a water balance. The application is to a river basin in northern Afghanistan. A constrained optimization framework is developed to examine economic consequences on food security and farm income resulting from each policy measure. Results show that significant improvements in both policy aims can be achieved through expanding existing storage capacity to capture up to 150 percent of long-term average annual water supplies when added capacity is combined with either a proportional sharing of water shortages or unrestricted water trading. An important contribution of the paper is to show how the benefits of storage and a changed water appropriation system operate under a variable climate. Results show that the hardship of droughts can be substantially lessened, with the largest rewards taking place in the most difficult periods. Findings provide a comprehensive framework for addressing future water scarcity, rural livelihoods, and food security in the developing world's irrigated regions.

  12. Characteristics of dissolved carbon change in irrigation water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaike, Y.; Kunishio, A.; Kawamoto, Y.; Murakami, H.; Iwata, T.

    2012-12-01

    It is necessary to estimate carbon emission from soil for understanding carbon cycle processes in cultivated fields. Since irrigation water is introduced into a typical rice paddy field, one part of emitted carbon content from soil were trapped by water and dissolved in it, and dissolved carbon content outflows from the field at the drainage moment. In this study, we continuously and regularly analyzed dissolved carbon content of irrigation water and investigated seasonal variation of efflux of carbon from a paddy field. Experimental site is located reclaimed land in the southern part of Okayama Prefecture, Japan. And rice cropping cultivation has continued in a similar method every year. Intermittent irrigation water managements, or 3 days flooded and 4 days drained condition, were carried out during almost all the period of rice cultivated term. Irrigation water was sampled every flooding and drainage days. Inorganic carbon (IC) concentration was measured with total carbon (TC) analyzer (TOC-V/CSH, SHIMAZU). Amount of dissolved carbon in irrigation water was calculated from product of the carbon concentration and water levels. The experimental paddy field was divided into two areas, and two bottle of water were sampled from each area. In order to investigate what impact is brought on the annual carbon cycle by the difference of disposal management of residual biomass after the harvest, residual biomass was burned and plowed into soil at the one area on 29th Nov., 2011, and residue was not burned and directly plowed into soil at the other area as usual. IC during cultivated term in 2011 and 2012 in both area gradually increased day by day for every flooded periods. And IC showed distinct diurnal variations with lower value in the daytime than at night, it is because of photosynthetic activities by aquatic algae in the irrigation water.

  13. Distillation irrigation: a low-energy process for coupling water purification and drip irrigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method is proposed for combining solar distillation and drip irrigation to simultaneously desalinize water and apply this water to row crops. In this paper, the basic method is illustrated by a simple device constructed primarily of sheets of plastic, which uses solar energy to distill impaired water and apply the distillate to a widely spaced row crop. To predict the performance of the proposed device, an empirical equation for distillate production, dp, is developed from reported solar still production rates, and a modified Jensen-Haise equation is used to calculate the potential evapotranspiration, et, for a row crop. Monthly values for et and dp are calculated by using a generalized row crop at five locations in the Western United States. Calculated et values range from 1 to 22 cm month-1 and calculated dp values range from 2 to 11 cm month-1, depending on the location, the month, and the crop average. When the sum of dp plus precipitation, dp + P, is compared to et for the case of 50% distillation irrigation system coverage, the results indicate that the crop's et is matched by dp + P, at the cooler locations only. However, when the system coverage is increased to 66%, the crop's et is matched by dp + P even at the hottest location. Potential advantages of distillation irrigation include the ability: (a) to convert impaired water resources to water containing no salts or sediments; and (b) to efficiently and automatically irrigate crops at a rate that is controlled primarily by radiation intensities. The anticipated disadvantages of distillation irrigation include: (a) the high costs of a system, due to the large amounts of sheeting required, the short lifetime of the sheeting, and the physically cumbersome nature of a system; (b) the need for a widely spaced crop to reduce shading of the system by the crop; and (c) the production of a concentrated brine or precipitate, requiring proper off-site disposal. ?? 1989.

  14. Ground-water resources of Riverton irrigation project area, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, Donald Arthur; Hackett, O.M.; Vanlier, K.E.; Moulder, E.A.; Durum, W.H.

    1959-01-01

    The Riverton irrigation project area is in the northwestern part of the Wind River basin in west-central Wyoming. Because the annual precipitation is only about 9 inches, agriculture, which is the principal occupation in the area, is dependent upon irrigation. Irrigation by surface-water diversion was begum is 1906; water is now supplied to 77,716 acres and irrigation has been proposed for an additional 31,344 acres. This study of the geology and ground-water resources of the Riverton irrigation project, of adjacent irrigated land, and of nearby land proposed for irrigation was begun during the summer of 1948 and was completed in 1951. The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the ground-water resources of the area and to study the factors that should be considered in the solution of drainage and erosional problems within the area. The Riverton irrigation project area is characterized by flat to gently sloping stream terraces, which are flanked by a combination of badlands, pediment slopes, and broad valleys. These features were formed by long-continued erosion in an arid climate of the essentially horizontal, poorly consolidated beds of the Wind River formation. The principal streams of the area flow south-eastward. Wind River and Fivemile Creek are perennial streams and the others are intermittent. Ground-water discharge and irrigation return flow have created a major problem in erosion control along Fivemile Creek. Similar conditions might develop along Muddy and lower Cottonwood Creeks when land in their drainage basins is irrigated. The bedrock exposed in the area ranges in age from Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (middle Eocene). The Wind River formation of early and middle Eocene age forms the uppermost bedrock formation in the greater part of the area. Unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age, which consist of terrace gravel, colluvium, eolian sand and silt. and alluvium, mantle the Wind River formation in much of the area. In the irrigated parts

  15. Nitrogen and water management on irrigated alluvial soils to protect ground water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Schepers, J.S. ); Watts, D.G.; Spalding, R.F. ); Peterson, T.A.

    1993-03-01

    Ground water in much of the Platte River Valley of Central Nebraska is contaminated by nitrate above the drinking water standards. Research has shown that much of the nitrate in ground water is due to excess N fertilizer and irrigation water applied to continuous corn monocultures. Nebraska's Management Systems Evaluation Area (MSEA) project was established in 1990 as part of the President's Water Quality Initiative to develop and demonstrate how state-of-the-art N and water management practices can improve ground water quality while maintaining crop yields. Shallow ground water used for irrigation contains about 30 mg/L nitrate-N, which can be a valuable source of N for crops. Traditional furrow irrigation practices received two to three times as much irrigation water as either surge-flow furrow techniques or center pivot sprinkler irrigation systems. Water moving through the silt loam soil in the field under conventional furrow irrigation resulted in nitrate-N concentrations leaving the root zone averaging about 90 mg/L for the first two applications of water with a total N loss of about 88 kg/ha. Improved water application methods that distribute water more uniformly than conventional furrow irrigation allow fertilizer applications through the irrigation water (fertigation) to correct a crop N deficiency. Chlorophyll meters were used to monitor crop N status and schedule fertigation as needed. Spoon-feeding the crop resulted in a 50 to 70% savings in fertilizer N application rates compared to conventional methods of corn production.

  16. Site-specific variable rate irrigation as a means to enhance water use efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of irrigated cropland in the US is watered with sprinkler irrigation systems. These systems are inherently more efficient in distributing water than furrow or flood irrigation. Appropriate system design of sprinkler irrigation equipment, application methods, and farming practices (e.g. ...

  17. Site-specific variable rate irrigation a means to enhance water use efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of irrigated cropland in the US is watered with sprinkler irrigation systems. These systems are inherently more efficient in distributing water than furrow or flood irrigation. Appropriate system design of sprinkler irrigation equipment, application methods, and farming practices (e.g. ...

  18. Soil properties evolution after irrigation with reclaimed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, M.; González-Naranjo, V.; de Miguel, A.; Martínez-Hernández, V.; Lillo, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many arid and semi-arid countries are forced to look for new and alternative water sources. The availability of suitable quality water for agriculture in these regions often is threatened. In this context of water scarcity, the reuse of treated wastewater for crop irrigation could represent a feasible solution. Through rigorous planning and management, irrigation with reclaimed water presents some advantages such as saving freshwater, reducing wastewater discharges into freshwater bodies and decreasing the amount of added fertilizers due to the extra supply of nutrients by reclaimed water. The current study, which involves wastewater reuse in agriculture, has been carried out in the Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes (Sevile, Spain). Here, two survey parcels equally designed have been cultivated with Jatropha curcas L, a bioenergetic plant and a non-interfering food security crop. The only difference between the two parcels lies on the irrigation water quality: one is irrigated with groundwater and another one with reclaimed water. The main aim of this study focuses on analysing the outstanding differences in soil properties derived from irrigation with two water qualities, due to their implications for plant growth. To control and monitor the soil variables, soil samples were collected before and after irrigation in the two parcels. pH, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+), kjeldahl nitrogen, organic matter content and nutrients (boron, phosphorus, nitrogen, potassium) were measured. Data were statistically analyzed using the R package. To evaluate the variance ANOVA test was used and to obtain the relations between water quality and soil parameters, Pearson correlation coefficient was computed. According to other authors, a decrease in the organic matter content and an increase of parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity and some exchangeable cations were expected. To date and after

  19. Water temperature in irrigation return flow from the Upper Snake Rock watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water returning to a river from an irrigated watershed could increase the water temperature in the river. The objective of this study was to compare the temperature of irrigation return flow water with the temperature of the diverted irrigation water. Water temperature was measured weekly in the mai...

  20. The impacts of climate change on global irrigation water requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Cai, X.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change tends to affect the irrigation water requirement of current irrigated agricultural land, and also changes the water availability for current rain-fed land by the end of this century. We use the most up-to-date climatic and crop datasets (e.g., global irrigated/rain-fed crop areas and grid level crop growing calendar (Portmann, Siebert and Döll, 2010, Global Biogeochemical Cycles 24)) to evaluate the requirements of currently irrigated land and the water deficit for rain-fed land for all major crops under current and projected climate. Six general circulation models (GCMs) under two emission scenarios, A1B & B1, are assembled using two methods, the Simple Average Method (SAM) and Root Mean Square Error Ensemble Method (RMSEMM), to deal with the GCM regional variability. It is found that the global irrigation requirement and the water deficit are both going to increase significantly under all scenarios, particularly under the A1B emission scenario. For example, the projected irrigation requirement is expected to increase by about 2500 million m3 for wheat, 3200 million m3 for maize and another 3300 million m3 for rice. At the same time, the water deficit for current rain-fed cropland will be widened by around 3000, 4000, 2100 million m3 for wheat, maize and rice respectively. Regional analysis is conducted for Africa, China, Europe, India, South America and the United States. It is found that the U.S. may expect the greatest rise in irrigation requirements for wheat and maize, while the South America may suffer the greatest increase for rice. In addition, Africa and the U.S. may face a larger water deficit for both wheat and maize on rain-fed land, and South America just for rice. In summary, climate change is likely to bring severe challenges for irrigation systems and make global water shortage even worse by the end of this century. These pressures will call for extensive adaptation measures. The change in crop water requirements and availability

  1. Effect of irrigation modernization on water and nitrogen use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Aguirre, Ma Teresa; Isidoro Ramirez, Daniel; Barros García, Rocío

    2014-05-01

    The growing pressure on water resources and water quality conservation demands a better and more efficient use of irrigation water and fertilizers, particularly nitrogen (N). Irrigated agriculture is the main water consumer, contributing to the reduction of available water resources and the degradation of water quality by contaminants exported in drainage waters. In Spain, the 1.1 Mha on-going modernization program (from surface to pressurized systems) prompts for the assessment of its impact on water availability and quality. Our goal was to analyze the changes in water and N use in the Almudévar Irrigation District (Spain) derived from its modernization from traditional flood irrigation (T-Irr) to sprinkler irrigation (S-Irr). Irrigation (I), actual crop evapotranspiration (ETa, calculated through a soil water balance), yield (Y) of the main crops (alfalfa, cereals (wheat and barley) and corn), fertilizer N (NF) and crop N uptake (NU) were obtained for the pre-modernization (T-irr) and post-modernization (S-Irr) scenarios. The I was 31% lower in S-Irr (20.7 Mm3/yr) than in T-Irr (30.2 Mm3/yr) (P0.05). After modernization, the irrigation water use efficiency (WUEI =Y/I) increased in corn (1.21 to 1.88 kg/m3), alfalfa (1.38 to 1.87 kg/m3), and cereals (1.71 to 3.63 kg/m3), whereas the consumptive water use efficiency (WUEET=Y/ETa) increased in corn (1.36 to 1.78 kg/m3) and slightly decreased in alfalfa (1.76 to 1.46 kg/m3) and cereals (1.31 to 1.14 kg/m3). After modernization, NF applied to corn decreased from 431 to 338 kg N/ha, yield increased from 10.2 to 13.9 Mg/ha, and nitrogen use efficiency (NUEy=Y/NF) increased from 23.8 to 41.1 kg DM/kg N. Alfalfa yield (mean of 14.2 Mg/ha), alfalfa NF (47 kg N/ha), cereal yield (5.1 Mg/ha) and cereal NUEY (41.6 kg DM/kg N) were similar in T-Irr and S-Irr, but cereal NF decreased from 154 to 110 kg N/ha. Reductions in NF after modernization were due to the ability of sprinkler irrigation to apply water and N timely, but

  2. Estimated Colorado Golf Course Irrigation Water Use, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivahnenko, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Golf course irrigation water-use data were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Use Program's 2005 compilation to provide baseline information, as no golf course irrigation water-use data (separate from crop irrigation) have been reported in previous compilations. A Web-based survey, designed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rocky Mountain Golf Course Superintendents Association (RMGCSA), was electronically distributed by the association to the 237 members in Colorado. Forty-three percent of the members returned the survey, and additional source water information was collected by telephone for all but 20 of the 245 association member and non-member Colorado golf courses. For golf courses where no data were collected at all, an average 'per hole' coefficient, based on returned surveys from that same county, were applied. In counties where no data were collected at all, a State average 'per hole' value of 13.2 acre-feet was used as the coefficient. In 2005, Colorado had 243 turf golf courses (there are 2 sand courses in the State) that had an estimated 2.27 acre-feet per irrigated course acre, and 65 percent of the source water for these courses was surface water. Ground water, potable water (public supply), and reclaimed wastewater, either partially or wholly, were source waters for the remaining courses. Fifty-three of the 64 counties in Colorado have at least one golf course, with the greatest number of courses in Jefferson (23 courses), Arapahoe (22 courses), and El Paso Counties (20 courses). In 2005, an estimated 5,647.8 acre-feet in Jefferson County, 5,402 acre-feet in Arapahoe County, and 4,473.3 acre-feet in El Paso County were used to irrigate the turf grass.

  3. Agricultural practices and irrigation water demand in Uttar Pradesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, J.; Buytaert, W.; Brozovic, N.; Mijic, A.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in farming practices within Uttar Pradesh, particularly advances in irrigation technology, have led to a significant drop in water tables across the region. While the acquisition of monitoring data in India is a challenge, current water use practices point towards water overdraught. This is exacerbated by government and state policies and practices, including the subsidising of electricity, seeds and fertilizer, and an agreement to buy all crops grown, promoting the over use of water resources. Taking India's predicted population growth, increases in industrialisation and climate change into account, both farmland and the water resources it depends upon will be subject to increased pressures in the future. This research is centred around irrigation demands on water resources within Uttar Pradesh, and in particular, quantifying those demands both spatially and temporally. Two aspects of this will be presented; the quantification of irrigation water applied and the characterisation of the spatial heterogeneity of water use practices. Calculating the volumes of applied irrigation water in the absence of observed data presents a major challenge and is achieved here through the use of crop models. Regional crop yields provided by statistical yearbooks are replicated by the crop models AquaCrop and InfoCrop, and by doing so the amount of irrigation water needed to produce the published yields is quantified. In addition, proxy information, for example electrical consumption for agricultural use, is used to verify the likely volumes of water abstracted from tubewells. Statistical analyses of borehole distribution and the characterisation of the spatial heterogeneity of water use practices, particularly farmer decision making, collected during a field trip are also presented. The evolution of agricultural practices, technological advancement and water use for irrigation is reconstructed through the use of multiple regression and principle component analysis

  4. Behavioural modelling of irrigation decision making under water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Brozovic, N.; Butler, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Providing effective policy solutions to aquifer depletion caused by abstraction for irrigation is a key challenge for socio-hydrology. However, most crop production functions used in hydrological models do not capture the intraseasonal nature of irrigation planning, or the importance of well yield in land and water use decisions. Here we develop a method for determining stochastic intraseasonal water use that is based on observed farmer behaviour but is also theoretically consistent with dynamically optimal decision making. We use the model to (i) analyse the joint land and water use decision by farmers; (ii) to assess changes in behaviour and production risk in response to water scarcity; and (iii) to understand the limits of applicability of current methods in policy design. We develop a biophysical model of water-limited crop yield building on the AquaCrop model. The model is calibrated and applied to case studies of irrigated corn production in Nebraska and Texas. We run the model iteratively, using long-term climate records, to define two formulations of the crop-water production function: (i) the aggregate relationship between total seasonal irrigation and yield (typical of current approaches); and (ii) the stochastic response of yield and total seasonal irrigation to the choice of an intraseasonal soil moisture target and irrigated area. Irrigated area (the extensive margin decision) and per-area irrigation intensity (the intensive margin decision) are then calculated for different seasonal water restrictions (corresponding to regulatory policies) and well yield constraints on intraseasonal abstraction rates (corresponding to aquifer system limits). Profit- and utility-maximising decisions are determined assuming risk neutrality and varying degrees of risk aversion, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the formulation of the production function has a significant impact on the response to water scarcity. For low well yields, which are the major concern

  5. Ground-water resources of Riverton irrigation project area, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, Donald Arthur; Hackett, O.M.; Vanlier, K.E.; Moulder, E.A.; Durum, W.H.

    1959-01-01

    The Riverton irrigation project area is in the northwestern part of the Wind River basin in west-central Wyoming. Because the annual precipitation is only about 9 inches, agriculture, which is the principal occupation in the area, is dependent upon irrigation. Irrigation by surface-water diversion was begum is 1906; water is now supplied to 77,716 acres and irrigation has been proposed for an additional 31,344 acres. This study of the geology and ground-water resources of the Riverton irrigation project, of adjacent irrigated land, and of nearby land proposed for irrigation was begun during the summer of 1948 and was completed in 1951. The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the ground-water resources of the area and to study the factors that should be considered in the solution of drainage and erosional problems within the area. The Riverton irrigation project area is characterized by flat to gently sloping stream terraces, which are flanked by a combination of badlands, pediment slopes, and broad valleys. These features were formed by long-continued erosion in an arid climate of the essentially horizontal, poorly consolidated beds of the Wind River formation. The principal streams of the area flow south-eastward. Wind River and Fivemile Creek are perennial streams and the others are intermittent. Ground-water discharge and irrigation return flow have created a major problem in erosion control along Fivemile Creek. Similar conditions might develop along Muddy and lower Cottonwood Creeks when land in their drainage basins is irrigated. The bedrock exposed in the area ranges in age from Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (middle Eocene). The Wind River formation of early and middle Eocene age forms the uppermost bedrock formation in the greater part of the area. Unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age, which consist of terrace gravel, colluvium, eolian sand and silt. and alluvium, mantle the Wind River formation in much of the area. In the irrigated parts

  6. Climate change and the water cycle in newly irrigated areas.

    PubMed

    Abrahão, Raphael; García-Garizábal, Iker; Merchán, Daniel; Causapé, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Climate change is affecting agriculture doubly: evapotranspiration is increasing due to increments in temperature while the availability of water resources is decreasing. Furthermore, irrigated areas are expanding worldwide. In this study, the dynamics of climate change impacts on the water cycle of a newly irrigated watershed are studied through the calculation of soil water balances. The study area was a 752-ha watershed located on the left side of the Ebro river valley, in Northeast Spain. The soil water balance procedures were carried out throughout 1827 consecutive days (5 years) of hydrological and agronomical monitoring in the study area. Daily data from two agroclimatic stations were used as well. Evaluation of the impact of climate change on the water cycle considered the creation of two future climate scenarios for comparison: 2070 decade with climate change and 2070 decade without climate change. The main indicators studied were precipitation, irrigation, reference evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, drainage from the watershed, and irrigation losses. The aridity index was also applied. The results represent a baseline scenario in which adaptation measures may be included and tested to reduce the impacts of climate change in the studied area and other similar areas.

  7. Water required, water used, and potential water sources for rice irrigation, north coast of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roman-Mas, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    A 3-yr investigation was conducted to determine the water required and used (both consumed and applied) for irrigation in the rice-growing areas of Vega Baja, Manati, and Arecibo along the north coast. In addition, the investigation evaluated the water resources of each area with regard to the full development of rice farming areas. Based on experiments conducted at selected test farms, water required ranged from 3.13 to 5.25 acre-ft/acre/crop. The amount of water required varies with the wet and dry seasons. Rainfall was capable of supplying from 31 to 70% of the water required for the measured crop cycles. Statistical analyses demonstrated that as much as 95% of rainfall is potentially usable for rice irrigation. The amount of water consumed differed from the quantity required at selected test farms. The difference between the amount of water consumed and that required was due to unaccounted losses or gains, seepage to and from the irrigation and drainage canals, and lateral leakage through levees. Due to poor water-management practices, the amount of water applied to the farms was considerably larger than the sum of the water requirement and the unaccounted losses or gains. Rivers within the rice growing areas constitute the major water supply for rice irrigation. Full development of these areas will require more water than the rivers can supply. Efficient use of rainfall can significantly reduce the water demand from streamflow. The resulting water demand, however, would still be in excess of the amount available from streamflow. Groundwater development in the area is limited because of seawater intrusion in the aquifers underlying the rice-growing areas. Capture of seepage to the aquifers using wells located near streams, artificial recharge, and development of the deep artesian system can provide additional water for rice irrigation. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Irrigation management using an expert system, soil water potentials, and vegetative indices for spatial applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems are irrigation systems that are capable of applying different water depths both in the direction of travel and along the length of the irrigation system. However, when compared to traditional irrigation systems, VRI systems require a higher level of management...

  9. Use of saline and recycled water as an alternative irrigation water supply: Chemical and agronomic considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predictions of increased occurrences of drought in the SW U.S. coupled with increasing urban demands for fresh water have resulted in projections of decreased irrigated acreage. However, agriculture can utilize saline, drainage and treated municipal and industrial waste waters for irrigation of many...

  10. Stewardship of water and fertilizer in irrigated cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture is a vital part of the southeast Missouri economy and it is essential that we maintain our precious soil and water resources. While we have shallow, high quality groundwater for irrigation, it is important to realize that our aquifer, the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer, also p...

  11. Sample container and storage for paclobutrazol monitoring in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paclobutrazol is a plant growth retardant commonly used on greenhouse crops. Residues from paclobutrazol applications can accumulate in recirculated irrigation water. Given that paclobutrazol has a long half-life and potential biological activity in parts per billion concentrations, it would be de...

  12. PATHOGENIC PHYTOPHTHORA SPECIES IN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY IRRIGATION WATER SOURCES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface sources of irrigation water including the Kings River and three canals were assayed for Phytophthora spp. at six locations in the San Joaquin Valley within 30 km of Hanford, CA. Four nylon-mesh bags, each containing three firm, green pear fruits (separated by Styrofoam blocks) as bait for Ph...

  13. Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Imagery for Irrigation Water Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nellis, M. Duane

    1985-01-01

    Water resources play a major role in the character of agricultural development in the arid western United States. This case study shows how thermal infrared imagery, which is sensitive to radiant or heat energy, can be used to interpret crop moisture content and associated stress in irrigated areas. (RM)

  14. Impact of reclaimed water irrigation on soil health in urban green areas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiping; Lu, Sidan; Pan, Neng; Wang, Yanchun; Wu, Laosheng

    2015-01-01

    Rapid increase of reclaimed water irrigation in urban green areas requires investigating its impact on soil health conditions. In this research, field study was conducted in 7 parks in Beijing with different histories of reclaimed water irrigation. Twenty soil attributes were analyzed to evaluate the effects of reclaimed water irrigation on the soil health conditions. Results showed that soil nutrient conditions were ameliorated by reclaimed water irrigation, as indicated by the increase of soil organic matter content (SOM), total nitrogen (TN), and available phosphorus (AP). No soil salinization but a slight soil alkalization was observed under reclaimed water irrigation. Accumulation of heavy metals in soil was insignificant. It was also observed that reclaimed water irrigation could significantly improve the soil microorganism activities. Overall, the soil health conditions were improved with reclaimed water irrigation, and the improvement increased when the reclaimed water irrigation period became longer.

  15. Comparison of Irrigation Water Use Estimates Calculated from Remotely Sensed Irrigated Acres and State Reported Irrigated Acres in the Lake Altus Drainage Basin, Oklahoma and Texas, 2000 Growing Season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, J.R.; Mladinich, C.S.; Konduris, A.M.; Smith, S. Jerrod

    2003-01-01

    Increased demand for water in the Lake Altus drainage basin requires more accurate estimates of water use for irrigation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, is investigating new techniques to improve water-use estimates for irrigation purposes in the Lake Altus drainage basin. Empirical estimates of reference evapotranspiration, crop evapotranspiration, and crop irrigation water requirements for nine major crops were calculated from September 1999 to October 2000 using a solar radiation-based evapotranspiration model. Estimates of irrigation water use were calculated using remotely sensed irrigated crop acres derived from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery and were compared with irrigation water-use estimates calculated from irrigated crop acres reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Texas Water Development Board for the 2000 growing season. The techniques presented will help manage water resources in the Lake Altus drainage basin and may be transferable to other areas with similar water management needs. Irrigation water use calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was estimated at 154,920 acre-feet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated crop acres was 196,026 acre-feet, a 23 percent difference. The greatest difference in irrigation water use was in Carson County, Texas. Irrigation water use for Carson County, Texas, calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was 58,555 acrefeet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated acres was 138,180 acre-feet, an 81 percent difference. The second greatest difference in irrigation water use occurred in Beckham County, Oklahoma. Differences between the two irrigation water use estimates are due to the differences of irrigated crop acres derived from the mapping process and those reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and Texas Water Development Board.

  16. Analytical steady-state solutions for water-limited cropping systems using saline irrigation water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaggs, T. H.; Anderson, R. G.; Corwin, D. L.; Suarez, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the diminishing availability of good quality water for irrigation, it is increasingly important that irrigation and salinity management tools be able to target submaximal crop yields and support the use of marginal quality waters. In this work, we present a steady-state irrigated systems modeling framework that accounts for reduced plant water uptake due to root zone salinity. Two explicit, closed-form analytical solutions for the root zone solute concentration profile are obtained, corresponding to two alternative functional forms of the uptake reduction function. The solutions express a general relationship between irrigation water salinity, irrigation rate, crop salt tolerance, crop transpiration, and (using standard approximations) crop yield. Example applications are illustrated, including the calculation of irrigation requirements for obtaining targeted submaximal yields, and the generation of crop-water production functions for varying irrigation waters, irrigation rates, and crops. Model predictions are shown to be mostly consistent with existing models and available experimental data. Yet the new solutions possess advantages over available alternatives, including: (i) the solutions were derived from a complete physical-mathematical description of the system, rather than based on an ad hoc formulation; (ii) the analytical solutions are explicit and can be evaluated without iterative techniques; (iii) the solutions permit consideration of two common functional forms of salinity induced reductions in crop water uptake, rather than being tied to one particular representation; and (iv) the utilized modeling framework is compatible with leading transient-state numerical models.

  17. Where Does the Irrigation Water Go? An Estimate of the Contribution of Irrigation to Precipitation Using MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jiangfeng; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Wisser, Dominik; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Mocko, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Irrigation is an important human activity that may impact local and regional climate, but current climate model simulations and data assimilation systems generally do not explicitly include it. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) shows more irrigation signal in surface evapotranspiration (ET) than the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) because ERA-Interim adjusts soil moisture according to the observed surface temperature and humidity while MERRA has no explicit consideration of irrigation at the surface. But, when compared with the results from a hydrological model with detailed considerations of agriculture, the ET from both reanalyses show large deficiencies in capturing the impact of irrigation. Here, a back-trajectory method is used to estimate the contribution of irrigation to precipitation over local and surrounding regions, using MERRA with observation-based corrections and added irrigation-caused ET increase from the hydrological model. Results show substantial contributions of irrigation to precipitation over heavily irrigated regions in Asia, but the precipitation increase is much less than the ET increase over most areas, indicating that irrigation could lead to water deficits over these regions. For the same increase in ET, precipitation increases are larger over wetter areas where convection is more easily triggered, but the percentage increase in precipitation is similar for different areas. There are substantial regional differences in the patterns of irrigation impact, but, for all the studied regions, the highest percentage contribution to precipitation is over local land.

  18. Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

  19. Estimated Domestic, Irrigation, and Industrial Water Use in Washington, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey has published a series of Circulars and other reports on the estimated use of water in the United States at 5-year intervals. This report presents State, regional, and county estimates of the amount of water used for domestic, irrigation, and industrial purposes in the State of Washington during the year 2000. Domestic water use was estimated to be 674 million gallons per day and the per-capita rate, 114 gallons per day. Crop-irrigation water use was estimated to be 3,005 million gallons per day and the application rate, 2.2 acre-feet per acre per year, or feet per year. Golf-course irrigation water use was estimated to be 23.6 million gallons per day and the application rate, 1.4 feet per year. Industrial water use was estimated to be 681 million gallons per day. Historically, these core categories account for about 92 percent of the estimated offstream water used in Washington.

  20. Food security, irrigation, climate change, and water scarcity in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, T. W.; Taheripour, F.; Gopalakrishnan, B. N.; Sahin, S.; Escurra, J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper uses an advanced CGE model (Taheripour et al., 2013) coupled with hydrological projections of future water scarcity and biophysical data on likely crop yields under climate change to examine how water scarcity, climate change, and trade jointly alter land use changes across the Indian subcontinent. Climate shocks to rainfed and irrigated yields in 2030 are based on the p-DSSAT crop model, RCP 2.6, as reported under the AgMIP project (Rosenzweig et al., 2013), accessed through GEOSHARE (Villoria et al, 2014). Results show that, when water scarcity is ignored, irrigated areas grow in the wake of climate change as the returns to irrigation rise faster than for rainfed uses of land within a given agro-ecological zone. When non-agricultural competition for future water use, as well as anticipated supply side limitations are brought into play (Rosegrant et al., 2013), the opportunity cost of water rises across all river basins, with the increase ranging from 12% (Luni) to 44% (Brahmaputra). As a consequence, irrigated crop production is curtailed in most regions (Figure 1), with the largest reductions coming in the most water intensive crops, namely rice and wheat. By reducing irrigated area, which tends to have much higher yields, the combined effects of water scarcity and climate impacts require an increase in total cropped area, which rises by about 240,000 ha. The majority of this area expansion occurs in the Ganges, Indus, and Brahmari river basins. Overall crop output falls by about 2 billion, relative to the 2030 baseline, with imports rising by about 570 million. The combined effects of climate change and water scarcity for irrigation also have macro-economic consequences, resulting in a 0.28% reduction in GDP and an increase in the consumer price index by about 0.4% in 2030, compared the baseline. The national welfare impact on India amounts to roughly 3 billion (at 2007 prices) in 2030. Assuming a 3% social discount rate, the net present value of the

  1. PERCHLORATE CROP INTERACTIONS VIA CONTAMINATED IRRIGATION WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and sods at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground- and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of un...

  2. Assessment of reclaimed water irrigation on growth, yield, and water-use efficiency of forage crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhamisi, S. A.; Abdelrahman, H. A.; Ahmed, M.; Goosen, M. F. A.

    2011-09-01

    Field experiments were conducted to determine the effect of water quality (reclaimed and fresh water), water quantity, and their interactions on the growth, yield, and water use efficiency of forage maize during two winter seasons in the Arabian Gulf. The plants irrigated with the reclaimed water had higher plant height than those irrigated with the fresh water. The leaf length and leaf area (cm2) did not show any significant differences among the interaction. Reclaimed water had shorter time for 50% male and female flowering of forage maize plants, indicating earlier maturity. Plants irrigated with reclaimed water had higher chlorophyll content for all levels of water applications. A significant difference in green forage yield was found among the interactions. Reclaimed water gave the highest green forage yield of 72.12 and 59.40 t/ha at 1.4ETo and 1.0ETo, respectively. Plants irrigated with the reclaimed water used water more efficiently [3.65 kg/m3 of DM (dry matter)] than those irrigated with the fresh water [2.91 kg/m3 of DM (dry matter)] for all water quantities. The enhanced growth in wastewater-irrigated crops, compared with fresh water-irrigated crops, was attributed primarily to higher nutrient content (e.g., nitrogen) and lower salinity of the reclaimed water. The study concluded that treated wastewater irrigation increased yields of forage crops and their water use efficiency. Cost-benefit analysis, studies on the use these forage crops as animal feed, and more in depth evaluation of possible crop and soil contamination were recommended.

  3. Incentives and technologies for improving irrigation water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Adriana; Djuma, Hakan; Giannakis, Elias; Eliades, Marinos

    2014-05-01

    The European Water Framework Directive requires Member States to set water prices that provide adequate incentives for users to use water resources efficiently. These new water pricing policies need to consider cost recovery of water services, including financial, environmental and resource cost. Prices were supposed to have been set by 2010. So far the record has been mixed. The European Commission has sent reasoned opinions to a number of countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Sweden) requesting them to adjust their national legislation to include all water services. Unbalanced water pricing may negatively affect the agricultural sector, especially in the southern EU countries, which are more dependent on irrigation water for production. The European Commission is funding several projects that aim to reduce the burden of increasing water prices on farmers by developing innovative technologies and decision support systems that will save water and increase productivity. The FP7 ENORASIS project (grant 282949) has developed a new integrated irrigation management decision support platform, which include high-resolution, ensemble weather forecasting, a GIS widget for the location of fields and sensors and a comprehensive decision support and database management software package to optimize irrigation water management. The field component includes wireless, solar-powered soil moisture sensors, small weather stations, and remotely controlled irrigation valves. A mobile App and a web-package are providing user-friendly interfaces for farmers, water companies and environmental consultants. In Cyprus, agricultural water prices have been set to achieve a cost recovery rate of 54% (2010). The pricing policy takes in consideration the social importance and financial viability of the agricultural sector, an important flexibility provided by the Water Framework Directive. The new price was set at 0.24 euro per m3 for water supply

  4. Integrated water resource management under water supply and irrigation development uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, E.; Elshorbagy, A. A.; Nazemi, A.; Wheater, H. S.; Gober, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Saskatchewan River Basin (SaskRB) in Saskatchewan, Canada, supports various water demands including municipal, industrial, irrigated agriculture, hydropower and environmental sectors. Proposals for future development include significantly increased irrigation. However, proposing an appropriate level of irrigation development requires incorporation of water supply uncertainties in the water resources management analysis, including effects of climate variability and change. To evaluate potential climate change effects, a feasible range of shifts in annual volume and peak timing of headwater flows are considered to stochastically generate flows at the Alberta/Saskatchewan border. This envelope of flows, 30,800 realizations, is further combined with various irrigation expansion areas to form various future scenarios. Using an integrated water resources model developed for Saskatchewan, the impact of irrigation development on the system is assessed under the changing water supply conditions. The results of this study show that level of irrigation development as well as variation in volume and peak timing of flows can all contribute to change the water availability, vulnerability and economic productivity of the water resources system in Saskatchewan. In particular, the combined effect of large irrigation expansion, reduction in the volume of flows and earlier timing of the annual peak can exacerbate water resources system vulnerability, produce unstable net revenues, and decrease flood frequency in the Saskatchewan River Delta.

  5. National Irrigation Water Quality Program data-synthesis data base

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, Ralph L.; Skorupa, Joseph P.

    2001-01-01

    Under the National Irrigation Water Quality Program (NIWQP) of the U.S. Department of the Interior, researchers investigated contamination caused by irrigation drainage in 26 areas in the Western United States from 1986 to 1993. From 1992 to 1995, a comprehensive relational data base was built to organize data collected during the 26-area investigations. The data base provided the basis for analysis and synthesis of these data to identify common features of contaminated areas and hence dominant biologic, geologic, climatic, chemical, and physiographic factors that have resulted in contamination of water and biota in irrigated areas in the Western United States. Included in the data base are geologic, hydrologic, climatological, chemical, and cultural data that describe the 26 study areas in 14 Western States. The data base contains information on 1,264 sites from which water and bottom sediment were collected. It also contains chemical data from 6,903 analyses of surface water, 914 analyses of ground water, 707 analyses of inorganic constituents in bottom sediments, 223 analyses of organochlorine pesticides in bottom sediments, 8,217 analyses of inorganic constituents in biota, and 1,088 analyses for organic constituents in biota. The data base is available to the public and can be obtained at the NIWQP homepage http://www.usbr.gov/niwqp as dBase III tables for personal-computer systems or as American Standard Code for Information Exchange structured query language (SQL) command and data files for SQL data bases.

  6. Yield and Irrigation Water Use Efficiency Response of Chufa (Cyperus esculentus L. var. sativus Boeck.) to Drip Irrigation Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Seva, Nuria; San Bautista, Alberto; López-Galarza, Salvador; Maroto, José Vicente; Pascual, Bernardo

    2016-04-01

    Chufa, also known as tigernut, is a typical crop in Valencia, Spain, where it is cultivated in ridges with furrow irrigation. Its cultivation uses large amounts of water, in the order of 10,000 m3 ha-1 year-1, so different studies have been undertaken in order to maximize the irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE). One of these studies faced the application of drip irrigation in the chufa cultivation, comparing three different irrigation strategies. These strategies differed on the volumetric soil water content (VSWC) when each irrigation event started. Starting each irrigation when the VSWC dropped to 90% of field capacity (FC) leaded to the highest yield, while the highest IWUE was obtained when irrigation started at 80% FC. It can be stated that starting each irrigation event when the VSWC is between 80 and 90% FC leads to the best results in terms of yield and IWUE. However, these results may still be improved by defining the best strategy in the irrigation stop, which is the aim of the herein presented research. This investigation comprises the productive response of the chufa crop with drip irrigation, determining yield and IWUE. The VSWC was monitored using multi-depth capacitance probes, with sensors at 0.10, 0.20 and 0.30 m below the top of the ridge. Each irrigation event started when the volumetric soil water content at 0.10 m dropped to 85% FC. Three irrigation strategies were considered, T1: each event being stopped when the average of the VSWC values at 0.10, 0.20 and 0.30 m depth reached the corresponding FC value; T2: each event being stopped when the VSWC values at 0.20 m reached the corresponding FC value; T3 each irrigation event lasted 30 min (corresponding to 7.33 mm). The largest yield (P ≤0.05) was obtained in T2 (2.31 kg m-2), with no statistical differences (P ≤0.05) between T1 (1.94 kg m-2) and T3 (1.92 kg m-2). The highest yield in T2 was obtained with the largest volume of irrigation water applied (722 mm), resulting in the lowest (P

  7. Balancing water scarcity and quality for sustainable irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Russo, David; Silber, Avner; Or, Dani

    2015-05-01

    The challenge of meeting the projected doubling of global demand for food by 2050 is monumental. It is further exacerbated by the limited prospects for land expansion and rapidly dwindling water resources. A promising strategy for increasing crop yields per unit land requires the expansion of irrigated agriculture and the harnessing of water sources previously considered "marginal" (saline, treated effluent, and desalinated water). Such an expansion, however, must carefully consider potential long-term risks on soil hydroecological functioning. The study provides critical analyses of use of marginal water and management approaches to map out potential risks. Long-term application of treated effluent (TE) for irrigation has shown adverse impacts on soil transport properties, and introduces certain health risks due to the persistent exposure of soil biota to anthropogenic compounds (e.g., promoting antibiotic resistance). The availability of desalinated water (DS) for irrigation expands management options and improves yields while reducing irrigation amounts and salt loading into the soil. Quantitative models are used to delineate trends associated with long-term use of TE and DS considering agricultural, hydrological, and environmental aspects. The primary challenges to the sustainability of agroecosystems lies with the hazards of saline and sodic conditions, and the unintended consequences on soil hydroecological functioning. Multidisciplinary approaches that combine new scientific knowhow with legislative, economic, and societal tools are required to ensure safe and sustainable use of water resources of different qualities. The new scientific knowhow should provide quantitative models for integrating key biophysical processes with ecological interactions at appropriate spatial and temporal scales.

  8. [Effects of tilage mode and deficit irrigation on the yield and water use of transplanted cotton following wheat harvest under sprinkler irrigation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Sun, Jing-Sheng; Zhang, Ji-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Peng; Shen, Xiao-Jun

    2012-02-01

    To develop a suitable tillage mode and irrigation schedule of transplanted cotton following wheat harvest under sprinkler irrigation, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different tillage modes (conventional tillage and no-tillage) and different irrigation schedules (45 and 22.5 mm of irrigating water quota) on the water consumption, seed yield, water use efficiency, and fiber quality of cotton. Comparing with conventional tillage, no-tillage decreased the soil evaporation among cotton plants by 20.3%. Whether with conventional tillage or with no-tillage, deficit irrigation (22.5 mm of irrigating water quota) did not affect seed yield and fiber quality, while decreased the water consumption and improved the water use efficiency. No-tillage with 22.5 mm of irrigating water quota under sprinkler irrigation not only decreased the soil evaporation effectively, but also achieved water-saving, high quality and high yield of transplanted cotton following wheat harvest. PMID:22586963

  9. [Effects of tilage mode and deficit irrigation on the yield and water use of transplanted cotton following wheat harvest under sprinkler irrigation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Sun, Jing-Sheng; Zhang, Ji-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Peng; Shen, Xiao-Jun

    2012-02-01

    To develop a suitable tillage mode and irrigation schedule of transplanted cotton following wheat harvest under sprinkler irrigation, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different tillage modes (conventional tillage and no-tillage) and different irrigation schedules (45 and 22.5 mm of irrigating water quota) on the water consumption, seed yield, water use efficiency, and fiber quality of cotton. Comparing with conventional tillage, no-tillage decreased the soil evaporation among cotton plants by 20.3%. Whether with conventional tillage or with no-tillage, deficit irrigation (22.5 mm of irrigating water quota) did not affect seed yield and fiber quality, while decreased the water consumption and improved the water use efficiency. No-tillage with 22.5 mm of irrigating water quota under sprinkler irrigation not only decreased the soil evaporation effectively, but also achieved water-saving, high quality and high yield of transplanted cotton following wheat harvest.

  10. Soil quality assessment of urban green space under long-term reclaimed water irrigation.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Sidan; Chen, Weiping

    2016-03-01

    Reclaimed water is widely used for landscape irrigation with the benefits of saving fresh water and ameliorating soil quality. Field samples were collected from seven parks in Beijing irrigated reclaimed water with different irrigation history in 2011 and 2014 to evaluate the long-term impacts of reclaimed water irrigation on soil quality. Soil quality index method was used to assess the comprehensive effects of reclaimed water irrigation on soil. Results showed that the effects of reclaimed water irrigation on the soil nutrient conditions were limited. Compared with tap water irrigation, soil salinity was significantly higher in 2011, while the difference was insignificant in 2014; soil heavy metals were slightly higher by 0.5-10.6 % in 2011 and 2014, while the differences were insignificant. Under reclaimed water irrigation, soil biological activities were significantly improved in both years. Total nitrogen in reclaimed water had a largest effect on soil quality irrigated reclaimed water. Soil quality irrigated with reclaimed water increased by 2.6 and 6.8 % respectively in 2011 and 2014, while the increases were insignificant. Soil quality of almost half samples was more than or closed to soil quality of natural forest in Beijing. Soil quality was ameliorated at some extent with long-term reclaimed water irrigation. PMID:26527339

  11. Soil quality assessment of urban green space under long-term reclaimed water irrigation.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Sidan; Chen, Weiping

    2016-03-01

    Reclaimed water is widely used for landscape irrigation with the benefits of saving fresh water and ameliorating soil quality. Field samples were collected from seven parks in Beijing irrigated reclaimed water with different irrigation history in 2011 and 2014 to evaluate the long-term impacts of reclaimed water irrigation on soil quality. Soil quality index method was used to assess the comprehensive effects of reclaimed water irrigation on soil. Results showed that the effects of reclaimed water irrigation on the soil nutrient conditions were limited. Compared with tap water irrigation, soil salinity was significantly higher in 2011, while the difference was insignificant in 2014; soil heavy metals were slightly higher by 0.5-10.6 % in 2011 and 2014, while the differences were insignificant. Under reclaimed water irrigation, soil biological activities were significantly improved in both years. Total nitrogen in reclaimed water had a largest effect on soil quality irrigated reclaimed water. Soil quality irrigated with reclaimed water increased by 2.6 and 6.8 % respectively in 2011 and 2014, while the increases were insignificant. Soil quality of almost half samples was more than or closed to soil quality of natural forest in Beijing. Soil quality was ameliorated at some extent with long-term reclaimed water irrigation.

  12. Optimal irrigation water allocation for a center pivot using remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Esfahani, L.; McKee, M.

    2013-12-01

    Efficient irrigation can help avoid crop water stress, undesirable leaching of nutrients, and yield reduction due to water shortage, and runoff and soil erosion due to over irrigation. Gains in water use efficiency can be achieved when water application is precisely matched to the spatially distributed crop water demand. This is important to produce high quality crops and otherwise conserve water for greatest efficiency of use. Irrigation efficiency is a term which defines irrigation performance based on indicators such as irrigation uniformity, crop production, economic return and water resources sustainability. The present paper introduces a modeling approach for optimal water allocation to a center pivot irrigation unit in consideration of these types of indicators. Landsat images, weather data and field measurements were used to develop a soil water balance model using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The model includes two main modules, one for soil water forecasting and one for optimization of water allocation. The optimization module uses Genetic Algorithms (GA) to identify optimal crop water application rates based on the crop type, growing stage and sensitivity to water stress. The forecasting module allocates water through time across the area covered by the center pivot considering the results from the previous period of irrigation and the operational limitations of the center pivot irrigation system. The model was tested for a farm equipped with a modern sprinkler irrigation system in Scipio, Utah. The solution obtained from the model used up to 30 percent less water without reducing the benefits realized by the irrigator than traditional operating procedures.

  13. Microbiological irrigation water quality of the Marchfeld canal system.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, F; Makristathis, A; Hassl, A; Nowotny, S; Neudorfer, W

    2001-07-01

    The Marchfeld basin with a size of approximately 1000 km2 represents the Austrian "granary". To prevent shortage of water as a result of increased ground water removal for irrigation, industrial purposes and drinking water supply, a canal being 18 km in length was constructed from the Danube to the center of the Marchfeld. From there, water is further distributed via two creeks (Russbach and Stempfelbach). This study was intended to evaluate whether the surface water of the Marchfeld canal system can be classified into hygienic-microbiological categories as proposed by DIN (Deutsche Industrienorm) standards for irrigation water. For this purpose, water sampled monthly from three different sampling sites from 1996 to 1999 was examined for E. coli and enterococci. In addition, water samples were examined for salmonella twice a year from 1996 to 1998 and for cryptosporidia six times during the year 1999. Though the water showed varying degrees of fecal load, the results of the examinations revealed that only one of the three sampling sites showed constant quality levels according to the DIN classification system over prolonged periods of time. However, exceeding of the limit values was occasionally observed indicating the need for regular bacteriological examinations. The high variation of the results from the other sampling sites hardly permits a definite classification in one of the quality classes. PMID:11556148

  14. Irrigation water demand: A meta-analysis of price elasticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheierling, Susanne M.; Loomis, John B.; Young, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Metaregression models are estimated to investigate sources of variation in empirical estimates of the price elasticity of irrigation water demand. Elasticity estimates are drawn from 24 studies reported in the United States since 1963, including mathematical programming, field experiments, and econometric studies. The mean price elasticity is 0.48. Long-run elasticities, those that are most useful for policy purposes, are likely larger than the mean estimate. Empirical results suggest that estimates may be more elastic if they are derived from mathematical programming or econometric studies and calculated at a higher irrigation water price. Less elastic estimates are found to be derived from models based on field experiments and in the presence of high-valued crops.

  15. Quantifying crop water stress factors from soil water measurements in a limited irrigation experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying crop water stress factors from soil water measurements in a limited irrigation experiment. A correct simulation of crop responses to water stress is essential for a system model. In this study, we investigated three methods of quantifying water deficit stresses based on soil water meas...

  16. Irrigation in water restricted regions: Managing water use efficiency with limited available water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Political and social pressures to increase water-use efficiency in agriculture from plant to regional scales are reaching critical levels. A region where these pressures have been extremely acute is most semi-arid parts of Texas where reliable crop production is possible only through irrigation. Re...

  17. Field kites: Crop-water production functions and the timing of water application for supplementary irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilovic, M.; Gleeson, T.; Adamowski, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural production is directly related to water management and water supply. The temporal distribution of water use throughout the growing season can significantly influence crop yield, and the facility to manage both the timing and amount of irrigation water may result in higher yields. The crop-water production function quantitatively evaluates the relationship between seasonal water use and crop yield. Previous efforts have attempted to describe and formalize the crop-water production function as a single-variable function of seasonal water use. However, these representations do not account for the effects of temporal distribution of water use and trivialize the associated variability in yields by assuming an optimized or arbitrary temporal distribution of soil moisture. This over-simplification renders the function inappropriate for recommendations related to irrigation scheduling, water management, economically optimal irrigation, water and agricultural productivity, and assessing the role of full and supplementary irrigation. We propose field kites, a novel representation of the crop-water production function that explicitly acknowledges crop yield variability as a function of both seasonal water use and associated temporal distributions of water use. Field kites are a tool that explicitly considers the farmers' capacity to manage their water resources, to more appropriately evaluate the optimal depth of irrigation water under water-limiting conditions. The field kite for winter wheat is presented both generally and cultivar- and climate-specific for Western Canada. The field kites are constructed using AquaCrop and previously validated cultivar-specific variables. Field kites provide the tools for water authorities and policy makers to evaluate agricultural production as it relates to farm water management, and to determine appropriate policies related to developing and supporting the necessary irrigation infrastructure to increase water productivity.

  18. Farm-level irrigation and the marginal cost of water use: evidence from Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Alvarez, Yassert; Keeler, Andrew G; Mullen, Jeffrey D

    2006-09-01

    We create a proxy for the cost of irrigation water in Georgia from a sample of Georgia irrigators by investigating the marginal cost of pumping groundwater. We then combine this proxy with agronomic and climatic variables to estimate the response of agricultural water use to differences in the marginal cost of irrigation. The results show that pumping costs are a significant determinant of water use, and imply that agricultural water use would be moderately affected by institutional changes that would explicitly price water.

  19. [Effects of sprinkler irrigation amount on winter wheat growth, water consumption, and water use efficiency].

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Peng; Huang, Guan-Hua; Liu, Hai-Jun; Wang, Xiang-Ping; Wang, Ming-Qiang

    2010-08-01

    In 2006-2008, a field experiment was conducted at the Tongzhou Experimental Base for Water-Saving Irrigation Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, aimed to study the effects of sprinkler irrigation amount on the growth, grain yield, water consumption, and water use efficiency of winter wheat. Different treatments were installed, with the irrigation amounts expressed by the multiples of the evaporation (E) from a standard 20-cm diameter pan placed above winter wheat canopy. The grain yield was the highest in treatment 0.75 E in 2006-2007 and in treatment 0.625 E in 2007-2008. In treatments with irrigation amount less than 0.25 E, winter wheat growth was subjected to water stress, and the yield loss was larger than 25%. The water consumption of winter wheat in the two growth seasons was in the range of 219-486 mm, and increased with increasing irrigation amount. The relationships between the grain yield and the water consumption and water use efficiency could be described by quadratic function. Sprinkler irrigation with an amount of 0.50-0.75 E was recommended for the winter wheat growth after its turning green stage in Beijing area. PMID:21043112

  20. Water content and water repellency in a field. Implications for irrigation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites, L. A.; de Rooij, G. H.; Salzman, S.; Allinson, G.; Stagnitti, F.; Carr, R.; Versace, V.; Struck, S.; March, T.

    2010-05-01

    The degree of water repellency of soil material depends on its water content. Irrigated soils preferably should be kept sufficiently wet to render the soil wettable, in order to prevent irrigation water bypassing the root zone. But if this leads to overirrigation, the risk of groundwater pollution increases. We applied three irrigation regimes to individual trees in a Eucalyptus plantation on water-repellent soil. The resulting unimodal distribution of shallow water contents produced a bimodal distribution in the degree of water repellency: at any location, the soil would most likely be either wettable, or strongly water-repellent. We developed a procedure to estimate from both distributions the area of wettable soil based on a population of locally determined water contents.

  1. New steady-state models for water-limited cropping systems using saline irrigation waters: Analytical solutions and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the diminishing availability of good quality water for irrigation, it is increasingly important that irrigation and salinity management tools be able to target submaximal crop yields and support the use of marginal quality waters. In this work, we present a steady-state irrigated systems mode...

  2. New steady-state models for water-limited cropping systems using saline irrigation waters: Analytical solutions and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the diminishing availability of good quality water for irrigation, it is increasingly important that irrigation and salinity management tools be able to target submaximal crop yields and support the use of marginal quality waters. In this work, we present a steady-state irrigated systems mod...

  3. Crops Demand-Side Irrigation Principle and Practice-The Innovation Irrigation Method to Save World's Water Supply in 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Y.

    2001-12-01

    More than 75% of the world's water suypply is used for irrigation. Currently the world's irrigation water use efficiency is less than 40%. If irrigation water use efficiency can be improved to 60% and higher, large quantity of water supply would be saved. In order to attend a higher irrigation water use efficiency in 21st century, an exammination of current irrigation principle and practice is needed. The current irrigation practice is based on the public water supply principle which uses the supply-side principle. Irrigation systems are designed by engineers, who design the irrigation systems to supply water to irrigation the farmlands at a scheduled frequency to support plant growth, they disregard the demand of water or not by the crops. This is the short-coming of the supply-side irrigation principle. Because it often over-irrigate the farmlands and frequently causes water logging and groundwater contammination. The principle of the demand-side crop irrigation is to satify the water demand of the crops when they need it and turn-off the water when their demand have been satisfied automatically. The advances in computer technology have given us the needed tools to fully accommodate the innovation and automation of the demand-side irrigation systems. The author expect to see a large amount of new hardwares on the market in 21st century. For example, the drip irrigation systems are in a position for changing into the demand-side irrigation systems readily. The emitters of the drip irrigation systems can be modified into the non-plugging and soil-misture tension sensing outlets to suit the demand-side irrigation principle to satisfy crops water demand and turn-off when the demand had been satified. Other innovative invention patents may be developed for sub-irrigation, sprinkler irrigation, border strip irrigation and furrow irrigation to solve the world's water supply shortage problems by means of the innovations in crop demand-side irrigation principle and

  4. Water balance and irrigation water pumping of Lake Merdada for potato farming in Dieng Highland, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Fadlillah, Lintang N; Widyastuti, M

    2016-08-01

    Lakes provide water resources for domestic use, livestock, irrigational use, etc. Water availability of lakes can be estimated using lake water balance. Lake water balance is calculated from the water input and output of a lake. Dieng Highland has several volcanic lakes in its surroundings. Lake Merdada in Dieng Highland has been experiencing extensive water pumping for several years more than other lakes in the surrounding area. It provides irrigation water for potato farming in Dieng Highland. The hydrological model of this lake has not been studied. The modeled water balance in this research uses primary data, i.e., bathymetric data, soil texture, and outflow discharge, as well as secondary data, i.e., rainfall, temperature, Landsat 7 ETM+ band 8 image, and land use. Water balance input components consist of precipitation on the surface area, surface (direct) runoff from the catchment area, and groundwater inflow and outflow (G net), while the output components consist of evaporation, river outflow, and irrigation. It shows that groundwater is the dominant input and output of the lake. On the other hand, the actual irrigation water pumping plays the leading role as human-induced alteration of outflow discharge. The maximum irrigation pumping modeling shows that it will decrease lake storage up to 37.14 % per month and may affect the ecosystem inside the lake. PMID:27384226

  5. Water balance and irrigation water pumping of Lake Merdada for potato farming in Dieng Highland, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Fadlillah, Lintang N; Widyastuti, M

    2016-08-01

    Lakes provide water resources for domestic use, livestock, irrigational use, etc. Water availability of lakes can be estimated using lake water balance. Lake water balance is calculated from the water input and output of a lake. Dieng Highland has several volcanic lakes in its surroundings. Lake Merdada in Dieng Highland has been experiencing extensive water pumping for several years more than other lakes in the surrounding area. It provides irrigation water for potato farming in Dieng Highland. The hydrological model of this lake has not been studied. The modeled water balance in this research uses primary data, i.e., bathymetric data, soil texture, and outflow discharge, as well as secondary data, i.e., rainfall, temperature, Landsat 7 ETM+ band 8 image, and land use. Water balance input components consist of precipitation on the surface area, surface (direct) runoff from the catchment area, and groundwater inflow and outflow (G net), while the output components consist of evaporation, river outflow, and irrigation. It shows that groundwater is the dominant input and output of the lake. On the other hand, the actual irrigation water pumping plays the leading role as human-induced alteration of outflow discharge. The maximum irrigation pumping modeling shows that it will decrease lake storage up to 37.14 % per month and may affect the ecosystem inside the lake.

  6. SEBAL Model Using to Estimate Irrigation Water Efficiency & Water Requirement of Alfalfa Crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Ermolaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    The sustainability of irrigation is a complex and comprehensive undertaking, requiring an attention to much more than hydraulics, chemistry, and agronomy. A special combination of human, environmental, and economic factors exists in each irrigated region and must be recognized and evaluated. A way to evaluate the efficiency of irrigation water use for crop production is to consider the so-called crop-water production functions, which express the relation between the yield of a crop and the quantity of water applied to it or consumed by it. The term has been used in a somewhat ambiguous way. Some authors have defined the Crop-Water Production Functions between yield and the total amount of water applied, whereas others have defined it as a relation between yield and seasonal evapotranspiration (ET). In case of high efficiency of irrigation water use the volume of water applied is less than the potential evapotranspiration (PET), then - assuming no significant change of soil moisture storage from beginning of the growing season to its end-the volume of water may be roughly equal to ET. In other case of low efficiency of irrigation water use the volume of water applied exceeds PET, then the excess of volume of water applied over PET must go to either augmenting soil moisture storage (end-of-season moisture being greater than start-of-season soil moisture) or to runoff or/and deep percolation beyond the root zone. In presented contribution some results of a case study of estimation of biomass and leaf area index (LAI) for irrigated alfalfa by SEBAL algorithm will be discussed. The field study was conducted with aim to compare ground biomass of alfalfa at some irrigated fields (provided by agricultural farm) at Saratov and Volgograd Regions of Russia. The study was conducted during vegetation period of 2012 from April till September. All the operations from importing the data to calculation of the output data were carried by eLEAF company and uploaded in Fieldlook web

  7. Remote sensing based water-use efficiency evaluation in sub-surface irrigated wine grape vines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zúñiga, Carlos Espinoza; Khot, Lav R.; Jacoby, Pete; Sankaran, Sindhuja

    2016-05-01

    Increased water demands have forced agriculture industry to investigate better irrigation management strategies in crop production. Efficient irrigation systems, improved irrigation scheduling, and selection of crop varieties with better water-use efficiencies can aid towards conserving water. In an ongoing experiment carried on in Red Mountain American Viticulture area near Benton City, Washington, subsurface drip irrigation treatments at 30, 60 and 90 cm depth, and 15, 30 and 60% irrigation were applied to satisfy evapotranspiration demand using pulse and continuous irrigation. These treatments were compared to continuous surface irrigation applied at 100% evapotranspiration demand. Thermal infrared and multispectral images were acquired using unmanned aerial vehicle during the growing season. Obtained results indicated no difference in yield among treatments (p<0.05), however there was statistical difference in leaf temperature comparing surface and subsurface irrigation (p<0.05). Normalized vegetation index obtained from the analysis of multispectral images showed statistical difference among treatments when surface and subsurface irrigation methods were compared. Similar differences in vegetation index values were observed, when irrigation rates were compared. Obtained results show the applicability of aerial thermal infrared and multispectral images to characterize plant responses to different irrigation treatments and use of such information in irrigation scheduling or high-throughput selection of water-use efficient crop varieties in plant breeding.

  8. Tap water nasal irrigation in adults with seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomized double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Min; Fu, Xiaoyan; Deng, Wenting; Lai, Huangwen; Yang, Chuanhong

    2014-06-01

    Saline nasal irrigation is effective in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and sodium chloride itself has no antiallergic effects. The mechanism of saline nasal irrigation depends mainly on washing away allergens and inflammatory mediators induced by allergic reactions. Tap water has the same washing effects as saline. In this study, it was investigated if tap water nasal irrigation was effective in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Sixty-four patients diagnosed with seasonal allergic rhinitis were enrolled. Patients were randomized to tap water nasal irrigation group and non-tap water nasal irrigation group for treatment. Patients of both groups were treated with desloratadine. Treatment outcomes were measured using allergic rhinitis Quality of Life (QoL) survey was completed at baseline and after 3 weeks of therapy. There were statistically significant differences in QoL scores between tap water nasal irrigation group and non-tap water nasal irrigation group. The tap water nasal irrigation group had better QoL scores than the non-tap water nasal irrigation group. Tap water nasal irrigation can be a valuable adjuvant therapy for patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis.

  9. Seasonal simulation of water, salinity and nitrate dynamics under drip irrigated mandarin (Citrus reticulata) and assessing management options for drainage and nitrate leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phogat, V.; Skewes, M. A.; Cox, J. W.; Sanderson, G.; Alam, J.; Šimůnek, J.

    2014-05-01

    and to reduce their leaching out of the crop root zone. Slightly higher nitrogen uptake (1.73 kg ha-1) was recorded when fertigation was applied second to last hour in an irrigation event, as compared to applying it earlier during an irrigation event. Similarly, a 20% reduction in irrigation and N application produced a pronounced reduction in drainage (28%) and N leaching (46.4%), but it also decreased plant N uptake by 15.8% and water uptake by 4.8%, and increased salinity by 25.8%, as compared to the normal practice. This management would adversely impact the sustainability of this expensive irrigation system. However, reducing only irrigation by 30% during the 2nd half of the crop season (January to August) reduced drainage and N leaching by 37.2% and 50.5%, respectively, and increased N uptake by 6.9%. Such management of irrigation would be quite promising for the sustainability of the entire system. It is concluded that judicious manipulations of irrigation and fertilizer applications can be helpful in designing drip irrigation schedules for perennial horticultural crops to achieve improved efficiency of irrigation and fertigation applications and reduced contamination of receiving water bodies.

  10. Alternating irrigation water quality as a method to control solute concentrations and mass fluxes below irrigated fields: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present numerical study was to extend the data-driven protocol for the control of soil salinity, to control chloride and nitrate concentrations and mass fluxes below agricultural fields irrigated with treated waste water (TWW). The protocol is based on alternating irrigation water quality between TWW and desalinized water (DSW), guided by solute concentrations at soil depth, zs. Two different schemes, the first requires measurements of soil solution concentrations of chloride and nitrate at zs, while, the second scheme requires only measurements of soil solution EC at zs, were investigated. For this purpose, 3-D numerical simulations of flow and transport were performed for variably saturated, spatially heterogeneous, flow domains located at two different field sites. The sites differ in crop type, irrigation method, and in their lithology; these differences, in turn, considerably affect the performance of the proposed schemes, expressed in terms of their ability to reduce solute concentrations that drained below the root zone. Results of the analyses suggest that the proposed data-driven schemes allow the use of low-quality water for irrigation, while minimizing the consumption of high-quality water to a level, which, for given climate, soil, crop, irrigation method, and water quality, may be determined by the allowable nitrate and chloride concentrations in the groundwater. The results of the present study indicate that with respect to the diminution of groundwater contamination by chloride and nitrate, the more data demanding, first scheme is superior the second scheme.

  11. 25 CFR 171.215 - What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... receive irrigation water? 171.215 Section 171.215 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Irrigation Service § 171.215 What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water? (a) We will not change our service...

  12. 25 CFR 171.215 - What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... receive irrigation water? 171.215 Section 171.215 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Irrigation Service § 171.215 What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water? (a) We will not change our service...

  13. 25 CFR 171.215 - What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... receive irrigation water? 171.215 Section 171.215 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Irrigation Service § 171.215 What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water? (a) We will not change our service...

  14. 25 CFR 171.215 - What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... receive irrigation water? 171.215 Section 171.215 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Irrigation Service § 171.215 What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water? (a) We will not change our service...

  15. Mercury pollution from irrigation with treated sewage water (TSW).

    PubMed

    Pillay, A E; Yaghi, B; Williams, J R; Al-Kindy, S

    2007-06-01

    The lack of potable water in arid countries leads to the use of treated sewage water (TSW) for crop growth. Mercury accumulation (up to 500 ng/g) in agricultural soil originating from daily irrigation with TSW was found at two sites fed separately from a hospital sewage plant and an industrial plant. A control site irrigated with potable water ([Hg] <0.01 ng/ml) had much reduced levels in soil (<12 ng/g). Cold-vapour analysis of TSW revealed that Hg concentrations fluctuated widely, and were between 10-100 times higher than those of potable water. The TSW data originated from a total of 46 samples (1 L each), from both plants, collected over a 6-month period. The Hg levels varied from 0.1 to 1.0 ng/ml, which suggested that the possible source of the accumulation could be found in continuous irrigation with comparatively higher Hg levels. Remedial measures could be approached from the perspective of curbing this inconsistency to produce more consistent Hg concentrations below 0.5 ng/ml. It was found that the electrical conductivity of TSW is a useful indicator to rapidly monitor fluctuations in treatment. A novel development in the study was the potential capacity of the plastic TSW discharge-pipes to behave as crude 'chromatographic' columns for possible Hg adsorption. If this property of the pipes is developed further it could have a considerable mitigating effect on the Hg levels. Possible recommendations for remediation to limit the Hg levels and promote sustainable development are discussed.

  16. [Effect of climate change on rice irrigation water requirement in Songnen Plain, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-gang; Wang, Xiao-li; Xiao, Ye; Yang, Fei; Wang, Chen-xi

    2015-01-01

    Based on meteorological data from China national weather stations and climate scenario grid data through regional climate model provided by National Climate Center, rice water requirement was calculated by using McCloud model and Penman-Monteith model combined with crop coefficient approach. Then the rice irrigation water requirement was estimated by water balance model, and the changes of rice water requirement were analyzed. The results indicated that either in historical period or in climate scenario, rice irrigation water requirement contour lines during the whole growth period and Lmid period decreased along southwest to northeast, and the same irrigation water requirement contour line moved north with decade alternation. Rice irrigation water requirement during the whole growth period increased fluctuantly with decade alternation at 44.2 mm . 10 a-1 in historical period and 19.9 mm . 10 a-1 in climate scenario. The increase in rice irrigation water requirement during the Lmid period with decade alternation was significant in historical period, but not significant in climate scenario. Contribution rate of climate change to rice irrigation water requirement would be fluctuantly increased with decade alternation in climate scenario. Compared with 1970s, contribution rates of climate change to rice irrigation water requirement were 23.6% in 2000s and 34.4% in 2040s, which increased 14.8 x 10(8) m3 irrigation water in 2000s and would increase 21.2 x 10(8) m3 irrigation water in 2040s.

  17. Sorghum response to foliar application of phosphorus and potassium with saline water irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing demand for fresh water resources for urban and industrial uses is leading to limited availability of better quality water for crop irrigation. Therefore, crop response to poor quality irrigation water (ex: saline water), and strategies to mitigate the negative effects of poor quality irri...

  18. Optimal crop selection and water allocation under limited water supply in irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Peter; Grießbach, Ulrike; Schütze, Niels

    2015-04-01

    Due to climate change, extreme weather conditions such as droughts may have an increasing impact on irrigated agriculture. To cope with limited water resources in irrigation systems, a new decision support framework is developed which focuses on an integrated management of both irrigation water supply and demand at the same time. For modeling the regional water demand, local (and site-specific) water demand functions are used which are derived from optimized agronomic response on farms scale. To account for climate variability the agronomic response is represented by stochastic crop water production functions (SCWPF). These functions take into account different soil types, crops and stochastically generated climate scenarios. The SCWPF's are used to compute the water demand considering different conditions, e.g., variable and fixed costs. This generic approach enables the consideration of both multiple crops at farm scale as well as of the aggregated response to water pricing at a regional scale for full and deficit irrigation systems. Within the SAPHIR (SAxonian Platform for High Performance IRrigation) project a prototype of a decision support system is developed which helps to evaluate combined water supply and demand management policies.

  19. Daily irrigation attenuates xylem abscisic acid concentration and increases leaf water potential of Pelargonium × hortorum compared with infrequent irrigation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Richard K A; McAinsh, Martin; Dodd, Ian C

    2016-09-01

    The physiological response of plants to different irrigation frequencies may affect plant growth and water use efficiency (WUE; defined as shoot biomass/cumulative irrigation). Glasshouse-grown, containerized Pelargonium × hortorum BullsEye plants were irrigated either daily at 100% of plant evapotranspiration (ET) (well-watered; WW), or at 50% ET applied either daily [frequent deficit irrigation (FDI)] or cumulatively every 4 days [infrequent deficit irrigation (IDI)], for 24 days. Both FDI and IDI applied the same irrigation volume. Xylem sap was collected from the leaves, and stomatal conductance (gs ) and leaf water potential (Ψleaf ) measured every 2 days. As soil moisture decreased, gs decreased similarly under both FDI and IDI throughout the experiment. Ψleaf was maintained under IDI and increased under FDI. Leaf xylem abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations ([X-ABA]leaf ) increased as soil moisture decreased under both IDI and FDI, and was strongly correlated with decreased gs , but [X-ABA]leaf was attenuated under FDI throughout the experiment (at the same level of soil moisture as IDI plants). These physiological changes corresponded with differences in plant production. Both FDI and IDI decreased growth compared with WW plants, and by the end of the experiment, FDI plants also had a greater shoot fresh weight (18%) than IDI plants. Although both IDI and FDI had higher WUE than WW plants during the first 10 days of the experiment (when biomass did not differ between treatments), the deficit irrigation treatments had lower WUE than WW plants in the latter stages when growth was limited. Thus, ABA-induced stomatal closure may not always translate to increased WUE (at the whole plant level) if vegetative growth shows a similar sensitivity to soil drying, and growers must adapt their irrigation scheduling according to crop requirements.

  20. Daily irrigation attenuates xylem abscisic acid concentration and increases leaf water potential of Pelargonium × hortorum compared with infrequent irrigation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Richard K A; McAinsh, Martin; Dodd, Ian C

    2016-09-01

    The physiological response of plants to different irrigation frequencies may affect plant growth and water use efficiency (WUE; defined as shoot biomass/cumulative irrigation). Glasshouse-grown, containerized Pelargonium × hortorum BullsEye plants were irrigated either daily at 100% of plant evapotranspiration (ET) (well-watered; WW), or at 50% ET applied either daily [frequent deficit irrigation (FDI)] or cumulatively every 4 days [infrequent deficit irrigation (IDI)], for 24 days. Both FDI and IDI applied the same irrigation volume. Xylem sap was collected from the leaves, and stomatal conductance (gs ) and leaf water potential (Ψleaf ) measured every 2 days. As soil moisture decreased, gs decreased similarly under both FDI and IDI throughout the experiment. Ψleaf was maintained under IDI and increased under FDI. Leaf xylem abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations ([X-ABA]leaf ) increased as soil moisture decreased under both IDI and FDI, and was strongly correlated with decreased gs , but [X-ABA]leaf was attenuated under FDI throughout the experiment (at the same level of soil moisture as IDI plants). These physiological changes corresponded with differences in plant production. Both FDI and IDI decreased growth compared with WW plants, and by the end of the experiment, FDI plants also had a greater shoot fresh weight (18%) than IDI plants. Although both IDI and FDI had higher WUE than WW plants during the first 10 days of the experiment (when biomass did not differ between treatments), the deficit irrigation treatments had lower WUE than WW plants in the latter stages when growth was limited. Thus, ABA-induced stomatal closure may not always translate to increased WUE (at the whole plant level) if vegetative growth shows a similar sensitivity to soil drying, and growers must adapt their irrigation scheduling according to crop requirements. PMID:26910008

  1. Environmental Horticulture Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard environmental horticulture curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the environmental horticulture field. The general information section contains the following: purpose and objectives; program description,…

  2. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON WATER BALANCE IN A NEGATIVE PRESSURE DIFFERENCE IRRIGATION SYSTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniruzzaman, S. M.; Fukuhara, Teruyuki; Terasaki, Hiroaki

    Negative pressure difference irrigation (NPDI) is considered to be an attractive mode of irrigation because water use efficiency in this case is higher than that in conventional irrigation methods such as basin irrigation, furrow irrigation and sprinkler irrigation. In order to investigate the water balance in a NPDI system, experiments involving the use of a soil column, porous pipe and water reservoir were carried out in a temperature and humidity controlled room. The evaporation (Meva), supplied water (Msup), soil water storage (Msoil), wetted soil surface area and configuration of the wetted soil around the porous pipe were determined for three different negative pressures. Empirical equations were proposed for the calculation of Meva and Msoil. The proposed simple model could well reproduce the temporal variations in Meva and Msoil. With a decrease in the negative pressure, the water use efficiency increased and was in the range of 0.92 to 0.97.

  3. Modeling as a tool for management of saline soils and irrigation waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal management of saline soils and irrigation waters requires consideration of many interrelated factors including, climate, water applications and timing, water flow, plant water uptake, soil chemical reactions, plant response to salinity and solution composition, soil hydraulic properties and ...

  4. Effects of shallow water table, salinity and frequency of irrigation water on the date palm water use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askri, Brahim; Ahmed, Abdelkader T.; Abichou, Tarek; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2014-05-01

    In southern Tunisia oases, waterlogging, salinity, and water shortage represent serious threats to the sustainability of irrigated agriculture. Understanding the interaction between these problems and their effects on root water uptake is fundamental for suggesting possible options of improving land and water productivity. In this study, HYDRUS-1D model was used in a plot of farmland located in the Fatnassa oasis to investigate the effects of waterlogging, salinity, and water shortage on the date palm water use. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data of sap flow density of a date palm, soil hydraulic properties, water table depth, and amount of irrigation water. The comparison between predicted and observed data for date palm transpiration rates was acceptable indicating that the model could well estimate water consumption of this tree crop. Scenario simulations were performed with different water table depths, and salinities and frequencies of irrigation water. The results show that the impacts of water table depth and irrigation frequency vary according to the season. In summer, high irrigation frequency and shallow groundwater are needed to maintain high water content and low salinity of the root-zone and therefore to increase the date palm transpiration rates. However, these factors have no significant effect in winter. The results also reveal that irrigation water salinity has no significant effect under shallow saline groundwater.

  5. A novel dual soil sensor for simultaneous water content and water potential determination in irrigation scheduling and environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Christof; Spohrer, Klaus; Karaj, Shkelqim; Müller, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    Due to the climate change and decreasing water availability in many parts of the world, water efficient irrigation becomes more and more important to stabilize or even increase agricultural productivity. An efficient irrigation scheduling relies on soil water potential information in order to define the optimal irrigation start as well as on soil water content data to quantify the amount of soil water and thus to properly define irrigation depth. Furthermore, nutrient leaching and groundwater contamination will be reduced by controlled irrigation. Therefore, a novel dual soil sensor was developed which allows for simultaneous determination of water content and water potential at low costs suitable for distributed sensing. The soil water content measurement is realized with a dielectric measurement approach. Sensor elements are arranged on a printed circuit board, which can easily be inserted into the soil. Soil water potential data is deduced from water content measurements in porous matrices with known retention characteristics. The matrices are placed on the printed circuit board above a water content sensitive dielectric measuring area. In contrast to common granular matrix sensors, the matrices are characterized by a narrow pore size ranges by which the accuracy of soil water potential determination can be improved and a threshold characteristic suitable for irrigation is achieved. Sensor principle and laboratory experiments will be presented. For application in irrigation scheduling, the dual sensor is connected to off-the-shelf irrigation controllers by an additional interface controller. The interface controller activates moisture measurements of the sensor and compares the actual measurements with set-points of water content or water potential. The running time-based programme of the irrigation controller will be interrupted if measured soil water contents are above a predefined water content threshold or soil water potential measurements are below a

  6. Irrigation Management with Remote Sensing Techniques. Crop Water Requirements and Biophysical Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toureiro, Célia; Serralheiro, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Saving water in irrigated agriculture is increasingly relevant, as the irrigation sector is in many regions the biggest water consumer, but must be a sustainable activity. Therefore, the need urges for water use control methods and water resources planning. In irrigated agriculture, the right way for saving water is constituted by the increase of efficiency in water management. This work validates procedures and methodologies with remote sensing to determine the water availability in the soil at each moment and therefore the opportunity for the application of the water volume strictly necessary to optimize crop growth (irrigation opportunity and irrigation amount). The analysis applied to the Irrigation District of Divor, Évora, having used 7 experiment plots, which are areas watered by center-pivot systems, cultivated to corn. Data were determined from multispectral and infrared images of the cultivated surface obtained by satellite or by flying unmanned platform and integrated with parameters of the atmosphere and of the crops for calculating biophysical indicators and indices of water stress in the vegetation (NDVI, Kc, Kcb, CWSI). Therefore, evapotranspiration (ETc) was estimated, with which crop water requirement was calculated, with the opportunity and the amount of irrigation water to allocate. As this information is geographic referenced, maps can be prepared with GIS technology, describing water situation and the opportunity for watering crops. If the remote images are available with enough high spatial and temporal resolution, the frequent availability of maps can serve as a basis for a farmers irrigation advice system and for the regional irrigation authority to make decisions on the irrigation management at the regional scale. This can be a significant contribute to an efficient water management technology and a sustainable irrigated agriculture. Key-Words: Remote Sensing, Vegetation Index, Crop Coefficients, Water Balance

  7. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: Part I. Water and solute movement

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Carleton R; Breit, George N; Healy, Richard W; Zupancic, John W; Hammack, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300–480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  8. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: part I. water and solute movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300-480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  9. Water losses from irrigation canals evaluation: comparison among different methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, Paolo; De Luca, Domenico Antonio; Antonella Dino, Giovanna; Lasagna, Manuela

    2013-04-01

    The research investigates the field methodologies to evaluate water losses from canals, in order to find a reliable method to identify and quantify them. This study was conducted in five canal lines in Piedmont, north-western Italy, different for hydraulic, morphological, geological and hydrogeological contexts (De Luca et alii, 2012). At a regional scale, Piedmont network consists of several tens of thousands km of irrigation canals. The loss of water due to seepage from irrigation canals constitutes a substantial part of the usable water. Irrigation canals placed in natural soil or fine and coarse sediments are characterized by water losses ranging from 20 % to more than 50 %. These losses cause economic, hydrogeological and environmental consequences: water losses evaluation from irrigation canals in the basis for the sustainable water resource use and management. First, hydrogeological and hydrological characterisation of the study area and of the bottom of the irrigation canals was carried out for every investigated canal, in order to evaluate the relationships between groundwater and stream water (eg. piezometric and hydrogeochemical survey campaigns, infiltrometry tests, penetrometric tests and electrical tomographies, soil characterizations from the bottom of investigated canals). The canals seepage rates were subsequently estimated using different methodologies: empirical formulas, inflow-outflow tests and double tracer tests. The empirical formulas applied for the study underestimated the real amount of the losses probably due to the scarce number of the considered variables. Then the canals seepage rates were evaluated employing inflow-outflow tests, considered the best tool by several authors. This method allows the determination of seepage quantities measuring inflow and outflow of a canal test reach either by instruments. The canal discharge was evaluated using a current meter. This method, even if easy to apply and practical, is not efficient

  10. [Effects of regulated deficit irrigation on water consumption characteristics and water use efficiency of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Han, Zhan-Jiang; Yu, Zhen-Wen; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xi-Zhi; Xu, Zhen-Zhu

    2009-11-01

    With the high-yielding winter wheat cultivar Jimai 22 as test material, a field experiment was conducted in Yanzhou of Shandong to examine the effects of regulated deficit irrigation on the water consumption and water use efficiency (WUE) of the cultivar. Five treatments were installed, i.e., the soil relative moisture content at sowing, jointing, and anthesis stages being 80%, 65% and 65% (W0), 80%, 70% and 70% (W1), 80%, 80% and 80% (W2), 90%, 80% and 80% (W3), and 90%, 85% and 85% (W4), respectively. Under the condition of 228 mm precipitation in growth season, the total water consumption was higher in treatments W1 and W4 than in treatments W0, W2, and W3, and no difference was observed between treatments W1 and W4. Comparing with W4, treatment W1 decreased the water storage in 0-200 cm soil layer and the water consumption by wheat from jointing to anthesis stages, but increased the water consumption from anthesis to maturity stages. The water consumption rates at the stages from jointing to anthesis and from anthesis to maturity in treatment W4 were higher. Under regulated deficit irrigation, treatment W0 had higher WUE, but the grain yield was the lowest. The WUE in other treatments increased first, and then decreased with increasing irrigation amount. Both the water consumption and the grain yield were the highest in treatments W1 and W4, and treatment W1 had higher irrigation water use efficiency and irrigation benefit than treatment W4, being the best irrigation regime of high-yielding and water-saving in our study.

  11. Quantifying the Impacts of Irrigation Technology Adoption on Water Resources in the High Plains Aquifer, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Anthony; Cotterman, Kayla; Hyndman, David

    2016-04-01

    Producers in key agricultural regions worldwide are contending with increasing demand while simultaneously managing declining water resources. The High Plains Aquifer (HPA) is the largest aquifer system in the United States, and supplied most of the water to irrigate 6 million hectares in 2012. Water levels in the central and southern sections of the aquifer have steadily declined, as groundwater recharge in this semi-arid region is insufficient to meet water demands. Individual irrigators have responded to these declines by moving from less efficient irrigation technologies to those that apply water more precisely. Yet, these newer technologies have also allowed for water to be pumped from lower-yielding wells, thus extending the life of any given well and allowing drawdown to continue. Here we use a dataset of the annual irrigation technology choices from every irrigator in the state of Kansas, located in the Central High Plains. This irrigation data, along with remotely-sensed Leaf Area Index, crop choice, and irrigated area, drives a coupled surface/groundwater simulation created using the Landscape Hydrology Model (LHM) to examine the impacts of changing irrigation technology on the regional water cycle, and water levels in the HPA. The model is applied to simulate cases in which no irrigation technology change had occurred, and complete adoption of newer technologies to better understand impacts of management choices on regional water resources.

  12. Field measurements of water and nitrogen losses under irrigated maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengni, L.; Vachaud, G.; Thony, J. L.; Laty, R.; Garino, B.; Casabianca, H.; Jame, P.; Viscogliosi, R.

    1994-10-01

    An intensive multidisciplinary experiment has been conducted over several years at La Côte Saint-André, near Grenoble, France. The major objective is to determine an optimal fertilizer application scheme for an irrigated agricultural system. Such a scheme would not degrade the quality of the environment, and yet would maintain a profitable level of crop production. This study is explicitly related to the cultivation of irrigated maize, a major crop in the area. The various terms of the water balance (consumption, drainage, soil storage) and of the nitrogen cycle (mineralization, plant uptake, leaching) were obtained from intensive monitoring in the upper layer of the 0.8 m of soil which corresponds to the root zone of the crop. This entailed the combined use of a neutron moisture meter, tensiometers and soil suction cups. To determine the specific effects of fertilization and crop growth, there were different treatments. These corresponded to a traditional fertilizer application of 260 kg N ha -1, no fertilization, and bare soil, carried out within an area of approximately 2 ha. Several sites were instrumented on each treatment, one of them being specifically for the application and the monitoring of 15N-tagged fertilizer. The results have shown that, in terms of the water balance, irrigation water management is extremely efficient, as drainage losses under the maize culture are negligible during the crop cycle. The situation is totally different, however, during the intercrop period (October-April), owing to rainfall. Then the soil is left bare and evaporation is very small, and now the drainage corresponds to about 90% of total inputs from precipitation. In terms of the nitrogen cycle, the results showed clearly that up to 150 kg N ha -1 was produced by mineralization in the soil. Nitrogen leaching beyond the root zone during the crop cycle is negligible, regardless of the rate of fertilizer application, as a result of the very small amount of drainage, despite

  13. Water quality, pesticide occurrence, and effects of irrigation with reclaimed water at golf courses in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Reuse of treated wastewater for golf course irrigation is an increasingly popular water management option in Florida, where growth has put stress on potable water supplies. Surface water, ground water, and irrigation water were sampled at three pairs of golf courses quarterly for one year to determine if pesticides were present, and the effect of irrigation with treated effluent on ground-water quality, with an emphasis on interactions of effluent with pesticides. In addition to the six paired golf courses, which were in central Florida, ground water was sampled for pesticides and other constituents at three more golf courses in other parts of the State. This study was the first to analyze water samples from Florida golf courses for a broad range of pesticides. Statistical methods based on the percentage of data above detection limits were used to determine the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water on ground-water quality. Shallow ground water at golf courses irrigated with treated effluent has higher concentrations of chloride, lower concentrations of bicarbonate, and lower pH than ground water at golf courses irrigated with water from carbonate aquifers. There were no statistically significant differences in nutrient concentrations in ground water between paired golf courses grouped by irrigation water type at a 95 percent confidence level. The number of wells where pesticides occurred was significantly higher at the paired golf courses using ground water for irrigation than at ones using reclaimed water. However, the limited occurrences of individual pesticides in ground water make it difficult to correlate differences in irrigation- water quality with pesticide migration to the water table. At some of the golf courses, increased pesticide occurrences may be associated with higher irrigation rates, the presence of well-drained soils, and shallow depths to the surficial aquifer. Pesticides used by golf courses for turf grass maintenance were detected in

  14. Evaluating regional water scarcity: Irrigated crop water budgets for groundwater management in the Wisconsin Central Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocco, M. A.; Kucharik, C. J.; Kraft, G.

    2013-12-01

    Regional water scarcity dilemmas between agricultural and aquatic land users pervade the humid northern lake states of Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan, where agricultural irrigation relies on groundwater drawn from shallow aquifers. As these aquifers have strong connectivity to surface waters, irrigation lowers water levels in lakes and wetlands and reduces stream discharges. Irrigation expansion has cultivated a 60-year water scarcity dilemma in The Wisconsin Central Sands, the largest irrigated region in the humid northern lake states, dedicated to potato, maize, and processing vegetable production. Irrigation has depleted Wisconsin Central Sands surface waters, lowering levels in some lakes by over 2 m and drying some coldwater trout streams. Aquatic ecosystems, property values, and recreational uses in some surface waters have been devastated. While the causal link between pumping and surface water stress is established, understanding crop-mediated processes, such as the timing and magnitude of groundwater consumption by evapotranspiration (ET) and groundwater recharge, will be useful in management of groundwater, irrigated cropping systems, and surface water health. Previous modeling and field efforts have compared irrigated crop water use to a natural reference condition on a net annual basis. As a result, we presently understand that for irrigated potatoes and maize, the average annual ET is greater and therefore, the average annual recharge is less than rainfed row crops, grasslands, and both coniferous and deciduous forests. However, we have a limited understanding of the magnitude and timing of ET and recharge from irrigated cropping systems on shorter time scales that proceed with the annual cropping cycle (i.e. planting, full canopy, harvest, residue cover). We seek to understand the spatiotemporal variability of crop water budgets and associated water scarcity in the Wisconsin Central Sands through detailed measurements of drainage (potential

  15. Holistic irrigation water management approach based on stochastic soil water dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, H.; Mousavi, S. J.

    2012-04-01

    Appreciating the essential gap between fundamental unsaturated zone transport processes and soil and water management due to low effectiveness of some of monitoring and modeling approaches, this study presents a mathematical programming model for irrigation management optimization based on stochastic soil water dynamics. The model is a nonlinear non-convex program with an economic objective function to address water productivity and profitability aspects in irrigation management through optimizing irrigation policy. Utilizing an optimization-simulation method, the model includes an eco-hydrological integrated simulation model consisting of an explicit stochastic module of soil moisture dynamics in the crop-root zone with shallow water table effects, a conceptual root-zone salt balance module, and the FAO crop yield module. Interdependent hydrology of soil unsaturated and saturated zones is treated in a semi-analytical approach in two steps. At first step analytical expressions are derived for the expected values of crop yield, total water requirement and soil water balance components assuming fixed level for shallow water table, while numerical Newton-Raphson procedure is employed at the second step to modify value of shallow water table level. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, combined with the eco-hydrological simulation model, has been used to solve the non-convex program. Benefiting from semi-analytical framework of the simulation model, the optimization-simulation method with significantly better computational performance compared to a numerical Mote-Carlo simulation-based technique has led to an effective irrigation management tool that can contribute to bridging the gap between vadose zone theory and water management practice. In addition to precisely assessing the most influential processes at a growing season time scale, one can use the developed model in large scale systems such as irrigation districts and agricultural catchments. Accordingly

  16. Comparative study of heavy metals in "soil-wheat" systems between sewage-irrigated areas and clean-water-irrigated areas in suburban Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ye; Han, Sha-Sha; Chen, Zhi-Fan; Liu, Jing; Hu, Honq-Xia

    2015-01-01

    After years of irrigating farmland with wastewater, concern is increasing about health risks from heavy metals contaminating wheat grown in sewage-irrigated soils in suburban areas of Beijing, China. The study discussed in this article aimed to compare the characteristics of heavy metal distribution in a sewage-irrigated "soil-wheat" system with those from a clean-water-irrigated area by collecting and analyzing samples from both areas. The results indicated that the average concentrations of copper, chromium, lead, and zinc in sewage-irrigated soil were higher than the values in the clean-water-irrigated region. Irrigation with wastewater could lead to increased bioconcentration factors. Therefore, issues of food contamination caused by sewage irrigation deserve more attention.

  17. Economic impacts on irrigated agriculture of water conservation programs in drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes vulnerability, impacts, and adaptability by irrigation to drought.It accounts for economic incentives affecting choices on irrigation technology, crop mix, and water sources.When surface water supplies fall, farmers increase pumping, even when pumping raises production costs.Conservation program subsidies raise the value of food production but can increase crop water depletions.

  18. Intelligent irrigation performance: evaluation and quantifying its ability for conserving water in arid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghobari, Hussein M.; Mohammad, Fawzi S.

    2011-12-01

    Intelligent irrigation technologies have been developed in recent years to apply irrigation to turf and landscape plants. These technologies are an evapotranspiration (ET)-based irrigation controller, which calculates ET for local microclimate. Then, the controller creates a program for loading and communicating automatically with drip or sprinkler system controllers. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the new ET sensors in ability to irrigate agricultural crops and to conserve water use for crop in arid climatic conditions. This paper presents the case for water conservation using intelligent irrigation system (IIS) application technology. The IIS for automating irrigation scheduling was implemented and tested with sprinkle and drip irrigation systems to irrigate wheat and tomato crops. Another irrigation scheduling system was also installed and operated as another treatment, which is based on weather data that retrieved from an automatic weather station. This irrigation control system was running in parallel to the former system (IIS) to be control experiments for comparison purposes. However, this article discusses the implementation of IIS, its installation, testing and calibration of various components. The experiments conducted for one growing season 2009-2010 and the results were represented and discussed herein. Data from all plots were analyzed, which were including soil water status, water consumption, and crop yield. The initial results indicate that up to 25% water saving by intelligent irrigation compared to control method, while maintaining competing yield. Results show that the crop evapotranspiration values for control experiments were higher than that of ET-System in consistent trend during whole growth season. The analysis points out that the values of the two treatments were somewhat close to each other's only in the initial development stages. Generally, the ET-System, with some modification was precise in

  19. Catchment scale analysis on river-return ratio of irrigation water from densely developed paddy areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Masumoto, T.; Horikawa, N.; Kudo, R.; Minakawa, H.; Nawa, N.

    2013-12-01

    Irrigation in Japan is predominantly used for rice cultivation, and it accounts for 70% of total water withdrawal. Water loss, which is attributable to nature of open channel irrigation system and percolation from fields, leads to relatively low irrigation efficiencies compared with ones for upland crops. However, because part of water gradually returns to rivers (river-return flow), it contributes to stable water use in downstream. This study investigated how irrigation water circulates and returns to rivers, and quantified a ratio of river-return flow to irrigation intake for an irrigation area (river-return ratio). One difficulty in river-return flow analysis lies in the fact that two types of flow pathways exist in an irrigation area; natural rivers that drain water from the areas, and channel networks whose directions do not necessarily coincide with river directions. In addition, outflux from irrigation area is consisted of water from different sources, such as water loss during water allocation, rainfall, irrigation, and influx from adjacent upstream areas. To cope with such difficulties, we used a grid-based distributed water circulation model that represents both catchment scale hydrological cycles and water flows related to irrigation channel network. The model calculates water flow for irrigation networks based on a GIS database of water use facilities. The model also incorporates operation rules for facilities and field level water management. Using the modeled river network, we first identify grid-cells where influx and outflux occurs across boundaries of irrigation areas. Then, to eliminate the effect of influx from adjacent upstream areas, we subtract influx from outflux. This makes us to capture outflux that purely originates in rainfall and irrigation within an irrigated area. Next, we separate the amount of outflux that originates in irrigation from the total amount of outflux. As residence time of each flow pathway had not been clarified yet, we

  20. Characterization of bacterial pathogens in rural and urban irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Aijuka, Matthew; Charimba, George; Hugo, Celia J; Buys, Elna M

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed to compare the bacteriological quality of an urban and rural irrigation water source. Bacterial counts, characterization, identification and diversity of aerobic bacteria were determined. Escherichia coli isolated from both sites was subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing, virulence gene (Stx1/Stx2 and eae) determination and (GTG)5 Rep-PCR fingerprinting. Low mean monthly counts for aerobic spore formers, anaerobic spore formers and Staphylococcus aureus were noted although occasional spikes were observed. The most prevalent bacterial species at both sites were Bacillus spp., E. coli and Enterobacter spp. In addition, E. coli and Bacillus spp. were most prevalent in winter and summer respectively. Resistance to at least one antibiotic was 84% (rural) and 83% (urban). Highest resistance at both sites was to cephalothin and ampicillin. Prevalence of E. coli possessing at least one virulence gene (Stx1/Stx2 and eae) was 15% (rural) and 42% (urban). All (rural) and 80% (urban) of E. coli possessing virulence genes showed antibiotic resistance. Complete genetic relatedness (100%) was shown by 47% of rural and 67% of urban E. coli isolates. Results from this study show that surface irrigation water sources regardless of geographical location and surrounding land-use practices can be reservoirs of similar bacterial pathogens. PMID:25719470

  1. Uptake of antibiotics from irrigation water by plants.

    PubMed

    Azanu, David; Mortey, Christiana; Darko, Godfred; Weisser, Johan Juhl; Styrishave, Bjarne; Abaidoo, Robert Clement

    2016-08-01

    The capacity of carrot (Daucus corota L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), two plants that are usually eaten raw, to uptake tetracycline and amoxicillin (two commonly used antibiotics) from irrigated water was investigated in order to assess the indirect human exposure to antibiotics through consumption of uncooked vegetables. Antibiotics in potted plants that had been irrigated with known concentrations of the antibiotics were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction and analyzed on a liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometer. The plants absorbed the antibiotics from water in all tested concentrations of 0.1-15 mg L(-1). Tetracycline was detected in all plant samples, at concentrations ranging from 4.4 to 28.3 ng/g in lettuce and 12.0-36.8 ng g(-1) fresh weight in carrots. Amoxicillin showed absorption with concentrations ranging from 13.7 ng g(-1) to 45.2 ng g(-1) for the plant samples. The mean concentration of amoxicillin (27.1 ng g(-1)) in all the samples was significantly higher (p = 0.04) than that of tetracycline (20.2 ng g(-1)) indicating higher uptake of amoxicillin than tetracycline. This suggests that the low antibiotic concentrations found in plants could be important for causing antibiotics resistance when these levels are consumed. PMID:27213239

  2. Characterization of bacterial pathogens in rural and urban irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Aijuka, Matthew; Charimba, George; Hugo, Celia J; Buys, Elna M

    2015-03-01

    The study aimed to compare the bacteriological quality of an urban and rural irrigation water source. Bacterial counts, characterization, identification and diversity of aerobic bacteria were determined. Escherichia coli isolated from both sites was subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing, virulence gene (Stx1/Stx2 and eae) determination and (GTG)5 Rep-PCR fingerprinting. Low mean monthly counts for aerobic spore formers, anaerobic spore formers and Staphylococcus aureus were noted although occasional spikes were observed. The most prevalent bacterial species at both sites were Bacillus spp., E. coli and Enterobacter spp. In addition, E. coli and Bacillus spp. were most prevalent in winter and summer respectively. Resistance to at least one antibiotic was 84% (rural) and 83% (urban). Highest resistance at both sites was to cephalothin and ampicillin. Prevalence of E. coli possessing at least one virulence gene (Stx1/Stx2 and eae) was 15% (rural) and 42% (urban). All (rural) and 80% (urban) of E. coli possessing virulence genes showed antibiotic resistance. Complete genetic relatedness (100%) was shown by 47% of rural and 67% of urban E. coli isolates. Results from this study show that surface irrigation water sources regardless of geographical location and surrounding land-use practices can be reservoirs of similar bacterial pathogens.

  3. [Simulation of effect of irrigation with reclaimed water on soil water-salt movement by ENVIRO-GRO model].

    PubMed

    Lü, Si-Dan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Wang, Mei-E

    2012-12-01

    As the conflict between water supply and demand, wastewater reuse has become an important measure, which can relieve the water shortage in Beijing. In order to promote safe irrigation with reclaimed water and prevent soil salinisation, the dynamic transport of salts in urban soils of Beijing, a city of water shortage, under irrigation of reclaimed water was simulated by ENVIRO-GRO model in this research. The accumulation trends of soil salinity were predicted. Simultaneously, it investigated the effects of different irrigation practices on soil water-salt movement and salt accumulation. Results indicated that annual averages of soil salinity (EC(e)) increased 29.5%, 97.2%, 197.8% respectively, with the higher irrigation, normal irrigation, and low irrigation under equilibrium conditions. Irrigation frequency had little effect on soil salt-water movement, and soil salt accumulation was in a downward trend with low frequency of irrigation. Under equilibrium conditions, annual averages of EC(e) increased 23.7%, 97.2%, 208.5% respectively, with irrigation water salinity (EC(w)) 0.6, 1.2, 2.4 dS x m(-1). Soil salinity increased slightly with EC(w) = 0.6 dS x m(-1), while soil salinization did not appear. Totally, the growth of Blue grass was not influenced by soil salinity under equilibrium conditions with the regular irrigation in Beijing, but mild soil salinization appeared.

  4. Evaluation system of water ecological civilization of irrigation area in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Chen, J.; Chen, D.; Zhang, S.; Li, X. C.; Zhu, Y.; Li, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Irrigation area is an important carrier, and also has a pivotal role in the construction of water ecological civilization in China, as well as worldwide. This work extracted the five basic characteristics of water ecological civilization of irrigated area, namely "resource saving, efficient production, ecological nature, beautiful environment, and civilized consciousness". Further, based on the frequency analysis of indicators related to the evaluation of irrigation area, we proposed the evaluation system of water ecological civilization of irrigated area. Taking an irrigation district of Huaian City, Jiangsu Province, China as an example, we carried out the case evaluation in use of the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method. Thus, we provide the theoretical and technical reference for the construction and assessment of water ecological civilization of irrigation district to both China and abroad.

  5. Soil water nitrate and ammonium dynamics under a sewage effluent irrigated eucalypt plantation.

    PubMed

    Livesley, S J; Adams, M A; Grierson, P F

    2007-01-01

    Managed forests and plantations are appropriate ecosystems for land-based treatment of effluent, but concerns remain regarding nutrient contamination of ground- and surface waters. Monthly NO3-N and NH4-N concentrations in soil water, accumulated soil N, and gross ammonification and nitrification rates were measured in the second year of a second rotation of an effluent irrigated Eucalyptus globulus plantation in southern Western Australia to investigate the separate and interactive effects of drip and sprinkler irrigation, effluent and water irrigation, irrigation rate, and harvest residues retention. Nitrate concentrations of soil water were greater under effluent irrigation than water irrigation but remained <15 mg L(-1) when irrigated at the normal rate (1.5-2.0 mm d(-1)), and there was little evidence of downward movement. In contrast, NH4-N concentrations of soil water at 30 and 100 cm were generally greater under effluent irrigation than water irrigation when irrigated at the normal rate because of direct effluent NH4-N input and indirect ammonification of soil organic N. Drip irrigation of effluent approximately doubled peak NO3-N and NH4-N concentrations in soil water. Harvest residue retention reduced concentrations of soil water NO3-N at 30 cm during active sprinkler irrigation, but after 1 yr of irrigation there was no significant difference in the amount of N stored in the soil system, although harvest residue retention did enhance the "nitrate flush" in the following spring. Gross mineralization rates without irrigation increased with harvest residue retention and further increased with water irrigation. Irrigation with effluent further increased gross nitrification to 3.1 mg N kg(-1) d(-1) when harvest residues were retained but had no effect on gross ammonification, which suggested the importance of heterotrophic nitrification. The downward movement of N under effluent irrigation was dominated by NH4-N rather than NO3-N. Improving the capacity of

  6. Irrigation: Erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation is essential for global food production. However, irrigation erosion can limit the ability of irrigation systems to reliably produce food and fiber in the future. The factors affecting soil erosion from irrigation are the same as rainfall—water detaches and transports sediment. However, t...

  7. Water Stress & Biomass Monitoring and SWAP Modeling of Irrigated Crops in Saratov Region of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Ermolaeva, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Development of modern irrigation technologies are balanced between the need to maximize production and the need to minimize water use which provides harmonious interaction of irrigated systems with closely-spaced environment. Thus requires an understanding of complex interrelationships between landscape and underground of irrigated and adjacent areas in present and future conditions aiming to minimize development of negative scenarios. In this way in each irrigated areas a combination of specific factors and drivers must be recognized and evaluated. Much can be obtained by improving the efficiency use of water applied for irrigation. Modern RS monitoring technologies offers the opportunity to develop and implement an effective irrigation control program permitting today to increase efficiency of irrigation water use. These technologies provide parameters with both high temporal and adequate spatial needed to monitor agrohydrological parameters of irrigated agricultural crops. Combination of these parameters with meteorological and biophysical parameters can be used to estimate crop water stress defined as ratio between actual (ETa) and potential (ETc) evapotranspiration. Aggregation of actual values of crop water stress with biomass (yield) data predicted by agrohydrological model based on weather forecasting and scenarios of irrigation water application may be used for indication of both rational timing and amount of irrigation water allocation. This type of analysis facilitating an efficient water management can be easily extended to irrigated areas by developing maps of water efficiency application serving as an irrigation advice system for farmers at his fields and as a decision support tool for the authorities on the large perimeter irrigation management. This contribution aims to communicate an illustrative explanation about the practical application of a data combination of agrohydrological modeling and ground & space based monitoring. For this aim some

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions, irrigation water use, and arsenic concentrations; a common thread in rice water management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice has historically been grown as a flooded crop in the United States. As competition for water resources has grown, there is interest in reducing water use in rice production so as to maintain a viable and sustainable rice industry into the future. An irrigation study was established in 2011 at ...

  9. [Effect of reclaimed water irrigation on soil properties and vertical distribution of heavy metal].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zong-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ping; Jiao, Wen-Tao; Wang, Mei-E

    2012-12-01

    Utilization of reclaimed water is one of the important methods to alleviate water shortage. The effect of reclaimed water irrigation on soil is always a concern. To understand the effect of long time reclaimed water irrigation on soil, typical farmland irrigated with reused water was selected. Soil properties and heavy metal concentration of soil and water samples were analyzed to identify the effect of the irrigation on heavy metal vertical distribution and organic matter content, total carbon, total nitrogen and pH value in soil. The results show that heavy metal contents of irrigation water used in Liangshuihe farmland are 2.5 to 10.5 times higher than that of Beiyechang farmland, and reclaimed water irrigation could cause changes of soil properties that soil organic matter content, total carbon, total nitrogen were increased and pH values were reduced. Based on the field investigation results, the soil nutrient conditions benefit from irrigate reclaimed water, however, the accumulation of heavy metal in soil could raise the risk. As a source of soil heavy metal, reclaimed water irrigation could make differences on the accumulation and mobility of soil heavy metal. Also the distribution and mobility of soil heavy metal are influenced by soil organic matter content and there are more heavy metal were taken up by plants or transferred to the deeper area in Liangshuihe farmland.

  10. Drainage water quality and end-member identification in La Violada irrigation district (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidoro, D.; Quílez, D.; Aragüés, R.

    2010-03-01

    SummaryThe identification of the different components in a water course is required to individualize and assess the actual contribution of irrigated agriculture to the pollution of the water course. This paper aimed at identifying and assessing the composition of the end-members in La Violada irrigation district (VID) and establishing a statistical procedure to reduce the sampling effort needed to establish drainage water quality. The quality of irrigation water, groundwater, and irrigated-land drainage water in VID was monitored during three hydrologic years to identify the components of flow in La Violada Gully, the natural exit course of VID. A network of sampling points in the secondary ditches and main drains of VID allowed identifying and separating those collecting irrigated-land drainage waters from those conveying high proportions of irrigation waters. Three end-member flows were identified in La Violada Gully during the irrigation season: (a) irrigation water arising from tail-waters, leakages and spills from the irrigation canals, very low in salts; (b) groundwater originating from the non-irrigated upper reaches of La Violada Gully watershed, high in Cl - and Na +; and (c) VID drainage water, high in SO42- and Ca 2+. The overall VID drainage water quality was accurately assessed through a simplified sampling scheme of only four sampling points that produced low errors of 0.1 dS/m for EC and 0.1 mmol c/L for Cl -. The separation of La Violada Gully flow in these three components is essential for estimating the actual contribution of irrigation in VID to the salt and nitrogen loads in La Violada Gully.

  11. Irrigation scheduling by ET and soil water sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling is the process of deciding when, where and how much to irrigate, usually with the goal of optimizing economic return on investment in land, equipment, inputs and personnel. This hour-long seminar presents methods of irrigation scheduling based, on the one hand on estimates of t...

  12. Emergy evaluation of a production and utilization process of irrigation water in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Luo, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Jing; Kong, Jun; She, Dong-Li

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability evaluation of the process of water abstraction, distribution, and use for irrigation can contribute to the policy of decision making in irrigation development. Emergy theory and method are used to evaluate a pumping irrigation district in China. A corresponding framework for its emergy evaluation is proposed. Its emergy evaluation shows that water is the major component of inputs into the irrigation water production and utilization systems (24.7% and 47.9% of the total inputs, resp.) and that the transformities of irrigation water and rice as the systems' products (1.72E + 05 sej/J and 1.42E + 05 sej/J, resp.; sej/J = solar emjoules per joule) represent their different emergy efficiencies. The irrigated agriculture production subsystem has a higher sustainability than the irrigation water production subsystem and the integrated production system, according to several emergy indices: renewability ratio (%R), emergy yield ratio (EYR), emergy investment ratio (EIR), environmental load ratio (ELR), and environmental sustainability index (ESI). The results show that the performance of this irrigation district could be further improved by increasing the utilization efficiencies of the main inputs in both the production and utilization process of irrigation water.

  13. Emergy Evaluation of a Production and Utilization Process of Irrigation Water in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dan; Luo, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Jing; Kong, Jun; She, Dong-Li

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability evaluation of the process of water abstraction, distribution, and use for irrigation can contribute to the policy of decision making in irrigation development. Emergy theory and method are used to evaluate a pumping irrigation district in China. A corresponding framework for its emergy evaluation is proposed. Its emergy evaluation shows that water is the major component of inputs into the irrigation water production and utilization systems (24.7% and 47.9% of the total inputs, resp.) and that the transformities of irrigation water and rice as the systems' products (1.72E + 05 sej/J and 1.42E + 05 sej/J, resp.; sej/J = solar emjoules per joule) represent their different emergy efficiencies. The irrigated agriculture production subsystem has a higher sustainability than the irrigation water production subsystem and the integrated production system, according to several emergy indices: renewability ratio (%R), emergy yield ratio (EYR), emergy investment ratio (EIR), environmental load ratio (ELR), and environmental sustainability index (ESI). The results show that the performance of this irrigation district could be further improved by increasing the utilization efficiencies of the main inputs in both the production and utilization process of irrigation water. PMID:24082852

  14. Identification of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Market Garden Products and Irrigation Water in Benin.

    PubMed

    Moussé, Wassiyath; Sina, Haziz; Baba-Moussa, Farid; Noumavo, Pacôme A; Agbodjato, Nadège A; Adjanohoun, Adolphe; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at biochemical and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli strains isolated from horticultural products and irrigation water of Cotonou. The samples were collected from 12 market gardeners of 4 different sites. Rapid' E. coli medium was used for identification of E. coli strains and the antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by the agar disk diffusion method. The β-lactamases production was sought by the liquid acidimetric method. The genes coding for β-lactamases and toxins were identified by PCR method. The results revealed that about 34.95% of the analyzed samples were contaminated by E. coli. Cabbages were the most contaminated by E. coli (28.26%) in dry season. All isolated strains were resistant to amoxicillin. The penicillinase producing E. coli carried blaTEM (67.50%), blaSHV (10%), and blaCTX-M (22.50%) genes. The study revealed that the resistance genes such as SLTI (35.71%), SLTII (35.71%), ETEC (7.15%), and VTEC (21.43%) were carried. Openly to the found results and considering the importance of horticultural products in Beninese food habits, it is important to put several strategies aiming at a sanitary security by surveillance and sensitization of all the actors on the risks of some practices.

  15. Identification of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Market Garden Products and Irrigation Water in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Moussé, Wassiyath; Sina, Haziz; Baba-Moussa, Farid; Noumavo, Pacôme A.; Agbodjato, Nadège A.; Adjanohoun, Adolphe; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at biochemical and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli strains isolated from horticultural products and irrigation water of Cotonou. The samples were collected from 12 market gardeners of 4 different sites. Rapid' E. coli medium was used for identification of E. coli strains and the antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by the agar disk diffusion method. The β-lactamases production was sought by the liquid acidimetric method. The genes coding for β-lactamases and toxins were identified by PCR method. The results revealed that about 34.95% of the analyzed samples were contaminated by E. coli. Cabbages were the most contaminated by E. coli (28.26%) in dry season. All isolated strains were resistant to amoxicillin. The penicillinase producing E. coli carried blaTEM (67.50%), blaSHV (10%), and blaCTX-M (22.50%) genes. The study revealed that the resistance genes such as SLTI (35.71%), SLTII (35.71%), ETEC (7.15%), and VTEC (21.43%) were carried. Openly to the found results and considering the importance of horticultural products in Beninese food habits, it is important to put several strategies aiming at a sanitary security by surveillance and sensitization of all the actors on the risks of some practices. PMID:26770972

  16. Ground water for irrigation in the Viking Basin, west-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    The Viking Basin consists of six glacial outwash areas in Douglas, Ottertail, and Todd Counties, west-central Minnesota. Total area is 340 square miles (880 square kilometres). Soils are sandy and excessively well-drained. Crops grown on the outwash would benefit from supplemental irrigation. Irrigation supplies can be obtained from wells in the surface outwash aquifer in significant parts of the large outwash areas near Carlos and Parkers Prairie and the small outwash area near Clotho. Irrigation supplies are unlikely in the outwash areas near Alexandria, Urbank, and Rose City. Major use of ground water for irrigation may lower ground-water levels sufficiently to affect lake and marsh levels and streamflow out of the irrigation areas. Water from the outwash is of excellent chemical quality for irrigation.

  17. Models for root water uptake under deficit irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarovitch, Naftali; Krounbi, Leilah; Simunek, Jirka

    2010-05-01

    Modern agriculture, with its dependence on irrigation, fertilizers, and pesticide application, contributes significantly to the water and solute influx through the soil into the groundwater, specifically in arid areas. The quality and quantity of this water as it passes through the vadose zone is influenced primarily by plant roots. Root water uptake is a function of both a physical root parameter, commonly referred to as the root length density, and the soil water status. The location of maximum water uptake in a homogenous soil profile of uniform water content and hydraulic conductivity occurs in the soil layer containing the largest root length density. Under field conditions, in a drying soil, plants are both subject to, and the source of, great spatial variability in the soil water content. The upper soil layers containing the bulk of the root zone are usually the most water depleted, while the deeper regions of the soil profile containing fewer roots are wetter. Changes in the physiological functioning of plants have been shown to result from extended periods of water stress, but the short term effects of water stress on root water uptake are less well understood. While plants can minimize transpiration and the resulting growth rates under limiting conditions to conserve water, many plants maintain a constant potential transpiration rate long after the commencement of the drying process. Compensatory uptake, whereby plants respond to non-uniform, limiting conditions by increasing water uptake from areas in the root zone characterized by more favorable conditions, is one such mechanism by which plants sustain potential transpiration rates in drying soils. The development of models which accurately characterize temporal and spatial root water uptake patterns is important for agricultural resource optimization, upon which subsequent management decisions affecting resource conservation and environmental pollution are based. Numerical simulations of root water

  18. Reuse potential of laundry greywater for irrigation based on growth, water and nutrient use of tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, R. K.; Patel, J. H.; Baxi, V. R.

    2010-05-01

    SummaryGreywater is considered as a valuable resource with a high reuse potential for irrigation of household lawns and gardens. However, there are possibilities of surfactant and sodium accumulation in soil from reuse of greywater which may affect agricultural productivity and environmental sustainability adversely. We conducted a glasshouse experiment to examine variation in growth, water and nutrient use of tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Grosse Lisse) using tap water (TW), laundry greywater (GW) and solutions of low and high concentration of a detergent surfactant (LC and HC, respectively) as irrigation treatments. Each treatment was replicated five times using a randomised block design. Measurements throughout the experiment showed greywater to be significantly more alkaline and saline than the other types of irrigation water. Although all plants received 16 irrigations over a period of 9 weeks until flowering, there were little or no significant effects of irrigation treatments on plant growth. Soil water retention following irrigation reduced significantly when plants were irrigated with GW or surfactant solutions on only three of 12 occasions. On one occasion, water use measured as evapotranspiration (ET) with GW irrigation was similar to TW, but it was significantly higher than the plants receiving HC irrigation. At harvest, various components of plant biomass and leaf area for GW irrigated plants were found to be similar or significantly higher than the TW irrigated plants with a common trend of GW ⩾ TW > LC ⩾ HC. Whole-plant concentration was measured for 12 essential plant nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Mo and B) and Na (often considered as a beneficial nutrient). Irrigation treatments affected the concentration of four nutrients (P, Fe, Zn and Na) and uptake of seven nutrients (P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe and B) significantly. Uptake of these seven nutrients by tomato was generally in the order GW ⩾ TW > HC ⩾ LC. GW

  19. Forest Irrigation of Tritiated Water: A Proven Tritiated Water Management Tool - 13357

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, Phil; Blount, Gerald; Kmetz, Thomas; Vangelas, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Tritium releases from the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) at the SRS in South Carolina has impacted groundwater and surface water. Tritiated groundwater plumes discharge into Fourmile Branch which is a small tributary of the Savannah River, a regional water resource. Taking advantage of the groundwater flow paths and the local topography a water collection and irrigation system was constructed and has been used at the SRS for over a decade to reduce these tritiated water releases to Fourmile Branch. The tritiated water is transferred to the atmosphere by evaporation from the pond surface, and after irrigation, wetted surface evaporation and evapotranspiration through the forest vegetation. Over the last decade SRS has irrigated over 120,000,000 gallons of tritiated water, which diverted over 6000 curies away from Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River. The system has been effective in reducing the flux of tritiated groundwater by approximately 70%. Mass balance studies of tritium in the forest soils before operations and over the last decade indicate that approximately 90% of the tritiated water that is irrigated is transferred to the atmosphere. Dose studies indicate that exposure to site workers and offsite maximally exposed individual is very low, approximately 6 mrem/year and 0.004 mrem/year, respectively. To consistently meet the flux reduction goal of tritium into Fourmile Branch optimization activities are proposed. These efforts will increase irrigation capacity and area. An additional 17 acres are proposed for an expansion of the area to be irrigated and a planting of approximately 40 acres of pine forest plantations is underway to expand irrigation capacity. Co-mingled with the tritiated groundwater are low concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs), and 1,4-dioxane. Research studies and SRS field data indicate the forest irrigation system may have an added benefit of reducing the mass of these co-contaminants via

  20. Forest Irrigation Of Tritiated Water: A Proven Tritiated Water Management Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, Karen; Blount, Gerald; Kmetz, Thomas; Prater, Phil

    2012-11-08

    Tritium releases from the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) at the SRS in South Carolina has impacted groundwater and surface water. Tritiated groundwater plumes discharge into Fourmile Branch which is a small tributary of the Savannah River, a regional water resource. Taking advantage of the groundwater flow paths and the local topography a water collection and irrigation system was constructed and has been used at the SRS for over a decade to reduce these tritiated water releases to Fourmile Branch. The tritiated water is transferred to the atmosphere by evaporation from the pond surface, and after irrigation, wetted surface evaporation and evapotranspiration through the forest vegetation. Over the last decade SRS has irrigated over 120,000,000 gallons of tritiated water, which diverted over 6000 curies away from Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River. The system has been effective in reducing the flux of tritiated groundwater by approximately 70%. Mass balance studies of tritium in the forest soils before operations and over the last decade indicate that approximately 90% of the tritiated water that is irrigated is transferred to the atmosphere. Dose studies indicate that exposure to site workers and offsite maximally exposed individual is very low, approximately 6 mrem/year and 0.004 mrem/year, respectively. To consistently meet the flux reduction goal of tritium into Fourmile Branch optimization activities are proposed. These efforts will increase irrigation capacity and area. An additional 17 acres are proposed for an expansion of the area to be irrigated and a planting of approximately 40 acres of pine forest plantations is underway to expand irrigation capacity. Co-mingled with the tritiated groundwater are low concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs), and 1,4-dioxane. Research studies and SRS field data indicate the forest irrigation system may have an added benefit of reducing the mass of these co-contaminants via

  1. [Effects of different irrigation modes on winter wheat grain yield and water- and nitrogen use efficiency].

    PubMed

    Men, Hong-wen; Zhang, Qiu; Dai, Xing-long; Cao, Qian; Wang, Cheng-yu; Zhou, Xiao-hu; He, Ming-rong

    2011-10-01

    Taking the widely planted winter wheat cultivar Tainong 18 as test material, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different irrigation modes on the winter wheat grain yield and water- and nitrogen use efficiency in drier year (2009-2010) in Tai' an City of Shandong Province, China. Five treatments were installed, i. e., irrigation before sowing (CK), irrigation before sowing and at jointing stage (W1), irrigation before sowing and at jointing stages and at over-wintering stage with alternative irrigation at milking stage (W2), irrigation before sowing and at jointing and flowering stages (optimized traditional irrigation mode, W3), and irrigation before sowing and at over-wintering, jointing, and milking stages (traditional irrigation mode, W4). The irrigation amount was 600 m3 hm(-2) one time. Under the condition of 119.7 mm precipitation in the winter wheat growth season, no significant difference was observed in the grain yield between treatments W2 and W4, but the water use efficiency was significantly higher in W2 than in W4. Comparing with treatment W3, treatments W2 and W4 had obviously higher grain yield, but the water use efficiency had no significant difference. The partial factor productivity from N fertilization was the highest in W2 and W4, and the NO3(-)-N accumulation amount in 0-100 cm soil layer at harvest was significantly higher in W2 than in W3 and W4, suggesting that W2 could reduce NO3(-)-N leaching loss. Under the conditions of our experiment, irrigation before sowing and jointing stages and at over-wintering stage with alternative irrigation at milking stage was the optimal irrigation mode in considering both the grain yield and the water- and nitrogen use efficiency.

  2. Assessing irrigated agriculture's surface water and groundwater consumption by combining satellite remote sensing and hydrologic modelling.

    PubMed

    Peña-Arancibia, Jorge L; Mainuddin, Mohammed; Kirby, John M; Chiew, Francis H S; McVicar, Tim R; Vaze, Jai

    2016-01-15

    Globally, irrigation accounts for more than two thirds of freshwater demand. Recent regional and global assessments indicate that groundwater extraction (GWE) for irrigation has increased more rapidly than surface water extraction (SWE), potentially resulting in groundwater depletion. Irrigated agriculture in semi-arid and arid regions is usually from a combination of stored surface water and groundwater. This paper assesses the usefulness of remotely-sensed (RS) derived information on both irrigation dynamics and rates of actual evapotranspiration which are both input to a river-reach water balance model in order to quantify irrigation water use and water provenance (either surface water or groundwater). The assessment is implemented for the water-years 2004/05-2010/11 in five reaches of the Murray-Darling Basin (Australia); a heavily regulated basin with large irrigated areas and periodic droughts and floods. Irrigated area and water use are identified each water-year (from July to June) through a Random Forest model which uses RS vegetation phenology and actual evapotranspiration as predicting variables. Both irrigated areas and actual evapotranspiration from irrigated areas were compared against published estimates of irrigated areas and total water extraction (SWE+GWE).The river-reach model determines the irrigated area that can be serviced with stored surface water (SWE), and the remainder area (as determined by the Random Forest Model) is assumed to be supplemented by groundwater (GWE). Model results were evaluated against observed SWE and GWE. The modelled SWE generally captures the observed interannual patterns and to some extent the magnitudes, with Pearson's correlation coefficients >0.8 and normalised root-mean-square-error<30%. In terms of magnitude, the results were as accurate as or better than those of more traditional (i.e., using areas that fluctuate based on water resource availability and prescribed crop factors) irrigation modelling. The RS

  3. Assessing irrigated agriculture's surface water and groundwater consumption by combining satellite remote sensing and hydrologic modelling.

    PubMed

    Peña-Arancibia, Jorge L; Mainuddin, Mohammed; Kirby, John M; Chiew, Francis H S; McVicar, Tim R; Vaze, Jai

    2016-01-15

    Globally, irrigation accounts for more than two thirds of freshwater demand. Recent regional and global assessments indicate that groundwater extraction (GWE) for irrigation has increased more rapidly than surface water extraction (SWE), potentially resulting in groundwater depletion. Irrigated agriculture in semi-arid and arid regions is usually from a combination of stored surface water and groundwater. This paper assesses the usefulness of remotely-sensed (RS) derived information on both irrigation dynamics and rates of actual evapotranspiration which are both input to a river-reach water balance model in order to quantify irrigation water use and water provenance (either surface water or groundwater). The assessment is implemented for the water-years 2004/05-2010/11 in five reaches of the Murray-Darling Basin (Australia); a heavily regulated basin with large irrigated areas and periodic droughts and floods. Irrigated area and water use are identified each water-year (from July to June) through a Random Forest model which uses RS vegetation phenology and actual evapotranspiration as predicting variables. Both irrigated areas and actual evapotranspiration from irrigated areas were compared against published estimates of irrigated areas and total water extraction (SWE+GWE).The river-reach model determines the irrigated area that can be serviced with stored surface water (SWE), and the remainder area (as determined by the Random Forest Model) is assumed to be supplemented by groundwater (GWE). Model results were evaluated against observed SWE and GWE. The modelled SWE generally captures the observed interannual patterns and to some extent the magnitudes, with Pearson's correlation coefficients >0.8 and normalised root-mean-square-error<30%. In terms of magnitude, the results were as accurate as or better than those of more traditional (i.e., using areas that fluctuate based on water resource availability and prescribed crop factors) irrigation modelling. The RS

  4. Evaluation of Monensin Transport to Shallow Groundwater after Irrigation with Dairy Lagoon Water.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Sarah C; Harter, Thomas; Parikh, Sanjai J

    2016-03-01

    Animal waste products from concentrated animal feeding operations are a significant source of antibiotics to the environment. Monensin, an ionophore antibiotic commonly used to increase feed efficiency in livestock, is known to have varied toxicological effects on nontarget species. The current study builds on prior studies evaluating the impact of dairy management on groundwater quality by examining the transport of monensin in an agricultural field with coarse-textured soils during irrigation with lagoon wastewater. The dairy is located in California's San Joaquin Valley, where groundwater can be encountered <5 m below the surface. Groundwater samples were collected from a network of monitoring wells installed throughout the dairy and adjacent to irrigated fields before and after an irrigation event, which allowed for measurement of monensin potentially reaching the shallow groundwater as a direct result of irrigation with lagoon water. Monensin was extracted from water samples via hydrophilic-lipophilic balance solid-phase extraction and quantified with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Irrigation water was found to contain up to 1.6 μg L monensin, but monensin was only detected in monitoring wells surrounding the waste storage lagoon. Water chemistry changes in the wells bordering the irrigated field suggest that up to 7% of irrigation water reached groundwater within days of irrigation. The study suggests that contamination of groundwater with monensin can occur primarily by compromised waste storage systems and that rapid transport of monensin to groundwater is not likely to occur from a single irrigation event.

  5. Evaluation of Monensin Transport to Shallow Groundwater after Irrigation with Dairy Lagoon Water.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Sarah C; Harter, Thomas; Parikh, Sanjai J

    2016-03-01

    Animal waste products from concentrated animal feeding operations are a significant source of antibiotics to the environment. Monensin, an ionophore antibiotic commonly used to increase feed efficiency in livestock, is known to have varied toxicological effects on nontarget species. The current study builds on prior studies evaluating the impact of dairy management on groundwater quality by examining the transport of monensin in an agricultural field with coarse-textured soils during irrigation with lagoon wastewater. The dairy is located in California's San Joaquin Valley, where groundwater can be encountered <5 m below the surface. Groundwater samples were collected from a network of monitoring wells installed throughout the dairy and adjacent to irrigated fields before and after an irrigation event, which allowed for measurement of monensin potentially reaching the shallow groundwater as a direct result of irrigation with lagoon water. Monensin was extracted from water samples via hydrophilic-lipophilic balance solid-phase extraction and quantified with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Irrigation water was found to contain up to 1.6 μg L monensin, but monensin was only detected in monitoring wells surrounding the waste storage lagoon. Water chemistry changes in the wells bordering the irrigated field suggest that up to 7% of irrigation water reached groundwater within days of irrigation. The study suggests that contamination of groundwater with monensin can occur primarily by compromised waste storage systems and that rapid transport of monensin to groundwater is not likely to occur from a single irrigation event. PMID:27065394

  6. Perchlorate uptake in spinach as related to perchlorate, nitrate and chloride concentrations in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have reported on the detection of perchlorate in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. However, there is no information on spinach as related to perchlorate in irrigation water nor on the effect of other anions on perchlorate uptake. A greenhouse perchlorate up...

  7. Adapting irrigation management to water scarcity: constraints of plant growth, hydraulics and carbon assimilation.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water shortages are responsible for the greatest crop losses around the world and are expected to worsen. In arid areas where agriculture is dependent on irrigation, various forms of deficit irrigation management have been suggested to optimize crop yields for available soil water. The relationshi...

  8. Improving estimates of N and P loads in irrigation water from swine manure lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The implementation of nutrient management plans (NMPs) for confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) requires recording N and P loads from land-applied manure, including nutrients applied in irrigation water from manure treatment lagoons. By regulation, lagoon irrigation water nutrient records in ...

  9. Improving N and P estimates for swine manure lagoon irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management plans (NMPs) for confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) require a record of N and P loads from manure land-applications, including irrigation with lagoon water. Mississippi regulations require nutrient records for lagoon irrigation water be based on at least one annual analy...

  10. Simulated Corn Yield Responses to Limited-Water Irrigation Under Varying Soil and Climate Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water holding capacity of soils is a key factor in successful dryland and irrigated agriculture as it influences the fraction of precipitation and irrigation that is stored in the soil profile that can be subsequently used for crop production. There is a well-known dependence of water holding capaci...

  11. Assessment of water use in the Spanish irrigation district "Río Adaja"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naroua, Illiassou; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez Calvo, Raúl

    2013-04-01

    Intensive agricultural practices combined with the increasing pressure of urbanization and the changing lifestyles, have strengthened the problems of competing users over limited water resources in a fragile and already stressed environment. Sustainable irrigated agriculture is prescribed as a policy approach that maximizes economic benefits while maintaining environmental quality. Within this framework a proper management of irrigation systems saving water is required. On the other hand, crops with high tolerance to water stress and deficit irrigation are recommended. However, crop yield, among other factors, is very sensitive to water Thus, studies addressing the relations among crop water requirements, irrigation depth and crop yield are necessary. This type of study has been carried out in the Spanish irrigation District "Río Adaja" in the year 2010-2011 with the crops: wheat, barley, sugarbeet, corn, onion, potato, sunflower, clover and carrot. A soil hydrology balance model was applied taking into account climatic data for the nearby weather station and soil characteristics. Effective precipitation was calculated by the index curve number. Crop water requirements were calculated by the FAO Penman-Monteith with the application of the dual crop coefficient. Likewise, productivity was measured by the following indexes: annual relative irrigation supply (ARIS), relative water supply (RWS), relative rainfall supply (RS) and water productivity (WP). Results show that water applied with the irrigation of clover, sugarbeet, corn and onion was less than their water requirements There was a 35 % difference between the amount of water simulated with the model and the gross amount applied during the irrigation period by the irrigation district. WP values differed among crops depending, mainly, on the crop`s market price and the amount of irrigation water. The highest values corresponded to potato and onion crops.

  12. Optimal demand reponse to water pricing policies under limited water supply in irrigation: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießbach, Ulkrike; Stange, Peter; Schuetze, Niels

    2015-04-01

    Due to climate change, extreme weather conditions such as droughts may have an increasing impact on irrigated agriculture. To cope with the higher demand of water, a new decision support framework is developed which focuses on an integrated management of both irrigation water supply and demand. For modeling the regional water demand, local stochastic water demand functions are used which are derived from optimized agronomic response on farms scale. These functions take into account different soil types, crops, stochastically generated climate scenarios considering different economic conditions, e.g., variable and fixed costs. This generic approach enables the consideration of both multiple crops at farm scale as well as of the aggregated response to water pricing at a regional scale for full and deficit irrigation systems. Within the SAPHIR (SAxonian Platform for High Performance IRrigation) project a prototype of a decision support system is developed and applied for a case study in Saxony which helps to evaluate combined water supply and demand management policies on a regional level.

  13. 25 CFR 171.710 - Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual... AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Non-Assessment Status § 171.710 Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver? No. Water will not be delivered in any...

  14. 25 CFR 171.710 - Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual... AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Non-Assessment Status § 171.710 Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver? No. Water will not be delivered in any...

  15. 25 CFR 171.710 - Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual... AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Non-Assessment Status § 171.710 Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver? No. Water will not be delivered in any...

  16. 25 CFR 171.710 - Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual... AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Non-Assessment Status § 171.710 Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver? No. Water will not be delivered in any...

  17. GlobWat - a global water balance model to assess water use in irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogeveen, J.; Faurès, J.-M.; Peiser, L.; Burke, J.; van de Giesen, N.

    2015-01-01

    GlobWat is a freely distributed, global soil water balance model that is used by FAO to assess water use in irrigated agriculture; the main factor behind scarcity of freshwater in an increasing number of regions. The model is based on spatially distributed high resolution datasets that are consistent at global level and calibrated against values for Internal Renewable Water Resources, as published in AQUASTAT, FAO's global information system on water and agriculture. Validation of the model is done against mean annual river basin outflows. The water balance is calculated in two steps: first a "vertical" water balance is calculated that includes evaporation from in situ rainfall ("green" water) and incremental evaporation from irrigated crops. In a second stage, a "horizontal" water balance is calculated to determine discharges from river (sub-)basins, taking into account incremental evaporation from irrigation, open water and wetlands ("blue" water). The paper describes methodology, input and output data, calibration and validation of the model. The model results are finally compared with other global water balance models.

  18. GlobWat - a global water balance model to assess water use in irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogeveen, J.; Faurès, J.-M.; Peiser, L.; Burke, J.; van de Giesen, N.

    2015-09-01

    GlobWat is a freely distributed, global soil water balance model that is used by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to assess water use in irrigated agriculture, the main factor behind scarcity of freshwater in an increasing number of regions. The model is based on spatially distributed high-resolution data sets that are consistent at global level and calibrated against values for internal renewable water resources, as published in AQUASTAT, the FAO's global information system on water and agriculture. Validation of the model is done against mean annual river basin outflows. The water balance is calculated in two steps: first a "vertical" water balance is calculated that includes evaporation from in situ rainfall ("green" water) and incremental evaporation from irrigated crops. In a second stage, a "horizontal" water balance is calculated to determine discharges from river (sub-)basins, taking into account incremental evaporation from irrigation, open water and wetlands ("blue" water). The paper describes the methodology, input and output data, calibration and validation of the model. The model results are finally compared with other global water balance models to assess levels of accuracy and validity.

  19. On farm evaluation of the effect of low cost drip irrigation on water and crop productivity compared to conventional surface irrigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisiri, N.; Senzanje, A.; Rockstrom, J.; Twomlow, S. J.

    This on-farm research study was carried out at Zholube irrigation scheme in a semi-arid agro tropical climate of Zimbabwe to determine how low cost drip irrigation technologies compare with conventional surface irrigation systems in terms of water and crop productivity. A total of nine farmers who were practicing surface irrigation were chosen to participate in the study. The vegetable English giant rape ( Brassica napus) was grown under the two irrigation systems with three fertilizer treatments in each system: ordinary granular fertilizer, liquid fertilizer (fertigation) and the last treatment with no fertilizer. These trials were replicated three times in a randomized block design. Biometric parameters of leaf area index (LAI) and fresh weight of the produce, water use efficiency (WUE) were used to compare the performance of the two irrigation systems. A water balance of the inflows and outflows was kept for analysis of WUE. The economic profitability and the operation, maintenance and management requirements of the different systems were also evaluated. There was no significant difference in vegetable yield between the irrigation systems at 8.5 ton/ha for drip compared to 7.8 ton/ha in surface irrigation. There were significant increases in yields due to use of fertilizers. Drip irrigation used about 35% of the water used by the surface irrigation systems thus giving much higher water use efficiencies. The leaf area indices were comparable in both systems with the same fertilizer treatment ranging between 0.05 for surface without fertilizer to 6.8 for low cost drip with fertigation. Low cost drip systems did not reflect any labour saving especially when manually lifting the water into the drum compared to the use of siphons in surface irrigation systems. The gross margin level for surface irrigation was lower than for low cost drip irrigation but the gross margin to total variable cost ratio was higher in surface irrigation systems, which meant that surface

  20. Potentials and problems of sustainable irrigation with water high in salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Gal, Alon

    2015-04-01

    Water scarcity and need to expand agricultural productivity have led to ever growing utilization of poor quality water for irrigation of crops. Almost in all cases, marginal or alternative water sources for irrigation contain relatively high concentrations of dissolved salts. When salts are present, irrigation water management, especially in the dry regions where water requirements are highest, must consider leaching in addition to crop evapotranspiration requirements. Leaching requirements for agronomic success are calculable and functions of climate, soil, and very critically, of crop sensitivity and the actual salinity of the irrigation water. The more sensitive the crop and more saline the water, the higher the agronomic cost and the greater the quantitative need for leaching. Israel is a forerunner in large-scale utilization of poor quality water for irrigation and can be used as a case study looking at long term repercussions of policy alternatively encouraging irrigation with recycled water or brackish groundwater. In cases studied in desert conditions of Israel, as much of half of the water applied to crops including bell peppers in greenhouses and date palms is actually used to leach salts from the root zone. The excess water used to leach salts and maintain agronomic and economic success when irrigating with water containing salts can become an environmental hazard, especially in dry areas where natural drainage is non-existent. The leachate often contains not only salts but also agrochemicals including nutrients, and natural contaminants can be picked up and transported as well. This leachate passes beyond the root zone and eventually reaches ground or surface water resources. This, together with evidence of ongoing increases in sodium content of fresh produce and increased SAR levels of soils, suggest that the current policy and practice in Israel of utilization of high amounts of low quality irrigation water is inherently non- sustainable. Current

  1. Assessing soil water storage distribution under sprinkler irrigation by coupling 3D simulations and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Uday; Shabeeb, Ahmed; dragonetti, giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    This work analyzed the variability of sprinkler irrigation application over a bare soil, both in terms of water application efficiency and uniformity, by integrating and comparing the information on the irrigation depth data (ID), as measured by catch cans, soil water storage in the upper root zone, as measured by TDR probes, and a 3D simulations of water flow in soils. Three irrigation tests were performed at three different pressures (2, 3 and 4 bar). A lateral water redistribution was observed and simulated after each irrigation event by comparing spatial distributions of site-specific water application efficiency (AEs), as well as ratios of site-specific actual water storage increase (SWEs) and irrigation depth (IDs) to the water content before irrigation. Because of soil water redistribution processes, distribution uniformity based on soil storages was systematically higher than the catch can uniformity. The obvious consequence of lateral water redistribution processes was that the soil smoothing action on non-uniformity observed at the surface increased both with depth and over time. At a given depth the uniformity of soil water storages always attained the same value, whatever the pressure considered and the catch can-based uniformity coefficient. It was concluded that, for the case of random distribution of ID, the uniformity of water storages is driven by the soil behavior rather than by the irrigation system.

  2. Assessment of water use and its productivity in the Spanish irrigation district "Río Adaja"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Naroua, Iliassou; Sánchez-Calvo, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    A study of the assessment of the irrigation water use has been carried out in the Spanish irrigation District "Río Adaja" that has analyzed the water use efficiency and the water productivity indicators for the main crops during the first three years of operation (2010/2011, 2011/2012 and 2012/2013). A soil water balance model was applied taking into account climatic data for the nearby weather station and soil properties. Crop water requirements were calculated by the FAO Penman-Monteith with the application of the dual crop coefficient and by considering the readily available soil water content (RAW) concept. Likewise, productivity was measured by the indexes: annual relative irrigation supply (ARIS), annual relative water supply (ARWS), relative rainfall supply (RRS), the water productivity (WP), the evapotranspiration water productivity (ETWP), and the irrigation water productivity (IWP). The results show that the irrigation district applied deficit irrigation in most crops (ARIS<1), and also improved water productivity. This was higher in 2010/2011 which showed the highest effective precipitation Pe. The IWP (€/m3) index varied among crops with the highest values for onion (4.14), potato (2.79), carrot (1.37) and barley (1.21) for the first year and, onion (1.98), potato (1.69), carrot (1.70) and barley (1.16) in the second year. Thus, these crops would be a proper cropping pattern to maximize the gross income in the irrigation district.

  3. Produced water irrigation changes the soil mesofauna community in a semiarid agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Raimundo Nonato Costa; Weber, Olmar Baller; Crisóstomo, Lindbergue Araujo

    2015-08-01

    The scarcity of water in semiarid regions requires alternative sources for irrigation to improve agricultural production. Here, we aimed to evaluate the effects of produced water from oil exploration on the structure of soil mesofauna during the dry and rainy seasons in irrigated sunflower and castor bean fields in a Brazilian semiarid region. Three irrigation treatments were applied on plots cultivated with castor beans and sunflowers: produced water treated by filtration (filtrated) or treated by reverse osmosis (reverse osmosis) and groundwater. The mesofauna under the biofuel crops was collected and identified during the dry and rainy seasons. Although the abundance and richness of the total fauna did not differ between seasons in sunflower plots, the community was altered. In castor beans, the abundance, richness, and community of mesofauna observed in plots irrigated with produced water differed from the groundwater treatment. Irrigation with produced water promotes important changes in soil fauna community that justify their assessment for the maintenance and monitoring of agroecosystems.

  4. [Simulation of soil water dynamics in triploid Populus tomentosa root zone under subsurface drip irrigation].

    PubMed

    Xi, Ben-Ye; Jia, Li-Ming; Wang, Ye; Li, Guang-De

    2011-01-01

    Based on the observed data of triploid Populus tomentosa root distribution, a one-dimensional root water uptake model was proposed. Taking the root water uptake into account, the soil water dynamics in triploid P. tomentosa root zone under subsurface drip irrigation was simulated by using HYDRUS model, and the results were validated with field experiment. Besides, the HYDRUS model was used to study the effects of various irrigation technique parameters on soil wetting patterns. The RMAE for the simulated soil water content by the end of irrigation and approximately 24 h later was 7.8% and 6.0%, and the RMSE was 0.036 and 0.026 cm3 x cm(-3), respectively, illustrating that the HYDRUS model performed well in simulating the short-term soil water dynamics in triploid P. tomentosa root zone under drip irrigation, and the root water uptake model was reasonable. Comparing with 2 and 4 L x h(-1) of drip discharge and continuous irrigation, both the 1 L x h(-1) of drip discharge and the pulsed irrigation with water applied intermittently in 30 min periods could increase the volume of wetted soil and reduce deep percolation. It was concluded that the combination of 1 L x h(-1) of drip discharge and pulsed irrigation should be the first choice when applying drip irrigation to triploid P. tomentosa root zone at the experiment site. PMID:21548283

  5. Evaluating the accuracy of soil water sensors for irrigation scheduling to conserve freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjegunte, Girisha K.; Sheng, Zhuping; Clark, John A.

    2012-06-01

    In the Trans-Pecos area, pecan [ Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh) C. Koch] is a major irrigated cash crop. Pecan trees require large amounts of water for their growth and flood (border) irrigation is the most common method of irrigation. Pecan crop is often over irrigated using traditional method of irrigation scheduling by counting number of calendar days since the previous irrigation. Studies in other pecan growing areas have shown that the water use efficiency can be improved significantly and precious freshwater can be saved by scheduling irrigation based on soil moisture conditions. This study evaluated the accuracy of three recent low cost soil water sensors (ECH2O-5TE, Watermark 200SS and Tensiometer model R) to monitor volumetric soil water content (θv) to develop improved irrigation scheduling in a mature pecan orchard in El Paso, Texas. Results indicated that while all three sensors were successful in following the general trends of soil moisture conditions during the growing season, actual measurements differed significantly. Statistical analyses of results indicated that Tensiometer provided relatively accurate soil moisture data than ECH2O-5TE and Watermark without site-specific calibration. While ECH2O-5TE overestimated the soil water content, Watermark and Tensiometer underestimated. Results of this study suggested poor accuracy of all three sensors if factory calibration and reported soil water retention curve for study site soil texture were used. This indicated that sensors needed site-specific calibration to improve their accuracy in estimating soil water content data.

  6. Irrigation depth far exceeds water uptake depth in an oasis cropland in the middle reaches of Heihe River Basin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural irrigation in the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin consumes approximately 80% of the total river water. Whether the irrigation depth matches the water uptake depth of crops is one of the most important factors affecting the efficiency of irrigation water use. Our results indicated that the influence of plastic film on soil water δ18O was restricted to 0–30 cm soil depth. Based on a Bayesian model (MixSIR), we found that irrigated maize acquired water preferentially from 0–10 cm soil layer, with a median uptake proportion of 87 ± 15%. Additionally, maize utilised a mixture of irrigation and shallow soil water instead of absorbing the irrigation water directly. However, only 24.7 ± 5.5% of irrigation water remained in 0–10 cm soil layer, whereas 29.5 ± 2.8% and 38.4 ± 3.3% of the irrigation water infiltrated into 10–40 cm and 40–80 cm layers. During the 4 irrigation events, approximately 39% of the irrigation and rainwater infiltrated into soil layers below 80 cm. Reducing irrigation amount and developing water-saving irrigation methods will be important strategies for improving the efficiency of irrigation water use in this area. PMID:26463010

  7. Irrigation depth far exceeds water uptake depth in an oasis cropland in the middle reaches of Heihe River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-10-01

    Agricultural irrigation in the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin consumes approximately 80% of the total river water. Whether the irrigation depth matches the water uptake depth of crops is one of the most important factors affecting the efficiency of irrigation water use. Our results indicated that the influence of plastic film on soil water δ18O was restricted to 0-30 cm soil depth. Based on a Bayesian model (MixSIR), we found that irrigated maize acquired water preferentially from 0-10 cm soil layer, with a median uptake proportion of 87 ± 15%. Additionally, maize utilised a mixture of irrigation and shallow soil water instead of absorbing the irrigation water directly. However, only 24.7 ± 5.5% of irrigation water remained in 0-10 cm soil layer, whereas 29.5 ± 2.8% and 38.4 ± 3.3% of the irrigation water infiltrated into 10-40 cm and 40-80 cm layers. During the 4 irrigation events, approximately 39% of the irrigation and rainwater infiltrated into soil layers below 80 cm. Reducing irrigation amount and developing water-saving irrigation methods will be important strategies for improving the efficiency of irrigation water use in this area.

  8. Irrigation depth far exceeds water uptake depth in an oasis cropland in the middle reaches of Heihe River Basin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural irrigation in the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin consumes approximately 80% of the total river water. Whether the irrigation depth matches the water uptake depth of crops is one of the most important factors affecting the efficiency of irrigation water use. Our results indicated that the influence of plastic film on soil water δ(18)O was restricted to 0-30 cm soil depth. Based on a Bayesian model (MixSIR), we found that irrigated maize acquired water preferentially from 0-10 cm soil layer, with a median uptake proportion of 87 ± 15%. Additionally, maize utilised a mixture of irrigation and shallow soil water instead of absorbing the irrigation water directly. However, only 24.7 ± 5.5% of irrigation water remained in 0-10 cm soil layer, whereas 29.5 ± 2.8% and 38.4 ± 3.3% of the irrigation water infiltrated into 10-40 cm and 40-80 cm layers. During the 4 irrigation events, approximately 39% of the irrigation and rainwater infiltrated into soil layers below 80 cm. Reducing irrigation amount and developing water-saving irrigation methods will be important strategies for improving the efficiency of irrigation water use in this area.

  9. Nitrate exported in drainage waters of two sprinkler-irrigated watersheds.

    PubMed

    Cavero, J; Beltrán, A; Aragüés, R

    2003-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of surface waters has been linked to irrigated agriculture across the world. We determined the NO3-N loads in the drainage waters of two sprinkler-irrigated watersheds located in the Ebro River basin (Spain) and their relationship to irrigation and N management. Crop water requirements, irrigation, N fertilization, and the volume and NO3-N concentration of drainage waters were measured or estimated during two-year (Watershed A; 494 irrigated ha) and one-year (Watershed B; 470 irrigated ha) study periods. Maize (Zea mays L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) were grown in 40 to 60% and 15 to 33% of the irrigated areas, respectively. The seasonal irrigation performance index (IPI) ranged from 92 to 100%, indicating high-quality management of irrigation. However, the IPI varied among fields and overirrigation occurred in 17 to 44% of the area. Soil and maize stalk nitrate contents measured at harvest indicated that N fertilizer rates could be decreased. Drainage flows were 68 mm yr(-1) in Watershed A and 194 mm yr(-1) in Watershed B. Drainage NO3-N concentrations were independent of drainage flows and similar in the irrigated and nonirrigated periods (average: 23-29 mg L(-1)). Drainage flows determined the exported mass of NO3-N, which varied from 18 (Watershed A) to 49 (Watershed B) kg ha(-1) yr(-1), representing 8 (Watershed A) and 22% (Watershed B) of the applied fertilizer plus manure N. High-quality irrigation management coupled to the split application of N through the sprinkler systems allowed a reasonable compromise between profitability and reduced N pollution in irrigation return flows. PMID:12809292

  10. Physiological mechanisms contributing to the increased water-use efficiency in winter wheat under deficit irrigation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwu; Zhu, Zixi; Musick, Jack T; Stewart, B A; Dusek, Donald A

    2006-02-01

    Deficit irrigation in winter wheat has been practiced in the areas with limited irrigation water resources. The objectives of this study were to (i) understand the physiological basis for determinations of grain yield and water-use efficiency in grain yield (WUE) under deficit irrigation; and (ii) investigate the effect of deficit irrigation on dry matter accumulation and remobilization of pre-anthesis carbon reserves during grain filling. A field experiment was conducted in the Southern High Plains of the USA and winter wheat (cv. TAM 202) was grown on Pullman clay loam soil (fine mixed thermic Torretic Paleustoll). Treatments consisted of rain-fed, deficit irrigation from jointing to the middle of grain filling, and full irrigation. The physiological measurements included leaf water potential, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and leaf area index. The rain-fed treatment had the lowest seasonal evapotranspiration (ET), biomass, grain yield, harvest index (HI) and WUE as a result of moderate to severe water stress from jointing to grain filling. Irrigation application increased seasonal ET, and ET increased as irrigation frequency increased. The seasonal ET increased 20% in one-irrigation treatments between jointing and anthesis, 32-46% in two-irrigation treatments, and 67% in three- and full irrigation treatments. Plant biomass, grain yield, HI and WUE increased as the result of increased ET. The increased yield under irrigation was mainly contributed by the increased number of spikes, and seeds per square meter and per spike. Among the irrigation treatments, grain yield increased significantly but the WUE increased slightly as irrigation frequency increased. The increased WUE under deficit irrigation was contributed by increased HI. Water stress during grain filling reduced Pn and Gs, and accelerated leaf senescence. However, the water stress during grain filling induced remobilization of pre-anthesis carbon reserves to grains, and the

  11. Soil chemical changes resulting from irrigation with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ganjegunte, G.K.; Vance, G.F.; King, L.A.

    2005-12-01

    Land application of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) co-produced water is a popular management option within northwestern Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. This study evaluated the impacts of land application of CBNG waters on soil chemical properties at five sites. Soil samples were collected from different depths (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60, 60-90, and 90-120 cm) from sites that were irrigated with CBNG water for 2 to 3 yr and control sites. Chemical properties of CBNG water used for irrigation on the study sites indicate that electrical conductivity of CBNG water (EC{sub w}) and sodium adsorption ratio of CBNG water (SAR{sub w}) values were greater than those recommended for irrigation use on the soils at the study sites. Soil chemical analyses indicated that electrical conductivity of soil saturated paste extracts (ECe) and sodium adsorption ratio of soil saturated paste extracts (SAR(e)) values for irrigated sites were significantly greater (P < 0.05) than control plots in the upper 30-cm soil depths. Mass balance calculations suggested that there has been significant buildup of Na in irrigated soils due to CBNG irrigation water as well as Na mobilization within the soil profiles. Results indicate that irrigation with CBNG water significantly impacts certain soil properties, particularly if amendments are not properly utilized. This study provides information for better understanding changes in soil properties due to land application of CBNG water.

  12. [Effects of irrigation time on the growth and water- and fertilizer use efficiencies of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Dang, Jian-You; Pei, Xue-Xia; Wang, Jiao-Ai; Zhang, Jing; Cao, Yong; Zhang, Ding-Yi

    2012-10-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of irrigation time before wintering (November 10th, November 25th, and December 10th) and in spring (March 5th, re-greening stage; and April 5th, jointing stage) on the growth, dry matter translocation, water use efficiency (WUE), and fertilizer use efficiency (FUE) of winter wheat after returning corn straw into soil. The irrigation time before wintering mainly affected the wheat population size before wintering and at jointing stage, whereas the irrigation time in spring mainly affected the spike number, grain yield, dry matter translocation, WUE, and FUE. The effects of irrigation time before wintering to the yield formation of winter wheat were closely related to the irrigation time in spring. When the irrigation time in spring was at re-greening stage, the earlier the irrigation time before wintering, the larger the spike number and the higher the grain yield; when the irrigation time in spring was at jointing stage, the delay of the irrigation time before wintering made the spike number and grain yield decreased after an initial increase, the kernel number per plant increased, while the 1000-kernel mass was less affected. The WUE, nutrition uptake, and FUE all decreased with the delay of the irrigation time before wintering, but increased with the delay of the irrigation time in spring. Therefore, under the conditions of returning corn straw into soil and sowing when the soil had enough moisture, to properly advance the irrigation time before wintering could make the soil more compacted, promote the tillering and increase the population size before winter, and in combining the increased irrigation at jointing stage, could control the invalid tillering in early spring, increase the spiking rate, obtain stable kernel mass, and thus, increase the WUE and FUE, realizing water-saving and high efficiency for winter wheat cultivation.

  13. Productivity of irrigated bean submitted to water deficit in different phenological stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miorini, T. J. J.; Saad, J. C. C.

    2012-04-01

    Water scarcity is the most important factor limiting crop yields worldwide. An increased sustainable use of irrigation water will be necessary to feed our growing population. Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is widespread in the social and economic scene in Brazil, as well it is Brazilian population main dish, and it also helps small and medium farmers' income. The damage caused by water deficit depends on the duration, severity and stage of plant development. The bean plant is classified as sensitive to both water deficit and excess water in the soil. The hypothesis is that if the water supply is suppressed in just one of the five development stages of irrigated beans, it can result in productivity reduction lower than 20%, allowing water economy. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of bean Carioca group IAC Alvorada yield components, with irrigation suppression in each of the five phenological phases (emergence, vegetative, flowering, grain filling and maturation) and no irrigation and irrigated in all stages. The study was conducted at Agronomical Sciences College, UNESP, Botucatu, SP, Brazil. The statistical design was the randomized block with seven treatments and four replications. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and "t" test at 5% probability. The irrigation suppression only during emergence, filling, and maturation phases did not show any statistical difference in productivity when compared with the irrigated at all stages. The irrigation suppression at vegetative and flowering phase, reduced the production at 75.1 and 76.2%, respectively, when compared with irrigation at all stages, despite the reduction of the water depth being around 20% for flowering and 33.8% for the vegetative phase when compared to the irrigated at all stages. Irrigation suppression in all phases generated a reduction of approximately 87.3% when compared with irrigation at all stages. During the experiment there was a total recorded rainfall of 156mm

  14. Irrigation-water quality during 1976 irrigation season in the Sulphur Creek basin, Yakima and Benton counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boucher, P.R.; Fretwell, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    A water-quality-sampling network was designed for the Sulphur Creek basin to observe the effects of farming practices on irrigation. Sediment and nutrient yield, discharge, and water temperature data were collected during the 1976 irrigation season and the following fall and winter. The suspended-sediment yield of the basin during this period was 2.0 tons per acre of irrigated cropland. Only about 3% of the net outflow of sediment occurred during the nonirrigation season. The yield computed by subbasin ranged from 0.7 to 7 tons per acre, depending mainly on land slope, but a high percentage of orchard land in the subbasins was probably also significant in reducing loads. Nutrient outflows during the study period were 1,180,000 pounds of nitrogen and 120,000 pounds of phosphorous. Nitrate-plus-nitrite represent 70% of the nitrogen outflow in the irrigation season and 84% in the nonirrigation season. The monitoring network was discontinued at the end of the study period, due largely to insufficient farmer participation. Network sensitivity in the control subbasins was inadequate to detect the effects of a planned demonstration program of best management practices. (USGS)

  15. Water relations of differentially irrigated cotton exposed to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The field study was conducted to test the hypothesis that plants chronically exposed to O{sub 3} may be more susceptible to drought because O{sub 3} typically inhibits root growth and increases shoot-root ratios in plants. Cotton was grown in open-top chambers on Hanford coarse sandy loam in Riverside, CA. Plants were grown under three irrigation regimes: Optimum water for lint production (OW), suboptimum or moderate drought stress (SO), and severely drought stressed (SS) and were exposed to seasonal 12 h (0800-2000) O{sub 3} centrations of 0.015, 0.074, 0.094, or 0.111/microLL. Leaf xylem pressure potentials Psi(sub 1) and soil water content Theta(sub v) were measured weekly from June to October. Mean seasonal Psi(sub 1) increased from -1.89 MPa to -1.72 MPa in low to high O{sub 3} treatments, averaged across soil water regimes. Ozone had no effect on seasonal water use of cotton, but water use efficiency was significantly reduced by O{sub 3} in OW and SO, but not in SS treatments. Drought-stressed plants extracted proportionally greater amounts of water from deeper in the soil profile than OW cotton, and O{sub 3} had no apparent effect on this redistribution of roots in the soil. Since O{sub 3} had no apparent effect on the ability of drought-stressed cotton to maintain Psi(sub 1) and to increase root growth relative to shoot growth, this suggests that O{sub 3} may have little or no effect on the potential of cotton to adapt to or tolerate drought.

  16. Gender and power contestations over water use in irrigation schemes: Lessons from the lake Chilwa basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkhoma, Bryson; Kayira, Gift

    2016-04-01

    Over the past two decades, Malawi has been adversely hit by climatic variability and changes, and irrigation schemes which rely mostly on water from rivers have been negatively affected. In the face of dwindling quantities of water, distribution and sharing of water for irrigation has been a source of contestations and conflicts. Women who constitute a significant section of irrigation farmers in schemes have been major culprits. The study seeks to analyze gender contestations and conflicts over the use of water in the schemes developed in the Lake Chilwa basin, in southern Malawi. Using oral and written sources as well as drawing evidence from participatory and field observations conducted at Likangala and Domasi irrigation schemes, the largest schemes in the basin, the study observes that women are not passive victims of male domination over the use of dwindling waters for irrigation farming. They have often used existing political and traditional structures developed in the management of water in the schemes to competitively gain monopoly over water. They have sometimes expressed their agency by engaging in irrigation activities that fall beyond the control of formal rules and regulations of irrigation agriculture. Other than being losers, women are winning the battle for water and land resources in the basin.

  17. Valuation of irrigation water in South-western Iran using a hedonic pricing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim; Shahsavari, Zahra

    2011-12-01

    Population growth, improved socioeconomic conditions, increased demand for various types of water use, and a reduction in water supply has created more competition for scarce water supplies leveling many countries. Efficient allocation of water supplies between different economic sectors is therefore very important. Water valuation is a useful tool to determine water price. Water pricing can play a major part in improving water allocation by encouraging users to conserve scarce water resources, and promoting improvements in productivity. We used a hedonic pricing method to reveal the implicit value of irrigation water by analyzing agricultural land values in farms under the Doroodzan dam in South-western Iran. The method was applied to farms in which irrigation water came from wells and canals. The availability of irrigation water was one of the most important factors influencing land prices. The value of irrigation water in the farms investigated was estimated to be 0.046 per cubic meter. The estimated price for water was clearly higher than the price farmers currently pay for water in the area of study. Efficient water pricing could help the sustainability of the water resources. Farmers must therefore be informed of the real value of irrigation water used on their land.

  18. Optimal management of water resources demand and supply in irrigated agriculture from plot to regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Niels; Wagner, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Growing water scarcity in agriculture is an increasing problem in future in many regions of the world. For assessing irrigation as a measure to increase agricultural water security a generalized stochastic optimization framework for a spatial distributed estimation of future irrigation water demand is proposed, which ensures safe yields and a high water productivity at the same time. Different open loop and closed loop control strategies are evaluated within this stochastic optimization framework in order to generate reliable stochastic crop water production functions (SCWPF). The resulting database of SCWPF can serve as a central decision support tool for both, (i) a cost benefit analysis of farm irrigation modernization on a local scale and (ii) a regional water demand management using a multi-scale approach for modeling and implementation. The new approach is applied using the example of a case study in Saxony, which is dealing with the sustainable management of future irrigation water demands and its implementation.

  19. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon

  20. Using the soil water balance to analyze the deep percolation losses and the irrigation adequacy of irrigated citrus crops (Haouz plain, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassah, Houda; Fakir, Younes; Er-raki, Salah; Khabba, Said; Merlin, Olivier; Mougenot, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    In the semi-arid Haouz plain, located in central Morocco, agriculture consumes about 85% of the available water resources. Therefore, the management of irrigation water is important to avoid the water loss by soil evaporation and by deep percolation (DP) below the plant root zone. Estimating the irrigation water demand has been investigated by many studies in the Haouz plain, but DP losses beneath the irrigated areas have not been quantified yet. In this context, the objectives of the persent work are threefold :1) to evaluate DP over irrigated citrus orchard under drip and flood irrigation systems using the soil water balance equation; 2) to compare the obtained results to direct measurements of DP by a "flux-meter"; and 3) to optimize the irrigation rates that avoid excessive DP losses and water stress. The results showed that the weekly DP losses vary in average from 15 mm/week to more than 40 mm/week depending to the amount of water supply. The irrigation systems have also an important impact on DP losses evaluated to 38 % in drip irrigation and 12% in flood irrigation. Additionally the density of canopy influences the DP percentage inducing a difference of 10% between the denser citrus site and the sparse one. The comparison of DP losses calculated by soil water balance with those measured by a flux-meter installed beneath the root zone show that the first method gives higher values than the second does. Finally we evaluated the adequacy of the water supply for the crop needs based on two performance indices: depleted fraction (DF) and relative evapotranspiration (RET), showing that the drip irrigation has respond to the culture demands with an excessive quantity of irrigation, unlike to the flood one.

  1. Roles of the combined irrigation, drainage, and storage of the canal network in improving water reuse in the irrigation districts along the lower Yellow River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Luo, Yi; He, Chansheng; Lai, Jianbin; Li, Xiubin

    2010-09-01

    SummaryThe commonly used irrigation system in the irrigation districts (with a combined irrigation area of 3.334 × 10 6 ha) along the lower Yellow River of China is canal network. It delivers water from the Yellow River to the fields, collects surface runoff and drainage from cropland, and stores both of them for subsequent irrigation uses. This paper developed a new combined irrigation, drainage, and storage (CIDS) module for the SWAT2000 model, simulated the multiple roles of the CIDS canal system, and estimated its performance in improving water reuse in the irrigation districts under different irrigation and water diversion scenarios. The simulation results show that the annual evapotranspiration (ET) of the double-cropping winter wheat and summer maize was the highest under the full irrigation scenario (automatic irrigation), and the lowest under the no irrigation scenario. It varied between these two values when different irrigation schedules were adopted. Precipitation could only meet the water requirement of the double-cropping system by 62-96% on an annual basis; that of the winter wheat by 32-36%, summer maize by 92-123%, and cotton by 87-98% on a seasonal basis. Hence, effective irrigation management for winter wheat is critical to ensure high wheat yield in the study area. Runoff generation was closely related to precipitation and influenced by irrigation. The highest and lowest annual runoff accounted for 19% and 11% of the annual precipitation under the full irrigation and no irrigation scenarios, respectively. Nearly 70% of the annual runoff occurred during months of July and August due to the concentrated precipitation in these 2 months. The CIDS canals play an important role in delivering the diversion water from the Yellow River, intercepting the surface runoff and drainage from cropland (inflow of the CIDS canal) and recharging the shallow aquifer for later use. Roughly 14-26% of the simulated total flow in the CIDS canal system recharged

  2. Corn yield and water use efficiency under contrasting irrigation application methods: an AquaCrop study contrasting subsurface drip and sprinkler irrigation methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain corn (Zea mays, L.) is sensitive to soil water availability, which can be influenced by irrigation application method. Four facts motivate deficit irrigation of corn in this region. First, declining Ogallala aquifer well yields limit water availability and thus the area of land that can be irr...

  3. Season-long Changes in Infiltration Rates Associated with Irrigation Water Sodicity and pH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increasing need to substitute low quality waters, including saline sodic waters and treated municipal waste water for fresh water when irrigating land in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. In almost all instances low quality waters are more sodic than the fresh waters currently utili...

  4. New steady-state models for water-limited cropping systems using saline irrigation waters: Analytical solutions and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaggs, T. H.; Anderson, R. G.; Corwin, D. L.; Suarez, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the diminishing availability of good quality water for irrigation, it is increasingly important that irrigation and salinity management tools be able to target submaximal crop yields and support the use of marginal quality waters. In this work, we present a steady-state irrigated systems modeling framework that accounts for reduced plant water uptake due to root zone salinity. Two new explicit, closed-form analytical solutions for the root zone solute concentration profile are obtained, corresponding to two alternative functional forms of the uptake reduction function. The solutions express a general relationship between irrigation water salinity, irrigation rate, crop salt tolerance, crop transpiration, and (using standard approximations) crop yield. Example applications are illustrated, including the calculation of irrigation requirements for obtaining targeted submaximal yields, and the generation of crop-water production functions for varying irrigation waters, irrigation rates, and crops. Model predictions are shown to be mostly consistent with existing models and available experimental data. Yet the new solutions possess clear advantages over available alternatives, including: (i) the new solutions were derived from a complete physical-mathematical description of the system, rather than based on an ad hoc formulation; (ii) the new analytical solutions are explicit and can be evaluated without iterative techniques; (iii) the solutions permit consideration of two common functional forms of salinity induced reductions in crop water uptake, rather than being tied to one particular representation; and (iv) the utilized modeling framework is compatible with leading transient-state numerical models.

  5. How much water do we need for irrigation under Climate Change in the Mediterranean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fader, Marianela; Alberte, Bondeau; Wolfgang, Cramer; Simon, Decock; Sinan, Shi

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic climate change will very likely alter the hydrological system of already water-limited agricultural landscapes around the Mediterranean. This includes the need for, as well as the availability of irrigation water. On top of that Mediterranean agroecosystems are very likely to be under strong pressure in the near future through changes in consumer demands and diets, increasing urbanization, demographic change, and new markets for agricultural exportation. As a first step to assess the water demand of the agricultural sector, we use an ecohydrological model (the Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed land model, LPJmL) to estimate current and future irrigation water requirements of this region, considering various climate and socio-economic scenarios. LPJmL is a process-based, agricultural and water balance model, where plant growth is ecophysiologically coupled with hydrological variables. For these simulations, the model was adapted to the Mediterranean region in terms of agrosystems as well as crop parameters, and a sensitivity analysis for the irrigation system efficiency was performed. Patterns of current irrigation water requirements differ strongly spatially within the Mediterranean region depending mainly on potential evapotranspiration, the combination of crops cultivated and the extension of irrigated areas. The simulations for the future indicate that the Mediterranean may need considerable additional amounts of irrigation water. However, the regional patterns differ strongly depending on changes in length of growing periods, changes in transpirational rate (temperature and precipitation change, CO2-fertilization), and the consideration of potential improvements in irrigation system efficiency.

  6. An optimal management of water for a turf irrigation system in Milan area (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deangelis, Maria Laura; Mazzoleni, Abramo

    2015-04-01

    The design of an irrigation system is not just "draw", but a complex organization that takes into account of a whole range of information that are inherently contained in the graphic representation of the final plan. The various stages that make up the activity of designing an irrigation system include: general survey of the site to be irrigated, meteorological analysis of the site and the calculation of the water requirement, development of the project with the choice and location of the components. The use of a numerical model based on water balance in a soil-water-atmosphere system allows the evaluation of the optimal water requirement as a function of meteorological characteristics. The water saving is enabled through a smart programming of a modern automation system for irrigation. The meteorological data analysis was conducted choosing from the series of two special years: the year 2002, particularly rainy, and the other in 2007, extraordinarily drought. The determination of the water requirements of turf was conducted on a daily scale. The water consumption was calculated in a classic irrigation system that covers the delivery of 5 mm of water per day, interrupted only by a rain sensor. In the second case water consumption was analysed by managing an irrigation controller based on actual water needs of turf day by day. For the two years in question water savings ranges between 13 and 27%.

  7. Irrigation science and water quality challenges in Ukbekistan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture in Uzbekistan is nearly entirely irrigated due to the semi-arid to arid climate. Similar conditions exist in the U.S. Southern High Plains, and several irrigation crops are important to both regions, including cotton, maize and winter wheat. This presentation discussed cooperative resear...

  8. Evolution of water repellency of organic growing media used in Horticulture and consequences on hysteretic behaviours of the water retention curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Jean-Charles; Qi, Guifang; Charpentier, Sylvain; Boivin, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    Most of growing media used in horticulture (particularly peat substrates) shows hysteresis phenomena during desiccation and rehydration cycles, which greatly affects their hydraulic properties. The origins of these properties have often been related to one or several of the specific mechanisms such as the non-geometrical uniformity of the pores (also called ‘ink bottle' effect), presence of trapped air, shrinkage-swelling phenomena, and changes in water repellency. However, recent results showed that changes in wettability during desiccation and rehydration could be considered as one of the main factors leading to hysteretic behaviour in these materials with high organic matter contents (Naasz et al., 2008). The general objective was to estimate the evolutions of changes in water repellency on the water retention properties and associated hysteresis phenomena in relation to the intensity and the number of drying/wetting cycles. For this, simultaneous shrinkage/swelling and water retention curves were obtained using method previously developed for soil shrinkage analysis by Boivin (2006) that we have adapted for growing media and to their physical behaviours during rewetting. The experiment was performed in a climatic chamber at 20°C. A cylinder with the growing medium tested was placed on a porous ceramic disk which is used to control the pressure and to full/empty water of the sample. The whole of the device was then placed on a balance to record the water loss/storage with time; whereas linear displacement transducers were used to measure the changes in sample height and diameter upon drying and wetting in the axial and radial directions. Ceramic cups (2 cm long and 0.21 cm diameter) connected to pressure transducers were inserted in the middle of the samples to record the water pressure head. In parallell, contact angles were measured by direct droplet method at different steps during the drying/rewetting cycles. First results obtained on weakly decomposed

  9. Digital-model study of ground-water hydrology, Columbia Basin Irrigation Project Area, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, H.H.; Hansen, A.J., Jr.; Skrivan, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    Since 1952 water diverted from the Columbia River at Grand Coulee Dam has been used to irrigate parts of the Columbia Basin Irrigation Project area in eastern Washington, and as a result ground-water levels generally have risen in the area. The rapid increases in ground-water inflow, outflow, and storage from irrigation have created a need for a better understanding of the ground-water system before and after the start of irrigation to establish guidelines necessary for management of the area's ground-water resource. Data and information from previous geologic and hydrologic studies were used as a basis for quantitative analyses of ground-water inflow and outflow by means of digital computer models representing three major areas--Quincy Basin, Pasco Basin, and Royal Slope.

  10. Irrigated lands assessment for water management: Technique test. [California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. L.; Brown, C. E.; Eriksson, M.; Grigg, C. A.; Thomas, R. W.; Colwell, R. N.; Estes, J. E.; Tinney, L. R.; Baggett, J. O.; Sawyer, G.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure for estimating irrigated land using full frame LANDSAT imagery was demonstrated. Relatively inexpensive interpretation of multidate LANDSAT photographic enlargements was used to produce a map of irrigated land in California. The LANDSAT and ground maps were then linked by regression equations to enable precise estimation of irrigated land area by county, basin, and statewide. Land irrigated at least once in California in 1979 was estimated to be 9.86 million acres, with an expected error of less than 1.75% at the 99% level of confidence. To achieve the same level of error with a ground-only sample would have required 3 to 5 times as many ground sample units statewide. A procedure for relatively inexpensive computer classification of LANDSAT digital data to irrigated land categories was also developed. This procedure is based on ratios of MSS band 7 and 5, and gave good results for several counties in the Central Valley.

  11. Fair and sustainable irrigation water management in the Babai basin, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, B; Verhoeven, R; Troch, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to find a strategy to provide year-round irrigation for cultivating three crops per year in the southern plains of the country taking a case study of the Babai basin. Despite having enough flows during the summer for growing rice in total 27,000 ha area, the dry season flows of the Babai river can irrigate only 6,300 ha in winter and 4,000 ha in spring limiting the cropping intensity to 138.50%. It is proposed to irrigate the 7,500 ha southern dry area at the right bank bringing water from a large snow-fed river: the Karnali. Water balance study of the three irrigation regions to be irrigated from the Babai source preserving their existing water rights showed that the year-round irrigation at the west with the proposed arrangement will fall short of only 13.9 million m(3) water volume. At the east side, the head reach area and the tail portion will fall short of 19.4 and 66.4 million m(3) of water to insure a cropping intensity of 250%. The deficits can be fulfilled by means of capturing the excess river water of rainy season in local reservoirs and by making conjunctive use of groundwater. The proposed solution is financially, environmentally and socially viable being a cost effective, user friendly and should be the linchpin towards attaining a sustainable year-round irrigation in the region.

  12. Fair and sustainable irrigation water management in the Babai basin, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, B; Verhoeven, R; Troch, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to find a strategy to provide year-round irrigation for cultivating three crops per year in the southern plains of the country taking a case study of the Babai basin. Despite having enough flows during the summer for growing rice in total 27,000 ha area, the dry season flows of the Babai river can irrigate only 6,300 ha in winter and 4,000 ha in spring limiting the cropping intensity to 138.50%. It is proposed to irrigate the 7,500 ha southern dry area at the right bank bringing water from a large snow-fed river: the Karnali. Water balance study of the three irrigation regions to be irrigated from the Babai source preserving their existing water rights showed that the year-round irrigation at the west with the proposed arrangement will fall short of only 13.9 million m(3) water volume. At the east side, the head reach area and the tail portion will fall short of 19.4 and 66.4 million m(3) of water to insure a cropping intensity of 250%. The deficits can be fulfilled by means of capturing the excess river water of rainy season in local reservoirs and by making conjunctive use of groundwater. The proposed solution is financially, environmentally and socially viable being a cost effective, user friendly and should be the linchpin towards attaining a sustainable year-round irrigation in the region. PMID:19403963

  13. Changes in soil aggregate stability under different irrigation doses of waste water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán, Alicia; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Victoria; Bárcenas, Gema

    2010-05-01

    Freshwater availability and soil degradation are two of the most important environmental problems in the Mediterranean area acerbated by incorrect agricultural use of irrigation in which organic matter is not correctly managed, the use of low quality water for irrigation, and the inefficiency of dose irrigation. For these reasons strategies for saving water and for the restoration of the mean properties of soil are necessary. The use of treated waste water for the irrigation of agricultural land could be a good solution to these problems, as it reduces the utilization of fresh water and could potentially improve key soil properties. In this work we have been studying, for more than three years, the effects on soil properties of different doses of irrigation with waste water. Here we show the results on aggregate stability. The study is located in an agricultural area at Biar (Alicante, SE of Spain), with a crop of grape (Vitis labrusca). Three types of waters are being used in the irrigation of the soil: fresh water (control) (TC), and treated waste water from secondary (T2) and tertiary treatment (T3). Three different doses of irrigation have been applied to fit the efficiency of the irrigation to the crop and soil type: D10 (10 L m-2 every week during 17 months), D50 (50 L m-2 every fifteen days during 14 moths) and D30 (30 L m-2 every week during 6 months up to present day). The results showed a clear decrease of aggregate stability during the period we used the second dose (D50) independent of the type of water used. That dose of irrigation and frequency produced strong wetting and drying cycles (WD) in the soil, and this is suspected to be the main factor responsible for the results. When we changed the dose of irrigation to D30, reducing the quantity per event and increasing the frequency, the soil aggregate stability started to improve. This dose avoids strong drying periods between irrigation events and the aggregate stability is confirmed to be slowly

  14. Effects of irrigation practices on water use in the groundwater management districts within the Kansas high plains, 1991-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    Data compiled for the High Plains region of Kansas that includes five Groundwater Management Districts (GMDs) were analyzed for trends in irrigation water use, acres irrigated, precipitation, irrigation system types, and irrigated crop types to determine the effects of irrigation practices on water use over time. For the study period 1991 through 2003, precipitation decreased significantly (with 95-percent confidence) in northwestern and west-central Kansas but not in the southwestern and south-central parts of the State. Irrigation water use had no statistically significant trend during this period. There was a good (R= -0.77) relation between average regional precipitation and total GMD irrigation water use. When irrigation water use was adjusted for this relation, there was a positive trend (90-percent confidence level) in the adjusted irrigation water use. Another adjustment to water use was made using the ratio of annual precipitation to 1991-2005 average precipitation, which resulted in a negative trend (95-percent confidence level) in irrigation water use. This demonstrated the contradictory nature of precipitation adjustments to water use, making their utility somewhat suspect. GMD 3 in southwestern Kansas used 63 percent of the total acre-feet of irrigation water within all the GMDs. When all GMDs are considered, the number of irrigated acres for flood and center pivot systems without drop nozzles decreased significantly during the study period. At the same time the number of drop nozzle irrigated acres increased significantly. The number of irrigated acres of water-intensive crops (corn, alfalfa, and soybeans) also increased significantly, whereas the number of less- or non-water-intensive crops (grain sorghum and wheat), and multiple crop type acres decreased. Drop nozzle irrigation systems used approximately 2 percent less water in a year-by-year comparison than center pivot systems and 8 to 11 percent less water than flood irrigation. The best

  15. Rootzone processes, tree water-use, and the equitable allocation of irrigation water to olives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Steve; Clothier, Brent; Caspari, Horst; Neal, Sue

    John Philip's first job in 1947, at Griffith in Australia's Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area, was to develop means by which irrigation practices could become sustainable. Subsequently, through his analytical endeavors he created revolutionary new understanding of mass and energy transfers in the soil-plantatmosphere continuum. Here we describe applications and modeling that have directly benefited from John Philip's insights and perspicacity. We have used a new means for determining the radiation interception by an isolated olive tree, and we have employed these results to interpret and model the measured rates of tree water-use from heat-pulse measures of sapflow. These parameters are used in a risk assessment framework, along with measures of the soil's hydraulic character to provide a basis for establishing guidelines for the equitable and sustainable allocation of water for the irrigation of olive trees in Marlborough, New Zealand. We find that small 2-year old olive trees use about 25 litres a week, whereas mature 8-year old trees transpire about 525 L/wk. Our model developed to establish irrigation allocations, SPASMO, used a 28-year sequence of local weather records. For the Fairhall stony silt loam, we find that an irrigation allocation of 230 mm will meet the needs of olives 9 years in 10. Average requirements would be met with just 140 mm. Only 35 mm would be required to meet the needs of olives 90% of the time on the Woodbourne deep silt loam. Apposite measurements and apt modeling are shown capable of guiding regulatory authorities in managing the complexity of allocating water to olive irrigationists.

  16. Classifying Residents who use Landscape Irrigation: Implications for Encouraging Water Conservation Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Laura A.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Rumble, Joy N.; Martin, Emmett T.; Cantrell, Randall

    2016-08-01

    Large amounts of water applied as urban irrigation can often be reduced substantially without compromising esthetics. Thus, encouraging the adoption of water-saving technologies and practices is critical to preserving water resources, yet difficult to achieve. The research problem addressed in this study is the lack of characterization of residents who use urban irrigation, which hinders the design of effective behavior change programs. This study examined audience segmentation as an approach to encouraging change using current residential landscape practices. K-means cluster analysis identified three meaningful subgroups among residential landscape irrigation users ( N = 1,063): the water considerate majority ( n = 479, 45 %), water savvy conservationists ( n = 378, 36 %), and unconcerned water users ( n = 201, 19 %). An important finding was that normative beliefs, attitudes, and perceived behavioral control characteristics of the subgroups were significantly different with large and medium practical effect sizes. Future water conservation behaviors and perceived importance of water resources were also significantly different among subgroups. The water considerate majority demonstrated capacity to conserve, placed high value on water, and were likely to engage in behavior changes. This article contributes to the literature on individuals who use residential landscape irrigation, an important target audience with potential to conserve water through sustainable irrigation practices and technologies. Findings confirm applicability of the capacity to conserve water to audience segmentation and extend this concept by incorporating perceived value of water resources and likelihood of conservation. The results suggest practical application to promoting residential landscape water conservation behaviors based on important audience characteristics.

  17. Irrigation Water Quality for Leafy Crops: A Perspective of Risks and Potential Solutions.

    PubMed

    Allende, Ana; Monaghan, James

    2015-07-01

    There is increasing evidence of the contribution of irrigation water in the contamination of produce leading to subsequent outbreaks of foodborne illness. This is a particular risk in the production of leafy vegetables that will be eaten raw without cooking. Retailers selling leafy vegetables are increasingly targeting zero-risk production systems and the associated requirements for irrigation water quality have become more stringent in regulations and quality assurance schemes (QAS) followed by growers. Growers can identify water sources that are contaminated with potential pathogens through a monitoring regime and only use water free of pathogens, but the low prevalence of pathogens makes the use of faecal indicators, particularly E. coli, a more practical approach. Where growers have to utilise water sources of moderate quality, they can reduce the risk of contamination of the edible portion of the crop (i.e., the leaves) by treating irrigation water before use through physical or chemical disinfection systems, or avoid contact between the leaves and irrigation water through the use of drip or furrow irrigation, or the use of hydroponic growing systems. This study gives an overview of the main problems in the production of leafy vegetables associated with irrigation water, including microbial risk and difficulties in water monitoring, compliance with evolving regulations and quality standards, and summarises the current alternatives available for growers to reduce microbial risks. PMID:26151764

  18. Irrigation Water Quality for Leafy Crops: A Perspective of Risks and Potential Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Allende, Ana; Monaghan, James

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of the contribution of irrigation water in the contamination of produce leading to subsequent outbreaks of foodborne illness. This is a particular risk in the production of leafy vegetables that will be eaten raw without cooking. Retailers selling leafy vegetables are increasingly targeting zero-risk production systems and the associated requirements for irrigation water quality have become more stringent in regulations and quality assurance schemes (QAS) followed by growers. Growers can identify water sources that are contaminated with potential pathogens through a monitoring regime and only use water free of pathogens, but the low prevalence of pathogens makes the use of faecal indicators, particularly E. coli, a more practical approach. Where growers have to utilise water sources of moderate quality, they can reduce the risk of contamination of the edible portion of the crop (i.e., the leaves) by treating irrigation water before use through physical or chemical disinfection systems, or avoid contact between the leaves and irrigation water through the use of drip or furrow irrigation, or the use of hydroponic growing systems. This study gives an overview of the main problems in the production of leafy vegetables associated with irrigation water, including microbial risk and difficulties in water monitoring, compliance with evolving regulations and quality standards, and summarises the current alternatives available for growers to reduce microbial risks. PMID:26151764

  19. Irrigation Water Quality for Leafy Crops: A Perspective of Risks and Potential Solutions.

    PubMed

    Allende, Ana; Monaghan, James

    2015-07-03

    There is increasing evidence of the contribution of irrigation water in the contamination of produce leading to subsequent outbreaks of foodborne illness. This is a particular risk in the production of leafy vegetables that will be eaten raw without cooking. Retailers selling leafy vegetables are increasingly targeting zero-risk production systems and the associated requirements for irrigation water quality have become more stringent in regulations and quality assurance schemes (QAS) followed by growers. Growers can identify water sources that are contaminated with potential pathogens through a monitoring regime and only use water free of pathogens, but the low prevalence of pathogens makes the use of faecal indicators, particularly E. coli, a more practical approach. Where growers have to utilise water sources of moderate quality, they can reduce the risk of contamination of the edible portion of the crop (i.e., the leaves) by treating irrigation water before use through physical or chemical disinfection systems, or avoid contact between the leaves and irrigation water through the use of drip or furrow irrigation, or the use of hydroponic growing systems. This study gives an overview of the main problems in the production of leafy vegetables associated with irrigation water, including microbial risk and difficulties in water monitoring, compliance with evolving regulations and quality standards, and summarises the current alternatives available for growers to reduce microbial risks.

  20. Spatio-temporal estimation of consumptive water use for assessment of irrigation system performance and management of water resources in irrigated Indus Basin, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, M.; Liedl, R.; Awan, U. K.

    2015-06-01

    Reallocation of water resources in any irrigation scheme is only possible by detailed assessment of current irrigation performance. The performance of the Lower Chenab Canal (LCC) irrigation system in Pakistan was evaluated at large spatial and temporal scales. Evaporative Fraction (EF) representing the key element to assess the three very important performance indicators of equity, adequacy and reliability, was determined by the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm (SEBAL) using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images. Spatially based estimations were performed at irrigation subdivisions, lower and upper LCC and, whole LCC scales, while temporal scales covered months, seasons and years for the study period from 2005 to 2012. Differences in consumptive water use between upper and lower LCC were estimated for different crops and possible water saving options were explored. The assessment of equitable water distribution indicates smaller coefficients of variation and hence less inequity within each subdivision except Sagar (0.08) and Bhagat (0.10). Both adequacy and reliability of water resources are found lower during kharif as compared to rabi with variation from head to tail reaches. Reliability is quite low from July to September and in February/March. This is mainly attributed to seasonal rainfalls. Average consumptive water use estimations indicate almost doubled water use (546 mm) in kharif as compared to (274 mm) in rabi with significant variability for different cropping years. Crop specific consumptive water use reveals rice and sugarcane as major water consumers with average values of 593 mm and 580 mm, respectively, for upper and lower LCC, followed by cotton and kharif fodder. The water uses for cotton are 555 mm and 528 mm. For kharif fodder, corresponding values are 525 mm and 494 mm for both regions. Based on the differences in consumptive water use, different land use land cover change scenarios were evaluated with regard to savings

  1. Regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) to save water and improve Sauvignon Blanc quality?

    PubMed

    Greven, M; Green, S; Neal, S; Clothier, B; Neal, M; Dryden, G; Davidson, P

    2005-01-01

    With a fast change of land use in Marlborough from extensive pastoral farming to intensive irrigated viticulture, a need has risen to investigate the sustainable use of the available water. In 2001 a 5 ha irrigation research project was installed in a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc vineyard. Irrigation treatments installed were control (compensate 100% for crop evapotranspiration (ET(O)), 80%, 70% and 60% of ET(O). During the two years that the Regulated Deficit Irrigation (RDI) trial has run so far, very different climatic conditions created much greater differences in yield and vegetative growth, than up to 40% reduction in irrigation, none of which were significant. The use of sap flow in the vines has been fine-tuned and is now giving reliable results on which to base vine water need. PMID:15771094

  2. Soil water sensors:Problems, advances and potential for irrigation scheduling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation water management has to do with the appropriate application of water to soils, in terms of amounts, rates, and timing to satisfy crop water demands, while protecting the soil and water resources from degradation. In this regard, sensors can be used to monitor the soil water status; and so...

  3. Prediction of areas where irrigation drainage may induce selenium contamination of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior has investigated 25 areas in the western USA to determine whether irrigation drainage has caused harmful effects on wildlife or has reduced subsequent beneficial uses of the water. A database of chemical analyses of water, sediment, and biota from the 25 areas was created and supplemented with geologic, climatologic, and hydrologic date. The data were evaluated to identify common features among study areas and principal factors that result in Se contamination of water in lakes, ponds, and streams downgradient of irrigated areas. From the analysis of data, a decision tree that use readily available geologic, climatologic, and hydrologic date was derived for use by resource managers as a screening tool to predict the likelihood that irrigation drainage will result in Se contamination in areas of the western USA. Irrigation in areas that are not associated with marine sedimentary rocks of late Cretaceous age is unlikely to cause Se contamination. Irrigation in very arid areas that are associated with these Cretaceous sediments is almost certain to cause Se contamination if the irrigation water drains to terminal lakes and ponds. The likelihood that an area will be contaminated with Se because of irrigation drainage can change, particularly with changes in precipitation. During normal or wet periods, Se contamination may not occur in an area, even though it has seleniferous soils, but reduced water deliveries during a drought in such an area may result in Se contamination.

  4. Impacts of irrigation on regional water resources in the coupled climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puma, M. J.; Krakauer, N.; Cook, B.; Gentine, P.; Nazarenko, L.; Kelley, M.

    2015-12-01

    Widespread irrigation alters regional climate through changes to the energy and water budgets of the land surface. Within general circulation models (GCMs), simulation studies have revealed regionally significant changes in temperature, precipitation, and other climate variables. These irrigation impacts are especially notable in key water stressed regions of Asia, western North America, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East. Here we investigate the feedbacks of irrigation with a focus on regional water availability in model simulations. We use two GCM configurations, with and without irrigation, to understand irrigation-induced changes in regional water balances. Importantly, while most other GCM irrigation analyses have focused on monthly changes, we explore changes in daily climate variables. Our simulations reveal shifts in runoff that vary dramatically by region. For example, California's Central Valley experiences substantial shifts in daily runoff, while runoff is relatively insensitive to irrigation in the Ganges-Brahmaputra basin. It is important to understand such feedbacks, as we face a future with great uncertainty in water-resource availability.

  5. Decentralising Zimbabwe’s water management: The case of Guyu-Chelesa irrigation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambudzai, Rashirayi; Everisto, Mapedza; Gideon, Zhou

    Smallholder irrigation schemes are largely supply driven such that they exclude the beneficiaries on the management decisions and the choice of the irrigation schemes that would best suit their local needs. It is against this background that the decentralisation framework and the Dublin Principles on Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) emphasise the need for a participatory approach to water management. The Zimbabwean government has gone a step further in decentralising the management of irrigation schemes, that is promoting farmer managed irrigation schemes so as to ensure effective management of scarce community based land and water resources. The study set to investigate the way in which the Guyu-Chelesa irrigation scheme is managed with specific emphasis on the role of the Irrigation Management Committee (IMC), the level of accountability and the powers devolved to the IMC. Merrey’s 2008 critique of IWRM also informs this study which views irrigation as going beyond infrastructure by looking at how institutions and decision making processes play out at various levels including at the irrigation scheme level. The study was positioned on the hypothesis that ‘decentralised or autonomous irrigation management enhances the sustainability and effectiveness of irrigation schemes’. To validate or falsify the stated hypothesis, data was gathered using desk research in the form of reviewing articles, documents from within the scheme and field research in the form of questionnaire surveys, key informant interviews and field observation. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences was used to analyse data quantitatively, whilst content analysis was utilised to analyse qualitative data whereby data was analysed thematically. Comparative analysis was carried out as Guyu-Chelesa irrigation scheme was compared with other smallholder irrigation scheme’s experiences within Zimbabwe and the Sub Saharan African region at large. The findings were that whilst the

  6. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: part II. geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Waters with low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios (SARs) present a challenge to irrigation because they degrade soil structure and infiltration capacity. In the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, such low salinity (electrical conductivity, EC 2.1 mS cm-1) and high-SAR (54) waters are co-produced with coal-bed methane and some are used for subsurface drip irrigation(SDI). The SDI system studied mixes sulfuric acid with irrigation water and applies water year-round via drip tubing buried 92 cm deep. After six years of irrigation, SAR values between 0 and 30 cm depth (0.5-1.2) are only slightly increased over non-irrigated soils (0.1-0.5). Only 8-15% of added Na has accumulated above the drip tubing. Sodicity has increased in soil surrounding the drip tubing, and geochemical simulations show that two pathways can generate sodic conditions. In soil between 45-cm depth and the drip tubing, Na from the irrigation water accumulates as evapotranspiration concentrates solutes. SAR values >12, measured by 1:1 water-soil extracts, are caused by concentration of solutes by factors up to 13. Low-EC (-1) is caused by rain and snowmelt flushing the soil and displacing ions in soil solution. Soil below the drip tubing experiences lower solute concentration factors (1-1.65) due to excess irrigation water and also contains relatively abundant native gypsum (2.4 ± 1.7 wt.%). Geochemical simulations show gypsum dissolution decreases soil-water SAR to 14 and decreasing EC in soil water to 3.2 mS cm-1. Increased sodicity in the subsurface, rather than the surface, indicates that deep SDI can be a viable means of irrigating with sodic waters.

  7. Sr isotope study in the drainage water in semi-arid irrigation district, Adana, Turley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, T.; Akca, E.; Nakano, T.; Nagano, T.; Kapur, S.; Watanabe, T.

    2009-12-01

    The management of drainage water from irrigated lands is an important issue not only for agricultural planning but also for environmental conservation. In arid and semi-arid regions, drainage water is reused as irrigation water due to lack of enough fresh irrigation water and irrigation schemes. The drainage water reuse should be undertaken only if long-term deleterious effects on soil properties can be avoided. In addition to salt concentration, the origin of salts of drainage water should be examined to avoid agricultural and environmental pollution. The Lower Seyhan Irrigation Project (LSIP), Adana, Turkey, faces to the Mediterranean. In the LSIP, intensive irrigated agriculture has conducted since 1960s. Recently, total amount of applied irrigation water has been increased along with expansion of agricultural area and fertilizer input is also increasing. Some part of the southern lowest fields is under sea level. Soil salinization and shallow groundwater have been observed in the lowest part due to irrigation water seepage from upper stream and insufficient drainage. Moreover, agricultural drainage water has been used for irrigation water there, so that the salt is a mixture of several components. Therefore, geo-chemical measurements are indispensable to clarify the source of salt. In this study, we focused on the isotopic and chemical compositions of agricultural drain water of three main drainage canals in the LSIP. Seasonal changes in drainage features were examined using 87Sr/86Sr ratio (Sr isotope ratio) and major cation data. The abundances of possible end components were determined using mixing model. The result of measurements showed that there was a good relationship between 87Sr/86Sr values and reciprocal values of Sr concentration, while drain water quality clearly differed between summer and winter. This means Sr of drain water consists of several origins. The relationship and other data showed that Sr of drain water was a mixture of three

  8. [Effect of Recycled Water Irrieation on Heavy Metal Pollution in Irrigation Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-qi; Liu, Yun-xia; Fu, Hui-min

    2016-01-15

    With acceleration of urbanization, water shortages will become a serious problem. Usage of reclaimed water for flushing and watering of the green areas will be common in the future. To study the heavy metal contamination of soils after green area irrigation using recycled wastewater from special industries, we selected sewage and laboratory wastewater as water source for integrated oxidation ditch treatment, and the effluent was used as irrigation water of the green area. The irrigation units included broad-leaved forest, bush and lawn. Six samples sites were selected, and 0-20 cm soil of them were collected. Analysis of the heavy metals including Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb in the soil showed no significant differences with heavy metals concentration in soil irrigated with tap water. The heavy metals in the soil irrigated with recycled water were mainly enriched in the surface layer, among which the contents of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were below the soil background values of Beijing. A slight pollution of As and Cd was found in the soil irrigated by recycled water, which needs to be noticed.

  9. [Soil salinity in greenland irrigated with reclaimed water and risk assessment].

    PubMed

    Pan, Neng; Chen, Wei-Ping; Jiao, Wen-Tao; Zhao, Zhong-Ming; Hou, Zhen-An

    2012-12-01

    Compared to drinking water or groundwater, reclaimed water contains more salts. Therefore, the effects of application of reclaimed water on the soil salinity have received great attentions. To evaluate the potential risks posed by long-term reclaimed water irrigation, we collected surface soil samples from urban green lands and suburban farmlands of Beijing represented different irrigation durations. The electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) in soils were measured subsequently. Both EC1:5 and SAR1.5 from the green land and farmland soils irrigated with reclaimed water were significantly higher than those of control treatments (drinking water or groundwater irrigation). The EC1:5 values increased by 12.4% and 84.2% than control treatments in the greenland and farmland, respectively. The SAR1:5 values increased by 64.5% and 145.8% than control treatments, respectively. No significant differences of both EC1:5 and SAR1:5 were found between of 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm soil layer. A slight decrease of soil porosity was observed. The field investigation suggested there was a high potential of soil salinization under long-term reclaimed water irrigation. Proper management practices should be implemented to minimize the soil salinity accumulation risk when using reclaimed water for irrigation in Beijing.

  10. Can E. coli or thermotolerant coliform concentrations predict pathogen presence or prevalence in irrigation waters?

    PubMed

    Pachepsky, Yakov; Shelton, Daniel; Dorner, Sarah; Whelan, Gene

    2016-05-01

    An increase in food-borne illnesses in the United States has been associated with fresh produce consumption. Irrigation water presents recognized risks for microbial contamination of produce. Water quality criteria rely on indicator bacteria. The objective of this review was to collate and summarize experimental data on the relationships between pathogens and thermotolerant coliform (THT) and/or generic E. coli, specifically focusing on surface fresh waters used in or potentially suitable for irrigation agriculture. We analyzed peer-reviewed publications in which concentrations of E. coli or THT coliforms in surface fresh waters were measured along with concentrations of one or more of waterborne and food-borne pathogenic organisms. The proposed relationships were significant in 35% of all instances and not significant in 65% of instances. Coliform indicators alone cannot provide conclusive, non-site-specific and non-pathogen-specific information about the presence and/or concentrations of most important pathogens in surface waters suitable for irrigation. Standards of microbial water quality for irrigation can rely not only on concentrations of indicators and/or pathogens, but must include references to crop management. Critical information on microbial composition of actual irrigation waters to support criteria of microbiological quality of irrigation waters appears to be lacking and needs to be collected.

  11. [Soil salinity in greenland irrigated with reclaimed water and risk assessment].

    PubMed

    Pan, Neng; Chen, Wei-Ping; Jiao, Wen-Tao; Zhao, Zhong-Ming; Hou, Zhen-An

    2012-12-01

    Compared to drinking water or groundwater, reclaimed water contains more salts. Therefore, the effects of application of reclaimed water on the soil salinity have received great attentions. To evaluate the potential risks posed by long-term reclaimed water irrigation, we collected surface soil samples from urban green lands and suburban farmlands of Beijing represented different irrigation durations. The electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) in soils were measured subsequently. Both EC1:5 and SAR1.5 from the green land and farmland soils irrigated with reclaimed water were significantly higher than those of control treatments (drinking water or groundwater irrigation). The EC1:5 values increased by 12.4% and 84.2% than control treatments in the greenland and farmland, respectively. The SAR1:5 values increased by 64.5% and 145.8% than control treatments, respectively. No significant differences of both EC1:5 and SAR1:5 were found between of 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm soil layer. A slight decrease of soil porosity was observed. The field investigation suggested there was a high potential of soil salinization under long-term reclaimed water irrigation. Proper management practices should be implemented to minimize the soil salinity accumulation risk when using reclaimed water for irrigation in Beijing. PMID:23379127

  12. Rice performance and water use efficiency under plastic mulching with drip irrigation.

    PubMed

    He, Haibing; Ma, Fuyu; Yang, Ru; Chen, Lin; Jia, Biao; Cui, Jing; Fan, Hua; Wang, Xin; Li, Li

    2013-01-01

    Plastic mulching with drip irrigation is a new water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its productivity and water-saving capacity. This study aimed to assess the production potential, performance, and water use efficiency (WUE) of rice under plastic mulching with drip irrigation. Field experiments were conducted over 2 years with two rice cultivars under different cultivation systems: conventional flooding (CF), non-flooded irrigation incorporating plastic mulching with furrow irrigation (FIM), non-mulching with furrow irrigation (FIN), and plastic mulching with drip irrigation (DI). Compared with the CF treatment, grain yields were reduced by 31.76-52.19% under the DI treatment, by 57.16-61.02% under the FIM treatment, by 74.40-75.73% under the FIN treatment, which were mainly from source limitation, especially a low dry matter accumulation during post-anthesis, in non-flooded irrigation. WUE was the highest in the DI treatment, being 1.52-2.12 times higher than with the CF treatment, 1.35-1.89 times higher than with the FIM treatment, and 2.37-3.78 times higher than with the FIN treatment. The yield contribution from tillers (YCFTs) was 50.65-62.47% for the CF treatment and 12.07-20.62% for the non-flooded irrigation treatments. These low YCFTs values were attributed to the poor performance in tiller panicles rather than the total tiller number. Under non-flooded irrigation, root length was significantly reduced with more roots distributed in deep soil layers compared with the CF treatment; the DI treatment had more roots in the topsoil layer than the FIM and FIN treatments. The experiment demonstrates that the DI treatment has greater water saving capacity and lower yield and economic benefit gaps than the FIM and FIN treatments compared with the CF treatment, and would therefore be a better water-saving technology in areas of water scarcity.

  13. Reimagining cost recovery in Pakistan's irrigation system through willingness-to-pay estimates for irrigation water from a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Andrew Reid; Shah, M Azeem Ali; Ward, Patrick S

    2014-01-01

    It is widely argued that farmers are unwilling to pay adequate fees for surface water irrigation to recover the costs associated with maintenance and improvement of delivery systems. In this paper, we use a discrete choice experiment to study farmer preferences for irrigation characteristics along two branch canals in Punjab Province in eastern Pakistan. We find that farmers are generally willing to pay well in excess of current surface water irrigation costs for increased surface water reliability and that the amount that farmers are willing to pay is an increasing function of their existing surface water supply as well as location along the main canal branch. This explicit translation of implicit willingness-to-pay (WTP) for water (via expenditure on groundwater pumping) to WTP for reliable surface water demonstrates the potential for greatly enhanced cost recovery in the Indus Basin Irrigation System via appropriate setting of water user fees, driven by the higher WTP of those currently receiving reliable supplies. PMID:25552779

  14. Environmental Horticulture Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide contains 45 program standards for the environmental horticulture program conducted in technical institutes in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment,…

  15. Horticulture/Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This brochure describes the philosophy and scope of a secondary-level course in floriculture and horticulture. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the Future Farmers of America, floriculture, merchandising and selling, retail flower shop management, advertising, inventory, indentification of common floral…

  16. AquaCrop model simulation under different irrigation water and nitrogen strategies.

    PubMed

    Khoshravesh, Mojtaba; Mostafazadeh-Fard, Behrouz; Heidarpour, Manouchehr; Kiani, Ali-Reza

    2013-01-01

    On a global scale, irrigated agriculture consumes about 72% of available freshwater resources. Deficit irrigation can be applied in the field to save irrigation water and still lead to acceptable crop production. The AquaCrop model is a simulation model for management of irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer. This model is a new model that is accurate, robust and requires fewer data inputs compared with the other models. The purpose of this study was to simulate canopy cover, grain yield and water use efficiency (WUE) for soybean using the AquaCrop model. A field line source sprinkler irrigation system was conducted under full and deficit irrigation using different nitrogen fertilizer applications during two cropping seasons for soybean at Gorgan province in Iran. The simulation results showed a reasonably accurate prediction of yield, canopy cover and WUE in all cases (error less than 23%). The simulated pattern of canopy progression over time was close to measured values, with Willmott's index of agreement for all the cases being ≥0.95 for different parameters. The AquaCrop model has the ability to simulate the WUE of soybean under different irrigation water and nitrogen applications. This model is a useful tool for managing the crop water productivity.

  17. AquaCrop model simulation under different irrigation water and nitrogen strategies.

    PubMed

    Khoshravesh, Mojtaba; Mostafazadeh-Fard, Behrouz; Heidarpour, Manouchehr; Kiani, Ali-Reza

    2013-01-01

    On a global scale, irrigated agriculture consumes about 72% of available freshwater resources. Deficit irrigation can be applied in the field to save irrigation water and still lead to acceptable crop production. The AquaCrop model is a simulation model for management of irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer. This model is a new model that is accurate, robust and requires fewer data inputs compared with the other models. The purpose of this study was to simulate canopy cover, grain yield and water use efficiency (WUE) for soybean using the AquaCrop model. A field line source sprinkler irrigation system was conducted under full and deficit irrigation using different nitrogen fertilizer applications during two cropping seasons for soybean at Gorgan province in Iran. The simulation results showed a reasonably accurate prediction of yield, canopy cover and WUE in all cases (error less than 23%). The simulated pattern of canopy progression over time was close to measured values, with Willmott's index of agreement for all the cases being ≥0.95 for different parameters. The AquaCrop model has the ability to simulate the WUE of soybean under different irrigation water and nitrogen applications. This model is a useful tool for managing the crop water productivity. PMID:23128644

  18. IRRIMET: a web 2.0 advisory service for irrigation water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michele, Carlo; Anzano, Enrico; Colandrea, Marco; Marotta, Luigi; Mula, Ileana; Pelosi, Anna; D'Urso, Guido; Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Irrigation agriculture is one the biggest consumer of water in Europe, especially in southern regions, where it accounts for up to 70% of the total water consumption. The EU Common Agricultural Policy, combined with the Water Framework Directive, imposes to farmers and irrigation managers a substantial increase of the efficiency in the use of water in agriculture for the next decade. Irrigating according to reliable crop water requirement estimates is one of the most convincing solution to decrease agricultural water use. Here we present an innovative irrigation advisory service, applied in Campania region (Southern Italy), where a satellite assisted irrigation advisory service has been operating since 2006. The advisory service is based on the optimal combination of VIS-NIR high resolution satellite images (Landsat, Deimos, Rapideye) to map crop vigour, and high resolution numerical weather prediction for assessing the meteorological variables driving the crop water needs in the short-medium range. The advisory service is broadcasted with a simple and intuitive web app interface which makes daily real time irrigation and evapotranspiration maps and customized weather forecasts (based on Cosmo Leps model) accessible from desktop computers, tablets and smartphones.

  19. Estimating Irrigation Water Requirements using MODIS Vegetation Indices and Inverse Biophysical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Harriss, Robert; Harriss, Robert; Wells, Gordon; Glantz, Michael; Dukhovny, Victor A.; Orlovsky, Leah

    2007-01-01

    An inverse process approach using satellite-driven (MODIS) biophysical modeling was used to quantitatively assess water resource demand in semi-arid and arid agricultural lands by comparing the carbon and water flux modeled under both equilibrium (in balance with prevailing climate) and non-equilibrium (irrigated) conditions. Since satellite observations of irrigated areas show higher leaf area indices (LAI) than is supportable by local precipitation, we postulate that the degree to which irrigated lands vary from equilibrium conditions is related to the amount of irrigation water used. For an observation year we used MODIS vegetation indices, local climate data, and the SiB2 photosynthesis-conductance model to examine the relationship between climate and the water stress function for a given grid-cell and observed leaf area. To estimate the minimum amount of supplemental water required for an observed cell, we added enough precipitation to the prevailing climatology at each time step to minimize the water stress function and bring the soil to field capacity. The experiment was conducted on irrigated lands on the U.S. Mexico border and Central Asia and compared to estimates of irrigation water used.

  20. Effects of irrigation pumping on the ground-water system in Newton and Jasper Counties, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergeron, Marcel P.

    1981-01-01

    Flow in the ground-water system in Newton and Jasper Counties, Indiana, was simulated in a quasi-three-dimensional model in a study of irrigation use of ground water in the two counties. The ground-water system consists of three aquifers: (1) a surficial coarse sand aquifer known as the Kankakee aquifer, (2) a limestone and dolomite bedrock aquifer, and (3) a sand and gravel bedrock valley aquifer. Irrigation pumping, derived primarily from the bedrock, was estimated to be 34.8 million gallons per day during peak irrigation in 1977. Acreage irrigated with ground water is estimated to be 6,200 acres. A series of model experiments was used to estimate the effects of irrigation pumping on ground-water levels and streamflow. Model analysis indicates that a major factor controlling drawdown due to pumping in the bedrock aquifer are the variations in thickness and in vertical hydraulic conductivity in a semiconfining unit overlying the bedrock. Streamflow was not significantly reduced by hypothetical withdrawals of 12.6 million gallons per day from the bedrock aquifer and 10.3 million gallons per day in the Kankakee aquifer. Simulation of water-level recovery after irrigation pumping indicated that a 5-year period of alternating between increasing pumping and recovery will not cause serious problems of residual drawdown or ground-water mining. 

  1. An appraisal of ground water for irrigation in the Wadena area, central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindholm, F.G.

    1970-01-01

    Analyses were made to determine effects of development on ground-water levels under different development schemes both after a single irrigation season and after 5 and 20 successive years of irrigation. Where development is concentrated, some interference between wells can be expected. Although water levels recover rapidly when pumps are shut off, recovery will not be complete prior to the next irrigation season in heavily developed areas. After several years of watertable lowering, yields from wells will decrease because of deceased saturated thickness, unless climatic changes result in abnormally high amounts of recharge.

  2. [Water distribution and microclimatic effects of sprinkler irrigation on spring wheat field].

    PubMed

    Du, Y; Wang, J; Liu, Z; Cai, C; Yang, J; Gan, Z

    2001-06-01

    Measurements of sprinkler irrigation on spring wheat field indicated that spring wheat canopy could intercept water by 25-30%, and compared with that above canopy in first milking period, the uniformity coefficient below canopy could be increased by 7-9%. Floating and evaporation loss of sprinkler irrigation water could reach 20-25% of the total. In addition, sprinkler irrigation on spring wheat field could decrease air and soil temperature, and increase air actual vapor pressure and relative humidity, which played a definite role in restraining crop transpiration. PMID:11758422

  3. EQUITY EVALUATION OF PADDY IRRIGATION WATER DISTRIBUTION BY SOCIETY-JUSTICE-WATER DISTRIBUTION RULE HYPOTHESIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanji, Hajime; Kiri, Hirohide; Kobayashi, Shintaro

    When total supply is smaller than total demand, it is difficult to apply the paddy irrigation water distribution rule. The gap must be narrowed by decreasing demand. Historically, the upstream served rule, rotation schedule, or central schedule weight to irrigated area was adopted. This paper proposes the hypothesis that these rules are dependent on social justice, a hypothesis called the "Society-Justice-Water Distribution Rule Hypothesis". Justice, which means a balance of efficiency and equity of distribution, is discussed under the political philosophy of utilitarianism, liberalism (Rawls), libertarianism, and communitarianism. The upstream served rule can be derived from libertarianism. The rotation schedule and central schedule can be derived from communitarianism. Liberalism can provide arranged schedule to adjust supply and demand based on "the Difference Principle". The authors conclude that to achieve efficiency and equity, liberalism may provide the best solution after modernization.

  4. Is Improving Field Irrigation Efficiency the Panacea for Water Scarcity? the Case of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, C.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    Water is becoming scarce resource throughout the world with the Mediterranean Sea basin as one of the most water limiting regions in the world. Desalinization and improving irrigation efficiency are two of the possibilities mentioned for decreasing water scarcity. In this presentation we will use Egypt as an example to explore the effect of improving field irrigation efficiencies. In Egypt and the economy with 83 million people entirely depends on the Nile of which 85% of the water originates in Ethiopia. The water in the Egypt is regulated by Lake Nasser smoothing out the runoff peaks to an even flow of approximately 0.16 BCM per day. This water is mainly used for irrigation, industrial and municipal uses. Approximately between 5.4 and 6 million ha are irrigated along the Nile and in the delta. Less than 20% of the Nile flow at the Aswan dam enters the Mediterranean Sea and is highly polluted. Irrigation practices in Egypt are highly inefficient with field efficiencies in the order of 70%. It has been suggested that increasing efficiencies will increase water availability down stream. In order to understand if this is possible, we considered the fate of the irrigation water. Part of the water applied to the field evaporates and the remaining water percolates downward and recharges the aquifer. The aquifer supplies base flow to the Nile and provides water for irrigation. Thus the only loss of the system is the evaporation from the crop in the field. Using this fact we can estimate the overall irrigation efficiency of the irrigation in the Nile. If we assume that 98% of the cultivated land are irrigated with an average evaporation rate of 1150 mm we find that the agricultural water use is at the same order as the water released at the Aswan dam. Assuming that all other uses are also conservative (i.e. use the water and return it back to the Nile with some pollution), we see that the overall use is over 100% during some years. This is not possible so not all land is

  5. Responses of Winter Wheat Yield and Water Use Efficiency to Irrigation Frequency and Planting Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Chengyue; Ma, Changjian; Liu, Xinhui; Gao, Chao; Liu, Quanru; Yan, Zhenxing; Ren, Yujie; Li, Quanqi

    2016-01-01

    A suitable planting pattern and irrigation strategy are essential for optimizing winter wheat yield and water use efficiency (WUE). The study aimed to evaluate the impact of planting pattern and irrigation frequency on grain yield and WUE of winter wheat. During the 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 winter wheat growing seasons in the North China Plain, the effects of planting patterns and irrigation frequencies were determined on tiller number, grain yield, and WUE. The two planting patterns tested were wide-precision and conventional-cultivation. Each planting pattern had three irrigation regimes: irrigation (120 mm) at the jointing stage; irrigation (60 mm) at both the jointing and heading stages; and irrigation (40 mm) at the jointing, heading, and milking stages. In our study, tiller number was significantly higher in the wide-precision planting pattern than in the conventional-cultivation planting pattern. Additionally, the highest grain yields and WUE were observed when irrigation was applied at the jointing stage (120 mm) or at the jointing and heading stages (60 mm each) in the wide-precision planting pattern. These results could be attributed to higher tiller numbers as well as reduced water consumption due to reduced irrigation frequency. In both growing seasons, applying 60 mm of water at jointing and heading stages resulted in the highest grain yield among the treatments. Based on our results, for winter wheat production in semi-humid regions, we recommend a wide-precision planting pattern with irrigation (60 mm) at both the jointing and heading stages. PMID:27171202

  6. Use of magnesia for boron removal from irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Dionisiou, Nina; Matsi, Theodora; Misopolinos, Nikolaos D

    2006-01-01

    The risk of B phytotoxicity due to high levels of B in irrigation water can be avoided by removing B from the water, before its use, through adsorption on certain adsorbents, such as magnesia (industrial MgO), if the latter can be proven to be an effective and easy to handle means for B removal. In addition, if such a material is applied as a fertilizer after its use and the adsorbed B is easily released into the soil solution, B phytotoxicity could constitute a potential hazard. The objectives of this work were to: (a) establish the optimum working conditions (equilibration time, solution to adsorbent ratio, and particle size of the adsorbent) for B adsorption, (b) assess the magnitude of B adsorption by magnesia, both in capacity and intensity terms, as well as the influence of temperature, (c) study B desorbability from magnesia, spiked with B at two rates, 5 and 0.5 mg g(-1), and (d) compare the results from b and c to those obtained using reagent grade MgO. The results showed that the time to achieve equilibrium depended on the B concentration of the external solution and ranged from 6 h (for B /= 50 mg L(-1)). The percentage of B adsorbed decreased as the volume of external solution to adsorbent increased and a working ratio of 50:1 was selected. For magnesia, B adsorption was particle size dependent with the smallest fraction (<0.1 mm) sorbing more B than the other three fractions studied (0.1-1.0, 1.1-2.0, 2.1-4.0 mm). Boron adsorption was conducted under strongly alkaline pH (10.3 +/- 0.2 and 10.4 +/- 0.1 for the reagent and magnesia, respectively) and increased with temperature. Both adsorbents exhibited a high B adsorption capacity (Langmuir maximum values were 5.85 +/- 0.39 and 4.45 +/- 1.31 mg B g(-1) for the reagent and magnesia, respectively) comparable to other metal oxides. However, the reagent grade MgO seemed to be superior to magnesia in terms of capacity and strength of B retention. This superiority of the

  7. Use of magnesia for boron removal from irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Dionisiou, Nina; Matsi, Theodora; Misopolinos, Nikolaos D

    2006-01-01

    The risk of B phytotoxicity due to high levels of B in irrigation water can be avoided by removing B from the water, before its use, through adsorption on certain adsorbents, such as magnesia (industrial MgO), if the latter can be proven to be an effective and easy to handle means for B removal. In addition, if such a material is applied as a fertilizer after its use and the adsorbed B is easily released into the soil solution, B phytotoxicity could constitute a potential hazard. The objectives of this work were to: (a) establish the optimum working conditions (equilibration time, solution to adsorbent ratio, and particle size of the adsorbent) for B adsorption, (b) assess the magnitude of B adsorption by magnesia, both in capacity and intensity terms, as well as the influence of temperature, (c) study B desorbability from magnesia, spiked with B at two rates, 5 and 0.5 mg g(-1), and (d) compare the results from b and c to those obtained using reagent grade MgO. The results showed that the time to achieve equilibrium depended on the B concentration of the external solution and ranged from 6 h (for B /= 50 mg L(-1)). The percentage of B adsorbed decreased as the volume of external solution to adsorbent increased and a working ratio of 50:1 was selected. For magnesia, B adsorption was particle size dependent with the smallest fraction (<0.1 mm) sorbing more B than the other three fractions studied (0.1-1.0, 1.1-2.0, 2.1-4.0 mm). Boron adsorption was conducted under strongly alkaline pH (10.3 +/- 0.2 and 10.4 +/- 0.1 for the reagent and magnesia, respectively) and increased with temperature. Both adsorbents exhibited a high B adsorption capacity (Langmuir maximum values were 5.85 +/- 0.39 and 4.45 +/- 1.31 mg B g(-1) for the reagent and magnesia, respectively) comparable to other metal oxides. However, the reagent grade MgO seemed to be superior to magnesia in terms of capacity and strength of B retention. This superiority of the

  8. Delineating ground water recharge from leaking irrigation canals using water chemistry and isotopes.

    PubMed

    Harvey, F E; Sibray, S S

    2001-01-01

    Across the Great Plains irrigation canals are used to transport water to cropland. Many of these canals are unlined, and leakage from them has been the focus of an ongoing legal, economic, and philosophical debate as to whether this lost water should be considered waste or be viewed as a beneficial and reasonable use since it contributes to regional ground water recharge. While historically there has been much speculation about the impact of canal leakage on local ground water, actual data are scarce. This study was launched to investigate the impact of leakage from the Interstate Canal, in the western panhandle of Nebraska, on the hydrology and water quality of the local aquifer using water chemistry and environmental isotopes. Numerous monitoring wells were installed in and around a small wetland area adjacent to the canal, and ground water levels were monitored from June 1992 until January 1995. Using the water level data, the seepage loss from the canal was estimated. In addition, the canal, the monitoring wells, and several nearby stock and irrigation wells were sampled for inorganic and environmental isotope analysis to assess water quality changes, and to determine the extent of recharge resulting from canal leakage. The results of water level monitoring within study wells indicates a rise in local ground water levels occurs seasonally as a result of leakage during periods when the canal is filled. This rise redirects local ground water flow and provides water to nearby wetland ecosystems during the summer months. Chemical and isotopic results were used to delineate canal, surface, and ground water and indicate that leaking canal water recharges both the surface alluvial aquifer and upper portions of the underlying Brule Aquifer. The results of this study indicate that lining the Interstate Canal could lower ground water levels adjacent to the canal, and could adversely impact the local aquifer.

  9. The effect of a disinfectant/coolant irrigant on microbes isolated from dental unit water lines.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Dawson, J R; Buivids, Ilze A; Wong, Bea; Le, Nhu D

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess water samples from a hospital dental clinic to determine whether a disinfectant/coolant irrigant containing chlorhexidine (Lines, Micrylium Laboratories) affects the presence of microbial organisms in dental unit waterlines. Water samples from three hospital dental operatories were collected at baseline and after overnight treatment with a disinfectant-containing irrigant followed by sterile water irrigation. Saliva of treated patients and sterile water rinse specimens were collected from the waterlines of these operatories for three consecutive days, then weekly for eight weeks after treatment. Specimens were cultured to identify total heterotrophic plate counts as well as presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida species. Baseline organism counts varied from 10(3) to 10(5) colony-forming units per milliliter. After treatment, no organisms were detected in waterline discharge. Decontamination of dental unit waterlines is possible using a disinfectant/irrigant followed by sterile water irrigation. The potential for contamination of the lines from patients' saliva may have been reduced due to use of anti-retraction valves and the disinfectant/sterile water irrigation, as conducted in this study.

  10. Irrigation water as source of foodborne pathogens on fruit and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Steele, Marina; Odumeru, Joseph

    2004-12-01

    Awareness is growing that fresh or minimally processed fruit and vegetables can be sources of disease-causing bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and helminths. Irrigation with poor-quality water is one way that fruit and vegetables can become contaminated with foodborne pathogens. Groundwater, surface water, and human wastewater are commonly used for irrigation. The risk of disease transmission from pathogenic microorganisms present in irrigation water is influenced by the level of contamination; the persistence of pathogens in water, in soil, and on crops; and the route of exposure. Groundwater is generally of good microbial quality, unless it is contaminated with surface runoff; human wastewater is usually of very poor microbial quality and requires extensive treatment before it can be used safely to irrigate crops; surface water is of variable microbial quality. Bacteria and protozoa tend to show the poorest survival outside a human host, whereas viruses and helminths can remain infective for months to years. Guidelines governing irrigation water quality and strategies to reduce the risk of disease transmission by foodborne pathogens in irrigation are discussed.

  11. Infiltration into cropped soils: effect of rain and sodium adsorption ratio-impacted irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Donald L; Wood, James D; Lesch, Scott M

    2008-01-01

    The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and salinity criteria for water suitability for irrigation have been developed for conditions where irrigation water is the only water source. It is not clear that these criteria are applicable to environments where there is a combination of rain and irrigation during the growing season. The interaction of rainfall with irrigation water is expected to result in increased sodicity hazard because of the low electrical conductivity of rain. In this study we examined the effects of irrigation waters of SAR 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol(1/2) L(-1/2) and electrical conductivities of 1 and 2 dS m(-1) on the infiltration rate of two soils with alternating cycles of rain (simulated with a rainfall sprinkler) and irrigation water, separated by drying cycles. The infiltration rate of surface samples from two soils, Kobase silty clay (fine, smectitic, frigid, Torrertic Haplustept) and Glendive very fine sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed superactive, calcareous, frigid Aridic Ustifluvent) were evaluated under alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cropped conditions for over 140 d and under full canopy cover. Reductions in infiltration were observed for both soils for SAR above 2, and the reductions became more severe with increasing SAR. Saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements taken from undisturbed cores at the end of the experiment were highly variable, suggesting that in situ infiltration measurements may be preferred when evaluating SAR effects. PMID:18765763

  12. Mathematical models of water application for a variable rate irrigating hill-seeder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variable rate irrigating hill-seeder can adjust water application automatically according to the difference in soil moisture content in the field to alleviate drought and save water. Two key problems to realize variable rate water application are how to determine the right amount of water for the ...

  13. Mathematic models of water application for a variable rate irrigating hill-seeder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variable rate irrigating hill-seeder can adjust water application automatically according to the difference in soil moisture content in the field to alleviate drought and save water. Two key problems to realize variable rate water application are how to determine the right amount of water for the ...

  14. Diagnostic Study of Hydraulic and Water Serviceability Functions to Rehabilitate Irrigation Canal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miharu, Koichi; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Mukai, Akie; Taruya, Hiroyuki; Naka, Tatsuo

    In recent years, a technique for the functional diagnosis of various structures and a verification approach have been developed in order to increase the life-span of agricultural irrigation facilities. This permits visual inspections to understand structural conditions of deteriorated hydraulic structures and to assess their soundness indices. To update or upgrade an agricultural irrigation canal on the other hand, it is necessary to establish performance-based design of the system. In addition to structural performance, this performance-based design system should include the evaluation of hydraulic performance and water serviceability. This report targets the irrigation canal system in an irrigation district consisting of paddy fields. It provides examples of the generation of a diagnosis chart for irrigation canal systems that can be effective as an investigation method involving functional diagnosis. This report also discusses a diagnosis example to evaluate the problem examination priority.

  15. Modeling the effects of irrigation frequencies, initial water and nitrogen on corn yield responses for best management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Competing demands for fresh water resources necessitate adaptation of limited water irrigations in agriculture. In this context, the Crop Water Production Functions (CWPF) used in limited water irrigation management need to integrate the effects of climate, initial soil water content at planting, an...

  16. Effects of irrigation water supply variations on limited resource farming in Conejos County, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Jerry B.; Wang, Erda

    1993-02-01

    Farms in NE Conejos County, Colorado, are characterized by limited resources, uncertain surface flow irrigation systems, and mixed crop-livestock enterprise combinations which are dependent on public grazing resources. To model decision making on these farms, a linear program is developed stressing enterprise choices under conditions of multiple resource constraints. Differential access to grazing resources and irrigation water is emphasized in this research. Regarding the water resource, the model reflects farms situated alternatively on high-, medium-, and low-priority irrigation ditches within the Alamosa-La Jara river system, each with and without supplemental pumping. Differences are found in optimum enterprise mixes, net returns, choice of cropping technology, level of marketings, and other characteristics in response to variations in the availability of irrigation water. Implications are presented for alternative improvement strategies.

  17. Approaches and challenges of soil water monitoring in an irrigated vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolz, Reinhard; Loiskandl, Willibald

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of water content is an approved method to quantify certain components of the soil water balance, for example as basis for hydrological studies and soil water management. Temporal soil water data also allow controlling water status by means of demand-oriented irrigation. Regarding spatial variability of water content due to soil characteristics, plant water uptake and other non-uniformities, it is a great challenge to select a location that is most likely representing soil water status of a larger area (e.g. an irrigated field). Although such an approach might not satisfy the requirements of precision farming - which becomes more and more related to industrial agriculture - it can help improving water use efficiency of small-scale farming. In this regard, specific conditions can be found in typical vineyards in the eastern part of Austria, where grapes are grown for high quality wine production. Generally, the local dry-subhumid climate supports grape development. However, irrigation is temporarily essential in order to guarantee stable yields and high quality. As the local winegrowers traditionally control irrigation based on their experience, there is a potential to improve irrigation management by means of soil water data. In order to gain experience with regard to irrigation management, soil water status was determined in a small vineyard in Austria (47°48'16'' N, 17°01'57'' E, 118 m elevation). The vineyard was equipped with a subsurface drip irrigation system and access tubes for measuring water content in soil profiles. The latter was measured using a portable device as well as permanently installed multi-sensor capacitance probes. Soil samples were taken at chosen dates and gravimetrically analyzed in the laboratory. Water content data were analyzed using simple statistical procedures and the temporal stability concept. Soil water content was interpreted considering different environmental conditions, including rainfall and irrigation periods

  18. Toxicity assessment of oil field produced water treated by evaporative processes to produce water to irrigation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, V T; Andrade, B G; Costa, B R S; Pereira, O A; Dezotti, M

    2010-01-01

    During the productive life of an oil well, a high quantity of produced water is extracted together with the oil, and it may achieve up to 99% in the end of the well's economical life. Desalination is one of mankind's earliest forms of saline water treatment, and nowadays, it is still a common process used throughout the world. A single-effect mechanical vapor compression (MVC) process was tested. This paper aims to assess the potential toxicity of produced water to be re-used in irrigation. Samples of both produced and distilled water were evaluated by 84 chemical parameters. The distilled produced water presented a reduction up to 97% for the majority of the analyzed parameters, including PAHs. Toxicity bioassays were performed with distilled produced water to evaluate the growth inhibition of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata algae, the acute toxicity to Danio rerio fish, the germination inhibition of Lactuca sativa vegetable and the severity of toxicity, as well as behavior test with Lumbricid Earthworm Eisenia fetida. The ecotoxicological assays results showed no toxicity, indicating that the referred evaporative process can produce water to be reused in irrigation. PMID:20706017

  19. Toxicity assessment of oil field produced water treated by evaporative processes to produce water to irrigation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, V T; Andrade, B G; Costa, B R S; Pereira, O A; Dezotti, M

    2010-01-01

    During the productive life of an oil well, a high quantity of produced water is extracted together with the oil, and it may achieve up to 99% in the end of the well's economical life. Desalination is one of mankind's earliest forms of saline water treatment, and nowadays, it is still a common process used throughout the world. A single-effect mechanical vapor compression (MVC) process was tested. This paper aims to assess the potential toxicity of produced water to be re-used in irrigation. Samples of both produced and distilled water were evaluated by 84 chemical parameters. The distilled produced water presented a reduction up to 97% for the majority of the analyzed parameters, including PAHs. Toxicity bioassays were performed with distilled produced water to evaluate the growth inhibition of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata algae, the acute toxicity to Danio rerio fish, the germination inhibition of Lactuca sativa vegetable and the severity of toxicity, as well as behavior test with Lumbricid Earthworm Eisenia fetida. The ecotoxicological assays results showed no toxicity, indicating that the referred evaporative process can produce water to be reused in irrigation.

  20. [Effects of intermittent irrigation on ecological and physiological water requirement of rice in north China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoying; Liang, Wenju; Wen, Dazhong

    2004-10-01

    The ecological and physiological water requirement of rice was studied in a paddy field of north China, and the field experiment was conducted at Shenyang Experimental Station of Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Under continuous flooding irrigation (CSF) and intermittent irrigation (IT) conditions, the evapotranspiration and soil evaporation of paddy fields were measured by non-weighing lysimeters and micro-lysimeters, respectively. The results showed that compared with continuous flooding irrigation, the transpiration under intermittent irrigation condition was not significantly reduced, but 16% and 24% of water amounts were reduced by decreasing the water losses through soil water evaporation and percolation, respectively. The water use efficiency of intermittent irrigation was increased 10%, without any adverse effects on biomass and grain yield of rice. Although the amount of water requirement under IT treatment was reduced significantly compared with CSF treatment, about 60% of total water requirement was still lost through deep percolation. Based on the results obtained, the corresponding countermeasures to reduce the amounts of soil water evaporation and percolation and to increase the water use efficiency were put forward in this paper. PMID:15624834

  1. Water relations, nutrient content and developmental responses of Euonymus plants irrigated with water of different degrees of salinity and quality.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bellot, María José; Alvarez, Sara; Castillo, Marco; Bañón, Sebastián; Ortuño, María Fernanda; Sánchez-Blanco, María Jesús

    2013-07-01

    For 20 weeks, the physiological responses of Euonymus japonica plants to different irrigation sources were studied. Four irrigation treatments were applied at 100 % water holding capacity: control (electrical conductivity (EC) <0.9 dS m(-1)); irrigation water normally used in the area (irrigator's water) IW (EC: 1.7 dS m(-1)); NaCl solution, NaCl (EC: 4 dS m(-1)); and wastewater, WW (EC: 4 dS m(-1)). This was followed by a recovery period of 13 weeks, when all the plants were rewatered with the same amount and quality of irrigation water as the control plants. Despite the differences in the chemical properties of the water used, the plants irrigated with NaCl and WW showed similar alterations in growth and size compared with the control even at the end of the recovery period. Leaf number was affected even when the EC of the irrigation water was of 1.7 dS m(-1) (IW), indicating the salt sensitivity of this parameter. Stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthesis (Pn), as well as stem water potential (Ψstem), were most affected in plants irrigated with the most saline waters (NaCl and WW). At the end of the experiment the above parameters recovered, while IW plants showed similar values to the control. The higher Na(+) and Cl(+) uptake by NaCl and WW plants led them to show osmotic adjustment throughout the experiment. The highest amount of boron found in WW plants did not affect root growth. Wastewater can be used as a water management strategy for ornamental plant production, as long as the water quality is not too saline, since the negative effect of salt on the aesthetic value of plants need to be taken into consideration.

  2. Contamination of soils with microbial pathogens originating from effluent water used for agricultural irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, N.

    2009-04-01

    The use of wastewater for agricultural irrigation is steadily increasing world-wide and due to shortages of fresh water is common today in most arid regions of the world. The use of treated wastewater for agricultural irrigation may result in soil exposure to pathogens, creating potential public health problems. A variety of human pathogens are present in raw sewage water. Although their concentrations decrease during the wastewater reclamation process, the secondary treated effluents most commonly used for irrigation today still contain bacterial human pathogens. A range of bacterial pathogens, introduced through contaminated irrigation water or manure, are capable of surviving for long periods in soil and water where they have the potential to contaminate crops in the field. Therefore, there is a risk of direct contamination of crops by human pathogens from the treated effluents used for irrigation, as well as a risk of indirect contamination of the crops from contaminated soil at the agricultural site. Contradictory to previous notion, recent studies have demonstrated that human pathogens can enter plants through their roots and translocate and survive in edible, aerial plant tissues. The practical implications of these new findings for food safety are still not clear, but no doubt reflect the pathogenic microorganisms' ability to survive and multiply in the irrigated soil, water, and the harvested edible crop.

  3. Red cabbage yield, heavy metal content, water use and soil chemical characteristics under wastewater irrigation.

    PubMed

    Tunc, Talip; Sahin, Ustun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this 2-year field study was to evaluate the effects of drip irrigation with urban wastewaters reclaimed using primary (filtration) and secondary (filtration and aeration) processes on red cabbage growth and fresh yield, heavy metal content, water use and efficiency and soil chemical properties. Filtered wastewater (WW1), filtered and aerated wastewater (WW2), freshwater and filtered wastewater mix (1:1 by volume) (WW3) and freshwater (FW) were investigated as irrigation water treatments. Crop evapotranspiration decreased significantly, while water use efficiency increased under wastewater treatments compared to FW. WW1 treatment had the lowest value (474.2 mm), while FW treatments had the highest value (556.7 mm). The highest water use efficiency was found in the WW1 treatment as 8.41 kg m(-3), and there was a twofold increase with regard to the FW. Wastewater irrigation increased soil fertility and therefore red cabbage yield. WW2 treatment produced the highest total fresh yield (40.02 Mg ha(-1)). However, wastewater irrigation increased the heavy metal content in crops and soil. Cd content in red cabbage heads was above the safe limit, and WW1 treatment had the highest value (0.168 mg kg(-1)). WW3 treatment among wastewater treatments is less risky in terms of soil and crop heavy metal pollution and faecal coliform contamination. Therefore, WW3 wastewater irrigation for red cabbage could be recommended for higher yield and water efficiency with regard to freshwater irrigation.

  4. Integration of soil moisture and geophysical datasets for improved water resource management in irrigated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkenbiner, Catherine; Franz, Trenton E.; Avery, William Alexander; Heeren, Derek M.

    2016-04-01

    Global trends in consumptive water use indicate a growing and unsustainable reliance on water resources. Approximately 40% of total food production originates from irrigated agriculture. With increasing crop yield demands, water use efficiency must increase to maintain a stable food and water trade. This work aims to increase our understanding of soil hydrologic fluxes at intermediate spatial scales. Fixed and roving cosmic-ray neutron probes were combined in order to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture at three study sites across an East-West precipitation gradient in the state of Nebraska, USA. A coarse scale map was generated for the entire domain (122 km2) at each study site. We used a simplistic data merging technique to produce a statistical daily soil moisture product at a range of key spatial scales in support of current irrigation technologies: the individual sprinkler (˜102m2) for variable rate irrigation, the individual wedge (˜103m2) for variable speed irrigation, and the quarter section (0.82 km2) for uniform rate irrigation. Additionally, we were able to generate a daily soil moisture product over the entire study area at various key modeling and remote sensing scales 12, 32, and 122 km2. Our soil moisture products and derived soil properties were then compared against spatial datasets (i.e. field capacity and wilting point) from the US Department of Agriculture Web Soil Survey. The results show that our "observed" field capacity was higher compared to the Web Soil Survey products. We hypothesize that our results, when provided to irrigators, will decrease water losses due to runoff and deep percolation as sprinkler managers can better estimate irrigation application depth and times in relation to soil moisture depletion below field capacity and above maximum allowable depletion. The incorporation of this non-contact and pragmatic geophysical method into current irrigation practices across the state and globe has the

  5. Irrigation Trials for ET Estimation and Water Management in California Specialty Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.; Cahn, M.; Martin, F.; Lund, C.; Melton, F. S.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate estimation of crop evapotranspiration (ETc) can support efficient irrigation water management, which in turn brings benefits including surface water conservation, mitigation of groundwater depletion/degradation, energy savings, and crop quality assurance. Past research in California has revealed strong relationships between canopy fractional cover (Fc) and ETc of certain specialty crops, while additional research has shown the potential of monitoring Fc by satellite remote sensing. California's Central Coast is the leading region of cool season vegetable production in the U.S. Monterey County alone produces more than 80,000 ha of lettuce and broccoli (about half of U.S. production), valued at $1.5 billion in 2009. Under this study, we are conducting ongoing irrigation trials on these crops at the USDA Agricultural Research Station (Salinas) to compare irrigation scheduling via plant-based ETc approaches, by way of Fc, with current industry standard-practice. The following two monitoring approaches are being evaluated - 1) a remote sensing model employed by NASA's prototype Satellite Irrigation Management System, and 2) an online irrigation scheduling tool, CropManage, recently developed by U.C. Cooperative Extension. Both approaches utilize daily grass-reference ETo data as provided by the California Irrigation Management Irrigation System (CIMIS). A sensor network is deployed to monitor applied irrigation, volumetric soil water content, soil water potential, deep drainage, and standard meteorologic variables in order to derive ETc by a water balance approach. Evaluations of crop yield and crop quality are performed by the research team and by commercial growers. Initial results to-date indicate that applied water reductions based on Fc measurements are possible with little-to-no impact on yield of crisphead lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Additional results for both lettuce and broccoli trials, conducted during summer-fall 2012, are presented with respect to

  6. Decision Support System for an efficient irrigation water management in semi arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. A.; Islam, M.; Hafeez, M. M.; Flugel, W. A.

    2009-12-01

    A significant increase in agricultural productivity over the last few decades has protected the world from episodes of hunger and food shortages. Water management in irrigated agriculture was instrumental in achieving those gains. Water resources are under high pressure due to rapid population growth and increased competition among various sectors. Access to reliable data on water availability, quantity and quality can provide the necessary foundation for sound management of water resources. There are many traditional methods for matching water demand and supply, however imbalances between demand and supply remain inevitable. It is possible to reduce the imbalances considerably through development of appropriate irrigation water management tool that take into account various factors such as soil type, irrigation water supply, and crop water demand. All components of water balance need to be understood and quantified for efficient and sustainable management of water resources. Application of an intelligent Decision Support System (DSS) is becoming significant. A DSS incorporates knowledge and expertise within the decision support framework. It is an integrated set of data, functions, models and other relevant information that efficiently processes input data, simulates models and displays the results in a user friendly format. It helps in decision-making process, to analyse the problem and explore various scenarios to make the most appropriate decision for water management. This paper deals with the Coleambally Irrigation Area (CIA) located in Murrumbidgee catchment, NSW, Australia. An Integrated River Information System called Coleambally IRIS has been developed to improve the irrigation water management ranging from farm to sub-system and system level. It is a web-based information management system with a focus on time series and geospatial hydrological, climatic and remote sensing data including land cover class, surface temperature, soil moisture, Normalized

  7. Ground-water quality beneath irrigated agriculture in the central High Plains aquifer, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruce, Breton W.; Becker, Mark F.; Pope, Larry M.; Gurdak, Jason J.

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 and 2000, 30 water-quality monitoring wells were installed in the central High Plains aquifer to evaluate the quality of recently recharged ground water in areas of irrigated agriculture and to identify the factors affecting ground-water quality. Wells were installed adjacent to irrigated agricultural fields with 10- or 20-foot screened intervals placed near the water table. Each well was sampled once for about 100 waterquality constituents associated with agricultural practices. Water samples from 70 percent of the wells (21 of 30 sites) contained nitrate concentrations larger than expected background concentrations (about 3 mg/L as N) and detectable pesticides. Atrazine or its metabolite, deethylatrazine, were detected with greater frequency than other pesticides and were present in all 21 samples where pesticides were detected. The 21 samples with detectable pesticides also contained tritium concentrations large enough to indicate that at least some part of the water sample had been recharged within about the last 50 years. These 21 ground-water samples are considered to show water-quality effects related to irrigated agriculture. The remaining 9 groundwater samples contained no pesticides, small tritium concentrations, and nitrate concentrations less than 3.45 milligrams per liter as nitrogen. These samples are considered unaffected by the irrigated agricultural land-use setting. Nitrogen isotope ratios indicate that commercial fertilizer was the dominant source of nitrate in 13 of the 21 samples affected by irrigated agriculture. Nitrogen isotope ratios for 4 of these 21 samples were indicative of an animal waste source. Dissolved-solids concentrations were larger in samples affected by irrigated agriculture, with large sulfate concentrations having strong correlation with large dissolved solids concentrations in these samples. A strong statistical correlation is shown between samples affected by irrigated agriculture and sites with large rates of

  8. Assessment of groundwater utilization for irrigating park trees under the spatiotemporal uncertainty condition of water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Cheng-Shin; Kuo, Yi-Ming

    2013-04-01

    Parks have a variety of functions for residents and are important for urban landscape planning. The healthy growth of urban park trees requires regular irrigation. To reduce the pressure of high groundwater levels and to avoid wasting groundwater resources, proper groundwater extraction for irrigating park trees in the Taipei Basin is regarded as a reciprocal solution of sustainable groundwater management and preserving excellent urban landscapes. Therefore, this study determines pristine groundwater use for irrigating park trees in the metropolitan Taipei Basin under the spatiotemporal uncertainty condition of water quality. First, six hydrochemical parameters in groundwater associated with an irrigation water quality standard were collected from a 12-year survey. Upper, median and lower quartiles of the six hydrochemical parameters were obtained to establish three thresholds. According to the irrigation water quality standard, multivariate indicator kriging (MVIK) was adopted to probabilistically evaluate the integration of the six hydrochemical parameters. Entropy was then applied to quantify the spatiotemporal uncertainty of the hydrochemical parameters. Finally, locations, which have high estimated probabilities for the median-quartile threshold and low local uncertainty, are suitable for pumping groundwater for irrigating park trees. The study results demonstrate that MVIK and entropy are capable of characterizing the spatiotemporal uncertainty of groundwater quality parameters and determining suitable parks of groundwater utilization for irrigation. Moreover, the upper, median and lower quartiles of hydrochemical parameters are served as three estimated thresholds in MVIK, which is robust to assessment predictions. Therefore, this study significantly improves the methodological application and limitation of MVIK for spatiotemporally analyzing environmental quality compared with the previous related works. Furthermore, the analyzed results indicate that 64

  9. Water savings potentials of irrigation systems: global simulation of processes and linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägermeyr, J.; Gerten, D.; Heinke, J.; Schaphoff, S.; Kummu, M.; Lucht, W.

    2015-07-01

    Global agricultural production is heavily sustained by irrigation, but irrigation system efficiencies are often surprisingly low. However, our knowledge of irrigation efficiencies is mostly confined to rough indicative estimates for countries or regions that do not account for spatiotemporal heterogeneity due to climate and other biophysical dependencies. To allow for refined estimates of global agricultural water use, and of water saving and water productivity potentials constrained by biophysical processes and also non-trivial downstream effects, we incorporated a process-based representation of the three major irrigation systems (surface, sprinkler, and drip) into a bio- and agrosphere model, LPJmL. Based on this enhanced model we provide a gridded world map of irrigation efficiencies that are calculated in direct linkage to differences in system types, crop types, climatic and hydrologic conditions, and overall crop management. We find pronounced regional patterns in beneficial irrigation efficiency (a refined irrigation efficiency indicator accounting for crop-productive water consumption only), due to differences in these features, with the lowest values (< 30 %) in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa and the highest values (> 60 %) in Europe and North America. We arrive at an estimate of global irrigation water withdrawal of 2469 km3 (2004-2009 average); irrigation water consumption is calculated to be 1257 km3, of which 608 km3 are non-beneficially consumed, i.e., lost through evaporation, interception, and conveyance. Replacing surface systems by sprinkler or drip systems could, on average across the world's river basins, reduce the non-beneficial consumption at river basin level by 54 and 76 %, respectively, while maintaining the current level of crop yields. Accordingly, crop water productivity would increase by 9 and 15 %, respectively, and by much more in specific regions such as in the Indus basin. This study significantly advances the global

  10. Modeling the effects of different irrigation water salinity on soil water movement, uptake and multicomponent solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekakis, E. H.; Antonopoulos, V. Z.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation models can be important tools for analyzing and managing irrigation, soil salinization or crop production problems. In this study a mathematical model that describes the water movement and mass transport of individual ions (Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+) and overall soil salinity by means of the soil solution electrical conductivity, is used. The mass transport equations of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ have been incorporated as part of the integrated model WANISIM and the soil salinity was computed as the sum of individual ions. The model was calibrated and validated against field data, collected during a three year experiment in plots of maize, irrigated with three different irrigation water qualities, at Thessaloniki area in Northern Greece. The model was also used to evaluate salinization and sodification hazards by the use of irrigation water with increasing electrical conductivity of 0.8, 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1, while maintaining a ratio of Ca2+:Mg2+:Na+ equal to 3:3:2. The qualitative and quantitative procedures for results evaluation showed that there was good agreement between the simulated and measured values of the water content, overall salinity and the concentration of individual soluble cations, at two soil layers (0-35 and 35-75 cm). Nutrient uptake was also taken into account. Locally available irrigation water (ECiw = 0.8 dS m-1) did not cause soil salinization or sodification. On the other hand, irrigation water with ECiw equal to 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1 caused severe soil salinization, but not sodification. The rainfall water during the winter seasons was not sufficient to leach salts below the soil profile of 110 cm. The modified version of model WANISIM is able to predict the effects of irrigation with saline waters on soil and plant growth and it is suitable for irrigation management in areas with scarce and low quality water resources.

  11. Stover removal and cover crops effects on corn production and water use under full and limited irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn (Zea mays L.) residue removal in irrigated cropping systems for livestock forage or cellulosic ethanol is of great interest in south-central Nebraska. Irrigation water restrictions in the region have also resulted in adoption of limited-irrigation strategies. Little is known regarding the inter...

  12. Purification of contaminated paddy fields by clean water irrigation over two decades.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yiping; Lu, Huanping; Li, Zhian; Zhuang, Ping; Zou, Bi; Xia, Hanping; Wang, Faming; Wang, Gang; Duan, Jun; Zhang, Jianxia

    2013-10-01

    Paddy fields near a mining site in north part of Guangdong Province, PR China, were severely contaminated by heavy metals as a result of wastewater irrigation from the tailing pond. The following clean water irrigation for 2 decades produced marked rinsing effect, especially on Pb and Zn. Paddy fields continuously irrigated with wastewater ever since mining started (50 years) had 1,050.0 mg kg−1 of Pb and 810.3 mg kg−1 of Zn for upper 20 cm soil, in comparison with 215.9 mg kg−1 of Pb and 525.4 mg kg−1 of Zn, respectively, with clean water irrigation for 20 years. Rinsing effect mainly occurred to a depth of upper 40 cm, of which the soil contained highest metals. Copper and Cd in the farmlands were also reduced due to clean water irrigation. Higher availability of Pb might partly account for more Pb transferred from the tailing pond to the farmland and also more Pb removal from the farmland as a result of clean water irrigation. Neither rice in the paddy field nor dense weeds in the uncultivated field largely took up the metals. However, they might contribute to activate metals differently, leading to a different purification extent. Rotation of rice and weed reduced metal retention in the farmland soil, in comparison with sole rice growth. Harvesting of rice grain (and partially rice stalk) only contributed small fraction of total amount of removed metal. In summary, heavy metal in paddy field resulting from irrigation of mining wastewater could be largely removed by clean water irrigation for sufficient time.

  13. Crop-specific seasonal estimates of irrigation water demand in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemans, H.; Siderius, C.; Mishra, A.; Ahmad, B.

    2015-08-01

    Especially in the Himalayan headwaters of the main rivers in South Asia, shifts in runoff are expected as a result of a rapidly changing climate. In recent years, our insight in these shifts and their impact on water availability has increased. However, a similar detailed understanding of the seasonal pattern in water demand is surprisingly absent. This hampers a proper assessment of water stress and ways to cope and adapt. In this study, the seasonal pattern of irrigation water demand resulting from the typical practice of multiple-cropping in South Asia was accounted for by introducing double-cropping with monsoon-dependent planting dates in a hydrology and vegetation model. Crop yields were calibrated to the latest subnational statistics of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal. The representation of seasonal land use and more accurate cropping periods lead to lower estimates of irrigation water demand compared to previous model-based studies, despite the net irrigated area being higher. Crop irrigation water demand differs sharply between seasons and regions; in Pakistan, winter (Rabi) and summer (Kharif) irrigation demands are almost equal, whereas in Bangladesh the Rabi demand is ~ 100 times higher. Moreover, the relative importance of irrigation supply vs. rain decreases sharply from west to east. Given the size and importance of South Asia, improved regional estimates of food production and its irrigation water demand will also affect global estimates. In models used for global water resources and food-security assessments, processes like multiple-cropping and monsoon-dependent planting dates should not be ignored.

  14. Crop-specific seasonal estimates of irrigation-water demand in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemans, Hester; Siderius, Christian; Mishra, Ashok; Ahmad, Bashir

    2016-05-01

    Especially in the Himalayan headwaters of the main rivers in South Asia, shifts in runoff are expected as a result of a rapidly changing climate. In recent years, our insight into these shifts and their impact on water availability has increased. However, a similar detailed understanding of the seasonal pattern in water demand is surprisingly absent. This hampers a proper assessment of water stress and ways to cope and adapt. In this study, the seasonal pattern of irrigation-water demand resulting from the typical practice of multiple cropping in South Asia was accounted for by introducing double cropping with monsoon-dependent planting dates in a hydrology and vegetation model. Crop yields were calibrated to the latest state-level statistics of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal. The improvements in seasonal land use and cropping periods lead to lower estimates of irrigation-water demand compared to previous model-based studies, despite the net irrigated area being higher. Crop irrigation-water demand differs sharply between seasons and regions; in Pakistan, winter (rabi) and monsoon summer (kharif) irrigation demands are almost equal, whereas in Bangladesh the rabi demand is ~ 100 times higher. Moreover, the relative importance of irrigation supply versus rain decreases sharply from west to east. Given the size and importance of South Asia improved regional estimates of food production and its irrigation-water demand will also affect global estimates. In models used for global water resources and food-security assessments, processes like multiple cropping and monsoon-dependent planting dates should not be ignored.

  15. Water saving at the field scale with Irrig-OH, an open-hardware environment device for soil water potential monitoring and irrigation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masseroni, Daniele; Facchi, Arianna; Gandolfi, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    Sustainability of irrigation practices is an important objective which should be pursued in many countries, especially in areas where water scarcity causes strong conflicts among the different water uses. The efficient use of water is a key factor in coping with the food demand of an increasing world population and with the negative effects of the climate change on water resources availability in many areas. In this complex context, it is important that farmers adopt instruments and practices that enable a better management of water at the field scale, whatever the irrigation method they adopt. This work presents the hardware structure and the functioning of an open-hardware microstation based on the Arduino technology, called Irrig-OH, which allows the continuous and low-cost monitoring of the soil water potential (SWP) in the root zone for supporting the irrigation scheduling at the field scale. In order to test the microstation, an experiment was carried out during the agricultural season 2014 at Lodi (Italy), with the purpose of comparing the farmers' traditional management of irrigation of a peach variety and the scheduling based on the SWP measurements provided by the microstation. Additional measurements of leaf water potential (LWP), stomatal resistance, transpiration (T), crop water stress index (CWSI) and fruit size evolution were performed respectively on leafs and fruits for verifying the plant physiological responses on different SWP levels in soil. At the harvesting time, the peach production in term of quantity and quality (sucrose content was measured by a rifractometer over a sample of one hundred fruits) of the two rows were compared. Irrigation criteria was changed with respect to three macro-periods: up to the endocarp hardening phase (begin of May) soil was kept well watered fixing the SWP threshold in the first 35 cm of the soil profile at -20 kPa, during the pit hardening period (about the entire month of May) the allowed SWP threshold was

  16. Retrieving water productivity parameters by using Landsat images in the Nilo Coelho irrigation scheme, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de C. Teixeira, Antônio H.; Lopes, Hélio L.; Hernandez, Fernando B. T.; Scherer-Warren, Morris; Andrade, Ricardo G.; Neale, Christopher M. U.

    2013-10-01

    The Nilo Coelho irrigation scheme, located in the semi-arid region of Brazil, is highlighted as an important agricultural irrigated perimeter. Considering the scenario of this fast land use change, the development and application of suitable tools to quantify the trends of the water productivity parameters on a large scale is important. To analyse the effects of land use change within this perimeter, the large-scale values of biomass production (BIO) and actual evapotranspiration (ET) were quantified from 1992 to 2011, under the naturally driest conditions along the year. Monteith's radiation model was applied for estimating the absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR), while the SAFER (Simple Algorithm For Evapotranspiration Retrieving) algorithm was used to retrieve ET. The highest incremental BIO values happened during the years of 1999 and 2005, as a result of the increased agricultural area under production inside the perimeter, when the average differences between irrigated crops and natural vegetation were more than 70 kg ha-1 d-1. Comparing the average ET rates of 1992 (1.6 mm d-1) with those for 2011 (3.1 mm d-1), it was verified that the extra water consumption doubled because of the increments of irrigated areas along the years. More uniformity along the years on both water productivity parameters occurred for natural vegetation, evidenced by the lower values of standard deviation when comparing to irrigated crops. The heterogeneity of ET values under irrigation conditions are due to the different species, crop stages, cultural and water managements.

  17. [Effects of ridge and furrow rain harvesting with supplemental irrigation on winter wheat photosynthetic characteristics, yield and water use efficiency in Guanzhong irrigation district].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Han, Qing-fang; Cheng, Xue-feng; Yang, Shan-shan; Jia, Zhi-kuan; Ding, Rui-xia; Ren, Xiao-long; Nie, Jun-feng

    2015-05-01

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the regulation of crop photosynthesis and output and water saving effect under ridge and furrow rain harvesting with supplemental irrigation in Guanzhong irrigation district. The experiment was set with 5 treatments with irrigation at returning green stage, and the widths of both ridge and furrow being 60 cm. T1, T2 and T3 were in the ridge and furrow rain harvesting planting pattern, with the irrigation volumes being 0, 375 and 750 m3 · hm(-2) respectively, T4 was flat planting with irrigation (border irrigation) of 750 m3 · hm(-2) and CK was flat planting without irrigation. Effects on winter wheat photosynthetic organs, photosynthetic rate, yield and water use efficiency, etc. were tested. The results showed that compared with T4, T1, T2 and T3 treatments increased the grain yield by 2.8%, 9.6% and 18.9%, improved the harvest index by 2.0% to 8.5%, advanced the flag leaf chlorophyll content by 41.9% to 64.4% significantly, and improved the 0-40 cm layer soil moisture content by 0.1%-4.6% during the whole growth period. Photosynthetic rates at the flowering and filling stages also increased by 22.3% to 54.2% and -4.3% to 67.2%, respectively. Total water use efficiencies (WUEy) were 17.9%, 10.4% and 15.4% higher than that of T4, and 69.3%, 58.6% and 65.7% higher than that of CK (P < 0.05), respectively, and enhanced precipitation utilization efficiency ( PUE ) by 94.3%-124.5% than CK. Leaf areas of T2 and T3 treatments at each growth stage were significantly higher than that of T4 and CK, irrigation water use efficiencies (IUE) were 119.1% and 18.8% higher than that of T4, respectively. Therefore, it was concluded that ridge and furrow rain harvesting cultivation could maintain higher grain yield than border irrigation without irrigation or with irrigation reduction by 50%. The utilization efficiency of irrigation water under the condition of irrigation reduction by 50% was improved significantly, and the ridge and

  18. Faecal contamination indicators, Salmonella, Vibrio and Aeromonas in water used for the irrigation of agricultural products.

    PubMed

    Pianietti, A; Sabatini, L; Bruscolini, F; Chiaverini, F; Cecchetti, G

    2004-04-01

    The faecal contamination indicators (total coliforms, faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci) and the genera Salmonella, Vibrio, Aeromonas were investigated in water samples used for irrigation. During 4 months, 52 samples were taken. The methods used were: multiple tube fermentation method for faecal contamination indicators and membrane filtration techniques for salmonella, aeromonas and vibrio. Two samples were positive for Salmonella spp., fourteen for Aeromonas spp. and no samples for Vibrio spp. No correlation was found between aeromonas and the indicators of faecal contamination. Regarding Aeromonas spp., 21.6% of the strains were adhesive and 12.6% cytotoxic: this confirms the possible role of aeromonas in human pathologies. These results are important to determine the quality of irrigation water in relation to human health. In fact, the spray or sprinkler irrigation produces bioaerosol, which can contaminate the crops that are likely to be eaten uncooked. In addition, the flood or furrow irrigation represents a risk to field workers.

  19. Faecal contamination indicators, Salmonella, Vibrio and Aeromonas in water used for the irrigation of agricultural products.

    PubMed

    Pianietti, A; Sabatini, L; Bruscolini, F; Chiaverini, F; Cecchetti, G

    2004-04-01

    The faecal contamination indicators (total coliforms, faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci) and the genera Salmonella, Vibrio, Aeromonas were investigated in water samples used for irrigation. During 4 months, 52 samples were taken. The methods used were: multiple tube fermentation method for faecal contamination indicators and membrane filtration techniques for salmonella, aeromonas and vibrio. Two samples were positive for Salmonella spp., fourteen for Aeromonas spp. and no samples for Vibrio spp. No correlation was found between aeromonas and the indicators of faecal contamination. Regarding Aeromonas spp., 21.6% of the strains were adhesive and 12.6% cytotoxic: this confirms the possible role of aeromonas in human pathologies. These results are important to determine the quality of irrigation water in relation to human health. In fact, the spray or sprinkler irrigation produces bioaerosol, which can contaminate the crops that are likely to be eaten uncooked. In addition, the flood or furrow irrigation represents a risk to field workers. PMID:15061497

  20. Irrigation scheduling as affected by field capacity and wilting point water content from different data sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at field capacity and wilting point water content is critical information for irrigation scheduling, regardless of soil water sensor-based method (SM) or evapotranspiration (ET)-based method. Both methods require knowledge on site-specific and soil-specific Management Allowable De...

  1. Rice Water use efficiency and yield under continuous and intermittent irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, rice (Oryza sativa L.) is predominantly grown using continuous fl ood irrigation, which requires large quantities of fresh water. Due to increasing scarcity and demand for water, modern agricultural systems need to produce more food with less water. Th e ...

  2. Soil water sensing: Implications of sensor capabilities for variable rate irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling using soil water sensors aims at maintaining the soil water content in the crop root zone above a lower limit defined by the management allowed depletion (MAD) for that soil and crop, but not so wet that too much water is lost to deep percolation, evaporation and runoff or that...

  3. Optimizing Irrigation Water Allocation under Multiple Sources of Uncertainty in an Arid River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Tang, D.; Gao, H.; Ding, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Population growth and climate change add additional pressures affecting water resources management strategies for meeting demands from different economic sectors. It is especially challenging in arid regions where fresh water is limited. For instance, in the Tailanhe River Basin (Xinjiang, China), a compromise must be made between water suppliers and users during drought years. This study presents a multi-objective irrigation water allocation model to cope with water scarcity in arid river basins. To deal with the uncertainties from multiple sources in the water allocation system (e.g., variations of available water amount, crop yield, crop prices, and water price), the model employs a interval linear programming approach. The multi-objective optimization model developed from this study is characterized by integrating eco-system service theory into water-saving measures. For evaluation purposes, the model is used to construct an optimal allocation system for irrigation areas fed by the Tailan River (Xinjiang Province, China). The objective functions to be optimized are formulated based on these irrigation areas' economic, social, and ecological benefits. The optimal irrigation water allocation plans are made under different hydroclimate conditions (wet year, normal year, and dry year), with multiple sources of uncertainty represented. The modeling tool and results are valuable for advising decision making by the local water authority—and the agricultural community—especially on measures for coping with water scarcity (by incorporating uncertain factors associated with crop production planning).

  4. Simulations of Limited-Water Irrigation Management Options for Corn in Dryland Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diminishing land and water resources due to increasing demands from rapid population growth calls for increasing water use efficiency of irrigated crops. To produce more for every drop of water used in agriculture, it is important to develop location specific alternate agronomic practices vis-à-vis...

  5. Effect of irrigation techniques and strategies on water footprint of growing crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukalla, A. D.; Krol, M. S.; Hoekstra, A. Y. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Reducing the water footprint (WF) of growing crops, the largest water user and a significant contributor to the WF of many consumer products, plays a significant role in integrated and sustainable water management. The water footprint for growing crop is accounted by relating the crop yield with the corresponding consumptive water use (CWU), which both can be adjusted by measures that affect the crop growth and root-zone soil water balance. This study explored the scope for reducing the water footprint of irrigated crops by experimenting set of field level technical and managerial measures: (i) irrigation technologies (Furrow, sprinkler, drip and sub-surface drip), (ii) irrigation strategies (full and a range of sustained and controlled deficit) and (iii) field management options (zero, organic and synthetic mulching). Ranges of cases were also considered: (a) Arid and semi-arid environment (b) Loam and Sandy-loam soil types and (c) for Potato, Wheat and Maize crops; under (c) wet, normal and dry years. AquaCrop, the water driven crop growth and soil water balance model, offered the opportunity to systematically experiment these measures on water consumption and yield. Further, the green and blue water footprints of growing crop corresponding to each measure were computed by separating the root zone fluxes of the AquaCrop output into the green and blue soil water stocks and their corresponding fluxes. Results showed that in arid environment reduction in irrigation supply, CWU and WF up to 300 mm, 80 mm and 75 m3/tonne respectively can be achieved for Maize by a combination of organic mulching and drip technology with controlled deficit irrigation strategies (10-20-30-40% deficit with reference to the full irrigation requirement). These reductions come with a yield drop of 0.54 tonne/ha. In the same environment under the absence of mulching practice, the sub-surface drip perform better in reducing CWU and WF of irrigated crops followed by drip and furrow irrigation

  6. Evaluating the effects of mulch and irrigation amount on soil water distribution and root zone water balance using HYDRUS-2D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drip irrigation under mulch is a major water-saving irrigation method that has been widely practiced for cotton production. The performance of such irrigation systems should be evaluated for proper design, management, operation, and efficient water use. The modeling approach has been used as a commo...

  7. Water and nitrogen requirements of subsurface drip irrigated pomegranate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface drip irrigation is a well-developed practice for both annual and perennial crops. The use of subsurface drip is a well-established practice in many annual row crops, e.g. tomatoes, strawberries, lettuce. However, the use of subsurface drip on perennial crops has been slow to develop. With th...

  8. Three novel phytophthora species from irrigation water in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Phytophthora includes a number of destructive plant pathogens. Here we report three new taxa recovered from irrigation systems at an ornamental crop nursery in Mississippi. Isolates of these new taxa were recovered from rhododendron leaves submerged in ponds for 7 days in 2012. Isolat...

  9. A genetic approach to producing rice using less irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has shown that conventional rice production using the permanent flooded system can also result in high methane emissions, increased grain arsenic accumulation, and extensive demand on irrigation resources. Although rice is a staple grain for feeding half the world, there has been increasin...

  10. A case study of a bacterial pathogen in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter presents a case study of how exotic strains of Ralstonia solanacearum were disseminated throughout Europe and Florida via waterways used for irrigation. Several studies have demonstrated that aquatic weeds that commonly grow in rivers and ponds are able to harbor the pathogen and allow ...

  11. Safety assessment of greenhouse hydroponic tomatoes irrigated with reclaimed and surface water.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Galvez, Francisco; Allende, Ana; Pedrero-Salcedo, Francisco; Alarcon, Juan Jose; Gil, Maria Isabel

    2014-11-17

    The impact of reclaimed and surface water on the microbiological safety of hydroponic tomatoes was assessed. Greenhouse tomatoes were irrigated with reclaimed and surface water and grown on two hydroponic substrates (coconut fiber and rock wool). Water samples (n=208) were taken from irrigation water, with and without the addition of fertilizers and drainage water, and hydroponic tomatoes (n=72). Samples were analyzed for indicator microorganisms, generic Escherichia coli and Listeria spp., and pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella spp. and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC), using multiplex real-time PCR (RT-PCR) after enrichment. The correlation between climatological parameters such as temperature and the levels of microorganisms in water samples was also determined. In irrigation water, generic E. coli counts were higher in reclaimed than in surface water whereas Listeria spp. numbers increased after adding the fertilizers in both water sources. In drainage water, no clear differences in E. coli and Listeria numbers were observed between reclaimed and surface water. No positive samples for STEC were found in irrigation water. Presumptive positives for Salmonella spp. were found in 7.7% of the water samples and 62.5% of these samples were reclaimed water. Salmonella-positive samples by RT-PCR could not be confirmed by conventional methods. Higher concentrations of E. coli were associated with Salmonella-presumptive positive samples. Climatological parameters, such as temperature, were not correlated with the E. coli and Listeria spp. counts. Tomato samples were negative for bacterial pathogens, while generic E. coli and Listeria spp. counts were below the detection limit. The prevalence of presumptive Salmonella spp. found in irrigation water (reclaimed and surface water) was high, which might present a risk of contamination. The absence of pathogens on greenhouse hydroponic tomatoes indicates that good agricultural practices (GAP) were in place, avoiding the

  12. Safety assessment of greenhouse hydroponic tomatoes irrigated with reclaimed and surface water.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Galvez, Francisco; Allende, Ana; Pedrero-Salcedo, Francisco; Alarcon, Juan Jose; Gil, Maria Isabel

    2014-11-17

    The impact of reclaimed and surface water on the microbiological safety of hydroponic tomatoes was assessed. Greenhouse tomatoes were irrigated with reclaimed and surface water and grown on two hydroponic substrates (coconut fiber and rock wool). Water samples (n=208) were taken from irrigation water, with and without the addition of fertilizers and drainage water, and hydroponic tomatoes (n=72). Samples were analyzed for indicator microorganisms, generic Escherichia coli and Listeria spp., and pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella spp. and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC), using multiplex real-time PCR (RT-PCR) after enrichment. The correlation between climatological parameters such as temperature and the levels of microorganisms in water samples was also determined. In irrigation water, generic E. coli counts were higher in reclaimed than in surface water whereas Listeria spp. numbers increased after adding the fertilizers in both water sources. In drainage water, no clear differences in E. coli and Listeria numbers were observed between reclaimed and surface water. No positive samples for STEC were found in irrigation water. Presumptive positives for Salmonella spp. were found in 7.7% of the water samples and 62.5% of these samples were reclaimed water. Salmonella-positive samples by RT-PCR could not be confirmed by conventional methods. Higher concentrations of E. coli were associated with Salmonella-presumptive positive samples. Climatological parameters, such as temperature, were not correlated with the E. coli and Listeria spp. counts. Tomato samples were negative for bacterial pathogens, while generic E. coli and Listeria spp. counts were below the detection limit. The prevalence of presumptive Salmonella spp. found in irrigation water (reclaimed and surface water) was high, which might present a risk of contamination. The absence of pathogens on greenhouse hydroponic tomatoes indicates that good agricultural practices (GAP) were in place, avoiding the

  13. A modeling study of irrigation effects on global surface water and groundwater resources under a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Leung, L. Ruby

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of irrigation on global water resources by performing and analyzing Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4) simulations driven by downscaled/bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from five General Circulation Models (GCMs). For each climate scenario, three sets of numerical experiments were performed: (1) a CTRL experiment in which all crops are assumed to be rainfed; (2) an IRRIG experiment in which the irrigation module is activated using surface water (SW) to feed irrigation; and (3) a PUMP experiment in which a groundwater pumping scheme coupled with the irrigation module is activated for conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater (GW) for irrigation. The parameters associated with irrigation and groundwater pumping are calibrated based on a global inventory of census-based water use compiled by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Our results suggest that irrigation could lead to two major effects: SW (GW) depletion in regions with irrigation primarily fed by SW (GW), respectively. Furthermore, irrigation depending primarily on SW tends to have larger impacts on low-flow than high-flow conditions, suggesting increased vulnerability to drought. By the end of the 21st century, combined effect of increased irrigation water demand and amplified temporal-spatial variability of water supply may lead to severe local water scarcity for irrigation. Regionally, irrigation has the potential to aggravate/alleviate climate-induced changes of SW/GW although such effects are negligible when averaged globally. Our study highlights the need to account for irrigation effects and sources in assessing regional climate change impacts.

  14. Presence and distribution of wastewater-derived pharmaceuticals in soil irrigated with reclaimed water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinney, C.A.; Furlong, E.T.; Werner, S.L.; Cahill, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    Three sites in the Front Range of Colorado, USA, were monitored from May through September 2003 to assess the presence and distribution of pharmaceuticals in soil irrigated with reclaimed water derived from urban wastewater. Soil cores were collected monthly, and 19 pharmaceuticals, all of which were detected during the present study, were measured in 5-cm increments of the 30-cm cores. Samples of reclaimed water were analyzed three times during the study to assess the input of pharmaceuticals. Samples collected before the onset of irrigation in 2003 contained numerous pharmaceuticals, likely resulting from the previous year's irrigation. Several of the selected pharmaceuticals increased in total soil concentration at one or more of the sites. The four most commonly detected pharmaceuticals were erythromycin, carbamazepine, fluoxetine, and diphenhydramine. Typical concentrations of the individual pharmaceuticals observed were low (0.02-15 ??g/kg dry soil). The existence of subsurface maximum concentrations and detectable concentrations at the lowest sampled soil depth might indicate interactions of soil components with pharmaceuticals during leaching through the vadose zone. Nevertheless, the present study demonstrates that reclaimed-water irrigation results in soil pharmaceutical concentrations that vary through the irrigation season and that some compounds persist for months after irrigation. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  15. [Effect of reclaimed water used for irrigation on the quality of crops and soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing-Liang; Zhang, Jin-Na; Liu, Zhi-Gang; You, Shi-Jie; Wang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Li-Na; Xue, Shuang

    2007-02-01

    Effect of different water (tertiary effluent, secondary effluent, raw sewage as well as tap water as control) used for irrigation on the qualities of crops (cucumber, cabbage and corn) and soil was investigated; meanwhile, the contents of residual chlorine ion, phosphate, nitrate and nitrite as well as residual heavy metals present in crops were studied respectively. The results demonstrated that the secondary effluent and tertiary effluent had no significant effect on the crop quality. In contrast, irrigation with raw sewage could lead to increase of partial nutrient components in the crops. If protein contents were taken as an example, the proteins for three crops corresponding to different water sources were in the range of 0.736 2 - 0.812 5 mg/kg for cucumber, 0.134 8 - 0.164 5 mg/kg for cabbage and 10.28 - 10.84 mg/kg for corn, respectively. Irrigation with sewage produced more accumulation of nitrates (554.4 mg/kg for cabbage). Considerable effects of irrigation with secondary effluent and tertiary effluent were not observed; however, sewage was not suitable for irrigation due to an apparent accumulation of heavy metals in crops. During short-period irrigation, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values of soil ranged from 3.5 to 4.5, suggesting that there was no concern on soil basification. As well, obvious accumulation of heavy metals in soils was not detectable.

  16. [Impact of reclaimed water irrigation on soil chemical properties and culturable microorganisms ].

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue; Wang, Ji-hua; Guan, Jian-fei; Yang, Xue-chen; Chen, Dai-ci

    2014-09-01

    This research used batch soil column experiment to study the effects of irrigating with reclaimed water and tap water on the soil chemical properties and culturable microorganisms. The results indicated that reclaimed water could markedly increase the soil organic material (OM) and total nitrogen (TN) content, but it had no obvious effect on total phosphorus (TP), available phosphorus (AP) and pH value. Reclaimed water irrigation could significantly enhance the amounts of surface soil bacteria and actinomycetes at a depth of 0-20 cm, but it had little effect on the biomass of 20-40 cm and 40-60 cm soil layers. The dominant bacteria in tap water irrigation area was the genus Bacillus whereas that of reclaimed water irrigation area was the genus Acinetobacter. Tap water irrigation area had four endemic genera and reclaimed water irrigation area had six endemic genera. Reclaimed water had no obvious effect on the microbial community Shannon diversity of 0-20 cm soil layer, while it decreased Pielou evenness index, and improved Margalef richness index. Through SPSS 17. 0 correlation analysis between soil microbes quantity and soil chemical properties, it was shown that the soil microbes quantity was positively correlated with OM, TN, TP and AP, but negatively correlated with soil water content (SWC) and pH value. Based on CANOCO 4.5 detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and redundancy analysis (RDA) between soil microbes species and soil chemical properties, it was shown that AP had the strongest correlation with the microbial community (P = 0.002). TN and TP had larger impact on Streptococcus, Aeromonas and Neisseria. OM and AP had larger impact on Aerococcus, Planococcus and Halobacterium. PMID:25518681

  17. Water and energy footprint of irrigated agriculture in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daccache, A.; Ciurana, J. S.; Rodriguez Diaz, J. A.; Knox, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture constitutes the largest consumer of freshwater in the Mediterranean region and provides a major source of income and employment for rural livelihoods. However, increasing droughts and water scarcity have highlighted concerns regarding the environmental sustainability of agriculture in the region. An integrated assessment combining a gridded water balance model with a geodatabase and GIS has been developed and used to assess the water demand and energy footprint of irrigated production in the region. Modelled outputs were linked with crop yield and water resources data to estimate water (m3 kg-1) and energy (CO2 kg-1) productivity and identify vulnerable areas or ‘hotspots’. For a selected key crops in the region, irrigation accounts for 61 km3 yr-1 of water abstraction and 1.78 Gt CO2 emissions yr-1, with most emissions from sunflower (73 kg CO2/t) and cotton (60 kg CO2/t) production. Wheat is a major strategic crop in the region and was estimated to have a water productivity of 1000 t Mm-3 and emissions of 31 kg CO2/t. Irrigation modernization would save around 8 km3 of water but would correspondingly increase CO2 emissions by around +135%. Shifting from rain-fed to irrigated production would increase irrigation demand to 166 km3 yr-1 (+137%) whilst CO2 emissions would rise by +270%. The study has major policy implications for understanding the water-energy-food nexus in the region and the trade-offs between strategies to save water, reduce CO2 emissions and/or intensify food production.

  18. Irrigation experiments with produced waters from the retorting of oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.L.

    1980-12-01

    The research described herein was conducted by Geokinetics to qualitatively assess the tolerance of native and certain introduced species of vegetation to irrigation with produced water from the retorting of oil shale. Two separate experiments were conducted at the Kamp Kerogen field site in Uintah County, Utah. The results indicate possible effects on vegetation that a prolonged exposure to produced water would have. The two simple experiments were initiated during the summer of 1979. It was expected that irrigation with produced water would eventually result in detrimental effects to the plants receiving it; the concentrations of boron, molybdenum, arsenic, oil and other constituents in untreated production waters are high enough to likely cause damage to plants. In one experiment a 27 foot by 27 foot plot of native vegetation was irrigated with one inch of produced water per week for five weeks using a lawn sprinkler. Grasses and shrubs within the test plot appeared to have died; germination of annual plants was greatly inhibited. In the other experiment, 30 container-grown seedlings ranging in height from 0.3 feet to 3.0 feet were transplanted. Six species of broadleaf, deciduous trees not native to the test site were represented by five seedlings each. All 30 trees received well water irrigation for one month, after which four trees of each species were irrigated with produced water for seven weeks. One tree of each species continued to receive well water throughout the experiment; only two of those trees survived the summer of 1979. All six species appeared to have been adversely affected by produced water. The horse chesnut trees were the hardiest of the species planted. Most of the 30 trees, including those irrigated with well water, did not survive the winter season.

  19. A site-specific agricultural water requirement and footprint estimator (SPARE:WATER 1.0) for irrigation agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Multsch, S.; Al-Rumaikhani, Y. A.; Frede, H.-G.; Breuer, L.

    2013-01-01

    The water footprint accounting method addresses the quantification of water consumption in agriculture, whereby three types of water to grow crops are considered, namely green water (consumed rainfall), blue water (irrigation from surface or groundwater) and grey water (water needed to dilute pollutants). Most of current water footprint assessments focus on global to continental scale. We therefore developed the spatial decision support system SPARE:WATER that allows to quantify green, blue and grey water footprints on regional scale. SPARE:WATER is programmed in VB.NET, with geographic information system functionality implemented by the MapWinGIS library. Water requirement and water footprints are assessed on a grid-basis and can then be aggregated for spatial entities such as political boundaries, catchments or irrigation districts. We assume in-efficient irrigation methods rather than optimal conditions to account for irrigation methods with efficiencies other than 100%. Furthermore, grey water can be defined as the water to leach out salt from the rooting zone in order to maintain soil quality, an important management task in irrigation agriculture. Apart from a thorough representation of the modelling concept we provide a proof of concept where we assess the agricultural water footprint of Saudi Arabia. The entire water footprint is 17.0 km3 yr-1 for 2008 with a blue water dominance of 86%. Using SPARE:WATER we are able to delineate regional hot spots as well as crop types with large water footprints, e.g. sesame or dates. Results differ from previous studies of national-scale resolution, underlining the need for regional water footprint assessments.

  20. Use of Moringa oleifera seed extracts to reduce helminth egg numbers and turbidity in irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Mita E; Keraita, Bernard; Olsen, Annette; Boateng, Osei K; Thamsborg, Stig M; Pálsdóttir, Guðný R; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-07-01

    Water from wastewater-polluted streams and dug-outs is the most commonly used water source for irrigation in urban farming in Ghana, but helminth parasite eggs in the water represent health risks when used for crop production. Conventional water treatment is expensive, requires advanced technology and often breaks down in less developed countries so low cost interventions are needed. Field and laboratory based trials were carried out in order to investigate the effect of the natural coagulant Moringa oleifera (MO) seed extracts in reducing helminh eggs and turbidity in irrigation water, turbid water, wastewater and tap water. In medium to high turbid water MO extracts were effective in reducing the number of helminth eggs by 94-99.5% to 1-2 eggs per litre and the turbidity to 7-11 NTU which is an 85-96% reduction. MO is readily available in many tropical countries and can be used by farmers to treat high turbid water for irrigation, however, additional improvements of water quality, e.g. by sand filtration, is suggested to meet the guideline value of ≤ 1 helminth egg per litre and a turbidity of ≤ 2 NTU as recommended by the World Health Organization and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for water intended for irrigation. A positive correlation was established between reduction in turbidity and helminth eggs in irrigation water, turbid water and wastewater treated with MO. This indicates that helminth eggs attach to suspended particles and/or flocs facilitated by MO in the water, and that turbidity and helminth eggs are reduced with the settling flocs. However, more experiments with water samples containing naturally occurring helminth eggs are needed to establish whether turbidity can be used as a proxy for helminth eggs.

  1. 25 CFR 171.710 - Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an Annual Assessment Waiver? 171.710 Section 171.710 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Non-Assessment Status § 171.710 Can I receive irrigation water if I am granted an...

  2. Cultivar Mixture Cropping Increased Water Use Efficiency in Winter Wheat under Limited Irrigation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunqi; Zhang, Yinghua; Ji, Wei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Bin; Li, Jinpeng; Han, Meikun; Xu, Xuexin; Wang, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of cultivar mixture cropping on yield, biomass, and water use efficiency (WUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were investigated under non-irrigation (W0, no irrigation during growth stage), one time irrigation (W1, irrigation applied at stem elongation) and two times irrigation (W2, irrigation applied at stem elongation and anthesis) conditions. Nearly 90% of cultivar mixture cropping treatments experienced an increase in grain yield as compared with the mean of the pure stands under W0, those for W1 and W2 were 80% and 85%, respectively. Over 75% of cultivar mixture cropping treatments got greater biomass than the mean of the pure stands under the three irrigation conditions. Cultivar mixture cropping cost more water than pure stands under W0 and W1, whereas the water consumption under W2 decreased by 5.9%–6.8% as compared with pure stands. Approximately 90% of cultivar mixtures showed an increase of 5.4%–34.5% in WUE as compared with the mean of the pure stands, and about 75% of cultivar mixtures had 0.8%–28.5% higher WUE than the better pure stands under W0. Similarly, there were a majority of mixture cropping treatments with higher WUE than the mean and the better one of the pure stands under W1 and W2. On the whole, proper cultivar mixture cropping could increase yield and WUE, and a higher increase in WUE occurred under limited irrigation condition. PMID:27362563

  3. Evaluation of wetting area and water distribution on different soils in subsurface drip irrigation emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, B.; Sohrabi, T.; Mirzaei, F.; Rodríguez-Sinobas, L.

    2012-04-01

    Growing pressure on the world's available water resources has led to an increase in the efficiency and productivity of water-use of irrigation systems in arid and semi-arid regions with water scarcity. In this context, sub-surface drip irrigation, where emitters discharge water underneath the soil surface, might help by saving water since soil evaporation, surface runoff, and deep percolation are greatly reduced or eliminated. In this paper, the wetting area and water distribution on light, medium and heavy texture homogeneous soils in subsurface drip irrigation emitters were evaluated. Experimental tests were carried out in a plexiglass lysimeter container with transparent walls. Emitters were buried at 15, 30 and 45 cm depths and discharge rates of 2 and 4 L/h were applied. Observations of wetting bulbs dimensions showed that water moved more laterally than downwards for higher emitter discharges. However, small emitter discharges enhanced water to move downwards. Likewise, higher emitter discharges also favored water to move upwards toward the soil surface. Water redistribution was affected by emitter depth. For the same emitter discharge, the deepest depth showed less water redistributed in the down vertical and horizontal directions but the contrary was observed for shallow depths. This could be explained considering the dry soil area above the emitter that is larger in the deepest emitters. Observations on wetting bulb dimensions and water distributions could aim at the selection of proper design variables (emitter depth), and/or operation variables (inlet head and irrigation time) in the studied soils under different scenarios of cropping patterns. Key Words: subsurface drip irrigation, wetting bulb, soil water distribution, water redistribution, optimum management

  4. Classifying Residents who use Landscape Irrigation: Implications for Encouraging Water Conservation Behavior.

    PubMed

    Warner, Laura A; Lamm, Alexa J; Rumble, Joy N; Martin, Emmett T; Cantrell, Randall

    2016-08-01

    Large amounts of water applied as urban irrigation can often be reduced substantially without compromising esthetics. Thus, encouraging the adoption of water-saving technologies and practices is critical to preserving water resources, yet difficult to achieve. The research problem addressed in this study is the lack of characterization of residents who use urban irrigation, which hinders the design of effective behavior change programs. This study examined audience segmentation as an approach to encouraging change using current residential landscape practices. K-means cluster analysis identified three meaningful subgroups among residential landscape irrigation users (N = 1,063): the water considerate majority (n = 479, 45 %), water savvy conservationists (n = 378, 36 %), and unconcerned water users (n = 201, 19 %). An important finding was that normative beliefs, attitudes, and perceived behavioral control characteristics of the subgroups were significantly different with large and medium practical effect sizes. Future water conservation behaviors and perceived importance of water resources were also significantly different among subgroups. The water considerate majority demonstrated capacity to conserve, placed high value on water, and were likely to engage in behavior changes. This article contributes to the literature on individuals who use residential landscape irrigation, an important target audience with potential to conserve water through sustainable irrigation practices and technologies. Findings confirm applicability of the capacity to conserve water to audience segmentation and extend this concept by incorporating perceived value of water resources and likelihood of conservation. The results suggest practical application to promoting residential landscape water conservation behaviors based on important audience characteristics.

  5. Classifying Residents who use Landscape Irrigation: Implications for Encouraging Water Conservation Behavior.

    PubMed

    Warner, Laura A; Lamm, Alexa J; Rumble, Joy N; Martin, Emmett T; Cantrell, Randall

    2016-08-01

    Large amounts of water applied as urban irrigation can often be reduced substantially without compromising esthetics. Thus, encouraging the adoption of water-saving technologies and practices is critical to preserving water resources, yet difficult to achieve. The research problem addressed in this study is the lack of characterization of residents who use urban irrigation, which hinders the design of effective behavior change programs. This study examined audience segmentation as an approach to encouraging change using current residential landscape practices. K-means cluster analysis identified three meaningful subgroups among residential landscape irrigation users (N = 1,063): the water considerate majority (n = 479, 45 %), water savvy conservationists (n = 378, 36 %), and unconcerned water users (n = 201, 19 %). An important finding was that normative beliefs, attitudes, and perceived behavioral control characteristics of the subgroups were significantly different with large and medium practical effect sizes. Future water conservation behaviors and perceived importance of water resources were also significantly different among subgroups. The water considerate majority demonstrated capacity to conserve, placed high value on water, and were likely to engage in behavior changes. This article contributes to the literature on individuals who use residential landscape irrigation, an important target audience with potential to conserve water through sustainable irrigation practices and technologies. Findings confirm applicability of the capacity to conserve water to audience segmentation and extend this concept by incorporating perceived value of water resources and likelihood of conservation. The results suggest practical application to promoting residential landscape water conservation behaviors based on important audience characteristics. PMID:27177542

  6. Feedbacks between managed irrigation and water availability: Diagnosing temporal and spatial patterns using an integrated hydrologic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, Laura E.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-03-01

    Groundwater-fed irrigation has been shown to deplete groundwater storage, decrease surface water runoff, and increase evapotranspiration. Here we simulate soil moisture-dependent groundwater-fed irrigation with an integrated hydrologic model. This allows for direct consideration of feedbacks between irrigation demand and groundwater depth. Special attention is paid to system dynamics in order to characterized spatial variability in irrigation demand and response to increased irrigation stress. A total of 80 years of simulation are completed for the Little Washita Basin in Southwestern Oklahoma, USA spanning a range of agricultural development scenarios and management practices. Results show regionally aggregated irrigation impacts consistent with other studies. However, here a spectral analysis reveals that groundwater-fed irrigation also amplifies the annual streamflow cycle while dampening longer-term cyclical behavior with increased irrigation during climatological dry periods. Feedbacks between the managed and natural system are clearly observed with respect to both irrigation demand and utilization when water table depths are within a critical range. Although the model domain is heterogeneous with respect to both surface and subsurface parameters, relationships between irrigation demand, water table depth, and irrigation utilization are consistent across space and between scenarios. Still, significant local heterogeneities are observed both with respect to transient behavior and response to stress. Spatial analysis of transient behavior shows that farms with groundwater depths within a critical depth range are most sensitive to management changes. Differences in behavior highlight the importance of groundwater's role in system dynamics in addition to water availability.

  7. Irrigation water quality influences heavy metal uptake by willows in biosolids.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, W Scott; Baker, Alan J M; Gregory, David; Arndt, Stefan K

    2015-05-15

    Phytoextraction is an effective method to remediate heavy metal contaminated landscapes but is often applied for single metal contaminants. Plants used for phytoextraction may not always be able to grow in drier environments without irrigation. This study investigated if willows (Salix x reichardtii A. Kerner) can be used for phytoextraction of multiple metals in biosolids, an end-product of the wastewater treatment process, and if irrigation with reclaimed and freshwater influences the extraction process. A plantation of willows was established directly onto a tilled stockpile of metal-contaminated biosolids and irrigated with slightly saline reclaimed water (EC ∼2 dS/cm) at a wastewater processing plant in Victoria, Australia. Biomass was harvested annually and analysed for heavy metal content. Phytoextraction of cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc was benchmarked against freshwater irrigated willows. The minimum irrigation rate of 700 mm per growing season was sufficient for willows to grow and extract metals. Increasing irrigation rates produced no differences in total biomass and also no differences in the extraction of heavy metals. The reclaimed water reduced both the salinity and the acidity of the biosolids significantly within the first 12 months after irrigation commenced and after three seasons the salinity of the biosolids had dropped to <15% of initial values. A flushing treatment to remove excess salts was therefore not necessary. Irrigation had an impact on biosolids attributes such as salinity and pH, and that this had an influence on metal extraction. Reclaimed water irrigation reduced the biosolid pH and this was associated with reductions of the extraction of Ni and Zn, it did not influence the extraction of Cu and enhanced the phytoextraction of Cd, which was probably related to the high chloride content of the reclaimed water. Our results demonstrate that flood-irrigation with reclaimed water was a successful treatment to grow willows in a

  8. Assessment of irrigation performance: contribution to improve water management in a small catchment in the Brazilian savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Lineu; Marioti, Juliana; Steenhuis, Tammo; Wallender, Wesley

    2010-05-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the major consumer of surface water in Brazil using over 70% of the total supply. Due to the growing competition for water among different sectors of the economy, sustainable water use can only be achieved by decreasing the portion of water used by the irrigated agriculture. Thus, in order to maintain yield, farmers need to irrigate more efficiently. There is little known on irrigation efficiency in Brazil. Therefore a study was carried out in the Buriti Vermelho basin to assess the irrigation performance of existing system. The experimental basin has a drainage area of 940 hectares and is located in the eastern part of the Federal District, in the Brazilian savanna region. Agriculture is the main activity. There is a dominance of red latosols. Several types of land use and crop cover are encountered in the basin. Conflicts among farmers for water are increasing. As water, in quality and quantity, is crucial to maintain the livelihood of the population in the basin, concern about risk of water lack due to climatic and land use change is in place. Once irrigation is the main water user in the basin, to increase water availability and reduce conflicts a water resource management plan has to be established. For this purpose, irrigation system performance has to be understood. The objective of this work was to assess the performance and the management of irrigation (small and big) that has been carried out by farmers in the Buriti Vermelho experimental watershed. A survey undertaken in 2007 was used to identify the irrigation systems in the basin. It was verified that irrigation is practiced by both small (area up to 6 hectare) and big farmers. Small farmers usually crop limes and vegetables and use micro-irrigation, drip, sprinkler, guns or furrow to irrigate them. Big farmers plant annual crops and use center pivot as irrigation system. In this first assessment 13 irrigation systems were evaluated: five conventional sprinklers, four drip

  9. Age of irrigation water in ground water from the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Rupert, M.G.; Busenberg, E.; Schlosser, P.

    2000-01-01

    Stable isotope data (2H and 18O) were used in conjunction with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He) data to determine the fraction and age of irrigation water in ground water mixtures from farmed parts of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) Aquifer in south-central Idaho. Two groups of waters were recognized: (1) regional background water, unaffected by irrigation and fertilizer application, and (2) mixtures of irrigation water from the Snake River with regional background water. New data are presented comparing CFC and 3H/3He dating of water recharged through deep fractured basalt, and dating of young fractions in ground water mixtures. The 3H/3He ages of irrigation water in most mixtures ranged from about zero to eight years. The CFC ages of irrigation water in mixtures ranged from values near those based on 3H/3He dating to values biased older than the 3H/3He ages by as much as eight to 10 years. Unsaturated zone air had CFC-12 and CFC-113 concentrations that were 60% to 95%, and 50% to 90%, respectively, of modern air concentrations and were consistently contaminated with CFC-11. Irrigation water diverted from the Snake River was contaminated with CFC-11 but near solubility equilibrium with CFC-12 and CFC-113. The dating indicates ground water velocities of 5 to 8 m/d for water along the top of the ESRP Aquifer near the southwestern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Many of the regional background waters contain excess terrigenic helium with a 3He/4He isotope ratio of 7 x 10-6 to 11 x 10-6 (R/Ra = 5 to 8) and could not be dated. Ratios of CFC data indicate that some rangeland water may contain as much as 5% to 30% young water (ages of less than or equal to two to 11.5 years) mixed with old regional background water. The relatively low residence times of ground water in irrigated parts of the ESRP Aquifer and the dilution with low-NO3 irrigation water from the Snake River lower the potential for

  10. Produced water irrigation changes the soil mesofauna community in a semiarid agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Raimundo Nonato Costa; Weber, Olmar Baller; Crisóstomo, Lindbergue Araujo

    2015-08-01

    The scarcity of water in semiarid regions requires alternative sources for irrigation to improve agricultural production. Here, we aimed to evaluate the effects of produced water from oil exploration on the structure of soil mesofauna during the dry and rainy seasons in irrigated sunflower and castor bean fields in a Brazilian semiarid region. Three irrigation treatments were applied on plots cultivated with castor beans and sunflowers: produced water treated by filtration (filtrated) or treated by reverse osmosis (reverse osmosis) and groundwater. The mesofauna under the biofuel crops was collected and identified during the dry and rainy seasons. Although the abundance and richness of the total fauna did not differ between seasons in sunflower plots, the community was altered. In castor beans, the abundance, richness, and community of mesofauna observed in plots irrigated with produced water differed from the groundwater treatment. Irrigation with produced water promotes important changes in soil fauna community that justify their assessment for the maintenance and monitoring of agroecosystems. PMID:26205282

  11. Management of Chronic Periodontitis Using Subgingival Irrigation of Ozonized Water: A Clinical and Microbiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Jayan Jacob; Ambooken, Majo; Kachappilly, Arun Jose; PK, Ajithkumar; Johny, Thomas; VK, Linith; Samuel, Anju

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adjunctive use of professional subgingival irrigation with scaling and root planing (SRP) has been found to be beneficial in eradicating the residual microorganisms in the pocket. Objective To evaluate the effect of ozonized water subgingival irrigation on microbiologic parameters and clinical parameters namely Gingival index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level. Materials and Methods Thirty chronic periodontitis patients with probing pocket depth ≥6mm on at least one tooth on contra lateral sides of opposite arches were included in the study. The test sites were subjected to ozonized water subgingival irrigation with subgingival irrigation device fitted with a modified subgingival tip. Control sites were subjected to scaling and root planing only. The following clinical parameters were recorded initially and after 4 weeks at the test sites and control sites. Plaque Index, Gingival Index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level. Microbiologic sampling was done for the test at the baseline, after scaling, immediately after ozonized water subgingival irrigation and after 4 weeks. In control sites microbiologic sampling was done at the baseline, after scaling and after 4 weeks. The following observations were made after 4 weeks. The results were statistically analysed using independent t-test and paired t-test. Result Test sites showed a greater reduction in pocket depth and gain in clinical attachment compared to control sites. The total anaerobic counts were significantly reduced by ozonized water subgingival irrigation along with SRP compared to SRP alone. Conclusion Ozonized water subgingival irrigation can improve the clinical and microbiological parameters in patients with chronic periodontitis when used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing. PMID:26436042

  12. Mercury and cadmium contamination of irrigation water, sediment, soil and shallow groundwater in a wastewater-irrigated field in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, G-H; Cao, S-S

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the concentrations of Hg, Cd, Pb and As in samples of irrigation water, sediment, soil and groundwater from a field in Tianjin that was irrigated with wastewater. The results showed that the concentrations (Hg, 0.82 microg/L; Cd, 0.18 microg/L; Pb, 1.5 microg/L; As, 8.02 microg/L) in the irrigation water did not exceed the China Surface Water Quality Standard or the maximum concentrations in irrigation water recommended by the FAO. The concentrations of metals in the groundwater of wells (Hg, 0.016 microg/L; Cd, 0.128 microg/L; Pb, 0.25 microg/L; As, 4.65 microg/L) were lower than China Groundwater Quality Standard and the WHO guideline values for drinking water. The groundwater had not yet been contaminated through vertical infiltration-induced leaching. However, a substantial buildup of Hg and Cd in river sediments (I(geo) for Hg and Cd; 5.24 and 3.04, respectively) and wastewater-irrigated soils (I(geo) for Hg and Cd; 2.50 and 3.09, respectively) was observed. Taken together, these results indicated that irrigation with wastewater damaged the soil quality over the long term and that metals more easily accumulated in vegetable fields than rice fields.

  13. Integrated management of water resources demand and supply in irrigated agriculture from plot to regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Niels; Wagner, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Growing water scarcity in agriculture is an increasing problem in future in many regions of the world. Recent trends of weather extremes in Saxony, Germany also enhance drought risks for agricultural production. In addition, signals of longer and more intense drought conditions during the vegetation period can be found in future regional climate scenarios for Saxony. However, those climate predictions are associated with high uncertainty and therefore, e.g. stochastic methods are required to analyze the impact of changing climate patterns on future crop water requirements and water availability. For assessing irrigation as a measure to increase agricultural water security a generalized stochastic approach for a spatial distributed estimation of future irrigation water demand is proposed, which ensures safe yields and a high water productivity at the same time. The developed concept of stochastic crop water production functions (SCWPF) can serve as a central decision support tool for both, (i) a cost benefit analysis of farm irrigation modernization on a local scale and (ii) a regional water demand management using a multi-scale approach for modeling and implementation. The new approach is applied using the example of a case study in Saxony, which is dealing with the sustainable management of future irrigation water demands and its implementation.

  14. Modeling Water Infiltration in Soil Irrigated with Treated Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, Mamoun; Albalasmeh, Ammar; Alghzawi, Ma'in

    2015-04-01

    Infiltration of soils irrigated with treated wastewater (TWW) was modeled using Philip, Horton, Kostiakov, and modified Kostiakov. Treatments were: soil irrigated with TWW for 5 years, 2 years, and a control site. Cumulative (Ft), rate of infiltration (ft), and hydraulic conductivity (HC) were measured in the field and aggregate stability (AS) in the lab. Both HC and ft were decreased with and AS was increased with TWW use and period of application. The Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) and correlation coefficient (R2) were used to measure the goodness of fit and linearity of the relationship between models and measured data. Philip model was best to fit infiltration compared to other models. High AS values in treated areas compared to control area indicated that infiltration was more affected by pore clogging than soil dispersion and swelling,

  15. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operations Review; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

  16. Hydrochemical characterization of a groundwater aquifer and its water quality in relation to irrigation in the Jinghuiqu irrigation district of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuhua; Li, Lin; Hu, Anyan

    2013-03-01

    The Jinghuiqu irrigation district is located in the semi-arid regions of northwestern China, where groundwater is the most important natural source for local industry, agriculture and residents. The present work was conducted in the Jinghuiqu irrigation district to characterize the groundwater aquifer, which has undergone long-term flood irrigation for over 2000 years. Isotopic and hydrochemical analyses, along with geological and hydrogeological tools, were used to determine the chemical properties and evolutionary processes of the groundwater aquifer. Results showed that the groundwater chemistry had changed significantly from 1990 to 2009. Water with concentrations of CaMgSO4 had decreased significantly, from 60% to 28% of the total water samples, during the period, while water with concentrations of NaSO4 and NaCl increased significantly, from 28% to 72%. The salinity of the groundwater increased rapidly and the affected area had expanded to most of the irrigation district. Stable isotope studies showed that most of the groundwater concentrations were derived from sulfate mineral dissolution. The minerals saturation indices (SI), ion ratios and oxygen isotope values of the groundwater indicated that the shallow groundwater had mainly experienced mineral dissolution, cation exchange, and mixing of the irrigated surface waters and groundwater. The groundwater quality had continuously evolved toward salinization as concentrations of SO4(2-) and Na+ grew to dominate it. Water quality risk analyses showed that most of the saline groundwater is not suitable for domestic and irrigation uses, especially in the middle and eastern parts of the irrigation district. These findings indicate that the irrigation district should strengthen the groundwater resources management.

  17. When should irrigators invest in more water-efficient technologies as an adaptation to climate change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, K.; Adam, J. C.; Stockle, C.; Brady, M.; Yoder, J.

    2015-12-01

    The western US is expected to experience more frequent droughts with higher magnitudes and persistence due to the climate change, with potentially large impacts on agricultural productivity and the economy. Irrigated farmers have many options for minimizing drought impacts including changing crops, engaging in water markets, and switching irrigation technologies. Switching to more efficient irrigation technologies, which increase water availability in the crop root zone through reduction of irrigation losses, receives significant attention because of the promise of maintaining current production with less. However, more efficient irrigation systems are almost always more capital-intensive adaptation strategy particularly compared to changing crops or trading water. A farmer's decision to switch will depend on how much money they project to save from reducing drought damages. The objective of this study is to explore when (and under what climate change scenarios) it makes sense economically for farmers to invest in a new irrigation system. This study was performed over the Yakima River Basin (YRB) in Washington State, although the tools and information gained from this study are transferable to other watersheds in the western US. We used VIC-CropSyst, a large-scale grid-based modeling framework that simulates hydrological processes while mechanistically capturing crop water use, growth and development. The water flows simulated by VIC-CropSyst were used to run the RiverWare river system and water management model (YAK-RW), which simulates river processes and calculates regional water availability for agricultural use each day (i.e., the prorationing ratio). An automated computational platform has been developed and programed to perform the economic analysis for each grid cell, crop types and future climate projections separately, which allows us to explore whether or not implementing a new irrigation system is economically viable. Results of this study indicate that

  18. A Distributed Water Circulation Model Incorporating Large Irrigation Schemes for Paddy Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Masumoto, T.; Kudo, R.; Horikawa, N.

    2010-12-01

    Water intake for paddy irrigation in Japan accounts for approximately 70% of total intake. Spatial and temporal variation of precipitation and river flow changes, likely to be caused by climate changes, directly affect paddy irrigation and its management schemes. Previous studies show that potential water stresses were estimated in the framework of grid-based distributed water circulation models, in which water availability and demand were roughly compared in large-scale grids of 10~100km. However, in mid and small-scale basins, where we carry out impact assessment studies of 1~10km grids, we need schemes to couple the irrigation intake and its allocation, because agricultural water is highly dependent on human decision making processes. Then, we have developed a model that couples natural hydrological behaviors of a basin and artificial irrigation systems. A distributed water circulation model, which explains natural hydrological behaviors of a basin, consists of approximately 1km square gridded meshes. Infiltration and saturation-excess flow and water requirements of irrigated paddy fields on any grid are calculated. The generated surface flow is routed by a kinematic wave equation so that daily flow rate can be calculated at any point of interest. The core of the model is water allocation and management scheme that exploit the spatial database of irrigation facilities and beneficiary areas. This analysis consists of new modeled plane for irrigation, which is calculated independently from the surface plain of the distributed water circulation model. Following the configuration of the water allocation and management schemes, the model is coupled with the distributed water circulation model. The reservoir operation scheme is an algorithm to determine the reservoir releases for irrigation based on requirement and flow rate at downstream diversion weirs. Diversion weirs intake water from associated rivers at the maximum rate, if water is available. The integrated

  19. Simulating maize production, water and surface energy balance, and canopy temperature under full and deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface energy balance is critical to the understanding of crop evapotranspiration (ET) requirement and crop water stresses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the simulation of crop growth, water and surface energy balance components, and canopy temperature under full and deficit irrigated...

  20. Stover removal effects on seasonal soil water availability under full and deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removing corn (Zea mays L.) stover for livestock feed or bioenergy feedstock may impact water availability in the soil profile to support crop growth. The role of stover in affecting soil profile water availability will depend on annual rainfall inputs as well as irrigation level. To assess how res...

  1. Comparison of microbial quality of irrigation water delivered in aluminum and PVC pipes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial quality of irrigation water attracts substantial attention due to the increased incidence of gastrointestinal illness caused by contaminated produce. Little is known about the changes in microbial quality of water during its delivery to crops. Studies were conducted to compare the biofilm ...

  2. Salinity and Alkaline pH in Irrigation Water Affect Marigold Plants: II. Mineral Ion Relations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scarcity of water of good quality for landscape irrigation is of outmost importance in arid and semiarid regions due to the competition with urban population. This is forcing the use of degraded waters with high levels of salinity and high pH, which may affect plant establishment and growth. The o...

  3. Energy and Water Conservation Curriculum Development in Irrigation Technology for the Pacific Northwest. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, James R.

    This project was conducted to develop curriculum materials for classes in energy and water conservation for the Irrigation Technology Program at Walla Walla Community College. To develop the curriculum, the principal investigator read and analyzed materials on the subjects of water and energy conservation, participated in a short course on drip…

  4. Comparative analysis of water quality between runoff entrance and middle of recycling irrigation reservoirs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recycling irrigation reservoirs (RIRs) are an emerging aquatic ecosystem of critical importance, for conserving and protecting increasingly scarce water resources. Here we compare water quality between runoff entrance and middle of four RIRs in nurseries in Virginia (VA) and Maryland (MD). Surface w...

  5. Irrigation water supply for the Yurok Indians, Resighini Rancheria, Klamath, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A required 1,100 gallons of water per minute for irrigating agricultural lands used by the Coast Indian Community on the Resighini Rancheria near Klamath, Calif., cannot be developed from wells. However, the required quantity of water might be developed from a trench installed in sand and gravel deposits that are hydraulically connected with the Klamath River. (USGS)

  6. Evaluation of measured and simulated cotton water use and yield under full and deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AquaCrop model simulates crop growth, water use, yield, and water use efficiency of several crops including cotton. The model is intended to be useful for irrigation planning and management, and it attempts to balance simplicity and accuracy so that it can be applied in locations where weather a...

  7. Survival of Salmonella on spinach leaves treated with contaminated irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Salmonella outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of fresh produce. The produce may be contaminated with Salmonella during on-farm contact with contaminated water. Transmission of Salmonella from contaminated irrigation water to spinach plants in growth chamber settings ...

  8. Groundwater characterization and selection of suitable water type for irrigation in the western region of Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir Rahman, Mirza A. T. M.; Saadat, A. H. M.; Islam, Md. Safiqul; Al-Mansur, Md. Abdullah; Ahmed, Shamim

    2014-11-01

    The main source of irrigation water in Bangladesh is groundwater, hence its quality needs to be ensured; otherwise, it can damage soil and reduce crop production. In current research, work by analyzing hydrogeochemical characteristics of groundwater different water types have been assessed to find out the suitable irrigation water of Godagari upazila in the western zone of Bangladesh. Studied parameters include pH, EC, TDS, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3 - and SO4 2- along with sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), soluble sodium percentage (SSP), residual sodium bicarbonate (RSBC), permeability index (PI), magnesium adsorption ratio (MAR), Kelley's ratio (KR), Mg:Ca and Na:Ca. XLSTAT and AquaChem software were used to perform factor analysis and determine water types of groundwater, respectively. The mean trends of cations and anions of the study area are Na+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > K+ > Fe2+ and Cl- > HCO3 - > SO4 2- > NO3 - where silicate-weathered minerals influence the groundwater quality of the study area. Except PI all parameters satisfy irrigation water standards. However, Na-Ca-Mg and Na-Ca-Cl types of water need to be under observation for any future changes since SSP is not satisfied for both of them and considering KR Na-Ca-Cl water type is not suited. Except these two groups, Ca-Na-Mg and Ca-Na-Mg-Cl water types are suitable for irrigation.

  9. A farm pond water irrigation management system in Mid-South United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the mid-southern United States, though most states receive more than 1000 mm of annual precipitation, only 20% irrigation is from surface water in this region. The majority of rainfall occurs in fall, winter and spring, but water deficit still exists during crop critical growing season from May t...

  10. Crop Insurance Increases Water Withdrawals for Irrigation in Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, M.; Deryugina, T.; Lin, X.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural production remains particularly vulnerable to weather fluctuations and extreme events, such as droughts, floods, and heat waves. Crop insurance is a risk management tool that has been developed to mitigate some of this weather risk and protect farmer income in times of poor production. However, it is not clear what the implications of crop insurance are for crop irrigation. By providing a guaranteed level of income in case of crop failure, crop insurance can reduce the farmer's incentive to irrigate. Thus, crop insurance can decrease water use in times of drought and promote water sustainability. However, to minimize this "moral hazard", the insurer may require farmers to irrigate crops more than necessary. Further, by shifting crop production, crop insurance may increase demand for water. Thus, it is unclear whether crop insurance increases or decreases crop water use. Here, we determine the empirical relationship between crop insurance and irrigation withdrawals in the United States. To establish causality, we exploit variation in crop insurance policies over time, using an instrumental variables approach. We find that a 1% increase in insured crop acreage leads to a 0.223% increase in irrigation withdrawals, primarily from groundwater aquifers.

  11. [Effects of irrigation amount on morphological characteristics and water use of Jatropha curcas].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Liang; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Liu, Yan-Wei; Yang, Ju-Rui

    2014-05-01

    Jatropha curcas is the most promising energy tree, and soil moisture is the key factor which affects the seedling quality and water use efficiency of J. curcas. With aims to evaluate the effect of different irrigation amount on growth, morphological characteristics and water use of J. curcas, a pot experiment was conducted with four irrigation amounts, i. e., W1:472.49 mm, W2: 228.79 mm, W3:154.18 mm and W4:106.93 mm, respectively. Compared with W1 treatment, the leaf area and stem cross-section area of base significantly decreased in W2, W3 and W4 treatments, but Huber value significantly increased, which could improve the efficiency of water transfer from root to shoot, thus enhance the capability of resistance to drought stress. Compared with W, treatment, the healthy index of J. curcas seedlings decreased slightly in W2 treatment but significantly decreased in W3 and W4 treatments. Hence, the irrigation amount from 228.79 to 472.49 mm was beneficial to increase the healthy index of J. curcas seedlings. Compared with W1 treatment, irrigation water was saved by 67.4% in W3 treatment, and the total dry mass and evapotranspiration significantly decreased by 17.4% and 68.6%, and the irrigation water use efficiency and total water use efficiency increased by 153.2% and 163.2%, respectively. In the condition of this study, the irrigation amount of 154.18 mm was beneficial to increase water use efficiency.

  12. Regulated deficit irrigation and the recovery of water relations in pistachio trees.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, J; Moriana, A; Pérez-López, D; Couceiro, J F; Olmedilla, N; Gijón, M C

    2006-01-01

    Recovery of water status in water-stressed pistachio trees (Pistacia vera L. cv. Kerman) was investigated by subjecting trees to regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) (60% of crop evapotranspiration rate, ET(c)) during stages I and II of fruit development (FD) followed by full irrigation during FD stage III (kernel-filling). Trees irrigated at 100% ET(c) throughout FD stages I, II and III served as controls. Water-stress severity was characterized by changes in soil water content and midday stem water potential (Psi(md)). Midday leaf conductance (g(1)) and trunk diameter variation (TDV) were also measured. In RDI trees, the lowest Psi(md) value, -1.8 MPa, occurred at the end of the RDI period. The corresponding value for the control trees was around -1.1 MPa. Although the RDI treatment affected gas exchange later than Psi(md), the greatest reductions in gas exchange (60% of control values) also appeared at the end of the RDI period. There were significant differences in TDV between control and RDI trees at the end of the RDI period. Although plant water status recovered within 20 days of resuming irrigation, the TDV values indicated a longer period might be necessary for complete recovery. Recovery of g(1) was faster than that of Psi(md), although differences in TDV between control and RDI trees indicated that gas exchange recovered later than Psi(md). The slow recovery of pistachio trees during FD stage III from water stress imposed during FD stages I and II suggests that irrigation should exceed 100% ET(c) during FD stage III or that more extensive irrigation should commence before the end of FD stage II. PMID:16203718

  13. Irrigation Strategies and Crop Breeding As Complementary Measures for Improved Water Management and Ecosystem Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vico, G.; Manzoni, S.; Weih, M.; Porporato, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The projected population growth and changes in climate and dietary habits will further increase the pressure on water resources globally. Within precision farming, a host of technical solutions has been developed to reduce water consumption for agricultural uses. Examples are the shift from scheduled to demand-based irrigation and the use of sophisticated water distribution techniques. The next frontier for a more sustainable agriculture is the combination of reduced water requirements with enhanced ecosystem services. Currently, staple grains are obtained from annuals crops. Enhanced ecosystem services could be obtained shifting from annual to perennial crops, obtained by means of targeted breeding. In fact, perennial plants, with their continuous soil cover and the higher allocation of resources to the below ground, contribute to the reduction of soil erosion, water and nutrient losses, while enhancing carbon sequestration in the root zone. We explore here the implications for water management at the field- to farm-scale of both improved irrigation methods and targeted breeding. A probabilistic description of the soil water balance and crop development is employed to quantify water requirements and yields and their inter-annual variability, as a function of rainfall patterns, soil and crop features. Optimal irrigation strategies are thus defined in terms of maximization of yield and minimization of required irrigation volumes and their inter-annual variability. The probabilistic model is parameterized based on an extensive meta-analysis of traits of co-generic annual and perennial species (including both selected and wild species) to explore the consequences for water requirements of shifting from annual to perennial crops under current and future climates. The larger and more developed roots of perennial crops may allow a better exploitation of soil water resources than annual species. At the same time, perennial crops may require adequate water supply for

  14. Incentives to adopt irrigation water saving measures for wetlands preservation: An integrated basin scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikouei, Alireza; Zibaei, Mansour; Ward, Frank A.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryPreserving natural wetlands is a growing challenge as the world faces increased demand for water. Drought, climate change and growing demands by users aggravate the issue. The conflict between irrigated agriculture and wetland services presents a classic case of competition. This paper examines an institutional mechanism that offers an incentive to farmers to adopt water conservation measures, which in turn could reduce overall water use in irrigated agriculture within a selected basin. Reduced water demands could provide the additional water needed for wetland preservation. We present an analytical empirical model implemented through the development of an integrated basin framework, in which least-cost measures for securing environmental flows to sustain wetlands are examined for the Zayandeh-Rud River Basin of central Iran. To test this idea, two policies - one with and one without an incentive - are analyzed: (a) reduced agricultural diversions without a water conservation subsidy, and (b) reduced agricultural diversions with a water conservation subsidy. The policies are evaluated against a background of two alternative water supply scenarios over a 10-year period. Results reveal that a water conservation subsidy can provide incentives for farmers to shift out of flood irrigation and bring more land into production by adopting water-saving irrigation technologies. The policy increases crop yields, raises profitability of farming, and increases the shadow price of water. Although the conservation subsidy policy incurs a financial cost to the taxpayer, it could be politically and economically attractive for both irrigators and environmental stakeholders. Results open the door for further examination of policy measures to preserve wetlands.

  15. A comparative study of strains of salmonella isolated from irrigation waters, vegetables and human infections.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Villanova Ruiz, B.; Cueto Espinar, A.; Bolaños Carmona, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 181 samples of irrigation water from the farmlands of Granada were examined for the presence of Salmonella spp. At the same time 849 samples of the crops from these farmlands and of vegetables sold in city market-places were studied. Sampling was done regularly over the period of study which ran from March 1981 to February 1983. Isolates from these sources were compared with 93 salmonellas isolated from human pathological material at various hospitals of the city of Granada from 1979-80, and again from 1981-3. The most commonly isolated serotypes of human origin were S. typhimurium and S. enteritidis. In irrigation waters and in crops, S. typhimurium, S. kapemba, S. london and S. blockley were found to be the most common. The results indicate a close relationship between the isolates from the irrigation waters and those from the vegetables, but their relationship to prevalent human infections is less clear. PMID:3595745

  16. Irrigation in California's Central Valley strengthens the southwestern U.S. water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing climatological and hydrological responses to agricultural irrigation continues to be an important challenge to understanding the full impact of water management on the Earth's environment and hydrological cycle. In this study, we use a global climate model, combined with realistic estimates of regional agricultural water use, to simulate the local and remote impacts of irrigation in California's Central Valley. We demonstrate a clear mechanism that the resulting increase in evapotranspiration and water vapor export significantly impacts the atmospheric circulation in the southwestern United States, including strengthening the regional hydrological cycle. We also identify that irrigation in the Central Valley initiates a previously unknown, anthropogenic loop in the regional hydrological cycle, in which summer precipitation is increased by 15%, causing a corresponding increase in Colorado River streamflow of ~30%. Ultimately, some of this additional streamflow is returned to California via managed diversions through the Colorado River aqueduct and the All-American Canal.

  17. The Bureau of Reclamation's New Mandate for Irrigation Water Conservation: Purposes and Policy Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michael R.

    1991-02-01

    Although the Bureau of Reclamation adopted a new mission as a water management agency, social purposes of the mission and methods of accomplishing the purposes remain undefined. A broad consensus agrees that a central feature of the agency's management program should be irrigation water conservation. This paper describes three purposes of irrigation water conservation: achieving economic efficiency of water allocation, improving environmental quality of western river systems, and satisfying outstanding Native American water claims. Five policy instruments are described as alternative methods of inducing conservation: quantity-based regulation, price-based regulation, transferable water use permits, conservation subsidies, and decentralization of ownership of Reclamation facilities. Two findings are: (1) price-based regulation may not produce water conservation and (2) conservation policy instruments should be chosen with reference to their ability to achieve the purposes of federal water conservation policy. An example illustrates quantitative effects on farm income of the alternative instruments.

  18. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Jefferson County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Jefferson County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Jefferson County was 1,636 (1,227 groundwater and 409 surface water). Water with- drawals reported during the registration process total 5.64 Mgal/day (3.89 Mgal/d groundwater and 1.75 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 197.49 Mgal/d (161.39 Mgal/d groundwater and 36.10 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The regis- tration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 132,667 acres of land to irrigate rice, sorghum, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, cotton, vegetables, and unknown crops as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture, crawfish, minnows, timber, and ducks. (USGS) {descriptors: *Water use, *Arkansas, *Jefferson County, Selective withdrawal, Groundwater, Surface water

  19. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Monroe County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Monroe County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Monroe County was 1,886 (1,677 groundwater and 209 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 8.87 Mgal/d (5.75 Mgal/d groundwater and 3.12 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 210.61 Mgal/d (190.99 Mgal/d groundwater and 19.62 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 127,670 acres of land to irrigate rice, sorghum, soybeans, milo, cash grains, cotton, hay, and unknown crops, as well as for agricultural uses of animal aquaculture, minnows, and ducks. {descriptors: *Water use, *Arkansas, *Monroe County, Selective withdrawal, Groundwater, Surface water

  20. Competency-Based Horticulture: Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program in floriculture. It contains a master resource list, a listing of floriculture resources available from various states, and 89 competency task sheets organized into nine competency areas. These…

  1. Competency-Based Horticulture. Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    One of two competency-based horticulture curriculum guides developed by an Illinois project, this Floriculture guide provides the classroom teacher with specific tasks determined by state industry personnel to be necessary for entry-level job placement. It is intended for horticulture education at the senior high school and two year college level.…

  2. Long-term climate sensitivity of an integrated water supply system: The role of irrigation.

    PubMed

    Guyennon, Nicolas; Romano, Emanuele; Portoghese, Ivan

    2016-09-15

    The assessment of the impact of long-term climate variability on water supply systems depends not only on possible variations of the resources availability, but also on the variation of the demand. In this framework, a robust estimation of direct (climate induced) and indirect (anthropogenically induced) effects of climate change is mandatory to design mitigation measures, especially in those regions of the planet where the groundwater equilibrium is strongly perturbed by exploitations for irrigation purposes. The main goal of this contribution is to propose a comprehensive model that integrates distributed crop water requirements with surface and groundwater mass balance, able to consider management rules of the water supply system. The proposed overall model, implemented, calibrated and validated for the case study of the Fortore water supply system (Apulia region, South Italy), permits to simulate the conjunctive use of the water from a surface artificial reservoir and from groundwater. The relative contributions of groundwater recharges and withdrawals to the aquifer stress have been evaluated under different climate perturbations, with emphasis on irrigation practices. Results point out that irrigated agriculture primarily affects groundwater discharge, indicating that ecosystem services connected to river base flow are particularly exposed to climate variation in irrigated areas. Moreover, findings show that the recharge both to surface and to groundwater is mainly affected by drier climate conditions, while hotter conditions have a major impact on the water demand. The non-linearity arising from combined drier and hotter conditions may exacerbate the aquifer stress by exposing it to massive sea-water intrusion.

  3. Controlled alternate partial root-zone irrigation: its physiological consequences and impact on water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Jianhua

    2004-11-01

    Controlled alternate partial root-zone irrigation (CAPRI), also called partial root-zone drying (PRD) in other literature, is a new irrigation technique and may improve the water use efficiency of crop production without significant yield reduction. It involves part of the root system being exposed to drying soil while the remaining part is irrigated normally. The wetted and dried sides of the root system are alternated with a frequency according to soil drying rate and crop water requirement. The irrigation system is developed on the basis of two theoretical backgrounds. (i) Fully irrigated plants usually have widely opened stomata. A small narrowing of the stomatal opening may reduce water loss substantially with little effect on photosynthesis. (ii) Part of the root system in drying soil can respond to the drying by sending a root-sourced signal to the shoots where stomata may be inhibited so that water loss is reduced. In the field, however, the prediction that reduced stomatal opening may reduce water consumption may not materialize because stomatal control only constitutes part of the total transpirational resistance. The boundary resistance from the leaf surface to the outside of the canopy may be so substantial that reduction in stomatal conductance is small and may be partially compensated by the increase in leaf temperature. It is likely that densely populated field crops, such as wheat and maize, may have a different stomatal control over transpiration from that of fruit trees which are more sparsely separated. It was discussed how long the stomata can keep 'partially' closed when a prolonged and repeated 'partial' soil drying is applied and what role the rewatering-stimulated new root growth may play in sensing the repeated soil drying. The physiological and morphological alternation of plants under partial root-zone irrigation may bring more benefits to crops than improved water use efficiency where carbon redistribution among organs is crucial to the

  4. Occurrence of vancomycin-resistant and -susceptible Enterococcus spp. in reclaimed water used for spray irrigation.

    PubMed

    Carey, Stephanie Ann; Goldstein, Rachel E Rosenberg; Gibbs, Shawn G; Claye, Emma; He, Xin; Sapkota, Amy R

    2016-05-01

    Reclaiming municipal wastewater for agricultural, environmental, and industrial purposes is increasing in the United States to combat dwindling freshwater supplies. However, there is a lack of data regarding the microbial quality of reclaimed water. In particular, no previous studies have evaluated the occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in reclaimed water used at spray irrigation sites in the United States. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated the occurrence, concentration, and antimicrobial resistance patterns of VRE and vancomycin-susceptible enterococci at three U.S. spray irrigation sites that use reclaimed water. We collected 48 reclaimed water samples from one Mid-Atlantic and two Midwest spray irrigation sites, as well as their respective wastewater treatment plants, in 2009 and 2010. Samples were analyzed for total enterococci and VRE using standard membrane filtration. Isolates were purified and then confirmed using biochemical tests and PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted using the Sensititre® microbroth dilution system. Data were analyzed by two-sample proportion tests and one-way analysis of variance. We detected total enterococci and VRE in 71% (34/48) and 4% (2/48) of reclaimed water samples, respectively. Enterococcus faecalis was the most common species identified. At the Mid-Atlantic spray irrigation site, UV radiation decreased total enterococci to undetectable levels; however, subsequent storage in an open-air pond at this site resulted in increased concentrations of enterococci. E. faecalis isolates recovered from the Mid-Atlantic spray irrigation site expressed intrinsic resistance to quinupristin/dalfopristin; however, non-E. faecalis isolates expressed resistance to quinupristin/dalfopristin (52% of isolates), vancomycin (4%), tetracycline (13%), penicillin (4%) and ciprofloxacin (17%). Our findings show that VRE are present in low numbers in reclaimed water at point-of-use at the sampled spray

  5. Effect of the irrigation with waste water on two different mediterranean soils under greenhouse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, S.; Garcia-Orenes, F.; Mataix, J.; Jordan, M. M.; Mataix-Solera, J.

    2009-04-01

    The semi-arid zones as the Mediterranean coast are densely populated and their aquifers are being hardly exploited. The use of waste water for irrigation is an alternative for the water shortage. Consequently, it is considered necessary to improve the efforts to investigate changes of soil properties. The main objective of this work was to compare the short-term effects of irrigation with waste water on two different Mediterranean soils. It was used flowerpots with loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl) under greenhouse conditions. Two different Mediterranean soils were selected from Alicante, SE of Spain, one gypsiferous soil and one calcareous soil with similar texture, to evaluate the different behaviour against waste water irrigation. The flowerpots were irrigated with two different treatments: fresh water (control) and treated waste water from secondary treatment. The experience lasted twelve months, the first six to adapt the plants into the greenhouse and then the soils were irrigated twice a week. Two soil sampling were taking in the beginning and in the end of the experiment to determinate EC, Na, P, OC and N. In both soils our results show a slight increase in electrical conductivity, being deeper in the calcareous soil as it is easier to drain. However it was found a higher increase of sodium concentrations in the gypsiferous soil. Fertility analysis in the secondary treatment of both soils presented an improvement in potassium and available phosphorus levels. In the other hand, organic carbon and nitrogen do not seem to change; the reason could be an enhancement in biological activity caused by irrigation. This biological activity and greenhouse conditions speed up organic matter mineralization. According to the short-term results in the soils studied parameters, except for electrical conductivity and sodium content, there is not a notable negative impact. Nevertheless, it must be necessary to extend the experience for long-term conclusions.

  6. Microbiological water quality in a large irrigation system: El Valle del Yaqui, Sonora México.

    PubMed

    Gortáres-Moroyoqui, Pablo; Castro-Espinoza, L; Naranjo, Jaime E; Karpiscak, Martin M; Freitas, Robert J; Gerba, Charles P

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the microbial water quality of a large irrigation system and how this quality varies with respect to canal size, impact of near-by communities, and the travel distance from the source in the El Valle del Yaqui, Sonora, México. In this arid region, 220,000 hectares are irrigated with 80% of the irrigation water being supplied from an extensive irrigation system including three dams on the Yaqui River watershed. The stored water flows to the irrigated fields through two main canal systems (severing the upper and lower Yaqui Valley) and then through smaller lateral canals that deliver the water to the fields. A total of 146 irrigation water samples were collected from 52 sample sites during three sampling events. Not all sites could be accessed on each occasion. All of the samples contained coliform bacteria ranging from 1,140 to 68,670 MPN/100 mL with an arithmetic mean of 11,416. Ninety-eight percent of the samples contained less than 1,000 MPN/100 mL Escherichia coli, with an arithmetic mean of 291 MPN/100 mL. Coliphage were detected in less than 30% of the samples with an arithmetic average equal to 141 PFU/100 mL. Enteroviruses, Cryptosporidium oocysts, and Giardia cysts were also detected in the canal systems. No significant difference was found in the water quality due to canal system (upper or lower Yaqui Valley), canal-size (main vs. lateral), distance from source, and the vicinity of human habitation (presence of various villages and towns along the length of the canals). There was a significant decrease in coliforms (p < 0.011) and E. coli (< 0.022) concentrations as travel distance increased from the City of Obregón.

  7. Arsenic removal from flowing irrigation water in bangladesh: impacts of channel properties.

    PubMed

    Lineberger, Ethan M; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2013-11-01

    Across Bangladesh, dry-season irrigation with arsenic-contaminated well water is loading arsenic onto rice paddies, leading to increased arsenic concentrations in plants, diminished crop yields, and increased human health risks. As irrigation water flows through conveyance channels between wells and rice fields, arsenic concentrations change over space and time, indicating that channels may provide a location for removing arsenic from solution. However, few studies have systematically evaluated the processes controlling arsenic concentrations in irrigation channels, limiting the ability to manipulate these systems and enhance arsenic removal from solution. The central goal of this study was to quantify how channel design affected removal of dissolved arsenic from flowing irrigation water. Field experiments were conducted in Bangladesh using a chemically constant source of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water and an array of constructed channels with varying geometries. The resulting hydraulic conditions affected the quantity of arsenic removed from solution within the channels by promoting known hydrogeochemical processes. Channels three times the width of control channels removed ∼3 times the mass of arsenic over 32 min of flowing conditions, whereas negligible arsenic removal was observed in tarp-lined channels, which prevented soil-water contact. Arsenic removal from solution was ∼7 times higher in a winding, 200-m-long channel than in the straight, 45-m-long control channels. Arsenic concentrations were governed by oxidative iron-arsenic coprecipitation within the water column, sorption to soils, and phosphate competition. Collectively, these results suggest that better design and management of irrigation channels may play a part in arsenic mitigation strategies for rice fields in Southern Asia. PMID:25602413

  8. SWAP Modeling Results of Monitored Soil Water Moisture Data of Irrigation Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiliger, A.; Garsia-Orenes, F.; van den Elsen, E.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Semenov, V.

    2009-04-01

    In arid and semiarid zones of the Mediterranean regions a shortage of fresh water resources constitutes some time dramatic problem. In these regions with growing population and the scarce of rainfall irregularity in time during growing season an efficient use of water irrigation became a main challenge for future extensive agriculture development. In the frame of FP6 Water-Reuse project 516731 project a special field experimentation has been carried out in Alicante Region of Spain (Location UTM X: 693.809, Y: 4.279.922, Z: 626) on a Sandy Typic Xerofkuvent (Soil Survey Staff, 1999), Calcaric Fluvisol (WRB, FAO, 1989). with aim to investigate water regime in water repellent soils under irrigation of vine Vitus Labrusca. During field experimentation from 2006 till 2008 on 9 plots, there the same regime of irrigation water application was maintained, a monitoring of weather parameters was done by automatic meteorological station as well as a monitoring of soil water moisture was done by set of data-loggers and TDR-soil moisture sensors ECO-2 installed at different depts. SWAP model was used to simulate water regime of irrigated plots. Empirical coefficients of van Genuchten-Mualem's equations were calculated by pedotransfer functions derived from HYPRES data base using measured values of bulk density, organic matter content and soil texture. Testing of validity of the use of estimated curves was done by comparison with unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters of water retention and hydraulic conductivity measured in vitro by Wind's method on soil samples. Calibration of SWAP model for each plot was done on measured soil moisture data of irrigation events by adjusting a value of saturated hydraulic coefficient. Verification of the SWAP model was done by full range of experimental data. Similarity and non-similarity of the water regime at experimental plots as well as results of verification of SWAP model were analyzed

  9. Demand driven decision support for efficient water resources allocation in irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetze, Niels; Grießbach, Ulrike Ulrike; Röhm, Patric; Stange, Peter; Wagner, Michael; Seidel, Sabine; Werisch, Stefan; Barfus, Klemens

    2014-05-01

    Due to climate change, extreme weather conditions, such as longer dry spells in the summer months, may have an increasing impact on the agriculture in Saxony (Eastern Germany). For this reason, and, additionally, declining amounts of rainfall during the growing season the use of irrigation will be more important in future in Eastern Germany. To cope with this higher demand of water, a new decision support framework is developed which focuses on an integrated management of both irrigation water supply and demand. For modeling the regional water demand, local (and site-specific) water demand functions are used which are derived from the optimized agronomic response at farms scale. To account for climate variability the agronomic response is represented by stochastic crop water production functions (SCWPF) which provide the estimated yield subject to the minimum amount of irrigation water. These functions take into account the different soil types, crops and stochastically generated climate scenarios. By applying mathematical interpolation and optimization techniques, the SCWPF's are used to compute the water demand considering different constraints, for instance variable and fix costs or the producer price. This generic approach enables the computation for both multiple crops at farm scale as well as of the aggregated response to water pricing at a regional scale for full and deficit irrigation systems. Within the SAPHIR (SAxonian Platform for High Performance Irrigation) project a prototype of a decision support system is developed which helps to evaluate combined water supply and demand management policies for an effective and efficient utilization of water in order to meet future demands. The prototype is implemented as a web-based decision support system and it is based on a service-oriented geo-database architecture.

  10. An economic framework for valuing information in water scarce irrigation districts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaune, Alexander; Werner, Micha; Karimi, Poolad; de Fraiture, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Data and information plays a crucial role in quantifying the abundance of the available water resource and the demand placed on it in water scarce regions, and is central to decision making. This is particularly so for water allocation decisions in large irrigation districts. However, in most irrigation schemes data collection is normally limited due to the economic investments required. As a result, water allocation decisions are normally taken based on incomplete or uncertain data on the current or forecast situation, leading to less optimal decisions being taken in system planning and operation. Wrong water allocation decisions can lead to economic loss in agricultural production, implying low performance of the system and possible impact on the users' livelihoods. The objective of this research is to assess available frameworks in valuing information and to adapt these to support water allocation decisions in irrigation districts. Water allocation decisions made in the planning of irrigation districts as well as in their operation will be evaluated through a decision framework that considers a discrete set of options, each generating different agricultural production loss scenarios relative to uncertain water scarcity conditions. Additional information obtained from improved data can support better decision making and thus constitutes added value. This added value can be interpreted as the marginal benefit of the improved data. The marginal benefit of information will be determined following an economic framework based on the Relative Economic Value theory that is applied in making decisions in a Bayesian setting. Through this framework it is expected to provide economic values of information in support of water allocation decisions in vulnerable irrigation districts. This is an essential step to provide insight on the value of information in water allocation decisions in planning and operation, and ultimately to reduce agricultural production loss.

  11. 25 CFR 171.215 - What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to receive irrigation water? 171.215 Section 171.215 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Irrigation Service § 171.215 What if the elevation of my farm unit is too high to...

  12. Persistence of Indicator and Pathogenic Microorganisms in Broccoli following Manure Spreading and Irrigation with Fecally Contaminated Water: Field Experiment.

    PubMed

    Généreux, Mylène; Breton, Marie Jo; Fairbrother, John Morris; Fravalo, Philippe; Côté, Caroline

    2015-10-01

    In 2011 and 2012, trials consisting of experimental plots were carried out to evaluate the presence of pathogenic (Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella) and prevalence of indicator (Escherichia coli) microorganisms in broccoli fertilized with liquid hog manure or mineral fertilizers and irrigated zero, one, or two times with E. coli-contaminated water. In 2011, results showed that E. coli contamination in broccoli heads was affected by the interval between irrigation and sampling (P = 0.0236), with a significant decrease between the first and third day following irrigation (P = 0.0064). In 2012, irrigation frequency significantly increased E. coli prevalence in broccoli samples (P = 0.0499). In 2012, E. coli counts in the soil were significantly influenced by the type of fertilizer applied, as plots receiving liquid hog manure showed higher bacterial counts (P = 0.0006). L. monocytogenes was recovered in one broccoli sample, but geno-serogrouping differentiated the isolate from those recovered in manure and irrigation water. The L. monocytogenes serogroup IIA, pulsotype 188 strain was found in six soil samples and in irrigation water applied 5 days before soil sampling. This study highlights the link between E. coli levels in irrigation water, irrigation frequency, and interval between irrigation and harvest on produce contamination. It also demonstrates that L. monocytogenes introduced into the soil following irrigation can persist for up to 5 days.

  13. Effects of alternate drip irrigation and superabsorbent polymers on growth and water use of young coffee tree.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Li, Fusheng; Yang, Qiliang; Wang, Xinle

    2016-07-01

    To obtain optimal irrigation management for young coffee tree, the effects of alternate drip irrigation (ADI) and superabsorbent polymers on physiology, growth, dry mass accumulation and water use on one-year old Coffea arabica L. tree were investigated. This experiment had three drip irrigation methods, i.e., conventional drip irrigation (CDI), alternate drip irrigation (ADI) and fixed drip irrigation (FDI), and two levels of superabsorbent polymers, i.e., no superabsorbent polymers (NSAP) and added superabsorbent polymers (SAP). Compared to CDI, ADI saved irrigation water by 32.1% and increased water use efficiency (WUE) by 29.9%. SAP increased root-shoot ratio, total dry mass and WUE by 20.3, 24.9 and 33.0%, respectively, when compared to NSAP. Compared to CDI with NSAP treatment, ADI with SAP treatment increased total dry mass by 13.8% and saved irrigation water by 34.4%, thus increased WUE by 73.4%, and it increased root activity, the contents of chlorophyll and soluble sugar in leaves by 162.4, 38.0 and 8.5%, but reduced the contents of proline and malondialdehyde in leaves by 7.2 and 9.7%, respectively. Thus, alternate drip irrigation with superabsorbent polymers increased the growth and WUE of young Coffea arabica L. tree and was optimal irrigation management for young coffee tree.

  14. Effects of alternate drip irrigation and superabsorbent polymers on growth and water use of young coffee tree.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Li, Fusheng; Yang, Qiliang; Wang, Xinle

    2016-07-01

    To obtain optimal irrigation management for young coffee tree, the effects of alternate drip irrigation (ADI) and superabsorbent polymers on physiology, growth, dry mass accumulation and water use on one-year old Coffea arabica L. tree were investigated. This experiment had three drip irrigation methods, i.e., conventional drip irrigation (CDI), alternate drip irrigation (ADI) and fixed drip irrigation (FDI), and two levels of superabsorbent polymers, i.e., no superabsorbent polymers (NSAP) and added superabsorbent polymers (SAP). Compared to CDI, ADI saved irrigation water by 32.1% and increased water use efficiency (WUE) by 29.9%. SAP increased root-shoot ratio, total dry mass and WUE by 20.3, 24.9 and 33.0%, respectively, when compared to NSAP. Compared to CDI with NSAP treatment, ADI with SAP treatment increased total dry mass by 13.8% and saved irrigation water by 34.4%, thus increased WUE by 73.4%, and it increased root activity, the contents of chlorophyll and soluble sugar in leaves by 162.4, 38.0 and 8.5%, but reduced the contents of proline and malondialdehyde in leaves by 7.2 and 9.7%, respectively. Thus, alternate drip irrigation with superabsorbent polymers increased the growth and WUE of young Coffea arabica L. tree and was optimal irrigation management for young coffee tree. PMID:27498491

  15. Climate change, water rights, and water supply: The case of irrigated agriculture in Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenchao; Lowe, Scott E.; Adams, Richard M.

    2014-12-01

    We conduct a hedonic analysis to estimate the response of agricultural land use to water supply information under the Prior Appropriation Doctrine by using Idaho as a case study. Our analysis includes long-term climate (weather) trends and water supply conditions as well as seasonal water supply forecasts. A farm-level panel data set, which accounts for the priority effects of water rights and controls for diversified crop mixes and rotation practices, is used. Our results indicate that farmers respond to the long-term surface and ground water conditions as well as to the seasonal water supply variations. Climate change-induced variations in climate and water supply conditions could lead to substantial damages to irrigated agriculture. We project substantial losses (up to 32%) of the average crop revenue for major agricultural areas under future climate scenarios in Idaho. Finally, farmers demonstrate significantly varied responses given their water rights priorities, which imply that the distributional impact of climate change is sensitive to institutions such as the Prior Appropriation Doctrine.

  16. Occupational Exposure to Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp. among Spray Irrigation Workers Using Reclaimed Water

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E.; Micallef, Shirley A.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; He, Xin; George, Ashish; Sapkota, Amir; Joseph, Sam W.; Sapkota, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    As reclaimed water use expands, it is important to evaluate potential occupational health risks from exposure to this alternative water source. We compared odds of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE) between spray irrigation workers using reclaimed water and office worker controls. Nasal and dermal swabs from 19 spray irrigation workers and 24 office worker controls were collected and analyzed for MRSA, MSSA, VRE, and VSE. Isolates were confirmed using standard biochemical tests and polymerase chain reaction assays. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Sensititre® microbroth dilution. Data were analyzed by two-sample proportion, chi-square, Fisher’s exact tests, and logistic regression. No MRSA or VRE were detected in any samples. MSSA was detected in 26% and 29% of spray irrigators and controls, respectively. VSE was detected in 11% and 0% of spray irrigation workers and controls, respectively. The adjusted odds of MSSA, multidrug-resistant MSSA, and either MSSA or VSE colonization were greater among spray irrigation workers, however results were not statistically significant. Future studies with larger sample sizes are needed to further evaluate this relationship. PMID:24747541

  17. Yield and water use efficiency of different irrigated sugarcane cultivars in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, André L. B. O.; Pires, Regina C. M.; Ohashi, Augusto Y. P.; Ribeiro, Rafael V.

    2015-04-01

    There is an increasing demand for bioenergy production to provide environmental, economic and agricultural sustainability. In this context Brazil has an important option with sugarcane cultivation. The sugarcane cultivation has been increasing in marginal and appropriate areas depending on weather conditions. In appropriate areas, such as the State of São Paulo, it is important to increase yield and quality instead of expanding new areas. In this context, irrigation becomes an important cultural practice as a guarantee and to achieve high yields. Thus, the use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in sugarcane cultivation is an interesting cultural practice to save water since water and nutrients are applied in root zone plants. As irrigation demands great volume of water, it is important to study the most responsive cultivars to adopt this technique and improve water use efficiency (WUE). Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the yield and WUE of four sugarcane cultivars irrigated by a SDI system. The experiment with the SP79-1011, IACSP94-2101, IACSP94-2094 and IACSP95-5000 cultivars was carried out in Campinas, SP, Brazil, between October 2012 and November 2013 (second ratoon). These cultivars have different canopy characteristics and development. IACSP95-5000 and IACSP94-2094 are more responsive to soil water availability and presents higher light interception when compared to IACSP94-2101 and SP79-1011. The irrigation was applied by a subsurface drip system daily and it was suspended when precipitation occurred. Crop evapotranspiration was estimated through field water balance. In order to do so the soil moisture was evaluated with capacitance probe with sensors installed at depths of 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 m. Samplings were collected to estimate yield and qualitative attributes. The water use efficiency (WUE) was estimated based on stem production per hectare reached in each cultivar divided by (1) water volume contributed considering the actual

  18. The Impact of Soil Water Repellency on Hydrological Properties of Soil, the Plant Growing Environment, Irrigation Efficiency and Water Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Demie; Kostka, Stanley; Boerth, Thomas; McMillan, Mica; Ritsema, Coen; Dekker, Louis; Oostindie, Klaas; Stoof, Cathelijne; Wesseling, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Soil water repellency causes at least temporal changes in the hydrological properties of a soil. These changes, among other things, often result in suboptimal growing conditions, reduced crop performance, and/or increased irrigation requirements. Water repellency in soil is more wide spread than previously thought and has been identified in many soil types under a wide array of climatic conditions and cropping systems worldwide. (Dekker et al., 2005) The reduction or loss of soil wettability caused by soil water repellency leads to drastically different hydrological behavior (Dekker et al. 2009), and reduces the ability of the soil to function as expected. Consequences of soil water repellency include increased runoff and preferential flow, reduced plant available water, reduced irrigation efficiency, suboptimal crop performance, increased requirement for water and other inputs, and increased potential for non-point source pollution. (Dekker et al., 2001) This presentation consolidates information on basic hydrological and soil system functions as they relate to the plant growth environment, irrigation efficiency and water conservation, and shows the differences between what happens in soils affected by varying levels of soil water repellency compared to wettable soils or soils where soil surfactants have been used to restore/optimize wettability. The impact on irrigation efficiency and the plant growth environment is also discussed. The conclusion is that the impact of soil water repellency compromises hydrological properties and the plant growth environment in a wider range of conditions than previously recognized and, therefore, deserves consideration in the management of soil and water in crop systems.

  19. Deficit irrigation and sustainable water-resource strategies in agriculture for China's food security.

    PubMed

    Du, Taisheng; Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Jianhua; Davies, William J

    2015-04-01

    More than 70% of fresh water is used in agriculture in many parts of the world, but competition for domestic and industrial water use is intense. For future global food security, water use in agriculture must become sustainable. Agricultural water-use efficiency and water productivity can be improved at different points from the stomatal to the regional scale. A promising approach is the use of deficit irrigation, which can both save water and induce plant physiological regulations such as stomatal opening and reproductive and vegetative growth. At the scales of the irrigation district, the catchment, and the region, there can be many other components to a sustainable water-resources strategy. There is much interest in whether crop water use can be regulated as a function of understanding of physiological responses. If this is the case, then agricultural water resources can be reallocated to the benefit of the broader community. We summarize the extent of use and impact of deficit irrigation within China. A sustainable strategy for allocation of agricultural water resources for food security is proposed. Our intention is to build an integrative system to control crop water use during different cropping stages and actively regulate the plant's growth, productivity, and development based on physiological responses. This is done with a view to improving the allocation of limited agricultural water resources.

  20. Deficit irrigation and sustainable water-resource strategies in agriculture for China’s food security

    PubMed Central

    Du, Taisheng; Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Jianhua; Davies, William J.

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of fresh water is used in agriculture in many parts of the world, but competition for domestic and industrial water use is intense. For future global food security, water use in agriculture must become sustainable. Agricultural water-use efficiency and water productivity can be improved at different points from the stomatal to the regional scale. A promising approach is the use of deficit irrigation, which can both save water and induce plant physiological regulations such as stomatal opening and reproductive and vegetative growth. At the scales of the irrigation district, the catchment, and the region, there can be many other components to a sustainable water-resources strategy. There is much interest in whether crop water use can be regulated as a function of understanding of physiological responses. If this is the case, then agricultural water resources can be reallocated to the benefit of the broader community. We summarize the extent of use and impact of deficit irrigation within China. A sustainable strategy for allocation of agricultural water resources for food security is proposed. Our intention is to build an integrative system to control crop water use during different cropping stages and actively regulate the plant’s growth, productivity, and development based on physiological responses. This is done with a view to improving the allocation of limited agricultural water resources. PMID:25873664

  1. Water saving in chufa cultivation using flat raised beds and drip irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Seva, N.; San Bautista, A.; López-Galarza, S.; Maroto, J. V.; Pascual, B.

    2012-04-01

    Chufa (Cyperus esculentus L. var. sativus), also known as tiger nut, is a typical crop in the Region of Valencia (Spain). Its tubers are used to produce a beverage called horchata. Chufa has been cultivated traditionally in ridges and furrow irrigated. Currently, the quality of water used is acceptable, there are no limitations on supply, and water is not expensive; therefore, large amounts of water are used. The European Water Framework Directive 2000/60 is based on the precautionary principle, considering preventive action for measures to be taken; thus, water use is an issue to improve. Moreover, drought periods are becoming more frequent and extended, and water is being diverted to other uses. In this two year study (2007-2008), we analysed how yield and irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE) are affected by two cultivation factors: planting strategy and irrigation system. Three planting strategies were analysed: ridges (R) and flat raised beds, with two (B2) and three (B3) plant rows along them, while two irrigation systems were compared, furrow (FI) and drip irrigation (DI). Within the beds, the effect of the position of the plant row was considered, differing among plants grown in the north (n), central (c), and south (s) rows. Distances between ridge and bed axes were 60, 80 and 120 cm for R, B2 and B3, respectively. Irrigation was based on the Volumetric Soil Water Content (VSWC), which was continuously monitored with capacitance sensors (ECH2O EC-5 in FI and multidepth capacitance sensors C-Probe in DI). Each irrigation session started when the VSWC in R dropped to 60% and 80% of field capacity in FI and DI, respectively. Each DI session lasted 60 min in 2007; while in 2008 the installation was automated, stopping each session when the sum of the VSWC at 10, 20, and 30 cm soil depth reached its corresponding field capacity value. With both irrigation systems, beds were irrigated simultaneously with ridges and with the same irrigation duration. Plants from

  2. Comparison of simulations of land-use specific water demand and irrigation water supply by MF-FMP and IWFM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmid, Wolfgang; Dogural, Emin; Hanson, Randall T.; Kadir, Tariq; Chung, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Two hydrologic models, MODFLOW with the Farm Process (MF-FMP) and the Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), are compared with respect to each model’s capabilities of simulating land-use hydrologic processes, surface-water routing, and groundwater flow. Of major concern among the land-use processes was the consumption of water through evaporation and transpiration by plants. The comparison of MF-FMP and IWFM was conducted and completed using a realistic hypothetical case study. Both models simulate the water demand for water-accounting units resulting from evapotranspiration and inefficiency losses and, for irrigated units, the supply from surface-water deliveries and groundwater pumpage. The MF-FMP simulates reductions in evapotranspiration owing to anoxia and wilting, and separately considers land-use-related evaporation and transpiration; IWFM simulates reductions in evapotranspiration related to the depletion of soil moisture. The models simulate inefficiency losses from precipitation and irrigation water applications to runoff and deep percolation differently. MF-FMP calculates the crop irrigation requirement and total farm delivery requirement, and then subtracts inefficiency losses from runoff and deep percolation. In IWFM, inefficiency losses to surface runoff from irrigation and precipitation are computed and subtracted from the total irrigation and precipitation before the crop irrigation requirement is estimated. Inefficiency losses in terms of deep percolation are computed simultaneously with the crop irrigation requirement. The seepage from streamflow routing also is computed differently and can affect certain hydrologic settings and magnitudes ofstreamflow infiltration. MF-FMP assumes steady-state conditions in the root zone; therefore, changes in soil moisture within the root zone are not calculated. IWFM simulates changes in the root zone in both irrigated and non-irrigated natural vegetation. Changes in soil moisture are more significant for non-irrigated

  3. Propagation of biases in humidity in the estimation of global irrigation water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Y.; Hanasaki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Hijioka, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Future projections on irrigation water under a changing climate are highly dependent on meteorological data derived from general circulation models (GCMs). Since climate projections include biases, bias correction is widely used to adjust meteorological elements, such as the atmospheric temperature and precipitation, but less attention has been paid to biases in humidity. Hence, in many cases, uncorrected humidity data have been directly used to analyze the impact of future climate change. In this study, we examined how the biases remaining in the humidity data of five GCMs propagate into the estimation of irrigation water demand and consumption from rivers using the global hydrological model (GHM) H08. First, to determine the effects of humidity bias across GCMs, we ran H08 with GCM-based meteorological forcing data sets distributed by the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP). A state-of-the-art bias correction method was applied to the data sets without correcting biases in humidity. Differences in the monthly relative humidity amounted to 11.7 to 20.4 % RH (percentage relative humidity) across the GCMs and propagated into differences in the estimated irrigation water demand, resulting in a range between 1152.6 and 1435.5 km3 yr-1 for 1971-2000. Differences in humidity also propagated into future projections. Second, sensitivity analysis with hypothetical humidity biases of ±5 % RH added homogeneously worldwide revealed the large negative sensitivity of irrigation water abstraction in India and East China, which are heavily irrigated. Third, we performed another set of simulations with bias-corrected humidity data to examine whether bias correction of the humidity can reduce uncertainties in irrigation water across the GCMs. The results showed that bias correction, even with a primitive methodology that only adjusts the monthly climatological relative humidity, helped reduce uncertainties across the GCMs: by using bias-corrected humidity

  4. Using Satellite-based Evapotranspiration Estimation to Characterize Agricultural Irrigation Water Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Myint, S. W.; Hendrickx, J. M. H.

    2014-12-01

    The satellite-based evapotranspiration (ET) model permits estimation of water consumption across space and time in a systematic way. Developing tools to monitor water availability and water use is critical to meet future water shortage challenges in the American West. This study applied METRIC (Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution and with Internalized Calibration) to 2001 Landsat imagery to estimate ET of various crop types in Phoenix. The total annual ET estimates are correlated well with the actual water use at the irrigation district level (r=0.99). We further incorporated a crop type map to estimate annual ET for the major crop types in the region, and to examine variability in crop water use among different irrigation districts. Our results show that alfalfa and double crops consume more water than other crop types with mean annual ET estimations of 1300 to 1580 mm/year, and that cotton uses more water (1162 mm/year) than corn (838 mm/year) and sorghum (829 mm/year) as expected. Crop water use varies from one irrigation district to another due to differences in soil quality, water quality, and farming practices. Results from our study suggest that the ET maps derived from METRIC can be used to quantify the spatial distribution of ET and to characterize agricultural water use by crop types at different spatial scales.

  5. Water balance and soil losses in an irrigated catchment under conservation tillage in Southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Patricio; Mateos, Luciano; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Gómez-Macpherson, Helena

    2013-04-01

    Conservation tillage based on permanent beds with crop-residue retention and controlled traffic has been recently introduced in irrigated annual crops in Southern Spain as one way to improve water infiltration, reduce soil losses, and save energy. The water balance and soil losses in water runoff have been monitored during 4 years in a 28-ha catchment within a production farm where this kind of soil conservation practice was established in 2004 for a maize-cotton-wheat rotation. The catchment average slope is 6 %. Soils are Typic Calcixerept and Typic Haploxerert. The water balance components that were measured include: applied irrigation water, rainfall, and runoff. Runoff was measured at the outlet of the catchment by means of a hydrological station that consisted of long-throated flume, ultrasonic water level sensor, automatic water sampler, data logger and transmission system, weather station, and ancillary equipment. We present here results from three hydrological seasons (October to September): 2009-10, 2010-11, and 2011-12. The first season the catchment was grown with wheat, thus the irrigation depth was small (25 mm); rainfall above average, 1103 mm; and the runoff coefficient was 26 %. In the season 2010-11, the catchment was grown with cotton, the irrigation depth was 503 mm, rainfall was 999 mm, and the seasonal runoff coefficient was 7 %. The last season, the crop was maize, rainfall was below average (368 mm), irrigation 590 mm, and the runoff coefficient as the previous year, 7 %. Soil losses were very small: 0.05, 1.26, and 1.33 t per ha and year, the first, second, and third monitored seasons, respectively. A simple water balance model allowed simulating evapotranspiration, deep percolation and runoff. The Curve Number for the catchment was calibrated using the balance model.

  6. Using Soil Moisture as a Guide in Controlling the Amount of Irrigated Water on Grass Lawns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boateng, S.; Koenig, J.

    2007-05-01

    Soil moisture content is one of the factors that controls the infiltration capacity of soils. Precipitation and irrigation increase soil moisture which in turn reduces infiltration capacity. This results in increased runoff during subsequent storm events. Increased stormwater runoff may cause adverse environmental problems such as increased soil erosion, increased bed and suspended loads in streams, and increased non-point source pollution. Monitoring soil moisture on irrigated plots can be used as a guide for efficient use of irrigated water. Thus, irrigation systems only will be turned on when soil moisture falls below a threshold value for the respective soil type. However, landscapers at Northern Kentucky University (NKU) schedule the irrigation of grass lawns without taking into consideration the level of soil moisture. This has resulted in incidences of irrigation of the lawns during or immediately after a heavy storm event. Effective monitoring of the soil moisture of irrigated fields has been shown to help in controlling cost of irrigation and conserving valuable resources. This can be achieved by using instruments such as tensiometers and neutron probes to monitor soil moisture (Manning, 1992). On an irrigated field such as a grass lawn, the ideal condition will be to maintain soil moisture between field capacity and wilting point. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of soil texture and slope on the amount of irrigated water used on selected grass lawns on NKU campus at Highland Heights, Kentucky. The grass lawns were selected based on low slope (0 to 10¬0), medium slope (10¬0 to 15¬0), and high slope (more than 15¬0 ). Two plots were selected for each slope category. The soil texture of each grass lawn was determined by performing standard particle size distribution analysis of samples taken during the installation of the tensiometers. A survey instrument and a GIS software were used to analyze the slopes. The tensiometers were

  7. The use of zero-valent iron filtration to reduce Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Irrigation water can be a source of contamination in outbreaks associated with produce. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) filtration has been effective in E. coli O157:H12 in irrigation water, but has not been evaluated against Listeria spp. Purpose: To 1) determine effectiveness of ZVI filters...

  8. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Phillips County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Phillips County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Phillips County was 1,109 (1,103 groundwater and 6 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 0.15 Mgal/d (0.15 Mgal/d groundwater and none from surface water) for agriculture and 123.75 Mgal/d (122.66 Mgal/d groundwater and 1.09 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 96,502 acres of land to irrigate wheat, rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cotton, hay, vegetables, grapes, nuts, fruit trees, and sod, as well as for the agricultural use of animal aquaculture.

  9. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Lee County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Lee County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Lee County was 1,582 (1,533 groundwater and 49 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 3.77 Mgal/d (3.39 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.38 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 169.25 Mgal/d (166.79 Mgal/d groundwater and 2.46 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 97,029 acres of land to irrigate wheat, rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cotton, hay, vegetables, and nuts as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture and ducks.

  10. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Crittendon County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Crittenden County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Crittenden County was 868 (824 groundwater and 44 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 0.67 Mgal/d (0.67 Mgal/d groundwater and none from surface water) for agriculture and 60.29 Mgal/d (59.15 Mgal/d groundwater and 1.14 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water applied to 51,937 acres of land to irrigate wheat, rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cotton, and hay as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture.

  11. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Woodruff County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Woodruff County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Woodruff County was 1,930 (1,755 groundwater and 175 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 0.91 Mgal/d (0.91 Mgal/d groundwater and none from surface water) for agriculture and 284.20 Mgal/d (258.13 Mgal/d groundwater and 26.07 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 138,452 acres of land to irrigate wheat, rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cotton, and vegetables, as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture and ducks.

  12. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Drew County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Drew County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Drew County was 505 (342 groundwater and 163 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 0.32 Mgal/d (0.32 Mgal/d groundwater and none from surface water) for agriculture and 43.04 Mgal/d (37.43 Mgal/d groundwater and 5.61 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 23,775 acres of land to irrigate wheat, rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, cotton, and hay as well as for the agricultural use of animal aquaculture and catfish.

  13. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Lincoln County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Lincoln County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Lincoln County was 1,167 (868 groundwater and 299 surface water). Water with- drawals reported during the registration process total 3.88 Mgal/d (3.88 Mgal/d groundwater and none from surface water) for agriculture and 114.31 Mgal/d (98.59 Mgal/d groundwater and 15.72 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 81,477 acres of land to irrigate rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cotton and vegetables as well as for the agricultural use of animal aquaculture.

  14. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in St. Francis County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in St. Francis County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for St. Francis County was 1,286 (1,194 groundwater and 92 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 0.14 Mgal/d (0.14 Mgal/d groundwater and none from surface water) for agriculture and 172.48 Mgal/d groundwater and 12.66 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 100,183 acres of land to irrigate rice, soybeans, milo, cotton, and vegetables as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture and ducks.

  15. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Clay County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Clay County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Clay County was 2,025 (1,965 groundwater and 60 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 2.07 Mgal/d (2.01 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.06 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 164.50 Mgal/d (159.64 Mgal/d groundwater and 4.56 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 94,399 acres of land to irrigate rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cotton, vegetables, and unknown crops as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture.

  16. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Mississippi County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Mississippi County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Mississippi County was 981 (946 groundwater and 35 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 0.06 Mgal/d (0.01 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.05 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 97.82 Mgal/d (94.16 Mgal/d groundwater and 3.66 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 109,345 acres of land to irrigate rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cotton, hay, vegetables, berries, and sod as well as for the agricultural use of animal aquaculture.

  17. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Craighead County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Craighead County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Craighead County was 2,384 (2,187 groundwater and 197 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 1.45 Mgal/d (0.50 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.95 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 287.20 Mgal/d (261.52 Mgal/d groundwater and 25.68 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 168,003 acres of land to irrigate rice, sorghum, corn, soybeans, milo, cotton, hay, vegetables, nuts, and sod as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture and sports clubs.

  18. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Lonoke County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Lonoke County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Lonoke County was 3,313 (2,587 groundwater and 726 surface water). Water with drawals reported during the registration process total 61.30 Mgal/d (59.50 Mgal/d groundwater and 1.80 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 300.45 Mgal/d (241.86 Mgal/d groundwater and 58.59 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registra- tion reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 238,457 acres of land to irrigate rice, sorghum, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, cotton, and sod as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture, hatcheries, and ducks.

  19. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in west-central Arkansas counties, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Offices in the following west-central Arkansas counties: Conway, Crawford, Faulkner, Franklin, Johnson, Logan, Perry, Pope, Scott, Sebastian, and Yell. The number of withdrawal registrations for west-central Arkansas counties was 307 (90 groundwater and 217 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 1.00 Mgal/d (0.15 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.85 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 32.07 Mgal/d (5.67 Mgal/d groundwater and 26.40 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 22,856 acres of land to irrigate rice, corn, sorghum, soybeans, wheat, cash grains, hay, milo, vegetables, sod, berries, grapes, and fruit trees as well as for the agricultural uses of catfish and ducks.

  20. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in White County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in White County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for White County was 1,365 (1,146 groundwater and 219 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 1.37 Mgal/d (0.95 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.42 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 69.91 Mgal/d (43.78 Mgal/d groundwater and 26.13 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was supplied to 46,315 acres of land to irrigate rice, sorghum, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, hay, vegetables, berries, grapes, fruit trees, sod, and unknown crop as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture, minnows, ducks, and sport clubs.

  1. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Cross County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Cross County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Cross County was 2,506 (2,314 groundwater and 192 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 2.01 Mgal/d (1.85 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.16 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 404.04 Mgal/d (377.08 Mgal/d groundwater and 26.96 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 218,152 acres of land to irrigate rice, sorghum, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, cotton, hay, and vegetables as well as for the agricultural use of animal aquaculture and ducks.

  2. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Pulaski County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Pulaski County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Pulaski County was 291 (170 groundwater and 121 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 0.91 Mgal/d (0.71 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.20 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 37.42 Mgal/d (28.53 Mgal/d groundwater and 8.89 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 28,088 acres of land to irrigate wheat, rice, sorghum, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, cotton, vegetables, and sod, as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture, timber, and ducks.

  3. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in southwestern Arkansas counties, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Offices in the following southwestern Arkansas counties: Bradley, Calhoun, Clark, Cleveland, Columbia, Dallas, Garland, Grant, Hempstead, Hot Spring, Howard, Little River, Montgomery, Nevada, Ouachita, Pike, Polk, Saline, Sevier, and Union. The number of withdrawal registrations for southwestern Arkansas counties was 132 (31 groundwater and 101 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 0.84 Mgal/d (none from groundwater and 0.84 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 14.22 Mgal/d (1.64 Mgal/d groundwater and 12.58 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 8,455 acres of land to irrigate rice, corn, sorghum, soybeans, cotton, cash grains, vegetables, sod, berries, fruit trees, timber, shrubs, and nuts as well as for the agricultural use of animal aquaculture.

  4. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Prairie County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Prairie County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Prairie County was 2,187 (1,786 groundwater and 401 surface water). Water with- drawals reported during the registration process total 26.93 Mgal/d (26.84 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.09 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 191.08 Mgal/d (138.79 Mgal/d groundwater and 52.29 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 144,956 acres of land to irrigate rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, unknown crop, cotton hay, berries, and fruit trees as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture, minnows, timber, and ducks.

  5. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in northwestern Arkansas counties, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Offices in the following northwestern Arkansas counties: Baxter, Benton, Boone, Carroll, Cleburne, Fulton, Izard, Madison, Marion, Newton, Searcy, Sharp, Stone, Van Buren, and Washington. The number of withdrawal registrations for northwestern Arkansas counties was 106 (16 groundwater and 90 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 41.72 Mgal/d (0.74 Mgal/d groundwater and 40.98 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 3.33 Mgal/d (0.27 Mgal/d groundwater and 3.06 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 3,588 acres of land to irrigate rice, soybeans, cash grains, hay, oats, vegetables, sod, berries, fruit trees, and timber as well as for the agricultural use of animal aquaculture.

  6. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Greene County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Greene County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Greene County was 1,567 (1,510 groundwater and 57 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 26.69 Mgal/d (23.98 Mgal/d groundwater and 2.71 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 92.46 Mgal/d (91.03 Mgal/d groundwater and 1.43 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 70,947 acres of land to irrigate rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cotton, fruit trees, and sod as well as for the agricultural use of animal aquaculture.

  7. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Jackson County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Jackson County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Jackson County was 2,450 (2,279 groundwater and 171 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 5.24 Mgal/d (4.81 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.43 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 274.90 Mgal/d (263.59 Mgal/d groundwater and 11.31 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 149,737 acres of land to irrigate rice, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, cotton, hay, and vegetables as well as for the agricultural use of animal aquaculture, goldfish, and ducks.

  8. Quality of shallow groundwater and drainage water in irrigated agricultural lands in a Mediterranean coastal region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Odemiş, Berkant; Bozkurt, Sefer; Ağca, Necat; Yalçin, Mehmet

    2006-04-01

    Spatial and seasonal differences in water quality of drainage water and unconfined shallow groundwater were related to irrigation in Samandağ, a Mediterranean coastal region. Eighteen wells, seven drainage points and Orontes River were monitored bimonthly for one year for analyses of electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), cations (Na, K, Ca + Mg) and anions (CO(3), HCO(3), Cl and SO(4)). Agricultural irrigation using saline groundwater decreased water quality of Orontes River during the irrigation season (May to September) more than during the non-irrigation season (October to April). Seasonal fluctuations in water quality of shallow groundwater were greater during the irrigation season than the non-irrigation season in the study area. Excessive use of groundwater resulted in a decline in the water table levels in the irrigation season. Water table level rose up to the soil surface in areas where there was a lack of drainage or poor drainage, due to the impact of precipitation in the winter. SAR and pH values of drainage water increased in the irrigation season, while the other properties of drainage water decreased. Irrigation water quality of Orontes River was classified as C(3)S(1) in both seasons. Irrigation water quality of shallow groundwater and drainage water varied from C(2)S(1) to C(4)S(2) in one year. Drainage and well waters were found to be different on yearly basis in terms of Na, SAR (p<0.01) and Ca + Mg concentrations (p<0.001). Ca + Mg concentrations for both sources were different for all sampling dates (p<0.001). PMID:16614781

  9. Carbon Sequestration Potential in Irrigated Agriculture: Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Contribution of Water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolston, D. E.; Hopmans, J. W.; van Kessel, C.; Six, J.; Paw U, K.; Plant, R.; Lee, J.; Kochendorfer, J.; Ideris, A. J.; MacIntyre, J.; Louie, D.; Matista, T.; Evatt, J.; Poch, R.; King, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    This study aimed to quantify CO2 and N2O release from an irrigated field in California's Sacramento Valley in an effort to determine greenhouse gas mitigation potentials through minimum tillage (MT) practices. Surface CO2 and N2O flux were monitored on the 30 ha, laser-leveled field site from September 2003 through August 2006. Additional field-representative flux data was collected from eddy-covariance masts and continuously sampling auto-chambers. Irrigation and run-off waters were collected and analyzed for total suspended solids (TSS), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), nitrate-N, ammonium-N, total C and total N in the sediment. Overall, we found very little difference in CO2 flux, water composition, or sediment composition between the two tillage treatments. N2O flux was negligible in both systems until a fertilization and irrigation event occurred in each growing season, at which point the MT treatment showed slightly higher fluxes. NO3-N levels in the run-off exceeded drinking water quality standards only in irrigation events following fertilizer application. Collected CO2 and N2O data from this site will enable us to predict greenhouse gas emissions from similar agricultural systems in the California landscape. Our results indicate that the role of irrigation water in C budgets of agricultural systems is a significant factor in determining total C sequestration potential, but that short-term MT may not significantly decrease the contribution to global warming by irrigated agroecosystems and thus may not be a beneficial strategy for greenhouse gas mitigation.

  10. Irrigation water use for the Fort Lyon Canal, southeastern Colorado, 1989-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dash, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bent County Board of County Commissioners, began a study to evaluate irrigation water use quanti- tatively for about 91,630 acres of farmland irrigated from the 103.7-mile-long Fort Lyon Main Canal in the Arkansas River Valley of southeastern Colorado. This report provides information from 1980 and 1990 for four hydrologic components of irrigation water use: Surface-water withdrawals, conveyance losses, ground-water withdrawals, and estimates of threretical crop consumptive use. Surface-water withdrawals for the Fort Lyon Canal were 211,150 acre-feet (about 2.3 acre-feet per acre) during 1989 and 202,000 acre-feet (about 2.2 acre-feet per acre) during 1990. Conveyance losses occurred during the transport of water in the unlined Fort Lyon Canal. Conveyance losses were as much as 72 (acre-feet per day) per mile in the first division of the canal and generally decreased in the downstream canal divisions. Ground-water withdrawals for the Fort Lyon Canal were estimated to be 38,890 acre-feet (about 0.8 acre-foot per acre irrigated ground water) during 1989 and 33,970 acre-feet (about 0.7 acre-foot per acre irrigated by ground water) during 1990. Theoretical crop consumptive use was estimated to be 227,530 acre-feet (about 2.7 acre-feet per acre of cropland) during 1989 and 251, 130 acre-feet (about 2.9 acre-feet per acre of cropland) during 1990. The total crop irrigation requirement needed from irrigation withdrawals was 172,100 acre-feet (about 2.0 acre-feet per acre of cropland) during ` 1989 and 190,050 acre-feet (about 2.2 acre-feet per acre of cropland) during 1990. Crops cultivted in the five divisions of the canal were alfalfa, sorghum, corn, wheat, pasture, and spring grains.

  11. Water: pesticides in ground water beneath irrigated farmland in Nebraska, August 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, R.F.; Junk, G.A.; Richard, J.J.

    1980-09-01

    During the 1978 irrigation season, 14 ground water samples were collected in the Central Platte region of Nebraska, an area known to have high nitrate-nitrogen (NO-N) levels, and analyzed for the presence of 13 pesticide residues. Atrazine levels ranged from 0.06 ..mu..g/liter to 3.12 ..mu..g/liter and were correlated to NO/sub 3/-N concentrations with a coefficient of r = +0.55. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations were measured as indicators of deep percolation from irrigated lands and ranged from 17.1 mg/liter to 34.3 mg/liter. Alachlor levels ranged from <0.01 ..mu..g/liter to 0.71 ..mu..g/liter. The amounts of 2,4-D were indeterminate because of experimental problems. Levels of the herbicides silvex and EPTC were below the limits of detectability. Levels of the oragnochlorine insecticides endrin, ..gamma..-BHC (lindane), dieldrin, DDT and its primary metabolite DDE, heptachlor and its primary derivative heptachlor epoxide, and methoxychlor were all below the detectable limits of 0.005 and 0.010 ..mu..g/liter.

  12. Unintended consequence of managing the coupled humans and water: the irrigation efficiency paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Water shortage most severely restricts the socio-economic development of many arid and semi-arid regions in the world, for which water-saving technology is believed to be an effective solution. However, as a realworld case, the total water consumption of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China continued to increase as irrigation efficiency dramatically improved through the application of water-saving technology in the study period 1998-2010. This phenomenon, known as the irrigation efficiency paradox or Jevons paradox, is interpreted as an economic rebound effect. In this study, we explore the dynamic feedbacks between humans and water in this paradox through a socio-hydrological perspective. We analyze the co-evolutionary trajectory of coupled human-water dynamics from 1950 to 2010 to provide it a general context. A conceptual socio-hydrological model based on five key elements, namely, irrigation land, water-saving technology, water consumption, societal sensitivity to water scarcity, and the policy mix, is constructed. The policy mix to be adopted is determined by a social decision-making process mainly based on the societal sensitivity, which reflects the societal preference on two sorts of policies: (i) irrigation land control and (ii) water-saving technology promotion. Modeling results verify the hypothesized mechanism by successfully reproducing the observed dynamics including the emergence of the efficiency paradox. Our analysis indicates that the implementation of more adaptive rules may even eliminate the paradox. The effects of different initial policy mixes are also explored, and the results show that land control policies should be given equal priority when dealing with water scarcity. These findings point to a double-helix-type co-evolution of humans and water.

  13. Irrigation waters and pipe-based biofilms as sources for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, Ryan A; Shelton, Daniel R; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S; Karns, Jeffrey S; Stocker, Matthew D; Pachepsky, Yakov A

    2016-01-01

    The presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in environmental surface waters has gained recent attention. Wastewater and drinking water distribution systems are known to disseminate antibiotic-resistant bacteria, with the biofilms that form on the inner-surfaces of the pipeline as a hot spot for proliferation and gene exchange. Pipe-based irrigation systems that utilize surface waters may contribute to the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a similar manner. We conducted irrigation events at a perennial stream on a weekly basis for 1 month, and the concentrations of total heterotrophic bacteria, total coliforms, and fecal coliforms, as well as the concentrations of these bacterial groups that were resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline, were monitored at the intake water. Prior to each of the latter three events, residual pipe water was sampled and 6-in. sections of pipeline (coupons) were detached from the system, and biofilm from the inner-wall was removed and analyzed for total protein content and the above bacteria. Isolates of biofilm-associated bacteria were screened for resistance to a panel of seven antibiotics, representing five antibiotic classes. All of the monitored bacteria grew substantially in the residual water between irrigation events, and the biomass of the biofilm steadily increased from week to week. The percentages of biofilm-associated isolates that were resistant to antibiotics on the panel sometimes increased between events. Multiple-drug resistance was observed for all bacterial groups, most often for fecal coliforms, and the distributions of the numbers of antibiotics that the total coliforms and fecal coliforms were resistant to were subject to change from week to week. Results from this study highlight irrigation waters as a potential source for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which can subsequently become incorporated into and proliferate within irrigation pipe-based biofilms.

  14. Response of the Rio Grande and shallow ground water in the Mesilla Bolson to irrigation, climate stress, and pumping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walton, J.; Ohlmacher, G.; Utz, D.; Kutianawala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The El Paso-Ciudad Juarez metropolitan area obtains its water from the Rio Grande and intermontane-basin aquifers. Shallow ground water in this region is in close communications with the surface water system. A major problem with both systems is salinity. Upstream usage of the water in the Rio Grande for irrigation and municipalities has led to concentration of soluble salts to the point where the surface water commonly exceeds drinking water standards. Shallow ground water is recharged by surface water (primarily irrigation canals and agricultural fields) and discharges to surface water (agricultural drains) and deeper ground water. The source of water entering the Rio Grande varies seasonally. During the irrigation season, water is released from reservoirs and mixes with the return flow from irrigation drains. During the non-irrigation season (winter), flow is from irrigation drains and river water quality is indicative of shallow ground water. The annual cycle can be ascertained from the inverse correlation between ion concentrations and discharge in the river. Water-quality data indicate that the salinity of shallow ground water increases each year during a drought. Water-management strategies in the region can affect water quality. Increasing the pumping rate of water-supply wells will cause shallow ground water to flow into the deeper aquifers and degrade the water quality. Lining the canals in the irrigation system to stop water leakage will lead to water quality degradation in shallow ground water and, eventually, deep ground water by removing a major source of high quality recharge that currently lowers the salinity of the shallow ground water.

  15. [Effects of alternate partial root-zone subsurface drip irrigation on potato yield and water use efficiency].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhong-Dong; Qi, Xue-Bin; Fan, Xiang-Yang; Hu, Chao; Zhu, Dong-Hai; Li, Ping; Qiao, Dong-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of alternate partial root-zone subsurface drip irrigation (APRSDI) on the physiological responses, yield, and water use efficiency of potato. Compared with conventional drip irrigation (CDI), APRSDI had less negative effects on the potato leaf photosynthesis rate (P(n)), but decreased the transpiration rate and stomatal conductance significantly. The slightly higher P(n) under CDI was at the expense of consuming more water. No significant difference was observed in the potato yield under APRSDI and CDI, but APRSDI saved the irrigation amount by 25.8% and increased the irrigation water use efficiency and total water use efficiency by 27.5% and 15.3%, respectively, suggesting that APRSDI would be a feasible water-saving irrigation technique for the planting of potato.

  16. The Role of Windbreaks in Reducing Water Resources Use in Irrigated Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, T. A.; de Vries, T. T.

    2014-12-01

    Windbreaks are common features in flat agricultural landscapes around the world. The reduction in wind speed afforded by windbreaks is dictated by their porosity, location, height, and distance from the windbreak. The reduction in wind speeds not only reduces potential wind erosion; it also reduces crop evapotranspiration (ET) and provides shelter for livestock and crops. In the Canterbury plains of New Zealand there are over 300,000 km of windbreaks which were first implemented as a soil conservation strategy to reduce wind erosion of prime agricultural land. Agriculture in the region has since changed to irrigated pasture cultivation for dairy production and windbreaks are being cut down or reduced to heights of 2 m to allow for large scale centre-pivot irrigation schemes. Although soil erosion is no longer a major concern due to permanent pasture cover, irrigation water is sourced from limited supplies of ground and surface water and thus the effects of wind on irrigation losses due to spray drift and increased ET are of significant concern. The impact of reducing windbreaks needs to be understood in terms of water resources use. Experimental and theoretical work was conducted to quantify the reduction in wind speeds by windbreaks and in spray evaporation losses. A temporal and spatial model was also developed and validated to quantify the impact of single and multiple windbreaks on irrigation water losses. Initial modelling results show that for hot windy dry conditions in Canterbury, ET can increase by up to 1.4 mm/day when windbreaks are reduced to 2 m in height and on average wind days ET can increase by up to 0.5 mm/day. ET can be reduced by up to 30% in the windbreak leeward zone relative to ET in areas not protected by windbreaks. Wind speed, air temperature and relative humidity all had a considerable impact on spray evaporation losses, but the extent is determined by the droplet size. Estimated losses range from only 0.07% to 67% for 5 and 0.2 mm

  17. Reduction of predictive uncertainty in estimating irrigation water requirement through multi-model ensembles and ensemble averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Multsch, S.; Exbrayat, J.-F.; Kirby, M.; Viney, N. R.; Frede, H.-G.; Breuer, L.

    2015-04-01

    Irrigation agriculture plays an increasingly important role in food supply. Many evapotranspiration models are used today to estimate the water demand for irrigation. They consider different stages of crop growth by empirical crop coefficients to adapt evapotranspiration throughout the vegetation period. We investigate the importance of the model structural versus model parametric uncertainty for irrigation simulations by considering six evapotranspiration models and five crop coefficient sets to estimate irrigation water requirements for growing wheat in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. The study is carried out using the spatial decision support system SPARE:WATER. We find that structural model uncertainty among reference ET is far more important than model parametric uncertainty introduced by crop coefficients. These crop coefficients are used to estimate irrigation water requirement following the single crop coefficient approach. Using the reliability ensemble averaging (REA) technique, we are able to reduce the overall predictive model uncertainty by more than 10%. The exceedance probability curve of irrigation water requirements shows that a certain threshold, e.g. an irrigation water limit due to water right of 400 mm, would be less frequently exceeded in case of the REA ensemble average (45%) in comparison to the equally weighted ensemble average (66%). We conclude that multi-model ensemble predictions and sophisticated model averaging techniques are helpful in predicting irrigation demand and provide relevant information for decision making.

  18. Reduction of predictive uncertainty in estimating irrigation water requirement through multi-model ensembles and ensemble averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Multsch, S.; Exbrayat, J.-F.; Kirby, M.; Viney, N. R.; Frede, H.-G.; Breuer, L.

    2014-11-01

    Irrigation agriculture plays an increasingly important role in food supply. Many evapotranspiration models are used today to estimate the water demand for irrigation. They consider different stages of crop growth by empirical crop coefficients to adapt evapotranspiration throughout the vegetation period. We investigate the importance of the model structural vs. model parametric uncertainty for irrigation simulations by considering six evapotranspiration models and five crop coefficient sets to estimate irrigation water requirements for growing wheat in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. The study is carried out using the spatial decision support system SPARE:WATER. We find that structural model uncertainty is far more important than model parametric uncertainty to estimate irrigation water requirement. Using the Reliability Ensemble Averaging (REA) technique, we are able to reduce the overall predictive model uncertainty by more than 10%. The exceedance probability curve of irrigation water requirements shows that a certain threshold, e.g. an irrigation water limit due to water right of 400 mm, would be less frequently exceeded in case of the REA ensemble average (45%) in comparison to the equally weighted ensemble average (66%). We conclude that multi-model ensemble predictions and sophisticated model averaging techniques are helpful in predicting irrigation demand and provide relevant information for decision making.

  19. Agronomic aspects and environmental impact of reusing marginal water in irrigation: a case study from Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Mowelhi, N M; Abo Soliman, S M S; Barbary, S M; El-Shahawy, M I

    2006-01-01

    Egypt produces approximately 2.4 million m3 of secondary treated wastewater (TWW) annually, used for irrigation directly or indirectly by blending with agricultural drainage water (BDW). The annual re-use of (BDW) is approximately 4 million m3. The safe and efficient use of marginal water (BDW and TWW) is a core objective of this study which has been operating from 1997 to date. After six growing seasons the main results can be summarized as follows: MAXIMIZING CROP PRODUCTION: TWW can be used for high production of oil crops (canola, soybean sunflower or maize) compared to fresh water, while BDW can be used for high production of tolerant crops (cotton and sugar beet). CROP QUALITY: using marginal water increases the concentration of elements (Pb, B, Ni, Co) in all crops but these elements were under critical levels (there were no toxicity hazards). It is better to use alternative irrigation with fresh water under a drip irrigation system to maximise crop production and minimise the adverse effects of such water in field crops quality. SOIL POLLUTION AND SALINITY BUILD UP: A drip irrigation system under alternative irrigation by fresh with TWW or BDW reduces salinity build up risks and the levels of elements (Pb, B, Ni, Co) in soil compared to re-use marginal water. SOIL PATHOGENS: Using marginal water slightly contaminated the soil with total faecal coliform (TFC), mites, shigella and salmonella. PLANT ANATOMY: No great changes in anatomical disturbance where induced in different structures of plants which were reduced at maturity stage. PRIMARY GUIDELINES FOR RE-USING MARGINAL WATER: From obtained results it can be recommended to use marginal water with salinity content ranged between 1.1 to 3.64dS/m, and elemental contents (Pb 3.0-3.51 ppm), (B 0.05-1.67 ppm), (Co 0.04-0.07 ppm), (Ni 0.08-0.15 ppm) for safe (field, vegetable and medicinal) crops production. REUSE BIO SOLIDS FOR CROP PRODUCTION: Sewage sludge produced from treated wastewater can be safely used

  20. Assessment of reclaimed wastewater irrigation impacts on water quality, soil, and rice cultivation in paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moon Seong; Kim, Sang Min; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Jeong Jae; Yoo, Kyung H

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this research was to monitor and assess the impact of reclaimed wastewater irrigation on water quality, soil, and rice cultivation by comparing the effects of various wastewater treatment levels on the growth and yield of rice. A randomized complete block design was used for the application methods of the wastewater effluents to paddy rice, with five treatments and six replications. The treatments were: control with groundwater irrigation (GW); irrigation with polluted water form a nearby stream (SW); and three treatments of reclaimed wastewater irrigation at different treatment levels. The three levels of wastewater treatments included wastewater effluents: (i) directly from the wastewater plant (WW); (ii) after passing through a sand filter (WSF); and (iii) after passing a sand filter followed by an ultraviolet treatment (WSFUV). Each plot was 4 x 4 m and was planted with rice (Oryza sativa L.) in 2002 and 2003. The results indicated that irrigation of rice with reclaimed municipal wastewater caused no adverse effects on the growth and yield of rice. The chemical compositions of the rice from all plots were within the normal ranges of brown rice quality in Korea. No adverse effects were observed on chemical concentrations including the heavy metals Cu, As, Cd, Zn, Hg, and Pb, in either the brown rice or the field. The results showed that treated municipal wastewater can be safely used as an alternative water source for the irrigation of rice, although continued monitoring will be needed to determine the long-term effects with regard to soil contamination and other potential health concerns.

  1. Predicting perchlorate uptake in greenhouse lettuce from perchlorate, nitrate and chloride irrigation water concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has been detected in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. The primary concern has been the ClO4- concentration in lettuce. There has been a limited number of studies on ClO4- uptake but the interactive effect of other anions on ClO4- uptake is not known in...

  2. Uncertainty analysis of an irrigation scheduling model for water management in crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling tools are critical to allow producers to manage water resources for crop production in an accurate and timely manner. To be useful, these tools need to be accurate, complete, and relatively reliable. The current work presents the uncertainty analysis and its results for the Mis...

  3. Results of an irrigated lands assessment for water management in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, E. H.; Baggett, J. D.; Wall, S. L.; Thomas, R. W.; Brown, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Periodic assessment of existing and future demands for water within California is one responsibility of the California Department of Water Resources (CDWR). The California Irrigated Lands Assessment for Water Management Project represented a 5-year joint research effort between the NASA and the CDWR with technical support from the University of California (UC) at Berkeley and at Santa Barbara. The objectives were: (1) to develop and demonstrate procedures for providing highly precise, timely, estimates of irrigated area on a statewide basis using Landsat sensor data, and (2) to develop, through research with small demonstration sites, a procedure for the inventory and mapping of crop groups on a regional basis. Both manual and computer-assisted analyses were investigated. This paper highlights the statewide irrigated lands inventory where a procedure for statewide estimation of irrigated land using full frame Landsat MSS imagery and sampled ground data was successfully demonstrated. The statewide estimate of 3 990 112 hectares was within + or - 1.32 percent relative standard error at the 95-percent Confidence Interval, well within the design goal. This procedure represents a new capability for obtaining near-real time data on changes in agricultural water use throughout the state.

  4. Water productivity, yield, and berry composition in sustained versus regulated deficit irrigation of Merlot grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wine grape cultivar Merlot (Vitis vinifera L.) was irrigated at incremental fractions of estimated crop evapotranspiration or a regulated deficit (RDI) regime to identify which practice best optimized water productivity and berry composition without compromising yield. Three severities of susta...

  5. Leaching of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in turfgrass soils during recycled water irrigation.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, S; Gan, J; Ernst, F; Green, R; Baird, J; McCullough, M

    2012-01-01

    An important beneficial reuse of treated wastewater (recycled water) in arid and semiarid regions is landscape irrigation. However, the environmental fate, especially groundwater contamination potential, of trace contaminants such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) is a significant concern that can hinder the acceptance and adoption of such reuses. In this study, we irrigated mature turfgrass plots with nonspiked tertiary treated wastewater for over 6 mo at 100 or 130% of the reference evapotranspiration rate (ETo) and collected leachate water at the 90-cm depth on a weekly basis. In the recycled water, all 14 target PPCPs were consistently found, and the mean levels of atenolol, gemfibrozil, meprobamate, carbamazepine, and sulfamethoxazole were above 100 ng L. However, only five compounds were detected in the leachate at trace levels. Trimethoprim and primidone were frequently found, whereas the detection of sulfamethoxazole, meprobamate and carbamazepine was less frequent (<50%). When detected, the overall mean concentration in the leachate was 10.2 ng L for trimethoprim, 7.1 ng L for primidone, and 2.9 to 12.4 ng L for carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, and meprobamate. The majority of the target PPCPs were completely removed. Given that the irrigation rates were higher than normal, this study clearly demonstrated the efficacy of turfgrass systems in attenuating PPCPs during recycled water irrigation. However, it is also apparent that some PPCPs are more susceptible to leaching than others, and these PPCPs thus merit further research attention.

  6. Cotton Water Use Efficiency Under Two Different Deficit Irrigation Scheduling Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declines in Ogallala aquifer levels used for irrigation has prompted research to identify methods for optimizing water use efficiency (WUE) of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L). In this experiment, conducted at Lubbock, Texas in 2014, our objective was to test two canopy temperature based stress indices...

  7. Improved ant colony optimization for optimal crop and irrigation water allocation by incorporating domain knowledge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An improved ant colony optimization (ACO) formulation for the allocation of crops and water to different irrigation areas is developed. The formulation enables dynamic adjustment of decision variable options and makes use of visibility factors (VFs, the domain knowledge that can be used to identify ...

  8. Directed manipulation of crop water status through canopy temperature-based irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the relationship between canopy temperature and plant water status is well established, canopy temperature as a means of controlling crop irrigation has been limited in production applications due to the cost and complexity of temperature monitoring. A new low-cost infrared thermometry system...

  9. Irrigation water quality and the benefits of implementing good agricultural practices during tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) production.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Acosta, M; Jiménez, M; Chaidez, C; León-Félix, J; Castro-Del Campo, N

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of good agricultural practices (GAP) from irrigation water to the tomato packaging process enhances the safety of fresh produce and its value throughout the food chain. The aim of the present study was to show that fresh produce farms that apply and enforce GAP could reduce the presence of Salmonella in finished produce. Samples were collected biweekly from six packing houses from the central region of Sinaloa, México, for the isolation of Salmonella spp by the ISO 6579:2002 method, and the isolated strains were serotyped and genotyped by the Kauffmman-White scheme and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), respectively. Salmonella strains were detected in 13 (36.1 %) irrigation water samples, while only two tomato samples were positive (5.5 %). Eight different serotypes were identified in irrigation water, and Salmonella Oranienburg (34 %) was the most prevalent; however, only Salmonella Agona and Salmonella Weltevreden were present on tomatoes. Salmonella Oranienburg was the most widely dispersed and variable serotype, with 10 different PFGE profiles. Salmonella Weltevreden was isolated from both types of samples, albeit with distinct genetic profiles, implying that the sources of contamination differ. These results confirm the utility of implementing good agricultural practices to reduce Salmonella contamination in irrigation water and the packaging process. PMID:24682661

  10. Uptake and distribution of bisphenol A and nonylphenol in vegetable crops irrigated with reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Wu, Jun; Stoffella, Peter J; Wilson, P Chris

    2015-01-01

    The potential uptake and distribution of bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) (from reclaimed irrigation water) in edible crops was investigated. BPA and NP were spiked into simulated reclaimed water at environmentally relevant concentrations. Two crops (lettuce, Lactuca sativa and tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum) were grown hydroponically in a greenhouse using the spiked irrigation water under two irrigation exposure scenarios (overhead foliar exposure and subsurface root exposure). BPA concentrations in tomato fruit were 26.6 ± 5.8 (root exposure) and 18.3 ± 3.5 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1), while concentrations in lettuce leaves were 80.6 ± 23.1 (root exposure) and 128.9 ± 17.4 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1). NP concentrations in tomato fruit were 46.1 ± 6.6 (root exposure) and 24.6 ± 6.4 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1), while concentrations in lettuce leaves were 144.1 ± 9.2 (root exposure) and 195.0 ± 16.9 (foliar exposure) μg kg(-1). BPA was relatively mobile in lettuce plants regardless of exposure route. Limited mobility was observed for NP in both crops and BPA in tomatoes. The estimated daily intake of BPA and NP through consumption of vegetables irrigated with reclaimed water ranged from 8.9-62.9 to 11.9-95.1 μg, respectively, depending on the exposure route.

  11. Reclaimed water as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes: distribution system and irrigation implications

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Ma, Yanjun; O’Brien, Maureen; Pruden, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Treated wastewater is increasingly being reused to achieve sustainable water management in arid regions. The objective of this study was to quantify the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in recycled water, particularly after it has passed through the distribution system, and to consider point-of-use implications for soil irrigation. Three separate reclaimed wastewater distribution systems in the western U.S. were examined. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to quantify ARGs corresponding to resistance to sulfonamides (sul1, sul2), macrolides (ermF), tetracycline [tet(A), tet(O)], glycopeptides (vanA), and methicillin (mecA), in addition to genes present in waterborne pathogens Legionella pneumophila (Lmip), Escherichia coli (gadAB), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ecfx, gyrB). In a parallel lab study, the effect of irrigating an agricultural soil with secondary, chlorinated, or dechlorinated wastewater effluent was examined in batch microcosms. A broader range of ARGs were detected after the reclaimed water passed through the distribution systems, highlighting the importance of considering bacterial re-growth and the overall water quality at the point of use (POU). Screening for pathogens with qPCR indicated presence of Lmip and gadAB genes, but not ecfx or gyrB. In the lab study, chlorination was observed to reduce 16S rRNA and sul2 gene copies in the wastewater effluent, while dechlorination had no apparent effect. ARGs levels did not change with time in soil slurries incubated after a single irrigation event with any of the effluents. However, when irrigated repeatedly with secondary wastewater effluent (not chlorinated or dechlorinated), elevated levels of sul1 and sul2 were observed. This study suggests that reclaimed water may be an important reservoir of ARGs, especially at the POU, and that attention should be directed toward the fate of ARGs in irrigation water and the implications for human health. PMID:23755046

  12. Effects of seedbed preparation, irrigation, and water harvesting of seedling emergence at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Lyon, G.E.

    1994-02-01

    Approximately 800 hectares on the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site and vicinity are contaminated with plutonium. As part of a cleanup effort, both the indigenous vegetation and the top 5--10 cm of soil may be removed, and the soil may or may not be replaced. Technologies must be developed to stabilize and revegetate these lands. A study was developed to determine adaptable plant species, methods to prepare seedbeds for direct seeding and water harvesting, and proper irrigation rates. Plots were cleared of indigenous vegetation, and then prepared with various seedbed/water harvesting treatments including, pitting, land imprinting, and mulching. Other plots were treated with large water harvesting structures. Three irrigation treatments were superimposed over the seedbed/water harvesting treatments. Seedling emergence data was collected, and the treatment combinations compared. Supporting meteorological and soil data were collected with an automatic data-logger. Specific data included precipitation, and air temperature. In a year of above-average precipitation, irrigation did not generally aid germination and emergence of seeded species, and only slightly increased densities of species from the native seedbank. With the exception of increased shrub seedling densities in desert strips, there were no strong seedbed preparation/water harvesting treatment effects. In years of above-average rainfall, mulching and water harvesting treatments, irrigation may not be necessary to insure adequate germination and emergence of adapted perennial grasses, forbs, and shrubs in the Mojave/Great Basin Transition Desert. Future collection of survival data will determine whether a maintenance irrigation program is necessary to ensure establishmnent of native plants.

  13. Grey water treatment at a sports centre for reuse in irrigation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gabarró, J; Batchelli, L; Balaguer, M D; Puig, S; Colprim, J

    2013-01-01

    Grey water has long been considered a promising option for dealing with water scarcity and reuse. However, factors such as lack of macronutrients and low carbon content make its treatment challenging. The aim of this paper was to investigate the applicability of sequencing batch reactor (SBR) technology to on-site grey water treatment at a sports centre for reuse in irrigation. The results demonstrated that the regenerated water complied with microbiological parameters concerning restriction of solids and organic matter removal. Denitrification was not fully accomplished, but ammonium was totally oxidised and low concentrations of nitrates were achieved. Effluent with good appearance and no odour was used in an experimental study to irrigate a grid system containing natural and artificial grass sections. The conclusion is that SBR technology offers a promising treatment for grey water.

  14. Management of water for irrigation agriculture in semi-arid areas: Problems and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mvungi, A.; Mashauri, D.; Madulu, N. F.

    Most of the Mwanga district is classified as semi-arid with a rainfall range of 300 and 600 mm. Rainfall patterns in the district are unpredictable and are subject to great fluctuations. Like other semi-arid areas, the district is characterized with land degradation, unreliable rainfall, repeated water shortage, periodic famine, overgrazing, dry land cultivation in the marginal areas and heavy competition for limited biomass between farmers and cattle. Vulnerability here is high due to unreliability of weather. The people of Mwanga are dependent on agriculture for their livelihood. However agriculture is difficult in the area due to inadequate rainfall. For a very long time the people have been dependent on irrigation agriculture to ensure food security. Of late the traditional irrigation system is on the decline threatening food security in the area. This paper examines the state and status of the irrigation canal system in Mwanga district with the view of recommending ways in which it can be improved. The study used participatory, survey and in-depth interviews to obtain both quantitative and qualitative data. The major findings are that social, political, environmental and demographic bases that supported the traditional irrigation system have changed drastically. As a corollary to this, the cultural and religious belief systems that supported and guided the traditional canal system management have been replaced by mistrust and corruption in water allocation. In addition the ownership and management system of the water resources that was vested in the initiator clans has changed and now water user groups own the canals/furrows but they do not own the water sources. This has rendered the control of the water sources difficult if not impossible. Currently the system is faced by a number of problems including shortage of water and poor management as demand for water increases and this has led to serious conflicts among and between crop producers and pastoralists

  15. An overview of conflict and competition between water for irrigation and energy generation

    SciTech Connect

    Waddle, D.B.; Perlack, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the political and technical issues concerning conflicts between water use for irrigation and energy generation. It focuses on a specific case in the Dominican Republic, drawing on historical experience in the United States, and finally extrapolates this experience to other countries in the Caribbean and Latin American region. Coupling the growth in irrigation facilities with growing demand for electricity and the declining ability of developing countries to finance new power generating facilities, this problem could expand to a more important issue within this region and to other developing countries in general. 15 refs., 10 tabs.

  16. Are Small-Scale Irrigators Water Use Efficient? Evidence from Lake Naivasha Basin, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njiraini, Georgina W.; Guthiga, Paul M.

    2013-11-01

    With increasing water scarcity and competing uses and users, water use efficiency is becoming increasingly important in many parts of developing countries. The lake Naivasha basin has an array of different water users and uses ranging from large scale export market agriculture, urban domestic water users to small holder farmers. The small scale farmers are located in the upper catchment areas and form the bulk of the users in terms of area and population. This study used farm household data to explore the overall technical efficiency, irrigation water use efficiency and establish the factors influencing water use efficiency among small scale farmers in the Lake Naivasha basin in Kenya. Data envelopment analysis, general algebraic and modeling system, and Tobit regression methods were used in analyzing cross sectional data from a sample of 201 small scale irrigation farmers in the lake Naivasha basin. The results showed that on average, the farmers achieved only 63 % technical efficiency and 31 % water use efficiency. This revealed that substantial inefficiencies occurred in farming operations among the sampled farmers. To improve water use efficiency, the study recommends that more emphasis be put on orienting farmers toward appropriate choice of irrigation technologies, appropriate choice of crop combinations in their farms, and the attainment of desirable levels of farm fragmentation.

  17. Are small-scale irrigators water use efficient? Evidence from lake Naivasha basin, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Njiraini, Georgina W; Guthiga, Paul M

    2013-11-01

    With increasing water scarcity and competing uses and users, water use efficiency is becoming increasingly important in many parts of developing countries. The lake Naivasha basin has an array of different water users and uses ranging from large scale export market agriculture, urban domestic water users to small holder farmers. The small scale farmers are located in the upper catchment areas and form the bulk of the users in terms of area and population. This study used farm household data to explore the overall technical efficiency, irrigation water use efficiency and establish the factors influencing water use efficiency among small scale farmers in the Lake Naivasha basin in Kenya. Data envelopment analysis, general algebraic and modeling system, and Tobit regression methods were used in analyzing cross sectional data from a sample of 201 small scale irrigation farmers in the lake Naivasha basin. The results showed that on average, the farmers achieved only 63 % technical efficiency and 31 % water use efficiency. This revealed that substantial inefficiencies occurred in farming operations among the sampled farmers. To improve water use efficiency, the study recommends that more emphasis be put on orienting farmers toward appropriate choice of irrigation technologies, appropriate choice of crop combinations in their farms, and the attainment of desirable levels of farm fragmentation.

  18. Effect of Supplementary Irrigation Water Quality on Some Soil Chemical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, José Luis; Aparicio, Virginia

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of different combinations of irrigation water (demineralized and artificially salinized on the laboratory) on the electrical conductivity (EC), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), pH, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and percent base saturation of two petrocalcic paleudols of Argentina. An experiment was conducted in a greenhouse, using soil columns of 30 cm long, which were seeded with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Five water treatments were established: W2 (50% water of low SAR and 50 % distilled water), W0 ( 100 % distilled water), W1 (30% water with low RAS and 70 % distilled water), W3 (30% water of high RAS and 70 % distilled water), and W4 ( 50% water with high RAS and 50 % distilled water). As artificially salinized water proportion was greater than the demineralized water, the EC and ESP values increased principally at surface level (10cm). The artificial water SAR=12.5 produced a significant increase in ESP=19.8 compared with the control treatment. Considering the dilution effect of rain,it was possible to establish an equation to estimate the value of soil ESP for a given quality of irrigation water value.

  19. Estimating irrigation water use and withdrawal of ground water on the High Plains, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wray, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    In four decades following the Dust Bowl days of the 1930's, extensive areas of dry farming and rangeland on the semi-arid U.S. High Plains were transformed into a vast region of irrigated oases, producing meat and grain for much of the world. The agricultural economy has experienced such rapid growth in part because of the availability of ground water and because of development of new irrigation technology to use that water for agriculture. However, more water is being used than is being replaced. To estimate both the volume of water withdrawn and the regional scope of the problem a technique has been developed that combines multispectral data from Earth-orbiting satellite with known pumpage data for the same growing season. The location and extent of irrigated cropland-some with different crops watered at different times-is inventoried using computer-assisted analysis of the data from Landsat. The amount of water used is estimated by multiplying and summing surface area of irrigated agriculture and the average measured pumpage from sampled sites. Published findings to date are cited in the Selected References. All suggest transferability of a promising technology to the study of land transformation processes elsewhere. ?? 1983.

  20. Effects of long term irrigation with polluted water and sludge amendment on some soil enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    Topac, F.O.; Baskaya, H.S.; Alkan, U.; Katkat, A.V.

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of wastewater sludge-fly ash mixtures on urease, dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucosidase activities in soils. In order to evaluate the probable effects of previous soil management practices (irrigation with polluted water) on soil enzymes, two different soil samples which were similar in physical properties, but different in irrigation practice were used. The application of wastewater sludges supplemented with varying doses of fly ash increased potential enzyme activities for a short period of time (3 months) in comparison to unamended soils. However, the activity levels generally showed a decreasing trend with increasing ash ratios indicating the inhibitory effect of fly ash. The urease and dehydrogenase activities were particularly lower in soils irrigated from a polluted stream, indicating the negative effects of the previous soil management on soil microbial activity.

  1. Use of fluoride-containing water for the irrigation of soil-plant systems.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Lisa M; Kopittke, Peter M; Menzies, Neal W; Dalzell, Scott A; Macfarlane, David C; Wehr, J Bernhard

    2015-05-20

    Many groundwaters used for irrigation contain elevated concentrations of F, but much remains unknown regarding how this F behaves within soils and plants. The present study investigated the adsorption and desorption of F from several soils in short- to medium-term irrigation systems and related foliar F concentrations in three forage plant species to the maximum tolerable level (MTL) in the diets of grazing animals (being 1.8 μmol/g for young cattle, for example). Although adsorption isotherms could be successfully used to predict the behavior (adsorption and desorption) of F within the soil, this was not related to the subsequent accumulation of F in plant foliage. In addition, the extent to which F accumulated in the foliage depended on the plant species. Regardless, F generally did not accumulate in plant foliage to levels exceeding the MTL when used at rates equivalent to irrigation for 25 years. In addition to uptake by roots, F may accumulate in foliar tissues directly due to retention from overhead irrigation. The data presented here regarding the behavior of F in soils and plants will assist in the rigorous regulation of F-containing irrigation water to ensure maximum plant growth while simultaneously minimizing potential harm.

  2. Propagation of biases in humidity in the estimation of global irrigational water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Y.; Hanasaki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Hijioka, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Future projections on irrigational water under a changing climate are highly dependent on meteorological data derived from general circulation models (GCMs). Since climate projections include biases, bias correction is widely used to adjust meteorological elements, such as the atmospheric temperature and precipitation, but less attention has been paid to biases in humidity. Hence, in many cases, raw GCM outputs have been directly used to analyze the impact of future climate change. In this study, we examined how the biases remaining in the humidity data of five GCMs propagate into the estimation of irrigational water demand and abstraction from rivers using the global hydrological model (GHM) H08. First, to determine the effects of humidity bias across GCMs, we used meteorological data sets to which a state-of-the-art bias correction method was applied except to the humidity. Uncorrected GCM outputs were used for the humidity. We found that differences in the monthly relative humidity of 11.7 to 20.4% RH (percent used as the unit of relative humidity) from observations across the GCMs caused the estimated irrigational water abstraction from rivers to range between 1217.7 and 1341.3 km3 yr-1 for 1971-2000. Differences in humidity also propagate into future projections. Second, sensitivity analysis with hypothetical humidity biases of ±5% RH added homogeneously worldwide revealed the large negative sensitivity of irrigational water abstraction in India and East China, which have high areal fractions of irrigated cropland. Third, we performed another set of simulations with bias-corrected humidity data to examine whether bias correction of the humidity can reduce uncertainties in irrigational water across the GCMs. The results showed that bias correction, even with a primitive methodology that only adjusts the monthly climatological relative humidity, helped reduce uncertainties across the GCMs. Although the GHMs have different sensitivities to atmospheric humidity

  3. [Coupling effect of water and nitrogen for cotton under different furrow irrigation patterns].

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-Ling; Zhang, Fu-Cang; Jia, Yun-Gang

    2009-06-01

    A field plot experiment with general rotation design was conducted to study the coupling effect of water amount and nitrogen (N) application rate for cotton under alternative furrow irrigation (AFI), conventional furrow irrigation (CFI), and fixed separate furrow irrigation (FFI). When the water amount was 37.52-160.00 mm and N application rate was 56.2-95.2 kg N x hm(-2), cotton yield had significant positive correlations with them; when the two factors were in the ranges of 160.00-218.48 mm and 95.2-134.2 kg N x hm(-2), respectively, no significant change was observed in the cotton yield. Within the test ranges of water amount and N application rate, cotton yield had no significant difference between AFI and CFI, but was 9.15% higher under CFI than under FFI. The water use efficiency (WUE) of cotton was significantly negatively correlated with the water amount 37.52-160.00 mm and positively correlated with the N application rate 56.2-122.8 kg N x hm(-2), but had no significant change when the water amount was 160.00-218.48 mm and N application rate was 122.8-134.2 kg N x hm(-2). Within the test ranges of water amount and N application rate, the WUE had no significant difference between CFI and AFI, but was 9.01% higher under CFI than under FFI. The nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of cotton had significant positive correlation with the water amount 37.52-160.00 mm but significant negative correlation with the N application rate 56.2-134.2 kg N x hm(-2), and had no significant difference between AFI and CFI but was 6. 34% was lower under FFI than under CFI. Appropriate measures for high-efficiently using water and nitrogen resources under different furrow irrigation patterns were put forward to optimize cotton yield, WUE and NUE.

  4. Modeling the Climate Change Adaptation of Crop Production using Irrigation over Water-Limited Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, M.; Iizumi, T.; Sakurai, G.; Sakai, T.; Yokozawa, M.

    2014-12-01

    Replacing rainfed cropping system by irrigated one is assumed to be an effective measure for climate change adaptation in agriculture. However, in many agricultural impact assessments, future irrigation scenarios are externally given and do not consider the space-time varying available agricultural water under changing climate and land use. For these reason, this study aimed to (1) develop a crop-river coupled model that can simultaneously simulate crop growth and yield over a river watershed, river discharge and their dynamic interactions by embedded a large-area crop model, PRYSBI-2 [Sakurai et al., 2014] into a hydrologic model, H08 [Hanasaki et al., 2008]; (2) apply the developed coupled model to the Songhua River watershed in Northeast China and evaluate the model's performance by comparing the historical model simulations outputs; (3) assess the effects of adaption measure expanding irrigated area under climate change. The modeled year-to-year variations in soil moisture were comparable to the reference with the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) of 0.75 (p<0.001) and root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 13 %. The modeled river discharge accurately matched with the observation data with the r of 0.83 (p<0.01) and RMSE of 22 %. And the modeled soybean yields were quantitatively comparable to the reference with the r of 0.66 (p<0.001) and RMSE of 21 %. We made simulations to project the changes of potential soybean production under climate change scenarios and irrigation area expanding scenarios. It was projected that the soybean production effectively increase until the irrigated area has been increased 5 times compared to around the year 2000. However, the more increase in the irrigated area would bring significant reduction of the increase rate in soybean production due to depletion of available agricultural water resources.

  5. Seasonal ammonia losses from spray-irrigation with secondary-treated recycled water.

    PubMed

    Saez, Jose A; Harmon, Thomas C; Doshi, Sarika; Guerrero, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    This work examines ammonia volatilization associated with agricultural irrigation employing recycled water. Effluent from a secondary wastewater treatment plant was applied using a center pivot irrigation system on a 12 ha agricultural site in Palmdale, California. Irrigation water was captured in shallow pans and ammonia concentrations were quantified in four seasonal events. The average ammonia loss ranged from 15 to 35% (averaging 22%) over 2-h periods. Temporal mass losses were well-fit using a first-order model. The resulting rate constants correlated primarily with temperature and secondarily with wind speed. The observed application rates and timing were projected over an entire irrigation season using meteorological time series data from the site, which yielded volatilization estimates of 0.03 to 0.09 metric tons NH(3)-N/ha per year. These rates are consistent with average rates (0.04 to 0.08 MT NH(3)-N/ha per year) based on 10 to 20 mg NH(3)-N/L effluent concentrations and a 22% average removal. As less than 10% of the treated effluent in California is currently reused, there is potential for this source to increase, but the increase may be offset by a corresponding reduction in synthetic fertilizers usage. This point is a factor for consideration with respect to nutrient management using recycled water. PMID:22277226

  6. Synthetic- and bio-polymer use for runoff water quality management in irrigated agriculture.

    PubMed

    Sojka, R E; Entry, J A; Orts, W J; Morishita, D W; Ross, C W; Horne, D J

    2005-01-01

    Low concentrations of synthetic- or bio-polymers in irrigation water can nearly eliminate sediment, N, ortho- and total-P, DOM, pesticides, micro-organisms, and weed seed from runoff. These environmentally safe polymers are employed in various sensitive uses including food processing, animal feeds, and potable water purification. The most common synthetic polymer is anionic, high purity polyacrylamide (PAM), which typically provides 70-90% contaminant elimination. Excellent results are achieved adding only 10 ppm PAM to irrigation water, applying 1-2 kg ha(-1) per irrigation, costing 4 dollars - 12 dollars kg(-1). Biopolymers are less effective. Using twice or higher concentrations, existing biopolymers are approximately 60% effective as PAM, at 2-3 times the cost. A half million ha of US irrigated land use PAM for erosion control and runoff protection. The practice is spreading rapidly in the US and worldwide. Interest in development of biopolymer surrogates for PAM is high. If the supply of cheap natural gas (raw material for PAM synthesis) diminishes, industries may seek alternative polymers. Also "green" perceptions and preferences favor biopolymers for certain applications. PMID:15850180

  7. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  8. Irrigation-induced contamination of water, sediment, and biota in the western United States-synthesis of data from the National Irrigation Water Quality Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, Ralph L.; Skorupa, Joseph P.; Naftz, David L.; Nolan, B. Thomas

    2003-01-01

    In October 1985 the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), through the National Irrigation Water Quality Program (NIWQP), began a series of field investigations at 26 areas in the Western United States to determine whether irrigation drainage has had harmful effects on fish, wildlife, and humans or has reduced beneficial uses of water. In 1992 NIWQP initiated the Data Synthesis Project to evaluate data collected during the field investigations. Geologic, climatologic, and hydrologic data were evaluated and water, sediment, and biota from the 26 areas were analyzed to identify commonalities and dominant factors that result in irrigation-induced contamination of water and biota. Data collected for the 26 area investigations have been compiled and merged into a common data base. The structure of the data base is designed to enable assessment of relations between contaminant concentrations in water, sediment, and biota. The data base is available to the scientific community through the World Wide Web at URL http://www.usbr.gov/niwqp. Analysis of the data base for the Data Synthesis included use of summary statistics, factor analysis, and logistic regression. A Geographic Information System was used to store and analyze spatially oriented digital data such as land use, geology and evaporation rates. In the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) study areas, samples of water, bottom sediment, and biota were collected for trace-element and pesticide analysis. Contaminants most commonly associated with irrigation drainage were identified by comparing concentrations in water with established criteria. For surface water, the criteria used were typically chronic criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. Because ground water can discharge to the surface where wildlife can be exposed to it, the criteria used for ground water were both the maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water and the chronic criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life

  9. Experimental evaluation of four infiltration models for calcareous soil irrigated with treated untreated grey water and fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, M. A.; Eltaif, N. I.; Alrababah, M. A.; Alhamad, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    Infiltration is vital for both irrigated and rainfed agriculture. The knowledge of infiltration characteristics of a soil is the basic information required for designing an efficient irrigation system. The objective of the present study was to model soil infiltration using four models: Green and Ampt, Horton, Kostaikov and modified Kostiakov. Infiltration tests were conducted on field plot irrigated with treated, untreated greywater and fresh water. The field water infiltration data used in these models were based on double ring infiltrometer tests conducted for 4 h. The algebraic parameters of the infiltration models and nonlinear least squares regression were fitted using measured infiltration time [I (t)] data. Among process-based infiltration models, the Horton model performed best and matched the measured I (t) data with lower sum of squares (SS).

  10. Arsenic transport in irrigation water across rice-field soils in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Polizzotto, Matthew L; Lineberger, Ethan M; Matteson, Audrey R; Neumann, Rebecca B; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ashraf Ali, M

    2013-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to analyze processes impacting arsenic transport in irrigation water flowing over bare rice-field soils in Bangladesh. Dissolved concentrations of As, Fe, P, and Si varied over space and time, according to whether irrigation water was flowing or static. Initially, under flowing conditions, arsenic concentrations in irrigation water were below well-water levels and showed little spatial variability across fields. As flowing-water levels rose, arsenic concentrations were elevated at field inlets and decreased with distance across fields, but under subsequent static conditions, concentrations dropped and were less variable. Laboratory experiments revealed that over half of the initial well-water arsenic was removed from solution by oxidative interaction with other water-column components. Introduction of small quantities of soil further decreased arsenic concentrations in solution. At higher soil-solution ratios, however, soil contributed arsenic to solution via abiotic and biotic desorption. Collectively, these results suggest careful design is required for land-based arsenic-removal schemes. PMID:23688733

  11. Natural Wetlands Mediate Non-point Source Water Pollution From Irrigated Pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, K.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Tate, K. W.

    2005-12-01

    Non-point source discharge from grazed pastures may be high in nutrients, sediment, and pathogens, three major contributors to water quality impairment in California. Intercepting pollution at its source and managing water quality within the landscape are essential to maintaining healthy downstream waters. We investigated the efficacy of flow-through wetlands interspersed throughout the agricultural landscape to reduce non-point source pollution of tailwater from cattle-grazed, irrigated pastures in the Sierra Nevada Foothills of California. Wetlands are known to positively impact water quality through ecological processes such as filtration, sedimentation, microbial transformations and plant uptake of nutrients. Influent and effluent water of small (0.25 ha), natural wetlands located downstream from flood irrigated pastures was analyzed for Escherichia coli, NO3-N, total N, total suspended solids (TSS), total P, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) throughout two summer irrigation seasons (June to October). We compared reductions of sediment, nutrients and E. coli provided by a healthy, non-degraded wetland with reductions from flow through a channelized, degraded wetland. Large reductions in E. coli (>75%) and TSS (>50%) were observed in water exiting the healthy wetland while nutrient and DOC (~ 20%) concentrations were less affected by flow through the wetland. The channelized wetland provided smaller reductions in all constituents than did the non-degraded wetland. Results from this study demonstrate that small flow-through wetlands can improve water quality through the attenuation of E. coli and suspended sediments, and to a lesser degree DOC and nutrients.

  12. Optimal dynamic water allocation: Irrigation extractions and environmental tradeoffs in the Murray River, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafton, R. Quentin; Chu, Hoang Long; Stewardson, Michael; Kompas, Tom

    2011-12-01

    A key challenge in managing semiarid basins, such as in the Murray-Darling in Australia, is to balance the trade-offs between the net benefits of allocating water for irrigated agriculture, and other uses, versus the costs of reduced surface flows for the environment. Typically, water planners do not have the tools to optimally and dynamically allocate water among competing uses. We address this problem by developing a general stochastic, dynamic programming model with four state variables (the drought status, the current weather, weather correlation, and current storage) and two controls (environmental release and irrigation allocation) to optimally allocate water between extractions and in situ uses. The model is calibrated to Australia's Murray River that generates: (1) a robust qualitative result that "pulse" or artificial flood events are an optimal way to deliver environmental flows over and above conveyance of base flows; (2) from 2001 to 2009 a water reallocation that would have given less to irrigated agriculture and more to environmental flows would have generated between half a billion and over 3 billion U.S. dollars in overall economic benefits; and (3) water markets increase optimal environmental releases by reducing the losses associated with reduced water diversions.

  13. Heavy metals in vegetables and respective soils irrigated by canal, municipal waste and tube well waters.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amir; Riaz, Muhammad; Akhtar, Saeed; Ismail, Tariq; Amir, Mamoona; Zafar-ul-Hye, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination in the food chain is of serious concern due to the potential risks involved. The results of this study revealed the presence of maximum concentration of heavy metals in the canal followed by sewerage and tube well water. Similarly, the vegetables and respective soils irrigated with canal water were found to have higher heavy metal contamination followed by sewerage- and tube-well-watered samples. However, the heavy metal content of vegetables under study was below the limits as set by FAO/WHO, except for lead in canal-water-irrigated spinach (0.59 mg kg(-1)), radish pods (0.44 mg kg(-1)) and bitter gourd (0.33 mg kg(-1)). Estimated daily intakes of heavy metals by the consumption of selected vegetables were found to be well below the maximum limits. However, a complete estimation of daily intake requires the inclusion of other dietary and non-dietary exposure sources of heavy metals.

  14. Influences of coal mining water irrigation on the maize losses in the Xingdong Mine area, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuzhuang; Ling, Pei; Li, Yanheng; Li, Qingxue; Sun, Quande; Wang, Jinxi

    2014-02-01

    In 2008, a maize underproduction disaster occurred in the Xianyu village after irrigation using the coal mining water from the Xingdong Mine, China. This disaster resulted in about 40 hectare maize underproduction and 20 hectare total loss of the maize yields. In order to study the reason, a total of 25 soil, water and plant samples were taken from the study area. These samples were analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. The results indicate that the contents of both water-soluble fluorine and total fluorine are very high and resulting of maize underproduction and total loss of production. The possible pollution sources of fluorine in the study area could be from the coal mine water used for irrigation and glass chemical factory near the study area. PMID:23892594

  15. The Benchmark Farm Program : a method for estimating irrigation water use in southwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duerr, A.D.; Trommer, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Irrigation water-use data are summarized in this report for 74 farms in the Southwest Florida Water Management District. Most data are for 1978-90, but 18 farms have data extending back to the early 1970's. Data include site number and location, season and year, crop type, irrigation system, monitoring method, and inches of water applied per acre. Crop types include citrus, cucumbers, pasture, peanuts, sod, strawberries, and tropical fish farms are also included. Water-application rates per growing season ranged from 0 inches per acre for several citrus and pasture sites to 239.7 inches per acre for a nursery site. The report also includes rainfall data for 12 stations throughout the study area. (USGS)

  16. Effects on ground-water quality from irrigating pasture with sewage effluent near Lakeland, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichenbaugh, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Since 1969 an average of 25,000 gpd of domestic secondary-treated effluent has been used to supplement irrigation of 30 acres of grazed pasture north of Lakeland, Florida. Monitor wells were contructed near the effluent-irrigated pasture. The water table in the surficial aquifer under the pasture varied from 1.0 to 3.3 feet below land surface. Total nitrogen was less than 20 percent of the effluent content after percolating 8 feet; no increase in nitrogen was detected 20 feet below the surface, or in down-gradient ground water. There was no evidence of phosphorus or carbon contamination of ground water. Low numbers of bacteria (generally coliform) were noted in some samples from nine wells. Four wells sampled contained bacteria of probable fecal origin. Low-rate application of the effluent to the pasture apparently has had little effect on the soil and ground water. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Influences of coal mining water irrigation on the maize losses in the Xingdong Mine area, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuzhuang; Ling, Pei; Li, Yanheng; Li, Qingxue; Sun, Quande; Wang, Jinxi

    2014-02-01

    In 2008, a maize underproduction disaster occurred in the Xianyu village after irrigation using the coal mining water from the Xingdong Mine, China. This disaster resulted in about 40 hectare maize underproduction and 20 hectare total loss of the maize yields. In order to study the reason, a total of 25 soil, water and plant samples were taken from the study area. These samples were analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. The results indicate that the contents of both water-soluble fluorine and total fluorine are very high and resulting of maize underproduction and total loss of production. The possible pollution sources of fluorine in the study area could be from the coal mine water used for irrigation and glass chemical factory near the study area.

  18. Mitigation of soil water repellency improves rootzone water status and yield in precision irrigated apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, S.; Gadd, N.; Bell, D.

    2009-04-01

    Water repellent soils are documented to impact a range of hydrological properties, yet studies evaluating the consequences of soil water repellency (SWR) and its mitigation on crop yield and quality are conspicuously absent. With global concerns on drought and water availability and the projected impacts of climate change, development of novel strategies to optimize efficient rootzone delivery of water are required. Co-formulations of alkyl polyglycoside (APG) and ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EO/PO) block copolymer surfactants have been shown to improve wetting synergistically. The objectives of this study were to determine if this surfactant technology: 1) increased soil water content and wetting front depth in mini-sprinkler irrigated, water repellent, Goulburn Valley clay loam soils and 2) assess the consequence of SWR mitigation on yield of Malus domestica Borkh. Three trials were conducted in the apple varieties 'Pink Lady' (2006/07 and 2007/08) and 'Gala' (2007/08) growing on Goulburn Valley clay loam soils in Victoria, AU. The test design was a randomized complete block with treatments replicated 5-6 times. Plot size varied by location. SWR was mitigated by applying surfactant at initial rates of 0, 5, or 10 L ha-1 in the spring, then at 0, 2.5, or 5 L ha-1 monthly for up to four months and compared to an untreated control. Treatments were applied to tree lines using a hand held small plot sprayer (118 liters of spray solution ha-1) followed by irrigation within 1-3 days of treatment applications. At each location, plots were irrigated by mini sprinklers and received the same irrigation volumes and management practices. Soil volumetric water content (VWC) was monitored at depths of 0-10 and 10-20 cm using a Theta probe (Delta-T Devices, Cambridge, UK). At harvest, fruit number and weights were measured and used for crop yield estimations. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance with mean values summarized and separated using Least Significant Test

  19. [Effects of different water-saving irrigation modes on chestnut growth and fruiting in drought hilly land].

    PubMed

    Tian, Shou-Le; Shen, Guang-Ning; Xu, Lin; Sun, Xiao-Li

    2012-03-01

    Taking the chestnut trees in a semi-arid and semi-humid hilly orchard of Tai' an, Shandong Province of East China as test objects, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different water-saving irrigation modes (pottery jar storing water, small hole storing water, and border irrigation with covering) on the soil moisture characteristics and the growth, fruiting, and development of chestnut roots. Comparing with the control (border irrigation), all the three water-saving irrigation modes could prolong the period of soil keeping moist, and the best effect came from pottery, jar treatment, with the soil keeping moist for 32 days, 13 days longer than the control. Under water-saving irrigations, the bearing branches length and number, leaf area and mass, and shoot mixed buds all increased obviously. Both pottery jar storing water and small hole storing water could irrigate deeper roots and induce root growth in deeper soil layers, and thus, relieve the drought stress on superficial roots. The three water-saving irrigation modes could increase chestnut yield markedly, with an increment of 18.8%, 16.5%, and 14.2%, respectively, as compared with the control.