Science.gov

Sample records for horticultural research centre

  1. Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitken, James

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment in the field of horticulture and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains a validated competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography. The following…

  2. Environmental Horticulture. Project Report Phase I with Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachler, Mike; Sappe', Hoyt

    This report provides results of Phase I of a project that researched the occupational area of environmental horticulture, established appropriate committees, and conducted task verification. These results are intended to guide development of a program designed to address the needs of the horticulture field. Section 1 contains general information:…

  3. Characterization and evaluation of five jaboticaba accessions at the subtropical horticulture research station in Miami, Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of five Jaboticaba (Myrciaria caulifloria) cultivars ‘MC-05-06’, ‘MC-05-14’, ‘MC-05-12’, ‘MC-06-15,’ and ‘MC-06-14’ were evaluated and characterized at the National Germplasm Repository, Subtropical horticulture Research Station (SHRS) Miami, Florida. Thirty fruits were harvested from clona...

  4. The Press Research Centre, 1956-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press Research Centre, Krakow (Poland).

    In 1956, the Press Research Centre was established in Cracow, Poland by a group of journalists and publishers, for the purpose of instituting press research that would have practical applications. The aims of the Centre were to conduct studies on the history of the Polish press, the contemporary press, press readership, and editorial techniques.…

  5. CmMDb: a versatile database for Cucumis melo microsatellite markers and other horticulture crop research.

    PubMed

    Bhawna; Chaduvula, Pavan K; Bonthala, Venkata S; Manjusha, Verma; Siddiq, Ebrahimali A; Polumetla, Ananda K; Prasad, Gajula M N V

    2015-01-01

    Cucumis melo L. that belongs to Cucurbitaceae family ranks among one of the highest valued horticulture crops being cultivated across the globe. Besides its economical and medicinal importance, Cucumis melo L. is a valuable resource and model system for the evolutionary studies of cucurbit family. However, very limited numbers of molecular markers were reported for Cucumis melo L. so far that limits the pace of functional genomic research in melon and other similar horticulture crops. We developed the first whole genome based microsatellite DNA marker database of Cucumis melo L. and comprehensive web resource that aids in variety identification and physical mapping of Cucurbitaceae family. The Cucumis melo L. microsatellite database (CmMDb: http://65.181.125.102/cmmdb2/index.html) encompasses 39,072 SSR markers along with its motif repeat, motif length, motif sequence, marker ID, motif type and chromosomal locations. The database is featured with novel automated primer designing facility to meet the needs of wet lab researchers. CmMDb is a freely available web resource that facilitates the researchers to select the most appropriate markers for marker-assisted selection in melons and to improve breeding strategies.

  6. CmMDb: A Versatile Database for Cucumis melo Microsatellite Markers and Other Horticulture Crop Research

    PubMed Central

    Bhawna; Chaduvula, Pavan K.; Bonthala, Venkata S.; Manjusha, Verma; Siddiq, Ebrahimali A.; Polumetla, Ananda K.; Prasad, Gajula M. N. V.

    2015-01-01

    Cucumis melo L. that belongs to Cucurbitaceae family ranks among one of the highest valued horticulture crops being cultivated across the globe. Besides its economical and medicinal importance, Cucumis melo L. is a valuable resource and model system for the evolutionary studies of cucurbit family. However, very limited numbers of molecular markers were reported for Cucumis melo L. so far that limits the pace of functional genomic research in melon and other similar horticulture crops. We developed the first whole genome based microsatellite DNA marker database of Cucumis melo L. and comprehensive web resource that aids in variety identification and physical mapping of Cucurbitaceae family. The Cucumis melo L. microsatellite database (CmMDb: http://65.181.125.102/cmmdb2/index.html) encompasses 39,072 SSR markers along with its motif repeat, motif length, motif sequence, marker ID, motif type and chromosomal locations. The database is featured with novel automated primer designing facility to meet the needs of wet lab researchers. CmMDb is a freely available web resource that facilitates the researchers to select the most appropriate markers for marker-assisted selection in melons and to improve breeding strategies. PMID:25885062

  7. Basic Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Barbra Farabough

    This learning packet contains teaching suggestions and student learning materials for a course in basic horticulture aimed at preparing students for employment in a number of horticulture areas. The packet includes nine sections and twenty instructional units. Following the standard format established for Oklahoma vocational education materials in…

  8. The Effects of Task Instruction Sheets on the Performance of Vocational Horticulture Students. Summary of Research, 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Dennis C.; Newcomb, L. H.

    A study investigated the effect that task instruction sheets had on the performance of vocational horticulture students when being taught a unit on poinsettia production. Using a post-test only control group design, researchers administered a 35-item multiple choice test on poinsettia production to 207 students in 12 randomly selected eleventh…

  9. Morphological and physio-chemical characterization of five Canistel accessions at the subtropical horticulture research station in Miami Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of five canistel cultivars, 'Fairchild','E11', 'Keisau', 'TREC#3' and 'TREC 3680' were evaluated and characterized at the National Germplasm Repository, Subtropical horticulture Research Station (SHRS) Miami, Florida. Thirty fruits were harvested from clonal accessions during July and August, ...

  10. Advantages of diffuse light for horticultural production and perspectives for further research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Yang, Qichang

    2015-01-01

    Plants use diffuse light more efficiently than direct light, which is well established due to diffuse light penetrates deeper into the canopy and photosynthetic rate of a single leaf shows a non-linear response to the light flux density. Diffuse light also results in a more even horizontal and temporal light distribution in the canopy, which plays substantial role for crop photosynthesis enhancement as well as production improvement. Here we show some of the recent findings about the effect of diffuse light on light distribution over the canopy and its direct and indirect effects on crop photosynthesis and plant growth, and suggest some perspectives for further research which could strengthen the scientific understanding of diffuse light modulate plant processes and its application in horticultural production. PMID:26388890

  11. Lunar horticulture.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of the role that lunar horticulture may fulfill in helping establish the life support system of an earth-independent lunar colony. Such a system is expected to be a hybrid between systems which depend on lunar horticulture and those which depend upon the chemical reclamation of metabolic waste and its resynthesis into nutrients and water. The feasibility of this approach has been established at several laboratories. Plants grow well under reduced pressures and with oxygen concentrations of less than 1% of the total pressure. The carbon dioxide collected from the lunar base personnel should provide sufficient gas pressure (approx. 100 mm Hg) for growing the plants.

  12. Heartland Horticulture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poquette, Bonnie L.

    2009-01-01

    Midwestern gardeners are legendary for enduring and outwitting winter, with its heavy snowpack and recurring freezes and thaws. Most of them also reckon with a relatively short growing period. All of them find their horticultural plans complicated by hot, humid summers. In fact, the Midwest deals with four seasons dictating special considerations…

  13. Ornamental Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    Each of the 32 curriculum modules in this packet for ornamental horticulture instruction contains a brief description of the module content, a list of the major division or units, the overall objectives, objectives by units, content outline and suggested teaching methods, student application activities, and evaluation procedures. A listing of…

  14. The Charles Perkins Centre's Twins Research Node.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas C; Craig, Jeffrey M; Hopper, John L; Carrick, Susan E

    2016-08-01

    Twins can help researchers disentangle the roles of genes from those of the environment on human traits, health, and diseases. To realize this potential, the Australian Twin Registry (ATR), University of Melbourne, and the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC), University of Sydney, established a collaboration to form the Twins Research Node, a highly interconnected research facility dedicated specifically to research involving twins. This collaboration aims to foster the adoption of twin designs as important tools for research in a range of health-related domains. The CPC hosted their Twins Research Node's launch seminar entitled 'Double the power of your research with twin studies', in which experienced twin researchers described how twin studies are supporting scientific discoveries and careers. The launch also featured twin pairs who have actively participated in research through the ATR. Researchers at the CPC were surveyed before the event to gauge their level of understanding and interest in utilizing twin research. This article describes the new Twins Research Node, discusses the survey's main results and reports on the launch seminar.

  15. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horticultural Review allows extensive reviews of the state of the knowledge on certain topics or crops. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential, is outlined with an Introduction, Botany, Horticulture, Propagation, Uses and Conclusion sections. This review compiles literature from around the w...

  16. Introduction to Horticulture. Teacher Edition. Horticulture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication is designed to provide a core of instruction for the many different fields in agricultural/horticultural education. This course contains 21 instructional units that cover the following topics: introduction to horticulture; beginning a career in horticulture; hand and power tools; introduction to safety; growing facilities;…

  17. Assessment of the tung tree (Vernicia fordii) germplasm collection and latest cultivar release at the USDA-ARS Southern Horticultural Research Unit in Poplarville, MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tung trees (Vernicia fordii, syn Aleurites fordii) and tung oil production have a long history in the gulf coast region. The Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory (TCSHL) in Poplarville, MS was formerly the USDA Tung Oil Research Station in the 1940s, 50s and 60s and still maintains an exte...

  18. A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure funds. Despite being widely cited as a core component of research capacity building, infrastructure as a discrete concept has been rather analytically neglected, often treated as an implicit feature of research environments with little specification or relegated to a narrow category of physical or administrative inputs. The terms research infrastructure, capacity, and culture, among others, are deployed in overlapping and inconsistent ways, further obfuscating the crucial functions of infrastructure specifically and its relationships with associated concepts. The case is made for an expanded conceptualisation of research infrastructure, one that moves beyond conventional 'hardware' notions. Drawing on a case analysis of NEXUS, a multidisciplinary health research centre based at the University of British Columbia, Canada, a conceptual framework is proposed that integrates the tangible and intangible structures that interactively underlie research centre functioning. A relational approach holds potential to allow for more comprehensive accounting of the returns on infrastructure investment. For those developing new research centres or seeking to reinvigorate existing ones, this framework may be a useful guide for both centre design and evaluation. PMID:20925953

  19. Addiction Research Centres and the Nurturing of Creativity. Substance abuse research in a modern health care centre: the case of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Jürgen; Giesbrecht, Norman; Gliksman, Louis; Graham, Kathryn; Le, Anh D; Mann, Robert E; Room, Robin; Rush, Brian; Tyndale, Rachel F; Wells, Samantha

    2011-04-01

    The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health is one of the premier centres for research related to substance use and addiction. This research began more than 50 years ago with the Addiction Research Foundation (ARF), an organization that contributed significantly to knowledge about the aetiology, treatment and prevention of substance use, addiction and related harm. After the merger of the ARF with three other institutions in 1998, research on substance use continued, with an additional focus on comorbid substance use and other mental health disorders. In the present paper, we describe the structure of funding and organization and selected current foci of research. We argue for the continuation of this successful model of integrating basic, epidemiological, clinical, health service and prevention research under the roof of a health centre.

  20. Openness--A Way Forward: Development Education Research Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare-Heremia, Mahora

    2014-01-01

    Education is a vital aspect in the lives of humankind. It contributes and shapes our future as citizens of the world. To understand it is to discover the many hidden talents the world has in store for all. The Development Education Research Centre (DERC) holds many resources that aid in the development of education at a global level. With the…

  1. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre Bulletin No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Instructions for the construction of the following apparatus for the secondary school science laboratory are included in this issue of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre Bulletin: a cheap water purifier using an expendable deionizer can; a simple amplifier suitable for detecting or displaying D. C. currents of 1 microamp or…

  2. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2009 Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2009

    2009-01-01

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) was established in 1981 as a not-for-profit company owned by the Commonwealth and state and territory ministers with responsibility for vocational education and training (VET). It is a professional, independent body at arm's length from government. The company initially conducted research…

  3. Horticultural Mechanics Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipley, W. Edward

    1974-01-01

    Ornamental horticulture teachers and managers of ornamental horticulture businesses were surveyed to determine which agricultural mechanics knowledges and skills are needed for entry-level employment in nursery, greenhouse, turf, and landscape management, which are common to the four areas, and the appropriate grade level at which they should be…

  4. Environmental Horticulture Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard environmental horticulture curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the environmental horticulture field. The general information section contains the following: purpose and objectives; program description,…

  5. Agriculture Education. Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary agricultural education students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in ornamental horticulture. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) horticulture and job opportunities, (2) preparing soil mixtures, (3) control, (4) plant propagation, (5) plant…

  6. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hui; Zhang, Junxiang; Nageswaran, Divyashree; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors of many horticultural crops are attributed to the overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegetables. Not only do carotenoids give horticultural crops their visual appeal, they also enhance nutritional value and health benefits for humans. As a result, carotenoid research in horticultural crops has grown exponentially over the last decade. These investigations have advanced our fundamental understanding of carotenoid metabolism and regulation in plants. In this review, we provide an overview of carotenoid biosynthesis, degradation, and accumulation in horticultural crops and highlight recent achievements in our understanding of carotenoid metabolic regulation in vegetables, fruits, and flowers. PMID:26504578

  7. Temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Manjul; Dhekney, Sadanand A; Soriano, Leonardo; Kandel, Raju; Grosser, Jude W

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology provides plant breeders an additional tool to improve various traits desired by growers and consumers of horticultural crops. It also provides genetic solutions to major problems affecting horticultural crops and can be a means for rapid improvement of a cultivar. With the availability of a number of horticultural genome sequences, it has become relatively easier to utilize these resources to identify DNA sequences for both basic and applied research. Promoters play a key role in plant gene expression and the regulation of gene expression. In recent years, rapid progress has been made on the isolation and evaluation of plant-derived promoters and their use in horticultural crops, as more and more species become amenable to genetic transformation. Our understanding of the tools and techniques of horticultural plant biotechnology has now evolved from a discovery phase to an implementation phase. The availability of a large number of promoters derived from horticultural plants opens up the field for utilization of native sequences and improving crops using precision breeding. In this review, we look at the temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops and the usage of a variety of promoters either isolated from horticultural crops or used in horticultural crop improvement. PMID:26504550

  8. Development of Procedures for Assessing the Impact of Vocational Education Research and Development on Vocational Education (Project IMPACT). Volume 4--A Case Study of Illinois Projects in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hook, Colin; Ethridge, James

    As part of Project IMPACT's efforts to identify and develop procedures for complying with the impact requirements of Public Law 94-482, a case study was made of Illinois Projects in Horticulture. Fourteen horticulture projects in high schools and junior colleges were discovered through a previous study, personal interviews with two University of…

  9. Research in subsea welding technology at the National Hyperbaric Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.E.; Liddle, D.; Richardson, I.M.

    1993-12-31

    The National Hyperbaric Centre in Aberdeen is a testing facility used by diving contractors, manufacturers and offshore operators for testing of their equipment and procedures. The onshore saturation diving system is used for the qualification of hyperbaric welding procedures and diver welders. Research and development projects are also ongoing at NHC. During the past year, work has focused on the development of synergic MIG and Fluxcored wire welding parameters for the subsea repair of offshore structures. A robot welding system has been installed for operation in the large test chamber. Various aspects of health and safety in hyperbaric welding have also been addressed. These include a survey of current practice by contractors regarding welding fumes and gases and the development of an ozone monitoring system suitable for use in welding habitats.

  10. Horticulture/Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This brochure describes the philosophy and scope of a secondary-level course in floriculture and horticulture. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the Future Farmers of America, floriculture, merchandising and selling, retail flower shop management, advertising, inventory, indentification of common floral…

  11. The Education of Ornamental Horticulture Technicians in Ohio, a Research Report of a Ph.D. Dissertation. Research Series in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Robert H.; Woodin, Ralph J.

    The primary purposes of this study were to determine occupational opportunities for ornamental horticulture technicians in Ohio and to propose curriculums for training them. In the first phase, data were collected by questionnaire from 64.8 percent of 962 potential Ohio employers which was a 50 percent random sample of 1900 employers. In the…

  12. Research Informed Science Enrichment Programs at the Gravity Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venville, Grady; Blair, David; Coward, David; Deshon, Fred; Gargano, Mark; Gondwe, Mzamose; Heary, Auriol; Longnecker, Nancy; Pitts, Marina; Zadnik, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Excursions to museums and science centres generally are great fun for students and teachers. The potential educational benefits beyond enjoyment, however, are rarely realised or analysed for their efficacy. The purpose of this paper is to describe four educational enrichment programs delivered at the Gravity Discovery Centre (GDC), near Gingin,…

  13. 2016 INCAM Research Symposium: Expanding Person-Centred Care through Integrative Health Research.

    PubMed

    Boon, Heather; Gaboury, Isabelle; Balneaves, Lynda G; Tsui, Teresa; Ng, Jeremy Y; Bozinovski, Natalie

    2016-12-01

    The following are abstracts of research presentations given at the 9th INCAM Research Symposium. The theme for this year's conference was "Expanding Person-Centred Care through Integrative Health Research", which was held on November 18 and 19, 2016 at the Toronto Marriott Bloor Yorkville Hotel in Ontario, Canada. The abstracts are grouped under the categories of oral or poster presentation based on their presentation at the Symposium. For more information, please visit: http://www.iscmr.org/content/canadian-chapter---public.

  14. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre, India--a profile.

    PubMed

    Ray, Rajat; Dhawan, Anju; Chopra, Anita

    2013-10-01

    The National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre (NDDTC) is a part of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, a premier autonomous medical university in India. This article provides an account of its origin and its contribution to the field of substance use disorder at the national and international levels. Since its establishment, the NDDTC has played a major role in the development of various replicable models of care, the training of post-graduate students of psychiatry, research, policy development and planning. An assessment of the magnitude of drug abuse in India began in the early 1990s and this was followed by a National Survey on Extent, Patterns and Trends of Drug Abuse in 2004. Several models of clinical care have been developed for population subgroups in diverse settings. The centre played an important role in producing data and resource material which helped to scale up opioid substitution treatment in India. A nationwide database on the profile of patients seeking treatment (Drug Abuse Monitoring System) at government drug treatment centres has also been created. The centre has provided valuable inputs for the Government of India's programme planning. Besides clinical studies, research has also focused on pre-clinical studies. Capacity-building is an important priority, with training curricula and resource material being developed for doctors and paramedical staff. Many of these training programmes are conducted in collaboration with other institutions in the country. The NDDTC has received funding from several national and international organizations for research and scientific meetings, and, most recently (2012), it has been designated as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Substance Abuse.

  15. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Kurihama medical and addiction centre-a profile.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Akira; Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    The Kurihama Medical and Addiction Center began to conduct research and to provide medical care for alcohol-related problems in 1963, when special alcoholism treatment wards were established in Japan for the first time. At first, the provision of medical care to patients was prioritized. However, training courses for specialists were initiated in 1975, and the Department of Clinical Research was established in 1984, which led to the formation of the present management structure in which the centre's staff are shared by three departments: Medical Care, Clinical Research and Education and Information. The Department of Medical Care provides specialized treatment for alcohol use disorders and medical services for other conditions, including behavioural addictions such as internet addiction and gambling disorder, as well as dementia and other psychiatric disorders. The Departments of Clinical Research and Education and Information are engaged mainly in specialized activities related to alcohol. The Department of Clinical Research conducts research on the epidemiology of alcohol use, the effects of alcohol on health and the treatment of alcohol use disorders in Japan, in cooperation with universities and other research institutions. The Department of Education and Information fosters the human capacity to achieve the primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of alcohol-related problems and the dissemination of information on alcohol. The centre also performs alcohol-related problem prevention activities, government consultations and international collaborative research and personal exchanges, thereby functioning as a central institution for alcohol policy-based medical services and research in Japan.

  16. Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32: Patterns in Soil-Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, S. J.; Simmer, C.; Masbou, M.; Boessenkool, K.; Crewell, S.; Diekkruger, B.; Huber, K.; Klitzsch, N.; Koyama, C. N.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    The soil, vegetation and the lower atmosphere (SVA) are key compartments of the Earth, where almost all activities of mankind take place. This region is characterized by extremely complex patterns, structures and processes that act at different temporal and spatial scales. While the exchange of energy, water and carbon is continuous between the different compartments, the pertinent fluxes are strongly heterogeneous and variable in space and time. The overarching TR32 paradigm is that the characterisation of structures and patterns will lead to a deeper qualitative and quantitative understanding of the SVA system, and ultimately to better predictions of the SVA state. The TR32 combines research groups in the field of soil and plant science, remote sensing, hydrology, meteorology and mathematics located at the Universities of Aachen, Bonn, Braunschweig and Cologne and the Research Centre Juelich study the soil-vegetation atmosphere system under the novel holistic paradigm of patterns. To understand the mechanisms leading to spatial and temporal patterns in energy and matter fluxes of the SVA system we link experiments and theory via model-observation integration. Focusing our research on the Rur Catchment (Germany), patterns are monitored since 2006 continuously using existing and novel geophysical and remote sensing techniques from the local to the catchment scale based on ground penetrating radar methods, induced polarization, radiomagnetotellurics, electrical resistivity tomography, boundary layer scintillometry, lidar techniques, microwave radiometry, and precipitation radars with polarization diversity. Modeling approaches involve high resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP; 400m) and hydrological models (few meters). Example work from the first phase includes the transfer of laboratory methods to the field; the measurements of patterns of soil-carbon, evapotranspiration and respiration measured in the field; catchment-scale modeling of exchange processes

  17. Marketing time predicts naturalization of horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Robert W; Liu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    to address this problem, including research to identifyand select noninvasive forms and types of horticultural plants is urgently needed.

  18. Competency-Based Horticulture: Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program in floriculture. It contains a master resource list, a listing of floriculture resources available from various states, and 89 competency task sheets organized into nine competency areas. These…

  19. Bioelectromagnetics Research within an Australian Context: The Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (ACEBR)

    PubMed Central

    Loughran, Sarah P.; Al Hossain, Md Shahriar; Bentvelzen, Alan; Elwood, Mark; Finnie, John; Horvat, Joseph; Iskra, Steve; Ivanova, Elena P.; Manavis, Jim; Mudiyanselage, Chathuranga Keerawella; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Martinac, Boris; McIntosh, Robert; McKenzie, Raymond; Mustapic, Mislav; Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Pirogova, Elena; Rashid, M. Harunur; Taylor, Nigel A.; Todorova, Nevena; Wiedemann, Peter M.; Vink, Robert; Wood, Andrew; Yarovsky, Irene; Croft, Rodney J.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone subscriptions continue to increase across the world, with the electromagnetic fields (EMF) emitted by these devices, as well as by related technologies such as Wi-Fi and smart meters, now ubiquitous. This increase in use and consequent exposure to mobile communication (MC)-related EMF has led to concern about possible health effects that could arise from this exposure. Although much research has been conducted since the introduction of these technologies, uncertainty about the impact on health remains. The Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (ACEBR) is a National Health and Medical Research Council Centre of Research Excellence that is undertaking research addressing the most important aspects of the MC-EMF health debate, with a strong focus on mechanisms, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and exposure dosimetry. This research takes as its starting point the current scientific status quo, but also addresses the adequacy of the evidence for the status quo. Risk communication research complements the above, and aims to ensure that whatever is found, it is communicated effectively and appropriately. This paper provides a summary of this ACEBR research (both completed and ongoing), and discusses the rationale for conducting it in light of the prevailing science. PMID:27690076

  20. Bioelectromagnetics Research within an Australian Context: The Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (ACEBR).

    PubMed

    Loughran, Sarah P; Al Hossain, Md Shahriar; Bentvelzen, Alan; Elwood, Mark; Finnie, John; Horvat, Joseph; Iskra, Steve; Ivanova, Elena P; Manavis, Jim; Mudiyanselage, Chathuranga Keerawella; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Martinac, Boris; McIntosh, Robert; McKenzie, Raymond; Mustapic, Mislav; Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Pirogova, Elena; Rashid, M Harunur; Taylor, Nigel A; Todorova, Nevena; Wiedemann, Peter M; Vink, Robert; Wood, Andrew; Yarovsky, Irene; Croft, Rodney J

    2016-09-29

    Mobile phone subscriptions continue to increase across the world, with the electromagnetic fields (EMF) emitted by these devices, as well as by related technologies such as Wi-Fi and smart meters, now ubiquitous. This increase in use and consequent exposure to mobile communication (MC)-related EMF has led to concern about possible health effects that could arise from this exposure. Although much research has been conducted since the introduction of these technologies, uncertainty about the impact on health remains. The Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (ACEBR) is a National Health and Medical Research Council Centre of Research Excellence that is undertaking research addressing the most important aspects of the MC-EMF health debate, with a strong focus on mechanisms, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and exposure dosimetry. This research takes as its starting point the current scientific status quo, but also addresses the adequacy of the evidence for the status quo. Risk communication research complements the above, and aims to ensure that whatever is found, it is communicated effectively and appropriately. This paper provides a summary of this ACEBR research (both completed and ongoing), and discusses the rationale for conducting it in light of the prevailing science.

  1. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD), Stockholm University, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Stenius, Kerstin; Ramstedt, Mats; Olsson, Börje

    2010-03-01

    The Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD) was established as a national research centre and department within the Faculty of Social Science at Stockholm University in 1997, following a Government Report and with the aim to strengthen social alcohol and drug research. Initially, core funding came from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research and from the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs for several long-term projects. Today, SoRAD, with 25 senior and junior researchers, has core funding from the university but most of its funding comes from external national and international grants. Research is organized under three themes: consumption, problems and norms, alcohol and drug policy and societal reactions, treatment and recovery processes. SoRADs scientific approach, multi-disciplinarity, a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods and international comparisons was established by the centre's first leader, Robin Room. Regular internal seminars are held and young researchers are encouraged to attend scientific meetings and take part in collaborative projects. SoRAD researchers produce government-funded monthly statistics on alcohol consumption and purchase, and take part in various national government committees, but SoRADs research has no clear political or bureaucratic constraints. One of the future challenges for SoRAD will be the proposed system for university grants allocation, where applied social science will have difficulties competing with basic biomedical research if decisions are based on publication and citation measures.

  2. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  3. Is naturalistic driving research possible with highly instrumented cars? Lessons learnt in three research centres.

    PubMed

    Valero-Mora, Pedro M; Tontsch, Anita; Welsh, Ruth; Morris, Andrew; Reed, Steven; Touliou, Katerina; Margaritis, Dimitris

    2013-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experiences using Highly Instrumented Cars (HICs) in three research Centres across Europe; Spain, the UK and Greece. The data collection capability of each car is described and an overview presented relating to the relationship between the level of instrumentation and the research possible. A discussion then follows which considers the advantages and disadvantages of using HICs for ND research. This includes the obtrusive nature of the data collection equipment, the cost of equipping the vehicles with sophisticated Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) and the challenges for data storage and analysis particularly with respect to video data. It is concluded that the use of HICs substantially increases the depth of knowledge relating to the driver's behaviour and their interaction with the vehicle and surroundings. With careful study design and integration into larger studies with Low(ly) instrumented Cars (LICs), HICs can contribute significantly and in a relatively naturalistic manner to the driver behaviour research.

  4. BrisSynBio: a BBSRC/EPSRC-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sedgley, Kathleen R.; Race, Paul R.; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2016-01-01

    BrisSynBio is the Bristol-based Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)/Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre. It is one of six such Centres in the U.K. BrisSynBio's emphasis is on rational and predictive bimolecular modelling, design and engineering in the context of synthetic biology. It trains the next generation of synthetic biologists in these approaches, to facilitate translation of fundamental synthetic biology research to industry and the clinic, and to do this within an innovative and responsible research framework. PMID:27284028

  5. What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?

    PubMed

    Diebolt, Vincent; Lang, Marie; Thoby, Frédérique

    2016-02-01

    The Giens 2015 Workshop Round Table entitled "What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?" took a viewpoint distinct from earlier work and studies on changes in clinical research activities in France. The purpose of the present work was to identify, starting from concrete examples, the main strengths and advantages of clinical research activity in France related, in part, to the background environment and also to the specific characteristics of the investigation centres considered to be among the most high-performance units in activity. The criteria retained were grouped into a set of specifications that could be used to establish a "label of excellence" upon which the different teams and clinical research centres could model themselves. It was thus considered that belonging to a centre or structured network with at least a national configuration, when this is possible for the medial topic in question, constitutes a real advantage. Four benchmarks were identified: the scientific and clinical expertise of the head investigator, as well as the qualification and operational capacity of the centre's team; definition and measurement of performance using clearly displayed indicators and evaluation procedures; the quality of the overall trial "process" and of each of its component steps; communication, because know-how and promotion go hand in hand, with the main objective of informing the professional and general public about the value of the research centre meeting the above-mentioned criteria, about its networks of competencies, and more generally, about the important assets of the background of clinical research in France. This sector of research is funded by the public authorities via calls for public grants, financial aids for structures supporting clinical research in the University Hospital Centres and other healthcare institutions allowing for a professionalization of the research occupations, and the national public health

  6. Peripheries and Centres: Research Universities in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2007-01-01

    The research university is a central institution of the 21st century--providing access to global science, producing basic and applied research, and educating key leaders for academe and society. Worldwide, there are very few research universities--they are expensive to develop and support, and the pressures of massification have placed priorities…

  7. Students' Reflective Essays as Insights into Student Centred-Pedagogies within the Undergraduate Research Methods Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosein, Anesa; Rao, Namrata

    2017-01-01

    In higher education, despite the emphasis on student-centred pedagogical approaches, undergraduate research methods pedagogy remains surprisingly teacher-directed. Consequently, it may lead to research methods students assuming that becoming a researcher involves gathering information rather than it being a continuous developmental process. To…

  8. Research priorities of international sporting federations and the IOC research centres

    PubMed Central

    Talpey, Scott; Bradshaw, Ashley; Soligard, Torbjorn; Engebretsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim To be fully effective, the prevention of injury in sport and promotion of athlete's health needs to be both targeted and underpinned by scientific evidence. This study aimed to identify the research priorities of International Sporting Federation (ISFs) compared to the current research focus of the International Olympic Committee Research Centres (IOC-RCs). Methods Online survey of ISF Medical Chairpersons (n=22, 69% response) and IOC-RC Directors (n=7, 78% response). Open-ended responses relating to injury/illness priorities and specific athlete targets were thematically coded. Ratings were given of the need for different research types according to the Translating Research into Injury Prevention Practice (TRIPP) Framework stages. Results are presented as the frequency of ISFs and IOC-RCs separately. Results Both ISFs and IOC-RFs prioritised research into concussion (27%, 72%, respectively), competitive overuse (23%, 43%) and youth (41%, 43%). The ISFs also ranked catastrophic injuries (14%), environmental factors (18%), elite athletes (18%) and Paralympic athletes (14%) as important. The IOC-RCs gave higher priority to preventing respiratory illness (43%), long-term health consequences of injury (43%) and recreational athletes (43%). There was a trend towards ISFs valuing TRIPP stage 5/6 research more highly and for the IOC-RCs to value TRIPP stage 1/2 research. Conclusions There are clear opportunities to better link the priorities and actions of the ISFs and IOC-RCs, to ensure more effective practice-policy-research partnerships for the benefit of all athletes. Setting a mutually-agreed research agenda will require further active engagement between researchers and broader ISF representatives. PMID:27900197

  9. The joint cardiovascular research profile of the university medical centres in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Welie, S D; van Leeuwen, T N; Bouma, C J; Klaassen, A B M

    2016-05-01

    Biomedical scientific research in the Netherlands has a good reputation worldwide. Quantitatively, the university medical centres (UMCs) deliver about 40 % of the total number of scientific publications of this research. Analysis of the bibliometric output data of the UMCs shows that their research is highly cited. These output-based analyses also indicate the high impact of cardiovascular scientific research in these centres, illustrating the strength of this research in the Netherlands. A set of six joint national cardiovascular research topics selected by the UMCs can be recognised. At the top are heart failure, rhythm disorder research and atherosclerosis. National collaboration of top scientists in consortia in these three areas is successful in acquiring funding of large-scale programs. Our observations suggest that funding national consortia of experts focused on a few selected research topics may increase the international competitiveness of cardiovascular research in the Netherlands.

  10. UBC's Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) Will Serve as Test Bed for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The University of British Columbia (UBC) recently celebrated the opening of its Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS), a living laboratory for researchers to teach, test, and study the long-term impact of sustainable practices and technologies. Featuring advanced building controls, sensing technology, and management software…

  11. The Role of Higher Education Centres in Research and Policy: A Case from a European Periphery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zgaga, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on higher education research and policies in small and/or peripheral countries that usually occupy a marginal position in contemporary international debates. The region discussed here is South-eastern Europe and especially the Western Balkans. First, an outline of emerging research centres and the developments in higher…

  12. Leadership in University-Based Cooperative Research Centres: A Qualitative Investigation of Performance Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, S. Bartholomew; Hess, Clara E.; McGinnis, Jennifer Lindberg; Gray, Denis O.

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the importance often attached to the role played by leadership in university-based cooperative research centres, we know very little about what "leadership" means in this specific context. The research reported here used a qualitative approach to identify fifteen dimensions of leadership performance for directors of university-based…

  13. Applied Research Centres at South African Universities. The Relationship between 'Base' Internal Structures and Network 'Superstructures'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, David

    2005-01-01

    This article considers the way in which applied research centres and units at South African higher education institutions enhance their networks with industry, government and community organizations. The findings from 12 case studies of research groupings at higher education institutions in Cape Town support the author's argument for a more…

  14. Trends Shaping Education 2013. Centre for Educational Research and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2013

    2013-01-01

    What does it mean for education that our societies are increasingly diverse? How is global economic power shifting towards new countries? In what ways are the skills required in the world of work changing? "Trends Shaping Education 2013" brings together international evidence to give policy makers, researchers, educational leaders, administrators…

  15. Intelligent systems installed in building of research centre for research purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusov, Jozef; Mokry, Marian; Kolkova, Zuzana; Sedivy, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The attractiveness of intelligent buildings is nowadays directly connected with higher level of comfort and also the economic mode of consumption energy for heating, cooling and the total consumption of electricity for electric devices. The technologies of intelligent buildings compared with conventional solutions allow dynamic optimization in real time and make it easy for operational message. The basic division of functionality in horizontal direction is possible divide in to two areas such as Economical sophisticated residential care about the comfort of people in the building and Security features. The paper deals with description of intelligent systems which has a building of Research Centre. The building has installed the latest technology for utilization of renewable energy and also latest systems of controlling and driving all devices which contribute for economy operation by achieving the highest thermal comfort and overall safety.

  16. Evidence of public engagement with science: visitor learning at a zoo-housed primate research centre.

    PubMed

    Waller, Bridget M; Peirce, Kate; Mitchell, Heidi; Micheletta, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Primate behavioural and cognitive research is increasingly conducted on direct public view in zoo settings. The potential of such facilities for public engagement with science is often heralded, but evidence of tangible, positive effects on public understanding is rare. Here, the effect of a new zoo-based primate research centre on visitor behaviour, learning and attitudes was assessed using a quasi-experimental design. Zoo visitors approached the primate research centre more often when a scientist was present and working with the primates, and reported greater awareness of primates (including conservation) compared to when the scientist was not present. Visitors also reported greater perceived learning when the scientist was present. Installation of information signage had no main effect on visitor attitudes or learning. Visitors who interacted with the signage, however, demonstrated increased knowledge and understanding when asked about the specific information present on the signs (which was related to the ongoing facial expression research at the research centre). The findings show that primate behaviour research centres on public view can have a demonstrable and beneficial effect on public understanding of science.

  17. VAW Recycling Research Centre: Recycling techniques for post-consumer packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rossel, H.

    1995-12-31

    VAW aluminium AG has built a Recycling Research Centre to add a new arm to the company`s Corporate Research and Development Department. The Recycling Research Centre, a pilot plant for scientific research, has been in operation since September 1993. These state-of-the-art facilities allow the investigation and optimization of recycling techniques in a global way and in detail. Research is concentrated on the unit operations -- processing, melting and waste-gas purification -- with the available installations making it possible to compare different alternative process combinations on a 100-kg scale. One of the main targets of VAW research is the development of recycling techniques for packaging. The paper presents an approach to recover the aluminium contained in flexible packaging materials using an integrated melting and waste-gas purification system.

  18. Urban Horticulture: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 4-year program in urban horticulture. The guide consists of a course description; general course…

  19. Open Access Centre at the Nature Research Centre: a facility for enhancement of scientific research, education and public outreach in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šerpenskienė, Silvija; Skridlaitė, Gražina

    2014-05-01

    Open Access Centre (OAC) was established in Vilnius, Lithuania in 2013 as a subdivision of the Nature Research Centre (NRC) operating on the principle of open access for both internal and external users. The OAC consists of 15 units, i.e. 15 NRC laboratories or their branches. Forty four sets of research equipment were purchased. The OAC cooperates with Lithuanian science and studies institutions, business sector and other governmental and public institutions. Investigations can be carried in the Geosciences, Biotaxonomy, Ecology and Molecular Research, and Ecotoxicology fields. Environmental radioactivity, radioecology, nuclear geophysics, microscopic and chemical composition of natural compounds (minerals, rocks etc.), paleomagnetic, magnetic and environmental investigations, as well as ground and water contamination by oil products and other organic environment polluting compounds, identification of fossils, rocks and minerals can be studied in the Georesearch field. Ecosystems and identification of plants, animals and microorganisms are main subjects of the Biotaxonomy, Ecology and Molecular Research field. The Ecotoxicologal Research deals with toxic and genotoxic effects of toxic substances and other sources of pollution on macro- and microorganisms and cell cultures. Open access is guaranteed by: (1) providing scientific research and experimental development services; (2) implementing joint business and science projects; (3) using facilities for the training of specialists of the highest qualifications; (4) providing properly qualified and technically trained users with opportunities to carry out their scientific research and/or experiments in the OAC laboratories by themselves. Services provided in the Open Access Centre can be received by both internal and external users: persons undertaking innovative economic activities, students of other educational institutions, interns, external teams of researchers engaged in scientific research activities, teachers

  20. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Bulletin No. 61, February 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Edinburgh.

    This bulletin of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre provides information to teachers regarding the use of newly produced equipment such as an economical soldering iron, nickel cadmium cell, and a desk calculator. Useful information is also included for teachers on the use of electric coils and bicarbonate indicators. A detailed…

  1. Leadership Challenges of Strategic Research Centres in Relation to Degree of Institutionalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomqvist, Christine; Agrell, Cecilia; Sandahl, Christer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse leadership challenges in the organisation of strategic research centres, focusing on the relationship between organisation and the level of institutionalisation. Four main themes of leadership challenges were identified: (1) the "changing university context," including relationships…

  2. Teaching Research Method Using a Student-Centred Approach? Critical Reflections on Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barraket, Jo

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a reflective case study analysis of an attempt to enhance student learning through the introduction of student-centred teaching methods in a masters-level social research methods subject. The introduction of a range of specific techniques, including case study teaching, problem based learning, groupwork, role-play and…

  3. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Bulletin No. 64, July, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Edinburgh.

    This bulletin of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre provides information to teachers on a variety of topics relating to the use of equipment in science instruction. The introductory remarks deal with an assessment of electronic calculators suitable for use in schools. The section entitled "Physics Notes" lists surplus…

  4. Celebration of the Success of Distributed Research with Schools: The CEM Centre, Durham

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tymms, Peter; Coe, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The Curriculum, Evaluation and Management (CEM) Centre has grown in just 25 years to become the largest educational research unit in a UK university. It has influenced schools and teachers in unprecedented numbers and has had a considerable impact on policy and practice both directly and indirectly in the UK and beyond. This article summarises…

  5. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Bulletin No. 58, September 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Edinburgh.

    This issue of the bulletin contains four major topics. The first is a discussion of problems involved in establishing good communication with science teachers concerning the activities of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre (SSSERC) via exhibitions throughout Scotland. The second, headed "Biology Notes," presents a…

  6. Human molecular genetics research at the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Falaschi, P A

    1997-01-01

    The ICGEB started its activity in 1987 as a special project of UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization) and operates now as a fully autonomous International Organization, of which 40 countries are members at present. The mandate of ICGEB is to become a Centre of excellence for research and training in modern biology addressed to the needs of the developing world. The ICGEB consists of two main laboratories, one in Trieste (where the direction of the Centre is also located) and one in New Delhi, plus a network of 30 Affiliated Centres. The Centre operates through: 1) specific research programs of hish scientific content at the Trieste and New Delhi laboratories; 2) long term training through post-doctoral and pre-doctoral fellowships; 3) short term training; 4) collaborative research program, through which the Centre finances research projects of major impact to the need of the Member States; 5) scientific services, namely consultation for scientific programs, distribution of reagents and a bioinformatics network particularly geared to the human genome research. The research on human molecular genetics in particularly active in the Trieste Component and concerns the study at the molecular level of several genes important for human health: control of DNA replication, response to infectious diseases, cardiocirculatory diseases, cystic fibrosis and cancer. The methodologies for developing new diagnostic methods and for developing gene therapy protocols are actively pursued. Through these programs, the member countries have access to state-of-the-art technologies anf know-how essential for the development of the molecular approaches to medicine brought forward by the study of the human genome.

  7. Developing a national strategic plan for consumer horticulture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumer Horticulture encompasses a wide-array of activities that are practiced by and of interest to the gardening public, garden-focused non-governmental organizations, and gardening-related industries. In a previous publication, we described the current lack of funding support for research, exten...

  8. [The Centre for Medical Research and Health in Niamey, Niger. The new CERMES].

    PubMed

    Ouwe Missi Oukem-Boyer, O

    2014-01-01

    After 20 years under the umbrella of the Organisation de Coordination et de Coopération pour la lutte contre les Grandes Endémies (organization for coordination and cooperation against major endemic diseases), the Centre de Recherche sur les Méningites et les Schistosomoses (the meningitis and schistosomiasis research center) has been placed under the Niger Ministry of Public Health. It has become the Centre de Recherche Médicale et Sanitaire (medical and health research center) and thus keeps its acronym, CERMES. In 2008, CERMES became a full member of the Institut Pasteur International Network. Its main research interests include meningitis, malaria, and interactions between health, environment, and climate. CERMES also works in the areas of public health and health training. Here, 12 years after the creation of the new CERMES, we present its main research results, as well as the challenges and opportunities it faces.

  9. Putting the evidence into practice: the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre experience.

    PubMed

    Robertson-Malt, Suzi; Chapman, Ysanne; Ingram, Gillian

    2006-02-01

    For more than a decade, evidence-based practice has become the desired aim behind organized health care. Although a plethora of reasons exist as to why clinicians are reluctant to adopt research-based findings, the fundamentals relate to management of change and the nature of the individuals involved. Large organizations, with their daily routines and operations, are inherently difficult to change. Hence, one has to use the very structures that drive the organization to effect 'sustained' change. In large tertiary care facilities, such as the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, these structures are policies and procedures. This paper provides details of the process developed by the Nursing Affairs Practice Committee of the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre to achieve the committee mandate of: 'Establish and implement an evidence-based process for the systematic review and revision of nursing clinical standards, policies, procedures and protocols'.

  10. Ethical considerations in international nursing research: a report from the International Centre for Nursing Ethics.

    PubMed

    2003-03-01

    Ethical issues in international nursing research are identified and the perspectives o International Centre for Nursing Ethics are offered in an effort to develop an international consensus of ethical behaviour in research. First, theoretical issues are reviewed, then initial conditions for ethical conduct are defined, and protocol design and procedure considerations are examined. A concerted effort is made to identify and avoid a western bias. Broad guiding principles for designing and reviewing research are offered: (1) respect for persons; (2) beneficence; (3) justice; (4) respect for community; and (5) contextual caring. A collaborative model of the researcher-participant relationship is suggested and discussed.

  11. INA-RESPOND: a multi-centre clinical research network in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Karyana, Muhammad; Kosasih, Herman; Samaan, Gina; Tjitra, Emiliana; Aman, Abu Tholib; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Fatmawati; Gasem, M Hussein; Arif, Mansyur; Sudarmono, Pratiwi; Suharto; Merati, Tuti P; Lane, Clifford; Siswanto; Siddiqui, Sophia

    2015-07-29

    Nationally representative observational and translational research is needed to address the public health challenges in Indonesia due to the geographic disparity, recently decentralized health system, and diverse infectious disease priorities. To accomplish this, the Indonesian Ministry of Health in collaboration with the US National Institute of Health has established INA-RESPOND (Indonesia Research Partnership on Infectious Disease) - a clinical research network comprising 9 referral hospitals, 7 medical faculties, and 2 research centres across Indonesia. The network provides a forum to conduct research at a national scale and to address scientific questions that would be difficult to address in smaller research settings. Further, it is currently conducting multi-centre research on the etiologies of fever, sepsis, and tuberculosis. There are opportunities to leverage existing network resources for other public health research needs. INA-RESPOND is an Indonesian-led network in a country with diverse population groups and public health needs which is poised to collaborate with researchers, universities, donors, and industry worldwide. This paper describes the network and its goals and values, as well as the management structure, process for collaboration, and future vision.

  12. Radiological characterization of the nuclear waste streams of the Belgian nuclear research centre SCK.CEN

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, Patrick; Cornelissen, Rene; Bruggeman, Michel

    2007-07-01

    The radiological characterization of nuclear wastes of a research centre is difficult seen the many different processes that generate waste. Since these wastes may contain radionuclides relevant for the disposal option, the nuclide content and activity have to be known. Considering the fact that some wastes are generated only in minor quantities, complex approaches, involving sampling and successive analysis are not justified. Basic physical models can generally be applied to estimate activity ratios, from which the radionuclide inventory can be determined by non-destructive assay on waste-packages. This article discusses waste streams at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK.CEN and explains how nuclide inventories and activity are determined. The physical models, used to derive activity ratios, and other simple approaches are discussed. (authors)

  13. Assessing Public Engagement with Science in a University Primate Research Centre in a National Zoo

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Mark T.; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.; Whiten, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen increasing encouragement by research institutions and funding bodies for scientists to actively engage with the public, who ultimately finance their work. Animal behaviour as a discipline possesses several features, including its inherent accessibility and appeal to the public, that may help it occupy a particularly successful niche within these developments. It has also established a repertoire of quantitative behavioural methodologies that can be used to document the public's responses to engagement initiatives. This kind of assessment is becoming increasingly important considering the enormous effort now being put into public engagement projects, whose effects are more often assumed than demonstrated. Here we report our first attempts to quantify relevant aspects of the behaviour of a sample of the hundreds of thousands of visitors who pass through the ‘Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre’ in Edinburgh Zoo. This University research centre actively encourages the public to view ongoing primate research and associated science engagement activities. Focal follows of visitors and scan sampling showed substantial ‘dwell times’ in the Centre by common zoo standards and the addition of new engagement elements in a second year was accompanied by significantly increased overall dwell times, tripling for the most committed two thirds of visitors. Larger groups of visitors were found to spend more time in the Centre than smaller ones. Viewing live, active science was the most effective activity, shown to be enhanced by novel presentations of carefully constructed explanatory materials. The findings emphasise the importance and potential of zoos as public engagement centres for the biological sciences. PMID:22496822

  14. Academic collaborative centres for health promotion in the Netherlands: building bridges between research, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Molleman, Gerard; Fransen, Gerdine

    2012-04-01

    A logical and promising next step for the development of an effective infrastructure for health promotion in the Netherlands are Academic Collaborative Centres (ACCs). Their aims are to bridge the gap between research, policy and practice; make better use of available knowledge and strengthen the evidence base for health promotion practice. To understand their position, they must be seen in light of the strong growth in health promotion in the Netherlands. Since the 1970s, the emphasis in health promotion has shifted from simple unidimensional interventions to much more comprehensive and integrated programmes. Comprehensive research programmes, which explicitly involve actual practice and policy, are also thus called for. These developments are described in this article. There is considerable and widespread enthusiasm about the establishment of ACCs in the Netherlands. Experiences from the first 5 years of collaboration between research, policy and practice within the ACCs, however, shows research to still have the dominant position. The different groups of stakeholders in the public health infrastructure are also shown to perceive and appreciate the current infrastructure rather differently. These findings are similar to results found in the USA. The predominance of research has recently led the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) to impose stricter criteria and guidelines for the funding of such centres. These measures are aimed at eliciting a shift of power from science to practice. They seem to be a promising contribution to bridging the gap between research, policy and practice.

  15. Physiological relaxation induced by horticultural activity: transplanting work using flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite increasing attention and a growing volume of research data, little physiological evidence is available on the benefits of horticultural activity and the different effects on individuals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological effects of horticultural activity and to examine how differences in personality alter these effects. Results The effects of transplanting real flowers (horticultural activity) and handling artificial flowers (control activity) on human physiological activity were compared. On the first day, eight participants engaged in horticultural activity and another eight in the control activity. On the second day, participants switched roles. Participants’ physiological conditions during each activity were assessed by measuring the heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV). Psychological responses, which were measured using a semantic differential rating scale, showed that the horticultural activity promoted comfortable, soothed, and natural feelings, compared to the control activity. Analysis of physiological responses using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that sympathetic nervous activity significantly decreased in the late time period (11 to 15 minutes) of horticultural activity only in the type A group. Conclusions This study supports the fact that the horticultural activity can enhance psychological and physiological relaxation effects, although these physiological effects can differ among individuals with different personalities. PMID:24112302

  16. UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE IN THE MIDWESTERN SECTION OF THE UNITED STATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEMP, PAUL E.

    A RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT, DESIGNED TO RETRAIN TEACHERS, DEVELOP ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE CURRICULUM MATERIALS, AND STIMULATE THE DEVELOPMENT OF VOCATIONAL ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE PROGRAMS IN THE MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES, INCLUDED TRAINING, SERVICE, AND EVALUATION ACTIVITIES. THIRTY TEACHERS SELECTED FROM 75 APPLICANTS ATTENDED A SUMMER…

  17. A Canadian model for building university and community partnerships: centre for research & education on violence against women and children.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Peter G; Berman, Helene; MacQuarrie, Barb

    2011-09-01

    The importance of Canadian research on violence against women became a national focus after the 1989 murder of 14 women at École Polytechnique in Montreal. This tragedy led to several federal government studies that identified a need to develop centers for applied research and community-university alliances on violence against women. One such center is the Centre for Research & Education on Violence against Women and Children. The Centre was founded in London, Canada in 1992 out of a partnership of a university, a community college, and community services. The centre's history and current activities are summarized as a model for the development and sustainability of similar centers.

  18. CVAE-VEH Horticulture Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This curriculum guide consists of 14 units for use in teaching a high school level horticulture course. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: opportunities in horticultural occupations; plant classification and identification; structures and equipment used in producing greenhouse, ornamental, and nursery plants; greenhouse…

  19. Competency-Based Horticulture: Gardening--Groundskeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program in gardening/groundskeeping. It contains a master resource list, a listing of gardening/groundskeeping resources available from various states, and 87 competency task sheets organized into 10…

  20. Competency-Based Horticulture. Gardening/Groundskeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    One of two competency-based horticulture curriculum guides developed by an Illinois project, this Gardening/Groundskeeping guide provides the classroom teacher with specific tasks determined by state industry personnel to be necessary for entry-level job placement. It is intended for horticulture education at the senior high school and two-year…

  1. Competencies Needed by Workers in Horticultural Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaas, Duane; Kahler, Alan A.

    This study was undertaken to identify occupational areas in the horticultural industry and to identify, describe, and categorize the mental and physical skills needed by workers in horticultural occupations. Competency lists were developed for these occupational areas: arborist services, farm and garden supply centers, golf course management,…

  2. Introduction to Horticulture. Unit A-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luft, Vernon D.; Backlund, Paul

    Intended to provide about 10 hours of instruction to first-year vocational agriculture students, this instructional unit introduces students to the horticulture industry, provides a broad background of horticultural practices, and covers many skills that can be directly applied by students in their projects. Topics of the individual sections of…

  3. Competency-Based Horticulture: Turfgrass Maintenance Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program for training turfgrass maintenance workers. It contains a master resource list, a listing of turfgrass maintenance resources available from various states, and 59 competency task sheets organized…

  4. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airhart, Douglas L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University's Program of Special Education sponsors a "Super Saturday" of enrichment activities for gifted and talented students as well as students with learning disabilities. A session on horticulture was planned and arranged by students in a class on horticultural therapy who designed learning activities of…

  5. Air pollution and horticulture: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, D.C.

    1983-10-01

    An overview is presented of some of the general effects of pollutants on plants, as well as an approach for assessing these effects. The nature of effects can range from no effects at low doses to a reduced growth or yield at higher atmospheric concentrations. In addition to the dose of the pollutant, the degree of response is governed by a number of internal and external factors. Relative number and size of stomata have marked effect on pollutant uptake by the plant; therefore, environmental conditions exert a strong influence on pollutant-induced responses. Future research should focus on determining if the pollutant doses that now occur in areas of horticultural production cause effects and, if so, whether the effects constitute injury.

  6. Trauma research in Qatar: a literature review and discussion of progress after establishment of a trauma research centre.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, A; Asim, M; Zarour, A; Abdelrahman, H; Peralta, R; Parchani, A; Al-Thani, H

    2016-02-01

    A structured research programme is one of the main pillars of a trauma care system. Despite the high rate of injury-related mortalities, especially road traffic accidents, in Qatar, little consideration has been given to research in trauma. This review aimed to analyse research publications on the subject of trauma published from Qatar and to discuss the progress of clinical research in Qatar and the Gulf Cooperation Council countries with special emphasis on trauma research. A literature search using PubMed and Google Scholar search engines located 757 English-language articles within the fields of internal medicine, surgery and trauma originating from Qatar between the years 1993 and 2013. A steep increase in the number of trauma publications since 2010 could be linked to the setting up of a trauma research centre in Qatar in 2011. We believe that establishing a research unit has made a major impact on research productivity, which ultimately benefits health care.

  7. Laser remote maneuver of space debris at the Space Environment Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bold, Matthew M.

    2016-09-01

    Active satellites have the ability to maneuver to avoid collision with other space objects. Unfortunately the majority of objects in space are debris objects that do not have the ability to maneuver. In the future the population of debris objects will grow and the probability of collision will increase. This paper will provide details on plans to use a ground based laser with uplink adaptive optics compensation to apply photon pressure to debris objects and maneuver them out of harm's way. This work is ongoing at the Space Environment Research Centre at Mt. Stromlo Australia with collaborative efforts from Lockheed Martin, Electro-Optics Systems Inc. and the Australian National University.

  8. SFB 754 - Managing a large interdisciplinary collaborative research centre: what matters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelten, Christiane; Antia, Avan; Braker, Gesche; Kamm, Ruth; Mehrtens, Hela

    2016-04-01

    The German Research Foundation (DFG) funds Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs - in German: Sonderforschungsbereiche SFBs) that are generally applied for by one university, but may also incorporate neighbouring universities or non-university research institutions. SFBs are crossing the boundaries of disciplines, as well as faculties, departments, institutions and institutes. The funding of an SFB can be up to 12 years (3 x 4 years). Kiel University and GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel received funding for the SFB 754 'Climate-biogeochemical interactions in the tropical ocean' in 2008. Currently, the centre is in its third phase comprising 17 scientific subprojects, one outreach project, a central coordination and management subproject and a subproject covering the research expeditions with a total project budget of 12 Mio Euro. Around 100 scientists of interdisciplinary research fields (e.g. physical oceanography, micro-biology, palaeontology, chemistry, modelling) are actively involved. Besides generating high profile research, gender equality, early career support and data management are complementary goals of SFBs requested by the DFG. Within the SFB 754 the scientific coordination office is responsible for developing concepts and strategies to cover these additional requirements and over the past eight years the SFB 754 has been successful in setting up profound programmes and various measures. Some of the SFB 754 practices have been taken up by other projects, and hence allowed the SFB 754 to serve as a role model for 'best practice' within marine sciences in Kiel. A main reason for the success of the SFB 754 to work towards the additional goals set out in the DFGs SFB programme is that the project is well tied into existing structures and builds upon outstanding management expertise available in Kiel. Three examples are highlighted here: • young scientists programme (closely linked to a graduate school (Integrated School of Marine Sciences

  9. The Australian e-Health Research Centre: enabling the health care information and communication technology revolution.

    PubMed

    Hansen, David P; Gurney, Phil; Morgan, Gary; Barraclough, Bruce

    2011-02-21

    The CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) and the Queensland Government have jointly established the Australian e-Health Research Centre (AEHRC) with the aim of developing innovative information and communication technologies (ICT) for a sustainable health care system. The AEHRC, as part of the CSIRO ICT Centre, has access to new technologies in information processing, wireless and networking technologies, and autonomous systems. The AEHRC's 50 researchers, software engineers and PhD students, in partnership with the CSIRO and clinicians, are developing and applying new technologies for improving patients' experience, building a more rewarding workplace for the health workforce, and improving the efficiency of delivering health care. The capabilities of the AEHRC fall into four broad areas: smart methods for using medical data; advanced medical imaging technologies; new models for clinical and health care interventions; and tools for medical skills development. Since its founding in 2004, new technology from the AEHRC has been adopted within Queensland (eg, a mobile phone-based cardiac rehabilitation program), around Australia (eg, medical imaging technologies) and internationally (eg, our clinical terminology tools).

  10. Forms of interdisciplinarity in four sport science research centres in Europe.

    PubMed

    Camy, Jean; Fargier, Patrick; Perrin, Claire; Belli, Alain

    2017-02-01

    Interdisciplinarity is often presented as a significant element of sport science. We present here the results of an investigation conducted in four European Sport Science Research Centres applying interdisciplinarity. Four main dimensions, that we have called "forms", have been investigated. The "scientific", "organisational", "academic" and "societal" forms cover a wide range of activities run by these Centres. We have compared their situations using indicators. Globally they present quite similar combinations of forms, with dominant roles in the construction of interdisciplinarity played by the organisational and societal forms. The scientific form is never quite supported by an epistemological setting and the academic form, mostly characterised by the position of the university, plays an influential role when it is hostile to that kind of research. Following Klein classification, all of them remain at a multidisciplinary stage, one of them exploring interdisciplinary tracks in some research projects. The development of a common culture and a curiosity regarding disciplines other than its own is a key factor for a sustainable situation, as is the capacity to secure long-term financial resources, often linked to a high academic recognition for the director(s).

  11. The Community-First Land-Centred Theoretical Framework: Bringing a "Good Mind" to Indigenous Education Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styres, Sandra D.; Zinga, Dawn M.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces an emergent research theoretical framework, the community-first Land-centred research framework. Carefully examining the literature within Indigenous educational research, we noted the limited approaches for engaging in culturally aligned and relevant research within Indigenous communities. The community-first Land-centred…

  12. A Comprehensive Horticulture Curriculum Guide for New Jersey Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. Cook Coll.

    A horticultural core curriculum and draft copies of three horticultural cluster curricula are provided. Materials related to the curriculum development project appear first. The core curriculum is designed to provide broad initial instruction in horticulture for students in the first year of a secondary-level vocational horticulture program. The…

  13. Optical laboratory facilities at the Finnish Meteorological Institute - Arctic Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakkala, Kaisa; Suokanerva, Hanne; Matti Karhu, Juha; Aarva, Antti; Poikonen, Antti; Karppinen, Tomi; Ahponen, Markku; Hannula, Henna-Reetta; Kontu, Anna; Kyrö, Esko

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the laboratory facilities at the Finnish Meteorological Institute - Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC, http://fmiarc.fmi.fi). They comprise an optical laboratory, a facility for biological studies, and an office. A dark room has been built, in which an optical table and a fixed lamp test system are set up, and the electronics allow high-precision adjustment of the current. The Brewer spectroradiometer, NILU-UV multifilter radiometer, and Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer of the FMI-ARC are regularly calibrated or checked for stability in the laboratory. The facilities are ideal for responding to the needs of international multidisciplinary research, giving the possibility to calibrate and characterize the research instruments as well as handle and store samples.

  14. The International Development Research Centre: A Guide for the Canadian University Research Community = Le Centre de recherches pour le developpement international: guide a l'intention des scientifiques des universites Canadiennes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, George; Wasilewski, Ania, Ed.

    Written in both English and French this is a manual for the Canadian research community. It describes the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and its operations. The main objective of the IDRC is to assist scientists in developing countries to identify and conduct research into long term practical solutions to development problems.…

  15. Horticulture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Ashleigh Barbee, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  16. The Cyclotron radionuclide program at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupf, Homer B.; Tischer, Stephen D.; Al-Watban, Farouk

    1985-05-01

    The King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre Cyclotron is being used to produce radionuclides for nuclear medicine, short-lived positron emitters for positron emission tomography (PET) studies, neutrons for therapy and biological research. Radiopharmaceuticals for planar imaging at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and other hospitals in Saudi Arabia include thallous-201 chloride, gallium-67 citrate, sodium iodide 123I capsules, 123I orthoiodohippurate and 81mKr generators. Products from short-lived positron emitters such as 18F fluordeoxyglucose, 11C methionine, 15O carbon dioxide and 63Zn hematoporphyrin are prepared and used on site for physiological studies in a PET program. Several patients have been treated with neutron therapy and a program for studying neutron radiation effects on cells is underway. Radiopharmaceutical products under development include 111In-labelled monoclonal antibodies for specific tumor detection, 11C methylglucose for metabolic studies and 11C putrescine for tumor localization.

  17. People-centred science: strengthening the practice of health policy and systems research.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Kabir; George, Asha; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-04-17

    Health policy and systems research (HPSR) is a transdisciplinary field of global importance, with its own emerging standards for creating, evaluating, and utilizing knowledge, and distinguished by a particular orientation towards influencing policy and wider action to strengthen health systems. In this commentary, we argue that the ability of the HPSR field to influence real world change hinges on its becoming more people-centred. We see people-centredness as recognizing the field of enquiry as one of social construction, requiring those conducting HPSR to locate their own position in the system, and conduct and publish research in a manner that foregrounds human agency attributes and values, and is acutely attentive to policy context. Change occurs at many layers of a health system, shaped by social, political, and economic forces, and brought about by different groups of people who make up the system, including service users and communities. The seeds of transformative practice in HPSR lie in amplifying the breadth and depth of dialogue across health system actors in the conduct of research - recognizing that these actors are all generators, sources, and users of knowledge about the system. While building such a dialogic practice, those conducting HPSR must strive to protect the autonomy and integrity of their ideas and actions, and also clearly explain their own positions and the value-basis of their work. We conclude with a set of questions that health policy and systems researchers may wish to consider in making their practice more people-centred, and hence more oriented toward real-world change.

  18. Horticultural therapy in dementia care: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Blake, Marianne; Mitchell, Gary

    2016-01-20

    Aim To present a narrative review of the empirical literature on the use of horticultural therapy in dementia care. Method A comprehensive literature search, conducted in December 2014, resulted in the selection of 15 primary research articles for review. Of these, three used qualitative methods, five used quantitative methods and seven used mixed methodology. The articles were critically appraised, and the narrative synthesis used a thematic approach whereby prominent themes from the articles were grouped to form representative themes. Findings Three main themes emerged from the narrative synthesis: the emotional health of people living with dementia, their perceived self-identity and their levels of engagement. Conclusion Horticultural therapy can be beneficial. At a macro-level, it is an inexpensive therapy that does not require specialist training to deliver. At a micro-level, it enhances the wellbeing of people living with dementia. Recommendations are made to promote access to appropriate horticultural therapy for people living with dementia, and for further research in this area.

  19. Size, Accumulation and Performance for Research Grants: Examining the Role of Size for Centres of Excellence

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Carter; Schneider, Jesper W.; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examines the relation between size, accumulation and performance for research grants, where we examine the relation between grant size for Centres of Excellence (CoE) funded by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF) and various ex post research performance measures, including impact and shares of highly cited articles. We examine both the relation between size and performance and also how performance for CoEs evolves over the course of grant periods. In terms of dynamics, it appears that performance over the grant period (i.e. 10 years) is falling for the largest CoEs, while it is increasing for those among the smallest half. Overall, multivariate econometric analysis finds evidence that performance is increasing in grant size and over time. In both cases, the relation appears to be non-linear, suggesting that there is a point at which performance peaks. The CoEs have also been very successful in securing additional funding, which can be viewed as a ‘cumulative effect’ of center grants. In terms of new personnel, the far majority of additional funding is spent on early career researchers, hence, this accumulation would appear to have a ‘generational’ dimension, allowing for scientific expertise to be passed on to an increasing number of younger researchers. PMID:26862907

  20. Size, Accumulation and Performance for Research Grants: Examining the Role of Size for Centres of Excellence.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Carter; Schneider, Jesper W; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examines the relation between size, accumulation and performance for research grants, where we examine the relation between grant size for Centres of Excellence (CoE) funded by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF) and various ex post research performance measures, including impact and shares of highly cited articles. We examine both the relation between size and performance and also how performance for CoEs evolves over the course of grant periods. In terms of dynamics, it appears that performance over the grant period (i.e. 10 years) is falling for the largest CoEs, while it is increasing for those among the smallest half. Overall, multivariate econometric analysis finds evidence that performance is increasing in grant size and over time. In both cases, the relation appears to be non-linear, suggesting that there is a point at which performance peaks. The CoEs have also been very successful in securing additional funding, which can be viewed as a 'cumulative effect' of center grants. In terms of new personnel, the far majority of additional funding is spent on early career researchers, hence, this accumulation would appear to have a 'generational' dimension, allowing for scientific expertise to be passed on to an increasing number of younger researchers.

  1. [The Coordinating Centres for Clinical Trials Network. Objectives and significance for research sites].

    PubMed

    Bruns, I; Maier-Lenz, H; Wolff, S

    2009-04-01

    In the late 1990s a funding program was set up by the federal German government to help keep stride with developments in the international research arena. Within this programme, Coordinating Centres for Clinical Trials ("Koordinierungszentren für Klinische Studien", KKS) were established at 12 German universities aiming at supporting all processes of academic clinical trials according to international standards. A close network infrastructure was chosen in order to reap maximum benefit from synergy effects and to promote the harmonisation of standards. Continuing to grow, the KKS Network currently has 16 research institutions as members. More than 400 employees within the KKS Network provide scientific services to clinical trials at universities, hospitals and in industry. In cooperation with study clinics, surgeries, study groups and competence networks in medicine within Europe and beyond, the KKS supports many different research projects covering all areas of medicine. The KKS Network contributes expertise to legislative processes within Germany and Europe through its work in professional committees and working groups. A wide range of education and training concepts supports clinical research as a scientific field in its own right. After nearly ten years the KKS Network has established itself as an indispensable partner in the field of clinical research.

  2. KLIMA 2050: a research-based innovation centre for risk reduction through climate adaptation of infrastructure and buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, Anders; Time, Berit; Kvande, Tore; Sivertsen, Edvard; Cepeda, Jose; Lappegard Hauge, Åshild; Bygballe, Lena; Almås, Anders-Johan

    2016-04-01

    Klima 2050 - Risk reduction through climate adaptation of buildings and infrastructure is a Centre for Research based Innovation (SFI), funded jointly by the Research Council of Norway (RCN) and the partners of the centre. The aim of Klima 2050 is to reduce the societal risks associated with climate changes, including enhanced precipitation and flood water exposure within the built environment. The Centre will strengthen companies' innovation capacity through a focus on long-term research. It is also a clear objective to facilitate close cooperation between Research & Development, performing companies, public entities, and prominent research groups. Emphasis will be placed on development of moisture-resilient buildings, storm-water management, blue-green solutions, mitigation measures for water-triggered landslides, socio-economic incentives and decision-making processes. Both extreme weather and gradual climatic changes will be addressed. The Centre consists of a consortium of 18 partners from three sectors: industry, public entities and research/education organizations. The partners from the industry/private sector include a variety of companies from the building industry. The public entities comprise the most important infrastructure owners in Norway (public roads, railroads, buildings, airports), as well as the directorate for water and energy. The research and education partners are SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, the Norwegian Business School, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, the Norwegian Meteorological Institute, and the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute. This contribution presents the main research plans and activities of this Centre, which was started in 2015 and will run for 8 years, until 2023. The presentation also includes options for international cooperation in the Centre via PhD and postdoctoral positions, MSc projects and guest-researcher stays with Klima 2050 partners.

  3. At the centre of a science of psychopathology? Characteristics and limitations of cognitive research.

    PubMed

    Bentall, R P

    1996-01-01

    In this brief paper I will suggest that the cognitive approach has four characteristics which must place it at the centre of any complete science of psychopathology: (1) it leads to testable hypotheses about abnormal mental states; (2) it establishes a link between normal psychology and abnormal mental processes, and therefore obviates the need to dichotomise behaviour into the normal and the abnormal; (3) it has the potential to make apparently bizarre and irrational behaviour understandable; and (4) it is neutral with regard to the relative contributions that biology and the environment make to the aetiology of psychiatric disorders. I also identify three limitations of contemporary cognitive models of psychiatric disorders: (1) an over-reliance on conventional methods of psychiatric classification; (2) an underemphasis on social aspects of cognition; and (3) a failure to integrate findings obtained from different models. Once these limitations are overcome, cognitive research is likely to lead to a revolution in our understanding of abnormal behaviour.

  4. Building a Student-Centred Learning Framework Using Social Software in the Middle Years Classroom: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Gail

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the development of the online spaces that were used to create a learning framework: a student-centred framework that combined face-to-face teaching with online social and participatory media. The author, as part of her Doctoral research study, used action research as a mechanism for continual improvement as she redesigned…

  5. Professional Horticulture Competencies for Entry Level and Experienced Vocational Horticulture Teachers in Pennsylvania. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, A. Ronald

    The purpose of this study was to identify the professional horticultural competencies that vocational horticultural teachers must perform successfully and to distinguish between those competencies needed by entry level teachers and those needed by experienced teachers. A secondary purpose was to examine differences in the ratings of the…

  6. The Radiopharmaceuticals Production and Research Centre established by the Heavy Ion Laboratory of the University of Warsaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choiński, J.; Jastrzębskia, J.; Kilian, K.; Mazur, I.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Pękal, A.; Szczepaniak, D.

    2014-03-01

    The Radiopharmaceuticals Production and Research Centre was recently installed on the premises of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw. Equipped with a medical PETtrace p/d cyclotron , radiochemistry synthesis and dispensing units and a modern quality control laboratory the Centre is intended to produce regularly for commercial purposes the classic PET radiopharmaceuticals ( such -as e.g. FDG- ). Situated on the largest Warsaw scientific campus OCHOTA, an important part of the Centre's activities will also be devoted to the production of known species for preclinical studies and research into innovative radiopharmaceuticals in collaboration with other scientific units of this Campus as well as with members of the Warsaw Consortium for PET Collaboration. Research into the accelerator production route of 99mTc will also begin shortly.

  7. Marine research in Greece and the additional Greek marine research centres: Progress and present situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonidis, S.

    1995-03-01

    Greece, as is known, has a coastline of 17 000 km, and over 2000 small and large islands. As expected, the quest of humankind for new sources of matter and energy has been focussed on the sea, with fishery being its primary interest. A number of philosophers and scientists have been involved in the study of this vast ecosystem since ancient times (Aristotle). The political, social and geographical upheavals witnessed in the Greek area, have, however resulted in bringing all these activities to a halt. The first contemporary research work commenced at the end of the 18th century/beginning of the 19th — with marine flora and fauna as its starting point. The first investigations had, of course, been limited to random collections of marine material done in the frame of international exploratory expeditions. Studies became more systematic by the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, with priority being given to the animal kingdom (fish, molluscs, etc.). Investigation of the marine phytobenthos (macrophyceae, phytoplankton) was to follow. The past 40 years research has been more extensive, not limited only to biogeographical evaluations, but also having expanded to physiological and ecological levels. The relevant institutes of Greek universities have all the while watched and contributed to this effort. Today, this kind of research is being supported by the N.M.R.C., the Center of Marine Research, University of Crete, and two research boats which sail the Greek seas. In the ever-changing world, the study of marine flora and fauna has certainly made great progress; however, there are still two big problems to be faced. The first deals with increasing pollution of the seas, the second, with the difficulties in finding and affording adequate financial resources that would enable a more detailed and complete execution of this research work.

  8. Radioactive waste handling and disposal at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre.

    PubMed

    Al-Haj, Abdalla N; Lobriguito, Aida M; Al Anazi, Ibrahim

    2012-08-01

    King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre (KFSHRC) is the largest specialized medical center in Saudi Arabia. It performs highly specialized diagnostic imaging procedures with the use of various radionuclides required by sophisticated dual imaging systems. As a leading institution in cancer research, KFSHRC uses both long-lived and short-lived radionuclides. KFSHRC established the first cyclotron facility in the Middle East, which solved the in-house high demand for radionuclides and the difficulty in importing them. As both user and producer of high standard radiopharmaceuticals, KFSHRC generates large volumes of low and high level radioactive wastes. An old and small radioactive facility that was used for storage of radioactive waste was replaced with a bigger warehouse provided with facilities that will reduce radiation exposure of the staff, members of the public, and of the environment in the framework of "as low as reasonably achievable." The experiences and the effectiveness of the radiation protection program on handling and storage of radioactive wastes are presented.

  9. Profile: Manhiça Health Research Centre (Manhiça HDSS).

    PubMed

    Sacoor, Charfudin; Nhacolo, Ariel; Nhalungo, Delino; Aponte, John J; Bassat, Quique; Augusto, Orvalho; Mandomando, Inácio; Sacarlal, Jahit; Lauchande, Natu; Sigaúque, Betuel; Alonso, Pedro; Macete, Eusébio; Munguambe, Khátia; Guinovart, Caterina; Aide, Pedro; Menendez, Clara; Acácio, Sozinho; Quelhas, Diana; Sevene, Esperança; Nhampossa, Tacilta

    2013-10-01

    The Manhiça Health Research Centre, established in 1996 in a rural area of southern Mozambique, currently follows around 92 000 individuals living in approximately 20 000 enumerated and geo-positioned households. Its main strength is the possibility of linking demographic data and clinical data to promote and conduct biomedical research in priority health areas. Socio-demographic data are updated twice a year and clinical data are collected on a daily basis. The data collected in Manhiça HDSS comprises household and individual characteristics, household socio-economic assets, vital data, migration, individual health history and cause of death, among others. Studies conducted in this HDSS contributed to guide the health authorities and decision-making bodies to define or adjust health policies such as the introduction of Mozambique's expanded programme of immunization with different vaccines (Haemophilus influenzae type b, Pneumococcus) or the development of the concept of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Infants (IPTi) that led to the World Health Organization recommendation of this method as best practice for the control of malaria among infants. Manhiça's data can be accessed through a formal request to Diana Quelhas (diana.quelhas@manhica.net) accompanied by a proposal that will be analysed by the Manhiça HDSS internal scientific and ethics committees.

  10. The biological research programme of the nuclear microprobe at the National Accelerator Centre, Faure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prozesky, V. M.; Pineda, C. A.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Churms, C. L.; Springhorn, K. A.; Moretto, Ph; Michelet, C.; Chikte, U.; Wenzl, P.

    2000-03-01

    The nuclear microprobe (NMP) unit of the National Accelerator Centre (NAC) has initiated a focused research programme on studies of biological material, ranging from applications in medicine to agriculture and botany. During this period a state-of-the-art cryo-preparation laboratory was also developed. This research programme has resulted in a wide range of projects, and has shown how well suited the NMP is for studies of biological material in general. This paper reports on some of the problems and demands in this field, as well as some of the results obtained using particle induced X-ray spectroscopy (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). True elemental imaging is routinely performed using the dynamic analysis (DA) method, which forms part of the GeoPIXE suite of programmes. A collaborative project, together with the CENBG group of Bordeaux-Gradignan in France, on the development of a facility with the aim of studying effects of single-events of radiation in living cells was recently established and is discussed.

  11. Using Art Installations as Action Research to Engage Children and Communities in Evaluating and Redesigning City Centre Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy-Smith, Barry; Carney, Clare

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses learning from a project that set out to explore how the general public perceived the value of public art in the context of urban regeneration of a city centre space. Whilst not set up explicitly as an action research project, the paper discusses the way in which participatory public art projects of this kind can be understood…

  12. Establishing a Community-Controlled Multi-Institutional Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Leilani; Fredericks, Bronwyn

    2007-01-01

    The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) lead and govern the Centre for Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE), which has a focus on circulatory and associated conditions in urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The CCRE is a partnership between QAIHC and Monash University, the Queensland University of…

  13. When Triple Helix Unravels: A Multi-Case Analysis of Failures in Industry-University Cooperative Research Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Denis; Sundstrom, Eric; Tornatzky, Louis G.; McGowen, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative research centres (CRCs) increasingly foster Triple Helix (industry-university-government) collaboration and represent significant vehicles for cooperation across sectors, the promotion of knowledge and technology transfer and ultimately the acceleration of innovation. A growing social science literature on CRCs focuses on their…

  14. 26 CFR 1.199-6 - Agricultural and horticultural cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agricultural and horticultural cooperatives. 1... (continued) § 1.199-6 Agricultural and horticultural cooperatives. (a) In general. A patron who receives a... horticultural cooperative (cooperative) (as defined in paragraph (f) of this section) is allowed a...

  15. 26 CFR 1.199-6 - Agricultural and horticultural cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agricultural and horticultural cooperatives. 1... (continued) § 1.199-6 Agricultural and horticultural cooperatives. (a) In general. A patron who receives a... horticultural cooperative (cooperative) (as defined in paragraph (f) of this section) is allowed a...

  16. Research and Development Digest--2. A Summary of Published Research by the Centre for the Period 1 July, 1986 - 30 June, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William C., Ed.

    This digest summarizes the contents of the more than 50 separate items that were published by the Technical and Further Education (TAFE) National Centre for Research and Development in 1986-87. These items include major research reports, video programs, newsletters, clearinghouse reports and textbooks. The first section provides an overview of the…

  17. The strategy of the Belgian nuclear research centre in the area of high-level waste form compatibility research

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmens, Karel; Cachoir, Christelle; Valcke, Elie; Ferrand, Karine; Aertsens, Marc; Mennecart, Thierry

    2007-07-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN) has a long-standing expertise in research concerning the compatibility of waste forms with the final disposal environment. For high level waste, most attention goes to two waste forms that are relevant for Belgium, namely (1) vitrified waste from the reprocessing of spent fuel, and (2) spent fuel as such, referring to the direct disposal scenario. The expertise lies especially in the study of the chemical interactions between the waste forms and the disposal environment. This is done by laboratory experiments, supported by modeling. The experiments vary from traditional leach tests, to more specific tests for the determination of particular parameters, and highly realistic experiments. This results in a description of the phenomena that are expected upon disposal of the waste forms, and in quantitative data that allow a conservative long-term prediction of the in situ life time of the waste form. The predictions are validated by in situ experiments in the underground research laboratory HADES. The final objective of these studies, is to estimate the contribution of the waste form to the overall safety of the disposal system, as part of the Safety and Feasibility Case, planned by the national agency ONDRAF/NIRAS. The recent change of the Belgian disposal concept from an engineered barrier system based on the use of bentonite clay to a system based on a concrete buffer has caused a reorientation of the research programme. The expertise in the area of clay-waste interaction will however be maintained, to develop experimental methodologies in collaboration with other countries, and as a potential support to the decision making in those countries where a clay based near field is still the reference. The paper explains the current R and D approach, and highlights some recent experimental set-ups available at SCK.CEN for this purpose, with some illustrating results. (authors)

  18. International linking of research and development on the model of Laser Centre Hanover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowitzki, Klaus-Dieter; Boedecker, Olaf

    2005-10-01

    Asia is becoming one of the most important regions in the world from the political, economic and scientific point of view. Germany believes that it is becoming increasingly necessary to cooperate with certain Asian countries especially for scientific and technological reasons. Above and beyond exchanges of scientists, the scientific and technological cooperation will be organized to cover projects with specific targets and to find solutions to important problems. International economic development is characterized by a mixture of competition and cooperation within the context of growing globalization. Germany, being one of the world's largest exporting nation, must therefore combine its active role in cooperation with these countries in the fields of education, research and innovation with economic cooperation. The Laser Centre Hanover pursues the goal of establishing and operating a Chinese German center for training and further education in laser technology and setting up a joint platform for long-term German Chinese cooperation in laser technology. An optimized training infrastructure combined with modern production processes support consequently long-term German businesses in China and secures their market-shares. LZH establishes Laser academies for skilled workers and technical decision makers in Shanghai and Changchun together with local universities and German partners. Due to the economic growth, Russia records since more than two years, the economic conditions are improving the cooperation between Germany and Russia step-by-step. The main goal of Russian science-politics is to stabilize an efficient scientific-technical potential with better chances in the global competition. The German-Russian scientific and technological cooperation plays an important role in this context. It has considerably increased in the last years in terms of width and depth and virtually includes all areas of science and technology at present. The region around Moscow is regarded

  19. Mycetoma in the Sudan: an update from the Mycetoma Research Centre, University of Khartoum, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Fahal, Ahmed; Mahgoub, El Sheikh; El Hassan, Ahmed M; Abdel-Rahman, Manar Elsheikh

    2015-03-01

    This communication reports on the Mycetoma Research Centre of the University of Khartoum, Sudan experience on 6,792 patients seen during the period 1991-2014.The patients were predominately young (64% under 30 years old) males (76%). The majority (68%) were from the Sudan mycetoma belt and 28% were students. Madurella mycetomatis eumycetoma was the most common type (70%). In 66% of the patients the duration of the disease was less than five years, and 81% gave a history of sinuses discharging mostly black grains (78%). History of trauma at the mycetoma site was reported in 20%. Local pain was reported in 27% of the patients, and only 12% had a family history of mycetoma. The study showed that 57% of the patients had previous surgical excisions and recurrence, and only 4% received previous medical treatment for mycetoma. Other concomitant medical diseases were reported in 4% of the patients. The foot (76%) and hand (8%) were the most commonly affected sites. Less frequently affected sites were the leg and knee (7%), thigh (2%), buttock (2%) and arm and forearm (1%). Rare sites included the chest wall, head and neck, back, abdominal wall, perineum, oral cavity, tongue and eye. Multiple sites mycetoma was recorded in 135 (2%) of cases. At presentation, 37% of patients had massive lesions, 79% had sinuses, 8% had local hyper-hydrosis at the mycetoma lesion, 11% had regional lymphadenopathy, while 6% had dilated tortuous veins proximal to the mycetoma lesions. The diagnosis of mycetoma was established by combined imaging techniques and cytological, histopathological, serological tests and grain culture. Patients with actinomycetoma received a combination of antimicrobial agents, while eumycetoma patients received antifungal agents combined with various surgical excisions. Surgical excisions in the form of wide local excision, debridement or amputation were done in 807 patients, and of them 248 patients (30.7%) had postoperative recurrence. Different types of amputations

  20. Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32: Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmer, C.; Thiele-Eich, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Collaborative Research Centre TR32 has the goal to perform pattern-based prediction of states and fluxes of water, CO2 and energy in terrestrial systems across scales. For this, the TR32 set up the following three elements during the past nine years: measurement techniques that allow us to characterize and monitor the spatiotemporal dynamics and evolution of system properties across scales, a cross-scale, multi-compartment terrestrial system modeling approach that includes all relevant processes using the terrestrial model platform TerrSysMP and state variable assimilation and parameter estimation methods. We will present examples of how the TR32 utilizes these three elements to improve our understanding of the water cycle. The available soil moisture monitoring network consisting of e.g. cosmic-ray sensors or an in situ NMR slim-line logging tool has been helpful in understanding the interactions of plant growth and soil moisture dynamics. New algorithms derive soil moisture from satellite based SAR systems, which showed potential for the derivation of surface roughness and vegetation information. For surface precipitation, a radar composite using observations from two dual-polarized X-band Doppler radars provides nearly 100% coverage of the Rur catchment. To also be able to include other precipitation observations which occur at different temporal and spatial resolutions, such as rain gauges, a high resolution space-time precipitation model is being developed. Commercial microwave links used for cell phone communication have also been experimented with to improve polarimetric quantitative precipitation estimation. In addition, uncertainty plays a major role with respect to the central goal of the TR32 and is taken into account in various ways. For example, model uncertainty in the Rur catchment results in large parts from anthropogenic activities such as e.g. drainage patterns in fields, the control of the Rur discharge, groundwater pumping, storage lakes

  1. Mycetoma in the Sudan: An Update from the Mycetoma Research Centre, University of Khartoum, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Fahal, Ahmed; Mahgoub, EL Sheikh; Hassan, Ahmed M. EL; Abdel-Rahman, Manar Elsheikh

    2015-01-01

    This communication reports on the Mycetoma Research Centre of the University of Khartoum, Sudan experience on 6,792 patients seen during the period 1991–2014.The patients were predominately young (64% under 30 years old) males (76%). The majority (68%) were from the Sudan mycetoma belt and 28% were students. Madurella mycetomatis eumycetoma was the most common type (70%). In 66% of the patients the duration of the disease was less than five years, and 81% gave a history of sinuses discharging mostly black grains (78%). History of trauma at the mycetoma site was reported in 20%. Local pain was reported in 27% of the patients, and only 12% had a family history of mycetoma. The study showed that 57% of the patients had previous surgical excisions and recurrence, and only 4% received previous medical treatment for mycetoma. Other concomitant medical diseases were reported in 4% of the patients. The foot (76%) and hand (8%) were the most commonly affected sites. Less frequently affected sites were the leg and knee (7%), thigh (2%), buttock (2%) and arm and forearm (1%). Rare sites included the chest wall, head and neck, back, abdominal wall, perineum, oral cavity, tongue and eye. Multiple sites mycetoma was recorded in 135 (2%) of cases. At presentation, 37% of patients had massive lesions, 79% had sinuses, 8% had local hyper-hydrosis at the mycetoma lesion, 11% had regional lymphadenopathy, while 6% had dilated tortuous veins proximal to the mycetoma lesions. The diagnosis of mycetoma was established by combined imaging techniques and cytological, histopathological, serological tests and grain culture. Patients with actinomycetoma received a combination of antimicrobial agents, while eumycetoma patients received antifungal agents combined with various surgical excisions. Surgical excisions in the form of wide local excision, debridement or amputation were done in 807 patients, and of them 248 patients (30.7%) had postoperative recurrence. Different types of

  2. Ornamental Horticulture: Program Planning Guide: Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Roger R.; Stitt, Thomas R.

    The program planning guide for ornamental horticulture was written to assist Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations (ABAO) teachers in enriching existing programs and/or to provide the basis for expansion of offerings to include additional materials for the cluster areas of arboriculture, floriculture, greenhouse operation and management,…

  3. Agriculture: Horticulture. Secondary Schools. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands Dept. of Education, Saipan.

    This agricultural curriculum guide on horticulture for secondary students is one of six developed for inservice teachers at Marianas High School in Saipan. The guide provides the rationale, description, goals, and objectives of the program; the program of studies and performance objectives by levels; samples of lesson plans for effective delivery…

  4. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors in many horticultural crops attribute to overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegeta...

  5. Ornamental Horticulture Production Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains guidesheets for the ornamental horticulture production occupations. Each guidesheet provides a job-relevant task; performance objective, with task, performance standard, source of standard, and conditions for performance of task; enabling objectives; a list of resources; teaching activities; a criterion-referenced…

  6. Ornamental Horticulture. A Curriculum Guide. Preliminary Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Agricultural Education Section.

    Developed as part of a larger project to revise the total agricultural education curriculum in South Carolina, this curriculum guide for a 2-year ornamental horticulture course contains six functional units, each with several sub-units, and six horizontal supportive units. Each unit includes behavioral objectives, learning activities, topic…

  7. Using Horticulture As Therapy in Public Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, George; Dillon, Roy D.

    1974-01-01

    Horticultural activities to bring about desired changes in individual behavior are being developed in many psychiatric hospitals, rehabilitation centers, senior citizen homes, correctional institutions, and centers for the mentally handicapped. The authors provide some examples of greenhouse-oriented projects appropriate for therapy. (EA)

  8. Horticulture-Agriculture Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    This document, which lists the horticultural-agricultural technologies competencies identified by representatives from business, industry, and labor as well as educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through post-secondary…

  9. Polyacrylamide Hydrogel Properties for Horticultural Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels are commonly employed to ensure hydration of the growth media and minimize crop losses during the crop production and postproduction phases in horticulture. However, studies of the effect of these materials have shown that they have a minimal effect on crop life and q...

  10. Horticulture Therapy Curriculum Development. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sally; And Others

    This final report includes two major components: a narrative describing a project at Edmonds Community College, Washington, to develop a horticultural therapy curriculum and descriptions of six courses developed or revised during the project. The narrative reports the development of a supplementary interdisciplinary certification program to train…

  11. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doutt, Kathleen M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University offers an enrichment program (consisting of a summer session and three Saturdays) in which gifted children and children with learning disabilities are grouped together for activities. Horticulture is one of the few enrichment activities adaptable to both groups. Children are allowed to engage in the same…

  12. Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) sentinel network: a cohort profile

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ana; Hinton, William; McGovern, Andrew; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Yonova, Ivelina; Jones, Simon; de Lusignan, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) is one of the longest established primary care sentinel networks. In 2015, it established a new data and analysis hub at the University of Surrey. This paper evaluates the representativeness of the RCGP RSC network against the English population. Participants and method The cohort includes 1 042 063 patients registered in 107 participating general practitioner (GP) practices. We compared the RCGP RSC data with English national data in the following areas: demographics; geographical distribution; chronic disease prevalence, management and completeness of data recording; and prescribing and vaccine uptake. We also assessed practices within the network participating in a national swabbing programme. Findings to date We found a small over-representation of people in the 25–44 age band, under-representation of white ethnicity, and of less deprived people. Geographical focus is in London, with less practices in the southwest and east of England. We found differences in the prevalence of diabetes (national: 6.4%, RCPG RSC: 5.8%), learning disabilities (national: 0.44%, RCPG RSC: 0.40%), obesity (national: 9.2%, RCPG RSC: 8.0%), pulmonary disease (national: 1.8%, RCPG RSC: 1.6%), and cardiovascular diseases (national: 1.1%, RCPG RSC: 1.2%). Data completeness in risk factors for diabetic population is high (77–99%). We found differences in prescribing rates and costs for infections (national: 5.58%, RCPG RSC: 7.12%), and for nutrition and blood conditions (national: 6.26%, RCPG RSC: 4.50%). Differences in vaccine uptake were seen in patients aged 2 years (national: 38.5%, RCPG RSC: 32.8%). Owing to large numbers, most differences were significant (p<0.00015). Future plans The RCGP RSC is a representative network, having only small differences with the national population, which have now been quantified and can be assessed for clinical relevance for specific studies. This

  13. Building up careers in translational neuroscience and mental health research: Education and training in the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Rapado-Castro, Marta; Pazos, Ángel; Fañanás, Lourdes; Bernardo, Miquel; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Leza, Juan Carlos; Berrocoso, Esther; de Arriba, Jose; Roldán, Laura; Sanjuán, Julio; Pérez, Victor; Haro, Josep M; Palomo, Tomás; Valdizan, Elsa M; Micó, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Manuel; Arango, Celso

    2015-01-01

    The number of large collaborative research networks in mental health is increasing. Training programs are an essential part of them. We critically review the specific implementation of a research training program in a translational Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health in order to inform the strategic integration of basic research into clinical practice to have a positive impact in the mental health system and society. Description of training activities, specific educational programs developed by the research network, and challenges on its implementation are examined. The Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has focused on training through different activities which have led to the development of an interuniversity master's degree postgraduate program in mental health research, certified by the National Spanish Agency for Quality Evaluation and Accreditation. Consolidation of training programs within the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has considerably advanced the training of researchers to meet competency standards on research. The master's degree constitutes a unique opportunity to accomplish neuroscience and mental health research career-building within the official framework of university programs in Spain.

  14. Winter-injury following horticultural treatments to overcome juvenility in citrus seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus seedling juvenility delays new hybrid evaluation, slows cultivar release, and slows introgression of new traits. A horticultural program reported to overcome citrus juvenility was tested at the Whitmore Citrus Research Foundation farm (Lake County), using replicated Hirado Buntan x Clementine...

  15. The Power of Peer Reviewing to Enhance Writing in Horticulture: Greenhouse Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Neil O.; Flash, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Peer review is not included in undergraduate horticultural curricula. Our research objectives in an 8- year study, which ranged from 2000 to 2007 in two sections (2000-2002 non-peer reviewed and 2003-2007 peer-reviewed) of Greenhouse Management students at the University of Minnesota were to determine whether iterative peer reviews would result in…

  16. Process Evaluation of a Teaching and Learning Centre at a Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Deborah B.; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a teaching and learning centre (TLC) five?years after its inception at a mid-sized, midwestern state university. The mixed methods process evaluation gathered data from 209 attendees and non-attendees of the TLC from the full-time, benefit-eligible teaching faculty. Focus groups noted feelings of…

  17. A National network of schizophrenia expert centres: An innovative tool to bridge the research-practice gap.

    PubMed

    Schürhoff, F; Fond, G; Berna, F; Bulzacka, E; Vilain, J; Capdevielle, D; Misdrahi, D; Leboyer, M; Llorca, P-M

    2015-09-01

    Schizophrenia is probably the most severe psychiatric disorder with much suffering for the patients and huge costs for the society. Efforts to provide optimal care by general practitioners and psychiatrists are undermined by the complexity of the disorder and difficulties in applying clinical practice guidelines and new research findings to the spectrum of cases seen in day-to-day practice. An innovative model of assessment aimed at improving global care of people with schizophrenia provided by the French national network of schizophrenia expert centres is being described. Each centre has established strong links to local health services and provides support to clinicians in delivering personalized care plans. A common set of assessment tools has been adopted by the ten centres spread over the whole French territory. A web application, e-schizo(©) has been created to record data in a common computerized medical file. This network offers systematic, comprehensive, longitudinal, and multi-dimensional assessments of cases including a medical workup and an exhaustive neuropsychological evaluation. This strategy offers an effective way to transfer knowledge and share expertise. This network is a great opportunity to improve the global patient care and is conceived as being an infrastructure for research from observational cohort to translational research.

  18. Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32: Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmer, C.

    2014-12-01

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of states, flow and transport within the groundwater-soil-vegetation-atmosphere (GSVA) system lead to complex, scale-dependent patterns, which make predictions of terrestrial systems challenging to both scientists and policymakers. Studying how patterns influence fluxes and state variables across scales is a key goal of the Collaborative Research Centre TR32, which approaches this challenge by monitoring, modelling and data assimilation using the Rur catchment (Germany) as its study area.The evolution of system state variables across scales is monitored using two dual-polarized X-band Doppler radars as well as the atmospheric boundary layer, cloud and precipitation monitoring site JOYCE (Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution), and measurements from eddy covariance stations, an extensive soil moisture network including cosmic-ray probes. Monitoring is complemented by a suite of geophysical methods such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Spectral Induced Polarization, Electromagnetic Induction, and Ground-Penetrating Radar, as well as a rhizotrone facility set up to monitor root development in conjunction with plant growth.The TR32 employs multi-compartment modelling to upscale the water, CO2 and energy fluxes from the local to the catchment scale. The analysis of the simulations with grids that honor the respective scales reveal the role of patterns on the fluxes and helps to design a general upscaling framework that quantifies information transfer between scales.Model development centers around the coupled model platform TerrSysMP, which considers mutual fluxes from the groundwater to the atmosphere by combining the atmospheric model COSMO, the land surface model CLM, and the hydrological model ParFlow in a scale-consistent way using the OASIS coupler. Processes down to the root scale are modelled at high resolution in order to obtain improved parameterizations for TerrSysMP. State variable assimilation and parameter estimation methods

  19. [Quality management and practice-oriented research in a clinic-network of mother-/father-child rehabilitation centres].

    PubMed

    Otto, F; Arnhold-Kerri, S

    2010-04-01

    The Research Network Prevention and Rehabilitation for Mothers and Children is an association of currently 24 rehabilitation centres for mothers, fathers and their children, and a scientific team at the Hannover Medical School. The Research Network combines practice-oriented research on mother and child health with the further development of treatment programmes and the implementation of internal quality management in mother-/father-child rehabilitation centres in accordance with DIN EN ISO 9001. The present paper describes the concept of the Research Network and the work contents addressed over the last three years. The advantages and disadvantages of this association and the changes initiated in practice were evaluated from the point of view of 19 quality managers of the participating clinics. The data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, and a qualitative content analysis was performed in order to quantify the responses. The concept of the Research Network has proven successful. In the view of the quality managers of the clinics, implementation of DIN EN ISO 9001 has lead to structuring of the processes, improved internal communication, and increased motivation in the team. The major obstacles were the lack of time and human resources. In all clinics, the participation in practice-related research projects und scientifically monitored concept development has contributed to optimizing everyday practice. The exchange between the quality managers in external quality circle meetings was of central importance. The conjunction of internal quality management, practice-related research and concept development in a network can be recommended also for other associations of clinics, health centres or medical practices.

  20. Patient-centred interprofessional collaboration in primary care: challenges for clinical, educational and health services research. An EGPRN keynote paper.

    PubMed

    Van Royen, Paul; Rees, Charlotte E; Groenewegen, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The theme 'patient-centred interprofessional collaboration' of the EGPRN conference in October 2012, captures in just three words important challenges for European primary care and its research agenda. Challenges for future research are formulated, in three domains: clinical, educational and health services research. Transferability of research, based upon advanced computational infrastructure, will facilitate a rapid learning health care system. In educational research, this includes the use of observational and reflexivity methods. Outcomes should be defined in terms of improvement of functional status and social participation rather than in terms of disease-specific outcomes. Partnership with all stakeholders, patients, GPs and their health care colleagues and students, can help in reducing avoidable waste in the production and reporting of research evidence.

  1. Research in the Modern Language Centre at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Youn-Hee; Kohls, Robert; Chun, Christian W.

    2009-01-01

    The Modern Language Centre addresses a broad spectrum of theoretical and practical issues related to second and minority language teaching and learning. Since its foundation in 1968, the quality and range of the Centre's graduate studies programs, research, and development projects and field and dissemination services have brought it both national…

  2. Research on registry centre for geospatial web service based on CSW specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yumin; Song, Chunqiao; Shen, Shengyu; Yang, Qing

    2008-12-01

    With the increase of geospatial data and services, how to more efficiently utilize and share the geographic information becomes a crucial problem. To effectively integrate and enhance abundant geographic information anywhere, this paper presents a Registry Centre for Geospatial Web Service (RCGWS) based on the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalogue Service for Web and the ebXML Registry Information Model (ebRIM), which provides registration and discovery portals for geospatial metadata for dataset and services. The design ideology and architecture of RCGWS are introduced, and the techniques of appending GIS services classification in extended ebRIM and external interfaces of RCGWS based on OGC CWS are discussed. The implementation of RCGWS platform shows that this Registry Centre can satisfy the requirement of geospatial dataset and services.

  3. The red tape waltz. Where multi-centre ethical and research governance review can step on the toes of good research practice.

    PubMed

    Webster, Susan M; Temple-Smit, Meredith

    2013-03-01

    How could it happen that the very processes intended to assure ethical research in Australia might, themselves, undermine good research practice? This paper describes one PhD candidate's recent experiences of multi-centre review for a Human Research Ethics Committee approved, low/negligible risk, qualitative study, at the crossroad of health services research and organisational research. A retrospective review of international literature about multi-centre review processes revealed that many of these experiences were not unique and might have been expected, notwithstanding Australian efforts at harmonisation of multi-centre review. This paper examines not only the burden of red-tape that was applied to a small doctoral study, but also the way in which the red-tape threatened the anonymity of potential study participants and risked exposing them to undue pressure and distress. These experiences support the view that harmonisation initiatives have not yet developed as the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council may have hoped and that further attention is needed to harmonise research governance processes.

  4. Horticultural therapy: the garden benefits everyone.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J

    1998-10-01

    Horticulture therapy (HT) is an applied adjuctive therapy, using plants and gardening materials, to help the client with mental illness to improve social skills, self-esteem, and use of leisure time. HT provides a nonthreatening context for the development of a therapeutic alliance between client and nursing student. HT provides a group experience for the student nurse, allowing the promotion of therapeutic community, assessment of patient status, and management of a therapy session from start to finish via the nursing process.

  5. Treated sewage effluent (water) potential to be used for horticultural production in Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emongor, V. E.; Ramolemana, G. M.

    Botswana being semi-arid and arid country, the provision of drinking water and water for agricultural production is becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. Measures that can augment the available sources of water or measures that can reduce the demand on potable water should be given serious consideration. Horticulturists have incorporated new technology into many of their production programs, which has enabled them to grow more horticultural crops with less water; however, more effort is needed. Techniques such as drip irrigation, sensors, growing plants with low water requirements, timing and scheduling of irrigation to the growth needs of the plant, mulching, and establishing a minimum water quality standard for horticultural crops must be used to stretch agricultural water supplies. Recycling agricultural water and using treated municipal sewage effluent is a viable option for increasing horticultures’ future water supply in Botswana. Agriculture wastewater and sewage effluents often contain significant quantities of heavy metals and other substances that may be toxic to people but beneficial to horticultural crops. However, before sewage effluent can be used for commercial production of vegetables and fruits, research must be undertaken to determine whether there is accumulation of heavy metals and faecal coliforms in the edible portion of the horticultural produce which may be detrimental to human health 15-20 years later. Research must be undertaken to assess the impact of sewage effluent on soil physical, chemical properties and environment after continued use.

  6. Centre for Education, Training, & Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CETREE) of Malaysia: Educating the Nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi; Hilme, Khairur Rahim Ahmad

    2007-10-01

    Centre for Education, Training, and Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CETREE), was established in the year 2000, in Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). CETREE is a not-for-profit organization that was part of the Malaysian Government's continuous effort in promoting sustainable development. The centre's main task is to tackle issues and problems that are slowing the potential growth of RE & EE utilizations in Malaysia. CETREE and the Government of Malaysia, with funding and supports from Danish International Development Assistance (DANIDA) and USM, has been working together closely in applying trans-disciplinary educational methods and approaches for the teaching of RE & EE that are compatible with Malaysian. Through association with various entities such as Energy Centre of Malaysia (PTM), Energy Commission of Malaysia (ST), Malaysia Electricity Supply Industry Trust Account (MESITA); CETREE was able to successfully promote sustainable development through education and training. Significant accomplishments made by CETREE include introducing RE and EE as part of Malaysian secondary schools and universities education; conducting energy related courses for professionals; and generating awareness via campaign in the mass media and CETREE's mobile-exhibition-unit road-tour.

  7. Influenza viruses received and tested by the Melbourne WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza annual report, 2014.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Sheena G; Chow, Michelle K; Barr, Ian G; Kelso, Anne

    2015-12-31

    The WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza in Melbourne is part of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System. In 2014 the Centre received a total of 5,374 influenza samples from laboratories primarily in the Asia-Pacific region. Viruses were characterised by their antigenic, genetic and antiviral drug resistance properties. Of the viruses successfully analysed 52% were A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. The majority of these were antigenically and genetically similar to the WHO recommended reference strain for the 2014 Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccine. Results for A(H3N2) and B/Yamagata viruses suggested that circulating viruses of this subtype and lineage, respectively, had undergone antigenic and/or genetic changes, consistent with the decision by WHO to change recommended strains for the 2015 Southern Hemisphere vaccine. A small number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and B/Victoria viruses had highly reduced inhibition to the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir. The Centre also undertook primary isolation of vaccine candidate viruses directly into eggs. A total of 38 viruses were successfully isolated in eggs, of which 1 (B/Phuket/3073/2013) was included in the 2015 Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccine.

  8. Horticultural Related Occupations. VEH Horticulture Related. Curriculum Guide for Agribusiness 161.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for teachers to use in developing a 1- or 2-year course in horticulture-related occupations for at-risk and special education students. It is one of 28 semester courses in agricultural science and technology for Texas high schools. The program prepares low-achieving students with employability skills that…

  9. Healing, health, and horticulture: introduction to the workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present-day emphasis of horticulture and health is an extension of ancient and medieval traditions. The relationship of healing and the horticultural arts predates written history and relates to ancient wisdom, custom, and folklore. Plants and health have been of great concern for humankind cons...

  10. Ornamental Horticulture. Course of Study Outlines. 1975 Edition. Volume XXX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Aubry

    These courses of study in ornamental horticulture for secondary and adult technical education levels are based on a 1972 Rutgers University study and are designed to accomodate occupational needs in the field of ornamental horticulture. Job titles emphasized at the secondary level are caretaker, nurserymen, flower grower, and flower salesperson;…

  11. Asia’s Indigenous Horticultural Crops: An Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop diversity is an urgent issue today in horticulture, which is faced with an erosion of crop variability as monoculture systems dominate crop production throughout the world, particularly in Europe and North America. At the same time there is great interest in indigenous horticultural crops aroun...

  12. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This secondary horticulture curriculum guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in thirteen sections: (1) Orientation and Careers, (2) Leadership and Future Farmers of America, (3) Supervised Occupational Experience Program, (4) Plant…

  13. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This second horticulture guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Leadership, (2) Supervised Occupational Experience, (3) Plant Propagation, (4) Soil and Plant Growth Media, (5) Fertilizers, (6) Greenhouse, (7) Plant…

  14. Status of global strategies for horticultural fruit crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the International Horticultural Congress of 2014, a workshop discussed the advances of the development of global conservation strategies for some of the horticultural crops mentioned in International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) Annex 1. While global co...

  15. Negative ion research at the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, R.; Holmes, A. J. T.; King, D. B.; Surrey, E.; Turner, I.; Zacks, J.

    2016-12-01

    A summary of negative ion development work being presently undertaken at the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy is given. The small negative ion facility has an RF driven volume ion source with beam extraction at energies up to 30 keV. The extracted beam of H- ions has an associated co-extracted electron beam with an electron to ion ratio of <1 over the whole range of operating parameters. In order to understand this performance spectroscopic investigations have been undertaken using the Balmer series line to determine the electron temperature. In addition a 1D fluid model of an RF driven ion source is also under development. This model is based on a successful model for both arc discharge positive and negative ion sources. Additional system studies of neutral beam injection systems for future fusion machines beyond ITER are being carried out. This is required to understand the limits of various neutralisation and energy recovery systems in order to maximise overall electrical efficiency.

  16. The social dimensions of therapeutic horticulture.

    PubMed

    Harris, Holly

    2017-02-22

    Harnessing nature to promote mental health is increasingly seen as a sustainable solution to healthcare across the industrialised world. The benefits of these approaches to well-being include reduced symptoms of anxiety, depression and improved social functioning. Many studies assume that contact with nature is the main therapeutic component of these interventions yet 'green care' programmes typically include activities not based on 'nature' that may contribute to positive outcomes. This study explored the views of service users participating in a Therapeutic Horticultural programme on what factors promoted their engagement in the project, to identify variables other than 'nature' that may be responsible for successful engagement in these programmes. A secondary aim was to assess the significance 'nature' plays including, for example whether a prior interest in horticultural-related activities, such as gardening, is significant. Two focus groups were held with mental health service users (n = 15) attending a gardening project in south-east England. Findings revealed that the social element of the project was the key facilitator to engagement; the flexible structure of the gardening project was also significant and allowed service users to feel empowered. 'Nature' evoked a sense of calm and provided participants with a non-threatening space that was engaging.

  17. Workload composition of the organic horticulture.

    PubMed

    Abrahão, R F; Ribeiro, I A V; Tereso, M J A

    2012-01-01

    This project aimed the characterization of the physical workload of the organic horticulture by determining the frequency of exposure of operators to some activity categories. To do this, an adaptation of the PATH method (Posture, Activities, Tools and Handling) was done to be used in the context of agriculture work. The approach included an evaluation of physical effort demanded to perform the tasks in the work systems from an systematic sampling of work situations from a synchronized monitoring of the heart rate; a characterization of posture repertoire adopted by workers by adapting the OWAS method; an identification of pain body areas using the Corlett diagram; and a subjective evaluation of perceived effort using the RPE Borg scale. The results of the individual assessments were cross correlated and explained from an observation of the work activity. Postural demands were more significant than cardiovascular demands for the studied tasks, and correlated positively with the expressions of bodily discomfort. It is expected that, besides the knowledge obtained of the physical effort demanded by organic horticulture, this project will be useful for the development of new technologies directed to minimize the difficulties of the human work and to raise the work productivity.

  18. Education, Research and Passive Recreation: An Integrated Programme at the Wetlands Centre, Scotland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddock, Max

    1991-01-01

    Describes a center for education, research, and passive recreation in wetland settings operated by a community conservation organization in cooperation with the state and a local university. Discusses the philosophy, on-site programs (formal and nonformal), the outreach program, and community involvement in ornithological research of the center.…

  19. Time Is Precious: Variable- and Event-Centred Approaches to Process Analysis in CSCL Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Although temporality is a key characteristic of the core concepts of CSCL--interaction, communication, learning, knowledge building, technology use--and although CSCL researchers have privileged access to process data, the theoretical constructs and methods employed in research practice frequently neglect to make full use of information relating…

  20. Planting hope in loss and grief: self-care applications of horticultural therapy for grief caregivers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yeh-Jen; Lin, Chi Yun; Li, Yu-Chan

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Taiwan Association for Care and Counseling for Loss organized a workshop about Horticultural Therapy, conducted as a participatory action research (PAR). Nineteen grief caregivers participated. Specific goals were designed according to a survey of participant expectations and focus-group discussions. The workshop content included lectures and interactive activities. Results demonstrated that most participants displayed an increased awareness of personal loss and meaning in grief, indicating that horticulture and nature appreciation might relieve individual grief and stress. The report introduces the rationale, evolution, execution, and results of the program development.

  1. Promoting the Success of US Industry/University Research Centres. The Role of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tornatzky, Louis; Lovelace, Kay; Gray, Denis O.; Walters, S. George; Geisler, Eliezer

    1999-01-01

    Leadership in industry-university research centers often involves helping constituencies with conflicting priorities deal with challenges, necessitating a participatory leadership style. Other challenges include exercising intrapreneurship, creating a compelling technical vision, and spanning organizational boundaries. (SK)

  2. Factors influencing increased expertise for a sustainable workforce at a research centre in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Brand, S; Draper, H R; Enarson, D A; Beyers, N; Claassens, M

    2014-12-21

    Contexte : Le Centre Antituberculeux Desmond Tutu (DTTC), à l'Université de Stellenbosch, en Afrique du Sud.Objectifs : 1) Déterminer si l'accès au financement est associé au développement d'une expertise chez les employés, et 2) déterminer quels autres facteurs sont associés au développement de l'expertise des employés.Schéma : Cette étude était rétrospective. La population cible était constituée par les employés du DTTC entre le 1e janvier 2004 et le 31 décembre 2011. L'amélioration de l'expertise pendant la période de fonction était le premier résultat attendu ; le deuxième était une augmentation du niveau de connaissances en relation avec le Cadre National de Certification.Résultats : Il n'a pas été démontré d'association entre l'accès au financement et le développement de l'expertise, mais on a mis en évidence une association entre le nombre de mois de travail et cette amélioration (OR 1.03 ; IC95% 1,02–1.04 ; P< 0,001), en contrôlant l'âge lors de l'entrée en fonction, le sexe, l'accès au financement et le niveau d'instruction.Conclusion : L'étude montre que près d'un tiers du personnel a accru son expertise, plus de 90% ont eu accès au financement et que les personnes employées pendant une durée plus longue avaient davantage de chances d'améliorer leur expertise. Nous encourageons les organismes de recherche des pays à revenu faible et moyen à mettre en œuvre des stratégies visant à retenir leur personnel afin de renforcer leur expertise.

  3. Placing ethics in the centre: negotiating new spaces for ethical research in conflict situations.

    PubMed

    Zwi, A B; Grove, N J; MacKenzie, C; Pittaway, E; Zion, D; Silove, D; Tarantola, D

    2006-01-01

    Issues of power and consent, confidentiality, trust, and benefit, risks to researchers, and potential harm to participants, are all contested when working with different cultures and within environments marked by violence and insecurity. Difficulty resolving these dilemmas may paralyse ethics committees, may fail to give the guidance sought by researchers, and will not help populations who are among the world's most vulnerable. Even where efforts are made to respond to ethical guidelines and to improve practice, considerable impediments are present in many developing countries, including lack of formal ethical review structures in unstable settings, lack of required skills, limited political and institutional recognition of ethical issues, competing interests, and limitations in clinical and research practice (Elsayed 2004, Macklin 2004). In conflict settings, these limitations are more marked, and the responsibilities of the researcher for ethical practice are greater, but the mechanisms for oversight are weaker. Moreover, the constant focus on vulnerabilities and problems, and the often almost total lack of recognition of strengths and resilience, can further disempower already exploited groups and individuals. The capacity of refugees and communities in conflict to take an active role in the research process is seldom acknowledged, and undermines the potential for more innovative research which can help generate the evidence for better policy and practice.

  4. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Heilig, Markus; Warren, Kenneth R; Kunos, George; Silverman, Peter B; Hewitt, Brenda G

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a concise account of the history, mission, structure and some recent achievements of the US National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). Created by the US Congress 40 years ago, the NIAAA has evolved from an entity charged mainly with building a national system of alcoholism treatment services to one with responsibility for developing, nurturing and supporting the biomedical and behavioral science foundation necessary to reduce the significant domestic and global public health impact of alcohol use disorders. The NIAAA is unique in that it functions both as a funding agency, supporting research at universities and other external, or 'extramural' research institutions, and is also a research institution itself, where alcohol research is carried out in-house, or 'intramurally'. Of a $450.2 million 2009 Congressional Appropriation, approximately 90% was devoted toward the former and approximately 10% towards the latter objective. The current NIAAA Strategic Plan builds on a new organizing principle for long-range research planning, based on a life-span perspective that recognizes that human biology and behavior continue to change throughout life and changes occurring throughout the life-span affect individuals' drinking patterns as well as the decisions they may make to change their drinking habits or to seek help for alcohol use problems. Within this framework, major efforts are currently being devoted to educating practitioners on clinically useful, science-based assessment and treatment methods that exist today, and development of personalized new treatments for tomorrow.

  5. Scaling-up Sustainable Land Management Practices through the Concept of the Rural Resource Centre: Reconciling Farmers' Interests with Research Agendas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoutsing, Bertin; Tchoundjeu, Zacharie; Degrande, Ann; Asaah, Ebenezar; Tsobeng, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Formal agricultural research has generated vast amount of knowledge and fundamental insights on land management, but their low adoption has been attributed to the use of public extension approach. This research aims to address whether and how full participation of farmers through the concept of Rural Resource Centre (RRC) provides new…

  6. Going Boldly Into the Future: A Series of Case Studies of Co-Operative Research Centres and Their Relationships with the VET Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrier, Fran; Trood, Clifford; Whittingham, Karen

    This document presents case studies of 10 cooperative research centers (CRCs) across Australia and their relationships with the vocational education and training (VET) sector. The CRCs profiled in the case studies are as follows: Co-operative Research Centre for Sustainable Rice Production; Cast Alloy and Solidification Technology Co-operative…

  7. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity. The Korean Institute on Alcohol Problems (KIAP).

    PubMed

    Chun, Sungsoo; Reid, Easton A; Sohn, Aeree; Welch, Michael E; Yun-Welch, Sunmee; Yun, Mieun

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an account of the history, current status and vision of the Korean Institute on Alcohol Problems (KIAP). In the context of increasing alcohol consumption, rising second-hand effects and industry-friendly government policy, the Korean College Alcohol Study (KCAS) was established in the Republic of Korea in 1999, and changed its name to the Korean Institute on Alcohol Problems (KIAP) in 2005. KIAP's mission is to decrease alcohol consumption and its related harms by promoting research, advocating policy, developing intervention programmes and preparing media communications. Since 1999, KIAP has published scientific papers and books in alcohol research and used the internet and other media for dissemination of specialized information to the general population. In the last decade, KIAP has trained front-line alcohol researchers, and advanced domestic and international networks to promote evidence-based alcohol control policy in Korea. The light of hope shines brightly as KIAP grows and establishes critical linkages to move forward in its mission.

  8. The BonaRes Centre - A virtual institute for soil research in the context of a sustainable bio-economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, Ute; Helming, Katharina; Heinrich, Uwe; Bartke, Stephan; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Russell, David; Eberhardt, Einar; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Fertile soils are central resources for the production of biomass and provision of food and energy. A growing world population and latest climate targets lead to an increasing demand for both, food and bio-energy, which require preserving and improving the long-term productivity of soils as a bio-economic resource. At the same time, other soil functions and ecosystem services need to be maintained. To render soil management sustainable, we need to establish a scientific knowledge base about complex soil system processes that allows for the development of model tools to quantitatively predict the impact of a multitude of management measures on soil functions. This, finally, will allow for the provision of site-specific options for sustainable soil management. To face this challenge, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research recently launched the funding program "Soil as a Natural Resource for the Bio-Economy - BonaRes". In a joint effort, ten collaborative projects and the coordinating BonaRes Centre are engaged to close existing knowledge gaps for a profound and systemic understanding of soil functions and their sensitivity to soil management. This presentation provides an overview of the concept of the BonaRes Centre which is responsible for i) setting up a comprehensive data base for soil-related information, ii) the development of model tools aiming to estimate the impact of different management measures on soil functions, and iii) establishing a web-based portal providing decision support tools for a sustainable soil management. A specific focus of the presentation will be laid on the so-called "knowledge-portal" providing the infrastructure for a community effort towards a comprehensive meta-analysis on soil functions as a basis for future model developments.

  9. Perceptions of the Value of Extended Service in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Larae; Miller, Larry E.

    1983-01-01

    This study suggests the need for several improvements in the summer vocational horticulture education programs. Knowledge of the summer program, its aims, and the teacher's responsibilities appears to be lacking in the groups studied. (SSH)

  10. Reflecting photonics: reaching new audiences through new partnerships - IYL 2015 and the Royal Horticultural Society Flower Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, Matthew T.; John, Pearl V.; Standen, Deanna; Wheeler, Natalie V.; van Putten, Lieke D.; Soper, Nathan; Parsonage, Tina L.; Wong, Nicholas H. L.; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    The `Reflecting Photonics' show garden was exhibited at the 2015 Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) Flower Show in Tatton Park, UK, to celebrate the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies. Elks-Smith Garden Design alongside landscapers `Turf N' Earth' collaborated with researchers, marketing and outreach professionals from the University of Southampton to design, construct and exhibit a photonics-themed garden. The garden and supporting exhibition united science and art to reach new audiences - particularly family groups alongside other key influencers to the young - and showcased the world-leading research in optical fibers at the university in an accessible manner. Researchers and a publicity professional, funded by the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Photonics, developed an integrated approach to the event's public engagement and marketing. The overarching aim was to influence a positive change in the attitude of the garden visitors towards physics and photonics, with additional focus on promoting careers for women in STEM. The show garden won an RHS Gold Medal award and the coveted `People's Choice Award' for the best large garden. The project subsequently won the South East England Physics Network Public Engagement Innovation Project Award. Approximately 80,000 visitors saw the garden, with a further three million television viewers on a popular British gardening show. There were also over 75,400 Tweet impressions on social media. This paper discusses the project aims, explores the design of the garden and its relationship with the research, describes the work of the public engagement team, and outlines the impact of the event.

  11. A Worksite Health Education Workshop as Empowerment Intervention for Health Promotion in the National Research Centre of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Nagat Mohamed; Monir, Zeinab M.; Saleh, Mai Sabry; Mahdy-Abdallah, Heba; Hafez, Salwa Farouk

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The study aimed to assess worksite health education workshops as a successful tool for health promotion of employees. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A one day workshop was held for individuals engaged in research activities in the National research Centre of Egypt at the worksite. Its main objective was to highlight the nature, causes, symptoms and management of job stress. Participants were asked to fill a personality assessment sheet, a self-reported questionnaire for job satisfaction. Other questionnaires for assessment of falsification of type and some socio-demographic data were filled by the attendants. A concise survey was introduced at the end of the workshop for feedback collection. RESULTS: Attendants of the workshop were 36 subjects mainly females (94.4%). Mean age was 40.5 years with 63.9% of participants at their postdoctoral studies stage. Participants were at midway in the scale of job satisfaction (3.3) and did not suffer from falsification (0.3). The feedback survey score (11.5) showed great acceptance for the intervention. Special interest in the topic of stress was reported by 35.1% of attendants who found it the best item in the workshop and the interactive manipulation came next as declared by 18.9% of the participants. CONCLUSION: Worksite health education workshops seem to be a successful practice for empowerment in the Egyptian workplace. PMID:27703583

  12. [The contribution of the Russian Research Centre of Medical Rehabilitation and Balneotherapeutics to the development of the health resort business in this country].

    PubMed

    Povazhnaia, E A; Bobrovnitskiĭ, I P

    2013-01-01

    The definition of the notion of health resort business is proposed in the context of the legislation pertinent to the natural therapeutic resources, health and recreational localities, spa and resort facilities currently in force in this country. The main landmark events in the history of the Russian Research Centre of Rehabilitative Medicine and Balneotherapeutics are highlighted, its role in the development of balneotherapeutic science and health resort business is described. The major achievements of the Centre in the investigations of therapeutic properties of natural physical factors (climate, mineral waters, peloids, etc.), their action on the human organism, the possibilities of their application for the treatment and prevention of various pathological conditions in and outside health resort facilities are presented. The contribution of the specialists of the Centre to the search for and discovery of new resort resources is emphasized. Community needs in balneotheraputic treatment are estimated, scientific basis for its organization, principles and normatives of health resort business are discussed along with the problems of sanitary control and protection. The activities of the Centre as an organizer of the unique system of rehabilitative and balneotherapeutic aid to the population are overviewed. Scientifically substantiated indications and contraindications for the spa and resort-based treatment of various diseases are proposed in conjunction with the methods for the application of physiotherapeutic factors. The tasks currently facing the Centre and prospects for its future research activities in the fields of rehabilitative medicine and balneotherapeutics are discussed.

  13. Environmental fate of fungicides in surface waters of a horticultural-production catchment in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Wightwick, Adam M; Bui, Anh Duyen; Zhang, Pei; Rose, Gavin; Allinson, Mayumi; Myers, Jackie H; Reichman, Suzanne M; Menzies, Neal W; Pettigrove, Vincent; Allinson, Graeme

    2012-04-01

    Fungicides are regularly applied in horticultural production systems and may migrate off-site, potentially posing an ecological risk to surface waterways. However, few studies have investigated the fate of fungicides in horticultural catchments. This study investigated the presence of 24 fungicides at 18 sites during a 5-month period within a horticultural catchment in southeastern Australia. Seventeen of the 24 fungicides were detected in the waterways, with fungicides detected in 63% of spot water samples, 44% of surface sediment samples, and 44% of the passive sampler systems deployed. One third of the water samples contained residues of two or more fungicides. Myclobutanil, trifloxystrobin, pyrimethanil, difenoconazole, and metalaxyl were the fungicides most frequently detected, being present in 16-38% of the spot water samples. Iprodione, myclobutanil, pyrimethanil, cyproconazole, trifloxystrobin, and fenarimol were found at the highest concentrations in the water samples (> 0.2 μg/l). Relatively high concentrations of myclobutanil and pyrimethanil (≥ 120 μg/kg dry weight) were detected in the sediment samples. Generally the concentrations of the fungicides detected were several orders of magnitude lower than reported ecotoxicological effect values, suggesting that concentrations of individual fungicides in the catchment were unlikely to pose an ecological risk. However, there is little information on the effects of fungicides, especially fungi and microbes, on aquatic ecosystems. There is also little known about the combined effects of simultaneous low-level exposure of multiple fungicides to aquatic organisms. Further research is required to adequately assess the risk of fungicides in aquatic environments.

  14. Investigation of 10 herbicides in surface waters of a horticultural production catchment in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Allinson, Graeme; Bui, AnhDuyen; Zhang, Pei; Rose, Gavin; Wightwick, Adam M; Allinson, Mayumi; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Herbicides are regularly applied in horticultural production systems and may migrate off-site, potentially posing an ecological risk to surface waterways. However, few studies have investigated the levels and potential ecotoxicological impact of herbicides in horticultural catchments in southern Australia. This study investigated the presence of 10 herbicides at 18 sites during a 5-month period in horticulturally important areas of the Yarra Valley in southeastern Australia. Seven of the 10 herbicides were detected in the streams, in 39 % of spot water samples, in 25 % of surface sediment samples, and in >70 % of the passive sampler systems deployed. Few samples contained residues of ≥2 herbicides. Simazine was the herbicide most frequently detected in water, sediment, and passive sampler samples and had the highest concentrations in water (0.67 μg/L) and sediment (260 μg/kg dry weight). Generally the concentrations of the herbicides detected were several orders of magnitude lower than reported ecotoxicological effect values, including those for aquatic plants and algae, suggesting that concentrations of individual chemicals in the catchment were unlikely to pose an ecological risk. However, little is known about the combined effects of simultaneous, low-level exposure of multiple herbicides of the same mode of action on Australian aquatic organisms nor their contribution when found in mixtures with other pesticides. Further research is required to adequately assess the risk of pesticides in Victorian aquatic environments.

  15. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC): Development, Evolution, and Direction

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    A historical summary is provided of the evolution of the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) since its origins in 1988. Begun as an NIH research center within a Department of Psychiatry and focused solely on alcohol and aging, early work emphasized treatment efficacy, differential outcome studies, and characterization of the neurophysiological and behavioral manifestations of chronic alcoholism. Over the last fifteen years, UMARC has extended its research focus along a number of dimensions: Its developmental reach has been extended etiologically by studies of risk early in the life span, and by way of work on earlier screening and the development of early, brief treatment interventions. The addiction focus has expanded to include other drugs of abuse. Levels of analysis have also broadened, with work on the molecular genetics and brain neurophysiology underlying addictive processes on the one hand, and examination of the role of the social environment in long term course of disorder on the other. Activities have been facilitated by several research training programs and by collaborative relationships with other universities around the United States and in Poland. Since 2002, a program for research infrastructure development and collaboration has been carried on, initially with Poland and more recently with Ukraine, Latvia, and Slovakia. A blueprint for the future includes expanded characterization of the neurobiology and genetics of addictive processes, the developmental environment, as well as programmatic work to address the public health implications of our ability to identify risk for disorder very early in life. PMID:20331547

  16. The Iranian Documentation Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    The purpose of the Iranian Documentation Centr (Irandoc) was to collect that portion of the world's literature which was pertinent to Iran's research interests, to organize that material, and to promote its use by Iranian researchers. Stated more succinctly, Irandoc's purpose was to obtain ready access to the world's scientific literature in order…

  17. The Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC) Conceptual Model to Promote Mental Health for Adolescents with ASD.

    PubMed

    Shochet, Ian M; Saggers, Beth R; Carrington, Suzanne B; Orr, Jayne A; Wurfl, Astrid M; Duncan, Bonnie M; Smith, Coral L

    2016-06-01

    Despite an increased risk of mental health problems in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there is limited research on effective prevention approaches for this population. Funded by the Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, a theoretically and empirically supported school-based preventative model has been developed to alter the negative trajectory and promote wellbeing and positive mental health in adolescents with ASD. This conceptual paper provides the rationale, theoretical, empirical and methodological framework of a multilayered intervention targeting the school, parents and adolescents on the spectrum. Two important interrelated protective factors have been identified in community adolescent samples, namely the sense of belonging (connectedness) to school and the capacity for self and affect regulation in the face of stress (i.e. resilience). We describe how a confluence of theories from social psychology, developmental psychology and family systems theory, along with empirical evidence (including emerging neurobiological evidence), supports the interrelationships between these protective factors and many indices of wellbeing. However, the characteristics of ASD (including social and communication difficulties, and frequently difficulties with changes and transitions, and diminished optimism and self-esteem) impair access to these vital protective factors. The paper describes how evidence-based interventions at the school level for promoting inclusive schools (using the Index for Inclusion) and interventions for adolescents and parents to promote resilience and belonging [using the Resourceful Adolescent Program (RAP)] are adapted and integrated for adolescents with ASD. This multisite proof-of-concept study will confirm whether this multilevel school-based intervention is promising, feasible and sustainable.

  18. The Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2) study: implementation of a nationwide patient enrollment system.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens Steen; Thomsen, Reimar W; Steffensen, Charlotte; Christiansen, Jens S

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the patient enrollment system and implementation strategy for the new nationwide Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2) project. The paper will also describe the design, current content, and pilot testing of the DD2 registration form. The challenge of the DD2 project was to construct a registration system functioning in the entire Danish health care system, where new type 2 diabetes patients are initially met, and with the capacity to enroll 200 newly diagnosed diabetes patients per week nationwide. This requires a fast and simple registration that is part of everyday clinical practice in hospital outpatient clinics and general practitioner (GP) clinics. The enrollment system is thus built on a tested, rational design where patients need only one visit and only specific limited data about physical activity, anthropometric measures, and family history of diabetes are collected during a brief patient interview. Later, supplemental data will be extracted by computerized linkage with existing databases. The feasibility of this strategy was verified in a pilot study. For maximum flexibility, three different ways to fill in the DD2 registration form were provided and an interactive webpage was constructed. The DD2 project also involves collection of blood and urine samples from each diabetes patient, to be stored in a biobank. Clinicians may obtain the samples themselves or refer patients to the nearest clinical biochemical department. GPs have the additional option of referring patients to the nearest hospital outpatient diabetes clinic to obtain interview data, clinical data, and samples. At present, the enrollment system is in use at 17 hospital outpatient diabetes clinics and 45 GP clinics nationwide, together enrolling 40 new type 2 diabetes patients per week in the DD2 project. A total of 990 patients have now been enrolled and the DD2 is ready to expand nationwide.

  19. The influence of contextual teaching with the problem solving method on students' knowledge and attitudes toward horticulture, science, and school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcher, Carrie Lynn

    2005-08-01

    Adolescence is marked with many changes in the development of higher order thinking skills. As students enter high school they are expected to utilize these skills to solve problems, become abstract thinkers, and contribute to society. The goal of this study was to assess horticultural science knowledge achievement and attitude toward horticulture, science, and school in high school agriculture students. There were approximately 240 high school students in the sample including both experimental and control groups from California and Washington. Students in the experimental group participated in an educational program called "Hands-On Hortscience" which emphasized problem solving in investigation and experimentation activities with greenhouse plants, soilless media, and fertilizers. Students in the control group were taught by the subject matter method. The activities included in the Hands-On Hortscience curriculum were created to reinforce teaching the scientific method through the context of horticulture. The objectives included evaluating whether the students participating in the Hands-On Hortscience experimental group benefited in the areas of science literacy, data acquisition and analysis, and attitude toward horticulture, science, and school. Pre-tests were administered in both the experimental and control groups prior to the research activities and post-tests were administered after completion. The survey questionnaire included a biographical section and attitude survey. Significant increases in hortscience achievement were found from pre-test to post-test in both control and experimental study groups. The experimental treatment group had statistically higher achievement scores than the control group in the two areas tested: scientific method (p=0.0016) and horticulture plant nutrition (p=0.0004). In addition, the students participating in the Hands-On Hortscience activities had more positive attitudes toward horticulture, science, and school (p=0

  20. Winnipeg Centre Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    The Winnipeg Centre Project is a field-based, work-study program that attempts to create more appropriate education for the inner-city child. Sponsored by the Planning and Research Branch of the Department of Colleges and Universities Affairs and administered by Brandon University in consultation with the Winnipeg School Division, the project is…

  1. University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre Partners with CPTAC - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre, a leader in proteomic technology development, has partnered with the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) to make targeted proteomic assays accessible to the community through NCI’s CPTAC Assay Portal.

  2. A Research on a Student-Centred Teaching Model in an ICT-Based English Audio-Video Speaking Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Zhihong; Hou, Leijuan; Huang, Xiaohui

    2010-01-01

    The development and application of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the field of Foreign Language Teaching (FLT) have had a considerable impact on the teaching methodologies in China. With an increasing emphasis on strengthening students' learning initiative and adopting a "student-centred" teaching concept in FLT,…

  3. Getting the Price Right: Costing and Charging Commercial Provision in Centres of Vocational Excellence (CoVEs). Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitken, Liz; Chadwick, Arthur; Hughes, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Centres of Vocational Excellence (CoVEs) were established in 2001, intended to be a key driver in enhancing the contribution of the further education (FE) sector to meeting skills needs. Current government policy expects employers and individuals to pay a greater share of the costs of training, particularly at Level 3, which is the CoVE priority…

  4. An Ecological Footprint for an Early Learning Centre: Identifying Opportunities for Early Childhood Sustainability Education through Interdisciplinary Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNichol, Heidi; Davis, Julie Margaret; O'Brien, Katherine R.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, engineers and educators worked together to adapt and apply the ecological footprint (EF) methodology to an early learning centre in Brisbane, Australia. Results were analysed to determine how environmental impact can be reduced at the study site and more generally across early childhood settings. It was found that food, transport…

  5. Learning to Use Statistics in Research: A Case Study of Learning in a University-Based Statistical Consulting Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinn, Michelle K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative case study of statistical practice in a university-based statistical consulting centre. Naturally occurring conversations and activities in the consulting sessions provided opportunities to observe questions, problems, and decisions related to selecting, using, and reporting statistics and statistical techniques…

  6. Heterosis for horticultural traits in broccoli.

    PubMed

    Hale, Anna L; Farnham, Mark W; Nzaramba, M Ndambe; Kimbeng, Collins A

    2007-08-01

    Over the last three decades, broccoli (Brassica oleracea L., Italica Group) hybrids made by crossing two inbred lines replaced open-pollinated populations to become the predominant type of cultivar. The change to hybrids evolved with little or no understanding of heterosis or hybrid vigor in this crop. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine levels of heterosis expressed by a set of hybrids derived by crossing relatively elite, modern inbreds (n = 9). An additional objective was to determine if PCR-based marker derived genetic similarities among the parents can be useful to predict heterosis in this crop. Thirty-six hybrids derived from a diallel mating design involving nine parents were evaluated for five horticultural characters including the head characteristics of head weight, head stem diameter, and maturity (e.g., days from transplant to harvest), and the plant vigor characteristics of plant height, and plant width in four environments. A total of 409 polymorphic markers were generated by 24 AFLP, 23 SRAP and 17 SSR primer combinations. Euclidean distances between parents were determined based on phenotypic traits. About half of the hybrids exhibited highparent heterosis for head weight (1-30 g) and stem diameter (0.2-3.5 cm) when averaged across environments. Almost all hybrids showed highparent heterosis for plant height (1-10 cm) and width (2-13 cm). Unlike other traits, there was negative heterosis for maturity, indicating that heterosis for this character in hybrids is expressed as earliness. Genetic similarity estimates among the nine parental lines ranged from 0.43 to 0.71 and were significantly and negatively correlated with highparent heterosis for all traits except for stem diameter and days from transplant to harvest. Euclidean distances were not correlated with heterosis. With modern broccoli inbreds, less heterosis was observed for head characteristics than for traits that measured plant vigor. In addition, genetic similarity

  7. Research on teaching and learning processes in Earth Sciences education, particularly centred on the awareness on natural risks and hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhipinti, Susanna

    2013-04-01

    This research, main subject of a PhD now in progress, aims to promote the teaching - learning of Earth Sciences in schools of all levels of educations, with the interesting opportunity to experience innovative and effective practices in our local contest, sharing them between all the teachers as a community of practice and all schools as an open laboratory. Based on experiences already acted in other branches of science, we have made a work notebook freely downloadable from the internet, containing an archive of teaching tools, kits, interactive lessons, easy or complex, common and new, developing contents in a vertical approach, which are now shared and used by nearly all the teachers of our Region. The most important is that each teacher, if request, is initially supported in the practices, then trained and, finally, able to carry out the activity on his own. All the materials and kits necessary for carrying out the various activities are freely available at the regional Science Centre and ready to be used, with clear instructions for the use. Traditional educational scientific instruments, trolleys and trays with all the necessary materials, but mostly models and kits, organised in structured paths, sometime a bit naive but highly effective and able to interest, intrigue and involve, are proposed to students of all ages, sometimes in a peer-to-peer exchange of knowledge. Topics are linked to the curricula of Earth Science, such as minerals and rocks, air and water, plate tectonics, volcanoes and Earthquakes, but a special attention has been paid to the topic of natural hazards and risks: dealing with natural hazard and risks, so common in our Country, requires that local communities, starting from schools, become more and more aware of the natural phenomena, beneficial or catastrophic as they are, but always making a direct impact on the quality of life. For example, students can experience how and why landslides and floods occur, by varying on hands-on models

  8. Minister unveils new nanotech centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2009-06-01

    Three new nanotechnology research centres are to be set up in France as part of a €70m government plan to help French companies in the sector. Researchers at the new centres, which will be located in Grenoble, Saclay (near Paris) and Toulouse, will be encouraged to collaborate with industry to develop new nanotech-based products. Dubbed NANO-INNOV, the new plan includes €46m for two new buildings at Saclay, with the rest being used to buy new equipment at the three centres and to fund grant proposals from staff to the French National Research Agency (ANR).

  9. Documenting Student Performance through Effective Performance Assessments: Workshop Summary. Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Education Curriculum Materials Service.

    This document contains materials about and from a workshop that was conducted to help Ohio horticulture teachers learn to document student competence through effective performance assessments. The document begins with background information about the workshop and a list of workshop objectives. Presented next is a key to the 40 performance…

  10. Insects and Diseases. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on insects and diseases is one of four developed for classroom use in teaching the turf and lawn services area of horticulture. The five sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline steps and factors for consideration. Topics covered include…

  11. Turf Identification. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This compentency-based curriculum unit on turf identification is one of four developed for classroom use in teaching the turf and lawn services area of horticulture. The three sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline steps and factors for consideration. Topics covered include…

  12. Planting Turf. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on planting turf is one of four developed for classroom use in teaching the turf and lawn services area of horticulture. The eight sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline steps and factors for consideration. Topics covered include…

  13. 26 CFR 1.199-6 - Agricultural and horticultural cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... nonpatronage distributions). (d) Special rule for marketing cooperatives. In the case of a cooperative engaged in the marketing of agricultural and/or horticultural products described in paragraph (f) of this... deduction on Form 1099-PATR, “Taxable Distributions Received From Cooperatives,” issued to the patron....

  14. Vocational Instructional Materials in Horticulture for Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethridge, James I.

    This resource catalog of horticulture curriculum materials for students with special needs is divided into twenty-seven instructional areas: aboriculture; annuals; entomology; floral crops production; floral design and flower shop operations; garden center; greenhouse; ground covers and hedges; herbs; house plants; landscape construction and…

  15. Maintaining the Landscape. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on maintaining the landscape is one of five developed for classroom use in teaching the landscape/nursery area of horticulture. The five sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline steps and factors for consideration. Topics covered include…

  16. Audio-Tutorial Horticulture Learning Units. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Robert J.

    The four units in this workbook (units 2, 3, 5, and 9) are part of a larger 14-unit course in horticulture. The topics are plant classification, the plant cell, complex compounds, and vegetative growth and development. Student learning in these fields is frequently low in the traditional lecture-laboratory setting. These materials are designed for…

  17. An Analysis of the Horticulture Equipment and Services Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbage, Monroe; Lechner, Donald L.

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the horticulture equipment and services occupation. The document opens with a brief introduction followed by a job description. The bulk of the document is presented in table form. Fourteen duties are…

  18. Soils and Fertilizers. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on soils and fertilizers is one of four developed for classroom use in teaching the turf and lawn services area of horticulture. The four sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline taking soil samples, testing samples, preparing soil for…

  19. Effects of Horticulture Therapy on Engagement and Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gigliotti, Christina M.; Jarrott, Shannon E.

    2005-01-01

    Implementing generationally appropriate activities for persons with dementia is a challenging task. Horticulture therapy (HT) addresses this challenge through the use of plants to facilitate holistic outcomes. Utilizing the model of environmental press, the current study sought to analyse adult day service (ADS) participants' responses to HT as…

  20. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.). Secondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for horticulture I and II. Presented first are a program description and…

  1. Accelerator radiocarbon dating of evidence for prehistoric horticulture in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conard, N.; Asch, D.L.; Asch, N.B.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H.; Rubin, M.; Brown, J.A.; Wiant, M.D.; Farnsworth, K.B.; Cook, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    With the development of direct detection radiocarbon dating, which uses an accelerator as part of a highly selective mass spectrometer, it is now possible to determine the age of milligram samples of organic materials1-5. One application of accelerator dating is in evaluating scanty, sometimes controversial evidence for early horticulture throughout the world. We have now used the technique to date small samples of carbonized, cultivated plant remains from archaeological sites in Illinois. The results, reported here, establish (1) that squash was introduced by 7,000 yr ago, 2,500 yr before eastern North American records previously reported; (2) that horticulture involving indigenous plants had begun by 4,000 BP in eastern North America with domestication of Iva annua, a small-seeded annual; (3) that anomalous discoveries of Archaic period maize represent contaminants; and (4) that introduction of maize by initial Middle Woodland times (~2,000 BP) is questionable.

  2. Efficiency, sufficiency, and recent change in Newfoundland subsistence horticulture

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, J.T.

    1986-09-01

    Traditional Newfoundland horticulture has been a subordinate and compensatory element of the subsistence sphere in a plural economy centered on fishing. Criticized as inefficient and ruinous to the land, this tuber-rootbrassica gardening has in fact been a valuable contribution to diet, is relatively efficient, and compensates for the inadequacies of land and weather. Field data from the Great Northern Peninsula, where some traditional practices persist, demonstrate that the practices conserve time and labor, and substitute massive applications of materials to assure a yield sufficient for household needs. The inefficiency in the tradition may be understood as a response to the constraints upon household labor and follows a kind of Leibig's law of the minimum. Recent changes in gardening practices reveal the dynamics of horticulture in the household's mixed economic strategy. As cash and land have become more common, they have been used to further reduce time while maintaining sufficiency.

  3. The imperative of strategic alignment across organizations: the experience of the Canadian Cancer Society's Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Roy; Riley, Barbara L; Campbell, H Sharon; Manske, Stephen; Lamers-Bellio, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Cancer Society's Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation (CBRPE) is a national asset for building pan-Canadian capacity to support intervention studies that guide population-level policies and programs. This paper briefly describes CBRPE's experience in advancing this work in the field of prevention. The aim is to illuminate issues of central importance for advancing the goals of the Population Health Intervention Research Initiative for Canada. According to our experience, success in building the population intervention field will depend heavily on purposeful alignment across organizations to enable integration of research, evaluation, surveillance, policy and practice. CBRPE's capacity development roles include a) a catalytic role in shaping this aligned inter-organizational milieu and b) investing our resources in building tangible assets (teams, indicators, data systems) that contribute relevant capacities within this emerging milieu. Challenges in building capacity in this field are described.

  4. A Preliminary Analysis of Solar Irradiance Measurements at TNB Solar Research Centre for Optimal Orientation of Fixed Solar Panels installed in Selangor Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, A. M.; Ali, M. A. M.; Ahmad, B.; Shafie, R. M.; Rusli, R.; Aziz, M. A.; Hassan, J.; Wanik, M. Z. C.

    2013-06-01

    The well established rule for orienting fixed solar devices is to face south for places in the northern hemisphere and northwards for the southern hemisphere. However for regions near the equator such as in Selangor Malaysia, the position of the sun at solar noon is always near zenith both to the north and south depending on location and month of year. This paper reports an analysis of global solar radiation data taken at TNB Solar Research Centre, Malaysia. The solar radiation is measured using both shaded and exposed pyranometers together with a pyrheliometer which is mounted on a sun-tracker. The analysis on the solar measurements show that a near regular solar irradiation pattern had occurred often enough during the year to recommend an optimum azimuth orientation of installing the fixed solar panels tilted facing towards east. Even though all the solar measurements were done at a single location in TNBR Solar Research Centre at Bangi, for locations near the equator with similar weather pattern, the recommended azimuth direction of installing fixed solar panels and collectors tilted eastward will also be generally valid.

  5. "We Are like Dictionaries, Miss, You Can Look Things up in Us": Evaluating Child-Centred Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elton-Chalcraft, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Research concerning children is often presented with only a brief comment on the research methods adopted. This paper takes a "behind the scenes" view and I discuss my adoption of a non-hierarchical "least adult role" adapted from Mandell's work in 1991 to undertake qualitative research in the sensitive area of children's…

  6. Pioneering better science through the 3Rs: an introduction to the national centre for the replacement, refinement, and reduction of animals in research (NC3Rs).

    PubMed

    Burden, Natalie; Chapman, Kathryn; Sewell, Fiona; Robinson, Vicky

    2015-03-01

    The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement, and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) is an independent scientific organization that is based in the United Kingdom, which was set up by the government to lead the discovery and application of new technologies and approaches that minimize the use of animals in research and improve animal welfare. The NC3Rs uses a range of strategies to improve and advance science through application of the 3Rs. These include funding basic research, open innovation (CRACK IT), and programs run by inhouse scientists. We present several case studies from the NC3Rs portfolio, featuring asthma research, the use of nonhuman primates in monoclonal antibody development, and CRACK IT. Finally, we anticipate the future, as we use our experience to move into new research fields and expand toward international collaboration. Here we highlight how equipping scientists with relevant and emerging 3Rs tools can help overcome the challenges and limitations of the use of animals in research to the benefit of the whole bioscience community.

  7. Pioneering Better Science through the 3Rs: An Introduction to the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement, and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs)

    PubMed Central

    Burden, Natalie; Chapman, Kathryn; Sewell, Fiona; Robinson, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement, and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) is an independent scientific organization that is based in the United Kingdom, which was set up by the government to lead the discovery and application of new technologies and approaches that minimize the use of animals in research and improve animal welfare. The NC3Rs uses a range of strategies to improve and advance science through application of the 3Rs. These include funding basic research, open innovation (CRACK IT), and programs run by inhouse scientists. We present several case studies from the NC3Rs portfolio, featuring asthma research, the use of nonhuman primates in monoclonal antibody development, and CRACK IT. Finally, we anticipate the future, as we use our experience to move into new research fields and expand toward international collaboration. Here we highlight how equipping scientists with relevant and emerging 3Rs tools can help overcome the challenges and limitations of the use of animals in research to the benefit of the whole bioscience community. PMID:25836967

  8. Developing a WWW Resource Centre for Acquiring and Accessing Open Learning Materials on Research Methods (ReMOTE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert; Marcella, Rita; Middleton, Iain; McConnell, Michael

    This paper reports on ReMOTE (Research Methods Online Teaching Environment), a Robert Gordon University (Scotland) project focusing on the development of a World Wide Web (WWW) site devoted to the teaching of research methods. The aim of ReMOTE is to provide an infrastructure that allows direct links to specialist sources in order to enable the…

  9. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: IFT Institut für Therapieforschung in Munich, Germany.

    PubMed

    Bühringer, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the history and current structure of the Institut für Therapieforschung (IFT) [Institute for Therapy Research] in Munich, as well as major research topics and factors which might contribute to a creative structure and atmosphere for innovative research in the addiction field. The institute was founded in 1973 as a non-profit non-governmental organization (NGO) with a focus on applied research. Starting with behaviour therapy-based development and evaluation of programmes for alcohol, illicit drugs and smoking and the evaluation of treatment services, the institute gradually expanded its topics, covering prevention (1985) and epidemiology and policy evaluation (1990), and participated throughout this period in the development of guidelines and screening, diagnostic and clinical instruments. Later, the IFT tried to bridge the gap between basic sciences, applied research, health-care services and health policy, with a network of national and international contacts, including its own university engagements and collaborations with foreign research groups and national and European Union (EU) agencies. Possible creativity-promoting factors on the institutional and individual levels are discussed, e.g. the collaboration of experienced senior researchers with carefully selected innovative doctoral students, considerable in-house and external training of young researchers and the early participation and presentation of their work at international conferences, independence from stakeholders in the field and the refusal of project funds which require external clearance of publications.

  10. Barriers and facilitators to recruitment of physicians and practices for primary care health services research at one centre

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While some research has been conducted examining recruitment methods to engage physicians and practices in primary care research, further research is needed on recruitment methodology as it remains a recurrent challenge and plays a crucial role in primary care research. This paper reviews recruitment strategies, common challenges, and innovative practices from five recent primary care health services research studies in Ontario, Canada. Methods We used mixed qualitative and quantitative methods to gather data from investigators and/or project staff from five research teams. Team members were interviewed and asked to fill out a brief survey on recruitment methods, results, and challenges encountered during a recent or ongoing project involving primary care practices or physicians. Data analysis included qualitative analysis of interview notes and descriptive statistics generated for each study. Results Recruitment rates varied markedly across the projects despite similar initial strategies. Common challenges and creative solutions were reported by many of the research teams, including building a sampling frame, developing front-office rapport, adapting recruitment strategies, promoting buy-in and interest in the research question, and training a staff recruiter. Conclusions Investigators must continue to find effective ways of reaching and involving diverse and representative samples of primary care providers and practices by building personal connections with, and buy-in from, potential participants. Flexible recruitment strategies and an understanding of the needs and interests of potential participants may also facilitate recruitment. PMID:21144048

  11. Starch grains reveal early root crop horticulture in the Panamanian tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Piperno, D R; Ranere, A J; Holst, I; Hansell, P

    2000-10-19

    Native American populations are known to have cultivated a large number of plants and domesticated them for their starch-rich underground organs. Suggestions that the likely source of many of these crops, the tropical forest, was an early and influential centre of plant husbandry have long been controversial because the organic remains of roots and tubers are poorly preserved in archaeological sediments from the humid tropics. Here we report the occurrence of starch grains identifiable as manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), yams (Dioscorea sp.) and arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea L.) on assemblages of plant milling stones from preceramic horizons at the Aguadulce Shelter, Panama, dated between 7,000 and 5,000 years before present (BP). The artefacts also contain maize starch (Zea mays L.), indicating that early horticultural systems in this region were mixtures of root and seed crops. The data provide the earliest direct evidence for root crop cultivation in the Americas, and support an ancient and independent emergence of plant domestication in the lowland Neotropical forest.

  12. The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 3. Results: person centred care, comprehensive and holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-06-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In a second article, the results for the two core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' were presented. This article reflects on the three core competencies, which deal with person related aspects of GP/FM, i.e. 'person centred care', 'comprehensive approach' and 'holistic approach'. Though there is an important body of opinion papers and (non-systematic) reviews, all person related aspects remain poorly defined and researched. Validated instruments to measure these competencies are lacking. Concerning patient-centredness, most research examined patient and doctor preferences and experiences. Studies on comprehensiveness mostly focus on prevention/care of specific diseases. For all domains, there has been limited research conducted on its implications or outcomes.

  13. Epidemiology of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias in individuals referred to the haematology research centre, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran from 2006 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Ramzi, Mani; Zakerinia, Maryam; Nourani Khojasteh, Habib; Haghshenas, Mansour; Rezaei, Narges; Moayed, Vida; Rezaei, Alireza; Karimi, Mehran

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias are the most frequent genetic hereditary disorders with an increasing global health burden, especially in low- and middle-income countries. We aimed to determine the epidemiologic pattern of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias in individuals referred to the Haematology Research Centre, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, which is the most important referral center in Southern Iran during 2006 to 2011. The most frequent abnormality was β-thalassemia (β-thal) minor (24.0%), followed by α-thalassemia (α-thal) trait (10.0%), hemoglobin (Hb) S trait (4.0%) and Hb D-Punjab trait (4.0%). Because this center is a referral center, we detected a higher prevalence compared to the normal population; however, these data could help policymakers and health service providers to better programming for prevention of births affected with Hb disorders.

  14. Ectoparasite fauna of rodents collected from two wildlife research centres in Saudi Arabia with discussion on the implications for disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A; Robb, G N; Alagaili, A N; Hastriter, M W; Apanaskevich, D A; Ueckermann, E A; Bennett, N C

    2015-07-01

    The majority of human pathogens are zoonotic and rodents play an important role as reservoirs of many of these infectious agents. In the case of vector-borne pathogens, rodent reservoirs not only act as a source of infection for vectors but also serve as hosts for the vectors themselves, supporting their populations. Current data on rodent-ectoparasite relationships is limited in Saudi Arabia, however, this is needed to assess disease risk and the relative importance of different hosts for the maintenance of vector-borne pathogen cycles. In order to provide baseline data for the region that could be used to assess zoonotic disease risk, we collected and identified 771 ectoparasite specimens (ticks, fleas and mites) from 161 rodents at two wildlife research centres in Saudi Arabia and discuss our results in the context of possible zoonotic disease risk based on the hosts and vectors present.

  15. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(5)-1 - Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... agreement between labor union K and multiple employers. Trust A forms part of a plan that is established and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Labor, agricultural, and horticultural... Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations. (a) The organizations contemplated by section...

  16. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(5)-1 - Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... agreement between labor union K and multiple employers. Trust A forms part of a plan that is established and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Labor, agricultural, and horticultural... Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations. (a) The organizations contemplated by section...

  17. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(5)-1 - Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... agreement between labor union K and multiple employers. Trust A forms part of a plan that is established and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labor, agricultural, and horticultural... Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations. (a) The organizations contemplated by section...

  18. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(5)-1 - Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... agreement between labor union K and multiple employers. Trust A forms part of a plan that is established and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labor, agricultural, and horticultural... Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations. (a) The organizations contemplated by section...

  19. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(5)-1 - Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... agreement between labor union K and multiple employers. Trust A forms part of a plan that is established and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Labor, agricultural, and horticultural... Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations. (a) The organizations contemplated by section...

  20. Core I Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs. Units G-J.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethridge, Jim; And Others

    These units of instructional materials and teaching aids are the final four of a series of 10 designed for use in metropolitan agriculture/horticulture programs for students in grades 9 and 10. Covered in the unit on growing and managing horticultural crops are watering plants; pruning, pinching, and planting plants; using plant production…

  1. Past and future climate patterns affecting temperate, sub-tropical and tropical horticultural crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial horticultural crop production will be impacted by climate change effects on temperature, water availability, solar radiation, air pollution, and carbon dioxide. Horticultural crop value is derived from both the quantity and the quality of the harvested product; both of which are affected ...

  2. OPERATING, REPAIRING, AND MAINTAINING SMALL POWER EQUIPMENT. HORTICULTURE-SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE NO. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO PREPARE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR HORTICULTURE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, THIS MODULE HAS AS ITS MAJOR OBJECTIVE TO DEVELOP A PROFICIENCY IN THE OPERATION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SMALL POWER EQUIPMENT USED IN HORTICULTURAL ENTERPRISES. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE ON THE BASIS OF DATA FROM STATE STUDIES.…

  3. USING SOIL AND OTHER PLANT GROWING MEDIA EFFECTIVELY. HORTICULTURE-SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE NO. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO PREPARE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR HORTICULTURE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, THIS MODULE HAS AS ITS MAJOR OBJECTIVE TO DEVELOP THE APPRECIATIONS, UNDERSTANDINGS, AND ABILITIES NEEDED TO USE PLANT GROWING MEDIA IN GROWING HORTICULTURAL PLANTS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE ON THE BASIS OF DATA FROM STATE STUDIES.…

  4. Orchard Management: Horticultural Practices for Peace Corps Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development and Resources Corp.

    This manual is intended for use by Peace Corps volunteers as a resource for gaining an understanding and knowledge of basic horticultural principles and practices of orchard management. Addressed in the individual units of instructional text are orchard soils; botany of horticultural plants; insect and disease control in orchards; pome, stone,…

  5. Participation of Minority Youth in Urban Horticulture: A New York City High School Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Howard R. D.

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the experience-based urban Vocational Horticulture Project sponsored by the Central Diesel School of Brooklyn, New York, and involving the National Park Service and the Cornell Cooperative Extension Service. The program prepares minority youth for entry-level employment in ornamental horticulture or in forestry and wildlife…

  6. 78 FR 11725 - WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding Indonesia Importation of Horticultural Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Products, Animals and Animal Products AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION... horticultural products, animals and animal products. That request may be found at www.wto.org , contained in a... by Indonesia on the importation of horticultural products, animals and animal products into...

  7. Developing a High School Program in Ornamental Horticulture. Volume I, Nursery Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Howard C.; And Others

    This manual is one of a 3-volume series prepared to guide the high school vocational agriculture teacher in teaching ornamental horticulture. Chapter I introduces the reader to ornamental horticulture and gives examples of how the subject can be integrated into an existing agriculture curriculum. Chapter II is devoted to the public relations…

  8. Impact of Horticultural Therapy on Psychosocial Functioning among Urban Jail Inmates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jay Stone; Remy, Linda L.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the impact of a horticultural therapy program on 48 county jail inmates. Examines the changes in psychosocial functioning of the participants while in treatment and in post-release. Explores the clinical relevance of horticultural therapy in cultivating healthy self-development. (MKA)

  9. Level of environmental threat posed by horticultural trade in Cactaceae.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J; Richardson, David M; Wilson, John R U

    2017-01-11

    Ornamental horticulture has been identified as an important threat to plant biodiversity and the major pathway for plant invasions worldwide. In this context, the family Cactaceae is particularly interesting and challenging for three main reasons-it is considered the fifth most threatened major taxonomic group in the world; several cactus species are amongst the most widespread and damaging invasive species; and Cactaceae is one of the most popular horticultural plant groups. Based on CITES trade data and the eleven main auction sites selling cacti on the internet we document a substantial global trade from and to almost all continents. While less than 20 % of this trade involves threatened species, and less than 3% involves known invasive species, many species are sold without a valid scientific name. Importantly, however, hardly any of the globally traded cacti are collected from wild populations. In order to provide an in-depth look at the dynamics of the industry, we surveyed the businesses involved in the cactus trade in South Africa (one of the main hotspots of cactus trade and invasions). Despite a large commercial network, all South African imports (of which only 15 % and 1.5 % were of species listed as threatened and invasive, respectively) came from the same source. We purchased seeds of every available species and, based on DNA-barcoding techniques, could only identify 24 % of the species to genus level. If trade restrictions are placed on the small proportion of cacti that are invasive and there is no major increase in harvesting of native populations, the commercial cactus horticultural trade will pose a negligible environmental threat. However, there are currently no effective methods for easily identifying which cacti are traded, and both the illicit harvesting of cacti from the wild and the informal trade in invasive taxa pose on-going conservation challenges. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Horticultural therapy--the role gardening plays in healing.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M E

    1979-05-01

    Horticultural therapy is an adjunct therapy--to be used in addition to occupational and physical therapies, and combining means used by both. It is meant to increase the motivation of the physically and/or mentally handicapped, while at the same time stimulating the five senses and furnishing a means of self-gratification and self esteem. Now that neurologically orientated psychologists are identifying schizophrenia as being biologically based and capable of being reversed with exercise, it is time to study the many benefits of gardening as a therapy method.

  11. Informing Policy and Practice in Australia's Vocational Education and Training Sector: Reflections and Futures. Proceedings of the 25th Anniversary Forum of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, March 21, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Penelope, Ed.; Loveder, Phil, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    To mark the occasion of its 25th anniversary, the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) brought together policy, industry and academic leaders to reflect on the role that research and statistics have played in the development of Australia's vocational education and training (VET) sector. This publication includes the original…

  12. Integrated architectures for a horticultural application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Natalie R.; Rodrigo, T. Surangi

    1998-10-01

    For many applications, which involve the processing and handling of highly variable natural products, conventional automation techniques are inadequate. Field applications involving the processing and handling of these products have the additional complication of dealing with a dynamically changing environment. Automated systems for these applications must be capable of sensing the variability of each product item and adjusting the way each product item is processed to accommodate that variability. For automation to be feasible, both fast processing of sensor information and fast determination of how product items are handled, is vital. The combination of sensor equipped mobile robotic systems with artificial intelligence techniques is a potential solution for the automation of many of these applications. The aim of this research is to develop a software architecture which incorporates robotic task planning and control for a variety of applications involving the processing of naturally varying products. In this paper we discuss the results from the initial laboratory trials for an asparagus harvesting application.

  13. The Terry Fox Research Institute’s Atlantic Dialogue on patient-centred care in a personalized treatment world

    PubMed Central

    Curwin, K.; Johnston, M.; Sutcliffe, S.

    2010-01-01

    The words “personalized medicine” are used daily now in cancer care and research conversations. But what do those words really mean to us as patients, caregivers, physicians, managers of the health system, or researchers? Do we know how personalized medicine will affect us over the next decade? Are we prepared? Those and other questions are part of a continuing conversation that the Terry Fox Research Institute is having with the Canadian public in 2010 as part of its public research and outreach project, The Pan-Canadian Dialogue Series on Cancer: Let’s Get Personal. The first dialogue was held in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, April 12, to coincide with the 30th anniversary of the Terry Fox Marathon of Hope. It featured speakers and panellists from Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. Three core issues framed the Atlantic discussion: cancer and population health, cancer and the health system, and the science behind cancer care.

  14. On the Right and Left of the Centre: ABET and ECE Postgraduate Educational Research in South Africa, 1995-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, P.

    2011-01-01

    Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) and Early Childhood Education (ECE) are the stepchildren of the South African education system in terms of resource allocation and public attention, and yet vitally inform the enterprise of lifelong learning and the prospects for developing a learning nation. The paucity of research on ECE and ABET, and…

  15. Pieces of the Puzzle: Tracking the Chemical Component of the Exposome (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research UFZ)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an overview of the risk assessment conducted at the U.S. EPA, as well as some research examples related to the exposome concept. This presentation also provides the recommendation of using two organizational and predictive frameworks for tracking chemi...

  16. Institute for the Study of Sparsely Populated Areas. A Centre for Interdisciplinary Research into Sparsely Populated and Peripheral Regions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Peter G.

    The Institute for the Study of Sparsely Populated Areas is a multidisciplinary research unit which acts to coordinate, further, and initiate studies of the economic and social conditions of sparsely populated areas. Short summaries of the eight studies completed in the session of 1977-78 indicate work in such areas as the study of political life…

  17. Research and development in haematology. A report on international congresses and visit to academic centres in Europe.

    PubMed

    Wood, L

    1990-01-01

    Haematology is one of the most rapidly expanding disciplines in medicine and nursing. As occurs in other highly specialised areas, optimum care is now largely of a multidisciplinary nature. In this context there are literally unlimited opportunities for the involvement of professional nurses and, as I have attempted to illustrate in this report, integration in all aspects of research and development and active participation in presentation of research data and discussion at international meetings is one direction in which fulfillment of academic aspirations can be achieved. It is my viewpoint, based on more than a decade of direct involvement in all the activities of our department in Cape Town that these are entirely attainable goals. There is currently, in our country, a concerted move afoot to develop an improved career structure for the professional nurse along the lines of the American clinical nurse specialist. Much of this experience overseas would strongly support that commitment. It was my privilege to enjoy the confidence of the department, university and medical school sufficient for me to present research data at international meetings and to be a welcome visitor at some of the world's premier academic and research institutions. That this was possible reflects the uncompromising commitment in Haematology to the position of the professional nurse as an integral and equal part of the multidisciplinary health care team.

  18. Geoinformation evaluation of soil resource potential for horticulture in Krasnodar region and the Republic of Adygea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I. Yu.; Dragavtseva, I. A.; Mironenko, N. Ya.; Sergeeva, N. N.; Domozhirova, V. V.; Morenets, A. S.; Ovechkin, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    A geoinformation database for assessing soil resource potential for horticulture in Krasnodar region and Adygea has been developed. The results of geoinformation analysis indicate that only 55-60% of soils in these regions are suitable for growing horticultural crops without limitations; about 35-40% of the total soil area is unsuitable for horticultural purposes. For plum trees, the area of unsuitable soils is somewhat lower than for other horticultural crops. Geographically, the areas of soils suitable and unsuitable for horticulture are close to one another. The thickness of the loose earthy soil material, the gravel content, the degree of salinization, the soil texture, and the degree of soil hydromorphism are the major soil properties imposing considerable limitations for the development of fruit-growing industry in the studied regions. The highest portions of soils suitable for horticulture are found in Eiskii, Kushchevskii, Krylovskii, Shcherbinovskii, and Novokubanskii districts of Krasnodar region. The development of horticulture in Tuapsinskii, Slavyanskii, and Primorsko-Akhtarskii districts is limited because of the unsuitability of soils for this purpose. About 8% of the existing orchards are found on soils recognized as unsuitable for horticulture, and only about 20% of the existing orchards are found on soils suitable for fruit growing without limitations. About 70% of the existing fruit orchards are located on degraded soils or on soils with certain limitations for horticulture. The profitability of fruit orchards on such soils is lower than that of the orchards planted on soils without limitations for horticulture. This information is necessary for the adequate economic evaluation of the degree of soil degradation.

  19. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity
department of addictive behaviour and addiction medicine, central institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, University of Heidelberg.

    PubMed

    Mann, Karl

    2010-12-01

    Addictive behaviour is as prevalent in Germany as in other western countries, but in contrast to some European countries and the United States, very little money was given to this research field. Change came in the early 1990s, when the German government started to launch specific grants for addiction research. The first chair in addiction research was created in 1999 (Karl Mann) at the Central Institute of Mental Health Mannheim (CIMH; University of Heidelberg). The recruitment of a pre-clinical alcohol researcher as head of the department of psychopharmacology followed (Rainer Spanagel). This 'addiction research cluster' collaborates with several research groups at the CIMH (such as genetics). We inaugurated a clinical trial network which now comprises up to 20 treatment centres throughout Germany. Like most authors, we found effect sizes of different treatment modalities more in the low to moderate range, perhaps because of the heterogeneity of large patient samples. Therefore, we concentrated upon the biological basis of addiction in order to define more homogeneous 'subtypes' of patients for a better match with existing treatments. Results concerning genetics and neuroimaging (both animal and human) are promising, and could move our field towards a more personalized treatment approach. Our funding has been extended over the years, including involvement in several large European grants. We are studying substance-related problems as well as so-called 'behavioural addictions'. As a natural consequence of this development, we are deeply involved both in informing the general public on addiction issues as well as in counselling policy makers in Germany.

  20. Therapeutic horticulture in clinical depression: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil W; Kirkevold, Marit

    2009-01-01

    Clinically depressed persons suffer from impaired mood and distortion of cognition. This study assessed changes in depression severity and perceived attentional capacity of clinically depressed adults (N=18) during a 12-week therapeutic horticulture program. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Attentional Function Index (AFI) were administered at baseline, twice during (4 and 8 weeks), and immediately after the intervention (12 weeks), and at a 3-month follow-up. Experiences of being away and fascination related to the intervention were measured at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The mean BDI score declined 9.7 points from pretest (27.3) to posttest (p < .001) and were clinically relevant (deltaBDI > or =6) for 72% of the cases. The mean AFI score increased 10.2 points from pretest (68.8) to posttest (p = .06). The greatest change in BDI and AFI scores occurred in the initial weeks of the intervention. The reduction in BDI scores remained significant and clinically relevant at the 3-month follow-up (N=16). The decline in depression severity during the intervention correlated strongly with the degree to which the participants found that it captured their attention. Therapeutic horticulture may decrease depression severity and improve perceived attentional capacity by engaging effortless attention and interrupting rumination.

  1. Ergonomics Perspective in Agricultural Research: A User-Centred Approach Using CAD and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Thaneswer; Sanjog, J.; Karmakar, Sougata

    2016-09-01

    Computer-aided Design (CAD) and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) (specialized CAD software for virtual human representation) technologies endow unique opportunities to incorporate human factors pro-actively in design development. Challenges of enhancing agricultural productivity through improvement of agricultural tools/machineries and better human-machine compatibility can be ensured by adoption of these modern technologies. Objectives of present work are to provide the detailed scenario of CAD and DHM applications in agricultural sector; and finding out means for wide adoption of these technologies for design and development of cost-effective, user-friendly, efficient and safe agricultural tools/equipment and operator's workplace. Extensive literature review has been conducted for systematic segregation and representation of available information towards drawing inferences. Although applications of various CAD software have momentum in agricultural research particularly for design and manufacturing of agricultural equipment/machinery, use of DHM is still at its infancy in this sector. Current review discusses about reasons of less adoption of these technologies in agricultural sector and steps to be taken for their wide adoption. It also suggests possible future research directions to come up with better ergonomic design strategies for improvement of agricultural equipment/machines and workstations through application of CAD and DHM.

  2. Geoinformation postgraduate education at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia - towards a centre of high quality postgraduate education and research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S.; Kanniah, K. D.; Rahman, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Studying at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) will ensure academic and technological excellence. The Faculty of Geoinformation and Real Estate (FGHT), established in 1972, focus on education and research for undergraduate as well as postgraduate programs in the related disciplines such as geomatic engineering, geoinformatics, remote sensing, property management and land administration & development. FGHT strives to be a leading academic center in geoinformation and real estate in Southeast Asia. Graduates and alumni form major strong professional societies and work force in the related industries. Many of our graduates end up with good jobs not just in Malaysia but also in other countries (Asian, Middle East, Africa and Europe). The strong team and knowledgeable academic members in this faculty provide excellent ingredients for the success of the programs (i.e. with the relevant and up-to-date curriculum and syllabus). FGHT is continuously working to provide and offer first-class geoinformation and real estate education and research in the country and be at a par with other leading institutions in other parts of the globe. The Department of Geoinformation at FGHT runs a Bachelor of Engineering in Geomatic and a Bachelor of Science in Geoinformatics. At the postgraduate levels, namely M.Sc. and PhD programs, the offered disciplines are Geomatic Engineering, Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing. In the following, the state of the art of FGHT's postgraduate education in Geoinformation is presented, including a comparison with other universities in Malaysia, program content and curriculum information, alumni statistics as well as future strategies.

  3. Co-composting of invasive Acacia longifolia with pine bark for horticultural use.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis Miguel; Mourão, Isabel; Coutinho, João; Smith, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of commercial-scale co-composting of waste biomass from the control of invasive Acacia species with pine bark waste from the lumber industry, in a blend ratio of 60:40 (v:v), was investigated and compared with previous research on the composting of Acacia without additional feedstock, to determine the potential process and end-product quality benefits of co-composting with bark. Pile temperatures rose rapidly to >70 °C and were maintained at >60 °C for several months. Acacia and bark biomass contained a large fraction of mineralizable organic matter (OM) equivalent to approximately 600 g kg(-1) of initial OM. Bark was more recalcitrant to biodegradation compared with Acacia, which degraded at twice the rate of bark. Therefore, incorporating the bark increased the final amount of compost produced compared with composting Acacia residues without bark. The relatively high C/N ratio of the composting matrix (C/N=56) and NH3 volatilization explained the limited increases in NH4+-N content, whereas concentrations of conservative nutrient elements (e.g. P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe) increased in proportion to OM mineralization, enriching the compost as a nutrient source for horticultural use. Nitrogen concentrations also increased to a small extent, but were much more dynamic and losses, probably associated with N volatilization mechanisms, were difficult to actively control. The physicochemical characteristics of the stabilized end-product, such as pH, electrical conductivity and OM content, were improved with the addition of bark to Acacia biomass, and the final compost characteristics were suitable for use for soil improvement and also as horticultural substrate components.

  4. GiNA, an Efficient and High-Throughput Software for Horticultural Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Schlautman, Brandon; Zalapa, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for trait phenotyping have been a bottleneck for research in many crop species due to their intensive labor, high cost, complex implementation, lack of reproducibility and propensity to subjective bias. Recently, multiple high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed, but most of them are expensive, species-dependent, complex to use, and available only for major crops. To overcome such limitations, we present the open-source software GiNA, which is a simple and free tool for measuring horticultural traits such as shape- and color-related parameters of fruits, vegetables, and seeds. GiNA is multiplatform software available in both R and MATLAB® programming languages and uses conventional images from digital cameras with minimal requirements. It can process up to 11 different horticultural morphological traits such as length, width, two-dimensional area, volume, projected skin, surface area, RGB color, among other parameters. Different validation tests produced highly consistent results under different lighting conditions and camera setups making GiNA a very reliable platform for high-throughput phenotyping. In addition, five-fold cross validation between manually generated and GiNA measurements for length and width in cranberry fruits were 0.97 and 0.92. In addition, the same strategy yielded prediction accuracies above 0.83 for color estimates produced from images of cranberries analyzed with GiNA compared to total anthocyanin content (TAcy) of the same fruits measured with the standard methodology of the industry. Our platform provides a scalable, easy-to-use and affordable tool for massive acquisition of phenotypic data of fruits, seeds, and vegetables. PMID:27529547

  5. The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate - A European initiative for practical peat bog and climate protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, Geerd; Tänzer, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate (EFMK) is an initiative by different local communities, environmental protection NGOs, agricultural services, and partners from the peat and other industries in Lower Saxony (Germany). The Centre aims to integrate practical peat bog conservation with a focus on green house gas emission after drainage and after water logging activities. Together with our partners we want to break new ground to protect the remaining bogs in the region. Sphagnum mosses will be produced in paludiculture on-site in cooperation with the local peat industry to provide economic and ecologic alternatives for peat products used in horticulture business. Land-use changes are needed in the region and will be stimulated in cooperation with agricultural services via compensation money transfers from environmental protection funds. On a global scale the ideas of Carbon Credit System have to be discussed to protect the peat bogs for climate protection issues. Environmental education is an important pillar of the EFMK. The local society is invited to explore the unique ecosystem and to participate in peat bog protection activities. Future generations will be taught to understand that the health of our peat bogs is interrelated with the health of the local and global climate. Besides extracurricular classes for schools the centre will provide infrastructure for Master and PhD students, as well for senior researchers for applied research in the surrounding moor. International partners in the scientific and practical fields of peat bog ecology, renaturation, green house gas emissions from peat bogs, and environmental policy are invited to participate in the European Competence Center for Moor and Climate.

  6. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    PubMed

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  7. MEMS sensor technologies for human centred applications in healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing: a review on research activities in Italy.

    PubMed

    Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2015-03-17

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users' health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users' physical activity with inertial measurement unit-based devices, for instance, has also proven to be important in health management of patients affected by chronic diseases, e.g., Parkinson's disease, many of which are becoming highly prevalent in Italy and in the Western world. This review paper will focus on MEMS sensor technologies developed in Italy in the last three years describing research achievements for healthcare and physical activity, safety and environmental sensing, in addition to smart systems integration. Innovative and smart integrated solutions for sensing devices, pursued and implemented in Italian research centres, will be highlighted, together with specific applications of such technologies. Finally, the paper will depict the future perspective of sensor technologies and corresponding exploitation opportunities, again with a specific focus on Italy.

  8. MEMS Sensor Technologies for Human Centred Applications in Healthcare, Physical Activities, Safety and Environmental Sensing: A Review on Research Activities in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users’ health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users’ physical activity with inertial measurement unit-based devices, for instance, has also proven to be important in health management of patients affected by chronic diseases, e.g., Parkinson’s disease, many of which are becoming highly prevalent in Italy and in the Western world. This review paper will focus on MEMS sensor technologies developed in Italy in the last three years describing research achievements for healthcare and physical activity, safety and environmental sensing, in addition to smart systems integration. Innovative and smart integrated solutions for sensing devices, pursued and implemented in Italian research centres, will be highlighted, together with specific applications of such technologies. Finally, the paper will depict the future perspective of sensor technologies and corresponding exploitation opportunities, again with a specific focus on Italy. PMID:25808763

  9. Getting our house in order: an audit of the registration and publication of clinical trials supported by the National Institute for Health Research Oxford Biomedical Research Centre and the Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, A C; Petit-Zeman, S; Goldacre, B; Heneghan, C J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To audit the proportion of clinical trials that had been publically registered and, of the completed trials, the proportion published. Setting 2 major research institutions supported by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR). Primary and secondary outcome measures The proportion of trials reporting results within 12 months, 24 months and ‘ever’. Factors associated with non-publication were analysed using logistic regression. Inclusion criteria Phases 2–4 clinical trials identified from internal documents and publication lists. Results In total, 286 trials were identified. We could not find registration for 4 (1.4%) of these, all of which were completed and published. Of the trials with a registered completion date pre-January 2015, just over half (56%) were published, and half of these were published within 12 months (36/147, 25%). For some trials, information on the public registers was found to be out-of-date and/or inaccurate. No clinical trial characteristics were found to be significantly associated with non-publication. We have produced resources to facilitate similar audits elsewhere. Conclusions It was feasible to conduct an internal audit of registration and publication in 2 major research institutions. Performance was similar to, or better than, comparable cohorts of trials sampled from registries. The major resource input required was manually seeking information: if all registry entries were maintained, then almost the entire process of audit could be automated—and routinely updated—for all research centres and funders. PMID:26936902

  10. First radon measurements and occupational exposure assessments in underground geodynamic laboratory the Polish Academy of Sciences Space Research Centre in Książ Castle (SW Poland).

    PubMed

    Fijałkowska-Lichwa, Lidia; Przylibski, Tadeusz A

    2016-12-01

    The article presents the results of the first radon activity concentration measurements conducted continuously between 17(th) May 2014 and 16(th) May 2015 in the underground geodynamic laboratory of the Polish Academy of Sciences Space Research Centre in Książ. The data were registered with the use of three Polish semiconductor SRDN-3 detectors located the closest (SRDN-3 No. 6) to and the furthest (SRDN-3 No. 3) from the facility entrance, and in the fault zone (SRDN-3 No. 4). The study was conducted to characterize the radon behaviour and check it possibility to use with reference to long- and short-term variations of radon activity concentration observed in sedimentary rocks strongly fractured and intersected by systems of multiple faults, for integrated comparative assessments of changes in local orogen kinetics. The values of radon activity concentration in the underground geodynamic laboratory of the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAN) Space Research Centre in Książ undergo changes of a distinctly seasonal character. The highest values of radon activity concentration are recorded from late spring (May/June) to early autumn (October), and the lowest - from November to April. Radon activity concentrations varied depending on the location of measurement points. Between late spring and autumn they ranged from 800 Bq·m(-3) to 1200 Bq·m(-3), and even 3200 Bq·m(-3) in the fault zone. Between November and April, values of radon activity concentration are lower, ranging from 500 Bq·m(-3) to 1000 Bq·m(-3) and 2700 Bq·m(-3) in the fault zone. The values of radon activity concentration recorded in the studied facility did not undergo short-term changes in either the whole annual measuring cycle or any of its months. Effective doses received by people staying in the underground laboratory range from 0.001 mSv/h to 0.012 mSv/h. The mean annual effective dose, depending on the measurement site, equals 1 or is slightly higher than 10 mSv/year, while the maximum

  11. A prospective study of existential issues in therapeutic horticulture for clinical depression.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil Wilhelm; Kirkevold, Marit

    2011-01-01

    Two studies with single-group design (Study 1 N = 18, Study 2 N = 28) addressed whether horticultural activities ameliorate depression severity and existential issues. Measures were obtained before and after a 12-week therapeutic horticulture program and at 3-month follow-up. In both studies, depression severity declined significantly during the intervention and remained low at the follow-up. In both studies the existential outcomes did not change significantly; however, the change that did occur during the intervention correlated (rho > .43) with change in depression severity. Participants' open-ended accounts described the therapeutic horticulture experience as meaningful and influential for their view of life.

  12. Promotion in Call Centres: Opportunities and Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorjup, Maria Tatiana; Valverde, Mireia; Ryan, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the quality of jobs in call centres by focusing on the opportunities for promotion in this sector. More specifically, the research questions focus on discovering whether promotion is common practise in the call centre sector and on identifying the factors that affect this.…

  13. [The research on medicine in Greco-Roman Egypt in the Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) of the University of Liège].

    PubMed

    Marganne, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the research on medicine in Greco-Roman Egypt conducted in the last forty years at the Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) at the University of Liège. It describes the main results obtained by deciphering, editing, translating and commenting Greek and Latin medical papyri, be they literary, documentary or magical.

  14. Evaluating and optimizing horticultural regimes in space plant growth facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Y.; Chetirkin, R.; Wheeler, R.; Sager, J.

    In designing innovative Space Plant Growth Facilities (SPGF) for long duration space f ightl various limitations must be addressed including onboard resources: volume, energy consumption, heat transfer and crew labor expenditure. The required accuracy in evaluating onboard resources by using the equivalent mass methodology and applying it to the design of such facilities is not precise. This is due to the uncertainty of the structure and not completely understanding of the properties of all associated hardware, including the technology in these systems. We present a simple criteria of optimization for horticultural regimes in SPGF: Qmax = max [M · (EBI) 2 / (V · E · T) ], where M is the crop harvest in terms of total dry biomass in the plant growth system; EBI is the edible biomass index (harvest index), V is a volume occupied by the crop; E is the crop light energy supply during growth; T is the crop growth duration. The criterion reflects directly on the consumption of onboard resources for crop production. We analyzed the efficiency of plant crops and the environmental parameters by examining the criteria for 15 salad and 12 wheat crops from the data in the ALS database at Kennedy Space Center. Some following conclusion have been established: 1. The technology involved in growing salad crops on a cylindrical type surface provides a more meaningful Q-criterion; 2. Wheat crops were less efficient than leafy greens (salad crops) when examining resource utilization; 3. By increasing light intensity of the crop the efficiency of the resource utilization could decrease. Using the existing databases and Q-criteria we have found that the criteria can be used in optimizing design and horticultural regimes in the SPGF.

  15. Doing challenging research studies in a patient-centred way: a qualitative study to inform a randomised controlled trial in the paediatric emergency care setting

    PubMed Central

    Woolfall, Kerry; Young, Bridget; Frith, Lucy; Appleton, Richard; Iyer, Anand; Messahel, Shrouk; Hickey, Helen; Gamble, Carrol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To inform the design of a randomised controlled trial (called EcLiPSE) to improve the treatment of children with convulsive status epilepticus (CSE). EcLiPSE requires the use of a controversial deferred consent process. Design Qualitative interview and focus group study. Setting 8 UK support groups for parents of children who have chronic or acute health conditions and experience of paediatric emergency care. Participants 17 parents, of whom 11 participated in telephone interviews (10 mothers, 1 father) and 6 in a focus group (5 mothers, 1 father). 6 parents (35%) were bereaved and 7 (41%) had children who had experienced seizures, including CSE. Results Most parents had not heard of deferred consent, yet they supported its use to enable the progress of emergency care research providing a child's safety was not compromised by the research. Parents were reassured by tailored explanation, which focused their attention on aspects of EcLiPSE that addressed their priorities and concerns. These aspects included the safety of the interventions under investigation and how both EcLiPSE interventions are used in routine clinical practice. Parents made recommendations about the appropriate timing of a recruitment discussion, the need to individualise approaches to recruiting bereaved parents and the use of clear written information. Conclusions Our study provided information to help ensure that a challenging trial was patient centred in its design. We will use our findings to help EcLiPSE practitioners to: discuss potentially threatening trial safety information with parents, use open-ended questions and prompts to identify their priorities and concerns and clarify related aspects of written trial information to assist understanding and decision-making. PMID:24833694

  16. Green chemistry in protected horticulture: the use of peroxyacetic acid as a sustainable strategy.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Gilda; Urrestarazu, Miguel

    2010-05-03

    Global reduction of chemical deposition into the environment is necessary. In protected horticulture, different strategies with biodegradable products are used to control pathogens. This review presents the available tools, especially for the management of protected horticultural species, including vegetables and ornamental plants. An analysis of the potential for degradable products that control pathogens and also encourage other productive factors, such as oxygen in the root system, is presented. Biosecurity in fertigation management of protected horticulture is conducted by using peroxyacetic acid mixtures that serve three basic principles: first, the manufacture of these products does not involve polluting processes; second, they have the same function as other chemicals, and third, after use and management there is no toxic residue left in the environment. The sustainability of protected horticulture depends on the development and introduction of technologies for implementation in the field.

  17. Genome-editing technologies and their potential application in horticultural crop breeding

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jin-Song; Ding, Jing; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Plant breeding, one of the oldest agricultural activities, parallels human civilization. Many crops have been domesticated to satisfy human's food and aesthetical needs, including numerous specialty horticultural crops such as fruits, vegetables, ornamental flowers, shrubs, and trees. Crop varieties originated through selection during early human civilization. Other technologies, such as various forms of hybridization, mutation, and transgenics, have also been invented and applied to crop breeding over the past centuries. The progress made in these breeding technologies, especially the modern biotechnology-based breeding technologies, has had a great impact on crop breeding as well as on our lives. Here, we first review the developmental process and applications of these technologies in horticultural crop breeding. Then, we mainly describe the principles of the latest genome-editing technologies and discuss their potential applications in the genetic improvement of horticultural crops. The advantages and challenges of genome-editing technologies in horticultural crop breeding are also discussed. PMID:26504570

  18. Green Chemistry in Protected Horticulture: The Use of Peroxyacetic Acid as a Sustainable Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Gilda; Urrestarazu, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Global reduction of chemical deposition into the environment is necessary. In protected horticulture, different strategies with biodegradable products are used to control pathogens. This review presents the available tools, especially for the management of protected horticultural species, including vegetables and ornamental plants. An analysis of the potential for degradable products that control pathogens and also encourage other productive factors, such as oxygen in the root system, is presented. Biosecurity in fertigation management of protected horticulture is conducted by using peroxyacetic acid mixtures that serve three basic principles: first, the manufacture of these products does not involve polluting processes; second, they have the same function as other chemicals, and third, after use and management there is no toxic residue left in the environment. The sustainability of protected horticulture depends on the development and introduction of technologies for implementation in the field. PMID:20559497

  19. Report on the 13th symposium on invertebrate neurobiology held 26-30 August 2015 at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for ecological research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Crisford, Anna; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Walker, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes the lectures and posters presented at the International Society for Invertebrate Neurobiology's 13th symposium held 26-30 August 2015, at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for Ecological Research, Tihany, Hungary. The symposium provided an opportunity for scientists working on a range of topics in invertebrate neurobiology to meet and present their research and discuss ways to advance the discipline.

  20. Biosynthesis and molecular actions of specialized 1,4-naphthoquinone natural products produced by horticultural plants

    PubMed Central

    Widhalm, Joshua R; Rhodes, David

    2016-01-01

    The 1,4-naphthoquinones (1,4-NQs) are a diverse group of natural products found in every kingdom of life. Plants, including many horticultural species, collectively synthesize hundreds of specialized 1,4-NQs with ecological roles in plant–plant (allelopathy), plant–insect and plant–microbe interactions. Numerous horticultural plants producing 1,4-NQs have also served as sources of traditional medicines for hundreds of years. As a result, horticultural species have been at the forefront of many basic studies conducted to understand the metabolism and function of specialized plant 1,4-NQs. Several 1,4-NQ natural products derived from horticultural plants have also emerged as promising scaffolds for developing new drugs. In this review, the current understanding of the core metabolic pathways leading to plant 1,4-NQs is provided with additional emphasis on downstream natural products originating from horticultural species. An overview on the biochemical mechanisms of action, both from an ecological and pharmacological perspective, of 1,4-NQs derived from horticultural plants is also provided. In addition, future directions for improving basic knowledge about plant 1,4-NQ metabolism are discussed. PMID:27688890

  1. "A triumph of brains over brute": women and science at the Horticultural College, Swanley, 1890-1910.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Donald L

    2013-03-01

    The founding of Britain's first horticultural college in 1889 advanced a scientific and coeducational response to three troubling national concerns: a major agricultural depression; the economic distress of single, unemployed women; and imperatives to develop the colonies. Buoyed by the technical instruction and women's movements, the Horticultural College and Produce Company, Limited, at Swanley, Kent, crystallized a transformation in the horticultural profession in which new science-based, formalized study threatened an earlier emphasis on practical apprenticeship training, with the effect of opening male-dominated trades to women practitioners. By 1903, the college closed its doors to male students, and new pathways were forged for women students interested in pursuing further scientific study. Resistance to the Horticultural College's model of science-based women's horticultural education positioned science and women as contested subjects throughout this period of horticulture's expansion in the academy.

  2. The prospects for using (Q)SARs in a changing political environment--high expectations and a key role for the European Commission's joint research centre.

    PubMed

    Worth, A P; Van Leeuwen, C J; Hartung, T

    2004-01-01

    Recent policy developments in the European union (EU) and within the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) have placed increased emphasis on the use of structure-activity relationships (SARs) and quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), collectively referred to as (Q)SARs, within various regulatory programmes for the assessment of chemicals and products. The most significant example within the EU is the European commission's proposal (of 29 October 2003) to introduce a new system for managing chemicals (called REACH), which calls for an increased use of (Q)SARs and other non-animal methods, especially for the assessment of low production volume chemicals. Another development within the EU is the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which foresees the phasing out of animal testing on cosmetics, combined with the imposition of marketing bans on cosmetics that have been tested on animals after certain deadlines. At the same time, the Existing Chemicals programme within the OECD is investigating ways of increasing the use of chemical category approaches, which depend heavily on the use of (Q)SARs, activity-activity relationships and read-across. Such developments are placing an enormous challenge on industry, regulatory bodies, and on the European commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), which is responsible for providing independent scientific advice to policy makers in the European Commission and the Member States. This paper reviews the different scientific and regulatory purposes for which reliable (Q)SARs could be used, and describes the current work of the JRC in providing scientific support for the development, validation and implementation of (Q)SARs.

  3. Effect of horticultural therapy on wellbeing among dementia day care programme participants: A mixed-methods study (Innovative Practice).

    PubMed

    Hall, Jodi; Mitchell, Gary; Webber, Catherine; Johnson, Karen

    2016-04-11

    Fourteen people attending an adult day programme were recruited to a structured horticultural therapy programme which took place over 10 weeks. The effects were assessed using Dementia Care Mapping and questionnaires completed by family carers. High levels of wellbeing were observed while the participants were engaged in horticultural therapy, and these were sustained once the programme was completed. This study adds to the growing evidence on the benefits of horticultural therapy for people with dementia who have enjoyed gardening in the past.

  4. National Centre for Radio Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    India's National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), located on the Pune University Campus, is part of the TATA INSTITUTE OF FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH. At Khodad, 80 km from Pune, NCRA has set up the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), the world's largest telescope operating at meter wavelengths. GMRT consists of 30 fully steerable dishes of 45 m diameter, spread over a 25 km area. Another meter...

  5. Cultivations...and potting on a strategic plan for a social and horticultural therapy program.

    PubMed

    Smilski, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This research endeavored to develop a strategic growth plan for St. Ann's Garden Club (SAGC), a Non-Profit Social and Horticultural Therapy program, located at Providence Farm in Duncan, British Columbia. SAGC is a day program for older adults with mental illness and/or drug/alcohol addiction. The aim of the program is to be sustainable within the context of stakeholders needs, preferences, and resources and therefore they sought a strategic analysis prior to launching a growth strategy. SAGC has valuable intangible resources that contribute to strong core competencies and effectiveness despite facing many program issues requiring change in order for them to be sustainable. These same issues are shared by many public and non-profit health and wellness programs as they struggle to remain relevant in today's changing healthscape. To adequately focus the study and provide sound direction, the strategic analysis highlighted SAGC's environment, opportunities, issues, priorities, and requirements and was conducted through multiple iterations of the action research cycle. Data was gathered using surveys, interviews, and a focus group. The findings supported a capital campaign to build as new larger clubhouse and establish a more diverse sustainable funding base. Using a resource based perspective, a three year strategic plan was formulated for SAGC to help them cultivate growth and sustainability.

  6. Infertility among women working in horticulture. A follow-up study in the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register.

    PubMed

    Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hannerz, Harald; Feveile, Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Burr, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    The possible association between employment in horticulture with potential exposure to pesticides and female infertility was examined by identification of women with hospital contact due to infertility and working in horticulture through the Danish Occupational Hospitalization Register. This follow-up study gave a standardized incidence ratio of 1.06 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.32) for treatment of infertility in women working in horticulture compared with the standard population and did not confirm that women working in the horticultural industry are at increased risk for infertility.

  7. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London’s East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell’s first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory. PMID:26340279

  8. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture Technology Cluster (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.) (Program CIP: 01.0605--Landscaping Op. & Mgmt.). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the horticulture technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a framework of programs and courses, description of the programs, and suggested course sequences for…

  9. Conflict and compliance: Christianity and the occult in horticultural exporting.

    PubMed

    Dolan, C S

    1999-03-01

    The introduction of export horticulture in Meru District, Kenya, brought about disadvantageous effects on female farmers. Their workload increased while their earnings did not. Women reacted by turning to Christianity for support, and resorted to traditional witchcraft to regain control. In this article, Christianity and witchcraft are presented as ways of expressing discontent with the prevailing social norms, and as means to reclaim autonomy and security within their households. Since Kenyan women are entailed to meet the standards of being a good Christian wife, in which women are submissive to their husbands, the church became a means of escaping the confinements of their marriage. In Meru, Christian conversion offers a means of coping with life and an opportunity to interact with other women who share the same experience. Another strategy adopted by women is witchcraft, a traditional relic wherein women give "potions" to their husbands to induce psychosis and eventually death, which would then leave control of the household to the woman. In conclusion, the case presented here demonstrates how failure to recognize cultural dynamics leads to gender inequity and worsens women's well being, as well as men's security.

  10. Evaluating and optimizing horticultural regimes in space plant growth facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkovich, Y. A.; Chetirkin, P. V.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    In designing innovative space plant growth facilities (SPGF) for long duration space flight, various limitations must be addressed including onboard resources: volume, energy consumption, heat transfer and crew labor expenditure. The required accuracy in evaluating on board resources by using the equivalent mass methodology and applying it to the design of such facilities is not precise. This is due to the uncertainty of the structure and not completely understanding the properties of all associated hardware, including the technology in these systems. We present a simple criteria of optimization for horticultural regimes in SPGF: Qmax = max [M x (EBI)2/(V x E x T], where M is the crop harvest in terms of total dry biomass in the plant growth system; EBI is the edible biomass index (harvest index), V is volume occupied by the crop; E is the crop light energy supply during growth; T is the crop growth duration. The criterion reflects directly on the consumption of onboard resources for crop production. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a Sensor Node for Precision Horticulture

    PubMed Central

    López, Juan A.; Soto, Fulgencio; Sánchez, Pedro; Iborra, Andrés; Suardiaz, Juan; Vera, Juan A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a new wireless sensor node (GAIA Soil-Mote) for precision horticulture applications which permits the use of precision agricultural instruments based on the SDI-12 standard. Wireless communication is achieved with a transceiver compliant with the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. The GAIA Soil-Mote software implementation is based on TinyOS. A two-phase methodology was devised to validate the design of this sensor node. The first phase consisted of laboratory validation of the proposed hardware and software solution, including a study on power consumption and autonomy. The second phase consisted of implementing a monitoring application in a real broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Marathon) crop in Campo de Cartagena in south-east Spain. In this way the sensor node was validated in real operating conditions. This type of application was chosen because there is a large potential market for it in the farming sector, especially for the development of precision agriculture applications. PMID:22412309

  12. Development of a sensor node for precision horticulture.

    PubMed

    López, Juan A; Soto, Fulgencio; Sánchez, Pedro; Iborra, Andrés; Suardiaz, Juan; Vera, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a new wireless sensor node (GAIA Soil-Mote) for precision horticulture applications which permits the use of precision agricultural instruments based on the SDI-12 standard. Wireless communication is achieved with a transceiver compliant with the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. The GAIA Soil-Mote software implementation is based on TinyOS. A two-phase methodology was devised to validate the design of this sensor node. The first phase consisted of laboratory validation of the proposed hardware and software solution, including a study on power consumption and autonomy. The second phase consisted of implementing a monitoring application in a real broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Marathon) crop in Campo de Cartagena in south-east Spain. In this way the sensor node was validated in real operating conditions. This type of application was chosen because there is a large potential market for it in the farming sector, especially for the development of precision agriculture applications.

  13. STS in Engineering: The Teaching and Research Activities of the Centre for Technology and Social Development at the University of Toronto.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the conceptual framework and three core courses of the certificate program in Preventive Engineering and Social Development at the Centre for Technology and Social Development at the University of Toronto. Preventive approaches examine how technology fits into, interacts with, and depends on human life, society, and the biosphere to…

  14. Design and internal validation of an obstetric early warning score: secondary analysis of the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre Case Mix Programme database.

    PubMed

    Carle, C; Alexander, P; Columb, M; Johal, J

    2013-04-01

    We designed and internally validated an aggregate weighted early warning scoring system specific to the obstetric population that has the potential for use in the ward environment. Direct obstetric admissions from the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre's Case Mix Programme Database were randomly allocated to model development (n = 2240) or validation (n = 2200) sets. Physiological variables collected during the first 24 h of critical care admission were analysed. Logistic regression analysis for mortality in the model development set was initially used to create a statistically based early warning score. The statistical score was then modified to create a clinically acceptable early warning score. Important features of this clinical obstetric early warning score are that the variables are weighted according to their statistical importance, a surrogate for the FI O2 /Pa O2 relationship is included, conscious level is assessed using a simplified alert/not alert variable, and the score, trigger thresholds and response are consistent with the new non-obstetric National Early Warning Score system. The statistical and clinical early warning scores were internally validated using the validation set. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.995 (95% CI 0.992-0.998) for the statistical score and 0.957 (95% CI 0.923-0.991) for the clinical score. Pre-existing empirically designed early warning scores were also validated in the same way for comparison. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.955 (95% CI 0.922-0.988) for Swanton et al.'s Modified Early Obstetric Warning System, 0.937 (95% CI 0.884-0.991) for the obstetric early warning score suggested in the 2003-2005 Report on Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the UK, and 0.973 (95% CI 0.957-0.989) for the non-obstetric National Early Warning Score. This highlights that the new clinical obstetric early warning score has an excellent ability to

  15. Accuracy of two continuous glucose monitoring systems: a head-to-head comparison under clinical research centre and daily life conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kropff, J; Bruttomesso, D; Doll, W; Farret, A; Galasso, S; Luijf, Y M; Mader, J K; Place, J; Boscari, F; Pieber, T R; Renard, E; DeVries, J H

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the accuracy and reliability of the two most widely used continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems. Methods We studied the Dexcom®G4 Platinum (DG4P; Dexcom, San Diego, CA, USA) and Medtronic Paradigm Veo Enlite system (ENL; Medtronic, Northridge, CA, USA) CGM systems, in 24 patients with type 1 diabetes. The CGM systems were tested during 6-day home use and a nested 6-h clinical research centre (CRC) visit. During the CRC visit, frequent venous blood glucose samples were used as reference while patients received a meal with an increased insulin bolus to induce an aggravated postprandial glucose nadir. At home, patients performed at least six reference capillary blood measurements per day. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed using all data points ≥15 min apart. Results The overall mean absolute relative difference (MARD) value [standard deviation (s.d.)] measured at the CRC was 13.6 (11.0)% for the DG4P and 16.6 (13.5)% for the ENL [p < 0.0002, confidence interval of difference (CI Δ) 1.7–4.3%, n = 530]. The overall MARD assessed at home was 12.2 (12.0)% for the DG4P and 19.9 (20.5)% for the ENL (p < 0.0001, CI Δ = 5.8–8.7%, n = 839). During the CRC visit, the MARD in the hypoglycaemic range [≤3.9 mmol/l (70 mg/dl)], was 17.6 (12.2)% for the DG4P and 24.6 (18.8)% for the ENL (p = 0.005, CI Δ 3.1–10.7%, n = 117). Both sensors showed higher MARD values during hypoglycaemia than during euglycaemia [3.9–10 mmol/l (70–180 mg/dl)]: for the DG4P 17.6 versus 13.0% and for the ENL 24.6 versus 14.2%. Conclusions During circumstances of intended use, including both a CRC and home phase, the ENL was noticeably less accurate than the DG4P sensor. Both sensors showed lower accuracy in the hypoglycaemic range. The DG4P was less affected by this negative effect of hypoglycaemia on sensor accuracy than was the ENL. PMID:25132320

  16. Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling horticultural traits in diploid roses.

    PubMed

    Dugo, M L; Satovic, Z; Millán, T; Cubero, J I; Rubiales, D; Cabrera, A; Torres, A M

    2005-08-01

    A segregating progeny set of 96 F1 diploid hybrids (2n = 2x = 14) between "Blush Noisette" (D10), one of the first seedlings from the original "Champneys' Pink Cluster", and Rosa wichurana (E15), was used to construct a genetic linkage map of the rose genome following a "pseudo-testcross" mapping strategy. A total of 133 markers (130 RAPD, one morphological and two microsatellites) were located on the 14 linkage groups (LGs) of the D10 and E15 maps, covering total map lengths of 388 and 260 cM, respectively. Due to the presence of common biparental markers the homology of four LGs between parental maps (D10-1/E15-1 to D10-4/E15-4) could be inferred. Four horticulturally interesting quantitative traits, flower size (FS), days to flowering (DF), leaf size (LS), and resistance to powdery mildew (PM) were analysed in the progeny in order to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling these traits. A total of 13 putative QTLs (LOD > 3.0) were identified, four for FS, two for flowering time, five for LS, and two for resistance to PM. Possible homologies between QTLs detected in the D10 and E15 maps could be established between Fs1 and Fs3, Fs2 and Fs4, and Ls1 and Ls3. Screening for pairwise epistatic interactions between loci revealed additional, epistatic QTLs (EQTLs) for DF and LS that were not detected in the original QTL analysis. The genetic maps developed in this study will be useful to add new markers and locate genes for important traits in the genus providing a practical resource for marker-assisted selection programs in roses.

  17. Grafting: A Technique to Modify Ion Accumulation in Horticultural Crops

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Muhammad A.; Imtiaz, Muhammad; Kong, Qiusheng; Cheng, Fei; Ahmed, Waqar; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Grafting is a centuries-old technique used in plants to obtain economic benefits. Grafting increases nutrient uptake and utilization efficiency in a number of plant species, including fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. Selected rootstocks of the same species or close relatives are utilized in grafting. Rootstocks absorb more water and ions than self-rooted plants and transport these water and ions to the aboveground scion. Ion uptake is regulated by a complex communication mechanism between the scion and rootstock. Sugars, hormones, and miRNAs function as long-distance signaling molecules and regulate ion uptake and ion homeostasis by affecting the activity of ion transporters. This review summarizes available information on the effect of rootstock on nutrient uptake and utilization and the mechanisms involved. Information on specific nutrient-efficient rootstocks for different crops of commercial importance is also provided. Several other important approaches, such as interstocking (during double grafting), inarching, use of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria, use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, use of plant growth substances (e.g., auxin and melatonin), and use of genetically engineered rootstocks and scions (transgrafting), are highlighted; these approaches can be combined with grafting to enhance nutrient uptake and utilization in commercially important plant species. Whether the rootstock and scion affect each other's soil microbiota and their effect on the nutrient absorption of rootstocks remain largely unknown. Similarly, the physiological and molecular bases of grafting, crease formation, and incompatibility are not fully identified and require investigation. Grafting in horticultural crops can help reveal the basic biology of grafting, the reasons for incompatibility, sensing, and signaling of nutrients, ion uptake and transport, and the mechanism of heavy metal accumulation and restriction in rootstocks. Ion transporter and miRNA-regulated nutrient

  18. The horticultural trade and ornamental plant invasions in Britain.

    PubMed

    Dehnen-Schmutz, Katharina; Touza, Julia; Perrings, Charles; Williamson, Mark

    2007-02-01

    Ornamental horticulture has been recognized as the main pathway for plant invasions worldwide. We examined the link between propagule pressure created by the presence of ornamental plants in the market and their ability to escape from cultivation and establish in the wild. A random sample of 534 non-native ornamental species on sale in nineteenth century Britain showed that 27% of these species were recorded growing outside cultivation and 30% of those were established. Species that had escaped from cultivation were more frequently on sale both in the nineteenth century and today than nonescaping species. We used logit regression models to identify biological and socioeconomic variables that affect species' abilities to escape cultivation and become established. Frequencies in the market in the nineteenth century and today were good explanatory variables that distinguished escaping from nonescaping species, whereas for the transition from casual to established status these two socioeconomic variables were either absent or only of weak significance. Biological characteristics that increased the probability that a species would escape from cultivation were species height, a European native range, and being an annual. Climbing plants and species intolerant of low temperatures were less likely to escape. In contrast, the establishment probability was greater if the species belonged to a genus native to Britain and increased as the number of continents in a plant's native range increased. Annual plants had a reduced probability of establishment. Market presence, prices, and the date of introduction are among the socioeconomic factors that have had important effects on the observed course of invasions.

  19. Grafting: A Technique to Modify Ion Accumulation in Horticultural Crops.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Muhammad A; Imtiaz, Muhammad; Kong, Qiusheng; Cheng, Fei; Ahmed, Waqar; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Grafting is a centuries-old technique used in plants to obtain economic benefits. Grafting increases nutrient uptake and utilization efficiency in a number of plant species, including fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. Selected rootstocks of the same species or close relatives are utilized in grafting. Rootstocks absorb more water and ions than self-rooted plants and transport these water and ions to the aboveground scion. Ion uptake is regulated by a complex communication mechanism between the scion and rootstock. Sugars, hormones, and miRNAs function as long-distance signaling molecules and regulate ion uptake and ion homeostasis by affecting the activity of ion transporters. This review summarizes available information on the effect of rootstock on nutrient uptake and utilization and the mechanisms involved. Information on specific nutrient-efficient rootstocks for different crops of commercial importance is also provided. Several other important approaches, such as interstocking (during double grafting), inarching, use of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria, use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, use of plant growth substances (e.g., auxin and melatonin), and use of genetically engineered rootstocks and scions (transgrafting), are highlighted; these approaches can be combined with grafting to enhance nutrient uptake and utilization in commercially important plant species. Whether the rootstock and scion affect each other's soil microbiota and their effect on the nutrient absorption of rootstocks remain largely unknown. Similarly, the physiological and molecular bases of grafting, crease formation, and incompatibility are not fully identified and require investigation. Grafting in horticultural crops can help reveal the basic biology of grafting, the reasons for incompatibility, sensing, and signaling of nutrients, ion uptake and transport, and the mechanism of heavy metal accumulation and restriction in rootstocks. Ion transporter and miRNA-regulated nutrient

  20. CMCC Data Distribution Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, Giovanni; Fiore, Sandro; Negro, A.

    2010-05-01

    The CMCC Data Distribution Centre (DDC) is the primary entry point (web gateway) to the CMCC. It is a Data Grid Portal providing a ubiquitous and pervasive way to ease data publishing, climate metadata search, datasets discovery, metadata annotation, data access, data aggregation, sub-setting, etc. The grid portal security model includes the use of HTTPS protocol for secure communication with the client (based on X509v3 certificates that must be loaded into the browser) and secure cookies to establish and maintain user sessions. The CMCC DDC is now in a pre-production phase and it is currently used only by internal users (CMCC researchers and climate scientists). The most important component already available in the CMCC DDC is the Search Engine which allows users to perform, through web interfaces, distributed search and discovery activities by introducing one or more of the following search criteria: horizontal extent (which can be specified by interacting with a geographic map), vertical extent, temporal extent, keywords, topics, creation date, etc. By means of this page the user submits the first step of the query process on the metadata DB, then, she can choose one or more datasets retrieving and displaying the complete XML metadata description (from the browser). This way, the second step of the query process is carried out by accessing to a specific XML document of the metadata DB. Finally, through the web interface, the user can access to and download (partially or totally) the data stored on the storage device accessing to OPeNDAP servers and to other available grid storage interfaces. Requests concerning datasets stored in deep storage will be served asynchronously.

  1. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    PubMed

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist.

  2. Research is our middle name

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article highlights research by the USDA-ARS Greenhouse Production Research Group (GPRG). It provides an overview of the current research projects of the Application Technology Research Unit being conducted by the Agricultural Engineering Research Group, the Horticultural Insects Research Group...

  3. Chalcogenide centred gold complexes.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, M Concepción; Laguna, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Chalcogenide-centred gold complexes are an important class of compounds in which a central chalcogen is surrounded by several gold atoms or gold and other metals. They have special characteristics such as unusual geometries, electron deficiency and properties such as luminescence or non-linear optical properties. The best known species are the trinuclear [E(AuPR3)3]+, 'oxonium' type species, that have high synthetic applicability, not only in other chalcogen-centred species, but in many other organometallic derivatives. The aurophilic interactions play an important role in the stability, preference for a particular geometry and luminescence properties in this type of derivatives (critical review, 117 references).

  4. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  5. Complex Modelling Scheme Of An Additive Manufacturing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Liliana Georgeta

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a modelling scheme sustaining the development of an additive manufacturing research centre model and its processes. This modelling is performed using IDEF0, the resulting model process representing the basic processes required in developing such a centre in any university. While the activities presented in this study are those recommended in general, changes may occur in specific existing situations in a research centre.

  6. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  7. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  8. Wycheproof Education Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetnam and Godfrey, Melbourne (Australia).

    The Wycheproof township in New South Wales (Australia) is the regional center for a grain farming community. The Wycheproof Education Centre was formed by the merger of a separate primary and secondary school (on one site with existing buildings), into a single governing body that is educationally structured into junior, middle, and senior…

  9. Discovering a Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullagh, John; Stewart, James; Greenwood, Julian

    2007-01-01

    There has recently been a growth in the popularity of "science centres" and this development provides an excellent opportunity to support the primary science curriculum. Their use is therefore well worth including within initial teacher education courses. Hence, undergraduate student teachers at Stranmillis University College Belfast may…

  10. Agriculture--Horticulture. Kit No. 36. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Claudia

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on horticulture are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focus on the vocational area of agriculture. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home economics,…

  11. Asian germplasm in American horticulture: new thoughts on an old theme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    North American horticulture cultivates an astonishing diversity of ornamental species, from nearly every floristic region, but its landscapes are dominated by temperate species drawn from the Eastern Asiatic floristic region. The East Asiatic floristic region is one of the most diverse in the world...

  12. Project PLANTWORK: A Horticulture Employment Initiative for Workers with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council for Therapy and Rehabilitation through Horticulture, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD.

    Intended for persons establishing job development programs for developmentally disabled individuals, this training manual details the structure and procedures of Project PLANTWORK, a 21-month demonstration program which placed approximately 70 workers with developmental disabilities into employment in horticulture industry firms or into…

  13. An Analysis of Agriculture and Horticulture Programs at Illinois Public Community Colleges. Accountability Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    Prepared as part of a state program review, this report presents results from a review undertaken of all agriculture and horticulture programs at Illinois public community colleges for fiscal year 1995. The first part focuses on the four agricultural programs reviewed: Agricultural Business and Management; Agricultural Production, Workers, and…

  14. Nebraska Vocational Agribusiness Curriculum for City Schools. Horticulture. Agricultural Mechanics. A Curriculum Guide. 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    Designed for use with high school juniors, this agribusiness curriculum for city schools contains thirty-two units of instruction in the areas of horticulture and agricultural mechanics. Among the units included in the curriculum are (1) Planting Media, (2) Fertilizer, (3) Plant Classification, (4) Turf Grass Management, (5) Landscape Design, (6)…

  15. Supervised Occupational Experience Record Forms for Ornamental Horticulture. (Revised) Master Set. 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, R. W.; And Others

    The worksheets have been developed for use with any production occupational or work experience record book for high school vocational agriculture programs. Separate units have been developed for each of 11 areas in ornamental horticulture, so the student and teacher can select the appropriate one, or several, for the experiences planned by the…

  16. Teaching STEM through Horticulture: Implementing an Edible Plant Curriculum at a STEM-Centric Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Leila A.; Hughes, Harrison; Balgopal, Meena M.

    2016-01-01

    School gardens are ideal places for students to ask and answer questions about science. This paper describes a case study of two 3rd grade teachers and two STEM coordinators who were recruited to implement and evaluate a horticultural-based curriculum developed for this study. Informed by the Teacher-Centered Systemic Reform model we conducted a…

  17. Horticulture Materials for Agricultural Education Programs. Core Agricultural Education Curriculum, Central Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Office of Agricultural Communications and Education.

    This curriculum guide contains five units with relevant problem areas for horticulture. These problem areas have been selected as suggested areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for secondary students enrolled in an agricultural education program. Each problem area includes some or all of the following components: related problem…

  18. COMPARISON OF CERTAIN ABILITIES NEEDED BY WORKERS IN LICENSED NURSERIES AND LICENSED ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE BUSINESSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DILLON, ROY D.

    THIS STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT TO WHICH WORKERS WITH THE JOB TITLES OF GENERAL DIRECTORS, SALESMEN, SUPERVISORS, AND FIELD WORKERS IN LICENSED NURSERIES NEEDED AGRICULTURALLY ORIENTED KNOWLEDGE OF THE SAME KIND AND LEVEL AS WORKERS IN COMPARABLE JOB TITLES IN ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE BUSINESSES. DATA WERE COLLECTED BY PERSONAL…

  19. 4-H Horticulture Project Activity Guides. Leader's Guide and Units 1-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This document, concerning the 4-H horticulture project, includes a leader's guide and three youth activity guides. The leader's guide can be used to plan group project meetings that are both fun and educational. Activities can be adapted to various age groups. The leader's guide includes basic information for growing plants indoors and outdoors,…

  20. Insights from Spanish-Speaking Employees in the Iowa Horticultural Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justen, Emilie; Haynes, Cynthia; VanDerZanden, Ann Marie; Grudens-Schuck, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Addressing the needs of Latino workers can help improve working conditions, job satisfaction, and productivity of both employees and the companies hiring Latino workers. The study reported here assessed educational needs, communication gaps, and technical skills of Latino workers working in the horticultural industry in Iowa--an ethnic group that…

  1. Horticulture Mechanics Course Outline. Teacher Education Series, Vol. 15, No. 1t.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Lee P.; And Others

    The document provides 17 outlines of brief instructional units in mechanics, which are intended for incorporation into an existing program of study in ornamental horticulture at the secondary or postsecondary level. To facilitate the flexible use of the outlines, a grid is presented on which seven occupational areas (such as aboriculture,…

  2. Larvae of five horticulturally important species of Chrysopodes (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae): shared generic features, descriptions and keys

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia S.; Tauber, Catherine A.; Albuquerque, Gilberto S.; Tauber, Maurice J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract An expanded list of generic level larval characteristics is presented for Chrysopodes; it includes a reinterpretation of the mesothoracic and metathoracic structure and setation. Keys, descriptions and images of Semaphoront A (first instar) and Semaphoront B (second and third instars) are offered for identifying five species of Chrysopodes (Chrysopodes) that are commonly reported from horticultural habitats in the Neotropical region. PMID:23653514

  3. Use of Problem-Based Learning in the Teaching and Learning of Horticultural Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Lord; Dowsett, Eric; Sullivan, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Problem-based learning (PBL), a relatively novel teaching and learning process in horticulture, was investigated. Proper application of PBL can potentially create a learning context that enhances student learning. Design/Methodology/Approach: Students worked on two complex ill-structured problems: (1) to produce fresh baby greens for a…

  4. Evaluation of biochar-anaerobic potato digestate mixtures as renewable components of horticultural potting media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various formulations are used in horticultural potting media, with sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite and perlite currently among the most common components. We are examining a dried anaerobic digestate remaining after the fermentation of potato processing wastes to replace organic components such as p...

  5. An Introduction to the Sexual Reproduction of Flowering Plants. Ornamental Horticulture I, Lesson Plan No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ideoka, Keith

    Developed as part of a 90-hour high school course in ornamental horticulture, this 50-minute lesson plan is designed to explain the process of pollination and fertilization of flowering plants. The lesson plan begins with information on the course for which the lesson was designed; equipment and audio-visual aids needed; required student…

  6. Primary-care based participatory rehabilitation: users’ views of a horticultural and arts project

    PubMed Central

    Barley, Elizabeth A; Robinson, Susan; Sikorski, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Background Participation in horticulture and arts may improve wellbeing in those with mental and physical illness. Aim To conduct an in-depth exploration of the views and experience of participants of a primary-care-based horticultural and participatory arts rehabilitation project (Sydenham Garden). Design and setting Qualitative interview study of a primary-care-based horticultural and participatory arts rehabilitation project in South London. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 participants (referred to as ‘coworkers’) of Sydenham Garden. Seven were female. Participants were aged between 38 and 91 years and had a range of severe mental and physical health problems; most had depression. The interviews were analysed using constant comparison and thematic analysis. Results Data were overwhelmingly positive concerning participation. Coworkers considered participation in the project to promote wellbeing by providing purposeful and enjoyable activity and interest, improving mood and self-perceptions, and providing an escape from life’s pressures. Being outdoors was considered therapeutic. The most-valued aspect of participation was the social contact derived as a result of it. Many of the coworkers who were interviewed developed transferable skills, including nationally recognised qualifications, which they valued highly. Conclusion Delivery of horticultural therapy and participatory arts is a feasible model for improving wellbeing in patients in primary care who have serious illness. Longer-term studies are needed to address what happens to people after leaving such projects. PMID:22520790

  7. Effects of Horticultural Therapy on Psychosocial Health in Older Nursing Home Residents: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Min; Ji, Jeng-Yi

    2015-09-01

    This preliminary study examined the effect of horticultural therapy on psychosocial health in older nursing home residents. A combined quantitative and qualitative design was adopted. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 10 older residents from a nursing home in Taichung, Taiwan. Participants joined a 10-week indoor horticultural program once a week, with each session lasting for about 1.5 hours. A single-group design with multiple measurements was adopted for the quantitative component of this study. Interviews held 1-2 days before the intervention (T0) were used to collect baseline data. The two outcome variables of this study, depression and loneliness, were reassessed during the 5th (T1) and 10th (T2) weeks of the intervention. Generalized estimating equations were used to test the mean differences among T0, T1, and T2 measures. After the 10-week program, qualitative data were collected by asking participants to share their program participation experiences. The results of generalized estimating equation showed significant improvements in depression and loneliness. Four categories emerged from the qualitative data content analysis: social connection, anticipation and hope, sense of achievement, and companionship. Given the beneficial effects of the horticulture therapy, the inclusion of horticultural activities in nursing home activity programs is recommended.

  8. Insecticide dissipation from soil and plant surfaces in tropical horticulture of southern Benin, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Rosendahl, Ingrid; Laabs, Volker; Atcha-Ahowé, Cyrien; James, Braima; Amelung, Wulf

    2009-06-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, horticulture provides livelihood opportunities for millions of people, especially in urban and peri-urban areas. Although the vegetable agroecosystems are often characterized by intensive pesticide use, risks resulting therefrom are largely unknown under tropical horticultural conditions. The objective of this study therefore was to study the fate of pesticides in two representative horticultural soils (Acrisol and Arenosol) and plants (Solanum macrocarpon L.) after field application and thus to gain first insight on environmental persistence and dispersion of typical insecticides used in vegetable horticulture in Benin, West Africa. On plant surfaces, dissipation was rapid with half lives ranging from 2 to 87 h (alpha-endosulfan < beta-endosulfan < deltamethrin). Soil dissipation was considerably slower than dissipation from plant surfaces with half-lives ranging from 3 (diazinon) to 74 d (total endosulfan), but persistence of pesticides in soil was still reduced compared to temperate climates. Nevertheless, for deltamethrin and endosulfan, a tendency for mid-term accumulation in soil upon repeated applications was observed. The soil and plant surface concentrations of the metabolite endosulfan sulfate increased during the entire trial period, indicating that this compound is a potential long-term pollutant even in tropical environments.

  9. Horticultural Performance of Eight American Elderberry Genotypes at Three Missouri Locations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, A.L.; Byers, P.L.; Avery, J.D.; Kaps, M.; Gu, S.

    2016-01-01

    American elderberry (Sambucus nigra subsp. canadensis) is being increasingly cultivated in North America for its edible and medicinal fruit and flowers, yet remains largely undeveloped as a horticultural crop. Productive genotypes with desirable horticultural attributes, including disease and insect resistance, precocity, uniform fruit ripening, and large berry size are needed in order to advance the commercial production of elderberries. A four-year study of eight elderberry genotypes was established in 2008 at three diverse Missouri (USA) locations. Phenology, plant morphology, pest susceptibility, productivity, and fruit characteristics data were collected over three growing seasons, 2009–2011. Significant differences for most phenological, horticultural, and fruit juice characteristics were observed among the three sites, three years, and eight genotypes. The genotype ‘Ozark’ was the earliest to break bud, produced fruit with high levels of soluble solids, and out-yielded most other genotypes at the three sites over the three-year study. None of the new genotypes produced berries as large as or larger than the standard ‘York’ which is known for its large fruit. Some of the genotypes tested, especially ‘Ozark’ show promise as potential cultivars and as breeding stock for further development of elderberry as a commercially-viable horticultural crop. PMID:27158183

  10. Chemical and physical properties of Paulownia elongata biochar modified with oxidants for horticultural applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment of biochar with oxidants such as acids and hydrogen peroxide has been shown to alter porosity, increase adsorption of chemicals, and introduce functional groups on the biochar surfaces, all of which are desirable for their use in horticultural applications. Biochar was produced from the py...

  11. Spent mushroom substrates as component of growing media for germination and growth of horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Medina, E; Paredes, C; Pérez-Murcia, M D; Bustamante, M A; Moral, R

    2009-09-01

    This research work was conducted in order to investigate the possibility of using spent mushroom substrate (SMS) in the production of horticultural seedlings replacing part of the peat in the growing media. Three vegetable species with different salt sensitivities, the less sensitive being tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. Muchamiel), the moderately salt-sensitive being courgette (Cucurbita pepo L. var. Afrodite F1) and the most salt-sensitive being pepper (Capsicum annum L. var. Lamuyo F1) were grown in 12 media containing SMS of two types of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus (SMS-AB) and Pleurotus ostreatus (SMS-PO)) or a mixture of both 50% (v/v) (SMS-50), as well as peat in various ratios. The proportions of each residue in the mixtures elaborated with peat were 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% v/v residue. A substrate of 100% peat was used as control. The experiment was arranged in a completely-randomised design with two replicates per treatment under greenhouse conditions. Prior to sowing, some physical, physico-chemical and chemical properties of the growing media were determined and seed germination and fresh weight of seedling were also measured. In most of the cases, the addition of SMS to the growing media produced an increase in the pH values, salt contents, macro and micronutrient concentrations and a decrease in the water holding capacity contents in comparison to peat, whereas great differences were found in the air capacity values between SMS-based substrates and peat. Up to 75% SMS can be used in mixtures with peat for seed germination of the plant species studied. Regarding the most suitable SMS-based substrates for plant growth, any substrate could be used for tomato seedling production. However, all SMS-AB-based substrates and the media containing low dose of SMS-PO and SMS-50 were adequate for growth of courgette and pepper.

  12. Phenotypic plasticity of stem water potential correlates with crop load in horticultural trees.

    PubMed

    Sadras, Victor O; Trentacoste, Eduardo R

    2011-05-01

    Conceptual models accounting for the influence of source:sink ratio on water relations of trees are theoretically relevant from a physiological perspective and practically important for irrigation scheduling. Midday stem water potential of horticultural trees often declines with increasing crop load but the actual response depends on environmental, management and plant factors. Here we advance a quantitative synthesis of the response of stem water potential to crop load from the perspective of phenotypic plasticity, defined as 'the amount by which the expression of individual characteristics of a genotype are changed by different environments'. Data sets of stem water potential for contrasting crop loads were compiled for apple (Malus domestica L. Borkh.), olive (Olea europea L.), peach (Prunus persica L.), pear (Pyrus communis L.) and plum (Prunus domestica L.). Phenotypic plasticity of stem water potential was calculated as the slope of the linear regression between stem water potential for each crop load and the environmental mean of stem water potential across crop loads. Regression lines for trees with different crop load diverged with decreasing environmental mean stem water potential. For the pooled data, plasticity of stem water potential was a linear function of relative crop load. This represents a significant shift in perspective: the effect of crop load on the trait per se (stem water potential) is environmentally contingent, but the effect of crop load on the plasticity of the trait is not. We conclude that research on the effects of crop load on tree water relations would return more robust results if plant traits are considered from the dual perspective of the trait per se and its plasticity.

  13. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  14. Elderly Care Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  15. Citrus Disease Research and Development Trust Fund Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Buchanan, Vern [R-FL-16

    2013-02-27

    03/13/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Quality of Care and Education Provided by Greek Day-Care Centres: An Approach from Researcher's and Early Childhood Educators' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzou, Konstantina

    2012-01-01

    The present study is aimed at examining the level of quality and care provided by Greek preschool programmes, from the researcher's and early childhood educators' perspectives and verify whether they evaluate with the same way. Research results indicate that according to the researcher's assessment both preschool and infant/toddler classrooms…

  17. Industry Restructuring: Extracts from Centre Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William C., Ed.

    This document contains excerpts from material previously published by Australia's TAFE (Technical and Further Education) National Centre for Research and Development on the subjects of industry restructuring, the reasons for restructuring, revising curricula, and providing a service to business and industry. Its contents are "Industry…

  18. Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Haiyan

    Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique is promising for determining the optical properties and quality attributes of horticultural and food products. However, considerable challenges still exist for accurate determination of spectral absorption and scattering properties from intact horticultural products. The objective of this research was, therefore, to develop and optimize hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products. Monte Carlo simulations and experiments for model samples of known optical properties were performed to optimize the inverse algorithm of a single-layer diffusion model and the optical designs, for extracting the absorption (micro a) and reduced scattering (micros') coefficients from spatially-resolved reflectance profiles. The logarithm and integral data transformation and the relative weighting methods were found to greatly improve the parameter estimation accuracy with the relative errors of 10.4%, 10.7%, and 11.4% for micro a, and 6.6%, 7.0%, and 7.1% for micros', respectively. More accurate measurements of optical properties were obtained when the light beam was of Gaussian type with the diameter of less than 1 mm, and the minimum and maximum source-detector distances were 1.5 mm and 10--20 transport mean free paths, respectively. An optical property measuring prototype was built, based on the optimization results, and evaluated for automatic measurement of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients for the wavelengths of 500--1,000 nm. The instrument was used to measure the optical properties, and assess quality/maturity, of 500 'Redstar' peaches and 1039 'Golden Delicious' (GD) and 1040 'Delicious' (RD) apples. A separate study was also conducted on confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopic image analysis and compression test of fruit tissue specimens to measure the structural and mechanical properties of 'Golden

  19. Design Considerations for an Intensive Autism Treatment Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deochand, Neil; Conway, Alissa A.; Fuqua, R. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) who display severe and challenging behaviour sometimes require centre-based intensive applied behaviour analysis (ABA) therapy to meet their health, safety and educational needs. Unfortunately, despite the need for centre-based treatment, there is a paucity of empirical research on building and…

  20. Centre Computer Base for Visually Handicapped Children, Students and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The Centre Computer Base is a list of hardware which can effectively operate the software of the Research Centre for the Education of the Visually Handicapped. Essential hardware contained on the list is described, along with a variety of "add-on" devices such as joysticks, touch-screens, speech synthesizers, braille embossers, etc.…

  1. Current and potential trade in horticultural products irradiated for phytosanitary purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos-Griffin, Emilia; Hallman, Guy J.; Griffin, Robert L.

    2012-08-01

    The current status of trade in horticultural products irradiated for phytosanitary purposes is examined, including trends, strengths and weaknesses. A strategy is proposed to take advantage of the best future opportunities for increasing trade in irradiated horticultural products by identifying best possibilities for expanding both the number and volume of commodities for irradiation and then applying appropriate business criteria in a general analysis of the commodities, commercial scenarios, and geographic regions where the greatest potential exists for expansion. The results show that fresh fruits such as mango, papaya, citrus, grapes, and vegetables such as tomatoes, onions, asparagus, garlic, and peppers from Asia and the Americas show the greatest potential. Substantial opportunities for additional growth exist, especially as regulatory conditions become more favorable.

  2. Soil microbial community analysis of between no-till and tillage in a controlled horticultural field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung Koo; Kim, Min Keun; Seo, Youn Won; Choi, Kyung Ju; Lee, Seong Tae; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Lee, Young Han

    2012-04-01

    The present study evaluated the changes of soil microbial communities that were subjected to no-till and compared the results to those subject to tillage for organic farming in a controlled horticultural field by fatty acid methyl ester. Fungi (P < 0.001), gram-positive bacteria (P < 0.001), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (P < 0.01), and actinomycetes (P < 0.01) in the no-till soils were significantly larger than those in the tillage soils. The no-till in the subsoil had a significantly lower ratio of cy17:0 to 16:1ω7c compared to that of tillage, indicating that microbial stress decreased because the soils were not disturbed (P < 0.05). Fungi should be considered as a potential factor responsible for the obvious microbial community differentiation that was observed between the no-till and tillage areas in a controlled horticultural field.

  3. Comparing responses to horticultural-based and traditional activities in dementia care programs.

    PubMed

    Jarrott, Shannon E; Gigliotti, Christina M

    2010-12-01

    Engaging persons with dementia in meaningful activities supports well-being; however, care staff are challenged to implement age- and ability-appropriate activities in a group setting. We compared a randomly assigned treatment group, who received horticultural therapy-based (HT-based) programming to a comparison group, who engaged in traditional activities (TA) programming, on engagement and affect. Horticultural therapy-based programming was implemented twice weekly at 4 treatment sites for 6 weeks, while regular TA were observed at comparison sites. Results revealed no differences between groups on affective domains. Levels of adaptive behavior differed between the groups, with the treatment group demonstrating higher levels of active, passive, and other engagement and the comparison group demonstrating higher levels of self-engagement. Our results highlight the value of HT-based programs and the importance of simultaneously capturing participants' affective and behavioral responses. Theoretical and practical considerations about the facilitation of and context in which the programming occurs are discussed.

  4. Reduction of energy usage in postharvest horticulture through management of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Wills, Ron B H; Golding, John B

    2015-05-01

    Cool chain management is the preferred technology to extend the postharvest life of horticultural produce, but with rising energy costs and community pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, there is a need to use less energy-intensive technologies. Minimising the level of ethylene around horticultural produce inhibits ripening and senescence and therefore has the potential to reduce the use of refrigeration. The long-distance transport of bananas within Australia and from Central America to Europe is used as a case study to show that the need for refrigeration could be reduced if the appropriate concentrations of ethylene were maintained around fruit during transit. Data are also presented to show a similar benefit of ethylene control with green beans, as well as another study showing that apples treated with the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene could be stored at a higher temperature without loss of quality to the consumer. The range of technologies available to manage ethylene levels is discussed.

  5. [The primary healthcare centres].

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature.

  6. Co-composting of horticultural waste with fruit peels, food waste, and soybean residues.

    PubMed

    Choy, Sing Ying; Wang, Ke; Qi, Wei; Wang, Ben; Chen, Chia-Lung; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Horticultural waste was co-composted with fruit peels, food waste, and soybean residues individually to evaluate the effects of these easily available organic wastes in Singapore on the composting process and product quality. Each co-composting material was mixed with horticultural waste in the wet weight ratio of 1:1 and composted for 46 days. Results showed that all co-composting materials accelerated the degradation of total carbon and resulted in higher nutrients of nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and potassium (K) in the final product compared with horticultural waste alone. Mixture with fruit peels achieved the fastest total carbon loss; however, did not reach the minimum required temperature for pathogen destruction. The end product was found to be the best source for K and had a higher pH that could be used for the remediation of acidic soil. Food waste resulted in the highest available nitrate (NO3-N) content in the end product, but caused high salt content, total coliforms, and slower total carbon loss initially. Soybean residues were found to be the best co-composting material to produce compost with high N, P, and K when compared with other materials due to the highest temperature, fastest total carbon loss, fastest reduction in C/N ratio, and best conservation of nutrients.

  7. Should "Teacher Centred Teaching" Replace "Student Centred Learning"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Patrick D.

    2008-01-01

    Mission statements of most HEIs across the UK support "student centred learning". In this paper, it is suggested that "teacher centred teaching" should also have a major role to play, improving the quality of the learning experience in higher education. Students are extremely diverse in their skills, weaknesses, and learning…

  8. From the Generalist Courses to Work: An Annotated Bibliography on Generic Skills. Centre for the Study of Higher Education Research Working Papers, 93.5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon; O'Hanlon, Seamus

    This annotated bibliography of 70 items was developed as part of a larger research project on the possible application of competency-based approaches to generalist courses (arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences) in higher education. The project also looked at other ways, aside from the use of competency-based approaches, of…

  9. Systematic Assessment of Game-Centred Approach Practices--The Game-Centred Approach Assessment Scaffold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Background: Game-centred approaches (GCA) have been promoted as a more meaningful way to teach games and sports due to their connections with constructivist learning principles. However, the implementation is dependant on the teacher implementing it rather than just the model. There has been little research into what it means to use a GCA well and…

  10. A systematic review on the role of vitamins, minerals, proteins, and other supplements for the treatment of cachexia in cancer: a European Palliative Care Research Centre cachexia project.

    PubMed

    Mochamat; Cuhls, Henning; Marinova, Milka; Kaasa, Stein; Stieber, Christiane; Conrad, Rupert; Radbruch, Lukas; Mücke, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We provide a systematic review to support the European Palliative Care Research Collaboration development of clinical guidelines for cancer patients suffering from cachexia. CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, ClinicalTrials.gov, and a selection of cancer journals have been searched up until 15 April 2016. The systematic literature research yielded 4214 publications with 21 of these included in the final evaluation. Regarding minerals, our search identified only one study examining the use of magnesium with no effect on weight loss. As far as vitamins are concerned, vitamin E in combination with omega-3 fatty acids displayed an effect on survival in a single study, vitamin D showed improvement of muscle weakness in prostate cancer patients, and vitamin C supplementation led to an improvement of various quality of life aspects in a sample with a variety of cancer diagnoses. For proteins, a combination therapy of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB), arginine, and glutamine showed an increase in lean body mass after 4 weeks in a study of advanced solid tumour patients, whereas the same combination did not show a benefit on lean body mass in a large sample of advanced lung and other cancer patients after 8 weeks. L-carnitine led to an increase of body mass index and an increase in overall survival in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Adverse effects of food supplementation were rare and showed mild intensity. There is not enough solid evidence for the use of minerals, vitamins, proteins, or other supplements in cancer. No serious adverse effects have been reported with dietary supplementation.

  11. A systematic review on the role of vitamins, minerals, proteins, and other supplements for the treatment of cachexia in cancer: a European Palliative Care Research Centre cachexia project

    PubMed Central

    Mochamat; Cuhls, Henning; Marinova, Milka; Kaasa, Stein; Stieber, Christiane; Conrad, Rupert; Radbruch, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We provide a systematic review to support the European Palliative Care Research Collaboration development of clinical guidelines for cancer patients suffering from cachexia. CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, ClinicalTrials.gov, and a selection of cancer journals have been searched up until 15 April 2016. The systematic literature research yielded 4214 publications with 21 of these included in the final evaluation. Regarding minerals, our search identified only one study examining the use of magnesium with no effect on weight loss. As far as vitamins are concerned, vitamin E in combination with omega‐3 fatty acids displayed an effect on survival in a single study, vitamin D showed improvement of muscle weakness in prostate cancer patients, and vitamin C supplementation led to an improvement of various quality of life aspects in a sample with a variety of cancer diagnoses. For proteins, a combination therapy of β‐hydroxy‐β‐methylbutyrate (HMB), arginine, and glutamine showed an increase in lean body mass after 4 weeks in a study of advanced solid tumour patients, whereas the same combination did not show a benefit on lean body mass in a large sample of advanced lung and other cancer patients after 8 weeks. L‐carnitine led to an increase of body mass index and an increase in overall survival in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Adverse effects of food supplementation were rare and showed mild intensity. There is not enough solid evidence for the use of minerals, vitamins, proteins, or other supplements in cancer. No serious adverse effects have been reported with dietary supplementation. PMID:27897391

  12. RTEMS CENTRE - Support and Maintenance CENTRE to RTEMS Operating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Constantino, A.; Mota, M.; Freitas, D.; Zulianello, M.

    2007-08-01

    Real Time Operating System for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS) CENTRE is a project under the ESA-Portugal Task Force aiming to develop a support and maintenance centre to RTEMS operating system. The project can be summarized in two main streams, first one related to design, development, maintenance and integration of tools to augment and sustain RTEMS operating system and second stream linked to the creation of technical competences with a support site to RTEMS operating system in Europe. RTEMS CENTRE intends to minimize the cost of the incorporation/integration of airborne and space applications in this Real Time Operating System. The centre started officially in the 15th of November 2006 and is currently in the study definition and system engineering phase.

  13. Cohort profile of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust Biomedical Research Centre (SLaM BRC) Case Register: current status and recent enhancement of an Electronic Mental Health Record-derived data resource

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Gayan; Broadbent, Matthew; Callard, Felicity; Chang, Chin-Kuo; Downs, Johnny; Dutta, Rina; Fernandes, Andrea; Hayes, Richard D; Henderson, Max; Jackson, Richard; Jewell, Amelia; Kadra, Giouliana; Little, Ryan; Pritchard, Megan; Shetty, Hitesh; Tulloch, Alex; Stewart, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The South London and Maudsley National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust Biomedical Research Centre (SLaM BRC) Case Register and its Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) application were developed in 2008, generating a research repository of real-time, anonymised, structured and open-text data derived from the electronic health record system used by SLaM, a large mental healthcare provider in southeast London. In this paper, we update this register's descriptive data, and describe the substantial expansion and extension of the data resource since its original development. Participants Descriptive data were generated from the SLaM BRC Case Register on 31 December 2014. Currently, there are over 250 000 patient records accessed through CRIS. Findings to date Since 2008, the most significant developments in the SLaM BRC Case Register have been the introduction of natural language processing to extract structured data from open-text fields, linkages to external sources of data, and the addition of a parallel relational database (Structured Query Language) output. Natural language processing applications to date have brought in new and hitherto inaccessible data on cognitive function, education, social care receipt, smoking, diagnostic statements and pharmacotherapy. In addition, through external data linkages, large volumes of supplementary information have been accessed on mortality, hospital attendances and cancer registrations. Future plans Coupled with robust data security and governance structures, electronic health records provide potentially transformative information on mental disorders and outcomes in routine clinical care. The SLaM BRC Case Register continues to grow as a database, with approximately 20 000 new cases added each year, in addition to extension of follow-up for existing cases. Data linkages and natural language processing present important opportunities to enhance this type of research resource further, achieving both volume

  14. Perception and Understanding of Invasive Alien Species Issues by Nature Conservation and Horticulture Professionals in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoeven, Sonia; Piqueray, Julien; Halford, Mathieu; Nulens, Greet; Vincke, Jan; Mahy, Grégory

    2011-03-01

    We conducted a survey to determine how two professional sectors in Belgium, horticulture professionals and nature reserve managers (those directly involved in conservation), view the issues associated with invasive plant species. We developed and utilized a questionnaire that addressed the themes of awareness, concept and use of language, availability of information, impacts and, finally, control and available solutions. Using co-inertia analyses, we tested to what extent the perception of invasive alien species (IAS) was dependent upon the perception of Nature in general. Only forty-two percent of respondent horticulture professionals and eighty-two percent of nature reserve managers had a general knowledge of IAS. Many individuals in both target groups nonetheless had an accurate understanding of the scientific issues. Our results therefore suggest that the manner in which individuals within the two groups view, or perceive, the IAS issue was more the result of lack of information than simply biased perceptions of target groups. Though IAS perceptions by the two groups diverged, they were on par with how they viewed Nature in general. The descriptions of IAS by participants converged with the ideas and concepts frequently found in the scientific literature. Both managers and horticulture professionals expressed a strong willingness to participate in programs designed to prevent the spread of, and damage caused by, IAS. Despite this, the continued commercial availability of many invasive species highlighted the necessity to use both mandatory and voluntary approaches to reduce their re-introduction and spread. The results of this study provide stakeholders and conservation managers with practical information on which communication and management strategies can be based.

  15. Determinants of recycling common types of plastic product waste in environmental horticulture industry: The case of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ting; Klepacka, Anna M; Florkowski, Wojciech J; Braman, Kristine

    2016-02-01

    Environmental horticulture firms provide a variety of commercial/residential landscape products and services encompassing ornamental plant production, design, installation, and maintenance. The companies generate tons of waste including plastic containers, trays, and greenhouse/field covers, creating the need to reduce and utilize plastic waste. Based on survey data collected in Georgia in 2013, this paper investigates determinants of the environmental horticulture firms' recycling decision (plastic containers, flats, and greenhouse poly). Our findings indicate that the decision to discard vs. recycle plastic containers, flats, and greenhouse poly is significantly influenced by firm scope, size, location, and partnership with recycling providers, as well as whether recycling providers offer additional waste pickup services. Insights from this study are of use to local governments and environmental organizations interested in increasing horticultural firm participation in recycling programs and lowering the volume of plastic destined for landfills.

  16. Japanese plums (Prunus salicina Lindl.) and phytochemicals--breeding, horticultural practice, postharvest storage, processing and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Kent J; Topp, Bruce; Russell, Dougal; Stanley, Roger; Netzel, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Previous reviews of plum phytochemical content and health benefits have concentrated on the European plum, Prunus domestica L. However, the potential bioactivity of red- and dark red-fleshed Japanese plums, Prunus salicina Lindl., so-called blood plums, appears to warrant a significant increase in exposure, as indicated in a recent review of the whole Prunus genus. Furthermore, Japanese plums are the predominant plum produced on an international basis. In this review the nutrient and phytochemical content, breeding, horticultural practice, postharvest treatment and processing as well as bioactivity (emphasising in vivo studies) of Japanese plum are considered, with a focus on the anthocyanin content that distinguishes the blood plums.

  17. Light-emitting diode technology status and directions: Opportunities for horticultural lighting

    DOE PAGES

    Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Pattison, P. Morgan; Krames, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Here, light-emitting diode (LED) technology has advanced rapidly over the last decade, primarily driven by display and general illumination applications ("solid-state lighting (SSL) for humans"). These advancements have made LED lighting technically and economically advantageous not only for these applications, but also, as an indirect benefit, for adjacent applications such as horticultural lighting ("SSL for plants"). Moreover, LED technology has much room for continued improvement. In the near-term, these improvements will continue to be driven by SSL for humans (with indirect benefit to SSL for plants), the most important of which can be anticipated.

  18. Object oriented classification of high resolution data for inventory of horticultural crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbar, R.; Ravishankar, H. M.; Trivedi, S.; Subramoniam, S. R.; Uday, R.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    High resolution satellite images are associated with large variance and thus, per pixel classifiers often result in poor accuracy especially in delineation of horticultural crops. In this context, object oriented techniques are powerful and promising methods for classification. In the present study, a semi-automatic object oriented feature extraction model has been used for delineation of horticultural fruit and plantation crops using Erdas Objective Imagine. Multi-resolution data from Resourcesat LISS-IV and Cartosat-1 have been used as source data in the feature extraction model. Spectral and textural information along with NDVI were used as inputs for generation of Spectral Feature Probability (SFP) layers using sample training pixels. The SFP layers were then converted into raster objects using threshold and clump function resulting in pixel probability layer. A set of raster and vector operators was employed in the subsequent steps for generating thematic layer in the vector format. This semi-automatic feature extraction model was employed for classification of major fruit and plantations crops viz., mango, banana, citrus, coffee and coconut grown under different agro-climatic conditions. In general, the classification accuracy of about 75-80 per cent was achieved for these crops using object based classification alone and the same was further improved using minimal visual editing of misclassified areas. A comparison of on-screen visual interpretation with object oriented approach showed good agreement. It was observed that old and mature plantations were classified more accurately while young and recently planted ones (3 years or less) showed poor classification accuracy due to mixed spectral signature, wider spacing and poor stands of plantations. The results indicated the potential use of object oriented approach for classification of high resolution data for delineation of horticultural fruit and plantation crops. The present methodology is applicable at

  19. The Effect of Horticultural Therapy on the Quality of Life of Palliative Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Claudia Kam-Yuk; Lau, Carmen Ka-Yan; Kan, Wai Yin; Lam, Wai Man; Fung, Connie Yuen Yee

    2017-01-27

    Palliative care patients experienced a variety of needs and perceived their quality of life as being only fair. This study adopted a single group repeated-measure design to investigate the effect of horticultural therapy on the quality of life of palliative care patients using the Quality of Life Concern in End of Life Questionnaire. Significant differences in the domains of "existential distress" and "health care concern" were observed immediately post-intervention and at four weeks post-intervention, respectively. No other significant differences were seen in the other domains or in the total mean score of the outcome measure.

  20. The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Nicholas M.; Schade, D.; Astronomy Data Centre, Canadian

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) is the world's largest astronomical data center, holding over 0.5 Petabytes of information, and serving nearly 3000 astronomers worldwide. Its current data collections include BLAST, CFHT, CGPS, FUSE, Gemini, HST, JCMT, MACHO, MOST, and numerous other archives and services. It provides extensive data archiving, curation, and processing expertise, via projects such as MegaPipe, and enables substantial day-to-day collaboration between resident astronomers and computer specialists. It is a stable, powerful, persistent, and properly supported environment for the storage and processing of large volumes of data, a condition that is now absolutely vital for their science potential to be exploited by the community. Through initiatives such as the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM), the Canadian Virtual Observatory (CVO), and the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), the CADC is at the global forefront of advancing astronomical research through improved data services. The CAOM aims to provide homogeneous data access, and hence viable interoperability between a potentially unlimited number of different data collections, at many wavelengths. It is active in the definition of numerous emerging standards within the International Virtual Observatory, and several datasets are already available. The CANFAR project is an initiative to make cloud computing for storage and data-intensive processing available to the community. It does this via a Virtual Machine environment that is equivalent to managing a local desktop. Several groups are already processing science data. CADC is also at the forefront of advanced astronomical data analysis, driven by the science requirements of astronomers both locally and further afield. The emergence of 'Astroinformatics' promises to provide not only utility items like object classifications, but to directly enable new science by accessing previously undiscovered or intractable

  1. Breeding better cultivars, faster: applications of new technologies for the rapid deployment of superior horticultural tree crops

    PubMed Central

    van Nocker, Steve; Gardiner, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Woody perennial plants, including trees that produce fruits and nuts of horticultural value, typically have long breeding cycles, and development and introduction of improved cultivars by plant breeders may require many breeding cycles and dozens of years. However, recent advances in biotechnologies and genomics have the potential to accelerate cultivar development greatly in all crops. This mini-review summarizes approaches to reduce the number and the duration of breeding cycles for horticultural tree crops, and outlines the challenges that remain to implement these into efficient breeding pipelines. PMID:26504538

  2. Growing media constituents determine the microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media for horticulture.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Oliver; Reheul, Dirk; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine; Perneel, Maaike; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico

    2016-05-01

    Vegetables and fruits are an important part of a healthy food diet, however, the eco-sustainability of the production of these can still be significantly improved. European farmers and consumers spend an estimated €15.5 billion per year on inorganic fertilizers and the production of N-fertilizers results in a high carbon footprint. We investigated if fertilizer type and medium constituents determine microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media and can be used as a next step towards a more sustainable horticulture. We demonstrated that growing media constituents showed differences in urea hydrolysis, ammonia and nitrite oxidation and in carbon dioxide respiration rate. Interestingly, mixing of the growing media constituents resulted in a stimulation of the function of the microorganisms. The use of organic fertilizer resulted in an increase in amoA gene copy number by factor 100 compared to inorganic fertilizers. Our results support our hypothesis that the activity of the functional microbial community with respect to nitrogen turnover in an organic growing medium can be improved by selecting and mixing the appropriate growing media components with each other. These findings contribute to the understanding of the functional microbial community in growing media and its potential role towards a more responsible horticulture.

  3. Community response of insects associated with eastern hemlock to imidacloprid and horticultural oil treatments.

    PubMed

    Dilling, Carla; Lambdin, Paris; Grant, Jerome; Rhea, Rusty

    2009-02-01

    The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, is an invasive species reducing the populations of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis L. Carrière, throughout the eastern United States. Systemic imidacloprid and horticultural oil are the primary chemicals used to control infestations of this invasive pest; however, the impact of these two chemicals on nontarget canopy insects is unknown. This study was initiated in November 2005 to assess the effects of (1) imidacloprid soil drench, (2) imidacloprid soil injection, (3) imidacloprid tree injections, and (4) horticultural oil applications on multiple levels of organization (composition, overall specimen abundance and species richness, guild specimen abundance and species richness, and individual species) within the phytophagous and transient canopy insect community. Community composition differed significantly among treatments based on analysis of similarity. Mean species richness and specimen abundance were significantly reduced by one or more treatments. Soil drench applications significantly reduced species richness for the detritivore and phytophaga guilds. Furthermore, specimen abundance for species in the detritivore, fungivore, phytophaga, scavenger, and transient phytophaga guilds was significantly lower in the soil drench treatment. This trend was consistent in all insect guilds examined, with the exception of the hematophaga guild that was not significantly lower than for species on the control trees. Of the 293 species documented to be associated with eastern hemlocks, 33 species were found to be directly effected by one or more of the chemical treatments.

  4. Eats roots and leaves. Can edible horticultural crops address dietary calcium, magnesium and potassium deficiencies?

    PubMed

    Broadley, Martin R; White, Philip J

    2010-11-01

    Human individuals require at least 20 inorganic elements ('minerals') for normal functioning. However, much of the world's population is probably deficient in one or more essential minerals and at increased risk of physiological disorders. Addressing these 'hidden hungers' is a challenge for the nutrition and agriculture sectors. Mineral deficiencies among populations are typically identified from dietary surveys because (1) minerals are acquired primarily from dietary sources and (2) (bio)assays of mineral status can be unreliable. While dietary surveys are likely to under-report energy intakes, surveys show that 9% of all UK and US adults consume Ca and Mg, and 14% of adults consume K, at quantities below the UK lower reference nutrient intake, and are therefore at risk of deficiency. Low dietary Ca, Mg and K intakes can be caused by energy-malnourishment and by cultural and economic factors driving dietary conservatism. For example, cereal grains routinely displace vegetables and fruits in the diet. Cereal grains have low concentrations of several minerals, notably Ca, as a consequence of their physiology. Low grain mineral concentrations are compounded when cereal crops are grown in soils of low mineral phytoavailability and when grain is processed. In this paper, the impact of increased vegetable consumption and horticultural biofortification, i.e. enhancing crop mineral content through breeding and agronomy, on intakes of the major minerals Ca, Mg and K is assessed. Despite low energy intake from horticultural crops generally, increased vegetable consumption and biofortification would significantly improve dietary intakes of Ca, Mg and K.

  5. Production of pathogen-free horticultural crops by cryotherapy of in vitro-grown shoot tips.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chaohong; Wang, Renrui; Li, Jingwei; Wang, Biao; Yin, Zhenfang; Cui, Zhenhua; Li, Baiquan; Bi, Wenlu; Zhang, Zhibo; Li, Mingfu; Wang, Qiaochun

    2013-01-01

    Horticultural crops are economically valuable for sustainable agricultural production. Plant diseases caused by Pathogens including virus, phytoplasma and bacterium have been a great threat to production of horticultural crops. The efficient use of pathogen-free plant materials has overcome the menace of plant diseases and has sustained crop production. Cryotherapy of shoot tips, a novel application of cryopreservation technique, has become a new plant biotechnology tool for plant pathogen eradication. When compared with the traditional methods, cryotherapy of shoot tips produces high frequency of pathogen-free plants, which is independent of shoot tip size and cryogenic methods. Cryotherapy of shoot tips has six major steps to produce pathogen-free plants: (1) introduction of infected plant materials into in vitro cultures; (2) excision of shoot tips; (3) cryotherapy; (4) post-culture for plant regeneration; (5) indexing of pathogens in regenerated plants after cryotherapy; and (6) establishment of pathogen-free nuclear stock plants. The key steps 2, 3, and 4 are similar to cryopreservation, and play a major role in obtaining high pathogen eradication frequency.

  6. A prospective study of group cohesiveness in therapeutic horticulture for clinical depression.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil W; Kirkevold, Marit

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in psychological distress and social participation in adults diagnosed with clinical depression during and after participating in a therapeutic horticulture programme, and to investigate if the changes covaried with levels of group cohesiveness during the intervention. An intervention with a single-group design was repeated with different samples in successive years (pooled n = 46). In each year, five groups of 3-7 participants went through the intervention. Data were collected before, twice during, and immediately after a 12-week therapeutic horticulture programme, as well as at 3-months' follow up. Mental health assessments included the Beck Depression Inventory, the State Subscale of Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Positive Affect Scale from the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Therapeutic Factors Inventory-Cohesiveness Scale. The analysis of the pooled data confirmed significant beneficial change in all mental health variables during the intervention. Change from baseline in depression severity persisted at 3-months' follow up. Increased social activity after the intervention was reported for 38% of the participants. The groups quickly established strong cohesiveness, and this continued to increase during the intervention. The average level of group cohesiveness correlated positively, but not significantly, with change in all mental health outcome variables.

  7. Upgrading of the STP Uithoorn: treatment of nutrient rich wastewater from horticulture.

    PubMed

    Piekema, P; Neef, R

    2005-01-01

    The STP Uithoorn will be upgraded to accommodate the treatment of wastewater from a growing population and to meet more stringent nutrient discharge limits in 2006. In 2003 a system choice and preliminary design was made for the upgrading. A special feature is the nutrient rich wastewater flow from the rapidly developing horticulture in the area. Since the future loads from horticulture are highly uncertain, flexibility of the STP after upgrading is an important issue. A three stage system was selected: improved physical-chemical primary treatment, secondary treatment by activated sludge, and tertiary treatment by denitrifying filters. In this way an important part of the existing infrastructure can be reused, and flexibility is assured by constructing the tertiary treatment in modules and by providing a wide range of operational control possibilities. In this paper the process of system choice and selection of type of tertiary treatment are described, as well as the optimisation of the existing treatment. In order to determine the feasibility of allowing a high loading rate on the existing secondary clarifiers, a two-dimensional hydraulic model of the clarification process was used.

  8. Impact of intensive horticulture practices on groundwater content of nitrates, sodium, potassium, and pesticides.

    PubMed

    Melo, Armindo; Pinto, Edgar; Aguiar, Ana; Mansilha, Catarina; Pinho, Olívia; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2012-07-01

    A monitoring program of nitrate, nitrite, potassium, sodium, and pesticides was carried out in water samples from an intensive horticulture area in a vulnerable zone from north of Portugal. Eight collecting points were selected and water-analyzed in five sampling campaigns, during 1 year. Chemometric techniques, such as cluster analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and discriminant analysis, were used in order to understand the impact of intensive horticulture practices on dug and drilled wells groundwater and to study variations in the hydrochemistry of groundwater. PCA performed on pesticide data matrix yielded seven significant PCs explaining 77.67% of the data variance. Although PCA rendered considerable data reduction, it could not clearly group and distinguish the sample types. However, a visible differentiation between the water samples was obtained. Cluster and discriminant analysis grouped the eight collecting points into three clusters of similar characteristics pertaining to water contamination, indicating that it is necessary to improve the use of water, fertilizers, and pesticides. Inorganic fertilizers such as potassium nitrate were suspected to be the most important factors for nitrate contamination since highly significant Pearson correlation (r = 0.691, P < 0.01) was obtained between groundwater nitrate and potassium contents. Water from dug wells is especially prone to contamination from the grower and their closer neighbor's practices. Water from drilled wells is also contaminated from distant practices.

  9. Windrow composting as horticultural waste management strategy - A case study in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Gavilanes-Terán, Irene; Jara-Samaniego, Janneth; Idrovo-Novillo, Julio; Bustamante, Ma Angeles; Moral, Raúl; Paredes, Concepción

    2016-02-01

    In Ecuador, enormous quantities of vegetable wastes are produced annually from the horticultural industries. Composting can be a feasible treatment to stabilise horticultural wastes and, thus, to improve their properties for use as organic fertilisers. In this study, two different piles were prepared, using laying hen manure and sawdust mixed with broccoli or tomato waste, respectively, and composted by the turned windrow composting system. Throughout the composting process, the temperature of the mixtures was monitored and physico-chemical and chemical properties and the degree of maturity were determined. Also, principal component analysis was used to interpret the data set of compost characteristics. In both piles, the temperature exceeded 55°C for more than 2weeks, which ensured maximum pathogen reduction. Organic matter (OM) losses followed a first-order kinetic equation in both piles. The final composts showed a suitable degree of stability and maturity and an absence of phytotoxins, as observed in the evolution and final values of the total organic carbon/total nitrogen ratio (Corg/NT<20), water-soluble organic carbon (Cw<1.7%), germination index (GI>50%) and cation exchange capacity (CEC>67meq (100g OM)(-1)). As well, the evolution of different humification indexes during composting was a good indicator of the OM humification process. The type of vegetable waste used influenced OM and NT mineralisation and the final properties of the composts, showing the mixture with tomato waste a higher fertilising capacity and less environmental problems.

  10. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    This newsletter is composed of brief notes in the various areas of science. Biology Notes include hazards of tasting Phenylthiocarbamide in laboratory experiments, the use of Albustic and Clinistix test papers for protein and glucose determinations, the measurement of the respiratory quotient, and the construction of a simple respirometer. Physics…

  11. The Human Communication Research Centre dialogue database.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A H; Garrod, S C; Clark, A; Boyle, E; Mullin, J

    1992-10-01

    The HCRC dialogue database consists of over 700 transcribed and coded dialogues from pairs of speakers aged from seven to fourteen. The speakers are recorded while tackling co-operative problem-solving tasks and the same pairs of speakers are recorded over two years tackling 10 different versions of our two tasks. In addition there are over 200 dialogues recorded between pairs of undergraduate speakers engaged on versions of the same tasks. Access to the database, and to its accompanying custom-built search software, is available electronically over the JANET system by contacting liz@psy.glasgow.ac.uk, from whom further information about the database and a user's guide to the database can be obtained.

  12. The Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2): organization of diabetes care in Denmark and supplementary data sources for data collection among DD2 study participants.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Friborg, Søren; Nielsen, Jens Steen; Schroll, Henrik; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a short overview of the Danish health care system and the organization of care for type 2 diabetes patients in Denmark. It also describes the supplementary data sources that are used for collection of baseline data in the nationwide Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2) Project. The Danish National Health Service provides tax-funded medical care for all 5.6 million Danish residents. The health care system is characterized by extensive individual-level registration of data used for planning, administration, quality improvement, and research. It is estimated that there are currently at least 250,000 individuals with known diabetes in Denmark (approximately 4.5% of the Danish population), of which an estimated 80% are followed and treated by their general practitioners and approximately 20% are followed at hospital specialist outpatient clinics. These health care providers form the basis for recruiting diabetes patients in the DD2 project, and the data sources that these providers use in clinical practice give access to important supplementary patient data. The DD2's patient-enrollment system is designed to be fast and simple, and thus only collects primary interview data that cannot be extracted from already existing data sources. Thus, in addition to an online DD2 questionnaire filled out by general practitioners and hospital physicians at the time of patient enrollment, supplementary data are obtained from the Danish Diabetes Database for Adults, a nationwide clinical quality improvement registry. Both hospital physicians and a growing number of general practitioners routinely report data to this database. For general practitioners, the Danish General Practice Database acts as an important feeder database for the Danish Diabetes Database for Adults and thereby also for the DD2 project.

  13. [Interdisciplinary centres in hospitals? A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Erbsen, Astrid; Rüdiger-Stürchler, Marjam; Heberer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of complex disease patterns demands knowledge, and hence the collaboration of many medical disciplines. Interdisciplinary approaches to treatment are thus superior to multidisciplinary ones in terms of quality and costs. To make use of those benefits, interdisciplinary centres have emerged at many hospitals. Our review of the literature has sought to answer two questions: 1) Is there any evidence for the relationship 'creation of a centre = creation of interdisciplinarity'? 2) How can interdisciplinarity be fostered in centres? Medical and economic publications were identified via key terms in PubMed, Web of Knowledge and WISO. Using their references, further publications were researched. Contributions that complied with predefined criteria were included. For 75 of the 78 publications interdisciplinarity is the means to achieve a centre's objectives in quality and cost. Almost all the positive results achieved in centres, e.g., an increase in number of cases, are attributed to the seemingly established interdisciplinarity, without any evidence to substantiate this interrelation (question 1). The recommendations for creating the requested lively interdisciplinarity are insufficient, since technical arrangements dominate and the importance of social and therewith behavioural aspects is often forgotten--the findings of the respective literature remain unappreciated (question 2). Moreover, pertinent research as well as qualitative longitudinal research designs activating the knowledge of physicians, social scientists and economists should be used to investigate the interdisciplinarity sought for in centres.

  14. The digital eczema centre utrecht.

    PubMed

    van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Veelen, Carien; Hover, Maaike; Eland-de Kok, Petra; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Sonnevelt, Gert-Jan; Mensing, Geert; Pasmans, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMC Utrecht) has developed an eczema portal that combines e-consulting, monitoring and self-management training by a dermatology nurse online for patients and parents of young children with atopic dermatitis (AD). Patient satisfaction with the portal was high. It could be extended to become a Digital Eczema Centre for multidisciplinary collaboration between health-care providers from different locations and the patient. Before starting the construction of the Digital Eczema Centre, the feasibility was examined by carrying out a business case analysis. The purposes, strength and weaknesses showed that the Digital Eczema Centre offered opportunities to improve care for patients with AD. The financial analysis resulted in a medium/best case scenario with a positive result of euro50-240,000 over a period of five years. We expect that the Digital Eczema Centre will increase the accessibility and quality of care. The web-based patient record and the digital chain-of-care promote the involvement of patients, parents and multidisciplinary teams as well as the continuity and coordination of care.

  15. Institutional Effectiveness Assessment Process, 1993-94 Executive Summary. Hospitality and Service Occupations Division, Landscape and Environmental Horticulture Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    A study was conducted to determine current and former students' and local employers' satisfaction with South Seattle Community College's (SSCC's) Landscape and Environmental Horticulture Department. Specifically, the study gathered data on four outcomes: that students receive an education allowing them to meet goals; that students be satisfied…

  16. USING AND CARING FOR ORNAMENTAL PLANT MATERIALS AND LANDSCAPE STRUCTURES. HORTICULTURE-SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE NO. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO PREPARE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR HORTICULTURE-SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, THIS MODULE HAS AS ITS MAJOR OBJECTIVE TO DEVELOP THE ABILITIES NEEDED TO USE, CARE FOR, AND MAINTAIN ORNAMENTAL PLANT MATERIALS AND LANDSCAPE STRUCTURES. IT WAS DEVELOPED ON THE BASIS OF DATA FROM STATE STUDIES BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE. SUBJECT MATTER…

  17. Extending the uses of bioplastic granules for the application of Trichoderma biocontrol isolates in flori/horticulture and turf grass.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioplastic materials are gaining increasing interest in a variety of different industrial and domestic applications. Beside its usage as mulching films and plant clips in horticulture, no other agricultural applications have been proposed. In 2009 we demonstrated that granules made of the bioplastic...

  18. Extending the Use of Bioplastic Granules for the Application of Trichoderma Biocontrol Isolates in Flori/Horticulture and Turfgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioplastic materials are gaining increasing interest in a variety of different industrial and domestic applications. Beside its usage as mulching films and plant clips in horticulture, no other agricultural applications have been proposed. In 2009 we demonstrated that granules made of the bioplastic...

  19. The CAP Approach to Modifying Vocational Programs for Handicapped Students. Vol. 1: Agriculture with an Example in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Lloyd W.; Morehouse, Nancy

    This combination teaching guide and student workbook, the first in a five-volume series (see note), presents an approach to teaching horticulture for handicapped students. The guide discusses a functional approach to modifying agriculture programs to accomodate cognitive, affective, and psychomotor (CAP) domain handicaps. The discussion centers on…

  20. The Melwood Manual: A Planning and Operations Manual for Horticultural Training and Work Co-op Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melwood Horticultural Training Center, Inc., Upper Marlboro, MD.

    This manual is intended as a resource for anyone involved in planning, developing, and/or operating a horticultural training or work co-op program for the handicapped. Following an introductory chapter, the manual is divided into three parts with the greatest weight given to the second part. Part I elaborates on development of the horticulture…

  1. Physical and chemical characterization of biochars produced from coppiced wood of thirteen tree species for use in horticultural substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven-year-old coppiced shoots from thirteen species of native and non-native trees and shrubs were harvested, dried, and were pyrolyzed to produce biochars for potential use in horticultural substrates. Several chemical and physical characteristics of the biochars were determined. There were slight...

  2. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary ‘build to apply’ and ‘build to understand’ approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  3. New roles for poison control centres in the developing countries.

    PubMed

    Laborde, Amalia

    2004-05-20

    The primary mission of poison control centres has always been an improvement in the poisoned patients' care and poison prevention. The need to reach this mission implies that many functions and roles must be accomplished. Many centres, even in developing countries, are multifunctional and provide a broad toxicological information service. However, the main challenges of poison centres in developing countries are still treatment information, formal training, laboratory services accessibility and availability of antidotes. At the same time poison centres from developing countries need to accomplish their public health mission through strengthening and expansion of some well-defined roles like toxico-surveillance and environmental health monitoring according to the prevailing and future toxicological problems. Poison control centres from developing countries continue to face old challenges but cannot ignore the new ones that appear in the globalised world. Poison centres have a vital role for environmental exposure surveillance systems for sentinel event detection. Poison centres offer real-time and continuous data needed for preparation and response during such events and also offer a means to report health concerns. Centres from South America were involved in some of the most important environmental health problems of the region e.g., lead contamination (children), children 'occupational' poisoning, and flour contamination with fusarium toxins. Furthermore, poison centres can be the markers of risk factors or identifiers of vulnerable population e.g., changes in drugs prescription patterns, unusual patterns of addiction, unexpected product uses, children abuse scenarios or undetected sources of environmental contamination. In an era of evidence-based medicine and research, toxico-vigilance based on the millions of cases registered by poison centres everyday acquires more and more importance. A new approach of the toxico-vigilance and preventive roles of poison

  4. Person-centred reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Devenny, Bob; Duffy, Kathleen

    Person-centred health and person-centred care have gained prominence across the UK following the publication of reports on public inquiries exploring failings in care. Self-awareness and participation in reflective practice are recognised as vital to supporting the person-centred agenda. This article presents an education framework for reflective practice, developed and used in one NHS board in Scotland, and based on the tenets of the clinical pastoral education movement. Providing an insight into the usefulness of a spiritual component in the reflective process, the framework provides an opportunity for nurses and other healthcare professionals to examine the spiritual dimensions of patient encounters, their own values and beliefs, and the effect these may have on their practice.

  5. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    PubMed Central

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  6. The first initiative of DNA barcoding of ornamental plants from Egypt and potential applications in horticulture industry

    PubMed Central

    Ashfaq, Muhammad; Ali, Hayssam M.; Yessoufou, Kowiyou

    2017-01-01

    DNA barcoding relies on short and standardized gene regions to identify species. The agricultural and horticultural applications of barcoding such as for marketplace regulation and copyright protection remain poorly explored. This study examines the effectiveness of the standard plant barcode markers (matK and rbcL) for the identification of plant species in private and public nurseries in northern Egypt. These two markers were sequenced from 225 specimens of 161 species and 62 plant families of horticultural importance. The sequence recovery was similar for rbcL (96.4%) and matK (84%), but the number of specimens assigned correctly to the respective genera and species was lower for rbcL (75% and 29%) than matK (85% and 40%). The combination of rbcL and matK brought the number of correct generic and species assignments to 83.4% and 40%, respectively. Individually, the efficiency of both markers varied among different plant families; for example, all palm specimens (Arecaceae) were correctly assigned to species while only one individual of Asteraceae was correctly assigned to species. Further, barcodes reliably assigned ornamental horticultural and medicinal plants correctly to genus while they showed a lower or no success in assigning these plants to species and cultivars. For future, we recommend the combination of a complementary barcode (e.g. ITS or trnH-psbA) with rbcL + matK to increase the performance of taxa identification. By aiding species identification of horticultural crops and ornamental palms, the analysis of the barcode regions will have large impact on horticultural industry. PMID:28199378

  7. The first initiative of DNA barcoding of ornamental plants from Egypt and potential applications in horticulture industry.

    PubMed

    O Elansary, Hosam; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Ali, Hayssam M; Yessoufou, Kowiyou

    2017-01-01

    DNA barcoding relies on short and standardized gene regions to identify species. The agricultural and horticultural applications of barcoding such as for marketplace regulation and copyright protection remain poorly explored. This study examines the effectiveness of the standard plant barcode markers (matK and rbcL) for the identification of plant species in private and public nurseries in northern Egypt. These two markers were sequenced from 225 specimens of 161 species and 62 plant families of horticultural importance. The sequence recovery was similar for rbcL (96.4%) and matK (84%), but the number of specimens assigned correctly to the respective genera and species was lower for rbcL (75% and 29%) than matK (85% and 40%). The combination of rbcL and matK brought the number of correct generic and species assignments to 83.4% and 40%, respectively. Individually, the efficiency of both markers varied among different plant families; for example, all palm specimens (Arecaceae) were correctly assigned to species while only one individual of Asteraceae was correctly assigned to species. Further, barcodes reliably assigned ornamental horticultural and medicinal plants correctly to genus while they showed a lower or no success in assigning these plants to species and cultivars. For future, we recommend the combination of a complementary barcode (e.g. ITS or trnH-psbA) with rbcL + matK to increase the performance of taxa identification. By aiding species identification of horticultural crops and ornamental palms, the analysis of the barcode regions will have large impact on horticultural industry.

  8. Development of a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire for adult patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (HAE-QoL): Spanish multi-centre research project

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a need for a disease-specific instrument for assessing health-related quality of life in adults with hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency, a rare, disabling and life-threatening disease. In this paper we report the protocol for the development and validation of a specific questionnaire, with details on the results of the process of item generation, domain selection, and the expert and patient rating phase. Methods/Design Semi-structured interviews were completed by 45 patients with hereditary angioedema and 8 experts from 8 regions in Spain. A qualitative content analysis of the responses was carried out. Issues raised by respondents were grouped into categories. Content analysis identified 240 different responses, which were grouped into 10 conceptual domains. Sixty- four items were generated. A total of 8 experts and 16 patients assessed the items for clarity, relevance to the disease, and correct dimension assignment. The preliminary version of the specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for hereditary angioedema (HAE-QoL v 1.1) contained 44 items grouped into 9 domains. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multi-centre research project that aims to develop a specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for adult patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency. A preliminary version of the specific HAE-QoL questionnaire was obtained. The qualitative analysis of interviews together with the expert and patient rating phase helped to ensure content validity. A pilot study will be performed to assess the psychometric properties of the questionnaire and to decide on the final version. PMID:22817696

  9. The IOC Centres of Excellence bring prevention to sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, Lars; Bahr, Roald; Cook, Jill L; Derman, Wayne; Emery, Carolyn A; Finch, Caroline F; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Schwellnus, Martin; Steffen, Kathrin

    2014-09-01

    The protection of an athlete's health and preventing injuries and illnesses in sport are top priorities for the IOC and its Medical Commission. The IOC therefore partners with selected research centres around the world and supports research in the field of sports medicine. This has enabled the IOC to develop an international network of expert scientists and clinicians in sports injury and disease prevention research. The IOC wants to promote injury and disease prevention and the improvement of physical health of the athlete by: (1) establishing long-term research programmes on injury and disease prevention (including studies on basic epidemiology, risk factors, injury mechanisms and intervention), (2) fostering collaborative relationships with individuals, institutions and organisations to improve athletes' health, (3) implementing and collaborating with applied, ongoing and novel research and development within the framework and long-term strategy of the IOC and (4) setting up knowledge translation mechanisms to share scientific research results with the field throughout the Olympic Movement and sports community and converting these results into concrete actions to protect the health of the athletes. In 2009, the IOC also identified four research centres that had an established track record in research, educational and clinical activities to achieve these ambitions: (1) the Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Australia; (2) the Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre (SIPRC), Canada; (3) the Clinical Sport and Exercise Medicine Research (CSEM), South Africa and (4) the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center (OSTRC), Norway. This paper highlights the work carried out by these four IOC Centres of Excellence over the past 6 years and their contribution to the world of sports medicine.

  10. Lively Bureaucracy? The ESRC's Doctoral Training Centres and UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunt, Ingrid; McAlpine, Lynn; Mills, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the changing relationships between the UK government, its research councils and universities, focusing on the governing, funding and organisation of doctoral training. We use the Doctoral Training Centres (DTCs) funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as a prism through which to study the shifting nature of…

  11. The Makana Regional Centre of Expertise: Experiments in Social Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz-Sisitka, Heila; O'Donoghue, Rob; Wilmot, Di

    2010-01-01

    This article deliberates the possibilities for Regional Centres of Expertise (RCEs) to become "experiments" in social learning. The purpose of the article is to advance the broader research agenda of RCEs through reflection on the empirical research agenda of one RCE, Makana RCE in South Africa. As such it opens questions on how we might…

  12. Centre for Applied Language Studies, University of Limerick, Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Angela; Atkinson, David; Farr, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Applied Language Studies (CALS), founded in 1997, brings together researchers and postgraduate students from several disciplines in language studies, and is structured in three research clusters: New learning environments; Discourse, society and identity; and Plurilingualism and language policy. There is a certain amount of…

  13. Aqueous chlorine dioxide treatment of horticultural produce: Effects on microbial safety and produce quality - A review.

    PubMed

    Praeger, Ulrike; Herppich, Werner B; Hassenberg, Karin

    2016-05-19

    Microbial load on fresh fruit and vegetables causes decay and losses after harvest and may lead to foodborne illness in case of contamination with human pathogens on raw consumed produces. Washing with tap water only marginally reduces microorganisms attached to produce surfaces. Chlorine is widely used for decontamination on fresh horticultural produces. However, due to harmful by-products and the questionable efficacy it has become increasingly challenged. During the last 20 years, the interest to study ClO2 treatments as an alternative sanitation agent for industrially prepared fresh produce has largely increased. For a wide range of commodities, the application of gaseous ClO2 has meanwhile been investigated. In addition, since several years, the interest in aqueous ClO2 treatments has further risen because of the better manageability in postharvest processing lines compared to gaseous application. This article critically evaluated the effects of postharvest application of aqueous ClO2, either alone or in combination with other treatments, on microbial loads for various horticultural produces. In laboratory investigations, application of aqueous ClO2 at concentrations between 3 and 100 ppm effectively reduced counts of natural or inoculated microorganisms (bacteria, yeasts and mold) in the range of 1 and 5 log. However, various effects of ClO2 treatments on produce quality have been described. These mainly comprise implication on sensory and visual attributes. In this context, there is increasing focus on the potential impacts of aqueous ClO2 on relevant nutritional components of produces such as organic acids or phenolic substances.

  14. Towards Human-Centred Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  15. Fungal genetic resource centres and the genomic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Matthew J; Smith, David

    2004-12-01

    Fungal research and education has for many years been supported by public service genetic resource centres, whose roles have been to maintain, preserve and supply living cultures to the research community. In the genomic era, genetic resource centres are perhaps more important than ever before. The cultures held, many of which are described and validated by expert biosystematists, are valuable resources for the future. There is a need to supply genomic and proteomic research programmes with fully characterised organisms, as usage of organisms from unreliable sources can prove disastrous, not least in economical terms. However, mycologists often require more than just the organisms, for example, their associated information is vital for bioinformatic applications and some researchers may only require genomic DNA from the organism rather than the organism per se. Genetic resource centres are continually adapting to meet the needs of their users and the wider mycological research community, this associated with OECD international initiatives should ensure they exist to support research for many years to come. This review considers the impact of such initiatives, the current roles of fungal genetic resource centres, the mechanisms used to preserve organisms in a stable manner and the range of resources that are offered for genomic research.

  16. KNMI Data Centre: Easy access for all

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vegte, John; Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Spit, Jasper; Mastop, Joeri; Klos, Olaf; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu-Siu; van Moosel, Wim; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    KNMI is the Dutch institute for weather, climate research and seismology. It disseminates weather information to the public at large, the government, aviation and the shipping industry in the interest of safety, the economy and a sustainable environment. To gain insight into long-term developments KNMI conducts research on climate change. Making the knowledge, data and information on hand at KNMI accessible is one core activity. A huge part of the KNMI information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project these issues are tackled. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM was chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven open source technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) resulted in a first release in December 2012 This presentation will focus on the aspects of KDC relating to its technical challenges, the development strategy and the initial usage results of the data centre.

  17. Business Models of High Performance Computing Centres in Higher Education in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eurich, Markus; Calleja, Paul; Boutellier, Roman

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing (HPC) service centres are a vital part of the academic infrastructure of higher education organisations. However, despite their importance for research and the necessary high capital expenditures, business research on HPC service centres is mostly missing. From a business perspective, it is important to find an answer to…

  18. Statistics Canada's Definition and Classification of Postsecondary and Adult Education Providers in Canada. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 071

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Larry

    2009-01-01

    This document outlines the definitions and the typology now used by Statistics Canada's Centre for Education Statistics to identify, classify and delineate the universities, colleges and other providers of postsecondary and adult education in Canada for which basic enrollments, graduates, professors and finance statistics are produced. These new…

  19. Rapid Service/Prediction Centre

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    respect to the 05 C04 system of the IERS Earth Orientation Centre (EOC) at the Paris Observatory by way of a robust linear estimator. Statistical...of each individual data point. The software computes the spline coefficients for every data point, which are then used to interpolate the Earth ...between daily rapid solutions at each daily solution epoch for 2008 and the Earth orientation parameters available in 05 C04 series produced in March 2009

  20. Changing the paradigm for marine data production, dissemination and validation with Collaborative Platforms. The GlobColour webservice, a prime example which leads to the integration of CWE technologies to build-up virtual research centres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanton d'Andon, Odile; Martin-Lauzer, François-Regis; Mangin, Antoine; Barrot, Gilbert; Clouaire, Stephane; Sardou, Olivier; Demaria, Julien; Serra, Romain

    2015-04-01

    data for their particular applications. • Match-ups using real-time EO data and data collected from bio-Argo floats are processed automatically on-the-fly. • This is possible because quality control of the bio-Argo float data is also automated. A dedicated interface has been set-up to monitor the whole fleet of Bio-Argo floats, and access detailed information from each acquired profile. Finally, a Collaborative Platform has been developed to support R&D activities in parallel to the standard production chain, enabling users to work remotely within a dedicated production environment in order to develop new algorithms and methods. The Collaborative Platform is based on a Collaborative Working Environment, a secured IT environment mixing hardware and software elements. It provides access to raw data, to processing and storage facilities, to specific applicative software (e.g. visualisation and post-processing tools). In addition, collaborative tools to exchange data, information and ideas between participants (through forums, web-conferencing…) contribute to create a "Virtual Research Centre" preparing future evolutions of the service. Acknowledgements: This research received funding from the following projects: • MCGS project funded by the Fonds Unique Interministériel, French regional funds PACA and Bretagne, the Fonds Européen de Développement Régional • FP7 Copernicus projects OSS2015 (grant n° 282723) and E-AIMS (grant n° 312642). • The French EQUIPEX project NAOS

  1. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

    PubMed

    Evans, Roger

    2014-11-04

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control was set up in 2005 to strengthen Europe's defences against infectious diseases. The centre is an independent agency of the European Union and is based in Stockholm, Sweden.

  2. Sofia University GNSS Analysis Centre (SUGAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Tzvetan; Sidorov, Dmitry; Teferle, Norman; Guerova, Guergana; Egova, Evgenia; Vassileva, Keranka; Milev, Ivo; Milev, Georgi

    2015-04-01

    The Sofia University GNSS Analysis Centre (SUGAC, suada.phys.uni-sofia.bg) is a new analysis centre established via collaboration between the Department of Meteorology and Geophysics of Sofia University, the IPOS - BuliPOS GNSS network in Bulgaria and the University of Luxembourg. In April 2014, the first processing campaign took place. One year GNSS data from 7 stations of the BuliPOS network are processed in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg. Tropospheric products (Zenith Total Delay and gradients) with 5 min temporal resolution are obtained using the NAPEOS software, developed by ESA. The tropospheric products from this campaign will be used for validation of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model as well as for case studies during intense precipitation events and fog. In this work the WRF model validation for Bulgaria will be presented. Future work will be the establishment of autonomous near real-time processing of the regional ground-based GNSS network in Southeast Europe in support of the EUMETNET E-GVAP and COST ES1206 "Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems for Severe Weather Events and Climate" projects.

  3. Co-composting of solid and liquid olive mill wastes: management aspects and the horticultural value of the resulting composts.

    PubMed

    Aviani, I; Laor, Y; Medina, Sh; Krassnovsky, A; Raviv, M

    2010-09-01

    Successful co-composting of solid and liquid olive mill wastes (OMW) and obtaining a product of horticultural value may increase the viability of this recycling approach. Two composting cycles were performed, in which olive mill solid wastes (OMSW) were used to form five mixtures, wetted either with fresh water or with olive mill wastewater (OMWW). Up to approximately 0.3m(3) of OMWW could be applied to each m(3) of the raw materials without negatively affecting the chemical, physical and horticultural properties of the resulted composts. A growing media composed of perlite amended with 25-33% OMW-composts showed higher suppressiveness against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis as compared to equivalent perlite:peat moss mixtures. The yields of tomato plants grown in peat moss amended with 20% (v:v) of OMW-composts were not significantly different than plants grown in unamended peat. The viability of co-composting as a treatment approach for OMWW is discussed in the context of management aspects and the horticultural value of the final product.

  4. Asymmetric Introgression in the Horticultural Living Fossil Cycas Sect. Asiorientales Using a Genome-Wide Scanning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yu-Chung; Huang, Bing-Hong; Chang, Chun-Wen; Wan, Yu-Ting; Lai, Shih-Jie; Huang, Shong; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The Asian cycads are mostly allopatric, distributed in small population sizes. Hybridization between allopatric species provides clues in determining the mechanism of species divergence. Horticultural introduction provides the chance of interspecific gene flow between allopatric species. Two allopatrically eastern Asian Cycas sect. Asiorientales species, C. revoluta and C. taitungensis, which are widely distributed in Ryukyus and Fujian Province and endemic to Taiwan, respectively, were planted in eastern Taiwan for horticultural reason. Higher degrees of genetic admixture in cultivated samples than wild populations in both cycad species were detected based on multilocus scans by neutral AFLP markers. Furthermore, bidirectional but asymmetric introgression by horticultural introduction of C. revoluta is evidenced by the reanalyses of species associated loci, which are assumed to be diverged after species divergence. Partial loci introgressed from native cycad to the invaders were also detected at the loci of strong species association. Consistent results tested by all neutral loci, and the species-associated loci, specify the recent introgression from the paradox of sharing of ancestral polymorphisms. Phenomenon of introgression of cultivated cycads implies niche conservation among two geographic-isolated cycads, even though the habitats of the extant wild populations of two species are distinct. PMID:23591840

  5. Asymmetric introgression in the horticultural living fossil cycas sect. Asiorientales using a genome-wide scanning approach.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Chung; Huang, Bing-Hong; Chang, Chun-Wen; Wan, Yu-Ting; Lai, Shih-Jie; Huang, Shong; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2013-04-15

    The Asian cycads are mostly allopatric, distributed in small population sizes. Hybridization between allopatric species provides clues in determining the mechanism of species divergence. Horticultural introduction provides the chance of interspecific gene flow between allopatric species. Two allopatrically eastern Asian Cycas sect. Asiorientales species, C. revoluta and C. taitungensis, which are widely distributed in Ryukyus and Fujian Province and endemic to Taiwan, respectively, were planted in eastern Taiwan for horticultural reason. Higher degrees of genetic admixture in cultivated samples than wild populations in both cycad species were detected based on multilocus scans by neutral AFLP markers. Furthermore, bidirectional but asymmetric introgression by horticultural introduction of C. revoluta is evidenced by the reanalyses of species associated loci, which are assumed to be diverged after species divergence. Partial loci introgressed from native cycad to the invaders were also detected at the loci of strong species association. Consistent results tested by all neutral loci, and the species-associated loci, specify the recent introgression from the paradox of sharing of ancestral polymorphisms. Phenomenon of introgression of cultivated cycads implies niche conservation among two geographic-isolated cycads, even though the habitats of the extant wild populations of two species are distinct.

  6. Maintaining health: proactive client-oriented community day treatment centres for the chronic mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Yurkovich, E; Smyer, T; Dean, L

    1999-02-01

    This grounded theory study compared the definition of health by clients of two rural mental health day treatment centres, Big Sky Centre and Montana Centre. Based on an original grounded theory study of seven chronic mentally ill/disabled clients in Big Sky Centre (Yurkovich et al. 1997), the core variable, 'preventing loss of control' and related properties, were validated with nine residents of Montana Centre. While establishing a 'fit' with previous research findings, differences emerged between these two centres. These differences related to the staffs' philosophical approaches in providing treatment to the chronic mentally ill. Big Sky Centre care providers empowered their clients to learn new behaviours from their peers and assume new roles such as newcomer, member and leader. They also encouraged a prosocial attitude, and created a sense of belonging through valued involvement in their treatment. Montana Centre clients were not empowered to try out new behaviours in the treatment environment, or seek social support networks among their peers at the centre, which would foster a sense of belonging. The result was that clients from Montana Centre relied on the formal healthcare system more often than clients from the Big Sky Centre. The competing forces in healthcare today--family members, mental health providers, and insurance or managed care providers--make it easy to lose sight of or fail to gain the client's perspective about their health status and maintenance, particularly as it concerns day treatment centres. The importance of the day treatment centre as a therapeutic community which requires educational processes, innovative nursing practice, and client-centred interventions will be discussed.

  7. Learner Centred Design for a Hybrid Interaction Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Simon; Romero, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Learner centred design methods highlight the importance of involving the stakeholders of the learning process (learners, teachers, educational researchers) at all stages of the design of educational applications and of refining the design through an iterative prototyping process. These methods have been used successfully when designing systems…

  8. Centres for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Attendees' Perceptions of Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gajewska, Urszula; Trigg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Day and community learning centres aim to provide intellectually disabled (ID) people with social support, life skills and greater control over their lives. However, there is little research exploring the benefits of attendance from the perspective of attendees and whether these goals are met. Materials and methods: Unstructured…

  9. The DEMETER Science Mission Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoutte, D.; Brochot, J. Y.; de Carvalho, D.; Elie, F.; Harivelo, F.; Hobara, Y.; Madrias, L.; Parrot, M.; Pinçon, J. L.; Berthelier, J. J.; Peschard, D.; Seran, E.; Gangloff, M.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Lebreton, J. P.; Stverak, S.; Travnicek, P.; Grygorczuk, J.; Slominski, J.; Wronowski, R.; Barbier, S.; Bernard, P.; Gaboriaud, A.; Wallut, J. M.

    2006-04-01

    The DEMETER Scientific Mission Centre (SMC) has been developed and is operated by the Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement (LPCE). The SMC commands the instruments of the scientific payload, collects and distributes DEMETER data and associated products to the DEMETER international community. The SMC has been designed to maximize scientific return and to reduce development and exploitation costs for the DEMETER project. This paper describes the SMC's data processing system, data server and methods of payload operation, and presents associated hardware and software architectures.

  10. A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation on Pest Suppression and Yield of Horticultural Crops

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Utsala; Augé, Robert M.; Butler, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is a proven but relatively new strategy to control soil borne pests of horticultural crops through anaerobic decomposition of organic soil amendments. The ASD technique has primarily been used to control soil borne pathogens; however, this technique has also shown potential to control plant parasitic nematodes and weeds. ASD can utilize a broad range of carbon (C) amendments and optimization may improve efficacy across environments. In this context, a meta-analysis using a random-effects model was conducted to determine effect sizes of the ASD effect on soil borne pathogens (533 studies), plant parasitic nematodes (91 studies), and weeds (88 studies) compared with unamended controls. Yield response to ASD was evaluated (123 studies) compared to unamended and fumigated controls. We also examined moderator variables for environmental conditions and amendments to explore the impact of these moderators on ASD effectiveness on pests and yield. Across all pathogen types with the exception of Sclerotinia spp., ASD studies show suppression of bacterial, oomycete and fungal pathogens (59 to 94%). Pathogen suppression was effective under all environmental conditions (50 to 94%) and amendment types (53 to 97%), except when amendments were applied at rates less than 0.3 kg m-2. The ASD effect ranged from 15 to 56% for nematode suppression and 32 to 81% for weed suppression, but these differences were not significant. Significant nematode moderators included study type, soil type, sampling depth, incubation period, and use of mixed amendments. Weed suppression due to ASD showed significant heterogeneity for all environmental conditions, confirming that these studies do not share a common effect size. Total crop yield was not reduced by ASD when compared to a fumigant control and yield was significantly higher (30%) compared to an unamended control, suggesting ASD as a feasible option to maintain yield without chemical soil fumigants. We

  11. A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation on Pest Suppression and Yield of Horticultural Crops.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Utsala; Augé, Robert M; Butler, David M

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is a proven but relatively new strategy to control soil borne pests of horticultural crops through anaerobic decomposition of organic soil amendments. The ASD technique has primarily been used to control soil borne pathogens; however, this technique has also shown potential to control plant parasitic nematodes and weeds. ASD can utilize a broad range of carbon (C) amendments and optimization may improve efficacy across environments. In this context, a meta-analysis using a random-effects model was conducted to determine effect sizes of the ASD effect on soil borne pathogens (533 studies), plant parasitic nematodes (91 studies), and weeds (88 studies) compared with unamended controls. Yield response to ASD was evaluated (123 studies) compared to unamended and fumigated controls. We also examined moderator variables for environmental conditions and amendments to explore the impact of these moderators on ASD effectiveness on pests and yield. Across all pathogen types with the exception of Sclerotinia spp., ASD studies show suppression of bacterial, oomycete and fungal pathogens (59 to 94%). Pathogen suppression was effective under all environmental conditions (50 to 94%) and amendment types (53 to 97%), except when amendments were applied at rates less than 0.3 kg m(-2). The ASD effect ranged from 15 to 56% for nematode suppression and 32 to 81% for weed suppression, but these differences were not significant. Significant nematode moderators included study type, soil type, sampling depth, incubation period, and use of mixed amendments. Weed suppression due to ASD showed significant heterogeneity for all environmental conditions, confirming that these studies do not share a common effect size. Total crop yield was not reduced by ASD when compared to a fumigant control and yield was significantly higher (30%) compared to an unamended control, suggesting ASD as a feasible option to maintain yield without chemical soil fumigants. We

  12. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  13. Horticultural characteristics of transgenic tobacco expressing the rolC gene from Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, R.; Zimmerman, T.W.; Cordts, J.M.; Footen, K.J. ); Ravelonandro, M. . Station de Pathologie Vegetale)

    1994-09-01

    Wisconsin 38 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf discs were transformed with the disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 101 carrying the rolC gene from A. rhizogenes and NPT II and GUS genes. Shoots that regenerated on kanamycin-containing medium were confirmed as transgenic through GUS assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analyses, and transmission of the foreign genes through the sexual cycle. Transgenic plants were as short as half the height of control plants; were earlier flowering by up to 35 days; and had smaller leaves, shorter internodes, smaller seed capsules, fewer seeds, smaller flowers, and reduced pollen viability. The number of seed capsules, leaf number, and specific root length were similar between transgenic and control plants. Transgenic clones varied in the expression of the rolC-induced growth alterations as did the first generation of seedlings from these clones. Such differences suggested the potential for selecting for different levels of expression. Transformation with the rolC gene presents a potentially useful method of genetically modifying horticultural crops, particularly for flowering date, height, and leaf and flower size. Chemical names used: neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS).

  14. Plastid genomics in horticultural species: importance and applications for plant population genetics, evolution, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Marcelo; do Nascimento Vieira, Leila; Fraga, Hugo P; Guerra, Miguel P

    2015-01-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, plastids, and mitochondria arose from an endosymbiotic process, which determined the presence of three genetic compartments into the incipient plant cell. After that, these three genetic materials from host and symbiont suffered several rearrangements, bringing on a complex interaction between nuclear and organellar gene products. Nowadays, plastids harbor a small genome with ∼130 genes in a 100-220 kb sequence in higher plants. Plastid genes are mostly highly conserved between plant species, being useful for phylogenetic analysis in higher taxa. However, intergenic spacers have a relatively higher mutation rate and are important markers to phylogeographical and plant population genetics analyses. The predominant uniparental inheritance of plastids is like a highly desirable feature for phylogeny studies. Moreover, the gene content and genome rearrangements are efficient tools to capture and understand evolutionary events between different plant species. Currently, genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages as high-level of foreign protein expression, marker gene excision, gene expression in operon and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Therefore, plastid genome can be used for adding new characteristics related to synthesis of metabolic compounds, biopharmaceutical, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the importance and applications of plastid genome as tools for genetic and evolutionary studies, and plastid transformation focusing on increasing the performance of horticultural species in the field.

  15. Plastid genomics in horticultural species: importance and applications for plant population genetics, evolution, and biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Marcelo; do Nascimento Vieira, Leila; Fraga, Hugo P.; Guerra, Miguel P.

    2015-01-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, plastids, and mitochondria arose from an endosymbiotic process, which determined the presence of three genetic compartments into the incipient plant cell. After that, these three genetic materials from host and symbiont suffered several rearrangements, bringing on a complex interaction between nuclear and organellar gene products. Nowadays, plastids harbor a small genome with ∼130 genes in a 100–220 kb sequence in higher plants. Plastid genes are mostly highly conserved between plant species, being useful for phylogenetic analysis in higher taxa. However, intergenic spacers have a relatively higher mutation rate and are important markers to phylogeographical and plant population genetics analyses. The predominant uniparental inheritance of plastids is like a highly desirable feature for phylogeny studies. Moreover, the gene content and genome rearrangements are efficient tools to capture and understand evolutionary events between different plant species. Currently, genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages as high-level of foreign protein expression, marker gene excision, gene expression in operon and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Therefore, plastid genome can be used for adding new characteristics related to synthesis of metabolic compounds, biopharmaceutical, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the importance and applications of plastid genome as tools for genetic and evolutionary studies, and plastid transformation focusing on increasing the performance of horticultural species in the field. PMID:26284102

  16. Centre of Excellence For Simulation Education and Innovation (CESEI).

    PubMed

    Qayumi, A Karim

    2010-01-01

    Simulation is becoming an integral part of medical education. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) was the first organization to recognize the value of simulation-based learning, and to award accreditation for educational institutions that aim to provide simulation as part of the experiential learning opportunity. Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation (CESEI) is a multidisciplinary and interprofessional educational facility that is based at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Vancouver Costal Health Authority (VCH). Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation's goal is to provide excellence in education, research, and healthcare delivery by providing a technologically advanced environment and learning opportunity using simulation for various groups of learners including undergraduate, postgraduate, nursing, and allied health professionals. This article is an attempt to describe the infrastructure, services, and uniqueness of the Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation.

  17. Patient-centred measurement in ophthalmology – a paradigm shift

    PubMed Central

    Pesudovs, Konrad

    2006-01-01

    Ophthalmologists and researchers in ophthalmology understand what a rapidly evolving field ophthalmology is, and that to conduct good research it is essential to use the latest and best methods. In outcomes research, one modern initiative has been to conduct holistic measurement of outcomes inclusive of the patient's point of view; patient-centred outcome. This, of course, means including a questionnaire. However, the irony of trying to improve outcomes research by being inclusive of many measures is that the researcher may not be expert in all measures used. Certainly, few people conducting outcomes research in ophthalmology would claim to be questionnaire experts. Most tend to be experts in their ophthalmic subspecialty and probably simply choose a popular questionnaire that appears to fit their needs and think little more about it. Perhaps, unlike our own field, we assume that the field of questionnaire research is relatively stable. This is far from the case. The measurement of patient-centred outcomes with questionnaires is a rapidly evolving field. Indeed, over the last few years a paradigm shift has occurred in patient-centred measurement. PMID:16774690

  18. Children's Preferences for Group Musical Activities in Child Care Centres: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural research study of children's preferences for group musical activities in child care centres. A total of 228 young children aged 4-5 years in seven child care centres in Hong Kong and in the Adelaide City of South Australia participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected via a…

  19. Evaluation of the Behaviour Management Program at the Melbourne Juvenile Justice Centre. Working Paper 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmens, Bob; Cook, Sandy; Grimwade, Cherry

    In 1998, researchers were requested to undertake an evaluation of a proposed new behavior program at the Melbourne Juvenile Justice Centre. The behavior management program at the Centre attempts to intervene constructively in the lives of young offenders. The project aims to increase the range of skills for management of clients' behaviors in a…

  20. Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, G.; Potukuchi, P.; Roy, A.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne is collaborating with the Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), New Delhi, to develop a new type of superconducting accelerating structure for low-velocity heavy ions. A copper model has been evaluated and tests on the niobium prototype are currently in progress. Some technical details of this project are described in the Superconducting Linac Development section of this report. All funding for the prototype has come from the NSC, and they have also stationed two staff members at ATLAS for the past two years to gain experience and work on this project. Additional NSC personnel visited ATLAS for extended periods during 1994 for electronics and cryogenics experience and training. Two NSC staff members are scheduled to spend several months at ANL during 1995 to continue tests and developments of the prototype resonators and to initiate fabrication of the production models for their linac project.

  1. Distant Operational Care Centre: Design Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to outline the design of the Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC), a modular medical facility to maintain human health and performance in space, that is adaptable to a range of remote human habitats. The purpose of this project is to outline a design, not to go into a complete technical specification of a medical facility for space. This project involves a process to produce a concise set of requirements, addressing the fundamental problems and issues regarding all aspects of a space medical facility for the future. The ideas presented here are at a high level, based on existing, researched, and hypothetical technologies. Given the long development times for space exploration, the outlined concepts from this project embodies a collection of identified problems, and corresponding proposed solutions and ideas, ready to contribute to future space exploration efforts. In order to provide a solid extrapolation and speculation in the context of the future of space medicine, the extent of this project's vision is roughly within the next two decades. The Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC) is a modular medical facility for space. That is, its function is to maintain human health and performance in space environments, through prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Furthermore, the DOCC must be adaptable to meet the environmental requirements of different remote human habitats, and support a high quality of human performance. To meet a diverse range of remote human habitats, the DOCC concentrates on a core medical capability that can then be adapted. Adaptation would make use of the DOCC's functional modularity, providing the ability to replace, add, and modify core functions of the DOCC by updating hardware, operations, and procedures. Some of the challenges to be addressed by this project include what constitutes the core medical capability in terms of hardware, operations, and procedures, and how DOCC can be adapted to different remote

  2. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Faheem

    2008-07-01

    This talk traces in brief the genesis of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, as one of Prof. Abdus Salam's major achievements. It outlines why Salam felt the necessity for establishing such a centre to help physicists in the developing world. It situates the founding of the Centre within Salam's broader vision of the causes of underdevelopment and of science as an engine for scientific, technological, economic and social development. The talk reviews the successes and failures of the ICTP and gives a brief overall view of the current status of the Centre.

  3. Current, Short Term, Future and Star Wars Research Projects for Ornamental Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Greenhouse Production Research Group is involved in fundamental and developmental plant research aimed at developing tools for early stress detection and efficient agrochemical utilization for protected horticulture crops. The group conducts basic plant biology research with the goal o...

  4. Agroindustrial compost as a peat alternative in the horticultural industry of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Gavilanes-Terán, Irene; Jara-Samaniego, Janneth; Idrovo-Novillo, Julio; Bustamante, Ma Angeles; Pérez-Murcia, Ma Dolores; Pérez-Espinosa, Aurelia; López, Marga; Paredes, Concepción

    2017-01-15

    This work was conducted in order to investigate the possibility of using different agroindustrial composts in the production of horticultural seedlings, thereby replacing part of the peat in the growing media. Three vegetable species differing in salt sensitivity - tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. var. Malpica) (the least sensitive), courgette (Cucurbita pepo L. var. Mastil F1) (moderately sensitive) and pepper (Capsicum annuum L. var. Largo de Reus Pairal) (the most sensitive) - were grown in nine media containing three composts, prepared by co-composting vegetable waste (flower, broccoli or tomato waste) with laying hen manure and sawdust, as well as peat in various ratios. The proportions of the three composts in the mixtures elaborated with peat were 25%, 50% and 75% (v/v). A substrate of 100% peat was used as control. The experiment was arranged in a completely-randomised design, with two replicates per treatment, under greenhouse conditions. Prior to sowing, some physical, physico-chemical and chemical properties of the growing media were determined and the seed germination and fresh and dry weights of the aerial parts and roots of the seedlings were also measured, as well as the mineral composition of the aerial parts of the plants. In most cases, the addition of compost to the growing media produced an increase in the pH, salt content and macronutrient concentrations, in comparison to peat, whereas the physical properties of the compost based-substrates had values very similar to those of an ideal substrate. Also, multivariate analysis showed that the media prepared with flower waste compost, at all concentrations, and the medium with tomato waste compost at 25% were the most suitable substrates for the three plant species tested.

  5. Effects of ozone treatment on Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in relation to horticultural product quality.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Deana; Fan, Lihua; McRae, Ken; Walker, Brad; MacKay, Ron; Doucette, Craig

    2009-08-01

    Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are fungal pathogens that cause the decay of many fruits and vegetables. Ozone may be used as an antimicrobial agent to control the decay. The effect of gaseous ozone on spore viability of B. cinerea and mycelial growth of B. cinerea and S. sclerotiorum were investigated. Spore viability of B. cinerea was reduced by over 99.5% (P < 0.01) and height of the aerial mycelium was reduced from 4.7 mm in the control to less than 1 mm after exposure to 450 or 600 ppb ozone for 48 h at 20 degrees C. Sporulation of B. cinerea was also substantially inhibited by ozone treatments. However, ozone had no significant effect on mycelial growth of S. sclerotiorum in vitro. Decay and quality parameters including color, chlorophyll fluorescence (CF), and ozone injury were further assessed for various horticultural commodities (apple, grape, highbush blueberry, and carrot) treated with 450 ppb of ozone for 48 h at 20 degrees C over a period of 12 d. Lesion size and height of the aerial mycelium were significantly reduced by the ozone treatment on carrots inoculated with mycelial agar plugs of B. cinerea or S. sclerotiorum. Lesion size was also reduced on treated apples inoculated with 5 x 10(6) spores/mL of B. cinerea, and decay incidence of treated grapes was reduced. The 450 ppb ozone for 48 h treatment had no significant effect on color of carrots and apples or on CF of apples and grapes. Ozone, an environmentally sound antimicrobial agent, inactivates microorganisms through oxidization and residual ozone spontaneously decomposes to nontoxic products. It may be applied to fruits and vegetables to reduce decay and extend shelf life.

  6. Survey of organochlorine pesticides in horticultural soils and there grown Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Hilber, Isabel; Mäder, Paul; Schulin, Rainer; Wyss, Gabriela S

    2008-10-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCP) are still found in food and feed crops although they were applied about 40 years ago. There is a considerable knowledge gap concerning the extent of soil and crop contamination by OCP. We performed two surveys in 2002 and 2005 to assess the loads of OCP in 41 Swiss horticultural fields under organic and conventional production and corresponding Cucurbitaceae fruits (cucumbers, zucchini, and pumpkin), whereas these fields stay for intensive agricultural production in Europe. In addition, soil organic carbon, texture, and pH were measured also. OCP were detected in 27 out of 41 fields (65.9%). The farming practice had no influence on the contamination or level of OCP in soil. The sum of OCP-loads per field ranged from <0.01 to 1.3mgkg(-1) dry soil and pentachloroaniline (PCA, 2.1mgkg(-1)), p,p'-DDT (0.5mgkg(-1)), and p,p'-DDE and dieldrin (0.4mgkg(-1)) were the most detected pesticides over all investigated soils. PCA (up to 0.02mgkg(-1)), dieldrin (up to 0.04mgkg(-1)), alpha-chlordane and cis-heptachloroepoxide (<0.01mgkg(-1)) were detected in five cucumber samples out of 41 Cucurbitaceae samples. Statistical analysis revealed no significant influence of the measured soil properties on the OCP-load of soils and cucumbers, although there is evidence that the bioavailability of OCP in soils to Cucurbitaceae plants was influenced by the sorption of the compounds to soil organic matter and by the polarity of the pesticide molecules. It is suggested, that OCP contamination is widespread in all European regions with intensive plant production and associated pesticide use, and deserves more attention with respect to save food production.

  7. Safe motherhood partners -- the International Children's Centre.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The International Children's Centre (ICC) works worldwide to improve child health in the least developed countries. In its training and research projects the agency contributes to the Safe Motherhood Initiative to improve the health of mothers and infants. ICC is based in Paris, it was established in 1949, and the agency has cooperated with governments, nongovernmental organizations and international bodies like the World Health Organization (WHO) in child care. ICC's activities reflect concern for the health of women before and during pregnancy and the rest of their lives. The center's work comprises training, research, local projects, and information and documentation. Following the 1987 Nairobi conference on safe motherhood, ICC organized a seminar in Paris on maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan francophone Africa, which led to participation in the Safe Motherhood Initiative with a variety of training and research programs. ICC training is integrated, community-based, and multidisciplinary. Anthropology, psychology, economics and management have played a role in ICC training courses. The center runs an international course on maternal and child health from January to April each year and also organizes distance training courses on problem solving in health care. ICC training programs have taken place in Laos, Senegal, and Vietnam to strengthen the work of maternal and child health training centers there. A 4-week course on economic evaluation of health programs is held in Paris each July. In 1989 and 1990, ICC organized in collaboration with WHO safe motherhood workshops on research methodology in Benin and in Burkina Faso with participants from 6 francophone African countries. One research project in Benin is on risk factors for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and the other in Cameroon on improving surveillance of pregnancy, delivery, and the postnatal period. ICC focuses on long-term planning and action for the benefit of mothers and children.

  8. Multiple QTL for Horticultural Traits and Quantitative Resistance to Phytophthora infestans Linked on Solanum habrochaites Chromosome 11

    PubMed Central

    Haggard, J. Erron; Johnson, Emily B.; St. Clair, Dina A.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, a Phytophthora infestans resistance QTL from Solanum habrochaites chromosome 11 was introgressed into cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum). Fine mapping of this resistance QTL using near-isogenic lines (NILs) revealed some co-located QTL with undesirable effects on plant size, canopy density, and fruit size traits. Subsequently, higher-resolution mapping with sub-NILs detected multiple P. infestans resistance QTL within this 9.4-cM region of chromosome 11. In our present study, these same sub-NILs were also evaluated for 17 horticultural traits, including yield, maturity, fruit size and shape, fruit quality, and plant architecture traits in replicated field experiments over 2 years. The horticultural trait QTL originally detected by fine mapping each fractionated into two or more QTL at higher resolution. A total of 34 QTL were detected across all traits, with 14% exhibiting significant QTL × environment interactions (QTL × E). QTL for many traits were co-located, suggesting either pleiotropic effects or tight linkage among genes controlling these traits. Recombination in the pericentromeric region of the introgression between markers TG147 and At4g10050 was suppressed to approximately 29.7 Mbp per cM, relative to the genomewide average of 750 kbp per cM. The genetic architecture of many of the horticultural and P. infestans resistance traits that mapped within this chromosome 11 S. habrochaites region is complex. Complicating factors included fractionation of QTL, pleiotropy or tight linkage of QTL for multiple traits, pericentromeric chromosomal location(s), and/or QTL × E. High-resolution mapping of QTL in this region would be needed to determine which specific target QTL could be useful in breeding cultivated tomato. PMID:25504736

  9. The South Florida Avocado Breeding Program at USDA-Agricultural Research Service Subtropical Horticulture Research Station (USDA-ARS SHRS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA-ARS SHRS is part of the USDA National Germplasm Repository system and houses collections of tropical and subtropical fruit trees such as mango, lychee, and avocado. In addition to maintaining the germplasm collections, our mission is to also identify genetic diversity in the collections, to ev...

  10. Walk-in centres in primary care: a review of the international literature.

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Chris; Munro, James

    2003-01-01

    Nurse-led walk-in centres were first announced in April 1999. They represent a new development in unscheduled care provision in the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS). By the end of 2000, 40 NHS walk-in centres had been opened, with further centres recently announced. This paper aims to review international experience with walk-in centres in primary and emergency care and identify relevant lessons for the UK. This study is a systematic review, with qualitative synthesis of relevant findings. Studies were identified from seven major bibliographic databases using a sensitive search strategy, and 244 relevant documents relating to walk-in or 'ambulatory care' centres were identified. Users of walk-in centres in other countries tend to be a relatively affluent population of working age, and a different population from those using conventional general practice services. Walk-in centres are used particularly when other health services are closed. The problems presented are mainly minor illnesses and minor injuries. People choose this form of care mainly for reasons of convenience, and satisfaction with the service is generally high. The very limited evidence available suggests that walk-in centres provide care of reasonable quality, but there is insufficient evidence to draw firm conclusions about the impact of walk-in centres on other healthcare services or the costs of such care. Although a number of countries have had a long experience of walk-in centres, the lack of reliable evidence on many of the most important issues is notable. In the NHS, walk-in centres represent a radically innovative attempt to improve access to health care, but the limited research available does little to inform their development. Important questions that need to be addressed include whether walk-in centres do improve access to care, for whom, and at what overall cost. PMID:12564280

  11. Environmental Studies at the Guiana Space Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Sandrine

    2013-09-01

    The Environmental Commitment of the French Space Agency at the Guiana Space Centre (CNES / CSG) specifies that the environmental protection is a major stake. Consequently, CNES participates in numerous space programs that contribute significantly to a better knowledge, management and protection of our environment at a global scale.The studies and researches that are done at CNES / CSG meet several objectives:* Assessment of safety and environmental effects and risk related to the effects overflowing due to a pollution caused by ground and flight activities* Improvement of the studies related to the knowledge of the environment (flora and fauna monitoring).* Risk assessment and management which may affect the safety of people , property, and protection of public health and environment * Verification of the compliance of the results of impact studies of launch vehicle in flight phase provided by the launch operator (Technical Regulation) with the French Safety Operational Acts.In this note, study and research programs are presented. They allow a better knowledge of the surrounding environment and of impacts caused by the industrial activities done in Guiana Space Center.

  12. Energy efficiency in U.K. shopping centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiarotti, Michela

    Energy efficiency in shopping centres means providing comfortable internal environment and services to the occupants with minimum energy use in a cost-effective and environmentally sensitive manner. This research considers the interaction of three factors affecting the energy efficiency of shopping centres: i) performance of the building fabric and services ii) management of the building in terms of operation, control, maintenance and replacement of the building fabric and services, and company's energy policy iii) occupants' expectation for comfort and awareness of energy efficiency. The aim of the investigation is to determine the role of the above factors in the energy consumption and carbon emissions of shopping centres and the scope for reducing this energy usage by changing one or all the three factors. The study also attempts to prioritize the changes in the above factors that are more cost-effective at reducing that energy consumption and identify the benefits and main economic and legal drivers for energy efficiency in shopping centres. To achieve these targets, three case studies have been analysed. Using energy data from bills, the performance of the selected case studies has been assessed to establish trends and current energy consumption and carbon emissions of shopping centres and their related causes. A regression analysis has attempted to break down the energy consumption of the landlords' area by end-use to identify the main sources of energy usage and consequently introduce cost-effective measures for saving energy. A monitoring and occupants' survey in both landlords' and tenants' areas have been carried out at the same time to compare the objective data of the environmental conditions with the subjective impressions of shoppers and shopkeepers. In particular, the monitoring aimed at assessing the internal environment to identify possible causes of discomfort and opportunities for introducing energy saving measures. The survey looked at

  13. The Irish Centre for Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilheany, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Conducting potency tests on penicillin, discussing rocket technology with a NASA astronaut, analysing animal bone fragments from medieval times, these are just some of the activities which occupy the time of students at The Irish Centre for Talented Youth. The Centre identifies young students with exceptional academic ability and then provides…

  14. The European standards of Haemophilia Centres

    PubMed Central

    Giangrande, Paul; Calizzani, Gabriele; Menichini, Ivana; Candura, Fabio; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Makris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The European haemophilia community of professionals and patients has agreed on the principles of haemophilia care to address comprehensive optimal delivery of care which is nowadays scattered throughout Europe. Many of the health facilities call themselves Haemophilia Centres despite their variation in size, expertise and services provided. Only a small number of countries have Haemophilia Centre accreditation systems in place. Methods In the framework of the European Haemophilia Network project, following an inclusive process of stakeholder involvement, the European Guidelines for the certification of haemophilia centres have been developed in order to set quality standards for European Haemophilia Centres and criteria for their certification. Results The Guidelines define the standards and criteria for the designation of two levels of care delivery: European Haemophilia Treatment Centres, providing local routine care, and European Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centres, providing specialised and multi-disciplinary care and functioning as tertiary referral centres. Additionally, they define standards about general requirements, patient care, provision of an advisory service and establishment of network of clinical and specialised services. Conclusions The implementation of the European Guidelines for the certification of Haemophilia Centres will contribute to the reduction of health inequalities through the standardisation of quality of care in European Union Member States and could represent a model to be taken into consideration for other rare disease groups. PMID:24922293

  15. Evaluation of telemedicine centres in Madhya Pradesh, Central India.

    PubMed

    Bali, Surya; Gupta, Arti; Khan, Asif; Pakhare, Abhijit

    2016-04-01

    In a developing country such as India, there is substantial inequality in health care distribution. Telemedicine facilities were established in Madhya Pradesh in 2007-2008. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the infrastructure, equipment, manpower, and functional status of Indian Space and Research Organisation (ISRO) telemedicine nodes in Madhya Pradesh. All district hospitals and medical colleges with nodes were visited by a team of three members. The study was conducted from December 2013-January 2014. The team recorded the structural facility situation and physical conditions on a predesigned pro forma. The team also conducted interviews with the nodal officers, data entry operator and other relevant people at these centres. Of the six specialist nodes, four were functional and two were non-functional. Of 10 patient nodes, two nodes were functional, four were semi-functional and four were non-functional. Most of the centres were not working due to a problem with their satellite modem. The overall condition of ISRO run telemedicine centres in Madhya Pradesh was found to be poor. Most of these centres failed to provide telemedicine consultations. We recommend replacing this system with another cost effective system available in the state wide area network (SWAN). We suggest the concept of the virtual out-patient department.

  16. The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Marchessault, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Context: The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP) is a university research centre with a long-standing contractual arrangement with government. Objective: The purpose of this project was to examine the facilitators and challenges in the development, establishment and continuation of MCHP. Methods: In-depth, semi-structured interviews with 28 participants selected purposefully and a document review were conducted and analyzed using qualitative methods. Results: Although a unique confluence of factors facilitated MCHP's establishment, participants viewed safeguards to credibility (arm's-length from government; guaranteed academic freedom) along with powerful advocates as key to longevity. Other factors that participants discussed as important to sustainability included excellence in scholarship; thorough protection of privacy; stable funding; incremental growth; teamwork; leadership; nurturing of relationships; and authentic partnerships. Conclusions: MCHP has demonstrated that using local administrative data to address policy-related research questions is of enduring value to local and provincial communities, and also has national and international relevance. PMID:24933371

  17. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  18. Most ornamental plants on sale in garden centres are unattractive to flower-visiting insects

    PubMed Central

    Alton, Karin; Ratnieks, Francis L.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Gardeners and park managers seeking to support biodiversity in urban areas often plant ornamentals attractive to flower-visiting insects. There is a huge diversity of garden plant varieties, and some recommendations are available as to which are attractive to insects. However, these are largely not based on rigorous empirical data. An important factor in consumer choice is the range of varieties available for purchase. In the UK, garden centres are a key link in the supply chain between growers and private gardens. This study is the first to determine the proportions of flowering ornamentals being sold that are attractive to flower-visiting insects. Methods We surveyed six garden centres in Sussex, UK, each over two days in 2015, by making 12 counts of insects visiting patches of each ornamental plant on display for sale that was in bloom. To provide a consistent baseline among different locations, we brought with us and surveyed marjoram (Origanum vulgare) plants in pots, which are known to be attractive to a wide range of flower-visiting insects. The attractiveness of plant varieties to insects was then expressed in two ways: the absolute number and relative to that on marjoram (‘marjoram score’), both per unit area of plant cover. In addition, we noted whether each variety was recommended as pollinator-friendly either via a symbol on the label, or by being included in the Royal Horticultural Society’s ‘Perfect for Pollinators’ list. Furthermore, we compared the attractiveness of plants that are typically grown for more than one year versus only one year. Results We surveyed 59–74 plant varieties in bloom across the six garden centres. In each garden centre, the distributions of variety attractiveness were highly skewed to the right, with most varieties being relatively unattractive, and few varieties highly attractive to flower-visiting insects. The median attractiveness of varieties with a recommendation was 4.2× higher than that of

  19. ACTRIS Data Centre: An atmospheric data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, C. Lund; Fahre Vik, A.; Logna, R.; Torseth, K.; Linné, H.; O'Connor, E.

    2012-04-01

    ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) is a European Project aiming at integrating European ground-based stations equipped with advanced instrumentation for studying aerosols, clouds, and short-lived gas-phase species. The ACTRIS activities result in improved atmospheric measurements data made at more than 60 European sites, from numerous instruments and includes variables measured by ground based in situ and remote sensing technologies. Core variables are in situ aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties, short-lived trace gases (volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides), aerosol scattering and extinction profiles, and cloud properties. The ACTRIS data centre (ACTRIS DC) is giving free and open access to all data resulting from the activities of the infrastructure network, complemented with data from other relevant networks and data bases. The overall goal is to facilitate scientists and other user groups access to atmospheric observational data, and to provide mature products for analysis and interpretation of atmospheric composition change. The ACTRIS DC aims at substantially increasing the number of high-quality data by providing long-term observational data relevant to climate and air quality research produced with standardized or comparable procedures throughout the network. The backbone of the ACTRIS DC is the three core data bases: - EARLINET Data Base hosting aerosol lidar data from more than 30 European sites - EBAS hosting ground based atmospheric in situ data from more than 1000 sites globally - Cloudnet hosting remote sensing cloud data and products from 5 European sites Furthermore, a joint portal is developed combining information from various data sources to gain new information not presently available from standalone databases or networks. The data centre will provide tools and services to facilitate the use of measurements for broad user communities. Higher level and integrated products will be

  20. Disruption of pheromone communication of Choristoneura rosaceana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) using microencapsulated sex pheromones formulated with horticultural oil.

    PubMed

    Wins-Purdy, A H; Judd, G J R; Evenden, M L

    2007-10-01

    Sprayable, microencapsulated (MEC) sex pheromone formulations represent a promising tool for achieving mating disruption, yet often lack sustained effectiveness in the field, making repeated applications necessary. This study evaluated the impact of adding Purespray Green horticultural oil as an adjuvant to 3M MEC-LR, an MEC formulation of (Z)-11-tetradecenyl acetate, on disruption of mate-finding behavior in Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) in small-plot trials in experimental apple orchards. Treatments consisting of MEC-LR in water, MEC-LR in water + 2% (vol:vol) Purespray Green, and a water control were applied to plots of apple using an airblast sprayer at a rate of 100 g of pheromone/ha. Disruption caused by foliar treatments was evaluated over a 7-wk period using mark-release recapture experiments in the field and concurrent bioassays in a flight tunnel. Disruption of orientation to 2-d-old, calling, virgin females was used as a measure of treatment effect in all experiments. Both pheromone alone and pheromone + oil treatments significantly disrupted male mate-finding behavior for a period of > or =21 d in flight tunnel assays and > or =42 d in mark-recapture field trials. The addition of oil did not significantly enhance the disruption activity nor increase the longevity of the MEC pheromone formulation. Our results show the compatibility of spraying MEC pheromone with a horticultural oil, and techniques for applying an oil-pheromone formulation to maximize the control impact of this combination are discussed.

  1. Biological monitoring of exposure to organophosphorus insecticides in a group of horticultural greenhouse workers.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Michèle; Carrier, Gaétan; Brunet, Robert C; Dumas, Pierre; Noisel, Nolwenn

    2006-07-01

    Exposure to selected organophosphorus insecticides (OPs), malathion, diazinon and acephate, was evaluated in a group of horticultural greenhouse workers. This was achieved through measurements of the cumulative urinary excretion time courses of specific and non-specific biomarkers over a 24 h period following the onset of work exposure. For malathion, the absorbed daily doses were estimated from the 24 h cumulative urinary amounts of the specific mono- and di-carboxylic acid metabolites (the sum of MCA and DCA) through the use of a kinetic model. The observed 24 h urinary levels were also compared with a biological reference value (BRV) of 57 nmol kg(-1) of body weight established in a previous work on the basis of a human no-observed-effect level exposure dose. Excretion values were found to be 2.5% or less of the BRV, suggesting a negligible health risk. Both median and 95th percentile concentrations of DCA (n = 57 samples) were, however, slightly higher than the baseline values determined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the US civilian population (MCA was not analyzed by the CDC). The cumulative urinary excretion time course of the methyl phosphoric (MP) derivatives, which are metabolites of malathion but also of several other OPs, was also determined. Though relatively low, the MP levels were from 3 to 31 times higher than would be expected on the basis of the malathion specific MCA and DCA excretions, indicating that MP excretions stem from sources other than malathion exposure. Accordingly, only the time courses of MCA and DCA excretion rate (nmol h(-1)) were compatible with the time of work exposure. Urinary biomarkers of exposure to diazinon and acephate were also measured. Urinary concentrations were essentially below or equal to the analytical limit of detection of 1 microg l(-1) for 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (n = 54) and of 0.8 microg l(-1) for acephate and methamidophos (n = 59): values within the baseline range

  2. Regional centres for space science and technology education affiliated to the United Nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadimova, Sharafat

    Capacity-building efforts in space science and technology are a major focus of the activities of the Office of Outer Space Affairs. Such efforts include providing support to the regional centres for space science and technology education, affiliated to the United Nations, whose goal is to develop, through in-depth education, an indigenous capability for research and applications in the core disciplines of: (a) remote sensing and geographical information systems; (b) satellite communications; (c) satellite meteorology and global climate; and (d) space and atmospheric sciences and data management. The regional centres are located in Morocco and Nigeria for Africa, in Brazil and Mexico for Latin America and the Caribbean and in India for Asia and the Pacific. The overall policy-making body of each Centre is its Governing Board and consists of member States (within the region where the Centre is located), that have agreed, through their endorsement of the Centre's agreement, to the goals and objectives of the Centre. The United Nations Programme on Space Applications, with the support of prominent educators, has developed standard education curricula, which were adopted by the Centres for teaching each of the four core disciplines. Within the framework of the International Committee on global navigation satellite systems (ICG), which is established as an informal body for the purpose of promoting the use and application of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) on a global basis, the Regional Centres will also be acting as the ICG Information Centres. The ICG Information Centres aim to foster a more structured approach to information exchange in order to fulfil the reciprocal expectations of a network between ICG and Regional Centres.

  3. Predictors of valued everyday occupations, empowerment and satisfaction in day centres: implications for services for persons with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Mona; Sandlund, Mikael

    2014-09-01

    This study addresses predictors of occupational value, empowerment and satisfaction with the rehabilitation received in day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities. These outcomes represent varying aspects of relevance for the day centre context and together create a manifold outcome picture. This was a longitudinal study with approval from the regional research vetting board. Self-report instruments were used, and the investigated predictors motivation for going to the day centre, occupational engagement, socio-demographic factors and self-reported diagnosis. Attendees (N = 108) at 8 day centres participated and filled in self-report questionnaires regarding the predictor and outcome variables. A baseline measurement and a 14-month follow-up composed the data. Occupational engagement at baseline could predict all three outcomes at the follow-up. Motivation for the day centre activities and not preferring work before attending the day centre were positive for satisfaction with the day centre. A low participation rate, although comparable with previous studies on the target group, was a limitation of this study. To conclude, both occupational engagement and motivation are factors that can be stimulated by the staff in day centres. Actions for how to accomplish that, and thereby also more positive outcomes of the day centre services, are proposed, such as a system of freedom of choice among day centres, and between day centres and supported employment.

  4. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  5. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  6. AN IN-DEPTH STUDY TO ASCERTAIN WHETHER THERE IS A NEED IN THE STATE OF UTAH FOR A POST HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM IN ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DIRKSEN, DENNIS A.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY WERE TO DETERMINE (1) KINDS OF JOBS AND NUMBER OF PEOPLE ASSOCIATED WITH ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE IN UTAH, (2) SKILLS AND INFORMATION NEEDED BY NURSERY WORKERS, (3) TRAINING PROGRAMS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE NATION, (4) NEEDS OF GOLF COURSES, AND (5) THE USE OF DATA IN DEVELOPING A TRAINING PROGRAM. QUESTIONNAIRES WERE…

  7. Identity Theft: A Study in Contact Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Iain; Weir, George R. S.

    This paper explores the recent phenomenon of identity theft. In particular, it examines the contact centre environment as a mechanism for this to occur. Through a survey that was conducted amongst forty-five contact centre workers in the Glasgow area we determined that contact centres can and do provide a mechanism for identity theft. Specifically, we found a particularly high incidence of agents who had previously dealt with phone calls that they considered suspicious. Furthermore, there are agents within such environments who have previously been offered money in exchange for customers' details, or who know of fellow workers who received such offers. Lastly, we identify specific practices within contact centres that may contribute to the likelihood of identity theft.

  8. Comparative Vocational Education and Training Research in Europe: Balance and Perspectives. Contributions, Recommendations and Follow-Up of the CEDEFOP/DIPF Conference from January 1998 at the Science Centre in Bonn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauterbach, Uwe, Ed.; Sellin, Burkart, Ed.

    This document contains 32 papers from a conference on balance and perspectives in comparative vocational education and training (VET) research in Europe. Selected papers are as follows: "On the Path to Vocational Training Research with a European Dimension" (Oliver Lubke, Klaus Schedler, Alphonse de Vadder); "The Val Duchesse Social…

  9. Genome-Wide Differentiation of Various Melon Horticultural Groups for Use in GWAS for Fruit Firmness and Construction of a High Resolution Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Nimmakayala, Padma; Tomason, Yan R.; Abburi, Venkata L.; Alvarado, Alejandra; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Vajja, Venkata G.; Salazar, Germania; Panicker, Girish K.; Levi, Amnon; Wechter, William P.; McCreight, James D.; Korol, Abraham B.; Ronin, Yefim; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Reddy, Umesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Melon (Cucumis melo L.) is a phenotypically diverse eudicot diploid (2n = 2x = 24) has climacteric and non-climacteric morphotypes and show wide variation for fruit firmness, an important trait for transportation and shelf life. We generated 13,789 SNP markers using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) and anchored them to chromosomes to understand genome-wide fixation indices (Fst) between various melon morphotypes and genomewide linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay. The FST between accessions of cantalupensis and inodorus was 0.23. The FST between cantalupensis and various agrestis accessions was in a range of 0.19–0.53 and between inodorus and agrestis accessions was in a range of 0.21–0.59 indicating sporadic to wide ranging introgression. The EM (Expectation Maximization) algorithm was used for estimation of 1436 haplotypes. Average genome-wide LD decay for the melon genome was noted to be 9.27 Kb. In the current research, we focused on the genome-wide divergence underlying diverse melon horticultural groups. A high-resolution genetic map with 7153 loci was constructed. Genome-wide segregation distortion and recombination rate across various chromosomes were characterized. Melon has climacteric and non-climacteric morphotypes and wide variation for fruit firmness, a very important trait for transportation and shelf life. Various levels of QTLs were identified with high to moderate stringency and linked to fruit firmness using both genome-wide association study (GWAS) and biparental mapping. Gene annotation revealed some of the SNPs are located in β-D-xylosidase, glyoxysomal malate synthase, chloroplastic anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase, and histidine kinase, the genes that were previously characterized for fruit ripening and softening in other crops. PMID:27713759

  10. The Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.; Cole, W. A.; Craven, R.; de Reuck, K. M.; Trengove, R. D.; Wakeham, W. A.

    1986-07-01

    The IUPAC Thermodynamic Tables Project Centre in London has at its disposal considerable expertise on the production and utilization of high-accuracy equations of state which represent the thermodynamic properties of substances. For some years they have been content to propagate this information by the traditional method of book production, but the increasing use of the computer in industry for process design has shown that an additional method was needed. The setting up of the IUPAC Transport Properties Project Centre, also at Imperial College, whose products would also be in demand by industry, afforded the occasion for a new look at the problem. The solution has been to set up the Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre, which embraces the two IUPAC Project Centres, and for it to establish a link with the existing Physical Properties Data Service of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, thus providing for the dissemination of the available information without involving the Centres in problems such as those of marketing and advertising. This paper outlines the activities of the Centres and discusses the problems in bringing their products to the attention of industry in suitable form.

  11. Children as service users of a children's centre.

    PubMed

    James, Joan

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish what is important to pre-school children as service users of a children's centre. This research was conducted as part of a range of service users' perspectives in one inner city children's centre. This study shows that young children as service users are capable of contributing their views. The participants enjoyed private spaces. Nature and the environment were important to these children, as was watching their friends playing happily A mosaic approach was used in this qualitative study of five children aged three to four years. The mosaic approach uses observation and interviewing with participatory use of cameras by the children. It is a strengths-based approach, which extends to all children irrespective of ability and background. If adults are to understand children they need to look for opportunities for their voices to be heard.

  12. The Contribution of OLG Data and Analysis Centre to EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangl, Günter; Krauss, Sandro

    2013-04-01

    OLG (Observatory Lustbuehel Graz) as a joint venture of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying works as a GNSS data centre and analyses GNSS data for reference maintenance, geokinematics and ionosphere research. Due to the change from epoch to permanent sites regions in Africa, Asia and Europe are investigated since 1995. Presently, observations from about 300 GNSS stations are used for analysis. Most of the stations are public and are retrieved from different global, regional and local data centres. In addition some institutions provide their private data to the OLG. After presenting the main regions Austria, Central Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean and the Western Indian Ocean the question will be how these data and products could be included into EPOS.

  13. Environmental conservation by radiation technology: A new Italian multipurpose demonstration centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, A.; Manni, S.

    1993-10-01

    A new italian R&D/ Demonstration Centre, named CE.S.T.I.A. (CEntro Sperimentazione Tecnologie di Irraggiamento per l'Ambiente, namely Experimental Centre for Environmental Applications of Radiation Technology) will be presented. The Centre, that should represent the largest project in the world for research on environmental applications of radiation technology, will be located in the South of Italy and foresees, over an area of 35, 000 m 2, four independent irradiation plants, each one with a dedicated electron beam machine. The foreseen EB-machines features allow a large operative flexibility; the first research cycle will regard five activity lines: hazardous wastes, waste water, flue gases, hospital wastes, clean technologies. The Centre technical and economic features are described, together with an analysis of realistic spreading perspectives of radiation technology on the Italian industrial wastes management market.

  14. Evaluation Of Levels Of Climate Favorability For Viticulture In Breasta Viticultural Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzatu, Gilda-Diana; Mărăcineanu, Liviu Cristian

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this present research was to evaluate the climatic conditions of a viticultural centre, as there are always needed studies to determine the climate favorability of the vine cultivation and the varieties resistant to heat and water stress, especially when climate change affects globally viticulture. The present research was made using the interpretation of Craiova Regional Weather Centre's meteorological records for the year of 2014, for Breasta viticultural centre. The climatic factors permitted the determination of several indexes used in viticultural climatology for the appreciation of the viticultural biotope characteristics. Assessment of climatic resources through synthetic climatic indexes, clearly express the generous heliothermic offer available for Breasta viticultural centre, the guarantee of quality and specificity of vine products obtained in this area.

  15. Impact of trauma centre designation level on outcomes following hemorrhagic shock: a multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Philippe; Moore, Lynne; Tardif, Pier-Alexandre; Razek, Tarek; Omar, Madiba; Boutin, Amélie; Clément, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic shock is responsible for 45% of injury fatalities in North America, and 50% of these occur within 2 h of injury. There is currently a lack of evidence regarding the trajectories of patients in hemorrhagic shock and the potential benefit of level I/II care for these patients. We aimed to compare mortality across trauma centre designation levels for patients in hemorrhagic shock. Secondary objectives were to compare surgical delays, complications and hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study based on a Canadian inclusive trauma system (1999–2012), including adults with systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 90 mm Hg on arrival who required urgent surgical care (< 6 h). Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of trauma centre designation level on risk-adjusted surgical delays, mortality and complications. Linear regression was used to examine LOS. Results Compared with level I centres, adjusted odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of mortality for level III and IV centres were 1.71 (1.03–2.85) and 2.25 (1.08–4.73), respectively. Surgical delays did not vary across designation levels, but mean LOS and complications were lower in level II–IV centres than level I centres. Conclusion Level I/II centres may offer a survival advantage over level III/IV centres for patients requiring emergency intervention for hemorrhagic shock. Further research with larger sample sizes is required to confirm these results and to identify optimal transport time thresholds for bypassing level III/IV centres in favour of level I/II centres. PMID:28234589

  16. Chemical constituents with anti-allergic activity from the root of Edulis Superba, a horticultural cultivar of Paeonia lactiflora.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Shu; Tamura, Takayuki; Kadowaki, Makoto; Wang, Zhengtao; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2016-04-01

    The methanolic extract and its subfractions from the dried root of Edulis Superba, a horticultural cultivar of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, showed potent anti-allergic effect as inhibition of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated degranulation in rat basophil leukemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of 26 compounds, including a new norneolignan glycoside, paeonibenzofuran (1), together with 25 known ones (2-26). The chemical structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical evidences. Among the isolated compounds, mudanpioside E (5) with paeoniflorin-type skeleton and quercetin (16) showed potent inhibitory activity against a degranulation marker, β-hexosaminidase release with IC50 values of 40.34 and 25.05 μM, respectively. A primary structure-activity relationship of these components was discussed.

  17. From Blue to Green: The Development and Implementation of a Therapeutic Horticulture Program for Residents of a Battered Women's Shelter.

    PubMed

    Renzetti, Claire M; Follingstad, Diane R

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic services to clients is influenced by service providers' understanding of the "fit" of a specific program with their service mandate as well as their perceptions of the potential benefits of the program. This article discusses the development and implementation of a therapeutic horticulture (TH) program at a battered women's shelter that serves 17 counties in Central Kentucky. Through semistructured interviews, we gauge the shelter staff's perceptions of the relationship of the TH program to the shelter's overall mission; their sense of the program's benefits for residents, for the shelter as a community organization, and for themselves; and their concerns about the TH program. We consider how these findings may impact future programming at the shelter, and we discuss plans for further evaluation of the TH program in terms of its impact on shelter residents' long-term outcomes.

  18. Horticultural and gathering practices complement each other: a case study in a rural population of Northwestern Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Eyssartier, Cecilia; Ladio, Ana H; Lozada, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    We investigated gathering and cultivating practices and how they complement each other in a rural population of Northwestern Patagonia. We analyzed plant diversity, species similarity, biogeographic origin, and plant use by means of semi-structured interviews and field visits. Pichi Leufu inhabitants used 173 species: 138 cultivated plants, mainly for edible purposes, and 45 wild species principally for medicinal use. Most cultivated species were exotic (91.3%), whereas gathered plants were both native and exotic. While locals maintained vegetable gardens, the adoption of greenhouses improved conditions for certain crops. The integration of novel practices with ancestral knowledge suggests resilient processes in this community, probably reflected in the dynamics of current horticultural and gathering practices, which complement each other.

  19. 'Smashed by the National Health'? A Closer Look at the Demise of the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham.

    PubMed

    Conford, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Pioneer Health Centre, based in South London before and after the Second World War, remains a source of interest for advocates of a positive approach to health promotion in contrast with the treatment of those already ill. Its closure in 1950 for lack of funds has been blamed on the then recently established National Health Service, but this article argues that such an explanation is over-simplified and ignores a number of other factors. The Centre had struggled financially during the 1930s and tried to gain support from the Medical Research Council. The Council appeared interested in the Centre before the war, but was less sympathetic in the 1940s. Around the time of its closure and afterwards, the Centre was also involved in negotiations with London County Council; these failed because the Centre's directors would not accept the changes which the Council would have needed to make. Unpublished documents reveal that the Centre's directors were uncompromising and that their approach to the situation antagonised their colleagues. Changes in medical science also worked against the Centre. The success of sulphonamide drugs appeared to render preventive medicine less significant, while the development of statistical techniques cast doubt on the Centre's experimental methods. The Centre was at the heart of the nascent organic farming movement, which opposed the rapid growth of chemical cultivation. But what might be termed 'chemical triumphalism' was on the march in both medicine and agriculture, and the Centre was out of tune with the mood of the times.

  20. Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats; Eklund, Mats; Eklund, Jörgen; Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    2011-06-01

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste

  1. Comparative assessment of migrant farm worker health in conventional and organic horticultural systems in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Cross, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Hounsome, Barry; Edwards-Jones, Gareth

    2008-02-25

    This study describes the self-reported health and well-being status of field and packhouse workers in UK vegetable horticulture, and tests the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the self-reported health of workers on organic and conventional horticultural farms. The majority of those sampled were migrant workers (93%) from Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia and the Ukraine. More than 95% of the respondents were aged 18-34 and recruited through university agricultural faculties in East European or employed via UK agencies. The health of 605 farm workers (395 males and 210 females) was measured through the use of four standard health instruments. Farm workers' health was significantly poorer than published national norms for three different health instruments (Short Form 36, EuroQol EQ-5D and the Visual Analogue Scale). There were no significant differences in the health status of farm workers between conventional and organic farms for any of these three instruments. However, organic farm workers scored higher on a fourth health instrument the Short Depression Happiness Scale (SDHS) indicating that workers on organic farms were happier than their counterparts working on conventional farms. Multiple regression analysis suggested that the difference in the SDHS score for organic and conventional farms is closely related to the range and number of tasks the workers performed each day. These findings suggest that a great deal of improvement in the self-reported health of farmers will need to occur before organic farms meet the requirements of the 'Principle of Health' as described by IFOAM. Ensuring that farm workers have a varied range of tasks could be a cost effective means of improving self-reported health status in both organic and conventional farming systems.

  2. Phenology, natural enemies, and efficacy of horticultural oil for control of Chionaspis heterophyllae (Homoptera: Diaspididae) on Christmas tree plantations.

    PubMed

    Fondren, Kirsten M; McCullough, Deborah G

    2005-10-01

    Pine needle scale, Chionaspis pinifoliae (Fitch), and Chionaspis heterophyllae Cooley are important pests of Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris L., and other conifers in much of North America. On Christmas tree plantations, these insects are typically controlled by spraying broad-spectrum insecticides when the vulnerable immature stages are present. However, effective control of bivoltine populations can be difficult to achieve due to asynchronous hatch and development of the second generation. Our objectives were to 1) determine the phenology of the second generation of C. heterophyllae in Michigan; 2) characterize the natural enemy complex; and 3) assess the effectiveness of horticultural oil for control of C. heterophyllae on P. sylvestris Christmas tree plantations. We monitored scale populations in three counties in lower Michigan for 3 yr. Scale phenology was consistently associated with cumulative degree-days base 10 degrees C (DD(10 degrees C)). Second-generation egg hatch began at approximately 1230-1300 DD(10 degrees C), and continued for approximately 3 wk. The peak of the second instar coincided with 1500-1600 DD(10 degrees C). Common predators included the coccinellids Chilocorus stigma (Say) and Microweisia misella (LeConte). On average, 70% of the C. heterophyllae population in unsprayed fields was killed by predators in 1999. Two endoparasitic wasps, Encarsia bella Gahan and Marietta mexicana Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae), also were recovered. In 2000 and 2001, we applied a highly refined horticultural spray oil with a backpack mist blower at 1500-1600 DD(10 degrees). Scale mortality on trees treated with oil ranged from 66 to 80% and was similar to control achieved using conventional insecticides in both years.

  3. Conducting a paediatric multi-centre RCT with an industry partner: challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Jessica; Newcombe, Peter; Martin, Graham; Kimble, Roy

    2012-11-01

    There are many benefits of multi-centred research including large sample sizes, statistical power, timely recruitment and generalisability of results. However, there are numerous considerations when planning and implementing a multi-centred study. This article reviews the challenges and successes of planning and implementing a multi-centred prospective randomised control trial involving an industry partner. The research investigated the impact on psychosocial functioning of a cosmetic camouflage product for children and adolescents with burn scarring. Multi-centred studies commonly have many stakeholders. Within this study, six Australian and New Zealand paediatric burn units as well as an industry partner were involved. The inclusion of an industry partner added complexities as they brought different priorities and expectations to the research. Further, multifaceted ethical and institutional approval processes needed to be negotiated. The challenges, successes, lessons learned and recommendations from this study regarding Australian and New Zealand ethics and research governance approval processes, collaboration with industry partners and the management of differing expectations will be outlined. Recommendations for future multi-centred research with industry partners include provision of regular written reports for the industry partner; continual monitoring and prompt resolution of concerns; basic research practices education for industry partners; minimisation of industry partner contact with participants; clear roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders and utilisation of single ethical review if available.

  4. Measuring Children's Involvement as an Indicator of Curriculum Effectiveness: A Curriculum Evaluation of a Selected Child Study Centre in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbeck, Marjory; Winter, Pam; Russo, Sharon; Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Teo-Zuzarte, Geraldine Lian Choo; Goh, Mandy

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents one aspect of a research project evaluating a curriculum model of a selected child study centre in Singapore. An issue of worldwide interest and concern is the "quality of learning" debate as it relates to early childhood centres. In Singapore, the government is focusing on expansion in child care settings and…

  5. Indigenous Cultural Self-Representation and Its Internal Critiques: A Case Study of the Woodland Cultural Centre, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    This research report discusses Indigenous cultural representation and its internal critiques, based on the case study of an Indigenous-run museum, the Woodland Cultural Centre, in Canada. Since its establishment in 1972, the Woodland Cultural Centre has strived to promote Indigenous culture, especially First Nations art, and has challenged the…

  6. Infant Programmes in Australian Childcare Centres: Are There Gaps in Pre-Service Training of Childcare Staff?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyland, Berenice

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential of the childcare centre as a child-rearing niche and is based on data collection and research carried out in childcare centres. The everyday experiences of infants were recorded on video over a period of eighteen months. These experiences were coded using a number of communicative language categories as well as…

  7. Career Counselling in a Changing South Africa. Report on the Advanced Seminar of the Centre for Child and Adult Guidance of the Institute for Psychological and Edumetric Research (Republic of South Africa, September 16, 1987). Occasional Paper No. 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, M. J., Comp.

    Seminar papers included in this document are: (1) "Career Counselling in a Changing South Africa," the opening address by J. G. Garbers, president of the Human Science Research Council; (2) "Current Problems in Career Counselling: The Report of the National Manpower Commission" (I. J. van Zyl); (3) "The Present Economic…

  8. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  9. Patient-centred mountain medicine.

    PubMed

    Szawarski, Piotr; Hillebrandt, David

    2016-08-01

    Venturing into the mountains, doctors have accompanied expeditions to provide routine care to the teams, undertake research and occasionally take on a rescue role. The role of doctors practicing mountain medicine is evolving. Public health issues involving concepts of health and safety have become necessary with the coming of commercial and youth expeditions. Increasingly individuals with a disability or a medical diagnosis choose to ascend to high altitudes. Doctors become involved in assessment of risk and providing advice for such individuals. The field of mountain medicine is perhaps unique in that acceptance of risk is part of the ethos of climbing and adventure. The pursuit of mountaineering goals may represent the ultimate conquest of a disability. Knowledge of mountain environment is essential in facilitating mountain ascents for those who choose to undertake them, in spite of a disability or medical condition.

  10. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Framework for the Cystic Fibrosis Centre.

    PubMed

    Conway, Steven; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M; De Rijcke, Karleen; Drevinek, Pavel; Foweraker, Juliet; Havermans, Trudy; Heijerman, Harry; Lannefors, Louise; Lindblad, Anders; Macek, Milan; Madge, Sue; Moran, Maeve; Morrison, Lisa; Morton, Alison; Noordhoek, Jacquelien; Sands, Dorota; Vertommen, Anneke; Peckham, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A significant increase in life expectancy in successive birth cohorts of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a result of more effective treatment for the disease. It is also now widely recognized that outcomes for patients cared for in specialist CF Centres are better than for those who are not. Key to the effectiveness of the specialist CF Centre is the multidisciplinary team (MDT), which should include consultants, clinical nurse specialist, microbiologist, physiotherapist, dietitian, pharmacist, clinical psychologist, social worker, clinical geneticist and allied healthcare professionals, all of whom should be experienced in CF care. Members of the MDT are also expected to keep up to date with developments in CF through continued professional development, attendance at conferences, auditing and involvement in research. Specialists CF Centres should also network with other Centres both nationally and internationally, and feed Centre data to registries in order to further the understanding of the disease. This paper provides a framework for the specialist CF Centre, including the organisation of the Centre and the individual roles of MDT members, as well as highlighting the value of CF organisations and disease registries.

  11. The European Micropaleontological Reference Centre in Kraków

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Michael; Waskowska, Anna; Bebenek, Slawomir; Pilarz, Monika

    2016-04-01

    We are pleased to announce the establishment of the European Micropaleontological Reference Centre, housed in the offices of Micropress Europe at the AGH University of Science & Technology in Krakow, Poland. The new European Micropaleontological Reference Centre is an initiative of the Grzybowski Foundation and Micropress Europe. The centre is designed to serve the micropaleontological community by providing a permanent repository or "museum" for published microfossil collections. The centre houses a growing collection of microfossils picked into faunal slides, as well as a well-stocked library of micropaleontological books, journals, and reprints. We have the only up-to-date paper copy of the Ellis & Messina Catalogue of Foraminifera in Central Europe. Currently, the slide collections include: - Type slides of benthic foraminifera from Poland (the collection of I. Heller from the Polish oil company GEONAFTA), - Carboniferous foraminifera from Germany and Poland (collections of G. Eickhoff and Z. Alexandrowicz), - IODP sites in the Arctic, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans (collections of M. Kaminski, E. Setoyama, A. Holborn), - Exploration wells in the Boreal seas: North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Western Barents Sea, Labrador Sea, Bering Sea, Spitsbergen, Western Siberia (collections of M. Kaminski, J. Nagy, T. Van Den Akker, V. Podobina, and others), - Paratethyan Foraminifera (collections of E. Luczkowska, C. Beldean, F. Szekely), - Mesozoic-Paleogene Foraminifera from Gubbio, Italy (collections of M. Kaminski, C. Cetean, and students) and the Polish Carpathians (collection of A. Waskowska), - Caribbean (collection of M. Kaminski, R. Preece), West Africa (collection of R. Preece, S. Kender, C. Cetean), - We have a separate collection of type specimens of species (paratypes). Slides are housed in cabinet drawers together with the relevant publication. Researchers are welcome to visit the offices of Micropress Europe to view the archived microfossil collections. The center

  12. Optimizing Data Centre Energy and Environmental Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikema, David Hendrik

    Data centres use an estimated 2% of US electrical power which accounts for much of their total cost of ownership. This consumption continues to grow, further straining power grids attempting to integrate more renewable energy. This dissertation focuses on assessing and reducing data centre environmental and financial costs. Emissions of projects undertaken to lower the data centre environmental footprints can be assessed and the emission reduction projects compared using an ISO-14064-2-compliant greenhouse gas reduction protocol outlined herein. I was closely involved with the development of the protocol. Full lifecycle analysis and verifying that projects exceed business-as-usual expectations are addressed, and a test project is described. Consuming power when it is low cost or when renewable energy is available can be used to reduce the financial and environmental costs of computing. Adaptation based on the power price showed 10--50% potential savings in typical cases, and local renewable energy use could be increased by 10--80%. Allowing a fraction of high-priority tasks to proceed unimpeded still allows significant savings. Power grid operators use mechanisms called ancillary services to address variation and system failures, paying organizations to alter power consumption on request. By bidding to offer these services, data centres may be able to lower their energy costs while reducing their environmental impact. If providing contingency reserves which require only infrequent action, savings of up to 12% were seen in simulations. Greater power cost savings are possible for those ceding more control to the power grid operator. Coordinating multiple data centres adds overhead, and altering at which data centre requests are processed based on changes in the financial or environmental costs of power is likely to increase this overhead. Tests of virtual machine migrations showed that in some cases there was no visible increase in power use while in others power use

  13. Bureaucracy, professionalization and school centred innovation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Paul

    1990-03-01

    This paper examines an attempt to promote a school centred innovation strategy within a highly centralized educational system. The School Based Curriculum Project Scheme, which was introduced into Hong Kong in 1988, is analysed in terms of a professional-bureaucratic dichotomy. It is argued that the operational details of the scheme are designed to satisfy a range of bureaucratic concerns and these are not conducive to promoting the professional work ethic which is required for school centred innovation. Finally the paper identifies the implications which arise for policies designed to promote curriculum innovation.

  14. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory as Cultural Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    NAS RA V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory is presented as a cultural centre for Armenia and the Armenian nation in general. Besides being scientific and educational centre, the Observatory is famous for its unique architectural ensemble, rich botanical garden and world of birds, as well as it is one of the most frequently visited sightseeing of Armenia. In recent years, the Observatory has also taken the initiative of the coordination of the Cultural Astronomy in Armenia and in this field, unites the astronomers, historians, archaeologists, ethnographers, culturologists, literary critics, linguists, art historians and other experts.

  15. Evaluation and characterization in bananas (Musa ssp.) at the USDA-ARS Tropical Agriculture Research Station

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Banana, Musa spp., is a key horticultural crop in tropical regions of the world where they provide sustenance and serve as cash crops. The plantain subgroup in particular, is an important staple in the Caribbean, Central America and some countries in South America. One of the integral research comp...

  16. The Sacred Heart Hospice: an Australian centre for palliative medicine.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Harris, R

    1995-09-01

    The Sacred Heart Hospice, Sydney, was founded in 1890 and is the largest inpatient palliative-care facility in Australia. Patients with advanced cancer form the predominant patient group, although patients with HIV/AIDS account for approximately 20% of admissions. A community-outreach service, established in 1983, cares for more patients at home than in the Hospice. Recently the Hospice has participated in a number of clinical trials and intends to become a regional centre for palliative-care research, education and training.

  17. INFOMAT: The international materials assessment and application centre's internet gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branquinho, Carmen Lucia; Colodete, Leandro Tavares

    2004-08-01

    INFOMAT is an electronic directory structured to facilitate the search and retrieval of materials science and technology information sources. Linked to the homepage of the International Materials Assessment and Application Centre, INFOMAT presents descriptions of 392 proprietary databases with links to their host systems as well as direct links to over 180 public domain databases and over 2,400 web sites. Among the web sites are associations/unions, governmental and non-governmental institutions, industries, library holdings, market statistics, news services, on-line publications, standardization and intellectual property organizations, and universities/research groups.

  18. Status of the "ETOILE" project for a French hadrontherapy centre.

    PubMed

    Bajard, Marcel; De Conto, Jean-Marie; Remillieux, Joseph

    2004-12-01

    It is proposed to build a national centre for light-ion hadrontherapy in France, located in Lyon in the Rhône-Alpes region. Under the auspices of University Claude Bemard Lyon-I and with the support of a research contract between Rhône-Alpes region and the Minister of Research, a design has been elaborated. This paper reviews the medical and technical characteristics of the project, called ETOILE (Espace de Traitement Oncologique par Ions Légers dans le cadre Européen). The research programs associated with ETOILE concern mainly the tracking of moving organs, the design of an in-beam PET detector, the simulation of the interaction of carbon ions with tissues and radiobiological studies on the radiosensitivity and tolerance of normal tissues and on the radioresistance of tumours. The capital cost needed to realize ETOILE is about 90 M Euro. We expect a definitive decision to build ETOILE at the end of 2004. In that case the centre will treat its first patients in 2009. A routine flux of 1000 patients per year will be reached after 3 years with an operation cost of 15 M Euro.

  19. Recollections of Exhibits: Stimulated-Recall Interviews with Primary School Children about Science Centre Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Jennifer; Osborne, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    One issue of interest to practitioners and researchers in science centres concerns what meanings visitors are making from their interactions with exhibits and how they make sense of these experiences. The research reported in this study is an exploratory attempt, therefore, to investigate this process by using video clips and still photographs of…

  20. Cooperative Working towards Family-Centred Health Education in Acute Care: Improvement in Client Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastani, Farideh; Golaghaie, Farzaneh; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Rafeie, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish family-centred health education for patients in a neurosurgery unit and to evaluate its impact on patients' and families' satisfaction. Design: Cooperative participatory research through which a group of clinical nurses and an academic researcher engaged in cycles of action and reflection. Setting: The study was conducted…

  1. How Learning English Facilitates Integration for Adult Migrants: The Jarrah Language Centre Experience. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, Meaghan

    2012-01-01

    Building the research capacity of the vocational education and training (VET) sector is a key concern for the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER). To assist with this objective, NCVER supported an academic scholarship program, whereby VET practitioners are sponsored to undertake university study at honours, master's, or…

  2. Leading Highly Performing Children's Centres: Supporting the Development of the "Accidental Leaders"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Andy; Sharp, Caroline; Handscomb, Graham

    2016-01-01

    There is wide recognition that early childhood experiences are critical to a child's development and their subsequent life chances. However, little research has been undertaken into leadership in early years settings, which is so influential in this regard. This article summarizes research into the leadership of Sure Start Children's Centres,…

  3. Group Supervision: Supporting Practitioners in Their Work with Children and Families in Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soni, Anita

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how group supervision can be used to support the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of those working with children and families in early years provision in England. It is based on research conducted in 2008 with a cluster of four Children's Centres in the West Midlands in England, UK. The research evaluated group…

  4. Tracing Discourses of Social Action: Inner-City Sydney Neighbourhood Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, John

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on my doctoral research around community organizations in the inner city of Sydney, Australia. The neighbourhood centres (NCs) provide a case study of sites where discourses of feminism, multiculturalism and urban environmentalism have been activated within a social justice framework. The research participants were activists…

  5. Example of "Character Education" Course Design in the Light of "Experienced Centred" Design for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Nida

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design the course "Character Education" in the light of the "experienced centred" design and to assert an example of "Character Education" course design for higher education students. The research was conducted during the 2015-2016 spring semester as an action research. The participants…

  6. Workers with Disabilities in Sheltered Employment Centres: A Training Needs Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurado de los Santos, Pedro; Costa, Rebeca Soler

    2016-01-01

    The work presented is part of a study that the research group CIFO (Research Team in Training for the Labour Market, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona) has carried out, relating to the training needs analysis and basic competences and skills in the environment of sheltered employment centres (SECs) in Catalonia (this study was…

  7. Writing Centre Tutoring Sessions: Addressing Students' Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winder, Roger; Kathpalia, Sujata S.; Koo, Swit Ling

    2016-01-01

    The guiding principle behind university writing centres is to focus on the process of writing rather than the finished product, prioritising higher order concerns related to organisation and argumentation of texts rather than lower order concerns of grammar and punctuation. Using survey-based data, this paper examines students' concerns regarding…

  8. Person-Centred (Deictic) Expressions and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Garcia-Perez, Rosa M.; Lee, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We employed semi-structured tests to determine whether children with autism produce and comprehend deictic (person-centred) expressions such as "this"/"tilde" "here"/"there" and "come"/"go", and whether they understand atypical non-verbal gestural deixis in the form of directed head-nods to indicate location. In Study 1, most participants…

  9. Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) draws up, proposes and conducts France's space policy. Its role is to develop the uses of space, to meet the civilian and military needs of public bodies and of the scientific community, and to foster the development and dissemination of new applications, designed to create wealth and jobs....

  10. Crystallographic Data Centre Services and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Univ. (England). Chemical Lab.

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data based on diffraction methods. The source of input is almost entirely primary journals. Bibliographic information and numeric data on crystal and molecular structures are on magnetic tapes. The bibliographic file…

  11. Examining Whiteness in a Children's Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Verity; Watson, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    This article utilises critical whiteness theory to explore the ethnic discourses observed in a children's centre in South London. Whilst critical whiteness has been used as a framework to understand race, racism and multiculturalism in a number of settings, including education, there are few studies that have sought to understand ethnicity in…

  12. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  13. Cactus: The Centres of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of two articles which describe how to use "JavaSketchPad" to explore the centres of a triangle. This introductory exercise is suggested in the GSP "Workshop Guide". Students can use "JavaSketchPad Interactive Geometry" (JSP) at home at no cost. They are likely to impress their parents with their enthusiasm for geometry and all…

  14. Oo-Za-We-Kwun Centre Incorporated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, P. R.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Centre is described as being designed to help native people participate more effectively in a modern Canadian environment. The residential family program includes a five-week Life Skills course followed by a two-year transfer of learning period during which counseling, paid employment, and community activities are available. (Author/MS)

  15. Self Assessment and Student-Centred Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to show how self assessment facilitates student-centred learning (SCL) and fills a gap in the literature. Two groups of students were selected from a single class in a tertiary educational institution. The control group of 25 was selected randomly by the tossing of an unbiased coin (heads = control group). They were trained in the…

  16. In the Field: The Canadian Ecology Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Clare

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Ecology Centre (Ontario) offers year-round residential and day programs in outdoor and environmental education for secondary students, field placement and internship opportunities for college students, and ecotourism programs, while providing employment and tax revenues to the local community. Dubbed consensus environmentalism, the…

  17. Centring the Subject in Order to Educate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject--or self--should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially…

  18. Myanmar: The Community Learning Centre Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middelborg, Jorn; Duvieusart, Baudouin, Ed.

    A community learning centre (CLC) is a local educational institution outside the formal education system, usually set up and managed by local people. CLCs were first introduced in Myanmar in 1994, and by 2001 there were 71 CLCs in 11 townships. The townships are characterized by remoteness, landlessness, unemployment, dependency on one cash crop,…

  19. Early Childhood Centre Administrator Certification. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, E. Elaine

    This document presents the process for obtaining certification for the position of early childhood centre administrator (ECCA) in Nova Scotia, Canada. Following an introduction describing the development of the process and its pilot testing, Chapter 1 of the document details the four-step process: (1) application, including training in the ECCA…

  20. INTEGRAL Science Data Centre to be presented to the press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    's International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, will be launched in October 2002 on a Proton rocket from Baikonour, Kazakhstan. The spacecraft is currently subject to final testing at ESA's European Space Research & Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, while the ground segment facilities - from which INTEGRAL operations will be controlled - are preparing for final review in June. The spacecraft will be shipped to the launch site in August 2002.

  1. Horticultural therapy--aspects of land use for the mentally handicapped. A system of planning for the requirements of the mentally handicapped gardener.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, T; Underhill, C

    1979-01-01

    An increasing number of facilities for the mentally handicapped use horticulture, agriculture and gardening in their training programmes. This paper contains a review of: (1) some aspects of land use as a medium for leisure, rehabilitation, therapy and training for the mentally handicapped, (2) employment, both sheltered and open, in land use as reflected in a recent survey, (3) the variety of knowledge available through the medium of land use. The main emphasis of the paper deals with: (1) the need for planning, (2) a suggested planning system that assists the instructor in understanding the requirements of the mentally handicapped gardener when he approaches a given job, (3) some problems peculiar to land use work with the mentally handicapped. In conclusion the authors briefly examine: (1) the need for assessment, (2) the need to distinguish between production and training, (3) suggestions towards an expansion of the planning system to take in other areas of the horticultural unit than were originally described, (4) social activities connected with the horticultural activities described, (5) the hierarchy identified through the use of a particular planning system.

  2. 'The nourishing soil of the soul': The role of horticultural therapy in promoting well-being in community-dwelling people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Noone, Sarah; Innes, Anthea; Kelly, Fiona; Mayers, Andrew

    2015-12-23

    Two-thirds of people with dementia reside in their own homes; however, support for community-dwelling people with dementia to continue to participate in everyday activities is often lacking, resulting in feelings of depression and isolation among people living with the condition. Engagement in outdoor activities such as gardening can potentially counteract these negative experiences by enabling people with dementia to interact with nature, helping to improve their physical and psychological well-being. Additionally, the collaborative nature of community gardening may encourage the development of a sense of community, thereby enhancing social integration. Despite increasing evidence supporting its therapeutic value for people with dementia in residential care, the benefits of horticultural therapy have yet to be transposed into a community setting. This paper will examine the theoretical support for the application of horticultural therapy in dementia care, before exploring the potential of horticultural therapy as a means of facilitating improved physical and psychological well-being and social integration for people living with dementia within the community.

  3. Pneumococcal disease in Australia: current status and future challenges. A report of the workshop held at the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, 8-9 November, 2002.

    PubMed

    Roche, Paul; McIntyre, Peter; Spencer, Jenean

    2003-01-01

    In relation to surveillance, the predominant issue discussed was universal versus sentinel enhanced surveillance of IPD. In northern Australia, it will be important for enhanced surveillance to continue and to be as complete as possible. There are a number of reasons for this. First, the high incidence and high serotype diversity of IPD in Indigenous children in these areas has prompted the recommendation for boosters with 23vPPV to increase serotype coverage. This makes high quality, comprehensive surveillance essential for national policy. It is also important internationally as such as vaccine program has not been implemented anywhere else but is potentially applicable to other comparable populations. Secondly, the small absolute numbers of cases require data to be accumulated as comprehensively as possible. In relation to vaccine issues, both 23vPPV and 7vPCV policy are important. There was strong support from the meeting for the recent recommendation from the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation that both 23vPPV (for those over 65 years) and 7vPCV (for those less than 2 years) be publicly funded as universal programs. With respect to the current programs, there were important issues for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for both 23vPPV and 7vPCV. For 23vPPV, research is required into both the utility and frequency of boosters in adults as well as any potential role for 7vPCV in adults. Improving the identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is important, especially in urban areas.

  4. Redbay ambrosia beetle/Laurel wilt: Overview of projects at the USDA-ARS Subtropical Horticulture Research Station

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT Laurel wilt, a deadly fungal disease of avocado and other trees in the Lauraceae, is vectored by the redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus). First detected near Savannah, GA in 2002, the beetle and its obligatory pathogen have since spread to South Carolina and Florida. Currently, t...

  5. Research in Language Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoch, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Since its inception in 1990, the Language Testing Research Centre (LTRC) at the University of Melbourne has earned an international reputation for its work in the areas of language assessment and testing as well as program evaluation. The mission of the centre is: (1) to carry out and promote research and development in language testing; (2) to…

  6. Translating the medical home into patient-centred language

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Camille; Zittleman, Linda; Ringel, Marc; Felzien, Maret; Bennett, Christopher; Cowart, Shirley; Flores, Martha; Flores, Rafael; Hernandez, Mike; Norman, Ned; Rodriquez, Mary; Sanchez, Norah; Sanchez, Sergio; Winkelman, Kathryn; Winkelman, Steve; Sutter, Christin; Gale, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background The patient-centred medical home (PCMH) is a healthcare delivery model that aims to make health care more effective and affordable and to curb the rise in episodic care resulting from increasing costs and sub-specialisation of health care. Although the PCMH model has been implemented in many different healthcare settings, little is known about the PCMH in rural or underserved settings. Further, less is known about patients' understanding of the PCMH and its effect on their care. Aims The goal of this project was to ascertain the patient perspective of the PCMH and develop meaningful language around the PCMH to help inform and promote patients' participation with the PCMH. Method The High Plains Research Network Community Advisory Council (CAC) is comprised of a diverse group of individuals from rural eastern Colorado. The CAC and its academic partners started this project by receiving a comprehensive education on the PCMH. Using a community-based participatory research approach, the CAC translated technical medical jargon on the PCMH into a core message that the ‘Medical Home is Relationship’. Results The PCMH should focus on the relationship of the patient with their personal physician. Medical home activities should be used to support and strengthen this relationship. Conclusion The findings serve as a reminder of the crucial elements of the PCMH that make it truly patient centred and the importance of engaging local patients in developing and implementing the medical home. PMID:25949733

  7. Collaborating at a distance: operations centres, tools, and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Successful operation of the LHC and its experiments is crucial to the future of the worldwide high-energy physics program. Remote operations and monitoring centres have been established for the CMS experiment in several locations around the world. The development of remote centres began with the LHC{at}FNAL ROC and has evolved into a unified approach with distributed centres that are collectively referred to as 'CMS Centres Worldwide'. An overview of the development of remote centres for CMS will be presented, along with a synopsis of collaborative tools that are used in these centres today and trends in the development of remote operations capabilities for high-energy physics.

  8. User-Centred Design Using Gamestorming.

    PubMed

    Currie, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    User-centered design (UX) is becoming a standard in software engineering and has tremendous potential in healthcare. The purpose of this tutorial will be to demonstrate and provide participants with practice in user-centred design methods that involve 'Gamestorming', a form of brainstorming where 'the rules of life are temporarily suspended'. Participants will learn and apply gamestorming methods including persona development via empathy mapping and methods to translate artefacts derived from participatory design sessions into functional and design requirements.

  9. A synthesis of AOT40-based response functions and critical levels of ozone for agricultural and horticultural crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, G.; Buse, A.; Gimeno, B.; Bermejo, V.; Holland, M.; Emberson, L.; Pleijel, H.

    Crop-response data from over 700 published papers and conference proceedings have been analysed with the aim of establishing ozone dose-response functions for a wide range of European agricultural and horticultural crops. Data that met rigorous selection criteria (e.g. field-based, ozone concentrations within European range, full season exposure period) were used to derive AOT40-yield response functions for 19 crops by first converting the published ozone concentration data into AOT40 (AOT40 is the hourly mean ozone concentration accumulated over a threshold ozone concentration of 40 ppb during daylight hours, units ppm h). For any individual crop, there were no significant differences in the linear response functions derived for experiments conducted in the USA or Europe, or for individual cultivars. Three statistically independent groups were identified: ozone sensitive crops (wheat, water melon, pulses, cotton, turnip, tomato, onion, soybean and lettuce); moderately sensitive crops (sugar beet, potato, oilseed rape, tobacco, rice, maize, grape and broccoli) and ozone resistant (barley and fruit represented by plum and strawberry). Critical levels of a 3 month AOT40 of 3 ppm h and a 3.5 month AOT40 of 6 ppm h were derived from the functions for wheat and tomato, respectively.

  10. Effects of people-centred factors on enterprise resource planning implementation project success: empirical evidence from Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Vathsala; Gunawardena, Vathsala

    2010-08-01

    Extant literature suggests people-centred factors as one of the major areas influencing enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation project success. Yet, to date, few empirical studies attempted to validate the link between people-centred factors and ERP implementation project success. The purpose of this study is to empirically identify people-centred factors that are critical to ERP implementation projects in Sri Lanka. The study develops and empirically validates a framework for people-centred factors that influence the success of ERP implementation projects. Survey research methodology was used and collected data from 74 ERP implementation projects in Sri Lanka. The people-centred factors of 'project team competence', 'rewards' and 'communication and change' were found to predict significantly the ERP implementation project success.

  11. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  12. Oxidation of methane by a biological dicopper centre.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Smith, Stephen M; Rawat, Swati; Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2010-05-06

    Vast world reserves of methane gas are underutilized as a feedstock for the production of liquid fuels and chemicals owing to the lack of economical and sustainable strategies for the selective oxidation of methane to methanol. Current processes to activate the strong C-H bond (104 kcal mol(-1)) in methane require high temperatures, are costly and inefficient, and produce waste. In nature, methanotrophic bacteria perform this reaction under ambient conditions using metalloenzymes called methane monooxygenases (MMOs). MMOs thus provide the optimal model for an efficient, environmentally sound catalyst. There are two types of MMO. Soluble MMO (sMMO) is expressed by several strains of methanotroph under copper-limited conditions and oxidizes methane with a well-characterized catalytic di-iron centre. Particulate MMO (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme produced by all methanotrophs and is composed of three subunits, pmoA, pmoB and pmoC, arranged in a trimeric alpha(3)beta(3)gamma(3) complex. Despite 20 years of research and the availability of two crystal structures, the metal composition and location of the pMMO metal active site are not known. Here we show that pMMO activity is dependent on copper, not iron, and that the copper active site is located in the soluble domains of the pmoB subunit rather than within the membrane. Recombinant soluble fragments of pmoB (spmoB) bind copper and have propylene and methane oxidation activities. Disruption of each copper centre in spmoB by mutagenesis indicates that the active site is a dicopper centre. These findings help resolve the pMMO controversy and provide a promising new approach to developing environmentally friendly C-H oxidation catalysts.

  13. AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL HORTICULTURE WITH A FOCUS ON CALIFORNIA. (R823342)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. DISMANTLING OF THE FUEL CELL LABORATORY AT RESEARCH CENTRE JUELICH

    SciTech Connect

    Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Bensch, D.; Ambos, Frank

    2003-02-27

    The fuel cell laboratory was constructed in three phases and taken into operation in the years 1962 to 1966. The last experimental work was carried out in 1996. After all cell internals had been disassembled, the fuel cell laboratory was transferred to shutdown operation in 1997. Three cell complexes, which differed, in particular, by the type of shielding (lead, cast steel, concrete), were available until then for activities at nuclear components. After approval by the regulatory authority, the actual dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory started in March 2000. The BZ I laboratory area consisted of 7 cells with lead shieldings of 100 to 250 mm thickness. This area was dismantled from April to September 2000. Among other things, approx. 30,000 lead bricks with a total weight of approx. 300 Mg were dismantled and disposed of. The BZ III laboratory area essentially consisted of cells with concrete shieldings of 1200 to 1400 mm thickness. The dismantling of this area started in the fir st half of 2001 and was completed in November 2002. Among other things, approx. 900 Mg of concrete was dismantled and disposed of. Since more than 90 % of the dismantled materials was measurable for clearance, various clearance measurement devices were used during dismantling. The BZ II laboratory area essentially consists of cells with cast steel shieldings of 400 to 460 mm thickness. In September 2002 it was decided to continue using this laboratory area for future tasks. The dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory was thus completed. After appropriate refurbishment, the fuel cell laboratory will probably take up operation again in late 2003.

  15. Trends Shaping Education 2016. Centre for Educational Research and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Did you ever wonder if education has a role to play in stemming the obesity epidemic sweeping across all OECD countries? Or what the impact of increasing urbanisation might be on our schools, families, and communities? Or whether new technologies really are fundamentally changing the way our children think and learn? "Trends Shaping…

  16. The Centre for Food Innovation -- Research Areas and Potential Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    particular), fresh fruit (cherries, plums and pears), and processed foods [8]. In addition, the Australian Government has a desire to support two...meat $147M and 2.5% exports  Fruit $131M and 0.9% exports, including pome (apples and pears), stone (cherries, apricots, nectarines and plums ), and

  17. Infrasound research at Kola Regional Seismological Centre, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asming, Vladimir; Kremenetskaya, Elena

    2013-04-01

    A small-aperture infrasound array has been installed in Kola Peninsula, Russia 17 km far from the town of Apatity in the year 2000. It comprises 3 Chaparral V microbarographs placed closely to the APA seismic array sensors and equipped with pipe wind reducing filters. The data are digitized at the array site and transmitted in real time to a processing center in Apatity. To search for infrasound events (arrivals of coherent signals) a beamforming-style detector has been developed. Now it works in near real time. We analyzed the detecting statistics for different frequency bands. Most man-made events are detected in 1-5 Hz band, microbaromes are typically detected in 0.2-1 Hz band. In lower frequencies we record mostly a wind noise. A data base of samples of infrasound signals of different natures has been collected. It contains recordings of microbaromes, industrial and military explosions, airplane shock waves, infrasound of airplanes, thunders, rocket launches and reentries, bolides etc. The most distant signals we have detected are associated with Kursk Magnetic Anomaly explosions (1700 km far from Apatity). We implemented an algorithm for association of infrasound signals and preliminary location of infrasound events by several arrays. It was tested with Apatity data together with data of Sweden - Finnish infrasound network operated by the Institute of Space Physics in Umea (Sweden). By agreement with NORSAR we have a real-time access to the data of Norwegian experimental infrasound installation situated in Karasjok (North Norway). Currently our detection and location programs work both with Apatity and Norwegian data. The results are available in Internet. Finnish militaries routinely destroy out-of-date weapon in autumns at the same compact site in North Finland. This is a great source of repeating infrasound signals of the same magnitude and origin. We recorded several hundreds of such explosions. The signals have been used for testing our location routines. Some factors were observed enabling or disabling first (tropospheric) arrivals of such signals depending on weather conditions. Systematic backazimuth deviations for stratospheric arrivals have been observed caused by strong stratospheric winds. In 2009 mobile infrasound arrays were developed in KRSC. Each array comprises 3 low-frequency microphones, GPS, digitizer and PC with data acquisition system. Aperture of such arrays is about 250 m, deployment time is less than 1 hour. These arrays are used in experimental work with Roskosmos space agency to search space debris reentering places. In 2012 a wireless version of such mobile array was created. Each acquisition point comprises a microphone, GPS and ADC chips, microcontroller and radio modem to send data to a central unit. This enabled us to increase aperture (up to 500 m) and decrease deployment time.

  18. [The Freud Museum in London as a research centre].

    PubMed

    Molnar, Michael; Tögel, Christfried

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a compact description of those resources of the Freud Museum most relevant for the Freud scholar: 1. the Archives with its collection of letters, documents, photos, and press cuttings from the 1920s and 1930s, as well as reproductions of paintings and photos of tourist features, compiled by Freud himself; 2. Freud's archaeological collection; 3. Freud's library.

  19. Person-centred care: clarifying the concept in the context of inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Zingmark, Karin

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports an analysis of the concept of person-centred care in the context of inpatient psychiatry. It has been suggested that person-centred care in inpatient psychiatry might differ from person-centred care in other contexts, indicating a need to clarify the concept in this specific context. Scholarly papers from health-related disciplines were identified following a systematic search of the electronic databases CINAHL, PUBMED and PsycINFO, covering records indexed up until March 2014. An evolutionary approach to concept analysis was applied, integrating principles for data extraction and analysis in integrative reviews. The concept of person-centred care was defined as cultural, relational and recovery-oriented. It aspires to improve care and calls for a transformation of inpatient psychiatry. The concept is closely related to the concepts of recovery and interpersonal nursing. The result is described in terms of attributes, antecedents, consequences and related concepts. It is concluded that the further development of the concept needs to consider the contexts of the concept at both conceptual and praxis levels. Further research should explore the nature of and relationships between context, culture, care practice and outcomes in inpatient psychiatry from a perspective of person-centred care. The results of this analysis can provide a framework for such research.

  20. Canadian Educational Development Centre Websites: More Ebb than Flow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines information portrayed on Canadian educational development (ED) centre websites and, in particular, whether information that corresponds to questions compiled from a literature search of ED centre practices is readily available from centre websites. This study phase is part of a larger national study of Canadian educational…