Science.gov

Sample records for horticultural research centre

  1. Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitken, James

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment in the field of horticulture and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains a validated competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography. The following…

  2. Environmental Horticulture. Project Report Phase I with Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachler, Mike; Sappe', Hoyt

    This report provides results of Phase I of a project that researched the occupational area of environmental horticulture, established appropriate committees, and conducted task verification. These results are intended to guide development of a program designed to address the needs of the horticulture field. Section 1 contains general information:…

  3. Characterization and evaluation of five jaboticaba accessions at the subtropical horticulture research station in Miami, Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of five Jaboticaba (Myrciaria caulifloria) cultivars ‘MC-05-06’, ‘MC-05-14’, ‘MC-05-12’, ‘MC-06-15,’ and ‘MC-06-14’ were evaluated and characterized at the National Germplasm Repository, Subtropical horticulture Research Station (SHRS) Miami, Florida. Thirty fruits were harvested from clona...

  4. CmMDb: a versatile database for Cucumis melo microsatellite markers and other horticulture crop research.

    PubMed

    Bhawna; Chaduvula, Pavan K; Bonthala, Venkata S; Manjusha, Verma; Siddiq, Ebrahimali A; Polumetla, Ananda K; Prasad, Gajula M N V

    2015-01-01

    Cucumis melo L. that belongs to Cucurbitaceae family ranks among one of the highest valued horticulture crops being cultivated across the globe. Besides its economical and medicinal importance, Cucumis melo L. is a valuable resource and model system for the evolutionary studies of cucurbit family. However, very limited numbers of molecular markers were reported for Cucumis melo L. so far that limits the pace of functional genomic research in melon and other similar horticulture crops. We developed the first whole genome based microsatellite DNA marker database of Cucumis melo L. and comprehensive web resource that aids in variety identification and physical mapping of Cucurbitaceae family. The Cucumis melo L. microsatellite database (CmMDb: http://65.181.125.102/cmmdb2/index.html) encompasses 39,072 SSR markers along with its motif repeat, motif length, motif sequence, marker ID, motif type and chromosomal locations. The database is featured with novel automated primer designing facility to meet the needs of wet lab researchers. CmMDb is a freely available web resource that facilitates the researchers to select the most appropriate markers for marker-assisted selection in melons and to improve breeding strategies. PMID:25885062

  5. Basic Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Barbra Farabough

    This learning packet contains teaching suggestions and student learning materials for a course in basic horticulture aimed at preparing students for employment in a number of horticulture areas. The packet includes nine sections and twenty instructional units. Following the standard format established for Oklahoma vocational education materials in…

  6. The Effects of Task Instruction Sheets on the Performance of Vocational Horticulture Students. Summary of Research, 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Dennis C.; Newcomb, L. H.

    A study investigated the effect that task instruction sheets had on the performance of vocational horticulture students when being taught a unit on poinsettia production. Using a post-test only control group design, researchers administered a 35-item multiple choice test on poinsettia production to 207 students in 12 randomly selected eleventh…

  7. Morphological and physio-chemical characterization of five Canistel accessions at the subtropical horticulture research station in Miami Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of five canistel cultivars, 'Fairchild','E11', 'Keisau', 'TREC#3' and 'TREC 3680' were evaluated and characterized at the National Germplasm Repository, Subtropical horticulture Research Station (SHRS) Miami, Florida. Thirty fruits were harvested from clonal accessions during July and August, ...

  8. Advantages of diffuse light for horticultural production and perspectives for further research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Yang, Qichang

    2015-01-01

    Plants use diffuse light more efficiently than direct light, which is well established due to diffuse light penetrates deeper into the canopy and photosynthetic rate of a single leaf shows a non-linear response to the light flux density. Diffuse light also results in a more even horizontal and temporal light distribution in the canopy, which plays substantial role for crop photosynthesis enhancement as well as production improvement. Here we show some of the recent findings about the effect of diffuse light on light distribution over the canopy and its direct and indirect effects on crop photosynthesis and plant growth, and suggest some perspectives for further research which could strengthen the scientific understanding of diffuse light modulate plant processes and its application in horticultural production. PMID:26388890

  9. Ornamental Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    Each of the 32 curriculum modules in this packet for ornamental horticulture instruction contains a brief description of the module content, a list of the major division or units, the overall objectives, objectives by units, content outline and suggested teaching methods, student application activities, and evaluation procedures. A listing of…

  10. Heartland Horticulture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poquette, Bonnie L.

    2009-01-01

    Midwestern gardeners are legendary for enduring and outwitting winter, with its heavy snowpack and recurring freezes and thaws. Most of them also reckon with a relatively short growing period. All of them find their horticultural plans complicated by hot, humid summers. In fact, the Midwest deals with four seasons dictating special considerations…

  11. SOEP: Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Chris; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Theme articles on horticulture discuss how students develop basic skills in supervised occupational experience programs, how to develop a good program without additional funding, describe a program at a junior college, and outline a program preparing students for job entry or higher education. (JOW)

  12. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horticultural Review allows extensive reviews of the state of the knowledge on certain topics or crops. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential, is outlined with an Introduction, Botany, Horticulture, Propagation, Uses and Conclusion sections. This review compiles literature from around the w...

  13. The Charles Perkins Centre's Twins Research Node.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas C; Craig, Jeffrey M; Hopper, John L; Carrick, Susan E

    2016-08-01

    Twins can help researchers disentangle the roles of genes from those of the environment on human traits, health, and diseases. To realize this potential, the Australian Twin Registry (ATR), University of Melbourne, and the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC), University of Sydney, established a collaboration to form the Twins Research Node, a highly interconnected research facility dedicated specifically to research involving twins. This collaboration aims to foster the adoption of twin designs as important tools for research in a range of health-related domains. The CPC hosted their Twins Research Node's launch seminar entitled 'Double the power of your research with twin studies', in which experienced twin researchers described how twin studies are supporting scientific discoveries and careers. The launch also featured twin pairs who have actively participated in research through the ATR. Researchers at the CPC were surveyed before the event to gauge their level of understanding and interest in utilizing twin research. This article describes the new Twins Research Node, discusses the survey's main results and reports on the launch seminar. PMID:27302367

  14. Introduction to Horticulture. Teacher Edition. Horticulture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication is designed to provide a core of instruction for the many different fields in agricultural/horticultural education. This course contains 21 instructional units that cover the following topics: introduction to horticulture; beginning a career in horticulture; hand and power tools; introduction to safety; growing facilities;…

  15. Literacy Research Centre(s) in Canada: Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnaby, Barbara

    An exploratory study of appropriate models for an efficient and effective national research center on adult literacy in Canada used an informal survey of documents, a convenience sample of people who have some stake or experience in adult literacy and/or research administration, and information about some existing and proposed research…

  16. Beef quality assessed at European research centres.

    PubMed

    Dransfield, E; Nute, G R; Roberts, T A; Boccard, R; Touraille, C; Buchter, L; Casteels, M; Cosentino, E; Hood, D E; Joseph, R L; Schon, I; Paardekooper, E J

    1984-01-01

    Loin steaks and cubes of M. semimembranosus from eight (12 month old) Galloway steers and eight (16-18 month old) Charolais cross steers raised in England and from which the meat was conditioned for 2 or 10 days, were assessed in research centres in Belgium, Denmark, England, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands. Laboratory panels assessed meat by grilling the steaks and cooking the cubes in casseroles according to local custom using scales developed locally and by scales used frequently at other research centres. The meat was mostly of good quality but with sufficient variation to obtain meaningful comparisons. Tenderness and juiciness were assessed most, and flavour least, consistently. Over the 32 meats, acceptability of steaks and casseroles was in general compounded from tenderness, juiciness and flavour. However, when the meat was tough, it dominated the overall judgement; but when tender, flavour played an important rôle. Irish and English panels tended to weight more on flavour and Italian panels on tenderness and juiciness. Juciness and tenderness were well correlated among all panels except in Italy and Germany. With flavour, however, Belgian, Irish, German and Dutch panels ranked the meats similarly and formed a group distinct from the others which did not. The panels showed a similar grouping for judgements of acceptability. French and Belgian panels judged the steaks from the older Charolais cross steers to have more flavour and be more juicy than average and tended to prefer them. Casseroles from younger steers were invariably preferred although the French and Belgian panels judged aged meat from older animals equally acceptable. These regional biases were thought to be derived mainly from differences in cooking, but variations in experience and perception of assessors also contributed. PMID:22055992

  17. Assessment of the tung tree (Vernicia fordii) germplasm collection and latest cultivar release at the USDA-ARS Southern Horticultural Research Unit in Poplarville, MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tung trees (Vernicia fordii, syn Aleurites fordii) and tung oil production have a long history in the gulf coast region. The Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory (TCSHL) in Poplarville, MS was formerly the USDA Tung Oil Research Station in the 1940s, 50s and 60s and still maintains an exte...

  18. Centre for Applied Language Research at the University of Southampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Robert; Hyde-Simon, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    The Centre for Applied Language Research at the University of Southampton is one of two research centres within the discipline of Modern Languages. Established in 2004, CALR now has more than 50 members, predominantly faculty members working in the School of Humanities/Modern Languages, as well as growing number of postgraduate researchers. The…

  19. National Centre for Research on Rural Education. Report for 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Research on Rural Education, Nedlands (Western Australia).

    The Centre was originally funded in 1980 for three years to undertake research on major issues and problems in rural education, to publish and disseminate results, and to act as a source of advice to government and private authorities as well as communities. Funding for the Centre has been extended through 1985, and its activities continue to be…

  20. A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure funds. Despite being widely cited as a core component of research capacity building, infrastructure as a discrete concept has been rather analytically neglected, often treated as an implicit feature of research environments with little specification or relegated to a narrow category of physical or administrative inputs. The terms research infrastructure, capacity, and culture, among others, are deployed in overlapping and inconsistent ways, further obfuscating the crucial functions of infrastructure specifically and its relationships with associated concepts. The case is made for an expanded conceptualisation of research infrastructure, one that moves beyond conventional 'hardware' notions. Drawing on a case analysis of NEXUS, a multidisciplinary health research centre based at the University of British Columbia, Canada, a conceptual framework is proposed that integrates the tangible and intangible structures that interactively underlie research centre functioning. A relational approach holds potential to allow for more comprehensive accounting of the returns on infrastructure investment. For those developing new research centres or seeking to reinvigorate existing ones, this framework may be a useful guide for both centre design and evaluation. PMID:20925953

  1. Environmental Horticulture Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard environmental horticulture curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the environmental horticulture field. The general information section contains the following: purpose and objectives; program description,…

  2. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Tim; Reist, Dan; Macdonald, Scott; Benoit, Cecilia; Jansson, Mikael

    2010-02-01

    The Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia (CARBC) was established as a multi-campus and multi-disciplinary research centre administered by the University of Victoria (UVic) in late 2003. Its core funding is provided from interest payments on an endowment of CAD 10.55 million dollars. It is supported by a commitment to seven faculty appointments in various departments at UVic. The Centre has two offices, an administration and research office in Victoria and a knowledge exchange unit in Vancouver. The two offices are collaborating on the implementation of CARBC's first 5-year plan which seeks to build capacity in British Columbia for integrated multi-disciplinary research and knowledge exchange in the areas substance use, addictions and harm reduction. Present challenges include losses to the endowment caused by the 2008/2009 economic crisis and difficulties negotiating faculty positions with the university administration. Despite these hurdles, to date each year has seen increased capacity for the Centre in terms of affiliated scientists, funding and staffing as well as output in terms of published reports, electronic resources and impacts on policy and practice. Areas of special research interest include: drug testing in the work-place, epidemiological monitoring, substance use and injury, pricing and taxation policies, privatization of liquor monopolies, polysubstance use, health determinants of indigenous peoples, street-involved youth and other vulnerable populations at risk of substance use problems. Further information about the Centre and its activities can be found on http://www.carbc.ca. PMID:20078479

  3. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hui; Zhang, Junxiang; Nageswaran, Divyashree; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors of many horticultural crops are attributed to the overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegetables. Not only do carotenoids give horticultural crops their visual appeal, they also enhance nutritional value and health benefits for humans. As a result, carotenoid research in horticultural crops has grown exponentially over the last decade. These investigations have advanced our fundamental understanding of carotenoid metabolism and regulation in plants. In this review, we provide an overview of carotenoid biosynthesis, degradation, and accumulation in horticultural crops and highlight recent achievements in our understanding of carotenoid metabolic regulation in vegetables, fruits, and flowers. PMID:26504578

  4. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hui; Zhang, Junxiang; Nageswaran, Divyashree; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors of many horticultural crops are attributed to the overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegetables. Not only do carotenoids give horticultural crops their visual appeal, they also enhance nutritional value and health benefits for humans. As a result, carotenoid research in horticultural crops has grown exponentially over the last decade. These investigations have advanced our fundamental understanding of carotenoid metabolism and regulation in plants. In this review, we provide an overview of carotenoid biosynthesis, degradation, and accumulation in horticultural crops and highlight recent achievements in our understanding of carotenoid metabolic regulation in vegetables, fruits, and flowers. PMID:26504578

  5. Openness--A Way Forward: Development Education Research Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare-Heremia, Mahora

    2014-01-01

    Education is a vital aspect in the lives of humankind. It contributes and shapes our future as citizens of the world. To understand it is to discover the many hidden talents the world has in store for all. The Development Education Research Centre (DERC) holds many resources that aid in the development of education at a global level. With the…

  6. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre Bulletin No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Instructions for the construction of the following apparatus for the secondary school science laboratory are included in this issue of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre Bulletin: a cheap water purifier using an expendable deionizer can; a simple amplifier suitable for detecting or displaying D. C. currents of 1 microamp or…

  7. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2009 Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2009

    2009-01-01

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) was established in 1981 as a not-for-profit company owned by the Commonwealth and state and territory ministers with responsibility for vocational education and training (VET). It is a professional, independent body at arm's length from government. The company initially conducted research…

  8. Temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Manjul; Dhekney, Sadanand A; Soriano, Leonardo; Kandel, Raju; Grosser, Jude W

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology provides plant breeders an additional tool to improve various traits desired by growers and consumers of horticultural crops. It also provides genetic solutions to major problems affecting horticultural crops and can be a means for rapid improvement of a cultivar. With the availability of a number of horticultural genome sequences, it has become relatively easier to utilize these resources to identify DNA sequences for both basic and applied research. Promoters play a key role in plant gene expression and the regulation of gene expression. In recent years, rapid progress has been made on the isolation and evaluation of plant-derived promoters and their use in horticultural crops, as more and more species become amenable to genetic transformation. Our understanding of the tools and techniques of horticultural plant biotechnology has now evolved from a discovery phase to an implementation phase. The availability of a large number of promoters derived from horticultural plants opens up the field for utilization of native sequences and improving crops using precision breeding. In this review, we look at the temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops and the usage of a variety of promoters either isolated from horticultural crops or used in horticultural crop improvement. PMID:26504550

  9. Environmental Horticulture Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide contains 45 program standards for the environmental horticulture program conducted in technical institutes in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment,…

  10. Horticulture/Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This brochure describes the philosophy and scope of a secondary-level course in floriculture and horticulture. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the Future Farmers of America, floriculture, merchandising and selling, retail flower shop management, advertising, inventory, indentification of common floral…

  11. Development of Procedures for Assessing the Impact of Vocational Education Research and Development on Vocational Education (Project IMPACT). Volume 4--A Case Study of Illinois Projects in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hook, Colin; Ethridge, James

    As part of Project IMPACT's efforts to identify and develop procedures for complying with the impact requirements of Public Law 94-482, a case study was made of Illinois Projects in Horticulture. Fourteen horticulture projects in high schools and junior colleges were discovered through a previous study, personal interviews with two University of…

  12. The Cooperative Research Centres Programme: An Australian Initiative to Link Research to Commercialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tegart, Greg

    1996-01-01

    In Australia, Cooperative Research Centres strengthen linkages between universities as producers and industry as users of research. Shifting perspectives on the functions of universities, industry, and government are driven by the need for wealth creation, global competitiveness, and optimum linkages between research and commercialization. (SK)

  13. Research in subsea welding technology at the National Hyperbaric Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.E.; Liddle, D.; Richardson, I.M.

    1993-12-31

    The National Hyperbaric Centre in Aberdeen is a testing facility used by diving contractors, manufacturers and offshore operators for testing of their equipment and procedures. The onshore saturation diving system is used for the qualification of hyperbaric welding procedures and diver welders. Research and development projects are also ongoing at NHC. During the past year, work has focused on the development of synergic MIG and Fluxcored wire welding parameters for the subsea repair of offshore structures. A robot welding system has been installed for operation in the large test chamber. Various aspects of health and safety in hyperbaric welding have also been addressed. These include a survey of current practice by contractors regarding welding fumes and gases and the development of an ozone monitoring system suitable for use in welding habitats.

  14. Computational toxicology at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre.

    PubMed

    Mostrag-Szlichtyng, Aleksandra; Zaldívar Comenges, José-Manuel; Worth, Andrew P

    2010-07-01

    The methods and tools of computational toxicology form an essential and integrating pillar in the new paradigm of predictive toxicology, which seeks to develop more efficient and effective means of assessing chemical toxicity, while also reducing animal testing. The increasingly prominent role of computational toxicology in the implementation of European chemicals' legislation is described, along with initiatives by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre to promote the acceptance and use of computational methods. Outstanding needs and scientific challenges are also outlined. In recent years, there have been impressive scientific and technological advances in computational toxicology. However, considerable progress is still needed to increase the acceptance of computational methods, and in particular to develop a deeper and common understanding of how to apply computational toxicology in regulatory decision making.

  15. Research Informed Science Enrichment Programs at the Gravity Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venville, Grady; Blair, David; Coward, David; Deshon, Fred; Gargano, Mark; Gondwe, Mzamose; Heary, Auriol; Longnecker, Nancy; Pitts, Marina; Zadnik, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Excursions to museums and science centres generally are great fun for students and teachers. The potential educational benefits beyond enjoyment, however, are rarely realised or analysed for their efficacy. The purpose of this paper is to describe four educational enrichment programs delivered at the Gravity Discovery Centre (GDC), near Gingin,…

  16. Competency-Based Horticulture: Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program in floriculture. It contains a master resource list, a listing of floriculture resources available from various states, and 89 competency task sheets organized into nine competency areas. These…

  17. Competency-Based Horticulture. Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    One of two competency-based horticulture curriculum guides developed by an Illinois project, this Floriculture guide provides the classroom teacher with specific tasks determined by state industry personnel to be necessary for entry-level job placement. It is intended for horticulture education at the senior high school and two year college level.…

  18. Marketing time predicts naturalization of horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Robert W; Liu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    to address this problem, including research to identifyand select noninvasive forms and types of horticultural plants is urgently needed.

  19. UK Solar System Data Centre: Data Archive for Ionospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Matthew; James, Sarah; Bogdanova, Yulia; Crothers, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The UK Solar System Data Centre (UKSSDC) has been working to improve access to its extensive holdings of historical ionospheric data. In our archive, ionospheric data from 200 stations worldwide (1930s-present), such as ionograms and scaled ionospheric parameters (e.g., foF2, fmin, h'F2), is held on both digital and physical media. From the 1990s these data sets are available in digital form and can be downloaded from our web-interface. Thanks to a Natural Environment Research Council grant we are in the process of digitising a selection, 2,200 out of ~27,000, of UK ionosonde film data to be made available via the web interface. It is hoped that more funding will be made available to continue this exercise over the next few years. The UKSSDC also provides real-time ionospheric data retrieval from two RAL Space ionosondes, Chilton and Port Stanley, alongside other European observatories. The UKSSDC is part of RAL Space based at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the electronic address: http://www.ukssdc.ac.uk. This is a UK national data archive facility with open data access and can be used by scientists around the globe.

  20. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre, India--a profile.

    PubMed

    Ray, Rajat; Dhawan, Anju; Chopra, Anita

    2013-10-01

    The National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre (NDDTC) is a part of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, a premier autonomous medical university in India. This article provides an account of its origin and its contribution to the field of substance use disorder at the national and international levels. Since its establishment, the NDDTC has played a major role in the development of various replicable models of care, the training of post-graduate students of psychiatry, research, policy development and planning. An assessment of the magnitude of drug abuse in India began in the early 1990s and this was followed by a National Survey on Extent, Patterns and Trends of Drug Abuse in 2004. Several models of clinical care have been developed for population subgroups in diverse settings. The centre played an important role in producing data and resource material which helped to scale up opioid substitution treatment in India. A nationwide database on the profile of patients seeking treatment (Drug Abuse Monitoring System) at government drug treatment centres has also been created. The centre has provided valuable inputs for the Government of India's programme planning. Besides clinical studies, research has also focused on pre-clinical studies. Capacity-building is an important priority, with training curricula and resource material being developed for doctors and paramedical staff. Many of these training programmes are conducted in collaboration with other institutions in the country. The NDDTC has received funding from several national and international organizations for research and scientific meetings, and, most recently (2012), it has been designated as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Substance Abuse.

  1. Reports from research centres--20. Alcohol research at the Hjellestad Clinic.

    PubMed

    Laberg, J C; Fauske, S; Løberg, T

    1989-09-01

    Treatment and research efforts at the Hjellestad Clinic are based on a biobehavioural model of the addictions. The treatment program encompasses life-style changes and relapse prevention, and extensive assessment for the purpose of the treatment choices. The clinic is treating nearly 1500 patients a year. Psychological and medical research projects have included experimental drinking studies, psychopharmacological and biomedical studies, treatment evaluations, studies of neuropsychological assessment, studies of personality subtypes, studies of violence related to alcohol and drugs, and investigations of women alcoholics. A new research laboratory houses an experimental bar, and state-of-the-art facilities for psychophysiological and neuropsychological testing. The Hjellestad Clinic is the only Norwegian centre for clinical and experimental research on the addictions from a psycho-physiological as well as behavioral and cognitive perspective. In addition, a national educational program offers theoretical and practical training for professionals and paraprofessionals in the addictions in co-operation with the University of Bergen. Training in the addictions and internships for psychology students at the University of Bergen is provided at the Clinic. The centre has established connections with centres in Scandinavia, England, Canada and the U.S., through visiting scholars and study trips. (The centre has an especially strong liaison with the Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies.)

  2. Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32: Patterns in Soil-Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, S. J.; Simmer, C.; Masbou, M.; Boessenkool, K.; Crewell, S.; Diekkruger, B.; Huber, K.; Klitzsch, N.; Koyama, C. N.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    The soil, vegetation and the lower atmosphere (SVA) are key compartments of the Earth, where almost all activities of mankind take place. This region is characterized by extremely complex patterns, structures and processes that act at different temporal and spatial scales. While the exchange of energy, water and carbon is continuous between the different compartments, the pertinent fluxes are strongly heterogeneous and variable in space and time. The overarching TR32 paradigm is that the characterisation of structures and patterns will lead to a deeper qualitative and quantitative understanding of the SVA system, and ultimately to better predictions of the SVA state. The TR32 combines research groups in the field of soil and plant science, remote sensing, hydrology, meteorology and mathematics located at the Universities of Aachen, Bonn, Braunschweig and Cologne and the Research Centre Juelich study the soil-vegetation atmosphere system under the novel holistic paradigm of patterns. To understand the mechanisms leading to spatial and temporal patterns in energy and matter fluxes of the SVA system we link experiments and theory via model-observation integration. Focusing our research on the Rur Catchment (Germany), patterns are monitored since 2006 continuously using existing and novel geophysical and remote sensing techniques from the local to the catchment scale based on ground penetrating radar methods, induced polarization, radiomagnetotellurics, electrical resistivity tomography, boundary layer scintillometry, lidar techniques, microwave radiometry, and precipitation radars with polarization diversity. Modeling approaches involve high resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP; 400m) and hydrological models (few meters). Example work from the first phase includes the transfer of laboratory methods to the field; the measurements of patterns of soil-carbon, evapotranspiration and respiration measured in the field; catchment-scale modeling of exchange processes

  3. Hand Mycetoma: The Mycetoma Research Centre Experience and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Omer, Rowa Fathelrahman; Seif El Din, Nancy; Abdel Rahim, Fadwa Awad; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2016-08-01

    Mycetoma is a devastating, neglected tropical disease characterised by extensive tissue involvement resulting in destruction, deformities and disabilities in the affected patients. The hand is commonly affected by mycetoma thus compromises its functionality and hinder the patient's daily activities of living. In this communication, we report on 533 patients with hand mycetoma managed over a period of 24 years at the Mycetoma Research Centre, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan. Eumycetoma was the commonest type of mycetoma (83.3%) encountered. Males were predominately affected (69.2%) with a sex ratio of 2.2:1. The majority of the patients (84%) were young adult below the age of 40 years old at presentation. The generality of patients (86.4%) were from the Sudan mycetoma belt. Children and adolescents (28.1%), farmers (18.2%) and workers (17.4%) were more frequently affected. The majority of patients (67.4%) had disease duration of less than 5 years at presentation. The study, did not document significant history of local trauma, familial tendency, concomitant medical diseases or other predisposing cause for mycetoma in this population. Pain (23.1%) was not a disease feature in this series and 52% of patients had past surgery for mycetoma and recurrence. The right hand was affected most (60.4%), and 64% of them had small lesion at presentation. Conventional x-ray was only helpful in patients with advanced disease and the MRI accurately determined the disease extension. Cytological smears, surgical biopsies histopathological examination and grains culture were the principal diagnostic tools for causative organisms' identification. In the present series it was difficult to determine the treatment outcome due to high patients follow up dropout. PMID:27483367

  4. Hand Mycetoma: The Mycetoma Research Centre Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Rowa Fathelrahman; Seif EL Din, Nancy; Abdel Rahim, Fadwa Awad; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Mycetoma is a devastating, neglected tropical disease characterised by extensive tissue involvement resulting in destruction, deformities and disabilities in the affected patients. The hand is commonly affected by mycetoma thus compromises its functionality and hinder the patient’s daily activities of living. In this communication, we report on 533 patients with hand mycetoma managed over a period of 24 years at the Mycetoma Research Centre, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan. Eumycetoma was the commonest type of mycetoma (83.3%) encountered. Males were predominately affected (69.2%) with a sex ratio of 2.2:1. The majority of the patients (84%) were young adult below the age of 40 years old at presentation. The generality of patients (86.4%) were from the Sudan mycetoma belt. Children and adolescents (28.1%), farmers (18.2%) and workers (17.4%) were more frequently affected. The majority of patients (67.4%) had disease duration of less than 5 years at presentation. The study, did not document significant history of local trauma, familial tendency, concomitant medical diseases or other predisposing cause for mycetoma in this population. Pain (23.1%) was not a disease feature in this series and 52% of patients had past surgery for mycetoma and recurrence. The right hand was affected most (60.4%), and 64% of them had small lesion at presentation. Conventional x-ray was only helpful in patients with advanced disease and the MRI accurately determined the disease extension. Cytological smears, surgical biopsies histopathological examination and grains culture were the principal diagnostic tools for causative organisms’ identification. In the present series it was difficult to determine the treatment outcome due to high patients follow up dropout. PMID:27483367

  5. Towards Sustainable Research Capacity Development and Research Ownership for Academic Institutes in Developing Countries: The Malawian Research Support Centre Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomo, Exnevia; Kalilani, Linda; Mwapasa, Victor; Trigu, Chifundo; Phiri, Kamija; Schmidt, Joann; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele

    2011-01-01

    In lesser-developed African countries, the lack of institutionalised support for research, combined with limited career opportunities and poor remuneration, have contributed to weak research infrastructure and capacity, and a continuing brain drain to developed countries. Malawi's Research Support Centre (RSC) model is novel in that it provides a…

  6. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  7. Bioelectromagnetics Research within an Australian Context: The Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (ACEBR)

    PubMed Central

    Loughran, Sarah P.; Al Hossain, Md Shahriar; Bentvelzen, Alan; Elwood, Mark; Finnie, John; Horvat, Joseph; Iskra, Steve; Ivanova, Elena P.; Manavis, Jim; Mudiyanselage, Chathuranga Keerawella; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Martinac, Boris; McIntosh, Robert; McKenzie, Raymond; Mustapic, Mislav; Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Pirogova, Elena; Rashid, M. Harunur; Taylor, Nigel A.; Todorova, Nevena; Wiedemann, Peter M.; Vink, Robert; Wood, Andrew; Yarovsky, Irene; Croft, Rodney J.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone subscriptions continue to increase across the world, with the electromagnetic fields (EMF) emitted by these devices, as well as by related technologies such as Wi-Fi and smart meters, now ubiquitous. This increase in use and consequent exposure to mobile communication (MC)-related EMF has led to concern about possible health effects that could arise from this exposure. Although much research has been conducted since the introduction of these technologies, uncertainty about the impact on health remains. The Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (ACEBR) is a National Health and Medical Research Council Centre of Research Excellence that is undertaking research addressing the most important aspects of the MC-EMF health debate, with a strong focus on mechanisms, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and exposure dosimetry. This research takes as its starting point the current scientific status quo, but also addresses the adequacy of the evidence for the status quo. Risk communication research complements the above, and aims to ensure that whatever is found, it is communicated effectively and appropriately. This paper provides a summary of this ACEBR research (both completed and ongoing), and discusses the rationale for conducting it in light of the prevailing science. PMID:27690076

  8. Is naturalistic driving research possible with highly instrumented cars? Lessons learnt in three research centres.

    PubMed

    Valero-Mora, Pedro M; Tontsch, Anita; Welsh, Ruth; Morris, Andrew; Reed, Steven; Touliou, Katerina; Margaritis, Dimitris

    2013-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experiences using Highly Instrumented Cars (HICs) in three research Centres across Europe; Spain, the UK and Greece. The data collection capability of each car is described and an overview presented relating to the relationship between the level of instrumentation and the research possible. A discussion then follows which considers the advantages and disadvantages of using HICs for ND research. This includes the obtrusive nature of the data collection equipment, the cost of equipping the vehicles with sophisticated Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) and the challenges for data storage and analysis particularly with respect to video data. It is concluded that the use of HICs substantially increases the depth of knowledge relating to the driver's behaviour and their interaction with the vehicle and surroundings. With careful study design and integration into larger studies with Low(ly) instrumented Cars (LICs), HICs can contribute significantly and in a relatively naturalistic manner to the driver behaviour research.

  9. BrisSynBio: a BBSRC/EPSRC-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sedgley, Kathleen R.; Race, Paul R.; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2016-01-01

    BrisSynBio is the Bristol-based Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)/Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre. It is one of six such Centres in the U.K. BrisSynBio's emphasis is on rational and predictive bimolecular modelling, design and engineering in the context of synthetic biology. It trains the next generation of synthetic biologists in these approaches, to facilitate translation of fundamental synthetic biology research to industry and the clinic, and to do this within an innovative and responsible research framework. PMID:27284028

  10. What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?

    PubMed

    Diebolt, Vincent; Lang, Marie; Thoby, Frédérique

    2016-02-01

    The Giens 2015 Workshop Round Table entitled "What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?" took a viewpoint distinct from earlier work and studies on changes in clinical research activities in France. The purpose of the present work was to identify, starting from concrete examples, the main strengths and advantages of clinical research activity in France related, in part, to the background environment and also to the specific characteristics of the investigation centres considered to be among the most high-performance units in activity. The criteria retained were grouped into a set of specifications that could be used to establish a "label of excellence" upon which the different teams and clinical research centres could model themselves. It was thus considered that belonging to a centre or structured network with at least a national configuration, when this is possible for the medial topic in question, constitutes a real advantage. Four benchmarks were identified: the scientific and clinical expertise of the head investigator, as well as the qualification and operational capacity of the centre's team; definition and measurement of performance using clearly displayed indicators and evaluation procedures; the quality of the overall trial "process" and of each of its component steps; communication, because know-how and promotion go hand in hand, with the main objective of informing the professional and general public about the value of the research centre meeting the above-mentioned criteria, about its networks of competencies, and more generally, about the important assets of the background of clinical research in France. This sector of research is funded by the public authorities via calls for public grants, financial aids for structures supporting clinical research in the University Hospital Centres and other healthcare institutions allowing for a professionalization of the research occupations, and the national public health

  11. What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?

    PubMed

    Diebolt, Vincent; Lang, Marie; Thoby, Frédérique

    2016-02-01

    The Giens 2015 Workshop Round Table entitled "What specifications for a centre or network of excellence in clinical research?" took a viewpoint distinct from earlier work and studies on changes in clinical research activities in France. The purpose of the present work was to identify, starting from concrete examples, the main strengths and advantages of clinical research activity in France related, in part, to the background environment and also to the specific characteristics of the investigation centres considered to be among the most high-performance units in activity. The criteria retained were grouped into a set of specifications that could be used to establish a "label of excellence" upon which the different teams and clinical research centres could model themselves. It was thus considered that belonging to a centre or structured network with at least a national configuration, when this is possible for the medial topic in question, constitutes a real advantage. Four benchmarks were identified: the scientific and clinical expertise of the head investigator, as well as the qualification and operational capacity of the centre's team; definition and measurement of performance using clearly displayed indicators and evaluation procedures; the quality of the overall trial "process" and of each of its component steps; communication, because know-how and promotion go hand in hand, with the main objective of informing the professional and general public about the value of the research centre meeting the above-mentioned criteria, about its networks of competencies, and more generally, about the important assets of the background of clinical research in France. This sector of research is funded by the public authorities via calls for public grants, financial aids for structures supporting clinical research in the University Hospital Centres and other healthcare institutions allowing for a professionalization of the research occupations, and the national public health

  12. Peripheries and Centres: Research Universities in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2007-01-01

    The research university is a central institution of the 21st century--providing access to global science, producing basic and applied research, and educating key leaders for academe and society. Worldwide, there are very few research universities--they are expensive to develop and support, and the pressures of massification have placed priorities…

  13. Pockets of Participation: Revisiting Child-Centred Participation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Myfanwy

    2011-01-01

    This article revisits the theme of the clash of interests and power relations at work in participatory research which is prescribed from above. It offers a possible route toward solving conflict between adult-led research carried out by young researchers, funding requirements and organisational constraints. The article explores issues of…

  14. Urban Horticulture: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 4-year program in urban horticulture. The guide consists of a course description; general course…

  15. Horticulture Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for 9 occupations in the horticulture series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space…

  16. Trends Shaping Education 2013. Centre for Educational Research and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2013

    2013-01-01

    What does it mean for education that our societies are increasingly diverse? How is global economic power shifting towards new countries? In what ways are the skills required in the world of work changing? "Trends Shaping Education 2013" brings together international evidence to give policy makers, researchers, educational leaders, administrators…

  17. Infusing Evaluative Thinking as Process Use: The Case of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carden, Fred; Earl, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Until the recent introduction of a dynamic interview-based process, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), a Canadian development research funding agency, faced a challenge: project completion reports (PCRs) were not being completed in a timely and quality manner. This is a common problem many organizations face in completing…

  18. The Role of Higher Education Centres in Research and Policy: A Case from a European Periphery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zgaga, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on higher education research and policies in small and/or peripheral countries that usually occupy a marginal position in contemporary international debates. The region discussed here is South-eastern Europe and especially the Western Balkans. First, an outline of emerging research centres and the developments in higher…

  19. UBC's Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) Will Serve as Test Bed for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The University of British Columbia (UBC) recently celebrated the opening of its Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS), a living laboratory for researchers to teach, test, and study the long-term impact of sustainable practices and technologies. Featuring advanced building controls, sensing technology, and management software…

  20. Intelligent systems installed in building of research centre for research purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusov, Jozef; Mokry, Marian; Kolkova, Zuzana; Sedivy, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The attractiveness of intelligent buildings is nowadays directly connected with higher level of comfort and also the economic mode of consumption energy for heating, cooling and the total consumption of electricity for electric devices. The technologies of intelligent buildings compared with conventional solutions allow dynamic optimization in real time and make it easy for operational message. The basic division of functionality in horizontal direction is possible divide in to two areas such as Economical sophisticated residential care about the comfort of people in the building and Security features. The paper deals with description of intelligent systems which has a building of Research Centre. The building has installed the latest technology for utilization of renewable energy and also latest systems of controlling and driving all devices which contribute for economy operation by achieving the highest thermal comfort and overall safety.

  1. Developing a national strategic plan for consumer horticulture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumer Horticulture encompasses a wide-array of activities that are practiced by and of interest to the gardening public, garden-focused non-governmental organizations, and gardening-related industries. In a previous publication, we described the current lack of funding support for research, exten...

  2. Evidence of public engagement with science: visitor learning at a zoo-housed primate research centre.

    PubMed

    Waller, Bridget M; Peirce, Kate; Mitchell, Heidi; Micheletta, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Primate behavioural and cognitive research is increasingly conducted on direct public view in zoo settings. The potential of such facilities for public engagement with science is often heralded, but evidence of tangible, positive effects on public understanding is rare. Here, the effect of a new zoo-based primate research centre on visitor behaviour, learning and attitudes was assessed using a quasi-experimental design. Zoo visitors approached the primate research centre more often when a scientist was present and working with the primates, and reported greater awareness of primates (including conservation) compared to when the scientist was not present. Visitors also reported greater perceived learning when the scientist was present. Installation of information signage had no main effect on visitor attitudes or learning. Visitors who interacted with the signage, however, demonstrated increased knowledge and understanding when asked about the specific information present on the signs (which was related to the ongoing facial expression research at the research centre). The findings show that primate behaviour research centres on public view can have a demonstrable and beneficial effect on public understanding of science.

  3. Cheminformatics Research at the Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics Cambridge

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E; Bender, Andreas; Glen, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Molecular Informatics, formerly Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics (UCMSI), at the University of Cambridge is a world-leading driving force in the field of cheminformatics. Since its opening in 2000 more than 300 scientific articles have fundamentally changed the field of molecular informatics. The Centre has been a key player in promoting open chemical data and semantic access. Though mainly focussing on basic research, close collaborations with industrial partners ensured real world feedback and access to high quality molecular data. A variety of tools and standard protocols have been developed and are ubiquitous in the daily practice of cheminformatics. Here, we present a retrospective of cheminformatics research performed at the UCMSI, thereby highlighting historical and recent trends in the field as well as indicating future directions. PMID:26435758

  4. Open Access Centre at the Nature Research Centre: a facility for enhancement of scientific research, education and public outreach in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šerpenskienė, Silvija; Skridlaitė, Gražina

    2014-05-01

    Open Access Centre (OAC) was established in Vilnius, Lithuania in 2013 as a subdivision of the Nature Research Centre (NRC) operating on the principle of open access for both internal and external users. The OAC consists of 15 units, i.e. 15 NRC laboratories or their branches. Forty four sets of research equipment were purchased. The OAC cooperates with Lithuanian science and studies institutions, business sector and other governmental and public institutions. Investigations can be carried in the Geosciences, Biotaxonomy, Ecology and Molecular Research, and Ecotoxicology fields. Environmental radioactivity, radioecology, nuclear geophysics, microscopic and chemical composition of natural compounds (minerals, rocks etc.), paleomagnetic, magnetic and environmental investigations, as well as ground and water contamination by oil products and other organic environment polluting compounds, identification of fossils, rocks and minerals can be studied in the Georesearch field. Ecosystems and identification of plants, animals and microorganisms are main subjects of the Biotaxonomy, Ecology and Molecular Research field. The Ecotoxicologal Research deals with toxic and genotoxic effects of toxic substances and other sources of pollution on macro- and microorganisms and cell cultures. Open access is guaranteed by: (1) providing scientific research and experimental development services; (2) implementing joint business and science projects; (3) using facilities for the training of specialists of the highest qualifications; (4) providing properly qualified and technically trained users with opportunities to carry out their scientific research and/or experiments in the OAC laboratories by themselves. Services provided in the Open Access Centre can be received by both internal and external users: persons undertaking innovative economic activities, students of other educational institutions, interns, external teams of researchers engaged in scientific research activities, teachers

  5. Celebration of the Success of Distributed Research with Schools: The CEM Centre, Durham

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tymms, Peter; Coe, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The Curriculum, Evaluation and Management (CEM) Centre has grown in just 25 years to become the largest educational research unit in a UK university. It has influenced schools and teachers in unprecedented numbers and has had a considerable impact on policy and practice both directly and indirectly in the UK and beyond. This article summarises…

  6. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Bulletin No. 64, July, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Edinburgh.

    This bulletin of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre provides information to teachers on a variety of topics relating to the use of equipment in science instruction. The introductory remarks deal with an assessment of electronic calculators suitable for use in schools. The section entitled "Physics Notes" lists surplus physics…

  7. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Bulletin No. 61, February 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Edinburgh.

    This bulletin of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre provides information to teachers regarding the use of newly produced equipment such as an economical soldering iron, nickel cadmium cell, and a desk calculator. Useful information is also included for teachers on the use of electric coils and bicarbonate indicators. A detailed…

  8. Leadership Challenges of Strategic Research Centres in Relation to Degree of Institutionalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomqvist, Christine; Agrell, Cecilia; Sandahl, Christer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse leadership challenges in the organisation of strategic research centres, focusing on the relationship between organisation and the level of institutionalisation. Four main themes of leadership challenges were identified: (1) the "changing university context," including relationships…

  9. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Bulletin No. 58, September 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre, Edinburgh.

    This issue of the bulletin contains four major topics. The first is a discussion of problems involved in establishing good communication with science teachers concerning the activities of the Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre (SSSERC) via exhibitions throughout Scotland. The second, headed "Biology Notes," presents a discussion of…

  10. Physiological relaxation induced by horticultural activity: transplanting work using flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite increasing attention and a growing volume of research data, little physiological evidence is available on the benefits of horticultural activity and the different effects on individuals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological effects of horticultural activity and to examine how differences in personality alter these effects. Results The effects of transplanting real flowers (horticultural activity) and handling artificial flowers (control activity) on human physiological activity were compared. On the first day, eight participants engaged in horticultural activity and another eight in the control activity. On the second day, participants switched roles. Participants’ physiological conditions during each activity were assessed by measuring the heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV). Psychological responses, which were measured using a semantic differential rating scale, showed that the horticultural activity promoted comfortable, soothed, and natural feelings, compared to the control activity. Analysis of physiological responses using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that sympathetic nervous activity significantly decreased in the late time period (11 to 15 minutes) of horticultural activity only in the type A group. Conclusions This study supports the fact that the horticultural activity can enhance psychological and physiological relaxation effects, although these physiological effects can differ among individuals with different personalities. PMID:24112302

  11. What's in a rehab? Ethnographic evaluation research in Indigenous Australian residential alcohol and drug rehabilitation centres.

    PubMed

    Chenhall, Richard

    2008-08-01

    Residential rehabilitation centres are a popular form of treatment for Indigenous Australians suffering from alcohol and drug misuse; however, there has been very little substantive research and evaluation in this area. Based on long-term ethnographic research, this study examines the informal aspects of a treatment programme in an Indigenous residential alcohol and drug rehabilitation service. Evaluation of such services often focuses on treatment length and/or treatment level obtained as key indicators of success. This study suggests that 'treatment' may be more complex and layered with multiple levels of meaning, which may not necessarily be captured in some evaluation designs. For the residential rehabilitation centre discussed in this paper, oscillating periods of mutual support and discipline have an important therapeutic function. Standard measures of treatment length and level obtained are meaningless without incorporating understanding of this process. This paper presents some of the ethnographic findings, alongside some of the evaluation implications of doing this kind of research.

  12. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity. Monitoring the European drug situation: the ongoing challenge for the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul; Mounteney, Jane; Lopez, Dominique; Zobel, Frank; Götz, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) is the designated hub for drug-related information in the European Union. The organization's role is to provide the European Union (EU) and its Member States with a factual overview of European drug problems and a common information framework to support the drugs debate. In order to achieve its mission, the EMCDDA coordinates and relies on a network of 30 national monitoring centres, the Reitox National Focal Points. The Centre publishes on a wide range of drug-related topics, across epidemiology, interventions, laws and policies. Every November, the EMCDDA publishes its Annual Report, providing a yearly update on the European drug situation, translated into 23 EU languages. In line with its founding regulation, the EMCDDA has a role acting as an interface between the worlds of science and policy. While not a research centre in the formal sense, the results the Centre generates serve as catalysts for new research questions and help to identify priorities. Current challenges facing the agency include continuing to increase scientific standards while maintaining a strong institutional role, as well as supporting European efforts to identify, share and codify best practice in the drugs field.

  13. UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE IN THE MIDWESTERN SECTION OF THE UNITED STATES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEMP, PAUL E.

    A RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT, DESIGNED TO RETRAIN TEACHERS, DEVELOP ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE CURRICULUM MATERIALS, AND STIMULATE THE DEVELOPMENT OF VOCATIONAL ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE PROGRAMS IN THE MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES, INCLUDED TRAINING, SERVICE, AND EVALUATION ACTIVITIES. THIRTY TEACHERS SELECTED FROM 75 APPLICANTS ATTENDED A SUMMER…

  14. Competency-Based Horticulture: Gardening--Groundskeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program in gardening/groundskeeping. It contains a master resource list, a listing of gardening/groundskeeping resources available from various states, and 87 competency task sheets organized into 10…

  15. CVAE-VEH Horticulture Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This curriculum guide consists of 14 units for use in teaching a high school level horticulture course. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: opportunities in horticultural occupations; plant classification and identification; structures and equipment used in producing greenhouse, ornamental, and nursery plants; greenhouse…

  16. Competencies Needed by Workers in Horticultural Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaas, Duane; Kahler, Alan A.

    This study was undertaken to identify occupational areas in the horticultural industry and to identify, describe, and categorize the mental and physical skills needed by workers in horticultural occupations. Competency lists were developed for these occupational areas: arborist services, farm and garden supply centers, golf course management,…

  17. Marketing time predicts naturalization of horticultural plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horticulture is an important source of naturalized plants, but little is known about naturalization frequencies and potential patterns of naturalization in horticultural plants. We analyzed a unique set of data derived from the detailed sales catalogs (1886-1930) of the most important early Florida ...

  18. Competency-Based Horticulture: Turfgrass Maintenance Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program for training turfgrass maintenance workers. It contains a master resource list, a listing of turfgrass maintenance resources available from various states, and 59 competency task sheets organized…

  19. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airhart, Douglas L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University's Program of Special Education sponsors a "Super Saturday" of enrichment activities for gifted and talented students as well as students with learning disabilities. A session on horticulture was planned and arranged by students in a class on horticultural therapy who designed learning activities of two types:…

  20. Competency-Based Horticulture. Gardening/Groundskeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    One of two competency-based horticulture curriculum guides developed by an Illinois project, this Gardening/Groundskeeping guide provides the classroom teacher with specific tasks determined by state industry personnel to be necessary for entry-level job placement. It is intended for horticulture education at the senior high school and two-year…

  1. Air pollution and horticulture: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, D.C.

    1983-10-01

    An overview is presented of some of the general effects of pollutants on plants, as well as an approach for assessing these effects. The nature of effects can range from no effects at low doses to a reduced growth or yield at higher atmospheric concentrations. In addition to the dose of the pollutant, the degree of response is governed by a number of internal and external factors. Relative number and size of stomata have marked effect on pollutant uptake by the plant; therefore, environmental conditions exert a strong influence on pollutant-induced responses. Future research should focus on determining if the pollutant doses that now occur in areas of horticultural production cause effects and, if so, whether the effects constitute injury.

  2. [R]MIT Research Centre at Delft University of Technology: A Bridge between Research, Education, Society and Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlstra, Hielkje

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, we launched the [R]MIT Research Centre (Modification, Intervention Transformation) at the Faculty of Architecture at Delft University of Technology. [R]MIT was founded to respond to the need for an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to the transformation of the built environment. [R]MIT aims to bring momentum to the renewal of…

  3. INA-RESPOND: a multi-centre clinical research network in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Karyana, Muhammad; Kosasih, Herman; Samaan, Gina; Tjitra, Emiliana; Aman, Abu Tholib; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Fatmawati; Gasem, M Hussein; Arif, Mansyur; Sudarmono, Pratiwi; Suharto; Merati, Tuti P; Lane, Clifford; Siswanto; Siddiqui, Sophia

    2015-07-29

    Nationally representative observational and translational research is needed to address the public health challenges in Indonesia due to the geographic disparity, recently decentralized health system, and diverse infectious disease priorities. To accomplish this, the Indonesian Ministry of Health in collaboration with the US National Institute of Health has established INA-RESPOND (Indonesia Research Partnership on Infectious Disease) - a clinical research network comprising 9 referral hospitals, 7 medical faculties, and 2 research centres across Indonesia. The network provides a forum to conduct research at a national scale and to address scientific questions that would be difficult to address in smaller research settings. Further, it is currently conducting multi-centre research on the etiologies of fever, sepsis, and tuberculosis. There are opportunities to leverage existing network resources for other public health research needs. INA-RESPOND is an Indonesian-led network in a country with diverse population groups and public health needs which is poised to collaborate with researchers, universities, donors, and industry worldwide. This paper describes the network and its goals and values, as well as the management structure, process for collaboration, and future vision.

  4. A Comprehensive Horticulture Curriculum Guide for New Jersey Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. Cook Coll.

    A horticultural core curriculum and draft copies of three horticultural cluster curricula are provided. Materials related to the curriculum development project appear first. The core curriculum is designed to provide broad initial instruction in horticulture for students in the first year of a secondary-level vocational horticulture program. The…

  5. Horticulture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Ashleigh Barbee, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  6. The Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and practice: promoting excellence in psychiatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda

    2006-09-01

    The Centre for Psychiatric Nursing Research and Practice (CPNRP), is funded by the Department of Human Services Victoria, as an initiative to support psychiatric nurses throughout the State of Victoria. At the time of the CPNRPs inception in 1999, psychiatric nursing had been affected by widespread changes in the delivery of mental health services and nursing education in Victoria. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the development of the CPNRP and how this development reflected the significant issues of the time. The CPNRP introduced a number of programs and other initiatives in response to six primary issues: recruitment, retention, leadership, professional development, research: practice gap and communication.

  7. SFB 754 - Managing a large interdisciplinary collaborative research centre: what matters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelten, Christiane; Antia, Avan; Braker, Gesche; Kamm, Ruth; Mehrtens, Hela

    2016-04-01

    The German Research Foundation (DFG) funds Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs - in German: Sonderforschungsbereiche SFBs) that are generally applied for by one university, but may also incorporate neighbouring universities or non-university research institutions. SFBs are crossing the boundaries of disciplines, as well as faculties, departments, institutions and institutes. The funding of an SFB can be up to 12 years (3 x 4 years). Kiel University and GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel received funding for the SFB 754 'Climate-biogeochemical interactions in the tropical ocean' in 2008. Currently, the centre is in its third phase comprising 17 scientific subprojects, one outreach project, a central coordination and management subproject and a subproject covering the research expeditions with a total project budget of 12 Mio Euro. Around 100 scientists of interdisciplinary research fields (e.g. physical oceanography, micro-biology, palaeontology, chemistry, modelling) are actively involved. Besides generating high profile research, gender equality, early career support and data management are complementary goals of SFBs requested by the DFG. Within the SFB 754 the scientific coordination office is responsible for developing concepts and strategies to cover these additional requirements and over the past eight years the SFB 754 has been successful in setting up profound programmes and various measures. Some of the SFB 754 practices have been taken up by other projects, and hence allowed the SFB 754 to serve as a role model for 'best practice' within marine sciences in Kiel. A main reason for the success of the SFB 754 to work towards the additional goals set out in the DFGs SFB programme is that the project is well tied into existing structures and builds upon outstanding management expertise available in Kiel. Three examples are highlighted here: • young scientists programme (closely linked to a graduate school (Integrated School of Marine Sciences

  8. The Community-First Land-Centred Theoretical Framework: Bringing a "Good Mind" to Indigenous Education Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styres, Sandra D.; Zinga, Dawn M.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces an emergent research theoretical framework, the community-first Land-centred research framework. Carefully examining the literature within Indigenous educational research, we noted the limited approaches for engaging in culturally aligned and relevant research within Indigenous communities. The community-first Land-centred…

  9. The NSW brain tissue resource centre: Banking for alcohol and major neuropsychiatric disorders research.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, G T; Sheedy, D; Stevens, J; McCrossin, T; Smith, C C; van Roijen, M; Kril, J J

    2016-05-01

    The New South Wales Brain Tissue Resource Centre (NSWBTRC) at the University of Sydney (Australia) is an established human brain bank providing tissue to the neuroscience research community for investigations on alcohol-related brain damage and major psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia. The NSWBTRC relies on wide community engagement to encourage those with and without neuropsychiatric illness to consent to donation through its allied research programs. The subsequent provision of high-quality samples relies on standardized operational protocols, associated clinical data, quality control measures, integrated information systems, robust infrastructure, and governance. These processes are continually augmented to complement the changes in internal and external governance as well as the complexity and diversity of advanced investigation techniques. This report provides an overview of the dynamic process of brain banking and discusses the challenges of meeting the future needs of researchers, including synchronicity with other disease-focus collections. PMID:27139235

  10. Optical laboratory facilities at the Finnish Meteorological Institute - Arctic Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakkala, Kaisa; Suokanerva, Hanne; Matti Karhu, Juha; Aarva, Antti; Poikonen, Antti; Karppinen, Tomi; Ahponen, Markku; Hannula, Henna-Reetta; Kontu, Anna; Kyrö, Esko

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the laboratory facilities at the Finnish Meteorological Institute - Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC, http://fmiarc.fmi.fi). They comprise an optical laboratory, a facility for biological studies, and an office. A dark room has been built, in which an optical table and a fixed lamp test system are set up, and the electronics allow high-precision adjustment of the current. The Brewer spectroradiometer, NILU-UV multifilter radiometer, and Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer of the FMI-ARC are regularly calibrated or checked for stability in the laboratory. The facilities are ideal for responding to the needs of international multidisciplinary research, giving the possibility to calibrate and characterize the research instruments as well as handle and store samples.

  11. The NSW brain tissue resource centre: Banking for alcohol and major neuropsychiatric disorders research.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, G T; Sheedy, D; Stevens, J; McCrossin, T; Smith, C C; van Roijen, M; Kril, J J

    2016-05-01

    The New South Wales Brain Tissue Resource Centre (NSWBTRC) at the University of Sydney (Australia) is an established human brain bank providing tissue to the neuroscience research community for investigations on alcohol-related brain damage and major psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia. The NSWBTRC relies on wide community engagement to encourage those with and without neuropsychiatric illness to consent to donation through its allied research programs. The subsequent provision of high-quality samples relies on standardized operational protocols, associated clinical data, quality control measures, integrated information systems, robust infrastructure, and governance. These processes are continually augmented to complement the changes in internal and external governance as well as the complexity and diversity of advanced investigation techniques. This report provides an overview of the dynamic process of brain banking and discusses the challenges of meeting the future needs of researchers, including synchronicity with other disease-focus collections.

  12. The International Development Research Centre: A Guide for the Canadian University Research Community = Le Centre de recherches pour le developpement international: guide a l'intention des scientifiques des universites Canadiennes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, George; Wasilewski, Ania, Ed.

    Written in both English and French this is a manual for the Canadian research community. It describes the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and its operations. The main objective of the IDRC is to assist scientists in developing countries to identify and conduct research into long term practical solutions to development problems.…

  13. Person centred care and shared decision making: implications for ethics, public health and research.

    PubMed

    Munthe, Christian; Sandman, Lars; Cutas, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a systematic account of ethical issues actualised in different areas, as well as at different levels and stages of health care, by introducing organisational and other procedures that embody a shift towards person centred care and shared decision-making (PCC/SDM). The analysis builds on general ethical theory and earlier work on aspects of PCC/SDM relevant from an ethics perspective. This account leads up to a number of theoretical as well as empirical and practice oriented issues that, in view of broad advancements towards PCC/SDM, need to be considered by health care ethics researchers. Given a PCC/SDM-based reorientation of health care practice, such ethics research is essential from a quality assurance perspective.

  14. People-centred science: strengthening the practice of health policy and systems research.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Kabir; George, Asha; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-04-17

    Health policy and systems research (HPSR) is a transdisciplinary field of global importance, with its own emerging standards for creating, evaluating, and utilizing knowledge, and distinguished by a particular orientation towards influencing policy and wider action to strengthen health systems. In this commentary, we argue that the ability of the HPSR field to influence real world change hinges on its becoming more people-centred. We see people-centredness as recognizing the field of enquiry as one of social construction, requiring those conducting HPSR to locate their own position in the system, and conduct and publish research in a manner that foregrounds human agency attributes and values, and is acutely attentive to policy context. Change occurs at many layers of a health system, shaped by social, political, and economic forces, and brought about by different groups of people who make up the system, including service users and communities. The seeds of transformative practice in HPSR lie in amplifying the breadth and depth of dialogue across health system actors in the conduct of research - recognizing that these actors are all generators, sources, and users of knowledge about the system. While building such a dialogic practice, those conducting HPSR must strive to protect the autonomy and integrity of their ideas and actions, and also clearly explain their own positions and the value-basis of their work. We conclude with a set of questions that health policy and systems researchers may wish to consider in making their practice more people-centred, and hence more oriented toward real-world change.

  15. Size, Accumulation and Performance for Research Grants: Examining the Role of Size for Centres of Excellence.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Carter; Schneider, Jesper W; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examines the relation between size, accumulation and performance for research grants, where we examine the relation between grant size for Centres of Excellence (CoE) funded by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF) and various ex post research performance measures, including impact and shares of highly cited articles. We examine both the relation between size and performance and also how performance for CoEs evolves over the course of grant periods. In terms of dynamics, it appears that performance over the grant period (i.e. 10 years) is falling for the largest CoEs, while it is increasing for those among the smallest half. Overall, multivariate econometric analysis finds evidence that performance is increasing in grant size and over time. In both cases, the relation appears to be non-linear, suggesting that there is a point at which performance peaks. The CoEs have also been very successful in securing additional funding, which can be viewed as a 'cumulative effect' of center grants. In terms of new personnel, the far majority of additional funding is spent on early career researchers, hence, this accumulation would appear to have a 'generational' dimension, allowing for scientific expertise to be passed on to an increasing number of younger researchers.

  16. Size, Accumulation and Performance for Research Grants: Examining the Role of Size for Centres of Excellence

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Carter; Schneider, Jesper W.; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examines the relation between size, accumulation and performance for research grants, where we examine the relation between grant size for Centres of Excellence (CoE) funded by the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF) and various ex post research performance measures, including impact and shares of highly cited articles. We examine both the relation between size and performance and also how performance for CoEs evolves over the course of grant periods. In terms of dynamics, it appears that performance over the grant period (i.e. 10 years) is falling for the largest CoEs, while it is increasing for those among the smallest half. Overall, multivariate econometric analysis finds evidence that performance is increasing in grant size and over time. In both cases, the relation appears to be non-linear, suggesting that there is a point at which performance peaks. The CoEs have also been very successful in securing additional funding, which can be viewed as a ‘cumulative effect’ of center grants. In terms of new personnel, the far majority of additional funding is spent on early career researchers, hence, this accumulation would appear to have a ‘generational’ dimension, allowing for scientific expertise to be passed on to an increasing number of younger researchers. PMID:26862907

  17. KLIMA 2050: a research-based innovation centre for risk reduction through climate adaptation of infrastructure and buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, Anders; Time, Berit; Kvande, Tore; Sivertsen, Edvard; Cepeda, Jose; Lappegard Hauge, Åshild; Bygballe, Lena; Almås, Anders-Johan

    2016-04-01

    Klima 2050 - Risk reduction through climate adaptation of buildings and infrastructure is a Centre for Research based Innovation (SFI), funded jointly by the Research Council of Norway (RCN) and the partners of the centre. The aim of Klima 2050 is to reduce the societal risks associated with climate changes, including enhanced precipitation and flood water exposure within the built environment. The Centre will strengthen companies' innovation capacity through a focus on long-term research. It is also a clear objective to facilitate close cooperation between Research & Development, performing companies, public entities, and prominent research groups. Emphasis will be placed on development of moisture-resilient buildings, storm-water management, blue-green solutions, mitigation measures for water-triggered landslides, socio-economic incentives and decision-making processes. Both extreme weather and gradual climatic changes will be addressed. The Centre consists of a consortium of 18 partners from three sectors: industry, public entities and research/education organizations. The partners from the industry/private sector include a variety of companies from the building industry. The public entities comprise the most important infrastructure owners in Norway (public roads, railroads, buildings, airports), as well as the directorate for water and energy. The research and education partners are SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, the Norwegian Business School, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, the Norwegian Meteorological Institute, and the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute. This contribution presents the main research plans and activities of this Centre, which was started in 2015 and will run for 8 years, until 2023. The presentation also includes options for international cooperation in the Centre via PhD and postdoctoral positions, MSc projects and guest-researcher stays with Klima 2050 partners.

  18. Building a Student-Centred Learning Framework Using Social Software in the Middle Years Classroom: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Gail

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the development of the online spaces that were used to create a learning framework: a student-centred framework that combined face-to-face teaching with online social and participatory media. The author, as part of her Doctoral research study, used action research as a mechanism for continual improvement as she redesigned…

  19. Marine research in Greece and the additional Greek marine research centres: Progress and present situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonidis, S.

    1995-03-01

    Greece, as is known, has a coastline of 17 000 km, and over 2000 small and large islands. As expected, the quest of humankind for new sources of matter and energy has been focussed on the sea, with fishery being its primary interest. A number of philosophers and scientists have been involved in the study of this vast ecosystem since ancient times (Aristotle). The political, social and geographical upheavals witnessed in the Greek area, have, however resulted in bringing all these activities to a halt. The first contemporary research work commenced at the end of the 18th century/beginning of the 19th — with marine flora and fauna as its starting point. The first investigations had, of course, been limited to random collections of marine material done in the frame of international exploratory expeditions. Studies became more systematic by the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, with priority being given to the animal kingdom (fish, molluscs, etc.). Investigation of the marine phytobenthos (macrophyceae, phytoplankton) was to follow. The past 40 years research has been more extensive, not limited only to biogeographical evaluations, but also having expanded to physiological and ecological levels. The relevant institutes of Greek universities have all the while watched and contributed to this effort. Today, this kind of research is being supported by the N.M.R.C., the Center of Marine Research, University of Crete, and two research boats which sail the Greek seas. In the ever-changing world, the study of marine flora and fauna has certainly made great progress; however, there are still two big problems to be faced. The first deals with increasing pollution of the seas, the second, with the difficulties in finding and affording adequate financial resources that would enable a more detailed and complete execution of this research work.

  20. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity. RAND's Drug Policy Research Center.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Peter; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Caulkins, Jonathan P

    2011-02-01

    In September 1989, amid an emotional and ideological debate regarding problematic drug use in the United States and the 'war on drugs', RAND's Drug Policy Research Center (DPRC) was created through private foundation funds. The purpose of this new research center was to provide objective empirical analysis on which to base sound drug policy. Twenty years later, RAND's DPRC continues its work, drawing on a broad range of analytical expertise to evaluate, compare and assess the effectiveness of a similarly broad range of drug policies. More than 60 affiliated researchers in the United States and Europe make up the Center, which attempts to provide objective empirical analyses to better inform drug policies within the United States and abroad. This paper provides a look back at the creation, evolution and growth of the Center. It then describes how the Center operates today and how it has maintained its clear identity and focus by drawing on the analytical capabilities of a talented group of researchers from a broad range of academic disciplines.

  1. Evaluating Industry-Based Doctoral Research Programs: Perspectives and Outcomes of Australian Cooperative Research Centre Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manathunga, Catherine; Pitt, Rachael; Cox, Laura; Boreham, Paul; Mellick, George; Lant, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Researchers of the future will need to be able to work across the increasingly porous boundaries between university, industry, government and community sectors. Concerns have been raised internationally for several decades about the content and approaches adopted in doctoral programs. Innovative doctoral programs that facilitate students'…

  2. Radioactive waste handling and disposal at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre.

    PubMed

    Al-Haj, Abdalla N; Lobriguito, Aida M; Al Anazi, Ibrahim

    2012-08-01

    King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre (KFSHRC) is the largest specialized medical center in Saudi Arabia. It performs highly specialized diagnostic imaging procedures with the use of various radionuclides required by sophisticated dual imaging systems. As a leading institution in cancer research, KFSHRC uses both long-lived and short-lived radionuclides. KFSHRC established the first cyclotron facility in the Middle East, which solved the in-house high demand for radionuclides and the difficulty in importing them. As both user and producer of high standard radiopharmaceuticals, KFSHRC generates large volumes of low and high level radioactive wastes. An old and small radioactive facility that was used for storage of radioactive waste was replaced with a bigger warehouse provided with facilities that will reduce radiation exposure of the staff, members of the public, and of the environment in the framework of "as low as reasonably achievable." The experiences and the effectiveness of the radiation protection program on handling and storage of radioactive wastes are presented.

  3. Radioactive waste handling and disposal at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre.

    PubMed

    Al-Haj, Abdalla N; Lobriguito, Aida M; Al Anazi, Ibrahim

    2012-08-01

    King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre (KFSHRC) is the largest specialized medical center in Saudi Arabia. It performs highly specialized diagnostic imaging procedures with the use of various radionuclides required by sophisticated dual imaging systems. As a leading institution in cancer research, KFSHRC uses both long-lived and short-lived radionuclides. KFSHRC established the first cyclotron facility in the Middle East, which solved the in-house high demand for radionuclides and the difficulty in importing them. As both user and producer of high standard radiopharmaceuticals, KFSHRC generates large volumes of low and high level radioactive wastes. An old and small radioactive facility that was used for storage of radioactive waste was replaced with a bigger warehouse provided with facilities that will reduce radiation exposure of the staff, members of the public, and of the environment in the framework of "as low as reasonably achievable." The experiences and the effectiveness of the radiation protection program on handling and storage of radioactive wastes are presented. PMID:22739968

  4. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doutt, Kathleen M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University offers an enrichment program (consisting of a summer session and three Saturdays) in which gifted children and children with learning disabilities are grouped together for activities. Horticulture is one of the few enrichment activities adaptable to both groups. Children are allowed to engage in the same…

  5. Ornamental Horticulture. A Curriculum Guide. Preliminary Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Agricultural Education Section.

    Developed as part of a larger project to revise the total agricultural education curriculum in South Carolina, this curriculum guide for a 2-year ornamental horticulture course contains six functional units, each with several sub-units, and six horizontal supportive units. Each unit includes behavioral objectives, learning activities, topic…

  6. Horticulture-Agriculture Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    This document, which lists the horticultural-agricultural technologies competencies identified by representatives from business, industry, and labor as well as educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through post-secondary…

  7. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors in many horticultural crops attribute to overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegeta...

  8. Polyacrylamide Hydrogel Properties for Horticultural Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels are commonly employed to ensure hydration of the growth media and minimize crop losses during the crop production and postproduction phases in horticulture. However, studies of the effect of these materials have shown that they have a minimal effect on crop life and q...

  9. Agriculture: Horticulture. Secondary Schools. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands Dept. of Education, Saipan.

    This agricultural curriculum guide on horticulture for secondary students is one of six developed for inservice teachers at Marianas High School in Saipan. The guide provides the rationale, description, goals, and objectives of the program; the program of studies and performance objectives by levels; samples of lesson plans for effective delivery…

  10. Using Art Installations as Action Research to Engage Children and Communities in Evaluating and Redesigning City Centre Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy-Smith, Barry; Carney, Clare

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses learning from a project that set out to explore how the general public perceived the value of public art in the context of urban regeneration of a city centre space. Whilst not set up explicitly as an action research project, the paper discusses the way in which participatory public art projects of this kind can be understood…

  11. Establishing a Community-Controlled Multi-Institutional Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Leilani; Fredericks, Bronwyn

    2007-01-01

    The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) lead and govern the Centre for Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE), which has a focus on circulatory and associated conditions in urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The CCRE is a partnership between QAIHC and Monash University, the Queensland University of…

  12. When Triple Helix Unravels: A Multi-Case Analysis of Failures in Industry-University Cooperative Research Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Denis; Sundstrom, Eric; Tornatzky, Louis G.; McGowen, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative research centres (CRCs) increasingly foster Triple Helix (industry-university-government) collaboration and represent significant vehicles for cooperation across sectors, the promotion of knowledge and technology transfer and ultimately the acceleration of innovation. A growing social science literature on CRCs focuses on their…

  13. Factors influencing increased expertise for a sustainable workforce at a research centre in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Draper, H. R.; Enarson, D. A.; Beyers, N.; Claassens, M.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: The Desmond Tutu Tuberculosis (TB) Centre (DTTC), Stellenbosch University, South Africa. Objectives: 1) To determine whether access to designated funding is associated with the development of expertise in employees, and 2) which other factors are associated with the development of expertise in employees. Design: This was a retrospective study. The target population consisted of all employees at the DTTC during the period 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2011. Improvement in expertise during employment was the primary outcome; the secondary outcome was an increase in educational level linked to the National Qualifications Framework. Results: There was no association between access to funding and expertise development, but an association between the number of months employed and improvement of expertise during employment was observed (OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.02–1.04, P < 0.001), controlling for age at appointment, sex, access to designated funding and education level. Conclusion: The study shows that almost a third of employees increased their expertise, more than 90% had access to designated funding and personnel employed for a longer duration were more likely to experience improvements in expertise. We encourage research organisations in low- and middle-income countries to implement strategies to retain employees in order to build their expertise. PMID:26400709

  14. A coverage plan for health centres in Murewa district in Zimbabwe: an example of action research.

    PubMed

    Criel, B; Macq, J; Bossyns, P; Hongoro, C

    1996-10-01

    Good access to health facilities providing good first-level health care remains problematic in many developing countries. It is a hindrance to effective and efficient functioning of the hospital, as outpatient departments become overcrowded with patients from areas without health centres. In many cases the quality of care delivered to these patients is poor because within the district health system the hospital is not the best place for the supply of comprehensive, integrated and continuous care. Eventually, high hospital involvement in first-level care can jeopardize the delivery of adequate referral care for those patients who desperately need the hospital's technology and expertise. This paper provides an account of the way this problem was investigated and managed by the district health management team in the Murewa district in north-east Zimbabwe. The design of a comprehensive 'master plan' or 'coverage plan' is presented as well as the problems and difficulties encountered. The Murewa experience highlights the relevance of a coverage plan for rational and coherent health infrastructure planning at district level. The approach followed by the Murewa team illustrates the use of action research as an integral part of the management of district health systems. PMID:8911457

  15. Winter-injury following horticultural treatments to overcome juvenility in citrus seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus seedling juvenility delays new hybrid evaluation, slows cultivar release, and slows introgression of new traits. A horticultural program reported to overcome citrus juvenility was tested at the Whitmore Citrus Research Foundation farm (Lake County), using replicated Hirado Buntan x Clementine...

  16. The Power of Peer Reviewing to Enhance Writing in Horticulture: Greenhouse Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Neil O.; Flash, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Peer review is not included in undergraduate horticultural curricula. Our research objectives in an 8- year study, which ranged from 2000 to 2007 in two sections (2000-2002 non-peer reviewed and 2003-2007 peer-reviewed) of Greenhouse Management students at the University of Minnesota were to determine whether iterative peer reviews would result in…

  17. Research and Development Digest--2. A Summary of Published Research by the Centre for the Period 1 July, 1986 - 30 June, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William C., Ed.

    This digest summarizes the contents of the more than 50 separate items that were published by the Technical and Further Education (TAFE) National Centre for Research and Development in 1986-87. These items include major research reports, video programs, newsletters, clearinghouse reports and textbooks. The first section provides an overview of the…

  18. International linking of research and development on the model of Laser Centre Hanover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowitzki, Klaus-Dieter; Boedecker, Olaf

    2005-10-01

    Asia is becoming one of the most important regions in the world from the political, economic and scientific point of view. Germany believes that it is becoming increasingly necessary to cooperate with certain Asian countries especially for scientific and technological reasons. Above and beyond exchanges of scientists, the scientific and technological cooperation will be organized to cover projects with specific targets and to find solutions to important problems. International economic development is characterized by a mixture of competition and cooperation within the context of growing globalization. Germany, being one of the world's largest exporting nation, must therefore combine its active role in cooperation with these countries in the fields of education, research and innovation with economic cooperation. The Laser Centre Hanover pursues the goal of establishing and operating a Chinese German center for training and further education in laser technology and setting up a joint platform for long-term German Chinese cooperation in laser technology. An optimized training infrastructure combined with modern production processes support consequently long-term German businesses in China and secures their market-shares. LZH establishes Laser academies for skilled workers and technical decision makers in Shanghai and Changchun together with local universities and German partners. Due to the economic growth, Russia records since more than two years, the economic conditions are improving the cooperation between Germany and Russia step-by-step. The main goal of Russian science-politics is to stabilize an efficient scientific-technical potential with better chances in the global competition. The German-Russian scientific and technological cooperation plays an important role in this context. It has considerably increased in the last years in terms of width and depth and virtually includes all areas of science and technology at present. The region around Moscow is regarded

  19. Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32: Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmer, C.; Thiele-Eich, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Collaborative Research Centre TR32 has the goal to perform pattern-based prediction of states and fluxes of water, CO2 and energy in terrestrial systems across scales. For this, the TR32 set up the following three elements during the past nine years: measurement techniques that allow us to characterize and monitor the spatiotemporal dynamics and evolution of system properties across scales, a cross-scale, multi-compartment terrestrial system modeling approach that includes all relevant processes using the terrestrial model platform TerrSysMP and state variable assimilation and parameter estimation methods. We will present examples of how the TR32 utilizes these three elements to improve our understanding of the water cycle. The available soil moisture monitoring network consisting of e.g. cosmic-ray sensors or an in situ NMR slim-line logging tool has been helpful in understanding the interactions of plant growth and soil moisture dynamics. New algorithms derive soil moisture from satellite based SAR systems, which showed potential for the derivation of surface roughness and vegetation information. For surface precipitation, a radar composite using observations from two dual-polarized X-band Doppler radars provides nearly 100% coverage of the Rur catchment. To also be able to include other precipitation observations which occur at different temporal and spatial resolutions, such as rain gauges, a high resolution space-time precipitation model is being developed. Commercial microwave links used for cell phone communication have also been experimented with to improve polarimetric quantitative precipitation estimation. In addition, uncertainty plays a major role with respect to the central goal of the TR32 and is taken into account in various ways. For example, model uncertainty in the Rur catchment results in large parts from anthropogenic activities such as e.g. drainage patterns in fields, the control of the Rur discharge, groundwater pumping, storage lakes

  20. Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) sentinel network: a cohort profile

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ana; Hinton, William; McGovern, Andrew; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Yonova, Ivelina; Jones, Simon; de Lusignan, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) is one of the longest established primary care sentinel networks. In 2015, it established a new data and analysis hub at the University of Surrey. This paper evaluates the representativeness of the RCGP RSC network against the English population. Participants and method The cohort includes 1 042 063 patients registered in 107 participating general practitioner (GP) practices. We compared the RCGP RSC data with English national data in the following areas: demographics; geographical distribution; chronic disease prevalence, management and completeness of data recording; and prescribing and vaccine uptake. We also assessed practices within the network participating in a national swabbing programme. Findings to date We found a small over-representation of people in the 25–44 age band, under-representation of white ethnicity, and of less deprived people. Geographical focus is in London, with less practices in the southwest and east of England. We found differences in the prevalence of diabetes (national: 6.4%, RCPG RSC: 5.8%), learning disabilities (national: 0.44%, RCPG RSC: 0.40%), obesity (national: 9.2%, RCPG RSC: 8.0%), pulmonary disease (national: 1.8%, RCPG RSC: 1.6%), and cardiovascular diseases (national: 1.1%, RCPG RSC: 1.2%). Data completeness in risk factors for diabetic population is high (77–99%). We found differences in prescribing rates and costs for infections (national: 5.58%, RCPG RSC: 7.12%), and for nutrition and blood conditions (national: 6.26%, RCPG RSC: 4.50%). Differences in vaccine uptake were seen in patients aged 2 years (national: 38.5%, RCPG RSC: 32.8%). Owing to large numbers, most differences were significant (p<0.00015). Future plans The RCGP RSC is a representative network, having only small differences with the national population, which have now been quantified and can be assessed for clinical relevance for specific studies. This

  1. Building up careers in translational neuroscience and mental health research: Education and training in the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Rapado-Castro, Marta; Pazos, Ángel; Fañanás, Lourdes; Bernardo, Miquel; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Leza, Juan Carlos; Berrocoso, Esther; de Arriba, Jose; Roldán, Laura; Sanjuán, Julio; Pérez, Victor; Haro, Josep M; Palomo, Tomás; Valdizan, Elsa M; Micó, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Manuel; Arango, Celso

    2015-01-01

    The number of large collaborative research networks in mental health is increasing. Training programs are an essential part of them. We critically review the specific implementation of a research training program in a translational Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health in order to inform the strategic integration of basic research into clinical practice to have a positive impact in the mental health system and society. Description of training activities, specific educational programs developed by the research network, and challenges on its implementation are examined. The Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has focused on training through different activities which have led to the development of an interuniversity master's degree postgraduate program in mental health research, certified by the National Spanish Agency for Quality Evaluation and Accreditation. Consolidation of training programs within the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has considerably advanced the training of researchers to meet competency standards on research. The master's degree constitutes a unique opportunity to accomplish neuroscience and mental health research career-building within the official framework of university programs in Spain.

  2. Building up careers in translational neuroscience and mental health research: Education and training in the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Rapado-Castro, Marta; Pazos, Ángel; Fañanás, Lourdes; Bernardo, Miquel; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Leza, Juan Carlos; Berrocoso, Esther; de Arriba, Jose; Roldán, Laura; Sanjuán, Julio; Pérez, Victor; Haro, Josep M; Palomo, Tomás; Valdizan, Elsa M; Micó, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Manuel; Arango, Celso

    2015-01-01

    The number of large collaborative research networks in mental health is increasing. Training programs are an essential part of them. We critically review the specific implementation of a research training program in a translational Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health in order to inform the strategic integration of basic research into clinical practice to have a positive impact in the mental health system and society. Description of training activities, specific educational programs developed by the research network, and challenges on its implementation are examined. The Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has focused on training through different activities which have led to the development of an interuniversity master's degree postgraduate program in mental health research, certified by the National Spanish Agency for Quality Evaluation and Accreditation. Consolidation of training programs within the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health has considerably advanced the training of researchers to meet competency standards on research. The master's degree constitutes a unique opportunity to accomplish neuroscience and mental health research career-building within the official framework of university programs in Spain. PMID:25682021

  3. Treated sewage effluent (water) potential to be used for horticultural production in Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emongor, V. E.; Ramolemana, G. M.

    Botswana being semi-arid and arid country, the provision of drinking water and water for agricultural production is becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. Measures that can augment the available sources of water or measures that can reduce the demand on potable water should be given serious consideration. Horticulturists have incorporated new technology into many of their production programs, which has enabled them to grow more horticultural crops with less water; however, more effort is needed. Techniques such as drip irrigation, sensors, growing plants with low water requirements, timing and scheduling of irrigation to the growth needs of the plant, mulching, and establishing a minimum water quality standard for horticultural crops must be used to stretch agricultural water supplies. Recycling agricultural water and using treated municipal sewage effluent is a viable option for increasing horticultures’ future water supply in Botswana. Agriculture wastewater and sewage effluents often contain significant quantities of heavy metals and other substances that may be toxic to people but beneficial to horticultural crops. However, before sewage effluent can be used for commercial production of vegetables and fruits, research must be undertaken to determine whether there is accumulation of heavy metals and faecal coliforms in the edible portion of the horticultural produce which may be detrimental to human health 15-20 years later. Research must be undertaken to assess the impact of sewage effluent on soil physical, chemical properties and environment after continued use.

  4. Process Evaluation of a Teaching and Learning Centre at a Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Deborah B.; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a teaching and learning centre (TLC) five?years after its inception at a mid-sized, midwestern state university. The mixed methods process evaluation gathered data from 209 attendees and non-attendees of the TLC from the full-time, benefit-eligible teaching faculty. Focus groups noted feelings of…

  5. Acarological diagnostic research at the Diagnostic Centre for Plants during the period 2004-2006.

    PubMed

    Witters, J; De Bondt, G; Desamblanx, J; Casteels, H

    2007-01-01

    During the period 2004-2006, 1691 samples of different origin were examined at the Diagnostic Centre for Plants. We received 1046 samples of imported plant material for detection and identification of quarantine organisms. More than 200 samples were checked on mites and insects to get a phytosanitary certificate for export and 391 samples were investigated for diagnostic reason. The Berlese-funnel and dissecting microscopy technique were used to separate mites from the samples. For identification, the mites were slide mounted in Berlese-Hoyer's medium and examined by using phase-contrast microscopy. In 3% of the samples examined on the presence of quarantine organisms, phytophagous mites belonging to the superfamily Tetranychoidea were found, but none with the quarantine status in accordance with the EPPO A1/A2 list. Besides Tetranychus urticae detected on different crops, the cassava green mite Mononychellus progresivus was found on cassava (import Cameroon) in 2006. Tenuipalpus elegans (Tenuipalpidae) was found on cut foliage (import South Africa) in 2004. In 19.9% of the investigated samples for diagnostic reason mites were found. In 47.7% of the infested samples mites were definitely the reason for the damage; in 15.9% mites were secondary and in 36.4% the occurrence of mites was not relevant for the injury. An overview of the determined mites will be given. During this 3 years diagnostic research a few new pest mites belonging to families Tetranychidae and Eriophyidae can be reported. In 2006 Panonychus citri was found on Prunus laurocerasus and later on Eleaegnus sp. and Skimmia sp.. Aceria silvicola was determined on Rubus idaeus in 2006 and Aculus ulae and Aceria carpini on Carpinus betulus in 2005. Besides new pest mites, never seen problems with the broad mite Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Fam. Tarsonemidae) occurred in tree-nurseries in 2005 and 2006. Also 20 samples coming from private persons were investigated. The main problems indoor were caused by

  6. A National network of schizophrenia expert centres: An innovative tool to bridge the research-practice gap.

    PubMed

    Schürhoff, F; Fond, G; Berna, F; Bulzacka, E; Vilain, J; Capdevielle, D; Misdrahi, D; Leboyer, M; Llorca, P-M

    2015-09-01

    Schizophrenia is probably the most severe psychiatric disorder with much suffering for the patients and huge costs for the society. Efforts to provide optimal care by general practitioners and psychiatrists are undermined by the complexity of the disorder and difficulties in applying clinical practice guidelines and new research findings to the spectrum of cases seen in day-to-day practice. An innovative model of assessment aimed at improving global care of people with schizophrenia provided by the French national network of schizophrenia expert centres is being described. Each centre has established strong links to local health services and provides support to clinicians in delivering personalized care plans. A common set of assessment tools has been adopted by the ten centres spread over the whole French territory. A web application, e-schizo(©) has been created to record data in a common computerized medical file. This network offers systematic, comprehensive, longitudinal, and multi-dimensional assessments of cases including a medical workup and an exhaustive neuropsychological evaluation. This strategy offers an effective way to transfer knowledge and share expertise. This network is a great opportunity to improve the global patient care and is conceived as being an infrastructure for research from observational cohort to translational research. PMID:26072427

  7. [Quality management and practice-oriented research in a clinic-network of mother-/father-child rehabilitation centres].

    PubMed

    Otto, F; Arnhold-Kerri, S

    2010-04-01

    The Research Network Prevention and Rehabilitation for Mothers and Children is an association of currently 24 rehabilitation centres for mothers, fathers and their children, and a scientific team at the Hannover Medical School. The Research Network combines practice-oriented research on mother and child health with the further development of treatment programmes and the implementation of internal quality management in mother-/father-child rehabilitation centres in accordance with DIN EN ISO 9001. The present paper describes the concept of the Research Network and the work contents addressed over the last three years. The advantages and disadvantages of this association and the changes initiated in practice were evaluated from the point of view of 19 quality managers of the participating clinics. The data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, and a qualitative content analysis was performed in order to quantify the responses. The concept of the Research Network has proven successful. In the view of the quality managers of the clinics, implementation of DIN EN ISO 9001 has lead to structuring of the processes, improved internal communication, and increased motivation in the team. The major obstacles were the lack of time and human resources. In all clinics, the participation in practice-related research projects und scientifically monitored concept development has contributed to optimizing everyday practice. The exchange between the quality managers in external quality circle meetings was of central importance. The conjunction of internal quality management, practice-related research and concept development in a network can be recommended also for other associations of clinics, health centres or medical practices. PMID:20446193

  8. Patient-centred interprofessional collaboration in primary care: challenges for clinical, educational and health services research. An EGPRN keynote paper.

    PubMed

    Van Royen, Paul; Rees, Charlotte E; Groenewegen, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The theme 'patient-centred interprofessional collaboration' of the EGPRN conference in October 2012, captures in just three words important challenges for European primary care and its research agenda. Challenges for future research are formulated, in three domains: clinical, educational and health services research. Transferability of research, based upon advanced computational infrastructure, will facilitate a rapid learning health care system. In educational research, this includes the use of observational and reflexivity methods. Outcomes should be defined in terms of improvement of functional status and social participation rather than in terms of disease-specific outcomes. Partnership with all stakeholders, patients, GPs and their health care colleagues and students, can help in reducing avoidable waste in the production and reporting of research evidence.

  9. Inter-laboratory comparison of HCV-RNA assay results: implications for multi-centre research.

    PubMed

    Pembrey, Lucy; Newell, Marie-Louise; Tovo, Pier-Angelo; van Drimmelen, Harry; Quinti, Isabella; Furlini, Giuliano; Galli, Silvia; Meliconi, Maria Grazia; Burns, Sheila; Hallam, Nick; Sönnerborg, Anders; Cilla, Gustavo; Serrano, Esther; Laccetti, Paolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Polywka, Susanne; Icardi, Giancarlo; Bruzzone, Bianca; Balbo, Luciano; Alfarano, Alda

    2003-02-01

    To investigate whether it is appropriate to assume comparability of hepatitis virus C (HCV)-RNA results across laboratories in multi-centre studies, nine laboratories of the European Paediatric HCV Network participated in an international proficiency study of HCV-RNA assays. A panel of 12 samples of different dilutions and genotypes was sent to each laboratory and tested with qualitative and/or quantitative HCV-RNA assays according to local procedures. Commercial assays were used in seven laboratories and in-house assays in two. All six laboratories in which a commercial qualitative assay was used were proficient, as were four of six runs (in five laboratories) in which a commercial quantitative assay was used. The proficiency of the laboratories where in-house assays were used could not be assessed according to the VQC definition because of differences in the methods used. Overall, there were several false-negative results, but only one false-positive result with a quantitative assay and none with a qualitative assay. The false-negative results may have implications for the diagnosis of infection, and highlight the need for an antibody test to be performed at 18 months to confirm the absence of infection. The results of qualitative assays were generally consistent across laboratories but it was difficult to evaluate and compare the results of quantitative assays. Multivariate analysis of data collected in multi-centre studies should therefore allow for centre and/or assay used.

  10. Horticultural Related Occupations. VEH Horticulture Related. Curriculum Guide for Agribusiness 161.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for teachers to use in developing a 1- or 2-year course in horticulture-related occupations for at-risk and special education students. It is one of 28 semester courses in agricultural science and technology for Texas high schools. The program prepares low-achieving students with employability skills that…

  11. Asia’s Indigenous Horticultural Crops: An Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop diversity is an urgent issue today in horticulture, which is faced with an erosion of crop variability as monoculture systems dominate crop production throughout the world, particularly in Europe and North America. At the same time there is great interest in indigenous horticultural crops aroun...

  12. Ornamental Horticulture. Course of Study Outlines. 1975 Edition. Volume XXX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Aubry

    These courses of study in ornamental horticulture for secondary and adult technical education levels are based on a 1972 Rutgers University study and are designed to accomodate occupational needs in the field of ornamental horticulture. Job titles emphasized at the secondary level are caretaker, nurserymen, flower grower, and flower salesperson;…

  13. Healing, health, and horticulture: introduction to the workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present-day emphasis of horticulture and health is an extension of ancient and medieval traditions. The relationship of healing and the horticultural arts predates written history and relates to ancient wisdom, custom, and folklore. Plants and health have been of great concern for humankind cons...

  14. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This secondary horticulture curriculum guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in thirteen sections: (1) Orientation and Careers, (2) Leadership and Future Farmers of America, (3) Supervised Occupational Experience Program, (4) Plant…

  15. Status of global strategies for horticultural fruit crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the International Horticultural Congress of 2014, a workshop discussed the advances of the development of global conservation strategies for some of the horticultural crops mentioned in International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) Annex 1. While global co...

  16. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This second horticulture guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Leadership, (2) Supervised Occupational Experience, (3) Plant Propagation, (4) Soil and Plant Growth Media, (5) Fertilizers, (6) Greenhouse, (7) Plant…

  17. Centre for Education, Training, & Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CETREE) of Malaysia: Educating the Nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi; Hilme, Khairur Rahim Ahmad

    2007-10-01

    Centre for Education, Training, and Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CETREE), was established in the year 2000, in Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). CETREE is a not-for-profit organization that was part of the Malaysian Government's continuous effort in promoting sustainable development. The centre's main task is to tackle issues and problems that are slowing the potential growth of RE & EE utilizations in Malaysia. CETREE and the Government of Malaysia, with funding and supports from Danish International Development Assistance (DANIDA) and USM, has been working together closely in applying trans-disciplinary educational methods and approaches for the teaching of RE & EE that are compatible with Malaysian. Through association with various entities such as Energy Centre of Malaysia (PTM), Energy Commission of Malaysia (ST), Malaysia Electricity Supply Industry Trust Account (MESITA); CETREE was able to successfully promote sustainable development through education and training. Significant accomplishments made by CETREE include introducing RE and EE as part of Malaysian secondary schools and universities education; conducting energy related courses for professionals; and generating awareness via campaign in the mass media and CETREE's mobile-exhibition-unit road-tour.

  18. Workload composition of the organic horticulture.

    PubMed

    Abrahão, R F; Ribeiro, I A V; Tereso, M J A

    2012-01-01

    This project aimed the characterization of the physical workload of the organic horticulture by determining the frequency of exposure of operators to some activity categories. To do this, an adaptation of the PATH method (Posture, Activities, Tools and Handling) was done to be used in the context of agriculture work. The approach included an evaluation of physical effort demanded to perform the tasks in the work systems from an systematic sampling of work situations from a synchronized monitoring of the heart rate; a characterization of posture repertoire adopted by workers by adapting the OWAS method; an identification of pain body areas using the Corlett diagram; and a subjective evaluation of perceived effort using the RPE Borg scale. The results of the individual assessments were cross correlated and explained from an observation of the work activity. Postural demands were more significant than cardiovascular demands for the studied tasks, and correlated positively with the expressions of bodily discomfort. It is expected that, besides the knowledge obtained of the physical effort demanded by organic horticulture, this project will be useful for the development of new technologies directed to minimize the difficulties of the human work and to raise the work productivity.

  19. The Academic Research Centre: A Vital Link between Industry and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Karl V.; Kukich, Diane S.

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Composite Materials at the University of Delaware opens up new funding sources and collaborative research opportunities and enhances student skills. Government-sponsored research is focusing on real-world problems in close cooperation with industry. (SK)

  20. Cancer Research UK Centre for Drug Development: translating 21st-century science into the cancer medicines of tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, James W A; Williams, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    The Cancer Research UK Centre (CRUK) for Drug Development (CDD) can trace its origins back to the Cancer Research Campaign Phase I/II Committee (created in 1980) and to date has tested over 120 potential cancer medicines in early-phase clinical trials. Five drugs are now registered, providing benefit to thousands of patients with cancer as part of their routine standard of care. In recent years, the CDD has established several different business and operating models that provide it with access to the pipelines of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. This has enabled potential new treatments to be taken into clinical development that might have otherwise languished on companies' shelves and has increased the number of drug combinations being explored in early-phase clinical trials.

  1. Perceptions of the Value of Extended Service in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Larae; Miller, Larry E.

    1983-01-01

    This study suggests the need for several improvements in the summer vocational horticulture education programs. Knowledge of the summer program, its aims, and the teacher's responsibilities appears to be lacking in the groups studied. (SSH)

  2. METHODS FOR EXCLUDING SLUGS AND SNAILS ON EXPORTED HORTICULTURAL COMMODITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasingly, slugs and snails (mollusks) are recognized as important quarantine pests threatening agriculture, export markets and the environment. This increased awareness results from the rapid spread of damaging species concurrent with higher levels of international trade of horticultural commodi...

  3. How-to-Do-It: Green Jeans Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menger, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Describes an outdoor classroom curriculum project which was devised to accommodate students of average and below-average academic ability and provide them with practical horticultural experiences. Discusses funding, plant facilities, program, and resultant products. (RT)

  4. Time Is Precious: Variable- and Event-Centred Approaches to Process Analysis in CSCL Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Although temporality is a key characteristic of the core concepts of CSCL--interaction, communication, learning, knowledge building, technology use--and although CSCL researchers have privileged access to process data, the theoretical constructs and methods employed in research practice frequently neglect to make full use of information relating…

  5. Factors influencing increased expertise for a sustainable workforce at a research centre in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Brand, S; Draper, H R; Enarson, D A; Beyers, N; Claassens, M

    2014-12-21

    Contexte : Le Centre Antituberculeux Desmond Tutu (DTTC), à l'Université de Stellenbosch, en Afrique du Sud.Objectifs : 1) Déterminer si l'accès au financement est associé au développement d'une expertise chez les employés, et 2) déterminer quels autres facteurs sont associés au développement de l'expertise des employés.Schéma : Cette étude était rétrospective. La population cible était constituée par les employés du DTTC entre le 1e janvier 2004 et le 31 décembre 2011. L'amélioration de l'expertise pendant la période de fonction était le premier résultat attendu ; le deuxième était une augmentation du niveau de connaissances en relation avec le Cadre National de Certification.Résultats : Il n'a pas été démontré d'association entre l'accès au financement et le développement de l'expertise, mais on a mis en évidence une association entre le nombre de mois de travail et cette amélioration (OR 1.03 ; IC95% 1,02–1.04 ; P< 0,001), en contrôlant l'âge lors de l'entrée en fonction, le sexe, l'accès au financement et le niveau d'instruction.Conclusion : L'étude montre que près d'un tiers du personnel a accru son expertise, plus de 90% ont eu accès au financement et que les personnes employées pendant une durée plus longue avaient davantage de chances d'améliorer leur expertise. Nous encourageons les organismes de recherche des pays à revenu faible et moyen à mettre en œuvre des stratégies visant à retenir leur personnel afin de renforcer leur expertise.

  6. Placing ethics in the centre: negotiating new spaces for ethical research in conflict situations.

    PubMed

    Zwi, A B; Grove, N J; MacKenzie, C; Pittaway, E; Zion, D; Silove, D; Tarantola, D

    2006-01-01

    Issues of power and consent, confidentiality, trust, and benefit, risks to researchers, and potential harm to participants, are all contested when working with different cultures and within environments marked by violence and insecurity. Difficulty resolving these dilemmas may paralyse ethics committees, may fail to give the guidance sought by researchers, and will not help populations who are among the world's most vulnerable. Even where efforts are made to respond to ethical guidelines and to improve practice, considerable impediments are present in many developing countries, including lack of formal ethical review structures in unstable settings, lack of required skills, limited political and institutional recognition of ethical issues, competing interests, and limitations in clinical and research practice (Elsayed 2004, Macklin 2004). In conflict settings, these limitations are more marked, and the responsibilities of the researcher for ethical practice are greater, but the mechanisms for oversight are weaker. Moreover, the constant focus on vulnerabilities and problems, and the often almost total lack of recognition of strengths and resilience, can further disempower already exploited groups and individuals. The capacity of refugees and communities in conflict to take an active role in the research process is seldom acknowledged, and undermines the potential for more innovative research which can help generate the evidence for better policy and practice. PMID:19153911

  7. Systematic list of the species added to the mosquito museum at the Vector Control Research Centre, Pondicherry, India.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, A R; Natarajan, R; Vaidyanathan, K; Jambulingam, P

    2011-03-01

    Mosquito species housed in the mosquito museum at the Vector Control Research Centre, Pondicherry, India, were increased from 181 to 266 species belonging to 22 genera. The systematic list of the 85 species added to the collection is provided. The collection consists of a total of 31,874 adult specimens, of which 23,696 are individually mounted on minuten pins, while the rest are held in stock vials. It also includes 2,456 male genitalia and 470 female genitalia preparations, 3,523 larvae, 4,745 larval exuviae, and 3,057 pupal exuviae on microscope slides. Representative specimens of different species are available from 16 states and 3 union territories of India.

  8. Investigation of 10 herbicides in surface waters of a horticultural production catchment in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Allinson, Graeme; Bui, AnhDuyen; Zhang, Pei; Rose, Gavin; Wightwick, Adam M; Allinson, Mayumi; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Herbicides are regularly applied in horticultural production systems and may migrate off-site, potentially posing an ecological risk to surface waterways. However, few studies have investigated the levels and potential ecotoxicological impact of herbicides in horticultural catchments in southern Australia. This study investigated the presence of 10 herbicides at 18 sites during a 5-month period in horticulturally important areas of the Yarra Valley in southeastern Australia. Seven of the 10 herbicides were detected in the streams, in 39 % of spot water samples, in 25 % of surface sediment samples, and in >70 % of the passive sampler systems deployed. Few samples contained residues of ≥2 herbicides. Simazine was the herbicide most frequently detected in water, sediment, and passive sampler samples and had the highest concentrations in water (0.67 μg/L) and sediment (260 μg/kg dry weight). Generally the concentrations of the herbicides detected were several orders of magnitude lower than reported ecotoxicological effect values, including those for aquatic plants and algae, suggesting that concentrations of individual chemicals in the catchment were unlikely to pose an ecological risk. However, little is known about the combined effects of simultaneous, low-level exposure of multiple herbicides of the same mode of action on Australian aquatic organisms nor their contribution when found in mixtures with other pesticides. Further research is required to adequately assess the risk of pesticides in Victorian aquatic environments. PMID:24935816

  9. Research Implications for Science and Mathematics Teachers. Volume 1. Key Centre Monograph Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Barry J., Ed.

    This document was compiled to help keep science and mathematics teachers in Australia abreast of the results of important research endeavors in education. The monograph is divided into 12 chapters. Chapter one, "Exemplary Science and Mathematics Teachers," (Barry Fraser and Kenneth Tobin) describes a study focusing on examples of outstanding…

  10. Research and Development Centres for Science Education in the South East Asian and Australasian Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekkers, John; Treagust, David F.

    1983-01-01

    Provides the status (as of February 1982) of institutions active in curriculum development and/or science education research in Australia, Fiji, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Paupau New Guinea, Philippines, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, Solomon Islands, and Thailand. Includes institutional title/address and name of contact person. (JN)

  11. A Student-Centred Tutor-Led Approach to Teaching Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Dawn F.; Thatcher, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    Many institutions acknowledge that students find courses in research methods difficult and challenging. To overcome the problems associated with teaching this subject we have replaced the traditional didactic teaching approach, which did not facilitate student learning, optimize student achievement or adequately prepare students for their…

  12. Going Boldly Into the Future: A Series of Case Studies of Co-Operative Research Centres and Their Relationships with the VET Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrier, Fran; Trood, Clifford; Whittingham, Karen

    This document presents case studies of 10 cooperative research centers (CRCs) across Australia and their relationships with the vocational education and training (VET) sector. The CRCs profiled in the case studies are as follows: Co-operative Research Centre for Sustainable Rice Production; Cast Alloy and Solidification Technology Co-operative…

  13. Scaling-up Sustainable Land Management Practices through the Concept of the Rural Resource Centre: Reconciling Farmers' Interests with Research Agendas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoutsing, Bertin; Tchoundjeu, Zacharie; Degrande, Ann; Asaah, Ebenezar; Tsobeng, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Formal agricultural research has generated vast amount of knowledge and fundamental insights on land management, but their low adoption has been attributed to the use of public extension approach. This research aims to address whether and how full participation of farmers through the concept of Rural Resource Centre (RRC) provides new…

  14. The BonaRes Centre - A virtual institute for soil research in the context of a sustainable bio-economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, Ute; Helming, Katharina; Heinrich, Uwe; Bartke, Stephan; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Russell, David; Eberhardt, Einar; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Fertile soils are central resources for the production of biomass and provision of food and energy. A growing world population and latest climate targets lead to an increasing demand for both, food and bio-energy, which require preserving and improving the long-term productivity of soils as a bio-economic resource. At the same time, other soil functions and ecosystem services need to be maintained. To render soil management sustainable, we need to establish a scientific knowledge base about complex soil system processes that allows for the development of model tools to quantitatively predict the impact of a multitude of management measures on soil functions. This, finally, will allow for the provision of site-specific options for sustainable soil management. To face this challenge, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research recently launched the funding program "Soil as a Natural Resource for the Bio-Economy - BonaRes". In a joint effort, ten collaborative projects and the coordinating BonaRes Centre are engaged to close existing knowledge gaps for a profound and systemic understanding of soil functions and their sensitivity to soil management. This presentation provides an overview of the concept of the BonaRes Centre which is responsible for i) setting up a comprehensive data base for soil-related information, ii) the development of model tools aiming to estimate the impact of different management measures on soil functions, and iii) establishing a web-based portal providing decision support tools for a sustainable soil management. A specific focus of the presentation will be laid on the so-called "knowledge-portal" providing the infrastructure for a community effort towards a comprehensive meta-analysis on soil functions as a basis for future model developments.

  15. Prionet Canada: a network of centres of excellence for research into prions and prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michelle; Toth, Janie; Haney, Sandra; Tyshenko, Michael G; Darshan, Shalu; Krewski, Daniel; Leighton, Frederick A; Westaway, David; Moore, Stephen S; Ricketts, Maura; Cashman, Neil

    2009-01-01

    PrioNet Canada's strength in basic, applied, and social research is helping to solve the food, health safety, and socioeconomic problems associated with prion diseases. Prion diseases are transmissible, fatal neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals. Examples of prion diseases include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, commonly known as "mad cow" disease), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and elk. As of March 31, 2008, PrioNet's interdisciplinary network included 62 scientific members, 5 international collaborators, and more than 150 students and young professionals working in partnership with 25 different government, nongovernment, and industry partners. PrioNet's activities are developing strategies based on a sustained, rational approach that will mitigate, and ultimately control, prion diseases in Canada. PMID:19697232

  16. A new facility for Quaternary Geochronology in Spain: The National Research Centre for Human Evolution (CENIEH) in Burgos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parés, Josep M.; Duval, Mathieu; Arnold, Lee J.; Hoffmann, Dirk L.

    2010-05-01

    A new geochronology facility has been recently set up in Burgos, Spain, as part of the recently established National Research Centre for Human Evolution (CENIEH). The CENIEH is sponsored by governmental funding and was established to foster major advances in our understanding of human evolution through multidisciplinary research. As part of this initiative, a modern laboratory complex is emerging as an European facility for Geochronology and Geoarchaeology. The Geochronology laboratories include archaeomagnetism, electron spin resonance, luminescence, uranium-series, and a clean laboratory for sample preparation. The facility includes a 2G, 755-4K SRM superconducting magnetometer, a Bruker ESR spectrometer (EMXmicro-6/1 model) associated with a low-temperature control system, allowing ESR measurements at room and liquid nitrogen temperature, two Riso readers with a single-grain and pulsed OSL attachments, a ThermoFinnigan Neptune MC-ICP-MS, with a CETAC Aridus and an ESI Apex sample introduction system, a NewWave UP213 nm laser ablation facility, a NewWave Instr. Micromill and ancillary sample preparation and field equipment. The Geochronology group, GEB (Geochronology rEsearch group in Burgos) is being set up as a facility that provides auxiliary laboratory and general support to the scientific community interested in Quaternary studies, and in archaeological and paleontological sites. Methodological advancements in Quaternary dating, and inter-technique collaborative studies form an integral part of GEBs research activities. Current research projects include the chronology of the oldest human occupation of Europe (Atapuerca and Orce), north-African archaeological sites and integration with Plio-Pleistocene climatic changes, rates of incision and uplift of Cenozoic basins in Spain, and dating of ancient DNA sequences and early human occupation sites across Siberia and North America.

  17. A Worksite Health Education Workshop as Empowerment Intervention for Health Promotion in the National Research Centre of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Nagat Mohamed; Monir, Zeinab M.; Saleh, Mai Sabry; Mahdy-Abdallah, Heba; Hafez, Salwa Farouk

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The study aimed to assess worksite health education workshops as a successful tool for health promotion of employees. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A one day workshop was held for individuals engaged in research activities in the National research Centre of Egypt at the worksite. Its main objective was to highlight the nature, causes, symptoms and management of job stress. Participants were asked to fill a personality assessment sheet, a self-reported questionnaire for job satisfaction. Other questionnaires for assessment of falsification of type and some socio-demographic data were filled by the attendants. A concise survey was introduced at the end of the workshop for feedback collection. RESULTS: Attendants of the workshop were 36 subjects mainly females (94.4%). Mean age was 40.5 years with 63.9% of participants at their postdoctoral studies stage. Participants were at midway in the scale of job satisfaction (3.3) and did not suffer from falsification (0.3). The feedback survey score (11.5) showed great acceptance for the intervention. Special interest in the topic of stress was reported by 35.1% of attendants who found it the best item in the workshop and the interactive manipulation came next as declared by 18.9% of the participants. CONCLUSION: Worksite health education workshops seem to be a successful practice for empowerment in the Egyptian workplace. PMID:27703583

  18. [The contribution of the Russian Research Centre of Medical Rehabilitation and Balneotherapeutics to the development of the health resort business in this country].

    PubMed

    Povazhnaia, E A; Bobrovnitskiĭ, I P

    2013-01-01

    The definition of the notion of health resort business is proposed in the context of the legislation pertinent to the natural therapeutic resources, health and recreational localities, spa and resort facilities currently in force in this country. The main landmark events in the history of the Russian Research Centre of Rehabilitative Medicine and Balneotherapeutics are highlighted, its role in the development of balneotherapeutic science and health resort business is described. The major achievements of the Centre in the investigations of therapeutic properties of natural physical factors (climate, mineral waters, peloids, etc.), their action on the human organism, the possibilities of their application for the treatment and prevention of various pathological conditions in and outside health resort facilities are presented. The contribution of the specialists of the Centre to the search for and discovery of new resort resources is emphasized. Community needs in balneotheraputic treatment are estimated, scientific basis for its organization, principles and normatives of health resort business are discussed along with the problems of sanitary control and protection. The activities of the Centre as an organizer of the unique system of rehabilitative and balneotherapeutic aid to the population are overviewed. Scientifically substantiated indications and contraindications for the spa and resort-based treatment of various diseases are proposed in conjunction with the methods for the application of physiotherapeutic factors. The tasks currently facing the Centre and prospects for its future research activities in the fields of rehabilitative medicine and balneotherapeutics are discussed.

  19. Benefits and payments for research participants: Experiences and views from a research centre on the Kenyan coast

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is general consensus internationally that unfair distribution of the benefits of research is exploitative and should be avoided or reduced. However, what constitutes fair benefits, and the exact nature of the benefits and their mode of provision can be strongly contested. Empirical studies have the potential to contribute viewpoints and experiences to debates and guidelines, but few have been conducted. We conducted a study to support the development of guidelines on benefits and payments for studies conducted by the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust programme in Kilifi, Kenya. Methods Following an initial broad based survey of cash, health services and other items being offered during research by all programme studies (n = 38 studies), interviews were held with research managers (n = 9), and with research staff involved in 8 purposively selected case studies (n = 30 interviewees). Interviews explored how these ‘benefits’ were selected and communicated, experiences with their administration, and recommendations for future guidelines. Data fed into a consultative workshop attended by 48 research staff and health managers, which was facilitated by an external ethicist. Findings The most commonly provided benefits were medical care (for example free care, and strengthened quality of care), and lunch or snacks. Most cash given to participants was reimbursement of transport costs (for example to meet appointments or facilitate use of services when unexpectedly sick), but these payments were often described by research participants as benefits. Challenges included: tensions within households and communities resulting from lack of clarity and agreement on who is eligible for benefits; suspicion regarding motivation for their provision; and confusion caused by differences between studies in types and levels of benefits. Conclusions Research staff differed in their views on how benefits should be approached. Echoing elements of international benefit

  20. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC): Development, Evolution, and Direction

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    A historical summary is provided of the evolution of the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) since its origins in 1988. Begun as an NIH research center within a Department of Psychiatry and focused solely on alcohol and aging, early work emphasized treatment efficacy, differential outcome studies, and characterization of the neurophysiological and behavioral manifestations of chronic alcoholism. Over the last fifteen years, UMARC has extended its research focus along a number of dimensions: Its developmental reach has been extended etiologically by studies of risk early in the life span, and by way of work on earlier screening and the development of early, brief treatment interventions. The addiction focus has expanded to include other drugs of abuse. Levels of analysis have also broadened, with work on the molecular genetics and brain neurophysiology underlying addictive processes on the one hand, and examination of the role of the social environment in long term course of disorder on the other. Activities have been facilitated by several research training programs and by collaborative relationships with other universities around the United States and in Poland. Since 2002, a program for research infrastructure development and collaboration has been carried on, initially with Poland and more recently with Ukraine, Latvia, and Slovakia. A blueprint for the future includes expanded characterization of the neurobiology and genetics of addictive processes, the developmental environment, as well as programmatic work to address the public health implications of our ability to identify risk for disorder very early in life. PMID:20331547

  1. Languages Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: A Response to the 2011 Research Centre for Languages and Cultures RCLC Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    The Research Centre for Languages and Cultures (RCLC) at the University of South Australia hosts an annual symposium on current issues related to languages and language education. The hallmark of the RCLC symposia is that they intend to raise critical, current issues in the languages field for wider debate, include presenting cutting edge research…

  2. The influence of contextual teaching with the problem solving method on students' knowledge and attitudes toward horticulture, science, and school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcher, Carrie Lynn

    2005-08-01

    Adolescence is marked with many changes in the development of higher order thinking skills. As students enter high school they are expected to utilize these skills to solve problems, become abstract thinkers, and contribute to society. The goal of this study was to assess horticultural science knowledge achievement and attitude toward horticulture, science, and school in high school agriculture students. There were approximately 240 high school students in the sample including both experimental and control groups from California and Washington. Students in the experimental group participated in an educational program called "Hands-On Hortscience" which emphasized problem solving in investigation and experimentation activities with greenhouse plants, soilless media, and fertilizers. Students in the control group were taught by the subject matter method. The activities included in the Hands-On Hortscience curriculum were created to reinforce teaching the scientific method through the context of horticulture. The objectives included evaluating whether the students participating in the Hands-On Hortscience experimental group benefited in the areas of science literacy, data acquisition and analysis, and attitude toward horticulture, science, and school. Pre-tests were administered in both the experimental and control groups prior to the research activities and post-tests were administered after completion. The survey questionnaire included a biographical section and attitude survey. Significant increases in hortscience achievement were found from pre-test to post-test in both control and experimental study groups. The experimental treatment group had statistically higher achievement scores than the control group in the two areas tested: scientific method (p=0.0016) and horticulture plant nutrition (p=0.0004). In addition, the students participating in the Hands-On Hortscience activities had more positive attitudes toward horticulture, science, and school (p=0

  3. The Iranian Documentation Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    The purpose of the Iranian Documentation Centr (Irandoc) was to collect that portion of the world's literature which was pertinent to Iran's research interests, to organize that material, and to promote its use by Iranian researchers. Stated more succinctly, Irandoc's purpose was to obtain ready access to the world's scientific literature in order…

  4. The Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC) Conceptual Model to Promote Mental Health for Adolescents with ASD.

    PubMed

    Shochet, Ian M; Saggers, Beth R; Carrington, Suzanne B; Orr, Jayne A; Wurfl, Astrid M; Duncan, Bonnie M; Smith, Coral L

    2016-06-01

    Despite an increased risk of mental health problems in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there is limited research on effective prevention approaches for this population. Funded by the Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, a theoretically and empirically supported school-based preventative model has been developed to alter the negative trajectory and promote wellbeing and positive mental health in adolescents with ASD. This conceptual paper provides the rationale, theoretical, empirical and methodological framework of a multilayered intervention targeting the school, parents and adolescents on the spectrum. Two important interrelated protective factors have been identified in community adolescent samples, namely the sense of belonging (connectedness) to school and the capacity for self and affect regulation in the face of stress (i.e. resilience). We describe how a confluence of theories from social psychology, developmental psychology and family systems theory, along with empirical evidence (including emerging neurobiological evidence), supports the interrelationships between these protective factors and many indices of wellbeing. However, the characteristics of ASD (including social and communication difficulties, and frequently difficulties with changes and transitions, and diminished optimism and self-esteem) impair access to these vital protective factors. The paper describes how evidence-based interventions at the school level for promoting inclusive schools (using the Index for Inclusion) and interventions for adolescents and parents to promote resilience and belonging [using the Resourceful Adolescent Program (RAP)] are adapted and integrated for adolescents with ASD. This multisite proof-of-concept study will confirm whether this multilevel school-based intervention is promising, feasible and sustainable.

  5. The Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC) Conceptual Model to Promote Mental Health for Adolescents with ASD.

    PubMed

    Shochet, Ian M; Saggers, Beth R; Carrington, Suzanne B; Orr, Jayne A; Wurfl, Astrid M; Duncan, Bonnie M; Smith, Coral L

    2016-06-01

    Despite an increased risk of mental health problems in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there is limited research on effective prevention approaches for this population. Funded by the Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism, a theoretically and empirically supported school-based preventative model has been developed to alter the negative trajectory and promote wellbeing and positive mental health in adolescents with ASD. This conceptual paper provides the rationale, theoretical, empirical and methodological framework of a multilayered intervention targeting the school, parents and adolescents on the spectrum. Two important interrelated protective factors have been identified in community adolescent samples, namely the sense of belonging (connectedness) to school and the capacity for self and affect regulation in the face of stress (i.e. resilience). We describe how a confluence of theories from social psychology, developmental psychology and family systems theory, along with empirical evidence (including emerging neurobiological evidence), supports the interrelationships between these protective factors and many indices of wellbeing. However, the characteristics of ASD (including social and communication difficulties, and frequently difficulties with changes and transitions, and diminished optimism and self-esteem) impair access to these vital protective factors. The paper describes how evidence-based interventions at the school level for promoting inclusive schools (using the Index for Inclusion) and interventions for adolescents and parents to promote resilience and belonging [using the Resourceful Adolescent Program (RAP)] are adapted and integrated for adolescents with ASD. This multisite proof-of-concept study will confirm whether this multilevel school-based intervention is promising, feasible and sustainable. PMID:27072681

  6. Audio-Tutorial Horticulture Learning Units. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Robert J.

    The four units in this workbook (units 2, 3, 5, and 9) are part of a larger 14-unit course in horticulture. The topics are plant classification, the plant cell, complex compounds, and vegetative growth and development. Student learning in these fields is frequently low in the traditional lecture-laboratory setting. These materials are designed for…

  7. Implementing the Plan. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on implementing the landscape plan is one of five developed for classroom use in teaching the landscape/nursery area of horticulture. The seven sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline steps and factors for consideration. Topics covered…

  8. Integrating Sunflower Oil Seed Crops into Florida Horticultural Production Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Locally produced biodiesel feedstock plant oil creates a unique possibility to integrate multiple-goal oriented cover crops into Florida horticultural production systems. Typically, cover crops are planted to improve soil fertility and the natural suppression of soilborne pests at times when fields...

  9. An Analysis of the Horticulture Equipment and Services Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbage, Monroe; Lechner, Donald L.

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the horticulture equipment and services occupation. The document opens with a brief introduction followed by a job description. The bulk of the document is presented in table form. Fourteen duties are…

  10. Maintaining the Landscape. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on maintaining the landscape is one of five developed for classroom use in teaching the landscape/nursery area of horticulture. The five sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline steps and factors for consideration. Topics covered include…

  11. Occupational Education for Students with Special Needs: Ornamental Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassau County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Westbury, NY.

    This curriculum resource guide on ornamental horticulture is one of a series of seventeen specialized curriculum guides for occupational education of the marginal, handicapped, or special needs occupational education student. The guide begins with six behavior clusters that contain a series of forty-two instructional topics designed to teach…

  12. Soils and Fertilizers. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on soils and fertilizers is one of four developed for classroom use in teaching the turf and lawn services area of horticulture. The four sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline taking soil samples, testing samples, preparing soil for…

  13. Ornamental Horticulture Technology; Suggested 2-Year Post High School Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    Developed by a technical education specialist, this guide is designed to aid school administrators in planning and developing 2-year post-high school programs or evaluating existing programs in ornamental horticulture technology. In addition to general information on the program, contents include course outlines with examples of tests and…

  14. Vocational Instructional Materials in Horticulture for Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethridge, James I.

    This resource catalog of horticulture curriculum materials for students with special needs is divided into twenty-seven instructional areas: aboriculture; annuals; entomology; floral crops production; floral design and flower shop operations; garden center; greenhouse; ground covers and hedges; herbs; house plants; landscape construction and…

  15. Planting Turf. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on planting turf is one of four developed for classroom use in teaching the turf and lawn services area of horticulture. The eight sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline steps and factors for consideration. Topics covered include…

  16. Effects of Horticulture Therapy on Engagement and Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gigliotti, Christina M.; Jarrott, Shannon E.

    2005-01-01

    Implementing generationally appropriate activities for persons with dementia is a challenging task. Horticulture therapy (HT) addresses this challenge through the use of plants to facilitate holistic outcomes. Utilizing the model of environmental press, the current study sought to analyse adult day service (ADS) participants' responses to HT as…

  17. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.). Secondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for horticulture I and II. Presented first are a program description and…

  18. University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre Partners with CPTAC - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre, a leader in proteomic technology development, has partnered with the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) to make targeted proteomic assays accessible to the community through NCI’s CPTAC Assay Portal.

  19. Getting the Price Right: Costing and Charging Commercial Provision in Centres of Vocational Excellence (CoVEs). Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitken, Liz; Chadwick, Arthur; Hughes, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Centres of Vocational Excellence (CoVEs) were established in 2001, intended to be a key driver in enhancing the contribution of the further education (FE) sector to meeting skills needs. Current government policy expects employers and individuals to pay a greater share of the costs of training, particularly at Level 3, which is the CoVE priority…

  20. An Ecological Footprint for an Early Learning Centre: Identifying Opportunities for Early Childhood Sustainability Education through Interdisciplinary Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNichol, Heidi; Davis, Julie Margaret; O'Brien, Katherine R.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, engineers and educators worked together to adapt and apply the ecological footprint (EF) methodology to an early learning centre in Brisbane, Australia. Results were analysed to determine how environmental impact can be reduced at the study site and more generally across early childhood settings. It was found that food, transport…

  1. 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Am, 90Sr and 137Cs in soils around nuclear research centre Rez, near Prague.

    PubMed

    Hölgye, Z; Schlesingerová, E; Tecl, J; Filgas, R

    2004-01-01

    Forty-four soil samples were taken around the nuclear research centre Rez, near Prague. The mean activity concentrations of 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Am, 90Sr and 137Cs in uncultivated soil were 0.010, 0.26, 0.12, 2.7 and 23 Bq.kg(-1), respectively. Contents of radionuclides in cultivated soil were lower and in forest soil higher than in uncultivated soil. The mean activity ratios of 238Pu/239,240Pu, 241Am/239,240Pu, 90Sr/239,240Pu and 239,240Pu/137Cs in uncultivated soil were 0.041, 0.47, 10.9 and 0.013, respectively. The mean activity ratios in cultivated and forest soils were close to the values given above. It follows from the results that the source of 239,240Pu, 90Sr and 137Cs in the studied area is deposition from atmospheric nuclear tests, in the case of 137Cs also deposition from Chernobyl accident. The contribution of the research centre effluents was not proved for these radionuclides. Increased activity ratio of 241Am/239,240Pu indicates the presence of 241Am in the soils studied emanating from sources other than nuclear tests. Uniform distribution of the 241Am/239,240Pu activity ratio around the nuclear research centre and the absence of an area with evidently higher activity ratio, including at sites lying in the main wind direction, suggest that the additional activity of 241Am does not originate from the nuclear research centre. The additional source might be the deposition following the Chernobyl accident.

  2. Research on teaching and learning processes in Earth Sciences education, particularly centred on the awareness on natural risks and hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhipinti, Susanna

    2013-04-01

    This research, main subject of a PhD now in progress, aims to promote the teaching - learning of Earth Sciences in schools of all levels of educations, with the interesting opportunity to experience innovative and effective practices in our local contest, sharing them between all the teachers as a community of practice and all schools as an open laboratory. Based on experiences already acted in other branches of science, we have made a work notebook freely downloadable from the internet, containing an archive of teaching tools, kits, interactive lessons, easy or complex, common and new, developing contents in a vertical approach, which are now shared and used by nearly all the teachers of our Region. The most important is that each teacher, if request, is initially supported in the practices, then trained and, finally, able to carry out the activity on his own. All the materials and kits necessary for carrying out the various activities are freely available at the regional Science Centre and ready to be used, with clear instructions for the use. Traditional educational scientific instruments, trolleys and trays with all the necessary materials, but mostly models and kits, organised in structured paths, sometime a bit naive but highly effective and able to interest, intrigue and involve, are proposed to students of all ages, sometimes in a peer-to-peer exchange of knowledge. Topics are linked to the curricula of Earth Science, such as minerals and rocks, air and water, plate tectonics, volcanoes and Earthquakes, but a special attention has been paid to the topic of natural hazards and risks: dealing with natural hazard and risks, so common in our Country, requires that local communities, starting from schools, become more and more aware of the natural phenomena, beneficial or catastrophic as they are, but always making a direct impact on the quality of life. For example, students can experience how and why landslides and floods occur, by varying on hands-on models

  3. Efficiency, sufficiency, and recent change in Newfoundland subsistence horticulture

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, J.T.

    1986-09-01

    Traditional Newfoundland horticulture has been a subordinate and compensatory element of the subsistence sphere in a plural economy centered on fishing. Criticized as inefficient and ruinous to the land, this tuber-rootbrassica gardening has in fact been a valuable contribution to diet, is relatively efficient, and compensates for the inadequacies of land and weather. Field data from the Great Northern Peninsula, where some traditional practices persist, demonstrate that the practices conserve time and labor, and substitute massive applications of materials to assure a yield sufficient for household needs. The inefficiency in the tradition may be understood as a response to the constraints upon household labor and follows a kind of Leibig's law of the minimum. Recent changes in gardening practices reveal the dynamics of horticulture in the household's mixed economic strategy. As cash and land have become more common, they have been used to further reduce time while maintaining sufficiency.

  4. Accelerator radiocarbon dating of evidence for prehistoric horticulture in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conard, N.; Asch, D.L.; Asch, N.B.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H.; Rubin, M.; Brown, J.A.; Wiant, M.D.; Farnsworth, K.B.; Cook, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    With the development of direct detection radiocarbon dating, which uses an accelerator as part of a highly selective mass spectrometer, it is now possible to determine the age of milligram samples of organic materials1-5. One application of accelerator dating is in evaluating scanty, sometimes controversial evidence for early horticulture throughout the world. We have now used the technique to date small samples of carbonized, cultivated plant remains from archaeological sites in Illinois. The results, reported here, establish (1) that squash was introduced by 7,000 yr ago, 2,500 yr before eastern North American records previously reported; (2) that horticulture involving indigenous plants had begun by 4,000 BP in eastern North America with domestication of Iva annua, a small-seeded annual; (3) that anomalous discoveries of Archaic period maize represent contaminants; and (4) that introduction of maize by initial Middle Woodland times (???2,000 BP) is questionable. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. Experimental delayed-light-emission meter for horticultural crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbus, W. R.; Hardigree, G. A.; Adams, J. H.

    1985-09-01

    Equipment for measuring the delayed light emission (DLE) from horticultural crops was developed for use in a long-range study to determine the feasibility of sorting different fruits and vegetables according to maturity by measuring the light emitted from them several seconds after illumination by a controlled light source. Preliminary tests with tomatoes showed that the magnitude of detector response to DLE decreased during apparent ripening as indicated by an increase in red color.

  6. An ultra-high-density bin map facilitates high-throughput QTL mapping of horticultural traits in pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Koeun; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Yang, Hee-Bum; Kang, Sung-Min; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Doil; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    Most agricultural traits are controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs); however, there are few studies on QTL mapping of horticultural traits in pepper (Capsicum spp.) due to the lack of high-density molecular maps and the sequence information. In this study, an ultra-high-density map and 120 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between C. annuum ‘Perennial’ and C. annuum ‘Dempsey’ were used for QTL mapping of horticultural traits. Parental lines and RILs were resequenced at 18× and 1× coverage, respectively. Using a sliding window approach, an ultra-high-density bin map containing 2,578 bins was constructed. The total map length of the map was 1,372 cM, and the average interval between bins was 0.53 cM. A total of 86 significant QTLs controlling 17 horticultural traits were detected. Among these, 32 QTLs controlling 13 traits were major QTLs. Our research shows that the construction of bin maps using low-coverage sequence is a powerful method for QTL mapping, and that the short intervals between bins are helpful for fine-mapping of QTLs. Furthermore, bin maps can be used to improve the quality of reference genomes by elucidating the genetic order of unordered regions and anchoring unassigned scaffolds to linkage groups. PMID:26744365

  7. Competence Development of Entrepreneurs in Innovative Horticulture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Martin; Lans, Thomas; Verstegen, Jos; Biemans, Harm; Meijer, Ypie

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study the learning of entrepreneurs in authentic learning environments. The research questions are: How do entrepreneurs assess their compentencies, and how do employees and external consultants assess the compentencies of these entrepreneurs? What are the competence strengths and weaknesses of…

  8. The imperative of strategic alignment across organizations: the experience of the Canadian Cancer Society's Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Roy; Riley, Barbara L; Campbell, H Sharon; Manske, Stephen; Lamers-Bellio, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Cancer Society's Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation (CBRPE) is a national asset for building pan-Canadian capacity to support intervention studies that guide population-level policies and programs. This paper briefly describes CBRPE's experience in advancing this work in the field of prevention. The aim is to illuminate issues of central importance for advancing the goals of the Population Health Intervention Research Initiative for Canada. According to our experience, success in building the population intervention field will depend heavily on purposeful alignment across organizations to enable integration of research, evaluation, surveillance, policy and practice. CBRPE's capacity development roles include a) a catalytic role in shaping this aligned inter-organizational milieu and b) investing our resources in building tangible assets (teams, indicators, data systems) that contribute relevant capacities within this emerging milieu. Challenges in building capacity in this field are described.

  9. Starch grains reveal early root crop horticulture in the Panamanian tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Piperno, D R; Ranere, A J; Holst, I; Hansell, P

    2000-10-19

    Native American populations are known to have cultivated a large number of plants and domesticated them for their starch-rich underground organs. Suggestions that the likely source of many of these crops, the tropical forest, was an early and influential centre of plant husbandry have long been controversial because the organic remains of roots and tubers are poorly preserved in archaeological sediments from the humid tropics. Here we report the occurrence of starch grains identifiable as manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), yams (Dioscorea sp.) and arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea L.) on assemblages of plant milling stones from preceramic horizons at the Aguadulce Shelter, Panama, dated between 7,000 and 5,000 years before present (BP). The artefacts also contain maize starch (Zea mays L.), indicating that early horticultural systems in this region were mixtures of root and seed crops. The data provide the earliest direct evidence for root crop cultivation in the Americas, and support an ancient and independent emergence of plant domestication in the lowland Neotropical forest. PMID:11057665

  10. Starch grains reveal early root crop horticulture in the Panamanian tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Piperno, D R; Ranere, A J; Holst, I; Hansell, P

    2000-10-19

    Native American populations are known to have cultivated a large number of plants and domesticated them for their starch-rich underground organs. Suggestions that the likely source of many of these crops, the tropical forest, was an early and influential centre of plant husbandry have long been controversial because the organic remains of roots and tubers are poorly preserved in archaeological sediments from the humid tropics. Here we report the occurrence of starch grains identifiable as manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), yams (Dioscorea sp.) and arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea L.) on assemblages of plant milling stones from preceramic horizons at the Aguadulce Shelter, Panama, dated between 7,000 and 5,000 years before present (BP). The artefacts also contain maize starch (Zea mays L.), indicating that early horticultural systems in this region were mixtures of root and seed crops. The data provide the earliest direct evidence for root crop cultivation in the Americas, and support an ancient and independent emergence of plant domestication in the lowland Neotropical forest.

  11. Past and future climate patterns affecting temperate, sub-tropical and tropical horticultural crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial horticultural crop production will be impacted by climate change effects on temperature, water availability, solar radiation, air pollution, and carbon dioxide. Horticultural crop value is derived from both the quantity and the quality of the harvested product; both of which are affected ...

  12. 78 FR 11725 - WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding Indonesia Importation of Horticultural Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Products, Animals and Animal Products AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION... horticultural products, animals and animal products. That request may be found at www.wto.org , contained in a... by Indonesia on the importation of horticultural products, animals and animal products into...

  13. 78 FR 27279 - WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding Indonesia-Importation of Horticultural Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... Horticultural Products, Animals, and Animal Products AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative... products, animals, and animal products. In particular, Indonesia imposes non-automatic import licensing regimes for horticultural products and for animals and animal products pursuant to which an importer...

  14. Developing a High School Program in Ornamental Horticulture. Volume I, Nursery Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Howard C.; And Others

    This manual is one of a 3-volume series prepared to guide the high school vocational agriculture teacher in teaching ornamental horticulture. Chapter I introduces the reader to ornamental horticulture and gives examples of how the subject can be integrated into an existing agriculture curriculum. Chapter II is devoted to the public relations…

  15. OPERATING, REPAIRING, AND MAINTAINING SMALL POWER EQUIPMENT. HORTICULTURE-SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE NO. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO PREPARE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR HORTICULTURE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, THIS MODULE HAS AS ITS MAJOR OBJECTIVE TO DEVELOP A PROFICIENCY IN THE OPERATION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SMALL POWER EQUIPMENT USED IN HORTICULTURAL ENTERPRISES. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE ON THE BASIS OF DATA FROM STATE STUDIES.…

  16. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(5)-1 - Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Labor, agricultural, and horticultural... Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations. (a) The organizations contemplated by section 501... those engaged in such pursuits, the improvement of the grade of their products, and the development of...

  17. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(5)-1 - Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Labor, agricultural, and horticultural... Labor, agricultural, and horticultural organizations. (a) The organizations contemplated by section 501... those engaged in such pursuits, the improvement of the grade of their products, and the development of...

  18. Participation of Minority Youth in Urban Horticulture: A New York City High School Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Howard R. D.

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the experience-based urban Vocational Horticulture Project sponsored by the Central Diesel School of Brooklyn, New York, and involving the National Park Service and the Cornell Cooperative Extension Service. The program prepares minority youth for entry-level employment in ornamental horticulture or in forestry and wildlife…

  19. A Content Analysis of U.S. Botanical and Horticultural Library Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Michele M.

    The purpose of this study was to provide an introductory analysis of the content of the Web sites of botanical and horticultural libraries in the United States to determine what types of resources and information is included, whether or not information is organized and accessible, and to what extent botanical and horticultural libraries are using…

  20. USING SOIL AND OTHER PLANT GROWING MEDIA EFFECTIVELY. HORTICULTURE-SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE NO. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO PREPARE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR HORTICULTURE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, THIS MODULE HAS AS ITS MAJOR OBJECTIVE TO DEVELOP THE APPRECIATIONS, UNDERSTANDINGS, AND ABILITIES NEEDED TO USE PLANT GROWING MEDIA IN GROWING HORTICULTURAL PLANTS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE ON THE BASIS OF DATA FROM STATE STUDIES.…

  1. Core I Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs. Units G-J.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethridge, Jim; And Others

    These units of instructional materials and teaching aids are the final four of a series of 10 designed for use in metropolitan agriculture/horticulture programs for students in grades 9 and 10. Covered in the unit on growing and managing horticultural crops are watering plants; pruning, pinching, and planting plants; using plant production…

  2. Orchard Management: Horticultural Practices for Peace Corps Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development and Resources Corp.

    This manual is intended for use by Peace Corps volunteers as a resource for gaining an understanding and knowledge of basic horticultural principles and practices of orchard management. Addressed in the individual units of instructional text are orchard soils; botany of horticultural plants; insect and disease control in orchards; pome, stone,…

  3. Integrated architectures for a horticultural application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Natalie R.; Rodrigo, T. Surangi

    1998-10-01

    For many applications, which involve the processing and handling of highly variable natural products, conventional automation techniques are inadequate. Field applications involving the processing and handling of these products have the additional complication of dealing with a dynamically changing environment. Automated systems for these applications must be capable of sensing the variability of each product item and adjusting the way each product item is processed to accommodate that variability. For automation to be feasible, both fast processing of sensor information and fast determination of how product items are handled, is vital. The combination of sensor equipped mobile robotic systems with artificial intelligence techniques is a potential solution for the automation of many of these applications. The aim of this research is to develop a software architecture which incorporates robotic task planning and control for a variety of applications involving the processing of naturally varying products. In this paper we discuss the results from the initial laboratory trials for an asparagus harvesting application.

  4. "We Are like Dictionaries, Miss, You Can Look Things up in Us": Evaluating Child-Centred Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elton-Chalcraft, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Research concerning children is often presented with only a brief comment on the research methods adopted. This paper takes a "behind the scenes" view and I discuss my adoption of a non-hierarchical "least adult role" adapted from Mandell's work in 1991 to undertake qualitative research in the sensitive area of children's multicultural awareness…

  5. Geoinformation evaluation of soil resource potential for horticulture in Krasnodar region and the Republic of Adygea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I. Yu.; Dragavtseva, I. A.; Mironenko, N. Ya.; Sergeeva, N. N.; Domozhirova, V. V.; Morenets, A. S.; Ovechkin, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    A geoinformation database for assessing soil resource potential for horticulture in Krasnodar region and Adygea has been developed. The results of geoinformation analysis indicate that only 55-60% of soils in these regions are suitable for growing horticultural crops without limitations; about 35-40% of the total soil area is unsuitable for horticultural purposes. For plum trees, the area of unsuitable soils is somewhat lower than for other horticultural crops. Geographically, the areas of soils suitable and unsuitable for horticulture are close to one another. The thickness of the loose earthy soil material, the gravel content, the degree of salinization, the soil texture, and the degree of soil hydromorphism are the major soil properties imposing considerable limitations for the development of fruit-growing industry in the studied regions. The highest portions of soils suitable for horticulture are found in Eiskii, Kushchevskii, Krylovskii, Shcherbinovskii, and Novokubanskii districts of Krasnodar region. The development of horticulture in Tuapsinskii, Slavyanskii, and Primorsko-Akhtarskii districts is limited because of the unsuitability of soils for this purpose. About 8% of the existing orchards are found on soils recognized as unsuitable for horticulture, and only about 20% of the existing orchards are found on soils suitable for fruit growing without limitations. About 70% of the existing fruit orchards are located on degraded soils or on soils with certain limitations for horticulture. The profitability of fruit orchards on such soils is lower than that of the orchards planted on soils without limitations for horticulture. This information is necessary for the adequate economic evaluation of the degree of soil degradation.

  6. Pioneering Better Science through the 3Rs: An Introduction to the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement, and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs)

    PubMed Central

    Burden, Natalie; Chapman, Kathryn; Sewell, Fiona; Robinson, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement, and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) is an independent scientific organization that is based in the United Kingdom, which was set up by the government to lead the discovery and application of new technologies and approaches that minimize the use of animals in research and improve animal welfare. The NC3Rs uses a range of strategies to improve and advance science through application of the 3Rs. These include funding basic research, open innovation (CRACK IT), and programs run by inhouse scientists. We present several case studies from the NC3Rs portfolio, featuring asthma research, the use of nonhuman primates in monoclonal antibody development, and CRACK IT. Finally, we anticipate the future, as we use our experience to move into new research fields and expand toward international collaboration. Here we highlight how equipping scientists with relevant and emerging 3Rs tools can help overcome the challenges and limitations of the use of animals in research to the benefit of the whole bioscience community. PMID:25836967

  7. Pioneering better science through the 3Rs: an introduction to the national centre for the replacement, refinement, and reduction of animals in research (NC3Rs).

    PubMed

    Burden, Natalie; Chapman, Kathryn; Sewell, Fiona; Robinson, Vicky

    2015-03-01

    The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement, and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) is an independent scientific organization that is based in the United Kingdom, which was set up by the government to lead the discovery and application of new technologies and approaches that minimize the use of animals in research and improve animal welfare. The NC3Rs uses a range of strategies to improve and advance science through application of the 3Rs. These include funding basic research, open innovation (CRACK IT), and programs run by inhouse scientists. We present several case studies from the NC3Rs portfolio, featuring asthma research, the use of nonhuman primates in monoclonal antibody development, and CRACK IT. Finally, we anticipate the future, as we use our experience to move into new research fields and expand toward international collaboration. Here we highlight how equipping scientists with relevant and emerging 3Rs tools can help overcome the challenges and limitations of the use of animals in research to the benefit of the whole bioscience community.

  8. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: IFT Institut für Therapieforschung in Munich, Germany.

    PubMed

    Bühringer, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the history and current structure of the Institut für Therapieforschung (IFT) [Institute for Therapy Research] in Munich, as well as major research topics and factors which might contribute to a creative structure and atmosphere for innovative research in the addiction field. The institute was founded in 1973 as a non-profit non-governmental organization (NGO) with a focus on applied research. Starting with behaviour therapy-based development and evaluation of programmes for alcohol, illicit drugs and smoking and the evaluation of treatment services, the institute gradually expanded its topics, covering prevention (1985) and epidemiology and policy evaluation (1990), and participated throughout this period in the development of guidelines and screening, diagnostic and clinical instruments. Later, the IFT tried to bridge the gap between basic sciences, applied research, health-care services and health policy, with a network of national and international contacts, including its own university engagements and collaborations with foreign research groups and national and European Union (EU) agencies. Possible creativity-promoting factors on the institutional and individual levels are discussed, e.g. the collaboration of experienced senior researchers with carefully selected innovative doctoral students, considerable in-house and external training of young researchers and the early participation and presentation of their work at international conferences, independence from stakeholders in the field and the refusal of project funds which require external clearance of publications.

  9. The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 3. Results: person centred care, comprehensive and holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-06-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In a second article, the results for the two core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' were presented. This article reflects on the three core competencies, which deal with person related aspects of GP/FM, i.e. 'person centred care', 'comprehensive approach' and 'holistic approach'. Though there is an important body of opinion papers and (non-systematic) reviews, all person related aspects remain poorly defined and researched. Validated instruments to measure these competencies are lacking. Concerning patient-centredness, most research examined patient and doctor preferences and experiences. Studies on comprehensiveness mostly focus on prevention/care of specific diseases. For all domains, there has been limited research conducted on its implications or outcomes.

  10. GiNA, an Efficient and High-Throughput Software for Horticultural Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Schlautman, Brandon; Zalapa, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for trait phenotyping have been a bottleneck for research in many crop species due to their intensive labor, high cost, complex implementation, lack of reproducibility and propensity to subjective bias. Recently, multiple high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed, but most of them are expensive, species-dependent, complex to use, and available only for major crops. To overcome such limitations, we present the open-source software GiNA, which is a simple and free tool for measuring horticultural traits such as shape- and color-related parameters of fruits, vegetables, and seeds. GiNA is multiplatform software available in both R and MATLAB® programming languages and uses conventional images from digital cameras with minimal requirements. It can process up to 11 different horticultural morphological traits such as length, width, two-dimensional area, volume, projected skin, surface area, RGB color, among other parameters. Different validation tests produced highly consistent results under different lighting conditions and camera setups making GiNA a very reliable platform for high-throughput phenotyping. In addition, five-fold cross validation between manually generated and GiNA measurements for length and width in cranberry fruits were 0.97 and 0.92. In addition, the same strategy yielded prediction accuracies above 0.83 for color estimates produced from images of cranberries analyzed with GiNA compared to total anthocyanin content (TAcy) of the same fruits measured with the standard methodology of the industry. Our platform provides a scalable, easy-to-use and affordable tool for massive acquisition of phenotypic data of fruits, seeds, and vegetables. PMID:27529547

  11. GiNA, an Efficient and High-Throughput Software for Horticultural Phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Schlautman, Brandon; Zalapa, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for trait phenotyping have been a bottleneck for research in many crop species due to their intensive labor, high cost, complex implementation, lack of reproducibility and propensity to subjective bias. Recently, multiple high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed, but most of them are expensive, species-dependent, complex to use, and available only for major crops. To overcome such limitations, we present the open-source software GiNA, which is a simple and free tool for measuring horticultural traits such as shape- and color-related parameters of fruits, vegetables, and seeds. GiNA is multiplatform software available in both R and MATLAB® programming languages and uses conventional images from digital cameras with minimal requirements. It can process up to 11 different horticultural morphological traits such as length, width, two-dimensional area, volume, projected skin, surface area, RGB color, among other parameters. Different validation tests produced highly consistent results under different lighting conditions and camera setups making GiNA a very reliable platform for high-throughput phenotyping. In addition, five-fold cross validation between manually generated and GiNA measurements for length and width in cranberry fruits were 0.97 and 0.92. In addition, the same strategy yielded prediction accuracies above 0.83 for color estimates produced from images of cranberries analyzed with GiNA compared to total anthocyanin content (TAcy) of the same fruits measured with the standard methodology of the industry. Our platform provides a scalable, easy-to-use and affordable tool for massive acquisition of phenotypic data of fruits, seeds, and vegetables. PMID:27529547

  12. Co-composting of invasive Acacia longifolia with pine bark for horticultural use.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis Miguel; Mourão, Isabel; Coutinho, João; Smith, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of commercial-scale co-composting of waste biomass from the control of invasive Acacia species with pine bark waste from the lumber industry, in a blend ratio of 60:40 (v:v), was investigated and compared with previous research on the composting of Acacia without additional feedstock, to determine the potential process and end-product quality benefits of co-composting with bark. Pile temperatures rose rapidly to >70 °C and were maintained at >60 °C for several months. Acacia and bark biomass contained a large fraction of mineralizable organic matter (OM) equivalent to approximately 600 g kg(-1) of initial OM. Bark was more recalcitrant to biodegradation compared with Acacia, which degraded at twice the rate of bark. Therefore, incorporating the bark increased the final amount of compost produced compared with composting Acacia residues without bark. The relatively high C/N ratio of the composting matrix (C/N=56) and NH3 volatilization explained the limited increases in NH4+-N content, whereas concentrations of conservative nutrient elements (e.g. P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe) increased in proportion to OM mineralization, enriching the compost as a nutrient source for horticultural use. Nitrogen concentrations also increased to a small extent, but were much more dynamic and losses, probably associated with N volatilization mechanisms, were difficult to actively control. The physicochemical characteristics of the stabilized end-product, such as pH, electrical conductivity and OM content, were improved with the addition of bark to Acacia biomass, and the final compost characteristics were suitable for use for soil improvement and also as horticultural substrate components. PMID:25559143

  13. Co-composting of invasive Acacia longifolia with pine bark for horticultural use.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis Miguel; Mourão, Isabel; Coutinho, João; Smith, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of commercial-scale co-composting of waste biomass from the control of invasive Acacia species with pine bark waste from the lumber industry, in a blend ratio of 60:40 (v:v), was investigated and compared with previous research on the composting of Acacia without additional feedstock, to determine the potential process and end-product quality benefits of co-composting with bark. Pile temperatures rose rapidly to >70 °C and were maintained at >60 °C for several months. Acacia and bark biomass contained a large fraction of mineralizable organic matter (OM) equivalent to approximately 600 g kg(-1) of initial OM. Bark was more recalcitrant to biodegradation compared with Acacia, which degraded at twice the rate of bark. Therefore, incorporating the bark increased the final amount of compost produced compared with composting Acacia residues without bark. The relatively high C/N ratio of the composting matrix (C/N=56) and NH3 volatilization explained the limited increases in NH4+-N content, whereas concentrations of conservative nutrient elements (e.g. P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe) increased in proportion to OM mineralization, enriching the compost as a nutrient source for horticultural use. Nitrogen concentrations also increased to a small extent, but were much more dynamic and losses, probably associated with N volatilization mechanisms, were difficult to actively control. The physicochemical characteristics of the stabilized end-product, such as pH, electrical conductivity and OM content, were improved with the addition of bark to Acacia biomass, and the final compost characteristics were suitable for use for soil improvement and also as horticultural substrate components.

  14. Strategies for biological system management of nematodes in horticultural crops: fumigate, confuse or ignore them.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    Integrated management of nematodes as well as other soil-borne pests and diseases in horticultural crops in the tropics and subtropics as well as in protected cultivation in temperate climates is often a lopsided approach based on soil fumigation. With the upcoming loss of methyl bromide (Mbr), because of its effects on the ozone layer of the atmosphere, growers will have to make changes in the way they look at the problem of controlling soil-borne nematodes, fungi, insects and weeds. They can no longer rely on eradication of all pest problems with a one-stroke fumigation process. This is a severe problem that requires sound scientific solutions. New control technologies need to be developed and established methods urgently refined that are acceptable to the growers. Alternative fumigants and systemic nematicides still on the market will not provide broad spectrum control equal to Mbr. More disturbing is a provocative statement made by an economist that due to pesticides nematologists have neglected developing suitable alternative IPM measures of control. Some people may agree with this statement, especially if they are not involved in soil-ecosystem research. If you are a nematologist, this thought-provoking statement is at first upsetting but it is not valid. My talk will concentrate on the biological and cultural control methodologies that have been developed by nematologist around the world for use in management systems. These are technologies that can compensate for the loss of methyl bromide to horticultural crops in many countries. Alternatives are available and new methodologies are being developed for restructuring IPM strategies in many crops. The compatibility of these new approaches with general farming practices needs to be assessed on a country by country basis. Mutually interacting technology packages are needed, that are logically structured in "biological system management" programs that stress biocontrol aspects of control and not pesticides as is

  15. Institute for the Study of Sparsely Populated Areas. A Centre for Interdisciplinary Research into Sparsely Populated and Peripheral Regions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Peter G.

    The Institute for the Study of Sparsely Populated Areas is a multidisciplinary research unit which acts to coordinate, further, and initiate studies of the economic and social conditions of sparsely populated areas. Short summaries of the eight studies completed in the session of 1977-78 indicate work in such areas as the study of political life…

  16. The Astronomical Observatory of the Autonomous Region of the Aosta Valley. A professional research centre in the Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcidese, P.; Bernagozzi, A.; Bertolini, E.; Carbognani, A.; Damasso, M.; Pellissier, P.; Recaldini, P.; Soldi, M.; Toso, G.

    The Astronomical Observatory of the Autonomous Region of the Aosta Valley (OAVdA), in the Alps at the border with France and Switzerland, is located in the Saint-Barthélemy Valley at 1675 m a.s.l. and 16 km from the town of Nus (AO). Managed by the Fondazione Clément Fillietroz-ONLUS with funding from local administrations, the OAVdA opened in 2003. For the first years its initiatives were focused on public outreach & education. Since 2006 the main activity has been scientific research thanks to an official agreement of cooperation established with the italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). The OAVdA researchers, with Research Grants from the European Social Fund (EU-ESF), have been authors and/or coauthors of several papers on international journals. Here we present in detail the scientific projects developed at the OAVdA and describe some public outreach & education initiatives proposed at the OAVdA and the Planetarium of Lignan, also managed by the Fondazione Clément Fillietroz-ONLUS since 2009.

  17. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity
department of addictive behaviour and addiction medicine, central institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, University of Heidelberg.

    PubMed

    Mann, Karl

    2010-12-01

    Addictive behaviour is as prevalent in Germany as in other western countries, but in contrast to some European countries and the United States, very little money was given to this research field. Change came in the early 1990s, when the German government started to launch specific grants for addiction research. The first chair in addiction research was created in 1999 (Karl Mann) at the Central Institute of Mental Health Mannheim (CIMH; University of Heidelberg). The recruitment of a pre-clinical alcohol researcher as head of the department of psychopharmacology followed (Rainer Spanagel). This 'addiction research cluster' collaborates with several research groups at the CIMH (such as genetics). We inaugurated a clinical trial network which now comprises up to 20 treatment centres throughout Germany. Like most authors, we found effect sizes of different treatment modalities more in the low to moderate range, perhaps because of the heterogeneity of large patient samples. Therefore, we concentrated upon the biological basis of addiction in order to define more homogeneous 'subtypes' of patients for a better match with existing treatments. Results concerning genetics and neuroimaging (both animal and human) are promising, and could move our field towards a more personalized treatment approach. Our funding has been extended over the years, including involvement in several large European grants. We are studying substance-related problems as well as so-called 'behavioural addictions'. As a natural consequence of this development, we are deeply involved both in informing the general public on addiction issues as well as in counselling policy makers in Germany.

  18. Tribromophenol and pentachlorophenol uptake from sawdust to horticultural products.

    PubMed

    Mardones, C; Von Baer, D; Silva, J; Ruff, A; Gutierrez, L; Berg, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a study of the uptake of 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), and its metabolite pentachloroanisole (PCA) from contaminated sawdust from the forest industry in horticultural products such as apples, raspberries, and fodder maize for cattle feed. The samples were obtained from Bio-Bio Province in South Chile between 2002 and 2006. The analytical parameters of the methodology applied to the different matrices are presented and discussed. The chromatographic method was applied to determine the residues in 413 horticultural product samples. Eleven per cent of fodder maize samples showed detectable or quantifiable levels of PCP, TBP or PCA, 3% of samples presented quantifiable levels, although the concentrations surpassed the maximum allowed concentrations for vegetables (>10 microg kg(-1)) in only two samples. Traces of TBP were detected in eight samples, PCA was detected in 15, and PCP in 14 samples. Based on these results, a risk analysis was performed, indicating a low probability, 0.4% for PCA, 1.6% for TBP and 1.9% for PCP, to find concentrations higher than the allowed maximum. For apples and raspberries, no residues of these compounds were detected. These results indicate that those cultivars directly exposed to sawdust, like fodder maize, could contain detectable residues in several samples. To confirm this observation, a field assay was performed on fodder maize cultivated in the presence of sawdust artificially contaminated with 30 mg of TBP and/or PCP under controlled conditions. The results showed that under the experimental conditions used in the study, TBP can be transferred from sawdust to the plant, with an uptake rate of 0.04% from the TBP applied initially with sawdust but not to the corn ear. Also, the degradation of PCP to PCA was observed in the soil.

  19. Evaluating and optimizing horticultural regimes in space plant growth facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Y.; Chetirkin, R.; Wheeler, R.; Sager, J.

    In designing innovative Space Plant Growth Facilities (SPGF) for long duration space f ightl various limitations must be addressed including onboard resources: volume, energy consumption, heat transfer and crew labor expenditure. The required accuracy in evaluating onboard resources by using the equivalent mass methodology and applying it to the design of such facilities is not precise. This is due to the uncertainty of the structure and not completely understanding of the properties of all associated hardware, including the technology in these systems. We present a simple criteria of optimization for horticultural regimes in SPGF: Qmax = max [M · (EBI) 2 / (V · E · T) ], where M is the crop harvest in terms of total dry biomass in the plant growth system; EBI is the edible biomass index (harvest index), V is a volume occupied by the crop; E is the crop light energy supply during growth; T is the crop growth duration. The criterion reflects directly on the consumption of onboard resources for crop production. We analyzed the efficiency of plant crops and the environmental parameters by examining the criteria for 15 salad and 12 wheat crops from the data in the ALS database at Kennedy Space Center. Some following conclusion have been established: 1. The technology involved in growing salad crops on a cylindrical type surface provides a more meaningful Q-criterion; 2. Wheat crops were less efficient than leafy greens (salad crops) when examining resource utilization; 3. By increasing light intensity of the crop the efficiency of the resource utilization could decrease. Using the existing databases and Q-criteria we have found that the criteria can be used in optimizing design and horticultural regimes in the SPGF.

  20. Ergonomics Perspective in Agricultural Research: A User-Centred Approach Using CAD and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Thaneswer; Sanjog, J.; Karmakar, Sougata

    2016-09-01

    Computer-aided Design (CAD) and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) (specialized CAD software for virtual human representation) technologies endow unique opportunities to incorporate human factors pro-actively in design development. Challenges of enhancing agricultural productivity through improvement of agricultural tools/machineries and better human-machine compatibility can be ensured by adoption of these modern technologies. Objectives of present work are to provide the detailed scenario of CAD and DHM applications in agricultural sector; and finding out means for wide adoption of these technologies for design and development of cost-effective, user-friendly, efficient and safe agricultural tools/equipment and operator's workplace. Extensive literature review has been conducted for systematic segregation and representation of available information towards drawing inferences. Although applications of various CAD software have momentum in agricultural research particularly for design and manufacturing of agricultural equipment/machinery, use of DHM is still at its infancy in this sector. Current review discusses about reasons of less adoption of these technologies in agricultural sector and steps to be taken for their wide adoption. It also suggests possible future research directions to come up with better ergonomic design strategies for improvement of agricultural equipment/machines and workstations through application of CAD and DHM.

  1. Geoinformation postgraduate education at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia - towards a centre of high quality postgraduate education and research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S.; Kanniah, K. D.; Rahman, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Studying at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) will ensure academic and technological excellence. The Faculty of Geoinformation and Real Estate (FGHT), established in 1972, focus on education and research for undergraduate as well as postgraduate programs in the related disciplines such as geomatic engineering, geoinformatics, remote sensing, property management and land administration & development. FGHT strives to be a leading academic center in geoinformation and real estate in Southeast Asia. Graduates and alumni form major strong professional societies and work force in the related industries. Many of our graduates end up with good jobs not just in Malaysia but also in other countries (Asian, Middle East, Africa and Europe). The strong team and knowledgeable academic members in this faculty provide excellent ingredients for the success of the programs (i.e. with the relevant and up-to-date curriculum and syllabus). FGHT is continuously working to provide and offer first-class geoinformation and real estate education and research in the country and be at a par with other leading institutions in other parts of the globe. The Department of Geoinformation at FGHT runs a Bachelor of Engineering in Geomatic and a Bachelor of Science in Geoinformatics. At the postgraduate levels, namely M.Sc. and PhD programs, the offered disciplines are Geomatic Engineering, Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing. In the following, the state of the art of FGHT's postgraduate education in Geoinformation is presented, including a comparison with other universities in Malaysia, program content and curriculum information, alumni statistics as well as future strategies.

  2. Ergonomics Perspective in Agricultural Research: A User-Centred Approach Using CAD and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Thaneswer; Sanjog, J.; Karmakar, Sougata

    2016-06-01

    Computer-aided Design (CAD) and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) (specialized CAD software for virtual human representation) technologies endow unique opportunities to incorporate human factors pro-actively in design development. Challenges of enhancing agricultural productivity through improvement of agricultural tools/machineries and better human-machine compatibility can be ensured by adoption of these modern technologies. Objectives of present work are to provide the detailed scenario of CAD and DHM applications in agricultural sector; and finding out means for wide adoption of these technologies for design and development of cost-effective, user-friendly, efficient and safe agricultural tools/equipment and operator's workplace. Extensive literature review has been conducted for systematic segregation and representation of available information towards drawing inferences. Although applications of various CAD software have momentum in agricultural research particularly for design and manufacturing of agricultural equipment/machinery, use of DHM is still at its infancy in this sector. Current review discusses about reasons of less adoption of these technologies in agricultural sector and steps to be taken for their wide adoption. It also suggests possible future research directions to come up with better ergonomic design strategies for improvement of agricultural equipment/machines and workstations through application of CAD and DHM.

  3. Science Learning Centres Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres aims to raise the quality of science teaching from Key Stage 1 through post-16 (ages 5-19). Short courses are provided locally through the regional Science Learning Centres and longer, more intensive programmes are available at the National Science Learning Centre in York. There are a growing number…

  4. The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate - A European initiative for practical peat bog and climate protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, Geerd; Tänzer, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate (EFMK) is an initiative by different local communities, environmental protection NGOs, agricultural services, and partners from the peat and other industries in Lower Saxony (Germany). The Centre aims to integrate practical peat bog conservation with a focus on green house gas emission after drainage and after water logging activities. Together with our partners we want to break new ground to protect the remaining bogs in the region. Sphagnum mosses will be produced in paludiculture on-site in cooperation with the local peat industry to provide economic and ecologic alternatives for peat products used in horticulture business. Land-use changes are needed in the region and will be stimulated in cooperation with agricultural services via compensation money transfers from environmental protection funds. On a global scale the ideas of Carbon Credit System have to be discussed to protect the peat bogs for climate protection issues. Environmental education is an important pillar of the EFMK. The local society is invited to explore the unique ecosystem and to participate in peat bog protection activities. Future generations will be taught to understand that the health of our peat bogs is interrelated with the health of the local and global climate. Besides extracurricular classes for schools the centre will provide infrastructure for Master and PhD students, as well for senior researchers for applied research in the surrounding moor. International partners in the scientific and practical fields of peat bog ecology, renaturation, green house gas emissions from peat bogs, and environmental policy are invited to participate in the European Competence Center for Moor and Climate.

  5. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    PubMed

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  6. Developing a User-Centred Planning Tool for Young Adults with Development Disorders: A Research-Based Teaching Project.

    PubMed

    Ribu, Kirsten; Patel, Tulpesh

    2016-01-01

    People with development disorders, for instance autism, need structured plans to help create predictability in their daily lives. Digital plans can facilitate enhanced independency, learning, and quality of life, but existing apps are largely general purpose and lack the flexibility required by this specific but heterogeneous user group. Universal design is both a goal and a process and should be based on a holistic approach and user-centered design, interacting with the users in all stages of the development process. At Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) we conducted a research-based teaching project in co-operation with the Department of Neuro-habilitation at Oslo University Hospital (OUS) with two employees acting as project managers and students as developers. Three groups of Computer Science bachelor students developed digital prototypes for a planning tool for young adults with pervasive development disorders, who live either with their families or in supervised residences, and do not receive extensive public services. The students conducted the initial planning phase of the software development process, focusing on prototyping the system requirements, whilst a professional software company programmed the end solution. The goal of the project was to develop flexible and adaptive user-oriented and user-specific app solutions for tablets that can aid this diverse user group in structuring daily life, whereby, for example, photos of objects and places known to the individual user replace general pictures or drawings, and checklists can be elaborate or sparse as necessary. The three student groups worked independently of each other and created interactive working prototypes based on tests, observations and short interviews with end users (both administrators and residents) and regular user feedback from the project managers. Three very different solutions were developed that were of high enough quality that an external software company were able to

  7. Genome-editing technologies and their potential application in horticultural crop breeding

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jin-Song; Ding, Jing; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Plant breeding, one of the oldest agricultural activities, parallels human civilization. Many crops have been domesticated to satisfy human's food and aesthetical needs, including numerous specialty horticultural crops such as fruits, vegetables, ornamental flowers, shrubs, and trees. Crop varieties originated through selection during early human civilization. Other technologies, such as various forms of hybridization, mutation, and transgenics, have also been invented and applied to crop breeding over the past centuries. The progress made in these breeding technologies, especially the modern biotechnology-based breeding technologies, has had a great impact on crop breeding as well as on our lives. Here, we first review the developmental process and applications of these technologies in horticultural crop breeding. Then, we mainly describe the principles of the latest genome-editing technologies and discuss their potential applications in the genetic improvement of horticultural crops. The advantages and challenges of genome-editing technologies in horticultural crop breeding are also discussed. PMID:26504570

  8. Green chemistry in protected horticulture: the use of peroxyacetic acid as a sustainable strategy.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Gilda; Urrestarazu, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Global reduction of chemical deposition into the environment is necessary. In protected horticulture, different strategies with biodegradable products are used to control pathogens. This review presents the available tools, especially for the management of protected horticultural species, including vegetables and ornamental plants. An analysis of the potential for degradable products that control pathogens and also encourage other productive factors, such as oxygen in the root system, is presented. Biosecurity in fertigation management of protected horticulture is conducted by using peroxyacetic acid mixtures that serve three basic principles: first, the manufacture of these products does not involve polluting processes; second, they have the same function as other chemicals, and third, after use and management there is no toxic residue left in the environment. The sustainability of protected horticulture depends on the development and introduction of technologies for implementation in the field. PMID:20559497

  9. Green Chemistry in Protected Horticulture: The Use of Peroxyacetic Acid as a Sustainable Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Gilda; Urrestarazu, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Global reduction of chemical deposition into the environment is necessary. In protected horticulture, different strategies with biodegradable products are used to control pathogens. This review presents the available tools, especially for the management of protected horticultural species, including vegetables and ornamental plants. An analysis of the potential for degradable products that control pathogens and also encourage other productive factors, such as oxygen in the root system, is presented. Biosecurity in fertigation management of protected horticulture is conducted by using peroxyacetic acid mixtures that serve three basic principles: first, the manufacture of these products does not involve polluting processes; second, they have the same function as other chemicals, and third, after use and management there is no toxic residue left in the environment. The sustainability of protected horticulture depends on the development and introduction of technologies for implementation in the field. PMID:20559497

  10. Genome-editing technologies and their potential application in horticultural crop breeding.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jin-Song; Ding, Jing; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Plant breeding, one of the oldest agricultural activities, parallels human civilization. Many crops have been domesticated to satisfy human's food and aesthetical needs, including numerous specialty horticultural crops such as fruits, vegetables, ornamental flowers, shrubs, and trees. Crop varieties originated through selection during early human civilization. Other technologies, such as various forms of hybridization, mutation, and transgenics, have also been invented and applied to crop breeding over the past centuries. The progress made in these breeding technologies, especially the modern biotechnology-based breeding technologies, has had a great impact on crop breeding as well as on our lives. Here, we first review the developmental process and applications of these technologies in horticultural crop breeding. Then, we mainly describe the principles of the latest genome-editing technologies and discuss their potential applications in the genetic improvement of horticultural crops. The advantages and challenges of genome-editing technologies in horticultural crop breeding are also discussed. PMID:26504570

  11. How do rural patients benefit from the patient-centred medical home? A card study in the High Plains Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Zittleman, Linda; Ringel, Marc; Sutter, Christin; McCaffrey, Kelly; Gale, Susan; Gerk, Tony; Sanchez, Sergio; LeBlanc, William; Dickinson, L Miriam; Dickinson, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Context The patient-centred medical home (PCMH) has become a dominant model for improving the quality and cost of primary care. Geographic isolation, small populations, privacy concerns and staffing requirements may limit implementation of the PCMH in clinical practice. Objective To determine the primary care provider perceived benefit of PCMH for patients in rural Colorado. Design, setting and participants The High Plains Research Network (HPRN) is a community and practice-based research network spanning 30 000 square miles in 16 counties in eastern Colorado. The HPRN consists of 58 practices, 120 primary care clinicians and 145 000 residents. Main outcome measures Providers' perceived benefit of PCMH for individual patients. Results Seventy-eight providers in 37 practices saw 1093 patients and completed 1016 surveys. There was wide variation among the provider-perceived benefits of PCMH elements ranging from 9% for group visits to 64% for electronic prescribing. Provider-perceived benefit was higher for patients with a chronic medical condition. Conclusions Rural primary care providers perceived patient benefit for numerous elements of the PCMH. There is need to consider what PCMH elements may be required in practice and what components might be optional. Our findings reveal that rural practices share PCMH aspirations including commitment to quality, safety, outcomes, cost reduction, and patient and provider satisfaction. These findings support the need for ongoing conversation about how to best provide a locally relevant medical home. PMID:25949735

  12. MEMS Sensor Technologies for Human Centred Applications in Healthcare, Physical Activities, Safety and Environmental Sensing: A Review on Research Activities in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users’ health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users’ physical activity with inertial measurement unit-based devices, for instance, has also proven to be important in health management of patients affected by chronic diseases, e.g., Parkinson’s disease, many of which are becoming highly prevalent in Italy and in the Western world. This review paper will focus on MEMS sensor technologies developed in Italy in the last three years describing research achievements for healthcare and physical activity, safety and environmental sensing, in addition to smart systems integration. Innovative and smart integrated solutions for sensing devices, pursued and implemented in Italian research centres, will be highlighted, together with specific applications of such technologies. Finally, the paper will depict the future perspective of sensor technologies and corresponding exploitation opportunities, again with a specific focus on Italy. PMID:25808763

  13. MEMS sensor technologies for human centred applications in healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing: a review on research activities in Italy.

    PubMed

    Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users' health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users' physical activity with inertial measurement unit-based devices, for instance, has also proven to be important in health management of patients affected by chronic diseases, e.g., Parkinson's disease, many of which are becoming highly prevalent in Italy and in the Western world. This review paper will focus on MEMS sensor technologies developed in Italy in the last three years describing research achievements for healthcare and physical activity, safety and environmental sensing, in addition to smart systems integration. Innovative and smart integrated solutions for sensing devices, pursued and implemented in Italian research centres, will be highlighted, together with specific applications of such technologies. Finally, the paper will depict the future perspective of sensor technologies and corresponding exploitation opportunities, again with a specific focus on Italy.

  14. Women's Information Centre, Bangkok, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1988

    1988-01-01

    The Women's Information Centre in Bangkok, Thailand, focuses on the creation of modules for professional skills training, awareness-building, organizing, and self-determination of women in rural areas, urban areas, and factories. It also supports women-related research. (JOW)

  15. Biosynthesis and molecular actions of specialized 1,4-naphthoquinone natural products produced by horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Widhalm, Joshua R; Rhodes, David

    2016-01-01

    The 1,4-naphthoquinones (1,4-NQs) are a diverse group of natural products found in every kingdom of life. Plants, including many horticultural species, collectively synthesize hundreds of specialized 1,4-NQs with ecological roles in plant-plant (allelopathy), plant-insect and plant-microbe interactions. Numerous horticultural plants producing 1,4-NQs have also served as sources of traditional medicines for hundreds of years. As a result, horticultural species have been at the forefront of many basic studies conducted to understand the metabolism and function of specialized plant 1,4-NQs. Several 1,4-NQ natural products derived from horticultural plants have also emerged as promising scaffolds for developing new drugs. In this review, the current understanding of the core metabolic pathways leading to plant 1,4-NQs is provided with additional emphasis on downstream natural products originating from horticultural species. An overview on the biochemical mechanisms of action, both from an ecological and pharmacological perspective, of 1,4-NQs derived from horticultural plants is also provided. In addition, future directions for improving basic knowledge about plant 1,4-NQ metabolism are discussed. PMID:27688890

  16. Biosynthesis and molecular actions of specialized 1,4-naphthoquinone natural products produced by horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Widhalm, Joshua R; Rhodes, David

    2016-01-01

    The 1,4-naphthoquinones (1,4-NQs) are a diverse group of natural products found in every kingdom of life. Plants, including many horticultural species, collectively synthesize hundreds of specialized 1,4-NQs with ecological roles in plant-plant (allelopathy), plant-insect and plant-microbe interactions. Numerous horticultural plants producing 1,4-NQs have also served as sources of traditional medicines for hundreds of years. As a result, horticultural species have been at the forefront of many basic studies conducted to understand the metabolism and function of specialized plant 1,4-NQs. Several 1,4-NQ natural products derived from horticultural plants have also emerged as promising scaffolds for developing new drugs. In this review, the current understanding of the core metabolic pathways leading to plant 1,4-NQs is provided with additional emphasis on downstream natural products originating from horticultural species. An overview on the biochemical mechanisms of action, both from an ecological and pharmacological perspective, of 1,4-NQs derived from horticultural plants is also provided. In addition, future directions for improving basic knowledge about plant 1,4-NQ metabolism are discussed.

  17. Biosynthesis and molecular actions of specialized 1,4-naphthoquinone natural products produced by horticultural plants

    PubMed Central

    Widhalm, Joshua R; Rhodes, David

    2016-01-01

    The 1,4-naphthoquinones (1,4-NQs) are a diverse group of natural products found in every kingdom of life. Plants, including many horticultural species, collectively synthesize hundreds of specialized 1,4-NQs with ecological roles in plant–plant (allelopathy), plant–insect and plant–microbe interactions. Numerous horticultural plants producing 1,4-NQs have also served as sources of traditional medicines for hundreds of years. As a result, horticultural species have been at the forefront of many basic studies conducted to understand the metabolism and function of specialized plant 1,4-NQs. Several 1,4-NQ natural products derived from horticultural plants have also emerged as promising scaffolds for developing new drugs. In this review, the current understanding of the core metabolic pathways leading to plant 1,4-NQs is provided with additional emphasis on downstream natural products originating from horticultural species. An overview on the biochemical mechanisms of action, both from an ecological and pharmacological perspective, of 1,4-NQs derived from horticultural plants is also provided. In addition, future directions for improving basic knowledge about plant 1,4-NQ metabolism are discussed. PMID:27688890

  18. Biosynthesis and molecular actions of specialized 1,4-naphthoquinone natural products produced by horticultural plants

    PubMed Central

    Widhalm, Joshua R; Rhodes, David

    2016-01-01

    The 1,4-naphthoquinones (1,4-NQs) are a diverse group of natural products found in every kingdom of life. Plants, including many horticultural species, collectively synthesize hundreds of specialized 1,4-NQs with ecological roles in plant–plant (allelopathy), plant–insect and plant–microbe interactions. Numerous horticultural plants producing 1,4-NQs have also served as sources of traditional medicines for hundreds of years. As a result, horticultural species have been at the forefront of many basic studies conducted to understand the metabolism and function of specialized plant 1,4-NQs. Several 1,4-NQ natural products derived from horticultural plants have also emerged as promising scaffolds for developing new drugs. In this review, the current understanding of the core metabolic pathways leading to plant 1,4-NQs is provided with additional emphasis on downstream natural products originating from horticultural species. An overview on the biochemical mechanisms of action, both from an ecological and pharmacological perspective, of 1,4-NQs derived from horticultural plants is also provided. In addition, future directions for improving basic knowledge about plant 1,4-NQ metabolism are discussed.

  19. Centre for human development, stem cells & regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    The Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration (CHDSCR) was founded in 2004 as a cross-disciplinary research and translational program within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton. The Centre undertakes fundamental research into early development and stem cells together with applied translational research for patient benefit. The Centre has vibrant and thriving multidisciplinary research programs that harness the translational strength of the Faculty together with an innovative Stem Cell PhD program, outstanding clinical infrastructure and enterprise to deliver on this vision.

  20. [The research on medicine in Greco-Roman Egypt in the Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) of the University of Liège].

    PubMed

    Marganne, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the research on medicine in Greco-Roman Egypt conducted in the last forty years at the Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) at the University of Liège. It describes the main results obtained by deciphering, editing, translating and commenting Greek and Latin medical papyri, be they literary, documentary or magical. PMID:26492678

  1. [The research on medicine in Greco-Roman Egypt in the Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) of the University of Liège].

    PubMed

    Marganne, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the research on medicine in Greco-Roman Egypt conducted in the last forty years at the Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) at the University of Liège. It describes the main results obtained by deciphering, editing, translating and commenting Greek and Latin medical papyri, be they literary, documentary or magical.

  2. "A triumph of brains over brute": women and science at the Horticultural College, Swanley, 1890-1910.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Donald L

    2013-03-01

    The founding of Britain's first horticultural college in 1889 advanced a scientific and coeducational response to three troubling national concerns: a major agricultural depression; the economic distress of single, unemployed women; and imperatives to develop the colonies. Buoyed by the technical instruction and women's movements, the Horticultural College and Produce Company, Limited, at Swanley, Kent, crystallized a transformation in the horticultural profession in which new science-based, formalized study threatened an earlier emphasis on practical apprenticeship training, with the effect of opening male-dominated trades to women practitioners. By 1903, the college closed its doors to male students, and new pathways were forged for women students interested in pursuing further scientific study. Resistance to the Horticultural College's model of science-based women's horticultural education positioned science and women as contested subjects throughout this period of horticulture's expansion in the academy.

  3. Promotion in Call Centres: Opportunities and Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorjup, Maria Tatiana; Valverde, Mireia; Ryan, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the quality of jobs in call centres by focusing on the opportunities for promotion in this sector. More specifically, the research questions focus on discovering whether promotion is common practise in the call centre sector and on identifying the factors that affect this.…

  4. The European Centre for Leisure and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Supported by UNESCO, the European Centre for Leisure and Education is an establishment of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences. The task of the Centre lies in the search for common trends of leisure and education in Europe, involving four types of activity: research, editorial, bibliographic, and documentary. It has sponsored conferences, and has…

  5. Causes of mortality of captive Arabian gazelles (Gazella Arabica) at King Khalid Wildlife Research Centre, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from 1988 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Soares, Jorge F; Pereira, Helena; Desta, Fekadu Shiferaw; Sandouka, Mohammed; Macasero, William

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the causes of mortality of the Arabian gazelle (Gazella arabica) based on the necropsy records of 1218 captive animals at King Khalid Wildlife Research Centre, Saudi Arabia, from 1988 to 2011. The largest number of deaths was attributed to trauma (391, 32.1%). Trauma was subdivided into the following three categories: collisions with fences (144, 11.8%); predator activity (91, 7.5%), and exhibit-mate aggression (156, 12.8%). Respiratory infection was another important cause of mortality, accounting for 186 (15.3%) deaths. Respiratory infection was more prevalent during the winter season (November to March). Other causes of death included gastrointestinal diseases, such as clostridiosis and salmonellosis (108, 8.9%). Maternal neglect (104, 8.5%), chronic renal fibrosis (34, 2.8%), and stress-related pathologies (35, 2.9%), in particular, capture myopathy, were also important causes of mortality. Here, the importance of these findings for improvement of the captive management of this vulnerable Arabian species is discussed, and for the first time, salmonellosis in Arabian gazelles is reported. PMID:25831570

  6. Cultivations...and potting on a strategic plan for a social and horticultural therapy program.

    PubMed

    Smilski, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This research endeavored to develop a strategic growth plan for St. Ann's Garden Club (SAGC), a Non-Profit Social and Horticultural Therapy program, located at Providence Farm in Duncan, British Columbia. SAGC is a day program for older adults with mental illness and/or drug/alcohol addiction. The aim of the program is to be sustainable within the context of stakeholders needs, preferences, and resources and therefore they sought a strategic analysis prior to launching a growth strategy. SAGC has valuable intangible resources that contribute to strong core competencies and effectiveness despite facing many program issues requiring change in order for them to be sustainable. These same issues are shared by many public and non-profit health and wellness programs as they struggle to remain relevant in today's changing healthscape. To adequately focus the study and provide sound direction, the strategic analysis highlighted SAGC's environment, opportunities, issues, priorities, and requirements and was conducted through multiple iterations of the action research cycle. Data was gathered using surveys, interviews, and a focus group. The findings supported a capital campaign to build as new larger clubhouse and establish a more diverse sustainable funding base. Using a resource based perspective, a three year strategic plan was formulated for SAGC to help them cultivate growth and sustainability.

  7. Development of a Sensor Node for Precision Horticulture

    PubMed Central

    López, Juan A.; Soto, Fulgencio; Sánchez, Pedro; Iborra, Andrés; Suardiaz, Juan; Vera, Juan A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a new wireless sensor node (GAIA Soil-Mote) for precision horticulture applications which permits the use of precision agricultural instruments based on the SDI-12 standard. Wireless communication is achieved with a transceiver compliant with the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. The GAIA Soil-Mote software implementation is based on TinyOS. A two-phase methodology was devised to validate the design of this sensor node. The first phase consisted of laboratory validation of the proposed hardware and software solution, including a study on power consumption and autonomy. The second phase consisted of implementing a monitoring application in a real broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Marathon) crop in Campo de Cartagena in south-east Spain. In this way the sensor node was validated in real operating conditions. This type of application was chosen because there is a large potential market for it in the farming sector, especially for the development of precision agriculture applications. PMID:22412309

  8. Conflict and compliance: Christianity and the occult in horticultural exporting.

    PubMed

    Dolan, C S

    1999-03-01

    The introduction of export horticulture in Meru District, Kenya, brought about disadvantageous effects on female farmers. Their workload increased while their earnings did not. Women reacted by turning to Christianity for support, and resorted to traditional witchcraft to regain control. In this article, Christianity and witchcraft are presented as ways of expressing discontent with the prevailing social norms, and as means to reclaim autonomy and security within their households. Since Kenyan women are entailed to meet the standards of being a good Christian wife, in which women are submissive to their husbands, the church became a means of escaping the confinements of their marriage. In Meru, Christian conversion offers a means of coping with life and an opportunity to interact with other women who share the same experience. Another strategy adopted by women is witchcraft, a traditional relic wherein women give "potions" to their husbands to induce psychosis and eventually death, which would then leave control of the household to the woman. In conclusion, the case presented here demonstrates how failure to recognize cultural dynamics leads to gender inequity and worsens women's well being, as well as men's security. PMID:12295338

  9. Evaluating and optimizing horticultural regimes in space plant growth facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkovich, Y. A.; Chetirkin, P. V.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    In designing innovative space plant growth facilities (SPGF) for long duration space flight, various limitations must be addressed including onboard resources: volume, energy consumption, heat transfer and crew labor expenditure. The required accuracy in evaluating on board resources by using the equivalent mass methodology and applying it to the design of such facilities is not precise. This is due to the uncertainty of the structure and not completely understanding the properties of all associated hardware, including the technology in these systems. We present a simple criteria of optimization for horticultural regimes in SPGF: Qmax = max [M x (EBI)2/(V x E x T], where M is the crop harvest in terms of total dry biomass in the plant growth system; EBI is the edible biomass index (harvest index), V is volume occupied by the crop; E is the crop light energy supply during growth; T is the crop growth duration. The criterion reflects directly on the consumption of onboard resources for crop production. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating and optimizing horticultural regimes in space plant growth facilities.

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Y A; Chetirkin, P V; Wheeler, R M; Sager, J C

    2004-01-01

    In designing innovative space plant growth facilities (SPGF) for long duration space flight, various limitations must be addressed including onboard resources: volume, energy consumption, heat transfer and crew labor expenditure. The required accuracy in evaluating on board resources by using the equivalent mass methodology and applying it to the design of such facilities is not precise. This is due to the uncertainty of the structure and not completely understanding the properties of all associated hardware, including the technology in these systems. We present a simple criteria of optimization for horticultural regimes in SPGF: Qmax = max [M x (EBI)2/(V x E x T], where M is the crop harvest in terms of total dry biomass in the plant growth system; EBI is the edible biomass index (harvest index), V is volume occupied by the crop; E is the crop light energy supply during growth; T is the crop growth duration. The criterion reflects directly on the consumption of onboard resources for crop production.

  11. Nutrient composition of strawberry genotypes cultivated in a horticulture farm.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ashrafi; Begum, Parveen; Salma Zannat, M; Hafizur Rahman, Md; Ahsan, Monira; Islam, Sheikh Nazrul

    2016-05-15

    This article decribes the nutrient composition of four strawberry genotypes cultivated at the Sher-e-Bangla Agriculture University horticulture farm in Dhaka (Bangladesh). AOAC and standard validated methods were employed to analyse the nutrient composition. Protein, fat and ash contents were found to be vary significantly (LSD<0.05), while the variation in moisture (LSD<1.33), dietary fibre (LSD<0.15) and total sugar (LSD<0.09) were found to be insignificant among the genotypes. Vitamin C content ranged from 26.46 mg to 37.77 mg per 100g edible strawberries (LSD<0.060). Amount of carotenoids were found to be very low being in a range of 0.99-3.30 μg per 100g edible fruit. Analysis of mineral revealed that strawberry genotypes contained a wide array of minerals including Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, Mn, Zn, Cu and Fe; most of which varied significantly (LSD<0.05) among the genotypes. Strawberries could be a potential dietary supplement for vitamin C along with minerals, particularly for the children who do not like local fruits, but love to eat the colourful strawberries. PMID:26776020

  12. Report on the 13th symposium on invertebrate neurobiology held 26-30 August 2015 at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for ecological research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Crisford, Anna; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Walker, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes the lectures and posters presented at the International Society for Invertebrate Neurobiology's 13th symposium held 26-30 August 2015, at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for Ecological Research, Tihany, Hungary. The symposium provided an opportunity for scientists working on a range of topics in invertebrate neurobiology to meet and present their research and discuss ways to advance the discipline.

  13. Elevated Seismic Activity Beneath the Slumbering Morne aux Diables Volcano, Northern Dominica and the Monitoring Role of the Seismic Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, R. B.; Robertson, R. E.; Abraham, W.; Cole, P.; de Roche, T.; Edwards, S.; Higgins, M.; Johnson, M.; Joseph, E. P.; Latchman, J.; Lynch, L.; Nath, N.; Ramsingh, C.; Stewart, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Since June 2009, periods of elevated seismic activity have been experienced around the flanks of Morne Aux Diables Volcano in northern Dominica. This long-dormant volcano is a complex of 7 andesitic lava domes with a central depression where a cold soufrière is evident. Prior to this activity, seismicity was very quiet except for a short period in 2000 and an intense short-lived swarm in April 2003. The most recent earthquake activity has been regularly felt by residents in villages on all flanks of the complex. In Dec 09/Jan10, scientists from the Seismic Research Centre (SRC), based in Trinidad & Tobago, in collaboration with staff of the Office of Disaster Management (ODM) and Dominica Public Seismic Network (DPSN) improved the monitoring capacity around this volcano from 1 to 7 seismic stations. Earthquakes are determined to be volcano-tectonic in nature and located at shallow depths (<4 km) beneath the central depression. Additionally, in Jan/Feb 10 geothermal sampling was undertaken and 2 permanent GPS sites were deployed. Public information leaflets prepared by SRC scientists using a "Question & Answer" format have been distributed to concerned citizens whilst many public meetings were carried out by ODM staff. Field investigations indicate that the previous Late Pleistocene activity of Morne Aux Diables switched from Pelèan dome growth and gravitational collapse to more explosive pumice-falls and associated ignimbrites, both styles forming extensive pyroclastic fans around the central complex. The town of Portsmouth is located on one of these fans ~5 km southwest of the central depression. Sporadic, short bursts of seismic activity continue at the time of writing.

  14. The prospects for using (Q)SARs in a changing political environment--high expectations and a key role for the European Commission's joint research centre.

    PubMed

    Worth, A P; Van Leeuwen, C J; Hartung, T

    2004-01-01

    Recent policy developments in the European union (EU) and within the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) have placed increased emphasis on the use of structure-activity relationships (SARs) and quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), collectively referred to as (Q)SARs, within various regulatory programmes for the assessment of chemicals and products. The most significant example within the EU is the European commission's proposal (of 29 October 2003) to introduce a new system for managing chemicals (called REACH), which calls for an increased use of (Q)SARs and other non-animal methods, especially for the assessment of low production volume chemicals. Another development within the EU is the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which foresees the phasing out of animal testing on cosmetics, combined with the imposition of marketing bans on cosmetics that have been tested on animals after certain deadlines. At the same time, the Existing Chemicals programme within the OECD is investigating ways of increasing the use of chemical category approaches, which depend heavily on the use of (Q)SARs, activity-activity relationships and read-across. Such developments are placing an enormous challenge on industry, regulatory bodies, and on the European commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), which is responsible for providing independent scientific advice to policy makers in the European Commission and the Member States. This paper reviews the different scientific and regulatory purposes for which reliable (Q)SARs could be used, and describes the current work of the JRC in providing scientific support for the development, validation and implementation of (Q)SARs. PMID:15669693

  15. Grafting: A Technique to Modify Ion Accumulation in Horticultural Crops

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Muhammad A.; Imtiaz, Muhammad; Kong, Qiusheng; Cheng, Fei; Ahmed, Waqar; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Grafting is a centuries-old technique used in plants to obtain economic benefits. Grafting increases nutrient uptake and utilization efficiency in a number of plant species, including fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. Selected rootstocks of the same species or close relatives are utilized in grafting. Rootstocks absorb more water and ions than self-rooted plants and transport these water and ions to the aboveground scion. Ion uptake is regulated by a complex communication mechanism between the scion and rootstock. Sugars, hormones, and miRNAs function as long-distance signaling molecules and regulate ion uptake and ion homeostasis by affecting the activity of ion transporters. This review summarizes available information on the effect of rootstock on nutrient uptake and utilization and the mechanisms involved. Information on specific nutrient-efficient rootstocks for different crops of commercial importance is also provided. Several other important approaches, such as interstocking (during double grafting), inarching, use of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria, use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, use of plant growth substances (e.g., auxin and melatonin), and use of genetically engineered rootstocks and scions (transgrafting), are highlighted; these approaches can be combined with grafting to enhance nutrient uptake and utilization in commercially important plant species. Whether the rootstock and scion affect each other's soil microbiota and their effect on the nutrient absorption of rootstocks remain largely unknown. Similarly, the physiological and molecular bases of grafting, crease formation, and incompatibility are not fully identified and require investigation. Grafting in horticultural crops can help reveal the basic biology of grafting, the reasons for incompatibility, sensing, and signaling of nutrients, ion uptake and transport, and the mechanism of heavy metal accumulation and restriction in rootstocks. Ion transporter and miRNA-regulated nutrient

  16. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life.

    PubMed

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London's East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell's first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory.

  17. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London’s East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell’s first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory. PMID:26340279

  18. STS in Engineering: The Teaching and Research Activities of the Centre for Technology and Social Development at the University of Toronto.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the conceptual framework and three core courses of the certificate program in Preventive Engineering and Social Development at the Centre for Technology and Social Development at the University of Toronto. Preventive approaches examine how technology fits into, interacts with, and depends on human life, society, and the biosphere to…

  19. Design and internal validation of an obstetric early warning score: secondary analysis of the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre Case Mix Programme database.

    PubMed

    Carle, C; Alexander, P; Columb, M; Johal, J

    2013-04-01

    We designed and internally validated an aggregate weighted early warning scoring system specific to the obstetric population that has the potential for use in the ward environment. Direct obstetric admissions from the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre's Case Mix Programme Database were randomly allocated to model development (n = 2240) or validation (n = 2200) sets. Physiological variables collected during the first 24 h of critical care admission were analysed. Logistic regression analysis for mortality in the model development set was initially used to create a statistically based early warning score. The statistical score was then modified to create a clinically acceptable early warning score. Important features of this clinical obstetric early warning score are that the variables are weighted according to their statistical importance, a surrogate for the FI O2 /Pa O2 relationship is included, conscious level is assessed using a simplified alert/not alert variable, and the score, trigger thresholds and response are consistent with the new non-obstetric National Early Warning Score system. The statistical and clinical early warning scores were internally validated using the validation set. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.995 (95% CI 0.992-0.998) for the statistical score and 0.957 (95% CI 0.923-0.991) for the clinical score. Pre-existing empirically designed early warning scores were also validated in the same way for comparison. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.955 (95% CI 0.922-0.988) for Swanton et al.'s Modified Early Obstetric Warning System, 0.937 (95% CI 0.884-0.991) for the obstetric early warning score suggested in the 2003-2005 Report on Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the UK, and 0.973 (95% CI 0.957-0.989) for the non-obstetric National Early Warning Score. This highlights that the new clinical obstetric early warning score has an excellent ability to

  20. The Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2) study: expected outcome from the DD2 project and two intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Solomon, Thomas Pj; Lauridsen, Jørgen; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente K; Johnsen, Søren P; Nielsen, Jens Steen; Kryger, Tine Bjerregaard; Sortsø, Camilla; Vaag, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of the Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2) is to near-normalize metabolic control in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) using an individualized treatment approach. We hypothesize that this will not only prevent complications and improve quality of life for T2D patients but also result in increased cost efficiency compared with current treatment modalities. This paper provides an overview of the expected outcomes from DD2, focusing on the two main intervention studies. The main data for the DD2 project are collected during patient enrollment and stored using the individual civil registration number. This enables subsequent linking to other national databases where supplemental data can be obtained. All data will be used for designing treatment guidelines and continuously monitoring the development of diabetic complications, thereby obtaining knowledge about predictors for the long-term outcome and identifying targets for new interventions. Further data are being collected from two intervention studies. The aim of the first intervention study is to improve T2D treatment using an individualized treatment modality optimizing medication according to individual metabolic responses and phenotypic characteristics. The aim of the second intervention study is to develop an evidence-based training protocol to be implemented as a treatment modality for T2D and used for initiating lifelong changes in physical activity levels in patients with T2D. An initial pilot study evaluating an interval-based walking protocol is ongoing, and preliminary results indicate that this protocol is an optimal "free-living" training intervention. An initial health-economic analysis will also be performed as a basis for analysis of the data collected during the project. A cost-benefit analysis of the two intervention studies will be conducted. The DD2 project is expected to lead to improved treatment modalities and increased knowledge about

  1. Pretoria Centre Reaches Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    On 5 July 2014 six members of the Pretoria Centre of ASSA braved the light pollution of one of the shopping malls in Centurion to reach out to shoppers a la John Dobson and to show them the moon, Mars and Saturn. Although the centre hosts regular monthly public observing evenings, it was felt that we should take astronomy to the people rather than wait for the people to come to us.

  2. Research is our middle name

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article highlights research by the USDA-ARS Greenhouse Production Research Group (GPRG). It provides an overview of the current research projects of the Application Technology Research Unit being conducted by the Agricultural Engineering Research Group, the Horticultural Insects Research Group...

  3. CMCC Data Distribution Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, Giovanni; Fiore, Sandro; Negro, A.

    2010-05-01

    The CMCC Data Distribution Centre (DDC) is the primary entry point (web gateway) to the CMCC. It is a Data Grid Portal providing a ubiquitous and pervasive way to ease data publishing, climate metadata search, datasets discovery, metadata annotation, data access, data aggregation, sub-setting, etc. The grid portal security model includes the use of HTTPS protocol for secure communication with the client (based on X509v3 certificates that must be loaded into the browser) and secure cookies to establish and maintain user sessions. The CMCC DDC is now in a pre-production phase and it is currently used only by internal users (CMCC researchers and climate scientists). The most important component already available in the CMCC DDC is the Search Engine which allows users to perform, through web interfaces, distributed search and discovery activities by introducing one or more of the following search criteria: horizontal extent (which can be specified by interacting with a geographic map), vertical extent, temporal extent, keywords, topics, creation date, etc. By means of this page the user submits the first step of the query process on the metadata DB, then, she can choose one or more datasets retrieving and displaying the complete XML metadata description (from the browser). This way, the second step of the query process is carried out by accessing to a specific XML document of the metadata DB. Finally, through the web interface, the user can access to and download (partially or totally) the data stored on the storage device accessing to OPeNDAP servers and to other available grid storage interfaces. Requests concerning datasets stored in deep storage will be served asynchronously.

  4. Agriculture--Horticulture. Kit No. 36. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Claudia

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on horticulture are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focus on the vocational area of agriculture. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home economics,…

  5. An Introduction to the Sexual Reproduction of Flowering Plants. Ornamental Horticulture I, Lesson Plan No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ideoka, Keith

    Developed as part of a 90-hour high school course in ornamental horticulture, this 50-minute lesson plan is designed to explain the process of pollination and fertilization of flowering plants. The lesson plan begins with information on the course for which the lesson was designed; equipment and audio-visual aids needed; required student…

  6. Meeting the Needs of Students Who Plan Careers in Ornamental Horticulture Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Due to increasing urbanization of the area, focus of the vocational agriculture department at Zachary High School, near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has changed from production agriculture to ornamental horticulture. The area supervisor describes the facilities for student instruction and work experience in the school's greenhouses and grounds. (MF)

  7. Horticulture Mechanics Course Outline. Teacher Education Series, Vol. 15, No. 1t.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Lee P.; And Others

    The document provides 17 outlines of brief instructional units in mechanics, which are intended for incorporation into an existing program of study in ornamental horticulture at the secondary or postsecondary level. To facilitate the flexible use of the outlines, a grid is presented on which seven occupational areas (such as aboriculture,…

  8. Horticulture Materials for Agricultural Education Programs. Core Agricultural Education Curriculum, Central Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Office of Agricultural Communications and Education.

    This curriculum guide contains five units with relevant problem areas for horticulture. These problem areas have been selected as suggested areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for secondary students enrolled in an agricultural education program. Each problem area includes some or all of the following components: related problem…

  9. Core II Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs. Units G-L.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This second volume of a 2-volume curriculum guide contains 12 problem areas selected as suggested areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for 10th-grade or second-year students enrolled in a metropolitan agriculture program. The 12 problem areas are divided into 5 units: Growing and Managing Horticultural Crops (4 problem areas),…

  10. ESTABLISHING AND CARING FOR LAWNS AND TURF. HORTICULTURE-SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE NO. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO PREPARE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR HORTICULTURE SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, THIS MODULE HAS AS ITS MAJOR OBJECTIVE TO DEVELOP THE ABILITY TO ESTABLISH AND MAINTAIN LAWNS AND TURF. IT WAS DEVELOPED ON THE BASIS OF DATA FROM STATE STUDIES BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE. SUBJECT MATTER AREAS ARE NEW LAWN ESTABLISHMENT, LAWN MAINTENANCE,…

  11. COMPARISON OF CERTAIN ABILITIES NEEDED BY WORKERS IN LICENSED NURSERIES AND LICENSED ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE BUSINESSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DILLON, ROY D.

    THIS STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT TO WHICH WORKERS WITH THE JOB TITLES OF GENERAL DIRECTORS, SALESMEN, SUPERVISORS, AND FIELD WORKERS IN LICENSED NURSERIES NEEDED AGRICULTURALLY ORIENTED KNOWLEDGE OF THE SAME KIND AND LEVEL AS WORKERS IN COMPARABLE JOB TITLES IN ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE BUSINESSES. DATA WERE COLLECTED BY PERSONAL…

  12. Second International Symposium on Plant Genetic Resources of Horticultural Crops - Volume I

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Second International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS) Symposium on Plant Genetic Resources was sponsored by the Commission on Plant Genetic Resources (PGR), Plant Genebank Management Working Group, and co-sponsored by broad coverage of additional ISHS Sections of Fruits, Vegetables, Orna...

  13. Second International Symposium on Plant Genetic Resources of Horticultural Crops - Volume 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Second International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS) Symposium on Plant Genetic Resources was sponsored by the Commission on Plant Genetic Resources (PGR), Plant Genebank Management Working Group, and co-sponsored by broad coverage of additional ISHS Sections of Fruits, Vegetables, Orna...

  14. 4-H Horticulture Project Activity Guides. Leader's Guide and Units 1-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This document, concerning the 4-H horticulture project, includes a leader's guide and three youth activity guides. The leader's guide can be used to plan group project meetings that are both fun and educational. Activities can be adapted to various age groups. The leader's guide includes basic information for growing plants indoors and outdoors,…

  15. Larvae of five horticulturally important species of Chrysopodes (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae): shared generic features, descriptions and keys

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia S.; Tauber, Catherine A.; Albuquerque, Gilberto S.; Tauber, Maurice J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract An expanded list of generic level larval characteristics is presented for Chrysopodes; it includes a reinterpretation of the mesothoracic and metathoracic structure and setation. Keys, descriptions and images of Semaphoront A (first instar) and Semaphoront B (second and third instars) are offered for identifying five species of Chrysopodes (Chrysopodes) that are commonly reported from horticultural habitats in the Neotropical region. PMID:23653514

  16. Evaluation of Resistance of Horticultural Plants to Destabilizing Effects Based on Analysis of Leaf Reflection Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, A. N.; Borzykh, N. V.; Butenko, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The influences of thermal effects and salinization on visible and near-IR reflection spectra of horticultural plant leaves with different drought and salt resistance are examined. An integral criterion for evaluating the susceptibility of the plants to stressors is based on measuring the distance between reflectance curves.

  17. An Analysis of Agriculture and Horticulture Programs at Illinois Public Community Colleges. Accountability Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    Prepared as part of a state program review, this report presents results from a review undertaken of all agriculture and horticulture programs at Illinois public community colleges for fiscal year 1995. The first part focuses on the four agricultural programs reviewed: Agricultural Business and Management; Agricultural Production, Workers, and…

  18. Nebraska Vocational Agribusiness Curriculum for City Schools. Horticulture. Agricultural Mechanics. A Curriculum Guide. 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    Designed for use with high school juniors, this agribusiness curriculum for city schools contains thirty-two units of instruction in the areas of horticulture and agricultural mechanics. Among the units included in the curriculum are (1) Planting Media, (2) Fertilizer, (3) Plant Classification, (4) Turf Grass Management, (5) Landscape Design, (6)…

  19. Primary-care based participatory rehabilitation: users’ views of a horticultural and arts project

    PubMed Central

    Barley, Elizabeth A; Robinson, Susan; Sikorski, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Background Participation in horticulture and arts may improve wellbeing in those with mental and physical illness. Aim To conduct an in-depth exploration of the views and experience of participants of a primary-care-based horticultural and participatory arts rehabilitation project (Sydenham Garden). Design and setting Qualitative interview study of a primary-care-based horticultural and participatory arts rehabilitation project in South London. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 participants (referred to as ‘coworkers’) of Sydenham Garden. Seven were female. Participants were aged between 38 and 91 years and had a range of severe mental and physical health problems; most had depression. The interviews were analysed using constant comparison and thematic analysis. Results Data were overwhelmingly positive concerning participation. Coworkers considered participation in the project to promote wellbeing by providing purposeful and enjoyable activity and interest, improving mood and self-perceptions, and providing an escape from life’s pressures. Being outdoors was considered therapeutic. The most-valued aspect of participation was the social contact derived as a result of it. Many of the coworkers who were interviewed developed transferable skills, including nationally recognised qualifications, which they valued highly. Conclusion Delivery of horticultural therapy and participatory arts is a feasible model for improving wellbeing in patients in primary care who have serious illness. Longer-term studies are needed to address what happens to people after leaving such projects. PMID:22520790

  20. Effects of Horticultural Therapy on Psychosocial Health in Older Nursing Home Residents: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Min; Ji, Jeng-Yi

    2015-09-01

    This preliminary study examined the effect of horticultural therapy on psychosocial health in older nursing home residents. A combined quantitative and qualitative design was adopted. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 10 older residents from a nursing home in Taichung, Taiwan. Participants joined a 10-week indoor horticultural program once a week, with each session lasting for about 1.5 hours. A single-group design with multiple measurements was adopted for the quantitative component of this study. Interviews held 1-2 days before the intervention (T0) were used to collect baseline data. The two outcome variables of this study, depression and loneliness, were reassessed during the 5th (T1) and 10th (T2) weeks of the intervention. Generalized estimating equations were used to test the mean differences among T0, T1, and T2 measures. After the 10-week program, qualitative data were collected by asking participants to share their program participation experiences. The results of generalized estimating equation showed significant improvements in depression and loneliness. Four categories emerged from the qualitative data content analysis: social connection, anticipation and hope, sense of achievement, and companionship. Given the beneficial effects of the horticulture therapy, the inclusion of horticultural activities in nursing home activity programs is recommended. PMID:25534575

  1. Evaluation of biochar-anaerobic potato digestate mixtures as renewable components of horticultural potting media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various formulations are used in horticultural potting media, with sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite and perlite currently among the most common components. We are examining a dried anaerobic digestate remaining after the fermentation of potato processing wastes to replace organic components such as p...

  2. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    PubMed

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist. PMID:26826952

  3. The risk of cryptorchidism among sons of women working in horticulture in Denmark: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Androgens are crucial for normal testicular descent. Studies show that some pesticides have estrogenic or antiandrogenic effects, and that female workers exposed to pesticides have increased risk of having a boy with cryptorchidism. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether pregnant women exposed to pesticides due to their work in horticulture experience excess risk of having sons with cryptorchidism. Methods We conducted a cohort study of pregnant women working in horticulture using four cohorts including one cohort established with data from the departments of occupational medicine in Jutland and Funen and three existing mother-child cohorts (n = 1,468). A reference group was established from the entire Danish population of boys born in the period of 1986-2007 (n = 783,817). Nationwide Danish health registers provided information on birth outcome, cryptorchidism diagnosis and orchiopexy. The level of occupational exposure to pesticides was assessed by expert judgment blinded towards outcome status. Risk of cryptorchidism among exposed horticulture workers compared to the background population and to unexposed horticulture workers was assessed by Cox regression models. Results Pesticide exposed women employed in horticulture had a hazard ratio (HR) of having cryptorchid sons of 1.39 (95% CI 0.84; 2.31) and a HR of orchiopexy of 1.34 (0.72; 2.49) compared to the background population. Analysis divided into separate cohorts revealed a significantly increased risk of cryptorchidism in cohort 2: HR 2.58 (1.07;6.20) and increased risk of orchiopexy in cohort 4: HR 2.76 (1.03;7.35), but no significant associations in the other cohorts. Compared to unexposed women working in horticulture, pesticide exposed women had a risk of having sons with cryptorchidism of 1.34 (0.30; 5.96) and of orchiopexy of 1.93 (0.24;15.4). Conclusions The data are compatible with a slightly increased risk of cryptorchidism in sons of women exposed to

  4. Phenotypic plasticity of stem water potential correlates with crop load in horticultural trees.

    PubMed

    Sadras, Victor O; Trentacoste, Eduardo R

    2011-05-01

    Conceptual models accounting for the influence of source:sink ratio on water relations of trees are theoretically relevant from a physiological perspective and practically important for irrigation scheduling. Midday stem water potential of horticultural trees often declines with increasing crop load but the actual response depends on environmental, management and plant factors. Here we advance a quantitative synthesis of the response of stem water potential to crop load from the perspective of phenotypic plasticity, defined as 'the amount by which the expression of individual characteristics of a genotype are changed by different environments'. Data sets of stem water potential for contrasting crop loads were compiled for apple (Malus domestica L. Borkh.), olive (Olea europea L.), peach (Prunus persica L.), pear (Pyrus communis L.) and plum (Prunus domestica L.). Phenotypic plasticity of stem water potential was calculated as the slope of the linear regression between stem water potential for each crop load and the environmental mean of stem water potential across crop loads. Regression lines for trees with different crop load diverged with decreasing environmental mean stem water potential. For the pooled data, plasticity of stem water potential was a linear function of relative crop load. This represents a significant shift in perspective: the effect of crop load on the trait per se (stem water potential) is environmentally contingent, but the effect of crop load on the plasticity of the trait is not. We conclude that research on the effects of crop load on tree water relations would return more robust results if plant traits are considered from the dual perspective of the trait per se and its plasticity.

  5. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  6. Wycheproof Education Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetnam and Godfrey, Melbourne (Australia).

    The Wycheproof township in New South Wales (Australia) is the regional center for a grain farming community. The Wycheproof Education Centre was formed by the merger of a separate primary and secondary school (on one site with existing buildings), into a single governing body that is educationally structured into junior, middle, and senior…

  7. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  8. The GSO Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, F.; Glorian, J.-M.; Génot, V.; Rouillard, A.; Petit, P.; Palacios, A.; Caux, E.; Wakelam, V.

    2015-12-01

    Hereafter we describe the activities of the Grand Sud-Ouest Data Centre operated for INSU (CNRS) by the OMP--IRAP and the Université Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, in a collaboration with the OASU--LAB in Bordeaux and OREME--LUPM in Montpellier.

  9. Discovering a Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullagh, John; Stewart, James; Greenwood, Julian

    2007-01-01

    There has recently been a growth in the popularity of "science centres" and this development provides an excellent opportunity to support the primary science curriculum. Their use is therefore well worth including within initial teacher education courses. Hence, undergraduate student teachers at Stranmillis University College Belfast may now…

  10. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  11. Citrus Disease Research and Development Trust Fund Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Buchanan, Vern [R-FL-16

    2013-02-27

    03/13/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  13. Elderly Care Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  14. Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Haiyan

    Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique is promising for determining the optical properties and quality attributes of horticultural and food products. However, considerable challenges still exist for accurate determination of spectral absorption and scattering properties from intact horticultural products. The objective of this research was, therefore, to develop and optimize hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products. Monte Carlo simulations and experiments for model samples of known optical properties were performed to optimize the inverse algorithm of a single-layer diffusion model and the optical designs, for extracting the absorption (micro a) and reduced scattering (micros') coefficients from spatially-resolved reflectance profiles. The logarithm and integral data transformation and the relative weighting methods were found to greatly improve the parameter estimation accuracy with the relative errors of 10.4%, 10.7%, and 11.4% for micro a, and 6.6%, 7.0%, and 7.1% for micros', respectively. More accurate measurements of optical properties were obtained when the light beam was of Gaussian type with the diameter of less than 1 mm, and the minimum and maximum source-detector distances were 1.5 mm and 10--20 transport mean free paths, respectively. An optical property measuring prototype was built, based on the optimization results, and evaluated for automatic measurement of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients for the wavelengths of 500--1,000 nm. The instrument was used to measure the optical properties, and assess quality/maturity, of 500 'Redstar' peaches and 1039 'Golden Delicious' (GD) and 1040 'Delicious' (RD) apples. A separate study was also conducted on confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopic image analysis and compression test of fruit tissue specimens to measure the structural and mechanical properties of 'Golden

  15. International Seismological Centre

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.; Hughes, A.

    1979-01-01

    The International Seismological Centre had its origins when the British seismologist Professor John Milne returned to England from Japan in 1895 to retire at Shide on the Isle of Eight. In cooperation with the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Milne had set up a number of seismographic stations around the world and, while Tokyo, had published a Catalogue of 8,33 Earthquakes Recorded in Japan, 1885-1892. 

  16. Reduction of energy usage in postharvest horticulture through management of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Wills, Ron B H; Golding, John B

    2015-05-01

    Cool chain management is the preferred technology to extend the postharvest life of horticultural produce, but with rising energy costs and community pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, there is a need to use less energy-intensive technologies. Minimising the level of ethylene around horticultural produce inhibits ripening and senescence and therefore has the potential to reduce the use of refrigeration. The long-distance transport of bananas within Australia and from Central America to Europe is used as a case study to show that the need for refrigeration could be reduced if the appropriate concentrations of ethylene were maintained around fruit during transit. Data are also presented to show a similar benefit of ethylene control with green beans, as well as another study showing that apples treated with the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene could be stored at a higher temperature without loss of quality to the consumer. The range of technologies available to manage ethylene levels is discussed. PMID:25257862

  17. Soil microbial community analysis of between no-till and tillage in a controlled horticultural field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung Koo; Kim, Min Keun; Seo, Youn Won; Choi, Kyung Ju; Lee, Seong Tae; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Lee, Young Han

    2012-04-01

    The present study evaluated the changes of soil microbial communities that were subjected to no-till and compared the results to those subject to tillage for organic farming in a controlled horticultural field by fatty acid methyl ester. Fungi (P < 0.001), gram-positive bacteria (P < 0.001), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (P < 0.01), and actinomycetes (P < 0.01) in the no-till soils were significantly larger than those in the tillage soils. The no-till in the subsoil had a significantly lower ratio of cy17:0 to 16:1ω7c compared to that of tillage, indicating that microbial stress decreased because the soils were not disturbed (P < 0.05). Fungi should be considered as a potential factor responsible for the obvious microbial community differentiation that was observed between the no-till and tillage areas in a controlled horticultural field.

  18. Kasza: design of a closed water system for the greenhouse horticulture.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, Raphaël T; Voogt, Wim; Pickhardt, Pieter W

    2008-01-01

    The need for a closed and sustainable water system in greenhouse areas is stimulated by the implementation in the Netherlands of the European Framework Directive. The Dutch national project Kasza: Design of a Closed Water System for the Greenhouse Horticulture will provide information how the water system in a greenhouse horticulture area can be closed. In this paper the conceptual design of two systems to close the water cycle in a greenhouse area is described. The first system with reverse osmosis system can be used in areas where desalination is required in order to be able to use the recycle water for irrigation of all crops. The second system with advanced oxidation using UV and peroxide can be applied in areas with more salt tolerant crops and good (low sodium) water sources for irrigation. Both systems are financially feasible in new greenhouse areas with substantial available recycle water.

  19. Reduction of energy usage in postharvest horticulture through management of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Wills, Ron B H; Golding, John B

    2015-05-01

    Cool chain management is the preferred technology to extend the postharvest life of horticultural produce, but with rising energy costs and community pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, there is a need to use less energy-intensive technologies. Minimising the level of ethylene around horticultural produce inhibits ripening and senescence and therefore has the potential to reduce the use of refrigeration. The long-distance transport of bananas within Australia and from Central America to Europe is used as a case study to show that the need for refrigeration could be reduced if the appropriate concentrations of ethylene were maintained around fruit during transit. Data are also presented to show a similar benefit of ethylene control with green beans, as well as another study showing that apples treated with the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene could be stored at a higher temperature without loss of quality to the consumer. The range of technologies available to manage ethylene levels is discussed.

  20. Current and potential trade in horticultural products irradiated for phytosanitary purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos-Griffin, Emilia; Hallman, Guy J.; Griffin, Robert L.

    2012-08-01

    The current status of trade in horticultural products irradiated for phytosanitary purposes is examined, including trends, strengths and weaknesses. A strategy is proposed to take advantage of the best future opportunities for increasing trade in irradiated horticultural products by identifying best possibilities for expanding both the number and volume of commodities for irradiation and then applying appropriate business criteria in a general analysis of the commodities, commercial scenarios, and geographic regions where the greatest potential exists for expansion. The results show that fresh fruits such as mango, papaya, citrus, grapes, and vegetables such as tomatoes, onions, asparagus, garlic, and peppers from Asia and the Americas show the greatest potential. Substantial opportunities for additional growth exist, especially as regulatory conditions become more favorable.

  1. Wastewater treatment by a modular, domestic-scale reedbed system for safe horticultural irrigation.

    PubMed

    Derry, Chris; Maheshwari, Basant

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the sequential treatment performance of a commercial, domestic-scale modular reedbed system intended to provide safe horticultural irrigation water. Previously only mechanical treatment systems involving forced aeration with subsequent disinfection, usually by tablet-chlorination, had been accredited in Australia. The modular design of the hybrid, subsurface-flow reedbed system offered 5 control points where monitoring and management of the treatment train could be carried out. Ten chemical parameters (chemical and biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, nitrite nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, total nitrogen, dissolved oxygen percentage saturation and suspended solids) and 4 microbial parameters (total coliform, Escherichia coli, enterococci and Clostridium perfringens) reached satisfactory levels as a result of the treatment process. Health requirements for safe horticultural irrigation were met by the outlet of the second reedbed, providing a high level of treatment-backup capacity in terms of the remaining 2 reedbeds. This suggested that chlorination was a redundant backup precaution in treating irrigation water to the acceptable regional guideline level for all horticultural uses, including the spray irrigation of salad crops eaten raw.

  2. Co-composting of horticultural waste with fruit peels, food waste, and soybean residues.

    PubMed

    Choy, Sing Ying; Wang, Ke; Qi, Wei; Wang, Ben; Chen, Chia-Lung; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Horticultural waste was co-composted with fruit peels, food waste, and soybean residues individually to evaluate the effects of these easily available organic wastes in Singapore on the composting process and product quality. Each co-composting material was mixed with horticultural waste in the wet weight ratio of 1:1 and composted for 46 days. Results showed that all co-composting materials accelerated the degradation of total carbon and resulted in higher nutrients of nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and potassium (K) in the final product compared with horticultural waste alone. Mixture with fruit peels achieved the fastest total carbon loss; however, did not reach the minimum required temperature for pathogen destruction. The end product was found to be the best source for K and had a higher pH that could be used for the remediation of acidic soil. Food waste resulted in the highest available nitrate (NO3-N) content in the end product, but caused high salt content, total coliforms, and slower total carbon loss initially. Soybean residues were found to be the best co-composting material to produce compost with high N, P, and K when compared with other materials due to the highest temperature, fastest total carbon loss, fastest reduction in C/N ratio, and best conservation of nutrients.

  3. Co-composting of horticultural waste with fruit peels, food waste, and soybean residues.

    PubMed

    Choy, Sing Ying; Wang, Ke; Qi, Wei; Wang, Ben; Chen, Chia-Lung; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Horticultural waste was co-composted with fruit peels, food waste, and soybean residues individually to evaluate the effects of these easily available organic wastes in Singapore on the composting process and product quality. Each co-composting material was mixed with horticultural waste in the wet weight ratio of 1:1 and composted for 46 days. Results showed that all co-composting materials accelerated the degradation of total carbon and resulted in higher nutrients of nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and potassium (K) in the final product compared with horticultural waste alone. Mixture with fruit peels achieved the fastest total carbon loss; however, did not reach the minimum required temperature for pathogen destruction. The end product was found to be the best source for K and had a higher pH that could be used for the remediation of acidic soil. Food waste resulted in the highest available nitrate (NO3-N) content in the end product, but caused high salt content, total coliforms, and slower total carbon loss initially. Soybean residues were found to be the best co-composting material to produce compost with high N, P, and K when compared with other materials due to the highest temperature, fastest total carbon loss, fastest reduction in C/N ratio, and best conservation of nutrients. PMID:25650141

  4. The Centre Program for Project Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, William H., III

    Reported is a research and development program, Project Opportunity, which involved 11 high schools in eight Southern states. Sponsors and participants were the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the Ford Foundation, Berea, Centre, and Transylvania Colleges, the schools systems of Breathitt and Lee Counties and the Princeton, N.J., High…

  5. Vision ergonomics at recycling centres.

    PubMed

    Hemphälä, Hillevi; Kihlstedt, Annika; Eklund, Jörgen

    2010-05-01

    All municipalities in Sweden offer their inhabitants a service for disposing of large-size and hazardous waste at local recycling centres. Opening hours at these centres include hours of darkness. The aims of this study were to 1) describe user and employee experiences of lighting and signs at Swedish recycling centres, 2) measure and assess the lighting system at the two recently built recycling centres in Linköping and to assess the legibility and visibility of the signs used and 3) propose recommendations regarding lighting and signs for recycling centres. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess experiences of employees and users, and light measurements were performed. By observing users, activities with different visual demands at different areas within the recycling centres were identified. Based on the literature, standards and stakeholder experiences, recommendations regarding lighting systems and sign design, illuminance, luminance and uniformity are proposed for recycling centres.

  6. From gene to structure: The protein factory of the NBICS Centre of Kurchatov Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Boyko, K. M.; Lipkin, A. V.; Popov, V. O. Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-05-15

    The Protein Factory was established at the Centre for Nano, Bio, Info, Cognitive, and Social Sciences and Technologies (NBICS Centre) of the National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute' in 2010. The Protein Factory, together with the Centre for Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology, promote research on structural biology. This paper presents the technology platforms developed at the Protein Factory and the facilities available for researchers. The main projects currently being performed at the Protein Factory are briefly described.

  7. Centrosomes as signalling centres

    PubMed Central

    Arquint, Christian; Gabryjonczyk, Anna-Maria; Nigg, Erich A.

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes—as well as the related spindle pole bodies (SPBs) of yeast—have been extensively studied from the perspective of their microtubule-organizing roles. Moreover, the biogenesis and duplication of these organelles have been the subject of much attention, and the importance of centrosomes and the centriole–ciliary apparatus for human disease is well recognized. Much less developed is our understanding of another facet of centrosomes and SPBs, namely their possible role as signalling centres. Yet, many signalling components, including kinases and phosphatases, have been associated with centrosomes and spindle poles, giving rise to the hypothesis that these organelles might serve as hubs for the integration and coordination of signalling pathways. In this review, we discuss a number of selected studies that bear on this notion. We cover different processes (cell cycle control, development, DNA damage response) and organisms (yeast, invertebrates and vertebrates), but have made no attempt to be comprehensive. This field is still young and although the concept of centrosomes and SPBs as signalling centres is attractive, it remains primarily a concept—in need of further scrutiny. We hope that this review will stimulate thought and experimentation. PMID:25047618

  8. Data Centres In The Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, F.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy has been at the forefront for the development of on-line services, and astronomers routinely retrieve data from observatory archives, information from value-added services provided by data centres, and bibliography from the ADS and electronic journals. The Virtual Observatory aims at going one step further by providing astronomers with seamless and transparent access to data and services, and data centres with a framework to publish their data and services. Many teams size the opportunity and express their willingness to provide VO services in their domains of expertise, such as data compilations or specific tools, including theory data and services. The VO allows astronomers to discover and use resources of interest for their research, and specific tools can be interfaced with more general VO portals. This means that even small teams can have a significant contribution if they choose the proper niche. VO projects are organising themselves to help these new data centres to uptake the VO framework. Traditional data centres also have a role to play in explaining the constraints linked to service quality and sustainability. The VO "Data Centre Alliance" opens exciting new prospects for increasing the sharing of knowledge throughout the community.

  9. Efficacy of several insecticides alone and with horticultural mineral oils on light brown apple moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) eggs.

    PubMed

    Taverner, Peter D; Sutton, Clay; Cunningham, Nancy M; Dyson, Chris; Lucas, Nola; Myers, Scott W

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the research was to identify efficacious and less environmentally harmful treatments than the standard chlorpyrifos sprays used for the control light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), eggs on nursery stock. A series of dip experiments showed a range of responses when comparing the efficacy of insecticides on egg hatch of E. postvittana. The insecticides that compared most favorably with chlorpyrifos were lamda-cyhalothrin and gamma-cyhalothrin, and thiacloprid. Indoxacarb, novaluron, and spinosad caused significant mortality only when combined with All Seasons mineral oil. All Seasons, showed ovicidal properties when evaluated alone and demonstrated adjuvant properties when combined with the above-mentioned insecticides, except gamma-cyhalothrin and thiacloprid. Several other horticultural mineral oils performed similarly, except the efficacy of spinosad varied with the oil product used, suggesting that the oil type selected is important for some insecticide and oil combinations. Several insecticides evaluated in this study are likely candidates for further work to develop treatments against E. postvittana eggs on nursery plants. Mineral oils are ovicidal and combinations with insecticides are likely to be advantageous.

  10. An exploration of spousal separation and adaptation to long-term disability: six elderly couples engaged in a horticultural programme.

    PubMed

    Martin, Linda; Miranda, Baldwin; Bean, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to explore the impact of separation on couples where one spouse lives in a skilled nursing facility and the other spouse lives alone in the community. Six couples participated in a 10-week gardening group. Semi-structured interviews were conducted at the beginning of the study and observations were made and discussions engaged through the 10-week horticultural programme. Thematic analysis of interviews and discussions revealed reduced social participation of community-dwelling spouses in an effort to maintain their marital role. In one or more cases the non-institutionalized spouse adapted to separation by developing social roles and relationships within the skilled nursing facility and continuing as a caregiver to their spouse. Occupational therapists are encouraged to include spouses in programmes to nurture healthy spousal roles. Further research is needed to explore how elderly couples may support each other through purposeful occupation while one spouse is in a long-term care facility.

  11. Centre Computer Base for Visually Handicapped Children, Students and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The Centre Computer Base is a list of hardware which can effectively operate the software of the Research Centre for the Education of the Visually Handicapped. Essential hardware contained on the list is described, along with a variety of "add-on" devices such as joysticks, touch-screens, speech synthesizers, braille embossers, etc. (Author/JDD)

  12. Child-Centred Inquiry Learning: How Mathematics Understanding Emerges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calder, Nigel; Brough, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how mathematical understandings might emerge through student-centred inquiry. Data is drawn from a research project on student-centred curriculum integration that situated mathematics within authentic problem-solving contexts and involved students in collaboratively constructed curriculum. The project involved case studies in…

  13. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction at the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland: diverse problems, diverse perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hakkarainen, Pekka; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Kuoppasalmi, Kimmo; Tigerstedt, Christoffer

    2012-10-01

    The Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction started operations on 1 January 2009, when the National Institute of Public Health (KTL) and the National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES) were merged. The newly formed institute, called the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), operates under the Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. The scope of the research and preventive work conducted in the Department covers alcohol, drugs, tobacco and gambling issues. The two main tasks of the Department are (i) to research, produce and disseminate information on alcohol and drugs, substance use, addictions and their social and health-related effects and (ii) to develop prevention and good practices with a view to counteracting the onset and development of alcohol and drug problems and the damaging effects of smoking and other addictions. The number of staff hovers at approximately 60 people. The Department is organized into three units, one specialized in social sciences (the Alcohol and Drug Research Unit), another in laboratory analytics (the Alcohol and Drug Analytics Unit) and the third primarily in preventive work (the Addiction Prevention Unit). These units incorporate a rich variety and long traditions of both research and preventive work. The mixture of different disciplines creates good opportunities for interdisciplinary research projects and collaboration within the Department. Also, the fact that in the same administrative context there are both researchers and people specialized in preventive work opens up interesting possibilities for combining efforts from these two branches. Nationally, the Department is a key player in all its fields of interest. It engages in a great deal of cooperation both nationally and internationally, and among its strengths are the high-quality, regularly collected long-term data sets.

  14. Polyethylene film incorporation into the horticultural soil of small periurban production units in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laura; Berenstein, Giselle; Hughes, Enrique A; Zalts, Anita; Montserrat, Javier M

    2015-08-01

    Horticulture makes intensive use of soil and extensive use of polyethylene (PE) sheeting and pesticides, producing an environment where the dynamics between soil and plastics can affect pesticide fate. We have determined that the presence of plastic residues in the horticultural soil of small production units equals 10% of the soil area, being meso and macro-sections the predominant fragment sizes. All soil samples were taken from different plots located in Cuartel V, Moreno district, in the suburbs of Buenos Aires city, Argentina. Laboratory experiments were conducted to see the relations among pesticide, soil and PE film. Endosulfan recovery from LDPE films (25μm and 100μm) was studied, observing evidence that indicated migration to the inside of the plastic matrix. To further analyze the dynamics of pesticide migration to soil and atmosphere, experiments using chlorpyrifos, procymidone and trifluralin were performed in soil-plastic-atmosphere microenvironments, showing that up to 24h significant amounts of pesticides moved away from the PE film. To determine whether PE residues could act as potential pesticide collector in soil, column elution experiments were done using chlorpyrifos, procymidone and trifluralin. Results showed an important pesticide accumulation in the mulch film (584μg-2284μg pesticide/g plastic) compared to soil (13μg-32μg pesticide/g soil). Finally, chemical and photochemical degradation of deltamethrin adsorbed in PE film was studied, finding a protective effect on hydrolysis but no protective effect on photodegradation. We believe that a deeper understanding of the dynamics among soil, plastic and pesticides in horticultural productive systems may contribute to alert for the implications of PE use for plastic sheeting.

  15. Should "Teacher Centred Teaching" Replace "Student Centred Learning"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Patrick D.

    2008-01-01

    Mission statements of most HEIs across the UK support "student centred learning". In this paper, it is suggested that "teacher centred teaching" should also have a major role to play, improving the quality of the learning experience in higher education. Students are extremely diverse in their skills, weaknesses, and learning styles, but lecturers…

  16. Japanese plums (Prunus salicina Lindl.) and phytochemicals--breeding, horticultural practice, postharvest storage, processing and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Kent J; Topp, Bruce; Russell, Dougal; Stanley, Roger; Netzel, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Previous reviews of plum phytochemical content and health benefits have concentrated on the European plum, Prunus domestica L. However, the potential bioactivity of red- and dark red-fleshed Japanese plums, Prunus salicina Lindl., so-called blood plums, appears to warrant a significant increase in exposure, as indicated in a recent review of the whole Prunus genus. Furthermore, Japanese plums are the predominant plum produced on an international basis. In this review the nutrient and phytochemical content, breeding, horticultural practice, postharvest treatment and processing as well as bioactivity (emphasising in vivo studies) of Japanese plum are considered, with a focus on the anthocyanin content that distinguishes the blood plums.

  17. Light-emitting diode technology status and directions: Opportunities for horticultural lighting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Pattison, P. Morgan; Krames, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Here, light-emitting diode (LED) technology has advanced rapidly over the last decade, primarily driven by display and general illumination applications ("solid-state lighting (SSL) for humans"). These advancements have made LED lighting technically and economically advantageous not only for these applications, but also, as an indirect benefit, for adjacent applications such as horticultural lighting ("SSL for plants"). Moreover, LED technology has much room for continued improvement. In the near-term, these improvements will continue to be driven by SSL for humans (with indirect benefit to SSL for plants), the most important of which can be anticipated.

  18. Nitrification of leachates from manure composting under field conditions and their use in horticulture.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Rafaela; Magrí, Albert; Marfà, Oriol

    2015-10-01

    This work aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of nitrification applied to the treatment of leachates formed during composting of cattle and pig manure in order to promote their further use as liquid fertilizer in horticulture. Nitrification trials were successfully conducted in summer and winter seasons under Mediterranean climate conditions. Subsequently, effect of using the nitrified effluents as nutritive solution in the fertigation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) was assessed in terms of productivity and nutrient uptake. Similar productivities were obtained when using the nitrified effluents and a standard nutritive solution. However, results also evidenced high nutrient uptake, which indicates that dosage should be adjusted to culture requirements. PMID:26239938

  19. Nitrification of leachates from manure composting under field conditions and their use in horticulture.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Rafaela; Magrí, Albert; Marfà, Oriol

    2015-10-01

    This work aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of nitrification applied to the treatment of leachates formed during composting of cattle and pig manure in order to promote their further use as liquid fertilizer in horticulture. Nitrification trials were successfully conducted in summer and winter seasons under Mediterranean climate conditions. Subsequently, effect of using the nitrified effluents as nutritive solution in the fertigation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) was assessed in terms of productivity and nutrient uptake. Similar productivities were obtained when using the nitrified effluents and a standard nutritive solution. However, results also evidenced high nutrient uptake, which indicates that dosage should be adjusted to culture requirements.

  20. Object oriented classification of high resolution data for inventory of horticultural crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbar, R.; Ravishankar, H. M.; Trivedi, S.; Subramoniam, S. R.; Uday, R.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    High resolution satellite images are associated with large variance and thus, per pixel classifiers often result in poor accuracy especially in delineation of horticultural crops. In this context, object oriented techniques are powerful and promising methods for classification. In the present study, a semi-automatic object oriented feature extraction model has been used for delineation of horticultural fruit and plantation crops using Erdas Objective Imagine. Multi-resolution data from Resourcesat LISS-IV and Cartosat-1 have been used as source data in the feature extraction model. Spectral and textural information along with NDVI were used as inputs for generation of Spectral Feature Probability (SFP) layers using sample training pixels. The SFP layers were then converted into raster objects using threshold and clump function resulting in pixel probability layer. A set of raster and vector operators was employed in the subsequent steps for generating thematic layer in the vector format. This semi-automatic feature extraction model was employed for classification of major fruit and plantations crops viz., mango, banana, citrus, coffee and coconut grown under different agro-climatic conditions. In general, the classification accuracy of about 75-80 per cent was achieved for these crops using object based classification alone and the same was further improved using minimal visual editing of misclassified areas. A comparison of on-screen visual interpretation with object oriented approach showed good agreement. It was observed that old and mature plantations were classified more accurately while young and recently planted ones (3 years or less) showed poor classification accuracy due to mixed spectral signature, wider spacing and poor stands of plantations. The results indicated the potential use of object oriented approach for classification of high resolution data for delineation of horticultural fruit and plantation crops. The present methodology is applicable at

  1. Determinants of recycling common types of plastic product waste in environmental horticulture industry: The case of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ting; Klepacka, Anna M; Florkowski, Wojciech J; Braman, Kristine

    2016-02-01

    Environmental horticulture firms provide a variety of commercial/residential landscape products and services encompassing ornamental plant production, design, installation, and maintenance. The companies generate tons of waste including plastic containers, trays, and greenhouse/field covers, creating the need to reduce and utilize plastic waste. Based on survey data collected in Georgia in 2013, this paper investigates determinants of the environmental horticulture firms' recycling decision (plastic containers, flats, and greenhouse poly). Our findings indicate that the decision to discard vs. recycle plastic containers, flats, and greenhouse poly is significantly influenced by firm scope, size, location, and partnership with recycling providers, as well as whether recycling providers offer additional waste pickup services. Insights from this study are of use to local governments and environmental organizations interested in increasing horticultural firm participation in recycling programs and lowering the volume of plastic destined for landfills.

  2. Determinants of recycling common types of plastic product waste in environmental horticulture industry: The case of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ting; Klepacka, Anna M; Florkowski, Wojciech J; Braman, Kristine

    2016-02-01

    Environmental horticulture firms provide a variety of commercial/residential landscape products and services encompassing ornamental plant production, design, installation, and maintenance. The companies generate tons of waste including plastic containers, trays, and greenhouse/field covers, creating the need to reduce and utilize plastic waste. Based on survey data collected in Georgia in 2013, this paper investigates determinants of the environmental horticulture firms' recycling decision (plastic containers, flats, and greenhouse poly). Our findings indicate that the decision to discard vs. recycle plastic containers, flats, and greenhouse poly is significantly influenced by firm scope, size, location, and partnership with recycling providers, as well as whether recycling providers offer additional waste pickup services. Insights from this study are of use to local governments and environmental organizations interested in increasing horticultural firm participation in recycling programs and lowering the volume of plastic destined for landfills. PMID:26626810

  3. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Commemoration of the centenary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 February 2009; Joint session of the Research Council of the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Rosatom State Corporation, 18 March 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalatnikov, Isaak M.; Fortov, Vladimir E.; Makarov, Aleksandr A.; Fridman, Aleksei M.; Martynenko, Yurii V.

    2009-12-01

    The scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) devoted to the centenary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich was held on 18 February 2009 in the conference hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Khalatnikov I M (L D Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region) "Nonaccidental coincidences (Lev Andreevich Artsimovich)"; (2) Pashinin P P (A M Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow) "L A Artsimovich and inertial thermonuclear fusion"; (3) Fortov V E (Institute of Thermophysics of Extreme States of the Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RAS, Moscow) "High-power shock waves and extreme states of plasma"; (4) Fridman A M (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "Prediction and discovery of ultrastrong hydrodynamic instabilities caused by a velocity jump: theory and experiment"; (5) Smirnov V P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Retracing Artsimovich's path to the thermonuclear source of energy". On 18 March 2009, a joint session of the Learned Council of the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute' (RNTsKI in Russ. abbr.), the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Rosatom State Corporation took place at RNTsKI; the session was devoted to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich. The following talks were presented at the session: (1) Velikhov E P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Academician L A Artsimovich—the founder of our field of science and industry"; (2) Smirnov V P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Retracing Artsimovich's path to the thermonuclear source of energy"; (3) Boyarchuk A A (Division of General Physics and Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "L A Artsimovich and astronomy"; (4) Martynenko Yu V (Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow

  4. Growing media constituents determine the microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media for horticulture.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Oliver; Reheul, Dirk; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine; Perneel, Maaike; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico

    2016-05-01

    Vegetables and fruits are an important part of a healthy food diet, however, the eco-sustainability of the production of these can still be significantly improved. European farmers and consumers spend an estimated €15.5 billion per year on inorganic fertilizers and the production of N-fertilizers results in a high carbon footprint. We investigated if fertilizer type and medium constituents determine microbial nitrogen conversions in organic growing media and can be used as a next step towards a more sustainable horticulture. We demonstrated that growing media constituents showed differences in urea hydrolysis, ammonia and nitrite oxidation and in carbon dioxide respiration rate. Interestingly, mixing of the growing media constituents resulted in a stimulation of the function of the microorganisms. The use of organic fertilizer resulted in an increase in amoA gene copy number by factor 100 compared to inorganic fertilizers. Our results support our hypothesis that the activity of the functional microbial community with respect to nitrogen turnover in an organic growing medium can be improved by selecting and mixing the appropriate growing media components with each other. These findings contribute to the understanding of the functional microbial community in growing media and its potential role towards a more responsible horticulture. PMID:27005434

  5. Impact of intensive horticulture practices on groundwater content of nitrates, sodium, potassium, and pesticides.

    PubMed

    Melo, Armindo; Pinto, Edgar; Aguiar, Ana; Mansilha, Catarina; Pinho, Olívia; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2012-07-01

    A monitoring program of nitrate, nitrite, potassium, sodium, and pesticides was carried out in water samples from an intensive horticulture area in a vulnerable zone from north of Portugal. Eight collecting points were selected and water-analyzed in five sampling campaigns, during 1 year. Chemometric techniques, such as cluster analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and discriminant analysis, were used in order to understand the impact of intensive horticulture practices on dug and drilled wells groundwater and to study variations in the hydrochemistry of groundwater. PCA performed on pesticide data matrix yielded seven significant PCs explaining 77.67% of the data variance. Although PCA rendered considerable data reduction, it could not clearly group and distinguish the sample types. However, a visible differentiation between the water samples was obtained. Cluster and discriminant analysis grouped the eight collecting points into three clusters of similar characteristics pertaining to water contamination, indicating that it is necessary to improve the use of water, fertilizers, and pesticides. Inorganic fertilizers such as potassium nitrate were suspected to be the most important factors for nitrate contamination since highly significant Pearson correlation (r = 0.691, P < 0.01) was obtained between groundwater nitrate and potassium contents. Water from dug wells is especially prone to contamination from the grower and their closer neighbor's practices. Water from drilled wells is also contaminated from distant practices.

  6. Windrow composting as horticultural waste management strategy - A case study in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Gavilanes-Terán, Irene; Jara-Samaniego, Janneth; Idrovo-Novillo, Julio; Bustamante, Ma Angeles; Moral, Raúl; Paredes, Concepción

    2016-02-01

    In Ecuador, enormous quantities of vegetable wastes are produced annually from the horticultural industries. Composting can be a feasible treatment to stabilise horticultural wastes and, thus, to improve their properties for use as organic fertilisers. In this study, two different piles were prepared, using laying hen manure and sawdust mixed with broccoli or tomato waste, respectively, and composted by the turned windrow composting system. Throughout the composting process, the temperature of the mixtures was monitored and physico-chemical and chemical properties and the degree of maturity were determined. Also, principal component analysis was used to interpret the data set of compost characteristics. In both piles, the temperature exceeded 55°C for more than 2weeks, which ensured maximum pathogen reduction. Organic matter (OM) losses followed a first-order kinetic equation in both piles. The final composts showed a suitable degree of stability and maturity and an absence of phytotoxins, as observed in the evolution and final values of the total organic carbon/total nitrogen ratio (Corg/NT<20), water-soluble organic carbon (Cw<1.7%), germination index (GI>50%) and cation exchange capacity (CEC>67meq (100g OM)(-1)). As well, the evolution of different humification indexes during composting was a good indicator of the OM humification process. The type of vegetable waste used influenced OM and NT mineralisation and the final properties of the composts, showing the mixture with tomato waste a higher fertilising capacity and less environmental problems.

  7. Cohort profile of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust Biomedical Research Centre (SLaM BRC) Case Register: current status and recent enhancement of an Electronic Mental Health Record-derived data resource

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Gayan; Broadbent, Matthew; Callard, Felicity; Chang, Chin-Kuo; Downs, Johnny; Dutta, Rina; Fernandes, Andrea; Hayes, Richard D; Henderson, Max; Jackson, Richard; Jewell, Amelia; Kadra, Giouliana; Little, Ryan; Pritchard, Megan; Shetty, Hitesh; Tulloch, Alex; Stewart, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The South London and Maudsley National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust Biomedical Research Centre (SLaM BRC) Case Register and its Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) application were developed in 2008, generating a research repository of real-time, anonymised, structured and open-text data derived from the electronic health record system used by SLaM, a large mental healthcare provider in southeast London. In this paper, we update this register's descriptive data, and describe the substantial expansion and extension of the data resource since its original development. Participants Descriptive data were generated from the SLaM BRC Case Register on 31 December 2014. Currently, there are over 250 000 patient records accessed through CRIS. Findings to date Since 2008, the most significant developments in the SLaM BRC Case Register have been the introduction of natural language processing to extract structured data from open-text fields, linkages to external sources of data, and the addition of a parallel relational database (Structured Query Language) output. Natural language processing applications to date have brought in new and hitherto inaccessible data on cognitive function, education, social care receipt, smoking, diagnostic statements and pharmacotherapy. In addition, through external data linkages, large volumes of supplementary information have been accessed on mortality, hospital attendances and cancer registrations. Future plans Coupled with robust data security and governance structures, electronic health records provide potentially transformative information on mental disorders and outcomes in routine clinical care. The SLaM BRC Case Register continues to grow as a database, with approximately 20 000 new cases added each year, in addition to extension of follow-up for existing cases. Data linkages and natural language processing present important opportunities to enhance this type of research resource further, achieving both volume

  8. The European NEO Coordination Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Borgia, B.; Micheli, M.

    An operational approach to NEO (Near-Earth Object) hazard monitoring has been developed at European level within the framework of the Space Situational Awareness Program (SSA) of the European Space Agency (ESA). Through federating European assets and profiting of the expertise developed in European Universities and Research Centers, it has been possible to start the deployment of the so-called SSA NEO Segment. This initiative aims to provide a significant contribution to the worldwide effort to the discovery, follow-up and characterization of the near-Earth object population. A major achievement has been the inauguration in May 2013 of the ESA NEO Coordination Centre located at ESRIN (Frascati, Italy). The goal of the NEOCC Precursor Service operations is twofold: to make available updated information on the NEO population and the associated hazard and to contribute to optimize the NEO observational efforts. This is done by maintaining and improving a Web Portal publicly available at http://neo.ssa.esa.int and by performing follow-up observations through a network of collaborating telescopes and facilities. An overview of the SSA-NEO System and a summary of the first two years of NEOCC operations is presented.

  9. Childcare Workers' and Centre Directors' Beliefs about Infant Childcare Quality and Professional Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, J.; Berthelsen, D.; Segaran, N.

    2009-01-01

    While there has been extensive research exploring quality in childcare programs for children older than three years, less attention has been directed to the nature of infants' experiences in centre-based childcare programs. In this study, six childcare workers and six centre directors located in centre-based childcare programs in metropolitan…

  10. Extending the uses of bioplastic granules for the application of Trichoderma biocontrol isolates in flori/horticulture and turf grass.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioplastic materials are gaining increasing interest in a variety of different industrial and domestic applications. Beside its usage as mulching films and plant clips in horticulture, no other agricultural applications have been proposed. In 2009 we demonstrated that granules made of the bioplastic...

  11. Extending the Use of Bioplastic Granules for the Application of Trichoderma Biocontrol Isolates in Flori/Horticulture and Turfgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioplastic materials are gaining increasing interest in a variety of different industrial and domestic applications. Beside its usage as mulching films and plant clips in horticulture, no other agricultural applications have been proposed. In 2009 we demonstrated that granules made of the bioplastic...

  12. The Melwood Manual: A Planning and Operations Manual for Horticultural Training and Work Co-op Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melwood Horticultural Training Center, Inc., Upper Marlboro, MD.

    This manual is intended as a resource for anyone involved in planning, developing, and/or operating a horticultural training or work co-op program for the handicapped. Following an introductory chapter, the manual is divided into three parts with the greatest weight given to the second part. Part I elaborates on development of the horticulture…

  13. Field Testing of the Greenhouse Production Section of a Horticulture Laboratory Record Book for Pennsylvania. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Kenneth B.

    A study was conducted to develop and field test a greenhouse production record book and unit of instruction for growing potted chrysanthemums. Twenty high schools in Pennsylvania with horticulture departments formed the population for the study. The twenty schools were randomly assigned to four treatment levels: (1) five classes received the…

  14. Physical and chemical characterization of biochars produced from coppiced wood of thirteen tree species for use in horticultural substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven-year-old coppiced shoots from thirteen species of native and non-native trees and shrubs were harvested, dried, and were pyrolyzed to produce biochars for potential use in horticultural substrates. Several chemical and physical characteristics of the biochars were determined. There were slight...

  15. The CAP Approach to Modifying Vocational Programs for Handicapped Students. Vol. 1: Agriculture with an Example in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Lloyd W.; Morehouse, Nancy

    This combination teaching guide and student workbook, the first in a five-volume series (see note), presents an approach to teaching horticulture for handicapped students. The guide discusses a functional approach to modifying agriculture programs to accomodate cognitive, affective, and psychomotor (CAP) domain handicaps. The discussion centers on…

  16. Agriculture--Ornamental Horticulture. Building Model Greenhouse and Growing Plants. Kit No. 41. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Wesley

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on building a model greenhouse and growing plants are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of agriculture (ornamental horticulture). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven…

  17. USING AND CARING FOR ORNAMENTAL PLANT MATERIALS AND LANDSCAPE STRUCTURES. HORTICULTURE-SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE NO. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO PREPARE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR HORTICULTURE-SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, THIS MODULE HAS AS ITS MAJOR OBJECTIVE TO DEVELOP THE ABILITIES NEEDED TO USE, CARE FOR, AND MAINTAIN ORNAMENTAL PLANT MATERIALS AND LANDSCAPE STRUCTURES. IT WAS DEVELOPED ON THE BASIS OF DATA FROM STATE STUDIES BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE. SUBJECT MATTER…

  18. Institutional Effectiveness Assessment Process, 1993-94 Executive Summary. Hospitality and Service Occupations Division, Landscape and Environmental Horticulture Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    A study was conducted to determine current and former students' and local employers' satisfaction with South Seattle Community College's (SSCC's) Landscape and Environmental Horticulture Department. Specifically, the study gathered data on four outcomes: that students receive an education allowing them to meet goals; that students be satisfied…

  19. National Centre of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Gy

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the social, political and economic background which led to the establishment of the Hungarian National Centre of Educational Technology and made essential the development of a national network of bases for promoting educational technology. (Author)

  20. Contemporary design for 'landmark' centre.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    As one of the UK's largest builders of healthcare facilities, construction company Morgan Ashurst is accustomed to delivering complex, challenging hospital projects. The construction of a new oncology centre at Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton for Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust-- said to be the first new stand-alone radiotherapy centre to be built in the UK for almost 20 years--was no exception. Health Estate Journal reports. PMID:19711668

  1. RTEMS Centre - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Constantino, A.; Freitas, D.; Coutinho, M.; Faustino, S.; Mota, M.; Colaço, P.; Sousa, J.; Dias, L.; Damjanovic, B.; Zulianello, M.; Rufino, J.

    2009-05-01

    RTEMS CENTRE - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System is a joint ESA/Portuguese Task Force initiative to develop a support and maintenance centre to the Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS). This paper gives a high level visibility of the progress, the results obtained and the future work in the RTEMS CENTRE [6] and in the RTEMS Improvement [7] projects. RTEMS CENTRE started officially in November 2006, with the RTEMS 4.6.99.2 version. A full analysis of RTEMS operating system was produced. The architecture was analysed in terms of conceptual, organizational and operational concepts. The original objectives [1] of the centre were primarily to create and maintain technical expertise and competences in this RTOS, to develop a website to provide the European Space Community an entry point for obtaining support (http://rtemscentre.edisoft.pt), to design, develop, maintain and integrate some RTEMS support tools (Timeline Tool, Configuration and Management Tools), to maintain flight libraries and Board Support Packages, to develop a strong relationship with the World RTEMS Community and finally to produce some considerations in ARINC-653, DO-178B and ECSS E-40 standards. RTEMS Improvement is the continuation of the RTEMS CENTRE. Currently the RTEMS, version 4.8.0, is being facilitated for a future qualification. In this work, the validation material is being produced following the Galileo Software Standards Development Assurance Level B [5]. RTEMS is being completely tested, errors analysed, dead and deactivated code removed and tests produced to achieve 100% statement and decision coverage of source code [2]. The SW to exploit the LEON Memory Management Unit (MMU) hardware will be also added. A brief description of the expected implementations will be given.

  2. Scottish Schools Science Equipment Research Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    This newsletter is composed of brief notes in the various areas of science. Biology Notes include hazards of tasting Phenylthiocarbamide in laboratory experiments, the use of Albustic and Clinistix test papers for protein and glucose determinations, the measurement of the respiratory quotient, and the construction of a simple respirometer. Physics…

  3. The digital eczema centre utrecht.

    PubMed

    van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Veelen, Carien; Hover, Maaike; Eland-de Kok, Petra; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Sonnevelt, Gert-Jan; Mensing, Geert; Pasmans, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMC Utrecht) has developed an eczema portal that combines e-consulting, monitoring and self-management training by a dermatology nurse online for patients and parents of young children with atopic dermatitis (AD). Patient satisfaction with the portal was high. It could be extended to become a Digital Eczema Centre for multidisciplinary collaboration between health-care providers from different locations and the patient. Before starting the construction of the Digital Eczema Centre, the feasibility was examined by carrying out a business case analysis. The purposes, strength and weaknesses showed that the Digital Eczema Centre offered opportunities to improve care for patients with AD. The financial analysis resulted in a medium/best case scenario with a positive result of euro50-240,000 over a period of five years. We expect that the Digital Eczema Centre will increase the accessibility and quality of care. The web-based patient record and the digital chain-of-care promote the involvement of patients, parents and multidisciplinary teams as well as the continuity and coordination of care.

  4. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary ‘build to apply’ and ‘build to understand’ approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  5. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia.

  6. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. PMID:27284024

  7. Some Models of Mathematics Teachers' Centres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B.

    There are two types of teacher centres in Great Britain, multi-purpose centres designed for all subjects of the curriculum, and topical centres which deal specifically with one area of subject matter such as mathematics, English, etc. In this paper, the five mathematics centres in London are analyzed for purpose, materials available, and…

  8. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    PubMed Central

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  9. A real-time PCR assay for the quantitative detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in the horticultural soil and plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Liu, Xin; Ma, Zhong-Hua; Li, Bo; Allen, Caitilyn; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2010-01-01

    A specific and rapid real-time PCR assay for detecting Ralstonia solanacearum in the horticultural soil and plant tissues was developed in this study. The specific primers RSF/RSR were designed based on the upstream region of UDP-3-O-acyl-GlcNAc deacetylase gene from R. solanacearum, and a PCR product of 159 bp was amplified specifically from 28 strains of R. solanacearum, which represent all genetically diverse AluI types and all 6 biovars, but not from any other nontarget species. The detection limit of 102 CFU/g tomato stem and horticultural soil was achieved in this real-time PCR assay. The high sensitivity and specificity observed with filed samples as well as with artificially infected samples suggested that this method might be a useful tool for detection and quantification of R. solanacearum in precise forecast and diagnosis.

  10. Centre for Applied Language Studies, University of Limerick, Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Angela; Atkinson, David; Farr, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Applied Language Studies (CALS), founded in 1997, brings together researchers and postgraduate students from several disciplines in language studies, and is structured in three research clusters: New learning environments; Discourse, society and identity; and Plurilingualism and language policy. There is a certain amount of…

  11. The Tehran Book Processing Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    Establishment of the Tehran Book Processing Centre (Tebroc) was proposed in the Spring of 1968. This document is a descriptive and historical account of the center, and a description of its contributions to Iranian processing development. The center was modeled, to a certain extent, after Bro-Dart's Alanar in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Tebroc was…

  12. Co-composting of solid and liquid olive mill wastes: management aspects and the horticultural value of the resulting composts.

    PubMed

    Aviani, I; Laor, Y; Medina, Sh; Krassnovsky, A; Raviv, M

    2010-09-01

    Successful co-composting of solid and liquid olive mill wastes (OMW) and obtaining a product of horticultural value may increase the viability of this recycling approach. Two composting cycles were performed, in which olive mill solid wastes (OMSW) were used to form five mixtures, wetted either with fresh water or with olive mill wastewater (OMWW). Up to approximately 0.3m(3) of OMWW could be applied to each m(3) of the raw materials without negatively affecting the chemical, physical and horticultural properties of the resulted composts. A growing media composed of perlite amended with 25-33% OMW-composts showed higher suppressiveness against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis as compared to equivalent perlite:peat moss mixtures. The yields of tomato plants grown in peat moss amended with 20% (v:v) of OMW-composts were not significantly different than plants grown in unamended peat. The viability of co-composting as a treatment approach for OMWW is discussed in the context of management aspects and the horticultural value of the final product. PMID:20399644

  13. Asymmetric introgression in the horticultural living fossil cycas sect. Asiorientales using a genome-wide scanning approach.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Chung; Huang, Bing-Hong; Chang, Chun-Wen; Wan, Yu-Ting; Lai, Shih-Jie; Huang, Shong; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The Asian cycads are mostly allopatric, distributed in small population sizes. Hybridization between allopatric species provides clues in determining the mechanism of species divergence. Horticultural introduction provides the chance of interspecific gene flow between allopatric species. Two allopatrically eastern Asian Cycas sect. Asiorientales species, C. revoluta and C. taitungensis, which are widely distributed in Ryukyus and Fujian Province and endemic to Taiwan, respectively, were planted in eastern Taiwan for horticultural reason. Higher degrees of genetic admixture in cultivated samples than wild populations in both cycad species were detected based on multilocus scans by neutral AFLP markers. Furthermore, bidirectional but asymmetric introgression by horticultural introduction of C. revoluta is evidenced by the reanalyses of species associated loci, which are assumed to be diverged after species divergence. Partial loci introgressed from native cycad to the invaders were also detected at the loci of strong species association. Consistent results tested by all neutral loci, and the species-associated loci, specify the recent introgression from the paradox of sharing of ancestral polymorphisms. Phenomenon of introgression of cultivated cycads implies niche conservation among two geographic-isolated cycads, even though the habitats of the extant wild populations of two species are distinct. PMID:23591840

  14. Asymmetric introgression in the horticultural living fossil cycas sect. Asiorientales using a genome-wide scanning approach.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Chung; Huang, Bing-Hong; Chang, Chun-Wen; Wan, Yu-Ting; Lai, Shih-Jie; Huang, Shong; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2013-04-15

    The Asian cycads are mostly allopatric, distributed in small population sizes. Hybridization between allopatric species provides clues in determining the mechanism of species divergence. Horticultural introduction provides the chance of interspecific gene flow between allopatric species. Two allopatrically eastern Asian Cycas sect. Asiorientales species, C. revoluta and C. taitungensis, which are widely distributed in Ryukyus and Fujian Province and endemic to Taiwan, respectively, were planted in eastern Taiwan for horticultural reason. Higher degrees of genetic admixture in cultivated samples than wild populations in both cycad species were detected based on multilocus scans by neutral AFLP markers. Furthermore, bidirectional but asymmetric introgression by horticultural introduction of C. revoluta is evidenced by the reanalyses of species associated loci, which are assumed to be diverged after species divergence. Partial loci introgressed from native cycad to the invaders were also detected at the loci of strong species association. Consistent results tested by all neutral loci, and the species-associated loci, specify the recent introgression from the paradox of sharing of ancestral polymorphisms. Phenomenon of introgression of cultivated cycads implies niche conservation among two geographic-isolated cycads, even though the habitats of the extant wild populations of two species are distinct.

  15. Towards Human-Centred Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  16. A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation on Pest Suppression and Yield of Horticultural Crops

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Utsala; Augé, Robert M.; Butler, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is a proven but relatively new strategy to control soil borne pests of horticultural crops through anaerobic decomposition of organic soil amendments. The ASD technique has primarily been used to control soil borne pathogens; however, this technique has also shown potential to control plant parasitic nematodes and weeds. ASD can utilize a broad range of carbon (C) amendments and optimization may improve efficacy across environments. In this context, a meta-analysis using a random-effects model was conducted to determine effect sizes of the ASD effect on soil borne pathogens (533 studies), plant parasitic nematodes (91 studies), and weeds (88 studies) compared with unamended controls. Yield response to ASD was evaluated (123 studies) compared to unamended and fumigated controls. We also examined moderator variables for environmental conditions and amendments to explore the impact of these moderators on ASD effectiveness on pests and yield. Across all pathogen types with the exception of Sclerotinia spp., ASD studies show suppression of bacterial, oomycete and fungal pathogens (59 to 94%). Pathogen suppression was effective under all environmental conditions (50 to 94%) and amendment types (53 to 97%), except when amendments were applied at rates less than 0.3 kg m-2. The ASD effect ranged from 15 to 56% for nematode suppression and 32 to 81% for weed suppression, but these differences were not significant. Significant nematode moderators included study type, soil type, sampling depth, incubation period, and use of mixed amendments. Weed suppression due to ASD showed significant heterogeneity for all environmental conditions, confirming that these studies do not share a common effect size. Total crop yield was not reduced by ASD when compared to a fumigant control and yield was significantly higher (30%) compared to an unamended control, suggesting ASD as a feasible option to maintain yield without chemical soil fumigants. We

  17. A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation on Pest Suppression and Yield of Horticultural Crops.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Utsala; Augé, Robert M; Butler, David M

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is a proven but relatively new strategy to control soil borne pests of horticultural crops through anaerobic decomposition of organic soil amendments. The ASD technique has primarily been used to control soil borne pathogens; however, this technique has also shown potential to control plant parasitic nematodes and weeds. ASD can utilize a broad range of carbon (C) amendments and optimization may improve efficacy across environments. In this context, a meta-analysis using a random-effects model was conducted to determine effect sizes of the ASD effect on soil borne pathogens (533 studies), plant parasitic nematodes (91 studies), and weeds (88 studies) compared with unamended controls. Yield response to ASD was evaluated (123 studies) compared to unamended and fumigated controls. We also examined moderator variables for environmental conditions and amendments to explore the impact of these moderators on ASD effectiveness on pests and yield. Across all pathogen types with the exception of Sclerotinia spp., ASD studies show suppression of bacterial, oomycete and fungal pathogens (59 to 94%). Pathogen suppression was effective under all environmental conditions (50 to 94%) and amendment types (53 to 97%), except when amendments were applied at rates less than 0.3 kg m(-2). The ASD effect ranged from 15 to 56% for nematode suppression and 32 to 81% for weed suppression, but these differences were not significant. Significant nematode moderators included study type, soil type, sampling depth, incubation period, and use of mixed amendments. Weed suppression due to ASD showed significant heterogeneity for all environmental conditions, confirming that these studies do not share a common effect size. Total crop yield was not reduced by ASD when compared to a fumigant control and yield was significantly higher (30%) compared to an unamended control, suggesting ASD as a feasible option to maintain yield without chemical soil fumigants. We

  18. A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation on Pest Suppression and Yield of Horticultural Crops.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Utsala; Augé, Robert M; Butler, David M

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is a proven but relatively new strategy to control soil borne pests of horticultural crops through anaerobic decomposition of organic soil amendments. The ASD technique has primarily been used to control soil borne pathogens; however, this technique has also shown potential to control plant parasitic nematodes and weeds. ASD can utilize a broad range of carbon (C) amendments and optimization may improve efficacy across environments. In this context, a meta-analysis using a random-effects model was conducted to determine effect sizes of the ASD effect on soil borne pathogens (533 studies), plant parasitic nematodes (91 studies), and weeds (88 studies) compared with unamended controls. Yield response to ASD was evaluated (123 studies) compared to unamended and fumigated controls. We also examined moderator variables for environmental conditions and amendments to explore the impact of these moderators on ASD effectiveness on pests and yield. Across all pathogen types with the exception of Sclerotinia spp., ASD studies show suppression of bacterial, oomycete and fungal pathogens (59 to 94%). Pathogen suppression was effective under all environmental conditions (50 to 94%) and amendment types (53 to 97%), except when amendments were applied at rates less than 0.3 kg m(-2). The ASD effect ranged from 15 to 56% for nematode suppression and 32 to 81% for weed suppression, but these differences were not significant. Significant nematode moderators included study type, soil type, sampling depth, incubation period, and use of mixed amendments. Weed suppression due to ASD showed significant heterogeneity for all environmental conditions, confirming that these studies do not share a common effect size. Total crop yield was not reduced by ASD when compared to a fumigant control and yield was significantly higher (30%) compared to an unamended control, suggesting ASD as a feasible option to maintain yield without chemical soil fumigants. We

  19. A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation on Pest Suppression and Yield of Horticultural Crops

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Utsala; Augé, Robert M.; Butler, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is a proven but relatively new strategy to control soil borne pests of horticultural crops through anaerobic decomposition of organic soil amendments. The ASD technique has primarily been used to control soil borne pathogens; however, this technique has also shown potential to control plant parasitic nematodes and weeds. ASD can utilize a broad range of carbon (C) amendments and optimization may improve efficacy across environments. In this context, a meta-analysis using a random-effects model was conducted to determine effect sizes of the ASD effect on soil borne pathogens (533 studies), plant parasitic nematodes (91 studies), and weeds (88 studies) compared with unamended controls. Yield response to ASD was evaluated (123 studies) compared to unamended and fumigated controls. We also examined moderator variables for environmental conditions and amendments to explore the impact of these moderators on ASD effectiveness on pests and yield. Across all pathogen types with the exception of Sclerotinia spp., ASD studies show suppression of bacterial, oomycete and fungal pathogens (59 to 94%). Pathogen suppression was effective under all environmental conditions (50 to 94%) and amendment types (53 to 97%), except when amendments were applied at rates less than 0.3 kg m-2. The ASD effect ranged from 15 to 56% for nematode suppression and 32 to 81% for weed suppression, but these differences were not significant. Significant nematode moderators included study type, soil type, sampling depth, incubation period, and use of mixed amendments. Weed suppression due to ASD showed significant heterogeneity for all environmental conditions, confirming that these studies do not share a common effect size. Total crop yield was not reduced by ASD when compared to a fumigant control and yield was significantly higher (30%) compared to an unamended control, suggesting ASD as a feasible option to maintain yield without chemical soil fumigants. We

  20. Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 069

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Darren; Eisl-Culkin, Judy; Desjardins, Louise

    2008-01-01

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education…

  1. KNMI Data Centre: Easy access for all

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vegte, John; Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Spit, Jasper; Mastop, Joeri; Klos, Olaf; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu-Siu; van Moosel, Wim; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    KNMI is the Dutch institute for weather, climate research and seismology. It disseminates weather information to the public at large, the government, aviation and the shipping industry in the interest of safety, the economy and a sustainable environment. To gain insight into long-term developments KNMI conducts research on climate change. Making the knowledge, data and information on hand at KNMI accessible is one core activity. A huge part of the KNMI information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project these issues are tackled. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM was chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven open source technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) resulted in a first release in December 2012 This presentation will focus on the aspects of KDC relating to its technical challenges, the development strategy and the initial usage results of the data centre.

  2. Business Models of High Performance Computing Centres in Higher Education in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eurich, Markus; Calleja, Paul; Boutellier, Roman

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing (HPC) service centres are a vital part of the academic infrastructure of higher education organisations. However, despite their importance for research and the necessary high capital expenditures, business research on HPC service centres is mostly missing. From a business perspective, it is important to find an answer to…

  3. Plastid genomics in horticultural species: importance and applications for plant population genetics, evolution, and biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Marcelo; do Nascimento Vieira, Leila; Fraga, Hugo P.; Guerra, Miguel P.

    2015-01-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, plastids, and mitochondria arose from an endosymbiotic process, which determined the presence of three genetic compartments into the incipient plant cell. After that, these three genetic materials from host and symbiont suffered several rearrangements, bringing on a complex interaction between nuclear and organellar gene products. Nowadays, plastids harbor a small genome with ∼130 genes in a 100–220 kb sequence in higher plants. Plastid genes are mostly highly conserved between plant species, being useful for phylogenetic analysis in higher taxa. However, intergenic spacers have a relatively higher mutation rate and are important markers to phylogeographical and plant population genetics analyses. The predominant uniparental inheritance of plastids is like a highly desirable feature for phylogeny studies. Moreover, the gene content and genome rearrangements are efficient tools to capture and understand evolutionary events between different plant species. Currently, genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages as high-level of foreign protein expression, marker gene excision, gene expression in operon and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Therefore, plastid genome can be used for adding new characteristics related to synthesis of metabolic compounds, biopharmaceutical, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the importance and applications of plastid genome as tools for genetic and evolutionary studies, and plastid transformation focusing on increasing the performance of horticultural species in the field. PMID:26284102

  4. Assessment of Primary Production of Horticultural Safety Management Systems of Mushroom Farms in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dzingirayi, Garikayi; Korsten, Lise

    2016-07-01

    Growing global consumer concern over food safety in the fresh produce industry requires producers to implement necessary quality assurance systems. Varying effectiveness has been noted in how countries and food companies interpret and implement food safety standards. A diagnostic instrument (DI) for global fresh produce industries was developed to measure the compliancy of companies with implemented food safety standards. The DI is made up of indicators and descriptive grids for context factors and control and assurance activities to measure food safety output. The instrument can be used in primary production to assess food safety performance. This study applied the DI to measure food safety standard compliancy of mushroom farming in South Africa. Ten farms representing almost half of the industry farms and more than 80% of production were independently assessed for their horticultural safety management system (HSMS) compliance via in-depth interviews with each farm's quality assurance personnel. The data were processed using Microsoft Office Excel 2010 and are represented in frequency tables. The diagnosis revealed that the mushroom farming industry had an average food safety output. The farms were implementing an average-toadvanced HSMS and operating in a medium-risk context. Insufficient performance areas in HSMSs included inadequate hazard analysis and analysis of control points, low specificity of pesticide assessment, and inadequate control of suppliers and incoming materials. Recommendations to the industry and current shortcomings are suggested for realization of an improved industry-wide food safety assurance system.

  5. Horticultural characteristics of transgenic tobacco expressing the rolC gene from Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, R.; Zimmerman, T.W.; Cordts, J.M.; Footen, K.J. ); Ravelonandro, M. . Station de Pathologie Vegetale)

    1994-09-01

    Wisconsin 38 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf discs were transformed with the disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 101 carrying the rolC gene from A. rhizogenes and NPT II and GUS genes. Shoots that regenerated on kanamycin-containing medium were confirmed as transgenic through GUS assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analyses, and transmission of the foreign genes through the sexual cycle. Transgenic plants were as short as half the height of control plants; were earlier flowering by up to 35 days; and had smaller leaves, shorter internodes, smaller seed capsules, fewer seeds, smaller flowers, and reduced pollen viability. The number of seed capsules, leaf number, and specific root length were similar between transgenic and control plants. Transgenic clones varied in the expression of the rolC-induced growth alterations as did the first generation of seedlings from these clones. Such differences suggested the potential for selecting for different levels of expression. Transformation with the rolC gene presents a potentially useful method of genetically modifying horticultural crops, particularly for flowering date, height, and leaf and flower size. Chemical names used: neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS).

  6. Plastid genomics in horticultural species: importance and applications for plant population genetics, evolution, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Marcelo; do Nascimento Vieira, Leila; Fraga, Hugo P; Guerra, Miguel P

    2015-01-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, plastids, and mitochondria arose from an endosymbiotic process, which determined the presence of three genetic compartments into the incipient plant cell. After that, these three genetic materials from host and symbiont suffered several rearrangements, bringing on a complex interaction between nuclear and organellar gene products. Nowadays, plastids harbor a small genome with ∼130 genes in a 100-220 kb sequence in higher plants. Plastid genes are mostly highly conserved between plant species, being useful for phylogenetic analysis in higher taxa. However, intergenic spacers have a relatively higher mutation rate and are important markers to phylogeographical and plant population genetics analyses. The predominant uniparental inheritance of plastids is like a highly desirable feature for phylogeny studies. Moreover, the gene content and genome rearrangements are efficient tools to capture and understand evolutionary events between different plant species. Currently, genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages as high-level of foreign protein expression, marker gene excision, gene expression in operon and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Therefore, plastid genome can be used for adding new characteristics related to synthesis of metabolic compounds, biopharmaceutical, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the importance and applications of plastid genome as tools for genetic and evolutionary studies, and plastid transformation focusing on increasing the performance of horticultural species in the field.

  7. Assessment of Primary Production of Horticultural Safety Management Systems of Mushroom Farms in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dzingirayi, Garikayi; Korsten, Lise

    2016-07-01

    Growing global consumer concern over food safety in the fresh produce industry requires producers to implement necessary quality assurance systems. Varying effectiveness has been noted in how countries and food companies interpret and implement food safety standards. A diagnostic instrument (DI) for global fresh produce industries was developed to measure the compliancy of companies with implemented food safety standards. The DI is made up of indicators and descriptive grids for context factors and control and assurance activities to measure food safety output. The instrument can be used in primary production to assess food safety performance. This study applied the DI to measure food safety standard compliancy of mushroom farming in South Africa. Ten farms representing almost half of the industry farms and more than 80% of production were independently assessed for their horticultural safety management system (HSMS) compliance via in-depth interviews with each farm's quality assurance personnel. The data were processed using Microsoft Office Excel 2010 and are represented in frequency tables. The diagnosis revealed that the mushroom farming industry had an average food safety output. The farms were implementing an average-toadvanced HSMS and operating in a medium-risk context. Insufficient performance areas in HSMSs included inadequate hazard analysis and analysis of control points, low specificity of pesticide assessment, and inadequate control of suppliers and incoming materials. Recommendations to the industry and current shortcomings are suggested for realization of an improved industry-wide food safety assurance system. PMID:27357039

  8. EAC: The European Astronauts Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, Andres

    The newly established European Astronauts Centre (EAC) in Cologne represents the European Astronauts Home Base and will become a centre of expertise on European astronauts activities. The paper gives an overview of the European approach to man-in-space, describes the European Astronauts Policy and presents the major EAC roles and responsibilities including the management of selection, recruitment and flight assignment of astronauts; the astronauts support and medical surveillance; the supervision of the astronauts' non-flight assignments; crew safety; the definition of the overall astronauts training programme; the scheduling and supervision of the training facilities; the implementation of Basic Training; the recruitment, training and certification of instructors, and the interface to NASA in the framework of the Space Station Freedom programme. An overview is given on the organisation of EAC, and on the European candidate astronauts selection performed in 1991.

  9. Changing the paradigm for marine data production, dissemination and validation with Collaborative Platforms. The GlobColour webservice, a prime example which leads to the integration of CWE technologies to build-up virtual research centres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanton d'Andon, Odile; Martin-Lauzer, François-Regis; Mangin, Antoine; Barrot, Gilbert; Clouaire, Stephane; Sardou, Olivier; Demaria, Julien; Serra, Romain

    2015-04-01

    data for their particular applications. • Match-ups using real-time EO data and data collected from bio-Argo floats are processed automatically on-the-fly. • This is possible because quality control of the bio-Argo float data is also automated. A dedicated interface has been set-up to monitor the whole fleet of Bio-Argo floats, and access detailed information from each acquired profile. Finally, a Collaborative Platform has been developed to support R&D activities in parallel to the standard production chain, enabling users to work remotely within a dedicated production environment in order to develop new algorithms and methods. The Collaborative Platform is based on a Collaborative Working Environment, a secured IT environment mixing hardware and software elements. It provides access to raw data, to processing and storage facilities, to specific applicative software (e.g. visualisation and post-processing tools). In addition, collaborative tools to exchange data, information and ideas between participants (through forums, web-conferencing…) contribute to create a "Virtual Research Centre" preparing future evolutions of the service. Acknowledgements: This research received funding from the following projects: • MCGS project funded by the Fonds Unique Interministériel, French regional funds PACA and Bretagne, the Fonds Européen de Développement Régional • FP7 Copernicus projects OSS2015 (grant n° 282723) and E-AIMS (grant n° 312642). • The French EQUIPEX project NAOS

  10. CADC and CANFAR: Extending the role of the data centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudet, Severin

    2015-12-01

    Over the past six years, the CADC has moved beyond the astronomy archive data centre to a multi-service system for the community. This evolution is based on two major initiatives. The first is the adoption of International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) standards in both the system and data architecture of the CADC, including a common characterization data model. The second is the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), a digital infrastructure combining the Canadian national research network (CANARIE), cloud processing and storage resources (Compute Canada) and a data centre (Canadian Astronomy Data Centre) into a unified ecosystem for storage and processing for the astronomy community. This talk will describe the architecture and integration of IVOA and CANFAR services into CADC operations, the operational experiences, the lessons learned and future directions

  11. Home as a hybrid centre of medication practice.

    PubMed

    Dew, Kevin; Chamberlain, Kerry; Hodgetts, Darrin; Norris, Pauline; Radley, Alan; Gabe, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This article presents research that explores how medications are understood and used by people in everyday life. An intensive process of data collection from 55 households was used in this research, which included photo-elicitation and diary-elicitation interviews. It is argued that households are at the very centre of complex networks of therapeutic advice and practice and can usefully be seen as hybrid centres of medication practice, where a plethora of available medications is assimilated and different forms of knowledge and expertise are made sense of. Dominant therapeutic frameworks are tactically manipulated in households in order for medication practices to align with the understandings, resources and practicalities of households. Understanding the home as a centre of medication practice decentralises the role of health advisors (whether mainstream or alternative) in wellness practices. PMID:23909467

  12. Communicating astronomy by the Unizul Science Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesham, A.; Beesham, N.

    2015-03-01

    The University of Zululand, situated along the east coast of KwaZulu-Natal, has a thriving Science Centre (USC) situated in the developing port city of Richards Bay. Over 30 000 learners visit the centre annually, and it consists of an exhibition area, an auditorium, lecture areas and offices. The shows consist of interactive games, science shows, competitions, quizzes and matriculation workshops. Outreach activities take place through a mobile science centre for schools and communities that cannot visit the centre.

  13. Maintaining health: proactive client-oriented community day treatment centres for the chronic mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Yurkovich, E; Smyer, T; Dean, L

    1999-02-01

    This grounded theory study compared the definition of health by clients of two rural mental health day treatment centres, Big Sky Centre and Montana Centre. Based on an original grounded theory study of seven chronic mentally ill/disabled clients in Big Sky Centre (Yurkovich et al. 1997), the core variable, 'preventing loss of control' and related properties, were validated with nine residents of Montana Centre. While establishing a 'fit' with previous research findings, differences emerged between these two centres. These differences related to the staffs' philosophical approaches in providing treatment to the chronic mentally ill. Big Sky Centre care providers empowered their clients to learn new behaviours from their peers and assume new roles such as newcomer, member and leader. They also encouraged a prosocial attitude, and created a sense of belonging through valued involvement in their treatment. Montana Centre clients were not empowered to try out new behaviours in the treatment environment, or seek social support networks among their peers at the centre, which would foster a sense of belonging. The result was that clients from Montana Centre relied on the formal healthcare system more often than clients from the Big Sky Centre. The competing forces in healthcare today--family members, mental health providers, and insurance or managed care providers--make it easy to lose sight of or fail to gain the client's perspective about their health status and maintenance, particularly as it concerns day treatment centres. The importance of the day treatment centre as a therapeutic community which requires educational processes, innovative nursing practice, and client-centred interventions will be discussed. PMID:10336739

  14. Centres for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Attendees' Perceptions of Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gajewska, Urszula; Trigg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Day and community learning centres aim to provide intellectually disabled (ID) people with social support, life skills and greater control over their lives. However, there is little research exploring the benefits of attendance from the perspective of attendees and whether these goals are met. Materials and methods: Unstructured…

  15. Learner Centred Design for a Hybrid Interaction Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Simon; Romero, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Learner centred design methods highlight the importance of involving the stakeholders of the learning process (learners, teachers, educational researchers) at all stages of the design of educational applications and of refining the design through an iterative prototyping process. These methods have been used successfully when designing systems…

  16. Survey of organochlorine pesticides in horticultural soils and there grown Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Hilber, Isabel; Mäder, Paul; Schulin, Rainer; Wyss, Gabriela S

    2008-10-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCP) are still found in food and feed crops although they were applied about 40 years ago. There is a considerable knowledge gap concerning the extent of soil and crop contamination by OCP. We performed two surveys in 2002 and 2005 to assess the loads of OCP in 41 Swiss horticultural fields under organic and conventional production and corresponding Cucurbitaceae fruits (cucumbers, zucchini, and pumpkin), whereas these fields stay for intensive agricultural production in Europe. In addition, soil organic carbon, texture, and pH were measured also. OCP were detected in 27 out of 41 fields (65.9%). The farming practice had no influence on the contamination or level of OCP in soil. The sum of OCP-loads per field ranged from <0.01 to 1.3mgkg(-1) dry soil and pentachloroaniline (PCA, 2.1mgkg(-1)), p,p'-DDT (0.5mgkg(-1)), and p,p'-DDE and dieldrin (0.4mgkg(-1)) were the most detected pesticides over all investigated soils. PCA (up to 0.02mgkg(-1)), dieldrin (up to 0.04mgkg(-1)), alpha-chlordane and cis-heptachloroepoxide (<0.01mgkg(-1)) were detected in five cucumber samples out of 41 Cucurbitaceae samples. Statistical analysis revealed no significant influence of the measured soil properties on the OCP-load of soils and cucumbers, although there is evidence that the bioavailability of OCP in soils to Cucurbitaceae plants was influenced by the sorption of the compounds to soil organic matter and by the polarity of the pesticide molecules. It is suggested, that OCP contamination is widespread in all European regions with intensive plant production and associated pesticide use, and deserves more attention with respect to save food production.

  17. Strigolactone pathway genes and plant architecture: association analysis and QTL detection for horticultural traits in chrysanthemum.

    PubMed

    Klie, Maik; Menz, Ina; Linde, Marcus; Debener, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Chrysanthemums are important ornamental plants with abundant phenotypic diversity. Especially in cut-flower breeding, shoot branching is important for the success of new varieties. To assess the genetic regulation of shoot branching and other horticultural important traits, we phenotyped and genotyped two types of chrysanthemum populations: a genotype collection of 86 varieties and a biparental F1-population (MK11/3) of 160 individuals. Using two different statistical approaches, a genome-wide association analysis and a single marker ANOVA, with AFLP marker data and candidate gene markers for shoot branching, we tried to identify markers correlated to the traits of interest. As expected for the outcrossing hexasomic chrysanthemums most of the phenotypic traits showed a continuous variation in both populations. With the candidate gene approach we identified 11 significantly associated marker alleles for all 4 strigolactone pathway genes BRC1, CCD7, CCD8 and MAX2 regulating shoot branching in the genotype collection. In the MK11/3 we detected seven markers for all candidate genes except MAX2 explaining a large proportion of the variation. Using anonymous AFLP markers in the GWA with the 86 genotypes and the single locus analysis with the F1-population we could detect 15 and 17 additional marker-trait associations, respectively. Our analyses indicate a polygenic inheritance of the shoot branching in the chrysanthemum, with a fundamental role of the strigolactone pathway genes BRC1, CCD7, CCD8 and MAX2 and we identified 50 associated markers to all traits under study. These markers could be used in the selection of the parental plants for breeding chrysanthemums to enrich them for positive alleles influencing plant architecture traits. PMID:26780913

  18. Effects of ozone treatment on Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in relation to horticultural product quality.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Deana; Fan, Lihua; McRae, Ken; Walker, Brad; MacKay, Ron; Doucette, Craig

    2009-08-01

    Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are fungal pathogens that cause the decay of many fruits and vegetables. Ozone may be used as an antimicrobial agent to control the decay. The effect of gaseous ozone on spore viability of B. cinerea and mycelial growth of B. cinerea and S. sclerotiorum were investigated. Spore viability of B. cinerea was reduced by over 99.5% (P < 0.01) and height of the aerial mycelium was reduced from 4.7 mm in the control to less than 1 mm after exposure to 450 or 600 ppb ozone for 48 h at 20 degrees C. Sporulation of B. cinerea was also substantially inhibited by ozone treatments. However, ozone had no significant effect on mycelial growth of S. sclerotiorum in vitro. Decay and quality parameters including color, chlorophyll fluorescence (CF), and ozone injury were further assessed for various horticultural commodities (apple, grape, highbush blueberry, and carrot) treated with 450 ppb of ozone for 48 h at 20 degrees C over a period of 12 d. Lesion size and height of the aerial mycelium were significantly reduced by the ozone treatment on carrots inoculated with mycelial agar plugs of B. cinerea or S. sclerotiorum. Lesion size was also reduced on treated apples inoculated with 5 x 10(6) spores/mL of B. cinerea, and decay incidence of treated grapes was reduced. The 450 ppb ozone for 48 h treatment had no significant effect on color of carrots and apples or on CF of apples and grapes. Ozone, an environmentally sound antimicrobial agent, inactivates microorganisms through oxidization and residual ozone spontaneously decomposes to nontoxic products. It may be applied to fruits and vegetables to reduce decay and extend shelf life. PMID:19723209

  19. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  20. Launch of the London Centre for Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Aeppli, Gabriel; Pankhurst, Quentin

    2006-12-01

    Is nanomedicine an area with the promise that its proponents claim? Professors Gabriel Aeppli and Quentin Pankhurst explore the issues in light of the new London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN)--a joint enterprise between Imperial College and University College London--opened on November 7, 2006. The center is a multidisciplinary research initiative that aims to bridge the physical, engineering and biomedical sciences. In this interview, Professor Gabriel Aeppli, LCN co-Director, and Deputy Director Professor Quentin Pankhurst discuss the advent and future role of the LCN with Nanomedicine's Morag Robertson. Professor Aeppli was formerly with NEC, Bell Laboratories and MIT and has more than 15 years' experience in the computer and telecommunications industry. Professor Pankhurst is a physicist with more than 20 years' experience of working with magnetic materials and nanoparticles, who now works closely with clinicians and medics on innovative healthcare applications. He also recently formed the new start-up company Endomagnetics Inc.

  1. How healthy is urban horticulture in high traffic areas? Trace metal concentrations in vegetable crops from plantings within inner city neighbourhoods in Berlin, Germany.

    PubMed

    Säumel, Ina; Kotsyuk, Iryna; Hölscher, Marie; Lenkereit, Claudia; Weber, Frauke; Kowarik, Ingo

    2012-06-01

    Food production by urban dwellers is of growing importance in developing and developed countries. Urban horticulture is associated with health risks as crops in urban settings are generally exposed to higher levels of pollutants than those in rural areas. We determined the concentration of trace metals in the biomass of different horticultural crops grown in the inner city of Berlin, Germany, and analysed how the local setting shaped the concentration patterns. We revealed significant differences in trace metal concentrations depending on local traffic, crop species, planting style and building structures, but not on vegetable type. Higher overall traffic burden increased trace metal content in the biomass. The presence of buildings and large masses of vegetation as barriers between crops and roads reduced trace metal content in the biomass. Based on this we discuss consequences for urban horticulture, risk assessment, and planting and monitoring guidelines for cultivation and consumption of crops.

  2. Student-centred instruction and learning processes in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welzel, Manuela

    1997-09-01

    During the 1970s, student-centred instruction—that is, “play orientation in physics education” (Spielorientierter Unterricht)—was at the centre of curriculum development at the Institute of Physics Education in Bremen. During the past decade, we investigated this kind of instruction with a particular focus on students' learning processes using a situated cognition perspective. Our research group at the Institute conducted several empirical studies of physics learning for different age groups. The aim of these case studies was to construct detailed understandings of how individual learning processes unfold. On the basis of these studies, we attempt to design physics lessons more effectively than they have been in the past. This paper exemplifies our approach providing information about the theoretical and methodological frameworks, the main outcomes of our studies; and reflections about the possibilities for “more effective” student-centred instruction.

  3. Centre of Excellence For Simulation Education and Innovation (CESEI).

    PubMed

    Qayumi, A Karim

    2010-01-01

    Simulation is becoming an integral part of medical education. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) was the first organization to recognize the value of simulation-based learning, and to award accreditation for educational institutions that aim to provide simulation as part of the experiential learning opportunity. Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation (CESEI) is a multidisciplinary and interprofessional educational facility that is based at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Vancouver Costal Health Authority (VCH). Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation's goal is to provide excellence in education, research, and healthcare delivery by providing a technologically advanced environment and learning opportunity using simulation for various groups of learners including undergraduate, postgraduate, nursing, and allied health professionals. This article is an attempt to describe the infrastructure, services, and uniqueness of the Centre of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation.

  4. CCall--healthy and successful work in call centres.

    PubMed

    Benninghoven, Alfred; Bindzius, Fritz; Braun, Detlef; Cramer, Jutta; Ellegast, Rolf; Flowerday, Udo; Genz, Andreas; von der Heyden, Thomas; Pfeiffer, Wolfgang; Schittly, Dagmar; Schweer, Ralf; Stamm, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Call centre workplaces are in many ways a challenge to occupational health and safety. The occupation itself can be described as an IT information technology-supported, communication-intensive form of work with often unusual working hours and a high rate of part-time employment. Data on the employee turnover as well as absenteeism related to occupational disability is quite contradictory. Occupational safety and its proponents still have to find new ways into the corporate structures and cultures of this relatively new and rapidly growing branch of industry. In a 2-year research and development project, using a holistic approach and under consideration of all the relevant disciplines, call centre workplaces were studied, and organisational measures were developed and field tested by putting them into practice. Practical help was developed for a sustainable strategy for successful and healthy work in call centres.

  5. Being Subject-Centred: A Philosophy of Teaching and Implications for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Hobson, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Being subject-centred as a higher education teacher offers a rich and illuminating philosophical and practical understanding of learning. Building upon previous research on subject-centred learning, we draw on reflection, literature review and a phenomenological approach to show how our ways of being infuse the teaching and learning environment.…

  6. Children's Preferences for Group Musical Activities in Child Care Centres: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural research study of children's preferences for group musical activities in child care centres. A total of 228 young children aged 4-5 years in seven child care centres in Hong Kong and in the Adelaide City of South Australia participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected via a…

  7. Clarifying the Subject Centred Approach to Vocational Learning Theory: Negotiated Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Workplace learning research has taken what could be termed a turn to the subjective. This brings the person and agency of workers to the centre of work learning theory. Within sociocultural perspectives that emphasise participative practice as the basis of vocational learning, a key concept that emerges from this subject centred approach is…

  8. How Person-Centred Counselling Trainers Understand and Experience Their Role in the Current British Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballinger, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a qualitative study into the experience of person-centred training from the viewpoint of the trainer. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was the adopted approach. The researcher conducted a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews with five person-centred trainers with experience across a range of…

  9. Current, Short Term, Future and Star Wars Research Projects for Ornamental Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Greenhouse Production Research Group is involved in fundamental and developmental plant research aimed at developing tools for early stress detection and efficient agrochemical utilization for protected horticulture crops. The group conducts basic plant biology research with the goal o...

  10. Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, G.; Potukuchi, P.; Roy, A.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne is collaborating with the Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), New Delhi, to develop a new type of superconducting accelerating structure for low-velocity heavy ions. A copper model has been evaluated and tests on the niobium prototype are currently in progress. Some technical details of this project are described in the Superconducting Linac Development section of this report. All funding for the prototype has come from the NSC, and they have also stationed two staff members at ATLAS for the past two years to gain experience and work on this project. Additional NSC personnel visited ATLAS for extended periods during 1994 for electronics and cryogenics experience and training. Two NSC staff members are scheduled to spend several months at ANL during 1995 to continue tests and developments of the prototype resonators and to initiate fabrication of the production models for their linac project.

  11. Genomic variants of genes associated with three horticultural traits in apple revealed by genome re-sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shijie; Chen, Weiping; Xin, Lu; Gao, Zhihong; Hou, Yingjun; Yu, Xinyi; Zhang, Zhen; Qu, Shenchun

    2014-01-01

    The apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) cultivar ‘Su Shuai’ exhibits greater disease resistance, shorter internodes and lighter fruit flavor compared with its parents ‘Golden Delicious’ and ‘Indo’. To obtain a comprehensive overview of the sequence variation in these three horticultural traits, the genomes of ‘Su Shuai’ and ‘Indo’ were resequenced using next-generation sequencing and compared to the genome of ‘Golden Delicious’. A wide range of genetic variations were detected, including 2 454 406 and 18 749 349 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and 59 547 and 50 143 structural variants (SVs) in the ‘Indo’ and ‘Su Shuai’ genomes, respectively. Among the SVs in ‘Su Shuai’, 17 genes related to disease resistance, 10 genes related to Gibberellin (GA) and 19 genes associated with fruit flavor were identified. The expression patterns of eight of the SV genes were examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The results of this study illustrate the genomic variation in these cultivars and provide evidence for a genetic basis for the horticultural traits of disease resistance, short internodes and lighter flavor exhibited in these cultivars. These results provide a genetic basis for the phenotypic characteristics of ‘Su Shuai’ and, as such, these SVs could serve as gene-specific molecular markers in maker-assisted breeding of apples. PMID:26504548

  12. Distant Operational Care Centre: Design Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to outline the design of the Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC), a modular medical facility to maintain human health and performance in space, that is adaptable to a range of remote human habitats. The purpose of this project is to outline a design, not to go into a complete technical specification of a medical facility for space. This project involves a process to produce a concise set of requirements, addressing the fundamental problems and issues regarding all aspects of a space medical facility for the future. The ideas presented here are at a high level, based on existing, researched, and hypothetical technologies. Given the long development times for space exploration, the outlined concepts from this project embodies a collection of identified problems, and corresponding proposed solutions and ideas, ready to contribute to future space exploration efforts. In order to provide a solid extrapolation and speculation in the context of the future of space medicine, the extent of this project's vision is roughly within the next two decades. The Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC) is a modular medical facility for space. That is, its function is to maintain human health and performance in space environments, through prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Furthermore, the DOCC must be adaptable to meet the environmental requirements of different remote human habitats, and support a high quality of human performance. To meet a diverse range of remote human habitats, the DOCC concentrates on a core medical capability that can then be adapted. Adaptation would make use of the DOCC's functional modularity, providing the ability to replace, add, and modify core functions of the DOCC by updating hardware, operations, and procedures. Some of the challenges to be addressed by this project include what constitutes the core medical capability in terms of hardware, operations, and procedures, and how DOCC can be adapted to different remote

  13. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Faheem

    2008-07-01

    This talk traces in brief the genesis of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, as one of Prof. Abdus Salam's major achievements. It outlines why Salam felt the necessity for establishing such a centre to help physicists in the developing world. It situates the founding of the Centre within Salam's broader vision of the causes of underdevelopment and of science as an engine for scientific, technological, economic and social development. The talk reviews the successes and failures of the ICTP and gives a brief overall view of the current status of the Centre.

  14. Safe motherhood partners -- the International Children's Centre.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The International Children's Centre (ICC) works worldwide to improve child health in the least developed countries. In its training and research projects the agency contributes to the Safe Motherhood Initiative to improve the health of mothers and infants. ICC is based in Paris, it was established in 1949, and the agency has cooperated with governments, nongovernmental organizations and international bodies like the World Health Organization (WHO) in child care. ICC's activities reflect concern for the health of women before and during pregnancy and the rest of their lives. The center's work comprises training, research, local projects, and information and documentation. Following the 1987 Nairobi conference on safe motherhood, ICC organized a seminar in Paris on maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan francophone Africa, which led to participation in the Safe Motherhood Initiative with a variety of training and research programs. ICC training is integrated, community-based, and multidisciplinary. Anthropology, psychology, economics and management have played a role in ICC training courses. The center runs an international course on maternal and child health from January to April each year and also organizes distance training courses on problem solving in health care. ICC training programs have taken place in Laos, Senegal, and Vietnam to strengthen the work of maternal and child health training centers there. A 4-week course on economic evaluation of health programs is held in Paris each July. In 1989 and 1990, ICC organized in collaboration with WHO safe motherhood workshops on research methodology in Benin and in Burkina Faso with participants from 6 francophone African countries. One research project in Benin is on risk factors for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and the other in Cameroon on improving surveillance of pregnancy, delivery, and the postnatal period. ICC focuses on long-term planning and action for the benefit of mothers and children.

  15. Energy efficiency in U.K. shopping centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiarotti, Michela

    Energy efficiency in shopping centres means providing comfortable internal environment and services to the occupants with minimum energy use in a cost-effective and environmentally sensitive manner. This research considers the interaction of three factors affecting the energy efficiency of shopping centres: i) performance of the building fabric and services ii) management of the building in terms of operation, control, maintenance and replacement of the building fabric and services, and company's energy policy iii) occupants' expectation for comfort and awareness of energy efficiency. The aim of the investigation is to determine the role of the above factors in the energy consumption and carbon emissions of shopping centres and the scope for reducing this energy usage by changing one or all the three factors. The study also attempts to prioritize the changes in the above factors that are more cost-effective at reducing that energy consumption and identify the benefits and main economic and legal drivers for energy efficiency in shopping centres. To achieve these targets, three case studies have been analysed. Using energy data from bills, the performance of the selected case studies has been assessed to establish trends and current energy consumption and carbon emissions of shopping centres and their related causes. A regression analysis has attempted to break down the energy consumption of the landlords' area by end-use to identify the main sources of energy usage and consequently introduce cost-effective measures for saving energy. A monitoring and occupants' survey in both landlords' and tenants' areas have been carried out at the same time to compare the objective data of the environmental conditions with the subjective impressions of shoppers and shopkeepers. In particular, the monitoring aimed at assessing the internal environment to identify possible causes of discomfort and opportunities for introducing energy saving measures. The survey looked at

  16. The Irish Centre for Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilheany, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Conducting potency tests on penicillin, discussing rocket technology with a NASA astronaut, analysing animal bone fragments from medieval times, these are just some of the activities which occupy the time of students at The Irish Centre for Talented Youth. The Centre identifies young students with exceptional academic ability and then provides…

  17. Student Centred Approaches: Teachers' Learning and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, Colleen; Davies, Anne; Weaven, Mary; Hooley, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Student centred approaches to teaching and learning in mathematics is one of the reforms currently being advocated and implemented to improve mathematics outcomes for students from low socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds. The models, meanings and practices of student centred approaches explored in this paper reveal that a constructivist model…

  18. Genome-Wide Differentiation of Various Melon Horticultural Groups for Use in GWAS for Fruit Firmness and Construction of a High Resolution Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Nimmakayala, Padma; Tomason, Yan R.; Abburi, Venkata L.; Alvarado, Alejandra; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Vajja, Venkata G.; Salazar, Germania; Panicker, Girish K.; Levi, Amnon; Wechter, William P.; McCreight, James D.; Korol, Abraham B.; Ronin, Yefim; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Reddy, Umesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Melon (Cucumis melo L.) is a phenotypically diverse eudicot diploid (2n = 2x = 24) has climacteric and non-climacteric morphotypes and show wide variation for fruit firmness, an important trait for transportation and shelf life. We generated 13,789 SNP markers using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) and anchored them to chromosomes to understand genome-wide fixation indices (Fst) between various melon morphotypes and genomewide linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay. The FST between accessions of cantalupensis and inodorus was 0.23. The FST between cantalupensis and various agrestis accessions was in a range of 0.19–0.53 and between inodorus and agrestis accessions was in a range of 0.21–0.59 indicating sporadic to wide ranging introgression. The EM (Expectation Maximization) algorithm was used for estimation of 1436 haplotypes. Average genome-wide LD decay for the melon genome was noted to be 9.27 Kb. In the current research, we focused on the genome-wide divergence underlying diverse melon horticultural groups. A high-resolution genetic map with 7153 loci was constructed. Genome-wide segregation distortion and recombination rate across various chromosomes were characterized. Melon has climacteric and non-climacteric morphotypes and wide variation for fruit firmness, a very important trait for transportation and shelf life. Various levels of QTLs were identified with high to moderate stringency and linked to fruit firmness using both genome-wide association study (GWAS) and biparental mapping. Gene annotation revealed some of the SNPs are located in β-D-xylosidase, glyoxysomal malate synthase, chloroplastic anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase, and histidine kinase, the genes that were previously characterized for fruit ripening and softening in other crops. PMID:27713759

  19. The role of the sexual assault centre.

    PubMed

    Eogan, Maeve; McHugh, Anne; Holohan, Mary

    2013-02-01

    Sexual Assault Centres provide multidisciplinary care for men and women who have experienced sexual crime. These centres enable provision of medical, forensic, psychological support and follow-up care, even if patients chose not to report the incident to the police service. Sexual Support Centres need to provide a ring-fenced, forensically clean environment. They need to be appropriately staffed and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to allow prompt provision of medical and supportive care and collection of forensic evidence. Sexual Assault Centres work best within the context of a core agreed model of care, which includes defined multi-agency guidelines and care pathways, close links with forensic science and police services, and designated and sustainable funding arrangements. Additionally, Sexual Assault Centres also participate in patient, staff and community education and risk reduction. Furthermore, they contribute to the development, evaluation and implementation of national strategies on domestic, sexual and gender-based violence. PMID:22975433

  20. National Arboretum Solves Green Industry Problems with a Multi-Disciplinary Research Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ornamental horticulture or “green” industry continues to be one of the fastest growing segments of agriculture in the U.S., ranking behind only corn and soybeans in total cash receipts. The Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit (FNPRU), of the U.S. National Arboretum, is the largest research g...

  1. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  2. ACTRIS Data Centre: An atmospheric data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, C. Lund; Fahre Vik, A.; Logna, R.; Torseth, K.; Linné, H.; O'Connor, E.

    2012-04-01

    ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) is a European Project aiming at integrating European ground-based stations equipped with advanced instrumentation for studying aerosols, clouds, and short-lived gas-phase species. The ACTRIS activities result in improved atmospheric measurements data made at more than 60 European sites, from numerous instruments and includes variables measured by ground based in situ and remote sensing technologies. Core variables are in situ aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties, short-lived trace gases (volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides), aerosol scattering and extinction profiles, and cloud properties. The ACTRIS data centre (ACTRIS DC) is giving free and open access to all data resulting from the activities of the infrastructure network, complemented with data from other relevant networks and data bases. The overall goal is to facilitate scientists and other user groups access to atmospheric observational data, and to provide mature products for analysis and interpretation of atmospheric composition change. The ACTRIS DC aims at substantially increasing the number of high-quality data by providing long-term observational data relevant to climate and air quality research produced with standardized or comparable procedures throughout the network. The backbone of the ACTRIS DC is the three core data bases: - EARLINET Data Base hosting aerosol lidar data from more than 30 European sites - EBAS hosting ground based atmospheric in situ data from more than 1000 sites globally - Cloudnet hosting remote sensing cloud data and products from 5 European sites Furthermore, a joint portal is developed combining information from various data sources to gain new information not presently available from standalone databases or networks. The data centre will provide tools and services to facilitate the use of measurements for broad user communities. Higher level and integrated products will be

  3. Chemical constituents with anti-allergic activity from the root of Edulis Superba, a horticultural cultivar of Paeonia lactiflora.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Shu; Tamura, Takayuki; Kadowaki, Makoto; Wang, Zhengtao; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2016-04-01

    The methanolic extract and its subfractions from the dried root of Edulis Superba, a horticultural cultivar of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, showed potent anti-allergic effect as inhibition of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated degranulation in rat basophil leukemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of 26 compounds, including a new norneolignan glycoside, paeonibenzofuran (1), together with 25 known ones (2-26). The chemical structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical evidences. Among the isolated compounds, mudanpioside E (5) with paeoniflorin-type skeleton and quercetin (16) showed potent inhibitory activity against a degranulation marker, β-hexosaminidase release with IC50 values of 40.34 and 25.05 μM, respectively. A primary structure-activity relationship of these components was discussed.

  4. Chemical constituents with anti-allergic activity from the root of Edulis Superba, a horticultural cultivar of Paeonia lactiflora.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Shu; Tamura, Takayuki; Kadowaki, Makoto; Wang, Zhengtao; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2016-04-01

    The methanolic extract and its subfractions from the dried root of Edulis Superba, a horticultural cultivar of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, showed potent anti-allergic effect as inhibition of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated degranulation in rat basophil leukemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of 26 compounds, including a new norneolignan glycoside, paeonibenzofuran (1), together with 25 known ones (2-26). The chemical structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical evidences. Among the isolated compounds, mudanpioside E (5) with paeoniflorin-type skeleton and quercetin (16) showed potent inhibitory activity against a degranulation marker, β-hexosaminidase release with IC50 values of 40.34 and 25.05 μM, respectively. A primary structure-activity relationship of these components was discussed. PMID:26833191

  5. Frailty modelling for survival data from multi-centre clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ha, Il Do; Sylvester, Richard; Legrand, Catherine; Mackenzie, Gilbert

    2011-07-30

    Despite the use of standardized protocols in, multi-centre, randomized clinical trials, outcome may vary between centres. Such heterogeneity may alter the interpretation and reporting of the treatment effect. Below, we propose a general frailty modelling approach for investigating, inter alia, putative treatment-by-centre interactions in time-to-event data in multi-centre clinical trials. A correlated random effects model is used to model the baseline risk and the treatment effect across centres. It may be based on shared, individual or correlated random effects. For inference we develop the hierarchical-likelihood (or h-likelihood) approach which facilitates computation of prediction intervals for the random effects with proper precision. We illustrate our methods using disease-free time-to-event data on bladder cancer patients participating in an European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer trial, and a simulation study. We also demonstrate model selection using h-likelihood criteria.

  6. Comparative assessment of migrant farm worker health in conventional and organic horticultural systems in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Cross, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Hounsome, Barry; Edwards-Jones, Gareth

    2008-02-25

    This study describes the self-reported health and well-being status of field and packhouse workers in UK vegetable horticulture, and tests the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the self-reported health of workers on organic and conventional horticultural farms. The majority of those sampled were migrant workers (93%) from Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia and the Ukraine. More than 95% of the respondents were aged 18-34 and recruited through university agricultural faculties in East European or employed via UK agencies. The health of 605 farm workers (395 males and 210 females) was measured through the use of four standard health instruments. Farm workers' health was significantly poorer than published national norms for three different health instruments (Short Form 36, EuroQol EQ-5D and the Visual Analogue Scale). There were no significant differences in the health status of farm workers between conventional and organic farms for any of these three instruments. However, organic farm workers scored higher on a fourth health instrument the Short Depression Happiness Scale (SDHS) indicating that workers on organic farms were happier than their counterparts working on conventional farms. Multiple regression analysis suggested that the difference in the SDHS score for organic and conventional farms is closely related to the range and number of tasks the workers performed each day. These findings suggest that a great deal of improvement in the self-reported health of farmers will need to occur before organic farms meet the requirements of the 'Principle of Health' as described by IFOAM. Ensuring that farm workers have a varied range of tasks could be a cost effective means of improving self-reported health status in both organic and conventional farming systems.

  7. Comparative assessment of migrant farm worker health in conventional and organic horticultural systems in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Cross, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Hounsome, Barry; Edwards-Jones, Gareth

    2008-02-25

    This study describes the self-reported health and well-being status of field and packhouse workers in UK vegetable horticulture, and tests the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the self-reported health of workers on organic and conventional horticultural farms. The majority of those sampled were migrant workers (93%) from Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia and the Ukraine. More than 95% of the respondents were aged 18-34 and recruited through university agricultural faculties in East European or employed via UK agencies. The health of 605 farm workers (395 males and 210 females) was measured through the use of four standard health instruments. Farm workers' health was significantly poorer than published national norms for three different health instruments (Short Form 36, EuroQol EQ-5D and the Visual Analogue Scale). There were no significant differences in the health status of farm workers between conventional and organic farms for any of these three instruments. However, organic farm workers scored higher on a fourth health instrument the Short Depression Happiness Scale (SDHS) indicating that workers on organic farms were happier than their counterparts working on conventional farms. Multiple regression analysis suggested that the difference in the SDHS score for organic and conventional farms is closely related to the range and number of tasks the workers performed each day. These findings suggest that a great deal of improvement in the self-reported health of farmers will need to occur before organic farms meet the requirements of the 'Principle of Health' as described by IFOAM. Ensuring that farm workers have a varied range of tasks could be a cost effective means of improving self-reported health status in both organic and conventional farming systems. PMID:18063013

  8. Phenology, natural enemies, and efficacy of horticultural oil for control of Chionaspis heterophyllae (Homoptera: Diaspididae) on Christmas tree plantations.

    PubMed

    Fondren, Kirsten M; McCullough, Deborah G

    2005-10-01

    Pine needle scale, Chionaspis pinifoliae (Fitch), and Chionaspis heterophyllae Cooley are important pests of Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris L., and other conifers in much of North America. On Christmas tree plantations, these insects are typically controlled by spraying broad-spectrum insecticides when the vulnerable immature stages are present. However, effective control of bivoltine populations can be difficult to achieve due to asynchronous hatch and development of the second generation. Our objectives were to 1) determine the phenology of the second generation of C. heterophyllae in Michigan; 2) characterize the natural enemy complex; and 3) assess the effectiveness of horticultural oil for control of C. heterophyllae on P. sylvestris Christmas tree plantations. We monitored scale populations in three counties in lower Michigan for 3 yr. Scale phenology was consistently associated with cumulative degree-days base 10 degrees C (DD(10 degrees C)). Second-generation egg hatch began at approximately 1230-1300 DD(10 degrees C), and continued for approximately 3 wk. The peak of the second instar coincided with 1500-1600 DD(10 degrees C). Common predators included the coccinellids Chilocorus stigma (Say) and Microweisia misella (LeConte). On average, 70% of the C. heterophyllae population in unsprayed fields was killed by predators in 1999. Two endoparasitic wasps, Encarsia bella Gahan and Marietta mexicana Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae), also were recovered. In 2000 and 2001, we applied a highly refined horticultural spray oil with a backpack mist blower at 1500-1600 DD(10 degrees). Scale mortality on trees treated with oil ranged from 66 to 80% and was similar to control achieved using conventional insecticides in both years.

  9. Regional centres for space science and technology education affiliated to the United Nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadimova, Sharafat

    Capacity-building efforts in space science and technology are a major focus of the activities of the Office of Outer Space Affairs. Such efforts include providing support to the regional centres for space science and technology education, affiliated to the United Nations, whose goal is to develop, through in-depth education, an indigenous capability for research and applications in the core disciplines of: (a) remote sensing and geographical information systems; (b) satellite communications; (c) satellite meteorology and global climate; and (d) space and atmospheric sciences and data management. The regional centres are located in Morocco and Nigeria for Africa, in Brazil and Mexico for Latin America and the Caribbean and in India for Asia and the Pacific. The overall policy-making body of each Centre is its Governing Board and consists of member States (within the region where the Centre is located), that have agreed, through their endorsement of the Centre's agreement, to the goals and objectives of the Centre. The United Nations Programme on Space Applications, with the support of prominent educators, has developed standard education curricula, which were adopted by the Centres for teaching each of the four core disciplines. Within the framework of the International Committee on global navigation satellite systems (ICG), which is established as an informal body for the purpose of promoting the use and application of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) on a global basis, the Regional Centres will also be acting as the ICG Information Centres. The ICG Information Centres aim to foster a more structured approach to information exchange in order to fulfil the reciprocal expectations of a network between ICG and Regional Centres.

  10. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  11. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  12. Comparative Vocational Education and Training Research in Europe: Balance and Perspectives. Contributions, Recommendations and Follow-Up of the CEDEFOP/DIPF Conference from January 1998 at the Science Centre in Bonn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauterbach, Uwe, Ed.; Sellin, Burkart, Ed.

    This document contains 32 papers from a conference on balance and perspectives in comparative vocational education and training (VET) research in Europe. Selected papers are as follows: "On the Path to Vocational Training Research with a European Dimension" (Oliver Lubke, Klaus Schedler, Alphonse de Vadder); "The Val Duchesse Social Dialogue"…

  13. A SDMS Model: Early Warning Coordination Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Reyes, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Following the tsunami disaster in 2004, the General Secretary of the United Nations (UN) Kofi Annan called for a global early warning system for all hazards and for all communities. He also requested the ISDR (International Strategy fort Disaster Reduction) and its UN partners to conduct a global survey of capacities, gaps and opportunities in relation to early warning systems. The produced report, "Global survey of Early Warning Systems", concluded that there are many gaps and shortcomings and that much progress has been made on early warning systems and great capabilities are available around the world. However, it may be argued that an early warning system (EWS) may not be enough to prevent fatalities due to a natural hazard; i.e., it should be seen as part of a ‘wider' or total system. Furthermore, an EWS may work very well when assessed individually but it is not clear whether it will contribute to accomplish the purpose of the ‘total disaster management system'; i.e., to prevent fatalities. For instance, a regional EWS may only work if it is well co-ordinated with the local warning and emergency response systems that ensure that the warning is received, communicated and acted upon by the potentially affected communities. It may be argued that without these local measures being in place, a regional EWS will have little impact in saving lives. Researchers argued that unless people are warned in remote areas, the technology is useless; for instance McGuire [5] argues that: "I have no doubt that the technical element of the warning system will work very well,"…"But there has to be an effective and efficient communications cascade from the warning centre to the fisherman on the beach and his family and the bar owners." Similarly, McFadden [6] states that: "There's no point in spending all the money on a fancy monitoring and a fancy analysis system unless we can make sure the infrastructure for the broadcast system is there,"… "That's going to require a lot

  14. Identity Theft: A Study in Contact Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Iain; Weir, George R. S.

    This paper explores the recent phenomenon of identity theft. In particular, it examines the contact centre environment as a mechanism for this to occur. Through a survey that was conducted amongst forty-five contact centre workers in the Glasgow area we determined that contact centres can and do provide a mechanism for identity theft. Specifically, we found a particularly high incidence of agents who had previously dealt with phone calls that they considered suspicious. Furthermore, there are agents within such environments who have previously been offered money in exchange for customers' details, or who know of fellow workers who received such offers. Lastly, we identify specific practices within contact centres that may contribute to the likelihood of identity theft.

  15. Hillary Clinton impressed by the Centre's work.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994, US First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, her daughter Chelsea, the Bangladesh Minister for Women and Children's Affairs, and the US Ambassador to Bangladesh visited the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B). The First Lady remarked that ICDDR,B's research programs on health and family planning have many important lessons for the developing and developed regions alike. She noted the development successes in Bangladesh that can be applied in the US and other countries: the Grameen Bank, oral rehydration solution (ORS), and the community outreach programs for health and family planning services. The First Lady was especially interested in ORS and its cost-effectiveness. Most of the 220,000 children hospitalized each year in the US for severe gastrointestinal illness are treated with expensive intravenous (IV) drips (average cost = $2300), while a few ORS packets would be a small fraction of the cost. The average cost of treatment per patient at ICDDR,B was only $12. Patients receive care free of charge. Less than 0.6% of the patients die. The previous year, a USAID administrator asked ICDDR,B for its expertise in fighting cholera at the Rwandan refugee camps in Goma, Zaire. ICDDR,B staff developed diagnostic antisera for the new cholera strain responsible for the epidemic in the Americas, described its pathophysiology, and established its mode of transmission in surface waters. ICDDR,B also provides technical support to the national family planning and maternal and child health programs. In the Matlab, ICDDR,B's work has contributed to a high contraceptive prevalence rate of more than 64% among poor and largely illiterate persons.

  16. Hillary Clinton impressed by the Centre's work.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994, US First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, her daughter Chelsea, the Bangladesh Minister for Women and Children's Affairs, and the US Ambassador to Bangladesh visited the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B). The First Lady remarked that ICDDR,B's research programs on health and family planning have many important lessons for the developing and developed regions alike. She noted the development successes in Bangladesh that can be applied in the US and other countries: the Grameen Bank, oral rehydration solution (ORS), and the community outreach programs for health and family planning services. The First Lady was especially interested in ORS and its cost-effectiveness. Most of the 220,000 children hospitalized each year in the US for severe gastrointestinal illness are treated with expensive intravenous (IV) drips (average cost = $2300), while a few ORS packets would be a small fraction of the cost. The average cost of treatment per patient at ICDDR,B was only $12. Patients receive care free of charge. Less than 0.6% of the patients die. The previous year, a USAID administrator asked ICDDR,B for its expertise in fighting cholera at the Rwandan refugee camps in Goma, Zaire. ICDDR,B staff developed diagnostic antisera for the new cholera strain responsible for the epidemic in the Americas, described its pathophysiology, and established its mode of transmission in surface waters. ICDDR,B also provides technical support to the national family planning and maternal and child health programs. In the Matlab, ICDDR,B's work has contributed to a high contraceptive prevalence rate of more than 64% among poor and largely illiterate persons. PMID:12289844

  17. The Western European Union Satellite Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasani, Bhupendra; Mara, Simon

    1993-06-01

    In January 1993, the FALCON consortium of 13 European companies, led by Cray Systems, won the contract to supply a turnkey satellite image processing facility to the Western European Union. The project started immediately and will be installed at WEU's Data Centre in Torrejon near Madrid in December 1993. This paper discusses the development of an idea for a Regional Satellite Monitoring Agency (RSMA) which will be realized in December 1993 when the Centre becomes fully operational.

  18. Dublin centre sees light of day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John

    2008-01-01

    An innovative new centre designed to get the public interested in science and technology will open at Trinity College Dublin later this month. The centre, known as the Science Gallery, will allow scientists and the public to debate and exchange ideas through a variety of interactive exhibitions, workshops and other events. The first exhibition will be “Lightwave” - a nine-day, city-wide festival about the principles of light and the technologies used to control it.

  19. Children as service users of a children's centre.

    PubMed

    James, Joan

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish what is important to pre-school children as service users of a children's centre. This research was conducted as part of a range of service users' perspectives in one inner city children's centre. This study shows that young children as service users are capable of contributing their views. The participants enjoyed private spaces. Nature and the environment were important to these children, as was watching their friends playing happily A mosaic approach was used in this qualitative study of five children aged three to four years. The mosaic approach uses observation and interviewing with participatory use of cameras by the children. It is a strengths-based approach, which extends to all children irrespective of ability and background. If adults are to understand children they need to look for opportunities for their voices to be heard.

  20. The Contribution of OLG Data and Analysis Centre to EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangl, Günter; Krauss, Sandro

    2013-04-01

    OLG (Observatory Lustbuehel Graz) as a joint venture of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying works as a GNSS data centre and analyses GNSS data for reference maintenance, geokinematics and ionosphere research. Due to the change from epoch to permanent sites regions in Africa, Asia and Europe are investigated since 1995. Presently, observations from about 300 GNSS stations are used for analysis. Most of the stations are public and are retrieved from different global, regional and local data centres. In addition some institutions provide their private data to the OLG. After presenting the main regions Austria, Central Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean and the Western Indian Ocean the question will be how these data and products could be included into EPOS.

  1. Evaluation Of Levels Of Climate Favorability For Viticulture In Breasta Viticultural Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzatu, Gilda-Diana; Mărăcineanu, Liviu Cristian

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this present research was to evaluate the climatic conditions of a viticultural centre, as there are always needed studies to determine the climate favorability of the vine cultivation and the varieties resistant to heat and water stress, especially when climate change affects globally viticulture. The present research was made using the interpretation of Craiova Regional Weather Centre's meteorological records for the year of 2014, for Breasta viticultural centre. The climatic factors permitted the determination of several indexes used in viticultural climatology for the appreciation of the viticultural biotope characteristics. Assessment of climatic resources through synthetic climatic indexes, clearly express the generous heliothermic offer available for Breasta viticultural centre, the guarantee of quality and specificity of vine products obtained in this area.

  2. Pesticide potential dermal exposure during the manipulation of concentrated mixtures at small horticultural and floricultural production units in Argentina: the formulation effect.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, Giselle A; Hughes, Enrique A; March, Hugo; Rojic, Guillermo; Zalts, Anita; Montserrat, Javier M

    2014-02-15

    Potential dermal exposure measurements of horticultural and floricultural field operators that handled concentrated pesticides showed a correlation with the types of formulations used (liquid or solid) during the mix and load stage. For liquid formulations, hand exposure was 22-62 times greater than that for solid ones. The dermal exposure mechanism was studied for this formulation under laboratory conditions, finding that the rupture of the aluminum seal of the pesticide container and the color of the liquid formulation are important factors. Additionally, significant external surface contamination of pesticide containers collected at horticultural farms was found. This could partially account for the differences between the exposure levels of field and laboratory experiments for liquid formulations.

  3. Transmission of HIV in dialysis centre.

    PubMed

    Velandia, M; Fridkin, S K; Cárdenas, V; Boshell, J; Ramirez, G; Bland, L; Iglesias, A; Jarvis, W

    1995-06-01

    In August, 1993, 13 dialysis patients at one dialysis centre in Colombia, South America, were found to be HIV positive, and this prompted an epidemiological investigation. We carried out a cohort study of all dialysis centre patients during January, 1992 to December, 1993 (epidemic period) to determine risk factors for HIV seroconversion. Haemodialysis and medical records were reviewed, dialysis centre staff and surviving patients were interviewed, and dialysis practices were observed. Stored sera from all dialysis centre patients were tested for HIV antibody. 12 (52%) of 23 patients tested positive for HIV antibody by enzyme immunoassay and western blot during the epidemic period. Of the 23 tested, 9 (39%) converted from HIV antibody negative to positive (seroconverters) and 10 (44%) remained HIV negative (seronegatives). The HIV seroconversion rate was higher among patients dialysed at the centre while a new patient, who was HIV seropositive, was dialysed there (90% vs 0%; p < 0.01), or when the dialysis centre reprocessed access needles, dialysers, and bloodlines (60% vs 0%). While 2 of 9 HIV seroconverters had had sex with prostitutes, none had received unscreened blood products or had other HIV risk factors. No surgical or dental procedures were associated with HIV seroconversion. Dialysers were reprocessed separately with 5% formaldehyde and were labelled for use on the same patient. Access needles were reprocessed by soaking them in a common container with a low-level disinfectant, benzalkonium chloride; 4 pairs of needles were placed in one pan creating the potential for cross-contamination or use of one patient's needles on another patient. HIV transmission at the dialysis centre was confirmed. Improperly reprocessed patient-care equipment, most probably access needles, is the likely mechanism of transmission. This outbreak was discovered by accident and similar transmission may be occurring in many other countries where low-level disinfectants are used to

  4. 'Smashed by the National Health'? A Closer Look at the Demise of the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham.

    PubMed

    Conford, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Pioneer Health Centre, based in South London before and after the Second World War, remains a source of interest for advocates of a positive approach to health promotion in contrast with the treatment of those already ill. Its closure in 1950 for lack of funds has been blamed on the then recently established National Health Service, but this article argues that such an explanation is over-simplified and ignores a number of other factors. The Centre had struggled financially during the 1930s and tried to gain support from the Medical Research Council. The Council appeared interested in the Centre before the war, but was less sympathetic in the 1940s. Around the time of its closure and afterwards, the Centre was also involved in negotiations with London County Council; these failed because the Centre's directors would not accept the changes which the Council would have needed to make. Unpublished documents reveal that the Centre's directors were uncompromising and that their approach to the situation antagonised their colleagues. Changes in medical science also worked against the Centre. The success of sulphonamide drugs appeared to render preventive medicine less significant, while the development of statistical techniques cast doubt on the Centre's experimental methods. The Centre was at the heart of the nascent organic farming movement, which opposed the rapid growth of chemical cultivation. But what might be termed 'chemical triumphalism' was on the march in both medicine and agriculture, and the Centre was out of tune with the mood of the times. PMID:26971599

  5. Career Counselling in a Changing South Africa. Report on the Advanced Seminar of the Centre for Child and Adult Guidance of the Institute for Psychological and Edumetric Research (Republic of South Africa, September 16, 1987). Occasional Paper No. 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, M. J., Comp.

    Seminar papers included in this document are: (1) "Career Counselling in a Changing South Africa," the opening address by J. G. Garbers, president of the Human Science Research Council; (2) "Current Problems in Career Counselling: The Report of the National Manpower Commission" (I. J. van Zyl); (3) "The Present Economic Situation and Career…

  6. Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats; Eklund, Mats; Eklund, Jörgen; Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    2011-06-01

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste

  7. Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats; Eklund, Mats; Eklund, Jörgen; Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    2011-06-01

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste

  8. Evaluation and characterization in bananas (Musa ssp.) at the USDA-ARS Tropical Agriculture Research Station

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Banana, Musa spp., is a key horticultural crop in tropical regions of the world where they provide sustenance and serve as cash crops. The plantain subgroup in particular, is an important staple in the Caribbean, Central America and some countries in South America. One of the integral research comp...

  9. Conducting a paediatric multi-centre RCT with an industry partner: challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Jessica; Newcombe, Peter; Martin, Graham; Kimble, Roy

    2012-11-01

    There are many benefits of multi-centred research including large sample sizes, statistical power, timely recruitment and generalisability of results. However, there are numerous considerations when planning and implementing a multi-centred study. This article reviews the challenges and successes of planning and implementing a multi-centred prospective randomised control trial involving an industry partner. The research investigated the impact on psychosocial functioning of a cosmetic camouflage product for children and adolescents with burn scarring. Multi-centred studies commonly have many stakeholders. Within this study, six Australian and New Zealand paediatric burn units as well as an industry partner were involved. The inclusion of an industry partner added complexities as they brought different priorities and expectations to the research. Further, multifaceted ethical and institutional approval processes needed to be negotiated. The challenges, successes, lessons learned and recommendations from this study regarding Australian and New Zealand ethics and research governance approval processes, collaboration with industry partners and the management of differing expectations will be outlined. Recommendations for future multi-centred research with industry partners include provision of regular written reports for the industry partner; continual monitoring and prompt resolution of concerns; basic research practices education for industry partners; minimisation of industry partner contact with participants; clear roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders and utilisation of single ethical review if available.

  10. Breeding citrus for HLB resistance at the USDA/ARS U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, Ft. Pierce, Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus breeding has been conducted by the USDA since 1893. The initial objectives included improved disease-resistance, cold hardiness, and easy peeling fruit, which are still important breeding objectives today. The emergence of huanglongbing (HLB) in the US has propelled the development of HLB r...

  11. Indigenous Cultural Self-Representation and Its Internal Critiques: A Case Study of the Woodland Cultural Centre, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    This research report discusses Indigenous cultural representation and its internal critiques, based on the case study of an Indigenous-run museum, the Woodland Cultural Centre, in Canada. Since its establishment in 1972, the Woodland Cultural Centre has strived to promote Indigenous culture, especially First Nations art, and has challenged the…

  12. Student Experience and Academic Success: Comparing a Student-Centred and a Lecture-Based Course Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severiens, Sabine; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Born, Marise

    2015-01-01

    Past research has shown that, under certain conditions, student-centred and small-scale course programmes result in more academic success. The present study investigates these conditions in further detail. It is examined whether, in comparison to a course programme that is relatively more lecture-based, a student-centred course programme promotes…

  13. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  14. Incident and Emergency Centre of the IAEA.

    PubMed

    Baciu, Florian; Buglova, Elena; Martincic, Rafael; Spiegelberg Planer, Rejane; Stern, Warren; Winkler, Guenther

    2010-06-01

    The Incident and Emergency Centre of the International Atomic Emergency Agency is the global focal point for preparedness, event reporting, and response to nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies irrespective of their cause. The Centre continuously works to develop standards and guidance for strengthening Member States' preparedness; develops practical tools and training programs to assist Member States in promptly applying the standards and guidance; and organizes a variety of training events and exercises. The Centre evaluates national plans and assists in their development; facilitates effective communication between countries; develops response procedures; and supports national exercises. The Centre provides access to multiple information resources; assesses trends that may influence crisis and consequence management plans and response; and develops and continuously enhances methodology for identifying conditions needed for early warning and response. The Centre provides around-the-clock assistance to Member States in dealing with nuclear and radiological events, including security related events through timely and efficient services and the provision of a coordinated international response to such emergencies. PMID:20445379

  15. Patient-centred mountain medicine.

    PubMed

    Szawarski, Piotr; Hillebrandt, David

    2016-08-01

    Venturing into the mountains, doctors have accompanied expeditions to provide routine care to the teams, undertake research and occasionally take on a rescue role. The role of doctors practicing mountain medicine is evolving. Public health issues involving concepts of health and safety have become necessary with the coming of commercial and youth expeditions. Increasingly individuals with a disability or a medical diagnosis choose to ascend to high altitudes. Doctors become involved in assessment of risk and providing advice for such individuals. The field of mountain medicine is perhaps unique in that acceptance of risk is part of the ethos of climbing and adventure. The pursuit of mountaineering goals may represent the ultimate conquest of a disability. Knowledge of mountain environment is essential in facilitating mountain ascents for those who choose to undertake them, in spite of a disability or medical condition. PMID:27234206

  16. Patient-centred mountain medicine.

    PubMed

    Szawarski, Piotr; Hillebrandt, David

    2016-08-01

    Venturing into the mountains, doctors have accompanied expeditions to provide routine care to the teams, undertake research and occasionally take on a rescue role. The role of doctors practicing mountain medicine is evolving. Public health issues involving concepts of health and safety have become necessary with the coming of commercial and youth expeditions. Increasingly individuals with a disability or a medical diagnosis choose to ascend to high altitudes. Doctors become involved in assessment of risk and providing advice for such individuals. The field of mountain medicine is perhaps unique in that acceptance of risk is part of the ethos of climbing and adventure. The pursuit of mountaineering goals may represent the ultimate conquest of a disability. Knowledge of mountain environment is essential in facilitating mountain ascents for those who choose to undertake them, in spite of a disability or medical condition.

  17. The European Micropaleontological Reference Centre in Kraków

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Michael; Waskowska, Anna; Bebenek, Slawomir; Pilarz, Monika

    2016-04-01

    We are pleased to announce the establishment of the European Micropaleontological Reference Centre, housed in the offices of Micropress Europe at the AGH University of Science & Technology in Krakow, Poland. The new European Micropaleontological Reference Centre is an initiative of the Grzybowski Foundation and Micropress Europe. The centre is designed to serve the micropaleontological community by providing a permanent repository or "museum" for published microfossil collections. The centre houses a growing collection of microfossils picked into faunal slides, as well as a well-stocked library of micropaleontological books, journals, and reprints. We have the only up-to-date paper copy of the Ellis & Messina Catalogue of Foraminifera in Central Europe. Currently, the slide collections include: - Type slides of benthic foraminifera from Poland (the collection of I. Heller from the Polish oil company GEONAFTA), - Carboniferous foraminifera from Germany and Poland (collections of G. Eickhoff and Z. Alexandrowicz), - IODP sites in the Arctic, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans (collections of M. Kaminski, E. Setoyama, A. Holborn), - Exploration wells in the Boreal seas: North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Western Barents Sea, Labrador Sea, Bering Sea, Spitsbergen, Western Siberia (collections of M. Kaminski, J. Nagy, T. Van Den Akker, V. Podobina, and others), - Paratethyan Foraminifera (collections of E. Luczkowska, C. Beldean, F. Szekely), - Mesozoic-Paleogene Foraminifera from Gubbio, Italy (collections of M. Kaminski, C. Cetean, and students) and the Polish Carpathians (collection of A. Waskowska), - Caribbean (collection of M. Kaminski, R. Preece), West Africa (collection of R. Preece, S. Kender, C. Cetean), - We have a separate collection of type specimens of species (paratypes). Slides are housed in cabinet drawers together with the relevant publication. Researchers are welcome to visit the offices of Micropress Europe to view the archived microfossil collections. The center

  18. Optimizing Data Centre Energy and Environmental Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikema, David Hendrik

    Data centres use an estimated 2% of US electrical power which accounts for much of their total cost of ownership. This consumption continues to grow, further straining power grids attempting to integrate more renewable energy. This dissertation focuses on assessing and reducing data centre environmental and financial costs. Emissions of projects undertaken to lower the data centre environmental footprints can be assessed and the emission reduction projects compared using an ISO-14064-2-compliant greenhouse gas reduction protocol outlined herein. I was closely involved with the development of the protocol. Full lifecycle analysis and verifying that projects exceed business-as-usual expectations are addressed, and a test project is described. Consuming power when it is low cost or when renewable energy is available can be used to reduce the financial and environmental costs of computing. Adaptation based on the power price showed 10--50% potential savings in typical cases, and local renewable energy use could be increased by 10--80%. Allowing a fraction of high-priority tasks to proceed unimpeded still allows significant savings. Power grid operators use mechanisms called ancillary services to address variation and system failures, paying organizations to alter power consumption on request. By bidding to offer these services, data centres may be able to lower their energy costs while reducing their environmental impact. If providing contingency reserves which require only infrequent action, savings of up to 12% were seen in simulations. Greater power cost savings are possible for those ceding more control to the power grid operator. Coordinating multiple data centres adds overhead, and altering at which data centre requests are processed based on changes in the financial or environmental costs of power is likely to increase this overhead. Tests of virtual machine migrations showed that in some cases there was no visible increase in power use while in others power use

  19. From serenity to halcyon birth centre.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This article follows the journey of Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust quest for improving normal birth outcomes for a complex and diverse population. The opportunities that led to commissioning a colocated and freestanding birth centre are explored and how the design was influenced by less clinical beliefs about birth. Through the story of both birth centre developments, Kathryn Gutteridge shows the changes that have been seen in both clinical outcomes and families'comments. From a failing maternity service to a beacon of light where midwifery care and a belief that 'your birth in our home' really matters.

  20. A synthesis of AOT40-based response functions and critical levels of ozone for agricultural and horticultural crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, G.; Buse, A.; Gimeno, B.; Bermejo, V.; Holland, M.; Emberson, L.; Pleijel, H.

    Crop-response data from over 700 published papers and conference proceedings have been analysed with the aim of establishing ozone dose-response functions for a wide range of European agricultural and horticultural crops. Data that met rigorous selection criteria (e.g. field-based, ozone concentrations within European range, full season exposure period) were used to derive AOT40-yield response functions for 19 crops by first converting the published ozone concentration data into AOT40 (AOT40 is the hourly mean ozone concentration accumulated over a threshold ozone concentration of 40 ppb during daylight hours, units ppm h). For any individual crop, there were no significant differences in the linear response functions derived for experiments conducted in the USA or Europe, or for individual cultivars. Three statistically independent groups were identified: ozone sensitive crops (wheat, water melon, pulses, cotton, turnip, tomato, onion, soybean and lettuce); moderately sensitive crops (sugar beet, potato, oilseed rape, tobacco, rice, maize, grape and broccoli) and ozone resistant (barley and fruit represented by plum and strawberry). Critical levels of a 3 month AOT40 of 3 ppm h and a 3.5 month AOT40 of 6 ppm h were derived from the functions for wheat and tomato, respectively.

  1. INFOMAT: The international materials assessment and application centre's internet gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branquinho, Carmen Lucia; Colodete, Leandro Tavares

    2004-08-01

    INFOMAT is an electronic directory structured to facilitate the search and retrieval of materials science and technology information sources. Linked to the homepage of the International Materials Assessment and Application Centre, INFOMAT presents descriptions of 392 proprietary databases with links to their host systems as well as direct links to over 180 public domain databases and over 2,400 web sites. Among the web sites are associations/unions, governmental and non-governmental institutions, industries, library holdings, market statistics, news services, on-line publications, standardization and intellectual property organizations, and universities/research groups.

  2. How Learning English Facilitates Integration for Adult Migrants: The Jarrah Language Centre Experience. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, Meaghan

    2012-01-01

    Building the research capacity of the vocational education and training (VET) sector is a key concern for the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER). To assist with this objective, NCVER supported an academic scholarship program, whereby VET practitioners are sponsored to undertake university study at honours, master's, or…

  3. Cooperative Working towards Family-Centred Health Education in Acute Care: Improvement in Client Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastani, Farideh; Golaghaie, Farzaneh; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Rafeie, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish family-centred health education for patients in a neurosurgery unit and to evaluate its impact on patients' and families' satisfaction. Design: Cooperative participatory research through which a group of clinical nurses and an academic researcher engaged in cycles of action and reflection. Setting: The study was…

  4. Group Supervision: Supporting Practitioners in Their Work with Children and Families in Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soni, Anita

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how group supervision can be used to support the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of those working with children and families in early years provision in England. It is based on research conducted in 2008 with a cluster of four Children's Centres in the West Midlands in England, UK. The research evaluated group…

  5. Leading Highly Performing Children's Centres: Supporting the Development of the "Accidental Leaders"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Andy; Sharp, Caroline; Handscomb, Graham

    2016-01-01

    There is wide recognition that early childhood experiences are critical to a child's development and their subsequent life chances. However, little research has been undertaken into leadership in early years settings, which is so influential in this regard. This article summarizes research into the leadership of Sure Start Children's Centres,…

  6. Lively Bureaucracy? The ESRC's Doctoral Training Centres and UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunt, Ingrid; McAlpine, Lynn; Mills, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the changing relationships between the UK government, its research councils and universities, focusing on the governing, funding and organisation of doctoral training. We use the Doctoral Training Centres (DTCs) funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as a prism through which to study the shifting nature of…

  7. Framework for Developing Leadership Skills in Child Care Centres in Queensland, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nupponen, Hanna

    2006-01-01

    There has been minimal Australian research focused on leadership and management aspects of directors' work in centre-based child care to date. In Australia, practices in early education have been drawn largely from studies in other cultural contexts, particularly research undertaken in the United States. It is timely that Australian research…

  8. Leading the Way: Indigenous Knowledge and Collaboration at The Woolyungah Indigenous Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGloin, Colleen; Marshall, Anne; Adams, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper derives from collaborative research undertaken by staff at the Woolyungah Indigenous Centre, into our own teaching practice. It articulates a particular strand of inquiry emanating from the research: the importance of Indigenous knowledges as this is taught at Woolyungah in the discipline of Indigenous Studies. The paper is a reflection…

  9. Tracing Discourses of Social Action: Inner-City Sydney Neighbourhood Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, John

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on my doctoral research around community organizations in the inner city of Sydney, Australia. The neighbourhood centres (NCs) provide a case study of sites where discourses of feminism, multiculturalism and urban environmentalism have been activated within a social justice framework. The research participants were activists…

  10. Journey to the Centre of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Using the film "Journey to the Centre of a Triangle" with a group of 15-year-old pupils, the author describes how they had done some work on constructions such as angle bisector and perpendicular bisector. The pupils were given A3 papers, rulers, compasses and pencils and they were asked to recreate their favourite scence from the film. The film…

  11. Self Assessment and Student-Centred Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to show how self assessment facilitates student-centred learning (SCL) and fills a gap in the literature. Two groups of students were selected from a single class in a tertiary educational institution. The control group of 25 was selected randomly by the tossing of an unbiased coin (heads = control group). They were trained in the…

  12. Crystallographic Data Centre Services and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Univ. (England). Chemical Lab.

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data based on diffraction methods. The source of input is almost entirely primary journals. Bibliographic information and numeric data on crystal and molecular structures are on magnetic tapes. The bibliographic file…

  13. Myanmar: The Community Learning Centre Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middelborg, Jorn; Duvieusart, Baudouin, Ed.

    A community learning centre (CLC) is a local educational institution outside the formal education system, usually set up and managed by local people. CLCs were first introduced in Myanmar in 1994, and by 2001 there were 71 CLCs in 11 townships. The townships are characterized by remoteness, landlessness, unemployment, dependency on one cash crop,…

  14. In the Field: The Canadian Ecology Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Clare

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Ecology Centre (Ontario) offers year-round residential and day programs in outdoor and environmental education for secondary students, field placement and internship opportunities for college students, and ecotourism programs, while providing employment and tax revenues to the local community. Dubbed consensus environmentalism, the…

  15. UV LED lighting for automated crystal centring.

    PubMed

    Chavas, Leonard M G; Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2011-01-01

    A direct outcome of the exponential growth of macromolecular crystallography is the continuously increasing demand for synchrotron beam time, both from academic and industrial users. As more and more projects entail screening a profusion of sample crystals, fully automated procedures at every level of the experiments are being implemented at all synchrotron facilities. One of the major obstacles to achieving such automation lies in the sample recognition and centring in the X-ray beam. The capacity of UV light to specifically react with aromatic residues present in proteins or with DNA base pairs is at the basis of UV-assisted crystal centring. Although very efficient, a well known side effect of illuminating biological samples with strong UV sources is the damage induced on the irradiated samples. In the present study the effectiveness of a softer UV light for crystal centring by taking advantage of low-power light-emitting diode (LED) sources has been investigated. The use of UV LEDs represents a low-cost solution for crystal centring with high specificity.

  16. Student-Centred Learning: A Humanist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangney, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The notion of student-centred learning is often not defined; within the pedagogic literature it is generally associated with constructivism or principles associated with a constructivist environment such as building on prior knowledge, purposeful active learning and sense-making. An informal enquiry into conceptions of university staff prior to…

  17. [The coordination of care in health centres].

    PubMed

    Ribardière, Olivia

    2016-06-01

    Health centres are structurally designed to facilitate the coordination of care. However, evolutions in society have resulted in forms of consumption of health care which are not necessarily compatible with efficient care coordination. On a local level, teams are nevertheless organising and structuring themselves to offer the right form of care, to the right patient and at the right time.

  18. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  19. Learning Skills Centre--Department Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Pat

    This report on an internal evaluation, which was conducted for developmental purposes, describes services provided at the Learning Skills Centres (LSC) on three separate campuses of Grant MacEwan Community College, in Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). The key questions of the evaluation addressed student and staff awareness of the existence of the LSC;…

  20. Writing Centre Tutoring Sessions: Addressing Students' Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winder, Roger; Kathpalia, Sujata S.; Koo, Swit Ling

    2016-01-01

    The guiding principle behind university writing centres is to focus on the process of writing rather than the finished product, prioritising higher order concerns related to organisation and argumentation of texts rather than lower order concerns of grammar and punctuation. Using survey-based data, this paper examines students' concerns regarding…

  1. Cactus: The Centres of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of two articles which describe how to use "JavaSketchPad" to explore the centres of a triangle. This introductory exercise is suggested in the GSP "Workshop Guide". Students can use "JavaSketchPad Interactive Geometry" (JSP) at home at no cost. They are likely to impress their parents with their enthusiasm for geometry and all…

  2. INTEGRAL Science Data Centre to be presented to the press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    's International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, will be launched in October 2002 on a Proton rocket from Baikonour, Kazakhstan. The spacecraft is currently subject to final testing at ESA's European Space Research & Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, while the ground segment facilities - from which INTEGRAL operations will be controlled - are preparing for final review in June. The spacecraft will be shipped to the launch site in August 2002.

  3. Horticulture take-home messages. Grower Day Summary: 2011 International HLB Meeting, Orlando, Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2nd International Research Conference on Huanglongbing covered 3 full days, with 400 participants from 20 countries. There were 75 oral presentations, 96 posters, and I took 20 pages of notes. Urgency of HLB as a threat to citrus production and the engine of substantial grower investment has fu...

  4. The University of the First Age Extended Learning Centres: A Model of Study Support for the New Millennium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Sarah

    2000-01-01

    In Britain, University of the First Age Extended Learning Centres use multiple intelligence theory and brain research to provide enrichment activities beyond school hours. Multisensory learning environments, a broad-based learning team, and peer tutoring are featured. (SK)

  5. Collaborating at a distance: operations centres, tools, and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Successful operation of the LHC and its experiments is crucial to the future of the worldwide high-energy physics program. Remote operations and monitoring centres have been established for the CMS experiment in several locations around the world. The development of remote centres began with the LHC{at}FNAL ROC and has evolved into a unified approach with distributed centres that are collectively referred to as 'CMS Centres Worldwide'. An overview of the development of remote centres for CMS will be presented, along with a synopsis of collaborative tools that are used in these centres today and trends in the development of remote operations capabilities for high-energy physics.

  6. Effects of unstratified and centre-stratified randomization in multi-centre clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of randomization effects in multi-centre clinical trials. The two randomization schemes most often used in clinical trials are considered: unstratified and centre-stratified block-permuted randomization. The prediction of the number of patients randomized to different treatment arms in different regions during the recruitment period accounting for the stochastic nature of the recruitment and effects of multiple centres is investigated. A new analytic approach using a Poisson-gamma patient recruitment model (patients arrive at different centres according to Poisson processes with rates sampled from a gamma distributed population) and its further extensions is proposed. Closed-form expressions for corresponding distributions of the predicted number of the patients randomized in different regions are derived. In the case of two treatments, the properties of the total imbalance in the number of patients on treatment arms caused by using centre-stratified randomization are investigated and for a large number of centres a normal approximation of imbalance is proved. The impact of imbalance on the power of the study is considered. It is shown that the loss of statistical power is practically negligible and can be compensated by a minor increase in sample size. The influence of patient dropout is also investigated. The impact of randomization on predicted drug supply overage is discussed.

  7. Safer sex at holiday centres: providing contraceptive services to seasonal workers.

    PubMed

    Hennink, M; Cooper, P; Diamond, I

    1999-07-01

    Many seasonal workers experience an increase in sexual activity whilst employed at a holiday centre. Evidence of sexual risk-taking while at a holiday centre has important social and health implications for purchasers and providers of sexual health services in areas which experience an annual influx of seasonal workers. This research investigates the contraceptive behaviour of seasonal workers and focuses on their access to contraception and sexual health services. In-depth interviews were conducted with seasonal workers at holiday centres along the south coast of England. Respondents were, interviewed at the beginning of the season and again, five months later at the end of the season. This longitudinal methodology enabled changes in contraceptive behaviour to be identified as well as the strategies for seeking contraception and sexual health services throughout the season. The results of this study show that there are a range of different motivations which influence seasonal worker' use of contraception and sexual risk-taking while at a holiday centre. Categories of contraceptive protection are developed to assist purchasers and providers to identify the variety of sexual health needs of workers at holiday centres and determine the most effective strategies for delivering contraceptive and sexual health services to these workers. The paper describes the motivations which influence contraceptive use and sexual risk-taking amongst seasonal workers, identifies the contraceptive and sexual health needs of these workers, and discusses the difficulties workers experienced in meeting these needs while at a holiday centre.

  8. [The development process of colon cancer centres].

    PubMed

    Sahm, M; Wesselmann, S; Kube, R; Schöffel, N; Pross, M; Lippert, H; Kahl, S

    2013-02-01

    Colon carcinomas are the most common malignant tumours in the Western world. Important findings about the overall quality of medical care have been reported in multi-centre observational studies. A quality enhancement of therapeutic care can be achieved by an additional increase in diagnostic and therapeutic measures in the interdisciplinary setting. The development of colon cancer centres improves the chance to objectively observe the results of medical care induced by the development of an interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral unit that includes a comprehensive medical care for patients. The implementation of the current medical findings based on evidence in clinical routine, the inspection of the usage of guidelines by external specialists as part of an audit and the continuous correction of analysed deficits in the course of treatment guarantee a continuous improvement of service.

  9. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-12-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC has established a network of more than fifty inter-connected "CMS Centres" at CERN and in institutes in the Americas, Asia, Australasia, and Europe. These facilities are used by people doing CMS detector and computing grid operations, remote shifts, data quality monitoring and analysis, as well as education and outreach. We present the computing, software, and collaborative tools and videoconferencing systems. These include permanently running "telepresence" video links (hardware-based H.323, EVO and Vidyo), Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  10. User-Centred Design Using Gamestorming.

    PubMed

    Currie, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    User-centered design (UX) is becoming a standard in software engineering and has tremendous potential in healthcare. The purpose of this tutorial will be to demonstrate and provide participants with practice in user-centred design methods that involve 'Gamestorming', a form of brainstorming where 'the rules of life are temporarily suspended'. Participants will learn and apply gamestorming methods including persona development via empathy mapping and methods to translate artefacts derived from participatory design sessions into functional and design requirements.

  11. Effects of people-centred factors on enterprise resource planning implementation project success: empirical evidence from Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Vathsala; Gunawardena, Vathsala

    2010-08-01

    Extant literature suggests people-centred factors as one of the major areas influencing enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation project success. Yet, to date, few empirical studies attempted to validate the link between people-centred factors and ERP implementation project success. The purpose of this study is to empirically identify people-centred factors that are critical to ERP implementation projects in Sri Lanka. The study develops and empirically validates a framework for people-centred factors that influence the success of ERP implementation projects. Survey research methodology was used and collected data from 74 ERP implementation projects in Sri Lanka. The people-centred factors of 'project team competence', 'rewards' and 'communication and change' were found to predict significantly the ERP implementation project success.

  12. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  13. [In vitro tests of the antagonistic behavior of Trichoderma spp. against pathogenic species of the horticultural region of La Plata, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Mónaco, C; Perelló, A; Rollán, M C

    1994-12-01

    The antagonistic properties of seven Trichoderma species in front of the pathogens Fusarium oxysporum, F. equiseti, F. solani, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, S. minor, Rhizoctonia sp. and Sclerotium rolfsii was evaluated in vitro. Those microorganisms were isolated from horticultural soils of La Plata in order to test the antagonistic-pathogenic relationship. Dual cultures on PDA 2% were used. All the species of Trichoderma grew in the culture medium with a colonization value higher than 50%. Differences in the antagonistic behaviour of the pathogens were observed depending on the species with which they interacted. The presence of diffusible metabolites to the medium was demonstrated in almost 80% of the pathogens antagonists tested. PMID:7772296

  14. Trends Shaping Education 2016. Centre for Educational Research and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Did you ever wonder if education has a role to play in stemming the obesity epidemic sweeping across all OECD countries? Or what the impact of increasing urbanisation might be on our schools, families, and communities? Or whether new technologies really are fundamentally changing the way our children think and learn? "Trends Shaping…

  15. [The Freud Museum in London as a research centre].

    PubMed

    Molnar, Michael; Tögel, Christfried

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a compact description of those resources of the Freud Museum most relevant for the Freud scholar: 1. the Archives with its collection of letters, documents, photos, and press cuttings from the 1920s and 1930s, as well as reproductions of paintings and photos of tourist features, compiled by Freud himself; 2. Freud's archaeological collection; 3. Freud's library.

  16. Infrasound research at Kola Regional Seismological Centre, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asming, Vladimir; Kremenetskaya, Elena

    2013-04-01

    A small-aperture infrasound array has been installed in Kola Peninsula, Russia 17 km far from the town of Apatity in the year 2000. It comprises 3 Chaparral V microbarographs placed closely to the APA seismic array sensors and equipped with pipe wind reducing filters. The data are digitized at the array site and transmitted in real time to a processing center in Apatity. To search for infrasound events (arrivals of coherent signals) a beamforming-style detector has been developed. Now it works in near real time. We analyzed the detecting statistics for different frequency bands. Most man-made events are detected in 1-5 Hz band, microbaromes are typically detected in 0.2-1 Hz band. In lower frequencies we record mostly a wind noise. A data base of samples of infrasound signals of different natures has been collected. It contains recordings of microbaromes, industrial and military explosions, airplane shock waves, infrasound of airplanes, thunders, rocket launches and reentries, bolides etc. The most distant signals we have detected are associated with Kursk Magnetic Anomaly explosions (1700 km far from Apatity). We implemented an algorithm for association of infrasound signals and preliminary location of infrasound events by several arrays. It was tested with Apatity data together with data of Sweden - Finnish infrasound network operated by the Institute of Space Physics in Umea (Sweden). By agreement with NORSAR we have a real-time access to the data of Norwegian experimental infrasound installation situated in Karasjok (North Norway). Currently our detection and location programs work both with Apatity and Norwegian data. The results are available in Internet. Finnish militaries routinely destroy out-of-date weapon in autumns at the same compact site in North Finland. This is a great source of repeating infrasound signals of the same magnitude and origin. We recorded several hundreds of such explosions. The signals have been used for testing our location routines. Some factors were observed enabling or disabling first (tropospheric) arrivals of such signals depending on weather conditions. Systematic backazimuth deviations for stratospheric arrivals have been observed caused by strong stratospheric winds. In 2009 mobile infrasound arrays were developed in KRSC. Each array comprises 3 low-frequency microphones, GPS, digitizer and PC with data acquisition system. Aperture of such arrays is about 250 m, deployment time is less than 1 hour. These arrays are used in experimental work with Roskosmos space agency to search space debris reentering places. In 2012 a wireless version of such mobile array was created. Each acquisition point comprises a microphone, GPS and ADC chips, microcontroller and radio modem to send data to a central unit. This enabled us to increase aperture (up to 500 m) and decrease deployment time.

  17. DISMANTLING OF THE FUEL CELL LABORATORY AT RESEARCH CENTRE JUELICH

    SciTech Connect

    Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Bensch, D.; Ambos, Frank

    2003-02-27

    The fuel cell laboratory was constructed in three phases and taken into operation in the years 1962 to 1966. The last experimental work was carried out in 1996. After all cell internals had been disassembled, the fuel cell laboratory was transferred to shutdown operation in 1997. Three cell complexes, which differed, in particular, by the type of shielding (lead, cast steel, concrete), were available until then for activities at nuclear components. After approval by the regulatory authority, the actual dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory started in March 2000. The BZ I laboratory area consisted of 7 cells with lead shieldings of 100 to 250 mm thickness. This area was dismantled from April to September 2000. Among other things, approx. 30,000 lead bricks with a total weight of approx. 300 Mg were dismantled and disposed of. The BZ III laboratory area essentially consisted of cells with concrete shieldings of 1200 to 1400 mm thickness. The dismantling of this area started in the fir st half of 2001 and was completed in November 2002. Among other things, approx. 900 Mg of concrete was dismantled and disposed of. Since more than 90 % of the dismantled materials was measurable for clearance, various clearance measurement devices were used during dismantling. The BZ II laboratory area essentially consists of cells with cast steel shieldings of 400 to 460 mm thickness. In September 2002 it was decided to continue using this laboratory area for future tasks. The dismantling of the fuel cell laboratory was thus completed. After appropriate refurbishment, the fuel cell laboratory will probably take up operation again in late 2003.

  18. Person-centred care: clarifying the concept in the context of inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Zingmark, Karin

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports an analysis of the concept of person-centred care in the context of inpatient psychiatry. It has been suggested that person-centred care in inpatient psychiatry might differ from person-centred care in other contexts, indicating a need to clarify the concept in this specific context. Scholarly papers from health-related disciplines were identified following a systematic search of the electronic databases CINAHL, PUBMED and PsycINFO, covering records indexed up until March 2014. An evolutionary approach to concept analysis was applied, integrating principles for data extraction and analysis in integrative reviews. The concept of person-centred care was defined as cultural, relational and recovery-oriented. It aspires to improve care and calls for a transformation of inpatient psychiatry. The concept is closely related to the concepts of recovery and interpersonal nursing. The result is described in terms of attributes, antecedents, consequences and related concepts. It is concluded that the further development of the concept needs to consider the contexts of the concept at both conceptual and praxis levels. Further research should explore the nature of and relationships between context, culture, care practice and outcomes in inpatient psychiatry from a perspective of person-centred care. The results of this analysis can provide a framework for such research.

  19. 12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FIRST CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE, LATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FIRST CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE, LATER FARMER DEACON'S SHOP, WITH SECOND CENTRE FAMILY DWELLING HOUSE IN BACKGROUND - Shaker Centre Family Dwelling House (First), North side of Village Road, North of U.S. Route 68 & State Route 33 intersection, Shakertown, Mercer County, KY

  20. Centre-Based Child Care Quality in Urban Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishimine, Karin; Wilson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of childcare centres in urban Australian communities designated according to different bands of Centre Location Demographics (CLD). Childcare centres were assessed using the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- Revised Edition (ECERS-R) and the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Extension (ECERS-E).…

  1. Canadian Educational Development Centre Websites: More Ebb than Flow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines information portrayed on Canadian educational development (ED) centre websites and, in particular, whether information that corresponds to questions compiled from a literature search of ED centre practices is readily available from centre websites. This study phase is part of a larger national study of Canadian educational…

  2. Reaching the Students that Student-Centred Learning Cannot Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockings, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Student-centred learning has the potential to engage a more academically diverse student body than the more conventional teacher-centred approaches. In spite of the evidence in favour of student-centred learning, a recent study showed that it was ineffective for around 30% of undergraduates in a large and diverse group studying business operations…

  3. Novel Wireless Sensor System for Monitoring Oxygen, Temperature and Respiration Rate of Horticultural Crops Post Harvest

    PubMed Central

    Løkke, Mette Marie; Seefeldt, Helene Fast; Edwards, Gareth; Green, Ole

    2011-01-01

    In order to design optimal packages, it is of pivotal importance to determine the rate at which harvested fresh fruits and vegetables consume oxygen. The respiration rate of oxygen (RRO2) is determined by measuring the consumed oxygen per hour per kg plant material, and the rate is highly influenced by temperature and gas composition. Traditionally, RRO2 has been determined at discrete time intervals. In this study, wireless sensor networks (WSNs) were used to determine RRO2 continuously in plant material (fresh cut broccoli florets) at 5 °C, 10 °C and 20 °C and at modified gas compositions (decreasing oxygen and increasing carbon dioxide levels). Furthermore, the WSN enabled concomitant determination of oxygen and temperature in the very close vicinity of the plant material. This information proved a very close relationship between changes in temperature and respiration rate. The applied WSNs were unable to determine oxygen levels lower than 5% and carbon dioxide was not determined. Despite these drawbacks in relation to respiration analysis, the WSNs offer a new possibility to do continuous measurement of RRO2 in post harvest research, thereby investigating the close relation between temperature and RRO2. The conclusions are that WSNs have the potential to be used as a monitor of RRO2 of plant material after harvest, during storage and packaging, thereby leading to optimized consumer products. PMID:22164085

  4. VLF Science at Indian Centre for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has been monitoring VLF signals from stations around the world at its laboratories at Kolkata and Sitapur (Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre) as well as at several places throughout India when in a campaign mode. We have been interested to study high energy events from space, such as solar flares and gamma ray bursts. We have made studies during multiple solar eclipses and most importantly made substantial progress in the problem of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling while understanding various types of anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Other effects such as AGWs and LEPs are being studied. We have experience of two antarctic expedition and obtained VLF data from both Maitri and Bharati stations of India, which revealed, among other things, how the signal attenuation can indicate the extent of ice mass in Antarctica. We have been able to reproduce various VLF perturbation events using Atmospheric Chemical evolution model coupled with LWPC code. For instance we have reproduced solar flare induced VLF amplitude perturbation pattern by completely ab initio calculation. We also targeted the inverse problem, namely, deduction of the injected radiation spectra from space from the VLF signal alone, thereby establishing that the Earth can be used as a gigantic detector. These interesting results would be presented in my review talk.

  5. Science Archives at the ESAC Science Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    The ESAC Science Data Centre (ESDC) provides services and tools to access and retrieve science data from all ESA space science missions (astronomy, planetary and solar heliospheric). The ESDC consists of a team of scientists and engineers working together and in very close collaboration with Science Ground Segments teams. The large set of science archives located at ESAC represent a major research asset for the community, as well as a unique opportunity to provide multi missions and multi wavelength science exploitation services. ESAC Science Archives long term strategy is set along the main three axes: (1) enable maximum scientific exploitation of data sets; (2) enable efficient long-term preservation of data, software and knowledge, using modern technology and, (3) enable cost-effective archive production by integration in, and across, projects The author wants to thanks all the people from the ESAC Science Data Centre and the mission archive scientists who have participated to the development of the archives and services presented in this paper.

  6. Use of Dehydrated Agar to Estimate Microbial Water Quality for Horticulture Irrigation.

    PubMed

    Meador, Dustin P; Fisher, Paul R; Guy, Charles L; Harmon, Philip F; Peres, Natalia A; Teplitski, Max

    2016-07-01

    Petrifilms are dehydrated agar culture plates that have been used to quantify colony forming units (CFU) mL of either aerobic bacteria (Petrifilm-AC) or fungus (Petrifilm-YM), depending on substrate composition. Microbes in irrigation systems can indicate biofilm risk and potential clogging of irrigation emitters. The research objective was to compare counts on Petrifilms versus traditional, hydrated-agar plates using samples collected from recirculated irrigation waters and cultures of isolated known species. The estimated count (in CFU mL) from a recirculated irrigation sample after 7 d of incubation on Petrifilm-YM was only 5.5% of the count quantified using sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) with chloramphenicol after 14 d. In a separate experiment with a known species, Petrifilm-YM did not successfully culture zoospores of . Isolates of viable zoospores were cultured successfully on potato-dextrose agar (PDA), with comparable counts with a vegetable juice medium supplemented with the antibiotics pimaricin, ampicillin, rifamycin, pentochloronitrobenzene and hymexazol (PARP-H). The quantification of pv. Begoniaceae on Petrifilm-AC was not significantly different ( < 0.05) than on PDA, but was lower than on Reasoner and Goldrich agar (R2A) or with a hemocytometer. The current formulation of Petrifilm-YM is unlikely to be a useful monitoring method for plant pathogens in irrigation water because of the inability to successfully culture oomycetes. However, Petrifilm-AC was an effective method to quantify bacteria and can provide an easy-to-use on-farm tool to monitor biofilm risk and microbial density.

  7. Use of Dehydrated Agar to Estimate Microbial Water Quality for Horticulture Irrigation.

    PubMed

    Meador, Dustin P; Fisher, Paul R; Guy, Charles L; Harmon, Philip F; Peres, Natalia A; Teplitski, Max

    2016-07-01

    Petrifilms are dehydrated agar culture plates that have been used to quantify colony forming units (CFU) mL of either aerobic bacteria (Petrifilm-AC) or fungus (Petrifilm-YM), depending on substrate composition. Microbes in irrigation systems can indicate biofilm risk and potential clogging of irrigation emitters. The research objective was to compare counts on Petrifilms versus traditional, hydrated-agar plates using samples collected from recirculated irrigation waters and cultures of isolated known species. The estimated count (in CFU mL) from a recirculated irrigation sample after 7 d of incubation on Petrifilm-YM was only 5.5% of the count quantified using sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) with chloramphenicol after 14 d. In a separate experiment with a known species, Petrifilm-YM did not successfully culture zoospores of . Isolates of viable zoospores were cultured successfully on potato-dextrose agar (PDA), with comparable counts with a vegetable juice medium supplemented with the antibiotics pimaricin, ampicillin, rifamycin, pentochloronitrobenzene and hymexazol (PARP-H). The quantification of pv. Begoniaceae on Petrifilm-AC was not significantly different ( < 0.05) than on PDA, but was lower than on Reasoner and Goldrich agar (R2A) or with a hemocytometer. The current formulation of Petrifilm-YM is unlikely to be a useful monitoring method for plant pathogens in irrigation water because of the inability to successfully culture oomycetes. However, Petrifilm-AC was an effective method to quantify bacteria and can provide an easy-to-use on-farm tool to monitor biofilm risk and microbial density. PMID:27380096

  8. The "Magic" of Tutorial Centres in Hong Kong: An Analysis of Media Marketing and Pedagogy in a Tutorial Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Why do more than three-quarters of Hong Kong's senior secondary students flock to tutorial centres like moths to light? What is the "magic" that is driving the popularity of the tutorial centre enterprise? Indeed, looking at the ongoing boom of tutorial centres in Hong Kong (there are almost 1,000 of them), it is difficult not to ask…

  9. Pig manure vermicompost as a component of a horticultural bedding plant medium: effects on physicochemical properties and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, R M; Edwards, C A; Subler, S; Metzger, J D

    2001-05-01

    This experiment was designed to characterize the physical, chemical and microbial properties of a standard commercial horticultural, greenhouse container, bedding plant medium (Metro-Mix 360), that had been substituted with a range of increasing concentrations (0%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50% and 100% by volume) of pig manure vermicompost and to relate these properties to plant growth responses. The growth trials used tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), grown in the substituted media for 31 days under glasshouse conditions, with seedling growth recorded in 20 pots for each treatment. Half of the tomato seedlings (10 pots per treatment) were watered daily with liquid inorganic fertilizer while the other half received water only. The percentage total porosity, percentage air space, pH and ammonium concentrations of the container medium all decreased significantly, after substitution of Metro-Mix 360 with equivalent amounts of pig manure vermicompost; whereas bulk density, container capacity, electrical conductivity, overall microbial activity and nitrate concentrations, all increased with increasing substitutions of vermicompost. The growth of tomato seedlings in the potting mixtures containing 100% pig manure vermicompost was reduced, possibly as a result of high soluble salt concentrations in the vermicompost and poorer porosity and aeration. The growth of tomato seedlings was greatest after substitution of Metro-Mix 360 with between 25% and 50% pig manure vermicompost, with more growth occurring in combinations of pig manure vermicompost treated regularly with a liquid fertilizer solution than in those with no fertilizer applied. Some of the growth enhancement in these mixtures seemed to be related to the combined effects of improved porosity, aeration and water retention in the medium and the high nitrate content of the substrate, which produced an increased uptake of nitrogen by the plant tissues, resulting in increased plant growth. When the tomato seedlings were

  10. Pig manure vermicompost as a component of a horticultural bedding plant medium: effects on physicochemical properties and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, R M; Edwards, C A; Subler, S; Metzger, J D

    2001-05-01

    This experiment was designed to characterize the physical, chemical and microbial properties of a standard commercial horticultural, greenhouse container, bedding plant medium (Metro-Mix 360), that had been substituted with a range of increasing concentrations (0%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50% and 100% by volume) of pig manure vermicompost and to relate these properties to plant growth responses. The growth trials used tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), grown in the substituted media for 31 days under glasshouse conditions, with seedling growth recorded in 20 pots for each treatment. Half of the tomato seedlings (10 pots per treatment) were watered daily with liquid inorganic fertilizer while the other half received water only. The percentage total porosity, percentage air space, pH and ammonium concentrations of the container medium all decreased significantly, after substitution of Metro-Mix 360 with equivalent amounts of pig manure vermicompost; whereas bulk density, container capacity, electrical conductivity, overall microbial activity and nitrate concentrations, all increased with increasing substitutions of vermicompost. The growth of tomato seedlings in the potting mixtures containing 100% pig manure vermicompost was reduced, possibly as a result of high soluble salt concentrations in the vermicompost and poorer porosity and aeration. The growth of tomato seedlings was greatest after substitution of Metro-Mix 360 with between 25% and 50% pig manure vermicompost, with more growth occurring in combinations of pig manure vermicompost treated regularly with a liquid fertilizer solution than in those with no fertilizer applied. Some of the growth enhancement in these mixtures seemed to be related to the combined effects of improved porosity, aeration and water retention in the medium and the high nitrate content of the substrate, which produced an increased uptake of nitrogen by the plant tissues, resulting in increased plant growth. When the tomato seedlings were

  11. "Learner-Centred" Assessment Policies in Further Education: Putting Teachers' Time under Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Gillian; Colley, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Since incorporation of further education (FE) in England in 1992, much research has critiqued the performative pressures on FE teachers created by a managerialist audit culture. These critiques have demonstrated the detrimental effects of the technicised delivery of learning outcomes on more learner-centred pedagogies. However, FE policies now…

  12. Using Q-Methodology to Involve People with Intellectual Disability in Evaluating Person-Centred Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combes, Helen; Hardy, Gillian; Buchan, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Person-centred approaches do not easily lend themselves to standard methods of evaluation. This study develops a technique that will involve service users and their circle of support in making individual plans. Methodology: Q-methodology is a phenomenological approach, which enables the researcher to co-construct the stories of many…

  13. A Child-Centred Evaluation Model: Gaining the Children's Perspective in Evaluation Studies in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In recent times there has been a major international push for giving voice to children in the provision of services for early education and development particularly among researchers and non-government organisations. However, what has been missing from this body of literature and activity is the children's perspective when centres and services are…

  14. Having, Loving, and Being: Children's Narrated Well-Being in Finnish Day Care Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila; Syrjala, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to answer the following question: what do children tell about their well-being in Finnish day care centres? The theoretical and methodological framework of this study is based on a narrative approach. The research material was collected by participating in the everyday life of three groups of children and listening to…

  15. Does Santa Exist? Children's Everyday Narratives as Dynamic Meeting Places in a Day Care Centre Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila; Syrjala, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The article attempts to answer the question: What is the nature of children's everyday narratives in a day care centre context? The theoretical framework of this study is based on a narrative approach. The research material was gathered through applying the methodology of narrative ethnography. The article is based on observational material…

  16. Grapple with a Giant Squid at the Natural History Museum's Darwin Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinkler, Abigail; Collins, Sally

    2009-01-01

    The Natural History Museum's new Darwin Centre fulfils three main roles. It is a state-of-the-art scientific research and collections facility, but it is also an awe-inspiring new public space that allows visitors to explore the natural world in an exciting and innovative way. With its opening, students can experience the relevance of the science…

  17. [Tissue bank of the National Centre for Tumour Disease. An innovative platform for translational tumour].

    PubMed

    Herpel, E; Koleganova, N; Schirmacher, P

    2008-11-01

    The tissue bank of the National Centre for Tumour Diseases (NCT) in Heidelberg, Germany, was founded in 2005 by the University Hospital of Heidelberg and the German Cancer Research Centre as a section of the NCT. It is a nonprofit organization with a completely evaluated legal and ethical framework and supports the Comprehensive Cancer Centre concept. Its main aim is the acquisition and characterization of fresh-frozen and paraffin-embedded human tissues according to the standards of good scientific practice and the promotion of interdisciplinary tumour research of the comprehensive cancer centre and its cooperating partners. It also offers expert project assistance: a project leader can submit a short proposal, and the tissue collecting/preparing process will be performed in cooperation with a specialised pathologist and, if applicable, an experienced clinical researcher. The tissue bank is also a central platform for further developing of innovative technologies for tissue handling, e.g. multi-tissue-array and virtual microscopy, with links to digital image analysis and bioinformatics. Thus, the NCT tissue bank represents a model for innovative biobanking and for institutions with active interdisciplinary cancer research.

  18. Developing an English for Specific Purpose Curriculum for Asian Call Centres: How Theory Can Inform Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Jane

    2012-01-01

    The primary focus of this article is the investigation of how current applied linguistic research into the nature of call centre communication breakdown in business processing outsourcing (BPO) sites such as India and the Philippines, can impact English communications training program content and design for this industry. It is argued that a…

  19. The ICT Centre Model in Andalusia (Spain): Results of a Resolute Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguaded, J. Ignacio; Fandos, M.; Perez, M. Amor

    2009-01-01

    This paper displays some results from research carried out in Andalusia (Spain) to evaluate the impact of the educational innovation policy developed by the regional government through widely introducing Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in primary and secondary schools (ICT Centres). Specifically, it analysed the effect of the…

  20. Quality Matters: A Faculty-Centred Program to Assure Quality in Online Course Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shattuck, Kay

    2010-01-01

    One of the dilemmas faced by today's faculty is assuring quality in online courses. As one solution to that dilemma, Quality Matters (QM), a program of MarylandOnline, built a rubric of design standards informed by existing research literature and best practices. The rubric was implemented within a faculty-centred, peer review process in which…